Routledge Talkabout : a social communication skills package [Second ed.] 9781315173849

This core Talkabout manual is a practical resource essential for Speech and Language Therapists and other professionals

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Routledge 
Talkabout : a social communication skills package [Second ed.]
 9781315173849

Table of contents :
Cover
Title Page
Copyright Page
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
About the author
Preface to the second edition
Introduction
Assessment
Level 1 Talkabout Body Language
Level 2 Talkabout The Way We Talk
Level 3 Talkabout Conversations
Level 4 Talkabout Assertiveness
Group cohesion games
Record forms
References
Index

Citation preview

Activity 9 ‘Why is eye contact important?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

 

Date ……………………..

 

Why is eye contact important?  

Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

54

 

P This page may be photocopied for instructional use only. Talkabout Second Edition © Alex Kelly, 2016

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

Activity 10 The rules for eye contact Preparation Print out the worksheet and the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put these in their A5 fact book. It may help to have a see-through triangle that can be placed on a drawn face on the wipe board or can be placed in front of their faces.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to work out the rule for good eye contact. • Ask the group to agree where it is good to look in the face. You could draw a face on a wipe board and then use a triangle to agree where in the face it is OK to look. Ask the group to position it in different places and then you could demonstrate this with your co-facilitator. o You are aiming for it to be across the eyebrows and then down to the end of the nose. • Talk about why it may be not OK to look at someone’s mouth. o It is more intimate and can be seen as a flirting behaviour. • Ask the group to identify where in the triangle they would feel OK looking at. If they find it hard to look at someone’s eyes, ask them to consider in between the eyes or the bridge of the nose. • The group members could then practise looking at each other using the triangle rule. You can use stickers on your face or bridge of nose, for example, if that helps them to cue in to where they should be looking.

P This page may be photocopied for instructional use only. Talkabout Second Edition © Alex Kelly, 2016

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

Activity 10 ‘The rules of eye contact’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Can you draw a triangle on the face to show where you can look when you are talking to someone?

Sometimes we may briefly look at someone’s mouth when we are talking to them. What do you think that means?

56

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

Activity 10 ‘The rules for eye contact’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Eye contact What is good eye contact?

3 Good eye contact means we should look towards the person who is talking to us



3 If you can look at the person’s eyes then great



3 If it is difficult to look at their eyes, look at them somewhere in the triangle



3 It is OK to look away for a few seconds – we do not want to stare

!

Why is this important?

It is polite to look at people when we are talking to them. We need to show people we are listening to them. We can also use it to see how the other person is feeling and to help us take turns. Eye contact is more important at the beginning of the conversation and when we are listening rather than speaking. If we don’t use good eye contact, people may also think we are rude and not want to talk to us.

P This page may be photocopied for instructional use only. Talkabout Second Edition © Alex Kelly, 2016

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

Activity 11 Learning to look Preparation Print out copies of the worksheet and cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. Note: you will use this worksheet again for future topics and skills.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to think about what everyone can do to help them to use good eye contact. • First, ask them to think about what they are currently doing wrong. Are they looking away too much? Help everyone to describe it by starting the sentence ‘Sometimes I …’ • Then think about what other people may think or feel about them using poor eye contact. Finish the sentence ‘Other people may think …’ • Then ask them to think of a sentence that will help them to remember the rule or what they will do. Finish the sentence ‘I will try to …’ • Finally, think about why they are doing this. What is the motivation? Is it good to do this because it is the polite thing to do? Or is it because their parents will be proud? Or do they need a reward? This sentence can start with ‘This is …’ or ‘This will mean that …’ • If they would like a written reminder of this for their fact book, complete the worksheet and cut it to size.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

I am working on my ... Sometimes I …………….………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………

Other people may think …………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………

I will try to ………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………

This ………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………

My name ……………………………………… Date ……………

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Eye contact

Activity 12 Stop and look Preparation Create some space in the room so that the group members can move around freely. You may like to set up a way to play music for this activity; you will need to be able to stop and start it easily. You may also like to have a video recording device ready to record group members’ good eye contact.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to move around the room and when the music stops, or the facilitator says ‘Stop’, they turn to the person nearest to them. They will then try to use their good eye contact while each person asks a question. • You can make this simpler by agreeing a few questions beforehand, for example: o What is your favourite colour? o What did you do at the weekend? o What do you like to do in the evenings? o What is your favourite meal? • The group facilitator watches the group and encourages some of the pairs to show the others their good eye contact. • Repeat the activity until everyone has experienced success and has been praised. • This activity can be extended to help the group continue to practise. Use other scenarios to help people to role play good eye contact. You may choose to video them if you think this may help.

60

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Topic 3 Facial expression Activity 13 Watch my face! Preparation You may need some large sheets of paper and pens to write down discussion ideas. Print out the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the facial expression clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one of the group facilitators should use no facial expression while the other person talks normally. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the second role play, one of you could use excessive and/or inappropriate facial expression (you may want to do this as two separate role plays). Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? You can then talk about facial expression that is too much or inappropriate to the context. Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate facial expression. • At each point, discuss how it makes people appear if they use inappropriate facial expression. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete the worksheet.

P This page may be photocopied for instructional use only. Talkabout Second Edition © Alex Kelly, 2016

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 13 ‘Watch my face!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor facial expression

1 No facial expression … This means our faces don’t move much when we are talking or listening in a conversation. If we don’t use any facial expression when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 Inappropriate facial expression … This means our faces don’t match the words that are being spoken or our faces are too exaggerated in their expression. If we use inappropriate facial expressions when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

62

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 14 Why is facial expression important? Preparation Use the cards from Activity 9. Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to recap on all of the reasons why eye contact is important and see whether any of them apply to facial expression. So: o

To help start a conversation – we use more eye contact at the beginning of a conversation but also we need to have a friendly facial expression to encourage someone to want to talk to us.

o

To show people that we are listening – we need to use more eye contact when we are listening than when we are talking and we need to use facial expression that is appropriate to what they are telling us.

o

To show interest – we look at people to let them know we are interested in what they are saying. We widen our eyes to show real interest and use appropriate facial expression.

o

To watch the other person to see how they are feeling – we look at their eyes to see if they are looking at us (good sign!) or looking around the room (not a good sign!). We can also look at their facial expression.

o

To take turns – we use more eye contact as we hand over the conversation to the other person and we use appropriate facial expression to encourage the person to talk to us.

o

To be polite – people like people who make good eye contact and have good facial expression.

• You could demonstrate these points through different role plays (modelling) or you could use the cards to get a discussion going, as in Activity 9. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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Activity 14 ‘Why is facial expression important?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

 

Date ……………………..

 

Why is facial expression important?  

Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 15 Different feelings Preparation Collect and print out (or cut out) several faces, from the internet or magazines, showing a few different emotions, for example: happy, sad, angry, bored, scared, embarrassed, worried and excited. Print out some or all of the emotion cards and laminate them if you want to use them again. You may also need a copy of the worksheet and a large sheet of paper and some glue.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider different facial expressions and what they may look like. • Go through as many of the cards as is appropriate for the group and discuss the different emotions. Place them on the table. • Go through the pictures you have collected and agree what the emotion is. These can then either be placed under the corresponding card or stuck on a large piece of paper to create a collage or poster.

Variation Divide the group into two teams and take it in turns to act out one of the emotions. Can they guess which emotion is being acted? Take photographs of the group acting out these emotions and stick them on the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 15 ‘Different feelings’ cards $

66

happy

sad

angry

bored

scared

worried

embarrassed

excited

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 15 ‘Different feelings’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Guess how I am feeling?

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 16 The rules for facial expression Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put these in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for good facial expression. • Ask the group to consider when it is important to look sad or happy or angry. Think about helping other people to know we are feeling something. • Then consider the importance of looking sad if someone is saying something sad as this shows people we are listening to them and we are also showing empathy. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on facial expression. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

68

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 16 ‘The rules for facial expression’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Facial expression What does good facial expression mean?

3 Good facial expression means that our faces should match what we are saying



3 If we feel sad then we should look sad – this helps people to know how we feel



3 We should also make sure that our faces are responding to what the other person is saying



3 Smiling is a good way to appear more friendly and confident

!

Why is this important?

We need to use good facial expressions to show people we are listening to them. We can also use our facial expression to show people how we are feeling. Smiling is important to show people that we are friendly and interested. If we use poor facial expressions, people may think we are rude and may not want to talk to us.

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Facial expression

Activity 17 Face your emotions Preparation Create some space in the room so that the group members can move around freely. You will also need a music player and possibly a video recording device.

Instructions • Explain that you are going to move around the room and when the music stops, or the facilitator says ‘Stop’, they turn to the person nearest to them. They will then try to use their good facial expression when their partner tells them something. • You can make this simpler by agreeing a few statements beforehand. Ask the group to come up with some examples, such as: o

Tell your partner that your hamster has just died.

o

Tell your partner that it’s your birthday tomorrow.

o

Tell your partner that you are not feeling very well.

• The group facilitator watches the group and encourages some of the pairs to demonstrate their good facial expression. • Repeat the activity until everyone has experienced success and has been praised. • This activity can be extended to help the group continue to practise. Use other scenarios to help people to role play good facial expression. You may choose to video them if you think this may help.

70

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Topic 4 Gesture Activity 18 Watch my hands! Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the gesture clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling. It is hard to model inappropriate gesture and you will need to practise! Watch the DVD clip for an excellent example.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one facilitator should not use gestures. Make sure that you include things which really needed gestures, eg pointing at or explaining something. The other person could look confused. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the second role play, one facilitator could use excessive and then inappropriate gesture, for example, making a thumbs-up sign when saying you were not feeling very good (you could do this as two separate role plays). Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? You can then talk about gesture that is too much or inappropriate to the context. Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate gesture. • At each point, talk about how it makes people appear if they use inappropriate gesture. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 18 ‘Watch my hands!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor gesture

1 No gesture … This means we don’t use our hands much when we are talking or listening in a conversation. If we don’t use any gesture when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 Inappropriate gesture … This means our hands move too much when we are talking and are too exaggerated, or it means we use gestures which are inappropriate to the situation. If we use inappropriate gestures when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

72

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 19 Why is gesture important? Preparation Find some television clips of people talking and using gesture. Chat shows are often a good source. Prepare some scenarios for using no gesture Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch a short television clip with the sound off. Group members will watch and note down every time someone uses their hands. Ask the group why they thought they were using the gesture. Watch the clip again and see if they were right. • Then ask the group members to prepare a short role play or conversation where they are going to try to talk about something while sitting on their hands. Good suggestions for this are giving directions to someone, telling someone how big or tall something or someone is, and describing how to play an instrument or play a sport. • The group talk about how it felt to use no gesture and what it looked like to watch other people using no gesture. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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Activity 19 ‘Why is gesture important?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

 

Date ……………………..

 

Why is gesture important?  

Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 20 Different gestures Preparation Collect and print or cut out pictures of gestures, for example: pointed finger (angry or irritated), arms folded (bored), hands over mouth (scared), clenched fists (angry), open palms (happy or relaxed), head in hands (worried or stressed), hand clap (excited), and hands on cheeks (embarrassed). Print out co

pies of the worksheet.

You can also use the emotion cards from Activity 15 ‘Different feelings’.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to consider different gestures and what those may be telling us. • Go through the pictures and ask the group to think about how the person may be feeling. Choose the emotion card that best fits the picture. • Then consider what they may be saying, for example ‘Don’t do that!’ or ‘I’m not interested’. If you feel these ideas will be difficult to generate, think of some examples and ask the group to sort them accordingly. For example: Pointed finger

ANGRY

‘Don’t do that!’

Arms folded

BORED

‘I’m not interested’

Hand over mouth

SCARED

‘Oh no, that’s horrible!’

Clenched fists

ANGRY

‘I can’t believe she just said that!’

Open palms

HAPPY

‘What do you think?’

Head in hands

WORRIED

‘I’ve got too much to do!’

Hands on cheeks

EMBARRASSED

‘Oh no, I’m so silly’

• The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 20 ‘Different gestures’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Gestures

What are they saying?  

Date ……………………..

How are they feeling?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

76

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Copyright © 2017. Routledge. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law.

TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 21 The rules for gesture Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to consider the rules for good gesture. • Ask the group to consider when is it important to use gesture? • Then consider the importance of using gesture to back up what we are saying and helping people to understand what we are saying. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on gesture. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 21 ‘The rules for gesture’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Gesture What does good gesture mean?

3 Using gesture helps people to listen to us and understand what we are saying



3 It should back up what we are saying and not be a distraction



3 Using gesture can make us look more confident and interesting to listen to



3 Try to remember to use open hands to appear more friendly

!

Why is this important?

We need to use gestures to help reinforce what we are saying. Remember that our gestures will also tell people how we are feeling: for example, when we are nervous, our hands may move more and we may touch our face. If we don’t use gestures at all,or we use inappropriate gestures, it can be distracting for the other person. We may look tense or nervous.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 22 Give us a hand Preparation Print and cut out the prompt cards and laminate them if you want to use them again. You will also need the different feelings cards from Activity 15. Create a space in the room for people to move around and act out their scenario. You may also like to have a video recording device ready to record group members’ good use of gesture.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out something using no words, just lots of gesture and body language. • Start with the emotion cards. Take it in turns to take a card and act it out. Can everyone guess what emotion they are trying to act out? • Repeat the activity with the scenario cards and see if they can guess what the card says. They may like to choose their own scenarios rather than use the ones provided here. • Continue the activity until everyone has had a turn. • This activity can be extended to help the group continue to practise. Use other scenarios to help people to role play good gesture. You may choose to video them if you think this may help.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Gesture

Activity 22 ‘Give us a hand’ cards $

I have lost my cat – have you seen it? I have won the lottery! I went fishing and caught a big fish. I have eaten too much and now I feel ill. Be quiet! It’s too noisy in here. I watched a film that was very scary. I was playing football and scored a goal. I had to run to catch the bus. I went for a walk and got wet in the rain. 80

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Topic 5 Distance Activity 23 Watch the distance! Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and pens to write down discussion ideas. Print out the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the distance clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling. Inappropriate distance can be shown in two ways and must not be confused with touch when modelling being too close or volume when modelling being too far apart.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one of the group facilitators should walk up and stand right in front of the other (it is best to stand side-on to the group to show this). The second facilitator should look uncomfortable and may even take a step back. The first facilitator should step forward again, to close the distance, but be careful not to touch them. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the second role play, begin on opposite sides of the room. The same facilitator as above starts the conversation but remains where they are. Have the conversation in this way but be careful not to shout. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? The facilitators could then walk towards each other and ask the group to tell them where they should stop. Then suggest that one arm’s length is a good rule and that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate distance. • At each point, talk about how it makes people appear if they use inappropriate distance and how it makes others feel. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 23 ‘Watch the distance!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor distance

1 Too close … This means we stand too close to people when we are talking or listening to them in a conversation or get in their personal space. If we stand too close when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 Too far away ... This means we stand too far away from someone when we are talking to them in a conversation. If we stand too far away from someone when we are talking to them: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 24 That’s a close one! Preparation You will need a very large sheet of paper (eg four pieces of flipchart paper stuck together). Draw a pair of feet in the middle of one of the short edges and then two semi-circles, one within one arm’s length of the feet and one just a bit further away. You may also want to use a camera and a tape measure (optional).

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to be considering how close you can get to different people. • Ask one group member to come and stand on the feet on the large sheet of paper. • Then ask another group member to come up and stand face-to-face with the group member who is on the paper feet so that they both feel comfortable. When they have agreed, draw around the second group member’s feet and write in their names, eg ‘Ollie and Murphy’. You may like to take a photograph too. • You can also ask them to hold out their arms and see if they are one arm’s length away – the standard rule for distance. • Then ask another group member to come up and test out their distance with the first group member and add their feet to the paper. • Continue until every group member has had a turn standing on the feet and in the circles on the paper. • Are there any differences in the group? Was anyone closer than one arm’s length away? Are they close friends? • Who would they allow to get closer and stand in their inner circle? (eg mum, best friend, grandparent)

Variation Use a tape measure to measure the distances between each pair. Create a table of these measurements and compare the differences.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 25 Closer to you? Preparation Print out the worksheet. You may like to enlarge this to A3 size if you are discussing it as a group or make several A4 copies if working individually or in pairs. You may also need the large sheet of paper from Activity 24.

Instructions • Remind the group of the activity completed in the previous session, looking at how close the group members could get to each other. You may like to get out the large sheet from the previous activity. • Explain to the group that today you are going to be thinking about when the one arm’s length rule might change. • Put the worksheet in the middle of the group and start by getting them to think about the people who we don’t mind getting closer than one arm’s length to us, eg Mum and Dad, siblings, family, best friend, people we like and know well. • If a group member suggests someone different (for example, their social worker), ask them why and challenge this if it is not appropriate. • Next, ask the group to think of a situation where the rules may change and people who are not on the first list may get closer to us, eg in a lift, at a party, at a funeral or wedding, in a queue, at the doctor’s or dentist’s surgery. Talk about each one, how it may change and why this is OK in this situation. • The group can then fill in their worksheet.

Variations The group could complete the worksheet in pairs and then share their ideas with the rest of the group. The group facilitators could prepare several situation cards. The group members then take it in turns to choose one and discuss how distance may be affected or change in that scenario.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 25 ‘Closer to you?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Who? Can you think of a few people who you can get close to? Make a list of their names here:

Date ……………………..

When? Sometimes you have to get close to people who are not on your list. When might this happen?

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 26 The rules for distance Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may also need the worksheet from Activity 11.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for good distance. • Ask the group to consider what we mean by good distance and when this may alter. • Then consider the importance of getting distance right in a conversation to make people feel comfortable talking to us and how they might react if this is wrong. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on distance. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 26 ‘The rules for distance’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Distance What does good distance mean?

3 We don’t usually like people to stand closer than one arm’s length to us



3 If we know the person really well and like them then they may be able to get closer



3 If we are in a small space, like a lift, we can get closer to someone but it’s best to stand sideways



3 If people are taller than us, or we don’t know them well, then we like them to stand a bit further away

!

Why is this important?

We need to get our distance right to be polite. We can use our good distance to show someone that we are listening and that we like them or care about them. If we get our distance wrong and stand too close, people may not want to talk to us as they may feel uncomfortable or intimidated.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Distance

Activity 27 Mind the gap! Preparation Create a space in the room for people to move about and act out their scenarios.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out different scenarios and practise using your good distance rules. • The group should work in pairs and use the scenarios that they came up with in Activity 25. Give each pair a scenario and then give them time to create a little role play around it. • Each pair must decide who they are in the situation and then plan the appropriate distance they will need to achieve. • Each pair takes it in turns to perform these role plays to the group. You could keep the scenario secret, so that the group members have to guess it, and then comment on whether the distance was appropriate for it.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Topic 6 Touch Activity 28 Watch my touch! Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the touch clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling. Inappropriate touch can be shown in two ways and must not be confused with distance or gestures when modelling.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. In the first scenario, try to show inappropriate ‘no touch’. You could use a scenario where one person is upset: for example, their pet is ill. The other facilitator should look and sound sympathetic but not use any touch, even when the first person asks for a hug or indicates that they need comfort, eg ‘I could do with a hug’. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? Then suggest that you will do better the next time. Note: if ‘no touch’ is too subtle for the group, go straight on to the second role play. • In the second role play, begin the same conversation but, this time, the second facilitator responds by overreacting, giving the other person constant hugs, rubbing their head or hair too much, holding or rubbing their hand or leg. The first facilitator should look uncomfortable and attempt to pull away from the touches, to show they are inappropriate. Ask the group what they thought and discuss whether anything was wrong. Then suggest that we do need to use touch to comfort someone, or to greet or show interest, but it has to be appropriate to the context and setting. Suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate touch. • At each point, talk about how it makes people appear if they use inappropriate touch and how it makes others feel. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 28 ‘Watch my touch!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Poor touch

Date ……………………..

1 No touch ... This means we don’t touch someone when talking to them, even if it is appropriate, for example, if they are upset or worried. If we use no touch when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 Inappropriate touch ... This means we touch someone when talking to them but it is the wrong kind of touch or not right for the situation. If we touch someone inappropriately when we are talking to them: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 29 Touch control Preparation You will need to print out the two sets of cards. They can be cut out and laminated if you want to use them again. Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to be considering different types of touch and who they could use these with. • Place the two sets of cards in separate piles and face-down in the middle of the group. • Ask the first group member to select one card from each pile – one touch card and one scenario card. • The group member then considers whether this is an appropriate touch to use in that situation or not. The group can help decide this if they are struggling. • Continue the activity until all of the cards have been selected. • Next, match up cards and scenarios – what is the appropriate touch in each situation? You can use the touch cards more than once. • Discuss any differences in the group and challenge any that you feel may be inappropriate. • The group members can then complete an individual worksheet with the types of touch they would use in each scenario.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 29 ‘Touch control’ cards $

92

shake hands

high five

pat on back

hold hands

hug

kiss

touch elbow

no touch

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 29 ‘Touch control’ scenario cards $

Saying ‘Hello’ at an interview.

Greeting your friend when you see them in town.

Walking to the shops with your five-yearold niece.

Saying ‘Hello’ to your grandma.

Saying ‘Hello’ to your doctor.

Talking to a shopkeeper.

Meeting someone for the first time.

Comforting a friend.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 29 ‘Touch control’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Write in the appropriate touch you could use in each of the scenarios below. You could use some more than once.

H Saying ‘Hello’ at an interview Greeting your friend when

H you see them in town

to the shops with H Walking your five-year-old niece

H Saying ‘Hello’ to your grandma H Saying ‘Hello’ to your doctor H Talking to a shopkeeper H Meeting someone for the first time H Comforting a friend 94

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 30 Why is touch important? Preparation Find some video clips from a television programme of people talking and using touch. Print out copies of the worksheet. Have paper and pens out for the group members to write down ideas.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to watch a short clip of a television programme. The group members should watch it and write down every time that someone uses touch. • Ask the group why they thought the people were using the touch. Watch the video clip again and see if they were right. • The group then discuss why they think touch is important when talking to someone. The reasons may include: o to greet someone o to show we care o to comfort someone o to show we are interested o to show we are listening o to end a conversation. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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Activity 30 ‘Why is touch important?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

 

Date ……………………..

 

Why is touch important?  

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 31 The rules for touch Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may also need the worksheet from Activity 11.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for good touch. • Ask the group to consider what we mean by ‘good touch’ and when this may alter. • Then consider the importance of getting touch right in a conversation, to make people feel comfortable talking to us, and how they might react if this is wrong. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on touch. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 31 ‘The rules for touch’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Touch

What does good touch mean?

3 Touch can be an important part of having a conversation. If we know the person really well, we may greet them by giving them a high five or a hug



3 If they are upset, we may put our arm around them or hug them



3 If we don’t know people well, we could shake hands with them or wave



3 Touch may change depending on the situation and the age of the person we are talking to

!

Why is this important?

It is important to get our touch right when talking to someone so that we don’t make them feel uncomfortable. We can use touch to say ‘Hello’, comfort someone and show that we care about them. If we use the wrong touch with someone, they may feel embarrassed or unsafe and not want to talk to us any more.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 32 To touch or not to touch? Preparation Print and cut out the scenario cards and laminate them if you want to use them again. Clear enough space in the room for the group members to move around and role play appropriate touch.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out different scenarios and practise using your good touch rules. • The group should work in pairs and each pair should be given one scenario. Give them time to create a little role play around that situation. They may like to add to the scenario, to make it as relevant to their experience as possible. Or the group may choose their own scenarios if the ones given are not appropriate. • Each pair decides who they are in the scenario and they then plan the role play using appropriate touch. • Note: make sure that everyone is comfortable taking part in this activity, particularly with any use of touch. • The pairs then take it in turns to perform their role play to the group. The group could discuss whether everyone agrees with their choice of touch. Would anyone have done something different? Consider the important factor that some people use and like touch more than others and we must always take this into account

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Touch

Activity 32 ‘To touch or not to touch’ scenarios $

Your friend has just given you a brilliant gift

You meet up with your friend in town You are upset because your phone has been stolen You are meeting your favourite aunt who lives in Australia – you haven’t seen her for a year You are walking into an interview and introducing yourself to the person who is interviewing you You are chatting to your local shopkeeper Your friend is excited – she has just told you she is getting married

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Fidgeting

Topic 7 Fidgeting Activity 33 Watch me fidget! Preparation You will need large sheets of paper and pens to write down group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the fidgeting clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario: for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one group facilitator should fidget excessively while the second tries to continue the conversation. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? • In the second role play, the first group facilitator should sit very rigidly on their hands and not move at all. Make it very obvious that this is inappropriate. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Suggest that the first facilitator was better and didn’t fidget but was there anything that was not good? Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate fidgeting or movement. • At each point, talk about how it makes people appear if they use inappropriate fidgeting and how it makes others feel. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Fidgeting

Activity 33 ‘Watch me fidget!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Fidgeting

Date ……………………..

1 ❶ Too much fidgeting … This means we fidget a lot when we are talking to someone. We may move our legs and hands, or fiddle with objects or with our clothing. If we fidget too much when we are talking to someone: The other person may think …………………………………….… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 ❶ No movement at all … This means we sit very rigidly, with no movement, when we are talking to someone. If we don’t use any movements at all: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Fidgeting

Activity 34 Why do people fidget? Preparation You will need a large piece of paper or a wipe board and pens for recording the discussion. Alternatively, you could enlarge the worksheet to A3 size for the group discussion. Print out the worksheet.

Instructions • Ask the group to think about all of the different types of fidgeting, for example: o fiddling with objects o fiddling with hair o touching earrings or other jewellery o touching face o wringing hands o wiggling legs o tapping on the table o moving whole body. • Ask the group to think about why people fidget, for example: o they are nervous o they feel cold o they are bored o they feel excited o they need to go to the toilet o they have sensory difficulties o it helps them to concentrate. • The group members can then complete their worksheet (optional).

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Fidgeting

Activity 34 ‘Why do people fidget?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Different ways we fidget

Can you think of 5 reasons why people fidget? 1 2 3 4 5

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Fidgeting

Activity 35 The rules for fidgeting Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may also need the worksheet for Activity 11.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for fidgeting. • Ask the group to consider what we mean by ‘not fidgeting’ and when it may be harder to do this. • Then consider the importance of getting it right in a conversation, so that people feel comfortable talking to us, and how they might react if this is wrong. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on not fidgeting. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Fidgeting

Activity 35 ‘The rules for fidgeting’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Fidgeting

What does fidgeting mean?

3 It is natural to move a bit when we are talking to someone 3 We may move our hands or bodies to express something, such as excitement or shock, or to describe something 3 Fidgeting is when our movements become distracting to the other person 3 Fidgeting is when we fiddle with things or our bodies or clothing

!

Why is this important?

If we fidget when we are talking to people, it will look as if we are not listening or we are bored. People may not want to talk to us because it is distracting to talk to someone who is fidgeting a lot. It may also make them feel uncomfortable or angry.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Topic 8 Posture Activity 36 Watch my posture! Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the posture clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling. Inappropriate posture can be shown in two ways: too relaxed or slouching and too tense.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, what you are doing next weekend. In the first scenario, one group facilitator’s posture should be overly relaxed, eg slouched over the desk or back on their chair, legs and arms stretched out. Remember to keep facial expression and eye contact as appropriate as possible. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? • In the second role play, begin the same conversation but, this time, the group facilitator’s posture should be overly tense, for example, sitting upright and very rigid. They should retain this posture throughout. Ask the group what they thought and discuss whether anything was wrong. Then suggest that posture tells us a lot about how someone is feeling and that we adapt it to be appropriate to the context and setting. Suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate posture. • At each point, talk about how it makes people appear if they use inappropriate posture and how it makes others feel. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 36 ‘Watch my posture!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor posture

1 ❶ Too relaxed … This means we slouch over furniture and may stretch our legs and arms out or we may be hunched over. If our posture is too relaxed when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 ❶ Too tense … This means we sit or stand up very straight, head up, with arms and legs rigid and tense. If our posture is too tense when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 37 Walk this way Preparation Clear enough space in the room to allow the group members to walk around freely. You could also have a camera to take photographs of the group completing the activity.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to stand up and think about their bodies. Then give them the following instructions. • Make yourselves as tall as possible – raise your head, straighten your back, etc. Stop and look around the room. How do we all look? • Make yourselves as small as possible – huddle into a ball, bring your head down, etc. Stop and look around the room. How do we all look? • Imagine you are really angry – make your body and face look angry and then walk across the room. Stop and look around the room. How do we all look? • Imagine you are really sleepy – make your body and face look sleepy and walk across the room. Find a chair and sit down sleepily. Stop and look around the room. How do we all look? • Ask the group to think about how they changed their posture according to the instructions and how they were feeling. Introduce the terms tense and relaxed.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 38 Posture thermometer Preparation Print out a copy of the thermometer – it is best enlarged to A3 size. You will also need the emotions cards from Activity 15 ‘Different feelings’.

Instructions • Start by reintroducing the terms ‘tense’ and ‘relaxed’. • Then show the group the thermometer and explain that sometimes our bodies are really tense, sometimes they are really relaxed and sometimes they are in the middle. • Help the group members to feel familiar with the thermometer and rating scale by asking them to sit in a number 5 posture (really tense), a number 1 posture (really relaxed) and then number 3 (normal posture). • Next, using the feelings cards, select the first card and read out the emotion. Ask the group to imagine feeling like that and then sit in a way to show it, eg if ‘sad’ is selected, sit in a sad way, hunched over, head down. • Then ask the group to look around at everyone’s posture and rate it on the thermometer. You can place the emotion card next to the rating on the thermometer. • Work through until all of the emotions have been rated.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 38 ‘Posture thermometer’ worksheet

5 Tense

4

Normal

3 2

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 39 Different postures Preparation You will need to collect several images from the internet or magazines of different postures. Make sure that they are large enough for all of the group to see. You will also need the posture thermometer from the previous activity.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to look at other people’s postures today. • Place the first image in the middle of the group and talk about what they see. Where would they rate it on the posture thermometer? • Next, ask the group what their initial impression of this person is. What do they think of them? Words they may use include nervous, friendly, arrogant, open, closed, tense and confident. • Explain to the group that posture is very important when we meet people for the first time because it is one of the main areas of our body language that people judge us on. We will need to think about this especially if we are going to a job interview or meeting someone for the first time. • Choose another image and repeat the process. Continue until you have discussed several different postures and the initial impressions they give.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 40 The rules for posture Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may also need the worksheet from Activity 11.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for good posture. • Ask the group to consider what we mean by ‘good posture’ and when this may alter. • Then consider the importance of getting posture right in a conversation, to make people feel comfortable talking to us, and how they might react if this is wrong. • Also consider what initial impressions we give with our posture and how we should adapt it when meeting new people or in a formal setting, for example. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on posture. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 40 ‘The rules for posture’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Posture What does good posture mean?

3 Posture is important when talking to someone



3 When we meet someone, we decide whether we like them within 7 seconds and this is partly based on their posture



3 Sometimes we should sit upright to show respect, for example in a formal setting



3 Our posture can also show the other person that we are listening to them



3 Posture will change depending on the situation and the person we are talking to. For example, sometimes it is OK to be more relaxed

!

Why is this important?

It is important to get our posture right when meeting and talking to someone, so that they don’t think we are being rude. We can use our posture to show respect, to show we are listening and also to show how we are feeling. If we use the wrong posture with someone, they may feel like we are being rude, are not interested or don’t want to talk to them.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Posture

Activity 41 Time to pose! Preparation Clear enough space in the room to allow the group members to act out their scenarios.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out different scenarios and practise using good posture. • Good scenarios are: a job interview, meeting a friend for coffee, complaining at a hotel, giving a talk in a meeting, meeting someone new at the bus stop and going to the cinema with a friend. • The group should work in pairs. Give each pair a scenario and time to create a little role play around that situation. The pair must decide who they are in the scenario and then plan the appropriate posture they will use. • The pairs then take it in turns to perform their role play to the group.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Topic 9 Personal appearance Activity 42 Watch my appearance! Preparation You may need some large sheets of paper and pens to write down group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the personal appearance clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one group facilitator should enter the room looking scruffy and untidy, eg shirt untucked, a stain or mark on their top, food around their mouth, hair not brushed or untidy. The second facilitator should respond to the conversation as normal but also appear distracted by their appearance: for example, looking them up and down. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? • In the second role play, the first group facilitator should enter the room inappropriately dressed, eg wearing a woolly scarf, hat and gloves and a big coat or dressed too smartly. The two facilitators then talk about their day together at the beach and what they will do when they get there. The second facilitator should look at the first as above and may even ask questions such as ‘Are you sure that’s what you want to wear to the beach?’ Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Suggest that the first facilitator looked better and was dressed clean and tidy but was there anything that was not good? Then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, both facilitators are dressed appropriately and discuss their day out to the beach. • At each point, talk about how it makes people appear if they dress inappropriately and how it makes others feel. Use the phrases from Activity 7 to help. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Activity 42 ‘Watch my appearance!’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Personal appearance

1 Untidy/unclean … This means we forget to wash or brush our teeth, we may not brush our hair or have it cut and our clothes may be dirty or untidy. If we are untidy or unclean: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel ………………………………………

2

Inappropriate dress … This means we wear clothes that are not suited to the occasion, the setting or the season. We may wear a scarf in hot weather or a suit to go bowling with friends. If we don’t dress appropriately: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Activity 43 Looking good! Preparation Print out the worksheet. It is best enlarged to A3 size if you are working in a group.

Instructions • Explain to the group that today you are going to be thinking about personal appearance and what we mean by ‘appropriate appearance’. • Ask the group to think about what we mean by appropriate appearance. Encourage them to think about appropriate clothes depending on the setting, situation, season, appropriate accessories, cleanliness, smell, hair, facial hair, etc. Talk about how all of these factors are involved in appropriate appearance. • Then ask the group why they think appearance is important. Why do we need to worry? You can talk about confidence, belonging, identity, and social rules such as at funerals. • The group then think about when it is OK to be different and express ourselves, eg at a party, at home, seeing friends, and when it is not OK to express ourselves, eg in some jobs, at formal occasions or at school. • The group can then fill in their worksheet. Variation This activity could be done in two groups or in pairs and then the ideas can be shared and compared.

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Activity 43 ‘Looking good!’ worksheet

 

 

What does appropriate appearance mean?  

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

When is it OK to express ourselves?

 

When is it not OK to express ourselves?

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Activity 44 The rules for personal appearance Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may also need the worksheet from Activity 11.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules around personal appearance. • Ask the group to consider what we mean by this and when personal appearance can change. • Then consider the importance of getting it right when meeting and talking to people, so that they feel comfortable and don’t get the wrong impression about us. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on personal appearance. If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Activity 44 ‘The rules for personal appearance’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Personal appearance

What does good posture mean?

3 Our personal appearance is important when talking to people



3 When we meet someone, we decide whether we like them within 7 seconds and this is partly based on how someone is dressed, looks and smells



3 We need to wear the right clothes appropriate to a situation, setting or season



3 We need to make sure we are clean and our hair is appropriate too

!

Why is this important?

If we wear the wrong clothes or our appearance is inappropriate, people may think we don’t care, that we are lazy or rude, and they may get the wrong impression of us. People may feeluncomfortable talking to us or feel embarrassed, or they may not want to stand near us.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Activity 45 Dressed to impress Preparation Print out the worksheets, either one for each person or one enlarged to A3 size if you are doing this activity as a group.

Instructions • Introduce the activity to the group, explaining that they will be thinking about the clothes they wear or an aspect of their appearance that makes them feel good. • Each group member has a worksheet and thinks about a few things about their appearance that make them feel good and why. This could be a favourite jumper, their hair, a piece of jewellery, etc. • The group members then share one or two items from their worksheet with everyone else.

Variations You could have one large worksheet and complete the work as a group. In this case, get each group member to think of one thing about their appearance they like and collate them all on the one sheet. To step it down, you could focus on one aspect, for example what is everyone’s favourite item of clothing?

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... Personal appearance

Activity 45 ‘Dressed to impress’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Think about what you like about what you wear and the way you look. Remember to think about clothes, hair, accessories. What makes you feel good and why?

These make me feel good …

Because …

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... How did I do?

Topic 10 My body language … how did I do? Activity 46 Body language … What am I like? (part 2) Preparation Print out new assessment sheets. Make sure that you have the completed assessment sheets and target sheets from Activity 6, one for each group member. Print out copies of the certificate of achievement.

Instructions • Ask the group to consider how they have done over the last few weeks and whether they think they have improved. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ worksheet and ask where they would rate themselves now. • Then ask the group members to think individually about where they are with their body language skills now and to mark this on their sheet. They may want to sit in different parts of the room to be more private. • The group facilitator then discusses with each group member how they have rated themselves and they compare this with their original assessment sheet. • The group members are then given a certificate of achievement.

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TALKABOUT Body Language ... How did I do?

Activity 46 ‘What am I like? (part 2)’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Body Language ... what am I like at it? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

Very good

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DATE ............................................

BODY LANGUAGE SKILLS

HAS COMPLETED TALKABOUT LEVEL 1

.............................................................................

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT

SIGNED .......................................................

I

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Certificate of Achievement

TALKABOUT Body Language ... How did I do?

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Level 2 Talkabout The Way We Talk Introduction Objectives

To introduce the concept of the way we talk. To introduce the five aspects of good speaking: • volume • rate • clarity • intonation • fluency.

Materials

You will need to print out and copy several of the activities. Some of the activity sheets are best enlarged to A3 size. Some of the activity cards are best laminated. Some activities are designed to be A5 size to create a fact book on social skills.

Timing

This topic will take up to 12 sessions to complete.

Contents Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5 Activity 6 Activity 7 Activity 8 Activity 9 Activity 10 Activity 11 Activity 12

Listen to me! Why is good speaking important? How do we sound? The way we talk … what am I like? (part 1) My volume My rate My clarity My intonation My fluency The rules for good speaking Learning to do good speaking The way we talk … what am I like? (part 2)

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 1 Listen to me! Preparation Print out copies of the handout. This is best printed in colour and laminated if you want to use it again. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation or source video clips of people talking in different ways.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, what you did at the weekend. In the conversation, one facilitator should get different aspects of the way they talk wrong, eg talk too loud and too quiet, too fast and too slow, mumble, talk monotonously and hesitate with lots of ‘erms’ and ‘ers’ between words. The co-facilitator should keep their speaking appropriate. Below is a sample script which may help. F1: (Shouting) Hi Jane! F2: Oh hi Sue, you scared me. F1: (Whispering) Did you have a good time at the theatre yesterday? F2: What? F1: (Very fast rate of speech) Did you have a good time at the theatre? F2: I’m sorry I can’t understand you … F1: (Very slow rate of speech) Did … you … have … a … good … time … at … the … theatre? F2: Oh yes, it was brilliant. Have you seen the new show yet? F1: (Hesitating) Well, um, I erm, I’m not er, sure, I, well, maybe … F2: Well it was really good, the singers were amazing, do you like musicals? F1: (Mumbled and unclear) They are OK but I prefer the circus normally.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

F2: Sorry, what did you say? F1: (Monotonous tone) I said they are OK but I prefer the circus normally. I went to see the Russian circus last year and it was the best thing I have ever seen. Anyway, best be going, see you soon. F2: Oh, OK, bye then. • Stop and ask the group what did they notice? Was there anything that was not good? They will probably start by commenting on the volume and rate and then may talk about the speaking not being clear enough. You may like to then repeat the model and ask them to look out for anything else. For example, could the co-facilitator understand everything that was said? • In the second role play, use the same scenario but this time use appropriate speaking. • You can then show the summary handout and introduce the five aspects of good speaking. Talk about what we mean by each one and that we need to use them all appropriately when talking to people. • The group members can then put a copy in their fact book, if appropriate.

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volume

clarity

rate of speech

intonation

Date ……………………..……………

What do we mean by good speaking?

Name ………………………………………………………

Activity 1 ‘Listen to me!’ handout

fluency

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 2 Why is good speaking important? Preparation Print and cut out the cards and stick them back-to-back. Laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to think about all of the reasons why and when good speaking is important. For example: • People can understand what we are saying … if we mumble or speak too quickly, people won’t be able to understand us. • To express ourselves clearly … we need to speak clearly to be able to express our feelings, thoughts and ideas in an appropriate way. • To show we are interested … we can use our intonation and volume to show we are interested in what someone is saying. • To show how we are feeling … we alter the way we speak to show different emotions, for example, speaking more loudly, quickly and with more varied intonation when we are excited. • People will want to talk to us … if we use good speaking, people will feel comfortable and want to talk to us again. • To be polite … if we shout or speak very slowly, people may think we are being rude or unkind. • Use the cards to encourage a discussion. Place the cards text-side down on a table in the middle of the group. You could start by asking what they think the pictures mean and then take it in turns to pick them up and discuss what is on the other side. • The group members can then complete their worksheet.

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Activity 2 ‘Why is good speaking important?’ cards $

People can understand what we are saying If we mumble or speak too quickly, people won’t be able to understand us.

To show we are interested We can use our intonation and volume to show we are interested in what someone is saying.

People will want to talk to us If we use good speaking, people will feel comfortable and want to talk to us again.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 2 ‘Why is good speaking important?’ cards $

To express ourselves clearly We need to speak clearly to be able to express our feelings, thoughts and ideas in an appropriate way.

To show how we are feeling We alter the way we speak to show different emotions, such as speaking more loudly, quickly and with more varied intonation when we are excited.

To be polite If we shout or speak very slowly, people may think we are being rude or unkind.

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Activity 2 ‘Why is good speaking important?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

 

Date ……………………..

 

Why is good speaking important?  

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 3 How do we sound? Preparation Print and cut out the sentence cards and laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out the worksheet, either one for each group member or one enlarged to A3 size if you are completing the activity as a group. You will also need the emotions cards from Body Language, Activity 15.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to be thinking about good speaking today and how it changes with different emotions. • Place the emotions cards face-down in a pile in the centre of the group. Do the same with the sentence cards. Each group member takes it in turns to select a sentence and an emotion card and then reads the sentence in that way, eg in a sad way or a happy way. You could keep the emotion secret from the group and see if they can guess how the group member is feeling. • The group then think about how they sounded and what changed in their voice to make them sound that way. You could use the handout from Activity 1 showing the five aspects of speaking to prompt discussion. • The next group member then repeats this activity until all of the group members have had a turn. • The group then complete the worksheet either in pairs (you could give one emotion to each pair to complete a sheet) or as a group, deciding on how the five aspects of speaking change to convey different emotions.

Variation Watch the Talkabout DVD clip on the way we talk (number 17), in which four teenagers say the same thing and show their feelings through the way they say it.

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Activity 3 ‘How do we sound?’ cards $

My friend has asked me to go skiing with her at Christmas. I know what Mum is going to say. Sam spoke to Tim and they are both coming round to my house later. I wonder what else they’re planning. I hear from Claire that everyone is going out for a drink tonight after work. Richard has just told me that I need to have my work finished and handed in tomorrow. My auntie has given me a new jumper for my birthday. It’s red with orange spots. It’s raining again today. I am going to stay inside and complete a new puzzle.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 3 ‘How do we sound?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

How do we sound?

When we feel ............................................. Quiet

Medium

Loud

Slow

Medium

Fast

Clear

Medium

Mumbled

Flat

Medium

Varied

Hesitant

Medium

Fluent

Volume

Rate

Clarity

Intonation

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 4 The way we talk … what am I like? (part 1) Preparation Print out the worksheet, one for each group member. You may like to enlarge one to A3 size to use in the group discussion. Print out a target sheet for each group member.

Instructions • Remind the group that they are going to be focusing on good speaking for the next few weeks. Therefore, they are going to plan today what they need to work on. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ worksheet, recapping on the different aspects and explaining the rating scale. If group members did not complete this activity in Level 1 Body Language, it is a good idea to get them used to the rating scale first by rating easier skills such as cooking, cycling, getting out of bed in the morning, etc. • Ask the group members to individually rate the way they talk. They may want to sit in different parts of the room to be more private. • The group facilitators then discuss with each group member how they have rated themselves. The facilitators then share how they rated that group member on their Talkabout assessment wheel (only the ‘way we talk’ section), raising awareness of what they need to improve and what they are already doing well. • The group members can then complete a target sheet for this topic.

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Activity 4 ‘The way we talk … what am I like?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

The way we talk ... what am I like at it? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

Very good

1 Volume 2 Rate 3 Clarity 4 Intonation 5 Fluency

Comments:

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Activity 4 ‘The way we talk … what am I like?’ target sheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

My plan for the way I talk I am good at ...

I need to work on ...

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How did I get on?

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 5 My volume Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out copies of the worksheets. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator using good and poor volume in a conversation or source video clips of people talking. You could use the volume clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first role play, one of the group facilitators should talk too loudly while the other person talks normally. Remember not to talk over or interrupt the other facilitator. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? They will say you spoke too loudly or shouted. You can then ask them what should have happened and they will say you should have spoken more quietly. • In the second role play, one group facilitator should speak too quietly. Remember to keep all of your body language appropriate, such as not leaning towards the other facilitator. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? You can then talk about the appropriate volume for a conversation so that people can hear us and don’t think we are being rude. • In the third role play, you can use appropriate volume. • After each role play, talk about how it makes people appear if they shout or whisper. You could refer to the worksheet in Body Language Activity 7 ‘Watch my eyes’ for ideas. The group members can then complete their worksheets.

Variation Discuss situations when you can or may need to speak louder, such as at a party or giving a presentation, and when you need to be quieter, such as in a library. You could collect images of different settings and sort them accordingly.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 5 ‘My volume’ worksheet 1 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor volume

1 Too loud … This means we raise our volume when we are talking to someone and speak too loudly. We may even shout. If we speak too loudly in a conversation with someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 When might it be OK to be louder? •





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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 5 ‘My volume’ worksheet 2 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor volume

1 Too quiet … This means we lower our volume when we are talking to someone and speak too quietly. We may even whisper. If we speak too quietly in a conversation with someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 When might we need to be quieter? •





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Activity 6 My rate Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out copies of the worksheets. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation using a fast or a slow rate of speech, or source video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the rate clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first role play, one of the group facilitators should talk too fast while the other person talks normally. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? You can ask them what should have happened and they will say you should have spoken more slowly to the other person. • In the second role play, one of you should speak too slowly with pauses between each word, trying not to change your volume or intonation too much. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? You can then talk about speaking too slowly and that people may think we are being rude or boring. Talk about an appropriate rate of speech in conversations and suggest that you will try to do better the next time. • In the third role play, you can use an appropriate rate. • After each role play, talk about how it makes people appear if they speak too fast or too slowly. You could refer to the worksheet in Body Language Activity 7 ‘Watch my eyes’ for ideas. • The group members can then complete their worksheets. Discuss and add ideas to them about when your voice may become faster, such as when you are excited or happy, and when it may be slower, such as when you are upset or nervous.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 6 ‘My rate’ worksheet 1 Name …………………………………………………………..

Poor rate

Date ……………………..

1 Too fast … This means we quicken our rate when we are talking to someone and talk too fast. Our words may become jumbled and people can’t understand us. If we speak too fast in a conversation with someone: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 Sometimes we talk fast … why is that? •





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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 6 ‘My rate’ worksheet 2 Name …………………………………………………………..

Poor rate

Date ……………………..

1 Too slow … This means we slow down our rate when talking to someone. We may draw out our words or pause between them. If we speak too slowly when we are talking to someone: The other person may think …………………………………… The other person may feel ………………………………………

2 Sometimes we talk slowly … why is that? •





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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 7 My clarity Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation using unclear and clear speech, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the clarity clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first role play, one of the group facilitators should mumble a lot while the other person talks normally. Remember not to lower your volume though. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? You can then ask them what should have happened and they will say you should speak clearly when talking to the other person. • In the second role play, you can use an appropriate, clear voice. • After each role play, talk about how it makes people appear if they mumble or speak clearly. You can refer to the worksheet in Body Language Activity 7 ‘Watch my eyes’ for ideas. • The group members can then complete their worksheet. Variations To reinforce the idea of clarity, you could play a ‘call and response’ game; for example, have a leader who says a sentence or introduces themselves with a fact that the group then repeats back. You could begin by creating a beat, by clapping or tapping your feet, and complete the call and response to this rhythm. When one group member has finished, the next one can have a go, maintaining the beat continuously and remembering to use a good clear voice. You could also play ‘Simon says’, remembering that the leader needs to give clear instructions for the group to follow. Take it in turns to be the leader.

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Activity 7 ‘My clarity’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Poor clarity

Date ……………………..

1 Mumbling ... This means we mumble when we are talking to someone and our words may become unclear and difficult to understand. If we mumble when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 ❶ Clear voice … This means we speak clearly when we are talking to people and we are easy to understand. If we speak clearly when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 8 My intonation Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation using poor and good intonation, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the intonation clips from the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first role play, one of the group facilitators should use a flat, monotonous intonation while the other person talks normally. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? They may say you sounded bored or weird but you can ask them what made you sound bored or weird and then you can discuss your flat intonation. Then ask what should have happened and they will say you should sound more excited or lively. • In the second role play, you could use an overexaggerated intonation. Stop and ask the group what they thought. Was that better? • In the third role play, you can use appropriate intonation. • After each role play, talk about how it makes people appear if they use a monotonous or varied intonation. You can refer to the worksheet in Body Language Activity 7 ‘Watch my eyes’ for ideas. • The group members can then complete their worksheet. Variation Create several cards with the same sentence on them but different words stressed, eg I didn’t say you had smelly feet, I didn’t say you had smelly feet, I didn’t say you had smelly feet, I didn’t say you had smelly feet, I didn’t say you had smelly feet. The group members take it in turns to select a card and say the sentence, stressing the word in bold. The group then discusses how this changes the meaning. The group could then pair up and think of another sentence with a meaning that is changed by stressing different words.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 8 ‘My intonation’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor intonation

1 ❶ Flat intonation … This means we use the same tone throughout our speech when we are talking to someone. This makes our voice sound flat. If we use a flat intonation when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 ❶ Varied intonation … This means we change our intonation, raising and lowering it while speaking or adding stress to different words, depending on the topic or meaning. (We mustn’t vary it too much though!) If we use varied intonation when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 9 My fluency Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation using poor and good fluency, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the fluency clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first role play, one of the group facilitators should use a hesitant voice, adding in lots of pauses and ‘ums’, ‘ers’ and ‘ahs’ between words while the other person talks normally. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? They will probably say you weren’t talking clearly or you sounded nervous. In each case, you can ask them how they knew that. You can then ask what should have happened and they will say you should sound more confident. You can then introduce them to the word ‘fluent’. • In the second role play, you can use appropriate fluency. • After each role play, talk about how it makes people appear if they hesitate or speak fluently. You can refer to the worksheet in Body Language Activity 7, ‘Watch my eyes’ for ideas. • The group members can then complete their worksheet. Variation To reinforce the idea of fluency, you could play a ‘call’ game. The group members stand in a circle and the first turns to the second and says ‘Hi B’, they reply ‘Hi A’, then the first group member says to the second ‘Call C’ (the third group member). The second group member then repeats ‘Hi C’, ‘Hi A’, ‘Call D’, continuing until you are back at the beginning. The group members must speak clearly and not hesitate; if they hesitate, they must sit down and are out of the game. You can complete a few rounds until there is a winner. You can change what must be said each round to make it harder.

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Activity 9 ‘My fluency’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor fluency

1 Hesitant voice … This means we hesitate when we are talking to someone and use lots of filler sounds such as ‘um’ and ‘er’ between words. If we hesitate when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 Fluent voice … This means we speak confidently and clearly when we are talking to someone with no pauses and hesitations. If we speak fluently when we are talking to someone: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 10 The rules for good speaking Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. Print out the worksheets from Body Language, Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for good speaking. • Ask the group to recap why good speaking is important. • Then consider the importance of using good speaking to back up what you are saying and help people to understand you and how you are feeling. Discuss the handout as a group. • Explain that they are going to think about what they can do to use good speaking in their conversations. • First, ask them to think about what they are currently doing wrong. Are they speaking too quickly or mumbling? Help everyone to describe it by using the sentence ‘Sometimes I …’ • Then think about what other people may think or feel about them if they don’t do good speaking. Finish the sentence ‘Other people may think …’ • Then ask them to think of a sentence that will help them to remember the rule or what they will do. Finish the sentence ‘I will try to …’ • Finally, think about why they want to improve this skill. What is the motivation? Is it good to do this because it is the polite thing to do? Or is it because their parents will be proud? Or do they need a reward? This sentence can start with ‘This is …’ or ‘This will mean that …’ • Complete the worksheet from Body Language, Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’, if appropriate.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 10 ‘The rules for good speaking’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Good speaking

What does good speaking mean?

3 Using a clear voice helps people to understand what we are saying and how we are feeling



3 Our voice should match with the content and topic we are talking about



3 We need to remember to use an appropriate volume and rate for a situation – this can vary



3 Remember not to mumble or hesitate so that people can understand you

!

Why is this important?

We need to use our voice to help reinforce what we are saying. Remember that our voices will also tell people how we are feeling. For example, when we are nervous, we may speak slower and more quietly and won’t use such varied intonation. If we use inappropriate voices, it can be distracting for the other person and they may not be able to hear or understand us. We may appear either aggressive and rude or passive and nervous.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 11 Learning to do good speaking Preparation Print out the scenario cards and laminate them if you want to use them again.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out different scenarios and practise using good speaking. • Ask the group to work in pairs and give each one a scenario. Give them time to create a short role play around that situation. • The pair must decide who they are in the scenario and then plan the conversation using good speaking, thinking about the five aspects. • Note: make sure that everyone is comfortable taking part in this activity. You may want to check each pair before they perform. • The pairs then take it in turns to perform their role play to the group. The other group members then comment on whether the speaking was appropriate and clear.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 11 ‘Learning to do good speaking’ cards $

You are having a big birthday party tonight and your friend has arrived early to give you a brilliant birthday present.

Your brother or sister is really upset as they have just been told that their pet rabbit has died.

You are having tea with your great uncle who you only see once a year.

You are having an interview for a job at the new clothes shop in town and you really want it.

You’re out for dinner with friends and the waiter has brought you the wrong meal. You need to send it back and ask for yours.

You have just met someone new at a party. They seem really friendly and you would like to get to know them better.

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TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

Activity 12 The way we talk … what am I like? (part 2) Preparation Print out new assessment sheets. Make sure that you have the completed assessment sheets and target sheets from Activity 4, one for each group member. Print out copies of the certificate of achievement.

Instructions • Ask the group to consider how they have got on over the last few weeks and whether they think they have improved. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ sheet and ask where they would rate themselves now. • Then ask the group members to think individually about how they would assess their speaking skills now and to mark this on their sheet. They may want to sit in different parts of the room to be more private. • The group facilitator then discusses with each group member individually how they have rated themselves and they compare this with their original assessment sheet. • The group members are then given a certificate of achievement.

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Activity 12 ‘What am I like? (part 2)’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

The way we talk ... what am I like at it? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

1 Volume 2 Rate 3 Clarity 4 Intonation 5 Fluency

Comments:

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Very good

TALKABOUT The Way We Talk

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H

H

I

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SIGNED .......................................................

The Way We Talk DATE ............................................

HAS COMPLETED TALKABOUT LEVEL 2

.............................................................................

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT

Certificate of Achievement

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Level 3 Talkabout Conversations Introduction Objectives

To introduce the difference between a good conversation and a bad conversation. To introduce the eight conversational skills: • listening • starting a conversation • taking turns • asking questions • answering questions • being relevant • repairing • ending a conversation.

Materials

You will need to print out and copy several of the activities. Some of the activity worksheets are best enlarged to A3 size. Some of the activity cards are best laminated, so that you can use them again. Some activities are designed to be A5 to create a ‘fact book’ on social skills.

Timing

The topics in Level 3 will take up to 25 sessions to complete.

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Contents

page

Topic 1 Talkabout conversations Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3

What are conversational skills? Why worry about conversations? Conversational skills … what am I like? (part 1)

164 168 172

Topic 2 Listening Activity 4 Activity 5 Activity 6

The rules for listening Look and listen Listening time

175 178 180

Topic 3 Starting a conversation Activity 7 Activity 8 Activity 9

Listen to my starters The rules for starting a conversation Starting time

181 183 186

Topic 4 Taking turns Activity 10 Activity 11

The rules for turn taking Taking time

187 190

Topic 5 Questions Activity 12 Activity 13 Activity 14 Activity 15

The rules for asking questions The rules for answering questions Are you open or closed? Question time

191 195 199 202

Topic 6 Being relevant Activity 16 Activity 17 Activity 18

The rules for relevance Dotty about … dinosaurs Relevance time

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Topic 7 Repairing Activity 19 Activity 20

The rules for repairing Repairing time

211 215

Topic 8 Ending a conversation Activity 21 Activity 22 Activity 23 Activity 24

Listen to the ending The rules for ending a conversation Conversation critic Ending time

216 219 222 224

Topic 9 How did I do? Activity 25

Conversational skills … what am I like? (part 2)

225

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Topic 1 Talkabout conversations Activity 1 What are conversational skills? Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheets and the handout. Prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation. You can use the conversation clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In each scenario, one of the group facilitators should do something wrong involving the eight conversational skills, so: 1

No starter – for example, the person launches into the conversation and surprises the other person.

2

No listening.

3

No taking turns.

4

Asking questions inappropriately.

5

Poor answering of questions.

6

Using poor relevance.

7

Inability to repair – for example, one person uses the wrong name and the other person doesn’t correct them.

8

No ending of the conversation.

• After each scenario, ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? Make a note of this, eg ‘start the conversation’. In each case, you can ask them what should have happened. You can also talk about how it makes people appear if they don’t listen, or don’t take turns. You can refer back to the worksheet in Activity 7 in Level 1 Body Language to help generate ideas. • In the final role play, you should have an appropriate conversation. • The group members can then complete their worksheets either individually or as a group. • You can then give each group member the summary handout to look at and add to their fact book, if appropriate.

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 1 ‘What are conversational skills?’ worksheet 1 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

   

 

   

A bad conversation

 

 

 

 

What do people think?

How do people feel?

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Activity 1 ‘What are conversational skills?’ worksheet 2 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

   

 

   

A good conversation

 

 

 

 

What do people think?

How do people feel?

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Repairing

Ending a conversation

Listening

Starting a conversation

Being relevant

Asking questions

Answering questions

Taking turns

Date ……………………..……………

Conversational skills

Name ………………………………………………………

Activity 1 ‘What are conversational skills?’ handout

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TALKABOUT Conversations

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 2 Why worry about conversations? Preparation Print and cut out the cards and stick them back-to-back. Laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to think about all of the reasons why it is important to be good at conversations. For example, to: o

make friends

o

show people we are interested in them

o

find out things we need or want

o

get a job or work with other people

o

express ourselves

o

be polite.

• You could demonstrate these reasons through different role plays (modelling) or you could use the cards to elicit some discussion. If you are using the cards, place them text-side down. You could start by asking what they think the pictures mean and then take it in turns to pick up the cards and discuss what is on the other side. • The group members can then complete their worksheet. Variation Ask the group members to think about a recent conversation they have had. Why did they need to have this conversation or talk to that person? Was it for one of the above reasons or something else?

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 2 ‘Why worry about conversations?’ cards $

To make friends It is easier to make friends if we can talk to people easily. We can also have fun talking to them!

To show people we are interested We let people know we are interested in them by talking to them. We may ask questions or talk to them about their feelings.

To find out things we need or want We use our good conversational skills to ask people for things we may need or want.

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 2 ‘Why worry about conversations?’ cards $

To get a job or work with other people People with good conversational skills find it easier to get work and to work with others.

To express ourselves We use our conversational skills to let people know how we are feeling and what we are thinking. This will also help build relationships.

To be polite People like us to be good at having a conversation. They like us to take turns and listen and then ask good questions.

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Activity 2 ‘Why worry about conversations?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

 

Date ……………………..

 

Why is it important to be good at conversations?  

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TALKABOUT Conversations

 

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 3 Conversational skills … what am I like? (part 1) Preparation Print out copies of the assessment sheet, one for each group member. You may like to enlarge one to A3 size to use in a group discussion. Print out a target sheet for each group member.

Instructions • Remind the group that they are going to be focusing on conversational skills for the next few sessions. Therefore, they are going to plan today what they need to work on. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ assessment sheet, explaining the different behaviours and the rating scale. You may need to remind the group how to use the rating scale by rating easier everyday skills, such as cooking, cycling, getting out of bed in the morning, etc. • Then ask the group members to think individually about where they are with their conversational skills. They may want to sit in different parts of the room for this to be more private. • The group facilitator(s) then discuss with each group member how they have rated themselves. The facilitators then share how they rated that group member in their Talkabout assessment (only the ‘conversation skills’ section of the wheel), raising awareness of what they need to improve on and what they are already doing well. • The group members can then complete a target sheet for the conversational skills topic.

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 3 ‘Conversational skills … what am I like?’ assessment sheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Conversational skills ... what am I like? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

Very good

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TALKABOUT Conversations

Activity 3 ‘Conversational skills … what am I like?’ target sheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

My conversational skills plan I am good at ...

I need to work on ...

174

How did I get on?

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Listening

Topic 2 Listening Activity 4 The rules for listening Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet and the handout. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other and showing good and poor listening. You could use the listening clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain that the group members are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one of the group facilitators should not listen to the other person. You can break this down into several role plays to demonstrate the key skills: looking, good posture, appropriate facial expression, making the right noises, asking questions, and saying something relevant. Stop and ask the group each time what they noticed. Was there anything that was not good? How did it make them appear? You can then ask them what should have happened. • In the final role play, you can show appropriate listening. • Write down a list of all the things they think it is important to do to show someone you are listening. • The group members can then complete their worksheet and discuss the rules on the handout. Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on listening (a plan of action). If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ in Level 1 Body Language for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Listening

Activity 4 ‘The rules of listening’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor listening

1 Poor listening ... This means we do not listen to someone when they are talking to us. We may not look at them or use appropriate facial expressions or body language. We may then ask inappropriate questions or say something that is not relevant. If we don’t listen to someone when they are talking to us: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

2 How can we show that we are listening?

……………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Listening

Activity 4 ‘The rules of listening’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Listening

What is good listening?

3 Good listening means we should try to use good eye contact



3 We should also try to use appropriate facial expressions



3 We should try to use an open posture or lean forwards



3 We should comment on what they are saying and ask appropriate questions

!

Why is this important? It is polite to listen to people when they are talking to us. Listening to people will help us to make friends because people like people who listen to them.

If we don’t listen, people may think we are rude and not want to talk to us.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Listening

Activity 5 Look and listen Preparation Create some space in the room so that the group members can work in groups of three. Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Ask the group to divide into groups of three. If this is not possible, have a group of four or ask one of the facilitators to join a group. Ideally, they will need one person to talk, one person to listen and one person to observe. • Ask each group to prepare something to talk about. For example, they may like to talk about their favourite holiday or what they enjoy doing in the evenings. If some of the group members are struggling to think about a topic, make a list for the whole group to work from. • Explain that they will take it in turns to be in each role: talker, listener and observer. The observer will watch the person listening and will note in particular their eye contact, facial expression, posture and use of commenting. • At the end of the conversation, the observer feeds back what they thought and they then agree on what kind of smiley face they should draw (green, orange or red). • Repeat the activity until everyone has had a go. • This activity can be repeated a second time, so that they can improve on any areas that were not good. • Then try swapping the groups around, so that they work with different people. • Finally, each group can complete their worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Listening

Activity 5 ‘Look and listen’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

1 How did I do?

Name

Good eye contact

Good facial expression

Good posture

Good commenting

Good eye contact

Good facial expression

Good posture

Good commenting

1

2

3

2 How did I do?

Name 1

2

3

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Listening

Activity 6 Listening time … the zoo game and more Additional listening games • Zoo game. Ask each person to choose an animal. The group facilitator then reads a story that incorporates all of the animals chosen. The group members need to listen to the story and when they hear their animal, they have to stand up and sit back down again. If they hear the word ‘zoo’, they all stand up and sit down. This activity can be varied by changing the topic and key word, eg to ‘food’ or ‘shopping’. You can also vary the actions so that everyone has to ‘clap’ or ‘turn around’ when they hear a particular word.

• Fruit salad. Everyone chooses a fruit and one chair is removed from the circle. One person stands in the middle of the circle and calls out two fruits. These two ‘fruits’ change places and the person in the middle tries to sit in one of their seats. The person left standing repeats the process. If someone calls out ‘fruit salad’, everyone has to change seats.

• Change places if … The group leader asks people to change places if they like chocolate, have brown hair, watched television last night, etc. Try using a parachute and, standing in a circle, make the parachute go up and down. Call out the command just before the parachute goes up and they then change places quickly before the parachute comes back down.

• I went to the market. The first person says ‘I went to market and bought a …’ The next person has to repeat the first person’s object and then adds their own. You can add actions or mimes and can also change the topic, for example, ‘I went on holiday and took/saw …’

• Simon says. The group leader says ‘Simon says …’ and does an action or requests an action (eg ‘stand up’). The group members only follow the action if the leader says ‘Simon says …’ before the action. If the group leader says ‘Sit down’ without saying ‘Simon says’, the group members should not do it and, if they do, they are out of the game.

• Tell a story. One person starts a story by saying ‘Once upon a time …’ Each group member then adds a sentence to create a story. One of the group facilitators can write down the story and read it back at the end of the game.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Starting a conversation

Topic 3 Starting a conversation Activity 7 Listen to my starters Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator starting a conversation, or source a few video clips of people starting conversations. You could use the clip on starting a conversation on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain that the group members are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first scenario, one of the group facilitators should attempt to start a conversation by walking up but then not saying anything and, after a while, walking away. Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good? They will say you didn’t say anything. After each role play, ask the group how it made the person appear. • In the next role play, the group facilitator starts the conversation by saying ‘Hello’ appropriately but walks up and stands too close to the co-facilitator. They may say ‘Hello’ into the person’s back or neck and make them jump. Ask the group what went wrong. They will say you can’t stand so close or you need to get your body language right too. • In the third role play, the first group facilitator tries again to begin a conversation but this time by saying ‘Hello’ and then asking a personal question such as ‘So how much do you get paid?’ Ask the group if that was better. They will say you need to say something appropriate. Ask what you could say and then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the final role play, you can start a conversation appropriately. • The group can then complete their worksheet. You could also refer to the worksheet in Activity 7 in Level 1 Body Language.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Starting a conversation

Activity 7 ‘Listen to my starters’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor starters

1 Poor greeting … This means we may not say anything or we say something inappropriate when starting a conversation, such as asking a personal question. If we don’t greet someone appropriately when starting a conversation: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 Poor body language ... This means we stand behind someone, or with our body facing away from them, when attempting to start a conversation. We may not look at them. If we use poor body language when starting a conversation: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Starting a conversation

Activity 8 The rules for starting a conversation Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and pens to write down the discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet, enough for one per pair. Print out the handout and cut the copies to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the different ways in which you can start a conversation. • Ask the group to suggest all of the different ways in which they could start a conversation. Write down these ideas on a large sheet of paper. • Introduce the worksheet and explain that there are five main ways we start a conversation, then talk about each one. Ask the group to work in pairs to complete the worksheet. For each of the five areas, they must add an example from the previous discussion and then one different example of their own. • The pairs then share their ideas with the group. You could add new ideas and examples from the worksheets to the large sheet of paper. Keep this safe as you may like to refer back to it in later sessions. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Talk about the rules for starting a conversation and what we need to remember.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on starting a conversation (a plan of action). If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ in Level 1 Body Language for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Starting a conversation

Activity 8 ‘The rules for starting a conversation’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Summary of starters Can you think of two examples for each one? 1 Asking a question

2 Requesting or giving something

3 Commenting on the environment

4 General greeting

5 Personal remark

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Starting a conversation

Activity 8 ‘The rules for starting a conversation’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Starting a conversation

What are good starters?

3 We need to face someone when we want to start a conversation and look at them



3 We should use an appropriate greeting such as ‘Hello’ or ‘Good morning’



3 We could ask a question or make a comment such as ‘What a sunny day!’



3 We need to use good speaking as well, so that someone can hear and understand us clearly

!

Why is this important?

It is important to start a conversation appropriately to be polite and so that other people will want to talk to us. It will allow us to have a conversation and to express ourselves. It will also make us appear friendly. If we don’t start a conversation well, people may think we are rude and won’t want to talk to us.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Starting a conversation

Activity 9 Starting time … ‘Pass the greeting’ and more Additional activities for starting a conversation • Pass the greeting. Write down each of the five ways to start a conversation on separate cards. Place the cards in a pile face-down in the middle of the group. The first group member chooses who they would like to start a conversation with and selects a card to determine how they should do this. They then start their conversation. Continue until everyone has had a turn starting a conversation. Discuss how it went. Alternatively, you could make the cards into a dice by sticking them on an empty tissues box and then roll the dice to choose the starter. On the sixth side, add ‘you choose’.

• Musical starters. Divide the group into two groups of the same size. One group stands in a tight circle facing outwards and the other group walks around this circle until the group facilitator shouts ‘Stop!’ They should stop, facing a group member in the inner circle who they must then start a conversation with. While the group members are walking around the circle, the group facilitator will say how to start the conversation, eg begin with a comment about the environment.

• Starting up Sam. Ask the group to divide into pairs. Decide on a few scenarios such as meeting someone at a party, seeing your friend in town, visiting your granny, going for a job interview. Give each pair a scenario and ask them to create a short role play showing starting a conversation in that context. Each pair must decide who they are, what the conversation will be about and what would be an appropriate way of starting that conversation. Make sure that everyone feels comfortable and check all of the role plays before the pairs perform them to the group. The pairs then perform and the group members discuss whether they think the greeting is appropriate for that setting.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Taking turns

Topic 4 Taking turns Activity 10 The rules for turn taking Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out copies of the worksheet and the handout. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other. You could use the turn-taking clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain that the group members are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. In the first scenario, both facilitators say ‘Hello’ and then nothing else. They continue to look at each other while there is a long silence; they then both say ‘Goodbye’. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good about it? They will say you didn’t say anything or you didn’t talk. Suggest that you will do better the next time and you will say something. After each role play, ask the group how it made the people appear. • In the next role play, both group facilitators say ‘Hello’ and then both begin talking. They continue to talk at the same time for the whole conversation before both saying ‘Goodbye’. (Note: this takes a few practices to do well!) Ask the group if that was better. They will say that you both talked at once, so suggest that you will do better next time. • In the third role play, one group facilitator will dominate the conversation. Both facilitators say ‘Hello’ and then one begins talking non-stop. They may ask the other person a question but then won’t let them answer. The second facilitator will try to say things but not be allowed. Both then say ‘Goodbye’. Stop and ask the group if that was better. The group will say you need to let the other person speak. • In the final role play, you can take turns appropriately. • The group then complete their worksheet. You could also refer to the worksheet from Activity 7 in Level 1 Body Language. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Talk about the rules around turn taking in a conversation and what we need to remember. Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on taking turns (a plan of action). If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ in Level 1 Body Language for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Taking turns

Activity 10 ‘The rules for turn taking’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor turn taking

1 ❶ Talking at once … This means we may both speak at the same time. This means that we can’t hear each other or respond appropriately. If we talk at the same time in a conversation: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 ❶ Uneven turns ... This means one person in the conversation talks too much and doesn’t let the other person have a fair turn. They may even not let them talk at all. If one person talks too much in a conversation: The other person may think ……………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Taking turns

Activity 10 ‘The rules for turn taking’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Turn taking

What does good turn taking mean?

3 In a conversation, we want to have enough time to be able to say what we want



3 We also need to give the other person time to talk



3 When someone else is talking, we should keep quiet and let them have their turn



3 We can use eye contact to show it is the other person’s time to talk

!

Why is this important?

It is important to take turns in a conversation appropriately to be polite and so that everyone has a chance to talk. It will allow us to have a good conversation and other people will want to talk to us again. If we don’t take turns well, people may think we are rude and may not want to talk to us.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Taking turns

Activity 11 Taking time … ‘Pass the mic’ and more Additional activities for taking turns • Pass the mic. The group members sit in a circle with a microphone in the middle (this could be any object if you don’t have a microphone). They are given a topic to discuss, such as their favourite holiday or meal, but they can only speak when they have the microphone. The group will have to decide how they signal that they want to speak and if someone is talking too much.

• I went to the Moon. The group members sit in a circle. The group facilitator thinks of a rule in their head, such as things beginning with ‘A’, or things that have wheels. They then begin by saying ‘I went to the Moon and I took …’ and say something that fits their rule. Then go around the circle taking it in turns to say ‘I went to the Moon and I took …’, adding something to try to guess the rule. After each guess, the group facilitator says ‘yes’ or ‘no’ depending on whether that is something they can take. The game continues until the rule has been guessed correctly. Someone else in the group can then have a turn to decide on a rule.

• I went to the market. This activity encourages the group to take turns and listen to what the group members have said before them. The first person says ‘I went to the market and I bought an egg’. The second person says ‘I went to the market and I bought an egg and a magazine’. The third says ‘I went to the market and I bought an egg, a magazine and some biscuits’, and so on, until you have been round the group a couple of times. Ask the rest of the group to help if someone gets stuck.

• Taking turns Toni. Ask the group to divide into pairs. Decide on a few scenarios such as at a party, at work, seeing your grandparents, etc. Give each pair a scenario and ask them to prepare a short role play showing good turn taking. Each pair must decide who they are, and what the conversation will be about and practise using good turn taking. The pairs then perform their role plays and the group members discuss whether they think the turn taking was appropriate for that setting.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Topic 5 Questions Activity 12 The rules for asking questions Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet and the handout. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other and asking questions. You could use the asking questions clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use the scenario where you have just met and want to find out more about each other. In the first role play, the facilitators have a conversation but one doesn’t ask any questions while the other continues to ask questions to find out more about them. The facilitator who is asking questions may pause at times as they expect to be asked a question too. Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good? Did both facilitators find out lots of facts about each other? They will say only one did because the other didn’t ask any questions. That facilitator suggests they will do better the next time and will ask some questions. • In the next role play, use the same scenario but, this time, the facilitator who didn’t ask questions in the first role play now asks questions but they are inappropriate. For example, they may ask if they are married, and if not why, what do they earn, do they have any tattoos, where do they buy their underwear from, etc. The other facilitator does their best to answer but may look embarrassed or uncomfortable and will continue to ask appropriate questions. Ask the group if that was better. They will say ‘no’ because the questions were inappropriate. • In the third role play, change the topic slightly by saying you want to find out about each other’s weekend. Ask a couple of questions appropriately at the beginning and then one group facilitator will dominate the conversation by continually asking questions too quickly. These initially may be about the other facilitator’s weekend but could then switch to the weather or their new hair cut or outfit. Ask the group if that was better. They will say that you asked too many questions and need to let the other person ask some. Suggest that you will do better the next time.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Instructions (continued) • In the final role play, you can ask questions about each other’s weekend appropriately. • After each role play, ask the group how did it make the people appear? • The group can then complete their worksheet. You could also refer to the worksheet from Activity 7 in Level 1 Body Language. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Talk about the rules around asking questions in a conversation and what we need to remember.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 12 ‘The rules for asking questions’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Poor asking

Date ……………………..

1 ❶ Asking the wrong questions … This means we may ask questions that are not relevant to the topic of conversation or ask questions that are not appropriate for that person. If we ask the wrong questions: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 ❶ Asking the wrong number of questions … This means we may ask too many questions and overload the other person, or we may not ask any questions at all. If we ask too many questions or none at all: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations... Questions

Activity 12 ‘The rules for asking questions’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Asking questions

What does good asking mean?

3 In conversations we want to be able to ask questions to find things out



3 We need to ask appropriate questions, relevant to the topic and the other person



3 We need to make sure we ask questions but that we don’t ask too many



3 We can ask open or closed questions depending on how much detail we want

!

Why is this important?

It is important to take turns in a conversation appropriately to be polite and so that everyone has a chance to talk. It will allow us to have a good conversation and other people will want to talk to us again. If we don’t take turns well, people may think we are rude and may not want to talk to us.

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TALKABOUT Conversations... Questions

Activity 13 The rules for answering questions Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet and the handout. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other and answering questions. You could use the answering questions clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario, for example, talking to each other about what you did at the weekend. In the first role play, one facilitator will ask questions appropriately about the weekend but the other doesn’t answer. They may not say anything at all or they may say or talk about something different. Stop and ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good about it? They will say you didn’t answer any of the questions. Suggest that you will do better the next time and that you will answer the other person. • In the next role play, the group facilitator will answer the questions but inappropriately. For example, they may say something too personal or won’t answer the questions properly, eg ‘What’s your favourite pizza?’, ‘Well I just love a chicken burger’. Ask the group if that was better and they will say ‘no’ because you gave strange answers or said inappropriate things. Talk about how answers should be relevant to the question and then suggest that you will do better the next time. • In the third role play, the group facilitator will answer the questions appropriately but give either too much detail or not enough. The other facilitator may ask ‘Did you have a nice weekend?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘Did you go anywhere nice?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘Where did you go?’ ‘Go-karting.’ Later on, the group facilitator may then give an answer that is far too long and detailed and the other facilitator will look bored. Stop and ask the group if that was better. The group will say ‘no’ because you didn’t say enough or you said too much and the other person was bored. Talk about how we have to keep the length of our answers appropriate to both the setting and the person. • In the final role play, the questions are answered appropriately. • After each role play, ask the group how it made the people appear.

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TALKABOUT Conversations... Questions

Instructions (continued) • The group can then complete their worksheet. You could also refer to the worksheet from Activity 7 in Level 1 Body Language. • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Talk about the rules for answering a question in a conversation and what we need to remember. Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on asking or answering questions (a plan of action). If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ in the body language section for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 13 ‘The rules for answering questions’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor answering

1 ❶ Answering inappropriately … This means we answer a question we have been asked but our answer is not relevant or gives inappropriate information such as something too personal. If we answer questions inappropriately in a conversation: The other person may think ……………………………………………… The other person may feel ………………………………………………

2 ❶ Answering with inappropriate detail … This means we answer a question that we have been asked but either don’t give enough detail, or just say ‘Yes’ or our answer is too long. If our answers are too long or short in a conversation: The other person may think ……………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 13 ‘The rules for answering questions’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Answering questions

What does good answering mean?

3 In a conversation we like to answer questions to share information and give our ideas



3 We must remember to listen to the question and then make our answers relevant



3 If we are asked a closed question, our answer should be short and normally just ‘Yes’ or ‘No’



3 If we are asked an open question, we can give more detail but be careful not to give too much information and bore the other person

!

Why is this important? It is important to answer questions appropriately in a conversation to be polite and to help to get to know each other.

If we don’t answer questions well, people may think we are rude or get bored by our answers and may not want to talk to us.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 14 Are you open or closed? Preparation You will need some small pieces of paper and pens for the group discussion. Print out the headings cards and the sentences. Laminate them if you want to use them again and then cut them out. Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that there are two different types of question that people ask. One is a closed question where the answer is very short and usually just ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. These are good for getting answers and information quickly. • The second type is an open question. These are questions where the answer can be longer, where we give more detail and we can expand, giving longer explanations. These are good for getting lots of information and used when getting to know someone, or understanding something or when we are really interested in a topic. • Place the two headings in the middle of the group and the sentences in a pile face-down. The group members take it in turns to select a sentence and ask it to the person on their left who then answers. They then decide whether that was an open or a closed question and place it under the appropriate heading. Continue until all of the sentences are sorted. • Next, the group members can spend some time thinking up their own ideas and examples of open and closed questions. They could write them down and add them under the headings. • Finally, complete the worksheet, either as a group or in pairs. Read about what we mean by a closed question and then think about when you may use them, eg when you need information quickly, when you only need to know one thing, etc. Then think about open questions. When might we use those? For example, when we want to hear a story, or know someone’s ideas or opinions or when getting to know someone.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 14 ‘Are you open or closed?’ cards $

Open questions Closed questions Can you open that window please? What is your favourite meal? Would you like mayonnaise on that? What is the best holiday you have been on? Do you like swimming? Where do you live? Do you own a car? What pets do you have at home? 200

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 14 ‘Are you open or closed?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Open and closed questions Closed questions

The answer to a closed question is short and normally just a yes or a no. They are good when … •





Open questions The answer to an open question is normally much longer. We can expand and give lots more detail and information. They are good when … • • •

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Questions

Activity 15 Question time … ‘twenty questions’ and more Additional activities for asking and answering questions • Twenty questions. The group members sit in a circle and are each given three small slips of paper. On one they write an animal, on another they write a food and on the third they write an object. They then fold each piece of paper and put them in a hat or bowl. The group then take it in turns to pick out a piece of paper and tell the group whether it is an animal, a food or an object. The group then have twenty questions to guess what it is but the person with the paper can only answer yes or no. The person who guesses correctly wins!

• Question time. Divide the group into smaller groups of two or three. Ask them to think about two things that they don’t already know about the other two people and note these down. They then take it in turns for one to be the observer and the other two to have a short conversation, asking and answering questions to find out the two facts. They then switch roles so that all three have had a chance to be the observer. The whole group then discuss how it went. Did everyone ask good questions? Did people use a mix of open and closed questions and how did this go?

• Yes/no game. One group member starts by sitting in the middle of the group. The rest of the group then take it in turns to ask them questions. These could range from ‘Do you like chocolate?’ to ‘Have you got brothers and sisters?’. The person in the middle must answer the questions but cannot say ‘yes’ or ‘no’. As soon as they do, they are out of the game and the next group member sits in the middle.

• Asking Alex. Get the group to divide into pairs. Decide on a few scenarios such as meeting someone new, going for an interview, seeing a friend who you haven’t seen for a year. Choose scenarios where lots of questions will be asked. Give each pair a scenario and then 5 to 10 minutes to prepare a short role play. They must decide who they are in the role play and questions they think would be relevant. You may even like to stipulate that each role play must have a minimum number of open and closed questions. The pairs then perform their role plays for the group and afterwards discuss how they got on with their questions and answers.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Topic 6 Being relevant Activity 16 The rules for relevance Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheets and the handout. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people talking to each other, being relevant and not relevant. You could use the relevance clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. In the first scenario, one facilitator asks a few questions and each time the other person answers in an irrelevant manner. Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good? They will say you didn’t answer the question (which was the previous topic) and you will introduce the word ‘relevant’ to them (if it has not already been mentioned). • In the next role play, one facilitator asks the other a question such as ‘What did you do at the weekend?’ and the other person answers the question appropriately but then talks too much about a topic which they are clearly interested in. However, they go on about it and do not pick up the signs that the other person is obviously bored. Discuss with the group what the problem is with talking about our interests. Discuss the ways in which you can find out if the person is interested in a topic. • In the next role play, ask the group to identify any signs that the second person may give to show you they are not interested. Repeat the previous role play but ask the group members to note all the little signs which show that they are not interested. For example: looking away, not responding much verbally or non-verbally, not asking any questions or commenting, fidgeting, and turning their legs or body away from the person speaking. Discuss the ways in which we can check if someone is interested and change the topic if not. • In the next role play, ask the group to help you out. As you go through the role play, stop and ask for help. For example: F1: Did you have a nice weekend? F2: Yes thank you – I went to a dinosaur museum. Are you interested in dinosaurs? F1: Not really – sorry. But did you have a good day?

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Pause – ask the group what they think you should do now. How much can we say about the day at the dinosaur museum? One or two facts? What should we do then? Ask the group to help you decide how to change the topic. • Continue with the group helping you to have a conversation which includes relevant topics that are interesting to both facilitators. • Then the group can complete their worksheets. You could also refer to the worksheet in Activity 7 in the Body Language section for ideas on what people may think or feel if we are irrelevant. • Distribute the handout and discuss the rules for being relevant. Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider if any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on relevance (a plan of action). If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ in the Body Language section for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Activity 16 ‘The rules for relevance’ worksheet 1 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor relevance

1 Talking about something that is not relevant ... This means we may not answer someone’s question or we talk about something that is not relevant to the person or to the situation. If we talk about something that is not relevant: The other person may think ……………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………………

2 Talking about something that is not interesting to the other person ... This means we may talk about a subject that is not interesting to the other person. We may want to talk about it, but the other person is not interested. If one person talks about something that is not interesting: The other person may think ……………………………………………… The other person may feel …………………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Activity 16 ‘The rules for relevance’ worksheet 2 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

I need to change the topic! Signs to look out for … 1

Their face …

2

Their body …

3

Their responses …

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Activity 16 ‘The rules for relevance’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Relevance

What does being relevant mean?

3 We need to talk about topics that are appropriate to the person and the situation



3 We need to listen to the other person and answer their questions appropriately



3 We need to make sure that the person is interested in what we are talking about

!

Why is this important?

It is important to be relevant in a conversation so that people want to talk to us. If we talk about things that are not relevant, other people may think we are rude and may not want to spend time with us any more.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Activity 17 Dotty about … dinosaurs Preparation Print out copies of the worksheet.

Instructions • This activity is only suitable for people who are focused on a few topics and struggle to expand what they talk about. • Ask the group to brainstorm the topics of conversations they enjoy. • Ask them to note how we are all different. You could ask everyone to identify those topics that have been mentioned that they would be interested in talking about and those that they are not so interested in. • You may ask for someone to volunteer to talk about their main interest, eg dinosaurs. Complete the worksheet as a group activity and get help from those people who are not so interested in this topic. Consider ways they could change the topic and other topics they could talk about. • Consider if it would help to have a time in the day when they are able to talk to someone about dinosaurs. • Repeat this activity with other group members and their topics. Variation This activity could also be done individually.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Activity 17 ‘Dotty about … dinosaurs’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

I am very interested in ……………………………………………… What do I like about it?

What do I like to talk to people about? Or ask people?

If someone is not interested in this, what else could I talk about?

What else might help me?

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Being relevant

Activity 18 Relevance time … ‘Linking words’ and more Additional activities for relevance • Linking words. This is a good group cohesion activity when working on relevance. The first person thinks of a word and the next person says a word that is associated with it in some way. Continue this several times around the circle. You may like to ask people about their associations if some of them are not immediately apparent.

• Change the topic. Divide the group into smaller groups of two to four people. Prepare a few topics beforehand, eg food, school, television and film, hobbies, animals. One of the groups goes first and they are given two topics to talk about in a defined space of time (approximately 1–2 minutes). Ask them to talk about one topic and then move on to the next as smoothly as possible. The other group members observe and praise them for relevance and how easily they managed to change the topic.

• Build a story. One person starts a story by saying ‘Once upon a time …’ Each group member then adds a sentence to create a story. One of the group facilitators can write down the story and read it back at the end. You can choose a theme for the story and/or have props in a bag to help people to bring in different ideas. For example, a bag with the following objects: a map, a teddybear, a purse, a pair of sunglasses and a photo of a man. Each person chooses an object and has to bring it into the story.

• Relevant Robyn. Ask the group to brainstorm a few scenarios such as meeting someone at a party; or making friends with someone at work; or talking to your grandparents, etc. Now think about what topics could be good to talk about. Divide the group into pairs and ask them to come up with a short role play showing good relevance. Each pair must decide who they are and what the conversation will be about and practise using good relevance. Make sure that everyone is comfortable taking part and check all role plays before the pairs perform them to the group.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Repairing

Topic 7 Repairing Activity 19 The rules for repairing Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet and the handout. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation with inappropriate and appropriate repairing, or you could use the repairing clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. In the first role play, use the scenario of meeting someone for the first time but one facilitator will mishear something. For example, the two facilitators could greet and introduce themselves but one mishears the other’s name, eg Brandon instead of Brian. They then continue to call them by the wrong name for the rest of the conversation, maybe even entering the wrong name into their phone or on a form or sheet (so there is a consequence). The other facilitator continues to talk and does not correct the mistake. Other good things to show being misheard are: where someone lives, where you are meeting next week or someone’s phone number. • Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good? They may say ‘Yes’ because you got their name wrong and then you could ask ‘Why did I?’ or ‘Why did I keep getting it wrong?’ If they haven’t done so already, suggest that you will correct them and repair in the next role play. • You can then do appropriate repairing in the next role play, keeping the situation and everything else the same as before. • You may choose to do a third role play showing someone misunderstanding something in a conversation. This is more complicated, so only move on to this if you think the group will understand it. You need to think of a scenario where one facilitator is telling a story or explaining something and the other misunderstands or misinterprets it. It needs to be something quite obvious so that the group can see it. You could try something similar to the following scenario.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Repairing

F1: Hi Beth, did you have a good weekend? F2: Hi, well actually it wasn’t great. I had an argument with my boyfriend. F1: Oh no, that’s horrible. What about? F2: Oh just something little, it was nothing really but went on for a while! F1: That sounds awful, it sounds like you two are going to break up, and after eight years! Don’t worry, you will be fine and don’t worry about that dinner party I’m having next week – you know the one on Thursday night? F2: Yeah, I remember. F1: Well no need to worry – he’s no longer invited. In fact, I’m going to phone my friend Casper, you know the single one, and I’m going to get him to come instead. You would be great together! I’m going to set you up! F2: Er, okay, um, can I give you a ring next week and let you know? F1: No need, it’s all sorted! • Stop and ask the group if anything went wrong. They will say the second facilitator didn’t want a new boyfriend, or she didn’t break up with her boyfriend, or they may say the first facilitator overreacted. In that instance, you could then ask ‘Why did they?’, ‘What did she think had happened?’ and introduce the idea that the first facilitator had misunderstood the situation and then acted inappropriately because the second facilitator didn’t correct and repair the mistake. Talk about the fact that there are consequences if we don’t repair and make sure that people understand us correctly. • You can then do the role play again with the same scenario but this time the second facilitator repairs and explains that she made up with her boyfriend and everything is OK. • The group can then complete their worksheet, thinking of what other people may do or what might happen if we don’t repair in a conversation. • Then distribute the handout and discuss what it says and what we need to remember when repairing in a conversation.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Repairing

Activity 19 ‘The rules for repairing’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor repairing

1 ❶ Someone has misheard us and we don’t repair … This means the person we are talking to mishears something we have said, such as our name or where we live, and we don’t correct them. If we don’t correct someone when they mishear us, what may happen? ……………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………

2 ❶ Someone has misunderstood us and we don’t repair … This means the person we are talking to misunderstands what we have said or how we felt about a situation. If we don’t correct someone when they misunderstand us, what may happen? …………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Repairing

Activity 19 ‘The rules for repairing’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Repairing

What does repairing mean?

3 Sometimes in a conversation the other person may mishear or misunderstand us



3 We need to correct them otherwise they may go on to say or do something inappropriate



3 We need to try to repair it as soon as possible



3 We should politely say something like ‘No, sorry, I meant …’ or ‘No, it’s Amy’

!

Why is this important?

It is important to repair in a conversation so that people understand us and what we have said. Repairing also means we keep the conversation relevant and flowing well. If we don’t repair, people might not get to know us properly and conversations can get confusing.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Repairing

Activity 20 Repairing time Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and different coloured pens ready to write down the group’s ideas.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to be thinking about repairing again today and all the times when people might misunderstand us. • As a group, think of all the times when you have been misunderstood by someone who you are talking to. Write them all on the sheet. • Next, get two different coloured pens and ask the group to circle with one colour all of the situations you have listed where someone has misheard you and, with the other colour, all of the situations where someone has misunderstood you. You could refer back to the worksheet from Activity 19 to remind you of the differences if needed. • Now ask the group if they can think of any other situations or information that someone may mishear or misunderstand. Add these to the sheet and colour code them. • Divide the group into pairs and get each pair to choose a different situation from your sheet of paper. As a pair, they must think about the situation and how you could appropriately repair to keep the conversation going and the information correct and relevant. They then create a short role play to show this. You may decide to all choose an easier scenario first where someone mishears them and then to do a second scenario where someone misunderstands them. • Each pair performs their role play for the group and then the group discusses how they repaired in that situation and if that was appropriate.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Topic 8 Ending a conversation Activity 21 Listen to the ending Preparation You may need large sheets of paper and pens to write down the group discussion ideas. Print out copies of the worksheet. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator ending a conversation, or source a few video clips of people ending conversations. You could use the ‘Ending a conversation’ clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a normal scenario such as what you did at the weekend. Have a good conversation, keeping everything appropriate and then, in the middle of one facilitator talking, the other one gets up and walks off. Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good? They will say that you didn’t say goodbye or you were rude and walked out. Ask the group what you should have done and they will say that you need to say goodbye. That facilitator says they will do better the next time and will say goodbye. • In the next role play, use the same scenario of talking about your weekend. Have a good conversation and then, in the middle of one facilitator talking, the other says ‘Goodbye’ and walks off. Ask the group if that was better and they will say ‘no’ because you interrupted that person. Talk to the group about when it is OK to say goodbye and when it is not. Suggest that you need to wait for a pause or the end of a story before you say goodbye. • In the third role play, keep the scenario the same and have an appropriate conversation about your weekend but, this time, the group facilitator waits for a natural pause or end of topic and then says goodbye very abruptly and walks off. Stop and ask the group if you did well this time. They will say ‘no’ because you left quickly and seemed rude. Discuss how you may give clues about wanting the conversation to end; what you may say so that the ending is not so sudden.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Instructions (continued) • In the next role play, the group facilitators have the same conversation about their weekend. This time, one of them waits for a natural pause, says a few phrases about needing to go as it is getting late, and says goodbye appropriately, but then uses inappropriate body language, for example kisses the co-facilitator (or attempts to) or gives them a hug, making them embarrassed or uncomfortable. Stop and ask the group if that was better. They will say ‘no’ because of the inappropriate body language. Discuss the fact that we need to get our non-verbal communication right and also use this to give clues that we want the conversation to end and then say goodbye appropriately too. Ask the group to give you suggestions for how you can use your body to show that you want to leave, eg look away, look bored, fidget or play with your keys. • In the final role play, use the same scenario and then say goodbye appropriately, both verbally and non-verbally. • After each role play, ask the group how it made the people appear. • The group can then complete their worksheet. Also refer to Activity 7 in the Body Language section if needed. Add to the ideas you have come up with throughout the role plays of how you can show you want to end a conversation.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 21 ‘Listen to the ending’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Poor endings

1 Poor endings … This means we say the wrong things when ending a conversation or we don’t use our bodies to show we want to finish. We may use an inappropriate touch to end with or we may not do or say anything and just walk off. If we don’t end a conversation appropriately: The other person may think ………………………………………… The other person may feel ……………………………………………

2 How can we show that we want to end a conversation?

……………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 22 The rules for ending a conversation Preparation Print out copies of the worksheet. Enlarge them to A3 size if you are completing this activity as a group activity. Print out copies of the handout.

Instructions • Explain to the group that in a conversation it is not always you who wants it to finish. Sometimes the other person wants the conversation to finish because they need to leave or have said what they wanted to. Therefore, we also need to look at their body language and their non-verbal cues. We need to look for clues that they would like the conversation to end. • Begin by asking the group what they think you may see someone doing if they want to end a conversation. Write down any ideas. Then get the worksheet out and talk about how there are three main areas we need to look at for clues: their face, their body and their responses. Explain what we mean by each of these. • Complete the worksheet as a group, collating everyone’s ideas, or split the group into pairs to fill in the sheet and then all return and give feedback. The main answers you are hoping for are: o

their face – facial expression looks bored, eye contact lessens and they may look away, or at the door, or at their watch

o

their body – they may turn their body away, or their feet may point towards the door, or they may fidget, pack up or look for their keys

o

their responses – they will talk less or just make noises, they will stop asking questions or only ask closed questions, they may say things such as ‘right’ or ‘okay’ or even ‘Wow it’s late, I should be going’.

Note on ‘Learning to …’: now consider whether any of the group members need to complete a ‘Learning to …’ worksheet on ending a conversation (a plan of action). If appropriate, refer to Activity 11 ‘Learning to look’ in the Body Language section for instructions and the worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 22 ‘The rules for ending a conversation’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

I need to end the conversation! Signs to look out for … 1

Their face …

2

Their body …

3

Their responses …

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 22 ‘The rules for ending a conversation’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Ending conversations

What does a good ending mean?

3 If we need to end a conversation, we should start to talk less and not ask any questions



3 We need to wait for a pause in the conversation or the end of a topic or story



3 We may give some non-verbal signs we want to end such as fidgeting or looking away



3 We can then say goodbye appropriately, use touch if appropriate and then leave

!

Why is this important? It is polite to end a conversation appropriately and then people are more likely to want to talk to us again. We must use our verbal and non-verbal skills so that we appear polite and friendly.

If we don’t end a conversation appropriately, people may think we don’t like talking to them or that we are not interested.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 23 Conversation critic Preparation Source some clips of people having conversations from some of the group members’ favourite television programmes or films. Print out copies of the worksheet, either one per pair or one enlarged to A3 size if you are working as a group.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to be analysing the endings of conversations today. You are also going to be thinking about all of the things you have learned about conversations over the past weeks. • Divide the group into pairs and give each pair a worksheet. Alternatively, work as one big group with a larger worksheet in the middle. Go through the worksheet together, explaining that you want them to watch the conversation and think about three parts. The beginning: how did the conversation start and was this appropriate? The middle: did the conversation flow well? Did they take turns and ask and answer questions appropriately? And then the ending: how did the conversation end? Was this appropriate? Remind the group that they need to consider whether the conversational parts were appropriate for the setting and also the people involved. • Choose the first video clip and show it to the group. On first viewing, tell the group not to write down anything, just watch and listen. When it has finished, ask them what they noticed, good and bad, and add this to the worksheet. • Then play the video clip again so that the group can note down anything else they have missed. If working in pairs, each pair then shares their ideas and observations. The group decides whether it was a good or bad conversation and if anything could have been improved. • Repeat the activity with another conversation clip.

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 23 ‘Conversation critic’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

What was the setting?

How did the conversation start? Was it appropriate?

How did they keep the conversation going? (Did they take turns, ask and answer questions, repair and keep relevant?)

How did the conversation end? Was it appropriate?

Is there anything they could have improved?

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TALKABOUT Conversations ... Ending a conversation

Activity 24 Ending time … ‘Ending Eddie’ and more Additional activities for ending a conversation • Ending Eddie. Print or draw several blank speech bubbles. As a group, think of all the things you could say to end a conversation. Think about things you have used before and new ideas the group have had. Write each idea on a speech bubble. Then divide the group into pairs and give them each a simple scenario, such as having dinner with a friend, talking to the dentist, asking for information at the library, etc. Each pair decides who they will be in the scenario and creates a short relevant conversation. They can look at all of the possible ways to end a conversation and decide which would work best in their scenario. The pairs then perform their role plays to the group and the group discusses whether the ending was appropriate for the scenario.

• Tell me a story. This is similar to the story activity in Activity 23. One person starts a story by saying ‘Once upon a time …’ Going round the group clockwise, each group member then adds a sentence to create a story. After one round, the person sitting to the right of the group member who started has to end the story in some way. One of the group facilitators can write down the story and then read it back at the end. You can choose a theme for the story and/or have props in a bag to help people to bring in different ideas. Once you have played one round, the next group member starts a story with the person to their right ending it. Continue until everyone has had a chance to start and end the story. Discuss how it went and the difficulties in finishing the story if it was in the middle of something happening. Think about how this is similar to a conversation.

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TALKABOUT Conversations... How did I do?

Topic 9 How did I do? Activity 25 Conversational skills … what am I like? (part 2) Preparation Print out new assessment sheets. Make sure that you have the completed assessment sheets and target sheets from Activity 3, one for each group member. Print out copies of the certificate of achievement.

Instructions • Ask the group to consider how they have got on over the last few weeks and whether they think they have improved. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ assessment sheet and ask where they would rate themselves now. • Then ask the group members to think individually about where they are with their conversational skills now and to mark this on their sheet. They may want to sit in different parts of the room to be more private. • The group facilitator(s) then discusses with each group member how they have rated themselves and compare this with their original assessment sheet. • The group members are then given a certificate of achievement.

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TALKABOUT Conversations... How did I do?

Activity 25 ‘What am I like? (part 2)’ assessment sheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Conversational skills ... what am I like? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

1 Listening Starting a 2 conversation 3 Taking turns 4 Asking questions Answering 5 questions 6 Being relevant 7 Repairing Ending a 8 conversation 226

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Very good

TALKABOUT Conversations ... How did I do?

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H

H

I

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SIGNED .......................................................

DATE ............................................

CONVERSATIONAL SKILLS

HAS COMPLETED TALKABOUT LEVEL 3

.............................................................................

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT

Certificate of Achievement

227

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TALKABOUT

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Level 4 Talkabout Assertiveness Introduction Objectives

To introduce the difference between being passive, aggressive and assertive. To introduce the eight assertiveness skills: • expressing feelings • standing up for yourself • making suggestions • refusing • disagreeing • complaining • apologising • requesting explanations.

Materials

You will need to print out and copy several of the activities. Some of the activity worksheets are best enlarged to A3 size. Some of the activity cards are best laminated so that you can use them again. Some activities are designed to be A5 to create a ‘fact book’ for social skills.

Timing

The topics in Level 4 will take up to 35 sessions to complete.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Contents

page

Topic 1 Talkabout assertiveness Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5 Activity 6

What is assertiveness? What does assertiveness look like? Being passive Being aggressive Being assertive Assertiveness … what am I like? (part 1)

232 237 243 245 247 251

Topic 2 Expressing feelings Activity 7 Activity 8 Activity 9 Activity 10 Activity 11

Emotions recap What could I do? The rules for expressing feelings My STAR plan for expressing feelings Express yourself

254 255 258 260 262

Topic 3 Standing up for yourself Activity 12 Activity 13 Activity 14

Standing tall The rules for standing up for yourself Stand by Houston!

263 265 267

Topic 4 Making suggestions Activity 15 Activity 16 Activity 17

The negotiating game The rules for making suggestions Suggestion time

268 271 273

Topic 5 Refusing Activity 18 Activity 19 Activity 20

Saying ‘no’ The rules for refusing The refusing game

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274 280 282

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Topic 6 Disagreeing Activity 21 Activity 22 Activity 23 Activity 24

The disagreeing game Why is disagreeing important? The rules for disagreeing Disagree dilemma

283 287 289 291

Topic 7 Complaining Activity 25 Activity 26 Activity 27

Complaining time The rules for complaining The complaining game

292 294 296

Topic 8 Apologising Activity 28 Activity 29 Activity 30 Activity 31

Saying sorry The sorry scale The rules for apologising The apologising game

297 299 303 305

Topic 9 Requesting explanations Activity 32 Activity 33 Activity 34

Requesting time The rules for requesting explanations The requesting game

306 308 310

Topic 10 My assertiveness Activity 35

Assertiveness … what am I like? (part 2)

311

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Topic 1 Talkabout assertiveness Activity 1 What is assertiveness? Preparation Print and cut out the scenario cards. Laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out the assertive scale, which is best printed in colour. You could enlarge it to A3 size and laminate it if you wish to use it again.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to be starting a new topic today. Place the assertive scale in the middle of the group and the pile of scenario cards face-down beside it. • Ask the group to take it in turns to pick up a card and read out the scenario. They decide whether the story shows someone being passive, aggressive or assertive and place it on the scale accordingly. The group can help give ideas if the group member is struggling. • The next person then takes a card and repeats the process. Continue until all of the cards have been read, discussed and placed on the scale. • Summarise the activity by beginning to discuss what common traits we are seeing in the passive, aggressive or assertive card scenarios. Note: you may like to take a photograph or note down where each card is placed because in later activities you will be recommended to refer back to each area and its scenarios. Variation You could prepare short role plays (modelling) to introduce this topic. Use a simple scenario such as your co-facilitator asking you to change your plans so that they can come round for dinner because they are on their own tonight. You will need to prepare three role plays: one where you respond passively (try to explain you have plans but then agree to cancel them); one where you respond aggressively (don’t listen to the request and not even consider changing your plans); and a final one in which you respond assertively (inviting her to join your plans). After each role play, ask the group what they noticed and what you should do differently. Alternatively, you could watch and discuss the assertiveness clips on the Talkabout DVD.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 1 ‘What is assertiveness?’ scenario cards $

Amy is very cross with Raj because he has forgotten her birthday. She shouts at him in front of their friends.

Hayley is fed up. Her boss has asked her to stay late and finish an important job. Hayley says ‘No way’ and then swears at her boss and storms off home.

Rebecca is cross. She is supposed to be meeting Nevin for coffee but Nevin is late. Rebecca phones another friend and sends Nevin a rude text telling her not to bother coming.

Chris is furious. He has just bought a game from a shop but it doesn’t work. He rushes back to the shop and shouts at the shop assistant and demands another one.

Ed is talking to Tanvi who is not very happy at work. Ed doesn’t listen to what Tanvi is saying and tells her she is being silly and to just look for another job.

Grace is worried. She has been asked to do a job at work which she doesn’t understand. She decides not to say anything and hope for the best.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 1 ‘What is assertiveness?’ scenario cards $

Mohammed is upset. Someone at work has been saying mean things about him. He doesn’t want to make a fuss, so says nothing.

Joley is feeling ill and knows she should go to see her doctor. She is worried that the doctor will be cross with her for wasting his time, so she decides to wait and see if she feels better soon.

Tomas is upset. Someone at work keeps taking his packed lunch and eating it. Tomas decides to eat everyone’s lunch and see how they like it!

Zara is talking to her friend Sophie. Sophie is trying to persuade Zara to go out with her this weekend but Zara is supposed to be helping her mum. Zara is finding it difficult to say ‘no’.

Lisa is getting cross. She has been working hard today and wants to leave work on time. Her work mates are messing about, not doing their jobs. Lisa suggests that they all work together and try to leave on time.

Vincent is worried. He teased Helen this morning and he knows it has upset her. He decides to talk to Helen immediately and say sorry.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 1 ‘What is assertiveness?’ scenario cards $

Rachel is feeling upset. Her friend Sue has made fun of her in front of some other people. Rachel decides to tell Sue that she is hurt by what she said.

Jo is worried. Her friends are deciding what to do. Someone suggests going round to Ferhan’s house and surprising him. Jo knows Ferhan would hate this as he is studying, so Jo disagrees and tells them why.

Marnie is cross. Her boss has asked her to work at the weekend but Marnie is going to a wedding. She goes to see her boss and says she can’t work this weekend and explains why

Naomi is confused. Her boss has left her a note asking her to do a job but she doesn’t understand what she means. Naomi arranges to go and talk to her boss and ask her to explain.

Emily is upset. She has been telling everyone how she is now a vegetarian. Adam was mean and made fun of her. Emily decides to stand up for herself and tells Adam why being a vegetarian can be good.

Anya is annoyed. She ordered her food ages ago and now it has arrived and is wrong. She asks to talk to the manager and explains that she is not happy.

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236

1...2...3...4...5...6...7...8...9...10

Assertive Passive

Assertiveness scale

Aggressive

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 2 What does assertiveness look like? Preparation Print out the three worksheets, which you may like to enlarge to A3 size. Print out the cards; enlarge the sheet to A3 first if you have enlarged the three worksheets. You will also need scissors and glue.

Instructions • Place the three worksheets in the middle of the group. Explain that they are going to continue their work on assertiveness. You could use the scale from Activity 1 and recap on the basic descriptions for each word you came up with in the previous session. • Cut out all of the cards. Mix them up and get each group member in turn to read one out and decide whether it describes a passive person, an assertive person or an aggressive person. Sort all of the cards and stick them on the three worksheets. • Next, look at the three ‘consequence’ labels. Read out each one in turn and as a group decide which worksheet it belongs to. • Once you have completed each worksheet, read through them one at a time and discuss what is meant by passive, aggressive and assertive. Which do the group think is the best way to act? Does anyone think they are more passive or aggressive at times? • You may like to photocopy the finished worksheets so that each individual can have a copy.

Variation This activity could be done as a worksheet activity where the group members cut out and stick the descriptors (the cards) on their individual worksheets.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 2 ‘What does assertiveness look like?’ cards $

238

Think before they speak

Rude to people

Good listener

Talks to people

Shouts

Looks away

Good eye contact

Stares

Worries about talking to people

Interrupts a lot

Quiet, mumbling voice

Doesn’t listen

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 2 ‘What does assertiveness look like?’ cards $

Er....

No gestures

No words come out

Voice is clear

Upright posture

Hunched body

Angry gestures

Consequence labels They do not respond to hurtful situations. They allow problems to continue. They may have an outburst when they can’t take any more. They often feel guilty and confused. They respect others’ opinions and listen respectfully. They realise it is important to speak honestly and are confident about who they are. They address issues and take responsibility for their own happiness. They dominate and control people by either being rude or manipulating a situation. They criticise and blame others. They become isolated from people and not many like them.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 2 ‘What does assertiveness look like?’ worksheet 1 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

A passive person ... what do you see?

I lose, you win

Sorry, sorry, sorry...

Passive ...

240

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 2 ‘What does assertiveness look like?’ worksheet 2 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

An aggressive person ... what do you see?

I win, you lose ...

That’s your problem

Aggressive ...

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 2 ‘What does assertiveness look like?’ worksheet 3 Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

An assertive person ... what do you see?

I win, you win

I believe...

Assertive ...

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 3 Being passive Preparation Print out the worksheet. You may like to enlarge it to A3 size. You will also need a marker pen.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to think about being passive. You could use the scale from Activity 1 and the summary sheet from Activity 2 to remind the group what this means, or watch the passive clip from the Talkabout DVD (scene 32). • Get the group to think about times when they have been passive. This could be at home, with friends, at school, college or work, etc. Try to come up with at least four situations as a group when people have been passive and add them to the worksheet. • When a few situations have been written down, ask the group to think about what happened in each case and what could have been done to appear more assertive. Add these ideas to the worksheet. • Discuss as a group how we can all be passive at times but we need to know how we can be more assertive when we need to express something and get our ideas or opinions across.

Variation The group members could first think about situations when they have been passive, either on their own or in pairs, before feeding their ideas back to the group.

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Activity 3 ‘Being passive’ worksheet  

   

 

I was passive when ...

 

 

 

 

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

How could I have been more assertive?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 4 Being aggressive Preparation Print out the worksheet. You may like to enlarge it to A3 size. You will also need a marker pen.

Instructions • Explain to the group that today you are going to think about being aggressive. You could use the scale from Activity 1 and summary sheet from Activity 2 to remind the group what this means, or watch the aggressive clip from the Talkabout DVD (scene 32). • Ask the group to think about times when they have been aggressive. This could be at home, with friends, at school, college or work, etc. Try to come up with at least four situations as a group when people have been aggressive and add them to the worksheet. • When a few situations have been written down, ask the group to think about what happened in each case and what could have been done to appear more assertive. Add these ideas to the sheet. • Discuss as a group how we can all feel angry or annoyed at times but we need to know how we can be assertive to express ideas or opinions in an appropriate and effective way.

Variation The group members could think first about situations when they have been aggressive, either on their own or in pairs, before feeding their ideas back to the group.

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Activity 4 ‘Being aggressive’ worksheet  

   

 

I was aggressive when ...

 

 

 

 

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How could I have been more assertive?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 5 Being assertive Preparation Print out the ‘Assertiveness’ board and the cards, which are best printed in colour. Laminate the board and cards if you want to use them again. You could also stick a small piece of VelcroTM on the back of each card with a corresponding piece on each square of the board. Print out copies of the handout.

Instructions • Collect together the scenarios from Activity 1 which the group rated as being assertive; there should be eight of them. Read them through together one-by-one and talk about what that person is doing. • As the group members say each behaviour from the scenarios, discuss how this shows someone is being assertive and add it to the ‘Assertiveness’ board; for example, ‘this person is expressing their feelings’. • Continue until you have discussed all eight aspects and added them to the board. Summarise by talking about all of the different things we do to show that we are assertive. • You can then give each group member the summary handout to add to their workbook if they are completing one.

Variation Put all of the cards in a bag or in a pile face-down in the middle of the group. The group members take it in turns to pick a card and then tell the group how that behaviour shows you are assertive. The group then discusses whether everyone agrees.

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Assertiveness Activity 5 ‘Being assertive’ board

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 5 ‘Being assertive’ cards $

expressing feelings

standing up for yourself

making suggestions

refusing

disagreeing

complaining

apologising

requesting explanations

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250

complaining

apologising

expressing feelings

Date ……………………..

requesting explanations

Being assertive means …

standing up for yourself

Name …………………………………………………………..

Activity 5 ‘Being assertive’ handout

disagreeing

making suggestions

refusing

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 6 Assertiveness … what am I like? (part 1) Preparation Print out the assessment sheet, one for each group member. You may like to enlarge one to A3 size to use in group discussion. Print out a target sheet for each group member.

Instructions • Remind the group that they are going to be focusing on assertive skills for the next few sessions. Therefore, they are going to plan what they need to work on. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ sheet, explaining the different behaviours and the rating scale. It is a good idea to get the group used to the rating scale first by rating everyday skills such as cooking, cycling, getting out of bed in the morning, etc. • Then ask the group members to think individually about where they are with their assertive skills. They may want to sit in different parts of the room to be more private. • The group facilitator then discusses with each group member how they have rated themselves. The facilitators then share how they rated that group member on their Talkabout assessment summary wheel (only the ‘assertiveness’ section), raising awareness of what they need to improve on and what they are already doing well. • The group members can then complete a target sheet for the Assertiveness topic.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness

Activity 6 ‘Assertiveness … what am I like?’ assessment Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Assertiveness ... what am I like at it? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

Expressing 1 feelings Standing up 2 for yourself Making 3 Suggestions 4 Refusing 5 Disagreeing 6 Complaining 7 Apologising Requesting 8 explanations 252

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Very good

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness Activity 6 ‘Assertiveness … what am I like?’ target sheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

My Assertiveness plan I am good at ...

I need to work on ...

How did I get on?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Topic 2 Expressing feelings Activity 7 Emotions recap Preparation Print and cut out the feeling cards from Level 1 Body Language, Activity 15 ‘Different feelings’. These are best printed in colour and laminated if you want to use them again. Create two more cards with the headings ‘Difficult to talk about’ and ‘Easy to talk about’. You may want to laminate them if you would like to use them again. You will also need a large sheet of paper and pens.

Instructions • Begin this topic by recapping on how we express different feelings. Place the two heading cards on the table or on the floor in the middle of the group. Explain to the group that they are going to be thinking about feelings and which ones are harder to express and which ones are easier. • Place the feeling cards in a pile face-down and get each group member in turn to select a card, read it and then discuss as a group whether this feeling is easy or hard to express. The group members may also think of other feelings that are easy or difficult to express and these can be added. • Once you have sorted all of the feelings into the two categories, talk about why some feelings are harder to express. What is it about them? • Next, choose one of the feelings you have sorted as ‘difficult to talk about’ and brainstorm as a group all of the things that might make you feel that feeling, eg all of the things that make us angry. Write these on the large sheet of paper. • If there is time, choose another one or two feelings and do the same. • Keep your brainstorming sheet safe as you will need it for the next activity.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 8 What could I do? Preparation Print out the cards and the worksheet. You may like to enlarge them to A3 size. You will also need scissors and glue.

Instructions • Ask the group to consider one of the scenarios and feelings from Activity 7. Explain that they are going to decide what it would be best to do in that situation. • Cut out all of the cards and take it in turns to consider them and decide whether they are OK or not OK (or ‘good ideas’ and ‘bad ideas’). • Ask the group to look at the cards that have been considered OK. What might you do first? The group will probably choose the three cards that describe ‘stopping’. • Talk about the need to first ‘Stop’. There are three cards that can summarise this and you can talk about the need to ‘Stop for a minute’, ‘Walk away from the situation’ and ‘Count to ten, breathe and calm down’. These can then be placed or stuck in the three boxes on the worksheet. • What would you do next? Second, talk about the need to ‘Think’. There are three cards that can summarise this: ‘Take some time to think’, ‘Think about what I should say’ and ‘Think about what I should do’. • Third, we need to ‘Act’. There are three cards that summarise this: ‘Talk to someone’, ‘Tell someone how I feel’ and ‘Ask someone for help or their opinion’. • These cards can be stuck on the worksheet either as part of the group activity or as individual worksheets.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 8 ‘What could I do?’ cards $

Think about what I should say

Stop for a minute

Tell someone how I feel

Shout lots

Think about what I should do

Walk away from the situation

Do or say nothing

Take some time to think

Hit or throw something

Count to ten, breathe and calm down

Ask someone for help or their opinion

Talk to someone

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 8 ‘What could I do?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

1

Stop

2

Think

3

Act

Date ……………………..

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 9 The rules for expressing feelings Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people expressing their feelings in a conversation. You could use the ‘Expressing Feelings’ clip on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a simple scenario, for example, telling your co-facilitator that you are annoyed or sad because they are late, have broken something or have upset you. In the first role play, the group facilitator should express their feelings passively and maybe even blame themselves for getting the time wrong or moving the broken object. Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good about it? They will say the group facilitator didn’t speak strongly enough or say how they really felt. • In the next role play, use the same scenario but, this time, the group facilitator expresses their feelings aggressively. They shout and use aggressive body language, and may not listen to the other facilitator. Ask the group if that was better, if you were stronger. They will say ‘no’ because you were mean or aggressive. • In the third roleplay, express your feelings assertively. • Ask the group to consider why it is important to say how you are feeling. Think about how it is best to do this assertively. • Ask the group what happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss the rules for expressing feelings.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 9 ‘The rules for expressing feelings’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Expressing feelings

How should we express our feelings?

3 Stop and think about what you are feeling and what you should do



3 Remember to use good body language 3 Use a calm voice and speak clearly



!

3 Say how you feel and explain why you feel like that. Try saying ‘I feel … because …’

Why is this important?

It is important to be able to express our feelings clearly and appropriately so that other people can understand how we are feeling. They may be able to help us feel better or help us to find a good solution to the problem. If we don’t tell people how we feel, they may think we are rude or don’t care. We may also feel worse if we don’t tell someone how we are feeling.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 10 My STAR plan for expressing feelings Preparation Print out the worksheet and enlarge it to A3 size if you are completing this activity as a group. Print out A4-sized copies if the group members are completing the sheet individually. Note: this worksheet will also be used for future activities.

Instructions • Ask the group to think of a few situations where they would like to express how they are feeling. The group could think about situations that have happened before but choose one that may arise again which they could plan for. • Think about the STAR plan (Stop, Think, Act, Reflect). Can they decide what they should do in each area? They could refer back to the worksheet in Activity 8 for ideas. Which would work best for their situation? • The group then completes a worksheet either together or individually if they have a specific situation that they would like to plan. They can then feed back their ideas to the group. • If this is completed as a group, photocopy the worksheet to go in the group members’ fact books if appropriate.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 10 ‘My STAR plan’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

My plan for

Date ……………………..

Describe the situation …

Stop … How do I feel?

Think … What do I want to say or do? Who should I talk to?

Act … What will I do? What will I say?

Reflect … What will the consequence be? How will I feel?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Expressing feelings

Activity 11 Express yourself Preparation None needed.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out different scenarios and practise expressing feelings appropriately. Consider some of the scenarios that you have discussed in the previous activity. • Divide the group into pairs and give each pair a scenario. Give them time to create a short role play around that situation. • The pair must decide who they are in the scenario and then plan how they should express their feelings appropriately, thinking about the rules. • The pairs then take it in turns to perform their role play to the group who could then comment on whether they expressed their feelings assertively. • This activity is repeated as necessary until everyone feels confident. They may like to practise outside the group and feed back their successes and their difficulties in the next session.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Standing up for yourself

Topic 3 Standing up for yourself Activity 12 Standing tall Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and a pen. Print out the worksheet and enlarge it to A3 size. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people standing up for themselves in a conversation. You could use the ‘Standing up for yourself’ clip on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to watch the facilitators have a conversation. Use a simple scenario such as your co-facilitator teasing you about something you believe in or really like. In the first role play, the group facilitator should stand up for themselves passively and not even attempt to argue or express their opinions. Ask the group what they noticed. Was there anything not good about it? They will say the group facilitator didn’t speak strongly enough or give their feelings or opinions. • In the next role play, use the same scenario but, this time, the group facilitator stands up for themselves aggressively. They shout and use aggressive body language; they could criticise the co-facilitator’s lack of belief or things they like. Ask the group if that was better and they will say ‘no’ because you were mean, aggressive or rude. • In the third role play, stand up for yourself assertively. • The group then discuss what they think standing up for yourself means and the things they need to remember when doing it to come across in an assertive way. • Ask the group to think about all the times when they had to stand up for themselves or situations where they imagine they may have to do this. For example, if someone is making fun of the fact that they are a vegetarian. Write them all down on the large sheet of paper. • Complete the worksheet as a group with everyone’s ideas.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Standing up for yourself

Activity 12 ‘Standing tall’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Standing up for myself

What does standing up for myself mean?

What do I need to remember to do?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Standing up for yourself

Activity 13 The rules for standing up for yourself Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for standing up for yourself appropriately and effectively. • Ask the group to consider why it is important to stand up for yourself. Think about how it is best to do this assertively. • What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for standing up for yourself. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Standing up for yourself

Activity 13 ‘The rules for standing up for yourself’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Standing up for yourself

How should we stand up for ourselves?

3 Stop and think – do you agree with what is being said or done? What should you do?



3 Remember to use assertive body language to show that you are confident in what you think



3 Use a calm voice and speak clearly. Try saying ‘I think … because …’

!

Why is this important? It is important to be able to stand up for ourselves clearly and appropriately, so that other people know what we think and feel. It will allow us to say what we believe in and give our opinions.

If we don’t stand up for ourselves, other people won’t know how we feel about something. They may think we are weak or boring.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Standing up for yourself

Activity 14 Stand by Houston! Preparation None needed.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to act out different scenarios and practise standing up for yourself appropriately. Consider some of the scenarios that you have discussed in Activity 12. • Divide the group into pairs and give each pair a scenario. Give them time to create a short role play around that situation. • The pair must decide who they are in the scenario and then plan how they should stand up for themselves appropriately, thinking about the rules. • The pairs then take it in turns to perform their role play to the group who could then comment on whether they stood up for themselves assertively. • Repeat this activity as necessary until everyone feels confident. They may like to practise outside the group and feed back their successes and their difficulties in the next session.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Making suggestions

Topic 4 Making suggestions Activity 15 The negotiating game Preparation Print and cut out the topic cards. Laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out the worksheet and enlarge it to A3 size.

Instructions • Sitting in a circle, explain to the group that you are going to have a discussion. It would be good for everyone to be part of the discussion and to share at least one thing if they can. • Choose a topic card and read it to the group. The group then discusses this, considering all options. Let the discussion continue for a few minutes, or until a plan or decision has been reached and agreed by the group (or the majority of it). • When the discussion has ended, ask the group how it went. Which suggestions did they listen to and why? How did people respond to the suggestions? Did everyone make a suggestion and, if not, why? • You could then choose another topic and have a second discussion, asking the group members to think about the suggestions and how they were made. • The group can then complete the worksheet to summarise their ideas from the activity about making suggestions. Think about how we make suggestions. Also add some ideas about how we can begin a suggestion, eg ‘I think we should …’, ‘Maybe you could …’, ‘Why don’t we …?’, etc. Variation Split the group into two smaller groups. Give one group a scenario to discuss while the other group observes and then, at the end, gives feedback. Change over so that both groups get a chance to observe. You could also watch the ‘Making suggestions’ clip on the Talkabout DVD for ideas.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Making suggestions

Activity 15 ‘The negotiating game’ topic cards $

Decide on a meal which the group members should all have for dinner.

The group has been given some money. What should it be spent on?

The group has permission to go on a trip next week. Where should you go?

Decide on a film the group members could all watch in the next session.

There are two tickets to the theatre tonight.

Someone has brought their dog in but only four of you can take it for a walk.

Who in the group should go?

Who should go?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Making suggestions

Activity 15 ‘The negotiating game’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Making suggestions

What does making suggestions mean?

How could we make a suggestion? What do we need to remember?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Making suggestions Activity 16 The rules for making suggestions Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for making suggestions appropriately and effectively. • Ask the group to consider why it is important to make suggestions to other people. Think about how it is best to do this assertively. • What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says.

Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for making suggestions. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Making suggestions

Activity 16 ‘The rules for making suggestions’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Making suggestions

How could we make suggestions?

3 Wait for a pause in the conversation to give your idea and explain it



3 Use a calm voice and speak clearly, remembering not to shout



3 Try saying ‘I think that …’ or ‘Maybe we should …’ or ‘Why don’t we …?’



3 Remember to listen to other people’s suggestions and respond appropriately

!

Why is this important? It is important to be able to make suggestions clearly and appropriately to give our ideas and opinions effectively. We may have a suggestion that will help someone out or solve a problem.

If we don’t tell people our ideas or suggestions then a decision or plan may not be reached. We might not be able to do what we really wanted to, which may make us feel sad or annoyed.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Making suggestions

Activity 17 Suggestion time … ‘Suggestion indigestion’ and more Additional activities for making suggestions • Suggestion indigestion. The group brainstorms lots of different situations where suggestions may need to be made. You may have some from Activity 15. Divide the group into pairs or small groups and give each one a situation to role play. Each pair or small group discusses how they should make suggestions in that scenario and then practises it before performing their role plays to the rest of the group.

• Change one thing. One group member is selected to go first and leave the room. The rest of the group members then all suggest something that could be changed in the room, eg someone takes off their shoes or a pot of pens is moved. The group decide which is the best suggestion, make the change and then call the group member back in. They must then try to guess what has changed. The game is repeated until everyone has had a turn to leave the room.

• Compliment game. One group member is asked to leave the room. The other group members then all suggest things that they like about that person or something they are good at. The group decide which is the best compliment and write it down. The group member is then called back in and someone reads them the compliment the group has decided on. They are asked what they thought about their compliment and how it made them feel. Repeat the game until all of the group members have had a chance to leave the room and receive a compliment.

• Structures. Explain to the group that the idea of this game is for them to collectively create an object using their bodies. Everyone needs to be involved and included in some way. Then the group must think of suggestions for what they could become and the best suggestion is chosen. The group member who made the suggestion then becomes the ‘director’ and gets the group to become the chosen structure by giving each person suggestions about their role or position. When the structure is complete, you could take a photograph so that the group can see how they have done. You could then try another group member’s suggestion and they become the ‘director’. Good structures to try are car, boat, train, aeroplane, bridge and toaster. Can the group then complete the movement of the structure too, eg an aeroplane taxiing down the runway?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Topic 5 Refusing Activity 18 Saying ‘no’ Preparation You will need to print out the scenario cards, the ‘no/yes’ response cards and the headings for reasons why we need to say ‘no’. The headings are best printed in colour. Laminate them if you want to use them again. You will also need to print out the worksheet – enlarge it to either A3 size for the group to complete or A4 for everyone to complete. You may also need scissors and glue.

Instructions • Introduce the session by explaining to the group that you will be thinking about a new assertive skill – refusing. • Take it in turns to read out one of the scenarios and consider whether the person should say ‘yes’ or ‘no’. • Consider how they should say ‘no’ and find an appropriate response from one of the ‘no’ speech bubble cards. • The group then considers why it is appropriate to say ‘no’ in each situation. Is it because they don’t agree with it? Or because they don’t want to? Or is it because it is not right or safe? • Sort the cards under the different headings. • Complete the worksheet as a group with everyone’s ideas or complete it individually.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 18 ‘Saying “no”’ scenario cards $

George is a vegetarian. Ali offers him some of her ham sandwich.

Nick is working hard in his garden. He is enjoying himself. His friend Alex wants him to go to the pub but Nick doesn’t want to go.

Matilda is baby-sitting for her aunt this evening. Her friend Amir asks her if she wants to go to the cinema.

Jan is not feeling well. She has recently been in hospital and is still not well enough to go outside. Bob asks her if she can help him out by walking his dog this evening. He has been asked to go in to work.

Darren is in a hurry – he has an appointment he has to get to. His friend Yuri asks him if he has time for a chat as he is feeling sad.

Amelia wants to miss work today and pretend that she is ill. She phones her friend Grace and suggests that they both go shopping instead of going to work.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 18 ‘Saying “no”’ scenario cards $

Chuma suggests to his friend Lydia that they go swimming in the river. Lydia is not a strong swimmer.

Neil is hungry and wants a chocolate bar but doesn’t have enough money to buy one. He asks his friend Matt to go to the shop and steal one for him.

Sue doesn’t have anything pretty to wear to a party tonight so she asks her sister, Jo, if she can borrow one of her tops.

Lalla is bored and wants to play a trick on someone. She suggests that Sam hides in the cupboard and jumps out on their friend Becky. Sam knows that Becky is not feeling very happy today.

Lucy is walking into town. She notices an old lady struggling to cross a busy road. The old lady asks Lucy to help her.

John is playing with his friends. They suggest that it would be fun to go and play on the railway lines. John doesn’t want to.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 18 ‘Saying “no”’ response cards $

No

No thank you, I…

No, I’m sorry …

No, I don’t want to because…

No, I think that is a bad idea …

No, I can’t do that because …

Yes …

OK!

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 18 ‘Saying “no”’ response headings $

Refusing ... why do we need to? It’s not safe I don’t agree with it I don’t want to do it I don’t like it It’s not right It would hurt someone else I can’t do it

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 18 ‘Saying “no”’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Refusing ... why do we need to? There are 7 good reasons why we may want to refuse. Can you remember them all? 1 …………………………………………………………………………… 2 …………………………………………………………………………… 3 …………………………………………………………………………… 4 …………………………………………………………………………… 5 …………………………………………………………………………… 6 …………………………………………………………………………… 7 ……………………………………………………………………………

Refusing ... what could we say?      

 

 

   

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 19 The rules for refusing Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people refusing in a conversation. You could use the refusing clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for refusing appropriately and effectively. • The group facilitators can model inappropriate refusing, ie passively refusing and then aggressively refusing. Make sure that you model a scenario where a refusal is necessary, for example, one of the facilitators asks to borrow the other one’s car as she has had another accident and written off yet another car! • Ask the group to consider how the facilitator should refuse more assertively. What should they do? • Then model the assertive way to refuse. • Ask the group to consider why it is important to be able to refuse. What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for refusing. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 19 ‘The rules for refusing’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Refusing

How should we refuse assertively?

3 Stop and think – do you agree with what is being asked? Do you have a choice?



3 Remember to use assertive body language to show that you are confident about what you say



3 Use a calm voice and speak clearly



3 Say ‘no’ and then, if appropriate, give a reason

!

Why is this important?

It is important to be able to refuse clearly and appropriately so that other people know what we think and feel. Sometimes we need to refuse because it is the safe or right thing to do. Sometimes we just can’t do something and need to say ‘no’ and then apologise. If we don’t refuse assertively, people may think we are weak or boring. They may also make us do something we don’t want to.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Refusing

Activity 20 The refusing game Preparation You will need the ‘no’ response cards from Activity 18.

Instructions • Ask the group to remember all of the different ways you can say ‘no’. You could have the ‘no’ response cards from Activity 18 in the middle of the table. • Explain to the group that you are going to ask them, in turn, to do something and then, if they think it is right to refuse, they should say ‘no’ in an appropriate way. • Start by asking every group member to do something very simple, eg ‘Amy, can you stand up please?’ • Once everyone has had a turn at doing something reasonable, start asking the group members to do something unreasonable, for example: o

Go and put the waste-paper bin on your head.

o

Can you say something mean to the person sitting next to you?

o

Please will you go and find something in the room that doesn’t belong to you and put it in your bag?

o

Let’s go and play near the motorway!

o

Can you put your chair on that table and then stand on the chair?

o

Can you try to take your friend’s phone without her knowing and then phone someone?

• Ask the group how did it feel to say ‘no’? What worked best?

Variation Keep a diary over a week of the times you said ‘no’ or the times you said ‘yes’ but would have liked to refuse.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Topic 6 Disagreeing Activity 21 The disagreeing game Preparation Print and cut out the statement cards and the voting cards. You will need enough voting cards so that every group member has one of each. These are also best printed in colour. Laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out the group record sheet.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to think about the new assertive topic of disagreeing, starting with a voting game. • Give each group member a set of voting cards. Then read the first statement and ask the group members to vote by holding up the relevant card. Note down on the group record sheet how many of them agreed and disagreed. • Continue reading a few of the statements and getting the group to vote. Then see if anyone has a statement they would like to ask the group to vote on. • At the end of this task, look at the record sheet. Were there any statements which the whole group either agreed or disagreed on? What about ones where there was a divide? Discuss whether there is a compromise that could be made. • Summarise by discussing disagreeing and saying that it is OK to disagree about something but other people’s opinions may differ. We need to respect each other’s views and give reasons why we agree or disagree. In the end, we may need to reach a compromise so that everyone is happy. Variation Instead of using the voting cards, you could designate one side of the room as ‘agree’ and another as ‘disagree’. Then, when a statement is read out, the group members move to the side of the room corresponding to whether they agree or disagree.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 21 ‘The disagreeing game’ statement cards $

Scary films are brilliant

Curry is the worst food

Football is boring

Homework is important

Rich people are happier than poorer people

Beetles are the best cars

Cats make the best pets

Christmas is the best time of year

Exercising is boring

Winter is better than summer

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 21 ‘The disagreeing game’ voting cards $

Agree

Disagree

Agree

Disagree

Agree

Disagree

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Statement

How many agree

How many disagree

Is there a compromise? 286

The disagreeing game – group record

Activity 21 ‘The disagreeing game’ group record sheet

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 22 Why is disagreeing important? Preparation Print out the worksheet and enlarge it to A3 size if you are completing this activity as a group. Print out copies at A4 size if the group members are completing them individually. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and a co-facilitator having a conversation, or source a few video clips of people disagreeing in a conversation. You could use the ‘Disagreeing’ clips on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Ask the group to watch you and your co-facilitator having a conversation. You should then model inappropriate disagreeing, ie passively disagreeing and then aggressively disagreeing. Make sure that you model a scenario where a disagreement is appropriate: for example, your co-facilitator thinks that living in the country is better than in the city where you live. • Ask the group to consider how the facilitator should disagree more assertively. What should they do? • Then model the assertive way to disagree. • Next, ask the group to brainstorm different situations where they may want to disagree: for example, about what they have for dinner or something that is said in their news. Add the ideas to the worksheet. • The group then considers why it is important to disagree: for example, so that other people know how we think and feel, or to get something that we would prefer. Write these reasons on the worksheet too. • Finally, ask the group to think about what they could say. How might they start a sentence to disagree with someone or something? Get the group to think about this in pairs and maybe try out a few before feeding back their ideas to the group. Add them to the worksheet too.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 22 ‘Why is disagreeing important?’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Disagreeing ... why is it important? When should we disagree about something?

Disagreeing ... what could we say?      

 

 

   

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 23 The rules for disagreeing Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book. You may also need the worksheet from Activity 22.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for disagreeing appropriately and effectively. • Ask the group to think about the previous activity. Why might it be important to disagree and what could they say? • Think about how they can disagree assertively and what they need to remember. What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for disagreeing. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 23 ‘The rules for disagreeing’ handout

Name …………………………………………………………..

290

Date ……………………..

Disagreeing

How could we disagree?

3 Stop and think, do you agree with what is being said or suggested?



3 R emember to listen and respect other people’s opinions. Is there a compromise?



3 Use a calm voice and speak clearly. Remember to use assertive body language



3 Try saying ‘I’m sorry, I disagree …’ or ‘Maybe we should … instead’

!

Why is this important?

It is important to be able to disagree clearly and appropriately so that other people understand how we think and feel. We may have a better idea or a compromise that will make other people happy as well as us. If we don’t disagree or tell people our opinions, we may not be able to do or get the things we would like. Other people might think we are weak or that we don’t have any ideas.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Disagreeing

Activity 24 Disagree dilemma Preparation Clear enough space in the room for the group to be able to move around and practise their role plays.

Instructions • Consider some of the situations which you discussed in Activity 22 or think of some new ones. • Divide the group into pairs and give each one a scenario. Each pair then thinks about how they could role play this scenario and how they can disagree assertively. • Spend a few minutes with each pair, checking that they are showing the right skills before they perform their role play. • When all of the pairs are ready, they take it in turns to show their role plays to the rest of the group and practise how to disagree appropriately. • Repeat this activity as necessary until everyone feels confident. They may like to practise outside the group and feed back their successes and their difficulties in the next session.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Complaining

Topic 7 Complaining Activity 25 Complaining time Preparation Print out the worksheet. You may want to enlarge it to A3 size for the group to complete or have A4 copies for individuals to complete. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling), or source a few video clips, to demonstrate complaining in a conversation. You could use the ‘Complaining’ clip on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Introduce this skill by modelling inappropriate complaining. Make sure that you model a scenario where a complaint is necessary, eg your friend (co-facilitator) has sold you her old mobile phone (cell phone) but it doesn’t charge, so you can’t use it. She didn’t tell you this before you bought it from her. • In the first scenario, the facilitator should not complain and just accept the situation, maybe even blaming herself for not checking the phone first. Ask the group what they think went wrong. What should have happened? • Then model the same scenario but complain passively and then aggressively. Ask the group to consider after each one how the facilitator should complain more assertively. What should they do? • In the final scenario, model the assertive way to complain. Ask the group what did the facilitator do differently? Can the group summarise what assertive complaining looks like? • Next, discuss when it is important to complain: for example, when something is faulty or wrong, or when you have been misled by something or someone. • Why is it important to complain? Consider such things as our consumer rights and our human rights. • Finally, complete the worksheet either as a group with everyone’s ideas or individually.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Complaining

Activity 25 ‘Complaining time’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Complaining

When should we complain? Can you list a few ideas? 1 2 3 4

How should we complain? What do we need to remember?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Complaining

Activity 26 The rules for complaining Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for complaining appropriately and effectively. • Think about the previous activity and what we learned about how we should complain. Consider things like choosing the right person to talk to, using our assertive body language and voice, stating the reason why we are complaining, but listening to the other person and respecting what they have to say too. • What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for complaining. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Complaining

Activity 26 ‘The rules for complaining’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Complaining

How should we complain assertively?

3 Stop and think – who should you talk to? What are your rights?



3 Remember to use assertive body language to show that you are confident in what you say



3 Use a calm voice and speak clearly



3 Explain why you are not happy. Try saying ‘I am not happy because …’

!

Why is this important? It is sometimes important to complain if we feel something is not right or we have been misled or sold something faulty. It is important to do this clearly and appropriately so that other people know what we think and feel.

If we don’t complain assertively, people may take advantage of us and think we are weak.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Complaining

Activity 27 The complaining game Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and some pens.

Instructions • Ask the group to remember all of the different times it is important to be able to complain. Write down a list of scenarios to role play. • Divide the group into pairs and give each one a scenario. Each pair then thinks about how they could role play this scenario and how they can complain assertively. • Spend a few minutes with each pair before they perform their role play to the others. • When all of the pairs are ready, they take it in turns to show their role play to the rest of the group. • Repeat this activity as necessary until everyone feels confident. They may like to practise outside the group and feed back their successes and their difficulties in the next session. Variation The group members could keep a diary over a week of the times they needed to complain or would have liked to complain but didn’t. What have they learned from this?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Topic 8 Apologising Activity 28 Saying sorry Preparation Print out the worksheet. You may want to enlarge it to A3 size for the group to complete. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling), or source a few video clips, to demonstrate apologising in a conversation. You could use the ‘Apologising’ clip on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Introduce this skill by modelling inappropriate apologising. Make sure that you model a scenario where an apology is necessary, eg your friend (your co-facilitator) kicks you while talking to you. • In the first scenario, the facilitator does not apologise at all, even though the other facilitator says ‘Ow!’ Ask the group what they think went wrong. What should have happened? The group will say that she should have said ‘sorry’. • Then model the same scenario but, this time, the facilitator apologises inappropriately. The following order works well. •

They apologise but say it insincerely and carry on (they didn’t sound like they meant it).



They apologise nicely but then blame the other person, eg ‘If you move your leg, it won’t happen again’ (they don’t take responsibility).



They apologise nicely but then repeat the action several times (they don’t learn from their actions).



They apologise too much and embarrass the other person.

• Ask the group to consider after each scenario how well the facilitator did with the apology. What should they have done differently? • In the final scenario, model the assertive way to apologise. What did the facilitator do differently? Can the group summarise what assertive apologising looks like? • Finally, complete the worksheet either as a group with everyone’s ideas or individually.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 28 ‘Saying sorry’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Apologising

What does a good apology mean? Can you list a few ideas? 1 2 3 4 5

Why do we need to apologise?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 29 The sorry scale Preparation Print and cut out the cards. There are two blank ones for you to fill in if you wish. You may want to laminate them if you want to use them again. Print out the worksheet. You may want to enlarge it to A3 size to collate the ideas as a group.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to think about the different ways we say ‘sorry’. You can introduce the concept of the ‘big sorry’ and the ‘little sorry’. If you want to add a middle one, this is also OK. • The group members take it in turns to choose a card and read the scenario. How would you apologise? Is it short and sweet (a little sorry)? Or does it need much more effort with some evidence of regret and actions to remedy the situation (a big sorry)? • Talk about times when the group members have had to say ‘sorry’ recently. What did they do? Was it a big sorry or a little sorry? What did they say? Do they think they should have done something differently? • Then write down the ideas on the group worksheet or they can complete the worksheet individually.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 29 ‘The sorry scale’ cards $

BIG sorry

Little

sorry

You have just bumped into your friend while walking down the corridor.

You have borrowed your friend’s phone and dropped it by mistake and the screen is now cracked.

Your mum asked you to walk the dog while she was at work but you forgot.

You have just driven your car into your neighbour’s car while reversing. There is a big dent in his car now.

Your neighbour has just been round to complain about your music last night. You had friends visiting and didn’t realise the music was so loud.

You have just knocked your friend’s cup of tea all over her laptop.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 29 ‘The sorry scale’ cards (continued) $

You have forgotten it is your friend’s birthday.

Your friend has come round for dinner. You have cooked beef lasagne but forgot that she is a vegetarian.

Your boss asked you to buy milk on the way to work today. You forgot.

You teased your friend this morning about her new hair cut. You meant it as a joke but now realise that she is upset.

You call out ‘Hello’ to your friend as you walk into the room but don’t realise he is on the phone.

You accidently step on your friend’s shoe.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 29 ‘The sorry scale’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Saying sorry

1 ‘Little sorry’ … This means we may have done something little by accident. We have not hurt anyone’s feelings and there is no lasting damage. A little sorry means we should …

2 ‘Big sorry’ … This means we may have done something much more serious. We may have hurt someone’s feelings or damaged something. A BIG sorry means we should …

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 30 The rules for apologising Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that you are going to consider the rules for apologising appropriately and effectively. • Think about the previous activity and what we learned about how we should apologise. Consider things like how big the sorry should be and whether we need to do something to make up for it. Also think about our assertive body language and voice. • Discuss ‘the three Rs’ – regret, responsibility and remedy. • What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for apologising. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 30 ‘The rules for apologising’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Apologising

How should we apologise assertively?

3 Stop and think – who should you apologise to? Does it need to be a big or a little sorry?



3 Remember to use assertive body language to show that you mean what you are saying



3 Use a sincere tone of voice and express regret



3 Take responsibility. Try saying ‘I am sorry – that was my fault’ and, if appropriate, do something to make up for it

!

Why is this important? It is important to apologise if we have made a mistake or upset someone. We should do it quickly and with meaning so that people know we are really sorry.

If we don’t apologise assertively, people will think we are selfish and will not want to be friends with us.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Apologising

Activity 31 The apologising game Preparation None needed.

Instructions • Ask the group to remember all of the different times it is important to be able to say ‘sorry’. Consider the examples that were discussed in Activity 29. • Divide the group into pairs and give each one a scenario. Each pair then thinks about how they could role play this scenario and how they can apologise appropriately and assertively. • Spend a few minutes with each pair before they perform their role play to the others. • When all of the pairs are ready, they take it in turns to show their role play to the rest of the group. • Repeat this activity as necessary until everyone feels confident. They may like to practise outside the group and feed back their successes and their difficulties in the next session.

Variation The group members could keep a diary for a week of the times they needed to apologise or would have liked to apologise but didn’t. What have they learned from this?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Requesting explanations

Topic 9 Requesting explanations Activity 32 Requesting time Preparation Print out the worksheet. You may want to enlarge it to A3 size to complete as a group. You may want to prepare short role plays (modelling) of you and your co-facilitator having a conversation (see below), or source a few video clips of people requesting an explanation. You could use the ‘Requesting an explanation’ clip on the Talkabout DVD as an alternative to the modelling.

Instructions • Introduce this skill by modelling inappropriate requesting of explanations. Make sure that you model a scenario where this skill is necessary. For example, your friend (co-facilitator) has said that everyone is meeting tomorrow for lunch at a new café in town but you’re not sure where that is, what time to meet or who is going. • In the first scenario, one facilitator should try to request the information but does it passively. For example, they may say ‘Oh, I think I know where you mean’ and ‘Well, I have from 12 until one for lunch, so that should be OK’, etc. Ask the group what they think went wrong. What should have happened? • Then model the same scenario but, this time, the facilitator requests aggressively. For example, they may say ‘Well that’s a stupid idea, I don’t know where that place is’, ‘Are you going to tell me where it is or not?’ and ‘Well, I only have an hour for lunch, so it better be in that time’. Ask the group if that was better. The facilitator was more direct but how did the co-facilitator feel? What should have happened to get the information needed more assertively? • In the final scenario, model the assertive way to request explanations. What did the facilitators do differently? Can the group members summarise what assertive requesting looks like? • Discuss when it is important to request explanations: for example, when we are unsure what something means or what is expected of us. • Why is it important to request explanations? For example, to have all the information, to be able to make choices, and to know what is happening. • Finally, complete the worksheet either as a group with everyone’s ideas or individually.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Requesting explanations

Activity 32 ‘Requesting time’ worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Requesting explanations

When might we request explanations? Can you list a few ideas? 1 2 3 4 5

How should we request information? What do we need to remember?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Requesting explanations

Activity 33 The rules for requesting explanations Preparation Print out copies of the handout. Cut them to size if the group members are going to put them in their A5 fact book.

Instructions • Explain to the group that they are going to consider the rules for requesting explanations appropriately and effectively. • Think about the previous activity and what they learned about how we should request an explanation. Consider things like apologising because you haven’t understood, asking a clear question, using assertive body language and voice, saying ‘thank you’ if someone responds with a good explanation. • What happens if we don’t do this? How do we appear? • Distribute the handout and discuss what it says. Note on STAR plan: now complete a STAR plan for requesting explanations. See Activity 10 for the instructions and worksheet.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Requesting explanations

Activity 33 ‘The rules for requesting explanations’ handout Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Requesting explanations How should we request explanations assertively?



3 Stop and think – do you understand what has been said or asked of you?



3 Use a calm voice, speak clearly and remember to use assertive body language



3 Ask a question or for an explanation. Try saying ‘I’m sorry I don’t understand, please could you explain?’



3 Remember to say ‘thank you’

!

Why is this important?

It is important to request explanations if we don’t understand something or if we need more information. It is important to do this clearly and appropriately so that other people can understand us and give us the right explanation. If we don’t request explanations assertively, people may not know that we need more information or they may think that we are rude. We may feel confused or not be able to complete tasks.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... Requesting explanations

Activity 34 The requesting game Preparation You will need a large sheet of paper and some pens.

Instructions • Ask the group to remember all of the different times it is important to request explanations. Write down a list of scenarios to role play. • Divide the group into pairs and give each one a scenario. Each pair then thinks about how they could role play this scenario and how they can request assertively. • Spend a few minutes with each pair before they perform their role play to the others. • When all of the pairs are ready, they take it in turns to show their role play to the rest of the group. • Repeat this activity as necessary until everyone feels confident. They may like to practise outside the group and feed back their successes and their difficulties in the next session. Variation The group members could keep a diary for a week of the times they were able to or would have liked to request explanations but didn’t. What have they learned from this?

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... What am I like

Topic 10 My assertiveness Activity 35 Assertiveness … what am I like? (part 2) Preparation Print out new assessment sheets. Make sure that you have the completed assessment sheets and target sheets from Activity 6, one for each group member.

Instructions • Ask the group to consider how they have got on over the last few weeks and whether they think they have improved. • As a group, go through the ‘What am I like?’ assessment sheet and ask where they would rate themselves now. • Then ask the group members to think individually about where they are with their assertiveness skills now and to mark this on their sheet. They may want to sit in different parts of the room to be more private. • Then discuss with each group member how they have rated themselves and compare this with their original assessment sheet. • The group members are then given a certificate of achievement.

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TALKABOUT Assertiveness... How did I do?

Activity 35 ‘Assertiveness’ assessment worksheet Name …………………………………………………………..

Date ……………………..

Assertiveness ... what am I like at it? Never good

Not very good

Quite good

Expressing 1 feelings Standing up 2 for yourself Making 3 suggestions 4 Refusing 5 Disagreeing 6 Complaining 7 Apologising Requesting 8 explanations 312

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Very good

TALKABOUT Assertiveness ... What am I like?

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H

H

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SIGNED .......................................................

DATE ............................................

ASSERTIVENESS SKILLS

HAS COMPLETED TALKABOUT LEVEL 4

.............................................................................

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT

Certificate of Achievement

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TALKABOUT

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TALKABOUT Group cohesion games

Group cohesion games It is recommended that a group cohesion game is played to start and end every session. This helps to focus the group members and it ensures that everyone leaves feeling relaxed at the end of the session. A good group cohesion game is fun, simple and stress-free. It should be a game that everyone can take part in and no one is left out. It can be linked to the topic you are currently working on or it could be something completely unrelated.

Some of our favourites are: • The zoo game • I went to market • Horrible sandwiches • Change one thing • Steal the keys • Add an action • Pass the mime • Pass the bomb • Structures • The praise game For instructions on how to play any of the above games, see Talkabout for Adults (Kelly, 2014), Talkabout for Teenagers (Kelly & Bains, 2009) or the Talkabout group cohesion cards (Kelly, 2011d).

Some new ideas for games are given overleaf.

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TALKABOUT  

The human knot

For this game, you will need at least four people but no more than six. Stand the group in a circle, all facing inwards. Ask everyone to put one arm out into the circle and hold the hand of someone else in the group. Next ask the group to all put their other arm in and hold hands with someone different. When everyone has hold of two hands, explain that now you want the group to untangle themselves so that everyone is standing back in a circle with straight arms. The group can twist and step over each other in order to untangle but must never let go of each other’s hands. If you have a large group, it can be fun to divide into two groups and have a race. This may take a while … but is always achievable!

Pass the hoop For this game, you will need a hula hoop. Stand the group members in a circle, all facing inwards, and ask them to hold hands. The hoop is placed over the group facilitator’s arm before they hold hands. The idea of the game is to pass the hoop around the circle and back to the start without letting go of anyone’s hands. The group members will need to help each other to get everyone through the hoop. Once you have got all the way round, see if you can go back the other way.  

The dice decider

For this game, you will need an even number in the group, so a facilitator may decide not to play. You will also need a dice. The group should sit in a circle on chairs. Each group member is then given a number. You will need two group members to be the same number, eg in a group of six, you will have two group members who are a 1, two who are a 2 and two who are a 3. Group members then take it in turns to roll the dice. If a 1 is thrown then the group members who are a 1 both stand up and run around the circle back to their chair. The person who is back to their seat first wins. The game continues until everyone has had a few turns.

Call-and-response games Some call-and-response games are detailed in Level 2 The Way We Talk in this book but they also make good cohesion games. The group members sit or stand in a circle and begin by creating a beat by clapping hands, tapping thighs or stamping feet. The group facilitator then calls out, for example, ‘Good morning Sarah’, keeping to the beat. The group then repeats this back. The group facilitator continues for a while, then hands over to anyone else who would like a turn.

316

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TALKABOUT Forms

Record forms Contents

page

Plan of intervention

318

Session plan and evaluation

319

Individual target sheet

320

How did I do? record sheet

321

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Your notes Week

Topic

Plan

Equipment

Date Group

Plan of intervention

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TALKABOUT ... Record forms 318

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319

Plan

Completed by

Finishing activity

Main activities

How am I feeling? activity

Starter activity

Activity

Date

Evaluation

Session number

Topic

Members present

Date

Group

Session plan and evaluation

TALKABOUT ... Record forms

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Signed

How did I do?

My targets

1 Skill not present

What I will be doing

My aim is to

My name

Individual target sheet

2 Skill emerging with prompting

TALKABOUT ... Record forms

3 Skill emerging with occasional prompting

4 Skill present in a structured situation

Date

5 Skill present in some other situations

Date

6 Skill present and consistent across most situations

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321

Date

I did well

Name

How did I do?

I did OK

It was hard

Evaluation of main activity

‘How did I do?’ record sheet

TALKABOUT ... Record forms

Comments

Signed

Code: 33 = skill achieved 3 = skill emerging 7 = skill not present

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TALKABOUT References

References Gray C (1994) The New Social Story Book, Future Horizons, Arlington, Texas. Kelly A (1996) TALKABOUT: A Social Communication Skills Package, 1st edn, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2000) Working with Adults with a Learning Disability, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2003) TALKABOUT Activities, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2004) TALKABOUT Relationships, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2006) TALKABOUT DVD, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2011a) TALKABOUT for Children 1: Developing Self-awareness and Self-esteem, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2011b) TALKABOUT for Children 2: Developing Social Skills, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2011c) TALKABOUT Posters, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2011d) Talkabout Cards: Group Cohesion Activities, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A (2013) TALKABOUT for Children 3: Friendship Skills, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A & Green A (2014) TALKABOUT for Adults: Developing Self-awareness and Self-esteem, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A & Sains B (2009) TALKABOUT for Teenagers, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A & Sains B (2010) TALKABOUT Assessment, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes. Kelly A & Sains B (2011) TALKABOUT Board Game, Speechmark Publishing, Milton Keynes.

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TALKABOUT Index

Index Index

Section

Activity number

Page

aggressive behaviour

Assertiveness

2, 4

answering questions

Conversations

13–15

195

Conversations

13

195

apologising

Assertiveness

28–31

297

game

Assertiveness

31

305

the rules

Assertiveness

30

303

are you open or closed?

Conversations

14

199

‘asking Alex’ game

Conversations

15

202

asking questions

Conversations

12, 14, 15

Conversations

12

191

Assertiveness

1–35

232

assessment

Assertiveness

6, 35

251, 311

plan

Assertiveness

6

253

scale

Assertiveness

1

232

what am I like? (part 1)

Assertiveness

6

251

what am I like? (part 2)

Assertiveness

35

311

what does assertiveness look like?

Assertiveness

2

237

what is assertiveness?

Assertiveness

1

232

assessment

Assessment



13

being aggressive

Assertiveness

4

245

being assertive

Assertiveness

5

247

being passive

Assertiveness

3

243

being relevant

Conversations

16–18

203

blindfold game

Body Language

8

50

body language

Body Language

1–46

30

assessment

Body Language

6, 46

44, 124

plan

Body Language

6

44

what am I like? (part 1)

Body Language

6

44

what am I like? (part 2)

Body Language

46

124

what is it?

Body Language

3

33

build a story activity

Conversations

18

210

call-and-response games

Group cohesion



316

the rules

the rules assertiveness

234, 242

191, 8, 201

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TALKABOUT Index

Index

Section

Activity number

Page

certificate of achievement

All



change one thing

Assertiveness

17

273

change places if …

Conversations

6

180

change the topic activity

Conversations

18

210

clarity

The Way We Talk

7

147

closer to you?

Body Language

25

84

comic strips (strategy 2)

Introduction



8

complaining

Assertiveness

25–27

292

game

Assertiveness

27

296

the rules

Assertiveness

26

294

time

Assertiveness

25

292

compliment game

Assertiveness

17

273

conversation critic

Conversations

23

222

conversational skills

Conversations

1–25

164

assessment

Conversations

3

172

plan

Conversations

3

172

what am I like? (part 1)

Conversations

3

172

what am I like? (part 2)

Conversations

25

225

what are they?

Conversations

1

164

why worry about them?

Conversations

2

168

dice decider game

Group cohesion



316

different feelings

Body Language

15

65

different gestures

Body Language

20

75

different postures

Body Language

39

112

disagree dilemma

Assertiveness

24

291

disagreeing

Assertiveness

21–24

283

game

Assertiveness

21

283

the rules

Assertiveness

23

289

Body Language

23–27

81

Body Language

26

86

dotty about … dinosaurs

Conversations

17

208

dressed to impress

Body Language

45

122

emotions recap

Assertiveness

7

254

distance the rules

126, 158, 226, 310

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TALKABOUT Index

Index ending conversations

Section

Activity number

Page

Conversations

21–24

216

Conversations

22

219

‘ending Eddie’ game

Conversations

24

224

ending time

Conversations

24

224

environment (strategy 1)

Introduction



8

evaluation form

Record forms



317

express yourself

Assertiveness

11

262

expressing feelings

Assertiveness

7–11

254

Assertiveness

9

258

eye contact

Body Language

7–12

47

the rules

Body Language

10

55

face your emotions

Body Language

17

70

facial expression

Body Language

13–17

61

Body Language

16

68

feelings

Assertiveness

7–11

254

fidgeting

Body Language

33–35

101

Body Language

35

105

fluency

The Way We Talk

9

151

format of session

Introduction



11

four step plan

Introduction



7

fruit salad game

Conversations

6

180

gesture

Body Language

18–22

71

the rules

Body Language

21

77

give us a hand

Body Language

22

79

good speaking, the rules

The Way We Talk

10

153

group cohesion games

Group cohesion



315

group work (strategy 8)

Introduction



9

hierarchy of social skills

Introduction



5

‘how did I do?’ record sheet

Record forms



321

how do we sound?

The Way We Talk

3

135

human knot game

Group cohesion



316

‘I went to the market’ game

Conversations

6, 11

‘I went to the Moon’ game

Conversations

11

the rules

the rules

the rules

the rules

180, 190 190

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TALKABOUT Index

Index

Section

Activity number

Page

in the manner of the word

Body Language

4

37

intonation

The Way We Talk

8

149

learning to do good speaking

The Way We Talk

11

155

learning to look

Body Language

11

58

linking words activity

Conversations

18

210

listen to me!

The Way We Talk

1

128

listen to my starters

Conversations

7

181

listen to the ending

Conversations

21

215

listening

Conversations

4–6

175

listening time

Conversations

6

180

the rules

Conversations

4

175

look and listen

Conversations

5

178

looking good!

Body Language

43

118

making suggestions

Assertiveness

15–17

268

Assertiveness

16

271

media (strategy 6)

Introduction



9

mind the gap!

Body Language

27

88

modelling (strategy 7)

Introduction



9

musical starters game

Conversations

9

186

my clarity

The Way We Talk

7

147

my fluency

The Way We Talk

9

151

my intonation

The Way We Talk

8

149

my rate

The Way We Talk

6

144

my STAR plan for expressing feelings

Assertiveness

10

260

my volume

The Way We Talk

5

141

negotiating game

Assertiveness

15

268

paralinguistic skills

The Way We Talk

1–12

pass the greeting game

Conversations

9

186

pass the hoop game

Group cohesion



316

pass the mic game

Conversations

11

190

passive behaviour

Assertiveness

2, 3

personal appearance

Body Language

42–45

Body Language

44

120

Record forms



318

the rules

the rules plan of intervention form

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128–57

237, 243 116–22

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TALKABOUT Index

Index

Section

Activity number

Page

planning intervention sheet

Assessment



25

poor communication

Body Language

7

47

posture

Body Language

36–41

107

thermometer

Body Language

38

110

the rules

Body Language

40

113

question time

Conversations

15

202

questions

Conversations

12–15

rate of speech

The Way We Talk

6

144

record form

Forms



317

refusing

Assertiveness

18–20

274

game

Assertiveness

20

282

the rules

Assertiveness

19

280

Conversations

16–18

203

the rules

Conversations

16

203

time

Conversations

18

210

‘relevant Robyn’ game

Conversations

18

210

repairing

Conversations

19, 20

the rules

Conversations

19

211

time

Conversations

20

215

Assertiveness

32–34

306

game

Assertiveness

34

310

time

Assertiveness

32

306

the rules

Assertiveness

33

308

reward system (strategy 5)

Introduction



8

role play (strategy 7)

Introduction



9

running a group

Introduction



10

saying ‘no’

Assertiveness

18

274

saying sorry

Assertiveness

28

297

self-assessment

Assessment



24

self-awareness and self-esteem interview Assessment



15

session plan form

Forms



319

setting up a group

Introduction



9

‘Simon says’ game

Conversations

6

180

relevance

requesting explanations

191–202

211, 215

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TALKABOUT Index

Index

Section

Activity number

Page

social skills assessment

Assessment



18

social stories (strategy 3)

Introduction



8

sorry scale

Assertiveness

29

299

stand by Houston!

Assertiveness

14

267

standing tall

Assertiveness

12

263

standing up for yourself

Assertiveness

12–14

263

Assertiveness

13

265

STAR plan

Assertiveness

10

260

starting a conversation

Conversations

7–9

starting time

Conversations

9

186

the rules

Conversations

8

183

‘starting up Sam’ game

Conversations

9

186

stop and look

Body Language

12

60

strategies for intervention

Introduction



8

structures game

Assertiveness

17

273

suggestion indigestion

Assertiveness

17

273

suggestion time

Assertiveness

17

273

taking time

Conversations

11

190

taking turns

Conversations

10, 11

‘taking turns Toni’ game

Conversations

11

Talkabout resource list

Introduction



2

target sheet

Record forms



320

tell a story game

Conversations

6

180

tell me a story game

Conversations

24

224

that’s a close one!

Body Language

24

83

the way we talk

The Way We Talk

1–12

128

assessment

The Way We Talk

4, 12

138, 157

plan

The Way We Talk

4

140

what am I like? (part 1)

The Way We Talk

4

138

what am I like? (part 2)

The Way We Talk

12

157

theory of Talkabout

Introduction



time to pose!

Body Language

41

115

to touch or not to touch?

Body Language

32

99

the rules

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181–6

187, 190 190

4

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TALKABOUT Index

Index touch

Section

Activity number

Page

Body Language

28–32

89

control

Body Language

29

91

the rules

Body Language

31

97

turn taking

Conversations

10, 11

the rules

Conversations

10

187

twenty questions game

Conversations

15

202

visual cue (strategy 4)

Introduction



8

volume

The Way We Talk

5

141

walk this way

Body Language

37

109

watch me fidget!

Body Language

33

101

watch my appearance!

Body Language

42

116

watch my eyes!

Body Language

7

47

watch my face!

Body Language

13

61

watch my hands!

Body Language

18

71

watch my posture!

Body Language

36

107

watch my touch!

Body Language

28

89

watch that man

Body Language

2

32

watch the distance!

Body Language

23

81

watch us talk!

Body Language

1

30

what could I do?

Assertiveness

8

255

what happens to our bodies when …?

Body Language

5

40

why do people fidget?

Body Language

34

103

why is disagreeing important?

Assertiveness

22

287

why is eye contact important?

Body Language

9

51

why is facial expression important?

Body Language

14

63

why is gesture important?

Body Language

19

73

why is good speaking important?

The Way We Talk

2

131

why is touch important?

Body Language

30

95

yes/no game

Conversations

15

202

zoo game

Conversations

6

180

187, 190

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TALKABOUT

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