Weight Loss Recipe Books: 4 Manuscripts – Bodybuilding, Exercise and Fitness, Bodybuilding Cookbook 1717016626

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Weight Loss Recipe Books: 4 Manuscripts – Bodybuilding, Exercise and Fitness, Bodybuilding Cookbook
 1717016626

Table of contents :
Bodybuilding: Exercise & Fitness
Chapter 1: How to Create a Weight Loss Programme
Chapter 2: Barriers to exercise, motivation & tips for success
Chapter 3: Aerobic & Resistance Exercise for Weight Loss
Chapter 4: Nutrition & how to create a diet plan
40 dietary tips to shed body fat and reveal your abdominals
Conclusion
100 simple, healthy and delicious bodybuilding recipes to build muscle
Chapter 1: Pre-Workout Menu
1. Chicken, Rice & Broccoli
2. Sweet Potato & Garlic Grilled Chicken
3. Sweet Potato Wedges & Garlic Grilled Chicken
4. Jerk Chicken Tortillas
5. Omelette & Avocado Jacket Potato
6. Power Smoothie Blitz
7. Beef & Mustard Sarnie
9. Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty
10. Lamb & Roasties
Chapter 2: Post-Workout Menu
11. Turkey Steak, Rice & Mixed Veg
12. Posh Fish & Chips
13. Steak & Crème Fresche Sweet Potato
14. Turkey Bolognaise
15. Garlic Rice & Salmon
16. Garlic Wedges and Turkey Steak
17. Skinny Sweet Turkey Burger & Fries
18. Crispy Jerk Chicken with Lime & Coriander Rice
19. Garlic Chicken and Crispy Potato Bites
20. DIY Pizza Blitz
Chapter 3: Breakfast Menu
21. Post Cardio Breakfast Banana Split
22. Omelette & Avocado on Toast
23. Very Berry Protein Smoothie
24. Garlic Scrambled Eggs and co.
25. Protein Oatmeal Blitz
26. Bacon and Egg English Toasted Muffin
27. Porridge Power
28. Banana and Mango Protein Blitz
29. Chocolate Smoothie Delight
30. Tuna & Spring Onion Toasty
Chapter 4: Non-Training Day Menu
31. Rice, Turkey & Veg
32. Sweet Potato & Grilled Garlic Chicken
33. Porridge & Scrambled Eggs
34. Peanut Butter Bagel & Scrambled Eggs
35. Beef & Cheese Sarnie
36. Cottage Cheese & Ryvita
37. Sweet Potato & Salmon with Asparagus
38. Jerk Chicken, Rice & Corn on the Cob
39. Skinny Smoothie
40. Jacket Potato & Garlic Cottage Cheese
Chapter 5: Before Bed Menu
41. Cottage Cheese
42. Greek Yogurt & Banana
43. Tall Glass of Milk
44. Casein Protein Shake
45. Cottage Cheese with Peanut Butter
46. Salmon Salad
47. Cheddar Cheese Salad
48. Tuna & Spinach
49. Omelette & Salad with a side of Milk
50. Creamy Oatmeal
Chapter 6: Healthy Deserts
51. Oat & Berry Protein Bars (8 servings)
52. Fruit & Nut Yogurt
53. Protein Packed, Blueberry & Banana Pancakes (x4 servings)
54. Strawberries & Banana Frozen Yogurt
55. Nutty Strawberry Milkshake
56. Instant Protein Brownie
57. Chocolate orange mousse
58. Strawberry Frozen Yogurt
59. Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites (12 servings)
60. Peanut butter toasty
Chapter 7: Immediately Post-Workout
61. Shake & Jam
62. Milk & Pancakes
63. Strawberry Whey Protein Bliss
64. Organic Protein Smoothie
65. Tuna & Peanut Butter Toasty
66. Egg on Toast
67. Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty with Milk
68. Sweet Coconut & Berry Delight
69. Turkey Burger
70. Peanut Butter Jelly Bagel & Strawberry Milkshake
Chapter 8: Vegan/Vegetarian Friendly, High Protein Recipes
71. Sweet & Spicy Beans on a Bed of Potato
72. Rice, Beans & Greens
73. Mixed Beans & Sweet Potato
74. Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style
75. Beans on Toast 2.0
76. Potato & Mixed Bean Hit
78. Oats-So-Delicious
79. Avocado Baguette
80. Nutty Pasta & Lentils
81. Sweet Potato Fries with a Side of Beans
82. Chick Pea Grilled Sandwich
83. Hot Chilli Chick Pea Tortillas
84. High-Protein Enchiladas (7 servings)
85. Protein-Packed Tortilla Blitz
86. Rice & Beans with a Kick
87. Sweet Lentils & Rice
88. Jacket Potato & Sweet Kidney Beans
89. Soya & Veggie Burgers (4 servings)
90. Chick Pea Salad
91. Fruit & Nut Fettucine (2 servings)
92. Spicy Bean Tortilla Dream
93. Spaghetti Lentils (2 servings)
94. Alternative Mac N Cheese (4 servings)
95. Chunky Bean Veggie Soup
96. Chick Pea Curry (3 servings)
97. Soy Meat Tortillas
98. Spaghetti Lentil Bolognaise (2 servings)
99. Tofu Tortillas
100. Whole Hearty Vegan Fettuccine
Chapter 9: How to calculate your energy needs
200 more nutritious and delicious bodybuilding recipes to sculpt the perfect physique
Chapter 1: Pre-Workout Menu
1. Creamy Cajun Chicken Tortillas
2. Turkey Burger
3. Mixed Beans on Toast with a Twist
4. Peanut Butter & Banana English Muffin with Sweets
5. Pasta with Chicken & Greens
6. Creamy Tuna Pasta
7. Jamaican Inspired Rice & Peas
8. Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty
Chapter 2: Post-Workout Menu
9. Sweet Chicken Tikka Tortillas
10. Bagel with a Treat
11. Posh Fish & Chips
12. Sweet & Sour Chicken Curry
13. Chicken Fried Rice
Chapter 3: Non-Training Day Menu
14. Classy Salmon Sandwich with Orange, Mango and Blackberry Juice
15. Salmon, Asparagus & Sweet Potato Fries
16. Skinny-Sweet Tuna Salad
17. Bass Fillet with Sweet Potato Fries
18. Jerk-Turkey, Rice & Greens
19. Chick Pea Salad
20. Bed of Avocado + Chocolate Milk
21. Chicken Salad with Personality
22. Sticky Jerk Chicken
Chapter 4: Breakfast Menu
23. Apple & Blueberry Porridge
24. Muesli Fruit Mix Combo (servings: 2)
25. Hearty Breakfast
26. Banana & Blueberry Pancakes
27. Fruit & Berry Porridge (servings: 2)
28. Bacon & Egg English Muffin
29. Oats-So-Delicious (servings: 2)
30. Nutty Oats
Chapter 5: Healthy Desert Menu
31. Chocolate Mousse
32. D.I.Y Chocolate Orange Protein Bars (servings: 8)
33. Banana with Passion
34. Tropical Frozen Yogurt
35. Mixed Fruit Energy Bars (servings: 4)
36. Peanut Butter & Banana Chocolate Sandwich
37. Blackberry Frozen Yogurt
38. Chocolate Orange Mousse (servings: 2)
39. D.I.Y Oat & Berry Protein Bars (servings: 8)
40. Chocolate Mousse
41. Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites (servings: 12)
42. Peanut Butter & Chocolate Protein Toasty
43. D.I.Y Chocolate & Cranberry Protein Bars (servings: 8)
44. D.I.Y Granola Protein Bars (servings: 8)
45. D.I.Y Chocolate Orange Protein Bars (servings: 8)
46. D.I.Y Chocolate Coconut Granola Bars (servings: 10)
Chapter 6: Vegan/Vegetarian Menu
47. Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style (servings: 2)
48. High-Protein Enchiladas (servings: 7)
49. Soya & Veggie Burgers (servings: 4)
50. Chick Pea & Lentil Curry (servings: 4)
51. Mean Bean Tortilla Dream (servings: 4)
52. Quorn Chicken & Lentil Risotto (servings: 2)
53. Quorn Sausage & Garlic Wedges
54. Quorn Ham, Cheese & Spring Onion Toasty
55. Chicken Quorn Curry (servings: 2)
56. Whole Wheat Veggie Special
57. Vegetable Risotto (servings: 2)
58. Mixed Bean Stir Fry (servings: 2)
59. Spicy Mixed Beans on a Bed of Potato (servings: 2)
60. Rice, Beans & Greens
61. Mixed Beans & Sweet Potato Special (servings: 2)
62. Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style (servings: 2)
63. Beans on Toast 2.0
64. Mixed Beans & Potato
65. Red Kidney Bean Stir Fry (servings: 2)
66. Nutty Pasta & Lentils (servings: 2)
67. Sweet Potato Fries with a Side of Beans (servings: 2)
68. Chick Pea Grilled Sandwich
69. Hot Chilli Chick Pea Tortillas (servings: 2)
70. High Protein Enchiladas (servings: 7)
71. Protein-Packed Tortilla Blitz
72. Rice & Peas
73. Lentil Soup with Granary Baguette (servings: 2)
74. Jacket Potato & Sweet Kidney Beans (servings: 2)
75. Fruit & Nut Fettucine (servings: 2)
76. Spicy Bean Tortilla Dream
77. Spaghetti Lentils (2 servings)
78. Alternative Mac N Cheese (4 servings)
79. Chunky Bean Veggie Soup
80. Chick Pea Curry (3 servings)
81. Soy Meat Tortillas (servings x2)
82. Spaghetti Lentil Bolognaise (2 servings)
83. Tofu Tortillas
84. Whole Hearty Vegan Fettuccine (servings: 2)
85. Quorn Chicken Tortillas (servings: 2)
86. Quorn Sausage & Garlic Wedges
87. Sweet Thai Quinoa
88. Spicy Mexican Quinoa
Chapter 7: Low Carb Slow Cooker Menu
89. Slow Cooker Turkey Stew (servings: 6)
90. Slow Cooker Wild Rice Pilaf (servings: 4)
91. Slow Cooker Cranberry Chutney (servings: 8)
92. Slow Cooker Polynesian Chicken (servings: 6)
93. Slow Cooker Pork Tenderloin (servings: 8)
94. Slow Cooker BBQ Pulled Pork (servings: 4)
95. Slow Cooker Red Beans and Rice (servings: 6)
96. Slow Cooker German Schnitzel (servings: 4)
97. Slow Cooker Black Beans and Chicken (servings: 6)
98. Cheesy Spaghetti with Turkey Sausage (servings: 6)
99. Slow Cooker Chicken and Mushroom Gravy (servings: 6)
100. Slow Cooker Chicken & Rice (servings: 6)
101. Slow Cooker Herb Chicken and Vegetables (servings: 4)
102. Chocolate Bread Pudding with Caramel Sauce (servings: 10)
103. Slow Cooker Bananas Foster (servings: 3)
104. Slow Cooker Bread Pudding (servings: 10)
105. Slow Cooker Brown Rice Pudding (servings: 6)
106. Slow Cooker Vegetable and Bean Soup (Servings: 6)
107. Slow Cooker Chicken Tortilla Soup (servings: 10)
108. Slow Cooker Savory Superfood Soup (servings: 6)
109. Slow Cooker Butternut Soup (servings: 14)
110. Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup (servings: 6)
111. Slow Cooker Cream of Chicken and Rice Soup (servings: 6)
112. Slow Cooker Fiesta Chicken Soup (servings: 6)
113. Slow Cooker Black Bean & Veggie Soup (servings: 6)
114. Slow Cooker Cream of Potato Soup (servings: 6)
115. Slow Cooker Lentil & Veggie Stew (servings: 6)
116. Slow Cooker Chicken Chili (servings: 6)
117. Slow Cooker Chicken Stew (servings: 10)
118. Slow Cooker Halibut Stew (servings: 4)
119. Slow Cooker Honey Mustard Turkey Stew (servings: 4)
120. Slow Cooker Veggie Pot Pie Stew (servings: 4)
121. Slow Cooker Momma’s Roadhouse Chili (servings: 4)
122. Slow Cooker Texas Chili servings: 6
123. Slow Cooker Apple Pie Steel-Cut Oatmeal (servings: 6)
124. Slow Cooker the 13-Bean Burgoo Stew (servings: 6)
125. Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce (servings: 6)
126. Slow Cooker Garlic Mashed Potatoes (servings: 10)
127. Potatoes with Garlic and Rosemary (servings: 8)
128. Slow Cooker Macaroni and Cheese (servings: 4)
129. Slow Cooker Sweet & Savory Sweet Potatoes (servings: 3)
130. Slow Cooker Southern Style Green Beans (servings: 6)
131. Slow Cooker Sweet Potato Mash (servings: 6)
132. Slow Cooker Cornbread Stuffing (servings: 4)
133. Slow Cooker Apple Crisp (servings: 8)
134. Slow Cooker Fudge (servings: 6)
135. Slow Cooker Honey Bananas (servings: 4)
136. Slow Cooker Pecan Pie (servings: 6)
137. Slow Cooker Pumpkin Spice Bread Pudding (servings: 10)
138. Pasta with Eggplant Sauce (servings: 8)
Chapter 8: All-Natural High Protein Smoothie Menu
139. Sweet Banana Soya Fix
140. Peaches & Cream Supreme
141. Tooty-Fruity
142. Hearty Fruit Smoothie
143. Lemon & Lime Bitter Twist
144. Chocolate & Mint (servings: 2)
145. Hazelnut Bliss
146. Chocolate Orange (servings: 2)
147. Fruit & Nut (serving: 2)
148. Before Bed Desert
149. Wake Me Up Smoothie
150. High Carb Energy Boost Smoothie
151. Green Goodness
152. Chocolate Berry (servings: 2)
153. Coffee Mint Cocoa
154. Raspberry Double Nutty
155. Thick Chocolate Orange smoothie
156. Double Chocolate Milkshake (servings: 2)
157. Vanilla Carb Loader
158. Chocolate Vanilla Dream
159. Tropical Smoothie (servings: 2)
160. Strawberry Delight
161. Post Cardio Breakfast Smoothie Blitz
162. Granola Special (servings: 2)
Chapter 9: Whey Protein Smoothie Menu
163. Breakfast with Strawberry and Oatmeal
164. Green Chili Avocado
165. Mango and Banana Lava
166. Apple Broccoli Cleanse
167. Peach and Raspberry
168. Orange and Peach Delight
169. Beetroot Refresher
170. Apricot and Carrot Splash
171. The Green Splash
172. Berry-Berry
173. Choco Nut
174. Caribbean Drive
175. Ginger and Banana Boost
176. Watermelon Wonder
177. All-In Fruit Smoothie
178. Antioxidant Splash
179. Pumpkin Pump
180. Chocolate Sea
181. Strawberries and Papaya Joy
182. Coconut Chilling
183. Vanilla Shake
184. Banana-Berry Shake
185. Smooth Peanut Paradise
186. Triple Sundae Shake
187. Almond Blast
188. The Bran Shake
189. Strawberry Greek Shake
190. Charming Chocolate Shake
191. Low Carb Sour Chocolate Bliss
192. Cheese Shake
193. Creamy Peach Shake
194. Honey Spirulina Shake
195. Banana Based Peanut Smoothie
196. Pumpkin Pie Shake
197. Mixed Fruit Shake
198. Butter-Almond Smoothie
199. Chilled Barley Broth
200. Simple Spinach Stuff
201. Cranberry Cute Shake
202. Healthy n Hearty Shake
203. Wise-Water Shake
204. Squash Shake
205. Choco Sundae Shake
206. Java Banana Shake
207. Hazelnut Choco Shake
208. Super protein Shake
209. Peach & Berries
210. Tropical Shake
211. Simple Spirulina Shake
212. Mad Mango Shake
50 Simple and inexpensive bodybuilding recipes on a budget
Introduction
Chapter 1: The Shopping List
Chapter 2: Breakfast Menu
1. Scrambled Eggs and Avocado on Toast
2. Oatmeal with Boiled Eggs
3. Nutty Porridge
4. Mixed Beans on Toast
5. Granola Special
6. Potato Bites Breakfast Special
7. Bacon & Egg Toasted Muffin – English Style
8. Tuna, Cheese & Onion Toasty
9. Very Berry Smoothie
10. Chocolate Banana-Split Smoothie
Chapter 3: Pre-Workout Menu
11. Simple Pasta, Chicken & Greens
12. Sweet Potato, Tuna & Mixed Peppers
13. Jerk-Turkey, Rice & Greens
14. Spicy Beans on Toast
15. Whole Spicy Chicken Tortillas
16. Jacket Potato with Beans & Greens
17. Carb-Loader Smoothie
18. Turkey & Garlic Wedges
19. Turkey Burger
20. Basa Fish & Sweet Potato Fries
Chapter 4: Post-Workout Menu
21. Fresh Salmon & Garlic Rice
22. Garlic Chicken & Pasta in Tomato Sauce
23. Tuna, Cheese & Spring Onion Toasty
24. Sweet Chicken Tortillas
25. Garlic-Turkey & Roast Potatoes
26. Chicken Curry with Rice
27. Tuna Noodles
28. Tuna Peanut Butter Bagel
29. Jerk-Turkey & Potato Bites
30. Chick Pea Curry
Chapter 5: Immediately Post Workout Menu
31. Boiled Eggs & Co
32. Nutty Orange Juice Smoothie
33. Peanut Butter Jelly & Tuna
34. Raw Egg Smoothie
35. Peanut Butter Bagel & Eggs
Chapter 6: Before Bed Menu
36. Bedtime Smoothie
37. Cottage Cheese & Co
38. Granola & Sweets
39. Peanut Butter ‘n’ Cheese Bagel with Blueberry Yogurt
40. Vegetable Omelette with a side of Milk
Chapter 7: Healthy Desert Menu
41. Frozen Strawberry Greek Yogurt
42. DIY Protein Bars (8 servings)
43. Red Berry Milkshake
44. Peanut Butter Chocolate Sandwich
45. Chocolate Orange Mousse
Chapter 8: Non-Training Day Menu
46. Simple-Rice, Chicken & Courgette
47. Scrambled Eggs & Peanut Butter on Toast with Greens
48. Energise-Me Smoothie
49. Sweet Potato Avocado & Basa Fish with Mixed-Veg
50. Bed of Avocado with a side of Milk
Chapter 9: How to Calculate Your Energy Needs
Conclusion

Citation preview

Bodybuilding: Exercise & Fitness The tried and tested scientific formula, to lose weight, burn fat, reach supreme fitness and stack on lean muscle

Table of Contents Chapter 1: How to Create a Weight Loss Programme Chapter 2: Barriers to exercise, motivation & tips for success Chapter 3: Aerobic & Resistance Exercise for Weight Loss Chapter 4: Nutrition & how to create a diet plan 40 dietary tips to shed body fat and reveal your abdominals Conclusion

Chapter 1: How to Create a Weight Loss Programme To begin with, it’s essential that you develop an understanding of the physiological processes that’re involved with increased body fat levels. Think about why we gain fat in different areas of our body and how it can impact on our health. There are a few technical terms and habits connected with fat gains that are important to understand.

Energy Energy originates from the sun and is termed as “light energy.” Through the process of photosynthesis, plants convert light energy into a stored chemical energy. Then we acquire the energy we need by eating those plants or through animal sources that consume those plants. Energy is stored in our food in the form of fat, protein and carbohydrate. These are the main macronutrients and they get broken down to supply energy, which the body then uses. Energy is spread out and performs many tasks, it’s used to build muscle and repair damaged tissue after exercise or injury. It’s also used to carry substances including glucose, which is our body’s main source of energy and calcium through to cell membranes. A small amount of energy is used to nourish skeletal muscle activity, allowing the body to create movement and generate force. The activity of muscle creates a vast stress on the body’s capability to produce energy, as the rate of energy that’s used through intense exercise such as sprinting, can be a thousand times more than what would be required at rest.

Macronutrients As discussed above, macronutrients are what fuels our body and consist of fat, protein and carbohydrate. Fat has an energy yield of 9.3 kcals/g. Protein has an energy yield of 4.3 kcals/g and carbohydrates has 4.1 kcals/g.

A small amount of fat is crucial for our bodies to function, although many believe that body fat is unhealthy and bad for us. However, it’s an immense potential source of energy, as just 1kg of stored body fat can supply up to 7,000 kcals of energy. Even those who are very lean can rely on fat stores for energy. The body stores a substantial amount of energy, that has potential to be used as energy in the form of fat. For example, somebody who weighs in the average category with around 13% body fat, can store fat of 70,000 kcals, which would be enough to run 1,126 km. Their carbohydrate stores would equal to approx. 2,500 kcals, which is the equivalent of the energy required to run around 40 km. Our internal organs are protected by fat which serves as a warmth insulation and to store energy for future use. These are just a few of the many reasons why our body stores fat. Body fat is stored within two storage sites – fat storage and essential fat. Storage fat is composed mainly of adipose tissue, which includes the fat under the skins surface and that of which protects the organs inside the chest and abdomen from trauma.

Essential fat is spread out and stored all over the body including such sites as lipid-rich tissues of our central nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, intestines, spleen, in bone marrow and muscles. Essential fat is needed for normal physiological functioning. Women have specific sex essential fat in their buttocks, thighs, pelvis and breast regions, which is important for both child bearing and the functioning of hormones. Although there are many debates, men and women share a similar amount of fat storage, with men being 12% and women 15%, although the entire essential fat percentage in females (including sex specific fat) averages around four times the utility of essential fat in males.

Our body stores fat in cells that are known as adipocytes or fat cells, they’re specifically designed to store energy as fat. The fat stored within these cells are known as triglycerides, that can be brokendown for energy supply. The cells store excess fats and make them available for use when energy’s required. Somebody with an average weight has around 25-30 billion fat cells, however, an obese individual can have as much as 42-106 billion. The size of the fat cells in an obese person is on average 40% larger when compared with an individual of normal weight. Much of our fat is contained in adipose tissue which consists of around 83% fat, its supportive structures of around 15% water and 2% protein. Adipose tissue has two distinct types, the white adipose (WAT) which is the fat storage and the brown (BAT) which produces heat. Brown adipose tissue is often referred to as baby fat, because it’s mainly present within babies and serves to produce heat for the survival of the baby. When we gain moderate amounts of weight as an adult resulting from excessive eating, our existing fat cells begin to fill up with even more lipids, becoming larger. This process is known as fat cell hypertrophy. When an obese person gains excessive amounts of weight, they’ll reach a point known as, “maturity onset severe obesity,” where they obtain even more body fat. The adipocytes then reach their hypertrophic limits to which they cannot increase in size. As they can no longer increase in size, the total number of adipocytes increase through a process known as, “fat cell hyperplasia”. It’s believed that the body fat (or around 170% of normal weight) of an obese person is around 60%, before there becomes a direct result in increased numbers of adipocytes. Once an individual loses weight, each individual adipocyte cell decreases in size, but remains the same in number and remains in

place awaiting to be refilled. Typically, it’s most common for people to gain fat around the abdomen region or thighs. Let’s discover below, what’s accountable for the differences in which people store body fat in certain areas of the body. Lipoprotein lipase is an enzyme, it facilitates uptake and storage of triglycerides by the fat cells. The variations of lipoprotein activity, contributes to both the fat distribution differences between people and affects the changes in fat distribution that take place during midage and pregnancy. Total body fat distribution differences between genders, are closely related to the larger amount of lipoprotein which females possess. In females, the fat cells of the breast, thigh and hip create considerable amounts of lipoprotein. Whereas males, the abdominal fat cells are the ones that are active with the lipoprotein enzyme. When an obese individual loses weight, their fat cells increase their level of lipoprotein, which makes it easier for them to regain the weight and body fat. The bigger and more obese the person was before losing weight, the more vigorously their body will try to regain the lost weight. The term ‘pear shaped,’ is where somebodies body resembles a pear with stored fat in the hips and thighs, but the correct term is gynoid obesity. Android obesity is generally associated with men, the shape tends to resemble an apple with much of the fat distribution localised around the waist and upper body. This tends to place people at a greater risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, coronary heart disease, several types of cancers and premature death when compared to people with gynoid obesity. Having too much fat can be harmful to your health and it does matter where the fat is carried. The health risks of someone with android obesity are far greater than those with gynoid obesity. The reason for

this is because metabolically, it’s more responsive than fat stored of the thighs and hips and is more likely to be broken down leading to atherosclerosis, heart disease and other serious conditions. Although android obesity is typically associated more with men and gynoid obesity with women, some men do have gynoid obesity and vice versa.

The Causes of Obesity In Britain, reports suggest that by 2050 much of our society will be predominantly obese, with 60% of men and 50% of women clinically obese. Many people tend to blame genetics and hormone problems for their weight gain, but evidence suggests that the major reason for the rise in obesity is more of a combination of poor eating patterns, along with low activity levels. The causes of obesity are quite complex, but there are many things that factor in and contribute to an individual’s chances of gaining excess weight. The many factors include: Genetics Energy imbalance Hormonal imbalance Trauma, emotional and psychological issues Cultural influences and environment The most underlying cause of obesity from the above list, is energy imbalance. Energy balance is known as: Energy intake from food = energy expenditure – your body fat stores will remain unchanged.

If your energy intake exceeds the energy you expend, then this creates an energy imbalance and the excess energy becomes stored as fat. 1kg of body fat = approx. 7,000 kcals of unused energy. Therefore, a small amount of energy imbalance can contribute to considerable weight gain down the road. Research and evidence suggests that the main reasons for the rise of obesity and weight gain, is due to the combination of changes in eating patterns and an inactive life style. Those who expend less energy than others, typically have less active lifestyles, combined with excessive energy intake from energy dense convenience foods high in fat, which creates an energy imbalance. The past two decades in the UK, studies that examined the increases in body weight of the average male and females, found that an increase in both total energy intake and reduction of physical activity, were both the main causes for men and women. The main cause of weight gain was due to an increase in energy intake. The food and drink we consume provide us with energy. Foods packed with calories high in sugar and fat contained within our diet, often have little vitamins and minerals and other micro-nutrients, they lack major nutrients that the body requires for optimal health and only lead to weight gain which contributes to other health related problems down the line Studies show that many obese people consume less than others of the same sex and age that have average body fat levels but are a lot less physically active. Weight gain is caused by a lack of physical activity. Contributions to reduced physical activity, include labour saving devices such as lifts, escalators, lesser manual occupations and computer games, just to name a few.

When the food you consume equals the amount of energy you expend, your body fat stores stay relatively the same – known as energy balance. When our energy intake is greater than the energy expenditure, this causes an energy imbalance where excess energy stores as fat. Energy imbalance can vary from person to person and it can result from genetic predisposition, behaviour and factors within the environment. Children who become obese who also have obese parents, may have become that way due to their lifestyle more so than genetics. Obesity related genes can influence body fat distribution in the following way: Some genes can make us less likely to partake in physical exercise, they can affect how our body metabolises food and stores fat. If a child has only one parent who’s obese, then they already have a 40% chance of becoming obese. It can affect behaviour by making us more inclined to bad lifestyle choices that encourage the risk of being obese. Genes can make us more responsive to the sight, smell and taste of food, they may affect the sense of taste we have for food, giving us a preference to unhealthy foods high in fat and develop a dislike for the taste of healthy organic foods. Lastly, genes may affect and control our appetite to the point that it becomes a problem for us to experience a sense of fullness. The environment also plays a major factor: Sedentary Living – westernised cultures where people are living sedentary lives play a significant role in obesity. Relying too much on technology also contributes to decreased energy expenditure and levels of physical activity. Vehicle Usage – usage of vehicles has increased over time and more and more people are staying indoors because of fear of crime. A lot less children use buses these days and

more and more parents drive their children to school rather than letting them walk. Lifestyle & Ease of Access – Even without a genetic predisposition, it’s still possible to become obese. Our environment is more sedentary and stressful with an easy access of reasonably inexpensive and high fatty foods. Taste and convenience is easier to go for. The Environment – our environment has made it less likely for physical activity as people don’t feel comfortable using urban streets and conditions for pedestrians have become progressively worse, which contributes to peoples fear of antisocial behaviour and crime, discouraging people to want to walk etc. Physical Inactive Hobbies – which range from Internet surfing to video games and TV which are all very popular. More and more people are spending time on the computer as social media is at its highest peak. There are a few other causes of obesity which range from trauma or tumours in the food regulating centres of our brain that control hunger, satiety and energy expenditure which can cause varying degrees of obesity. Even when we aren’t hungry, we’ll eat if we’re emotional or to stop unwanted feelings, we sometimes use food to overcome sadness, loneliness, guilt, worry and boredom. Inferiority, insecurities and facing up to fears and challenges are other reasons why we overeat.

Body Fat Store Management When your energy intake exceeds energy expenditure, the unused energy becomes stored body fat.

To lower the stores of excess body fat, you must create a negative energy balance where you expend more energy than you consume. To lose weight, you must create an energy imbalance. For example: 1. Energy in > energy out = increase of body fat 2. Energy in < energy out = decrease of body fat 3. Energy in = energy out – fat stores remain the same (maintained, unchanged) When energy intake from our diet is less than the energy expenditure, the body then must recruit its own energy stores which includes the fat free mass (FFM), muscle and glycogen. With a healthy and effective fat loss programme, it allows you to use more of the fat stores than the FFM. If you reduce energy intake slowly over time, then around 75% of the energy your body will recruit to make up the stores, will come from body fat and only 25% from FFM.

Strategies for Fat Loss There are 3 effective ways to create an energy imbalance that will produce fat loss, but all come with pros and cons. 1. Energy Intake Maintenance – this is the most popular option as many fat loss programmes involve maintenance of the energy you take in, mixed with an increase in physical activity. Unfortunately for many people, increasing the physical activity levels alone, isn’t possible or practicable to lose their desired amount of fat. 2. Energy Intake Reduction Only – Following an extremely lowcalorie diet increases your chances of losing fat free mass, which isn’t the ideal way to utilise fat. 3. Energy Intake Decrease & Increase Expenditure – This is the most effective strategy in most fat loss programmes.

Planning your fat loss programme is important, the first thing you should do is consider how much fat you’d like to lose, because you could then use that information to clarify or determine your target weight.

Body Mass Index The body mass index won’t estimate body composition, but it’s a great indicator for health risks by specifying whether somebody is overweight or underweight for their height. To calculate your BMI, simply divide your weight in kilograms, by your weight in metres squared. If an individual’s BMI is more than 30, they’ll be at a greater risk of developing hypertension and heart disease. If somebody has a BMI less than 18.5, they risk development of cardiovascular disease.

Pros and Cons of BMI The BMI is vastly used in health services and hospitals, as it doesn’t cost anything and is quick and simple. The BMI is believed to be a more appropriate method, than just measuring your height and weight, as the formula used in BMI calculations serves as a more accurate indicator of body fat, than the straight forward method. The downside to the BMI is that it doesn’t differentiate between body fat, muscle and bone. It may underestimate the fatness of people who have lost muscle, such as the elderly or it may overestimate the fatness of more muscular individuals. The BMI doesn’t show changes in fat and FFM that arise in those that have lost weight. The BMI isn’t accurate for people who have oedema, (fluid retention) people under 5ft and even less reliable for children as their muscle to bone ratio is changing constantly.

BMI Classifications Classification

BMI (kg/m²)

Underweight

Less than 18.5

Normal weight

18.5-24.9

Overweight

25.0-29.9

Obesity grade 1

30.0-34.9

Obesity grade 2

35.9-39.9

Obesity grade 3

40 or greater

BMI = Weight in kg/height² (Metres) Example: 78kg ÷ 3.74 (1.87x2) = 20.8 (Classified as normal weight) Let’s now look at a method that assesses your body composition that measures both body fat and body density, measuring your waist and interpreting your body shape.

Body Composition Body composition is the total body fat you have compared with lean body mass. It’s essential that you measure your body fat, so you can measure your results every 2 weeks to measure your progress. It helps to create a suitable exercise programme and to achieve a healthy body fat level or a level specific to your goal. Even if you don’t have an elevated level of body fat, it’s still essential that you measure so you can differentiate between the amounts of muscle you have to fat, which helps you to create a more effective programme.

Reasons to Measure Body Composition 1. Estimating Your Ideal Body Weight Once you’ve collected your body composition data, you can then calculate your ideal body weight which gives you a target to aim for when exercising. 2. Effectiveness of Weight Management Once you’ve assessed your body composition, you can ensure any changes that take place in your body are of the right kind. If you have excessive body fat and you’ve lost weight, you can

ensure that while fat is decreasing, your muscle mass is increasing. 3. Body Composition for Athletic Performance If you’re in training for a specific sport, you’ll need to train specific to achieve the right body composition for that sport. 4. Changes in Body Composition Form Other Factors Changes in body composition can come from other factors, such as ageing diseases like cancer and poor nutrition. Body composition can be assessed in numerous ways, but one of the most accurate and cost effective, is to use the Anthropometric technique. This is a technique that assesses body mass by measuring the size and proportion of your body, it involves a simple measurement of the body circumference like the hips and waist. You can then take these measurements to calculate your body composition.

Step by Step Guide to Measuring Your Waist Circumference (you’ll need a flexible inelastic tape measure) 1. Start by standing with feet together, abdominal region relaxed and your arms by your side. 2. Have somebody you trust take your measurements for you. Have them stand to the side of you and measure the narrowest part of the torso, which is the lowest part of the sternum (xiphoid process) and above the belly button (umbilicus). Be careful that they don’t compress the fat. 3. In centimetres record the measurements to the nearest cm. 4. Use the waist circumference in the adult’s norms table provided below to assess what category you’re in. Risk category

Males

Females

Very low

< 80cm (31.5 in)

< 70cm (27.5 in)

Low

80 – 99cm (31.5 – 39)

70 – 89cm (28.5 – 35 in)

High

100 – 120cm (39.5 – 47)

90 – 109cm (35.5 – 43in)

Very high

>120cm (47 in)

>110cm (43.5 in)

The Sites of Circumference Measurements Before we move on to measurement procedure, it’s important to learn the four sites you should measure to estimate your body fat percentage. 1. The Waist – Standing upright, feet together with your abdominal relaxed have someone you trust measure you at the narrowest part of your torso. This site is just above the umbilicus and just below your sternum. 2. The Abdomen – It’s better to be measured at the abdomen where it peeks out forward the most. This is generally at the level of the umbilicus or belly button. 3. The Iliac Crest – Measurement to be taken horizontally around your body, level with your iliac crest. 4. Hips / Buttocks – Measurement to be taken at the maximum circumference of your buttocks. Take all measurements with an inelastic tape measure. The tape should be surfaced on the skin, but without compressing the fat. Duplicate the measurements at each site of the body and repeat if the duplicate measurements aren’t within 5mm. Measure the sites in one cycle before you duplicate to allow the skin to return to normal. Providing the duplicate measurements are within 5mm of each other, use the average of the two. Use the following formula to calculate your BD (Body Density) Male BD = 1.21142 + (0.00085 x weight (kg)) – (0.00050 x iliac (kg)) – (0.00061 x hip (cm)) – (0.00138 x abdomen (cm)) Using the male formula, you’ll need your weight and circumference measurements. Female BD = 1.168297 – (0.002824 x abdomen (cm)) + (0.0000122098 x abdomen ² (cm)) – (0.000733128 x hip (cm)) +

(0.000510477 x height (cm)) – (0.000216161 x age) Using the female formula, you’ll need your height, age and circumference measurements.

Body Density Formula Example Jane’s a white English office worker, she’s 43 years old and 170 cm tall. Her abdomen is 107 cm and her hips/buttocks are 109 cm. Let’s put this information into the female formula. 1.168297 – (0.002824 x 107 (cm)) + (0.0000122098 x 11449 (cm)) – (0.000733128 x 109 (cm)) + (0.000510477 x 170 (cm)) – (0.000216161 x 43) We then add up all the individual equations in the brackets first.

Now the equation will look like this: 1.168297 – (0.302168) + (0.1397900002) – (0.079910952) + (0.08678109) – (0.009294923) Add this together: = 1.0034942152 – Jane’s body density is 1.003 The next step is to convert this to a percentage of body fat. Population/ Race

Age

Gender

% Body fat

Black

19-45

Male

(4.86/Db) – 4.39

Black

24-79

Female

(4.85/Db) – 4.39

White

18-59

Male

(4.95/Db) – 4.50

White

18-59

Female

(4.96/Db) – 4.51

White

60-90

Male

(4.97/Db) – 4.52

White

60-90

Female

(5.02/Db) – 4.57

Athletes

Resistance trained

Endurance trained

24 + 4

Male

(5.21/Db) – 4.78

35 + 6

Female

(4.97/Db) – 4.52

21 + 2

Male

(5.03/Db) – 4.59

21 + 4

Female

(4.95/Db) – 4.50

18-22

Male

(5.12/Db) – 4.68

18-22

Female

(4.97/Db) – 4.52

All sports

*Multiply value by 100 to calculate %BF

4.96/Db – 4.51 Body fat percentage = ((4.96 ÷ BD) – 4.51) x 100 ((4.96 ÷ 1.003) – 4.51 x 100 (4.94 – 4.51) x 100) 0.43 x 100 = 43% Therefore, with the use of this formula, Jane’s Body fat percentage is 43% Once you’ve calculated your body fat percentage, you’ll need to compare it to the BF% norms table below. Males

Not recommended

Low

Mid

Upper

Obesity

18-34 yrs.

22

35-55 yrs.

25

55+ yrs.

23

Females

Not recommended

Low

Mid

Upper

18-34 yrs.

35

33-55 yrs.

38

55+ yrs.

35

Obesity

(It’s worth noting, that no precise BF% for optimal health has been defined, but as a guide the range for men is 10-22% and for women 20-32% is believed to be satisfactory for good health).

If we look at the BF% norms table, we can see that Jane’s body fat percentage is 43% which means that technically, she’s obese.

Targeting a Desirable Body Weight Body fat percentage may not mean a lot to you. If for instance you needed to reduce your BF% from 43% (Obese) to 25% (Low), this still may not solve your problem, unless you converted this into pounds, stone or kilograms, whichever means something to you. To make this simple for you, the next step is to identify a target weight. You’ll need your BF% & body weight (kg). For example, if Jane sat down and thought about a more suitable BF%, the next step would be to convert this into how much weight she’d need to lose. So, for this calculation, she’ll need her current weight in kg and BF% which we just calculated in the last step. So, if she compares her BF% to the norms table above, she can see that she’s in the obese category, she decides that a BF% of 25% is a desirable healthy target to achieve, as it’s in the low category for her age and gender.

How to Calculate a Target Weight 1. Determine your fat weight by multiplying your bodyweight by your BF%. So, in Jane’s case, we calculate this as 88.9 x 0.43 = 38.22 kg (fat weight). 2. Then, you need to calculate your current fat free weight mass – To do this you need to subtract your fat weight from your bodyweight. So again, in Jane’s case the calculation is as follows, 88.9 – 38.22 = 50.68 kg (current fat free weight). 3. Next, calculate your target fat-free mass – so you’ll need to subtract your target BF% from 100%. So, for Jane the calculation is as follows: 100% - 25% = 75% (target fat-free mass) 4. The next step is to calculate your target bodyweight, by dividing your current fat-free mass, by your new target % fat-

free mass. Again, for Jane the calculation would be, 50.68 ÷ 0.75 = 67.57 kg (target bodyweight). 5. Finally, the last step is to calculate your target weight loss, by subtracting your target bodyweight from your current weight. So, for Jane we need to calculate, 88.9 kg – 67.57 kg = 21.33 kg (target weight loss). To be more specific, rather than saying Jane needs to lose 18% BF, we’ve calculated that she needs to lose 21.33 kg (3.35 stone / 47.02 lbs).

How to Assess your Energy Expenditure Next you need to work out your energy needs using the following formula: Energy requirements = BMR (basal metabolic rate) + PAL (physical activity level).

BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate) BMR is the minimum calorie needs and energy an individual requires, to sustain life while at rest and to maintain your body’s normal function. In an individual that’s sedentary, BMR can make up to 75% of your overall energy requirements. It’s largely determined by the amount of lean muscle tissue the individual has. The leaner the individual, the higher their BMR is likely to be. You can see now why it’s so vital to maintain as much muscle as possible to make sure you maintain a sufficient BMR. During diets that consist of extreme starvation for a quick fix, lots of muscle becomes wasted and so your BMI would drop, causing a lower kcal requirement. People that follow extreme diets, often experience an unexpected weight increase once they return to their normal eating habits. This is because they hadn’t accounted for a reduced BMR from the lean muscle tissue lost. To estimate your BMR, all you need is your bodyweight in Kg or lbs. The Schofield method is a very effective method used to estimate the BMR in kcals of the average man and woman. An individual’s

age, weight and gender are considered in the equations, they’re very accurate for the average adult but they don’t consider an individual’s body composition. So, an individual’s kcal needs may be underestimated if they’re very lean and muscular and in turn over estimate the kcal needs of an obese individual. To calculate your BMR use the table below: BMR (kcal/day) Age

BMR Male

BMR Female

10-17 years

17.7 x W + 657

13.4 x W + 692

18-29 years

15.1 x W + 692

14.8 x W + 487

30-59 years

11.5 x W + 873

8.3 x W + 846

60-74 years

11.9 x W + 700

9.2 x W + 687

W = weight in kg

This gives you an approximate figure for how many kcals an individual use’s in a 24-hr period. To convert stone to kg, multiply weight in stone by 14 and divide by 2.2. To convert body weight from lbs to kg, divide weight in lbs by 2.2. So, if we calculate Jane’s BMR the calculation would be as follows: Remember Jane is a 43-year-old female and weighs 88.9 kg. 8.3 x 88.9 (kg) + 846 = 1584

Physical Activity Level Table Lifestyle

Occupation

PAL

Sedentary

Desk job, no exercise, little energy expenditure.

< 1.2

Lightly active

20-30 minutes of exercise up to 3 days per week.

1.3 - 1.4

Active lifestyle and exercise

1.5 – 1.6

Moderately active

up to 4-5 days per week. Very active

Extremely active

Sport specific training intensely for 5-6 hours per week and hard labour occupations. Athletes who spend more than 10 hours per week training and other activities outside of training.

1.7 – 1.8

1.9 - 2.2

The next step is to multiply your BMR by your PAL. Jane is a sedentary office worker and gets little to no exercise therefore her PAL is 1.2 so the following equation would be as follows: 1584 x 1.2 = 1900 kcals per day (energy requirements). Therefore, these are Jane’s daily requirements that she should be consuming for her weight and lifestyle, but obviously she’s consuming a lot more than this and with no exercise, she’s sure to put on excess weight. Once Jane has reached her goal of losing 21.33 kg or reduced her BF% to 25% and exercising regularly, her PAL will change to moderately active and therefore multiply her BMR by 1.3-1.4 accordingly, to maintain her new weight and BF%, which we’ll go through an example break down of later. Now that we know what Jane’s energy requirements are, we can break down how much energy we require from each macronutrient. According to the eat well plate, the percentage of each individual macronutrient we should consume each day from your total energy needs, are as follows:

Protein – 4 kcals per 1g Carbohydrates – 4 kcals per 1g Fat – 9 kcals per 1g Jane’s energy requirements per day: 1900 kcals To discover how much of each individual macronutrient, Carbohydrates, Fats & Protein, we must use the following formula. Total energy requirement x 0.55/ 0.30/ 0.15 (percentage of macronutrient) ÷ Macronutrient in kcals to find out what it is in grams. (1900 x 0.55 = 1045 ÷ 4 = 261)) For carbohydrates which should be 50-55% of your diet, Jane should consume approx. 261g daily. Next, we’ll do the same for fat. (1900 x 0.30 = 570 ÷ 9 (remember that for 1g of fat there are 9 kcals) = 63) So, for fat which is 30-35% of her daily needs, she’d consume 63g. Next, we will do the same for protein. (1900 x 0.15 = 285 ÷ 4 = 71)

Jane should consume 10-15% of her daily needs from protein which is 71g. Carbohydrates – 261g (1045 kcals) Fat – 63g (570 kcals) Protein – 71g (285 kcals) So, if we add these numbers together in the brackets that are in kcals: 1045 + 570 + 285 = 1900 kcals (total energy requirements) The reason we break each of these down into grams, is because most nutrient values on food packets show each macronutrient in grams, so when it comes to your diet plan it becomes much easier for you to create.

Total Energy Requirements to Maintain Weight With the type of training you perform, your carbohydrate and protein requirements should be adjusted accordingly compared with the eat well plate to maintain energy levels and to repair and increase muscle size. Type of exercise

Daily protein requirements (g)

Endurance – low to moderate intensity

1.0 – 1.2

Endurance – moderate to high intensity

1.2 – 1.6

Exercise of intermittent nature e.g. football

1.4 – 1.7

Strength or power training

1.6 – 2.0

Multiply bodyweight (kg) by daily protein requirement (g)

Activity level (number of hours of moderate intensity exercise of sports)

Grams of carbohydrate / kg bodyweight

3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

5-7 hours per week

5-6g per kg bodyweight

1-2 hours per day

6-7g per kg bodyweight

2-4 hours per day

7-8g per kg bodyweight

More than 4 hours per day

8-10g per kg bodyweight

Multiply bodyweight (kg) by daily carbohydrate requirement (g)

For example, Jane has reached her long-term goal of weighing 68 kg. She’s moderately active, has an active lifestyle and exercises 4-5 times per week aerobically, therefore, her new PAL is 1.5. Moderately active

Active lifestyle and exercise up to 4-5 days per week.

Jane’s new energy requirements are as follows. BMR formula – 8.3 x 68 + 846 = 1410 BMR = 1410

1.5 – 1.6

BMR x PAL 1410 x 1.5 = 2115 total kcal energy requirements Macronutrient breakdown requirements above:

using

carbohydrate

and

protein

Carbohydrates 3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

5g / per kg bodyweight

5 x 68 = 340g (1360 kcals)

Protein Endurance – moderate to high intensity

1.2 – 1.6

1.4 x bodyweight (kg)

1.4 x 68 = 95g (380 kcals) Add protein & carbohydrate requirements together in kcals 1360 + 380 = 1740 kcals Now we can work out Jane’s fat requirements by subtracting her protein and carbohydrate requirements from her total kcal requirements. Total kcals – protein and carbohydrate requirements = fat requirements 2115 – 1740 = 375 kcals Now you need to divide the fat requirements by 9 to convert to grams 375 ÷ 9 = 42g Carbohydrates – 1360 kcals Protein – 380 kcals

Fat – 375 kcals 1360 + 380 + 375 = 2115 kcals

Some Useful Information on Carbohydrate Consumption Before exercise

During exercise lasting more than 60 minutes

After exercise

Between daily session

How much

2.5g \ kg bodyweight

70g \ hour

1g \ kg bodyweight

5-10g \ kg bodyweight depending on intensity

Time-period

2-4 hours before exercise

Begin after 30 minutes and take at regular intervals

Up to two hours and then every two hours

Plan and time appropriately to meet recommended intake in timeperiod between session

Glycaemic index (GI)

Low

High

High – low

Low

Example foods

Bowl of muesli with semi skimmed milk

1-2 Bananas

Fresh fruit smoothie made with yogurt and milk

Stir fried noodles and vegetables

Bowl of Spaghetti Bolognese and salad Jacket potato with baked beans

Handful of dried fruit such as chopped apricots or raisins

Cereal bar Slice of malt loaf Tuna and lowfat crème fraiche Tuna and sweetcorn sandwich on wholegrain bread

Beans on wholegrain toast Jacket potato with cottage cheese and salad ½ large pizza with tomato and vegetablebased topping

How to Create a Kcal Deficit Now that we’ve established a target weight to achieve, we can begin a safe energy deficit programme to reach that goal or target weight. To do this you need to create a negative energy balance, for example your energy intake is to be less than your energy expenditure and then you must consider the safest way to create a negative energy balance if weight loss is to be maintained long term. There’s a healthy guideline to lose weight over a prolonged period, it’s a weight loss of approximately 1lb or (450g) per week. This may appear rather low, but if each week you aim for that guideline, the weight loss will be a result of losing body fat and not muscle. Research suggests that to lose 1lb of bodyweight per week as fat, you need to create a kcal deficit. For example, if you’re trying to lose 1lb per week and your energy needs are 3,500 kcals, you need to create a negative energy balance of approximately 500-700 kcals per day. The safest and most effective way to do this, is to go with a 500-kcal negative deficit where you’ll expend 250 kcals of energy through exercise, so your total energy expenditure should be 3,750 (3,500 + 250 = total energy expenditure. The other 250 kcals will come from a reduction in total energy needs. If you try to lose too much weight too soon, more than 700 kcals per day, then there’ll be a danger that your body will go into starvation, known as survival mode. This is where the body begins to utilise lean muscle tissue for energy, more so than body fat. So even though you’re achieving weight loss, it may not all be a direct result of body fat that you’re losing. If you create an energy balance of less than this, you’ll see some weight loss eventually, but it’ll be very slow over time and can demotivate you.

Weight Loss Guidelines Try to achieve a small kcal deficit of no more than 500kcal less than your energy expenditure.

Aim for no more than 1lb or 0.5 kg of fat loss each week Monitor body composition changes also, rather than just bodyweight Ensure you consume an optimal balance of all food groups in line with the eat well plate If we look at Jane’s energy requirements to lose 21.33 kg, we worked out earlier that she requires 1900 kcals. For Jane to lose weight she must have a negative energy deficit of 500 kcals, therefore we add 250 kcals to her energy expenditure. So, 1900 + 250 = 2150 kcals total energy expenditure. The other 250 kcals will come from a reduction in energy intake so 1900 – 250 = 1650 kcals total energy intake. 2150 (total energy expenditure) – 1650 (total energy intake) = 500 kcals (deficit). For Jane to lose 21.33 kg, she’ll aim to lose 0.5 kg per week to achieve her goal of 21.33 kg. This’ll take her 42-43 weeks, approx. 11 months to lose all fat weight. In simple terms, Jane needs to consume 1900 kcals a day to simply function. We’ve added 250 kcals that she’ll expend daily and a 250kcal reduction in energy intake. So, she’s eating 250 kcals less and burning 250 kcals = 500 kcal deficit.

Exercise Outside of the Gym You Can Perform to Burn 250 Kcals Activity

Calories burned / how long

Mountain bike riding

Can burn 250 kcals in approx. 25 minutes – also conditioning of the glutes, hamstrings, quadriceps and calves

Running

Running at a speed of 6 miles per hour can burn up to 270 kcals in just 20 minutes. If you run at around 5 miles per hour you can burn up to 250 kcals in approx. 30 minutes depending on your weight and age

Swimming

Swimming for 25 minutes can burn 250 kcals – back stroke, breast stroke and freestyle work almost every muscle in your body so it is great for toning increasing your strength and endurance

Garden activities

Working in your back garden mowing the grass etc you can quite easily burn 250 kcals in approx. 40 minutes

Activity with the kids

Playing with the kids for as little as 45 – 60 minutes can help you burn up to 250 kcals depending on your exertion rate. Best fat burning games include playing on a jungle gym, playing tag or hop scotch plus you get your kids exercising showing them that exercise can be fun

The Best Macronutrients to Consume Best sources of Protein

Healthy Fats

Complex Carbohydrates

Milk – skimmed Eggs Cottage cheese Greek yogurt Soy milk Steak – top or bottom round Ground beef – 95% lean Pork chops Chicken breast – skinless and boneless Turkey breast Tuna Salmon Sardines Anchovies Corned beef Dried lentils Chorizo

Avocados Cheese / Milk Whole eggs Nuts – unsalted Fatty fish – salmon is the best source Coconut oil Extra virgin olive oil Natural yogurt Dark chocolate – at least 70% cocoa Black olives Ground flaxseed Tofu Peanut butter

Brown rice – long grain Whole wheat pasta Spaghetti potatoes – in skin Wholemeal bread Whole wheat & granary bread Rye bread Wholemeal macaroni Plain bagel High fibre cereals Porridge oats Weetabix – whole grain biscuit All bran Muesli Baked beans Lentils

Pepperoni Peanut butter

Chapter 2: Barriers to exercise, motivation & tips for success Stress: The Causes and Consequences A small amount of stress each day is considered normal and our body has developed mechanisms to cope with it, although if stress levels occur too high too often and prolonged over time, it can lead to serious health issues such as: High blood pressure Heart disease Weakened immune system

What is Stress? For many of us, stress or feeling stressed can feel like being out of control, while for others, its considered as a feeling of being under too much pressure. There are vast differences between pressure and stress. Pressure isn’t considered a bad thing, it can bring about motivation and positive factors and your job often requires pressure. It’s an essential tool that helps you to achieve goals and perform to the best of your ability. If the pressure persists and becomes too much this is when stress sets in, as this is our natural reaction to excessive pressure. Work is a common cause of stress in our life, so it’s not uncommon for people to experience stress due to adverse high work-place pressures.

Feeling the Pressure The stress we feel is simply a natural reaction that our bodies go through due to the demands of everyday life. Surely, you’ve heard of the term, “I’m stressed out,” but what’s meant by this? Let’s look at an example of how stress can occur and affect us.

Frank is a 53-year-old sales man, he has 4 teenage children and a big mortgage. In the past decade, Frank has added 12 inches around his waist due to his sedentary and stress-filled lifestyle. As Frank experiences frequent stress, he often submits to fast food, eating on the go to satisfy his cravings and goes all out during regular business dinners. 2 months ago, Frank had been smoking 20 cigarettes per day, his doctor advised him to adopt a much healthier lifestyle and to lose weight as he had already taken medication for hypertension. You can see how stress has contributed to Frank’s lack of motivation. Next, let’s look at an example of a female. Tracey is 30, she works for a bank in the city and has recently been promoted to a higher pressured position within the company, where she’s taken on a lot more responsibility. She’s recently put her apartment on the market and trying to purchase a house, which hasn’t been as straight forward as she’d have liked. The past 2-3 months she’s had difficulties sleeping, concentrating and has experienced frequent stomach and headaches. Tracey visited her GP and explained that all these physical problems are affecting her quality of life and capability to work. Her doctor diagnosed that stress was the prime cause of her physical and mental problems.

What are Stressors? Stressors are referred to any stimulus that produces a stress response within the body, which can either be psychological or physiological. They’re conditions or events within our everyday life that can trigger stress, our body can respond differently to stress according to if it’s new or an ongoing problem, that’s been prolonged over a period, known as chronic stress. Events that can trigger psychological stressors include:

A new born child Career changes Exams Moving to a new house Relationship problems Family illness Death of loved ones Events that can trigger physiological stressors include: Aerobic training Anaerobic training Temperature or altitude changes Toxins Bleeding heavily Let’s look at distinct types of stress. Mild stress is vital for us to function, although viewed as negative, we all need a little stress in our lives to live. You can benefit greatly from mild stress, as it can help you rise to the occasion, motivate you and produce energy from within. This type of stress is key to help us evolve, grow and thrive in our own environment. Acute stress is a reaction that occurs immediately within your body when you experience a physical threat or challenge. This can be an immediate and intense response and we can also experience this type of response from something we find to be a thrill. Chronic stress can occur if the acute stressors aren’t sufficiently managed, which can cause an accumulation of

even more stress that won’t go away, causing physical effects such as insomnia and headaches. This type of stress is a lot less subtle than the acute response, but you’ll often find the problems you experience to be longer lasting, causing further problems down the line. Homeostasis is a healthy state of balance within the body that’s maintained by a constant adjustment of physiological and biochemical pathways and any disturbance to this, generally leads to some type of stress.

The Causes of Stress There are certain things that can trigger stress such as an important interview or exam, which is completely normal. But chronic stress brought about by prolonged periods of pressure or dreaded events, is the one that can really cause us some issues. The main source of chronic stress is mainly due to work and family. Stress can also be brought about if you experience any of the following: Emotional issues Health problems Relationship issues where you feel lack of support from loved ones Marriage Job loss Moving to a new house Money issues A bereavement Although these types of problems occur, they can stem from other factors and personal problems such as:

Long term care of a loved one or family member Arguments with children, teenage or partner also under stress Not having as much time to yourself as you’d like Not having as much time to spend with family (family values) due to work Your occupation – unhappy with your job role or actual job or find it too stressful Where you live – high percentage of crime, noise or abuse etc. How social you are – not many friends, feeling lonely, racism, sexual orientation and other discriminations

The Body’s Physiological Response to Stress When we experience a type of stressor, the body’s mechanisms try to defend it to ensure homeostasis is maintained. So, as the body attempts to return to homeostasis, it occurs in three stages and is referred to as the general adaptation syndrome. 1st Stage – Fight or flight If you’re in danger or feeling threatened, you’ll experience your body’s fight or flight response. It’s a release of hormones that speed up your heart rate increasing your breathing and gives you a burst of energy. The whole point of this is to prepare your body for action, which involves the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system and endocrine system in mobilizing the body’s resources to enable you to handle the situation accordingly. The body’s response to prepare you for the danger in question, requires large direct amounts of oxygen and glucose to the organs that’re going to be most active in action. The organs that are most active will be: The skeletal muscles – These obviously fight off any danger or enable you to run.

The brain – Your brain needs to be very alert allowing your body to act fast. The heart – Your heart needs to work hard to make sure enough blood is supplied to both the brain and skeletal muscles. 2nd Stage – Resistance Reaction Once the fight or flight stage or risk perception passes, your body then begins to slowly return to its usual state. Although, if a situation where you feel stressed or threatened is prolonged over time, your body will jump to the next stage – the resistance reaction. If the situation and stress is too high and persists over a long period, your body can lose the ability to resist the stress or stressor, therefore, you’ll end up in the third stage known as exhaustion. 3rd Stage – Exhaustion If the prolonged stress you’re experiencing is too intense and isn’t what you’re accustomed to, then the normal mechanisms that your body is designed to fight against might not be able to cope, which can cause serious problems for your health. The goal of the resistance reaction is to help your body to keep fighting the stressor after the fight or flight response passes. This stage takes place for a longer duration compared with the fight or flight response, which results in released cortisol, growth hormones and thyroid hormones. Together these help the body to fight the stressor, as they perform several functions that include making sure there’s enough fuel readily available. Usually the resistance reaction stage succeeds in making sure the body can fight the stressor and return to the body’s normal state. Again, if you experience an intense stressor for a prolonged period, your resources can deplete and therefore the resistance stage won’t be able to be sustained, which can have harmful effects and could

result in death, especially if your diets poor and you’re already in a bad state of health. Excessive exposure to high levels of circulating cortisol, plus other hormones during the resistance stage, can cause the following affects: Gut ulceration Muscle wasting Pancreatic beta cells failure Suppression of the immune system Even after the stressor has been removed, pathological changes can appear due to the resistance reactions.

Symptoms of Stress Stress can affect people in different ways and we all have different reactions and methods of coping. The following are some of the mental symptoms that can occur due to stress: Anxiety Depression Behavioral changes Feeling angry Short tempered Craving sugary or fast foods No appetite Insomnia Frequently upset Feelings of exhaustion

Short attention spam The following are some of the physical symptoms to stress: Muscle spasms Cramps Chest pain Diarrhea Constipation Bouts of dizziness Fainting spells Sexual difficulties Twitches Restlessness Pins and needles Muscular ache and pain Sweating regularly Difficulty catching your breath Excessive stress long term can cause many serious health issues that include: Hypertension Heart disease Stroke Ulcers Anxiety Depression Colitis

Again, stress affects different people in different ways. A situation you may find stressful can feel normal for another individual that they may strive in it. It solely depends on how an individual evaluates a situation, this can depend on several factors which include: Your condition of health Personality Work status Skills Experience Background Culture Gender Age Disabilities Ethnicity The types of stress Frank and Tracey have experienced are unlikely to be immediate physical threats and more likely down to emotional problems including money worries or work-related issues. These stressors are reasonably mild, but as we’ve just seen, if they’re prolonged over time, they can affect your health in both minor and serious ways. It can range from affecting your immune system giving you frequent colds, to something more serious such as hypertension.

An Understanding of Motivation and Potential Barriers

Motivation is key to performing at your best level, whether you’re a regular gym goer or an elite athlete competing at the highest level. If you’re a beginner to exercise or a regular gym goer, you’ll require a vast amount of motivation. Motivation enables you to feel driven, it gives you a purpose and is a source that keeps you going. For many, motivation can come from the desire to be successful or the best at something and for others it can come from wanting to live a longer and healthier life. People who wish to lose weight find this to be a huge motivation. Motivation is an interesting subject, though it’s important to consider what may motivate you, may not motivate somebody else. We all have our own reason as to why we turn up at the gym and exercise. There are many types of motivation but there are two main types that are intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation: is an anticipation of achievement that comes from a goal or task being achieved or completed. This type of motivation comes from inside, you know that exercise has the power to give you feelings such as: Achievement Fulfilment Feeling healthy Mental well being Comfort Satisfaction Accomplishment Intrinsic motivators to exercise, involve enjoying the feeling of your muscles feeling pumped, the rush of blood to the muscles, the postworkout high and accomplishment that could be from increasing repetitions, lifting heavier weights or running, pushing the body for

longer at a higher pace. It can also involve an enjoyment of how you feel dancing or moving to music or gaining a high degree of skill at a sport. Extrinsic motivation: on the other hand, comes from factors from outside of you that include: Increased appearance to others Benefits to career Financial rewards To gain points from employer

Adherence & Motivation The latter method is a less likely method to keep you motivated longterm, it’s a less sustaining way of maintaining exercise adherence. The extrinsic method is usually favored by high conditioned competitive athletes that use winning as the motivation to exercise, plus the financial rewards and popularity. Once they’re no longer competing, the motivation they once had to exercise can decrease rapidly, which is why you see so many ex athletes out of shape leading to other issues. It may be that you’re motivated by both intrinsic and extrinsic types, where you enjoy competing or playing a sport and receiving the financial rewards for doing it. What you may find motivating now may change over time, it can change as you progress. For instance, someone could take up martial arts to improve their fitness and confidence and then decide they want to compete competitively or professionally.

The Barriers to Exercise The benefits to regular exercise are well known, but in most cases, there are lots of barriers that can stand in the way of doing so, to

which we have no control over. In my experience as a Personal Trainer, I came across many clients in which I helped to overcome barriers and increase their exercise activity. Some of the most typical excuses I heard from clients were: I know I must make the effort to do what I need to, but I don’t think I have the extra time to fit Physical exercise into my daily schedule. I’m often tired out from the pressures I’m under at work and then I must look after my children afterwards as there’s nobody to look after them. I feel I need to relax and recover during this period. I fear I’ll look silly going to the gym as I’m very fat, I don’t think I’d feel very confident next to the regular and fit gym-goers. I think I’d feel awkward exercising in front of people, I’d like to go but I feel I’d struggle to go regularly. I feel I’m okay, besides I’m elderly. I feel it’s too late to start exercising, I don’t really like it, I don’t even enjoy walking. I don’t have anybody to go with and I don’t much like the idea of going alone. I know a few people that have over-done it in the gym and caused injury to themselves. Other common excuses include: Lack self-motivation Don’t have enough time Not enjoyable Exercise is boring Low self-esteem Fear of injury Fear of re-injury

No management skills (unable to set own goals and monitor progress to achieve goals) No support or encouragement from family and friends

Specific Groups For the most part, we all understand that exercise is essential, both for our physical and mental health, but for those who don’t exercise, although they understand the benefits, for whatever reason they won’t participate. Let’s look at some potential barriers for specific groups. It’s not always straight forward for women to fit exercise into their daily routine, to the extent that it’s both enjoyable and suitable for them. Women can therefore, feel that time and effort are bigger barriers to them, than men would find. Also, through my experience I’ve had many discussions with women of all ages, about feeling uncomfortable with being in a male-dominated environment inside a gym. Stay at home moms can struggle even more so to find the time to exercise, as they’re having to look after their children and maintain their family home. Another great example of a specific group, are the elderly. They know how important exercise is to maintain and improve their health, but there’s a whole bunch of reasons that they feel will hold them back, or reasons they give themselves such as why they’d even want to exercise at their age? In most instances, their ability to take part in exercise can be restricted because of poor health, pain in the joints/muscles, fears of getting hurt, having no friends to train with and not being able to use the machinery or equipment properly. Generally, the obese are the biggest percentage of people that find barriers to exercise. It can be a dreaded and humiliating experience being obese and walking into a gym, packed with fit exercisers that look like they know what they’re doing. Like the elderly, they also fear they won’t be able to use the fitness equipment due to

discomfort, as they’re likely to suffer with bad joints, muscle aches and pains.

How to Overcome Barriers Now we’ve gone through some of the potential barriers you may have encountered, let’s now look at how you can overcome them. The first thing you can do, is write down your weekly schedule so that you have it in front of you. Look back at your daily activities and identify 3-time slots that you could perform 30 minutes of physical activity. If you work, try a different approach to travelling, such as using a bike, walking and then advancing to jogging. Also, when you go out, no matter where you go, try to make it a habit to park a little further away from your destination. 30 minutes of exercise is the minimal amount of time, therefore, fitting something into your schedule such as walking, jogging and climbing stairs, should be easy. I had much success with many of my busy clients by advising that they try to allocate time slots each day, such as setting a goal of achieving 5-10,000 steps per day and walk, run or go swimming during their dinner break. Even with these suggestions there’re barriers such as the environment. Let’s look now at how you can overcome this. In the past, I had advised the elderly and obese to take up walking. The feedback I received was great as they enjoyed long walks in the countryside and enjoyed the scenery. But sometimes the environment can have an influence on how physically active you are, such as bad weather conditions and other factors such as pollution. Therefore, you can choose from the following activities that’ll always be available, no matter the conditions. Aerobic classes Swimming

Calisthenics (body weight exercises) Indoor cycling Climbing stairs Aerobic dancing or dancing alone Gym Martial arts academies Boxing clubs Home based Personal Trainer Just a little advice – try to keep outdoor activities that depend on weather conditions as an extra or to switch things up. As mentioned above, when talking to clients of the past, I received a lot of feedback from the elderly, that social support typically wasn’t there from family or friends, but this wasn’t only a problem for the elderly, the obese and regular out of shape individuals shared the same feelings. Social support can play a big role in motivating you to get involved with physical fitness, I advised many of my previous clients to bring along a friend or family member to their private sessions, to help encourage them. For the clients that did this it had a very positive effect on them both. I also encouraged other clients to attend aerobic classes to meet with other members in similar positions, this also had a positive effect on them as other members would share their experiences and ideas and friendships were developed, encouraging both parties to remain motivated to attend sessions.

How to Overcome Lack of Energy and Motivation

Out of all the barriers to exercise mentioned above, the most common barrier I’ve encountered with my clients, is that they felt a lack of energy and motivation. Like many people who’re sedentary, I had many clients who’d complain that they just didn’t have the energy, but the first thing you’ve to realize, is that performing physical activity will help to improve and increase your energy levels. To help my clients overcome lack of energy and motivation, I advised them to plan their physical activities when their energy levels were at their highest. To do this, simply keep a diary throughout the week and make a note of when you’re feeling the most energetic. For most its first thing in the morning and for others it could be towards the end of the day. Once you have your diary in place you can then create and schedule a planner. By doing so, this gave my clients a feeling of structure in their life, it encouraged them to stick to a routine and improved their confidence as well as give them a chance to take full advantage of their energy levels. If your partners supportive, try to discuss the situation with them and ask if he or she would be happy to go out walking, jogging or stair climbing from time to time and attend the gym with you every so often. Another effective technique you could use if you lack motivation at the gym, is by dissociation from exercise, meaning a distraction from exercise. So, if you’re using a treadmill, upright bike or a stair climber etc., try watching the TV or reading a book whilst exercising, this way your mind is distracted from exercise and focused in a different place rather than the actual exercise itself. Although the above covers how to overcome the main barriers to specific groups, here are some other strategies for people whose particular circumstances may require specific help from family and friends etc. For instance, stay at home moms could try asking a friend, family member or neighbor to babysit, which would enable them to

exercise. If this isn’t an option, then try to be creative with your children, go for walks together, play games involving running such as tag. Alternatively, you can exercise to aerobic DVD’s and use house hold fitness equipment while the children are sleeping or busy playing.

Changing Exercise Behavior Anyone that adopts a physically active lifestyle, must adjust their behavior considerably. But this isn’t a simple process, it can be quite complicated, and you cannot avoid this process if you wish to reap the benefits of physical activity in the long term. If you’ve ever made a similar change, you can comprehend how hard this behavioral change is to make and maintain.

Stages of Change Model The stages of change model have five stages: 1. Pre-contemplation 2. Preparation 3. Action 4. Maintenance 5. Relapse Each of the five stages show a type of exercise behavior towards changing your life to a more active lifestyle. This model and process is circular, because your behavior change won’t always be as straight forward as you’d like. Being a beginner to exercise can differ from one individual to another, you’ll move through each stage according to your motivation and personal life. Let’s look at an example of how an individual who leads an inactive lifestyle, could effectively use the stages of change model to help them commit to a physically active one. Pre-Contemplation

This is the stage where you haven’t even considered including physical fitness into your life. You may be feeling depressed that you’re overweight and perhaps lost your job or a loved one etc. Contemplation This then brings you to the contemplation stage, where at some point you start to believe that the idea of including exercise into your life would be to your benefit. Things that could potentially inspire you to act on this are health scares, negative comments towards you and the admiration of a more physically fit person, such as a friend or idol. I’ve worked with many clients that were dabbling with the idea of including exercise into their life, it may be to your benefit at this stage to recruit a Personal Trainers services, as they can be a great benefit in supporting your goals and boosting motivation that you may not have had alone. Preparation Once you’ve approached the preparation stage, you’ve made the commitment to change and become more physically active. It may be that you’ve joined a gym, a swimming club, become more physically active around the house etc. But it may not be that you’re doing enough to meet your physical activity recommendations. Action This is where you’re now performing the exercise that meets the guidelines to benefit your health. Statistically, around six months of physically fitness will encourage you to continue being physically active, as this allows for many adaptations to take place and small goals to be achieved. You’ll also notice physical changes within your appearance, which therefore, will motivate you further. Statistically, there’s a high drop-out rate during the first 3-6-months, so seeing as you won’t have been active for that long, you aren’t out of danger quite yet. Until you reach the 6-month mark, there’s no guarantee that you’ll adhere to physical fitness or enter the maintenance stage.

Maintenance Once you’ve followed an exercise regime for at least 6 months, you’ll have reached the maintenance stage. As a Personal Trainer, I’ve played my role successfully in helping clients to reach the maintenance stage, but even so, it doesn’t necessarily guarantee they won’t drop out down the line. Healthy habits are sometimes tough to maintain, just ask anyone that’s trying to give up drugs, alcohol or any other unhealthy behavior for a healthier life. A great deal of my clients discovered a passion or preference to a certain type of exercise such as running or lifting weights, which was very positive for their motivation, but not everyone’s prone to this. Relapse This is the stage where people drop out due to a bunch of reasons including illness, injuries, higher priorities, job change and other inconveniences. It’s important to note that relapse could appear at any stage. If you fall into this stage don’t worry you haven’t failed.

Why People Give Up We’ve just ran through the stages of change model in an orderly fashion, but only a few people go through the stages in this order, the rest are likely to go through them back and forth all throughout their history of exercise. Dropping into the relapse stage can happen during any stage you’re at. Therefore, it’s very important to acknowledge that you haven’t failed yourself and you can restart from the last stage you were at. You can still achieve all your fitness goals whether you’re going forwards or backwards through the stages of change.

How You Can Apply the Stages of Change Model The first thing you’ve to decide, is where on the model you’re at. From there, you can create a strategy to help encourage your progress towards a more physically active lifestyle.

Stages of Change Questionnaire In the past, I’ve used a questionnaire for my clients to help identify their position on the stages of change model. I suggest you do this too. Inside the questionnaire are four straight forward statements to which you simply answer yes or no to. Let’s look at each statement: 1. I am physically active. □ Yes □ No 2. I plan on becoming more physically active. □ Yes □ No 3. I currently take part in regular physical activity. □ Yes □ No 4. For the last 6 months I’ve been regularly physically active. □ Yes □ No Questions 3 & 4 ‘regularly physically active,’ means that you should at least be performing exercise for 30 minutes or more for up to 5 days per week. Simply work your way through the questionnaire and tick the yes or no boxes as appropriate and then you can use the answers to position yourself on the stages of change model. Let’s look at how to do this. Once you’ve discovered what stage you’re at on the stages of change model using your answers, you can use some of the strategies below to help you. Remember that applying the correct strategy at the correct time, can help you reach your goal of becoming regularly physically active. Pre-Contemplation = If you answered no to question 1 & 2 you’re at the pre-contemplation stage. Contemplation = If you answered no to question 1 & yes to question 2 you’re at the contemplation stage.

Preparation = If you answered yes to question 1 & no to question 3 you’re at the preparation stage. Action = If you answered yes to questions 1, 3 & no to question 4, you’re at the action stage. Maintenance = If you answered yes to question 1, 3 & 4 you’re at the maintenance stage.

Support Throughout the Pre-Contemplation Stage When you’re contemplating about beginning exercise, you need to have an effective strategy to help you move towards your goal of becoming regularly physically active. Encouragement from family, friends and even doctors is an absolute must at this stage, ask them what their thoughts are on you taking up exercise. This’ll encourage you to re-evaluate your inactive lifestyle, but ensure you feel you aren’t being forced into this change, as you want your decision to become cemented. This decision must be made solely by you and the more support you receive, the more likely you’ll be to reach your goals.

Support Throughout the Contemplation Stage When you’re seriously contemplating beginning an exercise regime, it’s very beneficial to sit down on your own and make a list of all the pros and cons of becoming physically active. Let’s look at some of the pros and cons of some of my past clients. Pros Helps with fat loss Improvements in physical and psychological well being Healthier appearance Slows down effects of ageing Enables daily tasks and occupation to become easier Improvements in confidence

Social interaction Cons Requires physical and mental effort Time consuming Possibilities of injury or discomfort Potentially cost worthy Thoughts that exercise is boring Out of comfort zone Sweating One thing to consider, is that one person’s con could be another person’s pro or vice-versa. Many of my clients were self-conscious, they had misunderstandings of what it meant to go to the gym. They would worry about; their clothing not being to the latest trend, how they’d look out of breath and sweating around other people, along with thoughts that I’d force them into high intense exercises.

Support Throughout the Preparation & Action Stages As you move through the preparation and action stages, you’ll likely feel that you’ve set your mind to participate in physical fitness, but you aren’t out of the woods just yet. When you reach the preparation stage, you’ll have made a commitment. To keep yourself committed you need to set yourself short and long-term goals, which we’ll look at later. Once my clients had reached this stage, I’d try to find anything that could prevent them from becoming physically inactive. For mutual support it’s a good idea to find somebody that has the same goals as you or who’s already in the position you want to be in. Most people who’re in the action stage, begin to adopt new exercise behavior which can be quite exciting for most. But the stats show

that most beginners to exercise drop out during the first 3-6 months, although there’re ways of making your exercise regime more exciting by adding variety and adjusting the intensity and volume. Let’s look at this in more detail. Variety is the spice of life, try to keep things interesting by varying your program, adjust the intensity and volume every 3-6 weeks and choose the exercises you enjoy performing. You should ensure that your program is challenging, but also rewarding and don’t forget that setting goals at this point is just as important as it was previously.

Support Throughout the Maintenance Stage This is the stage where you’ve developed determination and motivation to show up to every training session and maintain a physical fit lifestyle. The flip side to this is relapse, where for one or several reasons you’re unable to maintain a physically active lifestyle. Maintenance is the stage where you want to be, it’s the long-term goal you want to strive for and it’s the most difficult road to stay on. This is because this stage requires the most motivation and effort to maintain your new behavior. Many of my clients found a passion or preference to certain exercises at this stage, which strongly helped motivate them. So, try different things in the gym, join classes, swimming clubs and try different sports etc., to see if you have a passion for anything that could help spur you on. The most important aspect to maintain your new behavior comes from enjoyment and having the ‘need’ to do it. If you don’t find exercise to be satisfying or feel distressed if you can’t do it, it’s very unlikely that you’ll be able to maintain it.

Support Throughout the Relapse Stage If you fall into the relapse stage, it’s important to reassure yourself that it isn’t the end of your journey, it’s merely the start of a new one. Try to study people that are trying to give up unhealthy habits such

as drugs, alcohol and smoking, as this too isn’t a straight forward process. It can take many attempts and a solid mind set to get to the place where you want to be. As mentioned above, the most common drop outs that occur during the maintenance stage, are due to illness, injuries, higher priorities, job change and other inconveniences. If you do hit relapse due to the above reasons, try to be question why it happened, write down the causes, how prevent this from happening again? If you’re unable to exercising, be creative and find other ways to incorporate into your routine.

positive, can you continue exercise

If you’ve gained more responsibilities at work which leaves you with less time for exercise, you could exercise for shorter time periods, perform fewer sets, decrease recovery time and perform shorter bouts of cardio at high intensity. This way you can still burn similar amounts of calories. If you discontinue exercise due to a loss of motivation and lack of energy, try to look back at what motivated you in the first place. Many of my clients dropped out of exercise and lost motivation after achieving their weight loss goal. It’s important to set goals after achieving your initial goal, look at the benefits of exercise and look back at the pros and cons.

Behavior Change We’ve just discovered how people change their behavior back and forth through the stages of change, now let’s look at why they change. Let’s now look at why people change from a sedentary lifestyle to an active one. Think back to a time when you had to change an unhealthy behavior or habit. It could be something such as cutting down on fast food or reducing the amount of time spent at the pub to reduce alcohol

intake. Jot down what the change was and the reasons why you made that change. There are several reasons why we make significant changes in our life, but sometimes we don’t really understand why. What’s meant by this is, an individual may notice in pictures that they’re putting on weight, their clothes feel tight and comments from other people regarding their size could trigger their need to do something about it and become more physically active. The factors such as the ones above that can cause someone to act, are known as antecedents. What else can influence people to change their behavior? Receiving professional advice from a doctor, seeing family or friends who’ve lost weight by means of them changing their exercise behavior, can all trigger you to want to do the same. Role models who’ve lost a considerable amount of weight and maintained it are also a big inspiration to people to change their behavior.

Self-Efficacy Developing self-belief and a positive attitude, is key to adopting a new healthy behavior and to ensure you succeed in making that change. A high and healthy esteem along with belief allows you to change your behavior much easier, compared with those who don’t have these attributes. It goes like this, if you don’t believe in yourself that you can make the change, then you most certainly won’t.

How Self-Efficacy Can Be Gained Encouragement from family, friends or health professionals Becoming aware of how good exercise feels and the feel-good chemicals released following exercise Noticing changes of people like them or who they relate to who’ve made changes Feeling better about the way you look

Being able to complete an exercise session without any trouble and Progressing You can measure your self-efficacy by simply asking yourself how confident you are in changing your behavior, out of 100%. If you score yourself less than 70%, you may run into several obstacles and drop out of exercise. If your confidence is below 70%, then try to identify any barriers that may be stopping you from believing that you can do it. Create methods to overcome barriers, it could be that a close friend, partner or children object to you going to the gym, so you could try to convince them that it’s worth it.

Setting Goals Research reflects that approximately 45% of the UK make a new year’s resolution leading to 1st January, to lose weight and get fit. These resolutions are admirable, but sadly only 8% are successful at achieving their goal. Why is this? The big mistake people often make when setting goals, is how they plan them, if they plan them at all. To achieve your goals, be it losing weight or anything else, you must set 'realistic' goals, follow an attainable nutrition practice and use the SMART acronym. If we refer to the contemplation stage of change, during this stage it's a good idea to note down all your goals that you wish to achieve. You may have doubts and fears, but try to master this, dream big and push to be the best you can be no matter what. Focus on the goals that are sensible and realistic to achieve, with what you have to work with. Once you’ve set your goals you need to look at their quality by establishing if they’re SMART. Let's now look at what SMART stands for and how you can apply it to achieve your goals.

Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Time attained Specific The first SMART principle, is that your goal(s) are to be specific. This means creating goals that’re clear and concise that’ll steer you down a straight road to success. Think about what your goals are, the barriers and how to overcome them. Physically writing your goal on paper conditions your mind to work towards it, because if you only have general goals in place, it’s unlikely that it’ll become a part of your subconscious. A general goal would go something like this, "I want to lose fat from around my waist." A more specific approach would go something like, "I’ll decrease my body fat percentage overall by 7%, by following an effective training and nutrition plan" Your goal may be to decrease your body composition, so you should start by determining what your daily calorie intake should be to achieve that goal. Again, to determine this it’ll depend on many factors such as gender, age, exercise experience, activity level and your actual goal.

Measurable Once you’ve established the specific criteria to monitor and track your progress, you’re much more likely to stay on track and achieve your goals. If you’re a beginner to exercise and on a journey to transformation, then making notes of your dietary intake is the best place to start.

Once you’ve calculated your dietary needs, that you’ve either calculated yourself or by a professional, you can then use that as measurable data. If you exceed your calorie needs consistently based on your goals, you’ll be very unlikely to achieve them and therefore, be unsuccessful. It’s essential to measure your calorific needs and write them down, because if your progress was to stall, what would you do to adjust your needs accordingly? Monitoring your energy needs and having them on paper, enables you to make any necessary changes to the nutrition plan needed to progress.

Achievable Realistic goals are set, planned and put in place, so that they become “achievable.” Therefore, when you organise them specifically, you’ll become much more likely to attain them. In the case of losing weight, you’ll also need to be willing to try new foods and adopt healthier cooking methods. Experiment with new fruits & vegetables that you’ve never tasted, discover what you like and what you don't. You’re a lot less likely to adhere to a diet that consists of five fruits and veg if you don't like the taste of them, it’d be difficult to increase your intake. If you practice this method, you’ll be well on your way to expanding your nutritional benefits. If you struggle to consume fruits and vegetables, then start by setting smaller goals of trying a new fruit and vegetable each week and adding to your diet what you prefer. You can use this approach to achieve a long-term goal of consuming your recommended five portions per day.

Realistic Realistic means that your goals should be something that you truly know you can achieve. Setting too extreme of a goal that you feel you may not be able to achieve, will no doubt set you up for failure. Your expectations must be doable and following these rules will help motivate and send you on your way to reach the outcome desired.

Denial is one of the biggest factors linked with failure, so you must identify any habits that knock you off track. For instance, if you’re working towards cutting your body fat by 7% and you’re eating fast foods due to a hectic work schedule, you know what you need to do. The best way to avoid this and especially if you have a busy work schedule, is to prepare your meals prior to work. The last thing you want to do is starve yourself and then dash to the nearest fast food place to satisfy your hunger pans. Planning healthy meals ahead of time is vital to ensure that you succeed in staying on route to attaining your goals. If planning food seems too much for you, there are services out there that will prepare healthy meals for you, however, it can be costly. Sparing just 30-40 minutes each night, you’ll be well on your way to success.

Time Attained No matter what size a goal you have in mind, be it short or long term, there must be a set date in which you attain it in. The simple reason is, you’ll be less likely to put it off or put less important tasks before your goal. In other words, you’ll be less likely to put it off and just get on with it. Bear in mind that once you’ve attained your goal, you must be able to sustain it. Your goal for better nutrition and health should be timely and should enhance your life. There are many variations of diets out there, especially the fad diets, that offer fast results, but because of the poor nutrition practice, they aren't sustainable. It's always good practice to avoid diets that claim you can lose 12lbs in a week also. For fat loss, your safest bet is to aim to lose 1-2lbs per week. Transformation in body composition takes time, there’s no quick fix. It’s unlikely that you’ll be able to achieve a 6% loss of body fat in just a month, the same applies if you’re trying to pack on 6lbs of lean muscle. Fad diets in simple terms, only bring about “the quick fix.” You won’t gain any knowledge or skill that’s needed for your own personal dietary commands.

Body transformations aren’t going to happen overnight, the positive changes to your lifestyle may be a shock to your system at first glance, so take precautions and mix a little of the foods you enjoy, in with the foods you require. There’s no need to go too over the top either, this is what’s meant when we advise to educate yourself on nutrition, because in some respects you can use some of the bad foods to your advantage, especially simple sugars, as your muscles can absorb them like magnets during a small window after exercise.

Stay SMART to Go Forward As you’ve just discovered, the method of the SMART acronym builds on each component, therefore, you must make use of all five to be successful. Goals aren’t easy to achieve, there’s a long road to success and there are many bumpy roads along the way. Remember that the journey is important, and it should be fun and exciting, you’ll experience small considerable gains along with a few setbacks. Either way, it’s important to realise that only you have the control and power over the outcome that you truly desire. If you enjoy the journey and put the effort in, success and results are sure to follow. Motivation comes from within, you’ve got to be the one to make that change, do the work, and be somebody in your own life, because it matters, it absolutely does.

Chapter 3: Aerobic & Resistance Exercise for Weight Loss To maximize your fat burning potential, you must have a welldesigned weight loss program in place, that’s based on the most recent effective scientific findings. The bottom line is that regular exercise is the key to help you achieve weight loss, reduce body fat levels and maintain a healthier body weight. Physical activity increases the amount of fat you can shed when compared to dieting alone. You’ll also maintain more of your muscle structure this way, as with rapid dieting you can experience significant muscle loss. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to achieve and maintain a healthy weight long term. Although resistance training can prove a valuable role in a fat loss program, aerobic exercise is the prime mode. To receive the full benefits, you must perform the correct type and quantity of aerobic exercise. Again, to experience the full benefits, you need a wellplanned program that’s based on the most up to date scientific findings. Cardiovascular (CV) exercise involves movement that increases your heart rate to improve oxygen consumption by the body and should be the most important part of any exercise program. There are many different types of CV exercise options including walking, stepping, running, hiking, biking, cycling, cross-country, swimming, skating and aerobics classes. There are also many health benefits to perform regular CV exercise, whichever mode you perform. It can help to reduce health risks such as CV disease, prevent other disorders and diseases that can damage your CV system. Like any other exercise regime, there are four fitness training principles you must adhere to which are: Frequency

Intensity Time Type You may’ve heard of the acronym FITTA also, which stands for: Frequency Intensity Time Type Adherence “Adherence” or “enjoyment,” are two specific rules to abide by for a successful fat loss program.

Frequency The acronym FITT is used to set guidelines not only for aerobic exercise, but for resistance exercise also. It’s used to develop unique and specific training plans that serve your individual needs. Let’s start with “frequency.” You’ll need to perform some type of exercise up to 5 days or more per week, to maximize your energy expenditure. This is because when compared with other aerobic exercise programs, training for 2 days only, has been proved insufficient for notable changes in body composition. Training for 3-4 days per week produces some significant fat loss changes, but not to the standard of 5 days.

Intensity Second in the acronym FITT, we have “intensity,” which refers to how much effort is to be put in to an exercise program or session. You

must perform to a moderate–vigorous intensity to make a fat loss program effective.

(Rate of perceived exertion – Borg scale) How does the exercise feel?

Rating

Category ratio scale

Approximate correspondence with % of MHR (maximum heart rate)

Approximate correspondence with % of VO2 max

Very, very light

6 7

0 1

Very light

8 9

2

50% 55%

40%

Light

10 11

3

60% 65%

55%

Somewhat hard

12 13

4

70% 75%

60%

Hard

14 15 16

5 6 7

80% 85% 88%

70% 75% 80%

Very hard

17 18

8

92% 96%

82% 85%

Extremely hard

19

9

98%

95%

Maximum

20

10

100%

100%

Borg’s perceived exertion scale – Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 1998

Above is the Borg or RPE scale, you can see that a moderate intensity is an RPE of 3 on the Rate of perceived exertion scale. You should start with a moderate intensity if you’re a beginner to exercise and once you become more accustomed to that intensity, you can slowly turn it up more vigorously as appropriate. Moderate-hard on the RPE scale is an RPE of 5-6. Training at a vigorous intensity provides more health and fitness benefits which

allows you to burn as many calories as you would have at a moderate intensity, but in a shorter duration. You should be aware not to increase the intensity if you have an existing cardiovascular or orthopedic condition which effects the musculoskeletal system including the bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles and nerves. With my experience as a personal trainer, most obese people find an increase in intensity very uncomfortable, which causes a high dropout rate and failure to stick to their program, therefore it’s so important to progress slow and accordingly.

Time Third in the acronym FITT, is “time,” which is the amount of time you’ll be exercising each session. It’s ideal that each session lasts between 30-60 minutes, accumulating a total of 150 minutes each week. You can progress slowly to 300 minutes per week of moderate intensity exercise which burns around 2,000 kcals or more per week. If you’re severely over–weight, it may be necessary to perform around 60-90 minutes of exercise daily, as you’d need to lose a lot more fat and maintain it when compared to people who’re just overweight.

Intermittent Exercise Duration The volume of exercise performed in a day doesn’t need to be one continuous session, it could be acquired through a few sessions in blocks of intermittent exercise, of at least 10 minutes per block. Two, 20-30-minute sessions throughout a single day, has shown to be more effective than a single 40-60-minute session. If you split your sessions throughout the day, it can increase the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), the greatest EPOC occurring when the intervals between sessions are shorter.

Progress Slowly

If you’re severely overweight and deconditioned, you’ll most probably benefit from exercising up to 10 minutes per session. You can then progress gradually to a more fitting duration, making small increases over time. An important fact to remember is that women are naturally lighter than men, so you’d need to exercise a little longer if you’re a woman, as you’d need longer to burn the same number of kcals compared to a heavier male.

Type Last in the acronym FITT is “type,” which dictates the type of exercise you should perform to achieve appropriate exercise adaptations. For fat loss, your primary type of exercise should consist predominantly of aerobic activity, but guidelines for the amount of time spent exercising, would include some type of resistance training. Studies were performed on specific exercises that alter body composition, to see if one type differed from another. The results reflect that when comparing running, walking and cycling of equal duration, volume and frequency, they were all as equally effective as one another. Continuous aerobic exercise is one of the many types that improve your cardiovascular system, it targets all the larger muscle groups, therefore, you expend more energy. Research and studies were also taken out on composition and body weight and the results found that an aerobic mode of exercise for both men and women, were equally as effective for fat loss, but for women, running and walking showed to be more effective than cycling. To adhere to your fitness program, it’s wise to choose modes that’re more suited to your preference, skills and fitness level. From my experience, there becomes a high drop-out rate if clients don’t enjoy

the exercises they’re performing or when they feel they’re working too hard, too soon. As discussed above, the very overweight are at an increased risk of orthopaedic injury, so it’s best to choose low-non-impact types of activity to begin with and slowly progress. You’ll burn more kcals in a 30-minute jog than you would walking for the same period, but you could burn the same amount walking, you’d just need to walk for a longer period. Be aware of things like that when comparing the effectiveness of fat burning of different modes of exercise over the same period.

How to Progress We’ll now look at how Michele makes progress and safely adjusts the intensity of her sessions over time. Michele is overweight, she has a sedentary job and, in the past, has been inactive. She didn’t enjoy physical activity during her time at school and has never been the sporty type. With any fitness or fat loss program, the idea is to overload yourself to make progress. In Michele’s case she’s focused on overloading her CV system. It’s important to note that much of the progress should come from the duration of exercise, rather than an increase in intensity. As Michele is very overweight, has no exercise history and poorly conditioned, she’ll need to progress the duration of her sessions each week and once she can work at a particular intensity, for a certain period, she’ll then be able to increase the intensity and repeat the process again. Increasing the intensity of your programme too soon can lead to injury and may cause you to cease exercise, lose motivation and drop out of your fitness program, so progress slowly and adjust the intensity as necessary.

I’ve created below a simple progression chart designed for Michelle and any other individual new to exercise. Week

Intensity % HRR

Duration in minutes

1

40-50% HRR

30

2

40-50% HRR

33

3

40-50% HRR

35

4

40-50% HRR

38

5

40-50% HRR

40

6

40-50% HRR

43

7

40-50% HRR

46

8

40-50% HRR

50

9

40-50% HRR

53

10

40-50% HRR

57

11

40-50% HRR

60

12

50-60% HRR

45

13

50-60% HRR

49

14

50-60% HRR

53

15

50-60% HRR

57

16

50-60% HRR

61

17

60-70% HRR

45

18

60-70% HRR

48

19

60-70% HRR

51

20

60-70% HRR

55

If you look at week one, Michele performs 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise at 40-50% HRR. The exercises she performs consist of fast paced walking on the treadmill, rowing and cycling at 40-50% HRR. She increases the duration of her sessions each week by 5-10%, until she reaches up to 60 minutes of exercise and then increases the intensity up to 50-60%. Therefore, the

duration decreases to 45 minutes, she then increases the duration by 5-10% again each week until she can perform 60 minutes of exercise at the new intensity. Any adjustments made to the program would be based on Michele’s response to the intensity or duration of the sessions and psychological or emotional barriers including illness and diet. It’s not advised to make an adjustment to both the duration and intensity in the same session, as it’s not likely that you’d be able to work harder and longer during that session.

How to Maximise Energy Expenditure The first thing you must do to achieve weight loss, is to create a deficit in which you expend more energy than you take in. Maximal energy expenditure can be achieved by performing high intense exercises that last for a prolonged period. Although, through extended periods of exercise, comes a build-up of lactic acid which eventually leads to fatigue, therefore, high intense exercises can only be performed for short periods. There are two ways in which you can overcome this problem, here are two approaches to maximise energy expenditure. 1st Method – The first thing you must do is set the duration of your training session, so say it’s 30 minutes, then you’d to set the intensity as high as possible, but so that you can maintain this intensity throughout the duration of the session. By doing so, ensures fatigue gradually occurs over the 30 minutes and as you improve, you’ll be able to sustain a higher intensity throughout exercise, therefore, you’ll be able to expend more energy during those 30 minutes. 2nd Method – The second approach you can take is interval training, which involves a series of high intense bouts of activity in a short duration, interspersed with low intensity recovery periods. A commonly used format of interval exercise is aerobic interval

training, which allows you to build up more total exercise at a higher intensity at a duration you find tolerable.

Aerobic Interval Training High intensity exercise including interval training will increase calorie expenditure even in the hours after exercise. It’s important that you don’t participate in this mode of CV exercise if you have existing or have increased risk factors such as cardiovascular disease or orthopaedic conditions. Generally, an intensity of 80-85% HRR or RPE equivalent, is used for the hard-work rate intervals, whereas the recovery period intervals consist of 50% HRR. If you’re obese, it’d be more appropriate to start at a high intensity of 75% HRR. You’ll discover how to calculate HRR and a target HR a little later. The duration of long aerobic intervals is generally between 3-8 minutes and around the same duration for the active recovery period. Generally, obese clients being introduced into this mode of CV exercise for the first time, would start with an effort to recovery ratio of 1:1, so to simplify, you’d perform a work interval of 2 minutes and then an active recovery period of 2 minutes. Then to progress, you can increase the duration of the work interval and halve your active recovery periods, therefore, your effort to recovery ratio would be a 1:0.5 or to simplify, a 3-minute work interval and a 1.5-minute active recovery period. The volume or number of intervals performed, will depend on the time you have available along with your fitness level. Having worked with many obese and physically fit people, the typical number of intervals recommended to be completed each session are 5-10. Again, to simplify, if you’re obese and you’re working at a ratio of 1:1, a work ratio of 2 minutes and an active recovery of 2 minutes, you’ll be training between 20 – 40 minutes. 5x4 = 20, 10x4 = 40. The 4 is

for 2-minute work interval and 2-minute recovery interval, the 5+10 are the number of intervals.

Vary Your Program You can include many exercises into your fat loss program such as walking, hiking, running and playing games, it doesn’t solely have to involve hours upon hours of low intense continuous exercise. It’s an idea to vary your programme, keep things fresh and rotate things around, because if you’re enjoying your program, you’ll be more prone to continue and achieve you goal. Another wonderful thing about exercise and physically active is, that when you become fitter and can burn more calories through exercise, you won’t have to restrict your energy intake as much.

Rest and Recovery You’ll need to recover from each training session to achieve optimal fitness gains, you need to get enough rest, restore fuel sources and rehydrate which are all vital during recovery. If you’re a beginner to physical fitness, you should aim to exercise 3 times per week and as you become fitter and your body becomes more accustomed to it, you can slowly progress up to 5 times per week and more depending on your tolerance to the exercises. We’ll look more in depth at how to progress later.

Heart Rate Next, we’ll look at how to monitor the intensity of CV exercise, the most commonly used method being your heart rate. Heart rate is highly connected to the work of the heart, if you maintain the same heart rate throughout training sessions, you allow for a progressive training load increase and added benefits of improved fitness. An example would be; if you were to walk on a treadmill at 5kmph to hit a target of 135 bpm and then after 6 weeks of this you may need

to increase the intensity up to 6.4kmph, to get up to the same heart rate.

How to Determine Maximal Heart Rate To begin with, you’ll need to find out what your maximum heart rate is before you calculate a target heart rate. This can be based on your age, because HRmax (heart rate max) shows a steady decrease of approx. 1 bpm (beat per minute) per year, starting at 10-15 years of age. Let’s now look at one of the methods to estimate HRmax

The 220-Minus Age Formula Tony is 40-years old and his maximum heart is determined by 220 – 40 = 180 bpm. There’s a big associated error with this formula of about 10-12 bpm. It tends to overestimate the HRmax in adults under 40-years old and underestimates increasingly for over 40-year olds. 68% of 40-yearold adults will have heart rates of 168-192 bpm and 95% are between 156-204 bpm. Let’s now look at a more accurate and up to date method.

The Gellish Formula This formula involves the calculation of 206.9 – (0.67 x age) = bpm Be sure to always calculate the numbers in the brackets first and then calculate the whole thing. Next, we’ll compare the Gellish and 220 minus age formulae. If we start with person 60 years of age the Gellish method is as follows: 206.9 – (0.67 x 60) = bpm So, we start by calculating the sum in between the brackets. 0.67 x 60 = 40.2

Then we calculate the whole thing to get their HRmax 206.9 – 40.2 = 166.7 You then round this off to 167 bpm. Let’s now compare this with the 220-minus age formula 220 – 60 = 160 bpm, which you can see is too low compared with the more accurate method. Let’s compare the methods on a younger client of 30 years of age first, using the Gellish formula. 206.9 – (0.67 x 30) = bpm 0.67 x 30 = 20.1 206.9 – 20.1 = 186.8 bpm 187 bpm Compare this with the 220-minus age formula 220 – 30 = 190 which is too high. Next, let’s compare the formulas for a 40-year-old using the Gellish method first. 206.9 – (0.67 x 40) = bpm 0.67 x 40 = 26.8 206.9 – 26.8 = 180 bpm Compare this with the 220-minus age formula 220 – 40 = 180 bpm This is quite interesting as both formulas produce the same results for HRmax for a 40-year-old. This means that the 220-minus age formula is an older established formula that’s somewhat accurate for people of 40 years of age, but it’s best to use the more recent Gellish formula when you’re calculating beyond 40 years of age.

How to Calculate Target Heart Rate

Once you’ve estimated your HRmax, you then need to calculate your target heart rate, so you have an intensity to aim for while exercising. The zero to peak method is one of the eldest and common methods to set target heart rates and it uses a straight percentage of your HRmax. THR (Target heart rate) = HRmax x desired % of MHR (Maximum heart rate) For example, Tony is 30 years old and wants to train at 75% of MHR, so you’d calculate your target heart rate as follows: Remember to use the Gellish method first to find the HRmax. 206.9 – (0.67 x 30) = bpm 0.67 x 30 = 20.1 206.9 – 20.1 = 187 bpm Then we multiply this by the target heart rate % which is 75% 187 x 0.70 = a target heart rate of 131

The Karvonen Method This is a method used to find the target heart rate by calculating a given percentage of HRR (heart rate reserve) and then adding it to your resting heart rate. HRR is the difference between your maximum and resting heart rate. We’ll use the Karvonen method to calculate Tony’s THR at 50% of HRR. Tony’s HRmax is 187 and his resting heart rate is 80 bpm You can calculate your resting heart rate by performing the following: Find your pulse at the wrist (the radial artery) or at your neck (the carotid artery). Use your index and middle finger to count the beats you feel for 10 seconds. Record the number and multiply it by 6 to find the number of beats per minute.

The first step is to subtract Tony’s resting heart rate from his HRmax. 187 – 80 = 107 Then we multiply this number by his desired percentage of HRR which is 50. 107 x 0.50 = 53 The last step is to add Tony’s RHR of 80bpm. 53 + 80 = 133 So, Tony’s THR (target heart rate) at 50% HRR is 133 bpm.

How to Calculate a Heart Rate Range When you wish to work at a certain intensity during exercise, it’s best to use a target heart rate range rather than a specific target heart rate. Therefore, if you had a target heart range of 130-140 bpm it allows you to begin at the low end of range and progress gradually to the higher rate. Let’s use Tony as an example; he wishes to train between 60-70% HRR Tony has a HRmax of 187 bpm and a RHR of 80 bpm So, we subtract RHR from HRmax and multiply it by both THR’s and add RHR. HRmax – RHR x 0.60 and 0.70 + RHR = Target heart rate range 187 – 80 = 107 107 x 0.60 = 64 + 80 = 144 bpm 107 x 0.70 = 75 + 80 = 155 bpm This provides Tony with a heart rate range of 144-155 bpm If you’re using a continuous mode of training, it’s advised that you use a maximum range of 10% such as 60-70% HRR.

Having a target heart rate range to work with enables you to vary between heart rates that occur between your target heart rate when exercising.

The Effects of Medication If you’re taking medication such as beta blockers, you can’t use an estimated maximal heart rate as it’s not possible because medication reduces your maximum heart rate by 20-40 bpm. The RPE scale (Rate or perceived exertion) should be used in cases such as this to monitor the intensity.

Rate of Perceived Exertion RPE is a very valuable aid to prescribe exercise intensity and especially for individuals whose heart rate response to exercise may alter because of medications such as beta blockers. If you look at the RPE (Borg) scale provided above, you’ll see a 6-20 scale and a 0-10 scale. The 0-10 scale is the newest and simplest scale to go by, so stick with that one. Have the scale with you when following a programme, especially if you’re at the gym using machinery CV equipment, as it allows you to rate your perceived level of exertion during exercise.

Conditioning Stage for the Deconditioned The initial conditioning stage ideally lasts between 1-6 weeks, but it all depends on how well you adapt to the training sessions. It may even be that you’re completely new to exercise and must get over your fear and anxieties of the gym along with the awkward feeling. Previously, I started my deconditioned clients off at a moderate intensity of 40-60% HRR of cardiovascular exercise, it’s a promising idea to start from 15-20 minutes and progress up to 30 minutes, training 3-5 days per week. Another must if you’re deconditioned, is to have a rest day between each session.

Strategy to Progression for the Deconditioned

Depending on the adaptations you make to exercise, you should try to slowly increase the frequency. For deconditioned people I usually increase the duration by 5 minutes every 2-3 weeks, until you can work at a consistent level of intensity for 30 minutes. It’s advised that you train for 3 times per week to get started and slowly increase to 4 times per week ensuring you take a rest day in between sessions. If desired, you can then progress to 5 times per week, again, depending on your adaptations to exercise. It’s important that you take sufficient rest days to rehydrate, restore fuel and get enough rest to ensure you achieve optimal fitness gains. You must progress so that you’re able to consistently exercise for 2030 minutes before you increase the intensity. Once you’ve hit your duration target, then and only then should you increase the intensity by approximately 5% HRR preferably every 6th session and be sure to never increase both the intensity and duration in the same session. Again, depending on how you adapt to the sessions, you should try to produce an overload to increase the duration by approximately 510% per week. So, if you were to begin your program at a duration of 20 minutes, you should aim to increase the duration by approximately 2 minutes each week. Depending on what length of duration you’re aiming for, you could increase by 2 minutes each week to hit the peak of 30 minutes and then increase the intensity and then reduce the duration back down to 20 minutes. As mentioned above, you should never increase both the intensity and duration in the same session and especially not whilst adapting to the improvement stage. People who’re not so fit are better able to increase the duration rather than intensity, but when the intensity is eventually increased, be sure to lower the duration.

Maintenance After approx. 5-6 months of following an improvement programme, the maintenance stage is usually put in place. Obviously, the

intensity you’ve become accustomed too during the improvement stage needs to be maintained, so the intensity appears to be the key to maintain your level of fitness. To maintain your CV fitness, you’ll need to perform at an intensity of at least 70% HRR and at least 3 days per week, with no less than two thirds reduction in duration. If weight management is the case and it usually is, then you need to apply the right balance of duration, intensity and frequency of your sessions to achieve your required calorie reduction.

Training Adaptations You may at some point suffer uncontrollable circumstances such as an injury, illness or you may even want to take a short break from fitness, either way, you’ll need to adapt your fitness program by reducing your training load, such as a reduction in either the duration, intensity or both. So, if you were running for 45-minutes for a 6-minute per mile pace, it’d be wise to reduce training load to a 10-minute pace for 15-25minutes. Also, if you’ve suffered an injury, it’s a promising idea to change the exercise from a high-impact activity like running, to a non-impact activity such as using a machine like the recumbent or upright cycle or even bike-riding.

Cardiovascular Training Modes: Continuous Training: is often used by long distance endurance athletes, an example is long slow distance exercise, where you’d train at a moderate intensity for an extended period, approximately 30 minutes to 2 hours. Involves training at a low-moderate intensity approximately 60-70% HRR, continuously without rest intervals. This type of training is a lot more suited to beginners as its safer, more comfortable and has less risk associated with it.

Fartlek Training Fartlek means speed play and involves alternating between short high intensity efforts and low-easy intensity efforts. This type of combination is usually associated with running but can also be used with any type of CV exercise. The rest intervals should be based on how you feel, so you control the duration of the recovery intervals, unlike other modes where your work and rest intervals are precisely timed. Therefore, you go as fast as you want for as long as you want and then slow the pace down until you’re ready to increase the intensity again. You can have fun with this type of speed play, as you could slightly decelerate downhill using long strides and then increase the intensity to power up short-large hills. Interval Training Another technique you can use to improve CV fitness is interval training. It consists of several series of work bouts containing short recovery periods, the idea is that you can do more work this way at a higher intensity and experiencing less fatigue than with continuous training. This type of training is used to develop aerobic and anaerobic speed and power, to develop this kind of speed and power you need to be working at a HRR of 80-90% on your work bout. The best exercise formula to use is a 2-4-minute work bout, at a high intensity of 8090% and a 2-4-minute recovery period to achieve a 1:1 work and rest ratio. Again, depending on how fit you are, your fitness level and goals, you can increase the intensity by adjusting the ratio accordingly, working for around 2 minutes and resting for 1 minute, a 1:0.5 ratio. If you’re a deconditioned individual, it’s advised that you work your way up to this, try to work your way to a decent level of conditioning first.

Variation

Adding variety to your programme keeps you from overtraining and keeps things from becoming stale, it allows you to have variations of training specificity, intensity and volume to reach your fitness goals. There are several types of periodization models you can choose from and varying them by simply alternating between hard and easy training sessions. (Adjusting the duration, frequency and intensity each session). You can vary your programme with the following method each week: Session 1 – 20 minutes with 80-90% HRR Session 2 – 30 minutes with 70-80% HRR Session 3 – 40-60 minutes with 60-70% HRR Note that these times don’t include a warm up. You should always warm up for 5-10 minutes before each session, slowly increasing your heart rate and slowly work the intensity up to the higher work bout. Also, ensure you cool down for 5-10 minutes bringing the intensity right down, until you’re comfortably breathing, and your heart rate returns to normal.

What to Expect You may not know what to expect during your first couple of sessions so here is an idea of how adaptations are made or what type of adaptations your body makes in relation to exercise. You can expect an improvement in your aerobic fitness within the first 6-8 weeks of your exercise regime, it can increase each week by up to 3% in the first month and 2% each week in the second month and then 1% each week after or less. It’s important to note that highly conditioned individuals and athletes following a programme like this, are only likely to produce improvements of up to 5%, as they’re likely to be near the max of their genetic limits. The average individual can produce an improvement from 5-20% in HRmax. For the older sedentary deconditioned individuals, they can improve by

up to 40%, but as they’re older, they won’t improve and adapt as quickly as younger individuals of the same level of fitness.

CV interval training progression chart breakdown for the deconditioned individual Week

Intensity % HRR

Duration in minutes

1

40-50% HRR

30

11

40-50% HRR

60

As you can see, it’s best to progress slowly increasing the duration more appropriately than the intensity. Duration should be increased by 2-4-minutes each week, depending on how well you’re adapting to the exercise sessions, until you can perform 60 minutes continuously. Let’s calculate the intensity % HRR for weeks 1-11. Example: Tony is 40 years old, he has a resting HR of 80 bpm, so let’s use the Gellish formula to calculate his HRmax. 206.9 – (0.67 x age) = bpm (remember to calculate the equation in the brackets first). 0.67 x 40 = 27 206.9 – 27 = 180 bpm Next, let’s use the Karvonen method to calculate his target heart range. HRmax – RHR x THR + RHR = HRR 180 – 80 = 100 100 x 0.40 = 40 40 + 80 = 120 bpm (lower end HRR) Next, we calculate the high end of the target heart range.

180 – 80 = 100 100 x 0.50 = 50 50 + 80 = 130 bpm (higher end HRR) So, the results show that if Tony is training at a heart rate range of 40-50% he should be training between a HR of 120-130 bpm. Week

Intensity % HRR

Duration in minutes

12

50-60% HRR

45

16

50-60% HRR

61

Let’s do the same for weeks 12-16. 180 – 80 = 100 100 x 0.50 = 50 50 + 80 = 130 bpm (lower end HRR) Next, we calculate the higher end of HRR. 180 – 80 = 100 100 x 0.60 = 60 60 + 80 = 140 bpm (higher end HRR) The results show if Tony is training at a heart rate range of 50-60% he should be training between a HR of 130-140 bpm. Week

Intensity % HRR

Duration in minutes

17

60-70% HRR

45

20

60-70% HRR

55

Finally, let’s do the same for weeks 17-20. 180 – 80 = 100 100 x 0.60 = 60 60 + 80 = 140 bpm (lower end HRR)

Next, we calculate the higher end of HRR. 180 – 80 = 100 100 x 0.70 = 70 70 + 80 = 150 bpm (higher end HRR) So, the results show if Tony is training at a heart rate range of 6070% he should be training between a HR of 140-150 bpm. If you follow the progression chart and reach this point, you’ll either wish to maintain your new level of fitness or continue to train at a higher intensity at 70-80% and then 80-90%. The calculations are simple, just take your time and listen to your body, ensure adaptations have taken place and you feel comfortable before you increase the intensity.

Resistance Exercise for Weight loss So far, we’ve discovered the most effective ways to produce fat-loss, using predominantly the cardiovascular system to burn calories, now we look at resistance exercise, which is predominantly anaerobic. For fat-loss, it’s much more effective to combine resistance and aerobic exercise together, rather than just aerobic exercise alone. There are many solid benefits to resistance exercise, such as increases in muscle mass and endurance, strength and power and the same benefits can be shared for the obese and overweight, with people that are of normal weight. When people restrict the calories in their diet, it often causes an imbalance of nutrients and you may absorb less than you should to maintain muscle mass. This can cause a reduction in muscle size. Resistance exercise can help with this as it’s believed to help lessen the effects of calorie restriction.

Resistance Exercise & Muscle Mass

Resistance exercise is the most effective way to maintain and build muscle mass and although there are guidelines for aerobic exercise, there aren’t currently any for resistance exercise. Muscle is more metabolically active than fat, therefore, the more you have the easier it is to burn calories daily. People who are sedentary can lose up to 0.5 lbs per year in their 30’s and 40’s and can even double to 1 lb per year in those over 50years of age. Muscle loss causes a decrease in RMR (resting metabolic rate) of around 5% every 10 years. By the time an average sedentary individual reaches the age of 50, they could have lost up to 15 lbs of muscle and gained 45 lbs of fat. Therefore, the most fitting type of resistance training for an individual following a fat loss program, would be hypertrophy or muscle-mass strength-training programs. For the average person being introduced to resistance exercise for the first time, hearing the words “muscle building,” can be quite daunting. In my experience, woman worry if they follow a muscle mass building programme, that they’d end up looking like a male bodybuilder, but this isn’t the case. In fact, they may end up losing a certain amount of fat and gaining the same amount in muscle. You must understand that muscle is denser than fat, so while the changes in body composition take place, you’ll most likely end up looking smaller rather than blowing up like the hulk! Resistance exercise can help you effectively expend energy, up to rates of 25 kcals per minute and can also elevate your post-exercise metabolic rate by 4.2%, up to 16 hours post-training.

Exercise Selection Your objective is to burn off as many calories as possible, so you need to select the exercises that’ll offer you the best workout to achieve your exercise goals. Some typical guidelines to help you with this include:

Exercise Choice – When you choose exercises to incorporate into your resistance exercise sessions, make sure you select 8-10 that exercise all major muscle groups in one single session, which should include your back, chest, legs and shoulders. Frequency – You should aim to exercise each muscle group up to 2-3 times each week, so if you exercise all major muscle groups in a single session, you should perform 2-3 sessions weekly. Although you should allow significant recovery between sessions of approximately 48 hours. Split Routine – A split routine is where you exercise each individual muscle or 2-3 muscle groups, training each muscle group on different days. You can do this, and train more frequently, but still take 48 hours to recover the same muscle group. Shake Things Up – every couple of sessions change the exercises for each muscle group, as it encourages an even development, this also reduces injury that you could get through overuse of the muscle in the same way. So, if you were performing a seated machine chest press for 2-3 sessions, you could switch to slightly inclined dumb bell bench presses.

Isolation and Compound Exercises – Which are Better? If you’re trying to build or maintain muscle mass while following a fat loss program, we’ve established that hypertrophy training is the best type of mode to follow. Isolation exercises involve only one joint which usually isolates one single muscle or a small group of muscles, for example the peck deck or the peck fly machine. Compound exercises recruit several muscles, they work across multiple joints to produce movement, the bench press is a fitting example. Some of the best compound exercises include:

Deadlifts Bench Press (flat/inclined) Squats Leg Press Kettle Bell Swings Power Cleans Pull Ups Back Rows Compound exercises not only use multiple muscle groups, they’re also time efficient and burn more calories than isolation exercises would and are also more fitting for you to perform daily activities that involve using multiple muscle groups such as house hold chores.

How Many Sets and Repetitions? When you’re customising your resistance program, you need to include how many sets and repetitions you need to do for each muscle group. If you’re training for health-related fitness, to compliment or aid your fat loss program, you should be aiming to perform 2-4 sets of each exercise of 8-12 repetitions each muscle group. You should be performing these exercises until fatigue sets in and can no longer lift the weight. If you’re a healthy individual look at the RPE scale, you should be working at a rate of 9-10, which is extremely hard – maximum on the scale (RPE).

How Many Repetitions to Increase Muscle Mass? As discussed above, the recommendations for repetitions for each muscle group to increase muscle mass, is 8-12-repetitions which is the optimal amount.

Repetitions for older individuals

Individuals over 50-years of age are recommended to perform 10-15 repetitions at an RPE of 3-4 (light to somewhat hard). After the individual has become accustomed and adapted to that, they can then progress to a rep range of 8-12 and then progress your RPE or effort to 4-7 on the RPE scale (somewhat hard to hard). If you’re an older individual, it doesn’t matter what your resistance exercise goals are, you’re advised to begin your program with a low weight and high repetition range of 12-20 and progress with heavier loads and lower repetitions in the 8-12 range. These sets can include a few different exercises for the same muscle group, if you perform 2-3 different exercises for the same muscle group that would be classed as 2-3 sets, but if you’re just being introduced into exercise, you can make decent gains from a single set alone for each muscle group.

Repetition Speed There are three phases that take place during each repetition, they’re the eccentric, isometric and concentric phases. Let’s use the barbell bicep curl as an example and break down the stages. You would start with your hands shoulder width apart, gripping the bar in an underhand grip. The eccentric phase is where you lower the bar down towards your thighs, extending your elbows, but just enough so they aren’t locked out keeping tension on the muscle being worked. This should take approximately 3-4 seconds to lower down. Next is the isometric phase, where you pause at the bottom keeping tension on the muscle (remember to not lock your elbows out at the bottom), this should last for around 2 seconds. The final phase is the concentric where you flex your elbows returning the bar up towards your sternum to the starting position, which should take 2 seconds. This is a tempo of 4/2/2 which is recommended for muscle building. It can be difficult to count each phase during every repetition and while concentrating on your technique, so if you find it to be so, focus on slowing down the tempo to a moderate speed, rather than counting the phases each repetition.

How Much Recovery Time Between Sets? The recovery time you allow between sets throughout your session, can be quite significant to how effective your sessions become. You should never rush through your sessions and always allow enough time between sets so that a build-up of fatigue doesn’t affect your technique or form. When you’re training to build muscle, you’re recommended to take 1-2 minutes rest between sets, but you may need a little more time if relatively new. As you progress and become more accustomed to the intensity and adaptations, you can lower your resting period between sets to approximately 1-minute, which helps to increase growth hormone and testosterone levels, which are the primary anabolic hormones that are involved in the muscle-growth period.

What Does a Typical Resistance Program Look Like? We’ve discovered the resistance training principles to ensure progression each training session, now let’s look at two example training programs. The first one’s a beginner’s program for those new to resistance exercise, and generally while you’re in the beginner stages and adapting, you should be using predominantly machine-based exercises. Another thing to remember while designing your exercise sessions, is to train your biggest muscles first and end with your smallest muscles, followed by your abdominals or core muscles. The reason why we train the core last, is because in nearly every exercise the core muscles are utilized, so if we trained them first or early on, we may not get the most effective results from the other muscle groups as the core may become fatigued. Exercise Leg press Sitting chest press machine Leg curl machine Lateral pull down

Reps 12-20 12-20 12-20 12-20

Sets 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2

Shoulder press Bicep curls Triceps cable extensions Calf raise machine Abdominal curl machine

12-20 12-20 12-20 12-20 12-20

1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 2

The second program is for a more conditioned individual that’s more experienced in resistance exercise, therefore, they predominantly use free weight compound exercises. Exercise Squats Bench press Lying leg curl Bent over row with barbell Dumb bell shoulder press Bicep curls Dumb bell triceps extension Calf raise Lying leg raises

Reps 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12

Sets 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4

It’s exciting news if you’re a previously sedentary individual, because on average you can replace approximately 3 lbs of muscle after approximately 3 months of resistance exercise. This will result in an increased RMR (resting metabolic rate) of around 7%, so even when not exercising you’ll be burning more calories than you were when you were inactive.

How to Maximise Kcal Expenditure As you adapt and progress, you can start to try and implement new ways to increase energy expenditure to your training sessions. When you’re a beginner to physical exercise and you’re training 2-3 times each week, it takes between 1-3 months for your body to adapt to the stresses of your exercise regime. Once you’ve become accommodated to your beginner exercise program, you won’t use as much energy to perform it, so you’ll have to think up some new ways to increase your energy expenditure. Therefore, you could:

Change your program regularly Vary the intensity Use different exercises Decrease rest time between sets Change the exercise order Progress from machines to free weights Increase repetitions Another fantastic way to burn more calories to increase energy expenditure, is to perform an exercise such as dumb bell curls for the biceps on an unstable surface such as sitting on a stability ball or standing on a stability disc cushion. Unilateral exercises are another terrific way to expend energy where using a single limb instead of two, such as changing double arm barbell rows to single arm dumb bell rows. By doing so, you can burn more calories than you would have using both arms with a barbell. As you advance and become more adapted to specific exercise, you’ll be increasing the intensity as well as decreasing recovery time. When you decrease recovery periods you increase the time available to exercise or increase your work time and therefore, the intensity becomes increased. With less rest you’ll experience an increased build-up of lactic acid and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC).

Lactic Acid Lactic acid is a fluid that builds up in the muscles throughout exercise, too much acid is built up in the bloodstream and most commonly occurs through intense exercise. Common symptoms are muscle fatigue, weakness, nausea, cramps and a feeling of exhaustion toward the end of an intense resistance training session. In some respects, it’s your body’s sign that you should stop the exercise or whatever you’re doing. You may at times have felt your

muscles ache and experience soreness a few days after an intense gym session, but this isn’t because of lactic acid, it’s merely a sign of your muscles recovering; repairing and growing stronger. When we exercise our body uses oxygen so that it can break down glucose, (our body’s main source of energy) for energy. When we train at a high intensity, there might not be enough oxygen present to complete this process, so the substance lactate is produced. The body then converts this substance into energy without oxygen usage, but the lactic acid can build up in the bloodstream quicker than you can burn it off. One of the best ways to delay lactic acid is to ensure you warm up and warm down accordingly, especially if you’re new to exercise. Therefore, the warm up is so important and to pace yourself, do a little bit and build on it each week to increase your lactate threshold, this way your body can build more of a tolerance gradually, enabling you to work out for longer.

How to Combine Resistance and Aerobic Training You may prefer to combine aerobic and resistance exercise in single sessions rather than on consecutive days, which would involve either performing resistance exercise and then ending with some aerobic exercise or the other way around. You could even alternate between the two, throughout sessions. The advantages of alternating between the two is that resistance training enhances your aerobic activity and the intensity of it, so you would be able to work harder for longer. Below are a few example session plans that are combined, one for a conditioned individual and a second for a deconditioned individual.

Combined Session Plan for a Conditioned Individual 1. Warm up: Low-medium intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes 2. Main session: Medium-high intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes 3. Resistance training performed as standard training sets or in circuits for 30 minutes 4. Medium-high intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes 5. Cool down: Low-medium intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes

Alternative Combined Session Plan for a Conditioned Individual 1. Warm up: Low-medium intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes 2. Main session: Circuit resistance training for 10 minutes 3. Medium-high intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes 4. Circuit resistance training for 10 minutes 5. Medium-high intensity CV exercise for 10 minutes 6. Circuit resistance training for 10 minutes 7. Cool down: Low-medium CV exercise for 10 minutes

Combined Session Plan for a Deconditioned Individual 1. Low-moderate intensity CV exercise for 15 minutes 2. Circuit resistance training (1 set of 8-10 exercises) for 20 minutes 3. Low-moderate intensity CV exercise for 15 minutes

Chapter 4: Nutrition & how to create a diet plan The Glycaemic Index (GI) The glycaemic index is simply a ranking of foods containing carbohydrates based on the effect overall on blood glucose levels. Foods that are slow digesting have a low GI rating, as foods that are fast digesting have a much higher rating. Examples of some high GI foods Foods at the top end of scale

Glycaemic index (glucose = 100)

Serving size in grams

White plain baguette

95

30g

Corn flakes

93

30g

White rice

89

150g

Rice cakes

82

25g

Boiled white potato

82

150g

Foods at the bottom end of the scale

Glycaemic index (glucose = 100)

Serving size in grams

Skimmed milk

32

250ml

Black beans

30

150g

Soy beans

15

150g

Peanuts

7

50g

Hummus chick pea salad dip

6

30g

Examples of some low GI foods

Factors that can affect the GI of foods: A high protein content can lower the GI of food.

A high fat content can lower the GI of food. Because of its fat content chocolate has a medium GI as crisps will have a lower GI content than potatoes cooked without fat. Dairy products such as milk have a low GI content as they have a high protein and fat content. Cooking methods such as Frying, boiling and baking affect the GI of food. The ripeness of fruit and certain veg, and processing. High fibre foods and wholegrains serve as a physical barrier that slows down carbohydrate absorption. ‘Wholemeal` doesn’t work the same, although the whole grain is included, instead of being left whole, it’s been ground up. Therefore, some mixed grain breads that contain wholegrains have a lower GI than both white and wholemeal bread. It’s important to educate yourself on the GI, if you only ate low GI foods you’d create an in balance within your diet and it may be that you’re including high fat and calories into your diet which could lead to weight gain, which then increases your chances of heart disease. You shouldn’t focus ultimately on the GI of foods, try to concentrate more on consuming a healthy balanced diet with low fat, salt and sugar and consume plenty fruit and vegetables.

Methods to Lower GI Instead of eating white rice, choose basmati or noodles. Eat granary or rye bread instead of wholemeal and white bread. Eat pasta or noodles rather than microwavable fries. Swap breakfast cereals for porridge or natural muesli. Eat boiled or sweet potatoes instead of baked or mash potato. With each meal or snack you have, include a low GI food.

Carbohydrate Requirements for Exercise Having a lot of carbohydrate stores available promotes prolonged continuous aerobic activities, as well as high intense anaerobic activities. Glycogen is stored in the liver with a relatively small amount stored within the muscles. The main macronutrient we need for energy are carbohydrates. Carbohydrates or starch, is broken down to glucose (the body’s main source of energy) in the body and stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. So, you have an idea now why an adequate availability of carbohydrate within your diet is essential to make the most effective use of your glycogen stores. To perform to your best ability when exercising, it’s important the amount of glycogen and blood glucose you have available at any time, as this influences training adaptations and recovery. For an athlete or regular exerciser, carbohydrates are an essential part of their diet, without it or very little of it, it can have a negative impact on their health, performance, adaptation to training and recovery. Inadequate carbohydrate stores readily available for exercise can result in: Low training intensity Mental fatigue Physical fatigue Reduced overall performance Reduced recovery Having a diet rich in carbohydrates will help you to maximise preexercise glycogen stores and will improve long duration aerobic activities over 60-minutes. As discussed above, glycogen is stored within the liver and muscles, but the stores are limited and when depleted, it can lead to fatigue and reduce exercise performance. If glycogen stores are already low prior to exercise, then fatigue could set in sooner.

Since the early 90’s diets rich in carbohydrates have shown an increase in endurance performance and capabilities. Evidence shows a diet in high complex carbohydrates increases pre-exercise glycogen stores.

Carbohydrate Requirement Guidelines A general guideline on how much carbohydrates you’re to consume based on your activity level in grams per kg bodyweight: Number of hour’s moderate intensity exercise or sport – 3-5 hours per week – 5g per kg bodyweight 5-7 hours per week – 5-6g per kg bodyweight 1-2 hours per day – 6-7g per kg bodyweight 2-4 hours per day – 7-8g per kg bodyweight Over 4 hours per day – 8-10g per kg bodyweight

Carbohydrates as Fuel for Exercise We need a carbohydrate store of around 2,000 kcal, this is just enough to either fuel our body for a day without eating or to maintain two hours of high intense exercise. You can now see why it’s so essential for sports people, athletes and regular sports exercisers to maintain a diet rich in carbohydrates, as their glycogen stores can deplete so rapidly. Sports people and athletes should take in as much carbohydrates as possible to top up their glycogen stores, because if they don’t have an adequate amount available, their performance will suffer. Other benefits come from storing glycogen, especially for athletes, as it’s a good way to stay hydrated. Every glycogen molecule is bound to three molecules of water, so as athletes optimize their glycogen stores by increasing their intake of carbohydrates, they’re also maintaining a high level of hydration.

The amount of water content that comes with glycogen is the main reason why starvation or low carbohydrate diets result in rapid weight loss in such a short time, it’s just a result of glycogen stores with the associated water molecules in the liver and muscles being depleted. It’s important to know that the rapid weight loss comes from water not from fat loss. The more glycogen you have available as an athlete, the longer you exercise until the onset of fatigue sets in. The amount of glycogen you can store is determined by the amount of carbohydrate you have in your diet and how physically fit you are. The fitter you become the more glycogen your body will be able to store. Athletes that train in high endurance have more room to store glycogen and even the storage capacity increases with an increase in overall muscle mass. The more fit and active you become and the leaner muscle mass you develop, the higher your carbohydrate requirement in your diet will become to make the most effective use of your glycogen stores. When you expend energy during exercise it comes from mainly carbohydrates and fat, protein contributes around 5% of the total expenditure during exercise which is a very small amount.

Carbohydrate and Fat Contributions are Determined by: Diet Exercise intensity Duration of the exercise Fitness level When exercise increases there’s a significant increase in fat and carbohydrates being utilized for fuel, with very little contribution from protein. When carbohydrates are limited during extreme conditions such as long endurance-based exercise, the contribution of protein from total energy can become up to 10%. You want to avoid this as

the protein being used is likely a result of lean body mass including muscle being broken down. The source of energy we use changes as the exercise intensity increases and as we already know carbohydrate and fat are the main contributors. Let’s look at the changes in balance between both energy sources in different sports and exercises. Anaerobic activity

Low – high intensity

Training with weights your body will rely more predominantly on muscle glycogen as the main source of energy. This is the same method with any activity that is of a high intensity and mainly anaerobic for a short period of time. As well as heavy weight training other explosive activities include sports such as rugby and football which include explosive type movements with maximum effort at different stages of the game. These types of activity rely almost only on glycogen.

Exercises of a low intensity such as a slow long distance jog your body relies mainly on fat for its main source of energy. As your exercise intensity increases the switch to carbohydrate or glycogen increases and fat decreases. So, as you progress from a light jog to running increasing the intensity your body will rely more on glycogen as its main energy fuel.

Even when you’ve fueled up with carbohydrates before exercise, glycogen levels still deplete rather quickly. If you’ve been training at a consistent intensity for a short while, the glycogen stores in your muscle cells will start to become depleted, therefore, the muscles will predominantly try to use the circulating glucose in your blood stream provided by the liver. As soon as your body starts to rely on the circulating glucose, it’ll increase the amount of fat you use as fuel to make up for the reduced glycogen stores. Your body can’t use fat solely to provide energy, as fat relies on carbohydrates to utilize. Using fat for fuel won’t sustain high intense activity for very long, as fat has a slower rate of energy release than carbohydrate, which leads to early fatigue. Our body can store enough glycogen to fuel 90-180 minutes of aerobic or endurance based physical activity. The higher the

intensity of the activity you’re performing, the sooner your glycogen stores will deplete. Glycogen stores can deplete after 45-90 minutes of interval training, whereas with aerobic activities, glycogen stores will tend to deplete within 30-45 minutes.

Complex vs. Simple Carbohydrates Most simple carbohydrates are made from one or two molecules, they’re simple sugars and are the quickest source of energy as they’re digested rapidly. Simple carbohydrate foods include: 1. White sugar 2. Brown sugar 3. Jams 4. Honey 5. Maple syrup 6. Soft drinks 7. Fruit drinks 8. Sweets Complex carbohydrates are referred to as dietary starch, but unlike the simple sugars that only have one-two molecules, complex carbs have many sugar molecules that are strung together branched like a coil. These types of carbohydrates are satisfying and keep you fuller for longer along with promoting your health, as they’re rich in fibre. They’re commonly found in whole plant foods, so they’re also high in vitamins and minerals. Complex carbohydrate foods include: 1. Wholegrains such as pasta, oatmeal and breads rich in wholegrain

2. Green leafy vegetables 3. Peas, beans and lentils 4. Starchy vegetables including sweet potatoes, regular potatoes and corn

The Distinct Types of Fat The main types of fats that make up the fat in food are polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats, unsaturated fats, saturated fats and trans-fats. Each type of fat acts differently in our body and the impact it has varies for certain diseases.

Healthy Fats Found in Food Sources Monounsaturated fats Avocados Peanut oils Olives Nuts Seeds Margarines (non-hydrogenated) Polyunsaturated fats (Omega 3 & 6) Sunflower oil Sesame oil Safflower oil Soy bean oil Corn oils Nuts Seeds Margarines (un-hydrogenated)

Fish Flax seeds Eggs

Unhealthy Fats Found in Food Sources Saturated and Trans-fats These `bad’ fats are found widely in fast foods, snack foods and ready-made foods, containing hydrogenated oils. They’re also found in: Fatty meats Butter Lard Coconut oils Palm oils Cocoa butter Full fat dairy

How Much Fat Should You Eat? The problem with consuming too much fat is that there’ll be less carbohydrate ready available for exercise. Serious sports people and exercisers, must watch carefully over how much fat they consume from their total energy consumption, as too much fat can effect health, performance and recovery. Daily fat intake should range from 20-35% of total energy consumption. This should be enough to provide essential fatty acids, fat soluble vitamins and provide enough energy for maintenance of weight. Evidence shows that consuming 20% of total energy form fat, will not directly benefit your performance. The UK food standards

recommend that total fat intake should not consist of more than 35% of your daily total energy consumption and from 35% of fat, no more than 11% should come from saturated fats and 2% from trans-fats.

How to Achieve the Right Fat intake Highly active people and the elite sports people must achieve the right intake of fats. A fat intake of 20-25% is desirable for that category of individuals, again, with only 11% to be from saturated fats and no more than 2% from trans-fats. It’s not that all fats are bad, in fact some are essential. Much of the fat you should aim to consume, should come from unsaturated sources. Specifically, 6.5% from polyunsaturated and 13% from monounsaturated fats. Try to go for low fat spreads that contain olive oil instead of butter, and avoid spreads containing vegetable and hydrogenated oils. When spreading on your toast go for spreads such as avocado instead of fat spreads. When cooking with oils and using dressings, opt for those that have a rich source of omega 3 and monounsaturated fatty acids. Good sources include rapeseed, ground nut and walnut oils, which are higher in omega 6 instead of corn and sunflower oils. Only add small proportions of nuts and seeds that fit in with your total energy requirements, as too much of the healthy fats will be stored as body fat. Eat 1-2 fresh portions of fish including salmon, sardines, mackerel and fresh tuna.

Exercise: Fat as Fuel The fat that’s stored within our body, is in the form of triglycerides, which can be broken down and absorbed for energy when needed. There are two prime sources of triglycerides in our body, the largest is adipose tissue which is body fat. Adipose tissue stores a huge

amount of fatty acids large enough to fuel approx. fifty plus marathons, which in hindsight, is quite impressive. Although many people have high amounts of adipose tissue, it isn’t an efficient source of fatty acids that provide fuel for exercise. It’s a long and complex process in which the process of fatty acids is ready available to use, as you’ll discover below. The other source of triglycerides, are stored within the muscle cells called the intramuscular triglycerides. Intramuscular triglycerides release a much faster energy source for exercising muscles than the adipose tissue, but the supplies are somewhat limited.

The Process of How Fatty Acids get to the Muscles The process that’s involved to make the fatty acids available to exercising muscles is quite slow and appears in 6 stages: 1. The first stage is called Lipolysis where the triglycerides are broken down in the adipose tissue. They are broken down into free fatty acids which are then released from the glycerol molecule. 2. The second stage is when the free fatty acids move from the adipose tissue to the bloodstream. 3. The third stage is when the free fatty acids are transported to the target muscles via the bloodstream. 4. The fourth stage is when the free fatty acids are transported into the muscles cells through the cell’s membrane. 5. The fifth stage is when the fatty acids are transported into the mitochondria which are the energy production centers that are within each cell of the muscle. 6. The sixth stage is when the free fatty acids undergo a process in the mitochondria which is called oxidation to make Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) for the energy to be instantly

utilized. (ATP is the form of energy used in all cells which is produced by the breakdown of glucose of other sugars, fats or proteins).

The Effects of Lipolysis on Exercise With regular exercise, lipolysis increases which causes fatty acids to circulate leading muscle cells to take up the free fatty acids, although lipolysis is a long complex process, our muscles tend to prefer to utilize carbohydrate to fats. Intramuscular triglycerides don’t need to be transported to muscles, so they’re a more immediate source of free fatty acids for exercising muscles. The increase in storage of triglycerides expands with the more exercise you participate in.

Fat Metabolism and Exercise Let’s discover if adapting to a high fat, low carb diet can improve an athlete’s endurance. Firstly, we need to know how the body’s fat metabolism during exercise changes. As you begin to warm up, the rate of fatty acids and lipolysis starts to increase. Throughout the course of a 15-minute warm up, the muscles will take up the free fatty acids via the bloodstream along with the intramuscular triglycerides as a source for energy. As the warm up goes on, your muscles will begin to utilize more intramuscular triglycerides, as there’s only a limited supply of fatty acids in your bloodstream at the present moment. When you get up to a moderate intensity, the workings of lipolysis start to work at three times the rate it did in the beginning, which increases the supply of free fatty acids to the muscles that require them. We know that this process is a slow one, so your muscles will start to rely more favorably on your glycogen stores or carbohydrates. By now, you should’ve developed an understanding that while intensity is steady-low, your energy production will come

predominantly from fat, although fat usage increases with the intensity, it will decrease as a proportion of your total energy production. When exercising at a moderate intensity your body will use fat as fuel at its highest level and as soon as your intensity of that activity increases the utilization of fat decreases and your body will look to predominantly use glycogen stores for fuel.

Is There a Way to Change This Process? We’ve learnt so far that fatty acids are utilized during moderate intensity exercise, but as the intensity increases the body’s glycogen stores start to become utilized more, so the glycogen energy process takes over. You might ask if there are any ways to increase fat as fuel during exercise to delay glycogen uptake, which may lead to early fatigue. We know that carbohydrates cause a rise in the body’s insulin levels and earlier we learned that lipolysis is slowed down via released insulin into the blood stream, meaning that little fatty acids would be released from adipose tissue and as a result fewer fatty acids will get to the muscles to produce ATP. Research shows that somebody who consumes carbohydrates an hour before exercising, showed a 30% decrease in the oxidation of fatty acids and ATP production in your muscles compared to somebody that didn’t consume carbohydrates. Not eating 30-60 minutes before exercising would work from the same view as fat being utilized as fuel at the beginning of exercise. High insulin levels resulting from carbohydrates, would limit fatty acid availability to exercising muscles at the beginning of exercise. Therefore, glycogen won’t be spared for as long and the early onset of fatigue may occur, so it appears to be a good idea to not consume snacks and meals rich in carbohydrates an hour before exercise.

Consuming Fats Within an Hour Before Exercise

So, would eating fat rich snacks within an hour of exercise increase free fatty acid availability? Well this is twofold as there would be no rise in insulin levels that would allow lipolysis, which could provide an additional amount of free fatty acids that could be used instantly as fuel by the exercising muscles.

Carbohydrate and Fat Feeding Strategies Research has found that if you consume a high fat meal within 30-60 minutes before exercising, it could encourage fatty acid availability to fuel your muscles at the beginning of exercise, while saving carbohydrate stores prolonging exercise. The meal would need to be fast digesting to absorb quickly, but we’ve discovered that fat is typically slower to digest and absorb. Researchers claim that a meal consisting of medium chain triglycerides as a fuel, can potentially better exercise performance by delaying the usage of stored glycogen.

A More in Depth Look at the Types of Fat Let’s look at how long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) work. Many of us consume LCFAs in our everyday meals, they’re generally found in cow’s milk and omega-3 fish oils and take approximately four hours to digest and absorb. Rather than the transportation of LCFAs via the bloodstream, it occurs in the lymph system which is a slower process. The reason for this is immediately after they pass through the small intestine wall and into the lymph system, the dietary triglycerides are then packed into chylomicrons, which cannot pass across muscle cells, therefore, LCFAs are unable to provide immediate energy fuel for muscles. The LCFAs in short term aren’t much use, but they are effective long-term, as they replenish intramuscular triglyceride stores over a longer period. This process takes place after activity or prior to it. Make note, that as they’re so slow to digest, absorb and assimilate, LCFAs can’t produce significant fuel to the muscles, neither before or after exercise.

MCFAs don’t store as fat which proves them to be an efficient source of fuel and are also much easier to digest compared with LCFAs. They take less time to be emptied from the stomach and absorbed directly into the bloodstream. Eating too many fats in the form of MCFAs can create negative effects, as the average person can consume around 30g a day which is 250 kcals of energy. If any more than this, it can produce stomach cramps, mild laxative effects, gastrointestinal and abdominal discomfort. Scientifically, MCFAs don’t have any improved effect on athletic and or endurance exercise performance. MCFAs taken as a supplement, aren’t stored within the body, so they provide a quicker source of energy, even if consumed in excess of your energy intake. Bodybuilders take MCFAs as a supplement, believing that they permit a precise control of body composition, but we’ll look at this in more detail a little later.

Fat Feeding Strategies for Improved Performance Now that we’ve discussed the benefits and down sides to the different types of fat, we can now look at how to implement them into your diet to improve the availability of fatty acids to use during exercise. The idea is to see if you can effectively train your body to use fat as fuel, so to delay the uptake of the limited supply of glycogen, enabling you to train longer postponing fatigue. Methods include: 1. Long-term low carbohydrate, high fat strategies 2. Fasting strategies 3. Short-term low carbohydrate, high fat strategies

Fasting as a Strategy to Use More Fat as Fuel

Exercise and fasting are quite similar in the sense that both methods cause a significant drop in insulin levels and free fatty acids are released directly into the bloodstream. Some people recommend a combination of exercise and fasting, but here’s an insight to why this strategy is some-what flawed. Although fasting shows an increase in lipolysis that leads to more fatty acid availability, the one major drawback is that as you fast, your glycogen stores become depleted. This can lead to early fatigue and a lack of intensity throughout the session, which of course is undesired, therefore, by fasting you’re unable to benefit your performance. If you’ve ever tried to run first thing in the morning on empty, it’s likely that you’ve experienced early onset of fatigue and feel more exhausted than usual. This results from low glycogen levels, due to them becoming depleted while sleeping and then training with very low glycogen stores, meaning that you couldn’t run at your maximum effort. For some people it may feel okay to do this, but the same logic applies, they wouldn’t perform as well as they could of if they had consumed the appropriate foods before exercise and it’s very unlikely that they’d be able to improve each session.

Short-Term High-Fat, Low-Carbohydrate Diet Let’s uncover if a short term high-fat, low-carb diet would work. While research suggests that a short-term diet of high fats and low carbs will work in one way, it fails in another. That being, as the diet is taken out over 4-5 days, there’s a significant increase in free fatty acid availability, but a reduction in glycogen stores from the same period of 4-5 days, having reduced carbohydrate intake. This will cause a decline in your overall performance and therefore result in an early onset of fatigue.

Long-Term High-Fat, Low-Carbohydrate Diet This method involves fat loading, where your diet would consist of around 60-65% of your total energy needs coming from fat and a low

amount from carbohydrates. This is usually followed over more than a week, the people that use this strategy believe it benefits them when training in high endurance and marathon activities.

Fat Loading – Does it Work? Research shows that a diet high in fat\low in carbs, increases fat oxidation and the oxidation of glycogen decreases when you compare it to a low fat\high carb diet. If you compare the performances of the two diets, you’ll find that your performance during exercise would have very little difference between them.

Will Long-Term Fat Loading Work? If you look at the results from short term high fat\low carb diets, you may be able to determine whether these types of diets would work long-term. It’s simple, it wouldn’t. In fact, if you follow a diet high in fat and low in carbs for over four weeks long-term, your exercise performance would decrease. The basic principle for any feeding strategy that you abide by, is that your energy intake should meet your energy output. If your intake exceeds your output, excess energy will store as body-fat which is undesired, so try to ensure calories in match calories out.

High Fat, Low Carbohydrate Diets – Why Don’t They Work? If fat makes up around 65% of your diet, then the carbohydrate requirements would be significantly reduced as fat is so energy dense containing 9 kcals per gram, your carb requirements would contain a lot less calories than optimal to keep carb stores sufficiently topped up. You must understand that unlike fat stores, carbohydrate stores are limited and a reduction in them would affect performance, with early onset of fatigue.

Making the Calculations

Now that you’ve acknowledged that a high fat, low carb diet doesn’t compare with a high carb diet in respect to regular exercisers and athletes, let’s now investigate the calculations of fat compared with energy contributions made by different elements of your diet. To calculate these, you must remember the energy contained in each of the macronutrients; Fat, carbohydrates and protein. Fat – 9 kcals per 1g Carbohydrate 4 kcals per 1g Protein 4 kcals per 1g On average, men require 2,500 kcals and women 2,000 kcals per day, to function properly. Depending on activity levels, this can vary from individual to individual. Typically, high fat low carb diets contain approx. 65% fat, 10% protein and 25% carbohydrates. If total energy requirements for men is 2,500 kcals, then 65% of this must come from fat. So, let’s do the math. 65 ÷ 100 x 2,500 = 1,625 kcal from fat Then we divide this by the number of kcals per grams of fat. 1,625 ÷ 9 = 181 g of fat Then calculate the same for protein and carbohydrates. Protein 10 ÷ 100 x 2,500 = 250 kcals from protein 250 ÷ 4= 63g of protein Carbohydrate 25 ÷ 100 x 2,500 = 625 kcals from carbohydrate 625 ÷ 4 = 156 g of carbohydrate Let’s do the same calculations for a low fat, high carbohydrate diet A typical low fat, high carb diet contains 25% fat, 10% protein and 65% carbs. You need to calculate how many kcals each food group

must contribute to total energy needs, then calculate how many grams are needed. So, continuing with a male’s energy needs of 2,500 kcals per day Fat 25 ÷ 100 x 2,500 = 625 kcals 625 ÷ 9 = 69g fat Protein 10 ÷ 100 x 2,500 = 250 kcals 250 ÷ 4= 63g protein Carbohydrate 65 ÷ 100 x 2,500 = 1,625 kcals 1,625 ÷ 4 = 406g carbohydrate Next, let’s compare both energy needs from both diets. High fat low carb diet

Low fat high carb diet

Fat

181g

69g

Protein

63g

63g

Carbs

156g

406g

2,500 kcals

2,500 kcals

Total energy requirements

Final Thought You can now see that there are many disadvantages that’re associated with high fat low carb diets, including gastrointestinal discomfort, reduced nutritional status because of key food groups being left out and a reduced immune system leading to long-term health implications, such as: Heart disease Stroke

Breast cancer Other types of cancer Research shows that a diet high in fat when preparing for exercise or other activity, has no direct impact on improving your performance no matter the strategy. Most cases, a high fat intake can compromise your performance and have serious health implications if you persist with the diet long-term. Although fat plays a vital part for fuel in a diet for regular exercises and other sports people, it’s important that there’s a balance of all nutrients. You should take in at least 20-25% of your total energy needs from fat to improve nutritional intake and to optimize your overall performance. Don’t forget to limit saturated and trans-fats also.

The Role Protein Plays in the Diets of Sports People and Regular Exercisers Protein requirements of sports people and regular exercisers have been debated for a while now, we’ll look at why some people may need more protein than those that’re sedentary, which isn’t necessarily too much more.

How Much? It’s surprising to hear that many scientific people are adamant that long-term exercise and sports participation doesn’t necessarily increase protein requirements. However, the consensus states that protein requirements for the individuals participating in the more intense activities are to be higher. These are recommendations of the scientific bodies like the American College of Sport Medicine (ACSM). Even if you allow an increased protein requirement for the highly active people, the protein requirements scientists recommend are considerably lower than the amount everyday gym users and athletes consume.

There are a couple of reasons why somebody may require higher amounts of protein than people that don’t exercise. 1. Protein synthesis increases to repair muscles and replaces muscles proteins that become damaged through exercise. 2. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein which become oxidized through exercise which produces energy. The type of exercise we do will affect the amount of protein we need. We’ll look at endurance training first.

Protein Requirements for Endurance Exercise When our glycogen stores become low during endurance training, there’s a breakdown of protein for fuel of up to 15% for energy production. Whilst glycogen stores are topped up (high), energy production from protein becomes less than 5%. It’s important to prevent muscle breakdown by ensuring your muscle glycogen stores are topped up before you perform any exercise, because if you don’t, protein will be broken down for energy use. Depending on the intensity and duration of the type of endurance training you’re performing, along with your state of health, you’ll require approx. 1.1-1.6g protein per kg of bodyweight. Training at a moderate intensity of below 50% VO2max (under half of your maximal energy output), your protein needs won’t be significantly more than the general population recommendations. Whereas, a more elite athlete would need protein requirements that’re at the higher end of the recommendation scale.

Protein Requirements for Strength Training Let’s begin with an example. Tim is like many others, he has a goal of increasing his overall muscle mass by weight training. He’s been consuming a high amount of protein, especially from meat, as he believes this will help him gain strength and muscle. He’s also been talking to bodybuilders around the gym that inspire this theory, but as he’s noticed very little and slow results, he’s beginning to question

the theory and wonders if this strategy isn’t as effective as he’d hoped. Strength training is generally anaerobic, so carbohydrates are the predominant fuel and not amino acids (protein). Tim’s carbohydrate stores are low, and this is the reason why his belief and strategy aren’t working to build muscle mass. The protein that Tim requires is more effectively required following exercise, rather than before. He has a belief that he’ll absorb energy from a high-intake of protein. Muscle turnover increases immediately following exercise, as does the acceleration of the breakdown and synthesis of the protein. The turnover continues 24-hours after exercise, so if his protein intake is less than he should be consuming (the optimal amount), his desired strength and increase in muscle mass would be much slower. Tim gets the help of a nutritionist to resolve his concerns, he learns that for bodybuilding/strength training, he must increase his protein intake more than he’d have to, compared with endurance training. This works on the same principle when you’re a beginner to exercise, or only train a few times per week and even during a sharp increase in training volume. Therefore, for bodybuilders, the recommended daily intake of protein is approx. 1.6-2g per kg of bodyweight.

The Key to Achieving Tim’s Goals Tim understands that the only way he can increase overall strength and size of his skeletal muscles, is with combination of an appropriate protein intake and combining it with resistance or strength training. A high-intake of protein won’t by itself result in an increase in muscle size and strength, Tim requires protein to prevent muscle damage and to resynthesize protein, helping to build muscle post-exercise. He also needs a sufficient amount of carbohydrate to provide him with the energy to fuel exercise, so it’s important that he consumes the right amount of each macronutrient, instead of taking in as much protein as possible.

Protein Requirements for Intermittent Sports

Unlike the world of bodybuilding, protein requirements aren’t discussed all that much for participation in intermittent sports such as MMA, Football, Basketball or Dancing, so only a limited amount of research has gone into the protein requirements for a given sport. Research taken out on football players protein requirements, recommend that 1.4-1.7g per kg of bodyweight should be consumed daily. Also, it’s recommended that for other types of intermittent sports, the exact amount required depends on the intensity and duration of the activity or sport.

How to Calculate Daily Protein Requirements Exercise type

Daily protein requirements (g)

Endurance – low to moderate intensity

1-1.2

Endurance – moderate to high

1.2-1.6

Exercise of intermittent nature

1.4-1.7

Strength & power training

1.6-2

Grams per kg bodyweight

The table above shows the protein intake guidelines we’ve been discussing and provides an accurate starting point for you when calculating your protein requirements. Let’s put this into practice by estimating the protein needs of an 80 kg endurance athlete that takes part in moderate to high intensity exercise. Looking at the table above, you can see that their protein requirements are in the range of 1.2-1.6g per kg of bodyweight.

Calculation To calculate his protein needs, you simply multiply his bodyweight by the bottom end of the range and then the top end. So, the calculation would look as follows; 80 (bodyweight in kg) x 1.2 = 96g (bottom end of range) Then for the upper end of range – 80 x 1.6 = 128g Therefore, his intake of protein as an endurance athlete taking part in moderate-high intensity, should consume between 96-128g. You must remember that your protein intake should be no more than 20% of your total energy needs, so if you calculate that it’s more

than 20% when working out approximate figures of what you should be taking in from each macronutrient, adjust as necessary. Although the protein requirements we’ve just calculated are within range, it doesn’t necessarily mean you need to rush and increase your intake, as it’s possible that your intake is already sufficient enough. Sports people who’re highly-active and who’re regular exercisers, have higher than average energy needs, so will therefore require higher than normal protein needs.

The Importance of Protein Consumption Timing Not only is it important for athletes and regular exercisers to consume the correct amount of protein, but the timing can be crucial to your gains as it determines the amount of balance between both the breakdown and synthesis of muscle-protein. The IOC consensus states that foods or snacks that are packed with high quality proteins, should be regularly consumed throughout the day as part of your daily total protein intake. It’s also just as important post-workout to take in quantities sufficient enough to maximise muscle mass and repair damaged tissues. Ingesting foods and drinks post-exercise that provide 15-25g of quality protein, will help maximise the protein synthesis that underpins the above goals.

Don’t Forget Carbohydrates There are tremendous benefits to combining protein with carbohydrates post exercise, as it increases insulin levels in the blood which reduces the effects of protein breakdown.

Can You Consume Too Much Protein? Even if you take part in strength training 4 times or more per week, you can still take in too much protein than required. If you consume more protein than you require, there can be serious health risks as the extra protein doesn’t quite convert into muscle. Some of the health risks of protein overconsumption include: 1. Dehydration – eventually excess nitrogen is excreted from the kidneys in your urine. This then puts a strain on the

kidneys causing them to work harder and then they require greater amounts of water. 2. Kidney problems – There have been many studies over the years about how excess protein intake could damage the kidneys long term. This theory is because of the strain on the kidneys which causes increased nitrogen excretion. Although this theory sounds very convincing there is no facts or evidence to state that it’s true if you have normal functioning kidneys as you should have no problem excreting the excess nitrogen. It would be wise though to keep a close eye on your intake if you already have existing kidney problems. 3. Calcium losses – losses in calcium through urine appears to result from high protein diets. This can cause osteoporosis and low bone density down the road and especially in women that are more susceptible to those conditions. So ensure your calcium intake is optimized if you are following a high protein diet. 4. Atherogenesis – which is a formation of abnormal fatty acids or lipid masses in the arterial walls. You should be rather particular in the type of lean meats you consume for protein because if your diet is rich in lamb, pork and cheese, you risk consuming too much saturated fat which encourages atherogenesis and eventually heart disease as these foods are all high in fat. Instead you should consume lean meats, poultry, oily fish and plant proteins to reduce the risk of atherogenesis.

Supplements – Do They Work? Research and surveys have been taken out on the following supplements to prove their effectiveness: BCAA’s – claim to aid in muscle growth, prevent muscle breakdown during exercise, reduces fatigue, aids recovery and fuels endurance exercise sparing muscle glycogen. Sodium Bicarbonate – claim to delay the onset of fatigue improving high intensity exercise performance.

Boron – claim to improve bone density, strength and muscle mass. Caffeine – claims to improve overall performance and alertness. Carnitine – claims to enhance fat oxidation improving endurance capacity increasing fatty acid availability to exercising muscle cells and also aids in weight loss. Chromium Picolinate – claims to have an effective role with insulin action which is thought to help build muscle mass and aid growth adaptations to exercise. Coenzyme Q-10 – claims to enhance energy production through its aids in the electron transport chain. It is also thought to serve as an antioxidant which reduces exercise induced free radical damage. Conjugated Linoleic Acid – claims to improve body composition by creating weight loss. Creatine – claims to increase protein synthesis, strength improvement and a reduction in fatigue. Glutamine – claims to spare protein during intense exercise preventing muscle breakdown and aids in lean muscle tissue growth and improves immune function. Medium Chain Triglycerides – source of fat for energy during exercise so it I supposed to spare carbohydrate stores prolonging fatigue. ZMA (zinc monomethine aspartate and magnesium aspartate) – claims to boost testosterone levels, improve recovery and increases strength and muscle growth.

Banned Substances Ephedrine – claims to enhance alertness and the level of physical activity through enhancement of stimulation, enhanced motivation and focus to train more intensely. Stimulates metabolism which increases energy expenditure and promotes weight loss.

Prohormones (Androstenedione; androstenediol and norandrostenedione & DHEA) claims to enhance strength, power and lean muscle tissue. A stimulant to produce testosterone which increases muscle mass, aids in recovery from strength training.

What Works? Research has found that from all the above reviewed supplements, there are only four proven to be effective: 1. Ephedrine – although it’s a banned substance and has many bad side effects including rapid and abnormal heartbeats along with many bad health implications. 2. Sodium bicarbonate - evidence suggests it’s effective in improving high intense exercise performance. 3. Creatine – Improves performance in short explosive anaerobic bursts such as sprinting and increases repetition rate. Improves recovery and muscle growth. 4. Caffeine – evidence is shown that it improves overall performance but not so much short burst activities. Improves alertness, focus and concentration throughout exercise.

Side Effects of Caffeine Caffeine can be a great ‘supplement` to include in your diet to boost training sessions to the next level, although it can produce quite a few negative side effects such as the following: Irregular heart rhythms Headaches Trembling Anxiety Insomnia Dehydration Negative impact on creatine loading And even gastrointestinal bleeding People who are sensitive to caffeine are best advised to avoid caffeine altogether, as long-term use could produce unwanted health concerns such as hypertension, bone mineral loss and a potential rise in blood cholesterol. The consensus suggests that this isn’t the case but if you’re an individual that has pre-existing or a family

history already of the above conditions, it may be wise to reduce your daily intake or avoid caffeine all together. If caffeine is used only in moderation and you already have a healthy diet and consume plenty of fluids, then you’re unlikely to become dehydrated and experience diuretic effects. To improve your performance, it’s best to consume approx. 2-3mg per kg of bodyweight. So, for an individual of 80 kg you could consume between 160-240mg which is approx. 1-2 cups of coffee (filtered) or an energy drink. Research has proven that when you’re following a creatine loading strategy, consuming caffeine can completely counteract any effect from creatine. Therefore, athletes should avoid any drinks or foods containing caffeine for approx. seven days before starting a loading strategy. Caffeine is absorbed quickly through the small intestine and peaks in the blood stream approx. 30-60 minutes after ingestion, therefore, if you consume a supplemented sports drink containing caffeine around 60 minutes before exercise, it can have several positive effects on your performance, but this can be achieved by the carbohydrates in the drink alone.

How to Create a Homemade Sports Drink Isotonic

Hypotonic

Isotonic drinks contain a similar concentration of sugars and salt as the human body. They quickly replace lost fluid through sweating and supply a generous amount of carbohydrates. Isotonic sports drinks are preferred by most athletes that include middle and long-distance runners or team sport individuals.

Hypotonic sports drinks contain a concentration lower in salt and sugar than the human body. They quickly replace fluids lost from sweating and are more suited to athletes who require fluids without a carbohydrate boost such as gymnasts.

500ml water 500ml fruit juice Pinch of salt

How to Create a Diet Plan

750ml water 250ml fruit juice Pinch of salt

We’ve already looked at how to break down carbohydrate, protein and fats above, but here’s a quick recap. James attends the gym 4-times a week for an hour per session and follows a strength training programme. He works in an office which is sedentary, he weighs 78 kg and his total energy needs are 2895 kcals per day. If we refer to the eat well plate the following would be James’s individual total energy requirements: Protein = 434 kcals\109g (Protein 15% - 2895 x 0.15 = 434 kcals ÷ 4 = 109g) Carbohydrates = 1592 kcals\398g (Carbohydrate 55% - 2895 x 0.55 = 1592 kcals ÷ 4 = 398g) Fat = 868 kcals\96g (Fat 30% - 2895 x 0.30 = 868 kcals ÷ 9 = 96g)

Exercise Specific Calculations As James regularly attends the gym and his goals are to build muscle and lose fat, he needs to make sure he consumes the correct amounts of protein to repair, rebuild and increase muscle mass. He also needs to take in enough carbohydrate to ensure he refuels glycogen stores ensuring he has enough energy to fuel exercise. As James attends the gym 4 times per week, his protein requirements are between 1.6-2g per kg bodyweight. Exercise type

Daily protein requirements (g)

Strength & power training

1.6-2

Let’s calculate his protein requirements first: 1.6 x 78 = 125g x 4 = 500 kcals 2 x 78 = 156g x 4 = 624 kcals Protein requirements = 125-156g or 500-624 kcals We know that James shouldn’t consume more than 20% of his total energy requirements from protein alone, so let’s calculate his protein

intake limit. Protein limit – 2895 x 0.20 = 579 kcals ÷ 4 = 145g Therefore, James should not consume more than 579 kcals of his total energy needs, we can see at the bottom end of his estimated intake is 500 kcals, so this should be more than enough. Protein requirements = 125g\500 kcals Next, let’s calculate his carbohydrate requirements: Activity level (number of hours of moderate intensity exercise of sports)

Grams of carbohydrate / kg bodyweight

3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

James exercises for four hours per week, therefore, to calculate his requirements we make the following calculations: Grams of carbohydrate x Bodyweight (kg) 5 x 78 = 390g x 4 = 1560 kcals Let’s compare this to his requirements calculated from the eat well plate. 2895 x 0.55 = 1592 ÷ 4 = 398g So, if we compare the two you can see that his carbohydrate requirements estimated by his activity levels are more than enough. Carbohydrate requirements = 390g\1560 kcals Now let’s calculate his fat requirements: The first thing we should do is to subtract James’s protein and carbohydrate requirements in kcals from his total energy requirements. 500 + 1560 = 2060 (protein and carbohydrate requirements combined) Now we need to subtract this from his total energy requirements – 2895 kcals 2895 – 2060 = 835 kcals ÷ 9 = 93g

Let’s compare this to his requirements we calculated from the eat well plate 2895 x 0.30 = 868 kcals ÷ 9 = 96g So, if you compare the two you can see they are virtually the same and the estimated amount is more than enough. Fat requirements = 93g\835 kcals Let’s add up all the individual requirements in kcals to ensure they total up to your energy requirements. 500 + 1560 + 835 = 2895 kcals (total energy requirements) Now that you know that all his estimated requirements add up to his total energy requirements you have your energy requirements ready to customise your diet plan. Protein requirements – 125g\500 kcals Carbohydrate requirements – 390g\1560 kcals Fat requirements – 93g\835 kcals

The next stage is to create a diet plan template. Food product

Protein

Carbohydrate

Fat

Grams Kcals Total Kcals

Now you know the requirements from each macronutrient, it’ll be much easier to pick out foods and create meals. Simply search for foods online or that you know the value of that you want to include in your diet and take note of their nutrition information and ensure all grams add up to your requirements of each macronutrient. Remember that for every gram of; Protein there are 4 kcals Carbohydrate there are 4 kcals Fat there are 9 kcals You’ll need to multiply each macronutrient in total grams by their kcal value to get the total kcals for each of the macronutrients. To simplify things, below is an example diet plan with a breakdown of each food and their values for James.

Food product

Protein

Carbohydrate

Fat

2 eggs

10g

0.7g

10g

50g turkey breast

8.5g

2.1g

0.8g

50g chicken fillet skinless

10.9g

0.2g

1.6g

Whey protein shake

23g

5g

0g

60g salmon

12g

0g

13g

11.5g

5.1

6.4g

6g

24g

2g

6g

24g

2g

4g

3g

8g

1tbsp peanut butter

0.3g

14g

0.2g

Apple

0.5g

27.2g

0.5g

6g

69g

2.7g

1.8g

6.6g

0.3g

1.6g

12g

2g

0g

26g

0.2g

7g

83.7g

0.8g

1g

5g

0g

7.8g

32g

3.9g

5g

7g

14g

100g natural yogurt

5.2g

7g

1.5g

2tbsp organic honey

0g

34.6

0g

2g

9g

15g

Grams

125.1g

397.2g

84.9g

Kcals

500.4

1588.8

764.1

150g cottage cheese X2 slices whole wheat bread X2 slices whole wheat bread

250ml orange juice 300g brown rice 100g broccoli X2 slice of white bread 2tbsp jam 300g white rice 100g mixed peppers 50g muesli with skimmed milk Mixed nuts (28g)

100g Avocado

Total kcals

2853.3

Meal Plan Example Time

Meal no.

Meal

7:30am

1

X2 whole wheat slices toast with 100g avocado, 2 scrambled eggs, 1tbsp peanut butter, 1 apple and 250ml orange juice.

10:00am

2

28g mixed nuts, 100g natural yoghurt and 2tbsp organic honey.

13:00pm

3

X2 whole wheat slices bread, 50g turkey, salad and a low-fat dressing.

16:00pm

Preworkout

300g brown rice, 50g chicken fillet, 100g broccoli and a low-fat dressing.

18:30pm

Post workout

Whey protein shake, x2 slices white bread with 2tbsp jam

19:30pm

6

300g white rice, 60g salmon, 100g mixed peppers and a low-fat dressing.

22:00pm

7

50g muesli with skimmed milk and 150g natural cottage cheese.

Try to consume between 2-3L water per day

40 dietary tips to shed body fat and reveal your abdominals 1. Avoid Eating Simple Carbohydrates Avoid simple carbohydrates like white bread, white potatoes, fizzy drinks and table sugar. Fast digesting carbs spike insulin which brings the fat burning process to a halt, which encourages fat storage, particularly on top of your abdominals. Instead reach for slow digesting complex carbs such as whole wheat, rye, sourdough breads, oatmeal, sweet potatoes, fruits, vegetables, legumes, brown rice etc. The only exception to eating simple carbs here, is within 1-hour postworkout, where your muscles will soak them up putting them to work, helping to boost muscle growth and recovery. Your body is like a sponge after vigorous exercise, it’s primed to accept simple carbohydrates. After exercise, you need to replenish your glycogen stores as quickly as possible after being depleted, I suggest you take this opportunity to enjoy a small portion of simple carbs as they won’t be stored as fat.

2. Don’t Stop We’re taught to train in a typical specific repetition range such as 1215 reps per set, but when performing abdominal bodyweight exercises you can’t alter the weight to achieve the same predetermined number of reps. Rather than doing hanging leg raises or crunches for a set number of reps, try to achieve as many reps as possible until you reach failure.

3. Add Weight to Your Exercises Many people tend to think that their abdominals will appear thick and blocky if they perform weighted abdominal exercises, but this isn’t necessarily true as they are muscles just like the biceps. To stand out, abdominals need definition and separation, for optimal

abdominal development, perform weighted movements in the 8-10 rep range. Treat your abdominals like any other muscle, when you can achieve 10 reps at a certain weight, increase the weight. Set a goal that you want to lift a certain amount of weight and achieve a set number of reps, once you’ve achieved that goal switch the exercise to shock your abdominal muscles to keep them guessing. Aim to change the exercise every 4-6 weeks, for example, weighted crunches for 6 weeks achieving a goal of 10 reps at 10kg and then switching to weighted leg raises. Repeat the process.

4. Train Your Abdominals at the End of Your Session When you use compound exercises like squats, deadlifts or the clean and press you can be sure your abdominals are getting a good workout too. Research suggests that when weight lifters trained abs before squats, they achieved less reps than they did performing them at the end of their session. The reason for this is because the abdominals, transverse abdominals and oblique’s all work together to stabilise the core, allowing you to produce a greater force.

Obviously training abs first will fatigue them, which in turn lessens the core stability and weakens your base as well as your ability to produce greater force.

5. Vary the Speed Varying your repetition speed from slow and controlled to quick and explosive, will allow you to utilize more of the fast twitch muscle fibres which helps you to build power, strength and size. Scientists tested the muscular activity of an individual’s abdominals external/internal oblique’s and spinal erectors while they performed crunches of a rep range of up to 4 seconds, 2 seconds, 1.6 seconds, 1 second or as fast as possible. Reports suggest that as the repetition speed increased so did the activity of all 4 muscles. The greatest boost occurred in the person’s external oblique’s, which are

hardly involved in the crunch itself at a lower speed but had increased by more than 6 times at the fastest speed. Fast explosive reps will recruit more muscle fibres in the midsection, also turn the crunch each side which targets the rectus abdominis into an effective oblique exercise.

6. Keep Your Sodium Intake Low One of the first of many changes you can make to your diet, is to lower your salt intake. Sodium will quickly add water retention to your abdominal region. You may have noticed if you’ve eaten a meal high in salt the previous night, that your abs appear bloated the following morning. It may not take long to see the visual effects, on the upside, as you reduce your sodium intake, the same principles follow’s, as you’ll see immediate results. Reducing your salt intake is an effective way to look leaner.

7. Wake Up to Water During the night your muscles undergo a significant repair process and require rehydration first thing in the morning. Developing a wake-up routine can be very beneficial, try drinking 3 glasses of water each morning preferably lukewarm with honey and lemon. The combination of honey, lemon and water, encourages the elimination of bad hormonal toxins that contribute to fat deposition, it’s also beneficial for all around muscle development. One of the most important benefits is that it helps to kick start your metabolism, this helps to overcome the dormant phase that occurs during mornings that you aren’t burning as many calories.

8. Eat a Heavy Complex Carb and High Protein Breakfast Research suggests that people who skip out on breakfast are more likely to become overweight and obese than those who consume a

heavy complex carb and high protein breakfast, that helps to keep them fuelled until lunch. A fulfilling breakfast rich in protein and complex carbs is vital to ensure that you don’t indulge in snacks throughout the day, which helps your calorie consumption remain restricted. Rather than eating protein bars and other low-fat supplements, eating natural is always your best option. Create a wholesome nutritious breakfast and include foods such as whole wheat breads, eggs, low fat milk and combine that with some green leafy vegetables and fruit. Try to eat your breakfast within 1 hour of waking up.

9. How often should you train your abs? You should treat your abdominals like all other muscle groups, as they also need sufficient rest to recover and grow stronger. Perform abdominal exercises 2-3 times per week after your sessions to avoid overtraining. Core exercises including the plank, wood chops with cables and abdominal roll outs are all very effective variations to include in your routine. I generally train my abs for no longer than 1520 minutes after a tough workout. To see consistent results and avoid overtraining aim to vary the exercise and intensity.

10. Switch it Up Each time you perform abdominal exercise, switch it up by using diverse types of isolation or add weight performing lower reps or perform hanging leg raises as fast as possible to avoid hitting a plateau. Don’t neglect your abdominals, ensure you always include some type of isolation exercise and maybe perform a mixture of modes during any one session. For example, 3 different modes would be free weight explosive exercises, isolation exercises using a cable attached to a machine, or weighted exercise. As mentioned above, it’s wise to switch your abdominal sessions up every 4-6 weeks, it’s also very beneficial to make use of all 3 modes

mentioned above in any one session.

11. Avoid Meat High in Saturated Fat Consuming the wrong types and quantities of fat, will encourage your body to store fat rather than it being burned for energy and used for essential cell building activities. Your body needs fat to be used, not stored! Fatty foods like red meat, butter and whole dairy are saturated fats, these are known as bad fats, because they contribute to weight gain, increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and even more. Limit red meat, beef, steak, pork, bacon and processed meats, as they’re all high in fat. Bad fats can be remembered by the fact that they come from animals, they also come from plant oils that are liquid at room temperature. This rule is not perfect as many good fats are liquid at room temperature too, but following it ensures you’ll error on the side of caution.

12. Less Sugar, More Protein Sugary substances provide high calories and very little energy compared with other foods, although, they may look and sound tempting as part of a meal or snack. Whole grains and eggs packed with protein will fuel you with energy and a feeling of fullness. Ensure your breakfast contains very little sugar.

13. Eat Lean Sources of Protein Depending on your body type, you require no more than 1.5-2g protein per kg bodyweight, any excess will store as fat. The best sources of protein are tinned/fresh tuna/salmon, skinless chicken breast, turkey, eggs and other types of fish. Per 100g, most types of meat provide between 23-30g of protein.

14. Don’t Consume Too Much Protein at Any One Sitting

Protein requires a lot of stomach acid to be broken down properly. Many people claim that any one person can only absorb around 2030g protein at any one meal sitting. Research suggests that a meal that contains 30g protein, boosts the muscle building activity by 50%. You can find this amount of protein in a 100g chicken fillet or a lean quarter pounder of beef. Further research found that increasing the amount of protein didn’t create a bigger boost in muscle synthesis, as people who consumed up to 90g protein during one sitting experienced the same benefits but with added gas causing them to bloat. This happens because the body can take a lot longer to digest protein compared with fruits, beans, lentils and vegetables.

15. Eat More Fibre Fibre is a type of carbohydrate that your body cannot absorb or digest, so don’t concern yourself too much with burning it off. When you’re trying to control and maintain your weight for washboard abs, including fibre in your diet is an absolute must. Include more whole grains and wholemeal brown foods in your diet and save simple carbs for post workout. Fibre helps slow down the digestion process and the absorption process of other carbs, lowers cholesterol, helps to prevent incontinence, regulates healthy blood sugar levels and prevents you from overeating as it makes you feel fuller for longer. The recommendations for women are to consume 21-25g of fibre per day and men 30-38g respectively.

16. Eat Until You’re Satisfied Eating until you’re satisfied and eating until you’re full are not the same thing. It’s important to understand the difference so you can learn to stop eating once you’re satisfied. Try eating several meals spread throughout the day and ensure everywhere you go you take a healthy snack with you.

17. Expend More Calories Than You Consume Before you can reveal your abdominals, you need to reduce the layer of fat covering them. Abdominal exercises will certainly tone the muscles, but they won’t get rid of fat any faster. You need to consume a certain number of calories each day to sustain basic bodily functions such as breathing and cell production, this number is referred to as your basal metabolic rate BMR. The number of calories you need to maintain your weight in addition to BMR will be determined by how physically active you are each day. As an example, a sedentary female aged 31 should consume around 1,800 calories per day to maintain her weight. If she is then active, her calories need to increase to 2,200 per day. If its weight you’re trying to lose, then you need to create a deficit where you expend more calories than you take in. The best way to do this is to follow a healthy low-calorie diet and exercising 4-5 times per week for 45+ minutes.

18. Chew Your Food More Chewing kick starts the digestive process and in turns speeds up the release of gut hormones that are linked with the feeling of fullness. Studies suggest that people who chew their food 40+ times, ate less than those who chewed only 15 times. Chewing food until extremely soft is a fantastic way to prevent bloating, try to take time to enjoy your food, allow yourself at least 20-minutes each sitting. Limit water with meals and any other beverages to improve digestion, minimise water intake up to approx. 15 minutes before you consume a meal and for two hours after. This gives your digestive tract the best chance to digest your food. Remember we are not so much what we eat, as we are what we digest.

19. Eat as Organic as Possible Much of your diet should consist of foods that are organically grown and free of chemicals. Refer to the list below to help you stock up your cupboards and fridge with abdominal friendly macronutrients. Proteins Select from lean sources such as skinless chicken breast/fillets, turkey fillets, eggs, tuna, salmon, other fish sources and very lean pork. Try to limit red meat, lean beef and lamb to only once per week. If you’re vegetarian be sure to include plenty of nuts, seeds, legumes such as beans, lentils and chick peas. Fats Fish, nuts (walnuts/almonds/pistachios) flaxseed, olive oil and avocado. Complex carbohydrates Wholemeal, wheat, barley, rye, oatmeal, brown rice, sweet potatoes, yams and squash. Fibrous carbs Include mass varieties of green leafy vegetables such as green beans, broccoli, asparagus, sprouts, cabbage, spinach, artichokes, peppers, celery, mushrooms and more.

20. Don’t Cut Out all Fats Fat is necessary to include and consume in your everyday diet. The need to avoid certain fats may seem obvious, but how you go about avoiding them is not. The key is to eat the right types and quantities. Consuming the right types of fat will cause your body to store them rather than being burned for energy which encourages a layer of fat over the abdominals, giving you that smooth look. Fatty foods like

whole dairy, red meat and butter are saturated fats and are known as bad fats as they not only contribute to weight gain, but also encourage the risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke and more. Include a moderate amount of good fats in your diet. Good fats are known as unsaturated fats, include foods such as fish, nuts and olive oil in your diet. These fats eaten in moderation can help you to lose weight, reduce cholesterol levels and heart disease. Limit your fat intake to 20% of your total energy needs and ensure your saturated fat intake is less than 7%.

21. Study the Eat Well Plate The eat well plate is a valuable tool that you can use to determine what you should include in your diet and is a visual representation of how different foods contribute towards a healthy balanced diet. It’s based on the five main food groups, carbohydrates, proteins, fats, fruits/vegetables and milk/dairy foods. If you require special dietary needs or are under medical supervision, you may want to contact your GP or Dietician to consider whether the eat well plate is suitable for you. Generally, the eat well plate consists of carbohydrates (33%), fruit/veg (33%), protein (12%), milk/dairy products (15%) and fats/sugars (7%). The eat well plate represents the overall balance of a healthy diet, not the balance of any one specific meal. The plate model has been tested with consumers and health professionals extensively. The size of the segments for each of the food groups is consistent with the government recommendations for a diet providing all the nutrients needed for a healthy adult and child over the age of two.

22. Limit Alcohol There’s nothing to be gained when it comes to your diet and exercise from drinking alcohol, as it’s another one of those foods that fall into the category of empty calories with a mixture of sugar, carbohydrates and ethanol. In fact, alcohol isn’t really a food at all, neither of these ingredients will help you in developing muscle tone, it’ll worsen your efforts to build both tone and definition.

Much of the time, drinking is accompanied by eating and we all know we don’t make the most intelligent decisions when under the influence. This in turn leads to irrational decision making which can affect the choice, type and quantity of foods we consume. If we endure a hangover we often crave an appealing breakfast to make it much easier to deal with. It’s fine to indulge on occasion, try to opt for wine or a similar beverage lower in sugar and carbohydrates. Try to limit the amount you consume and remind yourself the sacrifices you make are worth the rewards.

23. Have ‘Cheat Meals,’ not ‘Cheat Days’ Instead of having a cheat day, it’s more beneficial to have 2-3 cheat meal or snacks throughout the week. It’s ideal to follow 90% of your diet plan and include a few cheat meals or snacks to stay sane. Cheat meals are only meant to satisfy your taste buds, not to stuff yourself like you’re at a buffet. A cheat meal does not constitute an entire day of cheating, it is wise to follow the 90/10 rule, as the 10% being cheat meal/snacks will never disrupt you from becoming ripped, toned and shredding fat. 90% of the time you should eat specifically to your diet plan to achieve your goals and 10% of the time indulge in foods that aren’t on the diet plan. Again, consuming cheat meals this way will not derail your fitness or fat loss goals. During your post workout window period is the best time to consume a cheat meal or snack, instead of storing it as fat it stands a greater chance of being utilized by your muscles. Your muscles can still soak up a lot of extra carbohydrates without them being stored as fat even with a low intensity workout.

24. Avoid Fizzy Drinks Soft drinks like Cola, Pepsi, Mountain dew and the many others, may taste great, but they offer your body no nutritional benefits at all. These types of drinks dehydrate your body which encourages you to drink more, as they’re simply empty calories full of sugar and salt. If a drink contains a lot of sugar, then don’t buy. Instead, reach for water or flavoured water, beware of the sugar content though,

skimmed milk is great too. Water is the best source we have to rehydrate our body, it’s free too! If you can’t stand the taste of water, you can purchase a filter for a small fee to improve the taste or add low sugar fruit juice to it.

25. Don’t Chew Gum Many people chew gum to reduce their cravings for unhealthy foods, but research suggests that chewing gum can increase your intake of junk food. When you chew gum it reduces hunger, motivation to eat and even how much you end up consuming. People who chew gum are less likely to consume foods like fruit and nutritious meals when compared to none gum chewers. They are instead motivated to consume junk food like sweets and savoury foods that have a high sugar, salt and fat content. The main reason for this is likely due to the minty flavour in the gum, making fruit and vegetables taste bitter. Chewing gum causes you to swallow excess air, which then contributes to abdominal discomfort and bloating, like irritable bowel syndrome which you must avoid to reveal those washboard abs. When we chew gum, we send our body signals that food is about to enter our body, enzymes and acids then become active, and released but without the food it intends to digest. This process can cause an over production of stomach acid, when you do eat food, it compromises your ability to produce sufficient digestive secretions and in turn bloats you. You may also experience gastrointestinal discomfort producing problems such as diarrhoea from artificial sweeteners found in chewing gum.

26. Keep Dairy Intake Low Keep dairy intake low as its high in fat, even if it says quite the opposite. The food industry refers to dairy as “vanishing calorie density,” which means that dairy, which is high in calories, and fat, is not perceived by the body of containing much of either, a similar occurrence that junk food suffers from. Your body thinks it has only taken in a few calories when in fact, it has taken in a fair few. Another problem with milk is that it can contain ingredients that are

not good for you over time, keeping this in mind, you don’t need to cut out dairy entirely as it does have many other benefits.

27. Avoid Commercial Breakfast Cereals All cereals including the ones that are marketed as being healthy, are all processed foods. Your best choice of cereal that are not processed are the old gold steel cut oats. Cereals are processed to make them last longer, giving them longer shelf life and this process also makes it easier for you to digest. The processing kills many of the grains nutrients, whole grain is forced out at a very high pressure and temperature transforming its shape, then the products are sprayed with a coating of sugar and oil to keep it crunchy when milk is added. It’s best to skip cereals, reach instead for whole grains, steel cut oats, muesli and fruit as they’re the least processed. You can spice up bland cereals by adding fruit, nuts, honey and plain yogurt. Whatever you do, don’t skip out on breakfast, you can opt for alternatives such as eggs, veggie omelettes, whole wheat toast, granola and plain yogurt.

28. Get a Sufficient Amount of Sleep One of the best things you can do for your body is to rest for longer. Studies on more than 68,000 people found that those who slept less than 5 hours each night, were 5.4 pounds heavier and a lot more likely to become obese than those who slept an average of 7 hours or more. Just one night of inadequate sleep can increase the activity in your brains reward system mainly regarding food. Another study found that people who had insufficient sleep took in an average of 220 more calories each day than those who had adequate sleep. Unplug the TV in your bedroom or put it on a timer, aim to get 8 hours sleep per night and settle for nothing less than 7 hours. Research suggests that the chances of an early death are significantly higher by 12% if you’re a habitual short sleeper.

29. Always Prepare Your Meals for Work

You need to keep your body satisfied and well fed throughout the day without overindulging. I always pack my meals wherever I go and take the contents inside very seriously. Packing your lunch should be as important to your ritual as taking a shower. By preparing your lunch box with the following contents you’ll provide your body with the nutrients it requires, so you’ll able to exercise no matter what time. To ensure you feel full and satisfied, include these energy packed foods in your lunch box: An apple for your morning snack, a few slices of low fat cheese or a couple of boiled eggs to eat with the apple, two slices of wholemeal bread with salad, 100g lean meat, a pint of skimmed milk or a pre-mixed protein shake for an afternoon snack.

30. Eat a Snack Before Going to a Restaurant Eating a 200-calorie snack that contains no less than 15g protein before a big meal at a restaurant, will cause you to eat less, therefore, cutting your total calorie intake with fewer hunger hormones circulating and a gut full of satiating protein. Try eating an apple with a few slices of low fat cheese, or a whey protein shake.

31. Eat Beans in Moderation Beans are vegetables packed with considerable amounts of fibre, protein and antioxidants, but they can also lead to bloating. This is known as bean bloat, which is very similar to being lactose intolerant, the primary cause for bloating is undigested carbohydrates. Beans packed with high fibre and whole grains cause bloating as they decompose in the gastrointestinal tract and causes gas which is a normal bypass of the digestive process. It’s associated with bacteria in the colon that breaks down nutrients that were not absorbed by the small intestines. The key to eating beans is to eat them in moderation, never in excess. Only eat fresh beans as processed versions have elevated levels of salt and sugar. Legumes are best as they’re smaller, lighter in weight and lower in fat. Peas, chick peas and lentils are all good choices of beans.

32. Don’t Skip Out on Resistance Training Running on the treadmill with its calorie counter may seem like the best fat loss option, but don’t be fooled. As you become more efficient at running, you’ll be able to run for a lot longer but the fewer calories you’ll burn. Running long distances time and time again, may dampen your enthusiasm and take a physical toll on your body. It can become very boring which causes many people to give up or burn out. Instead include some resistance training 2-3 times per week, this type of training offers you that metabolic boost needed to burn fat.

33. Drink Plenty of Water Always ensure your body is well hydrated to avoid water retention, as this will lead to a much smoother look. I advise you to drink at least 3L of water per day, water is helpful to your diet as it is an appetite suppressant, but it will not affect the enjoyment of your meals. If you’re prone to snacking or a reckless eater, reaching for a tall glass of water can do you a favour. Water won’t kill your hunger pains when you’re hungry but combining it with 5-6 small meals per day is an awesome combination. We need water constantly, it’s crucial to our growth, development and is the cleanest, healthiest drink we can consume. The more water you consume the more it has a psychological impact on you. You’ll simply feel healthier, you’ll make a conscious decision to drink and eat less junk, fewer sugary drinks and chug down more of the good stuff.

34. Avoid Salad Dressing If you’re trying to tone your abs and build muscle, then dodge the salad dressing as it’s usually a solution to poor tasting low quality lettuce and vegetables. It makes things taste better through combinations of salt and fat. It’s best to spend your money on fresh high quality organic vegetables, as they taste better than the cheaper mass-produced counter parts, meaning you’ll be less tempted to reach for the thousand-island dressing. A single serving of thousand-island dressing contains up to 20g fat, if you’re on a

1,400-calorie diet per day, you can only consume between 30-40g fat, whereas one serving of salad dressing accounts for more than half of your daily fat intake. If you really can’t eat salad without dressing, then go for olive oil, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice and mustard types, avoid dressing that contains dairy and saturated fats. The key is to taper your intake slowly, overtime, you’ll find that your taste for a dressing subsides and you may decide after a while you don’t want to add any at all.

35. Don’t Go Food Shopping on an Empty Stomach Research suggests that when people go food shopping on an empty stomach, they tend to load their trolleys with high calorie options, leading to poor eating throughout the week. Some good advice to follow is to go food shopping after breakfast on a weekend, if this isn’t a good option for you then try eating some fresh fruit or vegetables as you shop.

36. Lift Heavier Weights If you’re a regular gym user or lift at home, go for the heavier weights. Research suggests that training with heavier weights not only burns more calories during workouts but can increase your sleeping metabolism by around 8% which increases the number of calories you can burn as you lie on your back. Now 8% may not seem a lot, but it can add up to 5 lbs per year. As you feel yourself becoming stronger, don’t be afraid to go heavier, try to push your limits each time.

37. Eat When You Want For fat loss we’re told that eating 5-6 small meals spread throughout the day is the best option. The simple logic is that digestion requires energy, so spreading your calories over the day with small meals keeps your metabolism humming and hunger pangs at bay. The problem isn’t how frequently that you eat, but rather what you eat that affects the number of calories you burn at meal time. If you take in around 2,000 calories per day, it won’t matter how many meals

you’ve eaten, the calorie burns you get from digestion will remain the same. It’s a promising idea to take a week and note down when you feel hungriest and adjust your eating pattern accordingly. The idea is to pack each meal with food that provides the best metabolism boost. Incorporate foods like egg whites, lean meat, water, chilli, peppers, green tea, calcium (milk, cottage cheese, Greek yogurt), whole grains, lentils, blueberries, almonds, whey protein, salmon, spinach, turkey, oats, avocado, asparagus, legumes, poultry and hemp seeds.

38. Load up on protein When you skip out on protein during a snack or meal, you’re practically telling your body that you don’t want to burn more calories. Protein will help control your blood sugar, reduce hunger, keep you fuller and will burn a lot more calories during digestion so that you can still enjoy your favourite foods and stay lean. Plus, the fact that protein stops the breakdown of muscle and provides the raw materials for laying down new muscle. You shouldn’t shy away from carbs either, but when eaten alone, they set off a whole series of events including insulin levels rising which then causes you to store more fat and crave more food. Whether you’re eating a meal or snacking, include some protein and you’ll shed fat. Try a handful of nuts, Greek yogurt or a stick of string cheese as a snack.

39. Snack Smarter According to research, the average snack size has increased from 360-580 calories since the 1970’s. The number of meals throughout the day you consume doesn’t matter, but the size of your snacks does. Research suggests that the average man snacks twice a day during a work week, which adds a whopping 500 calories every 24hours due to the snack size. You can see that over the course of the week this can add up to a pound of fat. To beat your cravings, try to keep your snack portion size so that it fits into your hand, no matter if its fruit, almonds, cheese or chicken breast. If it’s too large to fit into your hand, then it’s probably too much. A good rule of thumb is to

keep calories between 200-300 per snack, with at least 15-20g protein and around the same for carbs per serving. You can find a great snack with those nutritional values in a cup of Greek yogurt and a handful of diced cherries or blueberries.

40. What to Eat Before Bed Carbohydrate consumption causes a notable rise in the storage of hormone insulin, which interferes with the breakdown of fat, so avoid simple carbs right before bed unless you’re hitting the gym close to the end of the day and load up on slow digesting high quality protein. Carbohydrate consumption right before bed in the late evening as your metabolism is winding down, is a recipe for disaster. Fortunately, slow digesting protein isn’t. Slow digesting protein throughout the night will provide your body with a steady flow of amino acids, helping you recover from exercise and maintaining your calorie burning lean muscle. Let’s look at a few of the best snacks to consume before bed. A low carb slow digesting protein shake. It’s a fantastic way to end the day with a tasty slow digesting protein shake before bed. To add healthy fats to your drink, throw in some peanut or almond butter. The best choice of protein to take is casein, as it has a slower release throughout the night. White meat. White meat sources of protein such as turkey and chicken are great before bed, as they digest slowly and have a very low insulin release. Also, these sources promote the release of the hormone glucagon, which assists the body with the breakdown of fat and carbs within your body to be burned for energy. It’s best to avoid red meat in the evening as it has a lot higher insulin response. Cottage cheese. Cottage cheese is one the best digesting foods to consume pre-bed time, as it coats the stomach to be assimilated by the body over the

several hours. It also stimulates glucagon release as a protein, just make sure you’re using plain cottage cheese as the flavoured choices have many added sugars. Green vegetables. Vegetables although contain very little protein, are virtually calorie free, there advantages are they’re high in fibre and filling. Eating a bowl full of vegetables at night before bed can kill your late-night cravings.

Conclusion Now that you’ve gained an insight to the information used by many Fitness Trainers across the globe, you can now apply the scientific formulas and strategies, to guarantee results. If you have further interest in incorporating flavorsome and nutrientdense foods into your diet to accommodate your fitness goals, please check out the other books in the series; “The Bodybuilding Essentials Series: Nutrition, Weight Loss, Weight Training, Exercise and Fitness.” Whether you’re on a budget, vegan/vegetarian, or just looking to try something new, there’s something for everyone. Good luck on your journey and please rest assured, results won’t come over night, it’s a marathon not a sprint. It’s an accumulation of your understanding of the given information, applying it and like anything worth having in life, it comes with sacrifice and effort on your behalf. This applies to increasing your fitness, losing weight and building muscle. Thank you for downloading my E-book, if you’ve found some value and appreciate the information provided, I’d be more than grateful if you could kindly leave a review.

Bodybuilding Cookbook 100 simple, healthy and delicious bodybuilding recipes to build muscle

Chapter 1: Pre-Workout Menu 1.

Chicken, Rice & Broccoli

2.

Sweet Potato & Garlic Grilled Chicken

3.

Sweet Potato Wedges & Garlic Grilled Chicken

4.

Jerk Chicken Tortillas

5.

Omelette & Avocado Jacket Potato

6.

Power Smoothie Blitz

7.

Beef & Mustard Sarnie

9.

Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty

10.

Lamb & Roasties

Chapter 2: Post-Workout Menu 11.

Turkey Steak, Rice & Mixed Veg

12.

Posh Fish & Chips

13.

Steak & Crème Fresche Sweet Potato

14.

Turkey Bolognaise

15.

Garlic Rice & Salmon

16.

Garlic Wedges and Turkey Steak

17.

Skinny Sweet Turkey Burger & Fries

18.

Crispy Jerk Chicken with Lime & Coriander Rice

19.

Garlic Chicken and Crispy Potato Bites

20.

DIY Pizza Blitz

Chapter 3: Breakfast Menu 21.

Post Cardio Breakfast Banana Split

22.

Omelette & Avocado on Toast

23.

Very Berry Protein Smoothie

24.

Garlic Scrambled Eggs and co.

25.

Protein Oatmeal Blitz

26.

Bacon and Egg English Toasted Muffin

27.

Porridge Power

28.

Banana and Mango Protein Blitz

29.

Chocolate Smoothie Delight

30.

Tuna & Spring Onion Toasty

Chapter 4: Non-Training Day Menu 31.

Rice, Turkey & Veg

32.

Sweet Potato & Grilled Garlic Chicken

33.

Porridge & Scrambled Eggs

34.

Peanut Butter Bagel & Scrambled Eggs

35.

Beef & Cheese Sarnie

36.

Cottage Cheese & Ryvita

37.

Sweet Potato & Salmon with Asparagus

38.

Jerk Chicken, Rice & Corn on the Cob

39.

Skinny Smoothie

40.

Jacket Potato & Garlic Cottage Cheese

Chapter 5: Before Bed Menu 41.

Cottage Cheese

42.

Greek Yogurt & Banana

43.

Tall Glass of Milk

44.

Casein Protein Shake

45.

Cottage Cheese with Peanut Butter

46.

Salmon Salad

47.

Cheddar Cheese Salad

48.

Tuna & Spinach

49.

Omelette & Salad with a side of Milk

50.

Creamy Oatmeal

Chapter 6: Healthy Deserts 51.

Oat & Berry Protein Bars (8 servings)

52.

Fruit & Nut Yogurt

53.

Protein Packed, Blueberry & Banana Pancakes (x4 servings)

54.

Strawberries & Banana Frozen Yogurt

55.

Nutty Strawberry Milkshake

56.

Instant Protein Brownie

57.

Chocolate orange mousse

58.

Strawberry Frozen Yogurt

59.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites (12 servings)

60.

Peanut butter toasty

Chapter 7: Immediately Post-Workout 61.

Shake & Jam

62.

Milk & Pancakes

63.

Strawberry Whey Protein Bliss

64.

Organic Protein Smoothie

65.

Tuna & Peanut Butter Toasty

66.

Egg on Toast

67.

Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty with Milk

68.

Sweet Coconut & Berry Delight

69.

Turkey Burger

70.

Peanut Butter Jelly Bagel & Strawberry Milkshake

Chapter 8: Vegan/Vegetarian Friendly, High Protein Recipes 71.

Sweet & Spicy Beans on a Bed of Potato

72.

Rice, Beans & Greens

73.

Mixed Beans & Sweet Potato

74.

Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style

75.

Beans on Toast 2.0

76.

Potato & Mixed Bean Hit

78.

Oats-So-Delicious

79.

Avocado Baguette

80.

Nutty Pasta & Lentils

81.

Sweet Potato Fries with a Side of Beans

82.

Chick Pea Grilled Sandwich

83.

Hot Chilli Chick Pea Tortillas

84.

High-Protein Enchiladas (7 servings)

85.

Protein-Packed Tortilla Blitz

86.

Rice & Beans with a Kick

87.

Sweet Lentils & Rice

88.

Jacket Potato & Sweet Kidney Beans

89.

Soya & Veggie Burgers (4 servings)

90.

Chick Pea Salad

91.

Fruit & Nut Fettucine (2 servings)

92.

Spicy Bean Tortilla Dream

93.

Spaghetti Lentils (2 servings)

94.

Alternative Mac N Cheese (4 servings)

95.

Chunky Bean Veggie Soup

96.

Chick Pea Curry (3 servings)

97.

Soy Meat Tortillas

98.

Spaghetti Lentil Bolognaise (2 servings)

99.

Tofu Tortillas

100.

Whole Hearty Vegan Fettuccine

Chapter 9: How to calculate your energy needs

Chapter 1: Pre-Workout Menu We’re told that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but when it’s training day, it’s the pre-workout meal that counts the most! Your muscles need fuelling before an intense session and energy is better utilised when it’s released slower, rather than quicker. Therefore, an understanding of carbohydrates is essential, as they’re the body’s main source of energy. This is why beans are such a power-food and essential part of a Vegan diet, because they’re packed with complex carbohydrates and protein. Simple carbohydrates are mainly found in white foods such as white pasta, white rice, white potatoes, white bread and so on. Simple carbs are most beneficial post-exercise to refuel. Complex carbs are vital prior to exercise, so whatever time of day you plan to workout, ensure you’ve loaded up considerably. Complex carbs consist of considerable amounts of fibre; therefore, they’re digested at a much slower rate compared with simple carbs, enabling a slow release of energy, which gives you sustainable fuel throughout your workout. Why no simple carbs before a workout? The truth is, simple carbs don’t really serve a purpose prior to exercise, because they consist of very little fibre and are made up of simple sugars, therefore, they’re released into your bloodstream at a much faster rate. The problem is, if you don’t use this energy right away, it’ll store as fat. Not only that, your workouts will suffer because you won’t have sufficient energy stores to fuel your workout. Have you ever eaten vast amounts of white rice or pasta, and not felt satisfied? This is because the glycogen is quickly converted to glucose and releases into your bloodstream almost instantly. So, you’ll feel an instant burst of energy, followed by a crash. However, this is an advantage after exercise, because your body will crave fast digesting sugars to replenish its energy stores – it’s like a magnet for small amounts of simple sugars along with protein during this stage. Protein is essential to building and repairing muscle tissue, but research suggests that there’s no real need to eat excessive

amounts in meals prior to your workout, because the muscles can’t absorb that much. Therefore, instead of protein being stored, it’ll be released as unused energy and stored as body fat. Depending on how much protein your body requires, it’d be a good idea to consume a ¼ of the amount before working out and the remainder afterwards. Also, research has found that it’s more beneficial to eat 6-7 small meals throughout the day, rather than 3 big meals, because our body can only digest and store so much energy at a time. This is because eating larger amounts results in your body being unable to store the excessive energy, resulting in body fat. Therefore, if you consume 67 small meals throughout the day, your body will receive the essential nutrients that it requires, and nothing goes to waste. Eating less and more frequently, enables you to receive a steady flow of energy throughout the entire day, instead of your levels rising quickly and then crashing between 3 heavy intervals. This is why so many people complain about being tired all the time, we get our energy from our food, therefore, we must be smart about what we eat. You’ve probably experienced this already, but what do you think would happen if you didn’t eat sufficient amounts of complex carbs before hitting the gym? Well, naturally, your body would look for other sources of energy to compensate and I don’t mean bodyfat! In the absence of sufficient fuel prior to exercise, naturally your body would go into survival mode and break down muscle for energy, which is a complete no-no. This results in exhaustion, mental fatigue and low-mood, and it’s just not a place you want to be in Many believe that you’ll burn fat on an empty stomach or by not eating 3-4 hours prior to exercise, but it just isn’t the case. When we exercise anaerobically, meaning short bouts of intense exercise, our body utilises its carbohydrate sources first and studies show that very little fat is actually utilised at all during anaerobic exercise. Therefore, when glycogen (carbohydrates) stores are depleted, the body tends to breakdown muscle tissue to compensate. With that being said, some studies have shown that other types of anaerobic exercise such as short bouts of sprinting, do burn considerable amounts of fat. The best way to burn fat is by running long distance,

as the body tends to utilise the glycogen stores first and then approx. 30-40 minutes into exercise, your body begins to feed on fat stores. Let’s look at some of the very best pre-workout meals to fuel your muscles throughout your session.

1. Chicken, Rice & Broccoli Ingredients: 300g Wholegrain rice 100g Turkey steak 40g Salsa (2 tbsp.) 150g Broccoli (2 cups) Cooking method: This is a quick and simple lean recipe for those that are always on the go. Simply make enough rice and turkey for 3 days and store in the fridge. When you’re preparing for work, grab your plastic tubs and load them with the serving amount above, the broccoli will cook in the microwave for 2 mins and then all you have to do is add the salsa to taste. Delicious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.5g Carbs – 82.1g Fat – 4.5g

Total kcals – 506.9 kcals

2. Sweet Potato & Garlic Grilled Chicken Ingredients: 300g Sweet potato 100g grilled chicken breast 1 tbsp. Extra virgin olive oil 2 garlic cloves (thinly sliced) 100g green beans 1 small corn on the cob (grilled) 1 tbsp. rosemary Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Jab the potato several times with a fork and place inside a microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Meanwhile put a grill pan on medium heat, add the olive oil, rosemary and garlic, leave for 5 minutes before adding the fresh chicken breast. After 10 minutes add the corn on the cob, turning every few minutes. Cook for a further 20 minutes or until the chicken browns. By now the sweet potato is ready to put in the oven, cook for 20 minutes. For the last 10 minutes boil the green beans. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.5g Carbs – 86.5g Fat – 15.9g

Total kcals – 611.1 kcals

3. Sweet Potato Wedges & Garlic Grilled Chicken Ingredients: 300g sweet potato chopped into chunky wedges 100g chicken breast 5 asparagus sprigs 1 tsp cracked salt and pepper 1 tsp ground garlic powder 1 tsp ground rosemary 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 40g salsa (2 tbsp.) Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Chop the sweet potato into chunky wedges and put into a microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Put your grill pan on a medium heat and add the olive oil, rosemary and garlic powder, leave for 5 minutes before adding the fresh chicken breast. After 10 minutes add the asparagus, cook the chicken for a further 20 minutes or until the chicken and asparagus have browned. Put a tbsp. of olive oil over the wedges and add cracked salt and pepper, put in the oven for 20 minutes or until crisp. Add the salsa to dip the wedges into. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30g Carbs – 66.4g Fat – 15g

Total kcals – 520.6 kcals

4. Jerk Chicken Tortillas Ingredients: 2 whole wheat tortillas 100g chicken breast (diced) 2 handfuls lettuce ½ white onion (chopped) 1 red pepper (chopped) 2 tbsp. Jamaican jerk seasoning 60g salsa (3 tbsp.) Cooking method: Pre-heat your grill pan on a medium heat and then add the chicken, cook for 5 minutes or until it starts to brown. Add the onion and red pepper and cook for a further 10 minutes. Turn the heat to low and add the Jamaican jerk seasoning and salsa and leave for the last five minutes. Heat the whole wheat wraps in the microwave on full power for 40 seconds add all the ingredients from the grill pan and add the lettuce, wrap and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32.6g Carbs – 61.5g Fat – 2.3g

Total kcals – 400 kcals

5. Omelette & Avocado Jacket Potato Ingredients: 300g Jacket potato 2 whole eggs ½ avocado 1 medium red pepper (chopped) ¼ cup mushrooms 2 asparagus sprigs (chopped) Salt and pepper 1 tbsp. grated parmesan cheese Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Jab the potato with a fork and put into a microwave for 10 minutes on full power. Once the potatoes are ready put them in the oven for 20 minutes. For the last 10 minute’s spray pam in a medium sized pan and leave on a mediumhigh heat for a few minutes and start cooking the red pepper, asparagus and mushrooms. When the jacket potato is done put on a plate, slice down the middle and put the meat from the avocado inside of the jacket and crack fresh sea salt and black pepper over it. While that is cooling, beat the two eggs in a bowl, add the tbsp. of grated parmesan cheese and tsp fresh sea salt and black pepper and pour over the ingredients in the pan for 30-40 seconds until the bottom is slightly set. Once the bottom has set, turn off the heat and flip the egg to cook the top of the omelette. Leave for a further minute, then eat immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 27.1g Carbs – 83.4g Fat – 23.2g

Total kcals – 650.8 kcals

6. Power Smoothie Blitz Ingredients: 3 tbsp. frozen Greek yogurt (0% fat) 1 medium banana ¼ cup frozen mixed berries 1 tbsp. natural honey ¼ cup oats 1 scoop whey protein (unflavoured) 200ml almond milk 1 handful slithered almonds 2 handfuls spinach 2 tbsp. cocoa powder (70%) 1 tsp ground ginger Nice and simple, simply toss all the above ingredients into a blender and blend away. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 62.7g Carbs – 129.7g Fat – 21.6g

Total kcals 964 kcals

7. Beef & Mustard Sarnie Ingredients: 100g ground beef (95% lean) 1 slice low fat cheddar cheese 2 slices wholegrain bread 1 handful mixed salad 1 tbsp. wholegrain mustard 1 large banana Nothing complicated here, simply layer your sandwich, dig in and feed those muscles! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 37.89g Carbs – 79.35g Fat – 12.95g

Total kcals – 585.51 kcals

8. Hearty Spaghetti Bolognaise Ingredients: 300g whole wheat spaghetti 100g tinned organic tomatoes 1 tbsp. tomato purée 2 garlic cloves (mashed) ½ white onion (finely sliced) 100g lean beef mince 150g mushrooms and mixed peppers 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Cooking method: Heat the olive oil in a grill pan and add the garlic and onions on a medium heat for 10 minutes. Add the beef mince, mushrooms and mixed peppers and cook for 20 minutes or until browned. Once the mince has browned turn the heat down to low and add the tinned tomatoes and tomato purée – cook for a further 10 minutes. Boil the spaghetti for 15-18 minutes, once cooked throw it into the beef mince mixture and eat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 40.9g Carbs – 87.3g Fat – 20.7g

Total kcals – 699.1 kcals

9. Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty Ingredients: 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 2 whole wheat slices bread 2 medium bananas 350ml skimmed milk Cooking method: Spread the peanut butter on both slices of bread. Cut the 2 bananas in half and slice down the middle, insert onto the bread and put it onto a toasty or George Foreman grill. Leave for 3-4 minutes or until bread has toasted. Serve with glass of milk and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 27.7g Carbs – 121.9g Fat – 14.5g

Total kcals – 729 kcals

10. Lamb & Roasties Ingredients: 1 tbsp. mint sauce 100g lean lamb shank 300g white potato 100g cabbage 100g green beans 2 tbsp. salsa 1 tbsp. rosemary and garlic seasoning 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Freshly cracked salt and pepper Cooking method: Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees. Cut the potato into large quarters, drizzle the olive oil over them, add the rosemary, garlic and salt and pepper seasoning and microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Once finished, throw them into the oven for a further 20 minutes or until crispy. Meanwhile cook the lamb shank on your grill pan for 20 minutes or until cooked through. For the last 10 minutes boil the cabbage and green beans on high. When everything is ready, serve with the salsa dip and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34g Carbs – 65.3g Fat – 37g

Total kcals – 730.2 kcals

Chapter 2: Post-Workout Menu The best time to indulge in fast digesting simple carbs is Immediately after your workout, because only then is there a short window where your muscles are like magnets for them. It’s thought that the best thing to consume immediately after a workout is a protein shake with some added simple sugars and then 45-60 minutes later, consume a meal rich in simple carbs and protein, to replenish your energy stores and repair the muscle tissues. Consume the same amount of simple carbs in your post-workout meal as the amount of complex carbs you had prior to working out. So, for example, if you had 1 cup of whole wheat pasta prior to working out, have 1 cup of white pasta after working out. What happens is your body stores carbohydrates in the muscles in the form of glycogen and breaks down and releases into the bloodstream in the form of glucose (sugar). Depending on the type of carbohydrate consumed, determines the speed of energy in which it releases, replenishes energy stores and begins the repair process. Therefore, on this occasion it’s okay to indulge in some simple carbohydrates, in fact, it’s essential. Refer to the carbohydrate requirement chart at the end of the book to help you calculate how much you require if you’re struggling. Your energy requirements determine how much carbohydrates, protein and fat you require, so if you look at how much carbohydrates you’ll need to consume overall, just subtract the amount of simple carbohydrates the chart suggests, to calculate better how much complex carbohydrates you’ll need to divide into your other meals throughout the day. Now let’s look at some of the best post-workout recipes to nourish and replenish your muscles after a tough grind in the gym.

11. Turkey Steak, Rice & Mixed Veg Ingredients: 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 100g turkey steak 1 wholegrain roll 300g white rice – uncooked 150g mixed vegetables ½ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp Cajun spice 30g Nando’s sauce for flavour Cooking method: Pre-heat your grill or frying pan over a low-medium heat, spray the pam oil and add the turkey steak, along with the seasoning. Cook for 15-17 mins, turning occasionally, until cooked to your desire. For the final 10 mins, add the rice and mixed vegetables into two separate pots. For the rice, add 300ml water and cook over medium heat until all water is absorbed. For the vegetables, simply heat on high until boiling point, drain and put them to the side. Transfer the entire contents onto a plate and serve with the wholegrain roll and a dollop of Nando’s sauce to taste. Simple, yet delicious. Following that, if you’re always on the go, it’d be wise to bulk cook these types of meals and store them in the freezer to save time. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.2g Carbs – 129.7g Fat – 3.4g

Total kcals 686.2 kcals

12. Posh Fish & Chips Ingredients: 300g white potato chopped into chunky chips 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Sea salt and black pepper 100g fresh salmon 5 piece’s asparagus Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Cut the potato into chunky chips, season with salt and pepper, drizzle 1 tbsp. olive oil over the top and place in microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Put your grill pan on medium heat, add a tbsp. olive oil and wait 2 minutes to heat up. Crack some fresh salt and pepper over the fresh salmon and place on the grill pan with the asparagus, cook for 20 minutes or until the salmon is cooked through. Once potatoes are finished in the microwave, place them in the oven for 20 minutes or until crisp. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.3g Carbs – 65.3g Fat – 36.1g

Total kcals – 723.3 kcals

13. Steak & Crème Fresche Sweet Potato Ingredients: 100g lean sirloin steak 300g sweet potato 2 cloves garlic (finely sliced) 1 sprig fresh rosemary 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 tbsp. crème fresch 1 tbsp. fresh chives Cracked salt and pepper Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Jab the potato several times with a fork and put in the microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Once finished place in the oven for 20 minutes. For the last 10 minutes put your grill pan on a medium heat, add the olive oil, rosemary and finely sliced garlic cloves and leave for 2-3 minutes. Add the steak and cook to preference. Once the sweet potato is done take out of oven, cut down the middle and scoop the sweet potato away from the skin and place in a bowl. Add the crème fresch and salt and pepper and mash it all together. Put the mix back into the sweet potato skins and eat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28.7g Carbs – 60.9g Fat – 8.7g

Total kcals – 436.7 kcals

14. Turkey Bolognaise Ingredients: 300g white pasta 100g lean turkey mince 150g mushrooms and mixed peppers Tinned organic tomatoes ½ white onion 1 tbsp. tomato purée ½ wholegrain baguette (small) 1 tbsp. garlic powder Cooking method: Boil the pasta for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, heat your frying pan to medium and put 2 sprays of pam in, add the chopped white onion, mushrooms, mixed peppers and garlic and fry for 5 minutes. Add the turkey mince, cook for a further 10 minutes or until the mince has browned. Turn heat down to low and add the tinned organic tomatoes, and tomato purée, cook for a further 5 minutes. Drain the pasta and add to the frying pan and mix well, leave on heat for five minutes. Serve with wholegrain baguette and eat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 67.7g Carbs – 153.2g Fat – 8g

Total kcals – 955.6 kcals

15. Garlic Rice & Salmon Ingredients: 100g salmon 300g white rice ½ avocado ½ medium whole wheat baguette 150g mixed vegetables 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Parsley and rosemary seasoning Salt and pepper – 1 pinch Cooking method: Cook the rice for 15-20 minutes or until water is absorbed. Meanwhile in a separate frying pan, put on a very low heat, add the olive oil, parsley, rosemary seasoning and crushed garlic. Put your grill pan on a medium heat, sprinkle the salt and pepper over the salmon and place in the pan. Cook for 15 minutes or until the salmon is cooked through. Boil the mixed veg for 10 minutes on high. Once the rice is cooked, put it into the frying pan and mix through the seasoning and oil, turn the heat off. Once everything is ready, spread the avocado onto the baguette, serve and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 40g Carbs – 142.7g Fat – 48.6g

Total kcals – 1168.2 kcals

16. Garlic Wedges and Turkey Steak Ingredients: 300g white potato 100g turkey steak 150g mixed vegetables 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp. garlic powder 1 rosemary sprig Salt and pepper Salsa (3 tbsp.) Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Cut potato into thick wedges, drizzle the olive oil over them and season with the rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper. Place them into the microwave on full power for 10 minutes. when done place into the oven, cook for 20 minutes or until crisp. Meanwhile boil the mixed vegetables for 10 minutes and cook the turkey for 15 mins on your grill pan. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.3g Carbs – 86.6g Fat – 33.1g

Total kcals – 761.5 kcals

17. Skinny Sweet Turkey Burger & Fries Ingredients: 1 wholemeal burger bun 100g turkey steak ½ white onion (chopped) 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 garlic clove Handful lettuce Half medium tomato (sliced) 1 tbsp. low fat mayo 200g sweet potato (cut into thin slices) Salt and pepper Cooking method: Pre-heat oven to 220 degrees. Chop the sweet potato into thin slices, drizzle olive oil over them and season with salt and pepper. Place them into the microwave on full power for 10 minutes and then put them in the oven for a further 20 minutes or until crisp. Meanwhile in a grill pan drizzle a tbsp. olive oil and add the garlic and white onion, cook for 10 minutes and add the turkey steak. Cook for 5 minutes and add the sliced tomatoes for a further 10 minutes. Once everything is ready place the turkey in the bun, add the onion, tomatoes, lettuce and mayo. Take the crisp wedges out of the oven and serve. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 31.6g Carbs – 74g Fat – 35.2g

Total kcals – 739.2 kcals

18. Crispy Jerk Chicken with Lime & Coriander Rice Ingredients: 300g lime and coriander rice (uncle bens 2-minute rice) 100g chicken thigh (with skin) 150g broccoli 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp jerk seasoning ½ tsp garlic powder ¼ of a lemons juice 1 wholegrain roll Cooking method: In a small bowl, season the chicken thigh with the lemon juice, garlic and jerk spice. Heat a grill or frying pan over a low-medium heat, add the olive oil along with the seasoned chicken – fry, stirring occasionally for 20-25 mins. If you prefer to make the rice yourself, for the last 10 minutes, add ½ cup of white rice to a pot along with ½ cup of water and boil over a medium-high heat until all water has absorbed. When the rice is ready, simply squeeze a ¼ of a limes juice over it, along with 1 tsp coriander seasoning – stir and let it sit for 1 minute. Alternatively, microwave the uncle bens brand for 2 minutes on full power. Finally, place the broccoli into a bowl and cook in the microwave on high for 1.5-2 minutes. Serve with the wholegrain roll and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.7g Carbs – 105.2g Fat – 17.8g

Total kcals – 739.8 kcals

19. Garlic Chicken and Crispy Potato Bites Ingredients: 100g chicken fillet 300g white potato (chopped into 0.5-inch slices) 100g broccoli 1 small corn on the cob (grilled) 2 garlic cloves 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 rosemary sprig Salt and pepper Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Chop the potato into 0.5-inch slices, drizzle 1 tbsp. olive oil and season with rosemary and cracked sea salt and pepper. Put the slices into the microwave and put on full power for 10 minutes. Once finished, put into the oven for 20 minutes or until crispy. In a frying pan drizzle 1 tbsp. olive oil and add the garlic, fry on a low heat for 5 minutes and then add the chicken – turn up to medium heat. Cook for 10 minutes and then add the corn on the cob. For the last 10 minutes boil the broccoli and serve. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 42.8g Carbs – 88.8g Fat – 30.6g

Total kcals – 1245.8 kcals

20. DIY Pizza Blitz Ingredients: 150g wheat flour pizza base 50g cooked chicken breast 30g reduced fat mozzarella ball ¼ cup tinned tomatoes (organic) ½ red onion (finely chopped) 1 medium red pepper (finely chopped) Cooking method: Assort all ingredients onto the wheat flour pizza base, put in the oven on a medium – high heat and cook for 15 – 20 minutes. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 33.4g Carbs – 105.5g Fat – 8.9g

Total kcals – 635.7 kcals

Chapter 3: Breakfast Menu Although you may not think so, consuming a vast nutritious breakfast to begin the day, is super essential to weight loss and making muscle gains. Many people that miss out on breakfast tend to be overweight, but how is this the case if they aren’t eating first thing? Well typically, those who skip breakfast for whatever reason, tend to eat 3-4 hours prior to waking, and by then they’re starved, so they indulge in the things they crave to satisfy their sweet tooth, absorbing hundreds of calories. Studies suggest that beginning your day with a nutritious breakfast, rich in complex carbohydrates and protein, can cure your midday sweet tooth cravings and keeps you feeling fuller for longer. Also, as mentioned above, if you eat several small meals throughout the day, you’ll never go hungry, you’ll be less likely to experience cravings and indulge in bad foods. People who skip breakfast before any type of morning exercise, are making a huge mistake. Those who do so, believe that if they exercise on an empty stomach, they’ll be running on their fat stores, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Exercising on an empty stomach doesn’t allow your muscles to store energy, so naturally, your body will look to breakdown muscle tissue first and then utilise minimal fat stores, but by then you’ll experience exhaustion and be unable to continue exercise, which is unhealthy and leads to extreme fatigue. If you prefer early morning runs and generally don’t wake up too hungry, then try throwing something in a blender that’s rich in complex carbs and protein such as almond milk, bananas, oats and frozen fruit – 30-60 mins before exercise. Trust me, you’ll see the difference in your performance and in your energy levels later on.

21. Post Cardio Breakfast Banana Split Ingredients: 1 medium banana 1 handful cashew nuts ¾ low fat natural yogurt 1 large strawberry ¼ cup blueberries 2 tbsp. granola 1 tbsp. natural honey 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 250ml glass orange juice Simply throw all the above ingredients into a blender and blend for 1.5-2 minutes. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.1g Carbs – 117.4g Fat – 31.1g

Total kcals – 849.9 kcals

22. Omelette & Avocado on Toast Ingredients: 2 large eggs ½ avocado 2 whole wheat slices bread 2 sprays of pam 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 250ml orange juice Cooking method: Heat your frying pan to medium to high, put 2 sprays of pam onto the pan and wait a couple of minutes. Beat the eggs in a bowl and add to the pan for 30-40 seconds until the bottom is slightly set, turn the heat off and flip the egg to cook the top – leave for two minutes. Spread the avocado on toasted bread and serve with a tbsp. of peanut butter and glass of orange juice. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.1g Carbs – 86.3g Fat – 36.4g

Total kcals – 793.2 kcals

23. Very Berry Protein Smoothie Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) ¼ cup oats ½ cup blueberries Handful strawberries 1 tbsp. peanut butter 200ml almond milk Add all the above ingredients to your blender and blend for 1 minute. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 41.9g Carbs – 51.4g Fat – 14.2g

Total kcals – 501 kcals

24. Garlic Scrambled Eggs and co. Ingredients: 2 large eggs 2 whole wheat slices bread ½ avocado 1 tbsp. grated low fat cheddar cheese 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 medium red pepper ½ white onion (finely sliced) Freshly cracked salt and pepper 2 garlic cloves (mashed) 250ml orange juice Cooking method: Put a medium frying pan on medium heat. Drizzle in the olive oil and add the garlic, white onion and red peppers – cook for 15 minutes. In a separate bowl beat the eggs and add the freshly cracked salt and pepper. Add egg and scramble until the egg is cooked through. Spread the avocado on the toasted bread and serve with the orange juice. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.1g Carbs – 101.4g Fat – 44.9g

Total kcals – 930.1 kcals

25. Protein Oatmeal Blitz Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein (unflavoured) ¼ cup old fashioned thick rolled oats ¼ cup mixed frozen berries 1 tbsp. slithered almonds 1 tbsp. organic honey 200 ml skimmed milk Cooking method: Blend the scoop of whey protein with the skimmed milk. Add all the other ingredients into a bowl accept for the honey and pour the wet mix over the dry mix – swirl all ingredients together for a couple of seconds and leave to set for 10 minutes. Drizzle honey over the top and eat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 44.2g Carbs – 63.8g Fat – 7.5g

Total kcals – 499.5 kcals

26. Bacon and Egg English Toasted Muffin Ingredients: 2 wholegrain English muffins 3 slices lean bacon (non-streaky) 2 medium eggs 1 tbsp. low fat butter 1 tbsp. reduced salt and sugar ketchup 1 piece of fruit 250ml orange juice Cooking method: Boil your kettle, put the 2 eggs into a pan and pour the hot water in to boil the eggs for 6 minutes on a medium – high heat. Grill the bacon for 10 minutes or until browned. Slice the English muffins, toast and butter. Serve with a piece of fruit and glass of orange juice. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 47.3g Carbs – 108.1g Fat – 23.6g

Total kcals – 834 kcals

27. Porridge Power Ingredients: ¼ cup of oats Skimmed milk Handful blueberries Handful strawberries 2 tbsp. low fat yogurt 1 tbsp. walnuts ¼ cup slithered almonds 1 tbsp. organic honey Cooking method: Place the oats in a bowl, cover them slightly with skimmed milk – place in microwave for 2 minutes on full power. Mix the porridge together and add walnuts, slithered almonds, strawberries and blueberries. Add a layer of low fat yogurt and drizzle the honey on top to enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.5g Carbs – 71.2g Fat – 19.7g

Total kcals – 620 kcals

28. Banana and Mango Protein Blitz Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) ¼ cup oats 1 large banana ½ mango 2 tbsp. frozen natural yogurt 200ml almond milk Toss all the above ingredients into a blender and blend for 1 minute. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 60.8g Carbs – 86.1g Fat – 6.4g

Total kcals – 645.2 kcals

29. Chocolate Smoothie Delight Ingredients: 2 tbsp. 70% cocoa powder ¼ cup oats 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) ½ large banana 1 cup frozen mixed berries 250ml almond milk Add the above ingredients to a blender and blend for 1 minute. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.9g Carbs – 68.7g Fat – 8.7g

Total kcals – 512.8 kcals

30. Tuna & Spring Onion Toasty Ingredients: 2 sprays 1 calories pam oil 80g tuna in spring water (½ large tin) 2 whole wheat slices of bread 60g grated low fat cheddar cheese 3 spring onions (finely chopped) 2 handfuls mixed salad ½ tsp parsley seasoning ¼ tsp garlic powder 250ml orange juice Cooking method: Add the spring onions, tuna and seasoning to a bowl and stir. Place the mix between 2 slices of bread, along with the grated cheese, spray both the front and back surfaces with a spray of 1 calorie pam oil, before placing in the toastie maker. Cook until the bread has toasted to your preference. Serve with the mixed salad, a glass of orange juice and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g Carbs – 76.9g Fat – 12g

Total kcals – 534.5 kcals

Chapter 4: Non-Training Day Menu If it’s a none training day, try to keep your diet relatively clean by consuming only moderate amounts of complex carbohydrates along with lean proteins and plenty of fruit and veg, rich in fibre and low in sugar. Too often people continue to consume the same amount of food and portions sizes as they would if it was a training day. Your body will have no use for the excessive energy, eating the same amount of carbohydrates will store as glycogen, but don’t forget if you don’t use that energy, it’ll still get released into the bloodstream as glucose and store as fat. So, how much should you eat on a non-training day? Well below, you should’ve calculated your energy requirements, by multiplying your PAL by your BMR. All you need to do in this instance, is when looking at the PAL table to work out your activity level, simply calculate it as sedentary or just slightly lower than your PAL if you have a strenuous job. Then, simply multiply it again by the BMR. Calculate how much you need from each of the major macronutrients and use those energy requirements for your “rest” or “non-training” days. Eating on rest days doesn’t necessarily have to be boring, you’ve just got to experiment with healthy foods that contain very little sugar and that are low in complex carbs, along with the right amount of protein. Be careful with how much fruit you consume also, as some fruits contain quite a lot of sugar in the form of fructose. The best fruits to consume that have the lowest sugar count, are kiwis, raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, cranberries, olives, rhubarb, and avocados.

31. Rice, Turkey & Veg Ingredients: 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil ¼ cup wholegrain rice (uncooked) 100g turkey steak 100g broccoli – raw ¼ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp jerk seasoning 30g Nando’s sauce Cooking method: Again, simple and nutrient-rich recipes like this one, are worth cooking in bulk, especially if you live a very busy life style. Simply heat a grill/frying pan over a low-medium heat, spray with pam oil and add the turkey steak along with the garlic and jerk seasoning. Cook for 15-17 minutes, or until cooked to your preference. For the final 10 minutes, add the rice along with ½ cup of water to a pot and boil over a high heat until all water has been absorbed. Then, simply cook the broccoli in the microwave for 2 minutes on full power, add a dash of Nando’s sauce to taste and dig in! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.3g Carbs – 52.2g Fat – 3.4g

Total kcals – 360.2 kcals

32. Sweet Potato & Grilled Garlic Chicken Ingredients: 200g sweet potato 100g chicken breast 1 tbsp. garlic and rosemary seasoning 100g spinach 100g green beans Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Jab the potato with a fork several times and place in microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Season the chicken breast with the garlic and rosemary and begin to cook on a low – medium heat on your grill pan for 30 minutes or until cooked through. Once the sweet potato has finished in microwave, throw in oven for a further 20 minutes. For the last 10 minutes boil the spinach and green beans on high heat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.9g Carbs – 50.9g Fat – 1.8g

Total kcals – 343.4 kcals

33. Porridge & Scrambled Eggs Ingredients: 27g porridge oats (1 plain sachet) 2 large eggs ½ cup blueberries 1 tbsp. organic honey 2 sprays pam oil 250ml organic apple juice 1 tsp sea salt and cracked pepper seasoning 1 tbsp. skimmed milk Cooking method: In a medium saucepan, spray the pam and put on a low – medium heat. Add the 2 eggs, salt and pepper seasoning and tbsp. of milk in a bowl and beat until mixed well. Throw the mix into the pan and stir every 30 seconds or so with wooden spoon until cooked through. Pour the porridge oats in a bowl and add skimmed milk just covering the oats. Microwave on high power for 2 minutes and then mix well. Add the blueberries and drizzle the honey on top. Serve with Apple juice and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 18g Carbs – 71.8g Fat – 12.6g

Total kcals – 472.6 kcals

34. Peanut Butter Bagel & Scrambled Eggs Ingredients: 2 large eggs 300ml skimmed milk 1 tbsp. skimmed milk Sea salt and cracked pepper seasoning 1 whole wheat bagel 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 2 sprays pam oil 1 cup mixed fruit Cooking method: In a medium saucepan, spray the pam and put on a low – medium heat. Add the 2 eggs, salt and pepper seasoning and tbsp. of milk in a bowl and beat until mixed well. Throw the mix into the pan and stir every 30 seconds or so with wooden spoon until cooked through. Spread the peanut butter over the toasted bagel and serve with the skimmed milk and cup of mixed fruit. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 40.2g Carbs – 100.3g Fat – 20.5g

Total kcals – 746.5 kcals

35. Beef & Cheese Sarnie Ingredients: 2 slices wholegrain bread 100g lean ground beef (95% lean) 1 slice low fat cheddar cheese ½ medium tomato – sliced ½ tsp basil ¼ tsp garlic powder 1 pinch sea salt 1 handful fresh spinach leaves Simply sprinkle the garlic, basil and sea salt seasoning over the tomato slices and make a sandwich with the above ingredients. Delicious, nutritious and energy boosting. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 38g Carbs – 55.1g Fat – 12g

Total kcals – 480.4 kcals

36. Cottage Cheese & Ryvita Ingredients: 100g cottage cheese 2 Ryvita multigrain crispbreads 200g mixed leafy salad 1 tbsp. fat free salad dressing ¼ tsp paprika seasoning ¼ tsp chives seasoning This recipe can be enjoyed at any time of day, especially as a bedtime snack. Cottage cheese is packed with protein and slowly releases energy that’ll feed your muscles throughout the night. To prepare this recipe, add the cottage cheese along with the chives and paprika seasoning to a bowl and mix well. Add the mix to a plate along with the mixed leafy salad, drizzle with the fat-free dressing and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 17.3g Carbs – 25.1g Fat – 6.5g

Total kcals – 228.1 kcals

37. Sweet Potato & Salmon with Asparagus Ingredients: 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 100g salmon – fresh 200g sweet potato 5 asparagus spears ½ red pepper (sliced) 2 pinches sea salt and cracked pepper seasoning Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. With a fork, jab the potato several times and place in microwave on full power for 5 minutes. Once finished, toss it in the oven for a further 20 minutes. Next, season the salmon with a pinch of salt and pepper. Pre-heat your grill/frying pan over a low-medium heat, spray the pam oil and add the salmon. Cook for 20 minutes, turning occasionally. Finally, add the asparagus and sliced red pepper, season with salt and pepper and cook for the last 10 minutes. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 27.2g Carbs – 49.7g Fat – 6.5g

Total kcals – 366.1 kcals

38. Jerk Chicken, Rice & Corn on the Cob Ingredients: 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil ¼ of a limes juice 100g chicken breast 200g wholegrain rice 1 medium corn on cob 1 tsp. jerk seasoning ½ tsp turmeric 100g broccoli 2 tbsp. organic salsa 400ml water Cooking method: In a separate bowl, add the chicken breast, squeeze the lime juice over the top along with the turmeric and jerk seasoning. Pre-heat your grill/frying pan over a medium heat, spray with pam oil, add the chicken breast and corn on a cob – cook for 20 minutes or until cooked to your preference. For the final 10 minutes, add the rice to a pot along with 400ml of water and boil until all water has been absorbed. Then place the broccoli in your microwave on full power for 1.5-2 minutes and serve with a dollop of salsa. Beautiful! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.4g Carbs – 71.4g Fat – 4.6g

Total kcals – 464.6 kcals

39. Skinny Smoothie Ingredients: ¼ cup oats 1 scoop whey protein (unflavoured) 1 tsp organic honey ¼ cup blueberries 2 tbsp. frozen Greek yogurt 200ml water Blend all ingredients together and consume immediately. This is an ideal breakfast for those who are always on the go. It’s packed with nutrients, energy and keeps you feeling fuller for longer. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 44g Carbs – 52.6g Fat – 3.2g

Total kcals – 415.2 kcals

40. Jacket Potato & Garlic Cottage Cheese Ingredients: 200g white potato 100g cottage cheese 100g green beans 100g broccoli ½ lemons juice Garlic and rosemary seasoning Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Jab the potato with a fork several times and place in microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Once finished throw in oven for further 20 minutes. For the last 10 minutes boil the green beans and broccoli on a high heat. Once the potato is cooked and crisp on the outside, cut in half and scoop out the soft potato and place into a small bowl. Add the garlic and rosemary seasoning, lemon juice and cottage cheese and mash together in the bowl. Place the mix into the potato skins and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.1g Carbs – 58.4g Fat – 5.2g

Total kcals – 368.8 kcals

Chapter 5: Before Bed Menu For years now, we’ve been advised not to eat at night, anything after 8pm will cause weight gain, right? Wrong! This may apply to those who are sedentary and lead an unhealthy lifestyle, but for those who are physically active and exercise at least 3 days per week, specifically towards the end of the day, missing out on an important night time snack may inhibit your chances of muscle growth. Studies show that to maximise protein synthesis, it’s a better idea to eat small meals every 2-3 hours, rather than 3 big meals. This is because when we consume bigger meals, most of the nutrients go to waste and as the body cannot utilise the excess energy, it stores as fat. This is the case also, when trying to consume too much protein at any one meal sitting. If you’ve ever experienced bad gas after consuming vast amounts of meat or protein shakes, this likely indicates that your body cannot handle the amount and results in temporary bloating. So, if studies show that eating several small meals throughout the day facilitate muscle growth, why stop at night? The don’t eat after 8pm theory may appear true at first sight, as the more time you have throughout the day, the more time you have to burn the extra calories, but again, this doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t utilise the nutrients you consume right before bed. Naturally, eating at night for the average sedentary individual, can cause high insulin levels, which then instead of helping you burn fat, causes you to store it. But this isn’t the case for people who regularly exercise. Studies revealed that people who exercised 3 times per week and indulged in bed time snacks, showed no direct increase in their insulin levels. The most important aspect to look at when you’re snacking at night, is what you’re snacking on, rather than at what time. So, what’s the best snacks to consume before bed to promote growth? Well, generally we’re asleep for 6-8 hours per night, so we require foods that’ll digest protein slowly to feed our muscles and aid in recovery. Typically, casein protein powder is the preferred choice amongst most Professional Bodybuilders and Sports Athletes, as it’s released from the stomach, broken down and absorbed into the

bloodstream at a much slower rate than whey protein. Casein can be found in milk and cheese, especially cottage cheese, and that’s why they’re some of the best sources of slow release protein to consume before bed. There’re so many added benefits to consuming a slow-release, high protein snack before bed. Studies show that by doing so, it helps you to lose weight, boosts your metabolism and promotes sleep, as it promotes the amino acid Tryptophan, which we cannot produce naturally. Let’s now look at the best snacks to consume before bed to aid in muscle growth and repair.

41. Cottage Cheese Ingredients: 1 cup cottage cheese ¼ tsp chives seasoning ½ tsp paprika seasoning Cottage cheese is essential to include in your diet and especially right before bed, as it’s packed with protein and amazingly, slowly releases energy over 7 hours. It takes roughly 6-7 hours for your body to digest cottage cheese, enabling your muscles to receive a dose of protein throughout the night, avoiding any potential breakdown of muscle. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 31.1g Carbs – 8.2g Fat – 4.4g

Total kcals – 196.8 kcals

42. Greek Yogurt & Banana Ingredients: 230g Greek yogurt (8oz) 1 large banana 1 tsp organic honey ¼ tsp cinnamon Bananas are great before bed as they slowly release energy throughout the night. Also, another positive, is it releases a natural source of melatonin which is the sleep hormone. Greek yogurt is another great source of protein that releases slowly throughout the night to keep your muscles fed. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 14g Carbs – 52g Fat – 4.5g

Total kcals – 304.5 kcals

43. Tall Glass of Milk Ingredients: 450ml skimmed milk (2 cups) Drinking a large glass of milk aids in muscle growth and keeps your muscles well-nourished throughout the night. Again, like cottage cheese, milk contains a considerable amount of casein, enabling a slow release of protein to your muscles to help repair and encourage muscle development. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 16.7g Carbs – 23.8g Fat – 0.1g

Total kcals – 162.9 kcals

44. Casein Protein Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop 100% casein protein powder 250ml skimmed milk Casein is the main protein found in milk and it takes around 7-8 hours to digest. Casein protein powder is packed with protein and it’s released slowly throughout the night. It promotes growth and aids in the repair of muscle tissue. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 31.5g Carbs – 15.5g Fat – 1.4g

Total kcals 200.6 kcals

45. Cottage Cheese with Peanut Butter Ingredients: 100g cottage cheese 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter The casein in cottage cheese ensures a steady supply of amino acids and is released slowly to the muscles throughout the night. When you mix it with peanut butter, you prolong the digestion process allowing more muscle nourishment throughout the night. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 16.5g Carbs – 5.8g Fat – 12.6g

Total kcals – 202.6 kcals

46. Salmon Salad Ingredients: 1 spray 1 calorie pam oil 100g salmon fillet 200g mixed leafy salad ¼ of lemons juice ¼ tsp garlic powder 1 pinch sea salt and black pepper Salmon’s a very high source of protein and is super rich in omega-3 fatty acids. When combined with green leafy vegetables/salads, it’s ideal before bed, as it naturally boosts testosterone, keeps your muscles looking dense and makes your muscles appear much fuller the following morning. Cooking method: Pre-heat your grill/frying pan over a low-medium heat, spray with pam oil and add the salmon fillet along with the lemon juice, garlic powder and salt and pepper seasoning. Cook for 20-25 minutes, turning occasionally. Once cooked, add the salad to your plate and place the salmon on top. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 21.6g Carbs – 2g Fat – 5.9g

Total kcals – 139.5 kcals

47. Cheddar Cheese Salad Ingredients: 100g reduced fat cheddar cheese 200g mixed leafy salad Cheese contains very little carbohydrates and like milk, contains very high amounts of casein which is great for feeding and repairing your muscles overnight. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 24.4g Carbs – 1.9g Fat – 7g

Total kcals – 168.2 kcals

48. Tuna & Spinach Ingredients: 80g tuna in spring water (1 small tin) 100g spinach leaves 1 tsp olive oil ½ tsp paprika seasoning 1 pinch chilli seasoning Tuna, much like salmon is a major source of omega-3 fatty acids, it’s relatively carb free and packed with protein. The combination of tuna and spinach can naturally boost your testosterone and make your muscles appear dense and fuller. Simply drain and add the tuna to a separate bowl, along with the olive oil, paprika and chilli seasoning. Mix together thoroughly and place the mix on top of the fresh spinach leaves. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 18.3g Carbs – 5.4g Fat – 14.6g

Total kcals – 226.2 kcals

49. Omelette & Salad with a side of Milk Ingredients: 2 large eggs (omelette style) 100g mixed leafy salad 250ml skimmed milk Eggs are an excellent source of protein, they’re low in carbs and have a generous amount of essential amino acids. They also naturally boost your testosterone. Eggs are a great combination with milk as milk contains a considerable amount of casein, enabling a slow release of protein to your muscles to help repair and promote growth. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 21.5g Carbs – 13.5g Fat – 10.4g

Total kcals – 233.6 kcals

50. Creamy Oatmeal Ingredients: 1/4 cup oats 1 tbsp. Greek yogurt 1 tbsp. organic honey Skimmed milk ½ tsp cinnamon 1 handful blueberries Greek yogurt and skimmed milk contain considerable amounts of casein, which again, is very beneficial to your muscles throughout the night. Oats also have quite a considerable amount of protein, low fat, complex carbs and are high in fibre, allowing energy to be released very slowly. A tablespoon of honey helps to ensure you get a great night’s sleep. Yes, it does raise blood sugar levels, but only slightly. The benefits are that honey stores in the liver as glycogen, which converts into glucose (the body’s main energy source) and is released slowly through the night to feed the body. If there are insufficient amounts of glycogen available in the liver during the night, then your body will look to breakdown muscle tissue to use as energy, which is a complete no-no. Cooking method: Place the oats in a bowl and pour the milk over the top just slightly covering them. Microwave on full power for 2 minutes or until the it turns thick and creamy. Add the cinnamon and blueberries and mix together well before adding the Greek yogurt on top. Drizzle the honey over the yogurt and dig in. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.6g Carbs – 39.9g Fat – 7.7g

Total kcals – 335.3 kcals

Chapter 6: Healthy Deserts Just because you’re trying to build muscle, it doesn’t mean you can’t treat yourself and give in to sugar cravings now and again. I’ve created some of the most delicious and flavoursome low-calorie deserts below, for you to include into your new diet to keep you sane. The protein oat & berry bars are a personal favourite of mine, as they can be consumed to supplement a meal, before or after a workout to energise or replenish and they’re loaded with protein and very little fat. The trick is to eat as fresh as possible, try to experiment with organic foods, it’s all about knowing what’s a good substitute! Honey’s a beautiful substitute for table sugar and has way less calories. Also, preparing deserts yourself, you’re eliminating the additives that food industry’s use to make their products last. Here are a few of my high protein deserts, that I personally indulge in when I experience mad sugar cravings. Enjoy!

51. Oat & Berry Protein Bars (8 servings) Ingredients: Dry mix: 2 cups oatmeal 3 scoops whey protein powder (unflavoured) ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup mixed berries 1 tsp cinnamon Wet mix ¼ cup organic honey ¼ cup natural peanut butter ¼ cup almond milk ¼ cup unsweetened apple sauce ¼ cup 70% dark chocolate 1 tsp vanilla extract Cooking method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 8 pieces and enjoy as a desert or a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 16g Carbs – 35.3g Fat – 8.8g

Total kcals – 284.4 kcals

52. Fruit & Nut Yogurt Ingredients: 3 tbsp. Greek yogurt ¼ cup hazelnuts (crushed) ¼ cup strawberries (cut in half) ¼ cup blueberries 1 tbsp. milk chocolate sauce 1 tbsp. organic honey Place the strawberries, blueberries and hazelnuts in a bowl. Pour the Greek yogurt over the top, drizzle the chocolate and honey over the top and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.2g Carbs – 43.4g Fat – 20.3g

Total kcals – 445.1 kcals

53. Protein Packed, Blueberry & Banana Pancakes (x4 servings) Ingredients: 1 cup whole wheat flour ½ cup white flour 2 tbsp. sugar 2 tsp baking powder ¼ tsp salt 3 ripe medium bananas 1 cup skimmed milk 1 large egg 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 ½ cups frozen blueberries 4 tbsp. maple syrup Cooking method: Preheat your oven to 250 degrees. Spray a layer of oil into a large non-stick frying pan and preheat on a medium heat. Add both flours, the salt, sugar and baking powder in a bowl and mix together with a fork and put to one side. In another bowl mash the 3 bananas together until their mushy. In a blender put the mushy bananas, the egg, milk and vanilla and blend together. Throw in the dry mix and blend for 10-15 seconds. Try not to over blend the mix as you still want it to have tiny lumps in it. With a large soup serving spoon, put a 3 tbsp. of pancake mix onto the pan for each pancake. On top of each pancake put ½ tbsp. blueberries. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the bubbles start to appear around the edges, then flip and cook for another minute. Put the cooked pancakes onto a plate and put in the oven to keep warm while you cook the rest. Serve the pancakes with the maple syrup drizzled over the top of them and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 43.1g / 10.8g per serving Carbs – 311.4g / 77.9g per serving Fat – 10.7g / 2.7g per serving

Total kcals – 1513.7 kcals

54. Strawberries & Banana Frozen Yogurt Ingredients: 2 medium ripe bananas 2 tbsp. frozen Greek yogurt 2 large strawberries (sliced in half) 1 tbsp. milk chocolate sauce Cut the bananas into quarters and throw them in a blender along with the frozen Greek yogurt. Blend until mixed well. Pour the ingredients into a bowl, jab the strawberries into the yogurt and drizzle with the chocolate sauce. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 14.6g Carbs – 69.9g Fat – 3.6g

Total kcals – 370.4 kcals

55. Nutty Strawberry Milkshake Ingredients: 250ml skimmed milk 1 cup frozen strawberries 1 large banana ¼ cup slithered almonds Blend all ingredients together with ice and serve immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 16g Carbs – 60.4g Fat – 17.6g

Total kcals – 464 kcals

56. Instant Protein Brownie Ingredients: 1 large egg 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) 1 tsp skimmed milk ¼ tsp baking powder 1 tbsp. Cadbury’s drinking chocolate powder Cooking method: In a large mug add all the ingredients and mix together well with a fork for 2 minutes. Throw the mix in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix rises above the mug. Once it has risen it’s ready to eat! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 35.5g Carbs – 19.5 Fat – 5.4g

Total kcals – 268.6 kcals

57. Chocolate orange mousse Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) ¼ cup water ½ avocado (ripe) ¼ cup almond flakes (crushed) ½ cup ice 2 tbsp. options hot chocolate orange powder Cooking method: Blend the water and protein powder together then add the orange chocolate powder and avocado and blend again. If you’re going to eat it straight away throw in the ice for 30 seconds, if not pour the mix into a small bowl and put into the fridge. Sprinkle the crushed almonds over the top of the mousse before you eat and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36.3g Carbs – 25.6g Fat – 27.2g

Total kcals – 492.4 kcals

58. Strawberry Frozen Yogurt Ingredients: 1/2 cup fat free Greek yogurt 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) 1 tbsp. organic honey 1 cup frozen yogurt 2 tbsp. 70% cocoa powder Blend all ingredients together and pour into a small bowl. Add a handful of sliced strawberries for topping and eat! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 43.7g Carbs – 69.4g Fat – 3g

Total kcals – 479.4 kcals

59. Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites (12 servings) Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein powder 3 tsp Cadbury hot chocolate powder ¼ cup milled flax seed 150g organic peanut butter 1 tbsp. organic honey 2 tbsp. organic dark chocolate chips (70% cocoa) Cooking method: Mix the whey protein powder, organic peanut butter and milled flax seed together in a small bowl until the powder is no longer visible. Mix well before adding the organic honey – mix again. Then add the dark chocolate chips and mix together with all ingredients with your hands and roll into 12 1inch balls. Place the balls into a plastic tub and place in the fridge for at least an hour to harden. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 74.3g / per serving – 6.2g Carbs – 89.3g / per serving – 7.4g Fat – 96.7g / per serving – 8.1g

Total kcals – 1524.7 kcals / per serving – 127.3 kcals

60. Peanut butter toasty Ingredients: ½ scoop whey protein powder 3 tsp Cadbury drinking chocolate powder 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 slice whole wheat bread Cooking method: Grab a small bowl and insert all ingredients and add a tbsp. of water – mix to achieve a thick consistency. Avoid making the mix too watery, it needs to be thick enough to spread. Once you’ve prepared the mix, simply spread over one side of bread evenly and either put it under a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster – grill until both sides are toasted for 2 mins. Serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.3g Carbs – 47.6g Fat – 10.6g

Total kcals – 375 kcals

Chapter 7: Immediately Post-Workout Although no evidence suggests that consuming a protein shake immediately after a workout is more effective than consuming a solid meal, the theory is, if you blend foods, the body will digest and absorb them into the bloodstream to feed your muscles a lot quicker, as the digestion process is significantly faster. We’ve all been told how important it is to eat something high in protein within 20-30 minutes of working out, but why? Well, when you’re exercising your muscles, you’re actually breaking down muscle tissue, so contrary to belief, you don’t grow in the gym. You grow when you rest and the main ingredient that helps repair and grow muscles, is protein. Whey protein is the most easily absorbed and ingested to repair and build new muscle tissue, but if you don’t believe in supplements, there are some organic recipes to try down below that can be just as effective, especially if on a budget. Also, with your immediate post-workout shake, add some simple carbs as they’re digested quickly, they prevent your body from breaking down its own muscle tissue, and encourage muscle synthesis. It doesn’t have to be a shake, just as long as the food you consume can be quickly digested. Avoid any type of casein protein powder, or anything that contains slow release proteins, because they won’t be as effective.

61. Shake & Jam Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein (unflavoured) 250ml skimmed milk 2 slices white bread (toasted) 1 tbsp. jam (any flavour to spread) I like to consume protein shakes with milk as I prefer the flavour and consistency, but if you want to maximise the rate in which you absorb the protein, use water instead. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 40.4g Carbs – 56.4g Fat – 6.7g

Total kcals – 447.5 kcals

62. Milk & Pancakes Ingredients: 450ml skimmed milk 3 plain pancakes (toasted) A traditional favourite, another simple recipe for those who are on a budget or who don’t wish to purchase supplements. Rich in protein and packed with simple carbs. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.4g Carbs – 69.9g Fat – 7g

Total kcals – 432.2 kcals

63. Strawberry Whey Protein Bliss Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein (unflavoured) 250ml almond milk 36g oats (1 sachet) 1 tbsp. strawberry nesquick drinking powder ¼ cup strawberries Whey protein is the most rapidly digested protein available on the market and adding raw oats adds a hefty amount of carbs to the drink, to refuel and re-energise your body. Blend the ingredients together and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 42.9g Carbs – 56.1g Fat – 10.1g

Total kcals – 486.9 kcals

64. Organic Protein Smoothie Ingredients: 250ml almond milk 1 large banana 50g oats ¼ slithered almonds 2 tbsp. frozen yogurt ¼ cup mixed berries 1 tbsp. organic honey 2 tbsp. chocolate nesquick drinking powder Again, this is great for those who don’t wish to purchase expensive supplements. Blend all ingredients together and consume immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.1g Carbs – 129.4g Fat – 19.6g

Total kcals – 794.4 kcals

65. Tuna & Peanut Butter Toasty Ingredients: 2 sprays 1 calories pam oil 2 slices white bread 2 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 small tin of tuna in water (80g) 1 apple Cooking method: White bread isn’t usually the healthiest choice of carbohydrates, but in this instance, we’re looking to quickly refuel, and as white bread is digested and absorbed into the bloodstream almost instantly, it’s the perfect choice. Spread the peanut butter evenly over the 2 slices of bread. Drain the water from the tinned tuna and make a sandwich. Spray the top and bottom of the sandwich with the oil, and place on a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster for 2-3 mins, or until both sides are toasted. Serve with an apple. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.2g Carbs – 50.7g Fat – 18.6g

Total kcals – 475 kcals

66. Egg on Toast Ingredients: 2 sprays 1 calories pam oil 2 large eggs (omelette style) 2 slices white bread (toasted) 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 medium apple (sliced) 1 tbsp. skimmed milk ¼ tsp paprika 1 pinch sea salt and black pepper Cooking method: Pre-heat your frying pan over a medium heat and spray with the oil. Beat the eggs in a small bowl with the skimmed milk, paprika and salt and pepper seasoning. Add the mixture to the pan and leave for 1 minute or until underneath is cooked. Use a plastic spatula to flip the egg and turn the heat off immediately. Leave for another minute. Toast the bread, spread with the peanut butter and serve with a sliced apple. Enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20.8g Carbs – 48.3g Fat – 19.8g

Total kcals – 454.6 kcals

67. Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty with Milk Ingredients: 2 slices white bread 1 large banana 2 tbsp. peanut butter 300ml skimmed milk Cooking method: Spread 1 tbsp. of peanut butter on one side of both slices bread. Chop the banana into small chunks and put between the 2 slices of bread. Simply put it under a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster and leave for 2-3 mins or until both sides are toasted. Serve with a glass of skimmed milk and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 24g Carbs – 77.8g Fat – 18.7g

Total kcals – 575.5 kcals

68. Sweet Coconut & Berry Delight Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein powder (unflavoured) ¼ cup mixed frozen berries ¼ cup oats 1 tbsp. organic honey 2 tbsp. fat free yogurt (coconut flavoured) 250ml skimmed milk Cooking method: Add all ingredients into a blender – blend for 1.5-2 minutes and consume immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 43.1g Carbs – 83.1g Fat – 2.7g

Total kcals – 529.1 kcals

69. Turkey Burger Ingredients: 100g turkey steak 1 large white burger bun 100g mixed leaf salad ½ large tomato (sliced) ½ avocado (ripe) Thai sweet chilli sauce (30ml) Cooking method: Place your grill pan on a medium heat and leave for 1-2 minutes. Add the turkey steak and cook for 15 minutes or until cooked through. Put the turkey to one side and keep the grill pan on a medium heat – slice the bun in half and place down on the grill pan cut side down along with the tomatoes. Grill for 2-3 minutes. Once the bread has toasted, spread the avocado on the bun, add the tomatoes, turkey, leafy salad and drizzle the Thai sweet chilli sauce over the top. Amazing! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g Carbs – 51.2g Fat – 18.1g

Total kcals – 486.5 kcals

70. Peanut Butter Jelly Bagel & Strawberry Milkshake Ingredients: 1 white bagel 1 tbsp. strawberry jam 1 tbsp. peanut butter 350ml skimmed milk Large banana (chopped) ¼ cup strawberries 3 heaped tsp strawberry nesquick Cooking method: Add the banana, strawberries, nesquick powder and milk to your blender and blend for 2 minutes. Pour into a glass and place to one side. Cut the bagel in half and toast for 2 minutes or until lightly toasted on each side. Spread the peanut butter on the one half and jam on the other half – serve immediately. Delicious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 35.8g Carbs – 144.4g Fat – 14.5g

Total kcals – 851.3 kcals

Chapter 8: Vegan/Vegetarian Friendly, High Protein Recipes If you’re Vegan, Vegetarian, having a break from meat or just want to try something new, then these recipes are definitely worth a try. Each recipe is loaded with protein, complex carbohydrates and healthy fats. It’s a misconception that vegans cannot absorb as much protein as meat eaters, but fortunately, this isn’t the case. Every plant has a complete amino acid profile, it’s just that the ratio of acids varies from plant to plant. When you think of a plant-based diet, you imagine lettuce, broccoli, spinach etc. But in essence, beans and legumes are the base of Vegan Bodybuilding and most general high protein diets, as they’re loaded with complete proteins and are the core part of a plant-based diet. Proteins are made up of small amino acids which are building blocks, there are 20 different amino acids and are all joined together in chains. The reason we require amino acids, is that if we didn’t include them in our diet, our muscles would breakdown, creating muscle loss, as there wouldn’t be sufficient tools to repair the muscle tissues. Animal sources (meat), have complete proteins, meaning they have all the essential amino acids we need for our muscles to grow and repair, whereas plant sources aren’t complete proteins, therefore, to recruit all the essential proteins into your diet that you require, you need to include a wide range of plant sources. Also, a wonderful thing about a plant-based diet, is that it’s relatively inexpensive and very healthy for the body, as you’re consuming all organic goods. It is important however, to develop an understanding of what your body requires with the absence of meat sources, to ensure your body gets all the macro and micronutrients that you require. If you’re interested in beginning a plant-based diet and specifically for Bodybuilding, it’d be wise to visit your GP and Dietician before doing so, as to educate yourself a little more on

nutrition and what your body requires with the absence of animal sources.

71. Sweet & Spicy Beans on a Bed of Potato Ingredients: 1 medium potato (200g) 200g red kidney beans (in water) 200g mixed beans in tomato sauce 1 cup garden peas (fresh/thawed) ½ tsp paprika seasoning ¼ tsp cumin seasoning This is a simple, yet effective dish pre-workout, full of healthy carbohydrates, protein and very low in fat. The ingredients are also cost effective. Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees and start by washing the red kidney beans thoroughly in a colander to avoid the issue of gas – put to one side. Fork the potato several times and place in the microwave for 5 minutes on full power. Put in the oven for a further 25 minutes. In a small pan, add the kidney beans, mixed beans in tomato sauce and peas along with the spices and cook on low for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cut the potato in half and pour the mixed beans on top. Flavoursome and packed full of energy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 35.5g Carbs – 122.6g Fat – 3.2g

Total kcals – 660.8 kcals

72. Rice, Beans & Greens Ingredients: White rice (150g) 300ml water200g Red kidney beans 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans 200g spinach 1 tsp paprika seasoning 1 tsp Jamaican jerk seasoning Cooking method: You don’t need as much carbohydrates such as rice, potatoes and pasta as you would do with a meat dish because there are already a lot of carbohydrates in the source of protein you are getting within the beans. Also, with beans you’re getting a high amount of fibre and that will digest slowly like a complex carbohydrate such as brown pasta, brown rice and sweet potatoes so you can eat a small amount of simple carbohydrates with the beans and vegetables. This is yet another simple and cost-effective dish, great as a pre or post – workout. Wash the red kidney beans thoroughly to avoid gas and add to a small pan together with the baked beans and seasoning. Heat the rice in a medium sized pan – use 300ml of water and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes or until all water is absorbed. For the last 10 minutes put the beans on a low heat for 10 minutes and stir occasionally. Boil the spinach for 6-7 minutes and drain the water. When the rice is cooked add it to the beans and stir, leave for 2 minutes and serve with the side of spinach. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g Carbs – 101.9g Fat – 1.5g

Total kcals – 539.9 kcals

73. Mixed Beans & Sweet Potato Ingredients: Medium sweet potato (150g) 200g broccoli 200g red kidney beans 200g mixed beans in tomato sauce 1 serving soy sauce Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork the potato several times and microwave on full power for 10 minutes. Put in the oven for a further 20 minutes. Meanwhile wash the kidney beans thoroughly and add to a pan with the mixed beans in tomato sauce. Add the soy sauce and cook for the final 10 minutes on a low heat – stirring occasionally. Once everything is cooked, place the broccoli in the microwave for 2 minutes on full power. Cut the potato in half and pour the mix over the top with broccoli on the side. Power foods to boost your energy and fuel your workout. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28.5g Carbs – 94.8g Fat – 3g

Total kcals – 520 kcals

74. Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style Ingredients: 200g green lentils (uncooked) 200g garden peas Medium sweet potato (150g) ¼ cup water ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 medium tomato (chopped) 2 tbsp. parsley 2 tbsp. tomato paste 2 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp salt ½ tsp pepper ½ tsp red chilli powder 500 ml water Cooking method: Throw the tomatoes, garlic, tomato paste, salt, pepper, onion and turmeric in a large non-stick pan with ¼ cup water and cook on a low heat for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. Then add the lentils, peas and 500ml of water, mix together and leave to gently simmer on a low-medium heat for 30 mins or until the mix has a thick consistency. After 20 minutes add the parsley. When the mix has thickened add the chilli, mix and leave to stand for 2 minutes before serving. Meanwhile pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork your potatoes several times and microwave on full power for 10 mins and then put in the oven for a further 20 minutes. Once your dish is ready, serve the lentil soup in a large bowl and potato on a side plate. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.8g Carbs – 80.1g Fat – 2.5g

Total kcals – 450.1 kcals

75. Beans on Toast 2.0 Ingredients: 2 slices whole wheat toast 200g black eye beans 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 200g broccoli 1 tsp smoked paprika seasoning 1 medium fried tomato (sliced in half) ½ tsp garlic seasoning Cooking method: Wash the black eye beans thoroughly before adding them to the baked beans along with the garlic and paprika seasoning in a small pan. Cook on a low heat for 10 minutes – stirring occasionally. Toast the bread and pour the beans over the top. Then simply throw the broccoli in the microwave on full power for 2 minutes. Serve on the side and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 38.9g Carbs – 99.8g Fat – 5.2g

Total kcals – 601.6 kcals

76. Potato & Mixed Bean Hit Ingredients: 150g black eye peas 150g tinned organic garden peas 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce Medium white potato (150g) ¼ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp paprika 1 pinch black cracked pepper Another simple and inexpensive recipe, packed full of energy, awesome as a pre-workout muscle meal. Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Fork the potato several times and microwave on full power for 5 minutes, cook for a further 25 minutes in oven. For the last 10 minutes, add the peas, kidney beans and baked beans to a pan along with the spices and heat on low for 10 minutes – stirring frequently. Cut the potato in half and pour the bean mix on top. Yummy!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 42.2g Carbs – 135.2g Fat – 4g

Total kcals – 745.8 kcals

77. Red Kidney Bean Stir Fry Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans 125g fresh stir fry noodles 1 medium wholemeal cob 200g mixed peppers (frozen chopped) ½ white onion (chopped) ½ large tomato (chopped) 30ml sweet chilli sauce 1 tbsp. soy sauce 2 sprays pam oil Cooking method: Spray the pam oil onto a large wok pan and leave over a medium heat for 2 minutes. Add the onions and red kidney beans and cook for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. Then add the tomato and peppers and cook for a further 5 minutes before adding the noodles and soy sauce. Cook for 5 more minutes and add the sweet chilli sauce. Stir the mix together and leave to stand for one minute before serving with the wholemeal cob. Enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 31.8g Carbs – 120.5g Fat – 2.4g

Total kcals – 618.8 kcals

78. Oats-So-Delicious Ingredients: 72g steel cut oats (2 sachets) 100ml almond milk 1 large banana (sliced) ¼ cup blueberries 1 tbsp. organic honey ¼ cup hazelnuts (crushed) Cooking method: Add the almond milk and oats to a pan and put on a low heat for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. When the porridge starts to thicken, turn the heat off and add the rest of the ingredients and stir – leave for 2 minutes and eat immediately. Remember, although this recipe may seem a little higher in fat, it doesn’t necessarily make it unhealthy. The fat contained within nuts are healthy when eaten in moderation and quite low in saturated fat which is the type of fat you must stay clear of. Saturated fats are mainly found in animal fats, most ready-made products and dairy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 21g Carbs – 90.8g Fat – 23.4g

Total kcals – 657.8 kcals

79. Avocado Baguette Ingredients: 200g whole wheat baguette (½ large baguette) 1 large avocado (ripened) 1 medium tomato (sliced) 200g mixed salad 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar Pinch of salt and pepper to taste Cooking method: Slice the fresh baguette in half and spread the avocado on each of the halves. Top with slices of tomato and salt and pepper to taste. Put the salad in a small bowl and drizzle balsamic vinegar over the top. Light, nutrient-rich and packed with energy – Beautiful. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.5g Carbs – 127.4g Fat – 21.5g

Total kcals – 809.1 kcals

80. Nutty Pasta & Lentils Ingredients: 300g whole wheat pasta 200g green lentils (tinned) 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil 2 tbsp. sundried tomatoes 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 tbsp. tomato paste ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 tsp garlic and rosemary seasoning Cooking method: Pre-heat your grill pan on a low-medium heat, leave for 2 minutes. Add the olive oil, onion, garlic and rosemary seasoning and cook for 5-6 minutes stirring occasionally. Turn the heat right down to low and add the sundried tomatoes, tomato paste and lentils and cook for 1012 minutes – stirring frequently. Whilst you’re cooking the lentils, start boiling the pasta in a separate pan on a medium heat – use 600ml water and cook for 12-14 minutes or until all water is absorbed. Once the pasta is cooked add the peanut butter to the middle and leave for 2 minutes to melt. Mix together and place in the pan to mix together with the rest of ingredients. Eat immediately… yum!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30g Carbs – 112.7g Fat – 15.3g

Total kcals – 708.5 kcals

81. Sweet Potato Fries with a Side of Beans Ingredients: 1 large sweet potato (300g) 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp garlic and rosemary seasoning 100g mixed peppers (frozen) 100g broccoli (frozen 100g black eye peas (¼ of can) 100g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce (¼ can) Cooking method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Wash the sweet potato and cut into French fries, place onto a large dish, drizzle the olive over the top and add the garlic and rosemary seasoning – mix together with your hands. Place in the microwave on full power for 10 mins then put on a baking tray and cook for a further 20 minutes in the oven. For the last 15 minutes, drain the black eyes peas and wash thoroughly and add to a small pan along with the baked beans – cook on a low heat for 10-12 mins stirring occasionally. For the last 10 minutes place the broccoli and mixed peppers in a medium pan and boil on high. Enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32.3g Carbs – 133.6g Fat – 16.9g

Total kcals – 815.7 kcals

82. Chick Pea Grilled Sandwich Ingredients: 2 slices whole wheat 2oz tofu 100g chick peas (tinned in water) 3 sundried tomatoes 1 tbsp. nutritional yeast Salt and pepper seasoning Cooking method: Blend together the tofu, chick peas, sundried tomatoes and nutritional yeast – add the salt and pepper to taste and blend once again for a few seconds. Spread the paste onto one side of each of the slices of bread and make a sandwich. Place onto a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster for 2-3 minutes or until both sides are cooked. Leave to cool for 2 minutes and then dig in! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g Carbs – 100.9g Fat – 8.7g

Total kcals – 600.7 kcals

83. Hot Chilli Chick Pea Tortillas Ingredients: 2 plain tortillas 100g kale 400g chick peas (1 can in water) 2 chipotle peppers (chopped 2 red chilli peppers (chopped) 3-4 red Thai chilli peppers (chopped) 1 tbsp. cracked black pepper ½ large red onion (chopped) 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 2 small tomatoes (quartered) 2 tomato slices 1 tbsp. curry powder 1 tbsp. sugar Cooking method: Add the above ingredients apart from the 2 tomato slices and kale into your blender and blend until you achieve a thick spreadable paste. Throw the tortillas into your microwave for 30-40 seconds on high. Spread the thick paste on both tortillas, add the tomato slices and kale, wrap and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29g Carbs – 143.6g Fat – 8.5g

Total kcals – 766.9 kcals

84. High-Protein Enchiladas (7 servings) Ingredients: 400g Chicken Quorn strips 100g tofu (cut into strips) 400g black beans (1 tin in water) 150g wholegrain rice 100g spinach (frozen) 100g mushrooms (sliced) 56g soy cheese 7 whole wheat tortillas 340g green chilli enchilada sauce (1 jar) Cooking method: Wash the black beans thoroughly to avoid gas. Cook all the above ingredients (apart from the enchilada sauce, soy cheese and tortillas) all according to packaging. Once everything is ready, put 7 tortillas on a large serving plate and place in microwave for 30-40 seconds on full power, then pack the tortillas and wrap on an oven tray tightly together length ways, side by side. Pour the enchilada sauce over and cover the wraps from top to bottom. Grate the soy cheese over the top and put in the oven on 190 degrees C for 20 minutes or until crisp. Serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 132g / per serving – 18.9g Carbs – 246.2g / per serving – 35.2g Fat – 31.5g / per serving – 4.5g

Total kcals – 1796.4 kcals / per serving – 256.9 kcals

85. Protein-Packed Tortilla Blitz Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans (tinned) 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 200g garden peas (frozen) 150g salad leaves 3 tortilla wraps 1 tbsp. paprika seasoning 2 tbsp. Tamari soya sauce 100g broccoli (frozen) 100g mixed peppers (frozen) 30g organic salsa 30g guacamole Cooking method: Wash the kidney beans thoroughly to avoid gas and add to a small pan along with the baked beans and paprika – cook on a lowmedium heat (stirring frequently) for 5 mins and then add the frozen peas. Turn the heat right down to low, cover the pan and leave to cook for a further 15 mins – stirring occasionally. For your side dish, simply boil the broccoli and mixed peppers together in a pan for 10 minutes, place in a small serving bowl and drizzle the soya sauce over the top. Once everything is ready, place 3 tortillas on a plate and microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds. Fill the wraps with the bean mix, salad leaves, salsa and guacamole and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 45.2g Carbs – 101.8g Fat – 6.6g

Total kcals – 647.7 kcals

86. Rice & Beans with a Kick Ingredients: 150g wholegrain rice 300ml water 150g red kidney beans (¼ tin) 200g garden peas (½ tin) 100g broccoli (frozen) 100g spinach (frozen) 1 tbsp. soy sauce 30g organic salsa ¼ tsp garlic powder ¼ tsp coriander seasoning ¼ tsp chilli seasoning 1 pinch sea salt and black pepper Cooking method: Wash the kidney beans thoroughly to avoid gas, add to a small pan along with the garden peas and stir in the spices – leave to one side. Add the rice to a separate pan and pour in 300ml of water – over a medium heat, boil for 10 minutes or until all water has absorbed. Stir occasionally. Simultaneously, cook the beans and peas over a light heat – stirring frequently, especially the bottom of the pan. At the same time, boil the broccoli and spinach together on a medium-high heat for 10 minutes. Once they hit boiling point, drain and add to a small serving bowl, drizzle the soy sauce over the top and put to one side. By now the rice and beans should be done. Add the bean mix to the rice and stir well, then add the salsa and stir once again. Eat immediately – inexpensive and scrumptious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.6g Carbs – 89.1g Fat – 4.9g

Total kcals – 522.9 kcals

87. Sweet Lentils & Rice Ingredients: 200g green lentils (tinned in water) 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 100g garden peas (tinned in water) 100g white rice 200ml water 100g broccoli (frozen) 100g spinach (frozen) Cooking method: Drain the lentils and rinse well to avoid gas, then add them to a medium sized pan along with the baked beans and peas – mix together and put on a low-medium heat for 12-14 minutes stirring frequently. Add the rice and water to a separate pan and boil for 10 minutes or until all water is absorbed. For the last 10 minutes, add the spinach and broccoli to another pan and boil for 10 minutes on a medium-high heat – serve on the side of plate. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 31.1g Carbs – 88.9g Fat – 3.5g

Total kcals – 511.5 kcals

88. Jacket Potato & Sweet Kidney Beans Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans (tinned in water) 100g garden peas (tinned in water) 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 150g white potato 100g broccoli (frozen) 100g spinach (frozen) 1 tbsp. soy sauce ½ tsp smoked paprika seasoning 1 pinch black pepper Cooking method: Wash the kidney beans thoroughly and leave to one side. Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork potato several times and throw in the microwave for 5 mins on full power, put in the oven for a further 25 mins. In a separate pan add the kidney beans, baked beans, peas and seasoning. Mix together thoroughly and cook over a low heat for 12-14 minutes – stirring frequently. For the final 10 minutes, boil the broccoli and spinach over a medium heart, until boiling point. Once they’re done, add to a small serving bowl and drizzle over the soya sauce – put to one side. When the jacket potato is ready, cut in half and pour the mixed beans on top. Flavoursome, inexpensive, relatively fat-free and an excellent source of complex carbs to fuel a gruelling workout! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.2g Carbs – 99.7g Fat – 3.5g

Total kcals – 567.1 kcals

89. Soya & Veggie Burgers (4 servings) Ingredients: 4 whole wheat buns 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 75g soya crumbs ¾ cups water 1 tbsp. red chilli powder 1 tbsp. sea salt ½ cup bread crumbs 5 mushrooms (sliced) ½ red pepper (chopped) ¼ cup fresh coriander leaves 3 jalapeno peppers (finely sliced) 1 cup soaked beaten rice/3 tbsp. red poha 1 large whole egg 4 tbsp. soya cream cheese 1 large tomato 4 tbsp. mustard 100g fresh spinach leaves Cooking method: Put soya crumbs in a large bowl and add the ¾ cup of water, leave to soak for 5 minutes or until all water has absorbed. Once absorbed, fork through the mix and add the bread crumbs – mix with the fork again. Then add the mushrooms, chopped peppers, coriander leaves, jalapeno peppers, beaten rice mix, salt and red chilli powder. Combine all the ingredients and mix well before adding the egg – mix well again. (use flax seeds and water to replace the egg if vegan). With the combined ingredients, make 4 burger patties and put to one side. Put your frying pan on a medium heat, add 1 tbsp. olive oil and wait for 2 minutes to heat up. Add one burger at a time, push down on the mix to ensure a flat surface – leave for 3-4 minutes or until the side has cooked, then flip and leave another 3-4 minutes. Once cooked, put the burger to one side, slice the bun in half and put them cut face down in the pan to lightly toast – 1-2 minutes. (Add another tbsp. olive oil after 2nd burger). Spread 1 tbsp. soya cream cheese on one half of the bun and 1 tbsp. mustard on

the other half. Add the burger in between the slices along with 2 fresh spinach leaves and 2 slices of tomato. Heaven!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 99.7g / per serving – 24.9g Carbs – 184.5g / per serving – 46.1g Fat – 61.1g / per serving – 15.3g

Total kcals 1686.7 kcals / per serving – 345.2 kcals

90. Chick Pea Salad Ingredients: 200g chick peas (ready cooked, tinned & in water) ½ avocado (ripened & chopped) ¼ cup cucumber (chopped) 100g fresh baby spinach ½ red pepper (chopped) 100g fresh sugar snap peas (chopped) 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper 1 tsp sea salt 1 tsp lemon juice Cooking method: Rinse chick peas thoroughly to avoid gas. Add all the above ingredients apart from the salt and pepper, balsamic vinegar and lemon juice onto a large serving bowl and mix together well to combine. In a small bowl combine the dressing – lemon juice, salt, pepper and balsamic vinegar. Mix together for 2 minutes with a fork and drizzle over the salad mix. Refreshing and light to your delight! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 17.7g Carbs – 46.3g Fat – 19.5g

Total kcals – 433.3 kcals

91. Fruit & Nut Fettucine (2 servings) Ingredients: 12 Oz (340g) fettucine 475ml unsweetened soy milk 2 tbsp. soy cream cheese 3 tbsp. almonds (blanched & sliced) 3 tbsp. nutritional yeast 1 tsp lemon zest (grated finely) 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper 1 tsp sea salt 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 3 garlic cloves (finely sliced) ½ cup freshly chopped parsley leaves Cooking method: Grab a large pot, fill with water and bring to the boil before adding your fettucine – cook according to packaging. Once cooked, drain the water through a colander into a bowl – reserve 1 cup of the pasta cooking water and put to one side. In your blender throw in the soy milk, soy cream cheese, almonds, nutritional yeast, lemon zest, salt and pepper and blend until the mix is smooth. In your frying pan, heat the olive oil on a low-medium heat and add the garlic – fry until it just starts to sizzle and softens for around 1 minute. Add the soy milk and reserved pasta water, simmer and cook for 8-10 minutes or until the mixture is thick and creamy. Once it’s ready add the fettucine and fresh parsley and mix together with a wooden spoon. If the sauce is too thick, add a little more pasta water to thin it out. Eat and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 47.3g / per serving – 23.7g Carbs – 96.9g / per serving – 48.4g Fat – 59.2g / per serving – 29.6g

Total kcals – 1109.6 kcals / per serving – 554.8 kcals

92. Spicy Bean Tortilla Dream Ingredients: 100g lentils (tinned in water) 100g red kidney beans (tinned in water) 200g mixed peppers (chopped) 300g mixed vegetables 2 whole wheat tortillas 30g organic salsa 1 tsp red chilli powder ½ white onion (chopped) 1 tbsp. garlic and rosemary seasoning 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning ½ avocado (ripened & chopped) Cooking method: Wash the red kidney beans and lentils thoroughly to avoid gas and place in a medium non-stick pan – put on a low heat for 6-7 minutes. Then add the chopped peppers and onions and cook for a further 67 minutes – stir frequently. Then add the garlic and rosemary seasoning, jerk seasoning and organic salsa and let it simmer for another 6-7 minutes, stir again. Then add the chilli powder, stir and turn the heat off, leave to settle for 2 minutes. For the last 10 minutes of the total cooking process put your mixed vegetables in a separate pan and boil. When that’s boiled, drain and put in a serving bowl as a side dish. Finally place your 2 tortillas in the microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, spread the avocado on both tortillas, add the bean mix and wrap – serve with the side of veg and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32.6g Carbs – 100.3g Fat – 26.9g

Total kcals – 773.8 kcals

93. Spaghetti Lentils (2 servings) Ingredients: 200g whole wheat spaghetti 100g lentils 25g vegan cheese (grated) 3 sprays pam oil ½ tin organic tomatoes 100g mushrooms ¼ cup fresh basil 1 tbsp. tomato paste 2 garlic cloves (crushed) ½ white onion (sliced) Cooking method: Wash the lentils thoroughly to avoid gas and put to one side. In a large frying pan add the pam oil, put on a low-medium heat and leave for 2 minutes. While you’re waiting for the pan to heat, in a separate pan add the spaghetti and boil for 12-14 minutes or according to packaging – drain and leave to one side. Then add the garlic and onion – lightly fry for 6-7 minutes. Next add the tinned tomatoes, lentils, tomato paste, mushrooms and fresh basil – cook for a further 12-14 minutes on a gentle simmer, stirring occasionally. When that is ready simply add the spaghetti and stir well before sprinkling the cheese alternative over the top. Split into two bowls and serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 42g Carbs – 161.5g Fat – 17.8g

Total kcals – 974.2 kcals

94. Alternative Mac N Cheese (4 servings) Ingredients: 500g macaroni pasta 4 medium potatoes (peeled & chopped) 1 cup raw cashews 1 tbsp. mustard ½ white onion (chopped) 50g nutritional yeast 1 tbsp. sea salt 2 tbsp. garlic powder 2 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. paprika 3 medium carrots (chopped) Cooking method: Put the potatoes and carrots into a large pot and boil for 10 minutes on a high heat, then add the onion for a further 10 minutes. Boil until the potatoes feel soft – fork the potatoes, if you stab it and the potato falls off the fork they’re ready. Drain, keeping 2 cups of the drained water and leave to one side. Add the macaroni to another pan and cook according to packaging. While the pasta is cooking… grab your blender and add the cashews, garlic powder, onion powder, nutritional yeast, mustard, paprika, salt, the 2 cups of the boiled water as well as the boiled potatoes, carrots and onion. Blend for 1-2 minutes until the mix is smooth. When the pasta has cooked, drain and add the smooth mix from the blender one small amount at a time – stirring well each time you add a little. Once the pasta and sauce are mixed together, split into 4 separate bowls and serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 138.9g / per serving – 34.7g Carbs – 595.9g / per serving – 149g Fat – 108.4g / per serving – 27.1g

Total kcals – 3914.9 kcals / per serving – 843.2 kcals

95. Chunky Bean Veggie Soup Ingredients: 200g black beans (tinned in water) 200g sweet potato (chopped into small chunks) 4 medium tomatoes 200g fresh kale (chopped) 100g fresh broccoli 100g frozen peas 100g carrots (chopped into chunks) 1 small white onion (sliced) 2 tbsp. curry powder 1 tsp sugar 1 tbsp. cayenne powder Cooking method: In a large pot add the chopped carrots and onion and cook until the onions become translucent. While they’re cooking, blend the 4 tomatoes until you achieve a smooth mix, then when the onions are ready, pour in the tomato mix and stir well, then add the black beans and stir again. (wash the beans thoroughly before use to avoid gas problems). Next add the sugar, cayenne and curry powder and stir well. Then throw in the chopped kale, broccoli, peas and sweet potato – mix well again. Finally add just enough water to cover the vegetables as you want to achieve a chunky soup. Cover the mix and cook on a medium-high heat until you reach a boil, then turn the heat right down to low and simmer for 30 minutes or until all vegetables are cooked. Delicious!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.5g Carbs – 136.4g Fat – 7g

Total kcals – 766.6 kcals

96. Chick Pea Curry (3 servings) Ingredients: 300g wholegrain rice 200g chick peas 100g fresh kale 1 large tomato (chopped into chunks) 1 large carrot (finely chopped) 1 medium white onion (finely chopped) 2 garlic cloves ¼ cup fresh ginger (finely chopped) 3 tbsp. tomato paste ¼ cup slithered almonds (chopped) 2 tbsp. curry powder 1 small red pepper (finely chopped) 1 handful chopped coriander leaves 1 tsp red chilli Cooking method: Put your rice in a pan and add 600ml water, bring to the boil and then simmer on a low-medium heat for 20 minutes or until all water has absorbed. At the same time in a pot steam the kale and for 25 minutes on a medium heat. Then wash the chick peas thoroughly. In a non-stick grill pan start cooking the onions, ginger and garlic with ¼ cup water over a medium heat, add the tomato paste, chilli and curry powder, another ¼ cup water and stir to combine. Bring the mix to a boil, add the chick peas and 1 cup water, bring back to a boil and then simmer on a low heat for 15 minutes or until the sauce thickens. Add the fresh coriander leaves and stir. Then add the carrots, red pepper and another ½ cup of water, then add the kale and peas – stir to combine. Keep heat on low for 6-7 minutes before adding the rice and almonds – stir to combine and leave to stand for 2-3 minutes before serving. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 57.1g / per serving – 19g Carbs – 235.6g / per serving – 78.5g

Fat – 82.5g / per serving – 27.5g

Total kcals – 1913.3 kcals / per serving – 637.5 kcals

97. Soy Meat Tortillas Ingredients: 50g soy meat 3 whole wheat wraps 2 medium tomatoes ¾ cup cucumber 100g mixed beans 100g soy yogurt ½ can sweetcorn (tinned) 100g fresh lettuce 2 garlic cloves 1 tsp oregano 1 tsp thyme ¼ tsp pepper 1 tsp salt 1 tsp Jamaican jerk 1 tsp paprika 1 tbsp. BBQ sauce Cooking method: Cut your vegetables and salad into small pieces and put to one side. in a small bowl add your yogurt, grate 1 clove of garlic on top and add the oregano, paprika, pepper, BBQ sauce, then stir and taste before adding any extra salt – mix well and leave to one side. Next cook your soy meat according to packaging (using water). Once cooked add the Jamaican jerk, 2nd grated garlic clove and 1 tsp salt and mix to combine. Then put your whole wheat wraps in the microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, fill and roll! Scrumptious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36g Carbs – 127.3g Fat – 17.3g

Total kcals – 808.9 kcals

98. Spaghetti Lentil Bolognaise (2 servings) Ingredients: 400g whole wheat spaghetti 200g dried lentils (uncooked) 120g organic tinned tomatoes 1 medium white onion 1 large stick of celery 1 clove garlic 120g soy milk (unsweetened) 1 large carrot 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp sage 1 sprig rosemary 1 tsp salt 2 vegetable stock cubes (500ml water per cube) Cooking method: Start by slicing the celery length ways and then dicing finely, then do the same for the carrot, onion, garlic and rosemary. Place them into a non-stick pan and add ¼ cup water and cook for 5 minutes on a medium heat – stir frequently then add the sage. Cook until the onion turns translucent before adding the lentils, stir to combine and leave for 2 minutes before adding the vegetable stock with 1L of water. Bring to a gentle simmer on a low heat, cover the pan with a lid and leave for 20 minutes – stir occasionally. Then add the tomatoes, chilli powder, soy milk, and salt – stir well to combine and cook to a gentle simmer remaining on a low heat and leave for a further 15 mins or until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally. (keep covered with lid). For the last 12-14 minutes add the spaghetti to a large pan and boil until cooked through – drain, add to the sauce, stir well and serve immediately!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 47.8g Carbs – 189.3g Fat – 8.6g

Total kcals – 1025.8 kcals

99. Tofu Tortillas Ingredients: 75g tofu (crumbled) 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 whole wheat tortillas 3 medium spring onions (chopped) 1 red onion (finely sliced) 2 tbsp. organic salsa 1 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. turmeric 1 tsp salt Cooking method: Start by heating your saucepan on a low-medium heat, add the olive oil and leave to heat up for 2 minutes. Add the spring onion and red peppers – leave for 2-3 minutes and stir. Then add the tofu and cook for a further 10 minutes or until it starts to brown – stirring frequently. Next, add the onion powder, turmeric and salt and mix together well – turn heat right down to low and cook for a further 10 minutes. Finally put your tortillas in a microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, add the cooked ingredients, top with the salsa, wrap and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 23.8g Carbs – 58.6g Fat – 23.3g

Total kcals – 539.3 kcals

100. Whole Hearty Vegan Fettuccine Ingredients: 100g butter beans (tinned in water) 250g whole wheat fettuccine 2 medium white onions (finely sliced) 2 tins organic tomatoes (diced) 100g fresh baby spinach leaves 1 tbsp. tomato paste 1 tbsp. coconut sugar 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp garlic powder 1 tsp oregano 1 tsp basil 200ml water Cooking method: Start by washing the butter beans thoroughly to avoid any gas problems. Grab a large non-stick pan and put the beans on a lowmedium heat for 6-7 mins – stirring occasionally. Then turn the heat right down to low, mash the beans, add the onions and 50ml water and cook for 2-3 minutes stirring occasionally. Then add the tomatoes, chilli, garlic, oregano, basil and stir well. Add 150ml water and turn the heat up to high to bring to the boil and then turn heat back down to low again and simmer until the mix thickens. While you’re waiting for the sauce to thicken, boil the fettuccine in a separate pan according to packaging, then drain and leave to one side. Once the sauce has thickened to your desire, turn the heat off, sprinkle in the coconut sugar and mix well. Finally add the spinach leaves and leave to settle for 2-3 minutes before adding the fettuccine – mix well and serve straight away! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30g Carbs – 131.6g Fat – 4.5g

Total kcals – 686.9 kcals

Chapter 9: How to calculate your energy needs Next you need to work out your energy needs using the following formula: Energy requirements = BMR (basal metabolic rate) + PAL (physical activity level). BMR (basal metabolic rate) BMR is the minimum calorie needs and energy an individual requires in order to sustain life while at rest and to maintain your body’s normal function. In an individual that’s sedentary, BMR can make up to 75% of your overall energy requirements. It’s largely determined by the amount of lean muscle tissue that the individual possesses. The leaner the individual, the higher their BMR is likely to be. You can see now why it’s so vital to maintain as much muscle as possible, to ensure you maintain a sufficient BMR. People who follow diets that consist of extreme starvation for the “quick fix,” often lose a lot of muscle, for obvious reasons. Therefore, your BMI would drop also, causing a lower kcal requirement. People that follow extreme diets often experience an unexpected weight increase once they return to their normal eating habits, as they forget to account for a reduced BMR from the amount of lean muscle tissue lost. To estimate your BMR, all you need is your bodyweight in Kg or lbs. The Schofield method is a very effective method used to estimate the BMR in kcals for the average man and woman. An individual’s age, weight and gender, are all considered in the equations, they’re very accurate for the average adult, but they don’t consider an individual’s body composition. Therefore, an individual’s kcal needs may be underestimated if they’re very lean and muscular and in turn, over estimate the kcal needs of an obese individual.

To calculate your BMR use the table below: BMR (kcal/day) Age

BMR Male

BMR Female

10-17 years

17.7 x W + 657

13.4 x W + 692

18-29 years

15.1 x W + 692

14.8 x W + 487

30-59 years

11.5 x W + 873

8.3 x W + 846

60-74 years

11.9 x W + 700

9.2 x W + 687

W = weight in kg

This gives you an approx. figure for how many kcals an individual use’s in a 24-hr period. To convert stone to kg multiply weight in stone by 14 and divide by 2.2. To convert body weight from lbs to kg divide weight in lbs by 2.2. So, if we calculate Jane’s BMR the calculation would be as follows: Jane is a 43-year-old female and she weighs 88.9 kg. 8.3 x 88.9 (kg) + 846 = 1584 Physical activity level table Lifestyle

Occupation

PAL

Sedentary

Desk job, no exercise, little energy expenditure.

< 1.2

Lightly active

20-30 minutes of exercise up to 3 days per week.

Moderately active

Active lifestyle and exercise up to 4-5 days per week.

Very active

Sport specific training intensely for 5-6 hours per week and hard labour occupations.

Extremely active

Athletes who spend more than 10 hours per week training and other activities outside of training.

1.3 - 1.4 1.5 – 1.6

1.7 – 1.8

1.9 - 2.2

The next step is to multiply your BMR by your PAL. Jane is a sedentary office worker and gets little to no exercise, therefore, her PAL would be 1.2 so the following equation would be as follows: 1584 x 1.2 = 1900 kcals per day (energy requirements). So, this is the daily requirements that Jane should be consuming for her weight and lifestyle, but obviously she’s consuming a lot more than this and

with no exercise, she’s sure to put on excess weight. Once Jane has reached her goal of losing 21.33 kg or reduced her BF% to 25% and exercising regularly, her PAL will change to moderately active and therefore multiply her BMR by 1.3-1.4 accordingly to maintain new weight and BF%. Now that we’ve calculated Jane’s energy requirements, we can break down how much energy we require from each macronutrient. According to the eat well plate, the percentage of each individual macronutrient we should consume each day from your total energy needs are as follows:

Protein – 4 kcals per 1g Carbohydrate – 4 kcals per 1g Fat – 9 kcals per 1g

Jane’s energy requirements per day: 1900 kcals So, to find out each individual macronutrient (Carbohydrates, Fats & Protein) we must use this formula: Total energy requirement x 0.55/ 0.30/ 0.15 (percentage of macronutrient) ÷ Macronutrient in kcals to find out what it is in grams.

(1900 x 0.55 = 1045 ÷ 4 = 261)) So, for carbohydrates which should be 50-55% of your diet, Jane should consume approx. 261g daily. Next, we’ll do the same for fat. (1900 x 0.30 = 570 ÷ 9 (remember that for 1g of fat there are 9 kcals) = 63) So, for fat which is 30-35% of her daily needs, she should consume 63g. Next, we’ll do the same for protein. (1900 x 0.15 = 285 ÷ 4 = 71) So, Jane should consume 10-15% of her daily needs from protein which is 71g. Carbohydrates – 261g (1045 kcals) Fat – 63g (570 kcals) Protein – 71g (285 kcals) So, if we add these numbers together in the brackets that are in kcals: 1045 + 570 + 285 = 1900 kcals (total energy requirements). The reason we break each of these down into grams, is because most nutrient values on food packets show each macronutrient in grams, so when it comes to your diet plan it becomes a lot easier for you to create.

Total energy requirements to maintain weight With the type of training you do your carbohydrate and protein should be adjusted accordingly compared with the eat well plate to maintain energy levels and to repair and increase muscle size. Type of exercise

Daily protein requirements (g)

Endurance – low to moderate intensity

1.0 – 1.2

Endurance – moderate to high intensity

1.2 – 1.6

Exercise of intermittent nature e.g football

1.4 – 1.7

Strength or power training

1.6 – 2.0

Multiply bodyweight (kg) by daily protein requirement (g)

Activity level (number of hours of moderate intensity exercise of sports)

Grams of carbohydrate / kg bodyweight

3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

5-7 hours per week

5-6g per kg bodyweight

1-2 hours per day

6-7g per kg bodyweight

2-4 hours per day

7-8g per kg bodyweight

More than 4 hours per day

8-10g per kg bodyweight

Multiply bodyweight (kg) by daily carbohydrate requirement (g)

So, for example Jane has reached her long-term goal of weighing 68 kg. She’s moderately active, has an active lifestyle and exercises 4-5 times per week aerobically, therefore her new PAL is 1.5. Moderately active

Active lifestyle and exercise up to 4-5 days per week.

1.5 – 1.6

Jane’s new energy requirements are as follows. BMR formula – 8.3 x 68 + 846 = 1410 BMR = 1410 BMR x PAL 1410 x 1.5 = 2115 total kcal energy requirements Macronutrient breakdown using carbohydrate and protein requirements above: Carbohydrates 3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

5g / per kg bodyweight 5 x 68 = 340g (1360 kcals) Protein Endurance – moderate to high intensity

1.4 x bodyweight (kg) 1.4 x 68 = 95g (380 kcals)

1.2 – 1.6

Add protein & carbohydrate requirements together in kcals 1360 + 380 = 1740 kcals Now we can work out Jane’s fat requirements by subtracting her protein and carbohydrate requirements from her total kcal requirements. Total kcals – protein and carbohydrate requirements = fat requirements 2115 – 1740 = 375 kcals Now you need to divide the fat requirements by 9 to get in grams 375 ÷ 9 = 42g Carbohydrates – 1360 kcals Protein – 380 kcals Fat – 375 kcals 1360 + 380 + 375 = 2115 kcals

Some useful information on carbohydrate consumption Before exercise

During exercise lasting more than 60 minutes

After exercise

Between daily session

How much

2.5g \ kg bodyweight

70g \ hour

1g \ kg bodyweight

5-10g \ kg bodyweight depending on intensity

Time period

2-4 hours before exercise

Begin after 30 minutes and take at regular intervals

Up to two hours and then every two hours

Plan and time appropriately to meet recommended intake in time period between session

Glycaemic index (GI)

Low

High

High – low

Low

Example foods

Bowl of muesli with semi skimmed milk

1-2 Bananas

Fresh fruit smoothie made with yogurt and milk

Stir fried noodles and vegetables

Bowl of Spaghetti Bolognese and salad Jacket potato with baked beans

Handful of dried fruit such as chopped apricots or raisins

Cereal bar Slice of malt loaf Tuna and low-fat crème fraiche Tuna and sweetcorn sandwich on wholegrain bread

Beans on wholegrain toast Jacket potato with cottage cheese and salad ½ large pizza with tomato and vegetable-based topping

Bodybuilding Cookbook: 200 more nutritious and delicious bodybuilding recipes to sculpt the perfect physique

Contents Chapter 1: Pre-Workout Menu 1.

Creamy Cajun Chicken Tortillas

2.

Turkey Burger

3.

Mixed Beans on Toast with a Twist

4.

Peanut Butter & Banana English Muffin with Sweets

5.

Pasta with Chicken & Greens

6.

Creamy Tuna Pasta

7.

Jamaican Inspired Rice & Peas

8.

Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty

Chapter 2: Post-Workout Menu 9.

Sweet Chicken Tikka Tortillas

10.

Bagel with a Treat

11.

Posh Fish & Chips

12.

Sweet & Sour Chicken Curry

13.

Chicken Fried Rice

Chapter 3: Non-Training Day Menu 14.

Classy Salmon Sandwich with Orange, Mango and Blackberry Juice

15.

Salmon, Asparagus & Sweet Potato Fries

16.

Skinny-Sweet Tuna Salad

17.

Bass Fillet with Sweet Potato Fries

18.

Jerk-Turkey, Rice & Greens

19.

Chick Pea Salad

20.

Bed of Avocado + Chocolate Milk

21.

Chicken Salad with Personality

22.

Sticky Jerk Chicken

Chapter 4: Breakfast Menu 23.

Apple & Blueberry Porridge

24.

Muesli Fruit Mix Combo (servings: 2)

25.

Hearty Breakfast

26.

Banana & Blueberry Pancakes

27.

Fruit & Berry Porridge (servings: 2)

28.

Bacon & Egg English Muffin

29.

Oats-So-Delicious (servings: 2)

30.

Nutty Oats

Chapter 5: Healthy Desert Menu 31.

Chocolate Mousse

32.

D.I.Y Chocolate Orange Protein Bars (servings: 8)

33.

Banana with Passion

34.

Tropical Frozen Yogurt

35.

Mixed Fruit Energy Bars (servings: 4)

36.

Peanut Butter & Banana Chocolate Sandwich

37.

Blackberry Frozen Yogurt

38.

Chocolate Orange Mousse (servings: 2)

39.

D.I.Y Oat & Berry Protein Bars (servings: 8)

40.

Chocolate Mousse

41.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites (servings: 12)

42.

Peanut Butter & Chocolate Protein Toasty

43.

D.I.Y Chocolate & Cranberry Protein Bars (servings: 8)

44.

D.I.Y Granola Protein Bars (servings: 8)

45.

D.I.Y Chocolate Orange Protein Bars (servings: 8)

46.

D.I.Y Chocolate Coconut Granola Bars (servings: 10)

Chapter 6: Vegan/Vegetarian Menu 47.

Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style (servings: 2)

48.

High-Protein Enchiladas (servings: 7)

49.

Soya & Veggie Burgers (servings: 4)

50.

Chick Pea & Lentil Curry (servings: 4)

51.

Mean Bean Tortilla Dream (servings: 4)

52.

Quorn Chicken & Lentil Risotto (servings: 2)

53.

Quorn Sausage & Garlic Wedges

54.

Quorn Ham, Cheese & Spring Onion Toasty

55.

Chicken Quorn Curry (servings: 2)

56.

Whole Wheat Veggie Special

57.

Vegetable Risotto (servings: 2)

58.

Mixed Bean Stir Fry (servings: 2)

59.

Spicy Mixed Beans on a Bed of Potato (servings: 2)

60.

Rice, Beans & Greens

61.

Mixed Beans & Sweet Potato Special (servings: 2)

62.

Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style (servings: 2)

63.

Beans on Toast 2.0

64.

Mixed Beans & Potato

65.

Red Kidney Bean Stir Fry (servings: 2)

66.

Nutty Pasta & Lentils (servings: 2)

67.

Sweet Potato Fries with a Side of Beans (servings: 2)

68.

Chick Pea Grilled Sandwich

69.

Hot Chilli Chick Pea Tortillas (servings: 2)

70.

High Protein Enchiladas (servings: 7)

71.

Protein-Packed Tortilla Blitz

72.

Rice & Peas

73.

Lentil Soup with Granary Baguette (servings: 2)

74.

Jacket Potato & Sweet Kidney Beans (servings: 2)

75.

Fruit & Nut Fettucine (servings: 2)

76.

Spicy Bean Tortilla Dream

77.

Spaghetti Lentils (2 servings)

78.

Alternative Mac N Cheese (4 servings)

79.

Chunky Bean Veggie Soup

80.

Chick Pea Curry (3 servings)

81.

Soy Meat Tortillas (servings x2)

82.

Spaghetti Lentil Bolognaise (2 servings)

83.

Tofu Tortillas

84.

Whole Hearty Vegan Fettuccine (servings: 2)

85.

Quorn Chicken Tortillas (servings: 2)

86.

Quorn Sausage & Garlic Wedges

87.

Sweet Thai Quinoa

88.

Spicy Mexican Quinoa

Chapter 7: Low Carb Slow Cooker Menu 89.

Slow Cooker Turkey Stew (servings: 6)

90.

Slow Cooker Wild Rice Pilaf (servings: 4)

91.

Slow Cooker Cranberry Chutney (servings: 8)

92.

Slow Cooker Polynesian Chicken (servings: 6)

93.

Slow Cooker Pork Tenderloin (servings: 8)

94.

Slow Cooker BBQ Pulled Pork (servings: 4)

95.

Slow Cooker Red Beans and Rice (servings: 6)

96.

Slow Cooker German Schnitzel (servings: 4)

97.

Slow Cooker Black Beans and Chicken (servings: 6)

98.

Cheesy Spaghetti with Turkey Sausage (servings: 6)

99.

Slow Cooker Chicken and Mushroom Gravy (servings: 6)

100.

Slow Cooker Chicken & Rice (servings: 6)

101.

Slow Cooker Herb Chicken and Vegetables (servings: 4)

102.

Chocolate Bread Pudding with Caramel Sauce (servings: 10)

103.

Slow Cooker Bananas Foster (servings: 3)

104.

Slow Cooker Bread Pudding (servings: 10)

105.

Slow Cooker Brown Rice Pudding (servings: 6)

106.

Slow Cooker Vegetable and Bean Soup (Servings: 6)

107.

Slow Cooker Chicken Tortilla Soup (servings: 10)

108.

Slow Cooker Savory Superfood Soup (servings: 6)

109.

Slow Cooker Butternut Soup (servings: 14)

110.

Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup (servings: 6)

111.

Slow Cooker Cream of Chicken and Rice Soup (servings: 6)

112.

Slow Cooker Fiesta Chicken Soup (servings: 6)

113.

Slow Cooker Black Bean & Veggie Soup (servings: 6)

114.

Slow Cooker Cream of Potato Soup (servings: 6)

115.

Slow Cooker Lentil & Veggie Stew (servings: 6)

116.

Slow Cooker Chicken Chili (servings: 6)

117.

Slow Cooker Chicken Stew (servings: 10)

118.

Slow Cooker Halibut Stew (servings: 4)

119.

Slow Cooker Honey Mustard Turkey Stew (servings: 4)

120.

Slow Cooker Veggie Pot Pie Stew (servings: 4)

121.

Slow Cooker Momma’s Roadhouse Chili (servings: 4)

122.

Slow Cooker Texas Chili servings: 6

123.

Slow Cooker Apple Pie Steel-Cut Oatmeal (servings: 6)

124.

Slow Cooker the 13-Bean Burgoo Stew (servings: 6)

125.

Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce (servings: 6)

126.

Slow Cooker Garlic Mashed Potatoes (servings: 10)

127.

Potatoes with Garlic and Rosemary (servings: 8)

128.

Slow Cooker Macaroni and Cheese (servings: 4)

129.

Slow Cooker Sweet & Savory Sweet Potatoes (servings: 3)

130.

Slow Cooker Southern Style Green Beans (servings: 6)

131.

Slow Cooker Sweet Potato Mash (servings: 6)

132.

Slow Cooker Cornbread Stuffing (servings: 4)

133.

Slow Cooker Apple Crisp (servings: 8)

134.

Slow Cooker Fudge (servings: 6)

135.

Slow Cooker Honey Bananas (servings: 4)

136.

Slow Cooker Pecan Pie (servings: 6)

137.

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Spice Bread Pudding (servings: 10)

138.

Pasta with Eggplant Sauce (servings: 8)

Chapter 8: All-Natural High Protein Smoothie Menu 139.

Sweet Banana Soya Fix

140.

Peaches & Cream Supreme

141.

Tooty-Fruity

142.

Hearty Fruit Smoothie

143.

Lemon & Lime Bitter Twist

144.

Chocolate & Mint (servings: 2)

145.

Hazelnut Bliss

146.

Chocolate Orange (servings: 2)

147.

Fruit & Nut (serving: 2)

148.

Before Bed Desert

149.

Wake Me Up Smoothie

150.

High Carb Energy Boost Smoothie

151.

Green Goodness

152.

Chocolate Berry (servings: 2)

153.

Coffee Mint Cocoa

154.

Raspberry Double Nutty

155.

Thick Chocolate Orange smoothie

156.

Double Chocolate Milkshake (servings: 2)

157.

Vanilla Carb Loader

158.

Chocolate Vanilla Dream

159.

Tropical Smoothie (servings: 2)

160.

Strawberry Delight

161.

Post Cardio Breakfast Smoothie Blitz

162.

Granola Special (servings: 2)

Chapter 9: Whey Protein Smoothie Menu 163.

Breakfast with Strawberry and Oatmeal

164.

Green Chili Avocado

165.

Mango and Banana Lava

166.

Apple Broccoli Cleanse

167.

Peach and Raspberry

168.

Orange and Peach Delight

169.

Beetroot Refresher

170.

Apricot and Carrot Splash

171.

The Green Splash

172.

Berry-Berry

173.

Choco Nut

174.

Caribbean Drive

175.

Ginger and Banana Boost

176.

Watermelon Wonder

177.

All-In Fruit Smoothie

178.

Antioxidant Splash

179.

Pumpkin Pump

180.

Chocolate Sea

181.

Strawberries and Papaya Joy

182.

Coconut Chilling

183.

Vanilla Shake

184.

Banana-Berry Shake

185.

Smooth Peanut Paradise

186.

Triple Sundae Shake

187.

Almond Blast

188.

The Bran Shake

189.

Strawberry Greek Shake

190.

Charming Chocolate Shake

191.

Low Carb Sour Chocolate Bliss

192.

Cheese Shake

193.

Creamy Peach Shake

194.

Honey Spirulina Shake

195.

Banana Based Peanut Smoothie

196.

Pumpkin Pie Shake

197.

Mixed Fruit Shake

198.

Butter-Almond Smoothie

199.

Chilled Barley Broth

200.

Simple Spinach Stuff

201.

Cranberry Cute Shake

202.

Healthy n Hearty Shake

203.

Wise-Water Shake

204.

Squash Shake

205.

Choco Sundae Shake

206.

Java Banana Shake

207.

Hazelnut Choco Shake

208.

Super protein Shake

209.

Peach & Berries

210.

Tropical Shake

211.

Simple Spirulina Shake

212.

Mad Mango Shake

Introduction You may think that a low-carb, low-fat diet is the way forward to achieve weight loss and a healthy lifestyle, but this isn’t necessarily the case. The main macronutrients in the foods we consume are made up of protein, carbohydrates and fat, but it’s the type and how much of each you consume, that really makes the difference. Proteins are mainly found in animal meats and by products, but it’s important to choose from lean sources. For example, lean sources can be found in tuna, salmon, chicken, turkey and eggs. They can also be found in less amounts within nuts, legumes, beans and plant-based sources. It’s often thought within the fitness community, that the more protein you consume, the bigger and leaner your muscles will become, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. For instance, research has found that eating any more than 30g protein per meal sitting, it’s unlikely that your body would be able to utilize it, therefore, the excess that isn’t digested and absorbed, would store as unused energy in the form of fat. The same can be said about carbohydrates and fats, but it depends on your size and genetics to be specific. Protein is essential for muscle growth and certainly contributes to becoming leaner, because it gives you that satiated feeling of fullness. Plus, as you can only consume approx. 20-30g per sitting, to get the correct amount for your body type, it’s a better idea to eat several small meals spread throughout the day, instead of 2-3 big meals. This ensures you absorb all the protein you require, helps you to maintain high energy levels throughout the day and boosts your metabolism. Carbohydrates are a little more complicated, it’s essential that you educate yourself on them, because when you think of losing weight, people tend to cut out carbohydrates all together. This is dangerous, because they’re our main source of energy. Sugar, or the more technical term, ‘glucose,’ is our main energy source, which is released into the bloodstream to use as energy. Carbohydrates are stored in the form of glycogen within your muscles and liver and

depending on the type of carbohydrate, determines how fast the energy is released and broken down into the form of glucose. Now that you understand that not all carbohydrates are the same, let’s look at how to separate the good from the bad and learn when it’s ideal to utilize both types. There are two types of carbohydrates, ‘simple’ and ‘complex.’ Simple carbs are predominantly made up of fast release sugars, therefore, they convert to glucose almost instantly and if the energy isn’t utilized immediately, it stores as fat. They’re mainly found in white starchy foods such as white potatoes, white pasta, spaghetti, white rice and white bread. You may find you can eat lots of simple carbs in one sitting, which is due to the rapid digestion process. The problem is, if you don’t exercise prior to consuming simple carbs, and consume them in every meal sitting, long term, it’s going to affect your blood-sugar and contribute to weight gain. It’s because of the rapid digestion process along with the sudden rush of energy, that people become addicted to this feeling, along with the taste of fast foods and junk foods of course. But these kinds of habits offer no benefit to your health and only lead to obesity and an elevated risk of developing diabetes. That’s not to say that healthy eaters don’t like to indulge in “unhealthy” foods from time to time, you can still eat those foods, it’s more about timing and moderation. Apart from foods high in saturated fat, there aren’t really any unhealthy foods, all foods can serve a purpose, it’s just about timing and quantity. Although simple carbs don’t serve a purpose when you’re trying to lose weight and increase energy levels, they can however, be utilized very well immediately after exercise and up to two hours later. This is because following exercise, your glycogen stores become depleted and as your muscles and liver are like magnets for a certain amount of simple sugars at this stage, consuming simple carbs becomes essential to replenish your energy stores. This, along with a decent amount of protein to repair the muscle tissues and cells of course.

Therefore, it’s essential to top-up your Glycogen stores with complex carbs, at least 1-2 hours before exercise, so that your muscles and liver have sufficient energy to fuel your workout. Hence, this is the reason why a diet consisting of predominantly simple carbs, won’t benefit your workout or energy levels. If you haven’t sufficient glycogen stored, then you aren’t going to have enough energy to build muscle and burn off fat. In simplistic terms, complex carbs before training and simple carbs following training. The easiest way to judge complex carbs from the simple carbs, is to remember that the simple ones are mainly white, and the complex ones are generally brown. Complex carbs are mainly made up of wholegrains, whole wheat, wholemeal and consist of lots of fibre which takes longer to digest. Consequently, the Glycogen breakdown process takes longer to convert to glucose and release into the bloodstream to use as energy. Therefore, it’s best to consume predominantly complex carbs if you’re looking to increase your energy and lose weight, because they keep you stocked up and feeling fuller for longer and when you have a steady flow of energy, you’re less likely to indulge in unhealthy foods. Fibre’s released steadily, it’s good for your gut and best of all, it helps to release energy slowly. So, by consuming a diet predominantly made up of complex carbohydrates, you’re sure to receive a steady release of energy throughout the entire day. Complex carbs can be found in whole wheat pasta, wholegrain rice, grainy breads, raw steel cut oats, sweet potatoes and even within beans and legumes. Just as significant as carbohydrates, are fats. Fats are essential to us as we require them for multiple reasons. A small amount of unsaturated fat is vital for our health, because it helps our body to absorb fat soluble vitamins, such as vitamin A, D, E and they can only be absorbed with the help of other fats. We also use fat as fuel, although your body will always utilise carbohydrate stores as the main energy supply first, it’s only when those stores become depleted, that your body will begin to utilize fat for energy. For instance, if you’re a weight lifter or bodybuilder, your main energy supply would come from carbohydrates, as most sessions usually last around 60 minutes. On the other hand, if you’re a long-distance

endurance runner, then you’d be exercising for 1-3 hours, therefore, initially your body would use the glycogen stores and as they become depleted, it’d switch to utilising fat for energy. It’s not recommended to exercise on an empty stomach, because although the theory states that if you exercise on an empty stomach and have insufficient carb stores available, that your body would utilise its fat stores for energy, it’s completely untrue. In fact, it’s extremely dangerous, your body won’t run on fat stores, it doesn’t work that way. By doing so, your body would break down muscle tissue to utilize as energy, which brings about severe fatigue and all kinds of other problems. The type of fats you must avoid are saturated fats. Too much saturated fat can contribute to high cholesterol, which increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Its recommended that you take in no more than 30g saturated fat per day. Saturated fats are found predominantly in animal meats, butter, lard, cream, meat (sausages, bacon), chocolate and biscuits. When you discover how much of each of the macronutrients you require within your diet, per meal, the eat well plate suggests; 50% Carbohydrates, 35% Protein and 15% Fat. This makes sense as over half of your plate should be made up of complex carbs, which are our main source of energy. Over a quarter of the plate should be made up of protein, which serves many roles such as helping you feel fuller and a small amount of unsaturated fats, which are essential. To lose/put on weight, grow muscle and maintain a thick and full muscular tone, it’s 95% down to diet. I’m not suggesting a boring, flavourless diet, neither am I suggesting you consume healthy foods at each meal sitting. It’s more about eating the right quantity of the right foods, at the right time. Again, there aren’t any bad foods, only bad timing. It’s simple really; before exercise, load up on healthy complex carbs to fuel your glycogen stores so you have sufficient energy to power through the session without becoming fatigued. As mentioned above, the best carbohydrates to consume before exercise, are

brown complex carbs which can be found in sources such as sweet potatoes, wholegrain rice, whole wheat pasta and grainy breads etc. This allows glycogen to be stored and released slowly overtime, unlike simple white carbs, as they’re simple sugars which’re released almost instantly into your bloodstream and stored as fat, if you don’t put that energy to use right away. Eat between 35-50g of complex carbohydrates, 1-1.5 hours prior to exercise to maximise your energy stores. Immediately after exercise, your muscles require protein along with simple carbohydrates to refuel and repair. This is when it’s okay to indulge in bad carbs, because during this stage, your muscles are like magnets for a certain amount of simple sugars, as your body’s energy stores will have become depleted and therefore, need refuelling asap. Your muscles also require adequate amounts of protein in order to grow and repair. It’s recommended to consume approx. 35-50g of simple carbs and 25-30g protein, within 20-30 minutes following exercise. Repeat approx. 1.5 hours later. If it’s a rest day and you’re not going to expend much energy, you’ll need to adjust the quantity of food you consume accordingly. If you usually consume 3 large meals daily, instead, consume 2/3 and if you eat 6 small meals spread throughout the day, consume 4/6. The simple reason is, if you were to eat the same amount as you would on a training day, your body would store the excess energy as body-fat. Try to consume no more than 2,500 Kcals on a rest day, depending on your size and body type. The bodybuilding cookbook contains something for everybody; from vegan/vegetarian recipes, to high protein recipes, to low-carb recipes, to smoothie recipes, to slow cooker recipes, to healthy deserts, to D.I.Y energy and protein bar recipes. Most recipes are simple to prepare, some are family orientated, they’re all healthy, packed with nutrients and all taste delicious. There’s also a nutrition value breakdown of each recipe, allowing you to keep track of exactly how many calories you’re taking in at a time. It’s important to avoid thinking of a new eating habit as a diet, especially if it’s something you’re going to be following long-term, because when people say, “I’m going on a diet,” it usually means it’s temporary and

end up reverting back to old eating habits once the weight loss or whatever goal has been achieved. Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring, it’s all about variety, being creative and experimenting in the kitchen with natural, organic and healthy foods. It’s so easy to fall in love with cooking, as you’ll learn with the many healthy and delicious recipes below.

Chapter 1: Pre-Workout Menu 1. Creamy Cajun Chicken Tortillas Ingredients: 100g chicken fillet (skinless & chopped) 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 2 whole wheat tortillas 1 small tomato (chopped into small chunks) ¼ cup cucumber (chopped into small chunks) 1 handful baby spinach leaves 3 tbsp. ricotta cheese 1 tsp parsley 1 tsp fresh mint 1 tsp Cajun seasoning Preparation Method: In a large frying pan add the pam oil and leave to pre-heat on the hob over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes. Meanwhile, season your chicken by rubbing the Cajun spice over it evenly with your hands – it’s easier if you chop the chicken first. Cook the chicken for 10-12 minutes or until cooked through, then add the tomato, cucumber, along with the parsley and fresh mint – cook for 3-4 minutes. Then turn the heat off, add the ricotta cheese, stir through and leave to stand for 2 minutes. While you’re waiting, put the tortillas in the microwave and heat on full power for 30-40 seconds. Add the mix to the tortillas, wrap and tuck in! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 38.8g Carbohydrates – 50g Fat – 12g

Total Kcals – 463.2 Kcals

2. Turkey Burger Ingredients: 100g turkey fillet ½ red tomato (sliced) 1 wholemeal burger bun 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil 2 garlic cloves (crushed) ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 handful lettuce Dressing 1 tbsp. low fat mayonnaise 1 tsp. lime juice 1 tsp coriander seasoning ½ tsp jerk seasoning Preparation Method: Pre-heat a large frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes and add the rapeseed oil. Then, add the white onion and crushed garlic – cook until the onions turn translucent. Next, add the turkey fillet and cook for 8-10 minutes turning occasionally. Meanwhile, it’s time to prepare the dressing. In a small bowl, add the mayonnaise, lime juice, coriander, jerk seasoning and use a fork to mix thoroughly. Once the turkey is cooked through, empty the contents onto a serving plate, slice the burger bun in half and place cut side down on the pan for 3-4 mins to lightly toast. Turn the heat off, add the fillet to the bun along with the lettuce, onions, tomato slices, premade dressing and dig in! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.6g Carbohydrates – 42g Fat – 20.1g

Total Kcals – 507.3 Kcals

3. Mixed Beans on Toast with a Twist Ingredients: 2 wholegrain slices bread 200g reduced salt & sugar baked beans 200g mixed beans (in water) ½ tsp jerk seasoning ½ tsp paprika 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce Preparation Method: A simple recipe that tastes great and gives an intense energy boost! Remember, before you consume any beans (minus the baked beans), you should always wash thoroughly and soak for at least an hour beforehand, to avoid any stomach discomfort and bloating. Wash the mixed beans thoroughly and add them to a small pan along with the baked beans Worcestershire sauce, paprika and jerk seasoning. Place the pan over a low heat and simmer for 6-7 minutes – stirring frequently. Then, simply toast the bread and pour the beans on top. Simple, delicious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28.6g Carbohydrates – 67.2g Fat – 4.8g

Total Kcals – 426.4 Kcals

4. Peanut Butter & Banana English Muffin with Sweets Ingredients: 1 wholegrain English muffin 1 heaped tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 large banana ½ cup fresh blueberries Preparation method: Once again, another quick and easy recipe that’s packed with protein and complex carbs along with healthy fats. Great as a snack or to fuel a workout. Simply slice the muffin in half and toast until golden brown, before spreading with peanut butter on both slices and then place the sliced bananas on top. Serve them on a medium plate along with the blueberries and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 17g Carbohydrates – 79.2g Fat – 13.4g

Total Kcals – 505.4 Kcals

5. Pasta with Chicken & Greens Ingredients: 100g chicken fillet (skinless / cut into chunks) 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 150g whole wheat pasta (any style) 300ml water 100g broccoli (chopped) ¼ cup courgette (chopped) ½ tin tomatoes 1 pinch sea salt and cracked black pepper 1 tsp oregano seasoning 2 garlic cloves (crushed) ½ white onion (finely sliced) ¼ of a limes juice Preparation Method: Pre-heat your frying pan over a medium heat for 2 minutes, before adding the pam oil along with the chicken fillet chunks, crushed garlic and diced onion – cook for 10-12 minutes or until cooked through. Then, add the pasta to a small pan along with 300ml of chilly water, boil over a medium heat on the hob for 10 minutes or until all water has been absorbed. As soon as you begin cooking the pasta, it’s time to prepare the sauce. Add the tinned tomatoes, salt, pepper, oregano and limes juice along with the courgette and broccoli to the frying pan and lightly simmer until the sauce thickens – stirring frequently. Once the pasta has absorbed all water, simply add to the sauce and mix well. Leave to stand for 1 minute, stir once again and eat immediately!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 45.6g Carbohydrates – 61.6g Fat – 2g

Total Kcals – 446.8 Kcals

6. Creamy Tuna Pasta Ingredients: 150g whole wheat penne (uncooked) 300ml water 1 small tin tuna (60g in water) ½ tin tomatoes 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil 1 tsp oregano seasoning 1 tsp cayenne pepper 1 pinch sea salt and cracked black pepper 2 cloves garlic (crushed) ½ a limes juice 1 tbsp. low fat natural yogurt 15g parmesan cheese (grated) Preparation Method: Add the penne to a medium pan along with the 300ml water and boil for 10 minutes or until all water has been absorbed. While you’re waiting, pre-heat a frying pan for 2 minutes over a low-medium heat before adding the rapeseed oil and tuna – cook for 2-3 minutes stirring frequently. Then, add the tinned tomatoes along with the lime juice, crushed garlic, oregano, cayenne and salt & pepper seasoning. Simmer for 10 minutes or until the sauce thickens. Once the pasta is ready, add to the sauce, turn the heat off, mix well and add the parmesan cheese – mix lightly and leave for 1 minute. Finally, add the tablespoon of low fat yogurt and stir the mix thoroughly. Simply delicious. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.8g Carbohydrate – 47.8g Fat – 18.2g

Total Kcals – 474.2 Kcals

7. Jamaican Inspired Rice & Peas Ingredients: 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 1 medium white onion (thinly sliced) 1 tsp jerk seasoning 1 tsp Cajun seasoning ½ a limes juice 2 medium spring onions (chopped into small pieces) 1 sprig of fresh thyme 1 pinch sea salt and black pepper ½ cup coconut milk (unsweetened) 150g wholegrain rice (½ cup) 300ml water (for rice) 1 tsp hot cayenne pepper 100g garden peas (frozen) 100g red kidney beans (tinned in water) Preparation Method: This next recipe has lots of ingredients that’ll leave your taste buds tingling, it’s very simple, it just takes a little time to allow all flavours to combine, to create the perfect aroma. Start by washing the red kidney beans thoroughly and then simply add the entire contents to a large pot pan and put on the hob over a low heat and simmer for 1 hour or until the mix thickens to your desire – stir occasionally. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 19g Carbohydrates – 87.5g Fat – 6.4g

Total Kcals – 483.6 Kcals

8. Peanut Butter & Banana Toasty Ingredients: 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 2 whole wheat slices bread 2 medium bananas 350ml almond milk Preparation Method: Another simple and flavoursome, cost-effective recipe, packed with protein and complex carbs. Ideal prior to an intense workout. Spread the peanut butter on both slices of bread. Cut the 2 bananas in half and slice down the middle, insert in between the two slices and put under a George Foreman grill or toasty. Leave for 3-4 minutes or until bread has toasted. Serve with a glass of almond milk and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 27.7g Carbs – 121.9g Fat – 14.5g

Total kcals – 729 kcals

Chapter 2: Post-Workout Menu 9. Sweet Chicken Tikka Tortillas Ingredients: 2 white tortillas 100g chicken fillet (skinless / chopped) 1 handful baby spinach 1 medium tomato (chopped into small chunks) ¼ cucumber (chopped into small chunks) 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 tsp tikka masala seasoning ¼ of a lemons juice 2 tbsp. natural yogurt ½ small red onion (diced) 1 tsp fresh mint Preparation Method: Start by pre-heating the pam oil in a large frying pan over a lowmedium heat for 2 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, season the chicken by using two hands rubbing the tikka masala evenly all over, before adding to the pan – cook for 10-12 minutes or until cooked through. Then add the tomato, lemons juice, fresh mint and red onion and cook for a further 6-7 minutes, stirring frequently. The last step, is to turn the heat off and add the baby spinach, cucumber and natural yogurt, stir the mix well and leave to stand for 1 minute. Put your tortillas in the microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, place them on a large serving dish, add the chicken tikka mix, wrap and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 37.3g Carbohydrates – 29.4g Fat – 4.3g

Total Kcals – 305.5 Kcals

10. Bagel with a Treat Ingredients: 1 wholegrain bagel 1 tbsp. low fat cheese spread 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 100g Greek yogurt ¼ cup blueberries 1 tsp honey Preparation Method: Simply slice the bagel in half and toast until golden brown. Spread 1 tbsp. low fat cheese on 1 half and 1 tbsp. peanut butter on the other half. On a side plate add the blueberries, cover with the Greek yogurt and drizzle with honey. Delicious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 23.2g Carbohydrates – 67.4g Fat – 17.6g

Total Kcals – 520.8 Kcals

11. Posh Fish & Chips Ingredients: 200g white potato (medium sized) 100g salmon fillet (seasoned with a pinch of sea salt & black pepper) 1 tsp rosemary seasoning 1 pinch sea salt and black cracked pepper 6 sprays 1 calories pam oil ½ cup garden peas (frozen) Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Peel the potatoes, chop into fries, season with a pinch salt and pepper, 1 tsp rosemary along with 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil – mix well with your hands. Place into the microwave for 5 minutes on full power, before adding to the oven for a further 20 minutes. As soon as you’ve done that, pre-heat a medium frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes and add the salmon – cook for 18 minutes or until cooked through. For the final 10 minutes of the cooking process, add the frozen peas to a pan along with cold water to cover, cook over a medium heat until boiling point. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 38.2g Carbohydrates – 59.2g Fat – 9.9g

Total Kcals – 478.7 Kcals

12. Sweet & Sour Chicken Curry Ingredients: 150g 2-minute Palau rice (½ cup / uncle bens) 100g chicken fillet (skinless / chopped) 1 tbsp. low fat yogurt 1 chicken stock cube 450ml water (for stock) 1 pinch sea salt and cracked black pepper ½ tin tomatoes 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 tsp coriander seasoning ½ white onion (diced) 2 garlic cloves (crushed) ¼ of a lemons juice ¼ of a limes juice 1 tbsp. garam-masala seasoning Preparation Method: Pre-heat a frying pan along with the pam oil over a medium heat for 2 minutes before adding the onion and garlic – cook until the onion turns translucent. Then, add the chopped chicken and cook for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Meanwhile, prepare the stock by adding the stock cube along with the 450ml boiling water, coriander and garam-masala to a jug and mix well. Turn the heat down lowmedium and add the tinned tomatoes to the pan along with the lemon and limes juice, sea salt and cracked pepper – cook for 3-4 minutes before adding the stock. Add a little stock at a time just covering the mix. Bring to the boil and then turn the heat down low and simmer until the curry mix thickens to your desire. Once the sauce is ready, add the yogurt and mix well – leave to stand for 1 minute and then stir once more. The last step is to simply heat the Palau rice according to packaging and serve to the side of the curry. A perfect addition to the post-workout menu. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 41.6g

Carbohydrates – 63.6g Fat – 9.2g

Total Kcals – 503.6 Kcals

13. Chicken Fried Rice Ingredients: ½ chicken fillet (50g skinless & chopped) 150g white rice (½ cup) 2 spring onions (diced) ½ large white onion (diced) 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil ¼ cup garden peas (tinned in water) ¼ cup carrots (diced) 1 pinch sea salt and cracked black pepper ½ tsp ginger seasoning Preparation Method: For best results and to get the perfect texture, pre-make the rice and store in the fridge for 60 minutes before adding to the pan. To do this, simply add the rice along with 300ml boiling water to a medium pan and boil over a medium heat on the hob for 10-12 minutes or until all water has been absorbed – store in the fridge for 1 hour. Once you’ve prepared the rice, it’s time for the next stage. Pre-heat a frying over a low-medium heat on the hob for 2 minutes before adding the pam oil, garlic and white onion – cook until the onion turns translucent. Then, add the chopped chicken and cook until golden brown. Next, turn the heat down low and add the spring onions, garden peas, carrots, salt, black pepper and ginger seasoning to the pan – cook for 6-7 minutes before adding the rice (stirring frequently). Cook for a further 3-4 minutes stirring occasionally and then serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 27.5g Carbohydrates – 72.2g Fat – 4.4g

Total Kcals – 444.4 Kcals

Chapter 3: Non-Training Day Menu 14. Classy Salmon Sandwich with Orange, Mango and Blackberry Juice Ingredients: 1 slice smoked salmon 1 slice wholegrain bread (toasted) 1 handful baby spinach leaves 1 pinch sea salt and cracked black pepper Dressing 1 tbsp. light cream cheese 1 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp mustard 1 tsp fresh parsley The Juice 250ml 100% orange juice ½ medium mango (skinned and chopped) ½ cup blackberries 3 ice cubes Preparation Method: In a small mixing bowl add the light cream cheese, lemon juice, mustard and parsley and mix together into a thick paste – leave to one side. Then, in a blender add the orange juice, blackberries and mango along with the ice cubes and blend for 1-2 minutes or until the mix is smooth – pour into a glass and put to the side. Finally, season the salmon with salt and pepper and place on top of the toasted bread along with the baby spinach leaves. Drizzle the dressing on top and serve with the juice. Delicious. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 14.9g Carbohydrates – 67.5g

Fat – 10.7g

Total Kcals – 425.9 Kcals

15. Salmon, Asparagus & Sweet Potato Fries Ingredients: 100g salmon fillet 150g sweet potato (medium sized) 50g salsa 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 tsp sea salt and black cracked pepper 4 sticks of asparagus 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp rosemary seasoning Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 200 degrees. Leave the skin on the potatoes and chop into 0.5-inch slices. Put them onto a plate, drizzle over the rapeseed oil and add the garlic and rosemary seasoning – mix together with your hands. Microwave on full power for 5 minutes and then add them to the oven for a further 25-30 minutes to crisp. As soon as you place the fries into the oven, grab a frying pan and spray it with pam oil. Leave to pre-heat for 2 minutes over a lowmedium heat. Season the salmon with the salt and pepper and add to the centre of the pan – cook for 15-20 minutes, tossing occasionally. For the final 10 minutes, add the asparagus to the pan. Add everything to a large serving dish along with the salsa to taste. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.2g Carbohydrates – 36.5g Fat – 22.8g

Total Kcals – 468 Kcals

16. Skinny-Sweet Tuna Salad Ingredients: 1 small tin tuna (60g in water) 1 large cherry tomato (chopped into chunks) 1 pinch sea salt and black cracked pepper 1 sprig rosemary 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 tsp olive oil 1 tsp lime juice 1 tsp lemon juice 1 handful baby leaf spinach 1 tsp oregano seasoning 1 tsp basil seasoning ¼ cup chopped cucumber 2 spring onions (chopped finely) 2 medium celery sticks (chopped) ½ green pepper (chopped) Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 180 degrees. Place a sheet of foil down into an oven tray and add the tomato, season with salt and pepper, drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, add a rosemary sprig on top and add to the oven for 30 minutes. Once roasted, add them to a pre-heated frying pan over a low heat, along with the rest of the ingredients. Mix well and lightly fry for 6-7 minutes – stirring frequently. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20g Carbohydrates – 15.8g Fat – 15.1g

Total Kcals – 279.1 Kcals

17. Bass Fillet with Sweet Potato Fries Ingredients: 100g bass fish fillet 100g mixed vegetables (frozen) 150g sweet potato (medium sized / skin on, chopped into fries) 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil ½ tsp parsley 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp rosemary seasoning 1 tsp sea salt and black cracked pepper ½ lemon (chopped into slices) Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Start by seasoning the potato fries with the salt and pepper, garlic and rosemary seasoning and drizzle with rapeseed oil – mix together evenly with your hands. Precook the fries in your microwave on full power for 5 minutes, while waiting, it’s time to prep your fish. Place a large sheet of foil on the surface, place the fillet in the centre and season with the parsley and lemon slices. Wrap into a parcel so that all the aroma and flavours remain locked in and put to one side. Once the fries are pre-cooked, add them along with the fish to the oven for 20-25 mins, occasionally stirring the fries. For the final 10 minutes, add the frozen mixed vegetables to a small pan along with cool water to cover and cook on a medium-high heat until the boil. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.5g Carbohydrates – 34.6g Fat – 15.1g

Total Kcals – 364.3 Kcals

18. Jerk-Turkey, Rice & Greens Ingredients: 100g turkey fillet (chopped into chunks) 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 150g wholegrain rice (½ cup uncooked) 300ml water ¼ cup broccoli (chopped) ¼ cup courgette (chopped) 1 small tomato (chopped into quarters) 50g organic salsa 1 tsp jerk seasoning Preparation Method: Another simple, yet delicious and nutritious recipe, that’s rich in protein, complex carbs and relatively fat free. Add the rice to a medium sized pan along with 300ml boiling water and boil over a medium heat for 12-13 minutes or until all water has been absorbed – stir frequently. Meanwhile, pre-heat a frying pan along with the pam oil over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes. Season the turkey chunks with the jerk and then add them to the pan – cook for 8-10 minutes or until cooked through. Then, add the broccoli and courgette and cook for a further 3-4 minutes. Add the entire contents to a large serving plate along with the salsa to taste. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 40.9g Carbohydrates – 56.4g Fat – 2.1g

Total Kcals – 408.1 Kcals

19. Chick Pea Salad Ingredients: 200g chick peas (tinned in water) 6 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 pinch sea salt & cracked black pepper ½ avocado (ripened) ½ red pepper (chopped) 2 handfuls baby spinach 3 garlic cloves (unpeeled) ¼ cup cucumber (chopped into small chunks) ¼ cup sugar snap peas (chopped) Dressing 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp sea salt & cracked black pepper Preparation Method: Again, the first thing to do to avoid any stomach discomfort or bloating, is to leave the peas to soak for at least an hour before washing thoroughly. Then, pre-heat your oven to 180 degrees, grab a large sheet of foil and add the garlic cloves, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper along with 3 sprays of pam oil and make into a tight parcel. Place it in the centre of the oven for 40 minutes or until soft. For the final 10 minutes of the cooking process, pre-heat a large wok or frying pan along with 3 sprays pam oil, over a low heat for 2 minutes before adding the chick peas, red pepper and sugar snap peas – cook for 7-8 minutes stirring frequently. Then, turn the heat off, mash the chick peas up a little with the back end of a spoon, and add the garlic from the oven to the mix – mash and stir again. Finally, add the avocado, baby spinach, cucumber, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice and tsp of sea salt & cracked black pepper – stir well and serve immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 15.8g

Carbohydrates – 65.7g Fat – 10g

Total Kcals – 416 Kcals

20. Bed of Avocado + Chocolate Milk Ingredients: 1 medium avocado (ripened) 6-inch granary baguette 2 pinches sea salt and black cracked pepper 1 medium tomato (sliced) 300ml chocolate soy milk Preparation Method: This next recipe is simple, great as a snack, high in protein, complex carbs and healthy fats. It’s great to boost energy and cure cravings. Simply slice the baguette in half, spread the avocado over both sides, top with the sliced tomato and season with 2 pinches of sea salt & black cracked pepper. Serve with the chocolate soy milk and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 23.4g Carbohydrates – 62.8g Fat – 21.3g

Total Kcals – 500 Kcals

21. Chicken Salad with Personality Ingredients: 100g chicken fillet (skinless / chopped) 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning 1 tbsp. croutons 1 medium tomato (sliced) ½ cup cucumber (chopped) ½ red onion (sliced thin) 1 handful baby leaf spinach ½ red pepper (chopped) ¼ cup carrot (grated) Dressing 1 tbsp. natural yogurt 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil 1 tsp lime juice 1 tsp lemon juice ½ tsp garlic seasoning Preparation Method: Season the chopped chicken with the jerk and garlic and put to one side. Pre-heat a large frying pan along with the rapeseed oil for 2 minutes over a medium heat, before adding the chicken and cook for 10-12 minutes or until cooked through. The next step is to add the tomato slices, cucumber, red onion, red pepper and cook for a further 4-5 minutes. Then, turn the heat off and add the croutons, baby spinach, grated carrot, natural yogurt and balsamic vinegar – mix together well and eat immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 38.7g Carbohydrates – 42.1g Fat – 18.8g

Total Kcals – 492.4 Kcals

22. Sticky Jerk Chicken Ingredients: 100g chicken fillet (skinless) ½ red pepper (chopped) 3 sticks of asparagus (chopped) 100g broccoli (chopped) 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 pinch sea salt and black cracked pepper Sauce 1 tsp jerk 3 tbsp. soy sauce 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 1 tsp ginger seasoning ½ tsp chilli flakes ¼ of a limes juice 1 pinch sea salt and black cracked pepper 1 tsp honey Preparation Method: For best results, marinate the chicken over night or for at least a few hours. In a large serving bowl, add all ingredients above for the sauce along with the chicken fillet – using your hands, mix well, cover with foil and store in the fridge to marinate. Once you’ve done that, simply add the marinated chicken to your oven – cook for 25-30 minutes at 200 degrees. For the final 10 minutes of the cooking process, pre-heat your frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes, before adding the pam oil along with the broccoli, asparagus and red pepper – season with salt & pepper and lightly fry. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 41.5g Carbohydrates – 32.7g

Fat – 14g

Total Kcals – 422.8 Kcals

Chapter 4: Breakfast Menu 23. Apple & Blueberry Porridge Ingredients: ½ cup raw oats 190ml skimmed milk 1 apple (chopped) ¼ cup blueberries (frozen) 1 tsp unsweetened apple sauce Preparation Method: In a medium sized pan add the entire ingredients apart from the apple sauce and put on the hob over a low-medium heat for 3-4 minutes or until the porridge thickens to your desire – stir frequently. Once the porridge has thickened to your liking, simply add the apple sauce, stir and leave to stand for 1 minute before serving. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 12.6g Carbohydrates – 65.4g Fat – 4.8g

Total Kcals – 355.2 kcals

24. Muesli Fruit Mix Combo (servings: 2) Ingredients: ¼ cup muesli ¼ cup special k ¼ cup blackberries ¼ cup strawberries Pulp of ½ a passion fruit 200g Greek yogurt 1 tsp honey Preparation Method: This is one of my personal breakfast favourites, as its packed with protein, energy dense carbs, fibre and helps to fuel your day with very little fat. In a small glass desert bowl, add the muesli as the bottom layer, then ½ of the yogurt, then the special k, another layer of yogurt and top with the blackberries and strawberries and drizzle with the passion fruit pulp and honey. Warning, this’ll make your mouth water and keep you coming back for more! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 33.1g / 16.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 82g / 41g per serving Fat – 5.6g / 2.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 510.8 Kcals / 255.5 Kcals per serving

25. Hearty Breakfast Ingredients: 1 wholegrain slice bread ½ an avocado (ripened) 1 small tomato (quartered) 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 pinch sea salt ½ tsp oregano seasoning 2 large eggs (boiled) 1 granny smith apple Preparation Method: This next recipe is an awesome way to kick start your day, full of nutrients, high in protein, healthy fats and complex carbos to boost your energy. Start by adding 2 eggs to a small pan along with boiling water to cover, boil for 7 minutes over a medium-high heat, drain and then add cold water to cool for 90 seconds. Drain once again and then crack the egg shells several times with a spoon and leave to the side for 2-3 minutes. This’ll simplify the peeling process. Once peeled, cut them both in half and add to a large serving plate. Toast the bread and then spread with the avocado. Then, quarter the tomato, place on the side of the plate and season with salt, pepper, oregano and drizzle with balsamic vinegar. Have with your favourite fresh juice and enjoy. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.2g Carbohydrates – 46.3g Fat – 24.1g

Total Kcals – 490.9 Kcals

26. Banana & Blueberry Pancakes Ingredients: 2 large eggs 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 large banana ¼ cup blueberries (fresh) 2 tbsp. low fat natural yogurt 1 tsp honey Preparation Method: This recipe is quick and easy and can be enjoyed as a desert or snack at any time of day as part as a healthy diet to cure sweet cravings. Packed with protein, complex carbs and healthy fats to help boost energy levels. Pre-heat a medium frying pan for 2 minutes over a low-medium heat, before adding the pam oil. Then, crush 1 large banana with the back of a fork until you get a mushy consistency and put to one side. Next, add 2 eggs to a mixing bowl and mix well before adding the mashed banana and mix together again thoroughly for 2-3 minutes. Then, crush the fresh blueberries slightly with the back of a fork and add to the egg and banana mix and mix well once again. Once the pancake batter is ready, use a ladle or scooper to scoop out some of the mix one scoop at a time and place it in the middle of the pan gently. Leave for 60-90 seconds before flipping over and then repeat the process. Absolutely scrumptious!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20.6g Carbohydrates – 55.5g Fat – 18.1g

Total Kcals – 467.3 Kcals

27. Fruit & Berry Porridge (servings: 2) Ingredients: ¼ cup oats ¼ cup water ½ cup soya milk (unsweetened) 1 tsp Nutella chocolate (or alternative) 1 tsp cinnamon ¼ cup dried mixed berries 1 small apple (peeled & chopped into small chunks) Preparation Method: Simple, quick and easy nutritious recipe, to kick start the day and boost your energy levels. Have with a side of scrambled eggs to boost the protein content. Add the oats along with the water, soya milk, cinnamon, mixed berries and apple chunks to a pan and put on the hob over a low heat for 6-7 minutes or until the porridge thickens to your desire – stir frequently. Then, empty the contents into a large serving bowl and add the Nutella to the centre of the porridge, leave to stand for 1 minute before stirring well and consume immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 9.6g / 4.8g per serving Carbohydrates – 84.9g / 42.4g per serving Fat – 12g / 6g per serving

Total Kcals – 486 Kcals / 243 Kcals per serving

28. Bacon & Egg English Muffin Ingredients: 1 wholegrain English muffin 2 slices lean bacon (cut any excess fat off) 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 large egg 1 tbsp. low fat butter 1 tbsp. reduced salt and sugar ketchup Preparation Method: To begin with, add 1 egg to a small pan along with boiling water to cover. Boil the egg over a medium-high heat on the hob for 7 minutes, then drain and add chilly water – leave to cool for 1 minute before draining once again. Crack the egg several times with a spoon and leave for 90 seconds before peeling. Cut in half and leave to one side. Then, pre-heat a frying pan on the hob over a lowmedium heat before adding the pam oil along with the 2 slices of lean bacon – cook for 8-10 minutes or until crisp. Finally, slice the English muffin in half, toast, spread butter on both halves and add the bacon, egg and red sauce between the two slices and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 33g Carbohydrates – 40.5g Fat – 17.3g

Total Kcals – 449.7 Kcals

29. Oats-So-Delicious (servings: 2) Ingredients: 60g steel cut oats 300ml coconut milk 1 large banana (sliced) ¼ cup blueberries 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup ¼ cup cashew nuts (crushed) 2 tbsp. soy yogurt Preparation Method: Add the coconut milk and oats to a pan and put over a low heat for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. When the porridge starts to thicken, turn the heat off and add the rest of the ingredients and stir – leave for 2 minutes, stir again and eat immediately. Remember although this recipe may seem a little higher in fat, it doesn’t necessarily make it unhealthy. The fat derived from the nuts is healthy when eaten in moderation and very low in saturated fat which is the type to stay clear of. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 24.2g / 12.1g per serving Carbs – 102.3g / 51.1g per serving Fat – 51.5g / 25.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 969.5 Kcals / 484.7 Kcals per serving

30. Nutty Oats Ingredients: 60g oats 300ml almond milk ¼ cup fresh raspberries ¼ cup fresh blackberries 45g slithered almonds 1 tbsp. flax seeds 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup Preparation Method: Add the oats and almond milk to a pan and cook on a low heat until the milk is absorbed or to your desired consistency. Put in a serving bowl and add the raspberries, blackberries, almonds, flax seeds and drizzle the maple syrup over the top. Eat immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 15.2g Carbohydrates – 48.5g Fat – 30.7g

Total kcals – 531.1 kcals

Chapter 5: Healthy Desert Menu 31. Chocolate Mousse Ingredients: 1 scoop chocolate soya protein powder ¼ cup water ½ avocado (ripe) ¼ cup slithered almonds (crushed) ½ cup ice 2 tbsp. green and black’s dark chocolate cocoa powder (>70% cocoa) Preparation Method: Blend the water and protein powder together then add the chocolate powder, ¾ of the slithered almonds and avocado and blend again. If you’re going to consume it straight away throw in the ice for 30 seconds, if not, pour the mix into a small bowl and put into the fridge. Sprinkle the remaining crushed almonds over the top of the mousse before eating and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36.3g Carbs – 25.6g Fat – 27.2g

Total kcals – 492.4 kcals

32. D.I.Y Chocolate Orange Protein Bars (servings: 8) Ingredients: Wet Mix ¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice ¼ cup vegan dark chocolate (>70% cocoa) ¼ cup almond milk ¼ cup organic peanut butter ¼ cup apple sauce (unsweetened) ¼ cup organic maple syrup Dry Mix 1 tbsp. orange zest ¼ cup raw oats 1 tbsp. ginger seasoning 3 tbsp. chia seeds ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup mixed berries 3 scoops soya protein powder (unflavoured) Preparation Method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 8 pieces and enjoy as a desert or a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 17.9g Carbohydrates – 33.8g Fat – 19.3g

Total kcals – 380.7 kcals

33. Banana with Passion Ingredients: 1 large banana (chopped) 200g natural yogurt Pulp of ½ a passion fruit 1 tsp honey Preparation Method: This is a lovely desert that can be eaten at any time of day, it’s relatively low in fat, high in protein and complex carbohydrates. It’s also the perfect snack before bed as bananas, Greek yogurt and honey, promote the sleep hormone melatonin for the perfect night’s sleep. In a desert bowl, simply add the chopped banana and pour the yogurt over the top along with the passion fruit pulp and drizzle the honey over the top. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 10.4g Carbohydrates – 71.1g Fat – 8g

Total Kcals – 398 kcals

34. Tropical Frozen Yogurt Ingredients: 1 tbsp. crushed hazelnuts 1 kiwi (skinned and thinly sliced) 1 pulp of ½ a passion fruit 200g frozen Greek yogurt Preparation Method: Another delicious recipe packed with nutrients, high in healthy omega-3 fats derived from the hazelnuts, high in protein and low in carbohydrates. Simply add the sliced kiwi and crushed hazelnuts to a desert bowl and top with the yogurt, then drizzle with the passion fruit pulp. Beautiful. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 23.8g Carbohydrates – 36.7g Fat – 28.1g

Total Kcals – 494.9 Kcals

35. Mixed Fruit Energy Bars (servings: 4) Ingredients: 1 handful crushed hazelnuts ¼ cup dates ¼ cup mixed dried berries 3 tbsp. flax seeds ¼ cup unsweetened apple sauce Preparation Method: This recipe is simple to make and full of nutrients, they taste great and can be taken with you anywhere. They mainly consist of fibre and complex carbohydrates as that’s the main macronutrient that provides energy. Start by adding the hazelnuts and flax seeds to a blender and blend for 2-3 minutes or until the mix is reasonably smooth. Then, add the rest of the ingredients and blend for a further minute. Empty the mix and add it to a medium sized plastic tub – ensure you put some wax paper inside the tub first and spray with pam oil so the mix doesn’t stick. Pat the mix down so that the surface is flat and place the container in the fridge for 1 hour. Then, cut the bar into 4 servings and place back in the fridge. Eat when you’re peckish or when on the go for a quick boost. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 14.3g / 3.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 137g / 34.3g per serving Fat – 42.4g / 10.6g per serving

Total Kcals – 986.8 Kcals / 246.7 Kcals per serving

36. Peanut Butter & Banana Chocolate Sandwich Ingredients: 2 slices wholegrain bread 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 tbsp. chocolate Nutella (or alternative) 1 large banana (sliced) Preparation Method: This next recipe is packed full of flavour, great as a snack or desert to cure your cravings. It’s also high in protein, complex carbs and healthy fats. Simply spread 1 tbsp peanut butter on 1 slice of bread and 1 tbsp Nutella or alternative on the other slice and add the sliced banana between them. Place the sandwich onto a pre-heated George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster and toast until the outside of the bread turns golden brown. Amazing! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 13.4g Carbohydrates – 63.3g Fat – 18g

Total Kcals – 464.8 Kcals

37. Blackberry Frozen Yogurt Ingredients: ¾ cup frozen blackberries 150ml almond milk 300g frozen vanilla soya yogurt 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 2 tbsp. chia seeds Nutritional Benefits: Almond milk contains less fat when compared to animal milk while still containing plenty of calcium and fibre. Soya yogurt is packed with slow release protein, calcium and helps to protect the immune system. Chia seeds consist of a lot of protein, fibre and omega 3 fatty acids and full of B vitamins, minerals and boost energy levels. Blackberries add a unique and sweet taste to any desert and contain powerful antioxidants, fibre and fructose that boost energy without affecting your blood sugar. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 18.1g Carbohydrates – 42.2g Fat – 16.4g

Total kcals – 388.8 kcals

38. Chocolate Orange Mousse (servings: 2) Ingredients: 100g green and black’s dark chocolate (>70% cocoa) ¼ cup slithered almonds 2 tbsp. dark chocolate chips (>70% cocoa) 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter Juice of 1 large orange 150ml almond milk 350g frozen soya yogurt 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 1 tsp orange zest Preparation Method: Blend all the contents (bar the chocolate chips) until the mix is thick and creamy. Once the mix is ready, add to a large serving dish before adding the chocolate chips, spread them out by using a spoon. Simple, delicious and packed with protein. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 48.6g / 24.3g per serving Carbohydrates – 111.1g / 55.5g per serving Fat – 112.7g / 56.4g per serving

Total kcals – 1653.1 kcals / 826.5 kcals per serving

39. D.I.Y Oat & Berry Protein Bars (servings: 8) Ingredients: Dry mix 2 cups oatmeal 3 scoops soya protein powder (unflavoured) ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup mixed berries 1 tsp cinnamon Wet mix ¼ cup organic maple syrup ¼ cup organic peanut butter ¼ cup almond milk ¼ cup unsweetened apple sauce ¼ cup 70% dark chocolate 1 tsp vanilla extract Preparation Method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 8 pieces and enjoy as a desert or as a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 16g Carbs – 35.3g Fat – 8.8g

Total kcals – 284.4 kcals

40. Chocolate Mousse Ingredients: 1 scoop chocolate soya protein powder ¼ cup water ½ avocado (ripened) ¼ cup slithered almonds (crushed) ½ cup ice 2 tbsp. green and black’s dark chocolate cocoa powder (>70% cocoa) Preparation Method: Blend the water and protein powder together, then add the chocolate powder, ¾ of the slithered almonds and avocado and blend again. If you’re going to consume straight away throw in the ice for 30 seconds, if not, pour the mix into a small bowl and put into the fridge. Sprinkle the remaining crushed almonds over the top of the mousse before eating and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36.3g Carbs – 25.6g Fat – 27.2g

Total kcals – 492.4 kcals

41. Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites (servings: 12) Ingredients: 1 scoop Soya chocolate protein powder 3 tsp green and black’s dark chocolate cocoa powder (>70% cocoa) ¼ cup milled flax seed 150g organic peanut butter 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 2 tbsp. organic dark chocolate chips (>70% cocoa) Preparation Method: Mix the protein powder, organic peanut butter and milled flax seed together in a small bowl, until the powder is no longer visible. Mix well before adding the organic maple syrup – mix again. Then, add the dark chocolate chips and mix together all the ingredients with your hands and roll into 12, 1-inch balls. Place the balls into a plastic tub and place in the fridge for at least an hour to harden. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 74.3g / per serving – 6.2g Carbs – 89.3g / per serving – 7.4g Fat – 96.7g / per serving – 8.1g

Total Kcals – 1524.7 Kcals / 127.3 Kcals per serving

42. Peanut Butter & Chocolate Protein Toasty Ingredients: ½ scoop soya protein powder (unflavoured) 3 tsp green and black’s dark chocolate cocoa powder (>70% cocoa) 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 slice whole wheat bread Preparation Method: Grab a small bowl and insert all ingredients along with a tbsp of water – mix to achieve a thick consistency. Avoid making the mix too watery, it must be thick enough to spread. Once you’ve prepared the mix, simply spread over one side of bread evenly and either put it under a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster – grill until both sides are toasted for 2 mins. Eat immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 22.3g Carbs – 47.6g Fat – 10.6g

Total kcals – 375 kcals

43. D.I.Y Chocolate & Cranberry Protein Bars (servings: 8) Ingredients: Wet mix ¼ cup organic maple syrup ¼ cup organic peanut butter ¼ cup cranberry sauce (unsweetened) ¼ cup chocolate coconut milk (unsweetened) 100g dairy free dark chocolate (>70% cocoa) Dry mix 1 tsp ginger seasoning 1 cup raw oats 3 tbsp. flax seeds ¼ cup crushed hazelnuts 3 scoops soya protein (unflavoured) 2 tbsp. raisins 2 tbsp. mixed berries Preparation Method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 8 pieces and enjoy as a desert or a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 18.1g Carbohydrates – 38g Fat – 21.8g

Total kcals – 420.4 kcals

44. D.I.Y Granola Protein Bars (servings: 8) Ingredients: Wet mix ¼ cup organic maple syrup ¼ cup apple sauce (unsweetened) ¼ cup organic peanut butter ¼ cup almond milk (unsweetened) 1 tsp vanilla extract Dry mix 2 cups crushed plain granola 3 scoops soya protein powder 1 tsp cinnamon ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup dried cranberries Preparation Method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 8 pieces and enjoy as a desert or a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 20.1g Carbohydrates – 32.1g Fat – 18.4g

Total kcals – 374.9 kcals

45. D.I.Y Chocolate Orange Protein Bars (servings: 8) Ingredients: Wet mix ¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice ¼ cup vegan dark chocolate (>70% cocoa) ¼ cup almond milk ¼ cup organic peanut butter ¼ cup apple sauce (unsweetened) ¼ cup organic maple syrup Dry mix 1 tbsp. orange zest ¼ cup raw oats 1 tbsp. ginger seasoning 3 tbsp. chia seeds ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup mixed berries 3 scoops soya protein powder (unflavoured) Preparation Method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 8 pieces and enjoy as a desert or a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 17.9g Carbohydrates – 33.8g Fat – 19.3g

Total kcals – 380.7 kcals

46. D.I.Y Chocolate Coconut Granola Bars (servings: 10) Ingredients: Wet mix ¼ cup organic peanut butter ½ cup coconut milk ¼ cup vegan dark chocolate (>70% cocoa) 1 tsp vanilla extract ¼ cup apple sauce (unsweetened) Dry mix 2 cups plain granola ¼ cup dried coconut flakes 3 tbsp. chia seeds ½ cup dates (chopped) ¼ cup dried mixed berries 1 tbsp. cinnamon 3 scoops soya protein powder 2 tbsp. dairy free chocolate chips Preparation Method: Put the dry mix into a large mixing bowl and mix ingredients together. Put the wet mix in a separate bowl and put in the microwave on full power for 30 seconds or until the mix is thick and creamy. Then pour the wet mix on top of the dry mix and mix together well. Use an 8x8 container or plastic tub, put down some wax paper and spray with pam oil. Place the mix into the container and pat down until the surface is flat, then put it in the fridge for an hour to set. Cut into 10 pieces and enjoy as a desert or a snack on the go. Nutrition Facts: (per serving) Protein – 19.1g Carbohydrates – 51.5g Fat – 28.9g

Total kcals – 542.3 kcals

Chapter 6: Vegan/Vegetarian Menu 47. Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style (servings: 2) Ingredients: 200g green lentils (uncooked) 200g garden peas Medium sweet potato (150g) ¼ cup water ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 medium tomato (chopped) 2 tbsp. parsley 2 tbsp. tomato paste 2 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp salt ½ tsp pepper ½ tsp red chilli powder 500 ml water Preparation Method: Throw the tomatoes, garlic, tomato paste, salt, pepper, onion and turmeric in a large non-stick pan with ¼ cup water and cook on a low heat for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. Then add the lentils, peas and 500ml of water, mix together and leave to gently simmer on a low-medium heat for 30 mins or until the mix has a thick consistency. After 20 minutes add the parsley. When the mix has thickened add the chilli, mix and leave to stand for 2 minutes before serving. Meanwhile pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork your potatoes several times and microwave on full power for 10 mins and then put in the oven for a further 20 minutes. Once your dish is ready, serve the lentil soup in a large bowl and potato on a side plate. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.8g / 13.4g per serving Carbs – 80.1g / 40g per serving

Fat – 2.5g / 1.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 450.1 Kcals / 225 Kcals per serving

48. High-Protein Enchiladas (servings: 7) Ingredients: 400g Chicken Quorn strips 100g tofu (cut into strips) 400g black beans (1 tin in water) 150g wholegrain rice 100g spinach (frozen) 100g mushrooms (sliced) 56g soy cheese 7 whole wheat tortillas 340g green chilli enchilada sauce (1 jar) Preparation Method: Wash the black beans thoroughly to avoid gas. Cook all the above ingredients (apart from the enchilada sauce, soy cheese and tortillas) all according to packaging. Once everything is ready, put 7 tortillas on a large serving plate and place in microwave for 30-40 seconds on full power, then pack the tortillas and wrap on an oven tray tightly together length ways, side by side. Pour the enchilada sauce over and cover the wraps from top to bottom. Grate the soy cheese over the top and put in the oven on 190 degrees C for 20 minutes or until crisp. Serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 132g / per serving – 18.9g Carbs – 246.2g / per serving – 35.2g Fat – 31.5g / per serving – 4.5g

Total kcals – 1796.4 kcals / 256.9 kcals per serving

49. Soya & Veggie Burgers (servings: 4) Ingredients: 4 whole wheat buns 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 75g soya crumbs ¾ cups water 1 tbsp. red chilli powder 1 tbsp. sea salt ½ cup bread crumbs 5 mushrooms (sliced) ½ red pepper (chopped) ¼ cup fresh coriander leaves 3 jalapeno peppers (finely sliced) 1 cup soaked beaten rice/3 tbsp. red poha 1 large whole egg 4 tbsp. soya cream cheese 1 large tomato 4 tbsp. mustard 100g fresh spinach leaves Preparation Method: Put soya crumbs in a large bowl and add the ¾ cup of water, leave to soak for 5 minutes or until all water has absorbed. Once absorbed, fork through the mix and add the bread crumbs – mix with the fork again. Then add the mushrooms, chopped peppers, coriander leaves, jalapeno peppers, beaten rice mix, salt and red chilli powder. Combine all the ingredients and mix well before adding the egg – mix well again. (use flax seeds and water to replace the egg if vegan). With the combined ingredients, make 4 burger patties and put to one side. Put your frying pan on a medium heat, add 1 tbsp. olive oil and wait for 2 minutes to heat up. Add one burger at a time, push down on the mix to ensure a flat surface – leave for 3-4 minutes or until the side has cooked, then flip and leave another 3-4 minutes. Once cooked, put the burger to one side, slice the bun in half and put them cut face down in the pan to lightly toast – 1-2 minutes. (Add another tbsp. olive oil after 2nd burger). Spread 1 tbsp. soya cream cheese on one half of the bun and 1 tbsp. mustard on

the other half. Add the burger in between the slices along with 2 fresh spinach leaves and 2 slices of tomato. Heaven!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 99.7g / per serving – 24.9g Carbs – 184.5g / per serving – 46.1g Fat – 61.1g / per serving – 15.3g

Total kcals 1686.7 kcals / 345.2 kcals per serving

50. Chick Pea & Lentil Curry (servings: 4) Ingredients: 2 tbsp. curry powder seasoning 1 tbsp. coriander seasoning 1 tbsp. cumin seasoning 1 tsp chilli powder seasoning 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 3 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 1 medium white onion (finely sliced) ½ a lemons juice ½ a limes juice 100ml coconut milk 1 tin of organic tomatoes (400g) 400g tin of chick peas (in water) 200g green lentils (uncooked) 600g white rice (long grain, uncooked) 1 organic chicken stock cube 500ml water for the stock 1.2L water for rice Preparation Method: Thoroughly wash the chick peas and lentils and leave to one side – preferably over a 24hour period. Heat a large pan on a low-medium heat and add the olive oil – leave for 2 minutes and then add the garlic and onion. Cook until the onion is translucent. Meanwhile dissolve 1 chicken stock cube in 500ml of boiling water. Once the onions are translucent add the lentils and fry for 1-2 minutes before adding the chicken stock and all the seasoning. Add a little bit of stock at a time just covering the lentils – keep the heat on medium – high. Once all the stock has been absorbed, add the chick peas and tin of tomatoes and allow to simmer on a low heat for 25-30 minutes stirring occasionally. For the last 20 minutes add the rice and 1.2L water to another pan and boil on a medium-high heat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 62.9g / 15.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 334.5g / 83.6g per serving

Fat – 54.4g / 13.6g per serving

Total kcals – 2079.2 kcals / 500 kcals per serving

51. Mean Bean Tortilla Dream (servings: 4) Ingredients: 200g tinned red kidney beans (in water) 200g tinned reduced salt and sugar baked beans 200g mixed beans (in water) X4 plain tortilla wraps 2 handfuls salad leaves 100g mixed peppers (chopped) 1 tbsp. garlic seasoning 1 tbsp. paprika seasoning Preparation Method: Start by thoroughly washing the red kidney and mixed beans and then add to a medium sized pan along with the baked beans in tomato sauce and seasoning. Cook on a low heat and simmer for 10-12 minutes. Once the bean mix is ready, throw the tortillas in the microwave on full power for 40 seconds, fill them with the bean mix, add the salad leaves and wrap. Serve with raw peppers on the side. Nutritious and delicious!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.9g / 10g per serving Carbohydrates – 107.7g / 26.9g Fat – 8.1g / 2g

Total kcals – 663.3 kcals / 165.8 kcals

52. Quorn Chicken & Lentil Risotto (servings: 2) Ingredients: 1 medium white onion 3 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 200g green lentils (uncooked) 100g Quorn chicken 300g Arborio risotto rice 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 100g vine tomatoes 2 pinches of sea salt & cracked black pepper for risotto 2 pinches of sea salt & cracked black pepper for tomatoes ½ courgette (chopped) 50g violife original vegan cheese or alternative (grated) 2 organic chicken stock cubes 1L water 1 sprig of fresh rosemary Preparation Method: To begin with, set your oven to 180 degrees and then in a small baking tray, add the tomatoes, top with rosemary, salt and pepper seasoning and drizzle with balsamic vinegar. Pop it in the oven and cook for 30-35 minutes. Then, place a large frying pan over a lowmedium heat and spray with the pam oil, leave for 2 minutes before adding the onion and garlic – cook until the onions become transparent. Next, add the Quorn chicken and cook until golden brown. While you’re waiting for the Quorn to cook, prepare your chicken stock dissolving the 2 chicken stock cubes in 1L of boiling water. Once the Quorn is ready, add the lentils and risotto rice and wait 2 minutes before adding the stock – add a little at a time just covering the mix. Turn the heat to high and cook to the boil, then, turn the heat back down again and simmer until all the stock has been absorbed. Once your half way through the chicken stock (500ml), add the chopped courgettes and push them into the mix. Once all the water has been absorbed, the last step is to turn off the heat and add the cheese alternative, along with the salt and pepper

seasoning and leave to stand for 2 minutes. Stir the melted cheese through and then serve with the tomatoes on top. Simply irresistible. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 45.4g / 22.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 143.4g / 71.7g per serving Fat – 24.9g / 12.4g per serving

Total kcals – 979.3 kcals / 489.6 kcals per serving

53. Quorn Sausage & Garlic Wedges Ingredients: 200g white potato 2 Quorn meat free sausages 150g mixed vegetables 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp. garlic seasoning 1 rosemary sprig 1 pinch sea salt and black pepper Salsa (50g) Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Cut the potato into thick wedges, drizzle the olive oil over them and season with rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper. Place them into the microwave on full power for 5 minutes. when done, place into the oven, cook for a further 20 minutes or until crisp. For the final 15 minutes, add the Quorn sausages to the oven and cook until golden brown. For the final 10 minutes, add the mixed vegetables to a small pan and cook to boiling point over a medium-high heat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20.8g Carbs – 52.4g Fat – 17.3g

Total kcals – 448.5 Kcals

54. Quorn Ham, Cheese & Spring Onion Toasty Ingredients: 3 slices Quorn meat free ham 2 whole wheat slices of bread 30g violife original vegan cheese (or alternative) 3 spring onions (finely chopped) 2 handfuls mixed salad 250ml organic orange juice X2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil Preparation Method: Simply place the spring onions, Quorn ham and cheese alternative between the slices of bread, spray the pam oil over the outside of both slices and put under a sandwich toasty or George Foreman grill until the bread is golden and toasted on the outside of both sides. Serve with the mixed salad on the side and with a fresh glass of orange juice. Simple, delicious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 13.5g Carbs – 63.5g Fat – 11.7g

Total kcals – 413.3 kcals

55. Chicken Quorn Curry (servings: 2) Ingredients: 300g Palau rice (ready-made 2-minute rice) 200g Quorn chicken 150g frozen peas 1 chicken stock cube 500ml water for the stock 2 white medium onions (chopped) 3 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 1 heaped tbsp. flour 100ml coconut milk 2 tbsp. soya yogurt ½ limes juice ½ lemons juice 1 tbsp. coriander seasoning 1 tbsp. chilli cayenne seasoning 1 tbsp. garam masala seasoning 1 tsp salt 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil spray Preparation Method: In a large frying pan, spray the pam oil and leave for 2 minutes to pre-heat over a low-medium heat. Then, add the onions and garlic – cook until the onions turn translucent. Next, add the Quorn chicken and cook until golden brown, while you’re waiting, prepare your stock by dissolving the chicken stock cube in 500ml of boiling water. Once the chicken is ready, pour in the frozen peas and begin to add the stock along with the seasoning, add the stock a little at a time just covering the mix. Once you’ve poured in the last bit of stock, add the flour, stir and continue cooking for a further 2 minutes, before adding the coconut milk, lime and lemon juice and simmer over a low heat until the mix begins to thicken. Once the curry sauce is cooked to your desire, turn the heat off and add the soy yogurt, leave to stand for 2 minutes and then stir. The last step, is to simply pop your Palau rice into the microwave and heat for 2 minutes. Nutrition Facts:

Protein – 53.5g / 26.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 155.7g / 77.8g per serving Fat – 23.4g / 11.7g per servings

Total kcals – 1047.4 kcals / 523.7 kcals per serving

56. Whole Wheat Veggie Special Ingredients: 2 whole wheat tortillas 1 avocado (ripened) ½ beetroot ball (chopped into small chunks) 2 spring onions (finely chopped) 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 1 tbsp. olive oil ¼ cup white mushrooms (chopped) ½ red pepper (chopped) 1 medium carrot (grated) 1 small tomato (chopped into small chunks) 1 handful lettuce ¼ cup cucumber (chopped into small chunks) 1 tsp fresh parsley 1 tsp fresh oregano 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp. lime juice 1 pinch sea salt 2 tbsp. natural yogurt Preparation Method: Add the olive oil to a large frying pan and pre-heat over a low heat for 2 minutes before adding the 2 crushed garlic cloves and spring onions. Cook for 2-3 minutes and then add the chopped mushrooms, pepper, tomato along with the balsamic vinegar, lime juice and salt, oregano and parsley seasoning – cook for a further 6-7 minutes stirring frequently. Then add the natural yogurt, stir through the mix and leave to stand for 1 minute. Next, put the tortillas in your microwave and heat on full power for 30-40 seconds, lay them out on a plate and add the mix from the pan along with the remaining ingredients; avocado, beetroot, grated carrot, lettuce and cucumber. Wrap and arouse your taste buds. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 13.3g Carbohydrates – 68.7g

Fat – 19g

Total Kcals – 499 Kcals

57. Vegetable Risotto (servings: 2) Ingredients: ½ cup risotto rice 1 medium white onion (diced) 1 cup garden peas ¼ cup chopped courgette ¼ cup carrots (chopped into small chunks) 30g low fat cheese alternative (grated) 1 vegetable stock cube 600ml water 1 pinch sea salt and cracked black pepper 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 1 tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp low fat butter alternative 1 large vine tomato (chopped into quarters) 1 rosemary sprig 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar Preparation Method: Start by pre-heating a large wok or frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes along with the olive oil. Then, add the crushed garlic along with the diced onion and cook until the onion turns translucent. Meanwhile, heat your oven to 180 degrees and in a tray with foil add the vine tomato quarters and season with the salt and pepper, then drizzle with the balsamic vinegar along with 1 rosemary sprig – leave to roast for 30 minutes. Once the onions are ready, add the frozen peas, risotto rice, courgette and carrots and cook for 1-2 minutes while you prepare the stock. Dissolve 1 vegetable stock cube in 600ml of boiling water and add to the pan a little at a time just covering the mix. Turn the heat up high and bring to the boil, then turn the heat back down low and simmer for 25-30 minutes – stirring occasionally. Once the risotto has thickened to your desire, turn the heat off and add the butter and grated cheese – stir through and leave to stand for 2 minutes. Stir again and add the roasted tomatoes on top! Nutrition Facts:

Protein – 25.8g / 12.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 103.3g / 51.7g per serving Fat – 31.3g / 15.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 798.1 Kcals / 399.1 Kcals per serving

58. Mixed Bean Stir Fry (servings: 2) Ingredients: 1 tin mixed beans (300g in water) ¼ cup sweetcorn ½ red pepper (chopped into small chunks) ½ white onion (finely sliced) ¼ cup broccoli (chopped) ¼ cup carrots (grated) ¼ cup cucumber (chopped) 1 handful baby leaf spinach ½ medium tomato (chopped into small chunks) 4 sprays 1 calorie pam oil Dressing 1 tbsp. soy sauce 1 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp. rapeseed oil 2 garlic cloves 50g salsa Preparation Method: To begin with, leave the beans to soak for at least an hour before rinsing thoroughly. Pre-heat your wok or frying pan over a lowmedium heat for 2 minutes and spray with pam oil. Then, add the entire contents above apart from the dressing and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring frequently. Meanwhile, in a small bowl add the soy sauce, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, rapeseed oil, salsa and crushed garlic cloves and mix well. When the bean mix is ready, add the dressing and stir through, heat for 2 more minutes, then turn off and leave to stand for 1 minute. Stir through once again and serve immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36.5g / 18.3g per serving Carbohydrates – 77.8g / 38.9g per serving

Fat – 18.8g / 9.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 626.4 Kcals / 313.2 Kcals per serving

59. Spicy Mixed Beans on a Bed of Potato (servings: 2) Ingredients: 1 medium potato (200g) 200g black beans (in water) 200g mixed beans in tomato sauce ½ cup garden peas 1 tsp cayenne seasoning 1 tsp cumin seasoning Preparation Method: Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees and start by washing the black beans thoroughly in a colander to avoid the issue of gas - put to one side. Fork the potato several times and place in the microwave for 5 minutes on high. (It’s important to leave the skin on due to its high fibre content). Put in the oven for a further 25 minutes. In a small pan, add the black beans, mixed beans in tomato sauce, the garden peas and seasoning and cook on low for 10-12 minutes – stir occasionally. Once the potato is crisp on the outside, cut in half and pour the bean mix on top. Delicious. This is a simple, yet effective dish, especially prior to working out. It’s rich in healthy carbs, lean protein and contains very little fat. These ingredients are also cost effective. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.8g / 17.4g per serving Carbs – 98.9g / 49.4g per serving Fat – 3.2g / 1.6g per serving

Total Kcals – 563.6 Kcals / 281.8 Kcals per serving

60. Rice, Beans & Greens Ingredients: White rice (150g) 300ml water200g Red kidney beans 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans 200g spinach 1 tsp paprika seasoning 1 tsp Jamaican jerk seasoning Cooking method: You don’t need as much carbohydrates such as rice, potatoes and pasta as you would do with a meat dish because there are already a lot of carbohydrates in the source of protein you are getting within the beans. Also, with beans you’re getting a high amount of fibre and that will digest slowly like a complex carbohydrate such as brown pasta, brown rice and sweet potatoes so you can eat a small amount of simple carbohydrates with the beans and vegetables. This is yet another simple and cost-effective dish, great as a pre or post – workout. Wash the red kidney beans thoroughly to avoid gas and add to a small pan together with the baked beans and seasoning. Heat the rice in a medium sized pan – use 300ml of water and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes or until all water is absorbed. For the last 10 minutes put the beans on a low heat for 10 minutes and stir occasionally. Boil the spinach for 6-7 minutes and drain the water. When the rice is cooked add it to the beans and stir, leave for 2 minutes and serve with the side of spinach. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g Carbs – 101.9g Fat – 1.5g

Total kcals – 539.9 kcals

61. Mixed Beans & Sweet Potato Special (servings: 2) Ingredients: Medium sweet potato (150g) 200g broccoli 200g butter beans 200g mixed beans in tomato sauce 1 serving soy sauce 1 tsp garlic seasoning Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork the potato several times and microwave on full power for 5 minutes. Put in the oven for a further 20 minutes. Meanwhile wash the butter beans thoroughly and add to a pan with the mixed beans in tomato sauce and garlic seasoning. Add the soy sauce and cook for the last 10 minutes on a low heat – stirring occasionally. Once everything is cooked, place the broccoli in the microwave for 1.5 minutes on full power. Cut the potato in half and add the mixed beans with broccoli on the side. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.8g / 15.4g per serving Carbs – 91.8g / 45.9g per serving Fat – 1.4g / 0.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 503 Kcals / 251.5 Kcals per serving

62. Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup Moroccan Style (servings: 2) Ingredients: 200g green lentils (uncooked) 200g garden peas Medium sweet potato (150g) ¼ cup water ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 medium tomato (chopped) 2 tbsp. parsley 2 tbsp. tomato paste 2 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp salt ½ tsp pepper ½ tsp red chilli powder 500 ml water Preparation Method: Throw the tomatoes, garlic, tomato paste, salt, pepper, onion and turmeric in a large non-stick pan with ¼ cup water and cook on a low heat for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. Then add the lentils, peas and 500ml of water, mix together and leave to gently simmer on a low-medium heat for 30 mins or until the mix has a thick consistency. After 20 minutes add the parsley. When the mix has thickened add the chilli, mix and leave to stand for 2 minutes before serving. Meanwhile pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork your potatoes several times and microwave on full power for 5 mins and then put in the oven for a further 25 minutes. Once your dish is

ready, serve the lentil soup in a large bowl and potato on a side plate. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.8g / 13.4g per serving Carbohydrates – 80.1g / 40g per serving Fat – 2.5g / 1.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 450.1 Kcals / 225 Kcals per serving

63. Beans on Toast 2.0 Ingredients: 2 slices whole wheat toast 200g black eye beans 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 200g broccoli 1 tsp smoked paprika seasoning 1 medium fried tomato (sliced in half) ½ tsp garlic seasoning Preparation Method: Wash the black eye beans thoroughly before adding them to the baked beans along with the garlic and paprika seasoning in a small pan. Cook on a low heat for 10 minutes – stirring occasionally. Toast the bread and pour the beans over the top. Then simply throw the broccoli in the microwave on full power for 2 minutes. Serve on the side and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 38.9g Carbs – 99.8g Fat – 5.2g

Total kcals – 601.6 kcals

64. Mixed Beans & Potato Ingredients: 100g mixed beans (in water) 100g tinned organic garden peas 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce Medium white potato (150g) 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp basil seasoning Preparation Method: Another simple, tasty and cheap recipe. Great as a pre-workout, loaded with complex carbs to fuel your muscles with energy before a long intense workout. Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Fork the potato several times and microwave on full power for 5 minutes, cook for a further 25 minutes in oven. For the last 10 minutes add the peas, mixed beans, baked beans and the seasoning to a pan and heat on low for 10 minutes stirring occasionally. Cut the potato in half and pour the bean mix on top. Yummy!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.5g Carbs – 88g Fat – 2.1g

Total kcals – 472.9 kcals

65. Red Kidney Bean Stir Fry (servings: 2) Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans 125g fresh stir fry noodles 1 medium wholemeal cob 200g mixed peppers (frozen chopped) ½ white onion (chopped) ½ large tomato (chopped) 30ml sweet chilli sauce 1 tbsp. soy sauce 2 sprays pam oil Preparation Method: Pre-wash the red kidney beans to begin with. Then, pre-heat a wok pan over a medium heat for 2 minutes and spray with pam oil. Add the onions and red kidney beans and cook for 5-7 minutes – stirring occasionally. Then add the tomato and peppers and cook for a further 5 minutes before adding the noodles and soy sauce. Cook for 5 more minutes and add the sweet chilli sauce. Stir the mix together and serve with the wholemeal cob. Enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 31.8g / 15.9g per serving Carbs – 120.5g / 60.2g per serving Fat – 2.4g / 1.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 618.8 Kcals / 309.4 Kcals per serving

66. Nutty Pasta & Lentils (servings: 2) Ingredients: 300g whole wheat pasta 200g green lentils (tinned) 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil 2 tbsp. sundried tomatoes 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 tbsp. tomato paste ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 tsp garlic and rosemary seasoning Preparation Method: Pre-heat your grill pan on a low-medium heat, leave for 2 minutes. Add the olive oil, onion, garlic and rosemary seasoning and cook for 5-6 minutes stirring occasionally. Turn the heat right down to low and add the sundried tomatoes, tomato paste and lentils and cook for 1012 minutes – stirring frequently. Whilst you’re cooking the lentils, start boiling the pasta in a separate pan on a medium heat – use 600ml water and cook for 12-14 minutes or until all water is absorbed. Once the pasta is cooked add the peanut butter to the middle and leave for 2 minutes to melt. Mix together and place in the pan to mix together with the rest of ingredients. Eat immediately… yum!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30g / 15g per serving Carbs – 112.7g / 56.3g per serving Fat – 15.3g / 7.6g per serving

Total Kcals – 708.5 Kcals / 354.2 Kcals per serving

67. Sweet Potato Fries with a Side of Beans (servings: 2) Ingredients: 1 large sweet potato (300g) 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp garlic and rosemary seasoning 100g mixed peppers (frozen) 100g broccoli (frozen 100g black eye peas (¼ of can) 100g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce (¼ can) Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Wash the sweet potato and cut into French fries, place onto a large dish, drizzle the olive over the top and add the garlic and rosemary seasoning – mix together with your hands. Place in the microwave on full power for 5 mins then put on a baking tray and cook for a further 25 minutes in the oven. For the last 15 minutes, drain the black eyes peas and wash thoroughly and add to a small pan along with the baked beans – cook on a low heat for 10-12 mins stirring occasionally. For the last 10 minutes, place the broccoli and mixed peppers in a medium pan and boil on high. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32.3g / 16.1g per serving Carbs – 133.6g / 66.8g per serving Fat – 16.9g / 8.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 815.7 Kcals / 407.8 Kcals per serving

68. Chick Pea Grilled Sandwich Ingredients: 2 slices whole wheat bread 2oz tofu 100g chick peas (tinned in water) 3 sundried tomatoes 1 tbsp. nutritional yeast Salt and pepper seasoning Preparation Method: The ultimate pre-workout sandwich, packed full of fibre, complex carbs, healthy fats and protein. Blend together the tofu, chick peas, sundried tomatoes and nutritional yeast – add the salt and pepper to taste and blend once again for a few seconds. Spread the paste onto one side of each of the slices of bread and make a sandwich. Place onto a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster for 2-3 minutes or until both sides are cooked. Leave to cool for 2 minutes and then dig in! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g Carbs – 100.9g Fat – 8.7g

Total kcals – 600.7 kcals

69. Hot Chilli Chick Pea Tortillas (servings: 2) Ingredients: 2 white tortilla wraps 100g kale 400g chick peas (1 can in water) 2 chipotle peppers (chopped 2 red chilli peppers (chopped) 3-4 red Thai chilli peppers (chopped) 1 tbsp. cracked black pepper ½ large red onion (chopped) 2 garlic cloves (crushed) 2 small tomatoes (quartered) 2 tomato slices 1 tbsp. curry powder 1 tbsp. sugar Preparation Method: Add the above ingredients apart from the 2 tomato slices and kale into your blender and blend until you achieve a thick spreadable paste. Throw the tortillas into your microwave for 30-40 seconds on high. Spread the thick paste on both tortillas, add the tomato slices and kale, wrap and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29g / 14.5g per serving Carbs – 143.6g / 71.8g per serving Fat – 8.5g / 4.2g per serving

Total kcals – 766.9 kcals / 383.4 Kcals per serving

70. High Protein Enchiladas (servings: 7) Ingredients: 400g Chicken Quorn strips 100g tofu (cut into strips) 400g black beans (1 tin in water) 150g wholegrain rice 100g spinach (frozen) 100g mushrooms (sliced) 56g soy cheese 7 whole wheat tortillas 340g green chilli enchilada sauce (1 jar) Preparation Method: Wash the black beans thoroughly to avoid gas. Cook all the above ingredients (apart from the enchilada sauce, soy cheese and tortillas) all according to packaging. Once everything is ready, put 7 tortillas on a large serving plate and place in microwave for 30-40 seconds on full power, then pack the tortillas and wrap on an oven tray tightly together length ways, side by side. Pour the enchilada sauce over and cover the wraps from top to bottom. Grate the soy cheese over the top and put in the oven on 190 degrees c for 20 minutes or until crisp. Serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 132g / per serving – 18.9g Carbs – 246.2g / per serving – 35.2g Fat – 31.5g / per serving – 4.5g

Total kcals – 1796.4 kcals / per serving – 256.9 kcals

71. Protein-Packed Tortilla Blitz Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans (tinned) 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 200g garden peas (frozen) 150g salad leaves 3 tortilla wraps 1 tbsp. paprika seasoning 2 tbsp. Tamari soya sauce 100g broccoli (frozen) 100g mixed peppers (frozen) 30g organic salsa 30g guacamole Preparation Method: Wash the kidney beans thoroughly to avoid gas and add to a small pan along with the baked beans and paprika – cook on a lowmedium heat (stirring frequently) for 5 mins and then add the frozen peas. Turn the heat right down to low, cover the pan and leave to cook for a further 15 mins – stirring occasionally. For your side dish, simply boil the broccoli and mixed peppers together in a pan for 10 minutes, place in a small serving bowl and drizzle the soya sauce over the top. Once everything is ready, place 3 tortillas on a plate and microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds. Fill the wraps with the bean mix, salad leaves, salsa and guacamole and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 45.2g Carbs – 101.8g Fat – 6.6g

Total kcals – 647.7 kcals

72. Rice & Peas Ingredients: 150g wholegrain rice 300ml water 150g chick peas 200g garden peas (½ tin) 200g organic tinned tomatoes (½ tin) 1 tsp basil seasoning 1 tsp oregano seasoning 1 tsp garlic seasoning Preparation Method: Another simple, yet cheap recipe, that’s loaded with protein, complex carbs and very low in fat. To begin with, wash the chick peas thoroughly to avoid gas, then add them to a small pan along with the garden peas, tinned tomatoes and seasoning – leave to one side. Add the rice to a separate pan along with 300ml and boil over a medium-high heat for 12-14 minutes or until all water has absorbed – stir occasionally. For the last 10 minutes, cook the peas on a light heat – stirring frequently, especially the bottom of the pan. Once the rice and peas are ready, add the pea mix to the rice and stir well. Consume immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 24.8g / 12.4g per serving Carbs – 104g / 52g per serving Fat – 11.5g / 5.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 618.7 Kcals / 309.3 Kcals per serving

73. Lentil Soup with Granary Baguette (servings: 2) Ingredients: 200g green lentils (tinned in water) 200g garden peas (tinned in water) 6-inch granary baguette 500ml water 200g organic tinned tomatoes (½ tin) 1 organic chicken stock cube 2 garlic cloves (chopped finely) ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 tsp basil seasoning 1 tsp coriander seasoning 1 tsp chilli powder seasoning 1 tsp sea salt and cracked pepper seasoning 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Preparation Method: Drain the lentils and rinse well to avoid any gas issues, then leave to one side. In a large frying pan add the olive oil, onions and garlic and lightly fry until the onions become translucent and the garlic liquefies. Then add the tinned tomatoes, along with the seasoning (accept for the salt and pepper) – cook on low for five minutes. Put the stock cube in a jug along with 500ml boiling water and mix until the stock dissolves. Pour half the mix into the pan along with the lentils and peas and lightly simmer for 7-8 minutes and once absorbed, add the rest of the stock. Cook until the water becomes absorbed depending on your preference. Add the salt and pepper seasoning, stir and serve with a granary bread. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 50.2g / 25.1g per serving

Carbs – 64.5g / 32.2g per serving Fat – 26.1g / 13g per serving

Total kcals – 693.7 kcals / 346.8 Kcals per serving

74. Jacket Potato & Sweet Kidney Beans (servings: 2) Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans (tinned in water) 100g garden peas (tinned in water) 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans in tomato sauce 150g white potato 100g broccoli (frozen) 100g spinach (frozen) 1 tbsp. soy sauce ½ tsp smoked paprika seasoning 1 pinch black pepper Preparation Method: Wash the kidney beans thoroughly and leave to one side. Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork potato several times and throw in the microwave for 5 mins on full power, put in the oven for a further 25 mins. In a separate pan add the kidney beans, baked beans, peas and seasoning. Mix together thoroughly and cook over a low heat for 12-14 minutes – stirring frequently. For the final 10 minutes, boil the broccoli and spinach over a medium heart, until boiling point. Once they’re done, add to a small serving bowl and drizzle over the soya sauce – put to one side. When the jacket potato is ready, cut in half and pour the mixed beans on top. Flavoursome, inexpensive, relatively fat-free and an excellent source of complex carbs to fuel a gruelling workout! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.2g / 17.1g per serving Carbs – 99.7g / 49.9g per serving Fat – 3.5g / 1.8g per serving

Total kcals – 567.1 kcals / 283.6 kcals per serving

75. Fruit & Nut Fettucine (servings: 2) Ingredients: 12 Oz (340g) fettucine 475ml unsweetened soy milk 2 tbsp. soy cream cheese 3 tbsp. almonds (blanched & sliced) 3 tbsp. nutritional yeast 1 tsp lemon zest (grated finely) 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper 1 tsp sea salt 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 3 garlic cloves (finely sliced) ½ cup freshly chopped parsley leaves Preparation Method: Grab a large pot, fill with water and bring to the boil before adding your fettucine – cook according to packaging. Once cooked, drain the water through a colander into a bowl – reserve 1 cup of the pasta cooking water and put to one side. In your blender throw in the soy milk, soy cream cheese, almonds, nutritional yeast, lemon zest, salt and pepper and blend until the mix is smooth. In your frying pan, heat the olive oil on a low-medium heat and add the garlic – fry until it just starts to sizzle and softens for around 1 minute. Add the soy milk and reserved pasta water, simmer and cook for 8-10 minutes or until the mixture is thick and creamy. Once it’s ready add the fettucine and fresh parsley and mix together with a wooden spoon. If the sauce is too thick, add a little more pasta water to thin it out. Eat and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 47.3g / per serving – 23.7g

Carbs – 96.9g / per serving – 48.4g Fat – 59.2g / per serving – 29.6g

Total Kcals – 1109.6 Kcals / 554.8 Kcals per serving

76. Spicy Bean Tortilla Dream Ingredients: 100g lentils (tinned in water) 100g red kidney beans (tinned in water) 200g mixed peppers (chopped) 300g mixed vegetables 2 whole wheat tortillas 30g organic salsa 1 tsp red chilli powder ½ white onion (chopped) 1 tbsp. garlic and rosemary seasoning 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning ½ avocado (ripened & chopped) Preparation Method: Wash the red kidney beans and lentils thoroughly to avoid gas and place in a medium non-stick pan – put on a low heat for 6-7 minutes. Then add the chopped peppers and onions and cook for a further 67 minutes – stir frequently. Then add the garlic and rosemary seasoning, jerk seasoning and organic salsa and let it simmer for another 6-7 minutes, stir again. Then add the chilli powder, stir and turn the heat off, leave to settle for 2 minutes. For the last 10 minutes of the total cooking process put your mixed vegetables in a separate pan and boil. When that’s boiled, drain and put in a serving bowl as a side dish. Finally place your 2 tortillas in the microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, spread the avocado on both tortillas, add the bean mix and wrap – serve with the side of veg and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32.6g Carbs – 100.3g Fat – 26.9g

Total kcals – 773.8 kcals

77. Spaghetti Lentils (2 servings) Ingredients: 200g whole wheat spaghetti 100g lentils 25g vegan cheese (grated) 3 sprays pam oil ½ tin organic tomatoes 100g mushrooms ¼ cup fresh basil 1 tbsp. tomato paste 2 garlic cloves (crushed) ½ white onion (sliced) Preparation Method: Wash the lentils thoroughly to avoid gas and put to one side. In a large frying pan add the pam oil, put on a low-medium heat and leave for 2 minutes. While you’re waiting for the pan to heat, in a separate pan add the spaghetti and boil for 12-14 minutes or according to packaging – drain and leave to one side. Then add the garlic and onion – lightly fry for 6-7 minutes. Next add the tinned tomatoes, lentils, tomato paste, mushrooms and fresh basil – cook for a further 12-14 minutes on a gentle simmer, stirring occasionally. When that is ready simply add the spaghetti and stir well before sprinkling the cheese alternative over the top. Split into two bowls and serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 42g / 21g per serving Carbs – 161.5g / 80.8g per serving Fat – 17.8g / 8.9g per serving

Total kcals – 974.2 kcals / 487.1 kcals per serving

78. Alternative Mac N Cheese (4 servings) Ingredients: 500g macaroni pasta 4 medium potatoes (peeled & chopped) 1 cup raw cashews 1 tbsp. mustard ½ white onion (chopped) 50g nutritional yeast 1 tbsp. sea salt 2 tbsp. garlic powder 2 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. paprika 3 medium carrots (chopped) Preparation Method: Put the potatoes and carrots into a large pot and boil for 10 minutes on a high heat, then add the onion for a further 10 minutes. Boil until the potatoes feel soft – fork the potatoes, if you stab it and the potato falls off the fork they’re ready. Drain, keeping 2 cups of the drained water and leave to one side. Add the macaroni to another pan and cook according to packaging. While the pasta is cooking… grab your blender and add the cashews, garlic powder, onion powder, nutritional yeast, mustard, paprika, salt, the 2 cups of the boiled water as well as the boiled potatoes, carrots and onion. Blend for 12 minutes until the mix is smooth. When the pasta has cooked, drain and add the smooth mix from the blender one small amount at a time – stirring well each time you add a little. Once the pasta and sauce are mixed together, split into 4 separate bowls and serve immediately! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 138.9g / per serving – 34.7g Carbs – 595.9g / per serving – 149g Fat – 108.4g / per serving – 27.1g

Total kcals – 3914.9 kcals / per serving – 843.2 kcals

79. Chunky Bean Veggie Soup Ingredients: 200g black beans (tinned in water) 200g sweet potato (chopped into small chunks) 4 medium tomatoes 200g fresh kale (chopped) 100g fresh broccoli 100g frozen peas 100g carrots (chopped into chunks) 1 small white onion (sliced) 2 tbsp. curry powder 1 tsp sugar 1 tbsp. cayenne powder Preparation Method: In a large pot add the chopped carrots and onion and cook until the onions become translucent. While they’re cooking, blend the 4 tomatoes until you achieve a smooth mix, then when the onions are ready, pour in the tomato mix and stir well, then add the black beans and stir again. (wash the beans thoroughly before use to avoid gas problems). Next add the sugar, cayenne and curry powder and stir well. Then throw in the chopped kale, broccoli, peas and sweet potato – mix well again. Finally add just enough water to cover the vegetables as you want to achieve a chunky soup. Cover the mix and cook on a medium-high heat until you reach a boil, then turn the heat right down to low and simmer for 30 minutes or until all vegetables are cooked. Delicious!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.5g Carbs – 136.4g Fat – 7g

Total kcals – 766.6 kcals

80. Chick Pea Curry (3 servings) Ingredients: 300g wholegrain rice 200g chick peas 100g fresh kale 1 large tomato (chopped into chunks) 1 large carrot (finely chopped) 1 medium white onion (finely chopped) 2 garlic cloves ¼ cup fresh ginger (finely chopped) 3 tbsp. tomato paste ¼ cup slithered almonds (chopped) 2 tbsp. curry powder 1 small red pepper (finely chopped) 1 handful chopped coriander leaves 1 tsp red chilli Preparation Method: Put your rice in a pan and add 600ml water, bring to the boil and then simmer on a low-medium heat for 20 minutes or until all water has absorbed. At the same time in a pot steam the kale and for 25 minutes on a medium heat. Then wash the chick peas thoroughly. In a non-stick grill pan start cooking the onions, ginger and garlic with ¼ cup water over a medium heat, add the tomato paste, chilli and curry powder, another ¼ cup water and stir to combine. Bring the mix to a boil, add the chick peas and 1 cup water, bring back to a boil and then simmer on a low heat for 15 minutes or until the sauce thickens. Add the fresh coriander leaves and stir. Then add the carrots, red pepper and another ½ cup of water, then add the kale and peas – stir to combine. Keep heat on low for 6-7 minutes before adding the rice and almonds – stir to combine and leave to stand for 2-3 minutes before serving. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 57.1g / per serving – 19g

Carbs – 235.6g / per serving – 78.5g Fat – 82.5g / per serving – 27.5g

Total kcals – 1913.3 kcals / per serving – 637.5 kcals

81. Soy Meat Tortillas (servings x2) Ingredients: 50g soy meat 3 whole wheat wraps 2 medium tomatoes ¾ cup cucumber 100g mixed beans 100g soy yogurt ½ can sweetcorn (tinned) 100g fresh lettuce 2 garlic cloves 1 tsp oregano 1 tsp thyme ¼ tsp pepper 1 tsp salt 1 tsp Jamaican jerk 1 tsp paprika 1 tbsp. BBQ sauce Preparation Method: Cut your vegetables and salad into small pieces and put to one side. in a small bowl add your yogurt, grate 1 clove of garlic on top and add the oregano, paprika, pepper, BBQ sauce, then stir and taste before adding any extra salt – mix well and leave to one side. Next cook your soy meat according to packaging (using water). Once cooked add the Jamaican jerk, 2nd grated garlic clove and 1 tsp salt and mix to combine. Then put your whole wheat wraps in the microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, fill and roll! Scrumptious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36g / 15.3g per serving Carbs – 127.3g / 63.7g per serving Fat – 17.3g / 8.7g per serving

Total kcals – 808.9 kcals / 404.5 kcals per serving

82. Spaghetti Lentil Bolognaise (2 servings) Ingredients: 400g whole wheat spaghetti 200g dried lentils (uncooked) 120g organic tinned tomatoes 1 medium white onion 1 large stick of celery 1 clove garlic 120g soy milk (unsweetened) 1 large carrot 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp sage 1 sprig rosemary 1 tsp salt 2 vegetable stock cubes (500ml water per cube) Preparation Method: Start by slicing the celery length ways and then dicing finely, then do the same for the carrot, onion, garlic and rosemary. Place them into a non-stick pan and add ¼ cup water and cook for 5 minutes on a medium heat – stir frequently then add the sage. Cook until the onion turns translucent before adding the lentils, stir to combine and leave for 2 minutes before adding the vegetable stock with 1L of water. Bring to a gentle simmer on a low heat, cover the pan with a lid and leave for 20 minutes – stir occasionally. Then add the tomatoes, chilli powder, soy milk, and salt – stir well to combine and cook to a gentle simmer remaining on a low heat and leave for a further 15 mins or until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally. (keep covered with lid). For the last 12-14 minutes add the spaghetti to a large pan and boil until cooked through – drain, add to the sauce, stir well and serve immediately!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 47.8g / 23.9g per serving

Carbs – 189.3g / 94.7g per serving Fat – 8.6g / 4.3g per serving

Total kcals – 1025.8 kcals / 512.9 kcals per serving

83. Tofu Tortillas Ingredients: 75g tofu (crumbled) 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 whole wheat tortillas 3 medium spring onions (chopped) 1 red onion (finely sliced) 2 tbsp. organic salsa 1 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. turmeric 1 tsp salt Preparation Method: Start by heating your saucepan on a low-medium heat, add the olive oil and leave to heat up for 2 minutes. Add the spring onion and red peppers – leave for 2-3 minutes and stir. Then add the tofu and cook for a further 10 minutes or until it starts to brown – stirring frequently. Next, add the onion powder, turmeric and salt and mix together well – turn heat right down to low and cook for a further 10 minutes. Finally put your tortillas in a microwave on full power for 30-40 seconds, add the cooked ingredients, top with the salsa, wrap and enjoy! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 23.8g Carbs – 58.6g Fat – 23.3g

Total kcals – 539.3 kcals

84. Whole Hearty Vegan Fettuccine (servings: 2) Ingredients: 100g butter beans (tinned in water) 250g whole wheat fettuccine 2 medium white onions (finely sliced) 2 tins organic tomatoes (diced) 100g fresh baby spinach leaves 1 tbsp. tomato paste 1 tbsp. coconut sugar 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp garlic powder 1 tsp oregano 1 tsp basil 200ml water Preparation Method: Start by washing the butter beans thoroughly to avoid any gas problems. Grab a large non-stick pan and put the beans on a lowmedium heat for 6-7 mins – stirring occasionally. Then turn the heat right down to low, mash the beans, add the onions and 50ml water and cook for 2-3 minutes stirring occasionally. Then add the tomatoes, chilli, garlic, oregano, basil and stir well. Add 150ml water and turn the heat up to high to bring to the boil and then turn heat back down to low again and simmer until the mix thickens. While you’re waiting for the sauce to thicken, boil the fettuccine in a separate pan according to packaging, then drain and leave to one side. Once the sauce has thickened to your desire, turn the heat off, sprinkle in the coconut sugar and mix well. Finally add the spinach leaves and leave to settle for 2-3 minutes before adding the fettuccine – mix well and serve straight away! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30g / 15g per serving Carbs – 131.6g / 65.8g per serving Fat – 4.5g / 2.3g per serving

Total kcals – 686.9 kcals / 343.5 kcals per serving

85. Quorn Chicken Tortillas (servings: 2) Ingredients: 100g Quorn chicken 100g mixed peppers (chopped) 2 tbsp. low fat BBQ sauce 1 tbsp. Jamaican jerk seasoning 100g organic salsa 50g guacamole 2 whole wheat tortillas 100g broccoli 100g leafy spinach 2 tbsp. tamari soya sauce 3 sprays 1 calorie Pam oil 1 medium white onion (chopped) Preparation Method: In a large frying pan add the pam oil and leave on a low – medium heat for 2 minutes. Add the onion and cook until translucent then add the Quorn chicken along with the Jamaican jerk seasoning. Once the Quorn is golden brown add the peppers and cook for a further 5-7 minutes until the peppers have softened, then add the salsa and turn the heat to low for 5 minutes. Once the mix is cooked, throw the tortillas in the microwave on full power for 40 seconds and load them with the mix – drizzle the BBQ sauce and guacamole over the top of the mix and then wrap. For the side of broccoli and spinach simply throw the broccoli in the microwave on full power for 1.5 minutes and then drizzle the soy sauce over the top of both of them – consume immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 33.1g / 16.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 73.9g / 36.9g per serving Fat – 9.7g / 4.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 515.3 Kcals / 257.6 Kcals per serving

86. Quorn Sausage & Garlic Wedges Ingredients: 300g white potato 2 Quorn meat free sausages 150g mixed vegetables 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp. garlic seasoning 1 rosemary sprig Salt and pepper Salsa (3 tbsp.) Preparation Method: Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Cut the potato into thick wedges, drizzle the olive oil over them and season with the rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper. Place them into the microwave on full power for 5 minutes. When done place into the oven, cook for a further 25-30 minutes or until crisp. For the last 15 minutes, add the Quorn sausages to the oven and cook until golden brown. For the last 10 minutes, add the mixed vegetables to a small pan and boil over a high heat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 24.2g Carbs – 88.1g Fat – 17.8g

Total kcals – 609.4 kcals

87. Sweet Thai Quinoa Ingredients: 2 spring onions (finely chopped) 250g organic Quinoa (uncooked) 200g frozen garden peas 1 vegetable stock cube 500ml water 2 tbsp. sesame oil 1 medium white onion (finely chopped) 2 garlic cloves (finely chopped) 2 large carrots (chopped into small chunks) 1 tbsp. soy sauce 1 tbsp. ketchup 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning Preparation Method: Mix the vegetable stock in a measuring jug along with 500ml boiling water. In a medium sized pan add the Quinoa and the stock mix and simmer for 15 minutes – then turn the heat off and leave to stand for 5 mins to absorb all the juices. Next, in a frying pan add the oil, garlic and onion and cook on a low heat until the onion becomes translucent. Then add the frozen peas and carrots and cook for a further 5-7 minutes until they soften. Finally add the cooked Quinoa, soy sauce, ketchup and seasoning and mix well. Add the spring onions and cook for a further 2-3 minutes on a low heat – mix once more and eat immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.1g Carbohydrates – 108g Fat – 35.7g

Total kcals – 853.7 kcals

88. Spicy Mexican Quinoa Ingredients: 1 lime (freshly squeezed) 250g organic Quinoa 1 vegetable stock cube 500ml water 200g black beans (tinned in water / ½ tin) 200g organic sweet corn (tinned in water) 1 medium red pepper (chopped) 2 cloves garlic (minced) 75g organic salsa 1 red chilli pepper (diced) 1 handful fresh basil (finely chopped) Preparation Method: Add all ingredients to a frying pan and bring to the boil. Then simmer for 25 minutes and then leave to stand for 5 minutes – add the lime juice and basil and mix well. You can eat this delicious dish either hot or cold. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28g Carbohydrates – 125.2g Fat – 11.5g

Total kcals – 716.3 kcals

Chapter 7: Low Carb Slow Cooker Menu 89. Slow Cooker Turkey Stew (servings: 6) Ingredients: ¼ tsp cayenne pepper ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes 1 stalk celery ½ cup diced onion 2 cloves garlic 1 cup sweet potato 1lb leftover turkey 2 carrots ½ tsp black pepper 1 cup frozen peas 2 cups chicken broth 1 can fire roasted tomatoes Salt to taste Preparation Method: Add all the above ingredients to your slow cooker excluding the turkey, mix together well and cook until the carrots become tender. Once the carrots are ready, add the turkey and cook for a further hour on low. Stir occasionally. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 108.6g / 18.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 164.6g / 27.4g per serving Fat – 15g / 2.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 1227.8 Kcals / 204.6 Kcals per serving

90. Slow Cooker Wild Rice Pilaf (servings: 4) Ingredients: Wild rice blend, 1 cup 2 tbsp. olive oil 1 tbsp. rosemary 1 tbsp. sage 1 tbsp. thyme Vegetable broth, 1 cup ¾ cup shallots 2 cups sliced mushrooms 2 cloves garlic Preparation Method: Stir olive oil with the rice blend, add the vegetable broth shallots, mushrooms, garlic, and herbs. Cook on slow until the rice is ready to eat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.7g / 6.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 124g / 31g per serving Fat – 29g / 7.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 863.8 Kcals / 215.9 Kcals per serving

91. Slow Cooker Cranberry Chutney (servings: 8) Ingredients: 1 small bag of cranberries 1/4 cup 100% orange juice 1/2 cup honey 1 Gala apple 2 cinnamon sticks 1 tsp grated ginger 1 tbsp. Apple Cider vinegar Preparation Method: Although it’s not a dish on its own per say, the slow cooker cranberry chutney has become a house hold favorite because of its unique taste. You can have it with almost any recipe and it’ll enhance the taste of your favorite dishes beyond imagination. The best thing about this recipe is that it’s very low in calories, so you can consume as much as you wish. To prepare this recipe, simply add all the above ingredients to the slow cooker, stir and mix well. Cook on low for 3 hours, stirring occasionally. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 2.5g / 0.3g per serving Carbohydrates – 264.3g / 33g per serving Fat – 2.2g / 0.3g per serving

Total Kcals – 1087 Kcals / 135.9 Kcals per serving

92. Slow Cooker Polynesian Chicken (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 can of pineapple chunks 1/3 cup honey 2 tbsp. cornstarch Chicken boneless breasts, 400g Red bell pepper 2 cloves garlic 2 tbsp. grated ginger 2 tbsp. Bragg Liquid Amino Preparation Method: Drain the juice from the canned pineapples and add to a bowl along with the ginger, garlic and honey in addition to the Bragg Liquid Aminos – mix well before adding the mix to the slow cooker. Add the cornstarch, chicken and pineapple and mix together once again. Place the pineapples on top of the mix and cook on slow for five hours. Combine the bell peppers. When ready, serve with rice. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 180.4g / 30.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 151.1g / 25.2g per serving Fat – 46.9g / 7.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 1748.1 Kcals / 291.3 Kcals per serving

93. Slow Cooker Pork Tenderloin (servings: 8) Ingredients: Lean pork tenderloin – 2 lbs. Marinade: 2 tsp ginger, grated 1 cup chicken broth 1 tbsp. rice wine vinegar Salt ½ tsp black pepper 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 tbsp. lite soy sauce 2 tbsp. honey Garlic cloves 1 tsp curry powder Glaze: 2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar 1 tbsp. sesame oil 2 tbsp. honey 2 tbsp. soy sauce 2 tbsp. ketchup 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard Preparation Method: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Combine all ingredients. Slice tenderloin to create small pieces. Place in the refrigerator overnight. Now, add the marinade and tenderloin to the cooker and cook for 6 hours on low.

5. Mix all ingredients of the glaze, boil and then lower the heat to a simmer. 6. Cook for 4-5 minutes and tip over the tenderloin once ready. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 201.9g / 25.2g per serving Carbohydrates – 93.5g / 11.7g per serving Fat – 48.3g / 6.1g per serving

Total Kcals – 1616.3 Kcals / 202.1 Kcals

94. Slow Cooker BBQ Pulled Pork (servings: 4) Ingredients: 4 pork loin steaks 1 can tomato sauce 1 tbsp. onion powder Salt to taste 1 teaspoon chili powder ¼ cup honey 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tbsp. garlic powder Preparation Method: 1. To make the barbecue sauce, mix all the ingredients together excluding the chops in your slow cooker. 2. Place the chops in the sauce and cook on low setting until the internal temperature of the meat touches 165 degrees. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 184.5g / 46.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 81.1g / 20.3g per serving Fat – 42g / 10.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 1440.4 Kcals / 360.1 Kcals per serving

95. Slow Cooker Red Beans and Rice (servings: 6) Ingredients: Sausage: 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper 1lb lean ground turkey or chicken 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes 1/2 tsp black pepper 1 tsp dried oregano 1 tsp dried sage 1/2 tsp garlic powder Other: 1 stalk celery 1 tbsp. olive oil 2 cloves garlic 1 cup yellow onion 3/4 chopped red bell pepper Salt to taste 2 tsp freshly snipped thyme 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper 1/2 tsp ground black pepper 1 bay leaf 2 cans dark red kidney beans Chicken broth 1 cup wholegrain rice (uncooked) Preparation Method:

1. For the sausage: Put all the sausage ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Make into small meatballs, refrigerate while the veggies are cooking. 2. For the beans: Heat olive oil medium-low, add onions, bell pepper and celery, sauté until tender in a large skillet. Add sauté and garlic. Also, add bell pepper, sautéed onion, celery, garlic and other ingredients to the slow cooker. Stir to mix well. 3. Add sausage meatballs and stir. Cook on low for 6-8 hours. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 147.6g / 24.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 151.3g / 25.2g per serving Fat – 22.4g / 3.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 1397.2 Kcals / 232.9 Kcals per serving

96. Slow Cooker German Schnitzel (servings: 4) Ingredients: 2 butterfly pork chops, lean 2 tsp black pepper 1 egg white 1 cup buttermilk, reduced fat 1 tsp paprika 1 cup whole wheat crumbs Salt to taste 1 tsp garlic powder Preparation Method: 1. Trim the fat that may be apparent from the chops. Slice lengthwise on the seam. Pound the chops to flatten. Combine breadcrumbs, black pepper, tsp garlic powder and tsp paprika in a bowl. 2. Paddle salt, egg, buttermilk, black pepper, paprika and garlic powder. Now add the pork chops to the egg mix. Leave in the refrigerator for an hour to marinate 3. Lay out the bread crumbs on a cookie sheet. Eliminate the chops from the egg blend, allow the surplus to drip off before adding to the breadcrumbs. Spray both sides of the pork chops using a low-calorie cooking spray. Spray the bottom and lower sides of the slow cooker also. 4. Place in the slow cooker and arrange the chops on top. Cook until the pork is cooked through. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 66.5g / 16.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 101g / 25.2g per serving Fat – 27.2g / 6.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 914.8 Kcals / 228.7 Kcals per serving

97. Slow Cooker Black Beans and Chicken (servings: 6) Ingredients: Chicken breast fillets (300g) 1 can black beans (400g) 2 cups salsa 6 whole wheat tortillas Preparation Method: 1. Add all ingredients excluding the tortillas and cook for six hours on low. 2. Serve in a tortilla. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 143.9g / 24g per serving Carbohydrates – 214.2g / 35.7g per serving Fat – 9.8g / 1.6g per serving

Total Kcals – 1520.6 Kcals / 253.4 Kcals per serving

98. Cheesy Spaghetti with Turkey Sausage (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1lb lean ground turkey sausage 1 jar spaghetti sauce Mozzarella cheese (30g) Salt to taste 1 cup low-fat ricotta cheese 8 ounces 100% whole wheat spaghetti 1 tsp dried oregano Cottage cheese, 100g (low fat) Ground black pepper, to taste Ingredients to make the turkey sausage: Lean ground chicken or turkey 1 tsp dried sage 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper Ground black pepper, to taste 1/2 tsp garlic powder Dried oregano Preparation Method: 1. In a bowl, add all the ingredients for the sausage. In a skillet, prepare the ground turkey sausage. Add marinara with the meat. 2. In a bowl, add the turkey sausage along with the other items, in the slow cooker. Put the lid on and cook on slow until the cheese becomes foamy.

3. Now, combine the spaghetti and water and boil for 10 minutes or until the spaghetti is cooked through. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 143.5g / 23.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 137.1g / 22.8g per serving Fat – 78g / 13g per serving

Total Kcals – 1824.4 Kcals / 304.1 Kcals per serving

99. Slow Cooker Chicken and Mushroom Gravy (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 1/2 lbs. chicken breast filets 1/4 cup chopped flat leaf parsley 1-1/2 cups chicken broth 1/2 tsp black pepper Salt to taste 2 tbsp. cornstarch 1 yellow onion 2 tbsp. oil 16 Oz cremini mushrooms 2 cloves garlic Preparation Method: 1. Add a generous amount of oil into the slow cooker, turn it to medium-high heat and sear the chicken until brown. Place on a paper towel and bring the heat to medium-low. Combine onion to the same skillet, and sauté. 2. Add onion, chicken, and remaining ingredients to the slow cooker. Now cook until chicken is cooked through thoroughly. Remove chicken from slow cooker and put to one side. Add cornstarch to the cooker and beat until smooth. Return chicken to slow cooker and cook for a further 15 minutes. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 231.2g / 38.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 77g / 12.8g per serving Fat – 43.4g / 7.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 1623.4 Kcals / 270.6 Kcals per serving 3.

3.

100. Slow Cooker Chicken & Rice (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 small yellow onion 1 tbsp. Extra Virgin olive oil ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper ½ tsp red pepper flakes Salt to taste 2 ½ cups chicken broth 1 cup wild rice blend 300g chicken breasts fillets 1 can diced tomatoes ½ cup diced red bell pepper Preparation Method: 1. Heat oil in a large skillet, add bell pepper and onions and sauté on medium-low heat for approx. 3 minutes. 2. Add rice and continue to sauté for another 2 minutes. 3. Add the other ingredients, excluding chicken. Now stir to mix. 4. Add the chicken and the other ingredients from the skillet to your slow cooker and. cook on low for 4 hours. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 136.1g / 22.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 163g / 27.2g per serving Fat – 28.2g / 4.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 1450.2 Kcals / 241.7 Kcals per serving

101. Slow Cooker Herb Chicken and Vegetables (servings: 4) Ingredients: 3 garlic cloves 1 yellow onion 1 tsp paprika 2 tbsp parsley Salt to taste 3 bone-in, split chicken breast ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 carrot 1 parsnip 1 tbsp fresh thyme 1 tbsp fresh sage 1lb small red potatoes 1 tbsp rosemary ½ tsp black pepper Preparation Method: 1. Add the garlic, carrots, parsnips, potatoes and onion to a mixing bowl. 2. Separately, combine the oil, paprika, herbs, salt and pepper in another bowl. 3. Now, add half the oil & herb mixture to the vegetables, toss to coat and place in the slow cooker. 4. Add the chicken to the mixing bowl along with the remaining oil and herbs. In a large skillet, turn to medium-high heat and add the chicken.

5. Place the chicken over the vegetables and cook on low until the vegetables become tender. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 121.5g / 30.4g per serving Carbohydrates – 115.7g / 28.9g per serving Fat – 106.3g / 26.6g per serving

Total Kcals – 1905.5 Kcals / 476.4 Kcals per serving 102.

102.

Chocolate Bread Pudding with Caramel Sauce (servings: 10)

Ingredients: 4 egg whites 2/3 cup milk – low fat 1 cup low-fat milk Coconut milk 1 cup bread crumbs – whole wheat Salt ¼ cup chocolate chips - bittersweet 2 tsp vanilla extract 1 tbsp. coconut palm sugar 1 tbsp. cornstarch 2 eggs, whole ¼ cup cocoa powder - unsweetened ½ cup coconut palm sugar syrup 1 cup pecans Preparation Method: 1. Add the coconut palm sugar, pecans and chocolate chips to a bowl along with the cocoa and salt and mix together thoroughly. Combine the bread crumbs in the cooker. 2. Add the other ingredients to the cooker placing on top of the bread. Dash the left-over pecans and cook on low for three hours. 3. Caramel Sauce: Add the cornstarch along with the coconut palm sugar to a pan and combine with the milk. Cook over a low heat until thick.

4. Add the vanilla and pour over the bread pudding once ready. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 82.4g / 8.2g per serving Carbohydrates – 345.3g / 34.5g per serving Fat – 134.7g / 13.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 2923.1 Kcals / 292.3 Kcals per serving

103. Slow Cooker Bananas Foster (servings: 3) Ingredients: 1 tbsp. coconut oil 3 medium bananas 3 tbsp. honey Lemon Juice 1/4 tsp cinnamon Preparation Method: 1. Add the honey, lemon juice, cinnamon and oil to your cooker. 2. Then, add the sliced bananas. 3. Cook for two hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 3.1g / 1g per serving Carbohydrates – 97.6g / 32.5g per serving Fat – 14.5g / 4.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 533.3 Kcals / 177.8 Kcals per serving

104. Slow Cooker Bread Pudding (servings: 10) Ingredients: 8 piece’s whole grain bread ½ cup honey 3 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp. cinnamon 3 cups skimmed milk 2 whole eggs 2 egg whites Preparation Method: 1. Cut the bread into small pieces. 2. Add all ingredients to the slow cooker and mix thoroughly. 3. Cook on high for 4-5 hours. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 87.8g / 14.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 326.4g / 32.6g per serving Fat – 23g / 2.3g per serving

Total Kcals – 1863.8 Kcals / 186.4 Kcals per serving

105. Slow Cooker Brown Rice Pudding (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 can coconut milk, reduced fat 1 2/3 cup skimmed milk 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 2/3 cup long grain brown rice 1 tsp cinnamon ¼ cup sweetener Preparation Method: 1. Add the rice, cinnamon and sugar to the slow cooker. 2. Then, add both milks, stir to combine and cook until the rice is tender. 3. Add the vanilla and allow to set. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 33g / 5.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 167g / 27.8g per serving Fat – 43.1g / 7.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 1187.9 Kcals / 198 Kcals per serving

106. Slow Cooker Vegetable and Bean Soup (Servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 cup whole kernel corn 1 diced sweet onion 2 minced cloves garlic 400g sweet potato, skinned 1 teaspoon paprika 1 bay leaf 1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes 2 cups green beans 2 carrots 2 stalks celery Sea salt to taste 1 can tomatoes ½ can cannellini beans 1/2 teaspoon black pepper Allspice 1/8 tsp 1 ½ cups Vegetable broth ¼ cup parsley Preparation Method: 1. Put all the above ingredients in the cooker. 2. Cook until carrots are soft. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.7g / 5.8g per serving Carbohydrates – 187.6g / 31.3g per serving

Fat – 4.8g / 0.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 932.4 Kcals / 155.4 Kcals per serving

107. Slow Cooker Chicken Tortilla Soup (servings: 10) Ingredients: 1 sweet onion 3 cloves garlic sea salt to taste 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1/2 cup freshly chopped coriander 6 white corn tortillas 1 cup diced celery 3 chicken breast fillets 4 carrots 1 can black beans 1 can pinto beans 1 can fire roasted tomatoes 1 can diced jalapeño peppers 4 cups chicken broth or stock Preparation Method: 1. Place all ingredients in your slow cooker, excluding the tortillas. 2. Cook until carrots become soft. 3. Warm tortillas in microwave on full power for 40 seconds 4. Add the mix to the tortillas and wrap 5. Cut the tortillas in half and add to a large serving plate Nutrition Facts: Protein – 190.8g / 19.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 342.6g / 34.3g per serving

Fat – 44.4g / 4.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 2533.2 Kcals / 253.3 Kcals per serving

108. Slow Cooker Savory Superfood Soup (servings: 6) Ingredients: 2 cups carrots 1 sweet potato 1 cup green beans ½ cup cilantro 1 small onion 1 clove garlic 2 cans black beans ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes ½ tsp black pepper 1 tsp chili powder 1 tsp cumin Sea salt to taste 1 ½ cups vegetable juice 1 ½ cups vegetable broth Preparation Method: 1. Put all ingredients in your cooker and cook on slow until the veggies are ready to eat. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 78.3g / 13.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 185.3g / 30.9g per serving Fat – 9.2g / 1.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 1137.2 Kcals / 189.5 Kcals per serving

109. Slow Cooker Butternut Soup (servings: 14) Ingredients: Canned white beans - 1 Canned tomatoes -1 Ginger Cumin Ground black pepper 1 onion Chicken/vegetable broth, 2 ½ cups 2 potatoes, 600g 1 bell pepper 1 cup white corn 1 can black beans 3 cups butternut squash Coriander Cayenne pepper Preparation Method: 1. Add all ingredients to your slow cooker and cook for eight hours on slow. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 113.9g / 8.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 491.3g / 35.1g per serving Fat – 34.5g / 2.5g per serving

Total kcals – 2731.3 Kcals / 195.1 Kcals per serving

110. Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup (servings: 6) Ingredients: 2 lbs. cut up chicken 6 cups low sodium chicken broth ¼ cup fresh ½ teaspoon black pepper Sea salt to taste 8 Oz whole wheat noodles ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 cup sliced celery 4 carrots 1 small onion 2 cloves garlic Preparation Method: 1. Cook all the ingredients other than the noodles in your slow cooker on low for 8 hours. 2. For the final 30 minutes, add the noodles. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 246.3g / 41g per serving Carbohydrates – 107g / 17.8g per serving Fat – 25.8g / 4.3g per serving

Total Kcals – 1645.4 Kcals / 274.2 Kcals per serving

111. Slow Cooker Cream of Chicken and Rice Soup (servings: 6) Ingredients: ½ cup long grain brown rice ½ tsp salt 2 cloves garlic ½ tsp black pepper ¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes 1 cup skimmed milk 1 tbsp. cornstarch 2 sprigs thyme 1lb boneless chicken Chicken broth, 1 cup 3 carrots 1 large potato, 300g 1 stalk celery 1 sweet onion Preparation Method: 1. Put all your ingredients, excluding the milk and cornstarch into the cooker and cook for 8 hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 141.7g / 23.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 181.4g / 30.2g per serving Fat – 37.2g / 6.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 1627.2 Kcals / 271.2 Kcals per serving

112. Slow Cooker Fiesta Chicken Soup (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 can green chili peppers 1 can tomatoes Onion 1 clove garlic ½ tsp cayenne pepper ½ tsp black pepper 1 can black beans ½ cup cilantro 2 chicken breasts fillets 1 can red kidney beans Chicken broth 1 cup corn Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp. chili powder 1 tsp cumin Sea salt to taste Preparation Method: 1. Cook all the ingredients for 8 hours on low inside your slow cooker. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 121.9g / 20.3g per serving Carbohydrates – 176.8g / 29.5g per serving Fat – 26.8g / 4.5g per serving

Total kcals – 1435.2 / 239.2 Kcals per serving

113. Slow Cooker Black Bean & Veggie Soup (servings: 6) Ingredients: ½ cup cilantro 1 tsp chili powder 1 tsp cumin ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes 2 cans black beans 2 cups vegetable broth Kosher to taste 2 cloves garlic 1 small sweet onion 3 carrots 300g sweet potato, skinned 1 can fire roasted tomatoes ¼ tsp ground black pepper 1 can green chili peppers Preparation Method: 1. Add all ingredients to the slow cooker. 2. Cook on low until the carrots become tender. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 74.9g / 12.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 171.1g / 28.5g per serving Fat – 8.3g / 1.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 1058.7 Kcals / 176.4 Kcals per serving

114. Slow Cooker Cream of Potato Soup (servings: 6) Ingredients: 2 cups red potatoes 2 cups skimmed milk 2 cups vegetable broth 1 tbsp. fresh rosemary 1 tbsp. olive oil ¼ tsp black pepper ¼ tsp paprika ¼ tsp red pepper flakes 2 tbsp. cornstarch ½ cup white onion 1 clove garlic Salt to taste Preparation Method: 1. Add oil to a skillet and sauté onion until soft. 2. Add the garlic, onion, milk, vegetable broth, rosemary, salt, black pepper, paprika and crushed red pepper flakes. 3. Add the potatoes and cook for eight hours on low. 4. Combine the cornstarch with the milk and stir. Add this mixture and cook for another 10-15 minutes. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39.6g / 6.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 169.9g / 28.3g per serving Fat – 15.1g / 2.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 973.9 Kcals / 162.3 Kcals

115.

115.

Slow Cooker Lentil & Veggie Stew (servings: 6)

Ingredients: 1 cup whole kernel corn 1 medium red potato, skinned & quartered 3 large Carrots, chopped ½ cup diced sweet onion Celery (2 stalks) 1 cup green beans ½ tsp paprika ½ tsp black pepper Salt to taste 1 ½ cups tomato juice Vegetable broth, 1 cup 1 cup lentils Preparation Method: 1. Combine all ingredients leaving out the lentils. Cook for 10 hours on low. 2. Add the lentils for the final 20 minutes of the cooking process. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36.7g / 6.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 164.5g / 27.4g per serving Fat – 16.3g / 2.7g per serving

Total Kcals – 951.5 Kcals / 158.6 Kcals per serving

116. Slow Cooker Chicken Chili (servings: 6) Ingredients: 2 -3 chicken breast fillets 2 cloves garlic ½ cup sweet onion ½ tsp cayenne pepper ½ tsp cumin 1 can fire roasted tomatoes 3 tbsp. tomato paste Salt to taste 1 can Cannellini beans, in water 1 can Kidney beans, in water ¼ cup cheddar cheese 1 ½ cups chicken broth 2 tsp chili powder Black pepper Preparation Method: 1. Mix and cook all the ingredients on low for around 8 hours. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 185.8g / 31g per serving Carbohydrates – 105.6g / 17.6g per serving Fat – 68.6g / 11.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 1783 Kcals / 297.2 Kcals per serving

117. Slow Cooker Chicken Stew (servings: 10) Ingredients: 1 cup flour ½ tsp black pepper 1 yellow onion 2 cloves garlic Chicken broth, 1 cup 1 cup frozen peas Sea salt to taste 1 tsp dried sage ¼ cup oil 1 lb. chicken pieces on the bone Carrots, 3 large chopped Potato, 1 large skinned 2 stalks celery Preparation Method: 1. Scatter salt, pepper and sage on the chicken and dredge in flour. 2. Lightly brown the chicken, remove, add the onion and sauté until soft. Add the garlic and sauté. 3. Combine the carrots, potatoes, onions, garlic, and celery and place the chicken on top. 4. Pour the broth over the chicken and combine salt and pepper to taste. 5. Cook until the chicken is ready to eat… 6. Add peas for the final 20 mins. Nutrition Facts:

Protein – 169.2g / 16.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 213.2g / 21.3g per serving Fat – 114.7g / 11.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 2561.9 Kcals / 256.2 Kcals per serving

118. Slow Cooker Halibut Stew (servings: 4) Ingredients: 1 red bell pepper 1 small yellow onion Carrots, 3 large chopped 1 large potato 1 tsp chili powder ¼ cup freshly chopped cilantro ½ tsp cumin ½ tsp red pepper flakes 1 lb. halibut fillets Chicken broth, 1 cup Lemon juice, 1 tbsp. 2 cloves garlic ½ tsp black pepper Salt to taste Preparation Method: 1. Combine all ingredients excluding halibut. 2. Cook for 9 hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 135.8g / 33.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 85.2g / 21.3g per serving Fat – 20.2g / 5g per serving

Total kcals – 1065.8 Kcals / 266.4 Kcals per serving

119. Slow Cooker Honey Mustard Turkey Stew (servings: 4) Ingredients: 1 cup carrots 1.5 cups celery 1.5 cups onions 1 cup chicken broth 2 tbsp. honey 1 tsp dried rosemary 2 tbsp. grainy Dijon mustard 1 large turkey breast 2 tbsp. spelt flour Preparation Method: 1. Chop the turkey breast and toss in flour to cover. 2. Place all ingredients in the slow cooker and stir. 3. Cook for 3-4 hours on high. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32.6g / 9.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 114g / 28.5g per serving Fat – 12.4g / 3.1g per serving

Total Kcals – 698 Kcals / 174.5 Kcals per serving 120.

120.

Slow Cooker Veggie Pot Pie Stew (servings: 4)

Ingredients: 3 carrots 1 small Chayote Squash ¼ tsp red pepper flakes 1 cup green beans ½ tsp black pepper 1 ½ cups vegetable broth 2 cups low-fat milk 1 small onion 2 stalks celery 1 large sweet potato Salt to taste 1 tbsp. fresh thyme Preparation Method: 1. Combine all ingredients, excluding the milk, cornstarch and water. 2. Cook for 8 hours on low. 3. Add cornstarch and water, followed by milk and cook until you achieve your desired thickness. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 36g / 9g per serving Carbohydrates – 133.4g / 33.3g per serving Fat – 1.7g / 0.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 692.9 Kcals / 173.2 Kcals per serving

121. Slow Cooker Momma’s Roadhouse Chili (servings: 4) Ingredients: Tomatoes, 2 large Tomato paste, 2 tbsp. Black beans, 1 can 2 tablespoons chili powder 1 lb. lean ground turkey 1 tsp sea salt ½ tsp red pepper flakes 1 small sweet onion 2 can kidney beans ½ tsp black pepper 1 cup tomato juice Preparation Method: 1. Cook the turkey and onion in a skillet until soft. 2. Combine cooked meat and remaining ingredients and cook for eight hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 120.2g / 30.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 131.8g / 32.9g per serving Fat – 12.3g / 3.1g per serving

Total Kcals – 1118.7 Kcals / 279.7 Kcals per serving

122. Slow Cooker Texas Chili servings: 6 Ingredients: 2 lbs. lean beef chuck 2 tbsp. flour 1 tbsp. canola oil 1 onion, medium 1-2 jalapeño peppers 4 cloves garlic 1 tbsp. ground cumin 1 can chopped green chilies 2 cans tomatoes, and juices Greek yogurt, 2 tbsp. 3 tbsp. Ancho chili powder 1 tsp red pepper flakes 1 tsp dried oregano 3 cups beef stock, 2 cubes Green onions, ½ cup Preparation Method: 1. Toss the cubed beef chuck with the flour and sear the beef until brown. 2. Combine the onions and jalapeños. 3. Cook well and add the remaining ingredients. Stir thoroughly. 4. Cook on high for 3 hours or until the chili becomes thick. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 173.6g / 28.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 95.8g / 16g per serving

Fat – 206.8g / 34.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 2938.8 Kcals / 489.8 Kcals per serving

123.

Slow Cooker Apple Pie Steel-Cut Oatmeal (servings: 6)

Ingredients: 1 cup Steel-Cut Oats 1 tsp Cinnamon ¼ tsp Nutmeg 2 tbsp. Maple Syrup Lemon Juice Almond Milk, 1 cup 2 medium Apples 1 tsp Coconut Oil Preparation Method: 1. Mix all ingredients and cook for four hours on high. 2. Top with whatever toppings you desire. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28.5g / 4.8g per serving Carbohydrates – 169.7g / 28.3g per serving Fat – 21.8g / 3.6g per servings

Total Kcals – 989 Kcals / 164.8 Kcals per serving

124. Slow Cooker the 13-Bean Burgoo Stew (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 cup (dry) 13-bean mixture Chicken broth, 1 cup Chicken breast filets, 150g 2 cloves garlic 1 small sweet onion 1 bay leaf 3 carrots 2 ribs celery 1 cup frozen okra 1 can diced tomatoes ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes ½ tsp black pepper 1 tsp paprika Salt to taste Red potatoes, 1 large chopped Frozen corn, ¼ cup Preparation Method: 1. Soak the beans in water overnight. 2. Combine beans and remaining ingredients and add to your slow cooker. Cook on low for 8 hours. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 83.2g / 13.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 150.3g / 25.1g per serving

Fat – 9.2g / 1.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 1016.8 Kcals / 169.5 Kcals per serving

125. Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 cinnamon stick Honey, 1 tbsp. Cranberries, 100g ½ cup orange juice Preparation Method: 1. Add all ingredients and cook until berries become tender. 2. Chill in the fridge before serving. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 1.1g / 0.2g per serving Carbohydrates – 112.6g / 18.8g per serving Fat – 2.6g / 0.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 478.2 Kcals / 79.7 Kcals per serving

126. Slow Cooker Garlic Mashed Potatoes (servings: 10) Ingredients: Russet potatoes, 4 large deskinned ½ cup chicken broth 10 cloves garlic 1 tbsp. olive oil 1 cup plain yogurt, low fat ½ cup skimmed milk Salt to taste, 1 pinch Preparation Method: 1. Jab holes in the potatoes several times with a fork and place in the microwave for 10 minutes on full power. 2. Sauté the garlic in the olive oil for three minutes. 3. Cut the potatoes and place into the cooker along with the chicken broth. 4. Pour the garlic on top and mix well. 5. Cook until the potatoes become soft. Mash the potatoes with the milk and yogurt. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 55.2g / 5.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 306.5g / 30.6g per serving Fat – 20.2g / 2g per serving

Total Kcals – 1628.6 Kcals / 162.9 Kcals per serving 127.

127.

Potatoes with Garlic and Rosemary (servings: 8)

Ingredients: ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary ½ tsp black pepper Sea salt to taste 4 red potatoes, deskinned 3 cloves garlic, crushed Preparation Method: Combine all ingredients and cook until potatoes become soft. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28.5g / 3.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 237.7g / 29.7g per serving Fat – 66.9g / 8.4g per serving

Total Kcals – 1666.9 Kcals / 208.4 Kcals per serving 1.

1.

128. Slow Cooker Macaroni and Cheese (servings: 4) Ingredients: Skimmed milk, 1 cup 4 oz. cheddar cheese Whole wheat pasta, 1 cup uncooked 2 egg whites 2 tsp cornstarch Preparation Method: 1. In the cooker, beat the cornstarch, milk as well as the egg whites. 2. Add the rest of the contents and stir frequently. 3. Cook for two hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 62.2g / 15.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 106.9g / 26.7g per serving Fat – 46.4g / 11.6g per serving

Total Kcals – 1094 Kcals / 273.5 Kcals per serving

129. Slow Cooker Sweet & Savory Sweet Potatoes (servings: 3) Ingredients: 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes ½ tsp curry powder ¼ cup coconut palm sugar ¼ tsp black pepper ¼ tsp cinnamon ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 large sweet potatoes 2 cloves garlic Preparation Method: 1. Preheat the cooker with oil 2. Combine potatoes and the other ingredients and cook for three hours on high. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 12g / 4g per serving Carbohydrates – 201.6g / 67.2g per serving Fat – 65.5g / 21.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 1443.9 Kcals / 481.3 Kcals per serving

130. Slow Cooker Southern Style Green Beans (servings: 6) Ingredients: 2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 1 yellow onion 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp. chopped basil 1 tsp black pepper 2 lbs. fresh green string beans 1 potato, large deskinned Vegetable broth, 1 cup Salt to taste Preparation Method: 1. In a skillet sauté the onion and garlic until soft. 2. Add the sautéed onion and garlic along with the remaining ingredients and cook for 8 hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.3g / 4.2g per serving Carbohydrates – 141.2g / 23.5g per serving Fat – 35.4g / 5.9g per serving

Total Kcals – 984.6 Kcals / 164.1 Kcals per serving

131. Slow Cooker Sweet Potato Mash (servings: 6) Ingredients: 1 tsp. ground nutmeg ½ tsp. allspice ¼ tsp. ground cloves 2 lb. sweet potatoes 1 cup apple juice 1 tbsp. ground cinnamon Add: 1 pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg to taste Apple juice Preparation Method: 1. Add the potatoes to your cooker, combine the spices and most of the apple juice. 2. Cook until the potatoes are ready to eat. 3. Blend the sweet potatoes – adding the remaining juice. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 14.4g / 2.4g per serving Carbohydrates – 211.7g / 35.3g per serving Fat – 0.7g / 0.1g per serving

Total Kcals – 910.7 Kcals / 151.8 Kcals per serving

132. Slow Cooker Cornbread Stuffing (servings: 4) Ingredients: 2 tsp poultry seasoning Cornbread crumbs, 50g ½ tsp black pepper 2 cups chicken broth Salt to taste 2 tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1 cup celery 1 yellow onion Preparation Method: 1. In a skillet add oil and cook the celery and onion until soft. 2. Add the cornbread crumbs, black pepper and salt. 3. Combine the rest of the ingredients to the cornbread mixture. 4. Combine cornbread mixture and spread. Cook for four hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20.8g / 5.2g per serving Carbohydrates – 68.5g / 17.1g per serving Fat – 35.9g / 9g per serving

Total Kcals – 680.3 Kcals / 170.1 Kcals per serving

133. Slow Cooker Apple Crisp (servings: 8) Ingredients: Apples, 3-4 chopped 2 tbsp. lemon juice 2 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp nutmeg ½ tsp allspice Salt to taste Butter, low fat 3 tbsp. ½ cup organic sucanat ¾ cup whole wheat flour ½ cup rolled oats Preparation Method: 1. Spread the apples in the base of the cooker along with the lemon juice. 2. Combine ¼ cup sucanat and 1 tsp cinnamon to coat the apples. 3. In another bowl, combine the oats, flour, remaining sucanat, spices, and salt. 4. Cut in the butter using a pastry blender until the mix becomes coarse. 5. Pour the mix over the apples and cook on low for 4 hours. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 17.4g / 2.2g per serving Carbohydrates – 235.1g / 29.4g per serving Fat – 27.9g / 3.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 1261.1 Kcals / 157.6 Kcals per serving

134. Slow Cooker Fudge (servings: 6) Ingredients: 2 tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 cup Chocolate Chips 1/2 cup coconut milk 1/4 cup coconut sugar Pinch of sea salt Preparation Method: 1. Add the chocolate chips, coconut milk, coconut sugar, salt, and coconut oil. 2. Cook on low for 2 hours. Don’t stir. 3. Turn the cooker off and add vanilla. 4. Refrigerate until firm. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 9.5g / 1.6g per serving Carbohydrates – 190g / 31.7g per serving Fat – 79.5g / 13.2g per serving

Total Kcals – 1513.5 Kcals / 252.2 Kcals per serving

135. Slow Cooker Honey Bananas (servings: 4) Ingredients: Lemon juice, 2 tbsp. Bananas, 3 medium ½ tsp Cardamom Seeds Hazelnuts, 1 handful 1 tsp coconut oil 3 tbsp. honey Preparation Method: 1. Add all the above ingredients, bar the hazelnuts and cook on high for two hours. 2. When ready, crush the hazelnuts and add to the mix, stir well and serve immediately. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 2.7g / 0.9g per serving Carbohydrates – 142.9g / 35.7g per serving Fat – 35.5g / 8.9g per serving

Total Kcals – 1234.7 Kcals / 308.7 Kcals per serving

136. Slow Cooker Pecan Pie (servings: 6) Ingredients: Honey, 2 tbsp. 3 egg whites 2 cups diced pecans 4 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp cinnamon 3 tbsp. cornstarch Preparation Method: 1. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl. 2. Pour the mixed batter into an unbaked pie crust and cook for three hours on low. 3. Remove the lid and cook for another hour. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30.8g / 5.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 108.4g / 18.1g per serving Fat – 155.6g / 25.9g per serving

Total Kcals – 1957.2 Kcals / 362.2 Kcals per serving

137. Slow Cooker Pumpkin Spice Bread Pudding (servings: 10) Ingredients: 1-1.3 cups unsweetened almond milk ¼ tsp. ginger 1/8 tsp. ground allspice Ground cloves 8 piece’s whole grain bread ¾ cups canned pumpkin ½ cup coconut palm sugar 1 egg 4 egg whites ½ tsp. ground cinnamon Preparation Method: 1. Combine all ingredients besides the bread in a large bowl and mix together well. 2. Place the bread in the slow cooker and pour the mix over it. 3. Cook for 4 hours on low. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 61.5g / 6.1g per serving Carbohydrates – 308g / 30.8g per serving Fat – 23.2g / 2.3g per serving

Total Kcals – 1686.8 Kcals / 168.7 Kcals per serving 138.

Pasta with Eggplant Sauce (servings: 8)

138.

Ingredients: 2 garlic cloves 1 1/2 tsp dried oregano 1/3 cup pitted Kalamata olives Tomatoes diced – one can Tomato paste, 2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. parsley Parmesan cheese, 30g Chopped onion, 1 cup Black pepper 1 eggplant Penne pasta, 2 cups ¾ cup mushrooms – sliced 1/4 cup dry red wine Preparation Method: 1. Cut the eggplants into cubes. Add the oregano, eggplant cubes, chopped onion, tomatoes, tomato paste, water, sliced mushrooms, red wine, and chopped garlic to the slow cooker. 2. Cook for eight hours on slow. Mix parsley and Kalamata olives. 3. Season with pepper. 4. Add sauce and dash with cheese. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 48.2g / 6g per servings Carbohydrates – 198.6g / 24.8g per serving Fat – 14.3g / 1.8g per serving

Total Kcals – 1115.9 Kcals / 139.5 Kcals per serving

Chapter 8: All-Natural High Protein Smoothie Menu 139. Sweet Banana Soya Fix Ingredients: 1 large banana 250ml unsweetened soya milk Pulp of one passion fruit 100g Greek yogurt ½ tsp cinnamon Nutritional Benefits: Bananas are packed full of potassium, which benefits the circulatory system and eases muscle cramps. They’re high in fibre and maintain regular bowel function. Soya milk is a healthy alternative to cow’s milk and is packed with calcium and healthy fibre along with protein. Cinnamon also has many benefits including a high antioxidant content, along with antiaging properties. Greek yogurt contains a heavy amount of calcium and slow digesting protein. Passion fruit is high in iron, vitamin c, fibre, and helps to reduce cholesterol. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20.8g Carbohydrates – 60.3g Fat – 6.6g

Total Kcals – 383.8 Kcals

140. Peaches & Cream Supreme Ingredients: ½ tin of peaches 200ml skimmed milk 100ml frozen Greek yogurt ¼ cup cottage cheese ¼ cup oats 1 tsp lemon zest 2 tbsp. chia seeds Nutritional Benefits: Greek yogurt, skimmed milk and cottage cheese contain lots of slow release protein, calcium and do wonders for the immune system. Try to ensure that the syrup the peaches are contained within are low in sugar. Oats and chia seeds also contain considerable amounts of protein, along with lots of fibre which provides a slow release of energy. The lemon zest adds a tangy twist to this recipe and contains some strong antioxidant properties to help boost your immune system. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 35g Carbohydrates – 63.7g Fat – 10.9g

Total Kcals – 492.9 Kcals

141. Tooty-Fruity Ingredients: 1 cup fresh pineapple ¼ cup blueberries 200ml pomegranate juice 150ml frozen Greek yogurt 2 tbsp. flax seeds Nutritional Benefits: This smoothie serves as a great snack to boost energy levels, without rising blood sugar. It’s packed full of antioxidants that support your immune system and provides fuel for when you need it. The flax seeds add quality protein, along with fibre and omega 3 fatty acids. The pineapple, pomegranate juice and blueberries provide a source of fibre, vitamin C, antioxidants and fructose, which boosts energy without affecting glucose levels. Greek yogurt is a major source of slow release protein and is rich in calcium. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 16.8g Carbohydrates – 61.1g Fat – 9.8g

Total Kcals – 399.8 Kcals

142. Hearty Fruit Smoothie Ingredients: 1 cup fresh pineapple ¼ cup blueberries 200ml pomegranate juice 150ml frozen Soya yogurt 2 tbsp. flax seeds Nutritional Benefits: This smoothie is a great snack to boost your energy levels without raising blood sugar and is full of antioxidants that support your immune system and provides fuel for when you need it. The flax seeds provide some quality protein along with fibre and omega 3 fatty acids, the pineapple, pomegranate juice and blueberries provide a source of fibre, vitamin C, antioxidants and fructose which gives you a boost of energy without affecting glucose levels. Soya yogurt is a major source of slow release protein and contains plenty of calcium. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 16.8g Carbohydrates – 61.1g Fat – 9.8g

Total kcals – 399.8 kcals

143. Lemon & Lime Bitter Twist Ingredients: ¼ of a lemons juice 1 tsp lemon zest ¼ of a limes juice 1 tsp lime zest 250ml frozen vanilla soya yogurt 250ml coconut milk 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 2 tbsp. flax seeds Nutritional Benefits: The lemon and lime zest have strong antioxidant properties that protect your immune system and adds a sweet and bitter kick to any desert. The lemon and lime juice contain lots of vitamin C which is great for the absorption of iron, they also boost the immune system as they contain lots of antioxidant properties. Flax seeds are known as one of the top power foods as they’re packed with energy dense nutrients including fibre, protein, healthy fatty acids and fibre, they can help lower your blood pressure, reduce cholesterol and fight inflammatory. Coconut milk is lower in fat in comparison to animal milk, it’s full of calcium too, which helps to keep your bones strong. Soya yogurt is also full of calcium and contains considerable amounts of slow digesting protein. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 15g Carbohydrates – 32.9g Fat – 19g

Total kcals – 362.6 kcals

144. Chocolate & Mint (servings: 2) Ingredients: 1 kiwi ½ cup fresh spinach leaves 1 handful mint leaves 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 100ml soya yogurt 200ml coconut milk 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) ¼ cup slithered almonds Nutritional Benefits: Soya yogurt is a great alternative to dairy and is suitable for vegans. It contains a high amount of protein along with many more health benefits. Coconut milk is great for the immune system and again, is a healthy alternative to milk. It contains excessive amounts of potassium, iron and zinc, it also helps to lower blood sugar levels and keeps your blood vessels elastic and flexible. Ensure the cocoa powder is >70% as it has many health benefits such as, it increases the number of endorphins within the body, increases energy, contains powerful antioxidants which help to lower blood pressure and can even have similar effects as anti-depressants. Slithered almonds contain considerable amounts of protein, along with healthy fats and fibre. Try to use organic peanut butter as it’s usually made up of 95% peanuts and 5% rapeseed oil. Organic peanut butter should be slimy, you should be able to see it move if you turn the tub upside down or on its side, if it’s completely solid, avoid it. Spinach is full of iron which helps to restore energy and supports the function of red blood cells - It also has strong antioxidant properties. Apart from making meals, snacks and drinks taste fresh, mint leaves cleanse the stomach, help to clear certain skin disorders, treats bad breath and is a natural teeth whitener. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 32g / 16g per serving Carbohydrates – 38.6g / 19.3g per serving

Fat – 61.5g / 30.7g per serving

Total Kcals 835.9 Kcals / 417.9 Kcals per serving

145. Hazelnut Bliss Ingredients: 200ml hazelnut milk ¼ cup crushed hazelnuts 1 tsp cinnamon 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) 100ml Frozen soya yogurt 1 tsp organic honey ¼ cup oats Nutritional Benefits: Hazelnut milk is a healthier alternative to standard milk and has a very unique taste. There is less saturated fat per gram and barely affects blood sugar. It’s lactose free and helps the digestion process. Raw hazelnuts also taste great and consist of considerable amounts of protein, fibre and healthy omega-3 fats. Dark cocoa powder tastes great, releases feel good endorphins and boosts energy. Soya yogurt contains a high amount of protein, is great for the immune system and contains very little fat, it’s also rich in calcium. Oats provide a decent amount of protein along with fibre enabling you to feel full and satisfied and helps to release energy slowly. Cinnamon gives off a great taste, helps to fight against aging, has very high antioxidant properties and helps to balance insulin levels which encourages steady energy release throughout the day. Organic maple syrup tastes sweet, it’s a great alternative to sugar, boosts the immune system and helps to fight against allergies and fights bad bacteria. Maple syrup contains a high amount of sugars but is mainly in the form of fructose – the sugar found within fruit. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 26.6g Carbohydrates – 45.8g Fat – 62.8g

Total kcals – 854.6 kcals

146. Chocolate Orange (servings: 2) Ingredients: 250ml organic orange juice 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) ¼ cup slithered almonds 1 large banana ¼ cup oats ¼ cup frozen soy yogurt 1 tsp ground ginger 1 tsp orange zest Nutritional Benefits: Organic orange juice is loaded with vitamin C and adds a sweet citrus taste to any desert. Also, the orange zest adds a tangy taste and contains some antioxidant properties. Dark cocoa powder boosts your energy and consists of an elevated level of antioxidant properties. Slithered almonds have a unique taste and add a high amount of protein, fibre and healthy omega-3 fats to this smoothie. Oats contain a high amount of fibre to help make you feel full and provide a considerable amount of protein. Bananas have many benefits; they slowly release energy and contain a considerable amount of carbohydrates and protein. Bananas can be eaten before a workout to provide extra fuel, first thing in the morning to boost your energy and before bed to ensure a slow energy release throughout the night for a great night’s sleep as they help release melatonin. Ginger adds a spicy kick to whatever it’s added too and has very beneficial healing affects. Frozen soy yogurt tastes great, is packed with protein and is an awesome source of calcium – it also gives your smoothie a thick consistency. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 39g / 19.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 86.8g / 43.4g per serving Fat – 50.1g / 25g per serving

Total Kcals – 954.1 Kcals / 477 Kcals per serving

147. Fruit & Nut (serving: 2) Ingredients: ¼ cup blackberries ¼ cup blueberries 1 large banana 250ml coconut milk 100ml Frozen soya yogurt 1 tsp maple syrup ¼ cup oats ¼ cup cashews Nutritional Benefits: Bananas are rich in potassium and are loaded with energy, to get the best out of this recipe, consume within 1.5 hours before exercise. The blackberries and blueberries add a sweet citrus flavour, both contain strong antioxidant properties and are packed with vitamins. Greek yogurt is packed with protein and will help you feel fuller for longer. Oats also help to satisfy your stomach and provide a slow energy release as they’re rich in fibre. Cashews contain lots of protein, healthy fats and fibre. Coconut milk tastes delicious and is lactose free. The maple syrup along with the fruit makes this recipe taste like a treat, it contains a high amount of fructose so no more than a teaspoon. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 28.1g / 14g per serving Carbohydrates – 99.1g / 49.5g per serving Fat – 47.7g / 23.8g per serving

Total kcals – 938.1 kcals / 469 Kcals per serving

148. Before Bed Desert Ingredients: ½ medium avocado 1 medium banana 200ml unsweetened soya milk 2 tbsp. chia seeds ½ cup strawberries ¼ cup oats 100ml Frozen soya yogurt ¼ cup raspberries 1 tsp cinnamon Nutritional Benefits: Avocado is proven to have many health benefits, not just for the body but for the skin too. It’s loaded with potassium that’s proven to lower blood pressure, contains excessive amounts of vitamin C and E and is rich in antioxidants which strengthen the immune system. It’s a top brain food, great for eye sight, blood circulation, blood vessels, increases your mood and efficiency and great for weight loss. Yes, Avocado’s high in calories, but this is due to its high healthy fat and fibre content which enables you to feel fuller for longer. Chia seeds are another super food, they contain a full range of health benefits. They’re high in omega-3 fatty acids, contain a considerable amount of protein and naturally boost energy. Skimmed milk is the best type of animal milk to go for, it has the least fat and the most protein per gram. Greek yogurt and oats are both energy dense and contain a decent amount of protein, they both assist in slow energy release. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.7g Carbohydrates – 86.2g Fat – 25.2g

Total Kcals – 674.4 Kcals

149. Wake Me Up Smoothie Ingredients: 2 tbsp. flax seeds 1 tsp ground coffee beans 1 tsp ground ginger 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) 200ml almond milk 100ml soy yogurt ¼ cup slithered almonds 1 tsp organic honey Nutritional Benefits: Flax seeds are a super food packed with energy and are quite high in protein. They’re loaded with nutrients, healthy fats, fibre and antioxidants. Flax seeds are a great alternative to eggs. Caffeine has many positive affects including added intensity to your workouts, provides an energy boost and can improve your mental and physical performance. Almond milk and soya products are healthy alternatives to dairy products; they contain less fat and just as much if not more protein per gram. Slithered almonds taste great and are packed with protein, fibre and healthy fats. Organic honey tastes great as it’s a great alternative to sugar and boosts the immune system. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 30g Carbohydrates – 35.4g Fat – 59.6g

Total kcals – 797.8 kcals

150. High Carb Energy Boost Smoothie Ingredients: 2 medium bananas ¼ cup oats 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 200ml hazelnut milk 100ml frozen soy yogurt 1 tsp ground ginger 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) ¼ cup blackberries ¼ cup raspberries ¼ cup hazelnuts Nutritional Benefits: This recipe is energy and carb fuelled, it’d be ideal to consume within 1-1.5 hours before exercise. Bananas are full of potassium and complex carbohydrates; they keep your muscles fuelled and your tummy full. The soya yogurt, hazelnut milk and oats are energy dense as they contain considerable amounts of fibre which helps your body to release energy slowly, they also contain a decent amount of protein. The dark chocolate is designed to make you feel good and contains a small amount of natural caffeine which helps to boost energy and immune system. The hazelnuts taste awesome and provide a high amount of protein along with fibre and healthy fats. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.8g Carbohydrates – 100.2g Fat – 74g

Total kcals – 1206 kcals

151. Green Goodness Ingredients: handful fresh kale 1 handful spinach 1 kiwi ½ mango ½ avocado 2 tbsp. flax seeds 300ml pomegranate juice Nutritional Benefits: Kale and spinach are full of iron, calcium and many other important vitamins and minerals. They’re high in antioxidants and contain lots of fibre to ensure a slow release of energy. Kiwi has a lot of strong antioxidant properties also, contributing to eye, hair and skin health. They also uplift your mood and eating as much as 2 kiwis per day can improve your sleep. Avocados offer an entire range of health benefits including younger looking skin, strengthening of the immune system and lowers blood pressure. Flax seeds contain a considerable amount of protein per portion and are known as a power food for their powerful antioxidants and energy boosting properties. Pomegranate juice has a unique sweet taste and has strong antioxidant properties to strengthen the immune system and keeps your heart healthy by keeping the arteries flexible and decreases inflammation. Mangos are also great for boosting the immune system as they consist of lots of antioxidant properties. They’re a great snack on their own as they consist of lots of fibre, giving your stomach that satisfied feeling, the high fibre content also helps to maintain a healthy digestive system. They’re also rich in calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 8.1g Carbohydrates – 76.8g Fat – 25g

Total kcals – 564.6 kcals

152. Chocolate Berry (servings: 2) Ingredients: 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) ¼ cup raspberries ¼ cup strawberries ¼ cup cashew nuts ¼ cup oats 250ml coconut milk 100ml soy yogurt 2 tbsp. chia seeds Nutritional Benefits: Berries taste great and sweeten up any desert, they also offer your body plenty of health benefits. They are very nutrient dense, contain plenty of antioxidants and boost the immune system. They also have a high fibre content and can be used as a substitute to sugar. Chia seeds are full of energy and contribute a high amount of protein to this recipe. Almonds are the main source of protein in this smoothie, they also contain healthy fats and complex carbohydrates which enables you to feel fuller for longer and releases energy slowly. Coconut milk and soya yogurt are great substitutes to dairy and contain lots of calcium and slow release protein. The oats are a major source of fibre and protein enabling you to feel full and ensure you have plenty of energy to fuel your workout. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.5g / 14.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 65.9g / 32.9g per serving Fat – 57.9g / 28.9g per serving

Total Kcals – 902.7 Kcals / 451.3 Kcals per serving

153. Coffee Mint Cocoa Ingredients: 200ml coconut milk 100ml frozen soya yogurt 1 tsp ground coffee beans 1 handful mint leaves ¼ cup slithered almonds 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) 1 tsp maple syrup 2 tbsp. chia seeds Nutritional Benefits: This recipe is particularly beneficial first thing or around 1-1.5 hours before exercise. The coconut milk contains a lot of fibre and keeps the blood vessels elastic and flexible enabling the body to work more efficiently. Almonds are a super food and are packed with protein and healthy fats, they’re energy dense because of the high fat content, they’re also rich in fibre which boosts energy and they benefit the heart because of the magnesium and potassium contained inside. They also lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Chia seeds are also a power food and they provide a high fibre content that boosts energy levels. The mint leaves give the smoothie a fresh taste and helps to improve your digestive process. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 34.3g Carbohydrates – 44.9g Fat – 57.7g

Total kcals – 836.1 kcals

154. Raspberry Double Nutty Ingredients: 1 handful hazelnuts 1 handful slithered almonds 200ml coconut milk 100ml frozen soya yogurt ¼ cup oats ½ cup raspberries Nutritional Benefits: Hazelnuts and almonds are packed with fibre and help make you feel fuller for longer, they also contain considerable amounts of protein and healthy omega 3 fatty acids. The coconut milk and soya yogurt are both great sources of calcium and contain decent amounts of protein, these two are great alternatives to milk. Raspberries add a succulent sweet flavour to any desert, they give you an energy boost without affecting blood sugar. Oats add a lot of fibre to this shake and contain a major source of fibre and protein per serving. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 20.2g Carbohydrates – 35g Fat – 62.4g

Total kcals – 782.4 kcals

155. Thick Chocolate Orange smoothie Ingredients: 1 tsp orange zest ¼ fresh orange juice ½ avocado 1 medium banana ½ mango ¼ cup blueberries 2 tbsp. flax seeds 300ml coconut milk 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) 1 small handful slithered almonds Nutritional Benefits: The coconut milk, banana, mango and avocado add a smooth and creamy consistency to the smoothie, depending on how much of the 4 ingredients you use, it’s possible to make a delicious chocolate orange mousse. The blueberries are full of antioxidants that help to strengthen the immune system and contains a lot of fructose sugar that helps to boost your energy levels without affecting blood sugar. The almonds and flax seeds contain lots of fibre which encourages energy to release slowly. They’re packed with omega 3 fatty acids and adds the clear majority of protein to this wonderful desert. The cocoa powder gives it a chocolate kick and adds many health benefits such as releases endorphins within the body, they perform like antidepressants and naturally lower blood pressure. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 21.9g Carbohydrates – 82.2g Fat – 55.1g

Total kcals – 912.3 kcals

156. Double Chocolate Milkshake (servings: 2) Ingredients: 1 large banana 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) 250ml chocolate coconut milk 150ml frozen soya yogurt 2 tbsp. chia seeds 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 1 tbsp. maple syrup Nutritional Benefits: This one is great for chocolate lovers! Chocolate coconut milk is a major source of calcium, fibre, vitamin D and protein. The soya yogurt contains slow release protein and offers an entire range of health benefits that help to improve the immune system. The organic peanut butter has a decent amount of protein and adds some healthy fats. Bananas boost energy as they contain a lot of fibre, carbohydrates and are a rich source of potassium, they’re also rich in iron and help to improve your mood. Bananas are a great food source to consume at any time of day. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 27.1g / 13.5g per serving Carbohydrates – 81.9g / 40.9g per serving Fat – 29g / 14.5g per serving

Total Kcals – 697 Kcals / 348.5 Kcals per serving

157. Vanilla Carb Loader Ingredients: 1 tsp vanilla extract 300ml almond milk 150ml frozen soya yogurt 2 medium bananas ¼ cup oats 2 tbsp. flax seeds 1 tsp honey 1 tsp ground cinnamon Nutritional Benefits: This is an ideal meal replacement smoothie to consume around 1.5 hours before exercise, it consists of mainly complex carbs along with fibre to boost energy levels and fuel your workout. The two bananas are super foods and can be well utilized before exercise as they consist mainly of complex carbs and fibre and are free of fat and cholesterol. Oats also consist of fibre and complex carbs adding more fuel to the fire! Cinnamon has many health benefits including anti-aging, younger looking skin, helps to balance insulin levels and it tastes great too. Flax seeds are full of fibre, healthy fats and contain a decent amount of protein. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.1g Carbohydrates – 91.6g Fat – 16.7g

Total kcals – 633.1 kcals

158. Chocolate Vanilla Dream Ingredients: 1 tsp vanilla extract 200ml frozen vanilla soya yogurt 250ml chocolate coconut milk 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 2 tbsp. flax seeds 3 tsp dark cocoa powder (>70%) ¼ cup oats Nutritional Benefits: Oats are packed with fibre and contain complex carbohydrates with a considerable amount of protein, these are great for slow released energy and will make you feel fuller for longer due to the high fibre contents. Flax seeds are also high in fibre along with omega 3 fatty acids which contribute to your overall health. Soya yogurt is rich in calcium and is relatively high in protein and fibre. Chocolate coconut milk is delicious, high in calcium, low in fat and sugar and dairy free. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25.5g Carbohydrates – 65g Fat – 23.5g

Total kcals – 573.5 kcals

159. Tropical Smoothie (servings: 2) Ingredients: 250ml coconut milk 250ml frozen vanilla soya yogurt 2 tbsp. chia seeds ¼ cup oats ¼ cup sesame seeds ½ mango 1 kiwi ½ cup strawberries 1 large banana Nutritional Benefits: Oats are full of fibre and consist of complex carbs which help you feel fuller for longer and boost your energy. Soya yogurt contains a healthy source of calcium, and protein and helps to protect the immune system. Kiwis are full of powerful antioxidants and improve eye, hair and skin health, they’re also proven to help you sleep and improve your mood. Bananas are another powerful food that has all sorts of benefits. They’re high in fibre and complex carbs which boosts your energy, they’re also great to maintain a healthy digestive system and help produce the body’s natural sleep hormone melatonin. Coconut milk tastes delicious, contains fibre and many vitamins and minerals; potassium, magnesium, iron and zinc. It also helps to lower blood sugar, lower cholesterol and is lactose free. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 29.7g / 14.8g per serving Carbohydrates – 110.7g / 55.3g per serving Fat – 36.7g / 18.3g per serving

Total Kcals – 891.9 Kcals / 445.9 Kcals per serving

160. Strawberry Delight Ingredients: 1 cup fresh strawberries ½ cup raspberries 1 medium banana 250ml frozen vanilla soya yogurt 250ml hazelnut milk ¼ cup oats ¼ cup sesame seeds Nutritional Benefits: Hazelnut milk and soya yogurt are great sources of calcium and slow release protein. The oats and sesame seeds are full of fibre, help to boost your immune system and energy levels, they also help to control blood sugar. The strawberries and raspberries add a sweet and tangy flavour to any desert; they also consist of fibre and fructose sugars that give you an energy boost without affecting your glucose levels. Nutrition Facts: Protein – 25g Carbohydrates – 82.3g Fat – 28.7g

Total kcals – 687.5 kcals

161. Post Cardio Breakfast Smoothie Blitz Ingredients: 1 large banana 1 handful cashew nuts ½ cup frozen vanilla soya yogurt ¼ cup strawberries ¼ cup blueberries 2 tbsp. granolas 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 1 tbsp. organic peanut butter 150ml glass orange juice 150ml coconut milk Nutrition Facts: Protein – 24.2g Carbs – 122.8g Fat – 42.6g

Total kcals – 971.4 kcals

162. Granola Special (servings: 2) Ingredients: 100g Jordan’s crunchy oat granola (or any other brand) 200ml coconut milk 1 tbsp. soya yogurt 1 large banana (chopped into small chunks) 1 tbsp. organic maple syrup 1 tbsp. dairy free chocolate sauce (choc shot) Preparation Method: For an energy dense, delicious and nutritious breakfast, simply add the granola in a large serving bowl along with the milk, add the chopped banana, yogurt and drizzle the maple syrup and chocolate sauce over the top. Amazing!! Nutrition Facts: Protein – 13.5g / 6.7g per serving Carbohydrates – 119.8g / 59.9g per serving Fat – 16g / 8g per serving

Total Kcals – 677.2 Kcals / 338.6 Kcals per serving

Chapter 9: Whey Protein Smoothie Menu Whey protein is the most popular protein powder on the market today and has been proven to digest the fastest, which works to your advantage immediately after exercise! Ensure the Whey protein powder you use is flavorless, as each recipe contains its own unique taste. The given recipes contain 1 scoop of high quality Whey Protein. Each recipe is under 400 calories and provides you with 32g of protein or more.

163. Breakfast with Strawberry and Oatmeal Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 4 tablespoons of organic oats 7 organic strawberries 1 small organic banana A cup of water Preparation Method: Oats have a low glycemic index and help to keep your blood sugar stable, they also contain lots of fiber to keep you feeling fuller for longer. To start your day healthy without any hustle, blend the above ingredients and enjoy a smoothie that’ll serve to energizer, until your next meal. To sweeten this smoothie, simply add a tsp of organic honey for more healthy and natural taste of sweetness.

164. Green Chili Avocado Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 small deseeded organic green chili 1 organic avocado, medium sized 1 organic lime. Juice it completely 1 organic apple Chopped organic ginger of about half an inch 2-3 ice cubes A cup of water Preparation Method: Before chopping into cubes, peel and core the apple and avocado. For more of a spicy flavor, blend all ingredients until smooth. This smoothie is rich in immune boosting antioxidants and essential fatty acids. You can also use other spices like coriander or cumin or any organic herb, if you prefer a relatively milder flavor.

165. Mango and Banana Lava Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ½ organic mango 1 organic orange, juiced 1 small organic banana 4-5 ice cubes Preparation Method: To prepare this vitamin rich, delicious and creamy recipe, simply peel and chop the fruits and blend all ingredients together. You can also throw in some organic ginger to add a spicy kick to this smoothie.

166. Apple Broccoli Cleanse Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 organic apple 1 cup of organic broccoli florets Half organic lemon, juiced 1 stalk of organic celery Half a cup of water 1 teaspoon of organic honey Preparation Method: To create a fresh smoothie containing healthy nutrients and that’s bright green in color, simply blend together all the above ingredients to enjoy a smoothie designed to cleanse the body. Also, if you’re not a fan of broccoli, you can replace with any other dark green vegetable.

167. Peach and Raspberry Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2oz of frozen raspberries One organic orange, juiced 7oz of organic canned peaches Preparation Method: For a high protein smoothie recipe that’s low in fat, enriched with nutrients and flavor, blend all the above ingredients together. The tinned peaches speed up this recipe, however, you can also use fresh, just ensure they’re ripe.

168. Orange and Peach Delight Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 organic peach 1 organic orange 1 organic lemon A cup of water Preparation Method: For a refreshing and mouthwatering smoothie, begin by peeling and chopping the fruits. Make sure you remove the seeds and stones. Blend the above ingredients and enjoy a protein rich smoothie skyhigh in Vitamin C. This one’s great to fight infection, as it contains powerful antioxidants. You can also choose any other citrus fruit to satisfy your taste. All citrus fruits, including organic grapefruit and organic tangerines are equally as good.

169. Beetroot Refresher Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2 small organic Beetroots, properly peeled 1 cup of organic apple juice ½ organic grapefruit Preparation Method: After removing the skin and seeds from the grapefruit, blend it together with the beetroot. Add the protein powder along with the apple juice to the mix and two blend the ingredients together once again. This smoothie will refresh, revitalize and enrich you with Vitamin C. Beetroot can be consumed Raw or cooked, it’s high in vitamin B and has a wide range of health benefits.

170. Apricot and Carrot Splash Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2 organic apricots 1 organic carrot 1 organic apple A cup of water Preparation Method: To prepare a flavorsome orange smoothie filled with beta carotene, simply peel, chop and core the vegetables and fruits. Blend all the above ingredients well and enjoy. You can use other fruits rich in beta carotene, such as organic peaches, papaya, orange and cantaloupe melon.

171. The Green Splash Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ½ cup of organic spinach 2 organic kiwis 5 organic mint leaves 1 small organic mint leaves A cup of water Preparation Method: The green splash is loaded with goodness, it contains important nutrients and offers many health benefits, both inside and out. Peel the fruit, chop, add to the blender along with the water and protein powder and blend away. You can also replace the spinach with kale, watercress or dark green cabbage.

172. Berry-Berry Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 3 organic strawberries 1 tablespoon of organic blueberries 1 tablespoon of organic raspberries 6 organic cherries, with removed stones A cup of organic pomegranate juice Preparation Method: This next recipe has an exquisite taste and is a personal favorite. Simply blend all the ingredients together and enjoy its unique flavor. You can also alter the quantity of cherries for a more intense flavor.

173. Choco Nut Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2oz of organic cashews 1 tablespoon of organic cocoa powder 2 organic medjool dates A cup of water Preparation Method: To prepare a smoothie enriched with antioxidants and heart healthy fats, simply blend all the above ingredients together. If you aren’t keen on dates, you can replace them with dried fruits such as figs or prunes. You can also add a teaspoon of organic honey or syrup to sweeten.

174. Caribbean Drive Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 organic passion fruit pulp 1 large slice of chopped organic mango One organic lime, juice properly 1 large slice or chopped organic pineapple 5 organic lychees. Peel and remove the stone 3-4 ice cubes Preparation Method: Simply blend all the fruits together with the lime juice, protein powder and the ice cubes. Blend the mix until completely smooth. Pour and enjoy your drive of the Caribbean flavors. You can also add canned organic mangos or pineapples to save time.

175. Ginger and Banana Boost Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein Half small organic peach 1 small organic banana 6 frozen organic strawberries Finely chopped organic ginger of about half inch Organic vanilla extract to taste A cup of water Ground organic cinnamon for garnishing Preparation Method: Peel and chop the fruits and add to the rest of the ingredients – blend until smooth. Pour the smoothie into a container of choice and sprinkle the cinnamon for garnishing. Though other sweet spices are just as sufficient, ginger provides a warm tangy kick and contains anti-inflammatory properties.

176. Watermelon Wonder Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup of organic watermelon. Deseed and cut it into cubes 1 organic lime, juiced 4-6 ice cubes Preparation Method: To create a flavorsome smoothie that’s refreshing both inside and out, simply blend together all the ingredients above. The water derived from the melon is rich in lycopene; however, you can still replace with other types of melons such as cantaloupes as they’re nutrient dense and taste amazing.

177.

All-In Fruit Smoothie

Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 organic pear, properly ripe 1 organic apple 1 cup of organic apple juice 1 organic banana Ground organic cinnamon to taste Preparation Method: Peel the fruits and core the apple before chopping. Blend the ingredients together until you achieve a smooth consistency... You can replace the cinnamon with mixed spices or nutmeg to create your own unique flavor.

178. Antioxidant Splash Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 small organic banana 2oz of frozen organic blueberries 1 cup of organic apple juice Preparation Method: To prepare a delicious mouthwatering smoothie that’s loaded with healthy nutrients, chop the banana and blend with the rest of the ingredients. You can replace the blueberries with other berries such as cranberries, blackberries and raspberries, to create your own unique twist.

179. Pumpkin Pump Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 small organic banana Half a cup of organic pumpkin puree Just a little of organic vanilla extract 2 organic medjool dates ¼ teaspoon of organic ground nutmeg ¼ teaspoon of organic cinnamon ¼ teaspoon of organic ground ginger Preparation Method: Blend the ingredients together until smooth. Pour into a cup for a delicious taste and heart melting aroma. You can also add the following spices; cardamom and organic cloves for a different and unique taste.

180. Chocolate Sea Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 tablespoon of organic cocoa powder 1 small organic banana 1 organic orange Small amount of organic honey to increase the sweetness Organic vanilla extract about half a teaspoon A cup of water Preparation Method: Peel and deseed the orange and blend along with the other ingredients above. This recipe is both delicious and nutrient rich. Consume immediately after exercise, as a snack or as a dessert. You can also replace the orange with fresh organic mint for a more intense and refreshing flavor.

181. Strawberries and Papaya Joy Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 6 strawberries Half an organic papaya 1 organic banana A cup of water Preparation Method: For a refreshing start to your day, peel and deseed the papaya and blend together with all the ingredients above. This recipe is rich in potassium and Vitamin C and has many heart benefits. You can also use alternative berries to create your own unique taste.

182. Coconut Chilling Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 3 tablespoons of coconut milk 1 small chopped organic banana A cup of organic pineapple juice 4-6 ice cubes Preparation Method Blend all the ingredients together for approximately a minute and you’ll have in hand, a smoothie enriched with powerful nutrients and exquisite flavor. If preferred, the pineapple juice can be replaced with most other tropical fruits such as mangos, papayas and organic guava.

183. Vanilla Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop whey protein 3-4 ice cubes 1 scoop vanilla Ice cream 1 cup of almond milk 2 teaspoons peanut butter 3 tablespoon coconut milk ¼ cup Berries of your choice – strawberry or raspberry Preparation Method: To fabricate this delicious recipe, simply blend all the ingredients above by manually whipping until you reache a thick consistency. The vanilla ice cream can be replaced with frozen yogurt if you’re health conscious. Alternatively, this is an awesome smoothie to consume post-workout to refuel and repair.

184. Banana-Berry Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 medium sized banana ½ cup fresh strawberries 6 Oz almond milk Preparation Method: The banana berry shake is a treat if you’re looking to cure your sweet tooth craving. All you have to do is combine all the ingredients in a mixer and whisk to your preference. Consume as a breakfast on the go, pre/post workout or as a snack.

185. Smooth Peanut Paradise Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ¼ cup coconut milk 1/3rd cup almond milk (unsweetened) 2 tablespoons peanut butter Preparation Method: The smooth peanut paradise is unique and is another personal favorite. The peanut butter lends a risqué flavor and adds more protein and healthy fats to its content. This recipe doesn’t require the use of a blender either, as it can be stirred by hand. It can also be frozen and consumed as a snack.

186. Triple Sundae Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ½ cup strawberries 12 oz almond milk ½ cup blueberries 2 tablespoons peanut butter 3 tablespoons oatmeal Preparation Method: Blend all the above ingredients in a mixer and serve chilled. The addition of oatmeal lends a grainy texture to the drink. This smoothie is high in protein and will pump you full of energy.

187. Almond Blast Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup skimmed milk 2 teaspoons peanut butter Finely ground almond powder (approx. 12 groundnuts) ½ cup oatmeal Few drops of Vanilla flavor Raisins to taste Preparation Method: Mix all the above ingredients and blend to produce a healthy snack that promises to be a treat. The rich flavor of almonds, whey and raisins along with the vanilla extract ensures that you’ll receive the best taste possible.

188. The Bran Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 medium sized banana ½ cup oatmeal A little honey 1 glass water ¾ cup bran flakes Preparation Method: Combine all the above ingredients into a mixer and churn it until the banana and bran flakes crush to form a think shake. Add water and honey in variation depending on how thick you prefer your shake. Ice can be added before serving for a chilled effect.

189. Strawberry Greek Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup strawberry flavored yoghurt 4 strawberries (fresh or frozen) 1 teaspoon flaxseed oil 1 cup water Preparation Method: The addition of yoghurt adds an interesting twist to your daily protein shake. Just mix all the ingredients and whisk until thick and creamy. Fresh strawberries contribute added health benefits, but frozen can be just as sufficient when not in season. Serve chilled for best results.

190. Charming Chocolate Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 tablespoon peanut butter 2 cups non-fat milk 4-6 cubes of ice 3 tablespoons drinking cocoa Preparation Method: To prepare the charming chocolate shake, just add all elements into a blender and mix until smooth and silk. This is one for the chocolate lovers and will cure any sweet tooth cravings. Not only is it tasty, it’s also packed with protein and healthy fats along with a few simple carbs – the perfect choice immediately after killing it in the gym.

191. Low Carb Sour Chocolate Bliss Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup water 2 tablespoons drinking cocoa 3 teaspoons flaxseed oil Artificial sweetener 2 tablespoons low-fat sour cream Preparation Method: If you can’t get enough of chocolate, then you’re in for a treat. What’s more intriguing than a healthy dose of chocolate with the added benefits of whey protein! Mix all the ingredients in a glass thoroughly until it becomes of uniform consistency. Add a few ice cubes to the mix to enjoy it to its fullest.

192. Cheese Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2 cups skimmed milk 2 drops vanilla essence ½ cup low-fat yoghurt 1 cup non-fat cottage cheese Berries to taste Preparation Method: Blend all the ingredients together along with a fruit of choice. In addition to being rich in protein, this recipe also contains a high amount of calcium. Cheese is a favorite amongst many, it contains a ton of calcium and slow release protein, which is a perfect bed-time snack to consume prior to hitting the sack. It’ll keep your muscles well-nourished throughout the night with its slow release protein properties and helps to promote the sleep hormone melatonin, to ensure you get a great night’s sleep.

193. Creamy Peach Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup water 1 peach, ripe 2 table spoon low-fat sour cream Artificial sweeteners Preparation Method: Choose a ripe peach and deseed, add to a blender along with the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Refrigerate before serving and enjoy after a grueling workout.

194. Honey Spirulina Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2 teaspoons honey 1 medium sized banana 1 heaped tsp spirulina 1 tsp flaxseed ¾ cup yoghurt 1 cup water Preparation Method: Combine all elements, blend together and add to a tall glass. You can adjust the quantity of water based on your preference. Spirulina is a cyanobacteria and is consumed all over the world because of its health-related benefits. It’s rich in protein and many vitamins and minerals.

195. Banana Based Peanut Smoothie Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 medium sized banana ½ cup low fat milk 2 tablespoons peanut butter 4-6 ice cubes Preparation Method: This recipe is an excellent source of fuel prior to exercise as It’s jampacked with energy. It’s not only ideal before exercise, it’s also ideal post exercise and as a snack before bed due to the banana, milk and high protein content. Together, these food sources promote melatonin and help to feed your muscles throughout the night, ensuring you get a perfect night’s sleep.

196. Pumpkin Pie Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ¼ cup canned pumpkin ¼ cup water 1 cup almond milk (unsweetened) 1 tsp flaxseed 1 tsp honey ¼ tsp cinnamon Preparation Method: This next recipe has a taste of its own and is also energy dense. Just add all the above ingredients to your blender and blend away to achieve your desired consistency.

197. Mixed Fruit Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup almond milk (unsweetened) ½ cup water 1 cup frozen mixed fruits 4-6 ice cubes

198. Butter-Almond Smoothie Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ½ cup water 1 cup almond milk (unsweetened) 1 teaspoon honey 5-6 ice cubes 1 teaspoon almond butter

199. Chilled Barley Broth Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 tsp barley grass Almond milk (unsweetened) 4-5 ice cubes 1 tsp Flaxseed powder Honey (to taste)

200. Simple Spinach Stuff Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup almond milk(unsweetened) 1 teaspoon cocoa powder 1 cup Spinach 4-6 ice cubes

201. Cranberry Cute Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein ½ cup water ½ cup cranberries 1 tsp flaxseeds 1 tsp chia seeds 1 tsp honey

202. Healthy n Hearty Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 medium sized banana 1 cup water 0.5 cup raspberries 0.5 cup strawberries 1 teaspoon coconut oil ½ cup spinach 1 teaspoon flax seeds

203. Wise-Water Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1/3 cup skimmed milk ½ cup low-fat yoghurt ½ orange ½ cup strawberries ½ cup watermelon 3-5 ice

204. Squash Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 orange 3-5 ice cubes Fructose to taste

205.

Choco Sundae Shake

Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 tsp flaxseed ¾ cup strawberries ½ cup yoghurt 2 tsp cocoa 3-5 ice cubes

206. Java Banana Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 3 teaspoons coffee (instant powder) 1 medium sized banana 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1 cup almond milk (unsweetened) ¼ cup oats 1 tablespoon cocoa powder Cardamom – a pinch

207. Hazelnut Choco Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2 tbsp hazelnut flavored cocoa 2 tbsp Greek yoghurt 3 drops of Vanilla essence Sugar to taste 1/3 cup fat-free milk

208. Super protein Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 4 egg whites 8 Oz water 1 tablespoon peanut butter 4-6 cubes of ice

209. Peach & Berries Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 2 ripe peaches 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil 6 fresh strawberries 8 Oz water

210. Tropical Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 tsp pineapple extract ½ banana 8 Oz water 2-3 ice cubes ½ tsp coconut extract

211. Simple Spirulina Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 teaspoon Spirulina 2 teaspoons of honey 1 teaspoon flaxseed oil ¼ cup oatmeal 1 cup almond milk(unsweetened) ¾cup natural yoghurt

212. Mad Mango Shake Ingredients: 1 scoop Whey protein 1 cup mango pieces 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil 7 Oz water 1 cup yoghurt

Conclusion Losing weight, building muscle and getting chiseled has never been easier. Yes, a bodybuilding diet requires discipline, but it doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice flavor! The follow up from the “blue print,” offers 200 more bodybuilding recipes ranging from pre-workout recipes, to post workout recipes, to slow cooker recipes to healthy desert recipes. If you’re new to bodybuilding, looking to bulk up and get shredded or if you just want to get back into shape and incorporate a healthier diet into your daily regime, that’s full of flavor, the bodybuilding cookbook provides you with more than enough recipes to choose from, all year around. What’s more, these recipes are also diverse enough to feed the entire family. Thank you for downloading my E-book, if you’ve found some value and appreciate the information provided, I’d be more than grateful if you could kindly leave a review.

Bodybuilding Cookbook 50 Simple and inexpensive bodybuilding recipes on a budget

Table of Contents Introduction Chapter 1: The Shopping List Chapter 2: Breakfast Menu 1. Scrambled Eggs and Avocado on Toast 2. Oatmeal with Boiled Eggs 3. Nutty Porridge 4. Mixed Beans on Toast 5. Granola Special 6. Potato Bites Breakfast Special 7. Bacon & Egg Toasted Muffin – English Style 8. Tuna, Cheese & Onion Toasty 9. Very Berry Smoothie 10. Chocolate Banana-Split Smoothie Chapter 3: Pre-Workout Menu 11. Simple Pasta, Chicken & Greens 12. Sweet Potato, Tuna & Mixed Peppers 13. Jerk-Turkey, Rice & Greens 14. Spicy Beans on Toast 15. Whole Spicy Chicken Tortillas 16. Jacket Potato with Beans & Greens 17. Carb-Loader Smoothie 18. Turkey & Garlic Wedges 19. Turkey Burger 20. Basa Fish & Sweet Potato Fries Chapter 4: Post-Workout Menu 21. Fresh Salmon & Garlic Rice 22. Garlic Chicken & Pasta in Tomato Sauce 23. Tuna, Cheese & Spring Onion Toasty 24. Sweet Chicken Tortillas 25. Garlic-Turkey & Roast Potatoes 26. Chicken Curry with Rice 27. Tuna Noodles

28. Tuna Peanut Butter Bagel 29. Jerk-Turkey & Potato Bites 30. Chick Pea Curry Chapter 5: Immediately Post Workout Menu 31. Boiled Eggs & Co 32. Nutty Orange Juice Smoothie 33. Peanut Butter Jelly & Tuna 34. Raw Egg Smoothie 35. Peanut Butter Bagel & Eggs Chapter 6: Before Bed Menu 36. Bedtime Smoothie 37. Cottage Cheese & Co 38. Granola & Sweets 39. Peanut Butter ‘n’ Cheese Bagel with Blueberry Yogurt 40. Vegetable Omelette with a side of Milk Chapter 7: Healthy Desert Menu 41. Frozen Strawberry Greek Yogurt 42. DIY Protein Bars (8 servings) 43. Red Berry Milkshake 44. Peanut Butter Chocolate Sandwich 45. Chocolate Orange Mousse Chapter 8: Non-Training Day Menu 46. Simple-Rice, Chicken & Courgette 47. Scrambled Eggs & Peanut Butter on Toast with Greens 48. Energise-Me Smoothie 49. Sweet Potato Avocado & Basa Fish with Mixed-Veg 50. Bed of Avocado with a side of Milk Chapter 9: How to Calculate Your Energy Needs Conclusion

Introduction When you’re eating to build muscle on a budget, the best thing to do is consider exactly how much food you require each week. You can discover how to calculate your calorie requirements by simply scrolling to the bottom of this cookbook. Once you’ve made the calculations and can estimate how much food you need, it then becomes easier to create a diet plan to utilise all those ingredients. It’s simple stuff really, but with bodybuilding and dieting in general, we all tend to overcomplicate things. Once you have your diet plan in place, it becomes so much easier to build your shopping list each week. Cooking can become a little overwhelming and especially for bodybuilding, boiling rice, pasta and grilling chicken over and over just isn’t appealing, nobody wants to eat bland foods and that’s not the case here either. This is one of the prime reasons as to why people fall off track and throw their diet plan out the window. Once you become more accustomed to the recipes below, it would definitely benefit you to bulk-cook for the week, especially if you have a very busy schedule. For instance, if you were to work out 5x per week, you’d make 5x whole wheat pasta with some lean meat and vegetables as a pre-workout and 5x white pasta with some lean meat and vegetables as a post workout. Bulk-cooking takes the stress out of meal prepping day in day out each week, it’s just much more simplified this way. Besides, if you were to take a peak into a Pro-Bodybuilders fridge, you can guarantee it’s stacked to the ceiling full of pre and post-workout meals, along with snacks and other things, specific to their calorific needs. Following a diet consisting of lean muscle meals that are both flavoursome and nutrient-dense, doesn’t have to be expensive. However, the marketing for bodybuilding supplements that’s widely spread across the web, social media and via salespeople, say otherwise. It’s thought that the more protein you take in, the more your muscles absorb and expand, but this isn’t the case at all. In simple terms, your body can only process a certain amount of protein and especially during any one meal sitting. In fact, studies

revealed that on average, people who ate over 30g of protein per meal sitting, shown no direct increase in muscle-mass when compared to those who only ate 30g per sitting. While on a budget, the last thing you should be considering is supplements, besides, natural foods will always serve your body best. The supplement marketing industry for fitness is very misleading, there are huge goliath-like bodybuilders displayed on the labels of most products, who are clearly juiced out of their minds. This of course, attracts naïve youngsters out there, that believe by consuming these products, they can achieve similar results. Not only that, but we’ve all been a teenager and understand the pressure to look good at that age. Although it’s not only teenagers, more and more individuals of all ages, appear to be displeased with the way they look, which is what attracts them to supplements believing that that’s what they must take to achieve the results they desire. The truth is, when you really look at the experiments out there, when you look at the facts, the only two ‘legal’ supplements that positively affect your performance, are creatine and caffeine. The most popular supplements on the market today are protein powders. The intentions behind the marketing of these products are very clear and let’s face it, it gets results. However, facts are facts and science has proven that by drinking a protein shake post-workout, it’s no better than consuming 2-3 scrambled eggs, along with a slice of white bread spread with a tablespoon of jam. Protein shakes “appear” to be the better option, because it’s thought that once mixed together and in liquid form, it’d be quicker to digest and absorb into the bloodstream to nourish the muscles, which is false. If consuming natural foods post-workout doesn’t sound appealing, try out one of the natural protein smoothie recipes designed below. It’s also important to note, that animal sources such as; meat and dairy along with fish, aren’t the only sources of protein that’ll be included in each meal. A significant amount of protein can accumulate due to the carbohydrates contained within a meal, especially the wholegrain/wheat, brown complex sources. You’ll gain an understanding of this in more detail when you discover how to calculate your energy needs.

Chapter 1: The Shopping List To make things a little easier, if you don’t wish to specify your diet plan according to your calorific needs, below we’ve created a starter shopping list, consisting of the recipes below in general, therefore, you’ll have ingredients for most of the recipes. Let’s study the list. 340g Frozen Basa Fish Fillets, 3-4 protein portion servings – £2 1kg Boneless & Skinless Chicken Breast Fillet, 10-15 protein portion servings – £5.50 18 Medium Eggs, 9 protein portion servings – £1.50 3 pack of Small Tins of Tuna (60g portions), 3 protein portion servings – £2 100g Salmon Fillet, 1 protein portion serving – £1.50 1 tin Reduced Sugar & Salt Baked Beans (400g), 1 protein portion serving – £0.60 1 tin Red Kidney Beans (400g in water), 1 protein portion serving – £0.60 1 loaf Whole Wheat Bread – £1 1 small bag Wholegrain Rice – £2 1 small bag White Pasta – £0.50 1 large bag of Oats – £1 1 large bottle Skimmed Milk (2L) – £1 1 pot of Pure Honey (squeezable) – £1 1 bag of Frozen Blueberries – £1.50 1 Medium Avocado – £1 2 Cans Tomatoes – £0.70 1 pack Fresh Medium Tomatoes – £0.50 1 bag of Lemons – £1 1 bag of Apples – £1 1 bag of Sweet Potatoes – £1.50 1 Broccoli Floret – £0.35 1 Courgette – £1 Sea Salt – £0.50

Cracked Black Pepper – £0.50 Garlic Seasoning – £0.50 Jerk Seasoning – £0.50 Rosemary Seasoning – £0.50 Coriander Seasoning – £0.50 1 can 1 Calorie Oil Spray – £1 1 pack Chicken Stock Cubes – £1 1 bar Dark Cocoa Chocolate, (>70% cocoa) – £1 1 bag of Medium Bananas – £1 1 tub Natural Yogurt – £1 1 carton Orange Juice, (1L) – £1 200g tub Salsa – £1 1 bag Frozen Mixed Vegetables – £1 As you can see, if you calculate the total cost of this week’s first shop, it equals to approx. £39.25. You may agree that this is shockingly inexpensive, and this would be due to the absence of premade ready-meals, that can really bulk up the bill, therefore, in general, it’s always beneficial to buy as organic as possible. Organic and fresh foods not only taste better, they add way more health benefits to your body. This is because they’re more likely to contain high antioxidant properties, which is generally contained within fruits and veg, and help the body to fight off infections, as well as diseases. Fresh and organic foods also contain significantly less fat than ready-meals. The majority reason why people tend to fail at adhering to their dietplan, is because of the lack of effort they put in to improving the flavour of their meals. It’s important that you experiment and make the effort to discover how to spice up the foods you’re consuming, because if you don’t, you’re going to dread every meal sitting and eventually you’re going to fall off the waggon. Each of the recipes designed below, even the simple ones, are flavoursome and packed full of healthy nutrients either to fuel your workout or replenish your glycogen and energy stores post-workout. All ingredients contained within this cookbook, haven’t been included in the shopping list above, simply because, it’s cheaper and more to

your advantage to vary your diet from week to week. It’s cheaper this way. For your first week, you could have brown pasta and sweet potatoes as your main complex carbohydrate source prior to your workouts and then the following you could buy brown basmati rice and wholegrain bread to use as fuel. Variety is key, especially to stay on track eating clean, it’s all about keeping things fresh. Plus, if you buy every ingredient contained below, it’s going to be very costly and the food will just go to waste. Either that or you’ll be over-indulging. There are lots of items within the list above that’ll last you over 4-5 weeks, such as the herbs, seasoning, honey and oil spray, therefore, the next 3-4 weeks would be considerably cheaper. With a short amount of time spent dedicated to calculating your energy requirements, it’ll become fairly simple to calculate how much of each of the ingredients you’ll need each week. This is ultimately how you budget, while still consuming the best foods your body requires.

Chapter 2: Breakfast Menu Eating a large nutritious breakfast to begin the day is essential to weight loss and making those lean muscle gains. Those who avoid or skip out on breakfast tend to be overweight, and here’s the hard truth as to why. Typically, busy individuals that are always on the go and especially early workers, tend develop a habit of skipping breakfast and eating 3-4 hours later. The problem with this is, by that time you’re going to be starved and as a result, you’ll be more inclined to indulge in foods that you crave, to satisfy your urges. Studies suggest that consuming a nutritious breakfast, rich in complex carbs and protein, can cure your midday sweet tooth cravings and help keep you feeling fuller for longer. Along with a nutritious breakfast, if you consume several small meals throughout the day, you’ll never go hungry and be much less likely to experience cravings and indulge in bad foods. People who exercise early without loading up on a breakfast rich in complex carbs are making a huge mistake. Those who do this have a belief that if they exercise on an empty stomach, they’ll be running on their fat stores, but this just isn’t the case. Exercising on an empty stomach denies your muscles of storing any readily-available energy to fuel your workout, so instead, your body will look to breakdown muscle initially to use as energy and only then will it utilise minimal fat stores, which is unhealthy and can lead to extreme fatigue. If you like early morning runs or it’s just more practical for you to work out early, instead of skipping out breakfast all together, throw some complex carbs into a blender along with some protein such as skimmed milk, bananas, oats, peanut butter and frozen fruit, 30-60minutes before exercise. Believe me, you’ll see the difference in your performance and your energy levels later on.

1. Scrambled Eggs and Avocado on Toast Ingredients 2 sprays of 1 calorie oil spray 3 large eggs (scrambled style) 1 tbsp. skimmed milk 2 whole wheat slices bread ½ medium avocado 350ml orange juice Preparation Method Heat a large frying pan over a low-medium heat for a few minutes, before spraying the oil. While you’re waiting, add the 3 whole eggs into a jug along with the tablespoon of milk and mix well before adding to the pan. Stir frequently until the eggs are cooked through. Alternatively, you could keep the eggs in the plastic jug and microwave them for 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently. Lastly, toast the bread and spread the avocado on both slices, serve with the eggs on the side along with the orange juice. Delicious and energy packed to kick-start your day. Nutrition Facts Protein – 25.9g Carbohydrates – 68.2g Fat – 25.8g

Total kcals – 608.6 kcals

2. Oatmeal with Boiled Eggs Ingredients ¼ cup oats 200ml skimmed milk 1 tbsp. honey ¼ cup frozen blueberries 1 tbsp. peanut butter 2 large eggs 1 slice whole wheat bread Preparation Method To make the perfect boiled egg, simply pre-heat your kettle and add the 2 eggs to a pan, add the boiling water just covering the eggs, cook immediately on a medium-high heat for approx. 7 minutes. Once the eggs are ready, simply add them to cold water for a minute, drain and then tap the eggs in several places with a spoon and put to the side for 2 minutes. This allows the shell to come off a lot easier. Once you’ve peeled the shell off leave them to one side. Add both the oats and milk to a serving bowl and put in the microwave on high for 2 minutes stirring after 1 minute. Ensure that all the milk has been absorbed and stir, then add the blueberries and drizzle the honey over the top. Finally toast the bread and spread the peanut butter. Energy dense to fuel an early workout or to boost energy levels to kick-start your day. Nutrition Facts Protein – 34.2g Carbohydrates – 63.8g Fat – 29g

Total kcals – 653 kcals

3. Nutty Porridge Ingredients ¼ cup oats 200ml skimmed milk 1 large banana 1 tsp Nutella or alternative ¼ cup frozen blueberries ¼ cup slithered almonds (crushed) 350ml apple juice Preparation Method It’s important to note that nuts contain a high amount of fat which boosts the fat content of this dish. However, the fats within nuts are healthy omega 3 fatty acids and when eaten in moderation, are very healthy. Start by adding the milk and oats to a large serving bowl and microwave on high for 2 minutes, stirring after a minute. Once the porridge is ready, don’t stir again, first, add the Nutella or alternative to the middle of the bowl and then add the almonds and blueberries – leave to stand for 1 minute before stirring well. Consume immediately and serve with the apple juice. Delicious and nutritious. Nutrition Facts Protein – 30.2g Carbohydrates – 120.4g Fat – 49.1g

Total kcals – 1044.3 kcals

4. Mixed Beans on Toast Ingredients 150g mixed beans (tinned in water) 200g reduced salt and sugar baked beans (tinned) 2 slices whole wheat bread 1 apple (chopped) 350ml skimmed milk Preparation Method Add to a medium sized pan, the mixed and baked beans and put over a low-medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. It’s important to note that before you consume beans that are contained in water, tinned or raw, you should rinse and soak them in fresh water for 24-hours, which ensures you don’t get a ‘bean bloat’ which contributes to gas and swelling around the abdominals. Then simply toast the bread and pour the beans over the top, serve with a glass of milk and an apple on a side dish. Simple, low in fat and packed full of energy. Nutrition Facts Protein – 37.4 g Carbohydrates – 98.8g Fat – 4.8g

Total kcals – 588 kcals

5. Granola Special Ingredients 100g plain granola 1 small banana (chopped) ½ cup chopped strawberries 2 heaped tbsp. natural yogurt 1 tbsp. honey 200ml skimmed milk ¼ cup crushed hazelnuts 1 chopped apple Preparation Method Simply add the granola and milk and top with the banana, strawberries and hazelnuts, before drizzling over the honey. Eat with some chopped apple on the side. Again, this dish is high in fat, but bear in mind that this comes from the healthy omega 3 fat content from the hazelnuts and is very healthy when eaten in moderation. This one is great for early gym goers, as it’s high in complex carbohydrates to fuel a long gruelling workout. Nutrition Facts Protein – 32.2g Carbohydrates – 146.9g Fat – 68.7g

Total kcals – 1334.7 kcals

6. Potato Bites Breakfast Special Ingredients 300g white potato (chopped into 0.5-inch slices) 1 tbsp. olive oil 1 tbsp. rosemary seasoning 1 tbsp. garlic seasoning 1 tsp sea salt & cracked black pepper 1 large boiled egg 100g salmon fillet 1 medium tomato (sliced in half) 100g broccoli 60g salsa 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil Preparation Method Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees. Chop the potato into 0.5-inch slices and coat with the tbsp. of olive oil, then sprinkle the garlic, rosemary and salt and pepper seasoning over the top and mix together. Put them on a plate and add to the microwave on high for 10-minutes. Once they’re ready, add them to the oven for 20-minutes to crisp. Next, put a medium frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes and add the oil spray, then add the salmon and cook for 1720 minutes – turn every 3-4 minutes. For the final 10 minutes, add 1 egg to a small pan and add boiling water to cover, boil for 7 minutes on a medium-high heat. Once done, add cold water for 1 minute, drain and then crack the egg in several places, leave for 2 minutes before peeling – cut the egg in half and leave to one side. For the final 5 minutes, add the tomato cut side down to the frying pan with the salmon. Finally, add the entire contents to a large serving dish along with the salsa and enjoy. Nutrition Facts Protein – 44.2g Carbohydrates – 78.4g Fat – 31.5g

Total kcals – 773.9 kcals

7. Bacon & Egg Toasted Muffin – English Style Ingredients 3 slices lean non-streaky bacon (cut any excess fat off) 2 large eggs 1 wholegrain English muffin 1 tbsp. low fat butter 1 tbsp. ketchup 1 large banana ¼ cup natural yogurt 1 tbsp. honey Preparation Method Firstly, ensure all excess fat has been trimmed from the bacon. Put a medium frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 minutes and add the oil spray along with the bacon – cook for 10 minutes turning frequently. Next, add two eggs to a pan and add boiling water to cover, cook for 7 minutes. Once they’re ready add the eggs to cold water for 1 minute, drain and then crack the eggs in several places with a spoon and leave for 2 minutes before pealing. While they’re cooking, prepare your desert by adding 1 large chopped banana to a side dish, and drizzle the yogurt and honey over the top. Finally, when the eggs and bacon are cooked through, cut the muffin in half and toast until golden brown. Spread the butter on both cut sides and then add the bacon, eggs and red sauce in between the two. Nutrition Facts Protein – 48.8g Carbohydrates – 83.5g Fat – 28.6g

Total kcals – 786.6 kcals

8. Tuna, Cheese & Onion Toasty Ingredients 2 whole wheat slices bread 30g reduced fat cheddar cheese (sliced) 2 spring onions (finely sliced) 60g tuna (1 small tin) 2 handfuls fresh spinach leaves 1 medium tomato (sliced in half) 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 350ml apple juice Sea salt and black cracked pepper Preparation Method For best results use a sandwich toaster. If you’re using a George Foreman grill or sandwich toaster, pre-heat and spray each of the grill plates with the oil spray and then add one slice of bread – this ensures that the bread doesn’t stick. Add the tuna, cheese and spring onions, then add the other slice of bread on top and toast for around 5-7 minutes or until golden brown on the outside. While you’re waiting, chop half a tomato into thin slices, add it to the side of the serving plate along with the spinach leaves and season with the sea salt and black cracked pepper. Serve together with the glass of apple juice. Refreshing, nutritious, easy and delicious. Nutrition Facts Protein – 31.6g Carbohydrates – 68.8g Fat – 13.7g

Total kcals – 524.9 kcals

9. Very Berry Smoothie Ingredients 250ml skimmed milk 150ml frozen natural yogurt 1 tbsp. honey ¼ cup strawberries ¼ cup frozen blueberries ¼ cup oats ¼ cup slithered almonds Preparation Method Blend all the above ingredients together for 30-60 seconds. This recipe is simple, easy and perfect for those on the go. Nutrition Facts Protein – 37.6g Carbohydrates – 81.3g Fat – 52.9g

Total kcals – 951.7 kcals

10. Chocolate Banana-Split Smoothie Ingredients ¼ cup crushed hazelnuts 2 medium bananas 300ml skimmed milk 150ml frozen natural yogurt 1 tbsp. Nutella or alternative ¼ cup oats ½ cup frozen blueberries Preparation Method Blend the above ingredients for 60-seconds until the mix is completely smooth. Again, this is another recipe that can be prepared and consumed within minutes, it’s delicious, nutrient dense and carb fuelled to kick start your day. Nutrition Facts Protein – 36.4g Carbohydrates – 115.9g Fat – 69.9g

Total kcals – 1238.3 kcals

Chapter 3: Pre-Workout Menu We’re told that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but when it’s training day, it’s the pre-workout meal that counts the most! Your muscles need fuelling before an intense session and energy is better utilised when it’s released slower, rather than quicker. Therefore, an understanding of carbohydrates is essential, as they’re the body’s main source of energy. Therefore, beans are such a power-food and essential part of a Vegan diet, because they’re packed with complex carbohydrates and protein. Simple carbohydrates are mainly found in white foods such as white pasta, white rice, white potatoes, white bread and so on. Simple carbs are most beneficial post-exercise to refuel. Complex carbs are vital prior to exercise, so whatever time of day you plan to workout, ensure you’ve loaded up considerably. Complex carbs consist of considerable amounts of fibre; therefore, they’re digested at a much slower rate compared with simple carbs, enabling a slow release of energy, which gives you sustainable fuel throughout your workout. Why no simple carbs before a workout? The truth is, simple carbs don’t really serve a purpose prior to exercise, because they consist of very little fibre and are made up of simple sugars, therefore, they’re released into your bloodstream at a much faster rate. The problem is, if you don’t use this energy right away, it’ll store as fat. Not only that, your workouts will suffer because you won’t have sufficient energy stores to fuel your workout. Have you ever eaten vast amounts of white rice or pasta, and not felt satisfied? This is because the glycogen is quickly converted to glucose and releases into your bloodstream almost instantly. So, you’ll feel an instant burst of energy, followed by a crash. However, this is an advantage after exercise, because your body will crave fast digesting sugars to replenish its energy stores – it’s like a magnet for small amounts of simple sugars along with protein during this stage.

Protein is essential to building and repairing muscle tissue, but research suggests that there’s no real need to eat excessive amounts in meals prior to your workout, because the muscles can’t absorb that much. Therefore, instead of protein being stored, it’ll be released as unused energy and stored as body fat. Depending on how much protein your body requires, it’d be a good idea to consume a ¼ of the amount before working out and the remainder afterwards. Also, research has found that it’s more beneficial to eat 6-7 small meals throughout the day, rather than 3 big meals, because our body can only digest and store so much energy at a time. This is because eating larger amounts results in your body being unable to store the excessive energy, resulting in body fat. Therefore, if you consume 67 small meals throughout the day, your body will receive the essential nutrients that it requires, and nothing goes to waste. Eating less and more frequently, enables you to receive a steady flow of energy throughout the entire day, instead of your levels rising quickly and then crashing between 3 heavy intervals. This is why so many people complain about being tired all the time, we get our energy from our food, therefore, we must be smart about what we eat. You’ve probably experienced this already, but what do you think would happen if you didn’t eat sufficient amounts of complex carbs before hitting the gym? Well, naturally, your body would look for other sources of energy to compensate and I don’t mean bodyfat! In the absence of sufficient fuel prior to exercise, naturally your body would go into survival mode and break down muscle for energy, which is a complete no-no. This results in exhaustion, mental fatigue and low-mood, and it’s just not a place you want to be in Many believe that you’ll burn fat on an empty stomach or by not eating 3-4 hours prior to exercise, but it just isn’t the case. When we exercise anaerobically, meaning short bouts of intense exercise, our body utilises its carbohydrate sources first and studies show that very little fat is actually utilised at all during anaerobic exercise. Therefore, when glycogen (carbohydrates) stores are depleted, the body tends to breakdown muscle tissue to compensate. With that being said, some studies have shown that other types of anaerobic

exercise such as short bouts of sprinting, do burn considerable amounts of fat. The best way to burn fat is by running long distance, as the body tends to utilise the glycogen stores first and then approx. 30-40 minutes into exercise, your body begins to feed on fat stores.

11. Simple Pasta, Chicken & Greens Ingredients 300g whole wheat pasta 50g chicken fillet (½ a fillet / skin and boneless) ¼ cup courgette (chopped into 0.5-inch slices) ½ tomato (chopped into small slices) ¼ tin of tomatoes (100g) 1 tbsp. tomato paste 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 2 tbsp. water 2 garlic cloves (finely sliced) ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 tbsp. oregano seasoning 300ml water Preparation Method It’s best to prepare big batches and conceal in plastic containers over 3-5 days or store in the freezer. They’re simple to prepare and rich in complex carbohydrates to fuel your workout. Pre-heat a medium frying pan over a medium heat, add the oil spray and 2 tablespoons water and leave for 2 minutes. Add the white onion and garlic and cook until the onions become translucent before adding the chicken. Cook the chicken thoroughly and turn frequently for 7-8 minutes, then add the tinned tomatoes, ½ a tomato, tomato paste and sprinkle the oregano seasoning over the top. Turn the heat low and cook for a further 10 minutes until the mix becomes thicker – stirring frequently. While you’re waiting for the sauce to thicken, add the pasta to a small pan, along with 300ml of boiling water – boil on the hob over a medium heat for 12 minutes or until all water has been absorbed. Once the pasta has cooked add to the mix, stir and leave for a few minutes. If you’re going to consume right away you can heat the courgette within the sauce, but if you’re going to store it and consume later, just throw the whole mix along with the raw courgette into a tub. You can re-heat in the microwave for 2 minutes, the courgette will be fine.

Nutrition Facts Protein – 35.2g Carbohydrates – 96.9g Fat – 2.7g

Total kcals – 552.7 kcals

12. Sweet Potato, Tuna & Mixed Peppers Ingredients 300g sweet potato (large potato) 100g mixed peppers (chopped) 1 tsp mustard 1 tsp sea salt & cracked pepper ¼ of a lemons juice 60g tuna (1 small tin in water) Preparation Method Pre-heat your oven to 220 degrees, fork the sweet potato several times and pre-cook in the microwave for 10 minutes on high. Then finish the cooking process in the oven for a further 15-20 minutes to crisp. Meanwhile, in a small dish add the tuna, lemon juice, mustard and salt and pepper seasoning and mix well. Once the potato is ready, slice in half and add the tuna mix. Place on a serving dish along with the freshly chopped peppers. Nutrition Facts Protein – 22.1g Carbohydrates – 65.4g Fat – 1.4g

Total kcals – 362.6 kcals

13. Jerk-Turkey, Rice & Greens Ingredients 300g wholegrain rice 300ml water 100g broccoli (chopped) 50g turkey fillet (½ a fillet) ½ medium tomato (sliced) 50g salsa 1 tsp jerk seasoning 1 tsp basal 1 pinch of sea salt 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil Preparation Method Again, with this recipe, it’d be wise to cook a big batch such as 9-10 servings and store in plastic containers to consume at work or when on the go. Add the wholegrain rice to a small pan along with 300ml of boiling water, boil for 12 minutes over a medium heat until all water has been absorbed – stir frequently. At the same time, pre-heat a small frying pan over a medium heat and spray with the oil. Then, season the turkey fillet with the jerk seasoning and cook for 10-12 minutes, turning frequently. For the final 5-minutes, season the sliced tomato with basal and add to the frying pan – flip frequently. Once everything’s ready, place on a large serving dish and add the salsa to taste. Nutrition Facts Protein – 26.6g Carbohydrates – 82.3g Fat – 4.3g

Total kcals – 474.3 kcals

14. Spicy Beans on Toast Ingredients: 200g red kidney beans (tinned in water) 200g reduced salt & sugar baked beans 1 tsp jerk seasoning 2 slices wholegrain bread Preparation Method Start by washing the red kidney beans thoroughly to avoid any gas, then add them to a medium sized pan along with the baked beans and jerk seasoning. Cook on a low heat for 8-10 minutes – stirring frequently. Toast the bread and top with the bean mix. Very low in fat and high in fibre, just ensure to eat beans sparingly as consuming them too often causes stomach irritation and bloating. Nutrition Facts Protein – 28.6g Carbohydrates – 67.2g Fat – 4.8g

Total kcals – 426.4 kcals

15. Whole Spicy Chicken Tortillas Ingredients 100g chicken fillet 100g salsa ½ white onion (finely sliced) 100g mixed peppers (chopped) 1 tbsp. ketchup 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 2 whole wheat tortillas Preparation Method This is one of my favourites, they taste so great you’d think it was a cheat meal! Start by slicing the chicken into small chunks, add it to a pre-heated frying pan along with the pam oil. Cook for 10 minutes or until it turns golden brown and then add the onions and mixed peppers and cook for a further 5-6 minutes before adding the jerk seasoning and salsa. Turn the heat right down and cook for another 5 minutes then turn the heat off and leave to stand for 2 minutes. Finally, put the tortillas in the microwave for 40 seconds on full power, then add the chicken mix and wrap. Both delicious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts Protein – 40.4g Carbohydrates – 61.6g Fat – 1.6g

Total kcals – 422.4 kcals

16. Jacket Potato with Beans & Greens Ingredients 300g white potato 200g reduced salt & sugar baked beans 200g red kidney beans (½ a tin in water) 1 tsp jerk seasoning 200g spinach (fresh or frozen) 1 tbsp. tamari soy sauce Preparation Method Pre-heat the oven at 220 degrees. Fork the potato several times and put in the microwave for 10 minutes on full power, then add them to the oven and cook for a further 20 minutes to crisp. Wash the red kidney beans thoroughly to avoid potential gas issues and then add them to a small pan along with the baked beans and jerk seasoning. Cook over a low heat for the final 10 minutes. If the spinach is frozen, add to another small pan along with water and cook until the boil over a medium heat. Once everything is ready, cut the jacket potato down the middle and add the bean mix, then add the spinach to the side on a serving dish and drizzle the soy sauce over to taste. Nutrition Facts Protein – 33.6g Carbohydrates – 123.4g 3.1g

Total kcals – 655.9 kcals

17. Carb-Loader Smoothie Ingredients 2 medium bananas ¼ cup oats 250ml skimmed milk ¼ cup slithered almonds 150ml frozen natural yogurt ¼ cup frozen blueberries Preparation Method Blend the above ingredients for approx. 1 minute or until completely smooth. Beautiful taste and loaded with energy, this recipe is packed full of complex carbs which is essential to fuel a tough gruelling workout! Nutrition Facts Protein – 39.9g Carbohydrates – 116.2g Fat – 53.6g

Total kcals – 1106.8 kcals

18. Turkey & Garlic Wedges Ingredients 300g white potato (cut into wedges / skin left on) 1 tbsp. olive oil 50g turkey fillet ½ tomato 200g garden peas 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp rosemary seasoning 1 tsp sea salt & cracked black pepper 2 sprays of 1 calorie pam oil Preparation Method Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees. Drizzle the olive oil, sprinkle the garlic, rosemary and salt and pepper seasoning over the wedges and mix together. Put them in the microwave for 10 minutes on full power and then put them in the oven for a further 20 minutes to crisp. Then, pre-heat a frying pan, spray with the oil and add the turkey – cook over a medium heat until cooked through. For the final 10 minutes, add the tomato to the pan cut side down and add the garden peas to a small pan along with 300ml of water – cook over a medium-high heat until the boil. Add a dab of tomato ketchup to the wedges to bring out the flavour. Nutrition Facts Protein – 32.6g Carbohydrates – 91.1g Fat – 15.9g

Total kcals – 637.9 kcals

19. Turkey Burger Ingredients 1 wholemeal burger bun 100g turkey fillet ½ white onion (finely sliced) ½ red tomato (chopped into slices) 2 handfuls lettuce 30g low fat cheese 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp jerk seasoning 1 tbsp. low fat mayonnaise Preparation Method Pre-heat the frying pan over a medium heat for 2 minutes, spray with the oil, then, season the turkey fillet with the garlic and jerk and add to the pan – cook for 15 minutes or until it becomes golden brown. Once the turkey is done, turn the heat low and add the onion and tomato, cook for a further 8-10 minutes or until the onions become translucent. Once everything is ready, slice the bun in half and add the turkey fillet, top with the cheese, mayonnaise, tomato slices, onion and lettuce. Add the top half of the bun and enjoy! Nutrition Facts Protein – 47.1g Carbohydrates – 42g Fat – 19g

Total kcals – 527.4 kcals

20. Basa Fish & Sweet Potato Fries Ingredients 300g sweet potato (skin left on / cut into French fries) 1 tbsp. olive oil 100g Basa fish fillet 100g frozen mixed vegetables 1 tsp sea salt & black cracked pepper 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp rosemary Preparation Method Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees. Sprinkle the garlic, rosemary and salt and pepper seasoning over the potato fries, along with the olive oil and mix together with your hands. Microwave for 10 minutes on full power and then add to the oven for a further 20 minutes to crisp along with the Basa fillet. For the final 10 minutes, add the mixed vegetables to a small pan along with water – cook over a medium heat until the boil. Nutrition Facts Protein – 24.9g Carbohydrates – 64.8g Fat – 15.2g

Total kcals – 495.6 kcals

Chapter 4: Post-Workout Menu The best time to indulge in fast digesting simple carbs is Immediately after your workout, because only then is there a short window where your muscles are like magnets for them. It’s thought that the best thing to consume immediately after a workout is a protein shake with some added simple sugars and then 45-60 minutes later, consume a meal rich in simple carbs and protein, to replenish your energy stores and repair the muscle tissues. Consume the same amount of simple carbs in your post-workout meal as the amount of complex carbs you had prior to working out. So, for example, if you had 1 cup of whole wheat pasta prior to working out, have 1 cup of white pasta after working out. What happens is your body stores carbohydrates in the muscles in the form of glycogen and breaks down and releases into the bloodstream in the form of glucose (sugar). Depending on the type of carbohydrate consumed, determines the speed of energy in which it releases, replenishes energy stores and begins the repair process. Therefore, on this occasion it’s okay to indulge in some simple carbohydrates, in fact, it’s essential. Refer to the carbohydrate requirement chart at the end of the book to help you calculate how much you require if you’re struggling. Your energy requirements determine how much carbohydrates, protein and fat you require, so if you look at how much carbohydrates you’ll need to consume overall, just subtract the amount of simple carbohydrates the chart suggests, to calculate better how much complex carbohydrates you’ll need to divide into your other meals throughout the day. Now let’s look at some of the best post-workout recipes to nourish and replenish your muscles after a tough grind at the gym.

21. Fresh Salmon & Garlic Rice Ingredients 200g white rice 400ml water 1 tbsp. olive oil 2 garlic cloves 1 tsp low fat butter 1 pinch of sea salt and cracked black pepper 100g salmon fillet 100g frozen mixed vegetables 1 wholemeal roll 1 tsp rosemary seasoning Preparation Method Pre-heat your frying pan for 2-minutes over a low-medium heat. Add the olive oil along with the garlic, rosemary and tsp of butter and fry until the garlic liquefies, then add the salmon and sprinkle with the salt and pepper seasoning – cook for 17-20 mins or until cooked through. For the final 10 minutes, add the frozen mixed vegetables and water to a pan and cook to the boil over a medium-high heat. Finally, add to another pan; the white rice and 400ml water and boil over a medium heat for 10 minutes or until all the water has been absorbed. Once everything is ready, drain the vegetables, add everything to a serving dish and drizzle the juices from the salmon and garlic oil over the rice and vegetables. Nutrition Facts Protein – 41.9g Carbohydrates – 89.8g Fat – 28.3g

Total Kcals – 781.5 kcals

22. Garlic Chicken & Pasta in Tomato Sauce Ingredients 200g white pasta 400ml water ½ tomato (chopped into small pieces) 1 tsp tomato paste 2 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 1 tbsp. olive oil 100g chicken fillet (cut into small chunks) 100g broccoli ½ white onion (finely sliced) 100g tinned tomatoes (¼ of tin) 1 tsp tomato paste 1 tsp oregano Preparation Method Pre-heat a frying pan for 2 mins with olive oil and then add the onions and garlic – cook on a low heat until the onions turn translucent. Then add the chicken, turn the heat to medium and cook for 8-10 minutes or until golden brown. Once the chicken is cooked through, turn the heat back down low and add the tomato, tinned tomatoes, tomato paste and oregano seasoning and cook for a further 10 minutes – stirring occasionally. While you’re waiting for the sauce to finish, in another pan, add the pasta and 400ml boiling water – cook for 10-12 minutes over a medium heat or until all water has been absorbed. Finally, put the broccoli in the microwave for 1.5 minutes on full power and then add to the pasta and chicken in tomato sauce. Nutrition Facts Protein – 45.5g Carbohydrates – 72.5g Fat – 16.5g

Total kcals – 620.5 kcals

23. Tuna, Cheese & Spring Onion Toasty Ingredients 2 slices white bread 30g low fat cheddar cheese 60g tuna (small tin) 2 spring onions (chopped) 100g mixed peppers 100g broccoli 1 tbsp. tamari soy sauce 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil Preparation Method For best results, use a sandwich toasty, using a George Foreman grill is great too. First, pre-heat the grill for 2 minutes and then spray the grill plates with the oil which stops the bread from sticking. Add 1 slice of bread and add the tuna, cheese and spring onions, then add the other slice of bread on top and grill – cook for 7-8 minutes or until the outside of the bread turns golden brown. While you’re waiting for that to grill, put the broccoli in the microwave for 1.5 minutes then drizzle with the soy sauce for flavour. Nutrition Facts Protein – 34.9g Carbohydrates – 38.9g Fat – 13.7g

Total kcals – 418.5 kcals

24. Sweet Chicken Tortillas Ingredients 2 white tortillas ½ white onion (finely sliced) 1 red pepper (chopped) 1 tbsp. olive oil 2 garlic cloves (finely sliced) 100g salsa 100g chicken fillet (cut into thick pieces) 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning ¼ of a lemons juice Preparation Method Start by slicing the chicken into small chunks, add to a pre-heated frying pan along with the oil spray and lemon juice. Cook for 10minutes or until it turns golden brown and then add the onions and mixed peppers and cook for a further 5-6 minutes before adding the jerk seasoning and salsa. Turn the heat right down and cook for another 5-minutes then turn the heat off and leave to stand for 2minutes. Finally, put the tortillas in the microwave for 40 seconds on full power, then add the chicken mix and wrap. Both delicious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts Protein – 36.3g Carbohydrates – 325g Fat – 16.6g

Total kcals – 434.6 kcals

25. Garlic-Turkey & Roast Potatoes Ingredients 300g white potatoes (quartered, with skin on) 1 tbsp. olive oil 100g turkey fillet 100g frozen mixed vegetables 50g salsa 1 tsp sea salt & cracked black pepper 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp rosemary seasoning Preparation Method Pre-heat your oven at 220 degrees, drizzle the olive oil over the potatoes and season with the garlic, rosemary and salt and pepper seasoning – mix together with your hands. Put them in the microwave for 10 minutes on full power and then finish them off in the oven for 20 minutes or until crisp. For the final 15-17 mins, grill the turkey on a George Foreman grill or grill pan on a medium heat. For the final 10 minutes, boil the vegetables on a medium heat until the boil. Serve with the salsa on the side to taste. Nutrition Facts Protein – 40.9g Carbohydrates – 71.4g Fat – 14.6g

Total kcals – 580.6 kcals

26. Chicken Curry with Rice Ingredients 1 chicken stock cube 500ml water 1 tbsp. water 3 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 100g chicken fillet (chopped) 200g tinned tomatoes 1 tbsp. tomato paste ½ white onion (finely sliced) ½ a lemons juice 1 tbsp. natural yogurt 200g white rice 300ml water 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp coriander 1 tbsp. garam masala Preparation Method Pre-heat your frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2 mins, then add the oil spray, 1 tbsp. water, onion and garlic seasoning and cook until the onions turn translucent. Then add the chicken and cook for 15-minutes or until it’s cooked through. Next, turn the heat down low and add the tinned tomatoes, tomato paste along with the garam masala seasoning. Cook for 5 minutes – stirring frequently. While you’re waiting, prepare your chicken stock by adding 500ml of boiling water to the stock cube. Turn the heat back to medium and then pour in the stock a little at a time, just covering the mix – allow the mix to thicken a little before adding more and stir frequently. Take your time with this part of the process because the sauce is what makes the dish, this should take around 15-20 minutes to thicken into curry sauce. Once the sauce is to your desired thickness, turn the heat down low and add the lemon juice along with the tbsp. of natural yogurt – let it simmer for 10-minutes. While the sauce is simmering add the rice to another pan along with 300ml of boiling water – cook on a medium-high heat for 10-12 mins or until all the

water has been absorbed. Once the curry mix is ready, let it stand for 2-minutes before stirring and serve right away along with the rice on the side. Nutrition Facts Protein – 41.9g Carbohydrates – 76g Fat – 4.3g

Total kcals – 510.3 kcals

27. Tuna Noodles Ingredients 1 packet low fat super noodles Water for noodles 60g tuna (1 small tin) 1 medium wholemeal roll 100g broccoli 1 tbsp. tamari soy sauce Preparation Method This is another one of my favourites, it’s a simple yet delicious dish, to replenish your glycogen stores which can be prepared in minutes. Try to ensure that the noodles you buy, are ‘low fat,’ as the cheaper brands contain lots of saturated fats that your body cannot use which of course, will store as unwanted fat. Prepare the flavoured noodles according to the packaging and add the tuna and soy sauce to it in a serving bowl and mix well. For the side dish, steam the broccoli in the microwave for 1.5-minutes on high. Serve with 1 medium wholemeal roll. Nutrition Facts Protein – 42.2g Carbohydrates – 109.8g Fat – 4.1g

Total kcals – 644.9 kcals

28. Tuna Peanut Butter Bagel Ingredients 1 white bagel 2 tbsp. peanut butter 60g tuna (1 small tin) 100g broccoli Preparation Method Another simple, quick and easy delicious dish. Simply slice your bagel in half and toast until golden brown, spread 1 tbsp. peanut butter to each side and add the tuna in between both slices. Steam the broccoli in the microwave on full power for 10 minutes for the side dish. Job done, enjoy!! Nutrition Facts Protein – 36.7g Carbohydrates – 53.8g Fat – 22g

Total kcals – 560 kcals

29. Jerk-Turkey & Potato Bites Ingredients 300g white potato (cut into 0.5-inch slices) 1 tbsp. olive oil 200g frozen garden peas 100g turkey fillet 50g salsa 1 tsp jerk seasoning 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp rosemary 1 tsp sea salt & cracked black pepper Preparation Method Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees. Drizzle the olive oil over the potatoes along with the garlic, rosemary and salt & pepper seasoning and mix together with your hands. Put them in the microwave for 10 minutes on full power and then continue cooking them in the oven for a further 20 minutes or until crisp. For the final 15 minutes, add the jerk seasoning to the turkey fillet and cook on your George Foreman grill or grill pan on a low-medium heat or until cooked through. Finally, add your peas to a separate pan along with cold water and cook for 8-10 minutes or until the boil over a mediumhigh heat. Once everything is ready, add to a large serving plate along with the salsa to taste. Nutrition Facts Protein – 49.5g Carbohydrates – 96g Fat – 14.9g

Total kcals – 716.1 kcals

30. Chick Pea Curry Ingredients 200g white rice 200g chick peas (tinned in water) 200g green lentils (tinned in water) 100g tinned tomatoes (¼ of tin) 1 chicken stock cube ½ a lemons juice ½ white onion (finely sliced) 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil 450ml water for lentils & chick peas 400ml water for rice 1 tsp garlic seasoning 1 tsp coriander 1 tbsp. garam masala 1 pinch sea salt & cracked black pepper Preparation Method This recipe takes a little longer to prepare but is well worth the wait. When eating beans and lentils, it’s always best if you soak them over night to eliminate any gas and bloat problems. Start by heating a large frying pan over a low-medium heat for 2-minutes, before adding the 1 calorie oil spray and onion along with the garlic seasoning and cook until the onions turn translucent. Then, add the chick peas and green lentils and cook for 2-3-minutes. While they’re heating up, prepare the chicken stock by adding 450ml boiling water and the garam masala to the stock cube. Add a little stock to the pan at a time, just covering the mix. Turn the heat up high until the boil and then turn it back low again and simmer until all the water has been absorbed. Once the beans and lentils have absorbed the stock, it’s time to add the tinned tomatoes, lemons juice, coriander and salt and pepper seasoning and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes on a very low heat – stirring occasionally. For the final 10 minutes, add the rice to a separate pan along with 400ml boiling water and boil for 10-12 minutes on a medium heat or until all water has been absorbed.

Nutrition Facts Protein – 35.5g Carbohydrates – 147.3g Fat – 13.3g

Total kcals – 850.9 kcals

Chapter 5: Immediately Post Workout Menu Although no evidence suggests that consuming a protein shake immediately after a workout is more effective than consuming a solid meal, the theory is, if you blend foods, the body will digest and absorb them into the bloodstream to feed your muscles a lot quicker, as the digestion process is significantly faster. We’ve all been told how important it is to eat something high in protein within 20-30 minutes of working out, but why? Well, when you’re exercising your muscles, you’re actually breaking down muscle tissue, so contrary to belief, you don’t grow in the gym. You grow when you rest and the main ingredient that helps repair and grow muscles, is protein. Whey protein is the most easily absorbed and ingested to repair and build new muscle tissue, but if you don’t believe in supplements, there are some organic recipes to try down below that can be just as effective, especially if on a budget. Also, with your immediate post-workout shake, add some simple carbs as they’re digested quickly, they prevent your body from breaking down its own muscle tissue, and encourage muscle synthesis. It doesn’t have to be a shake, just as long as the food you consume can be quickly digested. Avoid any type of casein protein powder, or anything that contains slow release proteins, because they won’t be as effective.

31. Boiled Eggs & Co Ingredients 2 large eggs 1 slice white bread 1 tbsp. strawberry jam 1 medium apple When eating on a budget, there’s really no need to buy protein powders. They’re thought to be more convenient as they’re powder form and believed to be easier to digest and absorb by the muscles, but research has proven that protein powders are no more affective than whole foods. Preparation Method To make the perfect boiled eggs, simply add to a small pan along with boiling water to cover them and cook over a medium-high heat for 7-minutes. Once the eggs are done, put them in cold water to cool for a minute, drain and then crack the egg several times – leave for 2 minutes and then peel. Cut the eggs in half and leave to one side. Toast the slice of bread until golden brown and then spread the jam on top and serve with an apple. Replenish and enjoy! Nutrition Facts Protein – 19.4g Carbohydrates – 42g Fat – 16.3g

Total kcals – 392.3 kcals

32. Nutty Orange Juice Smoothie Ingredients 1 large banana 300ml orange juice 150ml frozen natural yogurt ¼ cup oats ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup blueberries If you prefer your post-workout meal to be in liquid form, then this is perfect, as you can take it with you pre-made in your shaker. Simply blend the above ingredients prior to your workout and keep chilled in the fridge before consuming. Protein-packed, delicious, organic and perfect to replenish. Nutrition Facts Protein – 32.4g Carbohydrates – 113.5g Fat – 53.7g

Total kcals – 1066.9 kcals

33. Peanut Butter Jelly & Tuna Ingredients 2 slices white bread 1 tbsp. peanut butter 1 tbsp. strawberry jam 60g tuna (1 small tin) 2 sprays 1 calorie pam oil Another simple, yet affective and cheap recipe designed to replenish your energy levels and deliver organic protein and simple sugars to your exhausted muscles. Preparation Method For best results, use a sandwich toasty or George Foreman grill. Start by heating your desired appliance for 2 minutes and then spraying the grill plates with the oil. Spread the peanut butter on 1 slice of the bread and spread the jam on the other slice. Add the tuna in between both slices and toast until golden brown on the outside. Nutrition Facts Protein – 24.7g Carbohydrates – 37g Fat – 12.2g

Total kcals – 356.6 kcals

34. Raw Egg Smoothie Ingredients 2 large eggs 250ml skimmed milk 1 medium banana 1 tbsp. peanut butter 150ml frozen natural yogurt 1 tbsp. honey Although this next recipe may not sound appealing on paper, it’s very effective, old-school and inexpensive. Preparation Method For best results, blend the above ingredients following your workout and consume immediately. Drink sparingly. Nutrition Facts Protein – 39.4g Carbohydrates – 61g Fat – 33g

Total kcals – 698.6 kcals

35. Peanut Butter Bagel & Eggs Ingredients 1 white bagel 2 tbsp. peanut butter 2 large eggs 100g broccoli 250ml apple juice Preparation Method In a small pan, add the eggs along with boiling water and boil for 7minutes. Then, empty the boiling water and add cold water to cool the eggs for 1-minute. Drain, then crack the eggs several times and wait 2-minutes before peeling them – cut them in half and leave to one side. Cut the bagel in half and toast until golden brown. Spread the peanut butter over both slices. Steam the broccoli in the microwave for 1.5 minutes and serve with the apple juice. Simple, delicious and nutritious! Nutrition Facts Protein – 38.6g Carbohydrates – 82g Fat – 36.6g

Total kcals – 811.8 kcals

Chapter 6: Before Bed Menu For years now, we’ve been advised not to eat at night, anything after 8pm will cause weight gain, right? Wrong! This may apply to those who are sedentary and lead an unhealthy lifestyle, but for those who are physically active and exercise at least 3 days per week, specifically towards the end of the day, missing out on an important night time snack may inhibit your chances of muscle growth. Studies show that to maximise protein synthesis, it’s a better idea to eat small meals every 2-3 hours, rather than 3 big meals. This is because when we consume bigger meals, most of the nutrients go to waste and as the body cannot utilise the excess energy, it stores as fat. This is the case also, when trying to consume too much protein at any one meal sitting. If you’ve ever experienced bad gas after consuming vast amounts of meat or protein shakes, this likely indicates that your body cannot handle the amount and results in temporary bloating. So, if studies show that eating several small meals throughout the day facilitate muscle growth, why stop at night? The don’t eat after 8pm theory may appear true at first sight, as the more time you have throughout the day, the more time you have to burn the extra calories, but again, this doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t utilise the nutrients you consume right before bed. Naturally, eating at night for the average sedentary individual, can cause high insulin levels, which then instead of helping you burn fat, causes you to store it. But this isn’t the case for people who regularly exercise. Studies revealed that people who exercised 3 times per week and indulged in bed time snacks, showed no direct increase in their insulin levels. The most important aspect to look at when you’re snacking at night, is what you’re snacking on, rather than at what time. So, what’s the best snacks to consume before bed to promote growth? Well, generally we’re asleep for 6-8 hours per night, so we require foods that’ll digest protein slowly to feed our muscles and aid in recovery. Typically, casein protein powder is the preferred choice amongst most Professional Bodybuilders and Sports Athletes, as it’s

released from the stomach, broken down and absorbed into the bloodstream at a much slower rate than whey protein. Casein can be found in milk and cheese, especially cottage cheese, and that’s why they’re some of the best sources of slow release protein to consume before bed. There’re so many added benefits to consuming a slow-release, high protein snack before bed. Studies show that by doing so, it helps you to lose weight, boosts your metabolism and promotes sleep, as it promotes the amino acid Tryptophan, which we cannot produce naturally.

36. Bedtime Smoothie Ingredients 100g cottage cheese 250ml skimmed milk 1 tbsp. honey 1 medium banana ¼ cup oats ¼ cup frozen blueberries Preparation Method Blend the above ingredients for 1-minute or until the mix is completely smooth. This recipe is very low in fat and is packed full of protein and complex carbohydrates to fuel your muscles throughout the night… not to mention it tastes great too!! Nutrition Facts Protein – 25.1g Carbohydrates – 81.1g Fat – 3.8g

Total kcals – 459 kcals

37. Cottage Cheese & Co Ingredients 200g cottage cheese 100g frozen mixed vegetables 1 slice wholegrain bread 1 tbsp. honey Preparation Method Add the frozen vegetables to a pan and fill with water and cook over a medium-heat until the boil. Drain and add to a serving plate. Vegetables contain lots of fibre and very little calories, so you can eat as much as you want without worrying about gaining weight late at night. Honey is sweet, contains antioxidant properties and when eaten right before bed, it signals that you’re ready for sleep. Toast the slice of bread and spread with the honey. Cottage cheese is one of the best foods to consume at night, due to the slow release of protein. Add the cottage cheese to the serving plate along with the other ingredients, consume within an hour or so before bed and you’ll be sure to keep your muscles well-nourished throughout the night. Nutrition Facts Protein – 29.7g Carbohydrates – 39.7g Fat – 3.7g

Total kcals – 310.9 kcals

38. Granola & Sweets Ingredients ½ cup plain granola 175ml skimmed milk 1 tbsp. natural yogurt 1 tbsp. honey 1 medium banana (chopped) ¼ cup blueberries Preparation Method This recipe is quite high in carbohydrates and is best consumed after a late-night workout, as it contains some simple sugars along with complex sugars in the form of fibre, which keeps your body sufficiently fed throughout the night. In a large serving bowl, add the granola, milk and top with the yogurt and drizzle the honey on top. On a small side plate, add the chopped banana and blueberries and enjoy. Nutrition Facts Protein – 18.2g Carbohydrates – 125.8g Fat – 13.9g

Total kcals – 701.1 kcals

39. Peanut Butter ‘n’ Cheese Bagel with Blueberry Yogurt Ingredients 1 wholegrain bagel 2 tbsp. low fat cheese spread 1 tbsp. peanut butter 100g natural yogurt 1 tsp honey ¼ cup blueberries This is one of my personal favourites prior to hitting the sack. It’s flavoursome, cures night-time sugar and salt cravings, keeps you feeling full and satiated along with keeping your muscles wellnourished throughout the night. Preparation Method Slice the bagel in half, I personally enjoy the bagel as it is when adding the cheese spread, but if you prefer to toast it that’s fine too. Add the cheese spread to the one half of the bagel and the peanut butter to the other half. On a separate side plate, add the blueberries, top with the yogurt and drizzle the honey on top. Nutrition Facts Protein – 22.4g Carbohydrates – 59.5g Fat – 21.5g

Total kcals – 521.1 kcals

40. Vegetable Omelette with a side of Milk Ingredients 200ml skimmed milk 2 sprays 1 calorie oil 2 large eggs 1 tbsp. grated cheese 1 tbsp. skimmed milk 200g frozen mixed vegetables – raw Preparation Method Frozen mixed-vegetables are much cheaper than fresh and especially organic which are the preferred choice. You can either allow the serving of mixed-vegetables to thaw beforehand or boil them prior to adding to the omelette. I personally prefer to boil them for 10-minutes beforehand, because it cuts the cooking process in half compared with standard methods. In a small pan, add the frozen vegetables along with cool water and cook over a medium-high heat until the boil. Drain and mash down a little to remove excess water and chop into small chunks. Then, preheat a medium sized frying pan over a medium heat. Add the two eggs along with the tbsp. of milk to a small bowl and mix well. Spray the oil in the pan before pouring in the mixed veg, along with the eggs. Cook for 1-2 minutes until the egg is no longer liquid form. Keep a close watch on the bottom of the pan, to ensure it doesn’t burn. Once the bottom has cooked through, using a spatula flip the egg and cook for a further 1-1.5 minutes. Turn the heat off and immediately add the tbsp of grated cheese, fold the omelette in half and leave to stand for 1-minute. Serve with a cold glass of milk and enjoy. Nutrition Facts Protein – 28.2g Carbohydrates – 18.8g Fat – 16.6g

Total kcals – 337.4 kcals

Chapter 7: Healthy Desert Menu Just because you’re trying to build muscle, it doesn’t mean you can’t treat yourself and give in to sugar cravings now and again. I’ve created some of the most delicious and flavoursome low-calorie deserts below, for you to include into your new diet to keep you sane. The protein oat & berry bars are a personal favourite of mine, as they can be consumed to supplement a meal, before or after a workout to energise or replenish and they’re loaded with protein and very little fat. The trick is to eat as fresh as possible, try to experiment with organic foods, it’s all about knowing what’s a good substitute! Honey’s a beautiful substitute for table sugar and has way less calories. Also, preparing deserts yourself, you’re eliminating the additives that food industry’s use to make their products last. Here are a few of my high protein deserts, that I personally indulge in when I experience mad sugar cravings. Enjoy!

41. Frozen Strawberry Greek Yogurt Ingredients 200g frozen Greek yogurt ½ fresh strawberries (chopped) 2 tbsp. hazelnuts (crushed) 1 tbsp. honey Preparation Method This is a simple and delicious desert recipe, loaded with healthy nutrients. It’s relatively low in calories and packed full of protein. Simply add the frozen Greek yogurt to a large serving bowl, along with the crushed hazelnuts and strawberries and drizzle the honey on top. Nutrition Facts Protein – 22.4g Carbohydrates – 36.7g Fat – 27.6g

Total kcals – 484.8 kcals

42. DIY Protein Bars (8 servings) Ingredients: Dry Mix 2 cups oats 3 scoops whey protein ¼ cup slithered almonds ¼ cup dried cranberries 1 tbsp. cinnamon Wet Mix ¼ cup honey ¼ cup peanut butter ¼ cup almond milk ¼ cup apple sauce 1 tsp vanilla extract ¼ cup (100g) dark chocolate (>70% dark cocoa is preferred) Preparation Method In hindsight, you may agree that there’re many ingredients to purchase above, but as they’re mainly specific to this recipe, they can be stored and used to create several batches. In this recipe you’ll learn how to create your own protein bars and not only are they delicious as a desert, they can also be used as a meal replacement. These bars will last up to 5 days in the fridge, they’re an awesome addition to your lunch box and ideal for those on the go. Start by placing the wet mix into the microwave on full power for 30 seconds, or until the mix turns thick and creamy. Once the mix has the correct consistency, simply pour over the dry mix and mix well for 2-3 minutes with a fork. The final process is to get a plastic tub/container, approx. 8x8, layer the bottom with wax paper and spray lightly with the oil. Add the mix to the container and push down with a spatula to create a flat surface. Place in the fridge for 2-3 hours. Finally, cut the bar into 8 separate pieces and snack on them over a 5-day-period.

Nutrition Facts Protein – 155.4g / 19.4g per serving Carbohydrates – 367.5g / 45.9g per serving Fat – 158g / 19.7g per serving

Total kcals – 3513.6 kcals / 439.2 kcals per serving

43. Red Berry Milkshake Ingredients 200ml skimmed milk 100g frozen Greek yogurt ¼ cup strawberries ¼ cup raspberries 2 tbsp. slithered almonds 1 medium banana Preparation Method Another flavoursome and nutrient-dense milkshake to cure your sugar cravings. Simply blend all the above ingredients until completely smooth and enjoy! Nutrition Facts Protein – 25.8g Carbohydrates – 57.6g Fat – 22.6g

Total kcals – 537 kcals

44. Peanut Butter Chocolate Sandwich Ingredients 2 slices wholegrain bread 1 tbsp. peanut butter 1 tbsp. Nutella or alternative 1 medium banana (chopped) Preparation Method Another personal favourite, this recipe tastes great, it’s high in protein, low in calories and simple to make. To prepare, simply spread the peanut butter on 1 slice of bread and spread the Nutella on the other slice. Add the chopped banana in between both slices, spray the grill plates with oil and place inside your George Foreman grill or sandwich toasty until golden brown. Nutrition Facts Protein – 12.4g Carbohydrates – 63.3g Fat – 18g

Total kcals – 464.8 kcals

45. Chocolate Orange Mousse Ingredients 3 tsp black and greens dark cocoa powder ½ avocado ½ cup ice ¼ cup water ¼ cup slithered almonds (crushed) 1 tsp orange rind Preparation Method Blend the above ingredients and then add the ice, blend once more. If you aren’t going to consume immediately, there’s no need to add the ice, simply place in the fridge in a desert bowl for later consumption. Sprinkle 1 tsp of crushed almonds over the top for the finishing touch and enjoy! Nutrition Facts Protein – 22.4g Carbohydrates – 23.8g Fat – 53.6g

Total kcals – 667.2 kcals

Chapter 8: Non-Training Day Menu If it’s a none training day, try to keep your diet relatively clean by consuming only moderate amounts of complex carbohydrates along with lean proteins and plenty of fruit and veg, rich in fibre and low in sugar. Too often people continue to consume the same amount of food and portions sizes as they would if it was a training day. Your body will have no use for the excessive energy, eating the same amount of carbohydrates will store as glycogen, but don’t forget if you don’t use that energy, it’ll still get released into the bloodstream as glucose and store as fat. So, how much should you eat on a non-training day? Well below, you should’ve calculated your energy requirements, by multiplying your PAL by your BMR. All you need to do in this instance, is when looking at the PAL table to work out your activity level, simply calculate it as sedentary or just slightly lower than your PAL if you have a strenuous job. Then, simply multiply it again by the BMR. Calculate how much you need from each of the major macronutrients and use those energy requirements for your “rest” or “non-training” days. Eating on rest days doesn’t necessarily have to be boring, you’ve just got to experiment with healthy foods that contain very little sugar and that are low in complex carbs, along with the right amount of protein. Be careful with how much fruit you consume also, as some fruits contain quite a lot of sugar in the form of fructose. The best fruits to consume that have the lowest sugar count, are kiwis, raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, cranberries, olives, rhubarb, and avocados.

46. Simple-Rice, Chicken & Courgette Ingredients 200g wholegrain rice 400ml water 100g chicken fillet (chopped) ¼ cup courgette (chopped) 50g salsa ¼ of a lemons juice 1 tbsp. jerk seasoning Preparation Method Add the rice and 400ml boiling water to a medium sized pan and cook over a medium heat for 12-15-minutes or until all water has been absorbed. Simultaneously, pre-heat your grill pan over a medium heat, season the chicken with the jerk and lemon juice and add to the pan – cook for 15-minutes or until cooked through. The final part is simple, put the chopped courgette in the microwave on full power for 1.5 minutes. Simple, flavoursome, nutritious and relatively fat-free. Nutrition Facts Protein – 37.3g Carbohydrates – 51.3g Fat – 1.9g

Total kcals – 371.5 kcals

47. Scrambled Eggs & Peanut Butter on Toast with Greens Ingredients 1 wholegrain slice bread 2 large eggs 1 tbsp. skimmed milk 1 tbsp. peanut butter 1 apple (chopped) 250ml cranberry juice 100g broccoli 1 pinch parsley seasoning 1 pinch sea salt & cracked black pepper Preparation Method In a microwavable jug, add the 2 eggs, the tbsp. milk, parsley and salt & pepper seasoning and mix well for 1-minute. Put the egg mix in the microwave for 1-2 minutes on full power, mixing-well with a fork every 30 seconds. Toast the slice of wholegrain bread until golden brown and spread with peanut butter. Finally, place the broccoli in the microwave for 1.5 minutes. Consume with a glass of refreshing cranberry juice along with the chopped apple on the side. Nutrition Facts Protein – 27.9g Carbohydrates – 67.1g Fat – 27.2g

Total kcals – 624.8 kcals

48. Energise-Me Smoothie Ingredients 100g natural cottage cheese 1 tbsp. honey 250ml skimmed milk 100g frozen natural yogurt 1 medium banana ¼ cup frozen blueberries Preparation Method Simple, inexpensive, quick and easy, this recipe tastes delicious and provides a hefty dose of complex carbs, and protein to boost energy levels. Simply blend the above ingredients for 1-minute or until the mix becomes smooth. Best times to consume would be pre-workout or before bed. Nutrition Facts Protein – 26.8g Carbohydrates – 65.7g Fat – 5.2g

Total kcals – 416.8 kcals

49. Sweet Potato Avocado & Basa Fish with Mixed-Veg Ingredients 200g sweet potatoes ½ large avocado – ripened 1 tsp sea salt and cracked black pepper 100g frozen mixed vegetables 100g frozen Basa fish fillet 50g salsa ¼ of a lemon 1 tsp parsley Preparation Method Pre-heat the oven to 220 degrees. Fork the sweet potato several times and place in the microwave for 5-minutes on full power. Then, place the Basa fish onto a bed of foil, sprinkle over the parsley and add the lemon – wrap well. Once the potatoes are ready to go in the oven, add them along with the Basa fish and continue to cook for 2025-minutes. For the final 10-minutes of the cooking process, add the frozen vegetables to a small pan along with cold water and boil for 10-minutes over a medium-high heat or until the boil. Once everything is ready, cut the sweet potato in half, spread the avocado and sprinkle over the salt and pepper seasoning. Drain the vegetables and add to the plate along with the salsa to taste. Nutrition Facts Protein – 22.6g Carbohydrates – 42.7g Fat – 9g

Total kcals – 342.2 kcals

50. Bed of Avocado with a side of Milk Ingredients Fresh 6-inch granary baguette 1 whole avocado (ripened) 1 tsp sea salt and black cracked pepper 1 medium tomato (sliced) 250ml skimmed milk Preparation Method The final recipe is a refreshing and delicious snack, low in calories, high in fibre and protein. Simply cut the baguette in half and spread the ripened avocado on both sides, then, add the sliced tomatoes on both halves and sprinkle with the salt & pepper seasoning. To complement this recipe and increase the protein count, consume with a cold glass of skimmed milk. Enjoy. Nutrition Facts Protein – 22.6g Carbohydrates – 51.9g Fat – 16.1g

Total kcals – 442.9 kcals

Chapter 9: How to Calculate Your Energy Needs Next, you need to work out your energy needs using the following formula: Energy requirements = BMR (basal metabolic rate) + PAL (physical activity level). BMR (basal metabolic rate) BMR is the minimum calorie needs and energy an individual requires in order to sustain life while at rest and to maintain your body’s normal function. In an individual that’s sedentary, BMR can make up to 75% of your overall energy requirements. It’s largely determined by the amount of lean muscle tissue that the individual possesses. The leaner the individual, the higher their BMR is likely to be. You can see now why it’s so vital to maintain as much muscle as possible, to ensure you maintain a sufficient BMR. People who follow diets that consist of extreme starvation for the “quick fix,” often lose a lot of muscle, for obvious reasons. Therefore, your BMI would drop also, causing a lower kcal requirement. People that follow extreme diets often experience an unexpected weight increase once they return to their normal eating habits, as they forget to account for a reduced BMR from the amount of lean muscle tissue lost. To estimate your BMR, all you need is your bodyweight in Kg or lbs. The Schofield method is a very effective method used to estimate the BMR in kcals for the average man and woman. An individual’s age, weight and gender, are all considered in the equations, they’re very accurate for the average adult, but they don’t consider an individual’s body composition. Therefore, an individual’s kcal needs may be underestimated if they’re very lean and muscular and in turn, overestimate the kcal needs of an obese individual.

To calculate your BMR use the table below: BMR (kcal/day) Age

BMR Male

BMR Female

10-17 years

17.7 x W + 657

13.4 x W + 692

18-29 years

15.1 x W + 692

14.8 x W + 487

30-59 years

11.5 x W + 873

8.3 x W + 846

60-74 years

11.9 x W + 700

9.2 x W + 687

W = weight in kg

This gives you an approx. figure for how many kcals an individual use’s in a 24-hr period. To convert stone to kg multiply weight in stone by 14 and divide by 2.2. To convert body weight from lbs to kg divide weight in lbs by 2.2. So, if we calculate Jane’s BMR the calculation would be as follows: Jane is a 43-year-old female and she weighs 88.9 kg. 8.3 x 88.9 (kg) + 846 = 1584 Physical activity level table Lifestyle

Occupation

PAL

Sedentary

Desk job, no exercise, little energy expenditure.

< 1.2

Lightly active

20-30 minutes of exercise up to 3 days per week.

Moderately active

Active lifestyle and exercise up to 4-5 days per week.

Very active

Sport specific training intensely for 5-6 hours per week and hard labour occupations.

Extremely active

Athletes who spend more than 10 hours per week training and other activities outside of training.

1.3 - 1.4 1.5 – 1.6

1.7 – 1.8

1.9 - 2.2

The next step is to multiply your BMR by your PAL. Jane is a sedentary office worker and gets little to no exercise, therefore, her PAL would be 1.2 so the following equation would be as follows: 1584 x 1.2 = 1900 kcals per day (energy requirements).

So, this is the daily requirements that Jane should be consuming for her weight and lifestyle, but obviously she’s consuming a lot more than this and with no exercise, she’s sure to put on excess weight. Once Jane has reached her goal of losing 21.33 kg or reduced her BF% to 25% and exercising regularly, her PAL will change to moderately active and therefore multiply her BMR by 1.3-1.4 accordingly to maintain new weight and BF%. Now that we’ve calculated Jane’s energy requirements, we can break down how much energy we require from each macronutrient. According to the eat well plate, the percentage of each individual macronutrient we should consume each day from your total energy needs are as follows:

Protein – 4 kcals per 1g Carbohydrate – 4 kcals per 1g Fat – 9 kcals per 1g

Jane’s energy requirements per day: 1900 kcals So, to find out each individual macronutrient (Carbohydrates, Fats & Protein) we must use this formula: Total energy requirement x 0.55/ 0.30/

0.15 (percentage of macronutrient) ÷ Macronutrient in kcals to find out what it is in grams. (1900 x 0.55 = 1045 ÷ 4 = 261)) So, for carbohydrates which should be 50-55% of your diet, Jane should consume approx. 261g daily. Next, we’ll do the same for fat. (1900 x 0.30 = 570 ÷ 9 (remember that for 1g of fat there are 9 kcals) = 63) So, for fat which is 30-35% of her daily needs, she should consume 63g. Next, we’ll do the same for protein. (1900 x 0.15 = 285 ÷ 4 = 71) So, Jane should consume 10-15% of her daily needs from protein which is 71g. Carbohydrates – 261g (1045 kcals) Fat – 63g (570 kcals) Protein – 71g (285 kcals) So, if we add these numbers together in the brackets that are in kcals: 1045 + 570 + 285 = 1900 kcals (total energy requirements). The reason we break each of these down into grams, is because most nutrient values on food packets show each macronutrient in grams, so when it comes to your diet plan it becomes a lot easier for you to create.

Total energy requirements to maintain weight With the type of training you do your carbohydrate and protein should be adjusted accordingly compared with the eat well plate to maintain energy levels and to repair and increase muscle size. Type of exercise

Daily protein requirements (g)

Endurance – low to moderate intensity

1.0 – 1.2

Endurance – moderate to high intensity

1.2 – 1.6

Exercise of intermittent nature e.g football

1.4 – 1.7

Strength or power training

1.6 – 2.0

Multiply bodyweight (kg) by daily protein requirement (g)

Activity level (number of hours of moderate intensity exercise of sports)

Grams of carbohydrate / kg bodyweight

3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

5-7 hours per week

5-6g per kg bodyweight

1-2 hours per day

6-7g per kg bodyweight

2-4 hours per day

7-8g per kg bodyweight

More than 4 hours per day

8-10g per kg bodyweight

Multiply bodyweight (kg) by daily carbohydrate requirement (g)

So, for example Jane has reached her long-term goal of weighing 68 kg. She’s moderately active, has an active lifestyle and exercises 4-5 times per week aerobically, therefore her new PAL is 1.5. Moderately active

Active lifestyle and exercise up to 4-5 days per week.

1.5 – 1.6

Jane’s new energy requirements are as follows. BMR formula – 8.3 x 68 + 846 = 1410 BMR = 1410 BMR x PAL 1410 x 1.5 = 2115 total kcal energy requirements Macronutrient breakdown using carbohydrate and protein requirements above: Carbohydrates 3-5 hours per week

5g per kg bodyweight

5g / per kg bodyweight 5 x 68 = 340g (1360 kcals) Protein Endurance – moderate to high intensity

1.2 – 1.6

1.4 x bodyweight (kg) 1.4 x 68 = 95g (380 kcals) Add protein & carbohydrate requirements together in kcals 1360 + 380 = 1740 kcals Now we can work out Jane’s fat requirements by subtracting her protein and carbohydrate requirements from her total kcal requirements. Total kcals – protein and carbohydrate requirements = fat requirements 2115 – 1740 = 375 kcals Now you need to divide the fat requirements by 9 to get in grams 375 ÷ 9 = 42g

Carbohydrates – 1360 kcals Protein – 380 kcals Fat – 375 kcals 1360 + 380 + 375 = 2115 kcals

Some useful information on carbohydrate consumption Before exercise

During exercise lasting more than 60 minutes

After exercise

Between daily session

How much

2.5g \ kg bodyweight

70g \ hour

1g \ kg bodyweight

5-10g \ kg bodyweight depending on intensity

Time period

2-4 hours before exercise

Begin after 30 minutes and take at regular intervals

Up to two hours and then every two hours

Plan and time appropriately to meet recommended intake in time period between session

Glycaemic index (GI)

Low

High

High – low

Low

Example foods

Bowl of muesli with semi skimmed milk

1-2 Bananas

Fresh fruit smoothie made with yogurt and milk

Stir fried noodles and vegetables

Bowl of Spaghetti Bolognese and salad Jacket potato with baked beans

Handful of dried fruit such as chopped apricots or raisins

Beans on wholegrain toast

Cereal bar Slice of malt loaf Tuna and low-fat crème fraiche Tuna and sweetcorn sandwich on wholegrain bread

Jacket potato with cottage cheese and salad ½ large pizza with tomato and vegetable-based topping

Conclusion Just because you’re on a budget, doesn’t mean you’ve got to sacrifice flavor, each recipe is inexpensive, nutritious, delicious and simple to make. Budgeting isn’t complicated, in fact, it’s simple when you know how. All it requires is a little time and patience on your behalf. Taking the time to calculate your energy needs will save you a ton of money down the line, because once you know how many calories you require, it becomes so much easier to customize your diet plan, so you’re able to buy the exact ingredients, rather than over-buy items that go to waste. If you enjoyed the recipes above, you may wish to discover other bodybuilding cookbooks within this series, “The Weight Loss Essentials Series: Nutrition, Weight Loss, Weight Training, Exercise and Fitness,” to get your hands on a further 370+ recipes, designed to build muscle, lose weight and increase your energy. Thank you for downloading my E-book, if you’ve found value and appreciate the information provided, I’d be more than grateful if you could kindly leave a review.