A course in job orientation

Citation preview

A COURSE Bf JOB ORIENTATION

A Project Presented to the Faculty of the School of Education. The University of Southern California

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science in Education

by Victor U. Kilburn June 1950

UMI Number: EP45907

All rights reserved INFORMATION TO ALL USERS The quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted. In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion.

Dissertation Publishing

UMI EP45907 Published by ProQuest LLC (2014). Copyright in the Dissertation held by the Author. Microform Edition © ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. This work is protected against unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code

ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway P.O. Box 1346 Ann Arbor, Ml 48106- 1346

££

So

IPro^j-

T h is project report, w ritte n under the direction of the candidate’s adviser an d app ro ved by him , has been presented to and accepted by the F a c u lty of the School of Ed u catio n in p a r t ia l fu lfillm e n t of the requirements f o r the degree of M a s t e r of Science in Education.

A d vis er

Dean

ii TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1.

PAGE

PLANNING A VOCATIONs HOW TO SELECT YOUR VOCATION . .

1

1.

1

How to select the field of work to follow . . . .

2. How to find out the answers to questions concerning the job

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A3

3. How to analyze your vocational assets (good points) and liabilities.(bad points) 2.

GETTING READY FOR YOUR VOCATION:

.

5

HOW TO PREPARE

YOURSELF FOR THE JOB SELECTED........................ 11 How to prepare yourself for w o r k .............

2.

How to make use of your leisure time in

.

1.

advancing your job preparation

. . . . . . . . .

11

12

3. How to pick out a school that offers vocational training . . .

3.

.......................

b.

How to earn your way while in school

5.

How to get practical training experience

PERSONALITY FOR THE JOB:

. . . . . . ....

13 13 l*f

HOW TO DEVELOP A GOOD

PERSONALITY......................................... 17 1. How to get along with others

. . . . . . . . . .

17

2. How to improve your ability to get along with others

............................

3.

How to achieve good a p p e a r a n c e .............. 18

b.

How to select food to maintain mental and physical h e a l t h ..........................

5.

How to select clothes becoming to your figure . . 20

19

iii CHAPTER

PAGE

6.

How

to

improve your voice and speech

. . . . . . 20

7.

How

to

improve your conversation

8.

How

to

develop the qualities needed for

. . . . . . . . 21

success on the j o b ................. b.

JOB HUNTING PRELIMINARIESs

HOW TO HARROW DOWN THE

JOB HUNTING POSSIBILITIES . . . .

5.

22

.........

. . . . . 25

1.

How

to

find out about job vacancies . . . . . . . 25

2.

How

to

select prospective employers . . . . . . . 26

3.

How toavoid wblind-alley" j o b s ............

WRITTEN APPLICATION; A JOB

27

HOW TO APPLY IN WRITING FOR

.....................

30

1.

How towrite a letter of a p p l i c a t i o n ............ 30

2.

How toput your letter in an approved business style

3.

How to carry your letter over to a second page

*f.

.................... 3*+

................................35

How to address an envelope 3 5/8 by 6 1/2 inches (Humber 6 3/^ s i z e ) ...........

5.

How to address an envelope b 1/8 by 9 1/2 inches (Number 10 size)

6.

. . . . . . . . . . . 36

How tofold your letter to fit into a number 6 3/*+ size envelope

7.

37

How tofold your letter to fit into a number 10 size envelope

8.

36

37

How toprepare your personal data s h e e t .......... 37

CHAPTER 6.

ORAL APPLICATION:

HOW TO APPLY IN PERSON FOR

A JOB . . . . . . . ............................... 1.

How to prepare for a personal interview . . • . •

2.

How to dress for the interview (girls)

3.

How to dress for the interview (boys) . . . . . .

*f.

How to approach the receptionist

' 5.

. . . . .

• • . . . • • •

How to fill out an application blank

. . . . . .

6.

How to approach the interviewer

7.

How to carry on the interview

8.

How to conclude the interview . • • • • • • • • •

9.

How to follow up your interview........ .. . . .

10.

........ .

How to prepare for additional interviews when a job has not materialized on the first attempt

7.

GROWTH ON THE JOBt

HOW TO SUCCEED ON THE JOB . . . .

1.

How to keep your job

........ .

2.

How to break in on your job

3.

How to develop good work habits . . . .

b,

How to dress for the job

5.

How to get along with your fellow workers . • . •

6.

How to get along with your supervisor . . ...

7.

How to win promotion on the job ................

...........

. . .

........

APPENDIX A:

RESERVE SHELF COLLECTION . . . . . . . . . .

APPENDIX Bs

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF OCCUPATIONS ..........

V

LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE

PAGE

1.

Two-page Application Letter . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.

Two-page Personal Data Sheet

3.

Desirable and Undesirable Dress for the Interview

31-32

.............38-39

...............

*+9

vi PREFACE TO TEACHERS The problems of selecting a vocation, getting a job, and succeeding on the job have become more difficult due to the increasing amount of specialization in all types of jobs today.

Without some guidance, students leaving school

often flounder around from job to job trying to find some­ thing which they want and enjoy doing. This book was written as a-functional guide to help students of high school age to select a vocation in which they can work happily, to obtain employment, and to succeed and advance on the job.

The functional approach involves

the actual carrying out of the procedures in locating and obtaining a job in the student*s selected vocational choice. Victor U. Kilburn

vii PREFACE TO STUDENTS Do you know what kind of work is the right kind of work for you?

If you don’t, you will find that selecting the voca­

tion you desire and are best suited for is a difficult task. There are some 30,000 known jobs in today’s business and industry.

A partial list of occupations appear in

Appendix B of this book.

The job requirements and working

conditions of these jobs differ greatly.

Before selecting

a vocation, you need to acquaint yourself with several occupations and find out the requirements, working conditions, and rewards to be expected.

The second step in selecting

your vocation is to analyze your qualifications in relation to the facts discovered about the occupations studied. Only after taking into consideration all factors should you make your selection. Many young people lose a job before they even get it. A Course in Job Orientation was prepared to help you get a job and keep it.

The course of study helps in locating

prospective employers, writing application letters, pre­ paring for the personal interview, carrying on the personal interview, following up the interview, and in correcting mistakes in your job applying procedure. An employee who does not take an interest in his work but considers it just a job, often finds himself unemployed. This book attempts to guide you to success on the job and promotion when the opportunity arises. Victor U. Kilburn

CHAPTER 1,

PLANNING A VOCATION

HOW TO SELECT YOUR VOCATION A.

MOTIVATION! 1.

Advantages of planning your vocation.

BETTER VOCATIONAL CHOICE:

The informed person can

select the job most suitable to his interests and abilities. 2.

TIME SAVED:

Once you have carefully selected your

life's work, you can aim toward it rather than flounder around in unrelated courses. 3.

FREEDOM FROM DISSAPPOINTMENT:

The person who has

planned his vocation in advance is more likely to have a happy and successful career. B.

DIRECTIONS: 1.

Helpful hints in selecting vour vocation.

How to select the field of work to follow. a. Determine your life goal or ambition. (1) To become wealthy? (2) To attain a place in society? (3) To secure a public office? (*+)

To do creative work?

(5)

To earn a good living?

(6)

To travel?

(7) To lead an adventurous life? (8) b.

To perform public services?

Look over the fields of work. appears in Appendix B.)

(A partial list

2 c.

Become acquainted with the scope and variety of occupations•

d.

Hake a list of 10 or 12 occupations for initial study.

(This will eliminate certain types of

work as not being feasible.) e.

Reduce the number to 2 or 3 selections.

f.

Study these few occupations thoroughly to learn about the work and the people who do it.

g.

Seek information on the following questionsA (1)

How many persons are engaged in this occupation?

(2)

How does it rank numerically as compared with other vocations?

(3)

Is the field overcrowded?

(**)

What does a worker do in this occupation?

(5)

What are the divisions or departments of the work?

(6)

How much does one usually earn:

the first

year; fifth year; tenth year? (7)

How much general education is required? How much special training?

(8)

Where can one obtain training?

(9)

How much will it cost?

% a r r y Dexter Kitson:

Selecting a Career. The

Institute for Research, Chicago, 1936.

3 (10)

Is capital required to make a start in the vocation?

(11)

In what job would one begin?

(12)

What is the next step on the promotional ladder?

(13)

What are the later steps one would take?

(I1*)

About how long does' it take most people to climb to the top in this vocation?

(15)

What are the outstanding advantages of this occupation; the particular disadvantages?

(16)

What are the trends within the occupation; are innovations likely to be introduced which will modify it markedly within a few years?

(17)

Is the demand for workers likely to grow or to decrease?

2.

How to find out the answers to questions concerning the job. a.

Read some of the books written on occupations.

b.

Take caution when selecting books. v(l)

Some books are written not to give vocational guidance, but to describe the process of work. .

(2)

Many books give only the bright side.

(3)

Other books are written about the successes of individuals which puts the vocation in a glamorous light.

(*+)

Some books are much too detailed.

Look for material written without bias.

(Books

which contain both good and bad points.) Consult the Readers1 Guide to Periodical Literature for current magazine articles. Pay particular attention to biographies of persons who have succeeded in the vocation. Talk with people who are already on the job. (1)

Exercise care in selecting the person to interview.

(2)

Be prepared to ask direct and intelligent questions.

(3)

Ask questions which are not answered in the books.2 (a) Where is the nearest school in which I can prepare for this vocation? (b) Which school do you think is best? (c) How should I go about getting a job in this community? (d) What are the prevailing wages? (e) What is the best way to get ahead in this vocation? (f) What do you find, most attractive in this work?

5 (g)

What are its chief drawbacks?

(h)

If you know the person being inter­ viewed, ask him frankly, do you think I would succeed in this occupation?.

3.

How to analyze your vocational assets (good points) and liabilities (bad points), a.

Examine yourself in the light of the facts you have discovered about the selected occupation.

b.

Study your educational background. (1)

Note the subjects in which you had the most success.

(2)

Did you like or dislike them?

Note the subjects in which you seem to have had little success.

Did you like or dis­

like them? (3)

Compare your educational background with the subjects you would have to take to prepare for your selected vocation.

c.

List your special abilities and accomplishments which may give clues to your probable fitness. /(Making furniture, interior decorating, direct­ ing plays, music, drawing, painting, repairing automobile s, etc.)

d.

Examine your physical status as compared with the job requirements. (1)

Do you have outstanding strength?

(2)

Do you wear glasses?

6 (3)

Are you color blind?

(*f)

Are you short or tall?

(5)

Were you a success in athletics?

(6)

Do you have any physical handicaps?

(7)

Are you restricted to in-door or out-ofdoor work?

e.

Explore your social status* (1)

Do you make friends easily?

(2)

Do you get along better in a mixed group or a homogeneous group?

(3)

Do you have the social’’gift of gab”?

(*+)

Can you talk before an audience?

f . List your economic assets in light of your selected vocation. (1)

Do you have capital to cover the training costs?

(2)

Do you have sufficient capital to make a start in the vocation?

(3)

Will the earnings be sufficient to cover your desired standard of living?

g.

Consider your work experience. (1)

Do you like it?

(2)

Are you successful in it?

(3)

Would you want to continue in that field of work?

h.

Take interest inventories such as Ruder*s Preference Record. Strong’s Vocational Interest

7 Blank, and Garretson*s Interest Questionnaire for High School Students. (1)

Take more than one interest inventory.

(2)

Compare the results of the several inven­ tories.

(3)

Compare the results with subjects in which you have had the most success.

(*+)

Take aptitude tests in the fields in which your interests seem to lie.

i.

Consider all of the above factors before making your final selection.

(Remember, even after a

thorough study and self analysis, your selection may change several times before you actually enter your vocational work.) Nhere to get further assistance. a.

Reserve Shelf Collection:

1:3-17^; 2:3-30,

130-158; if:l-51; 5:l-6*f; 6:1-1^; 7:1-69; 10:1-17; 11:3-9* b.

Amiss, John M. and Sherman, Esther:

New Careers

in Industry. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York, 19^6. c.

Bennett, Vernon G. and Sachs, Georgia M.: Exploring the World of Work. Society for Occupational Research, 6*+3 W. 3^-th Street, Los Angeles, 1937. Carrers.

The Institute for Research, Chicago.

(Series of monographs on occupations.)

8 ®.

Commonwealth Vocational Guidance Monographs. Commonwealth Book Company, Inc., 80 E. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago.

(Series of monographs on

vocations.) f.

Deming, Dorothy:

Careers for Nurses. McGraw-

Hill Book Company, Inc., 19^7. g.

Frankel, Alice H.:

Handbook of Job Facts.

Science Research Associates, Chicago, 19^8. h.

Huff, Darrell and Frances:

Twenty Careers of

Tomorrow. Whittlesey House, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York, 19*+5. i.

Kitson, Harry D.:

Selecting a Career.

for Research, Chicago, 1938.

Institute

(A monogram in the

Career series.) j.

Kitson, Harry D. and Lengenfelter, Mary R.: Vocations for Bovs. Harcourt, Brace and Company, New York, 19*+2.

k.

Lengenfelter, Mary R. and Kitson, Harry D.: Vocations for Girls. Harcourt, Brace and Company, New York, 1939.

1.

Logie, Iona R.:

Careers in the Making.

Harper &

Brothers Publishers, New York, 19^2. m.

Occupational Briefs on America^ Ma.lor Job Fields. A Science Research Associates Publication, 228 S. Wabash Avenue, Chicago. publication.)

(A monthly

9 n*

Occupations. The Vocational Guidance Journal. National Vocational Guidance Association, Inc., lU-16 16th Street N. W., Washington D. C. 6. (A monthly periodical.)

C.

ACTIVITIES; 1.

Projects involved in selecting your vocation.

Look over the fields of work at the end of this chapter.

Select 10 or 12 occupations on which to

make your initial study. 2.

Reduce the number to 2 or 3 selections which you would like to thoroughly investigate.

3.

Find out as much information as possible about these vocational selections.

1+.

Analyze your vocational assets and liabilities in terms of the conditions and requirements of the vocation selected.

5. D.

Select your future vocation.

EVALUATIONs

True and false questions to be considered

in planning vour vocation.

(Place an "X" in the space

for true or false.) T 1.

F

('•)(')

Before making a vocational selection, you : should first acquaint yourself with the fields of work which exist.

2.

( )( )

It is best to make an extensive and com­ plete study of 10 or 12 occupations.

10 3.

( )( ) You should read all the books on the voca­ tions on which you wish to make an extensive study.

lf. ( )(

)

It is wise to find out the promotional positions as well as the beginning positions for various occupations.

5. (

)( )

You should not pay any attention to biogra­ phies as they are likely to be one-sided.

6.

( )(

)

Hobbies should not be considered as a possible vocation as they are spare time activities.

7.

( )( )

In analyzing yourself, it is important to consider your social and economic status as well as your educational and physical qualifications.

8.

( )(

)

It is a good practice to take more than one interest inventory when examining your interests.

9.

( )( ) You should examine your present and past work experience as possible vocational selections.

10 .

(

)( ) Current magazine articles should not be neglected in search for information con­ cerning vocations.

11 .

(

K

)

It is not important to determine your life goal or ambition until you get your first job.

11 CHAPTER 2.

GETTING READY FOR YOUR VOCATION

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THE JOB SELECTED A.

MOTIVATIONS

Results obtained from planned .iob prepa­

ration. 1.

BETTER JOB OPPORTUNITIES:

The student who special­

izes within a particular field will have better opportunities of landing a job. 2.

PROFITABLE LEISURE TIME:

Those who use their leisure

time in advancing their job preparation gain more practical experience in their selected field. 3.

A COLLEGE EDUCATION:

Students who lack the finances

for college may earn their expenses if they have the .

»

will to do so. B.

DIRECTIONS:

Suggestions on ’ preparing vourself for vour

vocation. 1.

How to prepare yourself for work. a.

Finish high school.

(Many employers will not

consider applicants without a high school education.) b.

Attend college if you can afford it.

(The

more education and training, the greater the opportunities.) c.

Specialize within your field. (1)

In your business course place emphasis upon bookkeeping or stenographic work.

(2)

In industrial arts, specialize in woodwork, machine work, auto repairs, etc.

(3)

In art, specialize in commercial design, etching, cartooning, painting, drawing, etc.

(**-)

In home economics, place emphasis upon dress making, dress designing, baking, cooking meals, serving meals, etc.

(5)

In college, your major may be broken down into minute parts making for greater specialization.

d.

Enroll in schools which specialize in certain fields of work.

e.

Take a few skill subjects such as typing, short­ hand, bookkeeping, and clerical practice. (1)

They may be useful for part time employment while you continue your education.

(2), Shorthand and typing are found useful by most college students who have the skill, in taking notes and preparing typewritten reports. f.

Take all the courses you can which will help you prepare for your selected vocation.

(Don't

forget the subjects which are only indirectly related.) g.

Keep yourself in good health.

How to make use of your leisure time in advancing your job preparation.

a.

Make your hobby a part of your job preparation if possible.

b.

Obtain a part time job while yon are in school. (There is nothing better than on-the-job work experience.)

c.

Continue your training and education in evening 'f

schools if you have to work. d.

Read and study to prepare yourself for the next advanced job on the promotional ladder/

How to pick out a school that offers vocational training. a.

b.

ITisit and inspect the institution. (1)

Notice the equipment and type of students.

(2)

Examine the qualifications of the faculty.

Do not sign an admission blank or pay money to a solicitor who comes to your home.

(Transact

all business in the admissions office.) c.

Investigate the vocational success of former students.

d.

Be skeptical of schools which guarantee a position upon completion.

e.

Avoid “cut-rate" schools.

(There are no Saturday

specials.) How to earn your way while in school, a.

Take a part time job.

(Try to get experience

in the field of your interest.)

b.

Earn your board by waiting on tables or washing dishes.

c.

Earn your room by working around the dormitories, fraternity, or sorority houses.

d.

Tutor students in your spare time.

e.

Type reports and thesis for students unable to type.

f.

Play in orchestras.

g.

Work during the summer and over holidays.

h.

Do not undertake your entire support while in *

college. (1)

It will be easier if you have some other source of income.

(2)

If you spend too much time in earning money, you will not be able to give proper atten­ tion to your studies.

(3)

You may ruin your health by taking on too large a load.

How to get practical training experience. a.

Get a part time job while you are in school.

b.

Work as an apprentice.

c.

Work for your parents or friends without pay, if necessary, to obtain experience.

(It is not a

good idea to give your services to a company without pay.) d.

Enroll in a cooperative type program.

(Many

companies have their own schools where you go

15 to school part time and work part time.) e.

Apply for training programs.

(Some companies

prefer to train their own employees.) 6.

Where to get further assistance. Reserve Shelf Collection:

5:7^-85; 6:llf5-l8M-;

7 s70-102; Ufll-15. C.

ACTIVITIES:

Projects to be performed in preparing for

your vocation. 1.

Plan and make out your entire school program so it will include the courses which will make you more specialized within your field of work.

2.

Visit vocational training schools and pick out the one at which you wish to continue your education and training.

3.

Write letters or visit companies with cooperative programs and training programs to find out their requirements.

D.

EVALUATION;

True and false questions related to pre­

paring yourself for vour vocation.

(Place an "X" in

the space for true or false.) T 1.

F

( )( )

It is best to take a general course while in school.

2.

( )( )

It is wise to use your leisure time to advance your job preparation.

16 3.

( )( ) You should be quick to enter a school which guarantees you a job upon completion of your course*

h,

()(

) You should avoid schools which offer you special rates.

5.

()()

Itisa

good idea to earn all your college

expenses as it develops responsibility. 6.

()(

) I t ,is a good practice to offer your services free to a company to gain needed experience.

17 CHAPTER 3.

PERSONALITY FOR THE JOB

HOW TO DEVELOP A GOOD PERSONALITY A.

MOTIVATION;

Benefits to be derived from developing a

good personality. 1.

MORE FRIENDS:

Those who develop the ability to get

along with others have many friends. 2.

BETTER APPEARANCE:

Those who practice good grooming

and keep good health habits develop a better person­ ality. 3.

GREATER POPULARITY:

Those who are able to carry on

a good conversation do not sit alone at parties. B.

DIRECTIONS:

Guiding principles for developing a good

personality. 1.

How to get along with others. a.

Have good appearance.

b.

Be cheerful.

c.

Don’t gripe about every little thing. Be considerate of others.

e.

Be sociable.

. g.

Take criticism cheerfully. Be reliable.

h.

Help others when the occasion arises.

i.

Do your part when it's a cooperative undertaking

d.

Be courteous.

k.

Practice honesty.

f

18 1. Hold your temper, m. Don't brag,

2.

n.

Don'tbe a know-it-all.

o.

Don't

be a tatle-tale.

How to improve your ability a.

Adopt

to getalong withothers.

a confident attitude

thatyoucangetalong

with other people. b. Make up your mind about what you need to develop. c. Show evidence of improvement by displaying changed habits at every opportunity. d.

Don't allow yourself to slip back into bad habits even on one occasion.

3.

How to achieve good appearance. a.

Study yourself in the mirror.

b.

Correct obvious faults as you see them.

c.

Keep a check list of items to look for.

d.

Ask others to criticize your appearance.

e.

Keep good health habits. (1)

Maintain a well-balanced diet.

(A well-

balanced diet is not measured by quantity, but rather by the proper proportions of needed food elements.) (2)

Make sure you have sufficient exercise.

(3)

Play during your leisure time.

(V)

Stand, sit, and walk erect.

(Poor posture

has a direct bearing on fatigue.) (5)

Keep your teeth sparkling.

19

f.

(6)

Get sufficient rest each night.

(7)

Relax when you are tired.

Practice good grooming (1)

Wear clothes that are in good taste for the occasion.

(2)

Pick out clothes that fit your figure.

(3)

Be sure your clothes are clean, pressed, and in good condition.

(*+•) Keep your hair clean, brushed, and combed. (5)

Be sure your fingernails are clean and neatly trimmed.

(6)

Don't apply too much make-up or the wrong kind to suit your complexion.

(7)

Don’t over-load yourself with jewelry and other accessories.

(8) g. *f.

Keep your shoes shined.

Wear a smile on your face.

How to select food to maintain mental and physical health. a.

Drink 2 or more glasses of milk daily, or combine it with other foods.

b.

Eat 2 or more servings of vegetables daily other than potatoes (especially greens.)

c.

Eat 2 or more servings of fruit daily (at least 1 raw.)

d.

Eat 3 to 5 eggs a week (preferably 1 a day.)

20 e.

Eat 1 or more servings of meat, cheese, fish, or poultry daily (occasionally dried beans, peas, and peanuts.)

f . Eat 2 or more servings of whole-grain cereal and bread daily (added milk improves nutritional value•) g.

Eat 2 or more tablespoons of butter or margerine daily.

5.

How to select clothes becoming to your figure. a.

Consult the salespersons.

b.

Read the fashion magazines.

c.

Read newspaper fashion articles.

d. Consult your home economic teacher. e. Study yourself in the mirror before buying. (If it pleases you, it will probably please others.) 6.

How to improve your voice and speech. a. Listen critically to yourself when you talk. b. . Form the habit of speaking in a clear, wellmodulated voice with distinct enunciation. c.

Make your voice reflect your natural vigor and charm.

d.

Don’t shout or whisper.

e.

Ask your teacher for help if you lisp or if your voice is nasal or throaty.

f.

Don’t talk with your mouth full of gum, candy, or other foods.

21 7.

How to improve your conversation. a.

Have something to talk about. (1)

Visit interesting places in your community, city, or state.

(2)

Read the daily papers (not only the funnies, but the news items, the editorials, society page, and the sports section.)

(3)

Keep up on current books and movies.

(*f)

Make a note of jokes so you can repeat them when the occasion arises.

b.

Keep a scrap book or a card file on jokes, politics, sports, biographies, books, movies, world events, etc.

c.

Display good manners in your conversation ("Thank you," "will you, please," "you*re welcome," etc.)

d.

Avoid cooing over people (Dear, dearie, darling, honey, etc.)

e.

Avoid dragging long or unusual words into your conversation to prove you know them.

(Nobody

likes a show-off.) f.

Look up the pronunciation of new words before using them.

g.

Use slang sparingly.

h.

Choose words in good standing that express accurately the idea you have in mind.

22 i.

Shut your voice off when you stop to think. (Don11 be an ’’and-ur’’ or a ’’but-ur” speaker.)

8.

How to develop the qualities needed for success on the job. a.

Be determined to develop good personal character­ istics.

b.

Check over the following list of desirable qualities and work on the ones you need to develop: (1)

Honesty.

(2)

Dependability.

(3)

Self-initiative.

M

Leadership.

(5)

Promptness.

(6)

Good attendance.

(7)

Ability to follow rules and regulations

(8)

Ability to follow directions.

(9)

Courtesy.

(10)

Unselfishness.

(11)

Cheerfulness.

(12)

Good sportsmanship.

c.

Practice good traits at every opportunity.

d.

Don’t be tempted to slip back into your bad habits.

9.

Where to get further assistance. Reserve Shelf Collection: 9 s137-151»299-311; 11:13.

3:230-25**; 7:386-**07;

23

C.

ACTIVITIES;

Projects to be carried out in developing

a good personality.

1.

Keep a cheek list of your health and grooming habits.

2.

Come to school every day well groomed.

3.

Make an effort to improve your voice, speech, and conversation every day.

*f.

Keep a file or scrap book on current events, sports, books, movies, jokes, and politics as conversational topics.

D.

EVALUATIONS

Self-evaluating methods to be used in

evaluating your personality.

1.

RATING SCALE:

Rate yourself on the following

qualities needed for success on the job.

Give 1

point for below average, 2 points for average, 3 points for above average. a.

Honesty.

b.

Dependability.

c.

Self-initiative.

d.

Leadership.

e.

Promptness.

f.

Good attendance.

g.

Ability to follow rules and regulations

h.

Ability to follow directions.

i.

Courtesy.

j.

Unselfishness.

2b k . Che erfnines s. 1. 2.

CHECK LIST: YES

Good sportsmanship. Put a check in the space for yes or no.

NO )

a a.

Are your clothes clean and pressed?

)

b b.

Are you wearing colors that suit you?

)

c c.

Do your colors clash?

>

d d.

Are your shoes shined?

)

e e.

Are your fingernails clean?

)

f. f

Are your nails trimmed carefully?

)

g

Is your hair clean?

)

h

Is your hair combed?

)

i i.

Did you brush your teeth?

)

i

Are you standing erect?

)

k. k

Are you sitting erect?

)

1. 1

Are you walking erect?

)

m

Are you getting sufficient rest?

)

n. n,

Are you getting a well-balanced diet?

25 CHAPTER b.

JOB HUNTING PRELIMINARIES

HOW TO NARROW DOWN THE JOB HUNTING POSSIBILITIES A.

MOTIVATION:

Advantages to be realized through the

preliminaries of lob hunting. 1.

WIDER SELECTION OF JOBS:

By knowing all the sources

of job vacancies you have more opportunity to find the right job. 2.

HAPPIER EMPLOYMENT:

Through a thorough study of

a list of prospective employers, you can select a concern where you will enjoy working. 3.

REGULAR EMPLOYMENT:

By avoiding the “blind-alley**

jobs you can get a position which has promotional opportunities• B.

DIRECTIONS:

Suggestions on narrowing down the .lob

hunting possibilities. 1.

How to find out about job vacancies. a.

Get in touch with employers before you are * graduated.

b.

Notify your friends that you are looking for a job.

c.

Ask your friends to recommend you.

d.

Apply directly to personnel offices.

e.

Answer “want** advertisements in your daily paper.

f.

Insert an ad in the “situations wanted” section of your newspaper.

26 g.

Register with your school placement bureau.

h.

Ask your teachers if they know of any openings.

i.

Register at your local United States Employment Office.

j.

Inquire at the local labor unions,

k.

Inquire at the local chamber of commerce or manufacturers' association.

1.

Register at private employment offices. (1)

Some agencies are unscrupulous in their dealings.

(2)

Cheek the reliability of employment agencies • with the better business bureau.

2.

How to select prospective employers. a.

Make a list of prospective employers for the job in which you are interested.

b.

Determine whether you want to work for a large, medium, or small size concern, (1)

The smaller the plant, the more "familylike" it can be.

(2)

It is easier to get to know the entire business in a smaller concern.

(3)

There are more job opportunities i n larger plants•

(b)

Larger organizations are likely to be more stable.

c.

Select the type of business or industry for which you would prefer to work.

27 d.

Decide whether to begin your employment in the local community or away from home.

e.

Find out the companies* policies from company handbooks, employee friends, and local newspaper articles.

f.

Consider the following:

(1)

Steadiness of employment.

(2)

Training opportunities.

(3)

Opportunities for advancement

OO

Working conditions.

(5)

Salary schedules.

(6)

Special rules and regulations

(7)

Insurance plans.

(8)

Retirement plans.

(9)

Vacation plans.

(10)

Union relations.

(11)

Recreation facilities.

Select your prospective employer after carefully considering the above items.

g.

Don*t rely on only one choice.

(Plan on selling

your services to several prospective employers.) 3.

How to avoid "blind-alley" jobs. a.

Apply for jobs which are training positions for specific jobs.

b.

Know in advance the positions which are "stepping stones" to your desired goal.

c.

Ask people who are experienced on the particular job you desire.

28 d.

Get advice from your teachers or counselor.

e.

Ask about opportunities for advancement before accepting a position.

*f.

Where to get further assistance. Reserve Shelf Collection:

1:175-186; 3:230-25**;

*+:51-90,167-179; 5:86-111; 7:103-132; 8:13-28; 9:15^-155; 10:18-29; 11:20-21. C.

ACTIVITIES:

1.

Things to do preliminary to .lob hunting.

Make up a list of prospective employers for the job in which you are interested using as many sources as possible.

2.

Select several employers for w hom you would like to work.

D.

EVALUATION:

True and false items related to the pre­

liminaries of .1ob hunting.

(Place an MX" in the space

for true or false.) T

1.

F

( )( ) You should wait until you have graduated before contacting employers about jobs.

2.

( )( ) It is best to check the reliability of private employment agencies before dealing ■with them.

3.

( )( ) You should select your prospective employer only after a careful study.

*f.

( )( ) It is best to select only one prospective employer and work on him.

29 5.

( )( ) One of the deciding factors in your selection of a prospective employer should be the size of the concern.

6.

( )( ) Before accepting a position, it is wise to seek the advice of experienced persons on that job.

7.

( )( ) You should not overlook your friends and relatives as a source for finding out about job vacancies.

30 CHAPTER 5.

WRITTEN APPLICATION

HOW TO APPLY IN WRITING FOR A JOB A.

MOTIVATION;

Results to be gained bv studying the applica­

tion letter. 1.

ATTRACTIVE APPLICATION LETTER:

A

letter that is well

balanced and neat will reach the desk of the employer. 2.

COMPLETELY READ LETTER:

The letter that arouses the

reader's attention will be thoroughly read. 3.

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION LETTER:

A

letter that creates

a desire for your services will result in a personal Interview. B.

DIRECTIONS: Helpful hints on writing 1.

application letters.

How to write a letter of application.

(See Figure 1.)

a. Arrange your letter in a good business style. b. Type the letter, if possible, on white bond paper size 8 1/2 by 11 inches. c. Always type your letter if applying for a typing position. d.

Write legibly and neatly in blue or black ink if a typewriter is not available.

e.

Be sure you have the correct name and spelling of the person's name to whom you are writing.

f.

Make an outline of what you want to say. the information in the following order: (1)

Make application for the position.

Arrange

31

1325 Chestnut Street Torrance, CaliforniaJuly 21, 1950

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 111 West Seventh Street Los Angeles, California Gentlemen: Please consider my letter of application for the posi­ tion of typist advertised in t o d a y s Los Angeles Times.

Last month I graduated from Torrance High School where I majored in Business Education. My program included two years of typing and shorthand, and one year of bookkeeping, business English, and office practice. I can take dictation at 120 words a minute, transcribe my notes at 30 words a minute, and type straight copy at 60 words a minute. I learned to operate the mimeograph, ditto machine, dictaphone, calculators, and adding machines. My office practice course also included filing. During my senior year I worked for Mrs. Anna Branum in the attendance office. My duties included operating the, telephone switchboard, filing, and typing. Last summer I worked for Mr. Paul M, Allen in the Allen Real Estate Office. In his office I typed, filed and was receptionist. For information regarding my ability and character I have permission to refer you to: Mrs. Anna Branum Attendance Office Torrance High School Torrance, California Telephone - Torrance 6*+5

Miss Francis M. Lawrence Business Department Torrance High School Torrance, California Telephone - Torrance 6H-5

Mr. Paul M. Allen Allen Real Estate Office 1629 El Prado Torrance, California Telephone - Torrance 155

Mr. Joseph T. Morris (Neighbor) 1327 Chestnut Street Torrance, California Telephone - Torrance 65W

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Page 2 July 21, 1950

I am 18 years old and in good health. out of school only two days due to a cold. had any serious illness. do?

Last year I was I have never

May., I have a personal interview to show you what I can My telephone number is Torrance 1552J. Very truly yours,

(Miss) Shirley M. Greenwood

33 (2)

Give the source of information about the vacancy.

(3)

State your educational background.

(^-)

Give an accurate statement of experience with addresses of places worked.

List the

most recent first. (5)

List personal references with addresses and telephone numbers.

Ask permission before

listing references. (6)

Give additional personal and physical data.

(7)

Make a request for a personal interview. Indicate telephone number or address where you can be reached.

g.

Omit much of the personal details and education if you are enclosing a personal data sheet.

h.

Do not mention salary unless advertisement requests that you state salary desired.

i.

Convince the employer of your energy, ambition, and initiative.

j. Show why you will be more valuable to the company than the ordinary applicant. k.

Use tact, good judgment, and common sense.

Steer

a middle course between boasting and humility. 1.

Emphasize your strong points.

m.

Choose simple, everyday words.

n.

Be sure every sentence has a subject and a verb.

3b o.

Use natural phrases.

p.

Use short sentences which express one thought clearly.

Write as you would talk,

Caution, avoid the extreme blunt, curt

statements. q.

Be sure words are spelled correctly,

r.

Do not cross out words or strike over letters,

s.

Read over your letter to make sure it expresses what you want to say.

t.

Rewrite the letter if necessary,

u.

Enclose a recent photograph. (1)

Obtain a 2 by 3 inch size.

(Employers may

conclude that you are lacking in taste or are wasteful with your money if picture is too large.) (2)

Wear simple, well pressed clothing for the picture.

(3)

Do not wear party clothes or sport clothes.

(*0

Have a pleasant expression.

Don't smile

so broadly that your teeth show, v.

Do not enclose a stamp or stamped envelope. (If the employer is interested in you, he will be willing to spend 3 cents to contact you.)

2.

How to put your letter in an approved business style.

(See Figure 1.)

a.

Arrange your letter attractively on the paper.

b.

Leave equal margins on each side.

35 e.

Begin with a complete heading which consists of your street address, city and state, and the date.

d.

Include the complete inside address which con­ sists of the name, street address, and the city and state of the person to whom you are writing.

e.

Add the salutation or courteous greeting, such as Dear Sir, Gentlemen, Dear Mr. Higgins, or Dear Madam.

Always use “Gentlemen” when

writing to a company. f.

Indent the first line of each paragraph in the body of the letter,

g.

Begin the complimentary close, or courteous closing, such as Sincerely yours, Yours truly, Very truly yours, or Cordially yours, beneath the body of the letter and in the middle of the line.

h.

Begin the complimentary close 5 spaces to the left of the center of the paper when typing the letter.

i.

Sign the letter below the complimentary close if writing the letter.

j.

Type your name b lines below the complimentary close when typing the letter.

Sign your name

as typed, in the space above the typed name. 3.

How to carry your letter over to a second page. a.

Leave a 1 1/2 inch top margin on the second page.

b.

c.

Type the following 3 items at the left margins (1)

The company name.

(2)

The word "page" followed by the page number.

(3)

The date.

Leave 1/2 inch before resuming your letter.

How to address an envelope 3 5/8 by 6 1/2 inches (Number 6 3A- size.) a.

Type or write your complete return address, whieh includes your name, street address, and city and state, in the upper left corner.

b. Start the address in the middle of the and a little to the left of

envelope

the center when

written by hand. c.

Type the address 2 inches from the top and 2 1/2 inches from the left edge.

d.

Put the address on 3 lines whenever possible.

e.

Double space the address when typed on 3 lines. Single space, if

f.

or more lines are used.

Include the zone number, for quicker delivery, between the city and state.

How to address an envelope *+ 1/8 by 9 1/2 inches (Number 10 size.) a.

Begin the address in the middle and slightly to the left of the center when writing by hand.

b. Begin 13 lines from the top

edge and b inches

from the left edge when typing.

How to fold your letter to fit into a number 6 3/*fr size envelope. a.

Lay the letter flat on the desk.

b.

Fold upward from the bottom to within 1/b inch from the top.

c.

Fold from the right to the left approximately 1/3 of the width of the sheet.

d.

Fold the remaining portion from the left to the right leaving 1/b inch margin at the right.

e.

Place the letter in the envelope with the crease downward.

How to fold your letter to fit into a number 10 size envelope. a.

Fold from the bottom a lettle less than 1/3 the length of the paper.

b.

Fold from the top to within 1/b inch of the fold

c.

Insert into the envelope with the last fold toward you.

How to prepare your personal data sheet.

(See

Figure 2.) a.

Prepare data sheet under the following headings: (1)

Hame, address, and telephone.

(2)

Personal data.

Include date and place of

birth, age, height, weight, physical defects, religion, social security number, and marital status.

38 PERSONAL DATA SHEET July 21, 1950 % ■ PERSONAL INFORMATION Name:

Shirley M. Greenwood

Address:

1325 Chestnut Street Torrance, California

Age: 18 Height:

Telephone:

Place of Birth: 5' 2"

Present Health:

Number of days of illness during the past year: 2 Marital Status: Hobbies: Ambition:

Flint, Michigan Weight:

Physical Defects: None

108 lbs. Excellent

Nature of Illness:

Single

1552J

Religion:

Cold

Protestant

Photography, knitting, rarid swimming To become a private secretary

EDUCATION High School:

Torrance High School, Torrance, California

Date of Graduation: Course taken:

June 15, 1950

Business, with major in stenographic work

Subjects: English, 3 years Shorthand, 2 years Typing, 2 years Office Practice. 1 year Office Work (Attendance Office), 1 year Bookkeeping, 1 year

Social Studies, *+ years Phys. Education, b years Home Economics, 1 year Choir, 2 years Art, 1 year Math, 1 year Life Science, 1 year

Subjects in which best work was done: and Office Practice

Shorthand, typing,

39

Shirley M. Greenwood Personal Data Sheet Page 2 July 21, 1950 Activities: Member of Future Business Leaders of America; held offices of secretary and vice-president. Student body president during senior year. Member of Girls' Athletic Association; participated in bowling and basketball. Skills: Shorthand dictation, 120 words per minute. scribe notes, 30 words per minute.

Tran­

Typing rate (straight copy), 60 words per minute. Machines I can operate: Mimeograph, ditto machine, dictaphone, calculator, comptometer, and adding machine. WORK EXPERIENCE Worked for Mrs. Anna Branum in the school attendance office during my senior year. Duties included operating the switchboard, typing, and filing. Employed by Mr. Paul M. Allen of the Allen Real Estate Office during the summer of 19^9. Duties included typing, filing, and acting as receptionist. Reason for leaving was to return to school. REFERENCES Mrs. Anna Branum Attendance Office Torrance High School Torrance, California Telephone: Torrance 6M-5

Mr. Paul M. Allen Allen Real Estate Office 1629 El Prado Street Torrance, California Telephone: Torrance 155

Miss Francis M. Lawrence Business Department Torrance High School Torrance, California Telephone: Torrance 6*+5

Mr. Joseph T. Morris (Neighbor) 1327 Chestnut Street Torrance, California Telephone: Torrance 65^

*K> (3)

Education.

List schools attended (most

recent first), date of graduation, major, subjects taken, and subjects in which best work was done. (*f)

Extra curricular activities.

Write a brief

discussion of part taken in the activities. (5)

Skills. Make note of your ability to do special skills.

(6 )

Work experience.

List in the order of most

recent experience first.

State where, when,

duties, salary, and reason for leaving. (7)

References.

Give names, addresses, and

telephone numbers of ^ or 5 personal references. b.

Do not include relatives.

Give any other information that you may consider of importance.

c.

Include all work experience regardless of whether or not it is associated with your chosen voca­ tion.

d.

Be sure permission is granted before listing the names of references.

e.

Do not list persons who will not give you good references.

f. 9.

Fasten a picture beside your name.

Where to get further assistance. Reserve Shelf Collections

1:226-2^-1; *+:l5l-l66;

7:216-2^-7; 8:22-25; 9:l6*+-l80; 10:30-M*; 11:17-19.

bl C.

ACTIVITIESs Assignments to develop skill in writing application letters. 1.

Read and discuss sample application letters.

2.

Write a letter of application in answer to a want ad in your local paper.

3.

Address both No. 10 and 6 3/*+ size envelopes for your application letters.

b. D.

Prepare an up-to-date personal data sheet.

EVALUATIONS

Best answer questions related to the

written application for a riob.

(Place the letter of

the best answer in the parentheses.) 1.

( ) The best color ink to use when writing your letter of application

is;

(a) Red.

(b) Black,

(e) Green. 2.

( ) The first thing you should include in your letter of application a personal interview,

is;

(a) Request for

(b) Personal data.

(c) Application for the position. 3.

( ) When typing a number 6 3/b size envelope, the number of inches to be left at the left margin is;

*+.

(a) 2 1/2 .

(b) b 1/2 .

(c) b .

( ) The best references to include in an application letter or personal data sheet are; (b) Family,

(c) Personal.

(a) Credit,

b2 5.

( )

The best position for the complimentary close in the typed letter is: center,

(a) At the horizontal

(b) 5 spaces to the left of the hori­

zontal center,

(c) 5 spaces to the right of

the horizontal center. 6.

( )

The order in which yon'should list your work experience is:

(a) First experience first.

(b) Last experience first,

(c) The order in

which yonr work experience is best related to the position for which you are applying.

*+3 CHAPTER 6 .

ORAL APPLICATION

HOW TO APPLY IN PERSON FOR A JOB A.

MOTIVATION;

Rewards to be obtained through personal

contact with employer. 1.

PROMPT ANSWER:

The applicant Who is thoroughly

prepared for the interview will be able to respond quickly to the employer's questions. 2.

A GOOD FIRST IMPRESSION:

A neat and pleasing

appearance gives the employer good indication of your habits. 3.

JOB OBTAINMENT:

A successful personal interview

is likely to lead to a job. B.

DIRECTIONS:

Tins on the personal contact with the

employer. 1.

How to prepare for a personal interview. a.

Know in advance what you want.

b.

Arrange your questions, facts, or arguments logically in your mind.

c.

Rehearse what you plan to say.

d.

Try to foresee possible questions or objections and plan to meet them.

e.

Make an appointment giving your name and purpose for the interview.

f.

Get in advance as much information as possible about the interviewer, the company, and the position for which applying.

g.

Get a good night's rest the night before the interview. Use the following questions as a guide for your preparation^ ABOUT YOURSELF Cl)

How old are you?

(2)

Where were you born?

(3)

What nationality are you?