Primary Mathematics Workbook 2B [Standards Edition] 9780761469933

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Primary Mathematics Workbook 2B [Standards Edition]
 9780761469933

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28

.... ••nt1•anc1 · R-Y......... PR~I•' A

WORKBOOK

~ Marshall Cavendish

UA:1 Education

Original edition published under the title Primary Mathematics Workbook 28 Parts 1 & 2 © 1982 Curriculum Planning & Development Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore Published by Times Media Private Limited This edition© 2008 Marshall Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited © 2014 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd

Published by Marshall Cavendish Education Times Centre, 1 New Industrial Road, Singapore 536196 Customer Service Hotline: (65) 6213 9688 US Office Tel: (1-914) 332 8888 I Fax: (1-914) 332 8882 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.mceducation.com Marshall Cavendish Corporation 99 White Plains Road Tarrytown, NY 10591 U.S.A. Tel: (1-914) 332 8888 Fax: (1-914) 332 8882 E-mail : [email protected] Website: www.marshallcavendish.com First published 2008 Reprinted 2009, 2010, 2011 (twice), 2012 (twice), 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 (twice) Al I rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transm itted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Any requests for permission should be addressed to the Publisher. Marshall Cavendish is a registered trademark of Times Publishing Limited. Singapore Math® is a trademark of Singapore Math Inc.® and Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd. Primary Mathematics (Standards Edition) Workbook 28 ISBN 978-0-7614-6993-3 Printed in Singapore Primary Mathematics (Standards Edition) is adapted from Primary Mathematics Workbook 28 Parts 1 & 2 (3rd Edition), originally developed by the Ministry of Education, Singapore. This edition contains new content developed by Marsha ll Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited, wh ich is not attributable to the Ministry of Educat ion, Singapore. We would like to acknowledge the Project Team from the Ministry of Education, Singapore, that developed the original Singapore Edition: Project Director: Dr Kho Tek Hong Team Members: Hector Chee Kum Hoang, Liang Hin Hoon, Lim Eng Tann, Ng Siew Lee, Rosalind Lim Hui Cheng, Ng Hwee Wan, Thong Chee Hing Our thanks to Richard Askey, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Madge Goldman, President (Gabriella and Paul Rosenbaum Foundation), for their help and advice in the production of Primary Mathematics (Standards Edition). We would also like to recognize the contributions of Jennifer Kempe (Curriculum Advisor, Singapore Math Inc.®) to Primary Mathematics (Standards Edition).

7

Addition and Subtraction

Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Exercise 6 Exercise 7 Exercise 8 Exercise 9 Exercise 10 Exercise 11 Exercise 12

26

REVIEW 8 8

7 9 11 13 15 16 17 18 20 22 24 25

Multiplication and Division

Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

30 33 36 40 43 44 46 49

Exercise 9 Exercise 10

57

REVIEW 9 9

Money Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise

REVIEW 10

52 55

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

61 64

68 70 71 75 76

77

78 79 81

82 83 84

85

87

10 Fractions

Exercise . 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Exercise 6 Exercise 7 Exercise 8

92 94 96 100 103 105 108 109 110

REVIEW 11

1 1 Time

Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise

1 2 3 4 5

115 119 122 126 128 129

REVIEW 12

~A~A4A~~~4 12 Capacity

Exercise Exercise Exercise REVIEW 13

1 2 3

134 139 141 143

13 Tables and Graph s Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise

1 2 3 4

REVIE W 14

14 Geome try Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise Exercise

1 2 3 4 5 6

REVIE W 15

Math at Home

(r

1. Write the missing numbers.

D

= 20

D

= 6

D -1

=9

12 +

10 -

(c)

Unit 7: Addition and Subtraction

2.

Find the missing number in each of the following:

68 + .

0

1s +

D=

= 88

so

s0 -

D=

10

What is the best thing to put into a pie? Write the letters in the boxes below to find out.

1751351

~ I 30 I

I so I 70

145140 I 100 I

Unit 7: Add ition and Subtraction

1. Write the missing numbers.

60 +

+ 98

2. Write the missing numbers.

(a) 99 +

D

= 100

· (b) 95 +

D .......

= 1oo L l

_ , .. _ .

(c) 96 +

D

= 100

(d) 91 +

D

= 100

(e) 80 +

D

= 100

(f) 35 +

D

= 100

(g) 84 +

D

= 100

(h) 63 +

D

= 100

(i) 42 +

D

= 100

(j) 58 +

D

= 100

-

+ D -- 100 D -- 100 j 9

Divya

09 00 • • 00 Sally 09

Rosni

Weilin

Count the shells collected by each girl. Then complete the following picture graph.

,

0 0 Sally

Divya Each

Q

Weilin

stands for 2 shells.

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

Rosni

1. Fill in the blanks. (a) Each *stands for 5 fish. *

*

stand for _ _ _ _ _ fish.

0 000

(b) Each

stands for 10 cars. stand for _ _ _ _ _ cars.

Q stands for 4 people. Q Q Q stand for _ _ _ _ people.

(c) Each

D

2. (a) Each stands for 3 balloons. Color the correct number of squares to show 15 balloons.

DDDDDDDDDD (b) Each ~ stands for 10 flowers. Color the correct number of triangles to show 60 flowers.

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

3. This picture graph shows David's savings in four months.

() () ()

()

() () () ()

March

April

May

-

() () June

Each ( ) stands for $3.

Study the graph. Complete the table below. David's savings March April May June

Then fill in the blanks. (a) He saved$_ _ _ _ more in May than in April. (b) His total savings in the 4 months was $ _ _ __ (c) The most he saved in any month was$ _ _ __ (d) The least he saved in any month was$ _ _ __ Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

4. This table shows the number of stamps collected by four children. Ian

so

Matthew

60

Ryan

40

Annie

30

Study the table. Then fi II in the blanks. (a) Ian collected (b)

stamps. collected the greatest number

of stamps. (c)

collected 30 stamps.

(d) Ian collected than Ryan. (e) Annie collected than Matthew.

more stamps fewer stamps

(f) Ryan and Annie collected _ _ _ __ stamps altogether.

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

5. This picture graph shows the number of fish caught by four children. Carlos Cameron Mary Jackie Each

DD6DDD DDDDD DD DDD

D_ stands for 5 fish.

Study the graph. ' Write YES or NO for each of the following: (a) Carlos caught 6 fish. (b) Jackie caught 15 fish. (c) Cameron caught 2 more fish than Jackie. (d) Mary caught 20 fewer fish than Carlos. (e) If Carlos caught 2 more fish, he would have 20 fish.

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

1. A group of children made this picture graph to show the times at which they get up in the morning.

D D

D D

D D D D

6:00 a.m.

6:15 a.m.

6:30 a.m.

D

Each

D

D 6:45 a.m.

stands for 4 children.

Study the graph and fi II in the blanks. (a) _ _ _ _ _ children get up at 6:15 a.m. (b) 4 children get up at _ _ _ __ (c)

more children get up at 6:00 a.m. than at 6:45 a.m.

(d) The greatest number of children get up at _ _ _ __ (e) _ _ _ _ _ children get up before 6:30 a.m.

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

2. This table shows the number of students in each group.

A B

c

21 16 17

D

8

'

Use the table to color the graph.

22 20 18 16 14 Number 12 of 10 students 8 6 4 2 0

A

B

c

D

Group

Fill in the blanks. (a) There are _ _ _ _ _ more students in Group A than in Group C. (b) There are times as many students in Group B as in Group D. (c) There are _ _ _ _ _ students altogether. Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

3. This bar graph shows the number of eggs Lindsey sold from Monday to Friday.

I

Friday "

Thursday

Wednesday

Tuesday

Monday

'

,,

,,

i

,

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 9001 000 Number of eggs

Study the graph and fill in the blanks. (a) What was the number of eggs that Lindsey sold on most days? _ _ _ __ (b) She sold on Thursday.

more eggs on Friday than

(c) The most eggs she sold on any one day was _ _ _ __ (d) The least eggs she sold on any one day was _ _ _ __ Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

1. This bar graph shows the number of books read by five girls.

Number of books - - -

Meiling

Devi

Mary

Nicole Wendy

Study the graph and fill in the blanks. (a) Devi read

books. read the most books.

(b) She read

books. read the fewest books.

(c) She read

books.

(d) Mary read twice as many books as _ _ _ __

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

2. This bar graph shows the savings off ive students. 100~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

90 80 70 60 Savings

($)

50 40 30 20 10 0

Juan

Bonita

Kiara

Sean

Ryan

Study the graph and fill in the blanks. (a) Juan saved$_ _ _ __ (b) Kiara saved $ (c)

more than Bonita. saved the most.

(d) The total savings of Bonita, Kiara and Sean was$._ _ _ __

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

3. This table shows the number of stamps collected by five boys. Number of stamps John

300

Courtney

420

Samy

250

David

100

-

Ramat

--

180

.,

Study the table and fi II in the blanks. (a) Ramat collected

stamps.

(b) John collected than Courtney.

fewer stamps

(c) John collected SO more stamps than _ _ _ __ (d) The least number of stamps collected by any one boy is _ _ _ __ (e) The greatest number of stamps collected by any one boy is _ _ _ __ (f) The difference between the greatest and the least number of stamps collected is _ _ _ __

Unit 13: Tables and Graphs

R.E\tlE~

14

1. What number does each set of number discs stand for? (a)

888

888 88

(b)

@® ®® ®

2. These are regular number patterns. Fill in the missing numbers. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

6$

945

955

960 °

328

0

528

928 °

992

0

982

962 °

720

520

420 °

600

580

570 ° Review 14

3.

Fill in the missing numbers. (a) 100 -

(c)

D

D

+ 63

= 41 = 100

(b) 1oo

-

(d) 24 +

58

D

=D = 100

4. Add or subtract. (a) 108 +

42 --

(c) 365 + 135 (e) 486 -

-

90 --

(g) 875 - 250 --

(b) 249 +

51 --

(d) 598 + 243 -(f) 64? -

98 --

(h) 372 - 299 --

5. Color to show each pair of fractions. Then write>, < or=.

101 6 3

lQ-1 4 5

6. Draw the minute hand on each clock face to show the time.

10 minutes past 4 Review 14

15 minutes to 8

7.

(a) Mr. Ward has 40 chickens. He draws this diagram to show the number of chickens he has.

Each

6. stands for _ _ _ _ _ chickens.

(b) Melissa draws this diagram to show the number of books she has read.

10000001 Each

0

stands for 5 books.

Melissa has read _ _ _ _ _ books. 8. This bar graph shows the number of potted plants in four gardens A, B, C and D.

120 100 Number 80 of potted 60 plants 40 20 0

A

B

c

D

Study the graph and answer these questions. (a) How many more potted plants are there in Garden D than in Garden A? (b) How many potted plants are there altogether in the four gardens? Review 14

9. There are 120 boys at a concert. There are 85 more girls than boys. 19 boys and 16 girls wear glasses. (a) How many girls are there at the concert?

(b) How many children are there altogether?

(c) How many children do not wear glasses?

Review 14

10. Rolando scored 89 points in English, 91 points in Science and 90 points in Math. Find his total score for the three subjects.

11. Sara made 32 muffins. She put them into boxes of 4 each. How many boxes of muffins did she have?

12. Mrs. Smith bought 9 pieces of rope. Each piece was 5 m long. How many meters of rope did she buy altogether?

Review 14

13. Kelly has $6.80. She wants to buy a photo album that costs $8.50. How much more money does she need?

¥'°"$ ' nom

'1!111'~.,,Pf:llLL

.

~

""10Z:l3

-:

1"'1:2'..

ILF.+JiiCt •'S'tM'td

JrlQllUIWClllllt'l"qj!lf_1'(}[email protected]

W

-..e .. r

....... ~••

J

toe 5 .

ti

...

14. Pablo's family drinks 6 qt of milk a week. How many quarts of milk do they drink in 10 weeks?

15. John, David and Peter share 24 picture cards equally. (a) How many picture cards does each boy get? (b) What fraction of the picture cards does each boy get?

Review 14

B :A

1. Join each pair of objects that have the same shape.

''

''

''

''

''

''

''

''

''

''

''

''

' .... • . . .. . . . ·'. ..... . . .•

.

Unit 14: Geometry

2. Which object does not have the same shape as the others? Cross it out. (a)

(b)

Unit 14: Geometry

3.

Name the shape of the face which is shaded.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

:cl

(e)

I

•11

(f)

Unit 14: Geometry

4.

(a) Count the flat faces and curved faces of each solid. Complete the table below.

E

D

Solid

Number of flat faces ::11n1

A

Ill!

Number of curved faces

·---

MC....~_,,. . . i:C

""*'"

w-.•~

--~

B

c D

E

-~·-

bl

.d ...

---

(b) _ _ _ _ _ faces of Solid B are triangles. (c) _ _ _ _ _ faces of Solid C are squares. (d) _ _ _ _ _ faces of Solid D are circles.

Unit 14: Geometry

J

1.

Match.

c~::J

c~::J Unit 14: Geometry

2. ,...____,,,___________________~~--~--r";:ar-·-&--•~~----~--~-·-·----·-~·-'·-··1-. Solid figure Number of · Number of Number of surfaces edges vertices ·

1.

rectangular prism

surfaces

edges

vertices

pyramid

surfaces

edges

vertices

prism

surfaces

edges

vertices

cylinder

surfaces

edges

vertices

2.

3.

4.

5.

I sphere

Unit 14: Geometry

surfaces

edges

-

vertices

1. Trace this shape 4 times on a piece of paper. Cut out the pieces.

Use the 4 pieces to form each of the shapes below. Draw dotted lines on each shape to show how it is formed.

(a) /

/

/

/

/

(b)

Unit 14: Geometry

(c)

(d)

Unit 14: Geometry

D half circle /"\,quarter circle

D

square

triangle

rectangle

Each of the following figures is made up of two of the above shapes. Draw a dotted line on each figure to show how it is formed. Name the two shapes. (a)

Q

(b)

(c)

half circle

(d)

I

(e)

I

Unit 14: Geometry

2. Draw dotte d lines on each figure to show how it is forme d by the given shape s. (a) 2 rectan gles:

..----__ ___..···· ··········--·..--- ----'

(b) 1 rectan gle and 2 squar es:

Unit 14: Geome try

(c) A half circle and a rectangle:

(d) 2 quarter circles and a square:

(e) A rectangle, a triangle and a half circle:

Unit 14: Geometry

E-ER.CISE 5 1. Join the two parts that form a circle.



D 2. Join the two parts that form a square.



0

Unit 14: Geometry



3. This figure is formed by two straight lines and two curves.

Draw another figure with two straight lines and two curves.

Unit 14: Geometry

1. These are regular patterns of shapes. Find each pattern. Then color the shape that comes next.

(b)

D

D D

D

(c)

I

Unit 14: Geometry

·· ~

2. Study each regular pattern. Then draw the shape that completes the pattern. (a)

r----------,,_____..____

(b)

(c)

(d)

0 ;,_.,_.l..... itP'1_ ....._....____

~

;f:Cl&'.-•-'t'MF~........_,..__...__...,._ _

-.,_ .W.._.-W ___

111i:'CPQt-. .._ . ........... _ ..... . , _ , . ,.......

Unit 14: Geometry

R.£\tl!~

15

1. Arrange these figures into the three groups given below.

D

In this group, the figures are made up of straight lines only.

Review 15

In this group, the figures are made up of both straight lines and curves.

In this group, the figures are made up of curves only.

2.

(a) The solid has

flat faces.

(b) _ _ _ _ _ faces are rectangles. 3. Color each shape to show the given fraction.

(b)

(a)

2 3

4.

(c)

3 4

3

8

Each of the following figures is made up of two shapes. Draw a dotted line on each figure to show how it is formed and name the two shapes. This figure is made up of a

(a)

_ _ _ _ and a _ _ __

(b)

This figure is made up of a -

_ _ _ _ and a _ _ __

Review 15

5.

Arrange the numbers in order, beginning with the smallest.

403 (a)

(b)

6.

58 900 340

1

1

T2 2

Fill in the blanks.

(a)

(b)

The time is _ _ _ __

The time is _ _ _ __

minutes past 2.

minutes to 9.

(c)

There are _ _ _ _ _ minutes from 11 :45 a.m. to

12:15 p.m. Review 15

7. The table below shows the number of different fruit trees in an orchard.

300 220 270 350 80

Apple trees Pear trees Plum trees Apricot trees Peach trees

Use the table to complete the bar graph. Then answer the questions below.

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

......... ... ...... ...... ......... ... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......... ...

--

-

~

~

~

>-----

~



'

Apple trees

Pear trees

Plum trees

Apricot Peach trees trees

(a) How many more apple trees than plum trees are there? (b) Which fruit tree is there the most of? How many are there? _ _ _ __ (c) Which fruit tree is there the least of? How many are there? _ _ _ __ Review IS

8. The bar graph shows the number of different types of flowers sold by a florist on a Sunday. Roses Lilies Daisies Orchids Carnations

0

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Number of stalks

Study the graph and fill in the blanks. (a) The florist sold

stalks of carnations.

(b) The number of stalks of roses sold was _ _ _ _ _ more than the number of stalks of daisies sold. (c) He sold _ _ _ _ _ stalks of flowers altogether. 9. What fraction of the dogs do not have tails?

~~~~~ ~~ ~ Review 15

10. Jen made 240 cupcakes. She made 405 muffins. How many more muffins than cupcakes did she make?

11. 10 dolls cost $70. Find the cost of 1 doll.

12. Mike bought 20 apples at 4 for $1. How much did he pay?

Review 15

13. Wendy made 153 cookies. 89 of them were chocolate cookies. The rest were wheat cookies. How many wheat cookies did she make?

14. Samantha saved $10.40. She saved $3.95 more than her sister. How much did her sister save?

~i9!tlf •

.......,.,..._,. ._I

. . . . .:MC

F

,...,

z•

4' +w -- - - I W P W

ner

J'"t::::l!lr'4t'il l6i

.fi4('1.,..,_ ......._....... l .U

15. A tank can hold 8 buckets of water. The capacity of each bucket is 4 liters. What is the capacity of the tank?

Review 15

b6t ~.... J

...

*" L

bl

44dt

16. Warner bought a radio for $6.90 and a toy robot for $8.20. How much cheaper was the radio than the toy robot?

17. A full tank holds 26 gal of water. It is emptied into buckets with a capacity of 3 gal each. How many buckets are needed to empty the tank?

18. Juan paid $5.20 for a pen and a notebook. The pen cost $1.80. What was the cost of the notebook?

Review 15

19. 5 bags of sugar weigh 40 lb. How much does 1 bag of sugar weigh?

20. A tank contains 17 gal of water. 25 more gallons of water are needed to fill it. What is the capacity of the tank?

21. A magazine costs $3.80. A book costs 2 quarters more than the magazine. Find the cost of the book.

Review 15

22. A toy costs $6.05. Ryan has 24 quarters and 2 nickels. Does he have enough money to buy the toy?

~""1"Jil

..

.

1191',.....,..,

~PCS:-

U

OZ•

C.A.

•iem~

~;ilti4A •

.41olii(,,,...,_ . 11~:W

dlili.W

..I

, ........ •



23. Andy bought an eraser for 29 cents. He gave the cashier 2 quarters. How much change did he receive?

24. Bonita has 32 quarters, 12 dimes, 6 nickels and 3 pennies. How much money does she have?

Review 15

Dear Parents/Guardians,

Math at Home is a series of activities designed as a follow-up to what your child learns in school. It aims to bring math out of the classroom and into the home, to make math relevant to daily life. It comprises simple games and hands-on activities that can be carried out easily, helping your child have a delightful learning experience. Have a fun-filled time with your child as you enjoy math at home!

Dear Parents/Guardians, We had great fun learning how to add and subtract using mental calculation. We also learned to use subtraction to find a missing number. Find out how your child does it by carrying out the following activities together.

part

part

whole

12 - 7 = 5

~o •••••••••

•• •••

Help your child learn more about parts and wholes using cards. • Take a deck of cards. Remove the cards with kings, queens, jacks and jokers. • Divide the remaining cards equally between you and your child. • Take a card from your stack of cards, and place it face-up on the table. • On a sheet of paper, write a number less than 20 but greater than the number on the card that you have placed on the table. • For example, if you placed a card with the number '9' on the table, you can write the number '17' on the sheet of paper. • Ask your child, "Which number and 9 make 17?" • Prompt your child to find a card with the correct answer from either stack of cards. • Repeat this using different cards and numbers.

~~ •••••••••

•• •••

• Make 19 number cards of tens and ones. • On nine of the number cards, write the number '1 O' on each of them. These will be the 'tens'. • On the remaining ten number cards, write the number '1' on each of them. These will be the 'ones'. 10

• Display a few tens and ones face-up on the table. For example, place 6 tens and 5 ones on the table. These cards represent the number 65. • Say to your child, "What number must be added to 65 to make 100?" • Prompt your child to use the remaining ones to make a ten together with the 5 ones already on the table. • Next, ask your child to count the remaining tens that make a hundred together with the 7 tens (made up of 6 tens and 10 ones) already on the table. • Prompt your child to say, "3 tens and 5 ones added to 65 make 100". • Repeat this using a different combination of number cards.

~9

•• • • •

•••••••••

When it comes to mental addition and subtraction, you can have fun with your child without any materials! • Practice mental addition and subtraction with your child by asking him or her to add 2 or 3 numbers up to 3 digits each. • Help your child to do so by asking him or her to first add digits in the hundreds (if any) or tens place. Add digits in the ones place later. • For example, to add 36 and 28, ask him or her to add 20 to 36 first, and add 8 later. • Next, practice mental subtraction. Ask your child to subtract a 2-digit number from a 2 or 3-digit number by first subtracting the tens. • For example, to subtract 29 from 53, ask your child to subtract 20 from 53 first before subtracting the remaining 9.

Dear Parents/Guardians, We learned multiplication and division by 4, 5 and 10. We also learned how to divide when there is a remainder. Practice more multiplication and division at home with your child.

When we divide 9 tomatoes into 4 equal groups, 1 tomato is left over.

~{I •• •••

•••••••••

Help your child discover multiplication in everyday life. Bring him or her on an exciting trip to the supermarket! • At the supermarket, look for batteries in packs of 4. • Tell your child each pack has 4 batteries. Ask him or her how many batteries 6 packs have. • Repeat this with items in the supermarket that come in groups of 5 (such as pastries) and groups of 10 (such as paper towels). • Vary the number of groups each time, and ask your child for the total number of items.

~fj •• ••• • • • •

• • •

• •

•••••••••

Take a bowl of 40 beans. Ask your child to divide the beans into groups of 4. Ask him or her how many equal groups there are. Repeat this by asking your child to divide the beans into groups of 5 and 10, then asking him or her how many equal groups there are. Next, ask your child to divide the beans into 4 equal groups. Ask your child how many beans there are in each group. Repeat this by asking your child to divide the beans into 5 and 10 equal groups, then asking him or her how many beans there are in each group. Make this activity more challenging by encouraging your child to divide the beans into equal groups of 3, 6 and 7. Ask your child to identify the number of beans that are left over.

Dear Parents/Guardians, We learned counting money in dollars and cents. Help your child make sense of money by trying out these activities at home!

~o •••••••••

• • •••

It's time to hand over your wallet or purse to your child! • Ask your child to count the amount of money in your wallet or purse in dollars and cents. • Prompt him or her to say, for example, "There are twenty-six dollars and eighty-five cents." • Next, ask your child a series of questions, depending on the kind of bills and coins available in the wallet or purse. Highlight to your child that a nickel is 5¢ and a quarter is 25¢. - "How many quarters can be changed for $1 ?" - "How many nickels can be changed for 50¢?" - "How many five-dollar bills can be changed for 3 ten-dollar bills?"

~~ ••••••••

•••••

Turn your kitchen into a grocery store! Your child can have great fun as he or she plays the role of a cashier, while you play the customer. • Together with your child, make price tags for food items found in the kitchen. • Ensure that the items are priced in dollars and cents, and the prices are reasonable. • Ask your child to write the prices on label stickers before sticking the labels onto the items. • Each time, pick two items and ask your child how much both items cost. • Then, 'buy' the items, and hand your child some money that is of greater value than the total price of the chosen items. • Prompt your child to give you the correct change. • Next, take two items of different prices. Ask your child to identify the cheaper item, and to tell you how much cheaper that item is compared to the more expensive item.

Dear Parents/Guardians, We learned how to write fractions by looking at pictures. Practice identifying and writing fractions with your child at home!

KEY WORDS halves

quarters

fourths

fractions

.. a whole

halves

quarters or

fourths

~o

• ••••

•••••••••

• At the breakfast table, take what your child is having for breakfast, for example, waffles, pancakes or bread, and cut it into halves and fourths. • Highlight to your child that the whole must be divided into equal parts to make these fractions.

• Cut some also into thirds, fifths and other equal proportions. • Pull out one piece of each food item and ask your child what fraction of the whole it shows. • Ask your child to identify which piece does not show a fraction.

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• Let your child make fractions by colouring the shapes on the next page! • Tell your child that each shape is divided into equal parts. • Ask your child to color a few parts of each shape. For example, ask your child to color 3 parts of the square. • Cut out all the shapes after your child has coloured a few parts of each. • Then, ask him or her to write on the back of the shape, the fraction of the shape that is colored, i.e. ~ . • Next, prompt your child to say, "~ is 3 out of the 8 equal parts." • Do the same for the other shapes.

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• Place all the fruit from your refrigerator, such as apples, pears, peaches and bananas on a table. • Ask your child to count the total number of fruit on the table. • Next, ask him or her to identify the fraction of the fruit that is apples. • For example, if there are 9 pieces of fruit on the table, and 4 of them are apples, prompt your child to say, "~ of the fruit are apples." • Repeat this for the other fruit.

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Dear Parents/Guardians, We learned how to tell time before and after the hour, and how long an activity lasts by looking at time intervals. We also learned other ways of telling time using days, weeks, months and years. Practice telling time at home with your child!

KEY WORDS o'clock before

after to

past

~o •••••••••

•• •••

Combine this activity with the things your child enjoys doing, such as reading a book or playing outdoors. • Before your child begins his or her favorite activity, ask him or her to tell you the time using an analog clock. • For example, before your child reads a book, ask your child for the time. If the clock shows 7:45, prompt your child to tell the time by saying that it is 45 minutes past 7 o'clock, or 45 minutes after 7 o'clock. • Also prompt your child to tell you that 7:45 can be read as 15 minutes to 8 o'clock or 15 minutes before 8 o'clock. • Do likewise after your child finishes his or her favorite activity.

• Then, ask your child how long his or her activity took by finding out the time interval between the beginning and the end of the activity.

~El •••••••••

•• •••

Plan your next family vacation with your child! • Bring out a desk calendar and start planning activities for your next family vacation. • Begin by asking your child how long the school breaks are. Prompt him or her to give the answers in months and weeks. • Next, tell your child the activities that you plan to do during the vacation. Ask him or her to estimate how long each activity will take, using 'hours', 'days', 'weeks' and 'months'. • For example, you can ask your child the following questions. - "How long will it take to drive from one state to another?" - " How long will it take to visit all the rides in the amusement park?" - "How long will it take to get us to the airport from our house?" - "How long will our next vacation be?"

Dear Parents/Guardians, We had fun learning about capacity in school. We compared capacity with the use of containers, and measured capacity using different units. Try these activities with your child!

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Have an enjoyable time making fizzy orange lemonade! • Use a measuring cup for the following activity. • Ask your child to measure 2 cups of lemon juice and 2 cups of orange juice. • Pour the juice into a large container for mixing. • Next, ask your child to measure 4 cups of sparkling water. • Pour the sparkling water into the large container. • Mix the drink well, add some ice cubes and serve chilled!

~B ••••••••

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• Bring your child on a trip to the supermarket. • Ask him or her to identify the following. - a pint of chocolate milk - a quart of strawberry milk - a gallon of apple juice • Next, ask your child the following questions. - "How many cups can a pint of chocolate milk fill?" - "How many 1-pint containers can a quart of strawberry milk fill?" - "How many 1-quart containers can a gallon of apple juice fill?"

Dear Parents/Guardians, We learned about picture graphs and bar graphs in school. Practice making and reading graphs with your child at home.

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Make a simple picture graph with your child using some coins and stickers. • Place some pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters in a bag. Ensure that there is an even number of each type of coin. • Ask your child to identify the different types of coins in the bag. • Together with your child, draw a graph with the number of columns corresponding to the number of types of coins in the bag. • Next, ask your child to count each type of coin. • Give your child the stickers and tell him or her that each sticker stands for 2 coins. • Ask your child to place stickers on the graph to represent the number of each type of coins. • The graph should look similar to the one below, depending on the number of coins.

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• Ask your child a series of questions as he or she reads the graph. - "How many more quarters than dimes are there?" - "How many fewer dimes than nickels are there?" - "Which type of coin is the least in number?"

~~ ••••••••

•••••

Ask your child to make graphs by collecting information about his or her favourite hobby! • For example, if your child is interested in motor vehicles, ask him or her to count the number of cars, motorbikes and SUVs that pass by your home in the span of 15 mins. • Ask your child to record the information in a table. For example, if 18 cars, 15 motorbikes and 7 SUVs pass by, the table should look like this. Number of vehicles Cars 18 Motorbikes 15 SUVs 7 • With the information in the table, ask your child to draw a bar graph like the one below. 20

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• Ask your child a series of questions. Have him or her find the answers by reading the graph. - "Which vehicle passed by most often?" - "How many more cars were there than motorbikes?" - "How many vehicles were there altogether?'

Dear Parents/Guardians, We learned how to identify the different objects. We also had fun with patterns of shapes and made creative pictures with triangles, circles, squares and rectangles. Have fun at home as you try out these activities with your child.

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