Your Child in Today's World

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Your Child in Today's World

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CHILDCRAFT YOUR CHILD

IN

TODAY'S

WORLD

*t

IN

VOLUMES

FIFTEEN

VOLUME FIFTEEN

IN

YOUR CHILD TODAYS WORLD

)

FIELD ENTERPRISES EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION Chicaqo 54-, Illinois Merchandise Mart Plaza •

3 1

Childcraft

VI

PAGE

You Can Still Keep How Can You Give

in

80-

Touch

Security

:

8l

Home Lite

M Dowley

Edith

.

.

.

Without Father

B2

85

How

B6

Do

....

...

Children Respond?

New Down

Planning

Your Role

92 93 96

Choosing

a

9"

Sitters

Sitter

97

Do

99

....

Need Briefing A Start on Human Relations

Sitters

....

$7

139 140

M' 142

IOj

Action

in

Parent E.T. McSwain 145

as a

Parents Create a

New Times

Have an Influence .Marion Lowndes

What

Parents

91

Less Strange

Sharing Heightens Solidarity

Sitters

1

Much?

Parents Expect too

90

Roots

the

Putting

"35

90

.

Make

134

What About Table Manners? Growing in Mannerliness Feelings Mold Manners

the Family Moves Gladvs Gardner Jenkins in

•34

.

Manners Are Contagious Children Learn Manners

They Remember Papa Making Up for Father's Absence When Father Comes Home

Everybody Shares



128

Kind of Manners for Our Children? Rose H. Alschuler 135

84

How Do

Are Together

PAGE

What

Preparing for Separations

When

We

The More

Some Fathers Must Be Away from

....

When Neighbors Work Together Do Away with Red Tape

"Climate"

New

Bring

14=5

Customs

147

...

Spurs to Learning

147

Reading Stimulates Thinking Using Language Accurately Thinking About Ideals

Home

and School Are a

[51

151 151

Team

Bess B. Lane Taking Stock

What

Living with Your Neighbors Paillette K. Hartrich

.

107 1

How Are Older Ones Affected How About Bad Examples? How— Not Where — You Live

109

no

Children Learn About Other People Wanda G. Robertson Attitudes We Strive for .

for

Someone

to

Blame

Differences Are Interesting If

Your Child

What Can

.

.

...

.

"Picked on"

Is

.

.

Do? Good Feeling

Parents

Schools Foster

Each Family

Is

Creating

Neighbors Can

Together Neighbors

— Modern

i

Relations

115 116 117 1

S

.

TroubleHilda Taba 121 121 .

...

122

123

:

163

Where Do You Find Counseling?

165

:

165

166

Vi>ur Responsibility

.

.

Of Course. You Will Make Mistakes Achieving Happiness for Our Children Life

Is

167

' .

'

f >7

168

Living

Educating Your Child Mental Health

Is

.

1

.

7

Important

Passing on the Torch

A Healthy Child What

Is

Personality for Every Leonard W. Mayo 173

a Health>

Personality?

Living out Conference (deals Miilcenturx

....

White House Conference Pledge

173 175 179

123

Reading for Pari

Work Ernest G. Osborne \z~ Style

162

.

.

;

120

Different

Friendl)

i

118

"What Will the Neighbors Say?" What About Standard-. :

Needed

Qualified Counselor

Is a

Your Greatest Gift to Your Child M. F. Ashley Montagu

— Dictators,

makers, or Friends

Who

Is

Guidance Clinics Work The Parent's Part in Treatment

1

1

Cultivating Understanding

Your Neighbors

1

.56

Robert L. Sutherland l62

.

Signs That Help

How Do

1

154 161

1 1

'54

Family Guidance Services

"7

108

Families Are the Bulwark

Looking

....

Ways of Co-operating Challenges to Teamwork

Babies Feel the Influence

What About Troublemakers

...

Ask?

Practical

Neighborhoods Influence Personality

We

Questions Shall

12-

Index

Your Kia

n

is

.... 10

Childcraft

181

183

289

.

These Are the Authors Rose H. Alschuler points out the difference between

and ok

artificial

manners

in

Oik Children?

i

how

courtesy can be

This

is

What (page

made

courtesy

Kind of Manners She suggests

135).

part of family

a

which she

a subject to

true

lias

devoted

versity. California.

life.

much

attention while bringing up Eve children. Among the author's books are Children's Centers, and

and Personality

Painting

wick

La Berta

(with

can take his rightful place with the children on his return. The author has made a special stuck of the effects of Father's absence from home. She is Associate Professor of Psychology at Stanford Uni-

Hatt-

)

Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg Special Consultant, Child Study Association of America in New York City, and for main yean was its Director. Her Chapter Our Chancinc is

World

k'rech. discusses

Children Learn to Handle Money (page

in

64

1

discusses

.

gives

practical

allowances,

and

pointers for helping children

who

question

the

of

tend to be spendthrifts or hoarders. The author is Director of Manhattan ville Dav Nursery in New York City and has written Grow ing Together, All in the Family,

is

Day Care Consultant

for

family

life

the fruits of her

Personality

intensive

studv

of

in a

\n

page 107). The author, fonnerlv Discussion Leader for the Association for Familv Living. Chicago, has made use of experiences in meeting with hundreds of parents.

to work,

Child Welfare League of America. In Some Mothers Go Our to Work (page -5 she suggests a number of helpful ways for making the separation she

written

neighborhood problems to bring parents help down-to-earth way in Neighborhoods Influi

and Your Child and Other People.

knows what happens when mothers go out

5).

how

Paulette K. Hartrich has applied

Dorothy H. Beers for

(page

with Hilda Sidney has altered in the last fifty years and how we can turn the changes to good. Among Mrs. Gruenberg's books are We, the Parents, and Our Children Today.

Rhoda W. Bacmeister

the

1

I

James

easier for the child.

L.

Hymes,

points out in

Jr.

Becoming Resourceful

(page 58) children can be given appropriate experiences that help them deal with situations that require know-how and initiative. The author. Professor of Education at the University of Man land. College Park. Md.. is author of Understanding Your Child

how

Edgar Dale in

The Child and

i

Movies (page 19) makes

mi

available to parents the results of his research

children's reactions to movies.

He

on

suggests practical

and Effective Home-School Relations.

ways that movies can be made an asset rather than The author is Professor of Education at

a liability.

Ohio

State University,

Gladys Gardner Jenkins

Columbus.

explains

Harry is

F. Dietrich,

the author of

M.D.

many

accidents to children.

articles

In

Your Responsibility

on prevention of

1111

winv

1

\I0v1s

page go)

borhood. The author also has written, with others. These Arc Your Children.

Accident Prevention (page

51) he recommends steps parents should take to teach children sensible safety measures. The author is a wellknown pediatrician at the Beverly Hills Clinic. Beverly Hills. Calif. Is

m Winn

the effects of moving on children. She tells how parents can help them feel at home in a new neigh-

Hilda Sidney Krech is

co-author with Sidonie

Changing World (page discuss

Edith M. Dowley in Somi Fathers \Icsi Be ^wai ko\i Home (page 82) discusses how family ties can be kept strong during such separations, and how Father

how

families can

M. Gruenberg

of

Ock

3). These two authors use the new machines,

gadgets, and customs that help so

much

to enrich

and strengthen family life. She is also coauthor with Mrs Gruenberg of The Main Lives of Mud

1

cm Women. Vll

.

Childcraft

Vlll

Bess

B.

Lane Home and School Are

Together (page 127)

a Team (page who 153), outlines definite steps parents and teachers can take to support one another's efforts in helping children grow up. The author has also written Your Part in Your Child's Education.

wrote

Marion Lowndes wrote Sitters Have an Influence (page 9She discusses how you can select a good sitter and plan with her for the care of your children while she is with them. She suggests a convenient form for listing the information that every sitter needs. She also wrote Manual tor Baby Sitters. 1

discusses simple, practical, concrete undertakings that benefit everyone.

Wanda

G. Robertson

Children Learn About Other People (page 113) how the example, the attitudes, and the experiences we give our children can make for better feelings between families of different backgrounds, and why such good relationships are important. She is Professor of Elementary Education at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

suggests in

Robert Lewis Shayon in

Radio and Television (page 10), presents the

and the negative possibilities for children and viewing programs, and suggests definite steps parents can take to improve programs. He has been author, producer, director, and critic of radio and television programs. positive

McSwain

E. T.

Your Role as how vou can help in

in listening to

a Parent (page 145) suggests your child take his place in his

school and his community, as well as in his home. He presents constructive ideas for bringing about

good relationship among homes, schools, and communities. He is Dean of the School of Education, Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. a

Mayo

Leonard W.

was Chairman of the National Midcentury Committee for Children and Youth, formed to earn' out the recommendations of the Midcentury White House Conference on Children and Youth.

A Healthy

Personality

for

Every Child

shows how parents can earn' out these recommendations in day-to-day family living. He points out how the guidance volumes of Childcraft aim to put these principles into effect. (page

M.

F.

Ashley Montagu

Your Greatest Gift to Your Child explains how vou provide the foundations for a healthy personality in your children. He is Chairman of Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University, and has studied, written, and lectured

the

human

relations in

many

parts of the world.

Ralph H. Ojemann in Family Life Is Preparation for Adult Life (page 43) how home situations can

discusses

gradually

lead

children

into

the

responsibility

need to take in later years. The author is Professor of Psychology and Parent Education at the State University of Iowa, and has had a leading part in the distinguished studies from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station, Iowa

which they

will

City, Iowa.

Ernest G. Osborne is

Interpreting the News (page 33) points out relationships and activities at home can keep children from feeling overwhelmed by the violence, tragedy, and confusing values they hear and read about. Ways of highlighting helpfulness, humaneness, and courage are also suggested. The author is Chairman of the Department of Education at Adelphi College, Garden City, N. Y. in

how

Arensa Sondergaard

173),

in

about

Agnes Snyder

Professor

Columbia

pamphlets and

articles.

Bronxville Public Schools, Bronxville, N. Y.

Robert

L.

Sutherland

Family Guidance Services (page 162) what counseling services can offer when problems arise in family relations or in bringing up children. The author also points out the marks of a good counselor, and how to find your community's counseling resources. He is Director of Hogg Foundation, and Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas. Austin. explains

in

Hilda Taba Professor of Education, San Francisco State Col-



San Francisco, wrote Your Neighbor:, Dictators, Troublemakers, or Friends (page 121). She shows how neighborliness adds to children's healthy personality development, and how

lege,

a family can be friendly with neighboring families

Teachers College, of author many \i ighbors Can Work

Education, and University, of

in Comics (page 26) how the effect of the comics can be balanced by creative activities and by reading. She presents clearly both advantages and disadvantages in the comics. This author is a member of the Elementary School Staff of the tells

/

and vet hold fast to beliefs and customs of their own. She has written many books to help teachers improve human relations in the classrooms.

THE WORLD COMES TO OUR CHILDREN

T.ois

Hobart. Gushing

1.

OUR CHANGING WORLD

2.

RADIO AND TELEVISION

3.

THE CHILD AND THE MOVIES

4.

COMICS

5.

INTERPRETING THE

NEWS

Machines and gadgets have brought about way of living during

revolutionary changes in our

the last

fifty years.

How

can we use these changes

good advantage? Today's world offers splendid opportunities for the development of responsibilitv, resourcefulness, and the kind of interest in others that gives our boys and girls healthy personalities.

to

The world comes through

radio,

to

television,

our

children

and motion

todav

pictures.

These

are not in themselves a hazard, but the place they take in our children's lives determines whether they will be a constructive or a destructive force.

We want

our children to find satisfaction in vigor-

ous, creative play; not just in passive looking

and

listening.

Often, too. newspapers, magazines, and comic books portrav life in ways that are frightening and overloaded with violence. It takes time and thought and patience to explain the world to our children

wc hope thev will grow up to be kindly themselves and others.

so that thev will acquire the values

cherish.

Only then

will they

courageous, with faith in

OUR CHANGING WORLD SIDONIE MATSNER GRUENBERG Special Consultant, Formerly Director, Child Study Association of America, New York, N. Y.

and

HILDA SIDNEY KRECH,

B.A.

Co-author with Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg, "The

Many

Lives of

Modern Women;"

Words bring up

like

Berkeley, Calif.

a picture of

an old fam-

homestead that has stood on the same farm or the same street for generations. But people do not live like that any more. The attic with its odds and ends, the large family with grandmother and grandfather, uncles and aunts, and children of all ages are all as rare today as the horse and buggy. Often today we find one older relative living with the family, but not groups of them.

Most families today houses or in apartments. everything it stood for, that are

new

to

Making

"home" and "family"

ily

voung couples

from where thev grew up. What's more, you who are the parents of today's children did not grow up in such picturebook homes yourselves. You, too, for the most part grew up in small families and small houses or apartments. You, too, had parents who had moved great distances from their old homes.

live

The is

in attic,

gone.

small

with

Most

towns them, often many miles

live in cities or in

It is

davs.

the Most of the Present

no use

We have

to long for the

in the present as fully

possible.

and

We must hold on

values of the past. in

If

as wisely as

sound any have been lost to the

wc must find means them in new ways.

the shuffle,

recapturing

good old

to live with our children

of

Where Are Our Roots? Chief among the values wc want to hold fast is the feeling of belonging and of having "roots." Main voung parents fear that their children will never really have this feeling if thev must move from place to place, and arc far away from grandparents and cousins. But the im-

Childcraft mediate family matters most to a

Whether whether

it

or to shift

that family

child.

large or small,

its

home, mother and

father,

are the ones

who

The

near by.

clan gathered at least

on

holidavs and for family celebrations.

Many

continues to live in one place

and brothers

sisters

is

families

away from

who

are

living far

demand

occasions that

festive

now

relatives join friends for those

They

a large

family feeling

reallv count.

family.

Living in different towns, making a place among new groups of people may be pleasant or difficult, but it is a shared

having a warm, close group with several

experience. In

moving and making

justments, each gains

member

experiences and memories

share together.

ad-

of the family

Moving makes

thev

clearer

than ever the fact that while neighbors and friends may change, the family stays together. And it is the goings-on in the

adults

among

spiritual

development.

It

is

these close relationships that the

roots spread and draw their sustenance.

May

Replace Aunts and Cousins

once knew that bevond Boys and the immediate family circle was a larger family group. The cousins, the aunts and uncles, and the grandparents all lived girls

way

children. In this

Christmas can be given the proper

cele-

bration that brings full enjoyment to

all.

Birthday parties can be partly private affairs and will seem all the more "special" in contrast to the larger gatherings.

Community

Life

Gives Roots

Happenings within the larger family widen a child's sense of belonging

circle

to include others besides his

brothers,

on Friends

and many

be-

the big holidavs like Thanksgiving and

intimate family circle that nourish a child's

get a

and

sisters.

From

this

parents,

he goes

to understand his family's part in the

larger

community. Many children

when

their family has to

moves, for thev

suffer

make frequent

feel their parents are

out

of step.

If

You Are If

A Newcomer

you move

new town, even for become part of the means a great deal to

to a

a short time, try to

community.

It

your child if vou join the P.T.A., for example, and attend meetings with the teachers and the other mothers. It does not matter to a child that it was that P.T.A. last year and this P.T.A. this year. It is no harder for him than to adjust to this teacher this year after that

teacher last year. But he needs to feci that his family belongs.

The same Brownie and

No

applies,

Cub

of

course,

to

troops and other or-

matter what else changes, values in shared family experiences are eternal.

Machines can be your allies, but, like any friends, they must be chosen to fit in with

your family's

way

of living.

ganizations the children join. Granted,

being an active part, with a role to plav,

up with the same schoolmates and the same Scout troop. But if this is not possible, you can make

in the

pleasant to grow

it is

it

easier for

vour child bv taking part in

school and Scout activities, as well as in

volunteer

you

are.

community work, wherever can make your adjustments

You

along with your children's. If

You Are an Old

Settler

vou are settled in a communitv, you really have a double responsibility. You

communitv.

You have an obligation also to those families who are new to the community If the newcomers are to be kept from feeling lost and rootless perhaps even resentful or unfriendlv the permanent members need to make them feel a welcome, vital part of the communitv, whether for one year or for many.

or are there just temporarily.

— —

If

can give vour own children a feeling that the family belongs to and has an obligation toward a wider circle.

Your

child

not care about each meeting you attend and each project you work at. Whether it is Communitv Chest, library board, or acting as "watcher" at the will

polls

makes

slowly,

little

difference to him.

But

over the years, he will absorb

through your example the feeling of

Machines

—Enemies or Allies?

Todav's living

offers

advantages to

bovs and girls that their parents and grandparents never knew. The most striking changes in our way of life have resulted from the many inventions. Cars

and buses, washing machines, and frozen foods are but a few of the many things that make our whole way of living different from the ways of our grandparents. While most machines and

Childcraft gadgets

make

life

easier in

some way,

you may have noticed that they

also

bring problems.

Some

persons claim that there

is

less

when people

feeling of self-sufficiency

were

formerly

means

there

help

to

her.

It

mother has to call in a "sitter" if she wants to go on an errand. Once upon a time, relati\es were on hand to mind the baby while continuing that the

depend on machines for e\er\thing. Boys and girls, in particular, ha\e less

with other household

feeling of contributing to the life of the

Are the

family in a city apartment where the

But machines are here to stay and there is no sense in fighting them. Perhaps you do not think them good allies for improying family life. You might as well make them into assets, and recognize that in many cases the machine need not spoil the essential value of an

work

is done mechanically than on a farm where the necessary chores inyohe

their personal efforts.

Other persons

you that the

will tell

helped to build children's character and nothing takes their place. Riding in the school bus instead of walking to school makes children "softer" and takes away one more old-fashioned

chores

"character-builder."

Today, children watch telexision or when they might be playing games outdoors. These perprofessional athletics

sons will say this tends to

make

children

more passixe, less creati\e. Liying in complicated towns and cities, children cannot understand the meaning of their father's work (or even their mother's work, sometimes On farms they soon learn to understand the meaning of )

.

the yarious chores and routines, and the relation of the yarious actiyities to life

Both these situations tend to separate children from real experiences so runs one argument. itself.



The mother,

many

Human

Values

tasks.

There?

Still

experience.

A

child

who

takes care of his

little

on the school bus is showing much the same kind of respon-

brother or sibility as

sister

the child

who

took his brother

or sister to school on foot.

The boy who

mow

same kind

to

furnishing the

is

boy who mower. He

of service as the

pushes the

may

power mower

uses a

the family lawn

old-fashioned

exert less physical energy but, once

has worn off, he is exersame kind of responsibility. He must remember to do it and he must do it well. He must often give up doing something else that he would the

first

thrill

cising the

rather do, such as playing ball with his friends or reading a book.

The same

applies to the girl

who

runs

modern machines, may be busier and more tied down than the mother of two generations ago. This does not mean

the family dishwasher. At first it is fun but after a while it, too, is a chore that must be done, and usually at a time when she would rather be doing some-

that she actually works harder, for the

thing

blessed with so

machines do lighten her does

mean

that she herself

for all kinds of tasks that

by several

women

sisters-in-law.

the

in

labor. is

But

it

responsible

once were done

the family.

maiden

aunts,

older children and, perhaps, a hired

The

else.

All

among

these

the

jobs

can

members

still

be divided

of the family as

they once were. Children need the experience of being helpful and contrib-

the

uting to the

girl

more,

there

family is

often

welfare.

too

Further-

much

for

Our Changing World Mother

to

do alone, whether or not she

has the machines.

How

Children Develop Responsibility

was not so much the

It

specific task

that "taught" responsibility to a child in

knowledge

things

of

and

processes

through their tasks and hardships in past generations. Most important is what they learned through taking part in the daily work of the household, farm, or shop. In constantly being with others, they acquired the ability to get along with people of various ages and kinds.

was working with people Respect for the necessity and value of the task he was expected to do made it more important to him. Wlien children are expected to do

They

learned consideration, perhaps pa-

tience

and tolerance. Thev also learned up for their rights and to be

their share, they see the value of their

fair.

the past, as

and

it

for the group.

work and can

some

see, too,

the meaning of

parents and other adults seem

to fear that today's children will have

because thev have no

moral chance to share the hardships endured bv the pioneers and immigrants of the past. Or thev fear that because children spend more time in school and less "at work" whether at home or as newsboys or factory hands they are deprived of valuable lessons we and our fiber

less



own



parents acquired during childhood.

Certainlv children learned

New Skills Not alone through brooms and snow

Children Learn the

of their parents' work.

Manv

to stand

skills

and a

shovels, caring for animals or

weeding

the garden, do children acquire

Thev

can also learn useful

standing, chines.

skills,

skills.

under-

and ingenuity through ma-

Dishwashers,

heating systems,

and vacuum cleaners require dexterity and alertness to operate. Cameras and a hundred other devices can teach skills just as intricate, just as valuable, as those

needed for the spinning wheel or the old oaken bucket. Nor is it only in a large family or on a farm that children learn to work and play with others.

They can

learn through

their contacts with other children in the

cighborhood and in nursery school. and on the playground.

Later, in school

When the for

wood-chopping era ended, organized activities began, children had more free time. the

age

of

and guide is the boy who represents

Protector patrol

kind of children must the

and through various group projects find out

how

Concern

for

the}'

Is Still

Strong

From understanding and

accepting purposes of the common effort comes the need to see things through. the

The

tractions,

comes to persist against disboredom, and even against fa-

He

learns to be dependable, to be

child

tigue.

and sometimes even ingenious. Modern living in some ways gives children more of a chance to contribute, to be of use. A dramatic example is the foresighted,

who

"patrol" boys

traffic

are doing a

splendid job of preventing accidents at crossings

street

near

schools

teaching other children streets.

This

is

had an upset stomach. His elevenhad taken her home. The parents knew the apartment was locked and hurried home. When thev got there, they found that the boy had taken his sister home on the bus. He sister

year-old brother

to pull together.

Others

responsibility

assume today.

how

and to

of

cross

not "made" work, but

a

asked a neighbor to let him go through her apartment, so that he could go up to his

and

own home bv way in

through

a

of the fire escape

window.

locked the front door to

and put her to bed.

It

He

then un-

let his sister in,

had

also

been

his

decision to leave the eight-year-old be-

hind to explain the situation to their parents and to save them from worry. Here was an example of initiative, re-

and resourcefulness right in Those who bemoan the loss these virtues must not blame it all on

sponsibilitv, a large citv.

of

and children have

the removal of our children from the

han-

routine of feeding the chickens, water-

for resourcefulness in

Three

and sheltering the animals against the cold. Resourcefulness and responsibility

children were taken to a Sunday School

also flourish in the midst of our time-

vital

responsibility,

proved dling

themselves

capable

of

ing the cows, bringing in the firewood,

it.

There city life

is

room

and our children use

party by their parents. called for later.

When

it.

Thev were

to be

the parents came.

the youngest and the oldest were not there.

But the middle one, an

eight-year-

old bov, explained that his five-year-old

saving gadgets. They spring from the example we, as parents, set in dealing with unexpected situations, and in man aging the routines of daily living. These desirable qualities are rooted in our

at-

Our Changing World titudes ships

and

we

in the quality of the relation-

build

up with our

children.

Machines Need Not Boss You

The important thing is to feel -that you are running machines not that they are running you. You can choose between the machines you need and those you do not particularly need or want. Even when you decide to invest in a machine, you need not feel obliged to use it all the time. Constant use is not necessarily the best way to get your money's worth. Many women feel that if theY have a washing machine, for example, they must do all their washing



and ironing

home. Of machine is

at

pose of this

to take

all

the

ironing seems to be the last straw,

the one thing that keeps

them

tired

and

keeps them from catching up with their household tasks. Many do not feel that way. The point is that a woman should feel free to send some of her wash to the

laundry if she can afford it, and to use her machine chiefly for the things that do not have to be ironed. Using Machines with Discrimination

Television

is

another machine that

does not have to be used constantly once it is in the home. Families can still play

dominoes or

in hobbies or sports, and to spend some of their time out of doors. They do not have to condemn television programs any more than the parents of a "bookworm" have to condemn books.

They want fresh air try

chess, or read aloud.

The

TV

their children to get

and

to

make some

some

friends, to

out a variety of interests, and to

cover

new

dis-

The many possimake it necessary

possibilities.

and pressures weigh carefully the relative values of the different ways of spending our time. We must help our children so bilities

for us to

how to use their time in the most satisfying way. that they learn

New Ways

course, the pur-

work out of washing, to leaye only the ironing. But for many women the family

terested

iences.

for

New

Settings

the modern convenMother and Father are still the

In spite of

all

ones to guide the family in recreation, as in work and in most other matters. After all, the purpose of the many machines is to lighten labor

and

to save time.

The

thought we give and the decisions wc make about the use of that saved time are important. What we do with our free time makes a big difference in our life as a whole. When parents do nothing but watch sports on television or drive around in their cars to pass the time, neither the machines nor the younger generation are to blame. Parents can take the lead and look into the possibilities of camping, sports, games,

and hobbies. You may

handicrafts,

find

time for viewing depends on the programs and on the family's convenience. Certainly no child should spend all his free hours before a television set. He probably will not want to after the

your children and for yourselves, that enable you to share actively with others. The many changes that have come to

novelty has worn off

sider the values of

arc

—especially

enough counterattractions

if

there

for his

time.

Parents want their children to play with other boys and girls, to become in-

that there are ways of having fun, for

the

home

must use

challenge parents to reconfamily living.

Wc

our ingenuity and imagination to get for ourselves and our children what seems most worth while. must find new ways of living. all

We

MM

RADIO

Admiral Corp.

AND

much

nate adults as

as children.

It

is

only natural that children imitate that

TELEVISION

fascination, just as they imitate almost

ROBERT LEWIS SHAYON

parents talk about

Producer and Director of Radio and Television Shows; Author, Critic; Westport, Conn.

pect children to do less?

everything thev see grown-ups do.

TV

how

man\- hours at a time, Television,

it

If

for

can they ex-

is moving pichome! For three- to

actually,

tures right in the

ten-year-olds

and watch

who

still

have trouble with

much

clamor over television's effects on children is a good thing. It awakens us to a problem that many parents and teachers thought had been

words, the pictures are follow and understand.

solved

Fixed concentration on the screen can produce a sort of hvpnotic trance. Evervthing disappears except the images, flowing on with a falselv satisfying, sometimes habit-forming effect.

The



the

came

into the

home,

its

challenges have not been entirelv met.

Thev have onlv been compromised

Now

with, put out of mind, forgotten. that television

is

mind

reminding us on children. With our

How Do

aroused thinking,

we can make

use his imagination to

are getting cannot help

ress

on both

Why

TV

real prog-

so Compelling?

some

time, and actually

the

novelty of radio has not yet worn

off.

Both

for

arc

still

like

not

at

all.

new

toys.

Thev

the Effects of

TV and Radio

Differ?

some

must picture the

characters

the scenes thev are

in,

and

extent.

He

speaking,

their actions.

This requires effort, and not all children have their imaginations developed to a similar degree. This extra effort partly explains the fewer hours that children listen to radio in comparison with the

Television will continue to be a novelty

work

to

tire,

is

In listening to radio, the child must

fronts.

Is

it

here, the shaking-up

of radio's effects

we

easier to

the eves

not. Actually,

necessary for the

radio. Actually, in the genera-

tion since radio

mind does

If

fasci-

10

Radio and Television time thev spend watching television. It explains, too, why the smallest ones arc

among the most eager TV viewers. Whether it is music or words he

is

11

ment, sensitivity, curiosity, or intelligence in the children. In ancient huts or medieval feudal

when

castles,

clan or tribal storvtcllcrs

hearing, the child can shut off the intel-

gathered the children around them and

ligence content of

what is on the radio, stream of sound in the background. Instantly he can tunc himself, as well as the instrument, to what

thrilled

and

the

he

just feci a

selectively

stantly,

same things.

w ishes to hear. Just

he can tune out again, time concentrating on

The

as in-

at the

other

extraordinary capacity

children to do their listening to the radio

homework is

a

while

good example

Are Radio and TV Similar

in Effect?

hypnotized by pictures or can mentally tune in and out of words and music at will, the child's relationship it is

adventure, terror,

most tender

is

is

essentially the

to radio.

Both

same

to

TV

are endlessly flow-

ing fountains of psychological sensation,

bubbling up

in his living

are utterly impersonal

or fear to

suit

the

sensibilities of the smallest

child in the circle.

make no such Thcv speak alike to assuming some general

Television and radio

kindly distinctions. children,

all

type,

But whether he

as

that they did, soften the sharp edges of

of

of this.

How

them with myths and legends, knew their audiences personally. They could, and we guess storytellers

attributing

tics

to

are,

the

all.

identical

What

TV

characteris-

those characteristics

and radio producers

arc

never quite sure. The chief challenge

presented by both television and radio, then, is howto respond to their impersonal invasion of the home and turn it to good account for children, each of whom is unique.

room. They

The Case

and recognize no

individual differences of age, tempera-

Parents

TV 7 and

who

for

arc

TV and Radio enthusiastic about

radio sav that the screen

and

the loudspeaker open the door for their children to a world of information that children in past times never knew. This true. But what is the nature of this opencd-up world? Will it affect the is

child for better or for worse?

Undeniably, the range of

a

child's

knowledge and the picture he gets of the broad life around him on the earth cannot help being widened. But facts and things as they appear on the surface arc only the beginning of living satisfac-

Children use their imaginations when they transform radio voices into vivid scenes and lively characters.

Childcraft

12

The important

torilv.

thing

is

the mean-

with cheap

serials

and soap

operas.

ing of the facts, their arrangements, and

will adjust to television as well.

the values people give them.

an old storv and things are not as they seem."

What Values Do Radio and TV Uphold? Radio and TV affirm, in the great majoritv of their programs, the laws and rules of conduct that most Americans

common.

hold in

In this thev are ren-

dering a useful service to parent and teacher. is

One

of the tasks of the adult

to train the child for the world he will

Teaching him its ways and tracommunicating a societv's heritage has always been the core of education and upbringing. Any help from radio and TV is most welcome. live in.

ditions,

The Case Against Radio and TV

TV

But radio and

also cater to

what

they believe to be the majoritv tastes of the public in entertainment. All parents and teachers do not have, nor do they pass on to their charges, the same tastes and preferences in music, drama, comedv, variety, sports, or quiz. Why must children look at programs whose chief

element ings,

is

crime or horror, endless

or offensive

or

jokes,

just

killsilly,

producers of

TV

and radio pro-

grams and the advertisers who sponsor them are not deliberately doing harm. They are in business, and they want cus-

A

means more tomers. what they for out reach Thev customers. of

large audience

common denominator mass appeal." This lowest common

call

"the lowest

denominator

is

is

bad

the Risk to Character?

Is

The

as

is not that vour children will turn out to be "delinquent." and

risk

TV

and of themselves could hardlv

radio in

produce the emotional illnesses that are in the term "delinquencv." The danger is that these children will grow up dependent on TV and radio (and the movies, comics, and newspapers) for the goals thev pursue and the included

Thev

opinions thev hold.

will lose the

and thinking. They will become passive "lookers" and "listeners" who take no active part in life. That is not a good thing. The need of our time is for persons who can think for themselves. We need persons who can make up their own minds and thrive on the freedom to do so, even if it means not doing as others do. A child needs to spend some of his joy

of

doing,

creating,

time in constructive plav, using

his im-

making

things,

agination, being active,

trying out ways of getting along with

people. Such a child has a better chance

pointless noise?

The

What

We

This

responsible for

features of radio

and

TV

all

the

that parents

and teachers find objectionable. There is real risk to vour children

if

vou saw with many others, "In my childhood we read dime novels and wc outgrew them. We also have learned to live

of growing

than one dio. This

up able

who is

and radio

to think for himself

just soaks

up

TV

and

ra-

the real danger in heavy

TV

danger that

sur-

diets. It

is

a

immediate ones parents often worn about. Listening and viewing do keep children indoors. They may even interfere with homework, and perhaps with practicing music lessons, but, in passes the -

the long run, these are secondary

Can

The

We

risks.

Use Radio and TV Wisely?

day-to-day problems that arise in households over listening and viewing can be solved more easily if par-

most

Don't

TV

let

overdoses of your

or radio rob

child of that priceless gift

—ability

to lose

him-

self in creative play.

Century Photos

ents will

first

count it an inevitable, harmless passage through blood-and-thunder-land in growing up. The best protection against harm is no easy formula. Your child's protection here, as in cverv emotional hazard he meets, is a good relationship with vou and confidence in himself and the world around him.

consider the child's basic

needs and the quality of their own relationship with the child. A child needs his parents' respect. He needs consistent love and consistent limits. He needs to have a share in his family's problems, fun, responsibilities,

and

activities.

He

needs to have his curiositv easily and naturally satisfied and his imagination stimulated.

He

Can You Regulate

needs plenty of outdoor

tion without tension. his parents will love

He

needs to

know

him whether he

is

needs to have time alone with Mother or Father frequently. The child who has these will not be, year in and year out, what is called "an excessive

TV

and radio

and Viewing?

TV

He

good or bad.

Listening

Unless there arc some unusual circumstances, forbidding a child to look or listen is not a satisfactory solution. and Acquaintance with certain radio programs is almost essential as a password among children who go to school. He who has never heard of the current hero of the air waves could be at

play in an atmosphere of mutual affec-

listener-looker."

can see a zoo show or a circus program, enjoy it and forget it. He can even go through a spell of

lected programs has proved of practical

Westerns or "private-eye" programs and

value in

Such

a distinct

a child

disadvantage

Working out

13

a

socially.

compromise on

some homes. But

if

vou

se-

trv to

Childcraft

14 regulate vour child's listening

making

ing,

to give her a

and viewvou must take the trouble to find out what programs are to be seen and heard. That is not easv, for schedules are constantly changing.

Few

teachers have time to keep

parents or

up with the

latest thriller.

Rules Must Be Tailor-Made

A

program

at

mealtime

individual parent. So

is

is

up

to the

sending in a box

friends.

The

TV programs seem

common bond

other children in her

class.

with the

Recently, on

most afternoons, she has brought them to watch TV. For the present, TV seems to be serving a useful purpose. This six-year-old's mother is waiting until her daughter is a bit more sure of herself. Then she plans to bring out some "dress-up" material and suggest that the little girls might like to be the actors

home

Shall cantering cowboys replace conversation at your dinner table? The an-

swer depends on your own routines. Lucien Aigner

top,

or

balancing

playtime,

bedtime,

Bovs between six and eleven enjoy having close friends, having secret codes and hobbies. It emphasizes their growing independence from their parents. Some of the TV and radio badges and clubs that require the box

and

listening.

top cater to this desire in even a wholesome way. General rules do not

a

harmless or

with her in their own play. She has already managed on one occasion to involve them in cookv making with gratiis an absorbing but fying success.

TV

probablv

temporary

for

this

In another family, three times a

week

interest

youngster. five-year-old

Henry wants

to

watch

a

program that starts while the family is at dinner. Henry gets restless at the tabic

a fit

individual

families or individual children. In

one

familv a shy six-year-old has had trouble

before the other finish their

members

meal anyway.

of the family

No

great

harm

Radio and Television seems to be done by letting him take his and watch his program. If he hears the family laughing, he is likely to come in to sec what he is missing. dessert

Eight-year-old Barbara's parents feel strongly that the family should eat din-

ner together, no matter what program on. Barbara's father

home

for several

best, the

is

weeks

dinner hour

is

is

often away from at a time.

At

the only time he

sees his children or that the family gets

concern over short-time ones. The essential matter is to sec your child's listening and viewing against the back-

ground of everything else in his life. Is there a good balance between his work and his play? Has he time to choose what he wants to do, as well as having some planned and organized activities? Is TV or radio just one of the activities he enjoys, or is it the central point in his life? Is he worried about something, per-

But because her parents know somewhat resentful at missing her favorite program, thev make a point of making the meal as pleasant as possible. Slips in table manners and grammar go

at

uncorrected at that time.

is

together.

she

is

In each family, that elusive quality,

uncommon

sense,

must be the

guide.

15

haps his school work, perhaps his standing with his friends, or even his standing

home with you? Maybe radio or

television help him escape from a disagreeable situation. It

even possible that the disagreeable does not need to exist. Do something about it if you can, and the situation

and looking may diminish. voung chronic TV and Many radio addicts "get that way" because life

listening

TV Are Not Tools for Discipline Some parents wonder whether pro-

Radio and

grams a child enjovs should be a reward for good behavior. To use these programs to enforce any kind of discipline is to miss the point entirely. If you have good reason for feeling your child is spending too much time looking or listening, then you need to work things out with him. There is no sense in the attitude "I don't want you to do it, so I'll only let you do it if you are good. Then vou won't do it so often." His good behavior reallv is a bribe to you. Let us assume that a child is listening or looking onlv a reasonable amount and with other desirable Then the programs he likes should not need to be purchased with extra good behavior, any more than is

balancing his

life

activities in his play.

are his other leisuretime activities.

See the Child, Not

There

Just the

Program

tendency for parents to overlook the larger problems in their is

a

of the

is

too hard, or perhaps too uninterest-

may need to be relaxed them. Rather than concentrating on specific ways of limiting the looking and listening, try to see the larger picture of your child and his dailv life. A child may be failing in school because he watches TV too much. But don't overlook the fact that, instead, he may be watching television so much because it is the only way he can escape from his worries about school. Too much TV and radio may be the result, not the cause, of his troubles in any direction. He needs to be helped to find a better way to meet his problem. It is just possible that when he gets along better, he will have the desire and the energy to do something besides sit and gape at the magic screen ing. Pressures

for

or listen to the radio. It is

well to consider, too.

what

effect

the programs have on a child. Obviously

Childcraft it is

poor judgment to expose a nervous, frightened child to programs

easily

whose chief appeal

are

violence

and

ideas to

and helps to develop some ability and weigh the merits of

criticize

programs.

crime. In such a case, a clean-cut decision to keep issue. It

sion

is

is

away

is

a

no-compromise

better, of course,

the deci-

if

arrived at with the child's under-

standing and agreement, than

handed down It

is

as

it

is

effort to find

out what

ing the child to be fearful and

the child

is

Is

"Too Much" Radio

The agreed-upon

is

caus-

unstable.

of school age, the teacher

should be consulted.

Often it is a good idea to watch the programs with vour voungster. Then vou can tell when he is getting too keved up and provide something else that he likes to do. Just your presence may be enough to keep him from being frightened bv a program. If vou are a viewer or a listener, vou know what vour child is taking in and vou can talk it over with him. Discussing programs helps straighten out the children's mistaken

TV?

or

and

evils are excess

TV

allowing the children's demands for

Too

to tyrannize over the household.

manv hours

an ultimatum.

better, too, in such a case, to

make an If

if

What

TV

spent regularly watching

or listening to the radio to the ex-

clusion of reading, romping, and other

wrong. There can be no question that a child's taking all his meals with TV is a danger signal. Excess distorts reality for the child enjoyable activities

and

capacity for reading or

dulls his

creative play.

is

Too much

tends to lower his

TV

radio or

grades

in

school,

deepens his passive acceptance of the cheap, the tawdry, the sensational. excess that testifies to a in the child's life.

The

vawning

crater

may

criticism, nagging,

tween ridges of

It is

crater lie

be-

and

a

sense of failure; or between peaks of an

overbusv,

overprotected

overplanned,

life.

If

there

petite for

is

no

TV

insistent, unrelieved ap-

or radio, then the child

can pass safelv through the valley of their shadows with relative immunity. other resources that he enjoys and that his parents provide for his growth will outweigh the objectionable pro-

The

What

he sees or hears needless will be dissolved in the of desirable values and standards to him from the fountains of school, church, and good books. grams.

that

is

streams flowing family,

TV Hurt My Child's Eyes? Eve specialists seem to agree that TV does not harm eyes, provided the child Will

observes the normal, reasonable condi-

"My

report

card

— and

I'm

watching television anyway."

tired

of

tions for viewing.

A

set in

order, so that the picture

good working

is

bright, clear.

Make

the most of radio

and

TV.

your

Encourage

child

things up children's dia when

a good

encyclopeideas

new

come from and hearing.

and steady,

look

to

in

is

tecting eyes.

listening

a

requirement in pro-

first

Have

a light in the

at night, preferably

The

ideal thing

is

to

springboards

for after-program discus"looking things up," is an excellent custom. More important than the listening-viewing experience in fam-

room

sions, for

behind the viewer. sit at least one foot

away from the screen

for every inch of

If the size of the room makes the last condition impractical, the child should not watch too long at any single sitting

—and that

is

a

good idea under

all

listing in a

and

radio

trouble with eyesight that has

realistic.

grams ture

The

unfortunate aspects of radio and can be done away with better if practiced.

Even the poorest programs may then be used to teach good the

better

taste.

more out programs. Using them

un-

for children in the foreseeable fu-

is

not a result you can hope persons

are

vitally

for.

con-

TV

sonablv and cnjoyably. Then, as in life vou can accomplish a great

Family looking

also helps get

is

production of perfect pro-

cerned to embark on such a crusade. system roots of our radio and go deep down into our business life. "Work" means setting no alarm clocks for results, but taking a normal, balanced, long-range view of what an individual parent or teacher can do rca-

What About Family TV and Radio?

and listening

crusade to revolutionize the

The

The

is

it

television industrv, that

Not enough

then advised.

listening-viewing

Programs

work for depends on what you mean by "work." If you mean en-

a side angle.

family

for Better

Parents and teachers can

gone unnoticed before, the specialists say, is likely to be brought out bv watching TV. Examination and treatment are

TV

the feeling the child gets

better programs, but

con-

He should rest his eyes frequently and avoid watching the screen Any

is

Working

ditions!

from

TV

ily radio,

of sharing his parents' world.

its size.

of

generally,

as

deal.

17

If

any parent or teacher,

in

an

Childcraft

i8 othenvise

full

and

active

life,

does one

or another of the things suggested here,

he

is

doing his share. The degree of his

contribution depends on the intensity of his interests

and the time he can

What Can a

Parent Do?

him

directly, or to

teachers,

give.

parent-teacher

groups can join listener-councils. There are

many such

local councils.

The Na-

Radio and Television, 882 Victoria Avenue, Los tional Association for Better

Angeles

5, Calif.,

helps

them

organize.

Joining a listener-council puts you in touch with other persons who care

about better radio-TV for children. Together you can study radio-TV facts and help gather important data. You can make your ideas officially known to your representatives in government, as well station-owners, and as to networks, sponsors. It is the best step to take if you are interested in group action. Through vour group, or individually, you can support the efforts of the Joint Committee on Educational Television, 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington 6, D. C. This committee is leading the campaign of universities,

and municipalities in creating noncommercial educational TV stations. These stations are dedicated to the highest program standcolleges, public schools,

ards for children.

Individually or with others, you can support the efforts of the commercial

broadcasters to

lift

their

own program

You

can write your station a letter of approval when you think a program serves your child's best interests, or a letter of rebuke when it docs not. You may stop buying a sponsor's standards.

you object to his program or to his advertising. If vou do, it would be better if you took the trouble to write

product

if

make

Either would appreciate the informa-

Teachers Help?

you are a teacher, vou mav do

If

or

letter or

tion.

How Can Parents,

send a

a telephone call to your station-manager.

much

as,

or

more

lis

than, a parent to guide

children in the development of higher

radio-TV standards. You can take a what the children are seeing and hearing on the air if you can hear it yourself. You can show a sympathetic understanding of their likes and dislikes, even if they do not happen to be the same as your own. This, plus a friendly, critical appraisal of programs in group discussions in the classroom adds up to a really important contribulively interest in

tion.

Good

Citizens

Can Make Good TV

Parents and teachers together can help root a child's character in the good soil of affection and dignitv. They can maintain a wholesome respect for the

own pace of development, and democratic participation at home,

child's

of

school,

and

at play.

A

child's character

so rooted will thereafter

healthfullv

and without

grow of

itself,

distortion, into

who is not a "least denominator." Such a child will be nourished by the

a self-reliant person

common

many helpful qualities of radio and TV. Make no mistake, we have not even begun

to

draw on

their potentialities for

good! Such a child will tend to screen out naturally what could be destructive influences for

him

in

Also, such a child will

who The more adult cles

casts good seed about him. such parent-teacher-child cy-

there arc,

come

radio and TV. grow up to be an

the nearer

to better radio

and

wc

will

television.

all

Lucien AJcMt

ten good than unfortunate. If parents,

THE CHILD AND THE MOVIES

and the community are willing and effort into the

teachers,

to put thought, time,

question

of

movie-going, a

children's

great deal can be accomplished.

EDGAR DALE,

more, often it can be without pitched battles.

Ph.D.

Professor of Education, Ohio State University, Columbus; AuthoT of "How to Appreciate Motion Pictures" and "Audio- Visual Methods in Teaching"

What

Effect

What

is

accomplished

Have Movies?

Movies may be more exciting than radio or television, because children of-

ten see

When motion

we

them when they

Moving

on some children today, we wonder what can be done to develop wider, wiser tastes. Neither complete easy-goingness

contagious.

nor ovcranxictv

reassuring adult around.

true that

all

pictures have

is

the answer.

It is

are in a large

group. Excitement in such a group

see the strong hold that

pictures

can

is

be

frightening at times, because they are

seen away from the familiar surroundings of home, and main times with no

not

The way motion

children can take unlimited

pictures

affect

a

parents can take sensible steps to

depends on his age, his experiences. Ins needs, and his thinking and feeling at the time of exposure. I lis background and personality determine what the picture will say to him. Ilie real question for an indi-

sure that strong impression

vidual parent

movie-going in their stride. Neither can the movies almost overnight wipe out the excellent teaching of

doses

child's behavior

of

the church, home, and school. Motion pictures

make

a strong impression,

is

but

and

feelings

r

make more of19

is

not,

"Is

this

picture

Childcraft

20 good?" but "Is

this picture

good

child?" Just because a picture

on

a fine

book

or play, or has

cational features, docs not is

for this

based

is

some edu-

mean

that

it

suitable for a five-year-old or even an

eight-year-old.

The

moral or

visual presentation of a

immoral

act

mav have

a varietv of

mean-

there, many start going in babvhood. At an earlv age thev are often sent along with older brothers and sisters. Sometimes they start going because other children in the neighborhood go. Ideallv, children under eight would go onlv to those rare films they could rcallv enjoy

and

profit from. Actually

most

par-

ings to a child. Actually, films that can-

ents sometimes use the motion-picture

not be understood clearlv bv a child mav be harmful, because they can be deeplv

theater as a parking place for their chil-

no

The less this is done, the better chance vou have of developing more

horror and no sordid love storv does not

constructive interests and of avoiding

confusing. assure

The

fact that a film has

you that

five-vear-old

it

or an

is

"all right" for a

eight-vear-old.

The

same incident mav frighten one child and be ignored by another.

dren.

the undesirable effects of movie-going

on children.

How

Often Should Children Go?

If a child

When

When some

Should Attendance Start?

voung children

regularitv

to

a

are taken with

theater,

parents

should remember that a taste and a habit are being formed. In selecting the phvsical diet

we

ask: "Is this a healthful

harmless?" We would do well to use the same reasoning in

food?" not "Is

it

connection with motion-picture going. Children can get along without seeing anv commercial motion pictures until the age of seven or eight. But, because

mothers

Make a

and

fathers

seek

recreation

restless

is

irritable, overexcited,

after sitting

through a feature

then he is not ready for frequent motion-picture attendance. "How often" depends, too, on what is being shown. The once-a-month rule or once-a-week rule can defeat its own film,

purpose.

If

two

really

good features ap-

pear within a short time, it would be too bad to denv a voungster the chance to see both. If nothing good is in the

neighborhood for weeks, it is hardly worth going just to make use of the privilege

of

attending.

more

Clearly,

special treat of the rare movie

that is really suitable, not less, for children

under

merely harm-

eight.

and

I

I-

:

!T

is a child's way of many movies mean less

Constructive play learning.

Too

and

time,

flexibility

often less appetite, for

would make better

it.

sense.

How

often a child should go to the movies

must be decided in the light of his age, and the offerings at available theaters. The effect movies have on him, as well everything else he

as

is

doing needs to

be considered, too. Using Motion Pictures Wisely If

motion pictures are

his only source

of enjovment, then the answer

make more

to

tive activities available.

why he

sider

movies.

A

Lucien Aigner

We need to conChoose the Good Movies

and onlv balanced recreational diet and craves movies,

the capacitv to enjov tivities are

mav be

constructive and attrac-

many

the goals. There

Movies can be kept as something of a That means you must supply something else to give your child satisfaction and a sense of achievement. If you can provide play space, materials, excursions, and an atmosphere of friendliness and acceptance at home, the movies do not become an escape.

kinds of ac-

is

no need

treat.

to

be concerned about the child who gets along well with his friends in school, has

many

constructive

interests,

and

still

goes to the movies once a week.

A is

part of the answer to this question

matter of relative values. WTiat this child be doing if he were not the theater? He might be plaving on

would in

how vour children are know what they arc see-

In order to see

a

reacting ing,

and

to

probably you should go with your

crowded city street. But he might be building something at home or taking a

children before thev reach the age of

hike with his friends, or just resting.

ing,

a

vou keep

in

mind

this goal of a

eight. If the film does prove

If

good

vour presence

anxiety. If

overwhelm-

may

prevent excessive you are taking a small child

what

balance, vou will not go far wrong.

to see a particular feature, find out

Sometimes, if evervone else in the neighborhood has seen a film, vour voungster is practicallv an outcast if he has not seen it. Without succumbing totally to the pressure of "but everybody else does," you may occasionally need to let your child do as the others

time it begins and get there for the beginning of the feature. Avoid confusing previews and other shorts. It

is

good

for

your children to get the

feeling that you are not against

tion pictures.

all

mo-

They can know vou

are

against the dubious ones, but in favor

The effect of always feeling left out can be as unfavorable as the effect of seeing one or two poor movies.

of the excellent ones.

do.

movie-going makes

Your example

a difference in

in

our

children's attitudes. Graduallv children

21

Childcraft

22

should be able and be allowed to take

re-

de ;

sponsibility, as their discrimination

velops, for film selection.

How Can You Cultivate Taste? The taste of vour child probably

will

eventually be a reflection of your

own

taste.

mind to bear on what he sees on the screen. This does not mean that he is always picking things to pieces or that he does not enjoy himself. It means inquiring

that

This means that you must develop

absorb everything. ject

some

You

tion for films. It means, also, that you

asking

must help your maturing children grow

think

an awareness of suitable standards

in

this field.

Good

taste in family

movie attend-

ance can be fostered as your children learn to select their entertainment. They must not passively accept what comes along. People carefully select their books, their children's stories, their

vacation spots, their

with

You all

the

all

skill

home

and

furnishings,

taste thev have.

can build the ideal of excellence in The family attitude can be

fields.

that you go to a film because

thing vou want to

see.

You

it is

some-

don't go just

can't think of anything to

because vou do at the moment.

Good

means not only wise selecmeans active rather than passive viewing of the film. Even a small person can bring an active, critical, and tion.

It

taste

also

is

critical-minded

He doesn't He may and must re-

rather than sponge-minded.

discrimination and a critical apprecia-

in

he

general

in

things.

can stimulate discrimination bv occasionally,

made

that

"What do vou

movie

good?" or

so

"Why

did you like the last one better?" or "Let's all tell what we thought was

the best part of the picture."

How

Shall

You

Criticize?

Children over distinguish fanciful trouble.

five or six usually

between

and the

The

facts,

the

can

out-and-out

without too

much

heart of the problem

is

want vour movie-going children to accept as true values and standards that in real life would be conthat vou do not

sidered false.

For example, it is not true, as the movies suggest, that romantic love in real life solves all difficulties. It is not true in real life that the crime problem is solved bv punishing individual criminals. The intelligent movie-goer does not permit the highly persuasive movie Press Syndicate

Communities put effort and money into developing children's fondfor topnotch books. Let's have such

ness

efforts to cultivate

taste in films!

good

beg to go "because everybody else does," for moviegoing means being one of the gang and in the know. Children

L

him so that he suspends judgment of what he sees. These points you can discuss as a family with critical

school-age

children.

You can

explain

and in what wavs departure from reality enhances or takes awav from their value. To help children develop good taste, you must start where your children's taste is, not where you think it ought to be. You mav be bored bv Westerns. So may vour fourteen-year-old. But vour films are often not factual

eight- or ten-vear-old

mav not

be.

I

than

is

the best.

You can

plan to get

some

member

of

the

in

the director's or

You must remember

always that vou

are trving to help vour children develop their

own

standards and tastes. Some-

times those tastes will differ from vours.

This

lie

is

not a bad

sign. It

may be

a sign

of thinking and of growing independence. tastes

children get other types of films, and as well as

each

writer's place.

vour job to see that your

read other books

expected,

would have done

his onlv standard for judging It is

.V^T.er

family might suggest what he or she

best thing a person has seen. read, or

heard

*---

contributes to good photography, music, and sound. Social values, and strengths and weaknesses of plot are worth discussing, too. If the movie was poorer

to influence

why

.

It is

even possible that children's better than

mav sometimes be

those of the parents.

Westerns.

Good Movies

of the best

movies into the diet of vour child. You can help him to develop his own standards of good acting, direction, and casting. You can help him understand what

— A Community Problem

There are two approaches to the problem of the child and the movies. One approach is from the standpoint of "my child and the movies.'' You, an indi23

Give the children a chance to see interesting and artistic films, and they will develop more discrimination.

Cushing

must do the best you can But there is

vidual parent,

good reading

will build

taste unaided.

to protect your children.

On

the contrary, people tax themselves

another approach that of "our children and the movies." The co-operative

for

public

trained



activity of all parents

the movie problem.

needed to solve as an individual good pictures are

tion regarding

is

The

You

parent

Thev

libraries.

children's

hire

librarians.

good books

who wants

is

well-

Informaavailable.

his child to de-

parent can do little if almost never available for children at

velop good reading tastes has an allv in

the theater.

be easier to get good books for children than to get poor ones. If a child merelv selects what he likes without guidance, his taste will not im-

It

must be

the librarv. Indeed, in

realized also that group

standards have a great deal of effect on

Group opinion regarding

children.

all

movie-going

mav be

far stronger

the pressure that you exert alone. are constantly

than

If

A

prove.

you

ing

met with such statements

many

mav

cities it

recent studv of children's read-

mav have important

a child's movie-going.

implications for

This studv found

"But other kids can go" and "Why are you so strict with me? Other parents aren't so strict," you face difficulties in

out that children may read the same kinds of materials over and over again.

getting your children's co-operation.

thev will probablv read onlv that kind.

as,

That

If

something else is available for all the children, you are not likely to be looked on as a severe parent.

if

is,

they like Western

Unless

guidance

readers

readily

They can

is

fall

stories,

provided, into

voung

reading ruts.

as easily fall into film ruts.

Parents have an ally as far as movie-

What Guidance

in Selection?

going

Perhaps parents can get some help by turning to another field. What is the

No

concerned in some of the

ganizations.

some

good taste in readone assumes that each parent

situation in regard to

ing?

is

lists

supplied bv reliable magazines and

These

usually

or-

give

indication of suitability for differ-

ent age levels, too.

24

lists

The Child and the Monies members community must shoulder responsibility in this field. Thev must deParents as individuals and

tal

own

ef-

They must look

motion-picture

ccr-

and group

:: § nilv solidarity often make up for unfair. lings ties for

.

.

ME MOTHERS :-GO OUT TO

\

WORK

3

DOROTHY

H. BEERS,

MA.

Day Care Consultant, Child Welfare League America,

New

whether her working will result in happier child and greater satisfaction

sider a

of

York, N. Y.

for herself.

her husband

A (if

better relationship with

she has one

harmonious home

)

and a more be points

life will also

to consider.

One

of the

in

most debated questions

Different mothers will arriye at this

the twentieth

The needs of your child, your temperament, family

familv

century

life

in

"Should

is

decision in different ways.

mothers

work?" There is no single, simple anSome mothers should work and some should not. "Why" and "how" you decide to go to work largely determines whether or not it is the right an-

and the material situation will inEach child reacts differently, depending on his own personality and his experiences. There are certain basic facts you can use as a yardstick in measuring the validity of your values,

fluence your decision.

swer.

swer for you.

decision.

Shall Mother If a

sible

mother

may ha\c

she lives

in

to

Work?

Why Do

alone and solely respon-

for the care

child, she if

is

Go

a

and support

of her

Until

a child

readies his

he needs someone

to work, particularly state

Babies Need Their Mothers?

who

first

birthday,

considers

him

the most \ital piece of humanity ever

where go\crn-

mental allowances for the care of children are inadequate. If a mother does not ha\e to work, she will want to con-

brought forth. lie needs to this all-important

person

feel close to

who

will play

with him. cuddle him, and sometimes

75

Mother's departure

is

never easy, but

more readily endured when one is feeling well and reasonably contented. it

is

nonsense to him. This is the way human being capable of establishing relationships with others. The younger the child, the more he needs his mother. Most of what we call talk

he develops into a

character and personality fore the child

is

six.

mother should have in

possible

as large a role as

developing that character.

she does not

If

formed be-

is

Therefore, every

fill

that role,

someone

(whatever mother-substitute she chooses ) will fill it. A child learns about the world around him through the people who take care of him. His attitudes toward people, his friendliness, trust, or

else

mistrust,

are

sible,

familiar parent just at this time, even for

daw may be too much of a shock and too fear-provoking for a child. He needs consistent handling bv loving people as he tests his independence and

formed by the way the

adults in his earlv

life treat

then, mothers will

their children

Elizabeth Hibba

most

him.

want

If

part of the

pos-

to be with

of the time, in at

least the first three years of their lives.

his

What Do Mothers Mean

to

a mother whom he has already learned to trust. By the time he is three, a child has usually found his place in his own family. He is ready to include in his world other adults and children of his own age. A good nursery school at this time can further his deyelopment and teach him

Toddlers?

By the time a child is a year old, he is aware of a mother, a father, and perhaps brothers and sisters in his life. Finding his

own

place in the family

is

most

easily

accomplished if the people to whom he looks for comfort and reassurance are there when he needs them. A child needs familiar surroundings.

Around the age to sense their

own

a

of two, children begin

The

they

great

come from

deal.

that

is

It

free

may

also proyide a time for working, if

necessary.

powers. Every parent

When

familiar with the

his parents.

if

mother with

sudden contrariness of the previouslv sweet and docile child. But this toddler is still dependent. He shows it often bv apparcntlv forgetting how to do something that you were sure he had learned last week. He is testing his independence, and his security with is

Restrictions are easier to

security.

bear

Should You Stay Home?

If you are considering working outside your home, try to choose a time when things are going smoothly, not when a youngster is going through a difficult period. There arc many signs that you can recognize as distress signals, even if nothing is said. If your youngster cries

loss of the reassuring

76

Some Mothers Go Out to Work gone back to babyish ways, such as wetting after he has been toilet-trained, or if he refuses to eat, it may be a sign he is troubled. Vomiting, nail-biting, temper tantrums, or just plain whining on the part of a normally good-tempered small child may be a danger signal. If any of these symptoms are persistent, you can be rather certain that all is not well. This is not the time to start working away from home. persistently, or has

kind of discord between parents, can make a child uneasy and anxious. Young working mothers often have to withstand the disapproval of their own parents, their husband's parents,

present, whether you work or But one thing is certain. Your work-

may be

and the doubly important parents know where thev

So

neighbors.

both

that

it

is

stand on the subject and are in agree-

ment.

What

these signs of distress

It is true that

77

over Mother's working, like any other

The

Substitutes for Mother?

and it may make it worse. If your child shows such symptoms persistently, you will be wise to seek advice from someone

work or not to work by what arrangements you can make for your child's care while you arc gone. The needs any child has, as well as the special needs your own child has at this moment, can be taken into

trained in dealing with behavior prob-

account, too.

not.

ing probably will not help the situation,

lems of children.

The

Guidance Seryices, be helpful

in

Family

Volume

15, will

to the

consider the needs of

Job will

as well as those of the child. It

is

im-

portant that mother's working be a part of the family plan for the future.

band's attitude

When

is

A

hus-

especially important.

the normal problems of

management and

child

In communities with a population of

more than

rearing,

home

cil,

local office of the State

usually a

is



is

no Coun-

Department

of

Welfare, or a recognized children's or family agency can give this information. Remember that they may only be able to tell vou what services exist, not if these services are good.

Some

plus

have licensing laws reguconduct of all agencies and in-

states

lating the

well-being of your children are multi-

least,

you waste your energies worrying, "Is this what I should be doing? Tilings might be different if I had stayed home." Such feelings of guilt are decreased if the whole family, particularly your husband, have agreed that your working is the best solution to the problems confronting the family. Discord

are

if

there

the local department of welfare, the

competition in the outside world, are complicated by worrying about whether your husband approyes of the job, everyone involved suffers. Anxieties about the plied

30,000,

ices for child care. If there

want to the whole family,

you go to work, you

decision to

also influenced

Council of Social Agencies the place to find information on the various serv-

in this connection.

The Family Must Agree If

chapter,

is

dividuals caring for children.

If

that

is

true in your state, you can get information about licensed programs. These, at

have minimal standards. If there no licensing laws, you will have to judge for yourself what kind of care your child will get. Your understanding of what all children need, as well as what your

own

child in particular needs, will

influence your decision.

What in

The

chapters

Children Need from Life, Volume 12, and What Nursery

Childcraft

78

Groups Offer, in Volume 13, can help you make an estimate of the place. . National organizations have established standards for nursery schools, and publish material explaining these standards.

Among

the sources you might look

to for this information are the United States Children's Bureau, 4th and Independence Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C; Child Welfare League of America, Inc., 130 East 22nd St., NewYork, N. Y.; National Association for Childhood Education, 1201 16th St., N. W., Washington, D. C; National Association for Nursery Education, Education Office, Roosevelt College, 430 South Michigan Ave., Chicago.

family-service agency responsible for in-

specting and supervising the day-care home. If no agency offers this service in your community, the state department of welfare

Nursery Groups

When

fered by a

For the infant, an individualized and mothering kind of care is needed, if he cannot be with his own mother all the time. A motherly kind of person who can accept and fit into the ideas of the household, and who will come into your home by the day, or live there, is the

fer, in

the

question,

such a person

a

foster-family

home is a good alternate The safest way to find a day-care home is through a

is

licensing responsi-

Small Child

over three years of age, he probably will enjoy the fun and opportunities for social experiences ofery school.

If

for the

a child

Individual Care for Babies

best solution.

may have

and may be able to direct you to licensed homes. Those who have studied babies carefully consider day nurseries, or any form of group care, unsatisfactory for the infant, for the child under two, and, in most cases, for the child under three. bility

is

good day-care center or nursWhat Nursery Groups Of-

Volume

13, explains the differ-

ence between these types of care, as well as their programs. Teachers and social workers in such programs are ready to help you with problems that come up because you are working away from

home.

out of

day-care

solution.

foster-family child-care or

What Arrangements

for the

School Age?

Children between six and twelve years sometimes appear to get along without supervision. These children also of age

Usually, three-year-olds are ready to be away

from mother intervals

for

short

and enjoy

the

nursery school routines.

The care others give may be as good as Mother's, but only she can give the comfort that speeds recovery.

need to have a sense of belonging. They need a sense of responsibility to one or two adults who are interested in them, and who know them well enough to provide guidance, as well as to give

the phvsical care required.

communities are

them

Main

larger

that

these

realizing

children are not as self-sufficient as they

seem, and are providing day-care pro-

grams

for this age.

Some

tiuzam

of these centers

provide care and supervision before the elcmentarv school opens in the morn-

hot lunch

ing, as well as a

There

is

supervised play in

come! You can try to plan, too, so that the time you have with the children will find vou refreshed.

noontime. the afternoon at

mother gets home no such facilities exist,

after school until the

from work.

If

again the foster-family day-care

the neighborhood tion,

even for

may be

a

home

good

When Do

in

It

Own

my own

Needs

quite readily discover the times

be lived." The job of the working mother has been described as "a job-and-a-half." It often seems like two jobs! Mothers need recreation, but the schedule that many employed mothers set for themselves allows scant time for this. When vou are really fed up. weigh the relative advantages to vour family of spending an evening grudginglv reading stories to the children and doing the mending, against getting in a responsible baby sitter and going out to have some fun with vour husband. He would probably like to feci that he still has a wife, as well as a

and

to

mother

a partner in

is

when

it

important for you to be

especially

with vour children. In general, mealtime

when vour small He may enjoy lunch

times

is

one of the

child needs you. in

the

nursery

school where he eats at a small table

with other children. But he wants also the time with his own family at the dinner table when family activities and ideas are shared. It is hard for him to be given supper alone before the adults cat.

when he

has been out in the larger world

of the nurscrv school

all

day on his own.

The beginning and end of the day arc also times when your children need your

for his children

providing family

cannot be emphasized too often

and security is not dependent so much on the number of hours you spend with them as it is on the quality of the relationship when vou are together. You can

You may well ask at this point, "What about me? I. too, have needs and a life of

You Most?

that your children's sense of belonging

solu-

a school-age child.

Mothers Have Their

Children Need

reassurance. forting,

in-

79

Going to bed can be a comand welcome experience

safe,

Childcraft

8o

when

accompanied bv a good-night before-bedtime story, and a fond tucking-in. It can be dismal and lonely if night after night the child is left in it is

kiss, a

interests of the children with the interests of the adults in the family.

Excur-

Young Children, in Volume Adventuring and Through Excur13, sions, in Volume 14, may have helpful sions for

the hands of an indifferent baby sitter, whose main desire is to get the youngster bedded down and out of the way.

suggestions for you. Let your children

A

Sick Child Needs His Mother

plans and decisions are

When

you

children are sick, they need

mothers

their

especially.

They

feel

strange and less able to cope with the

challenges of

someone

life.

They want and need them, to make deci-

discomfort.

and

The

make up to the

child at this time for his need of

mother

sympathy, and comfort. There is certain to be some illness in every family. If you can plan your job so that you can be at home with your child when he is ill, you will find that your youngster is less demanding and happier when he is love,

well.

Shared Occasions Are Happier

Your own

You Can

hygienic but usually

of a strange nurse will not

sensitiyity to

your child will

guide you in knowing

how and

you on hand. his parents around young child wants A birthday parties and on such occasions as school. your As Christmas programs at youngster grows up a bit, you will be well rewarded if you follow his interests. If he is absorbed in airplanes, for instance,

together,

that.

to ease their physical

comfortless atmosphere of a hospital or

when he

made

have more fun as a family. The Family Council, in Volume 12, describes some practical ways of doing will

to comfort

sions for them,

also

how your time together can best be enjoyed. When participate in planning

If

you are

a

Still

Keep

in

Touch

working mother, you have

a special responsibility for

becoming

partner with your child's teacher. will

want

to

a

You

exchange information with

her and hear her suggestions for helping your youngster get along with the least possible conflict at

A

home and

at school.

nursery-school child especially needs

know

his mother and teacher are and are in agreement. Johnny can be torn in two if Mother says, "Afternoon naps make you stay awake too long at night," and if his

to

friends

teacher says, "All the children at nursery

school take naps after lunch."

particularly wants

become acquainted with airThe fact that you know

planes yourself.

be an added be a sign to the youngster that you care about him.

one plane from another

bond between

you.

will

It will

too.

You can

plan family holidays and excursions with an c\e to combining; the

Consistency and Co-operation

When

his

mother works, two

or three

adults unayoidabh" are responsible for a

grows older, he learns that different people respond differently and have different ideas. But it is better for his peace of mind, especially when he is very young, if the important persons in his life have similar ideas about most points that concern his bchayior. Mothers and teachers both can be prechild.

As

a child

pared for the "testing" the young child docs in his effort to find out whether the adults around him mean what they say.

Your touch, the tone of your voice, the way you listen to him tells a youngster more of your love than costly gifts.

You may trouble

save yourself a great deal of

you find out what the

if

policies

and routines are at the nursery school. You, in turn, can help the teacher. Let her know as much as possible about your youngster usually reacts, and

how how

you usually handle the routines and discipline at home. If you and the teacher keep in touch, your three-year-old or five-year-old will not be able to play one of you against the other bv insisting, "We never have to do that in school" or "My mother doesn't make me do it this way." Children change both physically and emotionally almost from month to

month

Korling

through breakfast that he is not in the way. He feels better if he knows that taking him to the nursery is not trouble for you. Try to make it a time when vou and he can be together and share some experiences. He wants to know by vour smile and your manner as vou call for

these early years, for rapid

in

growth brings change with it. If you and vour child's teacher work together, each of you can help the other understand vour child's changing needs and growing skills. Then your handling of him can keep pace with his needs. In the rush and pressure of your work and your responsibilities at home, you might sometimes

lose

sight

of

some

of

him

It is a

these

Give Security?

temptation to try to make up to

child

To

your child, this wants to feel does not your through vour love and affection his comb his face and touch as you wash through your security hair. He gains warmth and sympathy as he comes to vou with problems. He wants to know in the morning as you and he hurry of

them.

spell security.

who

has

become

These problems

lavishly of material things, or by requirlittle



and angry. mothers. They are common to all children and parents. But the working mother must

vour children for your absence by giving ing

home

evening that vou are truly glad to see him not just hoping that he will not cause any trouble! Patience is a virtue to be cultivated bv the working mother, for it will bring innumerable rewards. Children cannot be hurried or put aside or ignored. The hurry and the putting-aside of todav will require many more hours of time later to woo back the once lovable and loving

changes.

How Can You

at the nursery or the day-care

in the

He

afraid

face working

be especially aware of them, because she has fewer hours with her child. Since the quality of the time together counts for more than the quantity, children whose mothers work need not be the losers, if their mothers plan carefully. 8

4MI

H. Armstrong Roberts

SOME

ment, even though their fathers are ab-

FATHERS

sent during

MUST BE AWAY FROM HOME EDITH M. DOWLEY,

Ed.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

There

have always been,

many

as there are

whose work has taken them away from home. today,

New

fathers

understanding

of

impor-

the

tance of fathers in the development of

made

children's personality has

more thought

to the

way

us give

lather's ab-

sence and his return are handled.

It is a

distinct advantage for children to live

and grow

in a

home where

Mother together

give

Father and

them loving

healthy

personality

Life

Mothers

are

of their childhood.

Without Father

bound

to feel that they

earning an extra burden of responsibility when fathers are away, even if the absences are short but frequent. Decisions ordinarily made bv Father must now be made bv Mother. But caring for the lawn or watching the budget, coping with the vagaries of the family car or the furnace, may seem simple compared with the responsibility of rearing the children alone. A woman cannot be both father and mother to her children, and she need not try to be. Being as much as possible the same kind of mother you were before Daddv went away will give vour children a feeling of confidence in your unchangcablcncss. This is the confidence they need when so much else in their lives may have changed. are

care

and guidance day after day. But children can grow strong and happy, enjoy a life rich in experiences, and satisfying achieve

some

Mothers Are Lonesome, too

you arc alone with your children much of the time, you are bound to feel lonclv. It is neither necessary nor wise If

develop-

82

Some Fathers Must Be Away from Home

8?

on to disguise vour feelings of lone-

was separated from her husband because

Children might be Mother did not miss Daddy. Without burdening the children with your fears and anxieties for Father's safety, you can tell them of your loneliness. You can stress how happy you will be when he conies home.

of war, explained her little boy's later

for

\

liness

completely.

troubled

It

is

if

they thought

reassuring

to

children

to

hear

grownups express feelings that arc like their own, providing grownups do not frighten or worry them by exaggerating those feelings.

may feci down and isolated from your friends when Father is away. His going is likely In addition to loneliness, you

tied

your opportunities for adult companionship. More than ever you need the relaxation, the fun, and the stimulation of friends of your own age and with your own interests. Your children will be better off if you can keep in touch with your friends. One mother, looking back on the to limit

time when she, with her first-born baby,

Daily good-byes serve as practice for longer separations, and bring reassurance that Daddy will return again.

dependence on her. She said, "When your husband is not around to give your affection to, you give it all to your child. hen he expects to have you all to himI

self forever."

Mishaps Are Not

Mothers

All

Due

to

Separation

blame themselves when things go wrong while Father is away. If a child becomes ill or is badly hurt, and, most of all, when problems in discipline arise, a mother often feels, "This wouldn't have happened if my husband had been here." She may worry about what he will say, or how angry he will be. If a mother has taken reasonable precautions, she should not blame herself for accidents. Children can and do often

when both parents with them. Remember, too, that children got into mischief before Father went away, and probably will when he get sick or badly hurt

are

comes home

again.

Even when Father

Childcraft

84

and Mother together

mav

job, children

good

are doing a

still

occasionally mis-

behave and experience growing up.

in

difficulties

time about Daddv's leaving, and about Julie and Mommy will do when

what

Daddy

is

tell this

away.

It is

usually necessary to

over and over, as

favorite story, before

Here Today and Gone Tomorrow

Long absences

so

months or even vears are more dramatic and get more attention. But when Father is constantlv at home again and gone again, is

often

lost.

In this situa-

both Mother and Father need to guard against Father's becoming a guest or an onlooker, rather than an active tion,

mav

take a

Mother not

to as-

participant in family

conscious effort for

sume

all

she

the one

It

is

may

life. It

the responsibility, just because

take

who

some

is

steadilv

on the

job.

careful planning to ar-

range family events with Father taking the lead during the times he is at home.

Preparing for Separations "Julie's

ship next

mother selor.

daddy must go back month," three-year-old

to his Julie's

said to a child-guidance coun-

"How

can

I

prepare her for his

She is so fond of him and he adores her. She waves to him until he is out of sight when he goes to work each

leaving?

morning.

I

am

afraid she will miss

him

terriblv." Julie's

preparation for Daddy's leaving

has already had a good start. Her dailv good-bv's will make it easier to understand

separation

and reunion after a It would be well

longer period of time. for

Mother

Pictures

to let Julie

know ahead

of

and postcards can go back and

forth to let the children

not forgetting them, feel closer to

if

repeating a

has meaning for

a child.

that run into

the continuitv of his relationship with the children

voung

it

know Daddy

and

to

them while he

is

help him is

away.

How Can

a Child Take Part?

might "help" Daddv pack his things. She will notice that he packs faJulie

him use at shaving equip-

miliar articles she has seen

home: the

fascinating

ment, the clock he often held to her ear so she might hear it tick. Mommy's picture and Julie's picture. She will also observe some things he leaves behind: his old slippers, perhaps, and his work and play clothes, to wear when he comes back. If it is possible, she might watch him go away in the train, airplane, bus, or ship. She will realize this is different from the way she has watched him leave for work each morning. Letters, post cards, or pictures from

The story in pictures will be welcomed from those who are too small to write.

her daddy telling of his arrival, what he is doing, where he sleeps and eats and shaves, will help her to accept his being away. If Julie asks for him after he has gone, Mother might suggest "writing" a letter

which

Julie

would

dictate.

A

walk to the mailbox to mail it will help. Because she was so close to her father, Julie

may

little

children find

him

miss

greatly at

many

But

first.

interests in the

world about them. Thev can be distracted. They find pleasure in everyday events. The greatest comfort of all, of course, is the confidence in Mother and her love.

They Remember Papa

The whole

family will usually take

pleasure in talking about Father.

It

is

fun to recall the things he used to do, the songs he used to sing, and the stories he could tell. Such conversations make

him seem closer and help the vounger children remember him. This holds true even

if

Father's absences are only a mat-

ter of weeks. If

Father

is

to be

gone

a long time, take care to picture

him

for as

high for them. Children are children and should not be expected to take Father's place with

Mother.

"Doing what Father would want you to do" may be the magic phrase to tide

not too perfect, too demanding, or too awe-inspiring. Living up to such a father

the family over in an emergency, but

can be difficult for the older children. After all, Father, even though he is

advantage of

away,

is

onlv human.

his little weaknesses

incidents about

him

Knowing some

of

and hearing funny will

endear him to

his children.

Sometimes, without thinking, adults tend to point out to the oldest boy of the family, "When vour father is away, you arc the man of the house." Some children take such statements literally and trv to live up to standards far too

can be overdone.

It is

not

fair to

and

loy-

make

his

a child's affection

alty to his father, simply to

it

take

behavior conform to the wishes of another adult. Some children

who

miss

Father

keenly find it hard to talk about him even when he is away for short periods of time. It often helps these children if

Mother

tells

them

that

it

is

all

right

if

they do not want to talk about Daddy now, and that she understands how thev feci

because she misses him. too.

Childcraft

86

What Kind

of Letters?

Father will look forward to hearing about what happens at home. "Susan took her first steps," or "Johnny mastered the two-wheel bike," "Mary's two front teeth are loose," "Billy

is

now

a

Cub

Scout." These items are big news

to a

man

far

to keep the

picture of each family member changing with the growth and deyelopment that come with time. You may find it difficult to ayoid writing things which might worry your husIt is

usually a

good idea

to

omit

unpleasant, disturbing items which he

could not change from a distance. At the same time, it is important that Father should not feel you can do without him altogether. If his opinion is asked sometimes, he feels closer to the family

and

more important to its welfare. Eyen the younger children will enjoy dictating messages to Daddy and making pictures to send to him. Children

who have

only recently learned to write

usually prefer dictating their letters, too.

They can put say

if

the}" are

their

minds on what

to

not hampered by their

limited spelling yocabularies, or by the difficulties

so

many

small fingers meet in forming

letters.

When

they do write,

more important than spelling, punctuation, or neatness. Samples of their school work give Father an

what they

idea of

He

say

how

ther.

When

away from home. Such

homely incidents help him

band.

growth of his children more easily. He might also enjoy hearing their voices. If an occasional telephone call is possible, it can be a real treat. Recordings of Mother's and the children's voices can sometimes be made and mailed to Fa-

is

his children are developing.

an occasional paintnumber work, or a story written by an older child. will appreciate

ing or drawing, a page of

Pictures Tell the Story

Snapshots arc always a good way to keep in touch. A picture can tell so much, and if snapshots arc sent frequently Father can keep up with the

letters

come from

Father, they

can be shared by all the family. Mother can suggest to Father that children enjoy receiving mail addressed to them. A small person will often carry a post card or letter with him every place he goes, even to bed! A picture of Father in such a letter is an added source of joy. Be careful that a toddler does not get the idea that the picture

Making Up There a

is

is

"Daddy."

for Father's

no substitute

Absence

for Father,

mother's cheerful attitude and her

many

but in-

both inside and outside the home, can be reassuring to her children. It is important to them that Mother keep herself and the house looking as nice as she did when Father was at home. The children will appreterest in

things,

she makes interesting converand plans some of her special dishes for them, as she did for Father. There is real danger, in a home where Father is at home week-ends and away during the week, that the Mondav-toFridav interval will become lean and meager in every way. Mothers can make a point of keeping life pleasant and interesting, even if Father is not at home.

ciate

it if

sation

An

occasional

lift

to everyone's spirits.

midweek

treat

is

a great

Providing Masculine Companionship If

Father

tive,

ing

noisy,

little

away

for a

long time,

may develop

into an ac-

is

the baby bov

rough-and-tumble, fun-lovA household of women is

boy.

Some Fathers Must Be Away from Home apt to forget that little boys arc going to

be men, and that thev should be somewhat rougher than little girls. Boys of all ages need contacts with men and other boys. From them, small boys learn how to grow and behave in masculine ways. One lead comes from what nursery

schools

often

do.

Many

nursery

schools try to find high-school bo\

where

lege

men,

the

nursery-school

s.

col-

men

87

who encourage

in charge

the roughbovs seem to need. Girls, too, need friendly masculine companionship. If there is a choice, it

and-tumble

activity

might be well to find there are arc old

men

enough

where

a school

teachers.

If

the children

camp,

to go to

select a

camp that includes bovs as well as girls, or a camp where there are some men as

gives little bovs.

Bovs can benefit from a A group near home where organized activities arc led by men may be the solution in some in-

portunity to

stances

or,

practical, fathers of

children,

who can

participate in their daily programs. This

and girls, too, the opknow men as well as women of warm, helpful, protecting

in the role

counselors.

camp

for

bovs.

when

Churches

father

is

far

away.

of all faiths provide inspira-

members

the

teachers. It also provides opportunities

tion

for yigorous active play where boy-be-

Mothers often look to the Church for the help and guidance they especially need when Daddy is away.

ha\ior

way,

is

accepted and approxed. In this

little girls

and

their

mothers learn

for

to understand boys' behavior, too.

Sometimes you can secure bovs or young men as baby sitters. You can find a playground for school-age bovs with

all

When The

Father

of

family.

Comes Home

circumstances

of

Father's

dilip

For

warm

and

happy

welcomes reunions,

don't picture Father as a stern disciplinarian or

some kind

of

superman,

during his absences.

ab-

sence will determine to a large extent Geri'lrMU

Childcraft

88 the way children will react to his

home-

coming. So much depends on the length or frequency of his absences, and on the children's recollections of him. If the absence has not been too long, or if Father's going was an unusual event, there will probably be great rejoicing on his return.

To many

children

Daddy

is

Mother, who hoped so much for a happy reunion. For little children who do not remember Father at

all, it

to get acquainted. to

easy

see.

may take a long time The reason why is

Cautious

approaches

strangers are a healthy protection

children

develop.

The

to

most

newlv-returned

hero and model, \\lien Larry's father was allowed a day at home after four months of treatment for a paralyzing attack of polio, Larry was overjoyed. He insisted on spending the entire time on

more threatening than other strangers. He moves right into the house and demands much of Mommy's

day long this normally active four-year-old wore his pajamas and his bathrobe "like Daddy." He ate, napped, and played at his father's side until his daddy returned to

If

his daddy's bed. All

the hospital.

Nancy brought her

father to kinder-

first day home. She wanted him to meet her teacher and see all her friends. She tried to tell him everything at once and share with him all the new experiences she had had while he was gone.

garten with her on his

Getting Re-acquainted with Father

Such

a

thunderous welcome

Mothers

forthcoming.

always

husbands missed the

first

many

not

whose

years of their

children's lives because of tion, reported

is

war separa-

difficulties for their

when Father returned. "Even though I spoke of Daddy often, I was never quite sure Jimmy knew what I

children

was talking about. stand

who Daddy

Even

He

just didn't

may

leave a gap

that needs bridging. If Father's absence

runs into

many months

or years, a child

need time to get re-acquainted. Father may not be as he remembers him, and he may feel shy or ill at case with him. Often this is a disappointment to will

is

often

time.

a Child

Some

Angry

Is

children

at

Father

may

feel angry with Father for going away, and mav be rude to him when he returns. Often children imagine that a parent has gone awav because they were "bad," or because he did not love them. Such a child feels punished and resentful. He may be re-

lieved

when Father comes

shows

it

It

is

back, but he clumsy ways. probably good for a confused in

child to find expression for

all his angry thoughts and for all his worries and fears, even though the outburst sounds rude and unfriendly. Scolding or pun-

ishing a child for such behavior only

makes him

An

ever.

feel more pushed-out than acceptance and understanding

of his feelings,

and repeated

friendly,

why he away and what he did while

patient explanation by Father of

had

to go

with

mav help to make Daddy smoother.

How

Reunion Looks

gone,

the reunion

under-

was."

brief absences

father

to

Father

A man who

expected a father's welcome may feel hurt when the children turn to Mother for everything. It is hard for him to remember that while he was

gone Mother has been making all the decisions, bandaging all the hurt knees. and drying all the tears. Children are

man

"This

Can

I

trust

once.

left

him now?"

That question in a youngster's eyes is a signal that he needs time to make friends with Daddy again.

reluctant to accept such services from

the family.

anyone

make

long as she is available. Mother may need to prepare Father for this tactfully, so that he will not feel shut out. Father will be accepted sooner else, so

handled alone

thev will

Mother can avoid unloading too many problems on Father the minute he returns. She can do her utmost to sec that situations which create tension with the children do not arise during the first few days. Father needs time and help in making his adjustment to homecoming, too. Mother can give the children and Father a chance to get acquainted again if

un-

accustomed to children to understand a child whom he did not see growing and developing. Here again, an explanation from Mother may be helpful, for a man forgets that shvness

common

is

dependent judgment, learn to respect him, too.

to little

and that time and patience will win their love and affection. Anger and rudeness, or apparent indifference, need children,

them together for a part of a lets them go off on an interest-

she leaves

daw

or

not be taken as personal insults or evidence that a child does not care for Father. Often it is because a child cared so much that he found Father's going away

ing excursion without her.

so hard.

in a successful reunion.

Accepting the fact that things cannot be

just the

same

for the family as

ther had never been

time and patience

Dad

Is Still

Head

of the

Mother can make is

the

man

House it

to a close

clear that Father

of the house,

and the head

is

his

of her

dren.

man

in his absence, and, as the

on Father and respects

he does not trv to force himself on them. It is especiallv unwise to be stern and demanding or angrv with the chil-

now

she together

children observe that she

if

It is especiallv difficult for a

He and

decisions about matters which she

away

is

a

if

first

1

ci-

step

Confidence that

will insure a return

and happy family group

will

usually bring the realization of that goal

before too long.

of

89

H. Armstrong Roberta

WHEN THE FAMILY MOVES GLADYS GARDNER JENKINS,

M.A.

Bethesda,

Md.

Author of "These Are Your Children"

How

many

families

children do vou

day. Thoughtful parents often wonder whether all this moving is hard on the children in the long run, or whether it

with growing

know who

live in

the neighborhood, let alone the house or apartment, where the mother and father settled as a newly married

can give them a rich variety of experience and a greater ability to adjust to

new situations. You can take steps to help children of different ages over the rough spots as they become acquainted in a new neighborhood. You can even

couple? The search for a new home; the packing of boxes and barrels; the wait for the van on moving day are all too familiar to

some

youngsters.

night in a strange,

new

The

first

make

place; the curi-

from new playmates; the unfamiliar ways of a new school are experiences

many

have before they are ten years

How Do

a

good thing out of

this

moving

about.

ous, but interested, advances

It is difficult

show up

old.

how or when new home will

to predict

the effects of moving to a

children

in a particular child.

How

a

bov

or girl meets such an event depends on

Children Respond?

how

Moving from one home to another has become part of our way of life to-

secure he

is

at the time,

and on

the other experiences he has had. children

90

who

are

quite

all

Many

self-confident

When

the Family Moves

and well-adjusted may have difficulties when they must leave their friends and familiar surroundings.

and

out

more

find

the

Others blossom

new neighborhood

satisfying than the old. 'Hie

way

responds depends, too, at least in part, on the family's situation in the a child

community. Some moves others.

are easier to

The Clintons had

make than

lived in several

medium-sized towns in the Middle West. These communities were much alike, and the Clinton children had found it fairly easy to make places for themselves and fit into the life of each neighborhood. But when the family moved to a really big city, it was a different story. There were many new customs to learn, and the attitudes of the

are often

9i

communicated

to the children,

even though no word is said. It would be impossible and unnecessary for you to hide yo'ur feelings completely. But you can balance the effect of vour doubts by your willingness to go ahead because this change is necessary. Your acceptance of the move, and your anticipation that as a family you will "make a go of it" will give the children courage and build family morale. If you can manage

make

to

the

move

take on the character

and girls will be helped to weather more readily whatof an adventure, vour bovs

ever difficulties

mav

arise.

Everybody Shares All but the smallest

in

Planning

members

of the

family can understand the reasons for a

people seemed different.

move. They should be told about it as soon as a decision is made. It is best to

Your Feelings Set the Pattern

tell

Although you cannot know ahead of time what a move will mean to any one

Then

of vour children, vour own feelings about it will have a decided influence on their responses. Moving is not always

easy for parents. If

parents

feel

move, and anxious will like the

Conrad

new

about a whether thev

uncertain as to

location, their feelings

them why the move a youngster

who

is

is

necessary.

happy

in his

group of friends will not feci that he has been "made to go and live in that old town just because Daddy wants to." Children generally can accept a reasonable explanation of even such an upheaval as a move. If there is to be a great deal of conversation between Father and Mother and other relatives while plans arc afoot, it is better to let the children know what

Kiger. Black Stat

is

in the wind.

The

older children can

take part in the family discussions of reasons for and against moving. ter less

what the

facts

may

No

mat-

be, they arc far

disturbing to a child than half-fin-

ished sentences, an air of mystery, and

To some children, a new neighborhood means being a stranger and afraid, but Mother and Father take the new if

home

in stride,

they are reassured.

Childcraft

92

halted by his appearance in the room.

more secure if Father or Mother can go ahead and choose the new home. Then the children know that

Should Worries Be Expressed?

a

the dead silence of a family conclave

Boys and a

who

girls

are anxious about

move should be allowed

their doubts. Talking ries

help the children to accept

will

them

to express

about their wor-

as natural. It

is

reassuring to be

Mother or Father, "Yes, we all that way sometimes. We don't like

told by feel

and the places move is necessary. As

to leave our old friends

we know, but this soon as we are settled, we to look for other persons like,

will all begin

whom we

can

too."

Sometimes, part of the

the

if

town

plans can be

move

is

to another

or to a place near by,

made

for returning to visit such promises are made, the plans should be carried through soon after the move has been accomplished.

old friends.

Make If

If

the

move

the

New is

Less Strange

to a near-by

commu-

nity, it helps to let the children see the

new home

and,

if

possible,

feel

they

have a share in choosing it. Often this is out of the question, but the whole family can still have fun poring over maps of the

new home town and

something about "If

we

learning

it.

take the Chestnut Street apart-

near Dad's work, but how far would Bob and Ellen have to walk to

ment,

the family feel

house or an apartment will be waiting them. A house in a community of man}- children is the wisest selection for most families. An advance visit by Mother or Father also makes it posfor

sible for

them

to describe the

new home

to the youngsters.

Disappointments may be avoided if between the new home and the old one are explained. "The new house is not as large as this one, but it has a sun porch that'll make a good playroom." Or, "The new school may look a bit old-fashioned and ugly to you. This is an old town we are going to live in. differences

I met some of the teachers, and they seemed very nice."

But

If

things in the

new location

to be reallv difficult,

it is

are going

better to pre-

pare the children. "It may be sort of hard getting used to things for a while, but we'll all be together and that is much better than letting Daddy go alone." If a youngster knows about what he can expect, he is likely to be better able to accept a necessary situation, especially

he knows

if

stand his troubles.

his parents under-

He

feels the

family

is

sharing the experience, and that gives

him

support, too.

it's

school?"

Mother

asks.

How About

Separations?

Sometimes

it

seems desirable to leave

"There'd be good places to picnic if we lived in that old house out on the County Line Road," suggests Ellen. "Say, it says here on the map 'Indian mounds.' Pop, can we explore around there?" asks Bob.

the children with friends or relatives

Each member of the family feels more at home as he finds something desirable to look forward to. It may make

staving with them, a visit during the

while the

move

is

being made. Such a

decision should be weighed against the values of the family remaining together. If a child

is

or relatives

happy with particular friends and always looks forward to

moving period may be a sensible solution. But some children, particularly the

When

the Family Moves

93

Where

the treasure is, the heart is. Take pups and other valuables, and children will feel more at home.

their

smallest

ones,

find

being away from

Mother and Father at the ment an added adjustment.

mo-

crucial

On

this ac-

count many parents decide to keep the family together.

Older boys and

move

better

if

girls

in dismantling the old

tling in the

usually take the

thev are allowed

help

tv.

home and

new one. There

is

set-

real value

to an older child in having active

and

responsible participation in such an im-

ures" and an accumulation of "things."

The and

children can be

shown how

to pack

and few belongings can be taken and others must be stored, prioritv should be given as far as possible to those which the children use label

at

least

their

smaller

lighter treasures. If onlv a

and

cherish.

Even the

smallest

child

he has his own crib and other familiar objects about him.

seems to adjust best

if

portant family project as a move. Putting

What Treasures Go Along? The question of what to take and what to leave behind is important to the voungsters.

Let the children keep

as

Down

Roots

Begin putting the family roots into new community as soon as possible. At best it takes a little while for a famthe ilv

its place among new neighSome communities arc more wel-

to find

many of their treasures as possible. It may seem nonsense to take that old col-

bors.

lection of bottle tops, but

the wise family begins to show

prized

it

is

really

had better go along. The

bi-

the doll's house, the family of

cycle, dolls,

if it

the chemistry

set,

and the

favorite

help a child feel at home in a strange place. You can talk over to-

books

gether

will all

the

difference

between

"treas-

coming

to

newcomers than

others, but its

in-

tentions of "settling in" as soon as the furniture

Try

is

unpacked.

to get the "feel"' of the

new com-

munitv. Find out about its special customs and ways of doing things. Interest, instead of dislike or alarm over the "dif-

Childcraft

94

may find, smoothes the and vour children, for the you way children will follow your example. "This is our community now and we want to get to know our neighbors," is a friendly feeling that will soon be felt and usually will be appreciated. It is only human to look back fondly at the old home sometimes, but don't let these backward glances become the family's ferences" you for

chief topic of conyersation. It

helps to talk with the neighbors

nity to

new

become

better acquainted with

families, too.

should be necessary for a child

If it

to repeat a grade, because of differences in

the material presented in the two

careful explanations will be needed to ayoid disappointments and schools,

Your

heartaches.

talk with the principal

might lead to the conclusion that your child should be placed in a more ad\anced grade than in his old school. In this way, he might ayoid the boredom

possible. Go to church and to P.T.A. meetings. Enroll the children in

and restlessness that set work offers no challenge

Sunday school. Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts. 4H, or whatever organized groups are a\ailable. Such groups can help the whole family get acquainted. But re-

youngster.

whenever

member

it

takes time to put

roots again,

down your

and do not expect

to feel

completely settled too soon.

How Do

Start in

a

New

School

Getting acquainted with the school, the boys and girls, the teachers, the new ways of doing things is at best somewhat confusing to most youngsters. Some children are able to tackle the situation

on

their

own, but most of them need

support from Mother or Father to help them through the red tape of enroll-

ment.

You

can almost always arrange to talk with the principal before the

have a day the children start school. Xo two schools correspond exactly in the subject matter taught in comparable grades. It may save your children considerable discouragement if you straighten out the question of the grades they will be in before they enter the school.

You can invite your child's teacher to your home so that your child and you both get to know her as a person. Teachers appreciate any kind of an opportu-

when

to an

the

eager

Teachers Give a Welcome?

How

well a child oyer six years old

new community

adjusts in a

to a great extent

will depend upon the welcome the

school giyes him.

If

the school looks

one more child who has to be giyen a place in an o\ercrowded building, his feelings of loneliness may be increased. If the principal and teachers are warm and welcoming people, who understand that a child needs to be helped to belong, the first lonely, and often frightening, minutes and days in a new school can be made

upon him

A Good

in

as just

easier.

Miss Gross had a particularly happy way of introducing new boys or girls to her class. She always made a point of discoyering something about the new-

comer that would dren. "Joan

cordion.

bring

it

is

interest the other chil-

learning to play the ac-

Wouldn't to

it be fine to have her our Friday Assembly?" or

"Fred has li\ed in a big city and perhaps about riding in subways and on elevated trains." She would try to pair off the newcomer with one of the friendlier youngsters m some activity, casually throwing

he'll tell us

When

the Family Moves

95

The world may seem sad and dreary to a little girl who misses her old home. Not scolding, but constructive help in friends will banish the sulks.

making

•/ Ju^

-.-V

Triangle

out a hint about some interest that might draw them together. New children received special help and encouragement in Miss Gross's class. They usually found themselves entrusted with jobs

such as dusting the blackboard,

feeding the goldfish, or serving on

a pro-

gram committee. These activities made them feel comfortable as a part of the

pants can tragedy if long ones happen to be the rule in the neighborhood. Short spell

group.

him-

by doing poorly in his school work. He may flare up in rebellion against Mother and Father, or quarrel with brothers and sisters at home. As parents, you can help vour schoolage bovs and girls by understanding that the move may have been upsetting to them. You can sec the reason behind

part of the group than he was

their behavior instead of simply setting

Make Friends School-age bovs and girls are usually interested in new places and new surroundings. At first they may be quite

Help Your Child

enthusiastic about a move. Often such a child It is

may seem onlv

self less a

later,

to

have adjusted

when he may

find

well.

home, that a child may become disturbed and anxious about his acceptance by the other children. This is esat

pecially true at the

"gang" age, when to

the eight-, nine-, or ten-year-old, being a

member

of the

"gang"

is

all-important.

Sometimes an older child shows his concern bv being irritable or moodv, or

them down

as stubborn or unco-opcrcan help by welcoming new friends to the home. You can make it casv for vour voungsters to invite sonicone over after school or for supper. You can even suggest thev have a group in

You

ative.

for a

meeting or

You

a party.

can help, too, by noticing how

Childcraft

96

other bovs and girls are dressed, so that your Youngsters will not need to feel different in appearance from the other

new community.

children in their

If

the

nine-year-old boys wear blue jeans to it mav be unnecessary to insist on more dressed-up clothing, even if blue jeans were frowned on "back home." Sometimes you have the feeling there should be a few specific steps you can take to help Your older boYS and girls

school,

"belong."

A

constructiYe attitude

mav

do more than you

realize. If vour children are having difficulties, you can let them talk about their troubles. You can help them understand that most boys

and

girls

who

are indifferent or incon-

newcomer are not deliberatelv unkind. Thev just do not think about how it feels to be a stranger in a siderate to a

You can help vour children keep their confidence in themselves as people who are likable. "I know you feel badlv because you aren't asked to that birthday party. strange place.

Things

new

happen when you are Other girls and boys have

like that

in a class.

through

lived

It's

it.

nothing against

you ever were and you are the kind who will make friends. Give yourself a fewmonths more and vou'll be in the swim again." Encouragement like this from one father helped his daughter OYer some bad moments in a new third grade.

you. You're

How Do

A

as likable as

still

Preschoolers Take a

small child

is

new surroundings way

of

doing

New Home?

or changes in his usual

He

responds

mother and

He

more than

ever.

youngster

may

needs their attention A baby or preschool show the anxiety he feels

by clinging to his mother or father and not wanting them out of his sight. He may return to baby behavior such as thumb-sucking, or bed wetting, or wanting to be fed or dressed. It is usually best to give the preschool youngster the extra reassurance and attention he

wants. Give

him

a chance to learn grad-

ually to feel comfortable

and

It is not wise to put a child who is showing such anxiety into nursery school

or kindergarten right away.

Some

small children

make

tricycle

Sharing Heightens Solidarity

During the period of adjustment to new community, the family can help each other bv doing interesting things together. Sightseeing, exploring the new neighborhood, and family picnics serve to familiarize evenonc with the lav of the

the land. Decorating the

house,

aloud, or watching a radio or television

program together, can help to fill the gap until new friends are made and new If

there

is

under-

standing and a feeling of unity, an even greater sense of family strength can be

Accepting the problems arising move and working together to

built.

make

a

reinforce family solidarity

and act. If they are tired and and perhaps irritable from the moving, he may become more fussy and

new

plaving games in the evening, reading

tense,

fa-

friends easih'

crowd.

ther feci

his

until

with the youngsters on the block, but others are happier if Mother is near bv as they try to get acquainted with the

a

way

Wait

he is more settled. Unless it is essential, do not leave him with a strange neighbor or a sitter until he is more at ease.

from

quickly to the

safe in his

new home.

interests discovered.

sometimes upset by

things.

demanding.

home

out of

a

strange place can

and heighten

the sense of sharing and belonging.

SITTERS

HAVE AN INFLUENCE MARION LOWNDES, Author, "Manual

New

Palisades,

Baby

for

B.A.

Sitters"

York Uruody. Three Lions

One newour

helper, the sitter, has

into

recently.

lives

come More

often than not, this helper, the teen-age

or boy, or the older

woman,

into the references of any sitter

you do not know true,

we

well.

whom

Sometimes,

arc afraid of hearing

it

is

some un-

comments. It is so difficult anyone that it is a temptation

favorable

to

is

get

to

ideas about the world

oyerlook the obvious disadvantages in a candidate. As for looking farther and

girl

the one most familiar to the children, and plavs a big part in shaping their

it.

If a

people

voung

and the people

in

child's experiences with

who come

into his

home

arc

pleasant, his confidence in the world

expands.

He

begins

to

feel

that

the

world is safe, and that the people he meets in it will probably be kind to him. Eyerything that holds true in the selection

and the

briefing of sitters ap-

plies equally to other helpers, part-time

or full-time, working in the house or outside. It holds true for

may be

left

anyone who

with your children at any

time.

finding out all her faults, that seems to be inviting trouble! But you cannot afford to take chances. The risks are too great. Whether it is an adult or a young person, man or woman, be sure to find out about him or her from someone who knows and will give vou an honest opinion. If you use a sitter's guild or agency, check on its reliability, too. Don't be satisfied with an agency recom-

mendation

of

someone who

extra careful about the people

Choosing a Sitters

Sitter

need to be chosen

You cannot be

carefully.

too careful in looking

will

stay

with your children. Even though the agency looks impressive, it may not be

mends. There of

is

a

double reason for

investigation.

You want

it

recom-

this

to

kind

know

Childcraft

98

But if you are particular and thorough, you are about vour

of course.

sitter,

impress the agency or the

likeh" to

herself with the fact that

you

will

sitter

not be

with a slipshod job. No one who comes into Your home for a few hours will be more painstaking than she thinks you are. You set the standard for anyone who comes into your home. satisfied

Know Your

Sitter

"Ernestine

so

is

sloppv,"

another

mother sa\s, "but she was all I could get and we had tickets for the game and we haYe hardh" done anYthing together since the babY was born. Bill would haYe been broken-hearted if we'd missed it. So I just took a chance and left him with her." girl who took a chance on Erneshad been, before her marriage, a full-fledged nursen-school teacher. She might ha\e been expected to know bet-

The

You Can't

Trust to Luck

tine

carefulh- and check caresounds obvious. Yet time and again, because "it's only for a few hours," or "there's nothing to do but sit there," sitters are hired more casually than a

"Choose

fully,"

cleaning "I'll

woman would admit

that

be.

has

girl

mean

a

ter

than to

found Ernestine deep in a movie magababY in her lap. One in-

hand held the bottle for him. Formula was dribbled out of the corner of his mouth and OYer his face. Luckih it had not run down his nose or choked attentive

Tommv

him.

bed mother

So

anyway."

in

to

Tommy's

says

Tommy's

father, as they shut

the front door and go out. Behind their backs the "brain" sho\es

TommY's

him and goes off shiny brown hair

traY at

wash her IoycIy

TommY's

mother's

doesn't hear

when

to in

She that he

bathroom.

Tommy

calls

wants his traY taken away. He tries to put it down himself and spills the milk all OYer the blanket. \\ nen the sitter does come back, too late, and sees what has happened, she scolds him for an accident that was her fault. He turns o\er and pretends to sleep in the sloppy bed, while she settles comfortably in the living room with a fashion magazine and his mother's electric hair dncr. is

still

awake when

home. He

is

a

blotched face

up again.

TommY

mother gets miserable little boy with a and a temperature going

Sitters

his

have an influence!

helper like Ernestine

zine, with the

mouth, pretty as she is, but she's supposed to be the 'brain' of the freshman class. I suppose she can be trusted to keep things on an eYen keel and see that gets his supper, since he's sick

let a

come near her babY. She and her Bill were luckY. When theY came back theY

"My/'

said

Ernestine,

giggling,

didn't notice he was asleep.

How

"I

long

has that milk been pouring OYer him?"

There have been other times when young parents have been careless, with far more serious, actually tragic, results.

You cannot

take a chance "just once, few hours," on a sitter you do not know about or do not really like. just for a

Where

Shall

The

best

I

Find a Sitter?

way

of

all

to get a sitter, of

with good judgment who has had occasion to emploY the sitter herself. In the absence of a friend, a mother needing a sitter would do well to consult: Boy and Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls,

course,

is

through

a friend

solid

other Youth organizations

Doctors P.T.A.

Y.W.C.A.

A

Community Center Sitters'

agencies (references should be

carefully checked)

Council of Social Agencies or Wel-

good

sitter

keeps a baby happy as well as safe .

.

.

fare Council, in cities oxer 30,000

Home

Economics

classes in schools

Health Departments

The National

Keystone

Safety Council has put

out a "Baby Sitter Safety Packet," designed to

make

and

their sitters. It gives the Council's

list

of

community

the

S3 ,ttkH

sitting safer for children

con-

agencies

and

is

She

tries

give

him

to

his

favorite kinds

cerned with this subject. These agencies should be able to help a mother find a responsible sitter in anv community. In some communities, the American Red Cross sponsors courses in Baby Sitting,

l

,

of

food

.

.

.

Elizabeth Hihhs

a likely source of talent. Vis-

iting nurses

can often supply informa-

and sometimes will come themselves to sit. The student-employment offices of colleges and universities can

tion

often provide sitters for evening hours

and over week-ends. The chapter Neighbors Can Work Together, in Volume 1 5, suggests some ways in which parents have banded together to sit for one another, but that is

She takes it when easy dresses

she

him

.

.

.

a different story.

What It

is

Sitters

essential to

Do

have a

sitter

with

She reads the

good references as to health, honesty, and capability. For the child's sake, these references should be carefully checked before the sitter is engaged. It is

a

stories

equally essential that the sitter have

warm, understanding, human "Keep them happy, keep them

heart. safe,"

these are the duties of a sitter according to Mrs. Gladvs Citv,

who

Feelings

them

come

safe,

Romanoff

of

New

York

has trained scores of them.

Boys, too, will

"Keep

often

keep them happy/' but the

good

first.

It

is

not

he likes

to hear.

make sitters.

Childcraft

100

No

other way around, and rightly.

child

have his mother leave him, but it makes it ten times worse if the person with whom he is left is unfriendly. The character of the sitter is of real importance to the child, who is doing his best to manage by himself without his mother. likes to

Thev don't get what I want them to. Thev don't read what I want them to." to.

There seems to be another suggestion mothers here. Why not plan with the child what he will do when the sitter comes? Choose what thev will have for supper, what the sitter will read. Put the instructions in writing for the sitter. She for

is

Sitters

A

Children Like

clear case for the sitter with a heart

was made in a survey held recently in a small suburban public school. A hundred pupils, from kindergarten through fifth grade, were asked wha: they liked about sitters, and what they did not like. They were asked also whether they pre"old ladies," to use their own girls. Their answers,

ferred

words, or boys or

and simple as they are, show what a sitter should, and should not, be. The answers also show that this

brief

plainlv

7

family helper to the child

Even the

a

is

who

matter of real concern is left with her.

four-year-olds in the kinder-

from

little

scolds.

She

is

he

said.

"Thev

read lots of stories." sitter

a boy," a small, stout

is

partv volunteered. "He's nice. lie plays

games." possibilities of

here for mothers. The bovs as sitters arc not to

be overlooked.

What

There

is

possible.

Constant

vigi-

The

sitter

who

asked to cook, wash a lot of dishes, and do other distracting chores cannot watch the children as she should. is

Hcril

the Elderly Sitter!

In the primary grades, in the survey

mentioned above, there was a considerable body of opinion in favor of "old ladies" as

"When doesn't do reads to

sitters.

Freeman comes she homework," Alex said. "She Mrs.

me when

I

go to bed."

way of saying that Robin feels neglected and disturbed when she is left with

a girl," said Janev, scowl-

ladies are nicer,"

"My

if

the answer to keeping voung

boy named Brett looked up

is

his coloring.

"Old

is

children out of trouble.

"I

cushion."

A

lance

an old pin-

"My sitter "She

cooked, too,

Mommy gets Mrs. Bean," Robin agreed. "She keeps the house nice and tidy/' This is another

garten had firm ideas on the subject. ing.

not likely to remember rapidly-given Leave most of the supper

directions.

a hint

seven-year-old like a

looks to a

voung girl. "You know what I don't

acceptable than

five-

or

man may be more like

about

baby sitters?" another little boy joined in, stammering in his eagerness to tell all. "They don't cook what I want them

it

when

breezy high-school sitters who pull back the rugs and clutter the living room with cokes, books, and sweaters. Robin does not like to be told to be a good girl and

"go off and play," out of sight and out of mind. Lucy, in fourth grade, said, "Sitters should not telephone so much. Sitters should not have all their friends in when

Mother and Daddy

A

a

like

loud

arc away."

chorus

of,

shouldn't," greeted

this.

"Yeah,

thev

"You should tell vour mother to get Helen," said Sam. "She comes by herself,

and she reads and plays cards and

Nothing like the beloved picture book to break the ice when a

new

sitter

takes over!

S&odra from Monkiueyer

Leave in writing: Telephone number where you can be reached

docs anything yon want. She's neat!" Children know a good sitter when

Thev should be consulted

thcv get one.

more often when you make Sitters

The

sitter

Need

who

is

The doctor's number The number of a friend

a choice.

Briefing

to

them happy, keep them safe" deserves to be backed up in even way. You will

this chapter sec

if you what you want

find vour sitter does a better job

her to do. Take time to explain in a friendh" but definite way what you consider important. It is your rcsponsibilitY

most

sitters.

Young or

remember

"What

to

Do

in

telephone.

Caution the sitter about special hazShe should know the places where

ards.

that

the children arc not allowed to plaY.

old. are untrained

Be

emergency

an EmergcncY." TcJJ the sitter, and any older child, what time you will return, and stick to it, or check with them in ad\ance bv

-

to set a standard, but

or neighbor

in case of

In this connection, at the end of

qualified to "keep

giYe her a clear idea of

be called

but don't frighten them b\ gi\ing them too

Tell her about keeping small, hard foods

manv

smaller children. She should

in following directions.

explicit,

-

like

instructions at once.

Here is a check list of things a mother should do before she goes out the door.

ThcY she

is

will benefit the sitter

and the child

leaving behind.

101

popcorn and nuts away from the know any

peculiarities of the house. If the screen

on the window of the children's room is loose, if the water pipes have a tcndcncY to gurgle in an alarming way, or if the



.

Childcraft

102

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SITTER Our Name: .Telephone

Address:

:.

Children Name:

Nap

Age:

Time:

Bedtime:

Special Notes:

i

i.

I

am

Telephone l

at:

Telephone you have any questions and cannot reach me or my husband, you can

Children's Father:, If

:.

Mrs.:

Telephone:

Mrs.

Telephone:

:

Care

oi the

call:

Baby

Feeding:— Sleeping:-

Playing: Clothing:.

Bathing :_

Care

of

Other Children

Food: Play:.

Clothing:. Sleep:

Baths :. Places they

may

not go:

Keep outside doors locked from outside only.

Our

children's special

Be sure to

call

me

if

word

for

is

you have any questions or

,

if

for-

is

anything does not seem right!

Sitters

Have an Influence

WHAT TO DO I.

IN

AN EMERGENCY

Sickness or Accidents Telephone me

at:

or at:

:

If

you cannot reach me, telephone

If

you cannot reach

my

husband:

either, telephone:

Mrs.: or Mrs.

at:.

at

:

Our Doctor's Name: Telephone If

.

you cannot reach him is

Hospital.

call:

.

:

Fire 1.

2..

3.

III.

:.

:

The number

II.

Get the children out of the house. Telephone Fire Department at: If you cannot get Fire Department, ask the telephone operator to have

them come

at once.

Fire alarm

box

Gas and

located at:

is

Electricity

Should anything go wrong with the gas or Also

electric light, call

call or dial

operator and ask her to help you

reach the number.

If

You Need 1.

t.

to Call

Police:

Janitor or Apt. Supt.

V. In case the

baby

:

or a small child

Call First Aid Squad

or First Aid Squad

me.

Light Company:

call Electric

Gas Company: If you need help you can

IV.

103

is

FIRE DEPT. at:_

POLICE DEPT.

at:

Choking

Childcraft

104

bathroom door sticks if it's closed too tightly, remember to tell her about it. A panicky

sitter

can scare a child!

Show Her Around

The first time a sitter comes, always engage her for well ahead of the hour you will be leaving. Show her around carefully. Even your baby should have a chance to get to know her while you are still there. You will have a chance to see her off guard. If vou have a dog, let him get acquainted with the sitter in your presence. The extra half hour's pav is good insurance against preventable mishaps and mistakes. Take time to tell the

where to

and extra bedBe sure she knows where the lights and telephone are. Show her bedrooms and bathrooms, how to light the covers.

how

to regulate the heat. "All the

one pediatrigood burglar might want to

you can to make your child sitter.

Plan a favorite meal, get out the books he wants her to read. Tell him something about her if he hasn't seen her. One mother reports she had great success when she dramatized the situation.

She took the part of the child and he was the sitter; when his sitter really came he "did as he would be done by." Do not trv to leave without saying good-by. It is better for your child to see you go, and make a scene, than to find you have disappeared. When that happens, he is likelv to take his outraged feelings out

sitter

find the children's clothes

stove,

Do what

look forward to being with the

on the

sitter,

and that hardlv

starts things off well.

Remember, whatever vou can do help your

A

sitter will

Start

Through

on

Human

sitters

to

help vour child. Relations

and through other

things," in the words of

family helpers, too, a child gets some of

cian, "that a

his

know."

What Can

Make light

Sitters

Expect of You?

the sitter feel at home. Provide

refreshment and

place to

sit.

Be

definite

comfortable about rates of

a

pay and plans for getting her home. Do not ask teen-agers to give medicine. Take five minutes to put Yourself in the sitter's place. Trv to imagine what she would want and need to be told about vour child, vour house, your way of doing things. Advise her, for instance, to bear in

mind

that

if

the child

may be because he mav want to go to He

naughtv tired.

it

is

is

getting

the bath-

room, or need a drink of water. Explain that he may be too young to put his wants

first

beings.

in words. All

these possibilities

would occur automatically not ncccssarilv to the

sitter.

to you, but

impressions of his fellow

He

human

can learn, through your ex-

ample and the way you set the stage, to be friendly and considerate to the persons who help him and his family. He is storing up confidence and experience when he savs "Good morning" to a smiling milkman. He is learning respect for a job expertly done when he gasps with

wonder

at the strength of the

garbage man who can toss heavy trashcans around as if they were made of feathers. When a carpenter honors a small person by asking him to find a pencil,

he makes him

feel

that he

is

being included in the serious business of living. His family's helpers help him to learn how to meet the world. Among the busy figures that break, so welcome, into his ordered, uncrowded day. the sitter, cspcciallv the sitter with a heart,

can be "one to grow on."

LIVING WITH

YOUR NEIGHBORS

^

'

E

V

¥~ 1

J

^

»

mm

1

^J

*44*

->x

14.

NEIGHBORHOODS INFLUENCE PERSONALITY

15.

CHILDREN LEARN ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE

16.

YOUR NEIGHBORS— DICTATORS, TROUBLEMAKERS, OR FRIENDS

17.

NEIGHBORS CAN

18.

WHAT

WORK TOGETHER

KIND OF MANNERS FOR OUR CHILDREN?

Feeling you are part of the neighborhood

good

young and

is,

in

This feeling of belonging helps to deyelop a healthy personality in the general,

for

old.

child

Yet, the relationship of any family to neighboring families poses mam- questions. How can we

be part of the neighborhood and still keep our own ways, our own values, our own individuality as a family?

Will neighborhood customs and manners undo Mother's and Father's teachings? How shall we compromise between the demands other parents make and the freedom we feel our children should

How shall we maintain our own standards when neighborhood ways seem too free and easy? have?

What of

many

effect will playing with

different religious,

racial,

bovs and

girls

or nationality

backgrounds have on our children? What effect will their "own kind" of people have? can often go a long way toward resolving these ques-

knowing only tions

if

Wc

wc make common cause with our neighbors

II.

Armstrong Roberts

NEIGHBORHOODS Marion

INFLUENCE

PERSONALITY PAULETTE Former

Staff

K.

thev

they work

— the

better

as parent.

Babies Feel the Influence

HARTRICH, M.A.

Member,

how

arc,

you can do your job

I'alH

\\Tiat

Association for Family Living, Chicago, 111.

make

a

neighborhood

little direct

is

like

will

difference to a baby, a

one-year-old, a two-\ ear-old, or even a three-year-old.

The

force of neighbor-

hood customs and standards on these davs of much moving about,

INall

parents search for the ideal neigh-

our search we usually find that the "ideal" does not

borhood. After

all

Almost every neighborhood has advantages and disadvantages. Some neighborhoods may even be good for one of our children but not good for

exist.

another.

You can help vour children find what best in their own neighborhood, no matter where vou live. You can do this most effectively when you are able to is

weigh the importance of neighborhood influences against the other influences in your child's life. The more vou understand about neighborhoods what



10-

smallest children

Neighborhoods

is

are

these

apt to be indirect. filtered

to

these

youngsters through vou, their parents.

Suppose vou live in a neighborhood where everyone keeps children neat and clean at all times, where babies arc toilet trained at a young age, where perfect manners even for toddlers arc prized. In such a setting you may well have stricter rules for youi babv or vour twoyear-old. Even without vour knowing it, vou mav be more demanding than if you lived in a more easygoing community. The neighborhood influences you. The result can be that your small children



may be almost



afraid to get dirty, to be

noisy, or to express their feelings freely.

Childcraft

lo8

But suppose that you move to a neighborhood where standards arc not so rigid. EYeryone on all sides of you understands that two-year-olds are not ten-year-olds. Here you will not be worried

if

your children are

lively, spirited,

and sometimes even grubby and quarrelsome. You know that no one will write you down as a bad parent. Your young children get relaxation because your neighborhood lets you relax.

How With

Are Older Ones Affected? older children this indirect in-

But the

fluence, through you, continues.

neighborhood begins to exert a force on the youngsters themselves. Your nine-year-old, for example, wants to be just like all the other fellows on the

fully

game

and George is angry. He mother because he is left out

over,

is

blames

his

of the gang's plans.

The Grays

eat early, too, but

urdays their dinner

is

on

Sat-

a half-hour later.

This lets Max be with his friends. Mrs. Carlsen puts Van's dinner on a plate

and he eats when he comes home after the game. Van and Max feel that their mothers are good sports. When their families insist on something, Van and Max try to comply. They know that their parents do not insist unless the matter reallv is important. The Carlsens and the Grays rightly do not worry that neighborhood influences will disrupt their familv

on

or have too strong an effect

life

their

children.

block.

Because the neighborhood

is

portant in the school-age child's

so im-

life,

you

When

the Others

Have More Toys

want as many and toys as the other the neighborhood. Here vour

School-age

children

have to be careful not to make your child feel set apart or different. If he is

clothes,

denied privileges all the other children are allowed, he runs a double risk. Not only is he likely to feel different and uncomfortable, but also he may be teased by the other Youngsters. "Johnny is a sissy. His mother won't let him cross the street." Perhaps it would be wise to teach

attitudes have a great influence. If par-

Johnny to cross the street properly. If you do not teach him, the day may come when, just to prove he is not a sissy, he will

run across without looking.

treats,

children in

ents are worried because they cannot keep up with the Joneses, children are quick to sense it. Parents who do not place such great importance on material possessions

— parents who give their — find that

chil-

dren love, security, fun

will

their children can accept not having all

the toys that they might want.

Sometimes

a

little

ingenuity helps.

Gloria does not have a walking doll or

an elaborate dollhouse, but

all

the other

children want to play at her house.

When

Are Compromises

in

Order?

box of old clothes her mother

lets

The the

Sometimes minor adjustments arc the solution. The neighborhood gang plays baseball until six o'clock on Saturday night. Mrs. Hansen has supper at five-

children use for "dress up," the finger

She feels that the family should not be influenced by what other people do. George has to come home before the

sive toys.

thirty.

paints they can use in the kitchen, the

packing boxes they can build with in the back vard arc more exciting than expen-

Tim but he

docs not have an electric train visits the real railroad with his

Neighborhoods Influence Personality

He

father.

about

has read

trains and,

all

kinds of books

when he

goes to the

roundhouse, the engineers sometimes give him a ride. The other boys all envy Tim's knowledge of trams. railroad

How Some

from parental standards toward neighborhood standards

is

in healthy eight-,

larly

turning-awav

normal.

You

expect this particu-

nine-,

and

ten-

Do

not let this worn you. As children grow, thev meet all kinds of year-olds.

persons and arc exposed to behavior. This

One way About Bad Examples?

log

is

all

kinds of

way children

the

learn.

to get your child ready for

this time is to encourage him, from the beginning, to take responsibility for his

own

Suppose vou do not allow vour no matter what anyone else does. Forbidding her to go with Susie because Susie plays with matches will not teach Man responsiacts.

Man

to play with matches,

Or, just because the other children run into the street without looking is no excuse for Henry to do so. If you blame his behavior on the example of others, and do nothing about it, he is bility.

not

likely to

chapters

much sense of reown conduct. iTie

develop

sponsibility for his

Discipline

for

Volume 12, and Go Wrong, in Volume ance, in

Self-Reli-

When Things 14,

have more

to say about handling this question.

Development

or Imitation?

you watch your child and other children, to keep this in mind: It helps, too, as

"Everybody else has a need not be a plaintive theme song if trips to station and roundhouse with Dad make a boy familiar train"

with the real thing.

)

->

Let your

home be headquarters

for

a

2

group, and you will be able to make the most of the good and to counterbalance the weaknesses in the neighborhood.

WTiat the others do

is

i/S:*3?..

•l\

UOtt

£&/

lit

will

54}

TOT

\

Mv-

H

4

$viw

Friendlier

attitudes of-

with discussions where feelings are aired, for then truth can replace prejudices. ten

start

Loii

they actually practice these attitudes in

see these

and on jobs that count. Children do not learn these things bv just sitting quietly side by side in the classroom. Thev learn them on the playground, in the hall, and on their way to and from school. But they learn them best when they work together in the classroom on jobs that matter for themselves and their classmates.

sue's,

real situations,

— A By-Product

Learning About People

When

the second-graders take a trip

Mr. Smith's farm, thev learn a great deal about farms and farm life. But they also learn about people. They find out how people work, what they like or dislike about their work, and how they respond to other persons. to

They may not put the

feeling into

words but the idea sinks in: children and adults from different backgrounds have ideas and suggestions to offer. This realization can lead them to take a new look at the mothers and fathers of the children in their room. They begin to

H abort

from Cufhioc

mothers and fathers as Mitand Tommy's parents,

Angela's,

and not necessarily

as Japanese, Italian,

or Negro.

Children learn that people respond different ways,

and

be

underlying

important

also that there

these ways of behaving.

reasons

They

in

may for

learn that

Mexicans, Jews, government workers, and farmers may do different kinds of work. But they also learn that the Mexicans, the Jews, the government workers,

whom

or the farmers

alike as a group.

members

they know arc not

They

discover that the

any group do not all fit into the same pattern, but differ among of

themselves.

'ITiat

people

of

different

races or nationalities or religions, but of

and

similar tastes

much

in

common

discovery. In a

interests, may have can be an important

good

situation, children

learn these tilings without

ing to

them from

anyone

a lofty height

talk-

about

"tolerance."

Fostering familiarity with people of

many 119

kinds

is

no guarantee against

prej-

Childcraft

120 udice.

But

it

unfamiliarity

does help to eliminate the and strangeness that feed

prejudiced ways of thinking.

How Do Stories The lonely,

Help

in class a story

about another child

also

Cultivating Understanding

Adults who work closely with children know that all bovs and girls have some problems in getting along with others. If these become extremely severe, the children will tend to become full of hurt or hate. Sometimes these problems can be observed in outward conflicts. Johnnv argues with his father. Man and her sister quarrel. Children tease the shoemaker and gangs wage their warfare. But other problems, often more serious, are the unvoiced worries of children. Jake wants to be on the football team, Sue wonders if she will -

be invited to the of her size,

Tom

part}-,

Alice

is

ashamed

worries about

how

to

make his teacher like him. While some of these problems can be identified

require

and discussed

more

directly, others

subtle treatment. Often,

through the study of family life, the child who worries because his home seems inadequate can learn that people live in manv different ways and have done manv things to improve home liv-

He

ing.

learns that there are

terns of familv

life,

many

and that

pat-

make a child own familv.

his

In

a

similar

better able to accept

way,

discovers

that

was lonclv and pushed aside.

another worried

some

"working" when thev are

people

arc

sitting at a

desk or standing in a store. Other people working when they arc wielding a paintbrush or a pickax. Still others are

arc

haved to get sponded.

The

and how others

it,

ing whether the class

who have

people

re-

teacher takes part by ask-

knows about other

suffered similar un-

happiness, and whether anything like

happened to them. The children sometimes find it easier to talk about personal problems through the this ever

experiences of others.

Children's problems and attitudes toward others are also revealed in their

own and

writing of stories, autobiographies, diaries.

Sometimes

may wish

a story

a

group hearing

the storv had a

differ-

ent ending. Let the youngsters write it as they would like it to be. Let them their own feelings and connect them with the wavs other people feel in

examine

similar circumstances. In this wav, their sensitivity to the likenesses

ences

and

differ-

among people everywhere

be-

comes greater. Their sympathies arc more than likely to deepen and expand as their knowledge widens. Understanding Begins It is

too

much

at

Home

to expect

any child to if he

a capacity for friendliness

constantly feels himself inferior.

It

is

unreasonable to expect him to develop fine ideals of brotherhood when he lacks security in his own living. Understanding among groups and among nations begins in the home. Schools and churches can build on the start that

working when they talk or write. Schools can help children sec that each of these

homes have made. On

and many other

tion rest.

jobs are good.

who The

youngster has a chance to talk about what the chief character in the story wanted and did not have, how he be-

develop

child learns about differences in jobs.

He

Others?

families

vary in size and make-up, too. All this helps

Them Accept

pushed-aside child hears

this

base, world understanding

fundamental and co-opera-

Lucien

Aim"

'

PreMS>"dicat.

YOUR NEIGHBORS— DICTATORS, TROUBLEMAKERS, OR FRIENDS HILDA TABA,

Ph.D.

Professor of Education, San Francisco State College, San Francisco, Calif.

step toward having good The neighbors to be a good neighbor first

is

yourself.

This

is

You need make a com-

a fine art.

to sense the right time to

promise between your ways and the ways of the other families on the block. At times, you have to stand firm about your own way of doing things. You have to strike a healthy balance between keeping to Yourself and letting your children overrun the neighbors' houses, or letting the neighbors' chil-

dren take over yours. The fine art of being a good neighbor

is

not easy, but

Good

takes.

who

it

is

worth the

relationships

effort

with

it

those

near you can make life infimore smooth and pleasant for you and your children. Being a good neighbor and having good neighbors live

nitely

bring real satisfactions and rewards, particularly in these days

when we

all live

closer to each other.

Each Family

\o

Is

Different

matter how friendly you are. there be times when difficulties of one kind or another arise. Some of these dif

will

121

Childcraft

122

Acuities arise because families are differ-

you do not believe each family

ent. If

has

own

its

group of in

peculiarities,

five-vear-olds.

Anne,

kindergarten.

a

They

a

are playing

John,

and

and

serve

Shirley are pretending to cook breakfast.

to

listen

"Let's put the table in the

That is where we eat breaksays Anne. Shirley insists that

way

to eat breakfast

and to say good-bv.

You

can do this kind of "talking over" with your children at home, too. Out of the feeling that it is all right for families

how

to differ in little ways, such as serve breakfast, can it

is

all

right

if

thev

grow the feeling that

families differ in other

kitchen.

ways, too.

fast,"

Children need this kind of underif thev are to live comfortablv with their neighbors. Our attitudes and our discussions can give it to them.

breakfast should be eaten in the dining

room. John joins the argument bv suggesting that no one in his right senses would eat breakfast in any place but the breakfast nook. Now John he is the "father" leaves the pretend family for work. He wants to kiss Shirley, the pretend "mother." This makes Shirley mad and she slaps him. Surprised and rebuffed, John says





mother

that his father always kisses his

when he

work

leaves for

in the

morning.

Shirley replies that her father just slams

the door

when he

goes.

Anne

savs her

standing

"What Will It

is

easy

the Neighbors to

Say?"

become overanxious

about neighborhood opinion. You do have to take into consideration what the neighbors think. Yet, if you worrv too much about this, there is the danger that vour children will never do anvthing wholeheartedlv and freelv. Thev may have to consider evervthing from the standpoint of neighbors' opinions.

father always waves good-by from the street.

Agreeing upon time and place

No Danger These children live in the same neigh-

Differences Are

for vig-

orous, noisy play can ease tensions

when neighbors demand more

guiet.

borhood. In spite of the fact that their families are quite alike, there are differ-

Philip

Gendreau

ences in their stvles of living. It is

natural for five-vcar-olds to feel

wav is followed in their homes is the right way. It

that whatever particular

takes real maturity see

that

there

and understanding

may be

several

to

"right

ways." Differences in tastes, in interests, in customs, in opinions need not be threats.

more

They can

contribute to richer,

satisfactory living in the

nity as well as in the

commu-

home.

In this instance, the teacher helped these children talk over the differences.

Even the

five-year-olds

that there could be

began to

realize

more than one good

&-

You want your

youngsters to develop

standards and principles of their own.

Too much

talk

about what the neigh-

bors will say can

make

children fear

people, or follow blindly

what others

expect of them.

Nor

will this

anxious bowing to neigh-

bors' opinions teach true consideration. It sets

up blocks to sincere, spontaneous and behavior. Your children will

feelings

not be helped

in getting

along with the

be more likely to learn to look on them with suspicion.

They

neighbors.

will

What About Standards? Parents

who

are rigid about their

"We're the reason why the people who used to live here moved."

own

and expectations go to an

standards

equally unfortunate extreme.

what

They

are

right for their children

association

have different ideas about child training. Perhaps your children are lively and like noisy games. They gather in the thickest

feres

clusters

so sure of

is

that they are continually disturbed

when

with other children interwith the practice of any detail of conduct. Often they completely disregard their neighbors' convenience,

feel-

and wishes. "If Mrs. Burke doesn't care to

ings,

let her daughter climb trees with mv son, whv doesn't she keep her at home?" "If the football games in front of Mrs. Keen's

window bother her, why doesn't move where there are no children?"

youngsters and

Creating Friendly Relations In differences like this

ences of opinion

of course, right

romp and

resents noise in her back yard.

she

and natural to have some standards. Yet inflexibility in standards means making an issue of every difference. This is not a good examIt is,

of

shout at will. But Mrs. Keen, across the street, objects to noise. She is bothered when her daughter gets into rough plav, and she

—bear

— in

in all differ-

mind

that

children need to learn about differences,

ple to set for youngsters

compare different ways. Variations in neighborhood standards can be a laboratory in human relations for them. The old saying. "When in Rome do

live in a

as the

who have to world where there are differences galore. This question is discussed in Neighborhoods Influence Personality, in this volume.

to

Romans

good sense

in

do," has a great deal of

it.

Respecting Feelings

Feelings arc facts to be reckoned with. Difierences in Discipline

In any neighborhood, there are to be differences in

bound

what children

permitted or expected to do. Parents

arc all

Other people have the same feelings as vou do about the Tightness and reasonableness of their ways.

It is

wise to take

these feelings into account as vou ap-

12 3

Childcraft

124

proach vour neighbors. Your first step is to be sufficiently easygoing that you grant other people their right to differ

from you. Once you do this, it is likely that they will meet you halfway. A second step is to want a good solution yourself.

"How

can

we handle

this so

eyeryone

"How

can the differences between us be turned from liabilities into assets?" "How can we stand by our principles and yet let our neighbors stand by theirs?" Your answers to these gains?"

questions will to a great extent deter-

mine whether you regard your neighbors as dictators, troublemakers, or friends.

The

lazy way, of course,

is

to cut your

whose

atti-

tudes are different from your own.

You

children off from eyeryone

can forbid them to associate with a particular group, or with one or two children, but this seldom accomplishes anything. Children are dependent on the company of their own age-group for their

good times. They need the com-

pany of other children if they are to grow wholesomely in every direction.

Studies children

show

that schools are full of

who have no

less skillful in getting

along with others.

They usually have difficulties in meeting new people and in venturing into new situations.

Children can learn, gradually, to behave in the homes of the neighbors according to the rules of those homes. Thev can learn to respect the neighbors' requirements just as they are learning to respect the requirements you make. "Burt's mother sure makes a fuss over anybody bringing mud into the kitchen.

We gotta be careful over there. I'm glad vou aren't mud-happv like she is. There are enough other things we have to watch out for here," says eight-year-old Ted, matter-of-factly. The

ability to

accommodate

actions

customs of the country or the house is the beginning of wisdom! It is a way of learning consideration and true respect for others. to the

rules of the

Your example, Lucien Aigner

friends because

mothers overprotect them, or set too narrow limits on their choices of playmates. These children usually arc their

of course, helps vour

children develop this flexible,

dating attitude.

You have

share in interpreting people

Your words can help vour good about

Even

his

the

growing

most

accommo-

to

do vour

who

differ.

child

ability to

inconsiderate

feci

fit in.

and

troublesome persons respond better if vou grant that there may be something to their side of the issue.

tend to co-operate

if

Thcv

the problem

is

open to alternative interpretations and solutions. The most cold and distant

Youngsters who are fenced off in every sense are usually unhappy and less able to get along with others.

'

Common

goals. in or play, can bring together children as well as adults in

work

a

neighborhood

and

build friendliness.

Schaub, Cushing

persons thaw

if

thev have the chance to

participate in finding a solution.

If your contacts with vour neighbors are not limited to occasions

conflicts.

where problems are dealt with, Talk

A

It

over with the Neighbors

third step

is

to

know vonr

ion neigh-

bors and their children firsthand.

Do

not try to know them through the filter of your children's enthusiasms or complaints. Especially, do not depend on your children alone to interpret any conflicts. Youngsters are not the most impartial reporters of what happened.

Your neighbors' children have probably also "interpreted" the situation to their parents, tion!

If

but

in the opposite direc-

peace and good will are to be

preserved, neighborhood difficulties over conflicts

among

children are better dealt

with bv involving all parties in the interpretation. An impersonal description of actual events usually cools tempers,

and makes

A

a

workable solution possible.

solution formed co-operatively helps

prevent future difficulties, because everyone has a better understanding of the cause of the trouble. Co-operative planning for some com-

mon

project

such as a neighborhood beach, or a picnic,

party, a trip to the

often goes a long

way toward preventing

is

a cush-

and for Neighbors Can-

built for understanding

preventing

difficulties.

Work

this

gests

of co-operating.

Together, in ways and means

The Children Work

Even

It

volume, sug-

out

young children have good about sense ways of solving problems of fairly

relationships, provided thev get help in

analyzing the situation and can feel free to express their real feelings

buff

or

without

immediate moralizing.

teachers

involve

children

in

re-

Good solving

neighborhood problems, and perhaps mothers could, too. This discussion in a third grade illustrates how wise children can be in these matters. The class, under the teacher's leadership, was talking about how mothers help them. Frank said that his mother helped him bv letting no one hurt him. "I run home, and she savs, 'You let him be' Marion:

Yes.

Miss

k'enncv.

that's

what he does. lie always runs home. Lots of times we don't

i-5

mean nothing

Childcraft

.26

but he runs home and tells his mom we pick on him. Then she dares us to hit him. Ethel: He's an awful tattletale, Miss Kenney. Just like he was to you in the first part of the year, but now he don't tattle because you always ask him what he did. He don't like to tell that. I think his mom would help him more if she did

what you do instead of always thinking we're mean and that Frankie didn't do nothing. Teacher: Frank, what do you think

about it? Maybe your mother would help you more if she helped you meet your own problems instead of protecting you. Carl: She's afraid Frankie

would

get

He

would, too, because he can't fight worth nothing. Frank: That's right, Miss Kenney. I

hurt.

always get beat up. Teacher: But would Frank have to

hold his place with you? Jean: Maybe if Frank didn't do things to make them pick on him he wouldn't fight to

them. Regina: Well, I don't think his mother is helping him, letting him run

have to

fight

home

to her. He'll never learn to play. Ralph: Frankie, why don't you come over and play with me and Dick for a

while?

Then maybe

the boulevard except

forget

to

when

cross

she's with

me, or to come to school. Dick: Would she let you come if we went and got vou? Frank: Mavbe. Ralph: Then let's do that next Saturday.

Dick: All right, Ralph.

Do

want

3011

us to, Frankie?

Frank:

I

guess

so.

Frankie's mother did let him go with Dick and Ralph, and the way was opened for Frank to be part of the neighborhood group. This could not have happened if the children had not been helped to work out the problem

themselves. Perhaps in a

it

takes the children

neighborhood to make friends of us

all.

Every neighborhood problem one tainly worth a good try. so readily solved, but every

The one who runs home Mother does not always prove to be the one who has been wronged. to

they'd

you when you went back. Frank: My mom won't let me

fight

is

not

is

cer-

Public .School-

NEIGHBORS CAN WORK TOGETHER ERNEST

G.

OSBORNE,

"good old different meaning

in

the

had a from what it has today. When our country was a nation of farms and small communities, people pitched in to raise the barn or husk the corn. days"

Neighbors

—Modern Style

acquaintanceship in the elevator. Even smaller communities have changed.

There, too, social-service agencies have taken over manv jobs that people who

At

least,

it

once

did.

looks that

way

we

on

rely

\Yc look

department, or emergencies. Neighbors no longer seem as important as thev used to be. fire

social service for help in other

Yet we are

still

neighbors.

Our way

of

yet neighbors can

living has changed,

and do still help one another: thev still work together. The kinds of jobs they do together may be different from the oldfashioned ones. Methods of co-operating may not always be as simple as they were seventy-five or a hundred years ago, but the

need

for

things done

is

common

effort

just as great.

mutual aid and changed as much

No

of us

lived close together

illness strikes,

The

friendliness as

to

get

spirit of

has

not

vou might think.

Putting Co-operation into Practice

who live in apartments may not even know our next-door neighbors. We may have just a nodding Today those

When

to the police, the

Ph.D.

Professor of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y.

Neighbourliness

glance.

trained nurses for nursing care.

at

first

alike,

one

two neighborhoods are exactly any more than persons are. So no

right

result

way

of developing a plan will

neighbors working together.

in

But some

basic

operating

principles

have been found helpful in practice. In one way or another, these principles usually come into the picture when people try to

127

work together.

Childcraft

28 Friendliness Is Essential

Ask Young People

Rarelv will neighbors work together unless thev know and like one another.

Far too often, in homes, in schools, and in communities, younger members of the group are ignored. One of the real social problems of our highlv-organized

may demand

The

situation

and

action, but these

if

co-operation

seldom take place

people stay strangers. As you get acquainted over the card

game

you share hints on gardening, as you hear about neighbors through children's reports, as in a hundred other ways you become acquainted with the people around you, you almost or

table, as

automatically establish a basis for co-

Sometimes, of course, a neighborhood problem say the threat of an arterial highway cutting through

operation.



residential property



people

will bring

together in spite of themselves. Gen-

communities

Take Part

to find active roles these

is

can

youngsters

to

play

the

in

What is more natural than to include young persons in planning and in working out details? They will gain from the we

has to be a groundwork

experience, but so will

Then

can forget their immediate personal con-

and

cerns and find satisfactions in working

dren than are

together.

eight- or ten-year-old looks

erallv, there first

of

friendliness.

individuals

all.

Older boys

Give evervone who shows interest in any neighborhood project the opportunity to be in on the initial thinking

and planning. Manv worth-while

effective in

working with younger

many

up

men

of

good

Most people

all

intelligent

would follow them.

will

are

that

human enough

to re-

sent being "left out." In spite of them-

people find the "tag end." selves,

it

hard to come in at

When

Neighbors

Today, when the paired,

we

Work Together

streets

many possibilities for among neighbors. Some

a great

tion

hood. Others perhaps brief description of

sible,

may move more slowly many persons as pos-

try to use as

what

but

plished

is

is

much more

will the project fold

leader

bow

eventually

accom-

likely to stick.

up should

out of the picture.

Nor

a single

co-operaof

them

appropriate to vour neighbor-

indi-

you

re-

go to work. That is the responsibility of the street department. But there are still

what

if

need to be

don't shoulder shovels and

no one

goes on. Tilings

half-

father.

vidual or small group dominates

that

The

engineer, doctor, dentist, or bank-clerk

may be

You must beware

to the

ac-

have come a cropper because a small group has enthusiastically pushed

They assumed

chil-

The

of us adults.

back on the high-school football team is often more admired than the lawyer,

tivities

ahead.

more

actually are likely to be

girls

sixteen- or seventeen-year-old.

Everybody

Invite

project.

Things are usually done foi them. Thev are seldom given the chance to participate, to contribute, and to be partners. The very intimacy of neighborhood co-operation makes it feasible for young persons to play an important part. Often, we adults are working on a job in which they are the center of concern.

A

just

do not

fit.

some

of the

many

things on which neighborhood groups have worked together can start your thinking. As you read these examples, ask yourself: What can you and the folks on your street do to bring more satisfying living to your neighborhood?

Neighbors

Cw

Lending Schools a Helping Hand

Work Together Group,

We don't run the schools for our children. We leave that to the Board of Ed-

in

129

Volume

erative play groups

how

13. tells

co-op-

and nursery schools

can be organized.

But we can work together with school people in a Parent Teacher Association for the development of better schools. In many a community, mothers

gether, too. to provide informal super-

help with the supervision of children during the noon hour at school. Thev

children.

ucation.

also

take turns on the plavground so

children have a better recess time. a

Thev

sus of the children

ing school for the

This information

who first is

administrators.

school

time

helps

voungsters get off to a better liclv

ers,

Barnes welcomed the eight- to ten-year-

in

vinity fudge,

these

simple foods.

start, too.

a

Monday

after-

took delight

girls

making cupcakes, gingerbread, and many other kinds

to

few communities have pubsupported nursery schools for chil-

Onlv

one community, for inand Saturday activiwere conducted bv a group of mothwith a few fathers joining in. Mrs. In

noons. Both boys and

value

to-

stance, after-school

be attendin the fall.

worked

vised play activity for the neighborhood

olds to her kitchen on

real It

of neighbors have

take a cen-

will

of

Groups

ties

Committees from the PTA conduct summer roundup each year in thou-

sands of communities.

Providing Organized Activities

On sters

Wednesdays, joined Susan

studio she had fixed

a

di-

of

group of voung-

Snow up

in

in

the

little

the attic of

Though not a professional Mrs. Snow knew how to let chil-

dren four years of age and younger. In the last ten years, parents have

her home.

started

hundreds of co-operative nursery Bv working together, fathers and mothers have made possible group experiences for their younger children.

dren use paints and clav to express their

schools.

ideas.

The

Saturday morning, Tom Taggart who were interested to come to his basement shop. He was

chapter

If

You Want

a

Play

artist.

On

invited any children

PuMit S

Hot

soup

balls give

and meatadded vigor

only but study, mothers' help makes hearty lunches possifor

ble in

many

schools.

The

man who

and

children

good with both tools a neighborhood asset.

is

is

on hand to help them make toys and simple household equipment out of wood. Now and again, one of the neighborhood fathers or mothers organized a Saturday afternoon excursion to visit the museum, to hike along the river looking for birds, or to go on an "exploring trip." This informal recreation program was a lifesaver for both voungsters and parents. As Billv Thompson said, "Gee, it's swell to be able to do all those things! I never even knew what a band saw was

aunts or grandmothers on tap as babysitters, and few can pav what it costs to hire a sitter.

One

sitting exchange.

solution

The

is

idea

the babv-

is

a

simple

A

group of families living close together, either in an apartment house or in one section of a community, pool one.

their baby-sitting resources. If the Joneses want to go to the movies, the} ring the Browns next door -

and Mr. or Mrs. Brown takes over

for

the evening. Later, the Joneses will do the same for the Browns. When a group

Mr. Taggart asked us to come mother expressed the feeling of all parents in her neighborhood

of ten or more families co-operate in this way, any one of them can be pretty sure

when she wrote her mother, "You don't know how much it means to have Billv

one. In

until

over." Billv's

busv and interested. It's such a relief! And I can get a lot of things done when I'm not worrving about where he is." Developing a Baby-Sitting Exchange

to find a "babv-sitter"

some

instances,

when

thev need one of the group

acts as secretary or dispatcher. All ar-

rangements are cleared through

her.

She

keeps a record of the amount of timecredit that has been built up, so no one family gets far out of line in using the service.

Another increasingly common kind of neighborhood co-operation is the development of a baby-sitting exchange. Few of todav's families have maiden

Acting as Youth Leaders

Some like

130

parents are working with groups

the

Bov

Scouts,

Girl

Scouts,

Neighbors Can Y.M.C.A.,

and

Y.W.C.A. The Cub

Scouts, of course, have long had

Den

Now other arrangements.

Mothers and Den Dads. groups

have

Youth

leaders

vinced that,

if

similar arc

much

better

131

ten such neighborhood or

Halloween

community

continue just because everyone has such a good time at the block party or the art show.

But

con-

increasingly

families pitch in, the chil-

dren in the groups have a

Work Together

this

happen.

It

celebrations

co-operation does not just

some planning on the

takes

part of those

who

can see the value of

time.

working and playing together.

Celebrating Special Holidays

Providing Outdoor Play Space

Here and there in neighborhoods, groups are working together to make

more

on holidavs. and children together go about the streets on Christmas Eve singing carols. The families in one neighborhood pool their fireworks on In

of the various customs

many

places parents

the Fourth of July. They have an im"show" that no one of them

pressive

More and communities band Halloween celebrations.

Yes,

largest back yard in the neighborhood. What is more, they enjoy having children around. The result?

Several fathers got together

equipment that yard. a

Many

for

times the original goal here

is

forestall possible destructive pranks.

If

to

Of-

it,

still

They have the

more

together

stop to think about

numerous ways in which neighbors can work and play together. The Trcnts illustrate one more idea.

alone could possibly afford. frequcntlv, too,

when you

there are

fits

and

built

into the Trent back

Now that yard has actually become

kind of neighborhood center. In one suburban community, families living near a large vacant lot secured permission to use it. Together parents



Mother and Father are active and interested in Cubs, Brownies, or Blueboys and girls are more likely to be enthusiastic participants, too.

birds,

Dennison Mfc. Co.

A &*l

Secret passages, ramps, nooks

and crannies make

invitation to imaginative play. Fathers built

and

children

graded

— thev

cleaned

it

up.

and equipped it simply and for neighborhood play.

it,

usefully

it

new

playground structure an

this

in their

families

spare time at small

moved

cost.

into the neighbor-

hood where the Wagners

lived.

One

af-

ternoon, as thev were watching their

Wagner and Mrs. few houses down the street, got to talking about the newcomers. "You'll never know," said Mrs. Wagner, "how much I appreciated vour children at play, Mrs.

Toy and Clothing Exchange

Mrs. idea.

had

another

The neighborhood

Marches dren.

March

On

live

is

filled

bright

which the with growing chilin

their limited incomes,

many

of

the families have a difficult time keeping

welcome I

Most

friends

of these things are

worn

out.

outgrown be-

With

of her next-door neighbor,

the help

and with the

co-operation of most of the neighbor-

Mrs. March set up a and tov exchange. Through this exchange, outgrown clothes and tovs arc exchanged for usable ones.

hood

families.

clothing

lived a

when we moved into the Lila, why don't vou and

neighborhood.

youngsters in clothes, skates, and tovs. fore the\ are

who

Levine,

more of our welcoming com-

get together with a few

and organize

a

mittee?"

From then on, no one moved into the neighborhood without a visit from a neighbor bringing flowers, a hot dish to piece out moving-day meals. Doing

Away

with Safety Hazards

After a minor epidemic of accidents

Welcoming New Neighbors

Newtown

is

a

in

rapidly-growing com-

munity. Almost even week three or four

132

the neighborhood.

ther of

Cub

Tom.

Scouts,

Jr..

Tom

Xorris.

fa-

and Den Dad of the

suggested

that

the

boys

trm

Can Work Together

\i [CHBORS

make

a survey of all the things

around

133

fanfare, this "share-the-father" plan be-

the neighborhood that were not safe.

came common

Before long some of the parents became interested, too. In a few weeks, shaky

preciated.

uneven pavement, unsound tree branches, broken glass, and a variety of other hazards had been spotted and eliminated. In the homes, too, whole families tended to become safety con-

Summer Camp The families on the west side of I Iartston were on friendly terms with one another. Their neighborhood school gave them all a warm welcome and this had much to do with the high morale of the group. They had also shared the use of a large vacant lot where they could

steps,

scious. Pinch-Hitting for Absent Fathers

The Boontown PTA was

discussing

the importance of fathers to family

life.

During the discussion, someone brought out the fact that

many

fathers were not

home. Some were serving in the armed forces. Others were working on at

defense jobs or traveling in connection

with their regular business.

"I'm sure," said one father, "that the whose dads aren't around miss a good deal. Wouldn't it be a good idea

kids

for

some

of us fathers

regularly to invite

who

are

home

them along when we

take our youngsters to the movies, to

the park, or on an auto ride?"

The

idea took hold.

fuss or

and much ap-

Sharing a

raise vegetables.

The Bostwieks had house

farm-

a big old

out of town. Mrs. Bostwick was chatting with two of her friends one sunny June afternoon: "I wish you folks could come out on the farm with us this summer. It would be swell for Timmy to have children to plav with. And we have loads of thirty-five or forty miles

room."

The

idea took hold.

The

first

summer,

onlv four families in the neighborhood spent time on the farm. But they had such a good time that others were interested.

Without

practice,

At the end

of three years, sev-

eral families joined together to

bin an

adjoining old and run-down farm.

Out

Vacations, neighborhood style, may be the happy results when families are willing to share their resources with each other, and to pool their talents. Barbara Morgan

'

•ft

m

9

c

>*%

'

^2£Jj^Mk..

-

K

^ -*'+Jh A

tgh^sR^JS^fc ..

.

c

_

Childcraft

134

of Mrs. Bostwick's idea grew an informal family camp, which meant wonderful vacations at

minimum

ent co-operative nurserv school taken, experts in the care of

degree of organization. are a great people for organiza-

and committee chairmen But here is some-

natural to us.

thing to watch. This kind of organizational red tape can get badly in the

way

manv neighborhood

plans,

groups are small enough, the

the

activities

simple enough that it is possible to operate in friendlv. informal ways.

scratch, or attempting to get every job

If.

entirelv

on

its

for instance,

own. there

We

it

would be

foolish for

parents to organize an unofficial officers'

traffic

group. Instead, bring the matter

to the attention of the police depart-

ment

or citv council. Should other recognized communitv services such as garbage disposal, pest control, or fire protection be inadequate, the task of a

neighborhood organization

is

to

make

the regular agencies responsible for such services

still

together

aware of the hazards.

Use the Experts It

is

wise,

give

ourselves

out from the cities into semirural communities. In these communities, sometimes as far away from the job as thirtv

much

the same

way

that their grand-

parents once did.

There still are opportunities for neighbors to work together to mutual advanSuch working together brings the

understanding friendliness that much more worth living. There is deep satisfaction in being part of a group of people who mean somesort of

•makes

life

Working

together takes practice. not always go smoothlv. Some people may suspect your motives. Others may be cantankerous. You will

Things

will

meet some

failures

and

rebuffs.

to

use

consultants

planning and earning out projects which will be the major responsibility of the neighborhood group itself. If a par-

But

this

not characteristic. For the most part, a little friendlv initiative can change a is

mere

collection of families living side

bv

side into a real neighborhood.

Children

who grow up where

families

enjoy being neighbors, where families share their lives in a variety of ways, are

children

who have

greater feelings of be-

These boys and

girls

better able to get along with too,

a

Of late, there has been a considerable movement of voung families

chance.

longing.

in

enjoy working and plaving

we only

if

thing to one another.

an unpro-

is

tected and dangerous crossing in the

neighborhood,

Are Together-

Times have changed, but people have

tage.

Work with Other Groups There is no particular merit in a from starting group neighborhood done

We

or forty miles, folks share together in

of effective functioning.

In

The More not.

tion. Constitutions, rules of order, by-

come

chil-

mistakes.

Except in unusual circumstances, neighborhood co-operation such as we are thinking about does not need a high

laws, officers,

under-

dren in school, or a social agencv can do much to help the group avoid common

cost.

Do Away with Red Tape

We

is

voung

Thcv that

will is

and to there

is

be

others.

have the knack of co-operating

essential to personal

happincs

working democracy. no more worthy goal. a

will

Surely

Parma. Publix

WHAT

KIND OF MANNERS FOR OUR CHILDREN? ROSE

H.

ALSCHULER

Author of "Painting and Personality," Tempe.

Howyoumany looked

modified language and behavior in many One did not talk or behave

times have vou said, as disapprovingly at the

households.

wav before the help." Today most people do not have "help." and radio, television, and paper napkins have

young people of today. "Well, manners have certainly changed since I was the

And moment you

a child."

"that

indeed they have! If at are not concentrating

largely replaced conversation, correct ta-

on the lack of manners of some particular child, it may be amusing to think over the changes of manners that have

bic manners,

As

end of the Vicmanners were, from our pres-

Fifty vears ago, at the

ent

point

Twenty to

of

view,

thirty

far

help living in the house tain

amount

too

years ago,

made

of formality,

and

fine linen.

Manners Are Contagious

occurred during the past half century. torian era,

Ariz.

former ovcrcon-

a reaction to the

cern about manners,

when

many

of us

remem-

domestic

was considered quite unnecessary and even unwise to teach children any social forms. TTioughtful. conscien-

for a cer-

tious

formal.

ber

it

parents

believed

manners would come

and no doubt i

3>3

that

desirable

naturally to chil-



i

Childcraft

36

dren brought up together

lived

in

among people who courteous

fashion.

Manners were thought to be contagious, somewhat like measles. Teaching of manners, at that time, was not onlv out of fashion, but out of favor. Whether or not we teach them, everv group young, old, rich, and poor has its own variety of manners, accepted and used by its own group mem-





Bad manners

bers.

among

adults as

are as usual

communication, and if we agree that good manners will probablv result in making us nonacceptable in groups where we might long to feel accepted, we still have certain fundamental questions remaining. What manners shall we teach our children? When and how shall they learn them and is there a difference between manners and courtesv? cial

lack of

among

gangs of bovs. Adults

Courtesy

—Manners. Any Distinction?

them, failure to recognize people thev wish to keep out of their charmed circle is a common form of bad manners that all too often is passed on

Most manners are acquired by example. Some additional ones can easilv be taught over a period of time, if undue pressure is not felt or used. For the purpose of this discussion, let us distinguish

to children.

between the

frequently use bad manners to promote

snobberv.

Among

Manners as a Social Asset

Manners, whether good or bad, are automatic ways of communicating with one another. Phrases such as "would vou please?" and "thank vou" are a needed part of the machinery' of life. Readilv

and pleasantly used, they help keep the machinery of life running smoothly.

Even

little

children can get great

satis-

and practicing

faction out of learning

manners.

dren arc not

know how

to greet people or

do with themselves. holds, children

offer a

what

to

other house-

In

friendly smile.

They may even show you

their favorite-

toys, or with great satisfaction they may pass cookies or help serve a meal. Manners under the latter circumstances help

children to feel socially secure.

When

children learn to serve guests with poise

and

friendliness, they are at the

time learning to If

we

"please"

and

We

thev will respect others and enter into their lives

standing.

with sympathy and underas thev have faith in

Only

themselves can thev have faith in others,

moment, homes where childen. In some of them, chilobviously ill at ease. They do

Picture, for a

there are

superficial

"thank-you" variety of manners and that deeper courtesv springing from inner feelings of good will toward other persons. can expect this deeper courtesy to grow in children as our understanding and deep-felt appreciation help them to value themselves as good human beings. If thev have self-respect,

define

same

as a

form of

other persons.

Unfortunately,

so-

many

parents

privileged to "veil" at their children to order

them about.

ill-tempered,

feel

and

It is likely to

be the

parent

who

dictatorial

"Where's vour tongue? Can't you thank say you?" But good manners and courtesy do not come from orders given in a disagreeable way before other persnaps,

sons.

If

parents speak rudely to their

children, children are sure to snap back.

and

feel socially at case.

manners

and extend to them the true courtesy and manners that come from liking

in

turn are likely to be punished for

their discourtesy.

Ivan HoltzinRe-

Never mind what books of etiquette say when toddlers face a birthday cake! Good manners can wait until the wonder of fluffy frosting has worn off.

How

Children Learn Manners

be expressed naturally everyday Suggestions are more effective than

Courtesv only life.

it

if

demands

will

is

or

a routine part of

commands.

'Wouldn't you

like

much more

to

Mae?"

is

results

than a surly order.

A

friendly

thank

Aunt

apt to get desired

A

suggested

"Mother wishes you would help her clear the table," or "Wouldn't you like to get Daddy's newspaper for him?" are far more likely to secure mannerly and happy co-operation than are abrupt commands to help Mother or wait on Father.

From

their birth

Hands, arms, eves, and voices communicate our feelings to our children. From our flow of love to them, our children's capacity for love grows. relationships.

on, our gentle or

From their love and feeling for people, their own deep-felt courtesv and the best kind of consideration and manners

will

develop.

Do

Children

Have

to

Be Rude?

Unfortunately, knowing all this and tiring to live accordingly docs not mean that

we have who

We

a

sure recipe for having

be mannerly. have to take into account the ups

children

will always

not-too-gentle handling of our children,

and downs that are

our friendly or hostile eves, arms, and voices begin to set the pattern of human

dren's development.

Young

by nature somewhat

selfish, jealous,

137

a part of all chil-

children arc

and

Childcraft

138 fearful.

They anger

readily. If

express their feelings

as,

allowed to

of course, they

should be, thev will periodically have spells of being rude and resistant. If they are to grow up to healthy, independent

it is

wise,

if

possible, to by-pass the situa-

tion until a

more favorable time comes

for quiet discussion.

A

great

many

par-

ents arc overanxious to have their chil-

maturity, they have, from time to time,

dren behave correctly. They feel that their children's manners, good or bad,

to talk back, especially to those figures of

reflect credit or discredit

authority, their parents

and

teachers.

Conscientious parents, struggling to their children mannerly, should find comfort in the fact that little children who always are polite and well-

make

mannered

are

more

likely to

guidance than are the childen

on them.

Accordingly, too large a proportion of our children suffer from parental pres-

Although occasional spells of bad manners are to be expected, when our sure.

children

become

sullen or ill-mannered

need

later

over quite a long period of time,

who

peri-

to analyze our

The neighbors' may be givdo not know how to

own

Let us ask ourselves

we

odically sav "I won't."

theirs.

invariably polite youngsters

pecting too

ing in because they

more unhappy with grownups

defend their rights. In our world, where sturdiness and friendly give-and-take are needed tools for healthy survival, everyone needs to learn how to withhold as well as to give,

and how to say

"No"

as well as "Yes."

Until they are quite mature, children of various ages will from time to time have bursts of seemingly

tivism

and

unmannerly nega-

resistance. if

need to be exercised. WTien we are shocked and baffled by their "I don't want to," or "Nuts," or by their sullen resistance, we must keep reminding ourselves that these are but natural expressions of healthy development. "will's"

Rudeness If

May Have

Deeper Causes

guests or other adults are present,

manners will particuannoy and embarrass parents. But, if possible, children should not be reprimanded before other people. If the child has put his worst foot forward, he is undoubtedly as uncomfortable as are the adults. Even at the expense of pride children's lack of

larly

if

are ex-

of the child. Is

he

or with

he generally unhappy? After it and of trying to make fewer demands, it may be well children?

Is

a bit of thinking about

to secure the child's help in planning his daily

program so that he has

less to do.

We will probably soon find that we have a happier child

who

is

more ready

to re-

spond courteously to the lessened

de-

mands made upon him.

They somehow

they are to be upstanding characters their "won't's" as well as their realize that

much

we need

behavior as well as

Manners Are a Two-Way

Affair

Because mannerly habits, like other ways of behaving, are most readilv imparted if the child's co-operation is secured, it is unwise to force "How do you do?" "Thank you," and other like forms on unwilling children. Learning desirable manners is part of a two-way process. The arrangements we set up and the kind of atmosphere we create can make learning pleasant social behavior or manlearned

ners a

When

happv experience

for children.

they fetch something or in some

way try to be helpful and we, in turn, say "That was very nice of you" or "You did that very well," the child usually beams with satisfaction, and will do the same

Fine points of dining in company mean nothing to the high-chair set. Don't expect them to sit guietly at the table until they are a few years older.

Copyright 1953 by the Curtis Publishing

thing again ents

when

occasion

arises.

Par-

and teachers who remember that

children retain behavior that provides success

and

satisfaction can,

by provid-

ing friendlv. happy, learning situations,

help children develop desirable feelings, habits,

and manners.

Do Parents Expect

too

Much?

Parents and teachers who know what can reasonably be expected of children

Company

of different ages can graduallv and without undue pressure help children acquire manners. Learning, during the early vcars, is not onlv a gradual process,

but often means three steps forward and one step back. If we suit our requirements to their developing but uneven responses, and if we arc prepared to accept children and sometimes laugh with

them and never into difficulties,

39

them when they get we can as a rule help

at

Childcraft

140

and friendly ways the}" want. where and what of getting

them

find courteous

up and down while the family

What About Table Manners? sit

For children under six, it is difficult to through leisurely adult meals. In

nursery schools, chairs, tables, childlike

and plate service with descoming as soon as they are ready for it make mannerly eating far easier than in most homes where tables, chairs, and conversation, sert

conversation are at the adult

level.

Advance Planning Avoids Trouble in homes can often be by thoughtful advance planning. A hungrv child cannot wait patiently for food. But if milk, buttered bread, or jellv sandwiches can be in place when he sits down, the child can get started. His whole main course can be readied and set before him before the Difficulties

forestalled

To

through a meal geared to adults.

avoid the bedlam of children's jumping is

eating,

the child can be given the alternative of sitting at the table as

long as he wishes,

or of going off to play

when he has finBv prearrange-

ished his main course.

ment, his plavthings can be waiting for by, but not too near to the dining table. Choice also may be given him as to whether he wants his dessert as soon as he finishes his main course or wishes to be called back to have dessert with the family. Both the advance planning, about which the child should be informed in a careful, leisurely way, and the chance to exercise choice in two situations when to leave the table and when to have his dessert served will help the child behave in a mannerlv way.

him near



If



tensions at dinner are usual despite

planning, fifteen-minute lying-down rest

adults are served.

periods before dinner foi tired fathers,

than five to seven years Children of age cannot be expected to sit quietly

for children,

less

sible)

often

and

for

mothers

make evening

(if

pos-

dinners far

Elizabeth Hibbs

Enjoyment, not ness, is the

polite-

watchword

for a small child at mealtime, never so mind if she turns up her nose at a new food, or even if she pushes it away determinedly.



ten-year-olds to not practice what they preach, but they Six-

may are

highly

any lapses

of

critical

in

manners

on the part younger ones.

the

of

pleasanter than thev wise. Relaxation does

would be otherimprove manners.

and development. With one ing

may

ordination; with another,

Can

We

Good Table Manners? months, many children sav

Expect

At fifteen "Ta-Ta" for "Thank you." Around that time, many parents are concerned as to how their children eat. At first, if allowed, hands will be used altogether children will get food

all

over their faces

petite, as well as

manners,

feels quite able to

may be

When

paired by adult pressure.

im-

a child

handle his spoon and

fork with ease, he will take pleasure in

showing sympathetic adults how nicely he can eat. But this may take several years. Meanwhile, parents need patience. Three-year-olds spilling.

can

drink

without

But young children, more

inter-

ested in lots of things other than eating, will often spill.

individual

One

also has to allow for

differences

in

co-ordination

mav be

slow to anger.

It is

care-

should be

better to let a plastic

punishment rather than the child. Understanding adults will keep a "mopper-up" at hand and use it tablecloth take

without fussing.

when new foods are make faces or com-

tried, children will

ments or

spit out the food. If it is understood that children will take three bites of whatever food is served, without dis-

approving comments, and that they need not take more than three bites, most children will in time learn to like practically all foods. This will not work, of course, if the adults at the table have food dislikes and discuss them.

Growing

in

Mannerliness

Although the feelings that underlie what we think of as "good manners" and "true courtesy" usually do not begin to solidify until children are between four and seven, desirable manners of social

141

it

lessness. In either case, adults

Occasionally,

and the surrounding territory. Before long, hands and spoons will be used alternately. But just because he can hold a spoon and sometimes connect it with his mouth, let us not expect the child always to eat nicely with his spoon. Ap-

child, spill-

indicate poor small-muscle co-

give-and-take, like desirable eat-

Childcraft

142

But parents should guard against

ing habits, can gradually be initiated

ters.

among younger

giving the older children such responsi-

children. If the two-and*

he does not get what he wants by hitting, screaming, and temper outbursts, but is successful when he says "Please" or "Could I have a turn next?" he has begun to learn from his own experience that manners are an a-half-year-old finds that

important part of getting along with

Manners and Consideration to time

great deal of patience

for

and

I

will"

become mana-

bossv, while the vounger ones

become overdependent.

If this happens, both the bossy older child and the overdependent younger child will be at a so-

cial

disadvantage.

Every so-called advance

in civilization

own

problems. Children are frequently so absorbed bv television that thev ignore or refuse to

Others

we have when the

four-year-old says "Yes, I

gerial

apparently

other persons.

From time

often that they

bilities so

brings

its

Such incidents should,

to use a

greet guests.

three- to

possible, be ignored at the

and "No,

won't" in the same breath. The child

of that age is often in inner conflict, because he strongly desires to remain a

baby, but he also wants to be grown up

and independent. In his more grown-up moments, he will be glad to help with

occur.

But

some

at

if

moment

they

non-television

mo-

ment, parents can discuss friendliness and courtesy as a two-way relationship in which children who wish under all circumstances to receive love and friendliness should be willing to extend friendly greetings even when to do so is incon-

housework. His help is frequently a hindrance. But if time is taken at this age to show him how to do things properly, he is much more likely to be more com-

venient.

petent and helpful later on.

expressed by parents undoubtedly form

A

child's willingness to

help set or

clear the table indicates a

good begin-

Feelings Mold Manners

Real love and sincere consideration the soundest basis for learning pleasant

manners.

The

exact what, when, and

ning of his feeling for social responsibility. If his help is refused, he may feel

how

cut off and rejected. Sowing the seeds of

Manners among the Eskimo differ from our own. But "our own" in Boston differ

helpfulness, like

most planting,

is

a lot

of trouble, but the harvest a bit later justifies the earlier effort. Five-year-olds

can

take a great deal of responsibility for

Their growing participation in daily household tasks helps children to feel that they are an important part of the household. As they help around the house, they develop a growtable-setting.

ing sense of social interrelatedness and

concern for others. Both are basic to good manners. Children from six to ten occasionally like to care for younger brothers and sis-

will

be pretty

much

a

matter of the

parent and child personalities involved.

from "our own" on a ranch in Arizona. In manners as in other aspects of life, as the twig is bent so will the direction of the sapling be set. Children's real manners, as previously stated, derive from a real consideration of others. Children who consistently get real love and thoughtful consideration will naturally want to be helpful. They will, in other words, be basically considerate persons who have real "know how" in manners, because they understand how other persons

feel.

PARENTS

Suzanne BzaBI

IN

ACTION

19.

YOUR ROLE AS A PARENT

20.

HOME AND SCHOOL ARE A TEAM

21.

FAMILY GUIDANCE SERVICES

22.

A HEALTHY PERSONALITY FOR EVERY CHILD

Communities today offer families many kinds up their children. But commuresources in education, recreation, health, and

of help in bringing nity

welfare are not designed to relieve parents of sponsibilities.

Nor do they

re-

take over any of the fam-

ily's vital tasks.

Some community

resources like our public

schools are well established. Some, like family coun-

and child-guidance services, are still rather new and not yet to be found in all communities. seling

But, in any case, only

if

parents are willing to

co-operate by giving real time and effort can any

community agency do its best job of helping a child grow up. That means, too, that teachers and other professional persons working with children need to look on parents as members of their team.

you use the resources of your community you are likely to find yourself drawing closer to your children. You will be more interested in and more understanding of what they are doing and learning. You will probably, too, find parenthood more rewarding and family life smoother. If

wisely,

V / Yivienne Lapbsit,

YOUR ROLE AS A PARENT E. T.

McSWAIN,

Ed.D.

Dean, School of Education, Northwestern University. Evanston,

111.

Parenthood is life's most interesting and challenging opportunity. As a parent, you are your child's first and most influential

teacher.

Your home

the

is

school where vour son or daughter ceives his

first

lessons in

aspects of living.

He

all

re-

important

learns to observe

and explore in order to establish facts, and to put together what he knows to revise ideas and acquire new ones. As vou trv to be an understanding, resourceful, and stimulating parent, you help your child grow up. This may seem to be a large order, for, like most parents, you are probablv pleased if, at the end of the day, your children have not quarreled with the neighbors or fallen stairs. It is

reassuring to

down

remember

that

you make your greatest contribution to a child just bv being there and being an understanding parent. The continuing, affectionate, dav-to-dav care mothers and fathers give from the time a child is born assists the child in building a sense of his own worth and of trust in his parents. These feelings, in large part, arc the foundation for the desire to learn

and

to

be fricndlv that

living with a family

Throughout

is

so necessarv in

and with playmates.

his childhood, just

know

ing vou arc there, that vou are interested in

him, and willing to

stabilizing influence

listen to

on vour

him.

is

a

child.

Parents Create a "Climate"

You want of right

to give vour child the sense

and wrong that

will

make him

an intelligent, responsible citizen in his own generation. This he will get more from what vou arc, and from what vou c/o from dav to daw than from any hidi 4=;

Childcraft

146

sounding speeches that you may make. Your children tend to follow vour

Time

lead.

after

thev discover

time,

from your behavior whether one tries to "get by" or whether one tries to do his best. From vour attitudes, thev learn in countless situations whether "it won't matter because nobodv

will

know

the

whether one does the decent, honorable thing because one's selfdifference," or

respect

demands it. the way vou

From

tackle a problem,

how to get to a question, how to do and how to be resource-

your children can find out the bottom of first

things

ful in

in

first,

using what thev have to work with

manv

You

situations.

are

teaching

your children every dav, without

real-

up, he wants to be like vou. As he develops his ideas and his ways of behaving, you are his most frequent adult companion. He will develop with vou as a model, in spite of your faults. Your child would be discouraged in trying to follow your leadership if you were everlastingly perfect. If he observes how you overcome your mistakes, he finds encouragement and help in learning to overcome his.

Just as the climate of a region

is

made

up of the shifts from warmth to cold, and from sun to rain, so the customs and the prevailing attitudes in a home create an emotional climate. It

is as important that this emotional climate be favorable to your children's develop-

mental and moral leadership. You are

ment as that they have the proper food, comfortable clothes, and bodv-buildine o

helping each child develop the person-

recreation.

izing that these small events

alis that

is

uniquely

You may make Everyone does, but,

add up

to

frequent as

As you strive to provide the makes it possible to grow,

setting that

his.

mistakes.

your child grows

your child receives valuable assistance for doing his own growing.

and material

H. Armstrong Roberta

When you

tackle prob-

lems courageously and treat others kindly,

you

give moral leadership to your youngster, for you are indeed his hero

and

his model.

Your Role As

you have the opportunity

a parent,

to live with your child, but life

quires

him

to

do

his

own

still re-

living

and

learning.

Parent

as a

munity or the society you knew

When He

Is

Ready

great task as a parent

is

to offer

your child the opportunity to take new steps when he is readv, whether it be in walking, holding a spoon, reading, or being friendly. In that way you can cooperate with growth. A parent is more like the gardener who tends and waters the plant that will grow in

its

own way

than like the potter who shapes the clay to conform to the shape he has decided it should take. Just as you enrich the soil

growth of your plants, so vou must enrich the "living soil" in which for better

the child finds the spiritual nourishment for developing his mind.

Supplying a good setting or "climate" growth includes giving the kind of guidance that lets him know what he may and may not do. Your child depends on your affection and guidance in learning the ideas, meanings, and values he needs to get along with himself and with other persons and to feel comfortable in the world as it is for a child's

today. You make it clear that there are some things expected of a three-year-old, some things expected of a six-year-old, and different things again expected of a

When you set reasonable you give your children something to hang on to, just as the strings the gardener ties up for his sweet peas to nine-year-old. limits,

climb give the vines a sense of direction and keep them from running riot.

New

Times Bring

You mav

New Customs

enjov reliving in

memory

the days of vour childhood, but vour

boys and

He

of today's world.

Give Him a Chance

girls

do not

live in

the com-

as a

can only move forward. Your son or daughter thinks and feels as a part child. Life

how Your

147

is

learning dailv

to belong to that world,

she)

is

at

home

and he (or

with airplanes,

televi-

and similar inventions. The machines a child encounters in his daily life have an influence on him. During your child's lifetime, more machines will undoubtedly further increase his need for good emotional balance, sion,

for

as

mechanical inventions often create

many problems

as they solve.

Courage Comes from Your Faith

Your tunities

child cannot escape the opporand requirements which will be

associated with adult citizenship in the years ahead.

He may meet

far greater

changes during the next twenty-five to fifty years than you have witnessed since your early childhood.

No

one

is

able to forecast with accu

racy the scope

and speed

of

change

in

community life within the next half century. Of course, no one can tell what will happen, but you can be sure that vour interest in and courageous attitude toward probable changes will be a source of securitv for the voung citizens living with you. Children need the example of vour faith and vour belief in the future. Nobody is optimistic all the time but, if you are usually confident, vour children can draw courage from vour attitude to

use their minds frcelv and productively

now and when

they arc grown.

Spurs

to

Learning

To meet the problems of his time, vour child needs to use controlled imagination. He needs to have his curiositv about the world around him satisfied. He needs opportunities for free and un-

The small child who is encouraged to try out creative,

constructive,

original ideas is actually learning to think.

H. Armstrong Roberts

restricted conversation.

You

an

are

and companion

in-

you valuable ally inspiring and hours spend enjoyable challenging your children to use their minds creatively. Children will exercise surprising and enthusiastic interest in as

the future of jet-propelled planes as they are adapted to

commercial

travel.

Your

with radio and newspapers makes them respond to local and national developments. Children are actually fascinated by the almost miraculous development of television. Its frequent use brings them into contact with people in their own state and nation, and also with people and happenings in different countries all around the world. Children need to develop minds capable of separating facts from opinions. The rapid changes children's

familiarity

taking place in business, industry, and agriculture as man's energy

edge expand his

and knowl-

civilian use of

atomic

energy

may be

the source of

many

ques-

As the annual increase in population forces more and more adults and children to live in crowded villages and tions.

cities,

the requirements for democratic

be of concern to you As you help children find

citizenship should as a parent.

answers to questions touching these topics, you will further the development of constructive attitudes toward the problems of living together. Even the conditions and requirements for international co-operation and peace may come in for discussions as you talk with the children.

An Atmosphere That Fosters Thought Nobody would attempt to predict where children's intellectual curiosity and certainly nobody would expect you to be able to answer even half of the questions an eager, growing child will ask. "I don't know, but let's find out" will be your frequent answer. As will lead,

148

Your Role long as your child knows that he has a right to think about remote events and possibilities and to dream fine dreams, and that vou will help him find the information he wants, you are giving good guidance. If he is told rcpeatedlv that thinking about great questions must be put off until some distant day when he is grown up, then he is not receiving the help his developing mind demands. Hours shared with your children in

studving the heritage of the past, the

achievements and problems in the present, and the probable trends in the future represent vour investment in their

and preparation to face the tomorrows with faith, courage, and intelligence. Being a parent and watching readinesss

your child develop can become an

excit-

ing and companionable adventure, as you share the resources of your mind and the maturity of vour personality with your son or daughter.

Combining Ideas

Each

in

New Ways

unique individual with growth and development. Each child learns about the world around him and gets his feelings and attitudes through his five senses from books, objects, and situations he encounters in daily living. He uses what he has already learned to make child

is

a

different potentialities for

sense out of

How of

well

new

ideas or impressions.

he understands the world of people depends on

\s

\

Parent

M9

But chilmental vision when parents provide the experiences and the guidance that stimulate new ways of learning, greater self-confidence, and clear thinking. The sections in Childcrait on Sharing Pleasures and Refor faulty psychological vision.

dren

may improve

sponsibilities, in

in

Volume

12; Firsi

I

Ex-

Away irom Home and What Can Do Now, Mother?, in periences

I

Volume

and Children Need to Create and Widening Horizons, in Volume 14, give you some of the de13;

and specific ways you can provide such experiences and guidance. You cannot do the learning for vour child. Independent, informed, critical, tailed

and confident minds are custom-made by each individual. You set the stage by providing encouragement and the materials and experiences that provoke creative thinking. Sometimes you will suggest to Your bov or girl what books may be helpful. Sometimes vou will be able to suggest he talk with someone in the communitv who knows a great deal about a subject. Again, you may know where a Youngster can find an answer for himself through observation

and exploration. Different children will respond diffcrcntlv to the experiences that

way.

mind

You

will, of course,

come

their

need to keep

in

the age and the personality of the

child with

whom

you are

talking.

things and

what might be

called his psychological

vision.

Children have physical vision. They two eyes, but they get meanings from what they see bv using

Conversation

Can Be Education

Mental

is

building a

curiosity

mind and

a

powerful asset

a personality,

in

and

psychological vision, or the eves of the

encouraging a his curiosity. child to use Children gain new ideas and information by question-

mind.

ing, observing,

see with their

glasses

Parents if

arc

quick

to

provide

children do not sec well.

fortunatclv, there are

no

Un-

similar glasses

you can be resourceful

inquisitive

and exploring. They arc

when they

more about

in

are ready to learn

situations

thev

have en-

me why you

"Tell

story"

this

like

a good

is

lead in helping the children become careful listeners

and readers.

Myelie

When your child asks queshelp him to think for himself. Let use what he has already learned as

countered. tions,

him

you and he together search for an answer. At least, he can often use what he already

knows

to decide

how

to find an

read.

How

cussed in

My

for First Grade?,

dis-

is

Child Be Ready

Volume

in

You

13.

itv to read, in their rate of reading,

answering

Skillful

is

not

difficult

if

you are patient, if you let a child know you welcome his curiosity. You can suggest he observe carefully. You can aid him in learning how to use maps, dictionaries, and encyclopedias in finding answers to

manv

Common

an eleguiding your children, and common sense will warn vou to let a child's interest be vour guide in answering questions or opening up new subjects. You can sometimes avoid a bad case of "informational indigestion" if you resist the temptation to tell a youngster all you know about a subject, or to read him everything vou can find on it. sense

is

in their interests

interest in critical reading

are essential in developing an informed.

active mind.

vour child needs to

formation, to find enjovment, and to

expand and enrich for

mental world.

his

Learning

Varied experiences

and community

to

Read

in

both

family

develop a child's readiness for reading. Friendly conversation about

community

life

home, animal, life will

and more

nature,

give a child

meanings which he ties up with words. As vou read interesting stories and poems to vour children, and share discussion of what has been read, you show them that it is worth while to listen attentively.

and

and

for read-

find satisfaction in reading to gain in-

essential

Reading Stimulates Thinking

and purposes

ing. In the first stage,

Foundations

of his questions.

in

Ability

children learn to read

Will

will find that children varv in their abil-

answer.

ment

access to books and other materials which develop a readiness for learning to

You

can urge them to talk

about what they have heard, and to

ex-

press their likes or dislikes for the selections.

At home, children can have

Through reading 150

aloud, you have the

Your Role opportunity to expand your child's terest

in

reading,

to

improve

his

they have a chance to report an incident or to

munities.

Using Language Accurately is our most useful means thought and communication. The young child first uses words and sentences for the sheer fun of talking. Soon he is able to connect meanings and feelings with words. The next step comes when he discovers that language makes

Language

of

him to communicate with with other children. and his parents child does not easily underA young of his language on othstand the effect ers. Only gradually, through your patient possible for

explanations, will a youngster develop

the accuracy that

we

151

in-

and to extend his understanding of, and attitudes toward, peoples in near and distant com-

call

Parent

ap-

preciation for literature,

it

as a

being honest,

tell a

story, they find

out about

shades of meanings. Their reliability in using words increases with practice. If you are a good listener, your child is more likely to become a good talker. You can encourage a bov or girl to think about the ideas he wants to share, and to find the most effective and interesting way of organizing and expressing what he has to say. Cultivate Critical Listening

Careful listening is another ability needed for a well-disciplined mind. Children need assistance in learning early that there can be a difference between the thought of the speaker and the meaning the listener gets. Friendly

conversation between parents and chil-

dren

may

assist

young

listeners in dis-

covering that hearing correctly

is

as im-

and the consideration for other people's feelings that we call being courteous.

portant as reading or speaking correctlv.

A richer vocabulary comes about as children have varied experiences. As

ing

Children need guidance in discoverhow faulty listening can lead to misunderstanding, to confusion, and even

Your attitude and example do much to help vour child develop appreciation for and skill in listening.

to criticism. will

Thinking About Ideals All parents

want

their children to un-

derstand and to be loyal to the ideals and values inherent in our government and in our own way of life. Through selected reading, friendly conversation,

and

travel,

when

that

is

possible,

vou

have the opportunity to assist vour chil-

"I'm not glad to see her, so there." Using language considerately and accurately takes understanding beyond the

power

of the five- or six-year-old.

Childcraft

152 dren in learning about the

women whose the

faith

and

men and

vision achieved

unprecedented progress we have

example and the understanding vou have given them as they mature into informed, intellectually

witnessed in business, industry, and the various professions. You can encourage

citizens.

and help vour children to

Of

realize

the

importance of getting along with and understanding peoples of all races and creeds the human relations of one toward the other.



Spiritual

free,

and

loval

Values

An informed mind and

a healthv personalis need the support of moral and spiritual values. As a parent, vou can offer the example, the guidance, and the

experiences which will help your chil-

Of

Human Relations Advancement in human relations is possible onlv when men and women

dren discover the meaning and importance of respect for the worth and dig-

possess informed, critical minds; only

of

when

thev believe that the barriers to international understanding and goodwill

among

peoples can be eliminated

through education at home, in church,

and

in school.

By

practicing respect for

nity of each individual.

workmanship; respect

High standards for freedom of

choice in worship; accepting responsibility for

the consequences of one's be-

havior toward others; and the need for religion

and

faith in

God,

are

the values your children learn

among first

own homes. The way vou

in

the freedom of other persons, and by

their

having the will to be free intellectually, vou can inspire and assist vour children to live so that thev will practice a high

about these values will be a powerful influence on your children's attitudes. Reading about the lives and achievements of men and women who found strength in moral and spiritual values is a rewarding familv activity. Parenthood, then, is a job second to none in its influence and importance. Being a parent takes interest,

quality of

human

relations in their

own

generation.

Your children must

live in a

world

that has been reduced greatly in time

contact distance by the rapid changes in transportation and communication. Thev will have to demonstrate by thought and action an understanding of the needs, customs, and governments of peoples of all nations. Loval and intelligent citizenship needs to be rounded out with an understanding of international affairs and trends. Industrial and commercial prog-

and

feel

humor, good deal of endurance. But vou can be human, and you can make mistakes, and still be the best of parents for patience, humility, a sense of

and

a

your child. to

You

can

grow up able

still

help children

to tackle a

problem

with reasonableness and clear-headedness, to be children who can think straight. Through such family life vour

dependent on minds sufficiently and well-disciplined to rise above narrow prejudices, minority discriminations, and traditional bias. The real problems our children will have to meet will be in the field of hu-

dence in themselves, and will be able to have confidence in and respect for others. In our children, and the way we help them grow up, we place our hope

man

for the future.

ress

is

well-informed

relations.

Your children

reflect

vour

children will gain respect for and confi-

HOME AND SCHOOL ARE A TEAM

per with his family, does his homework,

and watches

affects

BESS

B.

LANE

Author of "Your Part Swarthmore, Pa.

in

television.

other

even-

Each experience experience.

Your Child's Education'

pearance, the necessity for

teamwork

tween home and school, on earlier times, it was thought that education of a child could be

before experienced,

INthe

Homes and

home and now convinced that

neatly divided between school.

We

are

whatever a child does fects what he does in

in all

one place

af-

to get

sister

be-

a scale never

came along with

it.

schools learned that they

in touch, for the child's best

interests.

success in

may help him

along better with his older

home.

must keep

other places.

We believe, for instance, that arithmetic at school

Tire

home's interests, purposes, and problems overlap and intertwine with those of the school, and vice versa. When the idea of the "whole" child made its ap-

There is no school that is not on the move. Most schools, while using the wisdom of the past, are mixing it with new knowledge and new insights. 'Ilicsc schools arc

at

We

own

all

moving forward, each

at

have learned that trouble with his father may make for a poor apresentment toward his petite, for

its

teacher, or for failure in reading or base-

carefully interpreted to parents. If con-

ball.

We have come to accept the idea

It is

school's

the "whole" child goes to school, plays

with his friends, comes home, has sup-

desirable that the changes in a

methods and curriculum be

are to be avoided, home people need to meet frequently with school people to learn of changes and to help make changes that affect the child. flicts

that

rate.

153

Childcraft

154

Homes and schools need always to keep in mind that the "home child" and the "school child" are the same child, even though he acts differently in one place from the

way he

acts in another.

Many problems may be avoided and

and his special talents found and developed more

missioners, the chief of police,

com

and the

chairman of the board of education, to find answers

may

find

some

to

You

questions.

superintendent of

the

that

him,

schools, the principal, teachers, parents,

may be

or pupils hold the key to other problems.

for

skills

ences with the mayor or the countv

effectively,

other individuals with special inter-

Still

from such home-school co-operation, but also groups as a whole may benefit. For instance, by means of such teamwork, racial problems in the group may

knowledge mav need to be on from time to time. Then vou can call meetings to report upon the findings and to discuss the situation. There may be meetings of small groups in the homes, medium-sized groups in the school librarv or the communitv cen-

be reduced, interest in the

ter,

when

the adults in his

gether, plan together,

Not

onlv

mav

meet

to-

and work together.

individual children profit

and the health

thered,

life

arts

level of the

fur-

group

ests or special

called

or large groups in the grange or in

the town

hall.

You may want

raised.

Taking Stock In their efforts to go forward together, number of communities that have

in a

realized the importance of

parents and teachers

make

it

teamwork, a practice

from time to time to get their bearings. Thev want to see where thev are, what they have already accomplished, what they should do next, and how thev should do it. They search for to stop

to prepare a question-

your survey, as some groups have done. This kind of survev does not require lists of statistics, counting machines, and complicated averages. An informal survey, just a lookingnaire to help

you

in

around, questioninglv, with the wellbeing of children in mind, may be all that

is

needed.

What Questions

Shall

Your questionnaire

We

Ask?

to guide the group

answers to such questions as the follow-

might include such questions

ing:

our street crossings well policed? Is the local movie theater providing pictures our community needs? Our school of these needs are most pressing? kinds of teamwork are possible in our

WTiat needs?

are

Which

What

that are suitable for children at

day matinees?

communitv

Is

as:

its

Are

Satur-

the school librarv or

library well stocked with

situation?

the

What means do we have at hand for carrying on teamwork? What means could we develop? What are the difficulties we have to face, and

books for children? Are our textbooks

how

without bias and prejudice? Are the resources of the school building and grounds being well and sufficicntlv used for communitv purposes after school and at week ends?

can we overcome them?

Where

Shall

There

We

many wavs member of

are

interested

Find Answers?

that you, as an

parent-teacher

groups, can go about finding answers

(temporary ones, at least) to questions such as these. You can arrange confer-

up

to date?

Do

thev present the facts

After you, the parents and teachers gether, have looked at vour

to-

community

and your school, and have selected ques-

Bbhu

No

i



Bma

last minute flurry, hurry, or worry for these youngsters! Considerate parents send children to school on time, relaxed, and in a good mood to learn.

Childcraft work on, have a program for teamwork. This program is usually directed and guided by some group which emphasizes parent participation in its work. Such working groups include parent-teacher associations, home-school astions to

parents'

sociations,

clubs,

parents'

as-

sociations, mothers' clubs, fathers' clubs,

and

committees.

parents'

Sometimes

these groups increase their effectiveness

bv joining forces with council or

some other

a

community

themselves constitute that real partnership. If a partnership between parents and teachers has been established, thev

meet as equals to learn together, and to work together on their common problems toward common goals. To these common problems each father, mother, and teacher contributes from his special knowledge and special experience. Each gains in ideas and understandings, and the child gains three times over.

civic organization.

Playing Together Practical

Ways

of

Co-operating

\\ nether your group

There are manv kinds, or levels, of home-school teamwork. All communities have made a beginning. Sending notices of changes in the school's routine to parents

When or

is

one kind of teamwork.

a teacher writes a friendly letter

makes

is

furthering co-operation.

Other ways may include sending bulletins to parents from time to time, to give

them them

begin-

its

Square dancing

a helpful telephone call to a

parent, she

just

is

teamwork or is well on its way. one of the best means of bringing school people and home people together and furthering teamwork is through plav. In play, you join hands both figuratively and literally, and that is good. ning

is

well received

some communities, bridge others.

An

in

or bingo in

informal tea in the school

li-

brary each month, to which teachers in-

few parents

by getting your children to school on time. You co-operate if you keep children out of school when they seem to be coming down with a cold. You mav be

works well and teachers to a home for a Sunday evening snack is popular with others. The parents need not always be hosts. Teachers enjov sharing their homes, too. Some parent-teacher groups like to write and put on plavs. Some like to

able to share your resources with the

plan a stunt night for parents, teachers,

certain school news, or sending invitations to an art exhibit or an

assembly program.

You may

school



give

co-operate with the school

talks,

lend costumes, or

buv equipment. These samples of co-operation show interest, friendliness, and good will. They are all good in themselves, and good, too, because they mav lead to the kind of partnership so necessary in even-

community if children are to we wish them to thrive. While such friendly and helpful acts may be and usually arc continued when

school

thrive as

a real partnership exists, they

do not

in

vite a

in

some

and

groups.

pupils.

Fun and sions

are all

good

activities.

laughter tend to remove ten-

and smooth rough

Home and In

These

at a time,

Inviting parents

places.

School Visiting

many communities, one

of the best

approaches to the formation of a sound partnership seems to be the exchange of visits. Parents go to the classroom and teachers go to the homes. When Mrs. Cox visits Fred's classroom, she sees her child in relation to

"Team play" may be starting

work."

a cup

A

the

"team square dance or

point

of coffee,

for

games

or

conversation, lay the foundation for a new project.

how he works with them and for them. She noother children. She discovers

tices his special interests, his strengths

and his weaknesses, and makes plans to supplement the teacher's efforts. She observes the materials that arc being used,

and how they tices

are being used.

She no-

the teacher's weaknesses and thinks

home might fill the doesn't sing too well, "Miss Hart gap. father has a good voice. Fred's but should sing with Fred more Maybe he of ways in which the

often."

When

Miss Hart

visits

the

Cox home

and uses her learning, in the same way. She notices that the three bovs have to occupy the same bedroom. "What a good idea it was," she thought she learns,

"to give ?.

them the

largest

room

in the

Ewing Galloway

When is

children feel teachers and parents stand shoulder to shoulder, their morale considerably higher, and they tend to like school much better, too.

house and then divide it into three parts by sliding curtains, tov cases, and bookcases built high, so that each child reallv

has

some privacy

—almost

a

room

of his

own." Miss Hart notices with interest homemade equipment, and gets some good ideas for her classroom. But she feels that it is too bad that no one has ever helped Fred organize his books and tovs. It occurs to her that perhaps she can help him bv giving him charge of the school supplv closet.

This exchange of

visits

by parents and

teachers usually leads to greater under-

standing

of

each

other's successes,

other's

and each

goals,

each

other's prob-

Some-

lems, and to greater co-operation.

times these visits do not accomplish what vou had hoped for. This does not mean that vou should discontinue them. It does challenge vour ingenuity in making future

Can Children Be

Some children

the Connecting Link?

make the most

schools as

the

building good and school.

The day filled

pleasant and profitable.

visits

at

greatest

relations

school

of the

resource

for

between home

may have been

with interesting and fruitful ac-

which parents would be deeply interested. Rut when Father asks, "What did you do in school today?" tivities

58

in

Home and School Are Bill's

answer

likely to be,

is

"Oh, noth-

ing much." Bill does not have any idea that this answer gives a of his school

and

bad impression

his teacher!

Some teachers are using the last few minutes of each day to help the children recall what they did during the day, why they did

it,

and what came

of

it.

Parents

himself such questions as the following:

What

news. They are also urged to suggest to the children certain home news that

school

might be of

his life

Such items as getting a new puppy, meeting interesting people, and tapping maple trees for sap are all helpful in "telling"

time in the early grades. Certain kinds of homework assignments can help bring home and school together. For instance, the teacher can

159

works in the chapter Reports and Promotions, in Volume 14. A conference of this kind, to be at its best, must be planned carefully in advance by the child's father, his mother, and his teacher. The conference will be more fruitful if each of you has asked

are urged to ask frequently for school

interest to the school.

Team

a

them?

the

are

child's

home

and

What are his

Are meeting

interests?

together

needs, his concerns,

problems? Are school and home helping him solve his problems? In what ways does the teacher need help? The parents need help? How can each help the other?

These parent-teacher conferences, held under a tree in the park, over a tea table in the home, in a drugstore booth,

the children about her early school

or in the quiet of the classroom after

She can then ask them to interview Mother, Father, or Grandpa, and

necessary for parent, teacher, and child

tell

days.

report such interviews to the class. It can be suggested that they ask such questions as, "Where did you go to school when vou were in fourth grade?"

school hours, have

development.

A

many

of the qualities

conference of parents

"What

and teacher in behalf of a child can be an experience in friendliness, openmindedness, mutual searching, common agreement, joint planning, and mutual

like

satisfaction.

did you learn?" "What did you and what did you dislike?" An interview with some neighbor, particularly one with a special interest or a background in another country, can be equally helpful.

This exchange of news and informa-

How About

Discussion Groups?

Common

interests

may

bring parents

and teachers together for study and discussion. The group may be mutually in-

tion through child reporters tends to

terested in such topics as child behavior,

and the home curriculum to bring home and

educational legislation, a consolidated

unify the school curriculum

school closer together.

school, great books, or

These

By adding the

child to the parent-teacher

team when-

first aid.

joint study groups, in addition

to arousing interest

and increasing

in-

greatly

formation, have tended to erase those

Parent-teacher conferences arc being

imaginary lines sometimes drawn between parents and teachers. They have also, at times, led to the formation of joint committees, organized to make

ever

the

possible,

team

is

strengthened. Conferences

substituted schools.

Fill

a Need

for

You

report cards

can read

how

in this

many plan

certain studies or to

or

community

do certain school no way can the

jobs. In

.

Childcraft

:6o

importance of teamwork be better demonstrated than in the work of parentteacher committees.

of the class. Usually, before the close of each meeting, plans are made for the next meeting.

Through Meetings

for

"Classroom Parents"

many communities

In

today, parents

and teachers meet by classes. The parents and teachers of kindergarten children meet together, the parents and teachers of first-grade children meet together, and so on throughout the school. In general, discussion in your class

around the school work or school problems of your group. But a teacher often uses this opportunity to learn from parents the children's home interests and home problems. She meetings

is,

these

parent-teacher

class

meetings, you usually find good will

centers

of course, particularly interested in

those problems originating in the work

is

furthered, friendships formed, information gained,

and important work done.

Have Large Meetings a Place? Public meetings of yarious kinds

may

spread information and promote co-operation.

Forum

or panel discussions by

parents and teachers on any topic of

common

haye been found useabo\e ways. Talks on special school subjects art, music, health by the teacher in charge are enjoyed and found helpful. Opening school-board meetings to the public has been found interest

ful in the





Associations for parents and teachers bring together men and women with Mutual respect grows as they discuss common interests.

different points of view.

Public Schools. Madison, Wis

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3

Home and School Are be a wise and useful move in a number of communities. to

Challenges

to

Teamwork

Perhaps you have the impression that, means for developing and

given certain

carrying on teamwork between home and school, good teamwork just naturally follows. But it doesn't. Under the best conditions, teamwork, particularlv a genuine partnership, makes progress slowly.

Under the worst

progress

may be

conditions,

scarcely perceptible.

In order to grow and develop in any community, teamwork requires much careful nourishment and understanding care bv the persons involved. Homeschool teamwork is complicated because there are

manv

involved.

All

different kinds of people ages,

economic

various

manv cultural groups, manv communities, a number

and, in

groups,

and

religious groups

together.

The

job

is

need to be brought not easy and that

something of an understatement! These various groups tend to have different ideas about education. Some groups and some individuals in each group are likely to be greatly attached are willing to

follow blindly the newer ways.

The

great

majority have special mixtures of the old and the find the

new which

common

thev cherish.

To

goals of the various

groups, and to use the resources of to

work toward these

goals,

is

all

a chal-

lenge to parent-teacher leadership.

The

pressures of social

demands con-

another challenge to our ingenuity. If we have accepted the importance of teamwork with our heads only, and not with our hearts, our main pressures are likely to prevent our putting it into practice. It is onlv when we feel deeply that our children may be handistitute

101

capped without school-home co-operation in thinking, planning, and working, that we are able to put aside other things and make a place for it. Perhaps the greatest challenge to our ingenuity lies in overcoming the drawback of lack of preparation for homeschool teamwork. Our schools, colleges, and adult-education programs must help with this by providing their students with wide experience in the practice of democracy. Real teamwork can thrive only in a democratic atmosphere. Because of this lack of training, mam school people and many home people

humps

lack the skill to get over the

or

out of the hollows, of which there are

many

in

home-school teamwork. And,

lacking this

skill, it

takes unusual cour-

age to inaugurate a teamwork program on other than a surface level.

A



Some

Team

of racial

is

to the older ways.

a

Hope

Time

of

The

challenges to vou to

make

prog-

home-school teamwork are many. But, if you feel at all hopeless about the progress being made, you have onlv to

ress in

look about you. are

now

A number

of colleges

taking a genuine working

in-

terest in this all-important partnership

between

home

and

School

school.

boards, superintendents,

and

principals

are studving the question in their

own

communities. Teachers are experiment-

and other citizens are rapbecoming alert to the problem, and are discovering new and practical ways of contributing their ideas and other reing. Parents

idly

sources to the school.

as

As parents and teachers partners on common

common engaged ture.

learn to interests

work and

problems, they find themselves an exciting, satisfying adven-

in

In respect to

work, our time

is

a

home-school teamtime of hope.

Public Schools. Madison, Wis.

FAMILY GUIDANCE SERVICES ROBERT

L.

SUTHERLAND,

Ph.D.

Director, Hogg Foundation, and Professor of Sociology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas

Everyone

solves

some

ing with emotional and behavior prob-

of his prob-

lems every day. But when

lems

a single

problem looms large, when it troubles you most of the time, when the solution seems bevond you, then outside

Signs That Help

Needed

most of us meet perplexities working out the best relationship with our marriage partners, or in guidoccasionally

that a counselor or guidance center aids onlv families who arc in serious trouble. But that is not so. Psychiatry, case work, and counseling

in

a

stress

Is

We live at such high speed todav that

may be needed. Some people think

help

now

as they arise.

ing our children.

Most people

take these "problems" in

their stride, but their stride docs not al-

the advisability of securing

ways earn them

a problem becomes serious. Workers in these fields help individuals and families live more satisfying lives by aiding them in understanding and deal

help before

Danger In family

show .62

in the best direction.

signals life,

that help

warn of road hazards.

too, there arc signs that

may be

needed.

If

things



Family Guidance Services seem to be going along badlv over a is one sign. If a child's behavior and development are

who,

constantly baffling,

to child

period of time, that

own marriage short

or

if

the parents'

has

relationship

what they had hoped

of

in the

home

a

is

barom-

members

rela-

He may be a social case worker who. following two years of graduate studv,

The emotional climate is bound to be tense (or chilly) occasionally. If it if

development and family

for

eter.

hits freezing often,

further experience in problems related tionships.

in order.

is

Atmosphere

in addition to several years of pro-

fessional stud\ after college, has gained

fallen

these are signs that a trained person's

help

.6,

of the

family get on each other's nerves con-

and always about what they do, then something is wrong. Steps toward improving things should be taken. tinuously, always concealing

defensive

has had additional training in a childguidance clinic or a family service agency.

Or he may be

headed

directly

a person who has toward family counseling. If so, he has drawn from the previous fields mentioned, and has had work in home and family-life education, human development, and the so-

cial sciences.

What Does a Counselor Do?

Who

Is

a Qualified Counselor?

Counselors

help

people

deal

A

with

counselor

friendly.

is

He

or she

takes time to listen to your problems,

eral of the professions are trained to give

you find your own solutions. The counselor docs not pry, he does not hurry, and he docs not jump to con-

counsel and guidance to others. Here

clusions.

the word counselor

tion of the family situation, or of the

problems in their

lesser or greater

re-

lationships with others. People in sev-

is

used to refer to

in the professional field who does counseling or guidance work in family relationships, or emotional or so-

anyone

cial-adjustment problems of children.

A

psychiatrist, a psychologist, or a social

may be a counselor in some The term itself does not de-

and

to help

He

how vou

He may

saving, or to see

or

training

The

qualifica-

is

descrip-

especially inter-

and later in how about the matter.

make

cer-

he understands what vou are

mation

how he

own

ask a few questions to

tain that

case worker

anvone's

is

feel,

the child himself feels

agencies. scribe

and

child's behavior,

ested in

your

listens to

if

other helpful infor-

available.

counselor

may

give a child



— espe-

clinic," in a "family-counseling service,"

voung child an opportunity to express through normal play activity his underlying attitudes and emotions. The

or in a "family service bureau," whether

child

or not he or she bears the title "coun-

dolls, blocks,

tions, or exactly

The worker

in

selor," has usuallv

ough professional

a

works.

cially a

"child-guidance

had long and

training.

A

thor-

worker

in

child-guidance clinics or family service

bureaus

may be

a doctor

who

has spe-

ized

still

seling.

more

He

in

or she

room

outfitted with

and other children's equipobserved while he chooses

a setting can, over a period of time, usu-

at

may be

some

a psychologist

taken to a

ment, and is and plays with the materials. A counselor trained in working with children in such

and then specialchild and family coun-

cialized in psychiatry,

is

ally learn

enough about the child

to get

the cause of the difficulty and. to extent, to

work

it

out through play.

Childcraft

164

Whether

the counselor works with

the child and parents through interviews, carries on treatment through plav. or uses psychological tests, he strives first

for

an understanding of the present

difficulty.

the counselor

assists parents in understanding the beliefs, values, and moral

principles they alreadv have, the

gious leader

is

the one

who

reli-

teaches per-

sons what beliefs they should have, and what moral values represent societv's best experience.

Do Counselors

The

Tell

You What

counselor gives

vice, especially

to

little

during the

Do? or

first

no

ad-

confer-

Some churches are so aware of the need for both religious teaching and psychological guidance that they have

National Institute of Mental Health

A

counselor often learns what makes a child angry, whom he fears and whom he from the way he plays with toys. With the aid of this important knowledge gained while watching a child at play, emotional tangles can be unraveled.

trusts,

ence.

He

helps parents think about and

interpret the aids

them

meaning in

seeing

courses of action

may

of a problem,

where

and

different

lead.

Counseling is not a substitute for reguidance and teaching. While

ligious

added

a

counselor to their

staff.

These

counselors help families and individuals

understand

themselves,

part religion

is

Counselors

including

playing in their often

help

the

lives.

overanxious

parents relax and gain a broader perspec-

Family Guidance Services tive by showing them that "one mistake docs not make a problem child," and bv helping them understand problems that

to be

do need attention.

Recognizing a

In the counseling set-up, the parents

and the child gradually decide the way thev want to go. Hie counselor gives them encouragement as they make their decisions and their plans, This approach takes time, but it is more effective and

There arc found

.6;

also well-trained counselors in private practice.

Good Counselor

Each of the professions engaged in counseling has standards and wavs of accrediting of

Social

quickly let

members. The local Council and Health Agencies can vou know if a certain coun-

member

in full standing of his

selor

is

lasting than giving people cut-and-dricd

own

accrediting group.

advice.

vou

Where Do You Find Counseling?

A

counselor

mav be found

in a family-

a

It can also tell an individual has passed the "specialtv boards" in his particular field of work. A qualified person would be a full if

member

of his

own

professional organ-

counseling service, in a family service agencv, in a marriage and familv-coun-

such as American Psychiatric Association, American Psychological As-

seling center, in a child-guidance clinic,

sociation,

or in a

community guidance

center.

You

ization,

can find out about counseling services by

telephoning the Council of Social and Communitv Health Agencies, the Council, or the

Council,

if

than 30,000.

Community Welfare

vou live in a city of more If none of these is listed in

the phone directorv,

the

Communitv

Chest office, if there is one in vour may know. In some places, there

city, is

a

counselor in the child-welfare agency, the public school's counseling and guid-

ance

office, or

It is

important that the counselor be

No

diplomas or written qualifications substitute for real interest and warmth. If the counselor starts to give advice before he has the facts; if he seems impatient, hurried, unfriendly, or "preachy"; or if he blames you immediately for the problem that has arisen, he is not among the good counselors. At can

he

least,

is

not good for

you.'

the visiting-teacher serv-

How Do Guidance

In a small communitv where there is no Council of Social Agencies, it might

be well to ask through the nearest representative of the State

Department

of

Health, the State Department of Edu-

Department of Welfare for persons and agencies in the locality who arc accredited to do child and family counseling. In larger communities, some churches have employed welltrained marriage and family counselors. industries have such workers in

their personnel departments.

Clinics

Work?

When

adjustment problems are comstaffed by specialists from different fields may be the most helpful, if there is such a one within plicated, a clinic

reach.

The

cation, or the State

few

Association of

friendly to the person seeking assistance.

ice.

A

or American

Psvchiatric Social Workers.

clinic

team usually

consists of

;i

and psycholThese three individuals are a work

psvehiatrist. social worker, ogist.

ing unit their in

who have

wisdom

in

personal relationships.

trist.

who

how

learned

to pool

dealing with problems

The

psychia

generally serxes as director of

the clinic, has had special

training in

Childcraft

66 understanding,

observing,

explaining,

and interpreting the behavior

of chil-

dren, as well as in handling children

A

the one parents.

who The

who

worker is often spends most time with the

are disturbed.

social

psychologist

is

especially

and

helpful in determining by tests characteristics of the child.

three confer with one another as

their understanding of the child devel-

ops.

One

or

all

confer with the parents.

In practice, this teamwork

complicated than

it

ing with the family. Visits to the clinic

mav be made once a week, or more frequently. The length of time vou conon the progress

mav be known

clinic,

give

you

as a child-

mental-hygiene

community guidance

center, or

a

list

York

19,

N.

Y.,

is

establishing

can

It

of accredited clinics.

The Parents' Part

clinic,

mental

in

Treatment

You are always a vital part of the plan. You have lived with vour child and know him well. Also, since vou are the ones who can do the most to bring a change in the family relationvour desire to help is important. No counseling service ever takes the place of the responsibility, the good judgment, and the love of parents. The counselor merely helps persons who are intimately involved to see more clearlv

ships,

tinue to go depends

New

organization

standards for this kind of work.

about

and clinic staff have attained mutual confidence and a clear picture of what is needed, any one member of the team may play the leading part in work-

clinic

national

less

far

ents, child,

made. Such a guidance

1790 Broadway, the

sounds. \\ nen par-

is

Associa-

tion of Psychiatric Clinics for Children,

in-

terviews the ability and the personality

The

The American

health center.

and objectively what the problem is, and what can be done about it. The continuing, affectionate understanding and consistent guidance of the parent, and the trust of the growing child in his mother and father, are still the greatest forces in shaping a child's future.

A good

counselor

good

listener.

a She

is

helps parents get problems out in the open, so they can use their

own

abilities

and

strengths to meet them.

YOUR GREATEST GIFT

TO YOUR CHILD Ewim

M.

ASHLEY MONTAGU,

F.

feeling of belonging in the

Ph.D.

Then

Chairman, Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University, Brunswick, N.

New

Galloway

community. and family sense

this individual

of belonging will extend to the nation as a

J.

whole, and eventually, perhaps, to

other

all

human

beings.

Your Responsibility

Childhood its

own,

of the is

made up

asm and

has a special quality as far as the

human

race

is

Children find courage to face the world today largely in the security which they gain from satisfying human relationships. Their confidence to meet the demands of the world grows as they

all

development concerned.

It

of that wonderful enthusi-

which give embarking upon

become

children the feeling of

an adventurous voyage of discovery. For this reason, an understanding of your child, of how he grows, and of what he needs is all-important. This understanding, plus a warm, loving rela-

competent

themselves,

spirit of curiosity

in

learning

in

thinking to

use

hands, and in acquiring know-how for

our complex modern world.

Family

life

help

that

provides the relationships

the

child

become

tionship with him, est gift

past

child's

foundations for his relationships with all

others.

Each individual needs to feci loved, and to enjoy a sense of belonging in the family. Each family, in turn, needs that

more

acutely aware of the importance of

Such awareness develops ents pass on to him the heritage

is perhaps the greatvou can bestow upon him. Your relationship with you lays the

for

their

dition.

such

in

fields

tra-

as par-

of the

as

literature,

and

science.

art.

This helps the child to identify himself with the world of human beings of which he music,

is

technology,

a part.

Actually, this rearing of a ing

67

who

is

human

be-

so dependent on you should

Lilting folk tunes,

stir-

ring ballads, and inhymns old spiring make children aware of the

great traditions

that are theirs.

be a delightful responsibility. But there will be times when it mav strike you as an awesome task. This need not be the case. Perhaps the best help anyone can give you as a parent is to suggest that you relax, and then get you to do so. The word does not mean that you should do nothing. It means action with a minimum of tension. Your child wants to have faith in you. He wants to trust you. It is through this trust and faith and confidence in you that he deYelops those qualities in himself. These volumes of Childcraft are intended as a compass bv which parents may, in the light of the best knowledge, steer their course through the reefs and shoals sometimes encountered in bringing up children. If it were not for such occasional obstacles, family

life

would

not be the exciting institution that reallY

needlesslv guilty about vour mistakes or the mistakes of your children. This is

sponsible for

may

dren

selves,

It is

natural for you and Your children

make

mistakes.

You may

often feel

you can

mistakes

is

learning.

A

understand yourvour children. Making an important process of trv to

amount

certain

of frustra-

unavoidable and even desirable as a part of everyday living. But it is comforting to know that one can learn from one's own mistakes and from those of others. It can be said truthfully tion

is

the

that the historv of civilization

is

historv of fruitful errors

which



errors

have been converted into creative

ac-

tion in the right direction. It

is

helpful to

remember

that

to err. In spite of your best

it

is

and

you will make misThe important tiling is not to worry unduly when you do. The best course of action is to benefit from hav-

most

to

have.

selves as well as

human

Of Course, You Will Make Mistakes

if

feel that

Instead of chiding and blaming Your-

it

is.

you occasional^ have you are solelv rewhatever faults Your chil-

understandable

been made to

takes.

.68

careful efforts,

Your Greatest

Gii

made

i

Your Child

ro

169

mistakes so that you can do better the next time. Your example will help your children to learn from their

later health

mistakes, too.

the good in others and helps

ing

Achieving Happiness

Our Children

for

As parents, one of our major objectives

is

tional

to achieve physical

and emo-

and happiness

health

for

our-

and for our children. What then do we mean by health? In the broadest sense, it is the ability to love and the ability to work. Each child is born with selves

the potential capacity to realize both objectives. It

is

up

help develop those

to us as parents to skills

and

first

years of his

life,

to good,

warm, loving human beings. Parents are usually the first such beings a child knows. They provide the experiences which largelv lay the foundations for his

To know the joys of creating, tinkering,

and puttering have a gift of

is

to

lasting

value, no matter where you may find yourself.

to

be

be a

and even

for his happiness.

human being means happy person who brings out a healthy

An

them

be their own best

selves.

factor in

love, for love

tive

all this is

the best of

is

of

its

own

substitute.

for

Xo

is

crea-

for the

educational

all

fluences. It has a firmness

and

to

important

both for the receiver and

giver. It

in-

discipline

which there can be no child can ever be spoiled

by the right kind of genuine love, and there arc few if any problems which cannot be efficiently solved by its application.

Love

talents

which are a part of his birthright. Even- child is born not only with the need to be loved, but also with the need to love others. Everv human being learns to become a good, warm, loving person bv being exposed, cspeciallv during the

To

is

is

reciprocal. Like happiness,

experienced

fullv

freelv given. is

onlv

Our major

when

them

express

it is

task as parents

to help our children realize this,

to help

it

it

in

their

and

own

and behavior. To love means communicate to another that von arc "all for him." It means that you arc deeplv involved and interested in his welfare, and that you will stand by him attitudes to

when he needs Love

is

you. the environment in which hu-

Far more than gardens flourish

when boys and

discover advantages in co-operation by working with father.

girls

The day, as well as the peas, has finer flavor

when you work

man and

together.

beings flourish most healthfully,

which they learn

in

best. It

is

the

principal factor in developing the individual's capacity for being

human.

Life Is Living

Life

is

theory. It

a practice, not a thought or a is

a

work of

art, for it is

made

which follow on up As parent, vou will other's heels. a each find more satisfaction in your family relationships if vou provide vourself with helpful materials that have been tested bv experience. Parents and children are involved toof a series of acts

gether in the educative process.

mav

the beginning, children

From

be invited

to participate activelv in the process of their

own development. Let your

child

and learn nurserv rhymes and songs which have come down through

listen to

the years! Let

him hear

which peoples of

the wonderful

nations have Let him learn to play games and explore the world around him! Encourage him to do and make things with his own hands, to use his ingenuity, and to applv what he has learned! stories

written!

all

Let him read about the great discoveries in technology and in science! And give him, through the study of great works of art, the opportunity to express himself naturally.

Broaden vour

child's horizons.

him an understanding

Give

of other times

Encourage him to take part around him so that he will develop wide interests and main hob170

and

places.

in the life

W

The

children benefit the dogs,

much as when caring as

for pups becomes a concern of

the entire family.

a *^«f J* bies.

Help him achieve skills through and interests. This is the true

his play

path

of

education,

for

such a back-

ground stays with a child as he grows, and he will find it useful under any conditions he may meet. Educating Your Child

You,

as

a

foundation for your child's education by keeping in mind that education should not be confused with instrucis

furnishing the indi-

vidual with information,

him

in

such

skills as

The purpose and tion

and training

the three "R's."

Education goes much deeper. It draws out the individual so that his skills and talents are developed for his

is

human

to prepare boys

and

girls for liv-

harmony with Knowledge in and

other

human

beings.

not of much use unless put to wise use. As a parent, you of itself

helpful to

it

offer

is

remember

your child love, you

best of

all

that

offer

if

it

is

will

you

him the

educators.

Mental Health

Is

Important

Before vour child can

live

in

peace

and harmony with others, it is of the utmost importance that he enjoy sound mental health. To achieve this, your child will always need such essential emotional vitamins as Jove, acceptance,

own welfare and for that of his fellow human beings. The quality of being a warm, loving human being cannot be

security,

emphasized too stronglv. No matter how competent a child may be at the three "R's," he is not successful as a human being unless he is competent at the fourth and most important of the "R's." This most important "R" is his

his parents love, want,

171

beings.

function of educa-

ing in creative peace and

find

parent, can best lay the

tion. Instruction

relations with other

faith,

protection,

independence.

guidance, and control.

Love. Every child needs to feci that and enjoy him. He needs to feel there are people near

him who

what happens

care

Acceptance.

know

Every

needs to for himlie wants them

that his parents like

self, just

the

way he

is.

to him.

child

him

1-2

Childcraft him

when

need them

just as

he acts according to their ideas of the

well-being.

If

way

the benefit of these psychological vitamins, you will learn from him a great deal about being human. The child who

to like

all

the time, not just

a child should act.

Every child needs to know that his parents will be on hand, especially in times of crisis when he needs them most. He needs to feel that he beSecurity.

longs to a family or group; that there is

a place

where he

fits in.

No

one can

much for emotional your child has received

has been treated with the respect and affection that

his birthright will cast

is

about him wherever he goes, and especially on his parents.

his bright light

give another person security all the time,

Passing on the Torch

but you can give your child enough security to make the moments of inseProtection. Every child needs to feel that his parents will keep him safe from harm; and that thev will help him when he must face strange, unknown, and

frightening situations.

up,

that his parents

want him

to

grow

and that they encourage him to

try

He

needs to know that thev have confidence in him and his ability to do things for himself and by himself. Faith. Even" child needs a set of moral standards to live by, and a belief in the human values. Among such val-

new

ues

things.

are

kindness,

generosity,

and

courage,

honesty,

democracy

of

what

Control. Every child needs to that there are limits to

what he

know is

per-

mitted to do. and that his parents will hold him to these limits. He feels safer

when he knows

though it is all and angry, he cannot with impunity be allowed to give that,

right to feci jealous

You

can readily sec that,

if

children

need vitamins for physical health, they

ethnic, or

belong.

It is this



give them.

Almost two thousand years

ago, the Master said: Except ye ... become as little children, ye not enter into the Kingdom of Heaven. .

shall

Nothing

is

more important than

ing the best parent vou

You

are the

will imitate.

know how

models that your

What

are to your children

what your children

is

beto

chil-

you, as parents,

likely to influence

will

be to their

dren. This will not apply in

chil-

all respects,

it will in many ways that are basic. You make your greatest gift to your child as you make your home the happy place it can be, and as you make the

bosom

of the family the

model

for all

way, you social comyour home, your help to make will healthy and your country munity, and imsuch an To participate in strong. relationships.

portant program

these feelings.

may

parents, in the past, too often failed to

but

this guidance.

the most

which parents of today can offer children respect which many

their

how

others, supply

is

religious,

political,

respect

dren

to get along with

craft

respect for the indi-

is

other group he

Guidance. Every child needs to have friendly help in learning how to behave toward persons and things. Grownups around him, who show him bv example

full rein to

Child

vidual worth of the person, no matter

be.

justice.

the most important job

is

important of all the crafts in which you as a parent can participate. The basis

to

Independence. Every child needs to

know

Parentage

in the world.

curity bearable.

There

is

no

your child.

is

In

this

a privilege

indeed.

greater gift you can give

A HEALTHY PERSONALITY FOR EVERY CHILD LEONARD W. MAYO,

S.Sc.D.

>uz*nor

White House Conference

of 1950 based concern for children on "the primacy of spiritual values, democratic practice, and the dignity and worth of every indiand on how we can develop vidual in children the mental, emotional, and its

.

Was Chairman century

Executive Committee. Mid-

White House Conference on Children

New

and Youth.

York.

New York

>uu

.

.

spiritual qualities essential to the indi-

vidual happiness

and

to responsible

citi-

zenship, and what physical, economic,

and

social conditions arc

deemed

neces-

development." Appropriations from Congress, grants from foundations, and contributions from individuals, made the Midcentury Conference possible. About one hundred thousand individuals participated in preparing for the Conference, and more than 5,000 delegates attended, insary to this

vour child develop a healthy That personality matter of vital imis

a

portance to you as a parent. Indeed, it is a matter of equal importance to you that even child have the opportunity to develop a healthy personality. On this -

basic principle, in the last analysis, de-

pend the well-being and strength of our and national communities.

cluding 500 teen-agers.

local, state,

No uals

nation

is

and families of which

it

is

a Healthy Personality?

the term personality is defined as "the thinking, feeling, acting human be-

terial,

great importance of a healthy

personality for every child was national!}

Is

In the Midcentury Conference ma-

com-

posed.

The

What

stronger than the individ-

recognized

when

the Midcentury

ing,

who, for the most

part, conceives

of himself as an individual separate

173

from

Childcraft

174

other individuals and objects. This hu-

man

being does not have a personality;

he

a personality."

is

The requirements for the development of healthy personality are set forth in the White House Conference factfinding report, Personality in the Making, edited by Helen Leland Witmer and Ruth Kotinsky. These requirements

make up

his world. Studies of mentallv persons and observations of babies deprived of their mothers, particularly ill

months, show how important the development of trust is to mental health. These studies show, too, after the age of five

how

development sudden shattering, may the whole personality.

seriously the lack of

of trust, or affect

its

are supported in the four guidance vol-

umes

of

Childcraft. You

will recog-

nize these principles as the essence of

what you have been reading Basic Trust

In the

Is

first

here.

Self-Coniident Independence Is Essential

About the month comes

twelfth or the fifteenth

the development of the

the Foundation

year of

life,

a sense of trust

growing out of the child's relationship with his mother, and later with his father and others who should

emerge,

The toddler who becomes aware himself as a person, able to act on own, has taken a forward step.

child's

a baby has learned in his first year Mother is to be trusted, the foundation for a healthy personality in the future has been well and truly laid. If

that

of

his

awareness of himself as an inde-

pendent human being. Much of his energy during the second or third year is directed toward asserting that he has a mind and will of his own. If he succeeds, he develops self-control without loss

of

self-esteem.

doubt and shame.

Failure

leads

to

A

Healthy Personality for Every Child Courage

Act on His

to

175

Own

The development

of a sense of initia-

follows the establishment of the

tive

child's sense of

independence. At the age

of four or five, his enterprise

nation able to

and imagi-

become important. He regulate his own conduct

is

now

to

some

degree, through a developing sense of

conscience. that care

The

sense of initiative

is

one

must always be encouraged, and must be taken to sec that children

do not have to

guilty for having

feel

dared to dream. Sense

of

Achievement Furthers Growth

The foundations

of healthv personal-

through the building of trust, independence, and initiative. At about the time he enters school, the child should be able to develop a sense of industry or accomplishment, based on real experiences rather than make-beity are laid

have the powers and use their imaginations, you can be satisfied that their growth is good. If

four-

courage

and

five-year-olds

to try out their

lieve.

Under average circumstances, the

early school years are a period of steady

Children

growth.

and

skills

that

knowledge good workman-

acquire

make

for

ship and the ability to co-operate, to play fair,

The

and

to follow the rules of the

chief danger

is

game.

that the child

may

develop a sense of inadequacy or inferiority. Then he may become rebellious or aggressive, in order to deal with this

problem. Living out Conference Ideals

Even- parent and every teacher can

work toward

a healthy personality for

the children in his or her care, in dayto-day living. It docs not take special

equipment or

training,

but

it

docs take

understanding, affection, and patience.

Self-assertion

may

venient, but, in is

not always be conmoderate amounts, it

also part of a healthy personality.

Adults must learn to know and control if thev wish to understand

themselves

and influence children. These volumes of Ciiildcrafi can help vou be more

Childcraft

176

understanding, and make it possible for you to give the affection your children need.

You

can carry forward, in your

home

and community, the recommendations and spirit of the Conference if you realize that the relationship you establish between yourself and Your children is the key to success.

An

attitude of con-

fidence in and respect for as people,

together with

\

our children

warmth and

interest in their affairs, goes far

toward

making them your friends. This mutual respect between children and adults is essential for a wholesome human relationship. It is

important to keep the relation-

ship with Your children enriched and lively. Interesting activities that you and your children can enjoy together are worth looking for and trying out. Every parent should budget some time for

volunteer work with the local school, church, or social agencv, the White

House Conference Committee in the some other organization working to make the community a better state, or

place for

all

children.

Following up the Conference

Even before the Midcentury Conference was held, plans were in the making to carry its message back to the grass roots. It takes courage and audacity to talk about a healthy personality for each child. So manv countries cannot provide even the bare necessities of life for large numbers of children that they can give little thought to anything beyond that. Here in the United States we have the wealth, the security, and the facilities

which should enable us to give attention to such basic things as personality devel-

opment, and get

real results. Lura Briscoe Owen

MIDCENTURY WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE

Pledge to Children TO YOU, members

on your

relying

who hold within you our most cherished hopes, we the Midcentury White House Conference on Children and Youth,

out children,

of the

full

response,

make

this pledge:

We

From your earliest infancy we give you our love, so that you may grow with trust in yourself

and

dice

we may

in others.

will work to lift the standard of living and to improve our economic practices,

so that vou a full

We will respect your right to be yourself same time help you

at the

may

encourage your curiosity and

We family

will

provide

your social

conditions

w ill work

to conserve

and improve

and, as needed, to provide foster care according to your inherent rights.

We

will intensifv

our search for new

knowledge

in order to guide

add to your learnexperience, and to your

fectivelv as

you develop your

will

you more

adult, establishing a family life of your

will illustrate

We

will

ef-

potentialities.

As vou grow from child to youth

happiness.

We

in

life

for

wholesome play that ing, to

the

de-

We will protect you against exploitation and undue hazards and help you grow health and strength.

your pride in workmanship, so that you may have the satisfaction that comes from achievement.

We

may

velop vour talents and contribute to a better world.

opportunity freely to create. will

the material basis for

cational opportunities, so that you

We will help you to develop initiative and imagination, so that you may have the We

mav have

life.

We will provide vou with rewarding edu-

to under-

stand the rights of others, so that you experience cooperative living.

achieve a truly democratic societv.

We

We

will recognize your worth as a person and we will help you to strengthen your sense of belonging.

and

will work to rid ourselves of prejuand discrimination, so that together

to

own

and accepting larger social responsibilities, we will work with you to improve conditions for all children and youth.

by precept and example the value of integrity and the importance of moral courage.

that these promises to you cannot

Aware

encourage you always to seek

be

the truth.

fullv

met

in a

world at war, we ask you

to join us in a firm dedication to the build-

We ties

will

provide you with

possible to develop vour

all

opportuni-

own

ing of a world society based

faith in

justice

God:

We

SO

your understanding of

MAY YOU

God and

open the way for you to enjoy and to use them for deepening

will

the arts

and mutual

all

— 1

grow in joy, in faith man, and in those qualities

in

of

and of the spirit that will sustain us and give us a new hope for the future.

vision

life.

in

on freedom,

respect.

WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCES The

First

White House Conference

Goal:

A

specific objective

provement was called into session by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1909. Goal: To stimulate higher standards of child care, to set

new

goals,

schools,

all

was the im-

child-welfare

recreation

agencies,

programs, and health

facilities.

Acfion Taken: Data on Child Health and Pediatrics produced by this Confer-

and to em-

phasize America's responsibility for

of

her

ence are

children.

still

being used by medical schools

and public health groups both here and

Action Taken: The United States Chil-

abroad.

dren's Bureau established bv Congress in

1912.

Child founded voluntary

Welfare League of America 1920 to work with private or

in

child-welfare

agencies

for

the

improvement of their programs. Subsequent White House Conferences have had the same general purposes as the first one, and in addition rather specific

The Fourth White House Conference

objectives as well.

the effect of economic and social factors on the welfare of children, with emphasis on housing, wages, unemplovment, and

was convened bv President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1940. Goal: A specific objective was to explore

the standard of living.

The Second White House Conference

Action Taken: While the entrance of the United States into World War II made it impossible to carry on the program as

was called into session by President Woodrow Wilson in 1919. Goal: A specific objective was to find ways and means of keeping homes intact

originallv planned, the Conference was held and inclusive data on the economic and other phases of child care were made available and given wide circulation. This

when death

of the father created an eco-

nomic

for the surviving

crisis

widow and

children.

Action Taken: First A /others' Pension drafted, eventually adopted in one form or another in various states. These ultimately led to the Aid to Dependent Children Act which is part of our Social Security Program.

Laws

Conference emphasized the need

for spe-

education for parenthood. The Conference also stressed the fact that the family has the most influence in shaping the life of the child.

cial

The Midcentury White House Conference on Children and Youth was called into session by President Harry

Truman

The Third White House Conference

S.

was called into session by President Her-

ganize

bert

Hoover

in

1930.

Goal:

A

and

and action

178

in

1950.

was to orcontinued interest state and local committees

specific

objective

stimulate in

ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH ^ oJiiggg'

on children and youth, and to collect a solid bod}' of scientific knowledge on what constitutes a healthy personality.

Action Taken: the

participation

Among of

the results were

100,000

citizens

in

preparation for the Conference, including

numbers of young persons. Active committees were organized in every state and territory, and valuable scientific materia] on what constitutes a healthy personality was collected. The six White House Conferences have increased the awareness of the American people of the special needs of children and large

youth.

They have helped

to

build

and

strengthen public and private programs for children and young persons. They have emphasized the importance and the sane titv of the American home, and the primacy of spiritual values. They have given added status and prestige to parents and teachers. They have demonstrated that

children

and

its

are

the

nation's

total wealth.

greatest

They have

assets

indirectly

influenced needed legislation. And they have added substantially to the literature on the development and rearing of children and vouth.

From all parts of the world, they came to the Midcentury White House Conference, concerned about the hope for humanity children's welfare, health, and education for the future of the world lies in a healthy personality for every child.





179

Childcraft

8o

The Sixth White House Conference was convened by President Dwight D.

enhower

Eis-

in i960. Participating in the five-

day conference were more than 7,500

indi-

These came from every state in the Union, with 500 representatives from viduals.

-2 other countries.

Among

the participants

Action Taken: The deliberations of the 210 work groups, each group consisting of 30 persons, resulted in a total of 1600 resolutions. These had to do with eight broad areas: children and vouth as individuals, social environment, physical environment, values

and

ideals,

human

rights, religion,

personal services, and particular agencies.

workers,

Delegates urged a Department of Edu-

parents, the clergv,

and young people. Goal: The main objective of this Golden Anniversary White House Conference on Children and Youth was "to promote opportunities for children and vouth to real-

cation with full cabinet status, guidance

ize their full potential for a creative life in

programs for students, a nation-wide study of school dropouts, and reciprocal arrangements among states in teacher certification. Xational, state, and local committees were to be set up throughout the country to

freedom and dignity."

promote these

were

educators,

doctors,

social

goals.

READING FOR PARENTS In connection with a study group, or for

vour

own

pleasure and information,

you mav want to read more about child guidance and getting along in the family. The following are just a few of the many simple, readable, excellent books and pamphlets available. This list has been compiled with the

to Everyday Problems ot Bovs and Helping Your Child from , to 12. Random House. 1958.

Guide Girls;

IIvmis. James L„ jr. Understanding Your Child. Prentice Hall. 1952. A Child Development Point of View. 1955. Jenkins, Gladys Gardner, and Others. These Are Your Children, expanded cd.: with a special section. "Studying Children."

assistance of the staff of the Association for Family Living under the direction

of Dr. Freda S.

Gruenberg, Sidonie \l. We the Parents; Our Relationship to Our Children and to the World Today, rev. cd. Harper. 194S. Parents'

Kehm.

Whitman.

Aldrich, C. Anderson and Mary. Babies Are Human Beings: an Interpretation of Growth, id. cd. Macmillan. 1954. Bacmeister, Rhoda. AH in the Family. Appleton. 1951. English, Oliver Spurgeon, and Foster, C. }. Fathers Are Parenfs Too; a Constructive Guide to Successful Fatherhood. Put-

nam. 1951.

W. How to Live Through Junior High School. Lippincott. 1959. Larrick, Nancy. A Parent's Guide to Children s Reading. (Cardinal ed. C 314. Pocket Books. 195S. 1

Neisser, Edits G. Brothers and Sisters. Harper. 1951. The Eldest Child. 195".

Spock, Benjamin McLane. Baby and Child Care. rev. and enl. cd. Giant Cardinal ed., GC 40.) Pocket Books. 19s 1

Iraiberg, (Mrs. Selma II. The Magic Understanding and Handling the Years; Problems of Ear/y Childhood. Seribner. 1959. Frank. Mary (Hughes) and Lawrenci K. How to Help Your Child in School. (Signet Kcv Book, Ks 314.) New American Librarv of World Literature, Inc., 501 MadiY. 1954. son Avenue. New York 22. Your Adolescent at Home and in School. Signet Kcv Book, KD 3-2.) 1959Gesell, Arnold Luther, and Others. Youth; the Years from Ten to Sixteen. 1

-

Stone, Lawrenci Joseph, and Church, Joseph. Childhood and Adolescence; a Psj choJogv of the Growing Person. Random House. 19".

V

Harper. 1956.

Cruenberg, Benjamin Charles and Sidonie (Matsner). The Wonderful Ston of You; Your Bodv. Your Mind, Your Feel ings.

1953.

Johnson, Eric

Garden Citv Books, i960.

181

Wolf, Anna W. M., and Helping with

Your Child's

introduction

h\

S/\s/. Suzanni

/.'motional

Milton

).

Growth; E.

Senn.

Doublcdav. 19s 4Pamphlets

These pamphlets mav be obtained from the Association for Family Living. ^2 West Randolph Street, Chicago 1. Illinois, or from the publishers.

Childcraft

82

A kin. Edith L. "Aggressiveness in Children." Child Studv Association of America. "What to Tell Your Children About Sex." cd. bv Adie Suchsdorf. Perma Books. 1958.

Menninger, William C, M.D. "Grow-

i

Frank. Josette. "Television: How to Use It Wisely with Children." rev. cd. Child Studv Association. 1959. Grossman, Jean Schick. "Brief Encounters in Faniilv Living." Play

Schools Associa-

Grlenberc. Sidonie M.. and Krech. Hilda S. "Your Child's Friends." Public Pamphlet =285. 1959. L.. Jr. "Being a Good Parent." Teachers College, Columbia UniverAges 1, 2. sitv. 1949. "Enjoy Your Child and 3." 16th ed. Public Affairs Pamphlet #141. 19=58. "Three to Six: Your Child Affairs

Hymes, James



to

Up

sociates.

Emotionally." Science Research As19 5".

Xeisser. Edith G.. with sociation for Familv Living.

School."

8th

cd.

Public

of the As-

staff

"How

to

be

a

Good Mothcr-in-Law and Public Affairs Live with

to

Associates.

Grandmother." Pamphlet =1-4. 1951. "How Children."

Science

Research

1950.

Walter

Xeisser,

tion. 1959.

Starts

ing

and Edith G. "Making

the Grade as Dad." Public Affairs Pamphlet = 1 5-. 12th ed. 1958.

Ernest

Osborne, Partnership."

G.

Teachers

"Parent-Teacher

Columbia

College,

Universitv. 1959.

Ross, Helen. "Fears of Children." Science Research Associates. 1951. "The Shv Child." Public Affairs Pamphlet =239. 1956.

Affairs

Pamphlet =163. 195". Jenkins, Gladys G. "A Guide for Family Living." Science Research Associates. 1956.

Addresses

of Publishers:

Kehm, Freda S. "Ten Commandments for Parents." The Association for Family

Child Studv Association of America. 9 East 89th Street, New York 28. X. Y. Bureau of Publications, Teachers College,

Living. 19^9.

Columbia Universitv,

L.

Krug, Othilda. M.D.. and Beck, Helen "A Guide to Better Discipline." Science

Research Associates. 1954.

Lambert. Child

— from

phlet

= 144.

Clara.

"Understand

Your Pam-

6 to 12." Public Affairs 19th ed. 1957. Le Shan, Eda J. "The Onlv Child." Public Affairs Pamphlet =293. i960.

New

Plav Schools Association.

York

19,

X. Y.

41

West

Inc.,

5-th Street. New York 19. X. Y. Pocket Books, Inc., 630 Fifth

Xew

York

Public Street.

20,

Pamphlets, 22 16. X. Y. Research Associates.

Affairs

Xew

Avenue,

X. Y. East

38th

Inc..

2^9

York

Science East Erie, Chicago 11.

Illinois.

INDEX

This material in

It titles,

complete Index in one alphabet to 1-1 5 of Childcraft.

a

Volumes

gives

listings

subjects,

It

poetry, songs,

is

and

under authors,

first

illustrators,

lines of poetry.

includes such types of material as games, stories,

and

child care,

of famous people, pictures, on various phases of family living,

lives

articles

and primary education.

The customarv practice of indexing has been followed in using the volume number, followed bv a colon and the page numbers on which each reference will be found. For example, Billy Boy, song, 11:86 means that the song BiJJv Boy will be found in Volume 11 on page 86. Cross references are also made to other parts of the Index. For example, Ant Cows: see Aphids, means that material concerning ant cows will be found in this Index under the heading Aphids.

1

INDEX Camps and Camping by

He Roy

Abbott,

L. in the

birdie with a yellow

book,

think,

I

Abraham

is

bill,

very

Lincoln's

Ground, 7:163-174

Organized

1:68

like, 2:1

Boyhood

as

Addams,

A

Your

Is

by

Jane, 6:128-134

Clothier. 14:270-

Adopted Child. The, by Sherwin, 12:231 Adoration of the Magi" by Bosch, 10:26g Adventures in Handwoi\ by Parkhill and Spaeth,

sec Safety

Achievement due to self-reliance, 14:42-44

8:210 Adventuring Through Excursions by Olsen and

needed for healthy personality, 15:175



Olsen, 14:236

A, E,

I, O, or U, game, 8:67 Aerodynamics, 9:183 A. E. (Russell, G. W.)

Stories

Albert Schweitzer by McNeer, 6:207-212

Alexander Graham Hell by Tait, 6:159-16(1 Babe Ruth's Own Story by Ruth. 6:135-139 George Washington Career by Ross. 6:103-109

Frolic, 2:45

Aesop

Louis Braille by Martin, 6:161-166

Belling the Cat, 3:232

Luther Bur bank by Bragdon, 6:187-195 Map That Came to Life, The, by Montgomery,

Crow and the Pitcher, The, 3:233 Dog and the Bone, The, 3:236 Farmer, His Son, and the Donkey, The, 3:230-

6:110-112

New

Bright World for fenny Lind, A, by Benet.

231

Fox and the Stork, The, 3:234 Goose That Laid the Go/den Egg, The, 3:240 Hare and the Tortoise, The, 3:239 Lion and the Mouse, The. 3:235 Maid and the Milk Can, The. 3:237 Town Mouse and the Country Mouse. The,

6:64-68

North to Labrador, a story of Wilfred Grenfell by McNeer, 6:178-186 Robert Fulton Makes the Paddles Work, by Judson, 6:54-59

Rosa Bon h cur Breakj Her Needle by Roberts,

3:228-229

6:95-102

Thomas

Wind and the Sun, The, 3:238

Alt a Edison by Wise. 6:118-123

True Story Brooks.

oj

Benjamin

Franklin,

The,

A

by

fairy

went a-marketing

When Mark Twain Was

Information

a Boy. 6:89-94

on

the

1:174

.

be

of

affection

found

in

a

throughout

12, 13, 14, 15

Affection" by Zorach. 10:2

^

Africa

animals: see Animals

Art

art: see

Acting

diamond mine

South Africa, 9:129

in

plants: see Plants

— Africa —

— Africa

— Africa

Acrobats. 10:64

Playmaking and Play Acting by Smith. 8:130-

place

growth may Childcraft volumes

child's

Wright Brothers Learn to Fly, The, by Cottier and lafTe, 6:113-117 Young George Washington by Baldwin. 6:29-33 Achievement Tests: see Testing Programs

— Africa

Folk Tales Talk by Courlander and Herzog, 3:1 1^-121

Africa

148

Trips:



Affection

6:

Will Rogers by Garst, 6:196-206

Activities:

Osborn,

276

Dietrich, 15:51

Achievement

bv

dillar, a dollar, 1:47

Looking Toward the Teens by

Responsibility

Accidents: see First Aid

—Prevention:

Children

Adolescence: see also Puberu

Acceptance of Age, 13:207-208; 14:48-49 Prevention

Groups for

organized neighborhood groups, 15:129-130

Told by Himself,

Acceptance, Group: see Group Acceptance

Accidents

and Toys by

14:241-246

6:69

Accident

Haskell, 14:255-263

.Utilities

Peller. 13:65-70

Animals That Live

A A

Through

Learns

see

also

Carpentry:

Handicraft:

lobs;

Drawing:

Field

Painting:

Play:

Pictures:

Egypt

Plavs

l8 5

see

— Pictures

Congo

River

— Pictures;

Childcraft

86 Africa



African Violets

my

After



Aldrich,

"My

Fisher, 1:72

A

bath, 1:72

Afternoon on a Hill, poem by Millay, 2:49 "After the Bath" by Cassatt, 10:26d-26e

A

Age-Mate

of, 13:207-208;

Relations:

14:48-49

Friendship;

see

Gangs:

Group Play

Age

"Me-Can-Do," The, by

of



Agriculture: see also

Ilg,

Gardens; Seeds;

13:73

Pictures, 9:181

Farm and Farmer

in this index;

Is

Surrounded by

Air

Realr, 9:92

Us in Some Machines, 9:209 The, poem by Bennett, 1:103

for

Airplanes, 9:183, 213, 264 jet airplanes,

9:210

Airplanes— Models, 8:188-189; paper, 9:184

— Airplanes —

Pictures, 9:94, 259, 264

Stories

JafTe,

man

of the sea, 1:162

All along the backwater, 1:157 All

around the cobbler's bench, 11:47

Carmen Stone Young Children, 13:226-230 Allen, Frederick H. When Things Go Wrong, 14:45-51 Allen,

a Boy, 6:89-94

Mary Louise First Snow, 1:148

Allen,

Zipper Suit, 1:73

Alligators, 7:185-187

Allingham, William Fairies,

The, 1:176-177 1:133

on earth do dwell, 11:155

All people that

All the birds have

All Things Bright

come again, 11:134 and Beautiful, song, 11:154

All

Through

I

went and went,

1:81

the Night, song, 11:36

Alphabet Games For Dinner I Like, 8:37 In the Zoo, 8:37

Herbert the Helicopter, 4:226 Hinckjey, Space Explorer, 4:222 Wright Brothers Learn to Fly, The, by Cottier

and

old

Aboard the DeWitt Clinton by Nolan, 4:184

All through the garden

service to mothers, 13:229

Airplanes

little

Swing Song, A,

for Us, 9:94

Airplane,

A

My Is

What Makes Air Mover, 9:97 What Makes Our Weather:, 9:98 Works Works

to Eat!' 13:177-184

Mitten Song, The, 1:73

Air, 9:95

Has Weight, Too, 9:93

How Do We Know

U\e 2:37

When Ma>\ Twain Was a Blanket of Air, The,

9:91

Fun with

elf,

Allen, Margaret Ford

Aerodynamics

Air on the Move, 9:96

Earth

gypsy

Traveling with

Soils

Ahoy and ahoy, birds!, 2:25 Ail^en Drum, song, 11:56 Air: see also

Mary M.

Child Doesn't

letter is a

All

Agricultural Machinery

1:140

Alexander Graham Bell by Tait, 6:159 Alexander Mackenzie by Shore and Oblinger, 6:34 Alice's Supper, poem by Richards, 2:58 A little light is going by, 1:98

furry coat has the bear to wear, 1:91

Age, Acceptance

I?,

Winter, 1:148

Pictures, 7:223

poem by

After a Bath,

Am

What

Stories

Eggs for Sale by Campbell, 5:219-225

6:113-117

Minister's Cat, The, 8:3

Alschuler, Rose

What Kind

H. Manners

of

for

Our Children?,

15:135-142

Air Pressure used in some machines, 9:210

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, from the Ara-

Amberg, William, illus. 9:260, Ambulances Pictures, 9:286

261, 262, 264



America, poem by Smith, 2:196

bian Nights, 3:199

America, song, 11:143

Alaska animals: see Animals Alcott, Louisa

—Alaska

May

Louisa Alcott's Childhood, 6:75-79

Dorothy Brooms, 1:126 Hiding, 1:78-79

Aldis,

Ice, It

1:148

Was,2:\l

Utile, 1:66 Picnic. The, 1:80



American Flag

Stories

Star-Spangled Banner Girl by Bailey, 5:32-39



American History Poems: sec Colonial Period in America Poems: Pioneer Life Poems; Revolutionary War in America Poems; United History Poems States













American History Stories: see Colonial Period America Stories; Pioneer Life Stories:



United States



— History — Stories

American Indians:

see Indians.

American

in

Index

18-

Animals

Americas, Children of the, 5:77-172

America the Beautiful, song by Bates, 11:144 A Mighty Fortress Is Our God, 11:150 Amphibians



Africa:

see

army ass,

ants, 7:132

chameleons, 7:183; 9:39

Toads, 7:119-120

chimpanzees, 7:21, 22

An An

Play:

Toys

angel, robed in spotless white, 2:20

ostriches, 7:28-31; 9:41

snakes, 7:181

Clothes, The, 3:87-92

Animals

Real Princess, The, 3:110-111

army

Steadfast Tin Soldier, The, 3:112-117

Ugly Duckling, The, 3:213-226 Anderson, Catherine Corley, illustrations, 8:242245, 247, 249-260

Sewing /

for Fun, 8:241-261

Can Be a

218

ostriches, 7:28-31; picture, 9:61

Animals

Crackers,

sheep, 7:84

Siamese

poem by Morley,

1:71

Friends, 4:7-170

Animal Houses:

Animals: see also

c,

tigers. 7:14-17; picture. 9:42; color plate,



d

ostriches, 7:28-31

—Houses Animals— Care; Birds: Animals

Insects; Pets; Reptiles;

make

Fishes;

and names of animals,

Animals

— Stories,

and names

ot

ground, 7:163-174

that live in water, 7:150-162

work

all

for

winter: see Hibernation

man.





Animals Canada Pictures Canada geese, color plate. 7:108g

mals, as Cats, Dogs, Horses

that

108

lark. 7:104-105 moose, 7:42-44; 9:40

of zoo, 7:1-31

that sleep

geese. 7:91,

meadow

pocketbook animals, 7:17-19, 44-45

that live in the

koala,

kingfishers, 7:108-110

and woods, 7:32-56

stories: see

picture, 9:41

— Australia —Pictures 7:30 Animals—Canada Canada

stuffed. 8:244-245, 2M


for traveling,

from waste

to use toilet, 13:47-54

materials, 13:67-70

interest in. 13:286

letthandedness, 13:28 love, 13:31-3, 64, 69, 80; 15:166a, 168

traveling, 13:226-30

mental growth. 13:27

weaning, 13:44

mother, attitude toward, 13:9

weight

relationship with, 12:82-3; 13:14. 60-4; 15:168

who

week. 13:12

well-being of, 13:40

Babies

works, 15:75. 76, 78

13:6

at birth.

loss in first

recognition of, 13:60-4, 41

—Care:

see also Feeding

music, 13:298, 301

hospital rooming-in. 13:15-19

naps, 13:187

Keeping a Baby Comfortable by Montgomery and Suydam, 13:32-39 mother's and father's parts in. 12:^2-84 newborn, 13:9- 14 newborn and the father, 13:23-24

needs, 12:69; 13:31, 40; 15:168

comforting, 12:14-15 to

be near mother, 13:29

newborn,

and the

13:6-8, 9-14: see also

Newborn Baby

father. 13:23-4

arrival of in family, 13:I'» S

jealousy of, 12:132. 133, 134: 13:198-9, 224 noises

made

by. 13:59

9:9 — Red Chair." Babies — Poems: Babies

"Baby

Pictures, in

Artist

Unknown.

10:24

see also Lullabies

Here All

We

See by

by Aldis.

personality development, 12:102

Little

play, 13:68-70. 286

What Docs

De

la

Mare. 1:66

1

Little Birdie

Say? by Tennyson. 1:92

Childcraft

194

—Sculpture Babies— Babies

Teacher

"Rocking Chair" by Moore, 10:25

Ball, 8:5-6

Tenpins, 8:11-12

Stories

Tether-Ball, 8:60

Christmas in the Piney Woods by Simon, 5:68-

poem by

Ballad of China, A,

Baboons, 7:23

Baby Animals—Pictures,

9:8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16-17,

19,48,61; 10:31 "Baby in Red Chair," Artist 18,

Unknown,

10:24

Have an

Poems and, illustrations,

Joyce,

94,

95,

108,

105,

109,

100,

98,

97,

128,

130,

2:109-200 5:18,

101,

131,

20,

133,

21,

6:103-

103;

135,

137,

139

Balloon Man, The,

poem by Fyleman,

1:111

Balloons, 9:93, 210

exchange, 15:130 Sitters

Ballads, Storytelling

Ballantyne, 24,

"Baby Owl" by Durer, 10:31 Baby Sitters Influence by Lowndes, 15:97-

Balloons

—Poems

Balloon Man, The, by Fyleman, 1:111

104

Baby Talk, 14:188-189

Balls for baby's play, 13:69-70

Bach, Johann Sebastian

The Boy Who Couldn't Be Discouraged,

11:162-

Baltimore Orioles, color

plate, 7:108e

Bands (Music), 11:18;

163

Little Elf,

illustrations, 5:164, 166, 167, 169,

171, 172

Barbers, 9:211

Barefoot Days,

Barges

Pictures, 9:48



poem by

Field, 1:131

Pictures, 9:268

Bark (Tree), 7:227 Bark (Tree)—Pictures, 7:230, 231 Barker, Roger C. and Louise S.

Badminton, game how to make, 8:60-61 Bailey, Carolyn Sherwin

Personalities

Need

Balancing, 14:37-44

John James Audubon, 6:60-63 Star-Spangled Banner Girl, 5:32-39

Barnum,

Teeny, Tiny Lady, 3:28-29

Barnyard Song, song, 11:80

J.

Hyde,

illustrations, 1:104, 105; 2:38,

Barrows, Marjorie

Bain, Katherine for Health, 14:70-75

"White-Headed Eagle," by Audubon, 10:39

Barton, Clara, 6:83-88

Baruch, Dorothy

Balder by Cooke, 6:234

W.

Divorce and Separation

Baldwin, Alfred L.

Your Child Moves Beyond the Family

Circle,

14:3-9

,

12:215-221

Merry-Go-Round, 1:82 Stop— Go, 1:100 Baseball

Baldwin, James

Boy Lafayette and the Wolf, The, 6:40-43 Story of William Tell, The. 6:245-246

Young George Washington,

Cric\et, The, 1:93

Bardett, William F., illustrations, 2:50-53, 64, 65

Bald Eagles, 7:105-106

6:29-33

Baldwin, Louise E. Silver Pesos for Carlos, 5:164-172

Basketball, 8:60

Instru-

The, 1:170

Bannon, Laura,

Badgers

game

Musical

Bangs, John Kendrick

Bactrian Camels, 7:12

What Your Child Needs

also

Banging Heads, 13:33

Rhoda W. Children Learn to Handle Money, 15:64-72 Bacon, Peggy Cub and the Crocodile, The, 4:25-29 Bacteria: see Germs Bacmeister,



see

ments; Orchestras

Back-Yard Play Groups, 13:239-241 Back Yards, 8:50-65

Ball,

Richards, 2:116

Ballads, Folk Songs and, 11:73-108

76

Babe Ruth's Own Story by Ruth, 6:135-139 Baseball—Pictures, 9:186, 222 Basketball, game, 8:60 Bates, Katharine Lee America, the Beautiful, 11:144 Baths

equipment

for baby, 13:38-39

of baby, 13:35-37

—Poems

Clock Golf, 8:57-58

Baths

Croquet, 8n^)-57

Ping-Pong, 8:13-14

After a Bath by Fisher, 1:72 Bath Time, song, 11:68

Sidewalk Tennis, 8:7-8

Bats, 7:51-53

39

Index

195

Bayeux Tapestry Famous French Tapestry, A, 10:62-63 Beanbag, game, 8:12 Beanbags, bow to make. 8:244

Beethoven, Ludwig van

Beans, 7:217

Beetles—Pictures, 9:22,

Beans—Pictures,

The Boy Who Heard fireflies..

7:215, 216: 9:24-25

click.

Beets

Bears, 7:1-6

9:4S; — Polar Bears — Bears —

Bears

Pictures:

color plate, 7:28c; see also



Bear Goes to School, A, by

Behind him

Belling the Cat by Aesop, 3:232

Frog, The, 1:97

Becoming Resourceful by Hymes, 15:58 Bedding

Rebecca,

Summer, poem by

Yak, The, 2:87

Stevenson, 1:166

"Lady Jean." 10:22



Belonging: see Group Acceptance

Benda,

Bedtime

Daniel Boone, 2:187

should be quieting, 13:186

Western Wagons,

stalling with questions, 13:154

Dreams

see also

—Poems;

Lulla-

Was by

Dusk by De

the

De

la

la

Mare, 1:167

Mother Goose,

1:22

2:100

by Fyleman, 2:46

Dorothy H. Some Mothers Go Out

Boats, 1:105

Bergengren, Ralph Berry, Elizabeth, illustrations. 14:S4, 123, 136, 202,

Beers,

to

Work,

15:75-81

Bees

honeybee colony, 7:122-127 Pictures, 9:4.

Bastin

Kite Whither. 2:26-27

Beef Cattle: see Cattle

— Bees—Poems What Does Bees— Song

Rowena

Flight of Icarus. The, 6:222-225

worry. 14:49-50

Beech Tree, The, poem

Bennett,

Benson, Sally

Bed-Wetting, 13:54,200

Bees

in confident tones,

Airplane. The, 1:103

Mare, 2: IS

Willie Winkic, from

to

Benjamin Jones

Ingenious Little Old Man, The, 1:162

Aldis, 2:13

Through

Sleepyhead by

due

2:1 MO- 101

Pictures, 9:42

Bennett, John

1:22

Wee



2:100

by Stevenson, 1:166

Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling, from Mother Goose,

Now

Bengal Tigers

Benjamin Jones Goes Swimming, poem by Fisher.

bies

//

for Jenny Lind, A, 6:64-68

Benet, Rosemary and Stephen Vincent

13:189-190

Summer

T., illustrations. 6:222-224, 220-231

New, Bright World

handling resistance, 13:94

in

W.

Benet, Laura

parents', 13:89

—Poems:

W.

Bellows, George

"Bedroom, The," by De Hooch, 10:26c Beds Poems My Bed by Scott, 1:67

Bedtime

IS!

Vulture, The, 2:86

of baby, 13:34-35. 39

Bed

Belloc, Hilaire

Elephant, The, 1:161

8:175-190. 192

rituals,

gray Azores, 2:178

Be kind and tender to the Frog. 1:97 Alexander Graham, 6:159-160

color plate, 7:44d

is

lay the

Bell,

Picures, 7:49, 50

decision

F.tiquette:

Temper Tantrums

Tattling; Teasing;

Sickels,

Beck, Guilford L., illustrations, 7:95. 191. 214, 265;

in

Pictures, 7:223

Spoiled Child; also such as Biting; Dawdling;

Beavers, 7:48-51

Bed

Pictures, 7:218

Behavior Problems: see Discipline;

4:68-74



52, 59

Before the Baby Arrives by Del Solar, 13:3

Goldilocks and the Three Bans, 3:15-18

Beavers



7:140

9:23

Begonias

Pictures

Stories

Little Black,

the Trees Sing, 11:170-171

BeeUes, 7:136-137

l

\

>.

64; color plate. 7:124d

244.

2^»1

Better beans

and bacon

Between the

Scissors,

in peace.

Betzner, Jean

Reading Together, 12:189-194 the Bee

The Fly and

Do

by Rossetti, 1:65

Beverages

eggnog. 8:1^5 the

Humble

Bee, 11:59

3:229

game. 8:70-71

milk shakes, 8:194-195

Childcraft

196

What Does

M.

Beyer, Evelyn

His Language

Is

Rich and Fluent, 13:111-J16

Wings and Wheels by Turner, 2:25

Biber, Barbara

What

—Protection 7:104-105 Birds—

Play Means to Your Child, 14:93-100

Birds

meadow

Bibliographies

After chapters in Volumes 7 and 8

Bird Cage with Tassels, A, by Parrish, 4:90-103 Spoonbill and the Cloud, The, by Hudson,

4:82-89

Bicycles

they work, 9:193

Bicycles

lark,

Stories

Books for the Family Library, 12:197-204 Reading for Parents, 15:181-182

how

Birth: see Childbirth; Reproduction; Sex Educa-



Pictures, 9:188

tion

pedal, 9:199

Birthdays

menu and

Bidushha Lays an Easter Egg by Jones, 4:37

dinner for Dad,

Biers, Clarence, illustrations, 4:21-24, 159, 160, 164-

in the family, 12:170-172

Birthdays

170

Big and Litde Bears (constellations), 9:149 "Big Apples, The," by Cezanne, 10:26h

Bischoff,

Stories

Use,

Bison

illustrations, 9:20, 21. 24. 25, 27, 30,

Cow, A, 10:32

Biting

Bitterns

Biography



Pictures

least bittern, color plate,

Persons, Adventures of, 6:7-160



Bitterroot

—Pictures

color plate, 7:204b

Pictures

Blacl{

color plate, 7:236c

and Gold, poem by Turner,

Birdbaths, 8:228-229

Black-Eyed Susans, 7:196

Birdbaths—Pictures, 7:103; 9:250

Blackstock, Josephine

Black

Birdhouses, 8:224-228

Birdhouses

Pictures, 7:109

Blake, William

Laughing Song,

Audubon, John James

banding

birds, 7:96, 97

making

birdhouses. birdbaths. and feeding

Bland, Jane Cooper sta-

of the Bird

World by Hausman,

—Care

canaries, 7:69

Sense of

Birds— Migration, 7:95-96; Canada geese, 7:108 Birds

—Nests— —

chart, 7:97

Pictures, 13:124

Blocks

names

of birds, as Robins

—Poems Once

I

Saw

to Rise

how

to

make. 8:183-184

tin-can building blocks, 8:214-215

a Little Bird, from Mother Goose,

Blough, Glenn O.

by Stevenson, 1:68

"Blowing Bubbles,

Discovering the

1:40

Time

Cannot See by Lowenfeld,

2:122

inflight, 9:91, 133

see also

Who

Blindman's Buff, game. 8:26; picture, 8:81 Blind Men and the Elephant, The, poem by Saxe,

Pictures, 9:10

—Poems:

Children

12:267-269

color plates, 7:108a-108h

Birds

Drawing, and Modeling, 14:217-223 William E. Family Council, The, 12:115-120 "Blessing. The," by Chardin, 10:26a Blind: see also Dogs for the Blind; Touch, Painting,

Blatz,

7:93-112

Birds

2:81

Spring, 1:118

tions, 8:224-229

Birds

Spiders, 7:148

Bladderworts, 7:205-206

Woodpecker, The, by Roberts, 1:99

Our Friends

Widow

Bladder Control: see Toilet Training

— —Poems

Birds: see also

1:141

Friend of Greece, 5:191-201

Bird Cage with Tassels, A, by Parrish, 4:90

Birdhouses

7:108h

Bitterroot, 7:202

Birch Trees, 7:236

Birch Trees

3:144-148,

control of anger, 13:202-203

36, 40, 45, 54, 63

Billy Boy, song, 11:86

Famous

2:168-173;

illustrations,

150, 151

Big Tall Indian, The, song, 11:58

A. K.,



recipes, 8:206-209

Hare's Birthday Party by Kozisek, 4:15-20

Big Dipper, The, 9:148-149 Bilder,

Say? by Tennyson,

Little Birdie

1:92

World 15.

>v."

of Science,

14:196-201

by Manet. I0:58f



1

1

Index Boo\, A, poem by Love, 2: Bookbinding Pictures, 9:276

Blow, Wind, Blow, from Mother Goose, 1:39 Bluebells,

poem by De

Bluebirds

Pictures



la

1



Mare, 2:33

Book

Bluebonnets, 7:197-198



Book

Stories

Luanda by

Bluebonnets for Blue Crabs, 7:154



Famous Boo\, A, 10:47 Books: see also Authors; Illumination of Books and Manuscripts;

—Sculpture Boastfulness—

history, 9:276

kinds. 9:277

Reading Together by Betzner, 12:189-194

Stories

Tortoise,

The, by Aesop, 3:239

Boats: see Steamboats

9:267,

Pictures: Ships

268;

see

also

Canoes

—Pictures

kayak, 9:74





Borja,

—Poems

Boston

Phillips, 4:184-191

Botany: see Plants

and Co-ordination by

Stolz, 14:63-69

Own Body

by McCune,

Botde Feeding, 13:44 "Bottle of Suze" by Picasso, 10:76 Bottles, Musical, bow to make, 8:266 Botts,

13:5=5-59

A.,

illustrations,

147, 148, 149, 150. 151. 152 Bill, illustrations.

9:144. 154

— 9:221 Bonfires — Poems Autumn by Stevenson, 1:138 Bongos— Pictures Pictures,

Fires

t l

Bonheur, Rosa, 6:95-102 Bonnard, Pierre "Landscape

at

Stories

5:57-67

in Size, Strength,

color plate. 7:2S



Christmas Eve on Beacon Hill by Cavanah, Boston Tea Party, game. 8:87

Robert of Lincoln by Bryant, 2:52-53 Body, Human: see also Sex Education

Bonfires

218; 15:61.

Bossy Cow, song, 11:49

Ocean Travel— Stories America by Judson, 5:174-18(1

Steam Comes Upriver by

Boggess,

210,

232, 233;

192,

10:44

11:65

Edward

129,

"Adoration of the Magi," 10:26g "Temptation of Saint Anthony (Detail), The."

Stories: see

Discovers His

12:209,

illustrations,

14:11,

84, 95

the Boats? by Stevenson, 1:106

—Songs Tugboat, The. Boats —

Connie,

Bosch, Hieronymus

Boats

Boehmer,

make, 8:177-178



13:34, 69;

Ferry Boats by Tippett, 1:104

He

2:1

a reason for excessive questions, 13:153-154

rowboat and motorboat, 9:188 Poems: see also Sailing Poems Boats sail on the rivers, 1:127 Bobby Shafto, from Mother Goose, 1:34

Boats

Growth

to

Poems Cumberland Gap by Carmer, 2:186 Daniel Boone by Benet and Benet, 2:187 Bo-Peep, Little, from Mother Goose. 1:58 Boredom Boone, Daniel

boat, 8:189

balsa boat, 9:75

Bobolinks

how

Boone, Daniel, 6:44-49

Pictures,

Journey to



Bookshelves,

Bennett, 1:105

Boats

Where Go

values, 9:278

Books Poems Boo\, A, by Love,

Story of Kattor, The, by Travers, 4:104-111

—Models paddle-wheel Boats—

Library by Duff, 12:195-204

collecting, 8:1 17-1 IS

"Wild Boars" by Warneke, 10:126

poem by

Home

Building a

Boars

Hare and the

Illustrators; Libraries; Liter-

ature; Paper; Storytelling

Pictures, 9:4: color plate, 7:108a

Boa Constrictors, 7:180-181 Boarding Schools by Hamilton, 14:264

Boats,

of Kells

Picture from a

Savers, 5:78-85

Blue Jays, 7:99

Blue Jays

Lists

Books for the Family Library, 12:197-204 Reading for Parents, 15:181-182

color plate, 7:108a

Bluebonnets

197

Vernon," 10:122d

9:135,

136,

Davi,

illustrations,

11 frontispiece,

title

page. 89, 107, 132. 133. 151; 13:13. 31, 43, 138, 15s, 208, 252. 274, 276; 15:23. 64, 73, 99, 157

Bounce-Ball, game. 8:56



Bow and Arrow Bowel Training: Bowman,

Pictures, 9:186

see Elimination: Toilet

Training

Chariot, illustrations, 1:90, 91, 140, 141.

1%. IT "Row, Wow," Says the Dog, from Mother Goose. 1:20

Boxes used in handicraft, 8: 75-1 89, 1

2l

i

Childcraft

98

Box

Brink, Carol Ryrie

Turtles, 7:177-178

color plate, 7:60b

"Boy Blowing Bubbles" by Manet, 10:58f Boy Blue, Little, from Mother Goose, 1:27

Boy Lafayette and the Wolf, The, by Baldwin, 6:40



Boy Scouts

1



Pictures

Muffin Man, The, by Richards, 1:112-113 Three Plum Buns by Rossetti, 1:69

Little

Red Hen and

the Grain of Wheat, The,

retold by Hutchinson, 3:8-10 Mill{ for Breakfast,

poem by

poem by

Stephens, 1:69

True Story

2:64

Benjamin Franklin, The, 6:24-28

of

Brooks, Phillips

Everywhere, Everywhere,

Christmas

Tonight,

2:77

O

Little

Town

of Bethlehem, 11:127

Sometimes

Rivals,

Sometimes Friends by Neis-

12:131-140

ser,

Brotherhood of Man: sec

Human

Relations

Brother-Sister Relations skills of

opposite sex, 15:48-49

Building Friendlier Feelings by Lasko, 12:141-

Sometimes

Little

demand

feeding, 13:14

Rivals,

Sometimes Friends by Neis-

12:131-140

— —Poems Relations —

Pictures, 12:102-103

by Aldis, 1:66

Brother-Sister

Stories

Silver Pesos for Carlos by Baldwin, 5:164-172

13:12

weaning, 13:44

Two, and Three, The, by Rowe,

Brothers One,

5:226

of water animals, 7:150

Brown, Beatrice Curtis

Bremen Town Musicians, The, by Grimm and Grimm, 3:43 Brevannes, Maurice, illustrations, 1:148, 149; 2:58,

59,66,67,70,71,

made from

clay,

and punishment)

— Pictures

Little Black

V"g. 1=95

Brown and

furry, 2:60

Browning, Robert Pied Piper of

Bright Children: see Gifted Children

Year's

Brill,

Hard

Sing about Jonathan Bing, A,

to

Paul Bunyan's Christmas, 6:253-256

9:245, 248

Richard G. Children Who Are

Song

2:93

Brown, Taggert Ted

9:123

Pictures, 9:266; 10:104-106; see also

Natural Bridge

Jonathan Bing, 2:92

New

Brown, Margaret Wise

104, 105

Bribes: see Discipline (rewards

Bricks—Pictures,

a Special Challenge by

12:149-156

Liss,

Brother-Sister Relations

Breathing, 9:29

272

Reptiles, 7:175-188

S.

Brother-Sister Relations

nipple care, 13:12-13

schedules versus



and Other

poem by Tennyson,

Brooks, Elbridge

ser,

Breast Feeding, 13:10-11

Bridges

Brool{, The,

148 Rossetti,

1:68

Bricks,

S.

Turtles, Lizards,

appreciating

Stories

of,

by

148

Supper by Richards, 2:58-59 Blow, Wind, Blow, from Mother Goose, 1:39 Hot Cross Buns, Old English, 1:64

value

Bronson, Wilfrid

Some Combinations Arc

Alice's

Breakfast Time,

Away from Home

Dowley, 15:82-89

Building Friendlier Feelings by Lasko, 12:1419:232, 235

—Poems

Bread and

Through Death by Franklin, 12:207-214 Fathers Must Be

Brother-Brother Relations

Bread—Pictures,



value, 14:265

Brooms, poem by Aldis, 1:126

Stories

jungle, 9:72

Little

may have

Divorce and Separation by Baruch, 12:215-221 Losses

— — Courage— Brazil —

Bread

boarding schools

Some

Pictures, 15:131

Brahms, Johannes The Modest Genius of Music, 11:178-179 Brahms' Lullaby, song, 11:38 Braille, Louis by Martin, 6:161-166 Brann, Esther Nanette Visits the Chateau, 5:202-210 Braque, Georges "Musical Forms," 10: 22f Bravery Poems: see Courage—Poems Bravery Stories: see Achievement Stories;

Bread

Rare Provider, A, 4:112-121 Broken Homes

of Hearing,

12:270-

tit

I

fame/in, The, 2:126-135

the Spring, The, 2:40

Brown Thrashers

—Pictures

color plate, 7:KISb

3

Index Brueghel, Pieter, the Elder "Children's Games," 10:58j

Robert of Lincoln, 2:52-5



Burrowing Owls, 7:172-173 Burton, Virginia L., illustrations, 2:36, 37, 94, 95 Buses— Pictures, 9:259, 260 school bus. 15:155

Pictures, 9:119

Buckeye Trees, 7:240

Money poem by Da vies, 1:128

Budget, Family: see

Busoni, Rafaello, illustrations, 2:152, 161

Buds (Tree), 7:229-230, 231 Buds (Tree)—Pictures, 9: 36 108,

3:15-17,

109;

51;

4:15-18,

20;

Buffaloes



Water

poem by

Richards, 2:86

Pictures

Butterflies

—Pictures;

Building

Materials; Carpentry: also kinds of buildings,

Houses

Building a

Library by Duff. 12:195

Building Friendlier Feelings by Lasko, 12:141 Building Machines, 9:179-180 Building Materials, 9:245-252

Buddings— Pictures,

9:179: 10:109-114, 117

Building the Strong Family by Lindeman and

to

game



how

to

1:95

Button, Button, game, 8:20

Buzz, game, 8:69 Bye, Baby Bunting, from Mother Goose, 1:16

braes,

9:46, 53 Cadel. John M.. illustrations.

6:253. 255

Bull in the Ring, game. 8:27

Cain, Leo F.

Bull Snakes, 7:180-181



Pictures, 9:46

Handicapped Child in School, The, 14:139-144 Award Winners Aulaire. Ingri and Edgar Parin d'. 2:2, 3. 122,

Caldecott

Bully: needs help. 14:17

Bumblebees, 7:127 Bumblebees Pictures. 9:64 Bunn. Harriet



Wapple's

Rossetti, 2:60

Cacti— Pictures,

Pictures, 7:119

Bull Thistles

by

Fuzzy Wuzzy, Creepy Crawly by Schulz, White Butterflies by Swinburne, 2:60

make, 8:178

Bullfrogs, 7:117-118



—Poems

Caterpillar, The,

Pictures. 9:17*

Bulletin Boards,

Bullfrogs

monarch, 9:16-17

11:100

make, 8:58

Bulldozers

Pictures, 9:7, 64

By the shores of Gitche Gumee, 2:174 By yon bonnie banks and bv yon bonnie

Glasser, 12:289

Bull Board,



color plate, 7:124b

Butterflies

Home

Moths

cabbage, 9:22

Architecture

see

in family. 7:204

collecting, 8:123-124

buffalo, 9:207

Building:

how

in family, 7:202

Butterflies, 7:133-136; see also Caterpillars;

Bugs: see Insects

as

columbine

Roberts, 1:81

hepatica in family. 7:198

marsh marigold

5:2,3 Buffalo, The,

poem by

Butterbean Tent, The, Buttercups

Buehrig, Rosemary, illustrations. 2:22. 23. 56, 57, 73,

The," by a

Burros, 7: v

Bryce Canyon National Park

72,

(detail),

Japanese Artist, 10:53

Bryant, William Cullen

Buds,

199

"Burning of the San jo Palace

123: 6:1

Index Dalmatia



Dear Lord, for these three things pray. 1:146 Death Leading Causes, chart, 15:53 Losses Through Death by Franklin. 12:2117-214 Death Stories Spoonbill and the Cloud, The, bv Hudson. 4:

Stories

1

Journey to America by Judson. 5: 174-1 SO

D'Amico, Victor Magic of Art, The, 10:v Dams, 10:100-101

Dams— Pictures,

209



9:114, 211, 250

Dancing, 13:300-301

89

an outlet for energy. 13:108

Debussy, Achille Claude

informal training, 13:31 10-31 II

The Composer Who Broke the Rules. 11:188-189 Dechmann, Louis, illustrations. 4:131-141, 143.



Dancing Poems Cock-a-Doodle-Doo

Round

from Mother Goose, 1:46 Now We Dance by

,

May

the

Pole



to

Stories

Cinderella, retold by Gibson, 3:177-l sS

Madelon Dances by



Pictures, 9:5

owcroft, 6:44

Darters



volumes

De

Creeft, Jose

"Picador." 10:Sl

Deer, 7:42-44

Deer—Pictures,

7:42. 43: 9:14

Daugherty, James H., 6:44. 46, 47. 49

and Edgar Parin

Cupboard. The. 1:70 see

Aulaire,

d'

Here All We See, 1:66 Huntsmen, The, 1:77 Mary, 2:22 Miss T., 2:23

Buds, 1:128

Now

Day

Sleepyhead, 2:1s

before April, The, 1:119 of the Rain. 1:123

2:20

Delphiniums

Find North During the Day, 9:85-86 :

.

9:133

9:156

Children in Trouble, 14:52-60

Day and Night, 9:78-79 Day before April, The, poem by

Del Solar, Charlotte Before the Baby Ami

es,

1

\

Persephone by Cooke. 6:229-233 Davies. 1:119

"Dead Bird" by Lippold, 10:81 Deaf Children Who Are Hard of Hearing by

Denmark art:

set Art

Denmark Brill.

— Denmark

— Fairy Tales

Emperor's

New

Clothes, The. by

Anders

3:87-92

12:270-272 tree that

—Pictures

color plate. 7:220a

"Demanding" Children, 13:136 137 Demeter, Greek Goddess

Day, A. Whittier

little

73

Delivery: see Childbirth

What Can You See in the Daytime Sky Where Do the Stars Go in the Daytime?,

Dear

1:1

the Dusk. 1^167

Delphiniums, 7:222

Dawn, poem by Dunbar. Day to

Through

Some One,

Snow!, 2:71

Dawdling. 14:51

How

Pieter de

Bluebells, 2:33

Mary Carolyn

at the

"

Dandi, the Deer by Coates. 4:42-52

De Hooch, Pieter: see Hooch, De la Mare, Walter

illustrations,

D'Aulaire, Ingri and Edgar Parin:

2:1 s

Stories

retold

by Dasent, 3:72-76

Look

12, 13. 14. 15

—Poems Deer—

Pancake, The, 3:30-34 Dashing through the snow, 11:116

Drums

allowing children

be found throughout

Daniel Boone by Benet and Benet,

Webbe Lad Who Went to the North Wind, The.

Ingri

in

may

Deer

Pictures, 9:51

Dasent, George

Davies,

decisions

color plate. 7:44c

the river. 1:106

is

make

Chii.ik raft

Dandi, the Deer by Coates, 4:42 Danger: see Safety Daniel Boone, poem by Benet and Benet. 2:187 Daniel Boone's New Home in Kentucky by Mead-

Dark brown

of

Deck Tennis, game how to make court, 8:60-62 Dec\ the Halls, song, 11:124

Phillips. 5:146-153

Dandelions, 7:190. 192-193

Dandelions

Making

Information on problems

Turner, 1:129

Dancing

145. 146

Decisions,

we

plant today, 1:130

Real Princess. Tin. by Andersen. 3:1

III

1

I

1

4

Childcraft

210

Steadfast Tin Soldier, The, by Andersen,

Ugly Duckling, The, by Andersen, 3:213-226

how

frequent, 13:257, 265-266



Pictures, 9:286:

Difficulties in

lies

animals: see Animals



Deserts

scolding, threats are ineffective,

—Deserts

Pictures, 9:73; see also Cacti

—Pictures

Destructiveness, 14:57-58

Development Information on the phases of a child's develop-

ment may be found throughout Childcraft

the

DeWitt

12:44-45

in the situation.

parents disagree, 12:23, 38, 40

Radio and

TV

Are not Tools



self-assertion and achievement, 12:70-72 Should Good Marks Be Rewarded?, 14:158

should show fairness, 14:47-49

when

Clinton, by Nolan,

12:72-73

to say "no,"

Discipline by

Stories

Howie, 14:147

Discipline for Self-Reliance by

also

names

of inventions, as Telephone

Discovering the World of Science bv Blough, 14:196

Diapers

commercial services, 13:38 washing, 13:38

Discovery

Donald J., and Palk, Helen King of the Fur Traders, The, 6:153-158 Dickinson, Emily

Dickie,

Period

America:

in

based on

TV

programs, 15:17, 18

Morning, 2:20

Family Council, The, by

and His Cat, by Hill, 3:62 Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling, from Mother Goose, 1:22

Food Harry

F. Is

Your

Responsibility,

15:51-57 in

Blatz, 12:115-120

parents, 12:48

informal neighborhood planning. 15:125-126

12:2M

parents of handicapped,

Learning:

see

Learning,

Difficul-

Discussion Groups



friendlier attitudes in

Living with Others bv

Omwake,

13:201

Pictures

on human

relations fostered,

15:119 Dishonesty: see Honesty

Digging Machines, 9:178, 213 Dillar, a Dollar, A, from Mother Goose, 1:47 Corinne, illustrations, 2:20, 21, 74, 75,

188, 189

Ding-a-ling ding-a-ling!, 11:64

Ding, Dong,

mothers, 13:17

pregnant mothers. 13:6

ties in

Dillon,

modern

for

new

nursery school, 13:234-236 on child development, 12:9 parents and teachers, 15:159-161

Accident Prevention

Difficulties

Columbus,

Discussion Groups

doctors with

Dicl{ Whittington

see

Christopher; Mackenzie, Alexander

Autumn, 2:66

Difficulties

Washburn, 12:107

Discoveries in Science, 9:288: see also Inventions;

Diamonds, 9:129

Dietrich,

15:15

taking the consequence, 13:138

4:192-200

Diet: see

for,

related to planned activities. 14:123

rewards and punishments, 12:105; 14:154 rewards for accepting medical care, 13:258, 260

Designs, Space: see Space Designs

Aboard

Omwake,

of groups, 14:244

Design Art for Children, Childcraft, volume 10

volumes 12, 13, 14, 15 Dew, 9:105 DeWitt Clinton (Locomotive)

Living with Others by

13:201-208

13:256, 265

Deserts

All

commands,

democratic methods, 14:8-9

Child's Teeth by Sillman, 13:261-266

Dentists

two-parent job, 12:123-124

14:39-41

Dentistry

Your

a

causes tension, 12:14-15

3:112-117

Bell,

from Mother Goose, 1:37

Dingey-Bird, The,

poem by

Field, 1:190

Directions, 9:84-90

Traveling by the Stars, 9:155 Disappearing, game. 8:^.39 Discipline: see also Crying; Rules; Spoiled Child;

Temper Tantrums

Disney, Walt, illustrations. 1:94, 95; 2:S2, ^3 Disobedience: see Obedience: Reason

Diverting History of ]ohn Gilpin, The, Cowper. 2:152

poem by

Divorce and Separation by Baruch, 12:215

Dixon, Rachel Taft,

illustrations,

1:58,

59.

1

24-

127

Doctor and the Dentist—Your Child's The, by Richmond,

1 .3

:

Friends,

2^

Dr. Dolittle's Pushmi-Pullyu by Lofting, 4:151

Doctors: see also Medical Care

Index Doctor and the

Dentist— Your

Child's Friends,

211

Dowley, Edith M.

Some

The, by Richmond, 13:254-260 Doctors Pictures, 9:2X6

Fathers Must Be 15:S2-89



Dog, The, poem by Herford, 2:84 Dog and the Bone, The, by Aesop, 3:236

Down

Dogs

"Down cellar," said the Down! Down!, poem by

care

and

Dog's

Rights,

The 7:59

kinds and characteristics, 7:58-62 Tribute to a Dog, A, by Vest, 7:58-59

Dogs



Pictures, 9:5; see also Puppies

Dragonflies

—Poems

Chums

by Guiterman, l: s 7 Dog, The, by Herford, 2:S4 Lost Pup, The, by Mead, 1:198-199 Old Mother Hubbard, from Mother Goose,

Smith, 14:224-228

Playmakjng and Play Acting by Smith, 8:130-

Egyptian Bronze Dog, An, 10:30

148

—Songs

Drawing, 10:12-14

Oh Where, Oh Where Has My

Little

Dog

materials. 8:150-153; crayons, 8:43

14:217-223

Raggle, 11:62

what

Stories

Christopher by Flack. 4:21-24

Dog and the Bone, The by Aesop, 3:236 Meals for Mickey by Dalgliesh, 4:122-130 Dogs and Cats, game. 8:67-68 Dogs for the Blind, 7:60-61 Dogwood, Flowering, 7:230, 232, 240

to

8:118-119

for baby, 13:70

stocking dolls, 8:246-250

—Songs

This

Is

the

8:149

"Dream Ride" by Glackens, 10:43 Dreams nightmare from chance remark, 13:308 nightmares. 13:192

—Poems

Cave-Boy, The. by Richards. 2:^» 31 Dinkey-Bird, The. by Field. 1:190-191 Now Through the Dusl{ by Dc la Mare. 1:167 Rock-a-bv Lady, The. by Field, 1:184

Way My

Dolly Wal\s, 11:69

Dolls. Kachina, 10:87

Domestic Animals: see Farm Animals; Pets; and names of animals, as Cats, Dogs, Horses Dominoes, game, 8:17-18

Sugar-Plum Tree, The, by Field, 1:182-183 Wynken, Blynk.cn. and Nod by Field, 1:180-181

Dreams



Stories

Bird Cage with Tassels. A. by Parrish,

4:90-103

Donatello "Statue of a Brave Soldier, A," 10:52

Donkeys, 7:80 Don't count your chickens. 3:237 Don't wriggle about any more, my dear'. 2:96 Doorbells,

draw, 8:153-159

Drawing and Painting by Howlett and Smith.

Dreams

Dolls

make

Drawing, and Modeling by Bland,

Painting.

Gone, 11:62-63

to

Games

Creating Through Language and Dramatics by

Dogs

Dolls

24a

Last of the Dragons, The, by Nesbit, 4:159-170

—Sculpture

how

1

Dramatics: see also Festivals;

"Affection" by Zorach, 10:23

collecting,

.

Pictures, 7:122: 9:22

,

Dogs



2:110

Farjeon, 1:139



1:50-51

Dogs



color plate, 7:

9:207

sleds,

cricket,

Dragons Costumes to Make Believe, Grown-Up People also Wear, 10:89 Costumes We Wear for Ma\e-Believe 10: Dragons Stories

Eskimo's, 9:66

used to pull

Meadow, poem by Turner,

Down on a farm in Arkansaw, 11:96 Down the Ram Falls, poem by Coatsworth, 1:123 poem by Wegert, 1:75 Do You Know .

—Pictures

color plates, 7:60a, 60b, 76b

Dogs

Easter

1:121

training, 7:62-64

Bill of

Sunny

a

Away from Home,

poem by

Field. 1:108

Dots and Lines, game, 8:72 Dove, Arthur "Goin' Fishin'," 10:75

Doves, 7:99-100

Feast

Eat-Everything,

of

The,

by

Marshall,

6:145-152

Dressing at 2': years, let

13:77-78

kindergarten 144.

child

choose clothes.

146 147

Dressing Up, 13:157-158, 284 Pictures, 13:285



Dressing I'p

"Lady Kan" by Bellows, 10:22

13:143-

Childcraft

212 Up Up

Dressing Dressing

for Fun, 10:90

Earth

Loo\ Important,

to

curvature of, 9:76-77

10:91

Has Changed

Drinking: see Table Etiquette

Man,

Drinks: see Beverages

movement

Drin\ to Me Only with Thine Eyes, song, 11:106 Dromedary, an Arabian camel, 7:12-14 Drop the Handkerchief, game, 8:28 Drums, how to make, 8:263-264

Drums

Du

poem by

of the Rain,

William Pene,

Bois,

2:28,

77;

100,

29,

around the sun, 9:80-82

What What

Is

the Earth

9:130

Wind and

101;

3:30-32,

34,

87-89.

We

Earth

poem by

Lear.

Easter

7:88, 91



Pictures, 9:4, 58

—Poems

Down

Ducks

a

Sunny

the Kangaroo, The, by Lear. 1:192-

Ducks' Ditty by Grahame, 1:157 Ducks' Ditty, poem by Grahame, 1:157

Turner,

—Song Easter—

poem by

Is

Risen Today, 11:156-157

Stories

Bidushl^a Lays an Easter

Duckweeds, 7:206

Egg by

Jones, 4:37-41

Eating: see also Table Etiquette Field, 1:188

Duff, Annis

Home

Ubrary, 12:195-204 Dunbar, Paul Laurence Dawn, 2:20 Duncan, Carl D. Insects and Spiders, 7:122-149 Dunsire, Marion, illustrations, 5:104, 105, 108,

between meals, 13:179 how much, 13:249-50

"My

of convalescents, 13:278 regularity, 14:72

Edelman, Katherine Saturday Shopping, 1:74 Edison,

"Baby Owl," 10:31 Dushkin, David Maying Musical Instruments, 8:262-272 Duvoisin, Roger, illustrations, 1:158, 159, 184-189: 3:23-27, 35; 6:8,

Child Doesn't Like to Eat" by Aldrich,

13:177-184

109, 112 Diirer, Albrecht

165,

Meadow by

Easter

Christ the Lord

Building a

Easter

1:121

193

Duel, The,

the Surface, 9:119

Easter, party for, 8:88-90

Ducks, 7:89; mallard, 7:108

Duc\ and

9:115

food for robins, 7:95

game, 8:9

—Poems

Change

Ice

of?,

Live on Means to Us,

Live On, The, 9:67

Earthworms

Ducks—Pictures,

Made

We

Earthworms, 7:163-166

the Kangaroo, The,

a Rock,

the Surface of the Earth, 9:1 IS

the Earth

Davies, 1:123

1:192

Duck on

travels

the Surface, 9:120

9:78-79

of,

Water Changes

illustrations, 1:50, 51, 76,

92-94, 96-99, 101

Duc\ and

too,

Thomas

Alva, 6:118-123

Education: see also Books; Character Education;

Consumer

Education;

Discussion

Groups:

Field Trips; Learning; Libraries: School Prob164,

10-12.

14,

lems; Sex Education for safety, 15:53-54, 55-56

of cerebral palsied child, 12:276-277

15, 17

Columbus Finds America, 6:8-17 Dwarfs Stories Snow-White and Rose-Red by Grimm, 3:162-



of deaf, 12:272

of the blind, 12:269 of the crippled, 12:274 of the epileptic, 12:280

171

of the handicapped, 14:139-144

parents can lay foundations for, 15:171

Each Child

Is

Different by Faegre. 12:90

Eagles, 7:105-106

pro and con effects of radio and television. 15:10-18 records of schools attended, 12: SS 1

art

from wood, wire, and cornhusks. 10:85

Eagles



Pictures, 9:40

"White-Headed Eagle" by Audubon, 10:39 Early Growth Is Swift and Dramatic by Perce,

Eells,

Eleanor P.

Handicapped Child and Your Child, The, 12:253-257

13:27

Ears

examination

Eels, Electric: see Electric Eels

of.

14:7^

Egg and Spoon Race, game, 8:24 Egg Beaters Pictures, 9:193



Index Eggs

213

Egypt

alligator

and

crocodile. 7:

-

ant, 7:128, 130

Egypt

7:136-137

beetle,

bird,

101.

100,

103,

104.

105,

Tombs. 10:115 Egypt, Ancient Stories Egyptian Bronze Dog, An, 10:30

and moth. 7:133-134

chicken, 7:87-89

Eichenberg,

cod, 7:155-156

7:140

Fritz,

illustrations,

earthworm, 7:166

telephone, 9:214. 224

frog, 7:114-115. 117

television, 9:218

goose, 7:91

Electric Appliances

grasshopper, 7:138, 139

Fans

Electric

housefly. 7:142

7:154



Pictures, 9:1*4

Where Does Electricity Come From?, 9:215 Works for Us. Too. 9:214

newt, 7:120

Electric Lighting, 9:22"

7:28-30

Electric Lighting

owl. 7:1 73



Electric

Power

7:160

Elephant, The,

poem by

spider. 7:144. 147. 148

Elephants



color plate, 7:2 8b

toad, 7:119

Prince

tropical fish. 7:71

Blind

7:176

Eletelephony,

7:129: color plate. 7:1 24d

Elf

2: s 3

by Richards.

2.

the

Dormouse, The, poem

bj

1

lerford,

1:171 El Greco: see Greco. El

7:177

Elimination: see also Toilet Training

9:13

difficulties

water bug, 7:137

between

2

!

and

4

years, 13:77

of baby. 13:37

—Poems

Ellenwood, James Lee

Humpty Dumpty

sat

on

a

wall,

Goose. 1:4^ for Sale by Campbell. 5:21"

game,

8: s(

egrets, color plate. 7:

from Mother

Family Ups and Downs. 12:22:

Elm

Trees, American. 7:235-236

Elves

— Poems:

Elf

>

—Pictures

snowy

and

2

frogs. 9:1 S

Egrets

poem

Elevators, 9:210 211

47

in a Basket,

The. by Saxe,

Elephant.

the

Eletelephony by Richards.

Pictures

chick hatching. 9:1

Eggs Eggs

—Poems

Men and

2:122-123

water animal. 7:150

Eggs

Mughal

Riding on an Elephant from

Elephants

turkey. 7:90

turtle hatching,

66

illuminated manuscript. 10:34

trout. 7:161

turtle.

Belloc. 1:161

Pictures, 9:42,

sunfish. 7:161

bird. 9:10.

by Wise,

Distribution, 9:216

Elephants, 7:6-11

.int.

Scientist,

"Elephant" by Flannagan, 10:33

7:155

snake, 7:181



Young

6:118-123

salmon. 7:157-158

Eggs

Stories

Thorn. a Alia Edison.

7:153

salamander. 7:120. 121

turtle,

Magnetism

Electricity: see also

mosquito. 7:142-143

snail,

Pictures, 9:251

Electric Heating, 9:219

mantis, 7:141

sea horse,



Electric Eels, 7:15S

honeybee. 7:123. 126

oyster,

S5;

9:183

electric fan.

kitchen appliances, 9:214. 219

ostrich.

84,

Electric Appliances

duck, 7:89

lobster.

1:60-63,

3:62, 63, 66, 67. 70, 71. 84, 85, 86

54

1

cricket,

— Egypt

Pictures, 9:71



106, 107, 108, 109, 110. Ill

crab. 7:



Nile River. 9:71

7:94, 98, 99,

butterfly

Art

art: see

1



Poems see also Fairies and the Dormouse The, by Herford. 1:171 The. by Hangs. 1:170 House. The. by Godley,

Little Elf.

lush

Little

I

Childcraft

214 Elves



Man — Influence

Environment: see

Stories

Shoemaker and the

Elves, The, by

Grimm and

When

Grimm. 3:48-50 Embroidered Picture, An, 10:58h Embryo, growth of. 13:4-6 Emergencies First Aid in case of accidents, 14:84-85 Emerson, Ralph Waldo Mountain and the Squirrel, The, 2:124 Emotional Health and Development: see Love, Anger, and Other Feelings Emperor's New Clothes, The, by Andersen, 3:87

Have More Toys. 15:108-109

the Others

Epileptic, Children

Equipment

for

Who

Play:

ment: Playrooms Erosion



Pictures,

Are, by Tenny, 12:278

Playgrounds

see

—Equipment 119

9:118,

art: see

Eskimos

—Eskimos

Art



Pictures, 9:55, 56,

Etiquette: see also Invitations; Letter-Writing in the library, 14:233

Telephone manners. 9:273 toward parents, 12:45-46



What Kind

Manners

of

Our Children? bv

for

Alschuler, 15:135-142

when Hill.

3:62-71

visiting.

Etiquette

—Poems

14:254

Tunney by McCann, 2:98-99 Rebecca by Belloc. 2:97 Little foe

]ac\ and the Beanstalk, retold by Craik. 3:52-61

Master of All Masters, retold bv Jacobs, 3:152153

Old

74

Esley, Joan, illustrations, 1:114, 115, 166, 167

bowel training, 13:52 Engines, 9:261. 265 England art: see Art England England Folk Tales Diel( Whittington and His Cat, retold bv



Woman and Her

Pig, The, retold by Ja-

cobs, 3:11-14

To

the Little Girl

Who

Wriggles by Richards.

2:96

Europe plants: see Plants

—Europe

Teeny. Tiny Lady, retold by Bailey, 3:2S-29

Evaporation, 9:99-102, 105, 112

Three Little Pigs, The, retold by Jacobs, 3:l c'-22 Three Wishes, The, retold by Jacobs, 3:84-86

Everest,

Tom

Tit Tot, retold by Jacobs, 3:77-83

—Legends

England

oj,

by Farjeon, 6:240-

244

Hood and Maid Marian

bv Harvey,

—Songs

I

Sat on a

,

Drink, to

Me

Fly and the

O

Only with Thine Eyes, 11:106-107

Humble

Bee, The, li:59

No, John!. 11:102

Sally

Go Round

Three

Pirates,

Warm England

the

11:108

iump

into

my

little

tub, 11:68

black and gold, 1:141

is

poem by Exceptional

Brooks, 2:77

Children,

Exercise: see

Young Children by Kunkle,

Games: Play

Expectant Mothers: see Pregnancy

Last of the Dragons, The, by Nesbit, 4:159-170

Experiences with

Experiments,

Writing Our Thoughts, 8:163-173

7S-79.

Numbers by Harding, 14:190 9:24-26, 27.

Scientific,

81,

82.

83,

85-S7, 92.

93,

5:104-112

223: see also Aquariums; Insects

Entertainment for Convalescents, 8:42-47

Terrariums

listening, watching, play materials.

to worry.

14:49-50

95.

36, 63, 97,

99,

184. 189, 195. 196, 197. 202. 210. 217. 220.

Entertaining: see Parties

Enuresis, 13:54. 2(H)

?i^.

102. 105, 106. 107. IIS. 121. 140. 166, 183,

Enright, Elizabeth

due

13:173-174;

12:247-286;

Handicapped Challenging Rapid Learners, 14:176 see also

13:304

Stories

In,

have such fun, 11:62

I

Excursions for

Engle, Paul

Locked

I

Ev'ryday

Excursions: see Field Trips

Moon, 11:47

Kitty, 11:53



Ev'ryday

Everywhere, Everywhere, Christmas Tonight,

Sunny Bank, 11:122-123 Coc\-a-Doodh-Doo 11:50

As

cypress. 7:242

pine, color plate, 7:236b

Everything

6:247-2=52

England

— —

Mount Pictures, 9:69 Evergreen Trees, 7:240-241 Evergreen Trees Pictures Monterey

King Arthur, The Story Robin

— Equip-

Eskimos

Enemas in

Environment

of

Envy

13:279-280

learning through. 14:1

(

>

( >

—Collecting;

200

Explanation of the Grasshopper, An, Lindsay, 1:97

poem by

Index Explorers

215 Tune, The, by Fyleman, 2:33

Little

Our

Columbus, Christopher, 6:8-17

Over

Mackenzie. Alexander, 6:34-39

Sleepyhead by



Poems Columbus by Miller, 2:178-179 Exploring the World Around Us, Chii.ix

Hill,

Dale by Shakespeare, 2:01 Mare. 2: IX

IJc la

Sometimes by Fyleman,

Explorers

2:

raft, \nl-

ume 7

in play,

15:45-46

not evident in marks, 14: 155- 156

Expression, Creative: see Creative Expression

taking turns, 15:48

Eyes

to each child in family. to stepchildren, 12:243.

co-ordination, 13:28 effect of television,

examination

of,

may

pcx>r sight

due

strain

-52

Fairness

to

12:142-143 244-240

Fairs

15:16-17

County Fair

14:73

Fairs

cause truancy. 14:57

—Poems

Party. 8:00

Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?, from Mother Goose, 1:47

poor lighting, 13:277



Songs Oh, Dear! What Can the Matter Be?, 11:84-85

Fairs

Fables

—Aesop

Fairy Tales

Crow and the Pitcher, The, 3:23 ^ Dog and the Bone, The, 3:236

Fairy Tales

Sun, The, 3:238

— the Brave by Mukerji. 4:8-14 Fables — Poems

Fats

Our

Fall: see

Autumn

Falling Leaves, song. 11:112

Families Shape Personality by Stolz, 12:00

Family Keeps Records, The, by Reynolds, 12:1^2

the Elephant, The, by Saxe,

Family Life

Manufacturing

^

14, 15

Family Ups and

Faegre, Marion L.

Fair,

Preparation for Adult Life by Oje-

Family Relations: see also Home Life Information on family relations may be found 13, 12, throughout Chii.imrvft volumes

Pictures, 10:118

Failure: see

Is

mann, 15:4

2:124

Each Child

Fathers, song. 11:149

Family Guidance Services by Sutherland. 15:162

Mountain and the Squirrel, The, by Emerson.



song, 11:34

Faith oj

2:122-123

Factories

74

Do Do,

Family Council. The, by Blatz, 12:115

Runny

Factories: see

Went A-Marketing, A, poem by Fyleman,

1:1

Family Budget: see Money Family Celebrations by Wright. 12:107

3:228-220

Men and



Sleeping Princess. The. 11:67 Fairy

231

Fox and the Stork, The, 3:234 Goose That Laid the Golden Egg, The, 3:240 Hare and the Tortoise, The, 3:239 Lion and the Mouse, The, 3:235 Maid and the Milk Can. The, 3:237 Town Mouse and the Country Mouse, The,

Blind

Is Different,

Stevenson. 1:170

Folk an(l Fairy Tales. 3:51-226 Songs

Farmer, His Son, and the Donkey, The, 3:230-

Wind and the Fables Hindu

poem by

Fairy Bread,

Belling the Cat, 3:232

Downs

by Ellenwood. 12:222

Family Vacations by Puner. 12:175

12:90-96

Family

Promotions

by

The, by Seredy. 5:181

Who Had

Never

Had

Roller Skates. The.

Woodward. 4:178

Fairies,

The, poem by Allingham, 1:176

Famous French Tapestry, A, 10:62-63 Famous Persons, Adventures of. 6:7-160

Fairies,

The, poem by Fyleman, 1:168

Far

Fairest

Fairies

Lord

Jesus, song,

—Poems:

Ariel's

11:159

see also Elves

— Poems

the

wheat grows green.

poem by

Stevenson. 1:200

Farjeon, Eleanor City Streets

Fairy Bread by Stevenson, 1:170

175

meadow

Farewell to the Farm,

Song by Shakespeare, 2:61 De la Mare, 2:33

Went A-Marketing, A, by Fyleman,

in the

2:58

Bluebells by

Fairy

down

1:174-

and Country Roads, 2:35

Down Down!, 1

1:139

Mrs. Peck-Pigeon.

1:

Childcraft

2l6

Night Will Never Stay, The, 2:19 King Arthur, The, 6:240-244 Farm Animals, 7:75-92; see also Pets, and names of farm animals, as Horses Farm Animals Pictures Story of



13:114

Farm



Buildings

young

textures for

children,

a trip to the library with child, 14:232

demands

of

importance

modern family

living,

12:46-47

bedtime, 13:251

at

upset. 12:15-16

is

part in reproduction explained to child, 13:126

Pinch-Hitting for Absent Fathers, 15:133

Farmer, His Son, and the Donkey, The, by Aesop, 3:230

Father and

I

and

I

Fath'r

Father

in the Dell,

calls

me

William, 2:147



game, 8:32-33

Father-Daughter Relations Stories Rosa Bonheur Breaks Her Needle bv Roberts,

pictures, 13:160

Farmer's Boy, A, poem, Author Unknown, 2:82 Farm Life: see also Farm Animals: Ranch Life

Harvest Party, 8:96-97 windmill, 9:94

Farm Life—Pictures,

and 4-year-old, 13:110 went down to camp, 2:185 went down to camp, 11:137

relationship with 3-

Pictures, 10:117

barn, 9:194

Farmer

and the newborn baby, 13:23-24

importance when mother

color plates, 7:76a-76d

new sounds and

Father

6:95-102

Father in the Family, The, by Smart, 12:121 Father of

all,

in

Heaven above, 1:146

Away from Home, Some,

Fathers Must Be

9:70, 229

Harvesting Scene, A, from

The Tomb

by

Dowley, 15:82-89 of

Me-

We Thank Thee, poem, Author Unknown, 2:74 Father we thank Thee for the night, 1:147

Father,

nena, 10:65

Machines on the Farm. 9:181

Farm

Life

—Poems

Supper by Richards, 2:58-59 City Streets and Country Roads by Farjeon, 2:35 Alice's

Farewell to the

Farm by

Stevenson, 1:200

Father William,

Farmer's Boy, A, 2:82

Boy Blue, from Mother Goose, Mary by De la Mare, 2:22 Milling Time by Roberts, 1:88

Little

changing the tempo of of toddler, 13:78

1:27

Riley, 2:142-143

Thanksgiving Day by Child, 1:142-143 When the Frost Is on the Punkin by Riley.

affects child's eating, 13:182-184

as

—Songs

Life



causes nervousness, 14:45-51 causes panic. 12:13-15 causes setback in toilet training, 13:199-200

concerning death, 12:207-214

Barnyard Song, 11:80-81 Old MacDonald Had a Farm, 11:60

Farm

evidenced by questions of 5-vear-olds, 13:154155

children's worries cause illness, 14:74-7^

2:68-69 Life

play, 14:104

Fear: see also Security

Pasture, The, by Frost, 2:56

Farm

Carroll, 2:106

Forestalling Trouble, 12:140

Hayloft, The, by Stevenson, 2:57

Raggedy Man, The, by

poem by

Fatigue: see also Bedtime; Overactivity; Sleep

due due

to loss causes

antagonism, 12:240, 242

to real events

and new experiences, 13:215-

217

Stories

Christmas in the Piney

Woods bv Simon,

expectant mothers are afraid, 13:7-8. 21-22 fathers help

5:68-76

them overcome. 12:124 punishment. 13:165-166

Freddie the Great by Weir, 4:53-59

5-year-olds', of

Gone

imaginative plav to express and overcome,

Gone, retold by Gag, 3:154-161 Hoosier Barbecue by Wilson. 5:113-121 Maid and the Milk Can, The, by Aesop, 3:237 Music of the Scythes, The, by Zobarskas, 5:211Is

13:120 mother's fear affects child's

toilet training.

13:195-196 of baby, for baths, 13:36-37

218

of epileptic seizure explained to child,

Rare Provider. A, by Brink, 4:112-121 Sugar Snow, The, by Wilder, 5:122-128 Farm Machinery: sec Agricultural Machinery

of

Fashion

of old age, 12:64



Stories

Emperor's 3:87-92

New

Clothes, The, by Andersen,

257

new

experiences, 13:257-258, 265

of school. 13:315-316; 14:132

of the dark, 13:214-215

12:256-

1

I\ DEX reassuring child about headlines,

nightmares, 13:192

results in

When

15:35-37

Are

Children

Anxious

Langmuir.

by

13:209-218

217 contribute to reading readiness, 14:172-173

in social studies,

Feast of Eat-Everything, The, by Marshall. 6:145152

suggestions. 7:31, 56. 92. 112. 121, 149. 162, 173174, 188. 209. 244

canned foods, 13:46 change in appetite of baby, 13:44

Filling Stations

food habits of school-age child. 14:7''

Filmstrips, 9:281

Filling Stations, 9:21

loaned by

formulas, 13:44, 46

new

introducing

meaning



for library books. 14:233-234

self-feeding, 13:92-94

Finger Painting,

when

Finland: see

traveling. 13:226-227, 229, 230

—Pictures

dangers. 9:2*4

Many Meanings

by Wolf,

13:41)

Ferry-Boats,

Ferryboats



Fireflies



Fireflies

Pictures, 10:103

poem by

To

Tippett. 1:104

names of Halloween

!

7:140

— —Poems

Pictures, 9:221

a Firefly by [ones. 2:45

Firefly,

Pictures, 9:267

Festivals, 8:145-148; see also

Christmas, Easter,

9:>

Fire Engines by Clymer, 4:216-221 Fireflies,

Pictures, 9:10. 27. 57

Wheels

52

1

Fire Departments,

by adult. 13:183

Feeney, Joyce, illustrations, 9:210

Ferris

8:

Art— Finland

Fire

baby, 13: ISO



see Directions

Fines

schedules, 13:41-43

Feeding Has

14:235

libraries.

Fine, Stan, illustrations. 13:28

to baby. 13:40-41

tired child

Pictures, 9:261, 262

Finding Directions:

foods, 13:43-44

night feeding. 13:42-43

Ferns

14:203, 204-206, 208

studying science. 14:201

in

Feeding: see also Breast Feeding

Feeding

Young Children by Kunkel,

Excursions for 13:304-308

poem by

Fireplaces holidays, as



Roberts,

I:

Pictures, 9:25s

First Aid, in case of accident, 14:84-85

First Noel, The. song. 11:129

Festivals— Songs,

1 1

: 1

(

19-

1

34 First

Fibers— Synthetic, 9:241 Fiddle-de-dee, Fiddle-de-dee, 11:59 Field,

Eugene

Snow, poem by

First Snowfall,

Allen. 1:148

The. poem by Lowell. 2:70

Fir Trees, 7:240-241 Fish: see Fishes

Christmas Song, 1:151

Fish as Food, 9:230

Dinkey-Bird, The, 1:190-191

fresh-water fishes, 7:160-161

Duel, The, 1:188-189

ocean

Jest

Tore Christmas. 2:147-149

RockrA-By Lady, The, 1:184 Sugar-Plum Tree The, 1:182-183 Wynken, Blynhen, and Nod, 1:180-181 Field, Rachel

Animal

Store, The, 1:85

5s

[60

Fisher, Aileen

After a Bath, 1:72

Benjamin fonts

(Iocs

Swimming,

2:100-101

Shelling Peas. 1:74

Fisherman and His Wife, The, by

General Store. 1:84

Grimm

lee-Cream Man, The, 1:110

Be a Lighthouse, 1:107 Merry-Go-Round, 1:83 Summer Morning, .1. 2:4^ to

Taxis, 1:101

Field Mice, or

1

Silver Trees. 2:70

Doorbells, 1:108

Like

7:152-155.

Otherwise, 1:98

Barefoot Days, 1:131

I'd

fishes. 7: 155-

shellfish,

— Fishermen —

Poems Wynken, Blynken, and Nod by

Fishermen

Meadow

Mice, 7:37-39

Adventuring Through Excursions by Olsen and Olsen, 14:236-240

Field, 1:180-181

Stories

Ghost of the Lagoon by Sperry, 5:232-240 Fisherman by Dalgliesh, 5:140-145 Fishes: see also Aquariums; Goldfish, Shellfish; Y.chcdce,

Field Trips

Grimm and

3:93

Starfish

cod. 7:155-156

curious ocean lishes. 7:155

Childcraft

2l8

Flowers

fresh-water fishes, 7:160-161

salmon, 7:156-158



Flowers

Pictures, 9:13, 29

brook stickleback, 9:47 catfish, smelt, whitefish,

pompano,

salmon, trout, mackerel,

and the Humble

Flying

Flying



Pictures, 9:38

Flyways: see Birds

Stories

Star-Spangled Banner Girl by Bailey, 5:32-39



— Flanders

poem by Sandburg,

and Fairy Folk Songs and

Folf(

Flannagan, John B.



Flea, The,

by Sawyer, 3:125

volume 3

Ballads, 11:73-108



Pictures, 9:221

and fairy tales, 3:51-226 Follow the Leader, game, 8:28 folk

—Flanders

Flemish Art: see Art

(Sari), illustrations,

2:67

Tales, Childcraft,

Folk Tales: see also Nursery Rhymes; also subhead Folk Tales under names of countries, as England Folk Tales

"Elephant," 10:33 Flashlights, 9:215

Flashlights

—Migration

Fly, white butterflies, out to sea, 2:60

Fog,

Pictures, 9:144

Flanders Art: see Art

1:152,

153,

162,

163, 190, 191:2:196, 197

Food: 9:30; see also Cooking; Fish (refreshments)

ties

animals useful

Pictures

"Anything

color plate, 7:108c

to

to

as

Food; Par-

Picnics

;

man,

7:80-91

Fat in This House?" by Lowen-

berg, 14:76-81

Flies

basic foods, 13:249; 9:235

housefly, 7:141-142

Cooking Up Fun bv Rombauer and Torno,

— Songs

Fly and the

Humble

Bee, The, song, 11:59

"Flight into Egypt, The," by Fra Angelico, 10:26f Flight of learns. The, retold by Benson, 6:222

Flounders, 7:155

Flowering Dogwood, 7:230, 232, 240

Wild Flowers to seeds,

—Frozen, 9:233 9:65 — Pictures,

cereals,

7:190

parts of a flower, 7:189-190

7:232



Food Food

animals useful to man, color

collecting, 8:123

Flowers

plants as food, 7:217; vegetables -easy to grow.

to build teeth, 13:262

Flowers: see also Gardens; Plants; Seeds; Weeds;

from pollen

8:193-209 farm products, 9:229 pioneer days and now, 9:228 7:217-219

Flour, 9:232

tree,

Stories

Flying Fishes

Christopher, 4:21-24

Flies



225

Flack, Marjorie



—Poems

Flight of Icarus, The, retold by Benson, 6:222-

Five-in-a-Row, game, 8:18

Flickers

Bee, The, song, 11:59

Pictures

Goose, 1:41

Pictures, 9:230

Anne



Swing Song, A, by Allingham, 1:133 There Was An Old Woman, from Mother

Fish Pond, game, 8:12-13

Fleur,

Sayers, 5:78-85

Kite Weather by Bergengren, 2:26-27

sunfish, 9:51

Flags

Luanda by

Flying: see Birds

shiner, 9:51



as

color plate. 7:108e

flying fish, 9:38

Day

flowers,

Stories

Flycatchers

haddock, 9:60 porcupine fish, 9:43 Portuguese man-of-war, 9:45

Flag

names of

Fly: sec Flies

Fly

haddock, 9:230

sole,

darter, 9:51



also

treatment of teeth, 13:265

catfish, 9:51

Fishing



Bluebonnets for Fluorine

archerfish, 9:45

cod,

see

—Poems

Buds by Da vies, 1:128

sea horse, 7:155

Fishes

—Poems:

Daffodils

Pictures, 7:223; color plates, 7:22()a-d

parts of a flower, 7:191

fish

rice,

and

plates,

7:76c-76d

meat, 9:232 shellfish,

9:230

bananas, coffee, lemons, brazil nuts,

oranges, sugar, vegetables, fats.

fruits,

9:235

tea,

pineapples, 9:231

milk products, meat, cereal,

——



1

Index Food

—Poems:

see

also

of food, as Bread





Cooking Poems: names Poems; Potatoes Poems



Animal Crackers by Morlcy, 1:71 Bread and Milk, for Breakfast by Rossetti,

1:68

1:29

Miss T. by

De

la

Pictures

Arctic fox, 9:39

France Art

art: see

France

— France

— Biography

Bonheur, Rosa

Rosa Bonheur Breads Her Nee-

dle by Roberts. 6:95-102

The Composer Who

Debussy, Claude Achille

Broke the Rules. 11:1SS-190 Lafayette. Marquis de The Boy Lafayette and the Wolf by Baldwin. 6:4(1-43 France Folk Tales



1:88

Cinderella, retold by Gibson, 3:177-185

Mare, 2:23

Popcorn Man. The, by Smith, 2:29 Queen of Hearts, The, from Mother Goose, 1:44 Saturday Shopping by Edelman, 1:74 Simple Simon, from Mother Goose, 1:57

—Preservation. 9:233-234 — Songs Aiken Drum. 11:56-57 Food — Food Food

Woman

Old

Clever

Pease Porridge Hot, from Mother Goose, 1:19

Chamoud.

—Songs

France

FaisDoDo,

Lune, 11:87

11:34

Frere Jacques, 11:52 Friendly Beasts, The, 11:120 Marionettes, Lis. 11:88

Twinbje, Tmnkje, France Stories



Feast of Eat-Everything, The, by Marshall, 6:145-

Carcassonne, The, by

of

3:122-124

Alt Clair de la

/'elites

Stories

Nanette

Visits the

Little Star, 11:4'.

Chateau by Brann. 5:2u2-2l0

"Francesco Sassetti and His Son" bv Ghirlandajo,

152

Hare's Birthday Party by Kozisek, 4:15-20

10:26d Frank, Lawrence K. and Mary H.

Indians for Thanksgiving bv Heiderstadt,

5:47-56

Lad Who Went told



color plate, 7:44a

Cupboard, The, by De la Mare, 1:70 Curly-Locks, from Mother Goose, 1:30 Ice-Cream Man, The, by Field, 1:110 //, from Mother Goose, 1:35 Jack Sprat, from Mother Goose. 1:28 Little Jack Horner, from Mother Goose, 1:29 Little Tommy Tucker, from Mother Goose,

Mary by De la Mare. 2:22 Milling Time by Roberts,

219

Foxes

to the

North Wind. The.

re-

by Dasent, 3:~_

Parents Are Important, 12:1(1-17 Frank, Mary H.

Stepparents and Stepchildren, 12:2

Pancake, The. retold by Dasent, 3:30-34

Franklin, Adele

Persephone by Cooke. 6:229-233 Town Mouse and the Country Mouse. The. by

Franklin, Benjamin, 6:24-2^

Aesop. 3:22S-229 Wappie's Surprise Cake by Bunn. 4:7^

Freddie the Great by Weir. 4:53 Freezing, 9:1 19

For Dinner

I

s

l

Like, game. 8:37

Forestry, 7:243-244; see also Trees;

Freight

Wood

For Fathers Only by Olmsted. 13:20 game. 8:23 For flowers that bloom about our teet. 2:74 For the Beauty of the Earth, song. 11:153 Fortune-Telling Games, 8:98-100 Foster, Robert G. // Three Generations Lite Together, 12:57-M Foster, Stephen Forfeits,

Oh

Susanna.

"Four Horses.** Fourth of July

1 .1



Persian drawing. 10:56

Star-Spangled Banner Girl by Bailey. 5:32-39

Foxes, 7:40-41



French

Pictures, 9:2'^

Trains— Pictures,

9:2(16.



265,

America Stories Victor and the Pirate by Radford. 5:12'M35 in

Frere Jacques, song. 11:52

Fresh Air, 13:251-252

Fresh-Water Animals, 7:16(1 [61 Friday came and the circus was there Friend, Esther, illustrations. 1:38, 39, 133:

93,

mi. 81,83, 111, 116, 117, 120 Friendly Beasts, The, song, 11:129

Friend of Greece by Hlackstock. Friendship: see also Gangs

among 3:2 ^4

''2.

.is

132,

11:29. 40. 41. 47. 49. 59, 62. 70. 71. 75,

5:l

(

Friends Are Important by She\ iako\

Stories

Fox and Geese, game, 8:27. 71 Fox and the Storlfj The, by Aesop,

Through Death, 12:297-214

Losses

Freight

Forest Fires, 7:242-244

^'

neighbors, 15:123-126

result of

camp

life,

desirable. 14:19-21

14:2"

'l

.

14:18

Childcrai

220

Furnaces, 9:25^

5-year-olds. 13:169-170, 171-173

Handicapped Child and Your Child, The, by 12:253-257

Eells,

I



Furnaces

Pictures, 9:251. 257, 258

Furniture

lasting school friends, 14:128-129

bookshelves, 8:177-178

of gifted children, 12:250-251

for baby, 13:39

of handicapped, 12:260-261

playhouse, 8:182-183

of nursery child, 13:133-134

small chair. 8:180-181; small table, 8:180

and promotion, 14:23-25 Sometimes Friends by Neis-

parents' interference

Sometimes

Rivals,



Cub and

1:95

Stories

the Crocodile, The, by Bacon. 4:25-29

Juan, the Yaqui. by Harrington. 5:86-93

Beech Tree, The, 2:46 The, 1:168 Fairy Went A-Ma>\cting, A, 1:174-175 Little Tune, The, 2:33 Mary Middling, 1:65 Sometimes, 2:32

Lion and the Mouse, The, by Aesop, 3:235 Pogo Goes to Sea by Xorling, 4:201-208

Fairies,

and ]a\e by Benton, 6:167-169

T.P.



Pictures

color plate, 7:204c

Frog, The,

poem by

Belloc, 1:97

He Would A-Woomg

Frog,

Go, A, song, 11:82

Frogs, 7:113-119

— 9:18 frog and toad 7:114 Frogs —Poems Twenty Froggies by Cooper, Frogs— Songs Frogs

Gag,

1

Frog

Frolic,

He Would A-Wooing

poem by A.

Wanda

Gone

Is Gone, 3:154-161 Hansel and Gretel, translated from Talcs from

Pictures,

orchestra.

A

Fyleman, Rose Balloon Man, The, 1:111

Fire Engines by Clymer. 4:216-221

Fringed Gentians

Gn mm, :

1

Game

59

Games: Go, 11:82-83

3:186-198

game, 8:67

of States, The,

see also Parties

year)

;

5-year-olds. 13:159

Frost, Bruno, illustrations, 1:82, 83, 100-103, 160,

for a rainy day, 8:36-40

192-195; 2:46, 47

for

ple

or fruits, as

Ap-

—Pictures

Fuel: see Coal: Petroleum

Fulton, Robert, 6:54-59

Fun: see Games: Play Fun, poem by Jackson, 2:82



Fun Poems Fun and Fancy, 1:153-200 Humorous Poems, 2:81-108



Stories

Zcbcdce, Fisherman, by Dalgliesh, 5:140-145 Funerals

should children go?, 12:214

Funny Animals, poem by New ell, 1:160 Funny Old Man and His Wife, The, poem by Thompson. 1:162 Fun with Sound and Rhythm. 11:1-26

for Indoors

and Outdoors by Horowitz.

8:1-34

party or group games, 8:20-24

Quiet

bananas, lemons, oranges, pineapples, 9:231, 235

Fundy, Bay of

one player, 8:40-42

Games

Pasture, The, 2:56

Fruits

of the

for a shut-in, 8:42-47

Frost, Robert

names of fruit trees Trees, Orange Trees

month

card and table games, 8:14-20

E. (Russell), 2:45

Fruits: see

(for every

Sportsmanship

Frost, 9:105

161,

by Dickie and

Fuzzy Wuzzy, Creepy Crawly, poem by Schulz.

undesirable, 14:21-23; 15:111-112

Friendship

of the,

Palk, 6:153-158

12:131-140

ser.

Fur Seals, 7:158-159 Fur Traders, The King

Games

for

Sixes

and Sevens. 14:112-113

Quiet Play by Murphy, 8:35-47 races, 8:29

running games, 8:24-29 sidewalk, porch, and backyard games, 8:3-9 singing games. 8:29-34: see also Nursery Rhymes: Nursery Songs with homemade equipment. 8:9-14 Games Indians of North America hoop and stick. 10:S6

— Games — ball

Pictures

team helps make good

"Children's

citizens. 15:111

Games" by Brueghel.

10:5Sj

place for noisy play, 15:122

Playing a Touch

Came.

10:71

playing together. 15:12^

"Snap the Whip" by Homer, 10:5Sj-5Sk

— ————

1

Index Gaines for Indoors and Outdoors by Horowitz, 8:1 Games for Travel by Pease, 8:66

Gangs Friends Are Important by Sheviakov, 14:18-25

"Us Kids" by

Stolz, 14:10-17

Garbage, 9:286 Gardens: see also Flowers; Plants; Seeds;

Soils;

earthworms

in soil,

7:166

kinds of flowers, 7:219-224 planning and planting, flower, 7:210, 219-220

sponge garden, 8:46 vegetable, 7:210-213

—Pictures

Geography: see Maps; Peoples of Other Lands Geology: see Earth George Washington Carver by Ross, 6:103 Georgy Porgy, from Mother Goose, 1:27 Geraniums Pictures



in the United States Bluebonnets for Lucinda by Sayers, 5:78-85

Germany

Watering Can" by Renoir,

"Girl with a

art: see

Germany

10:frontispiece

—Poems

—Germany

Art

—Biography

The Boy Who Couldn't Be Discouraged, 11:162-163 Beethoven, Ludwig van The Boy Who Heard Bach, Johann Sebastian

Fires by Stevenson, 1:138

Butterbean Tent, The, by Roberts, 1:81

the Trees Sing, 11:170-171

The, by Fyleman, 1:168

Brahms, Johannes

Mistress Mary, from Mother Goose, 1:24

Organ Grinders' Garden, The, by Meigs, 2:104-

sic,

The Modest Genius

Homes by Sandburg,



Humperdinck, Engelbcrt

Stories

Garden Spiders, 7:144-146 Garden Tools



era.

in

the

The Fairy Tale Op

1L1S4-1S5



Germany Folk Tales Bremen Town Musicians, The, by Grimm and Grimm, 3:43-47 Grimm, 3:93-101 Gone Is Gone, retold by Gag.

rake, 9:199

spade, 9:206 illustrations, 9:10, 49, 82, 83,

102,

118, 153, 163, 186, 187, 188, 234, 239, 240, 241.

Grimm and

3:154-161

Hansel and Gretcl, translated by (">.ig from Tales from Grimm, 3:1S6-198 Rapunzel by Grimm and Grimm. 3:144-151 Shoemaker and the Elves, The, by Grimm and

Grimm,

283

3:48-50

Sleeping Beauty by

Garter Snakes, 7:180

Grimm and Grimm,

3:172-

176

Gas, 9:127

Gasoline

Where Does Gattamelata

the Gasoline

Come From?,

9:262

Monument

"Statue of a Brave Soldier, A," by Donatello,

10:52

Gauguin, Paul "Tahitian Mountains," 10:122b



Pictures, 9:38

Geese, 7:91

Canada

The Music

Fisherman and His Wife, The, by

sprinklers, 9:21

Garden Tools Pictures lawnmowers, 9:205

Gazelles

Mu

Chapel, 11:164-165

1:99

Tale of Peter Rabbit, The, by Potter, 3:37-42 Garden Scamp, game, 8:28

Garland, Lois,

of

11:178-179

Handel, George Frederick

105

Small Gardens

Aesop, 3:240 General Store, poem by Field, 1:84 Generators Pictures, 9:215

Germans

Pictures

flowers, 7:223; color plates. 7:220a-220d

Fairies,

Bluebonnets for Lucinda by Sayers, 5:78-85 Goose That Laid the Go/den Egg, The, by

color plate, 7:220c

vegetables easy to grow, 7:217-219

Autumn

geese, color plate, 7:108g

Stories

color plate, 7:204c

growing things indoors, 8:45-46

Gardens

Pictures, 7:90

Canada

Gentians, Fringed

garter snakes useful in, 7:180



— Geese —

Geese



Weeds crystal garden, 8:46

Gardens

221

geese. 7:108

Snow-White and Rose-Red by Grimm and Grimm, 3:162-171 Wolf and the Seven Little Kids, The, by Grimm and Grimm, 3:23-27 Pied Piper of Hamelin, The, by Browning, 2:126-135



Germany Songs More We Sing Together, The,

My

Pony, 11:61

Christmas Tree, 11:121

11:45

Childcraft

222 Baby .Rest, 11:39

Rest,

"Gobble gobble gobble gobble," 11:114

God

Spring's Arrival, 11:134

Germs, 9:62-63 Gershwin, George The Music That Stopped a Ball Game, 11:192 Gesell, Arnold Guiding Him Tactfully, 13:90-96 Geysers





173,

by Craik, 3:52-61

199, 200,

107, 165, 171, 188, 199, 279. 290, 291: 14:8, 21,

Goff, Harper, illustrations, 6:50, 52-54, 56-58

"Room

at Aries," 10:26b

"Starry Night," 10:42b

"Goin' Fishin'

Going

Cinderella, 3:177-185

"

by Dove, 10:75 game, 8:23-24

to Jerusalem,

Gold, 9:129

Gifted Children

may need boarding

14:265-266

school,

Gifted Children by Zorbaugh, 12:247 Gifts, 8:210-224; see also

Toys

Golden Eagles, 7:106 Golden Gate Bridge Pictures, 10:105 Golden Goose, The, play outline, 8:141-143



Gila Monsters (lizards), 7:184

Goldenrod, 7:196-197

Gilbert, Paul T.

Goldenrod

Animals of Zoo and Circus, Gilt Bronze Pin, A, 10:38

7:1-31

— Goldfinches—

Pictures

color plate, 7:204c

Pictures

color plate, 7:108b

Giraffes, 7:25-26

Pictures, 9:61

Goldfish, 7:70

Goldfish

color plate, 7:28b

"Girl with a

197,

Gogh, Vincent van

Pictures

Gibson, Katharine



183,

30, 75, 117, 126, 151

Beanstalk^, retold

color plate, 7:28c

Giraffes

174,

37, 67, 151, 166, 177, 184, 274; 15:3, 5, 14, 27,

Stories



172,

275, 280; 11:78, 94, 96, 97, 143; 13:61, 88, 96,

Gibbons, 7:22

Gibbons

Fathers, song, 11:147

218, 219, 222, 227, 250, 251, 252, 253, 266, 274,

II

and the

Our

92, 93, 97,

Ghost of the Lagoon by Sperry, 5:232 ]ac\

of

Goessl, Marvin, illustrations, 9:82, 84, 85, 86, 87,

"Francesco Sassetti and His Son," 10:26d

Giants

House, The, 1:172

Little

God

Pictures, 9:117

Ghirlandajo,

Love, 1:146

Is

Godley, Elizabeth

Watering Can" by Renoir,



Pictures

color plate, 7:60d

Goldilocks and the Three Bears, 3:15

10:frontispiece

"Give Us This Day" by Hartley, 10:122h

Goldsmith, Cornelia

Glaciers, 9:119

Other Children Become More Important, 13:130-134 Gone Is Gone, retold by Gag, 3:154 Goose: see Geese Goose That Laid the Golden Egg, The, by Aesop,

Glaciers



Pictures, 9:74

Glackens, William

"Dream Gladioli



J.

Ride," 10:43 Pictures

3:240

color plate, 7:220a Glass, 9:245, 252, 253

Gophers, another name for

handwork, 8:215 made from sand, 9:123 Glasser, Melvin A. Building the Strong Family by Lindeman and

Gorillas, 7:22

Glasser, 12:289-296

Glass Snakes, 7:185

Glassware



Pictures, 9:253

Globes—Pictures, 9:287

—Pictures 7:76d Goats— Goats

color plate,

Stories

Three

Billy

Goats Gruff, The, retold by Thorne-

Thomsen, 3:35-36 Wolf and the Seven Little Kids, The, by Grimm and Grimm, 3:23-27

Go Go

tortoises.

7:1/8-179

to sleep, Colas, little Brother, 11:34 to sleep,

Grace

(at

my

little

one, 11:35

meals)

Prayers for Every Day. 1:146-147 Pictures, 12:295 (at meals)



Grace

"Blessing. The," by Chardin. 10:26a

Grace,

Katherine,

illustrations,

11:73,

109,

135,

145. 193

Grades: see Report Cards

Graham, Richard, 117,

124,

155,

illustrations. 9:32, 33,

185,

11:12. 13

Grahame, Kenneth

Duck/

Ditty. 1:157

201,

204,

206.

101.

26S,

116,

269;

Index Grain—Pictures, Grand Canyon

9:229. 232 of the

Colorado River



Pictures,

--3 Snow-White and Rose-Red, 3:162-171 Wolf and the Seven Little Kids, The,

Grindstones

9:71

Grandpa Dropped His

Glasses,

poem by

Jackson,

2:94

Grandparents // Three Generations Lire Together by Foster, 12:57-64

Grandparents and Other Relatives by Grossman, 12:49-56



Grizzly Bears, 7:6

Grossman, Jean Schick Grandparents and Other Ground-Hog Day, 7:171-172

Relatives, 12:49-56



Groundhogs Pictures, 9:4s Group Acceptance: see also Gangs at nursery school, 13:234

Grasshoppers,

7:

1

37- 1 39

4-

— 7:124a Grasshoppers— Poems

5-year-olds, 13:134 to children of

belonging in a

color plate,

in kindergarten, 13:145-147

Explanation of the Grasshopper, An, by Lind-

of the handicapped. 14:142-143

say.

not always the best reason. 13:207

related to school activities, 14:135, 138

1:97



Stories

Lion and the Mouse, The, by Aesop, 3:235 Great Horned

Owb

Men and Famous ume 6

15:93-96



else does,"

15:21; illustration, 15:23

color plate, 7:lH s g

Great

Deeds, Childcraft, vol-

Group Discussions: Grouping

see Discussion

Groups

of children in classes at school, 14:159-160

Great, wide, beautiful, wonderful World, 1:68

Group

He

Greco, El

Play, 13:100-102; 239-241

Gets Along Better tilth His Playmates by

Heinig, 13:169-174

Martin and the Beggar," 10:58b

of nursery-school-age child. 13:132-133

Greece myths: see Myths

Greece

when moving to new community, Group Acceptance Pictures, 12:4 movie-going 'because everybody

Gravity, 9:82-84

"St.

com

munity, 15:4-5

Pictures, 9:7. 23, 29

Grasshoppers

and

importance

katydids, 7:139

Gratitude

3:23-2;

Pictures, 9:192



—Greece and Rome

Other

Friend of Greece by Blackstock, 5:191-201 Greediness



Become More Important by Offer by

Horw ich,

Groups

for Children, Organized, by Osborn,

14:241-246

Growing Flowers and Vegetables by McKcnny,

3:93-101

Goose That Laid the Golden Egg, The, by Aesop, 3:240

Midas and the Golden Touch,

What Nursery Groups 13:231-236

Stories

Dog and the Bone, The, by Aesop, 3:236 Fisherman and His Wife, The, by Grimm and Grimm.

Children

Goldsmith, 13:130-134

Stories

retold by Pyle,

7:210

Growing Growth

in the Vale,

poem by

Rossetti. 2:40

Information on the phases of a child's growth

6:22

mav

be found

throughout Childcraft

vol-

Greek Vase. 9:2^5 Greenaway, Kate Pipe Thee High, and Pipe Thee Low, 1:77 Grenjelt, Wilfred by McNcer, 6:178-186

umes 12, 13, 14, 15 Growth in Size, Strength, and Co-ordination by

Grief

Gruber, Franz

Losses

Through Death by Franklin, 12:20,-214

Silent Night, 11:126

Grubs

Grieg, Edvard

From the Land of the Midnight Sun, 11:1 Grimm, Jakob and Wilhelm Bremen Town Musicians, The, 3:43-47 Fisherman and His Wife, The, 3:93-101 Hansel and Gretel, translated by Gag, 3:! Rapunzel, 3:144-151

Shoemaker and

Stolz. 14:63

the Flies, The, 3:4^-50

Sleeping Beauty, 3:172-176

-

ant. 7:128. 130 beetle, 7:136, 137 firefly.

7:140

honeybee. 7:126 -

Grubs



Pictures, 9:19

Gruenberg, Sidonie Matsner, and Krech, Hilda Sidney

Our Changing World.

15:3-9

^

Childcraft

224 Guidance: see also Etiquette

Children

every child needs, 15:172

Family Guidance Services by Sutherland, 15:162-166

Guiding

Him

Who

Are Epileptic bv Tennv, 12:278-

Who

Are Hard

Who

Are Mentally Retarded by Mar-

280 Children

of

Hearing by

Brill,

12:270

Children

Tactfully by Gesell, 13:90

tens, 12:281-283

Guilt feeling of, 12:208-209, 242-243

may

feeling of,

Who Have

Children

cause child to ask no questions,

With Rheumatic Fever bv

Children

14:32

Guinea Pigs, 7:73 Guiterman, Arthur

Cerebral Palsy by Shriner,

12:275-277 Josselyr:.

12:284-286 library service to, 14:235

Chums, 1:87 Pet Show, 2:24

Handicapped



Stories

Warm

Chief at

Springs, The, by Weil, 6: 140-' 44

Handicapped Child and Your Child,

Gulls, 7:110

Gulls—Pictures,

7:111

Eells,

Handicapped Child

Guppies, 7:70-71

The,

by

12:253 in

The,

School,

by

Cain,

14:139

Handicapped Child in the Family, The, by Stern and Castendyck, 12:258

H Habits

Handicraft: see also Boxes; Musical Instruments;

not to worry about, 13:80-81

Haddock—Pictures,

Hader, Berta and Elmer,

Hail— Pictures,

Parties, also types, as

Adventures

9:60, 230 illustrations, 2:192-195

9:104

and

How How How

Parkhill

and

leather ornaments, 8:215-219

Make a Five-Pointed Star, 9:146 Make a Paper Airplane, 9:184 to Make a Water Wheel, 9:212 Making a Wheel Toy from a Spool, 9:190

Halcyon (kingfisher), 7:110 Hale, Sarah Josepha

Mary's Lamb, 1:55 Halfway Down, poem, by Milne, 1:144

to

to

making

birdhouses, birdbaths,

and feeding

sta-

tions, 8:224-229

Halibut, 7:155

Halloween, party

making games,

for, 8:97-100



shellcraft, 8:219-223

Halloween Poems Blac\ and Gold by Turner, 1:141

Theme in Yellow by Sandburg, What Am I? by Aldis, 1:140

8:1-2

play for a shut-in, 8:42-47

Halloween, song, 11:111



Paper Work, Sewing

Handwor\ by

Spaeth, 8:210-230 felt

Hair-twisting, 14:45-46

Halloween

in

suggestions, 7:31, 56, 74, 92, 112, 121, 162, 173, 188, 225

2:66

with with

raffia,

tin

yarn, sequins, 8:223-224

and

glass, 8:214-215

Stories

Handling Genitals

]ac\-o -Lantern by Colby, 5:40-46

baby, 13:59

Hamelin Town's

Brunswick, 2:126

in

Hamilton, A. E. Boarding Schools, 14:264-269 Hamlin, Paul, illustrations, 6:145-149,

Handwriting: see Penmanship

151-155,

157-159

Hammers—Pictures,

9:187, 199, 204

Handball, game

how

to

left-

play, 8:55-56

and

right-, 13:28-29

Handel, George Frederick

The Music

in the Chapel, 11:164-165

Handforth, Thomas,

illustrations, 2:116-121; 4:90-

95, 97-103

Handicapped: Children

see also Blind

Who

objective of parents for children. 15:169

Are Crippled by Shover, 12:27



Poems Happy Thought by

Happiness

make and

Handedness,

Hansel and Gretel translated by Gag from Tales from Grimm, 3:186 Hanuhjiah Song, The, song, 11:114 Happiness

Stevenson, 1:63

Miller of the Dee, The, by Mackay, 2:140-141 Happy Thought, poem by Stevenson, 1:63

Harding, Lowry

W.

Experiences with Numbers. 14:190-105

Hare and Hounds, game. 8:26 Hare and the Tortoise. The, by Aesop, 3:239 Harebells, 7:203; color plate. 7:204d

\

I\

Hay

Hares, 7:36

Han's Birthday Party by Kozisek, 4:15 11:128 Isis

L.

Juan, the Yaqui, 5:S6-93

Harrison,

Haydn, Joseph The Father oj the Symphony, 11:166-167 Hayes, Nancy M. Shiny Little House, The. 2:16

poem by Head Banging, 13:33 Hayloft, The,

13:107

Bill, illustrations,

Hartley, Marsden

"Give Us This Day." 10: 22h Influence

Personality,

15:107-

112

Harvester Ants, 7:132

Harvesting

cal Care; Mental Health; Posture: Rest: Sleep Doctor and the Dentist Your Child's Friends. The, by Richmond. 13:254-260 helping to keep us well, 9:2^6 Keeping Your Young Child Healthy by Pro-



vence, 13:247-253

hay, color plate. 7:76a

Harvesting



may

Stories

Harvesting Scene, A, from

The Tomb

Your

13:261-266

always comes on market days, 1:111

Hearing, 13:27-2^

Who

Hearing, Children

14:255-263

Are Hard

oj.

bv

Brill,

12:270

Hearing Aids

chick, 9:12

for children, 12:271-272

9:13

—Pictures turban, 9:55 Hats—Poems

Hearts, game, 8:19

Hats

He 1:

I'M 105

Hauge, Carl, illustrations, 4:151-153, 156, Hauge, Mary, illustrations, 1:80, 81: 2:80,

81; 3:7,

135,

13:149

67, 69, 90, 93,

112,

118,

129,

131:

:

11:36, 38,

names of

He He

12:18, 20,

Hausman, Leon Augustus Our Friends of the Bud World. 7:93-1 12 Have you ever heard of the Sugar-Plum Tree 1:182

red-tailed, color plate, 7:108g

—Pictures

color plate, 7:70 all,

3:240

the

Nature Study

making puppets and of father

abilities,

14:136-137

marionettes, 8:231-240

and son together, 12:127-128

Hoben, Alice M. Puppets and Marionettes, 8:231-240 Ho, for taxis green or blue. 1:101 Ho, for the Pirate Don Durk of Dowdee!, 2:138 Hogner, Dorothy Childs Animals That Work for Man. 7:75-92 Hogs: see Pigs Holidays: see also names of holidays, as Clirisunas

Hewitt, Ruth E. 14:231-235

craft;

important in developing

sewing, 8:241-261

Herzog, George

Learns

Hobbies, 8:109-113; see also Collecting; Handi-

selecting a hobby. 8:129

Herring Gulls: see Gulls

Maying

Hickory Trees, 7:238 Hidden Words, game, 8:41 Hide and Seek, game, 8:25 Hide the Thimble, game, 8:22-23

Hilliard, Pauline



Herding Stories: see Shepherds Stories Here All We See, poem by De la Mare, 1:66 Here Come Three Dukjes A-Riding, song, 11:103 Here Goes Up for Monday, game, 8:56 Here We Go!, game, how to make, 8:190-191 Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush, from Mother Goose, 1:54 Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush, game,

Still

1:21

Hickory, Dickpry, Dock, song, 11:56

Hill, Sister Veronica, C.S.J.,

7:175

woodchucks. 7:171 Hickjety, Picl(ety, from Mother Goose, 1:21 Hickory, Dickson, Doct{, from Mother Goose,

Hill,

loveth well, by Coleridge,

Herbert the Helicopter by

He

1

Most

of

Your

Public

Library.

Family Celebrations by Wright, 12:167-174 neighborhood celebrations. 15:131





:

1

Index pageants and

227

Home

festivals, 8:1 45-1 4^

parties for, 8:83-104

Holidays



Stories, 5:7-76

Holland, Janice,

H. C, 86, 87,

84,

illustrations, 1:30, 31, 48, 49, 134,

119,

123

122,



Pictures

color plate, 7:220d

Holy God, We Praise Thy Name, song, 11:152 Home and School Are a Team by Lane, 15:153

Home Home

Library, Building

a,

by Duff, 12:1^5-204

Parent; Peoples of Other Lands

Up Fun

by Rombauer

and Torno,

8:193-209

Machines

Maying

in the

Home.

9:177

Home

the

Most of Your

for

Fun by Anderson,

Star-Spangled Banner Girl by Bailey, 5:32-39 Story of fane Addams, The, by Wagoner, 6:12^134

Teddy by

Ickis, 8:4 s

Roosevelt, the

Boy

Naturalist, by Weir.

6:124-127

and fake by Benton. 6:167-169 Tramp, The, by Locklin, 5:25-31 Victor and the Pirate by Radford, 5:129-135

T.P.

Life

—Poems:

—Poems;

Poems; Houses

8:241-261

—Poems: Bed —Poems; Food Morning— Poems

see also Babies

Clothing

time

—Poems;

After a Bath by Fisher, 1:72 Alice's

Supper by Richards, 2:58-59

Camel's Clocks,

Hump,

The, Author Unknown, 1:64

Down

the Rain Falls by Coatsworth, 1:123

Drums

of the Rain by

Da vies,

1:123

Land Little

Christmas by Field. 2:147-149

of Counterpane, The, by Stevenson, 1:178 Girl Next Door, The, by Wing. 1:117

in

We

How

House

a

changing

in.

9:244-252

Is Built.

9:256-258

policies today, 14:160-161

admitting ignorance or mistakes. 12:125

1

Mother

due to adult conversations, 13:201-202 do not respect other's property,

2-4-vear-olds

13:2n5

Goose. 1:31

The, by Aldis, 1:80 Prayers for Every Day, 1:146-147

Picnic,

Rebecca by Belloc, 2:97

There Was a Little Girl by Longfellow, 1:164 Three Guests by North. Time to Rise by Stevenson, 1:68 1

the Little Girl

Live

Homework

lack often

the Shoe, The, from

10:5sj-5vk

Pictures, 9:56, 65

Houses

in

Tietjens, 2:17 Scott,



5-year-olds, 13:148

Mother's Song, A, by Rossetti, 1:67

Woman

Homer, Winslow "Snap the Whip,"

Honesty, 14:52-56, 59-60; see also Imagination

Mist and All, The, by Willson, 1:139

Moring by My Bed by

Home on the Range, A, poem, 2:198 Home on the Range, song, 11:92

Homes

Halfway Down by Milne, 1:144 Hiding by Aldis, 1:" Jest 'Fore

Will Rogers by Garst, 6:196-206

Wolf and the Seven Little Kids, The, by Grimm and Grimm, 3:23-27 Zebedee, Fisherman, by Dalgliesh, 5:140-145

The, by Kipling, 2:88-89

Doorbells by Field, 1:108

To

and the Three Bears, 3:15-18 Gone, retold by Gag, 3:154-161 fack^-o'-Lantern by Colby, 5:40-46 Journey to America by Judson, 5:174-1^0 Louisa Alcott's Childhood by Alcott, 6:75-79 Meals for Mickey by Dalgliesh. 4:122-130 Miserable Merry Christmas, A, by Steffens, 4:60Is

Sugar Snow, The, by Wilder, 5:122-128

65

Sewing

Old

—Stories

67 Life: see also Appliances, Families; Family:

Cooking

Home

Relations

76

Gone

Holly, 7:239

Hollyhocks

Brother-Sister

Father-Daughter Relations

Goldilocks

12"

126,

Stories: see also Brother-Brother Re-

Bidushka Lays an Easter Egg by Jones, 4:37-41 Christmas in the Piney Woods by Simon. 5

illustrations, 6:40-43, 69-71, 73, 85,

124,



—Stories;

Stories;

135, 138, 139, 200; 6:1, IIS,

Holling,

Life

lations

Who

Wriggles by Richards.

2:96

Vespers by Milne. 1:145

What Does the Bee Do? by Rossetti. 1:65 When Young Melissa Sweeps by Turner, 2:15



Honesty Stories Eggs for Sale by Campbell, 5:21^-22=5 Music of the Scythes, The, by Zobarskas. 218

Honey, 7:125-126, 127

Honey

Ants, 7:132

Honeybees, 7:122-127

Honeysuckle



Pictures

color plate. 7:220d

Hooch. Pieter de "Bedroom. The," 10:26c

5:21

Childcraft

228 Hoopes, Harold Dexter,

illustrations,

4:172-177,

208, 210, 211, 213, 215, 226. 227. 229. 231, 232,

234

77,

124,

Horwich, Frances R. What Nursery Groups Offer, 13:231-236 Hospitals

125. 150, 151

poem by

Hoppity.

have ambulance

Milne. 2:43

Hopscotch, game, 8:4-5

Art of Spelling, The, 14:177-183

Hospital by Mercer,

nurseries. 13:15



Horowitz, Caroline Games for Indoors and Outdoors, 8:1-34 "Horse and Zebra on a Beach" by Chirico, 10:58a Horse Chestnut, or Buckeye, Trees, 7:240 Horses kinds and history, 7:75-80 7:79:

Pictures,

9:3.

41:

10:50: see also

—Pictures; Ponies—Pictures

"Burning of the Sanjo Palace (Detail), The," by a Japanese

rooming-in, 13:15-19

Hosts and Hostesses, 8:76-77

Hot Cross Buns, poem, Old English, Hot Lands Pictures, 9:72, 73



1:64

Houseflies. 7:141-142

Household Budget: see Money "House of Cards, The," by Chardin, 10:58g House of the Mouse, The, poem by Mitchell, 1:94 Houses, 9:244-249, 251, 256-258

care of, 7:76-77

Colts

to the

13:267-272

Hornbooks Pictures, 9:276 Horned Lizards, 7:184 Horned Lizards, or Toads, Pictures, 7:183: 9:60



service, 9:286

Your Child Goes

//

Horn, Ernest

Horses

Mil-

2:34

lay,

Hoosier Barbecue by Wilson, 5:113 Hopkins, Hildegard, illustrations. 2:76.



Poems Wonder Where This Horseshoe Went bv

Horseshoes

artist,

— —Poems

Houses Houses

Pictures, 9:56, 65, 244, 245

Do You Know. ... by Wegert, 1:75 House That Jac1{ Built, The, from

10:53

Mother

Goose, 1:60-62

color plate, 7:76a

Johnny Fife and Johnny's Wife by Meigs. 2:95

"Count of Galves, The," by Pablo de Jesus and San Geronimo, 10:54 Cover of an Indian Shield, The, by a Sioux In-

Shiny

dian, 10:56-57

"Four Horses," a Persian drawing, 10:56 "Horse and Zebra on a Beach" by Chirico.

Song Houses

known, 10:55 "Me on a Horse" by Doris, 10:57 "Merry-Go-Round Horse, A," by Louff, 10:58 "Page from a Sketch Book, A," by Toulouse-

2 A6 Hovey, Richard Sea Gypsy, The, 2:39

— —



De

How Do Children Grow? by Langmuir, How Doth the Little Crocodile, poem bv do you like Howie, Hillis L.

12:74 Carroll,

to

go up

in

.a

swing, 1:132

Discipline, 14:147-154

Brave Soldier. A." by Donatcllo,

Stories

Miserable Merr) Chnstnu/s.

I.

by StefTens. 4:60-

67

Pulling Bee, The. by Henry, 4:131 137

Horseshoe Crabs, 7:1^4

Howlett, Carolyn

Drawing and

How Many How

Creeft, 10:81

10:52



m

Howlers, 7:20-21

Poems: see also Ponies Poems Milkman's Horse, The, Author Unknown, 1:89 Horses Sculpture, 9:255

Horses

E.

Loveliest of Trees,

2:89

10:58b

"Statue of a

Stories

How

George and the Dragon" by Crivelli, 10:58c Martin and the Beggar" by El Greco,

"Picador" by



Housman, A.

Lautrec, 10:55

pony, color plate, 7:60c

Horses

House, The, by Hayes, 2:16 House by Morley. 2:14

1:60

on a Wooden Horse" by Monet, 10:58d "Man Riding a Long-Necked Horse," Un-

"St.

Little

for a Little

Three Little Pigs, The, retold by Jacobs, 3:19-22 House That Jac\ Built, The, from Mother Goose,

10:58a "Jean

"St.

House, The, by Godley. 1:172

Little

S.,

and Smith,

Isabel

Painting. 8:149-162

Miles?, game. 8:67

many

valentines,

pretty

red

valentines,

11:133

How Science and Industry Help Us. 9:225 How the Camel Got His Hump by Kipling. 4:147 How We Live Together by Michaelis and Shaftel, 14:202

H'Suan Tsung "Kittens." 10:30

!\ DEX

Hudson,

W. H.

229

Spoonbill and the Cloud, The, 4:82-89

153

Hughes, Toni "Children on the Beach," 10:125 Hull-House, Chicago Story of lane Addams, The, by Wagoner, 6:128-

Humperdinck, Engelbert The Fan) Tale Opera, 11:184-185 HumptyJ Dumpty Bean Game how to make. 8:185-186

Humpty Dumpty

134

Human

Relations:

see

Family

also

Group Acceptance; Neighbors; names of national groups in the United States, as Germans in the United States Children Learn About Other People by RobertFriendship;

son, 15:113-120

contributions of other nationalities, 14:237-238

customs learned through

visiting,

14:253-254

Hundreds Hungary

Together

Live

by

171; 5:136.

138,

139,

[91,

194.

43, 105,

198, 199, 201



Pictures, 9:96

Husband and Wife: Hush,

Little

Marriage

see

Baby, song, 11:31

Hush-a-by, Baby Mine, song, 11:40

helping child meet injustice, 15:39-40

How We

Stories

Hunt, Stan, illustrations, 12:121 Huntsmen, The, poem by De la Mare. 1:77 Hurford, A. F. and M. S., illustrations, 4:42.

Hurricanes

12:253-257

from Mother

The, by Sercdy, 5:181-190 Hungry Horse Dam, Montana, 10:101

Feast of Eat-Everything, The, by Marshall, 6:145-

Eells,

wall,

Fair,

45-49. 52,

Handicapped Child and Your Child, The. by

a

of stars in the pretty sky. 2:12



explaining adult errors, 15:36-38 152

on

sat

Goose, 1:48

Relations;

also

Micbaelis

and

Shaftel, 14:202-208

Hush-a-bye, Baby, from Mother Goose. 1:16 Hush! the waxes are rolling in, 1:1 *5

Hutchinson, Veronica

part of loyal citizenship. 15:152

Little

scapegoats, 14:15-16

S.

Red Hen and

the Grain of Wheat, The,

3:8-10

schools foster, 15:118-120

understanding differences, 13:160-161; of other family practices, 15:121-126

—Poems Ring Around the World by Human Relations— Human

of All Masters, retold by Jacobs, 3:152-

Mastet

Hyacinths



Pictures, 7:223

Hymes, James L., Jr. Becoming Resource Jul 15:58-63 What Children Need from Life, 12:67-73 Hymns, 11:145-160 .

Relations

Wynne, 2:37

Immigration and Emigration Stories; Regional Stories Indians for Thanksgiving by Heiderstadt, 5:47 Stories: see also

Cradle



Hymn, Author Unknown,

1:150

56 Silver Pesos for Carlos by Baldwin, 5:164-172 I

am am

I

Am

I

Hummingbirds, 7:100-102 Hummingbirds Pictures ruby-throated hummingbird,



the sister of him. 1:66

I

Thinking of Something, game. 8:36-37 came to Alabama wid my banjo on my knee.

/

Can Be a

I

can't

color plate, 7:108f

Humor

11:76

used correctly

Humorous

is

beneficial, 12:294

Pictures

"Manypeeplia Upsidownia" by Lear. 10:45 "Men Shoveling Chairs" by a Flemish painter. 10:44

Humorous Poems,

2:81-108

The,

by

Covvper, 2:152-161

Fun and Fancy, 1:153-200 Snow Man, The, by Meigs,

I

Last of the Dragons, The, by Nesbit, 4:150-170

1:1 In

Marguerite the

Most

of

Your Home, 8:4^

'.5

climbed up on the merry-go-round. 1:^2 come from haunts of coot and hern. 2:64

I'd

Lihe to Be a Lighthouse, poem by Field.

I'd

like to

2:73

Stories

by Anderson. 1:76

The Flight of. 6:222-225 poem by Aldis, 1:148 Ice-Cream Man, The, poem by Field.

I

Tragic Story, A, by Thackeray. 2:120

poem

Ice.

Makjng Gilpin,

Tiger,

go walking, 1:76

Icarus,

Ickis,

Antonio by Richards, 2:121 History of John

Diverting

Humorous

fevered with the sunset. 2:V>

1:107

have

was dreamed If, from Mother 1

I

a

garden. 2:46 a cave-boy.

(loose. 1:^5

2:30

Childcraft

230

the world were apple pie, 1:35 had a hundred dollars to spend, 1:85 Three Generations Live Together bv Foster,

If all If

I

//

Your Child Goes

the Hospital by Mercer,

to

13:267

I

/

/ I I I

I

a cat

a Little

Nut

me, 11:80

cat pleased

Mother Goose, 1:38

a Little Pony, from

a little

150,

Borja,

and out with

12:209,

218;

210,

13:34,

69;

15:61, 84, 95

192. 232, 233;

129,

132,

151;

133,

13:13, 31, 43,

138,

158,

209,

Chariot, 1:90, 91, 140, 141. 196, 197

Boyd, Jack, 4:234, 236, 237, 238, 239 Brevannes, Maurice, 1:148, 149; 2:58,

13:73-78

70, 71,

II

Buehrig,

59, 66, 67,

105

104,

Rosemary, 2:22,

23,

56,

57,

72,

73,

108, 109; 3:15-17, 51; 4:15-18, 20; 5:2, 3

I

like the fall. 1:139

I

like to

meet the popcorn man, 2:29

I

like to

move. There's such

I

like to shell peas,

I'll

9:144, 154

Connie,

Bowman,

like little Pussy, 1:86

When

151

252, 274, 276; 15:23, 64, 73, 99, 157

Ghirlandajo: see Ghirlandajo,

Illness: see also

150,

Botts, Davi, 11 frontispiece, title page, 89, 107,

in

cupboard, 1:70

"Me-Can-Do" The,

of

3:144-148,

A., 9:135, 136, 147, 148, 149,

152

Bill,

14:11,

Frances L.

Age

244,

202,

136,

160, 164-170

159,

Use, 2:168-173;

151,

Boggess,

Tree, song, 11:51

had a little tea-party, 1:80 have a little bed, 1:67 have a little shadow that goes me, 1:179

II I

and the

had

know

123,

45, 54, 63

Boehmer, Edward

Group by Woods, 13:237

a Play

Had Had

Ilg,

14:84.

Biers, Clarence, 4:21-24,

Bischoff,

You Want

//

Elizabeth.

261

Bilder, A. K., 9:20, 21, 24, 25, 27, 30, 36, 40,

12:57 //

Berrv,

Burton, Virginia L., 2:36, 37, 94, 95 Busoni, Rafaello, 2:152, 161

a feeling, 2:17

Cadel, John M., 6:253, 255

1:74

Caplan, Irwin, 12:37; 13:81

Health; Medical Care

Carbe, Nino, 2:34, 35, 136, 137, 186, 187, 200

Children Get Sick by Work, 14:82-90

12:190

Cavalli, Dick,

sing of a band that used to play, 11:98

Couri, Dorcas, 1:68, 69, 86, 87, 110, 111; 2:16,

Illumination of Books and Manuscripts

17

Page from an Old Book, Made by Hand, A, 10:27

Craig, Muriel, 12:67, 72, 73

Daugherty, James H., 6:44, 46, 47, 49

Picture from a

Famous Boo\, A,

Dechmann,

10:47

Mughal

Prince Riding on an Elephant from

il-

luminated manuscript, 10:34

Louis, 4:131-141,

143,

145,

146

Dillon, Corinne, 2:20, 21, 74, 75, 188, 189

Disney, Walt, 1:94, 95; 2:82, 83

Dixon, Rachel Taft, 1:58, 59, 124-127 Du Bois, William Pene, 1:50, 51, 76, 77: 2:28.

Illustrators

Algminowicz, Paula, 4:230, 231, 232. 233 Amberg, William, 9:260, 261, 262, 264 Anderson, Catherine Corlev. 8:242-245.

29,

247,

249-260

100,

101; 3:30-32, 34, 87-89, 92-94, 96-99,

101

Dunsire, Marion, 5:104, 105, 108, 109. 112

Armstrong, Samuel, 2:18, 198, 199: 6:34, 35, 38,

19.

110-115, 190, 191,

39

2:23-27, 35; 6:8, 10-12, 14, 15, 17

Augustiny, Edward, 6:113-115 Aulaire, Ingri and

Duvoisin, Roger, 1:158, 159, 164, 165, 184-189:

Edgar Parin

d',

2:2, 3,

122,

123: 6:18, 20, 21, 23

Eichenberg. Fritz, 1:60-63, 84. 85; 3:62, 63, 66, 67. 70, 71. 84, 85, 86 Esley, Joan, 1:114, 115, 166, 167

Babcock, R. Faverweather, 7:49. 114, 129, 131,

Feeney, Joyce, 9:210

133, 156, 157, 167

Ballantyne, Joyce, 5:18, 20, 21, 24, 94, 95, 97, 98, 100,

101,

103;

131.

133.

135,

6:103-105, 137,

108,

109,

Guilford

L..

7:95,

Fine, Stan, 13:28

Fleishman, Seymour, 4:201, 202, 204. 206, 207

Fleming. Stan, 6:178,

191.

214:

192

Benda,

130,

139

Bannon, Laura, 5:164. 166, 167, 169. Barnum, J. Hyde. 1:11)4. 105; 2:38, 39 Bartlett, William F.. 2:50-53. 64. 65 Beck,

128,

171.

172

188,

Fleur,

189. 190,

Anne

(Sari),

191; 2:196,

8:175-190,

T., 6:222-224. 229-231

181.

184.

185,

186,

187,

162.

163,

190,

192, 193

1:152,

153,

197

Friend. Esther, 1:38, 39, 92, 93, 132, 133; 11:29, 40, 41. 47. 49.

W.

191,

111,

116,

117,

59,

120

62.

70.

71,

75,

SO, 81, 83,

Index Frost, Bruno,

1:82,

100-103.

83,

160,

192-

161,

195; 2:46, 47

186,

187,

83,

102,

118,

153,

Kuhn, Robert,

239.

240,

241,

283

Kwiatkowski, Gordon, 9:59,

82,

234,

188,

Goessl. Marvin, 9:82, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92. 93, 97, 172, 173, 174, 183, 197, 199, 200, 218, 219, 222,

227,

250,

142,

144,

161,

162,

163,

62.

IDS.

109,

146.

99,

147-

165, 166

Garland, Lois, 9:10, 49, 163,

231 Krcsin, Robert, 6:140,

251,

252,

253.

266.

274,

275,

280;

1:52, 5

249,' 258, 259, 276,

Latham, Mary,

s

277 2".

2:26,

98,

89,

88,

149

11:78, 94, 96, 97. 143: 13:61, 88, 96. 107. 165,

Lathrop, Dorothy. 2:24, 25, 174-177

171, 188, 199, 279, 290, 291:

Lawrence, Bob, 12:

151,

166,

177,

274;

184,

14:8, 21, 37, 67,

15:3, 5,

14,

27,

30,

75, 117, 126, 151

GorT, Harper, 6:50, 52-54, 56-58

Martin, Bernard, 4:104. 105, 107 109. Ill

Grace, Katherine, 11:73, 109, 135, 145, 193

Graham, Richard. 155,

185, 201,

^,

9:32,

116,

101,

117.

11:12,

204, 206, 268, 269;

60; 13:21. 23, 115

5. 58.

1

Lawson, Robert, 2:92, 93, 106, 107 McCloskey, Robert, 2:40-43 Mackenzie. Garry, 1:46. 47. 154-157

124,

13

Mastri, Fiore. 4:75. 77. 79,

Merry weather. John.

Hader, Berta and Elmer, 2:192-195 Hamlin, Paul, 6:145-149, 151-155, 157-159

2:68, 69.

Mary. 3:177, 180,

Miller.

120; 5:1, 8, 10, 11, 14,

Hansen, Roy, 4:222, 223. 224, 225

66,

Harrison,

272, 273, 278, 287; 11:3, 4,

13:107

77-79;

75.

68,

Harvey, Laura, 3:1; 6:110, 112

157:

13:29,

132,

Hauge, Carl, 4:151-153, Hauge, Mary, 1:80, 81;

310;

14:28.

42.

156,

157

2:80. 81; 3:7, 132, 134.

135, 138-140, 142, 143; 5:78-85, 226, 227, 229-

231; 6:226, 227; 9:88, 228; 11:37, 38, 67, 69, 112,

90, 93, 168,

118.

HI;

129,

12:18, 20, 21, 67.

55,

53,

84,

104,

105,

153; 12:27, 35, 64

Tom,

3:186,

188,

Holland, lanice, 1:30, 139, 200; 6:1,

Holling, H.

C,

118,

189,

192,

194,

195,

198

31, 48, 49, 134, 135, 138,

119,

122,

73,

83,

84,

86,

Harold

Dexter,

4:172-177,

184.

186,

Hopkins, Hildegard, 2:76,

77,

124.

125,

150,

74-76,

125,

128,

9:frontispiece,

180. 305.

154,

226;

15:7,

11.

130,

29,

page; 11:6,

title

48,

172.

131,

7.

50.

72.

175;

174.

9

8,

Movers, William, 1:36, 37 Naylor. Ramon, 12:24, 26. 36

Neebe, O. William, 4:122.

123.

127,

129.

217,

220.

157,

160,

126.

130. 147-150; 5:219-223. 225; 9:14, 15

Gregory,

3:37-42,

216,

213,

221, 224. 226; 4:30-36;

5:154.

156.

163; 6:240-242. 247-249. 251

Pearson, Charles D., 15:37

Lou, 3:152, 153; 5:7.

Peters,

Petersham, Pit/.

151

Hunt. Stan, 12:121 Hurford, A. F. and M.

32,

34,

35.

38-43.

S..

4:42. 43, 45-49, 52. 194,

195,

198,

199,

201

Irwin, John D., 13:92

Elizabeth

Orton,

1:136,

137,

146.

14".

Al. 12:171;

14:43

Reamer, 13:183 Key, Ted, 12:178; 14:5 Bill.

Leo. 11:27

Price.

Harold

118,

120,

116.

1:96-99,

Priscilla.

Politi.

143;

142.

3:102.

Lee,

41

107,

109.

Norman.

6:29.

32.

13,

81

Prickett, Helen. 4:2 6. 217, 2 IS. 220. 221; 8:77. 1

79.

ss,

84,

106;

86,

B7,

11:32.

63. 225-22S. 249;

15:123

106.

103,

181

180.

117.

121. 227 240; 4:8-12. 14

89-91, 93, 95, 97, 98, 4s.

3s.

56,

101, 114, 141: 12:5, 43, 122;

Kotora. Hal. 6:196. 197. 198. 199. 200. 203. 204, 205, 206

Pointer,

103,

Keller,

Koering, Ursula, 1:40,

Miska. 2:162-167

1:34, 35, 44. 45, 56, 57.

Poe, Frances, 7:125. 145

Price,

151; 4:37-41

Jones, Lloyd, 6:24. 25, 28

Kaufman.

Maud and

Henry,

3:11-14, 43, 45-47: 6:2. 3

191,

139,

171; 5:136, 138,

King,

153. 126.

224.

121-123.

11,

46-50, 52, 53, 55-64, 66, 68-76

226

150,

10,

Moore, Phoebe Hansen, 3:28,

162.

187, 189, 190, 191, 193, 195, 197, 198, 200, 215,

Jones,

145, 108,

164-166.

158, 5,

173: 6:64.

77,

17,

113

20, 49, 90,

OrlorT,

123

6:40-43, 69-71,

87, 124, 126, 127

Hoopes,

135,

91.

185; 4:112-

184,

MordvinofT, Nicolas, 11:43

169

Henderson, Ann, 11:51. Hill,

15.

9:156,

179

[78,

181,

Handforth, Thomas, 2:116-121; 4:90-95, 97-103 Bill,

5:232. 2 35, 237,

SI);

239, 240

Rendall. Erwin is.

21. 23,

C,

27,

65,

13:16,

98,

$9,

101, 100,

^

14:65. 101. 224, 228,

7:195; 8:2.

2 32.

Roth. Salo. 14:159

57,

2

3 3.

3.

5-7.

235-239

10-12.

14.

Childcraft

232 Royt, Mary. 1:64-67. 74. Rudeen, Herbert, 4:53, 115.

118,

119,

Scott,

198,

54,

56,

5:113-

59:

5:25, 28, 29, 31

Ward. Lynd. 2:180-185;

12:222. 227

3:110,

177;

111,

162,

163,

130,

131,

Weber,

166-168,

170,

Weisgard, Leonard

171; 6:214, 215, 218, 219, 221

Seward, V.

A,

Thomas

Wilson,

118,

119

W. N.

2:48, 49 138,

2:32, 33, 90, 91,

Jr.,

159

158,

1:16-19, 22-27. 42, 43,

Spackey, Shirley, 3:19-22 J.

155,

2:12, 13, 44, 45, 62, 63, 96, 97

Smalley, Janet, 1:120-123, 128, 129

E.,'

154,

Wilkin, Eloise

201

Slobodkin, Louis, 6:245, 246

Starbuck,

29

Wiese, Kurt, 1:88. 89, 170, 171

L., 5:86, 87, 89-93

Helen Edell, 12:197,

15, 20, 21, 28,

3:8-10,

103

102,

3:122, 124

169

1:168,

2:30, 31, 86, 87

210-226, 228, 263-269. 271-272

Sloan,

Nettie,

1:2, 3,

7:97, 109, 134; 8:49, 52, 63, 64,

Siegel, Jack, 2:54, 55, 84, 85,

Sinnickson,

208, 210, 211

4:82, 83, 85-87, 89

148, 149, 152, 153

Marguerite Klinke, 1:106-109,

176,

Wagener, Paul, 6:207, Walker, Ora

199 57,

125-127

123,

122,

Ruud, Herbert, 5:146, Scott, Jane,

75.

139,

142-145

5:140,

142. 143

Stein,

Winter, Milo

Harve

1:1, 4-14, 32, 33,

4:60-62, 64-68, 71-73

2:1, 4-10,

5:174, 178, 179

6:4-7,

7:227

34,

19,

77,

50,

35,

78,

79,

53,

52,

51,

95,

81,

80,

98,

56,

99,

Winter, Milo Kendall,

65,

145,

160,

162,

165,

172,

173,

175,

180,

183,

184,

190,

191,

194,

195,

202,

203,

209,

212,

215,

216,

217,

220,

221,

225,

229,

230, 231, 232, 233, 235, 242,

243,

254,

257,

5:181-183,

Wool way. 100,

104,

106,

111,

119,

123,

130,

134.

137,

138,

139.

140,

161,

167,

168,

177,

179,

189,

205,

236,

244, 245, 247. 279, 284, 285, 286, 287

Pat.

Wu, Kong,

107.

110,

228,

229

178,

179: 2:78,

I

119

12:3,

6:170, 173, 175, 176, 177

love to see a lobster laugh, 2:82

Imaginary Companions, 13:120-121 Imagination: see also Dreams

11:34, 45, 67

dangers, 13:122

12:110, 111, 118,

187.

215, 247, 289

13:3. 74. 75, 79, 80, 82, 83. 96, 99,

226,

232,

14:1, 59, 75, 80, 33,

227,

1:70-73,

79; 4:178-183

9:28, 29, 37, 47, 90, 91,

15:1,

190

187,

1:78, 79, 174, 175; 2:11, 14, 15

Womack, Fred, 4:226, Woodward, Hildegard,

Tiedeman, Berthold

217,

186,

Wohlberg, Meg,

270, 271, 288

123,

Jr.

3:112, 113, 116, 117

113,

131,

121,

89-91, 94, 213, 234, 235, 238, 239

8:53-55

8:39-42, 56-59, 70-74 18,

182, 183

173,

5:4-6, 211, 212, 214, 215, 218

6:167, 168, 169

76,

172,

141

4:1-7

4:209, 211, 212, 214, 215

67,

113,

140,

3:2-6, 52-56, 58-61

Teason, James G.

9:1,

112,

126-135,

268,

199.

269,

121.

130,

174,

13:172

He's a Great Pretender by Collard, 13:117-122

298

206. 215, 239, 250 109,

34, 70, 93,

5-year-olds, 120.

Imagination Elves

175

—Poems:

— Poems;

see

Fairies

iilso

Dreams

— Poems;



Poems; Nonsense

Rhymes

Tobey, Harney, 15:16

He Thought He Saw

Tobin, Don. 13:78, 191; 14:74

by Carroll, 2:90-91

Can Be ii Tiger by Anderson, 1:76 Moon's the North Wind's Cool{\, The, by Lind-

/

Tucker, Marjorie, 2:60, 61, 144-146

Tudor, Tasha,

1:54. 55,

144,

145 say,

Turkle, Brinton 3:77-79, 81,

199. 202, 203, 206, 207. 209, 212 I

4:25-29 5:202, 203, 206-208,

met

a

little

I'm

132,

134, 135

nomg

1:133

Elf-man, once, 1:170

I'm glad our house

2 in

6:60, 61, 63, 95, 97, 98, 100-102

Turzak, Charles, 5:129, Ho,

1:137

Swing Song. A. by Allingham, is

a little

house, 2:14

out to clean the pasture spring, 2:56

I'm hiding. I'm hiding, 1:78

3

:

Index Imitation the

of

place

imitation

in

growth may be found throughout Childcraft volumes 12, 13, 14, 15 Immigration and Emigration Stories Journey to America by Judson, 5:174-180 "Improvisation No. 30" by Kandinsky, 10:4S to the seas again, 2:38 I must go down



In a great big

wood



Pictures

Indian Wall Painting. An, 10:46 Individual Differences

on

Information

differences

individual

given

throughout Childcraft volumes 12, 13, 14, 15 Industries

Science and Industry. Chii.ix

in a great big tree, 1:172

In an ocean, 'way out yonder, 1:190

(Jack-in-the-Pulpits)

color plate. 7:204c

a

child's

Industries

— Pictures

How Do We Use Sand and

Aprils Sweet Month, poem. Author Unknown,

kah. volume 9 Clay?, 9:123

mining. 9:126-129

1:119 In days of yore,

from

Britain's shore. 2:197

a Purple

Cow. 2:^7

Infants: see Babies



Independence Day Stories Star-Spangled Banner Girl by

Saw

never

I

Independence: see Self-Reliance

Infection: see Contagious Diseases Bailey, 5:32-39

Ingenious Little Old Man, The, poem by Bennett. 1:162

India

animals: see Animals India

Turnips

Indian

on

Information

/;/

233

—Folk

— India

//;

what and when. 14:74 Insect-Eating Plants. 7:204-206

Indian Paintbrush, 7:200-201 Indian Paintbrush



color

Pictures;

plate.

7:204c

Art

— Indians

North America

of

making an Indian costume

Powwow.

party, Indian

for boys. 8:254-256

8:106-10,

to

tell

use of dogs, 7:58 Indians,

— American — Poems

Pictures, 9:55. 56

American

Hiawatha's

Childhood by

American

John Broun

see

— Songs

Had

American

a Little Indian. 11:66



Insects,

Mosquitoes trees.

— — walking —Poems

7:24

Insects

Collecting, 9:20-21

Insects

Pictures, color plates, 7:124a-d

9:39

Butterbean Tent, The. by Roberts. 1:81

Longfellow. 2:174-

Big Tall Indian, The, 11:58

Indians.

Injurious:

names of insects, as Bees also names of insects, as

Insects

177 Indians,

Interdependence of Plants

also

Beneficial:

stick.

tepees. 10:1 15

Indians,

see

and Animals;

enemies of

time, 9:161

7:1 22-1 4'^

pets. 7:72-7.-?

Flies,

used animal skins, 9:242

moon

and Spiders by Duncan,

unusual Insects,

curios, 8:128

used

Insects Insects

American

art: see

needed tor healthy personality. 15:175 Inoculations, 13:252-253

Stories

Hoosier Barbecue by Wilson. 5:1H-12I

Indians,

Pollock, 5:154

Injuries: see First Aid: Safety

by Babbitt. 3:102-109



Gaucho by

of a

Initiative

Tales

Prince Wicked and the Grateful Animals, retold

Indiana

Honor

Stories

Feast of Eat-Every thing, The, by Marshall. 6:145152

Indians for Thanksgiving by Heiderstadt. 5:47-

56 ]ac\-o '-Lantern by Colby. 5:40-46 Juan, the Yaqui. by Harrington, 5:86-93 Pocahontas and Captain John Smith by Aulaire.

6:18-23 Indians for Thanksgiving by Heiderstadt. 5:47 Indian Totem Pole. An, 10:40 Indian Turnips (Jack-in-the-Pulpits), 7:199

Cricket, The, by Barrows. 1:93 Firefly

by Roberts, Black

Small

Homes

To

a Firefly

Insects

Flea,

Insects

by Sandburg. by Jones, 2:45

—Songs Humble —

FA and Insects

i

Bug by Brown.

Little

the

1:95 1

Bee. The. 11:59

Stories

The. by Sawyer, 3:125

and Spiders by Duncan. 7:122

Instruments, Musical:

set

"Intelligence Quotient."

Musical Instruments 14:165-166

Intelligence Tests: see Testing Intercultural Education: see

Programs

Human

Interdependence, 9:112. 121: see also Life; Co-operation;

of plants

and animals.

Human 9:

>t)

-35,

Relations

Community

Relations

64



8

Childcraft

-34 Interests: see

Childcraft volume

8,

Creative Play

outside the family. 12:7

Human

Intergroup Relations: see

Relations

Interplanetary Flight: see Space Travel

News

Interpreting the

from

Corn,

saw you toss the kites on high. 1:124 See Something You Can See, game. 8:68-69

I

spot the

I

United States Christmas Ere on Beacon 5:57-67

Italians in the

Mother

Goose, 1:24 In the evening moonlight, 11:87 In the /;;

fall

I

saw some

art:

Rossetti, 1:119

Italy

In the winter, in the winter, 2:104

names

of inventions, as Telephone

Alexander Graham, 6:159-160



Italy's

Great

Composer

Alva. 6:118-123

Franklin, Benjamin, 6:24-28

in the Bag,

// It

It

Invitations, 8:80

odd

a very

It's

I

Christmas Party. 8:102. 103

I

Circus Party, 8:95

I

keep up. 3:231

wiser to take care of your own. 3:236

It's

Wright, Orville and Wilbur. 6:113-117

thing. 2:23

game. 8:39-40

queer about my L'ncle Frank, 1:109 Was, poem by Aldis. 2:13

was six men of Indostan, 2:122 was the time when lilies blow. 2:170 wandered lonely as a cloud, 2:47 w ill be the gladdest thing, 2:49 wish, how I wish, that I had a little house. 2:16

Party. 8:96

Easter' Party.

89

8:88,

I

Halloween Party. 8:97-98

and fill, from Mother Goose, 1:32 and the Beanstalk, retold by Craik, 3:52 facl{ Be Nimble, from Mother Goose, 1:19 fac\ Horner, Little, from Mother Goose, 1:29

Harvest Party. 8:96, 97 Indian Powwow, 8:106

fack.

]acl{

January Party, 8:83

June Travel Party. 8:93 May Party, 8:90

Mother Goose

Jack-in-the-Pulpits, 7:199

Party. 8:105

Jack-in-the-Pulpits

party for a two-year-old. 8:/7-78 St.

Patrick's

Day

Party. 8:87

]ac\-o' -Lantern by Colby, 5:40

Jack Rabbits, 7:36

Valentine's Party. 8:85. 86

Jack Rabbits

Washington's Birthday Party. 8:86 when you are four or five. 8:/

Jackson, Edith B.

Ireland

I

get

— Songs

Sleep,

O

up

at night.

1:166

Pictures, 9:38

Rooming-] n, 13:15-19 Fun, 2:82

Babe, 11:32-33

Iroquois Indians



Jackson, Leroy F.

Grandpa Dropped His

Iron, 9:126. 251. 268



Glasses, 2:94

Jacks or Jackstones, game, 8:3-4

Stories

Feast of Eat-Everything, The, by Marshall. 6:145-

]acl{ Sprat,

from Mother Goose, 1:28

Jackstraws, game, 8:19

152 Irrigation



Pictures,

9:120: also

Dams— Pictures

John D., illustrations. 13:92 saw above a sea of hills, 1:135

Irvvin, I

—Pictures

color plate, 7:204c

Thanksgiving Party. 8:100. 101

In winter

proud, mysterious

of



It's

Fulton. Robert. 6:54-59

County Fair

Guiseppe

It is futile to try to It is

Inventors

Thomas

Italy

easy to propose impossible remedies, 3:232

It is

Inventions, 9:225-226, 236, 2SS; tee also

Edison,



Bridges Pictures, 10:104 Italy— Pictures, 10:110, 114

Italy

go, 2:, 2

In the Zoo, game, 8:37

Bell,

Art

see

Operas, 11:176-177

In the other gardens, 1:138

we

bv Cavanah,

—Biography

Verdi,

In the morning, very early, 1:131

In the wintertime

Hill

Italy

trees. 2:7(1

Meadow, poem by

the

2:66

hills.

Cradle Song, song, 11:35

Italian

by Snyder, 15:33

Cutery

Mintery,

Intery,

I

2:^5

I

saw

a

/

Saw

a Ship A-Sailmg.

I

saw dawn creep across the sky, 2:48

cat,

Old Rhyme, 1:158

Jacobs, Joseph

Master of All Masters, 3:152-153 Old Woman and Her Pig, The, 3:1 1-14

Three Little Pigs, The. 3:19-22 Three Wishes. The. retold by Jacobs. 3:84-86

Tom

Tit Tot, retold by Jacobs, 3:77-83

Km \ Haym

Jaffe,

Wright Brothers Learn and Jaffe, 6: 3 1

to Fly,

The, by Cottier

1

Jakuchu, Ito

Jones, Elizabeth Orton, illustrations. 146.

January brings the snow, 1:114

Jones, see Art

art:



— Japan

Pictures, 9:72

To

causes unhappiness,

baby. 13: 197-199

Wooden Horse"

by Monet. 10:5vl

Pictures, 9:59

Fore Christmas,

poem by

Field,



"Flight into Egypt," by Fra Angelico. 10:26f

—Poems

Christmas Foll{Song, A, by Reese, 2:76 Christmas Song by Field, 1:151

Hymn, Author Unknown. 1:150 Songs: see also Hymns Jesus Christ Away 111 a Manger, Author Unknown. 11:125 Cradle



Hark! the Herald Angels Sing, 11:128-129

O

Little

Tonn

of Bethlehem,

11:127

and Disappointments

of Being a Parent by

Jesus our brother, kind

5:1 s

Journey to America, 5:174-180 Robert Fulton Makes the Paddles Work. 6:54"higgler. The." by Chagall,

10:42d-43

Jumping. High, 8:60 Jumping Spiders, 7:147 June Beetles, or Bugs, 7:137 Jungle Animals: see Animals

— Jungles — Jungles

— Jungles

Pictures, 9:54. 56, "2

Stories

Bunny

the Brace by Mukcrji. 4:^ 14

Juniper Trees. 7:241 Jupiter (planet), 9:168

Juvenile Delinquency

11:126

Silent Night,

Jet

Joys

59

Pictures

"Adoration of the Magi" by Bosch, 10:26g Jesus Christ

2 s

M.

Judson, Clara Ingram

2:147

Pablo Ignacio de: see Pablo de Jesus, Friar

Jesus Christ

Jesselyn, Irene

Juan Brings a Valentine by Rushing. Juan, the Yaqui, by Harrington. 5: s '>

Gardner When the Family Mores. 15:90-96

Jesus,

a Firefly, 2:45

Clifford. 12:3

Jenkins, Gladys

Jest

Morris

Children with Rheumatic Fever, 12:2 s -

7:151



137,

Journey to America by Judson, 5:174

of other children. 13:213

Jellyfish

J.

Jones, Lloyd, illustrations. 6:24. 25.

12:13

of half-brothers and half-sisters. 12:219-22(1

"Jean on a

1:136,

151: 4:37-41

Utile Old Truck. The, 4:172 -177

Jealousy

Jellyfish,

150.

Christmas Day, 2:79 Christmas Fie. 2:~ s

Javanese Sarong, A, 10:36-37

new

147.

Bidushka Lays an Faster Fgg. 4:37-41

Japan

of

Johnny Fife and Johnny's Wife. 2:95 Johnny Morgan, song. 11:98 Jonathan Bing, poem by brown. 2:'*2

10:28-29

•Roosters."

Java

235

and good. 11:120

Children in Trouble by Day, 14:52-60

What Dangers

Propulsion, 9:264

in

Comics

1

15:29-30

Jewelry

Bronze I'm. A. 10:38 from Pent. A, 10:38 Jews Religion Songs Hannkkn" Song, The, 11:114-115 Gilt

Silver Neckjace





Jigsaw Puzzles

make, 8: S4 Jimson Weeds, 7:207

how

to

Jingle Bells',

1

poem by

l

— Kangaroos— Poems

Kangaroos Pierpont, 1:152

Jingle Bells, song. 11:116

Pictures, 9:41, 61

color plate. 7:2Sl

Duck and

home

should be appropriate. 12:159-166 fellow. 11:70 Joe Johnson was John Broun Had a Little Indian, song, 11:66 .1

John Gilpin was

a citizen.

10:4S

Kangaroos, 7:17-19

s5

Jobs at

Kachina Dolls. \()>~ Kandinsky, Wassilj "Improvisation No. 30,

2:152

John James Audubon by Bailey. 6:60 Johnny and His Mule by Credle, 4:1 58 Johnny Appleseed: see Chapman, John

the Kangaroo, The. by Lear. 1:192-

193

Kano, Yutoku "Chinese Children

Kansas rich



at

Play."

10:58i

Pictures

wheal lands, 9:70

Katydids, 7:139

Kaufman,

Al, illustrations,

12:171:

14:43

Childcraft

236 Kayaks



comic books, 15:26-32

Pictures, 9:74

toy, 10:86

conscience, 13:162-8

Keeping a Baby Comfortable by Montgomery and Suydam, 13:32 Keeping a Convalescent Child Happy bv Osborne.

convalescent, care of, 13:273, 276-80

conversation, 15:149-50 co-operation, 13:143-5. 207-8; 15:41-5

co-ordination, 13:160

13:273

Keeping Your Young Child Healthy bv Provence,

courage, 13:224 daring, 13:147

13:247

Kehm, Freda

death, attitudes about, 12:207-14

S.

Things Aren't the Same, 12:43-48

dentist, visits to, 13:254-60, 265-6

Mary Elizabeth Caution— Toddler at

differences, individual. 13:309-10

Keister,

lVorl(

Here, 13:79-84

discipline.

What School Means Keller, Kells,

Reamer,

Book

Kentucky



to the Child, 14:125-132

doctor, visits

Famous



13:254-60

dreams, 13:192

Stories

New Home

in

dressing, 13:143-4

Kentucky by

excursions, 13:172, 301-8 failure,

Key, Francis Scott Star-Spangled Banner, The, 11:140-141 Key, Ted,

to,

drawing, 13:153

Bool{, A, 10:47

Meadowcroft. 6:44-49

Kids

acceptance

of,

absence

illustrations, 12:178: 14:^

of, 15:84-6, 87-9

fatigue, 13:251

Wolf and the Seven Little Kids, The. by Grimm and Grimm, 3:23-27

13:209-18

fears,

come out

in play, 13:216

Kindergarten Child, 13:141-174

of animals, 13:216

Kindergartens

of dark, 13:224

in,

of

13:303

new

experiences, 13:216

of real events, 15:34-8

Kindergartner, 13:144-5, 173

of school, 13:315-16

accidents, 13:253; 14:84-5: 15:51-7

righting, 13:170-1

achievement, 12:71-2 activity,

first

13:147

grade, preparation for, 13:309-16

food, for health, 13:249-50

adoption, 12:236-7

fresh air, 13:251-2

13:204-5

adults, relationship with.

friends, 13:169-74

allowance, 15:69 anger, 13:202-3

choosing, 13:171-2

anxiety, 13:209-18

difficulties in

make

about events in the world, 15:35

making, 13:174

for security. 13:170

games, 13:159

appetite, 13:177-84 in convalescence. 13:2

15:46

father, 12:121-8; 13:163, 173, 251

Stories

music

112-14; 13:143-8.

divorce, questions about, 12:215-20

of

Daniel Boone's

107-10.

disputes, 13:167, 172, 173

13:183

illustrations,

Picture from a

12:44-5. 80.

203-5

Keliher, Alice V.

v

losing, 15:146

grandparents, 12:50-3. 62

attitudes

hair twisting, 13:215

toward differences, 15:121-22 toward events in the world, 15:33-44

health, signs of, 13:24N help, for disturbed children. 13:217-18: 15:162-6

toward other people, 15:114-15, 116 babyishness, 13:208

helpfulness, 12:159-62: 13:168

boisterousness, 13:147

honesty, 13:148, 201-2

brothers, relationships with. 12:136-9, 141-8

hospitalization, 13:267-9, 270-2

characteristics, 13:141

ideas,

children, relationships with other, 169-74; 15:117-18

growth

of,

13:151, 160

about other persons, 13:152. 160-1; 15:113-20

cheating, 13:166 12:

1SII

:

13:

independence. 13:143-5; 15:58-9, initiative, 13:143-5; 15:169

choices, 13:143-5

inoculations, 13:252-3

clothes for outdoors, 13:252

jealousy,

12:131-3;

13:197-9, 213

60. 61

Index language, 13:159,

171);

15:151

relationship with. 12:136-9,

sister,

learning, 13:310-15

through play, 13:156-61

with. 13:186-9

difficulties

snacks, 13:179

13:164, 209, 218

spoiling. 13:135-40

manners, 13:169-70, 202: 15:135-40, 141-2 money, 15:64, 65, 66

stammering, 13:111

mother, 13:22-3, 163

stories,

who

works, 15:75, 78-81

motion

13:290-6

Sunday

pictures, 15:20-1

13:215

school, 13:222

nervous habits, 13:215

on

sweets, effect

teeth of. 13:262

taking things, 13: 4S 1

13:165

tattling,

neighbors, relationships with. 15:108-12, 121

new new

stepparent. 12:240-2. 246

stuttering, 13:111

moving, 15:92-3, 96 music, Childcraft volume 11; 13:297-303 nail biting,

teeth, care of,

13:261-6

fluorine treatment for. 13:265

baby, 12:132-5; 13:224

television, 15:10-18

experiences, 13:143-8, 221-5

toothache, 13:266

nightmares, 13:192, 200

toys, 13:158, 283-6,

nursery groups, 13:231-6, 237-44

traveling. 12:175-S();

other people, concern for, 13:206-7

about being bad. 13:165-6

parents, 12:85-6 feelings about illness of, 12:227-8 feelings about remarriage of. 12:219

interferes with eating. 13:182-3

Kindness



Stories

Own

parties, 8:77; 12:171

Babe Ruth's

play, 13:156-61, 171-2

Story of fane

in groups, 13:145-6

with other children, 13:159



questions, 13:149-55 radio, 15:10-18

Little

reading, 12:189-91, 193, 195, 199

Pussy by Taylor, 1:86 Lamb by Hale, 1:55

Mary's

foundations for, 15:150-1

Kindness to Animals

readiness for, 13:312-15

Wicked and

Prince

13:166

12:45-6

for different opinions, 13:204 for property, 13:205

King,

toward grandparent, 12:50-1

King Arthur:



rudeness, 13:201-2; 15:137-9

King Crabs, 7:154 Kni^

13:145-6, 150. 166. 212-13. 222-3

13:161

who

Fur Traders. Tin. by Dickie

does not ask about, 13:127



learning about differences

—Songs Kings—

Kings

Old King Coh. 11:48-49

curiosity about, 13:128

sharing, 13:160

anil P. ilk.

Kings Poems Old King Cole, from Mother Goose. 1:45 Sing a Song of Sixpence, from Mother Goose, 1:56

sex, 13:123-9

child

of the

6:153-158

13:144-5

self-confidence, 13:224

self-understanding,

King

Pictures, color plate, 7:108e

Kingfishers, 7:108-110

15:47-54

school, 13:222, 309-15

security,

by Parrish, 4:90-103

15:123

see Arthur,

Kingbirds

to,

.1.

the Grateful Animals, retold

Bill, illustrations,

responsibility, 12:159-62; 13:164-5; 15:7-9

go

Stories

by Babbitt, 3:102-109 Rare Provider, A, by Brink. 4:112-121 Steam Comes Uprirer by Phillips. 4:184-191

resourcefulness, 15:56-63

refusal to



Bird Cage with Tassels,

reasonableness, 13:171, 206-7, 225

safety, 13:147, 166;

Story by Ruth, 6:135-139

Addams, The, by Wagoner, 6:128

North to Labrador, a Story of Wilfred Grenfell by McNeer, 6:178-186 Kindness effects more than severity, 3:238 Kindness to Animals Poems Frog, The, by Bel loc, 1:97

alone, 13:161

respect,

13:228-30

13:228

illness in,

worry, 13:154-5

overfeeding, 13:178

reliability,

141-8

sleep, 13:250-1

leaving home, 13:221-5 love,

237

in.

13:128-9

Stories

Flea, T/ie.hy

Sawyer, 3:125-131

Childcraft

2 38

Prince Wicked and the Grateful Animals, retold

by Babbitt, 3:102-109

Tom

Hump,

Lafayette, Marquis de, 6:40-43

The, 2:88-89

Camel Got His Hump, 4:147-150

the

Kitchen

how

to

— Kites —Poems

make, 8:191-192

Pictures, 15:146

Kites

Kite Weather,

poem by Bergengren, 2:26 7:66; 9:3,

—Poems

Lamps

Little Kittens,

from Mother Goose,

—Songs

Stories

King Arthur, The, by

Farieon. 6:240-

244 Knives, 9:204

Koalas



Vernon" by Bonnard, 10:122d

Children

Need Space and

Langmuir, Mary Fisher How Do Children Grow?, 12:74-81 When Children Are Anxious, 13:209-218 Language: see also Reading; Speech; Spelling; Words; Writing

development during

growth through hearing,

Kresin, Robert, illustrations,

6:140. 142. 144

Measuring Achievement and

Ability,

14:162-

168 illustrations. 1:52, 53

Kunkle, Ethel Wright Children, 13:304-308

illustrations, 9:59, 62, 108,

109, 146, 249, 258, 259, 276,

seeing,

etc.,

14:226-227

How Do

Comics Affect, 15:30-31 Languages Are Spoken at Home, 14:188 practice in talking and listening, 15:151 promotes sociability in 5-year-olds, 13:170-171 rudeness and impoliteness is misinterpretation If

Young

13:29-30

handling vulgarity, 14:31-32 His Language Is Rich and Fluent by Beyer, 13:111-116

Krugman, Morris

Excursions for

first year,

^year-olds, 13:159

Hare's Birthday Party, 4:15-20

Kwiatkowski, Gordon,

Play Materials,

14:106-114

correct sex vocabulary, 13:124-125

illustrations, 1:40, 41

Kozisek, Josef

Kuhn. Robert,

at

•bad" in small child, 13:114-115

Pictures, 7:30

Koering, Ursula,

Stevenson,

Home and School Are a Team, 15:153-161 Langdon, Grace



Story of

poem by

Lane, Bess B.

H*Suan Tsung, 10:30

Poems Lady Clare by Tennyson, 2:170-173 Riddling Knight, Author Unknown, 2:168-169



of Counterpane, The,

"Landscape

Kitty, 11:53

"Cat and Bird," 10:42

Knights

Pictures

1:178

Klee, Paul

Knights



kerosene lamp, 9:221

Land

1:52-53

Warm

1:55

Rare Provider, A, by Brink. 4:1 12-121 Lamplighter, The, poem by Stevenson, 1:134

8, 11

color plate, 7:60c

"Kittens" by

Pictures,

Stories

Kittens—Pictures,

Kittens

and the Pirate by Radford, 5:129-135 Lambert, Clara M. Choosing a Hobby, 8:109-129 Lambs: see Sheep

— 7:85 —Poems Mary's Lamb by Hale, Lambs—

Kittens, 7:67-68

Three

Jean

Lambs Lambs

Kite Weather by Bergengren, 2:26-27

Kittens

Lafitte,

Victor

using kitchen utensils, 8:193-194, 197-198 Kites,

Pictures, 9:6

Lady Clare, poem by Tennyson. 2:170 "Lady Jean" by Bellows, 10:22

Tit Tot, retold by Jacobs, 3:77-S3

Camel's



color plate, 7:124a

Kipling, Rudyard

How

Ladybirds, or Ladybugs

277

Two

of adults, 13:201-203

undesirable, 14:189

Wilting and Speaking the Language by Schuyler,

14:184-189

Langurs, 7:23 Labor: see Childbirth

Lad Who Went

to the

Larkspurs, 7:222

North Wind, The, retold

by Dasent. 3:72 Ladybird, Ladybird, from Mother Goose, 1:39 Ladybirds, 7:136-137

Larkspurs



Pictures

delphinium, color plate, 7:220a Larvae: see Caterpillars; Grubs; Maggots; Wigglers

Index



He

Larvae Pictures moth, 7:134 Lasko, Joan Kalhorn

How

illustrations, 2:2, 27.

88,

see

—Costa Rica;

Art

made 89,

*>s.

174-177

—Central America; Mexico; Plants —Central

Animals

America; South America Laughing Song, poem by Blake, 2:81

wash on the line, 9:194 Henri de Toulouse-: see ToulouseLautrec, Henri de

pulleys carry out the

Lautrec,

Lawnmowers, 9:205

modern equipment, 9:2S7

living, 14:121-124

illustrations. 12:15. 58, 60; 13:21,

Lawson, Robert,

Difficulties in

language

Reading, 14:174-176

difficulties, 14: ISM

Parents Foster

Good

social sciences,

14:2US

Spelling, 14:181-183

Thank You

for the

world so sweet, 1:146

Leather clothes

made from,

9:242

shoes, 9:243

115

23.

easier by

through

Learning Ability: see Testing Programs Leathan, Mrs. E. Rutter

Pictures

Lawrence, Bob,

Leather Work, 8:218-219

Leaves illustrations. 2:°-2. 93,

1U6,

107

Laxatives

colors, 7:234-235; 9:37 tree.

7:233-235

work of, 7:215-216 Leaves— Pictures, 7:214.

usually avoid, 13:77

Lead, 9:128 Leadership, 12:30-31

tree,

231, 234; 9:36-37

7:231,234

by organized groups, 14:242-244 camp directors and counselors, 14:257

Lee, Dorothy

independence, 14:3

Lee, Robert Edward, 6:80-82

learning to use judgment, 14:8

Left-Handedness, 13:28-29

tomboy, 12:150-151

Legends Myths and Legends, 6:214-256 Tied Piper of Hamelin, The, by Browning,

Leaf: see Leaves

Leaning Tower of Pisa



Pictures, 10:110

Edward Duc\ and the Kangaroo, The,

Sharing the Work, 12:159-166

2:126-135

Lear,

1:192-193

"Manypeeplia Upsidownia," 10:45 the Pussycat, The, 1:186-187

"Lehigh Canal" by Pickett. 10:122f-122g Leisuretime: see

Chiuhrakt volume

8,

Creathc

Play and Hobbies; also Reading: Storytelling

Owl and

Quangle Wangle's Hat, The, 1:194-195

nature study: see Childckaft volume 7

Table and the Chair, The, 1:196-197 There was an Old Man who supposed, 1:165

use by

There was an old man with a beard. 1:165 There was an old person of Ware. 1:165 Learning, 9:14-15; see also Arithmetic; Discussion

Groups; Field Trips; Language; Reading; Science; Social Sciences; Spelling

and imagination, 13:117-122 Challenging Rapid Learners, 14:176 constructive conversations and ideas, 15:147-152 from

Pictures, 9:280-281

reading: see

Lemons



Lei

Pctitcs

Marionettes,

a

French

Folk

Song,

11:88

Letter

Learns Through .Utilities and Toys by Peller, 13:65-70

— Pictures

Leopard Frogs, 7:114-117 Leopards Pictures, 9:39, 42 Lesemann, Maurice Mockjng Bud. The. 2:5oSi

He Askj 155

volumes 1-6

family. 15:9

Leo, the Lion, 9:1 52

Lessons

Endless Questions by Ridenour, 13:149-

Ouux raft

modern

color plate. 7:236d

Gifted Children by Zorbaugh, 12:247-252 graduallv at home, then at school. 12:84-89

He

in,

Learning, Difficulties in

America:



Children Learn Manners, 15:137-142

14:175-176

99, 147-149

Lathrop, Dorothy, illustrations, 2:24, 25,

Laundry

Learns Through His Play bv Stone,

how parents can help young school children

Last of the Dragons, The, by Nesbit, 4:159 Late lies the wintry sun a-bed, 1:149

Latin

Still

13:156-161

Building Friendlier heelings, 12:141-148

Latham, Mary,

2 39

Who

from Special Lessons. 14: H>4- 10^ Gypsy Elf. .1. poem by Wynne, 2:v

Benefits Is

a

Letter Writing, 8:166, 167; see also Invitations

an aid in spelling. 14:180-181, 182-183

when

father

is

away, 15:i4-b6

1

1

Childcraft

240 with children at camp, 14:262-263

Lion and the Mouse, The, by Aesop, 3:235

with children away

Lions, 7:14-17

14:269

at school,

Lettuce, 7:218

I., and Seligmann, Jean H. Learns About Differences Between Boys and

Girls, 13:123-129

Libraries: see also

Maying

the

Most

"Dead

Library by Duff, 12:195-204 of

Your Public Library bv

Hewitt, 14:231-235 Libraries Libraries

— —

Pictures, 9:278 Stories

Many

Challenge,

Listening to music, 11:25-26; 14:216

to radio, 9:274

with pulleys, 9:194-195

Listening

Light: see also Color; Electric Lighting; Eves:

Rainbows; Sun from many sources. 9:221 Putting Light to Work. 9:222

What Makes the Sky Bluer, Where Do the Stars Go in

—Poems

Listen,



my

9:136 the Daytime?, 9:156

Lightning Beedes, or Bugs: see

Fireflies

—Pictures

shall hear,

Life in

Many

Poems

for Every

telling

2:180

Books

Animal Friends and Adventures, Folk, and Fairy Tales, 3:8-240 influence on child, 14:275-276

Poems

Myths and

4:7-240

Lands, 5:7-240

Day; Humorous Poems; Story-

Poems and

Ballads, 2:11-200

of Early Childhood, 1:15-200

use with nursery child, 13:115-116

tiger lily, color plate, 7:220a

Limericks

Lithuania

Man who

and you

Adventures of Famous Persons; Legends, 6:7-240

Li\e to Be a Lighthouse by Field, 1:107 Lightning, 9:106-107, 215

There was an Old

Pictures, 9:270

children,

Literature: see also Authors;

I'd

Lilies

make some machines work, 9:21 Edward Some Combinations Are a Special

"Listen, children, listen," 2:44

Lands, Childcraft, volume 5

levers, 9:196-197

Lighthouses

Bird," 10:81

Liquids

12:149-156

Lifting, 9:179

with

the Crocodile, The, by Bacon, 4:25-29

Liss,

Locked In by Enright, 5:104-112 Life in

Stories

Cub and

Lippold, Richard

Reading

Home

Building a

Pictures

color plate, 7:28a

Levine, Milton

He

— Lions— Lions

Levers, 9:196-199

supposed, bv Lear.



Stories

Music of the Scythes, The, by Zobarskas.

5:21

218

1:165

There was an old

man

with a beard, by Lear.

poem by

Little,

Aldis, 1:66

Lttle Black Bear Goes to School, A, bv Sickels.

1:165

There was an old person of Ware, bv Lear.

4:68

poem by Brown,

Little

Black Bug,

Little

Bo-Peep, from Mother Goose, 1:58

thor

Little

Lincoln,

Little

Boy Blue, from Mother Goose, 1:27 Boy kneels at the foot of- the bed, 1:145

Little

by

1:165

There was

a

young maid who

Unknown, 1:164 Abraham Abraham Lincoln's Boyhood self,

Lincoln,

said.

as

"Why." Au-

Told bv Him-

6:69-74

poem by Turner,

2:189

Lind, Jenny, 6:64-68

Lindeman, Eduard C, and

The, poem by Bangs, 1:170

Little fairy snowflakes, 1:152 Little friends

Glasser, Melvin A.

Building the Strong Family, 12:289-296 Lindsay, Vachel

"Little

Little Girl

Little

Magnanimous Sun, The, 2:108

Little

Little

great friends. 3:235

of Paradise" by

Unknown German

Next Door, The, poem by Wing, 1:117

House, The, poem by Godley, 1:172 Jack Horner, from Mother Goose, 1:29 Joe Tunney, poem by McCann, 2:98

Land, The, poem by Stevenson, 1:153 Miss Mu{}ct, from Mother Goose, 1:26 Little Muffin Man, The, poem by Richards. 1:112 Litde Nancy F.tticoat. from Mother Goose. 1:48

Moon's the North Wind's Cooky. The, 1:137

Little

Mysterious Cat, The, 2:S5

Little

Yet Gentle Will the Griffin Be. 2:19

may prove

Garden

Painter, 10:122d-122e

Explanation of the Grasshopper, An, 1:97 Little Turtle, The, 1:96

Potatoes' Dance, The, 2:110-112

does the trick, 3:233

little

Little Elf,

1:95

Index Little

Old Truck, The, by

Little Pussy,

Little

poem

Jones, 4:172

Louff, Charles

by Taylor, 1:86

Red Hen and

Little

Little Little

Little

Little

re-

Louisiana

Robin Redbreast, from Mother Timothy Tim-o, 11:68 Tommy Tucker, from Mother Tune, The, poem by Fyleman, Turtle, The, poem by Lindsay. Woman, The, song, 11:78

Goose, 1:40 Goose.

1:2°-

2:33 1:96

—Pictures

Stories

Pirate by Radford, 5:129-135

Book, A,2:\\ Love and Affection Information on the place of love and affection in a child's growth may be found throughout Childcraft volumes 12, 13, 14, 15 Love Is Blind, game, 8: v. Loveliest of Trees,

color plate, 7:204d



me

Living Things, 9:1

Love

Lizards, 7:183-185

Lowell,

— 9:47 Llamas— 9:66 Lobsters, 7:153-154 Lobsters — Lizards



and the

Victor

Love, Adelaide

Liverworts (hepaticas), 7:199 Liverworts (hepaticas)

Merry-Go-Round Horse. A," 10:SS Louisa Alcott's Childhood by Alcott, 6:7^ '

the Grain of Wheat, The,

told by Hutchinson, 3:8 Little

=4i

I

poem by Housman,

love you,

2:4^

1

Amy

Crescent Moon, The, 1:136

Pictures,

Sea Shell, The, 1:107

Pictures,

Lowell, James Russell First Snowfall, The. 2:7n

Pictures, 9:59, 230

Locomotives, 9:213

Lowenberg, Miriam E. "Anything to Eat in This House? ," 14:76-81 Lowenfeld, Berthold Children Who Cannot See, 12:267-269 Lowndes, Marion Sitters Have an Influence, 15:97-104

Locoweeds, 7:208

Lucas, E. V.

"Lobster Trap and Fish Tail" by Galder. 10:96

Loch Lomond, song, 11:100 Locked In by Enright, 5:104 Locklin,

Anne

Tramp, The.

Litdefield 5:25-31

Cat's Cleanliness, The, 1:75

Locusts, 7:139

Lofting,

Hugh

Lullabies, 11:27-42

Baby Bunting, from Mother Goose, 1:16 Hymn, Author Unknown, 1:150 Hush-a-Byc, Baby, from Mother Goose. 1:16

Dr. Dolittle's Pushmi-l'ullyu, 4:151-158

Logging Lo,

It Is



Pictures: see

Lumbering

Bye,

—Pictures

Cradle

Gone, game, 8:39

Lombardy Poplar Trees



Mother's Song, A, by Rossetti, 1:67

Pictures

Old Gaelic Lullaby, Author Unknown, 1:185 Wynken, Blynkcn, and Nod by Field. 1:180-181

color plate. 7:236a

London



Stories

Dick Whittington and His Cat. retold by

Hill,

Hiawatha's Childhood,

~~

2:1 74-1

Paul Revere's Ride, 2:180-184



Looms



Hush.

Little

Italian

Cradle Song. 11:35

2:71

Pictures, 9:270

Scottish Lullaby. 11:30-31

Clothier, 14:270

Losing: see Sportsmanship

Through Death by Franklin. 12:20" Lost Pup. The. poem by Mead. 1:198

Lotto, game. 8:l

(

>-20

O

Babe. 11:32-33

Swedish Cradle Song.

Pictures, 9:239, 240

Losses

Baby. 11:31

Rockabye. Baby. 11:29 Schubert's Cradle Song, 11:42 Sleep,

Looking Toward the Teens by "Look it up," 13:151

the Night, 11:36

Rest, Baby. Rest. 11:39

Little Girl, 1:164

Look at the Snow!, poem by Davies, Looking at Television, 9:2" Looking

Through

Brahms' Lullaby, 11:38-39 Fas Do Do, 11:34 Hush-a-by. Baby Mine. 11:40-41

London Bridge, game. 8:31-32 Lone Wolf, game, 8:40-41 Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth

There Was a

Lullabies (with music) All

3:62-71

11: ^7

Lullaby and goodnight. 11:38 Lullaby,

mv

little

one. 11:37

Lulla, lullaby, 11:42

— —

Lumbering Luna Moths

Pictures, 9:2^

Pictures

color plate, 7:124c

Lupines (blucbonnets).

7:l

,,s

Childcraft

242 Luther, Martin

Malting the Most of Your

Mighty Fortress Is Our God, A, 11:150-151 Lying: see Honesty

Maying

Most

the

Home

by

Ickis,

8:48

Your Public Library by

of

Hewitt, 14:231

Malting Toys and Playthings by Turpin, 8:174 Mallards, 7:108

M

Mammals:

Macaques, 7:22-23

Mammals

Macaws

Man

—Pictures

color plate, 7:28d

Own

Body, 13:55-59

MacDonald, George Wind and the Moon, The, 2:144-146 MacDowell, Edward The City Boy and the Wild Rose, 11:186-187 Mace, David R. Parents Are also Husbands and Wives, 12:32-40 Machines Enemies or Allies?, 15:5-9 Need Not Boss You, 15:9 Machines We Use, The, 9:1" Mackay, Charles Miller of the Dee, The, 2:140-141

McKenny, Margaret Growing Flowers and

—Influence

of

Vegetables, 7:210-225

MacKenzie, Garry, illustrations, Mackerel Pictures, 9:230 McSwain, E. T.

Mann, Georg Our Pets, the Animals

1:46, 47,

154-157



Your Role as a Parent, 15:145-152 Madelon Dances by Phillips, 5:146 Madison, Dorothy Payne Todd, 6:50-53

10:55

Mantes, 7:140-141

Mantes



Pictures, 9:59

color plate, 7:124a

Manufacturing, 9:225-227, 236-243, 251-254, 263,

not for under

six,

13:308

—Poems —

of Art, The, by

D'Amico, 10:v

Magnanimous Sun, The, poem by Lindsay. 2:108

Maple Sugar Stories Sugar Snow, The, by Wilder, 5:122-128 Maple Trees, 7:238 Maple Trees Pictures



color plate, 7:236b

Maps, 9:88, 280 How to Use a Road Map, 9:89

Maps



Pictures

Make

Move Things. 9:217 Work. 9:218

Electricity

Putting Magnets to

the Milt{ Can, The, by Aesop, 3:237

— Mail Service—Poems Mail Service

Is

to

The, by Montgomery.

Life,

6:110

Marching Song, song, 11:72 Marionettes definition,

Marionettes

and how

to

make. 8:238-240

—Songs

Petttes Marionettes. Les, 11:88

Magnetism

Letter

of products

Marbles, game, 8:6-7

Ballad of China, A, by Richards, 2:116-119 Magic Stories: see Fairy Tales

Maid and

names

"Manypeeplia Upsidownia" by Lear, 10:45 Maple Leaf Forever, The, poem by Muir, 2:197

Map That Came

Magic

to

Best, 7:57-74

globes, 9:287

Maggots, 7:142

How

We Know

Manners: see Etiquette Manners and Customs: see Childcraft volume 5; also Folk Tales; Holidays Planning a Party by Carlson, 8:75-108 "Man Riding a Long-Necked Horse," Unknown,



Mackenzie, Alexander, 6:34-39

Magic

Environment, 9:65-66; 12:24

276, 282; see also

Wild Flowers, 7:189-209

Magic

as Bats

2:108

J.

Discovers His

mammals,

Manet, Edouard "Boy Blowing Bubbles," 10:58f Man in the Moon, The, poem, Author Unknown,

Utile foe Tunney, 2:98-99 McCloskey, Robert, illustrations. 2:40-43

He

of

Pictures, 9:61

Mandrills, 7:23

McCann, Rebecca

McCune, Donovan

names

see



a

Pictures, 15:62, S4

Gypsy

Elf,

Mariposa

Make-Believe: see Imagination

Make-Up, for plays. 8:138 Maying Musical Instruments by Dushkin, 8:262

7:202-203

—Poems

Went A-MarkeUng,

Fairy

A. by Fyleman, 1:174

175

To A. by Wynne, 2:37

Lilies, or Tulips,

Marketing

Markjet,

1:36

Marketing Little

Marks:

To Market, from Mother Goose,

— Songs

Woman. see

The, 11:78-79 Report Cards

Index Marmosets, monkeys, 7:21 Marriage: see also Sex Education

Mayflies

Parents Are also Husbands and Wives by Maee, 12:32-40

Stepparents and Stepchildren by Frank, 12:239-

246

H. E.

Feast of Eat-Everything, The, 6:145-152

Marsh Marigolds, 7:204 Marsh Marigolds Pictures

Arbutus,

Trailing;

Apples

poem by

Teasdale, 2:49

W.

Healthy Personality for Every Child, A, 15:173

Maypole Embroidered Mead, Stella

Picture,

An, 10:5sh

Daniel Boone's

New Home

;n Kcntncfry,

Larks, 7:104-105

Larks



Pictures

color plate. 7:10Se; nest. 9:47

Who Are

Mentally Retarded, 12:281-

S3

Martin, Bernard, illustrations, 4:104, 105, 107-109,

Meadow

Mice, 7:37-39

Meals for Mickey by Dalgliesh. 4:122 Measuring Achievement and Ability by Krugman, 14:162

111

Mary, poem by De

la

Meat—Pictures,

Mare, 2:22

Doctor and the Dentist

Mary! Mary! Mary', 2:22

for child

Child's Friends.

13:193-194

toileting difficulties,

who

doesn't eat, 13:1 77

1

~s

for epilepsv, 12:27s

for the blind, 12:269

(for the face)

Up for Fun, Up to Loo\

10:90

hospital rooming-in, 13:15-19

Important, 10:91

//

Master of All Masters, retold by Jacobs, 3:152 Mastri, Fiore, illustrations. 4:75, 77. 79. SO; 5:232.

Your Child Goes

to the

Hospital by Mercer.

13:267-272 in childbirth. 13:6-7

of expectant mother. 13:6, 8

235. 237. 239, 240

of handicapped, 12:262

Masturbation

of the crippled. 12:273-274

causes, 14:32-33

Maternity Care: see Hospitals (rooming-in);

Pregnancy Matisse, Henri "Mimosa Rug," 10:49 "Purple Robe, The," 10:122a Matterhorn Pictures, 9:69 Maturation Information on the phases of a child's maturation may be found throughout Chii.ixraft



volumes 12,

certain

for

Sea Fever, 2:38

Dressing

— Your

The, by Richmond, 13:254-260

1:65

Masefield, John

Dressing

9:232, 235

Medical Care: see also Dentistry

a little lamb, 1:55

Mary Middling, poem by Fyleman, Mary's Lamb, poem by Hale, 1:55

Masks

Night,

Meadow Meadow

7:204a

Martens, Elise H.

Mary had

May

6:44-49



color plate,

2

May

Anemones;

see

Hepaticas;

Lost Pup, The, 1:198-199 Meadowcroft, Enid LaMonte

(planet), 9:168

Children

Pictures, 9:7

Mayo, Leonard

12:57-64

Mars



Mayflowers:

Divorce and Separation by Baruch, 12:215-221 // Three Generations Live Together by Foster,

Marshall,

243

with doctor regarding pregnancy, 13:23

Until the Doctor Comes. 14:83

while traveling, 13:22S-229

"Meeting of Saint Anthony and

St.

Paul"

by

Sassetta, 10:5sl-59

Meigs, Cornelia

Ringing

in the

New

Year, 5:8-17

Johnny Fife and Johnny's Wife, 2:95 Organ Grinders' Garden, The, 2:104-105 Pirate Don Dur\ of Dowdee, 2:1 J8-1 J9



Snoie Man, The, 2:~ J Test, game. 8:24

Memory



Turner. 1:129

regular checks, 14:72-74 talk

Meigs, Mildred Plew

13, 14, 15

May Apples, 7:200 May Apples Pictures, 7:201 May Beedes, 7:137 May Day May Festival, 8:146 May Party, 8:90-92 May Day Poems Round the May Pole Now We Dance

prevention of infection, 13:252-253

by

Menagerie. The, song. 11:70 Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix, composer the Herald Angels Sing by I Lnl ! x

11:128-129

Wesley,

Childcrafi

^44 Menninger, William C.

You

Men

Mexico

as a Person, 12:24-31

Flemish Painter,

10:44

Mental Health: see

also

Entertainment for ConResourcefulness;

Personality;

valescents;

Se-

curity; Self-Confidence

ills,

15:162-166 Personality

Every

for

A, by

Child,

Need Balancing by Barker and

Personalities

Barker, 14:37-44 related to health, 14:74-75

Schools Influence Personality by Prevey, 14:133-

138 Special Family Situations, 12:229-286

What Children Need from

Hymes,

by

Life

What Play Means

to

Your Child by

Biber, 14:93-

What School Means

to

the Child bv Keliher.

14:125-132

When Things Go Wrong

by Allen, 14:45-51 Menninger, 12:24-31 Your Role as a Parent by McSwain, 15:145-152 Mentally Retarded, Children Who Are, by Martens, 12:281-283 as a Person by

Pictures, 9:38

City

Mouse and

the Garden

Mouse, The, by

Hickory, Dicf(ory, Doc\, from Mother Goose. of the Mouse, The, by Mitchell. 1:94 Three Blind Mice, from Mother Goose. 1:21 Mice Songs Hickory, Dickjory. Doc\, 11:56 Mice Stories Lion and the Mouse, The, by Aesop, 3:235 Town Mouse and the Country Mouse, The, bv Aesop, 3:228-229

— —

and

Michaelis, John U.,

Shaftel,

Fannie R.

Live Together, 14:202-208

Midas and the Golden Touch,

bv Pyle,

retold

may be a cause of toilet "Me on a Horse" by Doris, Mercer, Mary E. Your Child Goes

13:194

difficulties.

10:57

to the Hospital,

13:267-272

Merrily swinging on brier and weed, 2:52

Merry-Go-Round, poem by Baruch, 1:82 Merry-Go-Round poem by Field, 1:83 "Merry-Go-Round Horse, A," by Louff. 10:58 Merry-Go-Rounds Pictures, 10:103 Merryweather, John, illustrations, 2:68, 69, 178. ,



M.

for

New

Experiences. 13:143-148

1:89

— 7:204b; — 9:153-154 Milky Way— Milky Way—Poems

Milkweed Milkweed

Pictures; color plate,

seed. 7:

( 1

>5

Pictures; color plate. 7:124b

Butterflies

Pictures,

Man Millay,

in the

Moon,

Edna

St.

FA*?,

2:108

Vincent

Miller, Joaquin

Miller,

Meteors, 9:158, 159 of Teaching: see Arithmetic: Language:

Science;



Milk and Milk Products Pictures, 9:235 Milling Time, poem by Roberts, 1:88 Milkman's Horse, The, poem. Author Unknown.

Columbus, 2:\7X-\7s Mule by Credle, 4:138-146

illustrations. 11:43

Morley, Christopher

Morning

tain ballad,

Mountain Life Songs She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain, 11:75 Mountain Life Stories

8,9

Pictures, 9:40

Moral Standards:

Mountain Goats Pictures, 7:55; 9:38, 54 Mountain Life Poems She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain, a moun-

128, 130, 131. 172.

Moose, 7:42-44

Moose

poem bv Emer-

white goat. 7:53-54

1

Moore, Henry "Rocking Chair." 10:25 Moore, Phoebe Hanson, 50.

Squirrel, The,

2:124

Mountain Goats

Nicholas, A, 2: 1 50- 5

St.

Pictures, 9:17

son,

Moore, Clement Clarke

from



color plates, 7:124c

Lindsay. 1:137

Visit

—Poems

Mother's Song, A,

146 Yet Gentle Will the Griffin Be by Lindsay. 2:19 Moonbeam, poem by Conkling. 1:169

Moonbeam

Beers, 15:75-

Mother's Song, A, by Rossetti, 1:67

Conkling. 1:169

1:137

Wind and

Woi\ by

to

81

Moon's the North Wind's Coolly, The, by Lindsay.

newborn, 13:60-64

should balance restrictions with leeways. 14:9

165

Moon

to

important to toddler, 13:97-99

Pictures, 9:134, 163

huge mirror which

a

is

tell

Wolf,

bv

13:9

The Wonder Boy and

Mud

the Empress, 11:1'

Turdes, 7:176-177

Mother Goose, from Mother Goose, 1:15 Mother Goose and Nursery Rhymes, 1:15-62

Muffin Man, The, song. 11:52 Muffin Man. The Little, In Richards. 1:112

Mother Goose Party, 8: 105-1 Of. Mother Hubbard, Old, from Mother Goose, 1:50

Muir, Alexander

Maple Leaf Forever, The, 2:197



Index Mukerji,

Bunny

Dhan Gopal

for you to play. 11:17

the Brave, 4:8-14

of other lands. 11:14-15

Mules. 7:80

percussion family. 11:24

Mules

string family, 11:21

—Pictures 7:76a Mules— color plate,

woodwinds, 11:22

Musk

Stories

Johnny and His Mule by Credle, 4:138-146 Murals Indian Wall Painting, An, 10:46 Murphy, Ruby Bradford

Lind. Jenny.

throwing things, 13:92

My

Bed,

My

Bonnie, song. 11:104

"My

My

value of toys, 13:66

Music for the of between

relaxing children

2

tea

is

the skv.

left

Star Pictures. 9:149-152



Flight of Icarus, The, retold by Benson. 6:222-

14:213-214

225

Midas and the Golden Touch, retold by

of recordings, 11:193-198

11:27-42

Pandora's Box by Hawthorne. 6:214-221 Persephone by Cooke. 6:229.2^

11:135-144

Myths

practicing. 14:214-215

songs of the seasons and

—Northmen

Balder by Cooke, 6:2^4-23

singing games, 8:29-34

11:109-134 Stories About the World's Great Music Makers, festivals,

(

>

Myths and Legends, 6:214-256 My Uncle Came Home, game. 8:-

My

11:161-192

Young Children and Music by

Zipper Suit, poem by Allen, 1:73

Sheeliv. 13:2

303 Music Poems

N



Tune, The, by Fyleman. 2:33

Nail-biting, 14:45-46

Old King Cole, from Mother Goose. 1:45 Musical Chairs, game, 8:23-24 "Musical Forms" by Bruque, 10:1 22£

Nanette

Musical Instruments

Naps. 13:77. 251

Nails, 9:204

Nancy

choice important. 14:212-213

group music. 14:2

1

from Mother Goos Chateau by Brann, 5:2o2

Etticoat, Little, Visits the

daylight doesn't interfere, 13:1

and

3-

2

v

1:48

~

4-year-olds. 13: 108

Nasturtiums, 7:224

history. 11:12-13

Maying Musical Instruments by Dushkin, Musical Instruments

Pvle,

6:22'

nursery songs. 11:43-72

for early

Lindsay. 2: v 5

Myths Greece and Rome anemone. 7:200

listening to. 11:25-26; 14:216

Little

poem by

nearlv ready and the sun has

Myths

8:135

patriotic songs,

Aldrich,

1:134

hymns. 11:145-160

lullabies.

by

song, 11:61

Mysterious Cat, The,

ballads. 11:73-108

helps head off trouble. 12:140

list

Fat"

to

Shadow, poem by Stevenson. 1:170

My

fun with sound and rhythm, 11:1-26

lessons,

M\ Pony,

My

3 years, 13:77

for plays.

Li\e

Mynas, 7:70 11,

Family; also Musical Instruments

and

Doesn't

country, 'tis of tbec. 2:1%; 11:143 Heart's Desire, game. 8:^6

My



folk songs

Scott. 1:67

13:177

Museums: see Collecting Mushrooms Pictures, 9:27. 57 Music: see Childcraft, volume to

poem by

Child

2-year-old, 13:87

and

6:'

Music of the Scythes, The. by Zobarsk.is. 5:211 Musk Turdes, 7:1 ~7

childhood, 14:64-69

conducive

1

Musicians

Quiet Play, 8:35-47 Muscular Control and Development, 13:27-29 in later

for Children by Sheeby, 14:21

Music for the Family, Chilwraft, volume 11



8:262-

Natural Bridge



Pictures, 9:110

Natural Childbirth. 13:7 Pictures, 8:262 -272: 11:26

Nature

— Poems:

brass family. 11:23

2

families of instruments. 11:20

see

see

Chimxraft. volumes

wide variety; tor Birds Poems; Flowers

for

a



selected

— Poems;

1

and

groups,

Trees

Childcraft

248

Poems; April

also

names

—Poems;

of

months and

seasons, as

Autumn— Poems

Nature Study, 14:129-130

Neisser, Edith G.

nature collections, 8:121-125 suggestions, 7:31, 56, 74, 173, 188, 209, 225,

— —

Sometimes

112,

Nervous Child, 14:45-46 When Children Are Anxious bv Langmuir, 13:209-218

Who Loved

Birds

Nesbit, E.

Last of the Dragons, The, 4:159-170

Luther Burban\, Plant Magician, 6:187-195 Teddy Roosevelt, the Boy Naturalist by Weir.

Nests alligator, 7:187

ant, 7:128, 129, 130

6:124-127

Will Rogers, Immortal

Cowboy Humorist,

6:196-

bird, 7:94, 96, 98-101, 103-105, 107-111

burrowing owl, 7:172-173

206

Navaho Indians



meadow

Stories

Ramon,

illustrations,

mice, 7:38

orangutan, chimpanzee, and gorilla, 7:22 ostrich, 7:28-29

Juan, the Yaqui by Harrington, 5:86-93 12:24, 26. 36

Neatness: see also Baths; Dressing; Posture, 14:6-7

penguin, 7:28

Nebraska Capitol Pictures, 10:111 Neebe, O. William, illustrations, 4:122, 123. 126.

rabbit, 7:35-36



129,

127,

147-150;

130,

5:219-223,

225:

salmon, 7:157 spider, 7:147 squirrel, 7:33

9:14, 15



Needle and Thread Poems Old Mother Tuitchet had but one eye, from Mother Goose, 1:49 Needles and Pins, 9:204 Needlework Embroidered Picture, An, 10:5Mi Famous French Tapestry, A, 10:62 Needs Children Xeed Time for Play and Hobbies by Prendergast, 14:101-105

sunfish, 7:161

wasp, 7:148 Nests



Pictures

bird, color plates, 7:108a-108f.

eagle, 9:47

grebe, 9:47

meadow

wasp. 7:126: 9:49

mental needs, 15:171-172 Personalities Xeed Balancing by

Netherlands Barker

and

Barker, 14:37-44

Needs

of

9:47

lark,

squirrel, 9:64

Netherlands

Special

108h

brook stickleback, 9:47

Friends Arc Important by Sheviakov, 14:18-25

—Art: —

see

Art

—Netherlands

Pictures, 9:70,

94

Newborn Baby, 13:6,9-14 acceptance by other children, 12:133-134

Various Handicaps,

12:253-

257

and the father, 13:23-24 Growth Is Swift and Dramatic by Perce.

Early

What Children Need from

Life

by Hvmes,

What Your Child Needs

13:27-31

New, Bright World

12:67-73 for Health

by Bain,

14:70-75

Negroes

for Jenny Lind, A. bv Benet,

6:64

Newell, Elizabeth

Funny Animals, 1:160

Albert Schweitzer, Jungle Doctor, 6:207-212

George Washington Carver by Ross, 6:103-109

Neighborhoods Influence Personality bv Hartrich. 15:107 Neighbors, 14:15



Neighbors Dictators, Troublemakers, or Friends, Your, by Taba. 15:121 Neighbors Stories Story of fane Addams. The, by Wagoner, 6:128-



134

Sometimes Friends, 12:131-

Rivals,

140

121, 149, 162,

244

Nature Study Pictures, 7:106 Nature Study Stories John James Audubon, the Boy by Bailey, 6:60-63

Naylor,

Neighbors Can Wor/^ Together bv Osborne, 15:127

New New New

England Mexico

Asters, color plate, 7:220a



Orleans

Victor

Pictures, 9:73



Stories

and the

Pirate by Radford. 5:129-1 35

News, Interpreting the, by Snyder. 15:33-40 New Song to Sing About Jonathan Bing, A. poem by Brown, 2:93 Newspapers, 9:279 Newts. 7:120-121

New

Year. The,

poem by

Craik. 1:116





Index

New

— —

Day

Poems Tomorrow by Thompson, 2:80 New Year's Day Stories Year's

Norway

New

York City

New



Year by Meigs, 5:8-17

,

Pictures

Rockefeller Center, 10:113

tunnel under

New

Hudson

Nicholas, Saint

Sea,

Pictures,

:

.

— —



Poems and Nightingale by

Scotia

Now Now

Day

the

Over, song, 11:151

Is

Through

poem by De

the Duslt,

Mare.

la

1:167

Noyes, Alfred

Highwayman, The. 2:162-167 see also Counting Poems Experiences with Numbers by Harding.



Numbers:

14:190-

195

Nursery Rhymes, 1:15-62:

Nonsense

see also

Rhymes music

in,

13:303

and

maintaining

a

co-operative.

13:237-244 readiness, 13:236

2:19

What Nursery Groups

"Night Wind" by Burchfield, 10:42c



13:231-236

Pictures, 9:71

Noise

baby experiments with, 13:59 curtailing, 13:1 U>

activity,

Nolan, Jeannette Covert

Aboard the DeWitt Clinton, 4:192-200 Nonsense Rhyme, A, poem by Riley. 2:102 Nonsense Rhymes: see also Nursery Rhymes Ftm and Fancy. 1:153-200 Humorous Poems. 2:M-108 use with 4-year-olds, 13:1 13

of,

12:2

adults, relations with. 13:204-5

anger, 12:138, 202-3 anxiety, 12:210; 13:209-18 appetite. 13:177-81 s in convalescence, 13:2~

approval. 13:110

North, Jessica Nelson

toward other people. 15:114-15, 116 awakening, 13:106. 190-1 attitudes

Three Guests, 1:80

North America: sec Canada: Mexico: North America: United States Northmen: see Myths Northmen

Plants



Star, 9:1 4S

babvishness of, 13:208

bedtime. 13:189-90.2^1 biting, 13:203

books

Find North

at

Night:, 9:87

North to Labrador by McNeer, 6:178-186 North Wind Doth Blow, The, from Mother Goose, 1:39

13:105, 106

adoption, explanation

All

We



accidents, prevention of, 13:253; 15:51, S4

5-year-olds, 13:147

Can

Offer by Horwich,

Nursery Schools Pictures, 15:78 Nursery Songs, 11:43-72 Nursery Stories, 3:7-50 Nursery Years

Nipples: see Breast Feeding

How

Stories

organizing

Night Will Never Stay, The, poem by Farjeon,

North



Zebedee, Fisherman by Dalgiiesh. 5:140-145

Nursery Schools Rossetti, 2:48

Nightmares, 13:192, 308

Nile River

retold

by Dasent, 3:72-76 Pancake, The, retold by Dasent, 3:30-34 Three Billy Goats Gruff, The, retold by Thornc-

Nova

from St. Nicholas, A, by Moore, 2:150-151 Nickel, 9:128 Night How Can We Find North at Night?, 9: s 7 What Can You See in the Sky at Night 9:13-1 What Makes Day and Night?, 9:78-79 Night Pictures "Starry Night" by Van Gogh, 10:42b Night Poems May Night by Teasdale, 2:49 Night Will Never Stay, The. by Farjeon. 2:19 Slrylar/(_



Norway Folk Tales Lad Who Went to the North Wind, The.

Notre Dame Cathedral Stone Cartings from, 10:41 Nourishment: see Feeding

Stories

Visit

Nightingales

the l^tnd of the Midnight

Thomsen. 3:35-36

River, 9:266

— 4:201-208 — 9:69 —Poems

York City Pogo Goes to New York State

From

Sun. 11:182-183

5:226-231 in the

—Biography

Grieg, Edvard

Brothers One, Tito, and Three, The. by Roue,

Ringing

249

for. \2:

brothers

and

sisters,

relationship with,

141-8 characteristics of, 13:104

constipation. 13:195

12:136,

Childcraft

2^0 contagious diseases. 13:253; 14:89 convalescence, care for, 13:273-80 co-operation, 13:105-6, 207-8

co-operative nursery school, 13:232

imagination, 13:117-22 stimulates learning, 13:117-18

independence, 13:105-6, 140; 15:58-9, 60 in convalescence, 13:280

co-ordination, 13:106

individual differences, 13:106

counseling services for, 15:163-4

infection, prevention of, 13:252-3

courage, 13:334-5

initiative,

crossing streets, 13:106; 15:55-6

inoculations, 13:252-3

crying, 12:5; 13:258

jealousy, 12:131-3; 13:131-2, 197-9, 213

dancing, 13:108, 300-1

kicking, 13:203

dawdling, 13:202

language, 13:112-16; 15:151

15:169

demandingness, 13:136-7

baby talk, 13:111 improving, 13:116

dentist, 13:254-60

individual differences

death, questions about, 12:209-10

discipline, 12:44-5, 80,

107-14; 13:134-40, 201-8;

in,

parents affect development

15:109 divorce, explaining, 12:215-16

doctor, visits

13:256-7

to,

love,

13:134

excursions, 13:304-8

manners, 15:135-40, 141-2 mother, relationship with, 13:110, 140

13:277

father, relationship with, 12:83, 127; 13:110, 251;

in illness, 13:267-8

separation from, 13:222-5, 267-8

15:84, 85, 86

who

fatigue, 13:251 fears, 13:214-15, 215-17

cause toilet

difficulties,

13:199-200

works, 15:76-8, 79

motion pictures, 15:20-1 moving, 15:92-3, 96

of animals, 13:216

nail biting, 13:215

of dark, 13:214-15

naps, 13:108, 187, 251

of events in the world, 15:34-6

neatness, 13:110

of losing love, 13:210, 213-14

new

experiences, 13:216

of separation

worked out

13:111

13:184,209,218

loyalty,

eyes, care of,

of,

learning, through imitation, 13:110

dreams, 13:192

of

13:111

objectionable, 13:113-15

from

parents, 13:199, 224

in play, 13:1 12

feelings, expressed in play, 13:120

12:132-3; 13:224

13:221-5

contribute to language, 13:113

nightmares, 13:189, 192 night wetting, 13:200

food, 13:177-84 afreets teeth, 13:262-3

for health, 13:249-50 in convalescence, 13:262-3

preferences, 13:179-80, 182

nursery groups, 13:231-6, 237-44 co-operative, 13:238-43

when

to start,

13:236

overindulgence, 13:136 overprotection, 13:140

fresh air, 13:251-2 friendliness, 13:112, 221

friends, 12:180; 13:130-4, 205

grandparents, visiting, 12:50-2

group, influences

nervous habits, 13:215

new baby affects, new experiences,

of,

13:134

parents, relationship with, 12:85-6 parties, 8:77; 12:171

play, 13:113, 118-22

equipment

for, 13:106, 108

furthers understanding, 13:133 hair twisting, 13:218 in convalescence,

health, 13:247-8, 250, 254

examination, 13:253 in traveling, 12:179

hitting, 13:202-3

home, reluctance

in

13:279-80

groups, 13:132

outdoors, 13:106 parents' part in, 13:122 relieves tension, 13:133

to leave, 13:223-5

honesty, 13:202; 15:151

space for, 13:107

with other children, 13:130-4

hospitalization, 13:269-72

politeness, 13:202, 204; 15:135-40

imaginary companions, 13:120-1

radio. 15:10-18



11

Index reading. 12:189-91. 193. 195. 197

251 traveling. 13:226-

language improved by. 13:116

=50

wakefulness. 13:186-9

recordings, 11:163; 13:301-2

wheedling. 13:1

respect, 12:45-6

worry. 13:210. 224-5

for property. 13:205

$6

comes out in play. 12:2 Is Nursing Mothers: see breast Feeding

toward grandparents, 12:50-1 13:108 rewards, 13:25s

Nutrition, 9:235; see also Eating; Feeding;

rest,

Nuts

routines, 13:138



Food

Pictures

Brazil nuts. 9:231

Nylon, 9:241

in convalescence, 13:277-8

rudeness, 13:201-2; 15:137-9 safety, 13:253; 15:51-7

security. 13:212-13

Oak Trees, Oak Trees

self-confidence. 13:221-5

self-reliance, 12:1

sex, attitude

to

in,

O 13:128-9

about, 13:127

beautiful for spacious skies. 11:144 Obedience: see also Co-operation based on loyalty. 12:44

Obedience

sharing, 13:131-2, 205

13:185-92,251

and the Pirate by Radford. 5:120-135 M. M. Alexander Mackenzie by Shore and Oblinger,

Oblinger,

snacks, 13:179

speech, 13:111-16

6:34-39

spoiled child, 13:135-40

stammering, 13:1

Observation children like to watch. 13:304

1

stepparents, attitude towards, 12:240-2 stories, 13:290-6: sec also

Nursery Stories

Seeing and Discovering, 10:119-134 Observatories. 9:170-171

to understanding. 13:202

O

fears, 13:291, 295-6

Occupations

parents

make

Stories

Victor

singing. 11:29-42. 43-72; 13:297, 299, 301

add and



Pandora's Box by Hawthorne. 6:214-221

shyness, 13:22-5

sleep,

8:33-

34

toward. 13:123-9

tell

and Barley Grow, game,

Oats, Peas, Beans,

13:189

learning about differences

what

Pictures

white oak. 7:237

1

separation from parents. 13:223 affects sleep,

7:23^.-237



selfishness, 13:138

up, 13:293-5

Canada!, song. 11:142

— Poems:

see

also

names of occupa-

— Poems

Peddlers

tions, as

stuttering, 13:111. 215

Cobbler, The, by Chaffee. 1:109

Sunday

Lamplighter, The. by Stevenson, 1:134 Miller of the Dee, The, by Mackay. 2:140-141

school. 13:222

swapping, 13:134 sweets, affect teeth. 13:2^2 table

manners, 13:181-2: 15:141

tantrum, 13:205-6 taking things, 13:205 tears, 13:206,

215

Uncle Franl{ by Monica Shannon. 1:109



teeth. 13:249, 261-6

care of. 13:263-4

injurv

to,

Ocean

toileting, difficulties in, 13:103-200

influenced by feelings. 13:194-5 staying dry at night, 13:54, 200

toothache. 13:266 toys, 13:283-9

for outdoors, 13:286

— Travel —

Stories

Journey

13:266

timidity, 13:217



Pictures

fluorine treatment for, 13:266

thumbsucking. 13:190, 215, 218, 263



Stories: see names of occupations, as Cowboys Stories: Fishermen Stories Ocean Life: see Water Animals Ocean Travel Pictures, 9:250; see also Ships

Occupations

to

Pogo Goes

America by ludson. 5:174-180 to Sea, 4:20]

O

Christmas Tree, song, 11:121

O

Columbia, the

O Come

All

Octopuses



Ye

gem

of the ocean. 11:1

^

s

faithful, song. 11:130

Pictures, 9:5^

Of speckled eggs the birdie sings, 1:122 O God, Our Help in Ages Past. song. 11:157 o Hanukkah, O Hanukkah, 11:114

Childcraft

252

Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?, from Mother

One, Two, Buckle

Goose, 1:47

Oh, Dear! What Can the Matter Be?, song, llrN4 Oh, do you know the Muffin man, 11:52 Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam, 2:198; 11:92

Oh, hush

thee,

my

baby, thy sire was a knight,

11:30

Oh

Susanna, song by Foster, 11:76 Oh, where have you been, Billy Boy, 11:86

Oh Where, Oh Where Has My

Little

song, 11:62 Oil Industry, 9:262; see also Tankers

Dog

Gone,

—Pictures

Wells—Pictures, 9:126 Is

One, Two, Three, Four, Five, from Mother Goose, 1:23

Onions, 7:218-219

Only Child, 12:155-156 Only One Mother, poem by Cooper, 2:12 O No, John!, song, 11:102

On On

die top of the Crumpetty Tree, 1:194

Preparation for Adult Life,



Old-Fashioned Valentine, An, 10:77 Old Gaelic Lullaby, poem, Author Unknown,

yonder hill there stands a creature, 11:102 Opossums, 7:44-45

— Oranges—

Hundredth, The, song, 11:155 King Cole, from Mother Goose, 1:45

King Cole, song, 11:48 MacDonald Had a Farm,

Pictures

Orange Trees, 7:239 Orange Trees Pictures, 9:122



Orangutans, 7:22 Orchestras, 11:19; see also Bands (Music); Musi-

Mother Goose, 1:49 Woman and Her Pig, The,



in

the

Shoe,

Town

2:104

Organized Groups for Children by Osborn, 14:241

—Pictures

Baltimore oriole, color plate, 7:108e

Bethlehem, song by Brooks,

Edward G. and Pauline W. Adventuring Through Excursions, 14:236-240 Eveline B.

Saw

Orloff, Gregory, illustrations, 3:37-42, 213, 216, 217. 156.

221, 160,

224, 162.

226;

163:

4:30-36;

6:240-242.

5:154,

247-249.

251

O

say! can

you

see.

11:140

Osborn, Hazel

Organized Groups for Children. 14:241-246

Living with Others, 13:201-208

a Little Bird, from Mother Goose,

220, 157,

Osborne, Ernest G.

Neighbors Can Wor\ Together, 15:127-134 You Had a Family. Too. 12:18-23

1:40

Once there was an elephant, 2:83 Once upon a time, in a little wee house, 1:162 On Christmas Day the snow. 2:79

Osborne, Mary R.

One bad turn deserves another, 3:234 One day the snow man. Sir Benjamin buzz. 2:73 One Misty, Moisty Morning, from Mother Goose,

Ostriches, 7:28-31

1:35'

Pictures

Orion, the Mighty Hunter, 9:1 50 of

Olsen,

Difficulties in



color plate, 7:220c

11:127 Olmsted, Richard W. For Fathers Only, 13:20-24

Omwake,

04-

Singing by Stevenson, 1:122

from Mother

Goose, 1:31

1

Organ Grinders' Garden, The, poem by Meigs,

Oriental Poppies

The,

2:

105

Orioles

Woman

Little

organ grinder's monkey, 7:20 Organ Grinders Poems Organ Grinders' Garden, The, by Meigs,

retold by Jacobs,

3:11

I

Instruments

cal

song, 11:60

Maid, game, 8:15 Mother Goose, when, 1:15 Mother Hubbard, from Mother Goose, 1:50 Mother Twitchet had but one eye, from

Once

Pictures, 7:45; 9:61

Organ Grinders

1:185

O

1:131

color plate, 7:236d

Jonathan Bing, O Bingathon Jon, 2:93 Older Parents, first child, 12:156 Old Faithful (geyser) Pictures, 9:117

Old

poem by Armstrong,

color plate, 7:44b

O

Old

hot, 1:89

the Hill,

15:43-50

Old Old Old Old Old Old Old Old

it's

On

Opossums

Ojemann, Ralph H. Family Life

Shoe, from Mother Goose,

On stormy days, 1:126 On summer mornings when

Oh, Johnny Fife and Johnny's wife, 2:95

Oil

My

1:23

Keeping a Convalescent Child Happy, 13:273280 Ostriches

O

the



Pictures, 9:41

Raggedy Man' He works

Eer

I'.i.

2:142

1

1

Index Other Children Become More Important by Goldsmith, 13:130 Otherwise, Otters



poem by

Painted Cart, The, by Tenney. 4:234-240 Painted Cups (Indian Paintbrush)

Painting, 8:149-162;

making

causes trouble in classrooms, 14:15(1 of a 2-year-old, 13:83-84

in schools,

14:152-153

Over Dale, poem by Shakespeare, 2:61 Meadow, poem by Wadsworth, 1:154

Overprotection: see also Self-Reliance

Art for Children, CHILDCEAFT, volume 10 Paintings— Study, 10:122 Palk, Helen King of the Fur Traders, The, by Dickie and Palk. 6:153-158

Palmer, E. Laurence

by parent can be overdone, 14:46-47 is spoiling, 13:140 of only child. 12:155-156

Our Frog and Toad

Helpers, 7:113-121

Palms, 7:240



Over the mountains. 1:102 Over the river, 1:104 Over the river and through the wood. 1:142 Owl and the Pussycat, The, poem by Lear, 1:186

Palms

Owls, 7:107-108 burrowing, 7:172-173

Pandas

Pictures, color plate. 7:236c

Who Hare

Palsy, Children

Cerebral, bv Shriner,

12:275 Pancake, The, retold by Dasent, 3:30

— Pans— Pansies —

Pictures, 7:30

Pandora's Box by Hawthorne, 6:214 Pictures, 9:254

Pictures

"Baby Owl" by

Diirer, 10:31

Pansies, 7:222. 224

great horned, color plate, 7:108g

—Poems Pussycat, The, by Lear, Owl and Oxen—Pictures Owls

the

Pictures, color plate, 7:220c

Paper 1:186-187

how

it is

uses,

color plate, 7:76c

made, 9:282

9:283

Paper Work, 8:210-214; 10:92-93; see also Parties

Oysters, 7:152-153



and Modeling by Bland.

Paintings

in the

Oysters

8:153-159

14:217

Overcrowding Hill,

to paint,

Painting, Drawing,

Overactivity

10:6-11: see also Pictures

better pictures, 8:159-161

materials, 8:150-153

what

7:57



—Pictures

color plate, 7:204c

Painted Turtles, 7:1 7s

15:3

Our Friends of the Bird World by Hausman, 7:93 Our Frog and Toad Helpers by Palmer, 7:113 Our Pets, the Animals We Know Best by Mann,

Owls

14:223

Paint, kinds.

Painted Cups (Indian Paintbrush), 7:200-201

Fisher, 1:98

Pictures, 9:48

Our Changing World by Gruenberg and Krech,

Over Over

253

cut-outs

Pictures, 9:43,

230

and scrap books, 8:44-45

games, 8:71-74

making pictures with colored paper, "Mimosa Rug"' by Matisse. 10:49

10: In

pinwheels, 9:95

Pablo de Jesus, Friar

"Count of Galves, The," by Pablo de San Geronimo, 10:54

Jesus

and

Pace, Mildred Mastin

Clara Barton, the

Young

Schoolteacher, 6:83-88

Art

Pacific Islands

Pacific Islands

Parasol Ants, 7:132



Parasol Ants

Pictures, 7:

1

3

Parent Education

Pacific Islands art: see



Songs Marching Song, 11:72

Parades

— Pacific

— —

Islands

Pictures, 9:55, 56

Stories

Ghost of the Lagoon by Sperry, 5:232-240 Paddle Tennis, game. 8:60-62 Pageants, 8:145-148

Page from an Old Bool{ Made by Hand, A. 10:27 "Page from a Sketch Hook. A," by ToulouseLautrec, 10:55

may

Information on parent education

be found

throughout Childcraft volumes 12, 15



Parent Interviews

Pictures, 14:12

13,

14,

3

Parents influenced by

Your Greatest

own

childhoods, 12:

Gift to

v

Your Child bv Montagu,

15:167-172 Parents. Reading for, 15:181 182

—>

>

Childcrafi Pjhyto?

Als» HmshamJs

.-?••-/

Mace.

atu.

:

-

-

.

-

Pearson. Charles D..

:

Pamas Arr Inporuaa by Frank and Frank

Pear Trees.

fw«£.

Peas. '

12 «:

Pnicat-Teacher Relations. :.

;

^

;

-

;;--;:

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H«w

Srioa?

-

'.

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Laut.

i

:

Games

helping develop

7

language

child"*

-c:

..;..

.

mral schools. 14: < ;:: ;. _-:

?:-: if. H."-

:•:.>:

£

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Popcorn

:

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1:111

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game

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pictures.

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14:

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in

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other theme parties,

104 8:1 04- 10*

7: -">"•

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;r_rc->

Peoples of Other Lands: 100, 103-1

afn

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Petce. Frances

;



Pictures. 9 5

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lanes nut)

Wife

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—Production:

hand puppet 12

Goldsmith. 13:130-134 quiet, 8:35-47

13:130-131

room and equipment. 13:107-108 sports. 8:55

narionette stage.

Playthings:

Plows— Pictures.

Safety at Play. 15:^

Costumes

Play Schools. 13

Plodding wins the

out-of-doors. 13:10'-

readiness to play with others.

also

set

stage. s

8:240

on auto trip. 13:22 ^ Other Children Become More Important by

games and

set

Group by Woods. 13:237

244

special

1

Playpens, 13:29

13:156-161 // Yoit

— Playgrounds—

Equipment. Playgrounds— Materials. 14:11

Playmates:

'

5-year-olds with others. 13:169-174 Friends Arc Important by Sheviakov. 14:1 s -25 He's a Great Pretender by Collard. 13:11" 122 Still

Games: Teeter-

Pirate

Prendergast. 14:101-105

dramatic. 8:1

He

also

and 4-year-olds. 13:11^-119 Poems Playing House

Langdon. 14:106-114 Children

set

Playgrounds

5-vear-olds.

nursery school. 13:234

Children

10:2'>

3-

Rutherford

Play: see also at

7:235

9:241

Trees and

on playgrounds. 10:H>7

Totters

Playing Boat

^

Plants

deciduous

160,

Play and Hobbies, Creative, Childcraft, volume 8

how

Plants— Reproduction. 7:189, Tree Pollen. 7:

Plants

157.

15',.

Playhouses

—Protection. 9:46 1

14\

147.

Maude and Maxine Meyer de Schauen-

Playgrounds, 8:52-62;

7:210-225

violet. 7:1

Plav" by Kano. 10:5n

at

13:14'..

— Pictures

16

]

and Murrin. The." by Watkins.

see

Growing Flowers and Vegetables bv McKennv,

Plants

Games

also

13:2

interesting shapes

Plants



Biber.

161. 17n. 172. 173

zinnias. 7:22 1-222

Plants

Pictures.

'Chinese Children

2

7:22n-221

Trees and

Your Child by

building shapes. 10:1ns.

express tree, 7:2 rose,

to

14: >3-100

violets, color plate,

Plants

-->

Plums

race,

9:l s

—Pictures

color plate. 7:2 36d

Plum

Trees. 7:2

Pluto (planet). 9

l

3:239





Childcraft

2 58

Pocahontas and Captain John Smith by Aulaire

and Aulaire, 6:18 Poe, Frances, illustrations, 7:125, 145

Poems, Humorous, 2:81-108

Fun and Fancy, 1:153-200 Poems, Storytelling and Other, Childcraft,

Poplar Trees vol-

ume 2

Carolina or cottonwood, 7:237



Poplar Trees

Poems and Ballads, 2:109-200 Poems for Every Day, 2:1 1-80 Poems of Early Childhood, Childcraft, volume Poetry: see Childcraft, volumes

1

Lombardy

Pogo Goes



to

Pictures

poplars, color plate, 7:236a

Poppies 1

and 2

California poppy, 7:194, 196

Poppies

by children, 8:172-173 writing, 8:168-170 Poinsettias

Poor Johnny was bended well-nigh double, 2:192 Poor old Jonathan Bing, 2:92 Popcorn Man, The, poem by Smith, 2:29 Pop! Goes the Weasel, song, 11:47



Pictures

Oriental poppy, color plate, 7:220c

Porcupine Fishes, 7:155 Porcupine Fishes

Sea by Norling, 4:201-208



Pictures, 9:43

Porcupines, 7:53

Pictures, 7:223

Pointer, Priscilla, illustrations, 1:96-99, 116, 117,

Porcupines



Pictures, 9:45

Poison Ivy, 7:208

Boy" by Caroto, 10:15 Portuguese Man-of-War, 7:151

Poison Ivy

Portuguese Man-of-War

180, 181



"Portrait of a

Pictures, 9:46

remedies, 14:85

Postal Service



Poland Biography Chopin, Frederic

The

Patriot

Composer

of



Pictures, 7:6; 9:14, 54

Helping Our Policemen

—Pictures

Help Us, 9:285 youngster's contact with the protection comto

munities provide, 15:35



Pictures, 9:144

Leo, illustrations, 11:27

Pollination: see Plants

— Reproduction

Polliwogs: see Frogs; Toads of a Gattcho, 5:154-163

Put the Kettle On, from Mother Goose,

Polly,

1:30

Polyphemus Moths



Pictures

color plate, 7:124c



Pompano

Pom Pom

Pictures, 9:230

Pullaway, game, 8:25

ponies, 7:78

polo ponies, 7:78-79

— Ponies— Poems Had a Ponies — Songs Ponies

My

Little

health, 14:68-69

Potatoes' Dance, The, by Lindsay, 2:110-112

poem by

Potatoes' Dance, The, Pots, Pans,

Lindsay, 2:110

and Dishes, 9:254

Potter, Beatrix

Tale of Peter Rabbit, The, 3:37-42 Miriam Clark

Potter,

Pottery: see Clay

Modeling

Poultry: see Chickens; Ducks; Geese; Pigeons;

Turkeys Power: see also Dams; Water Power for the future, 9:288 Prairie Dogs, 7:169-170 Prairie

Dogs



Pictures, 7:168

Father,

Prayers

We Than\

—Poems

Thee, 2:74

Vespers by Milne, 1:145

Pictures

color plate, 7:60c

/

good

—Poems

Potatoes

Prayers: see also Grace

Ponies, 7:76, 79

cow

of preschool child, 13:248 related to

Mrs. Goose's Wild Christmas, 4:30-36

Pollock, Katherine G.

Honor

Posters

Acrobats, 10:64

Police: see also School Police

Policeman

Pictures: see Mail Service

Posture

Polar Bears, 7:5-6

Polar Bears



Pictures

Poland, 11:174-175

In

Pictures, 9:45

collecting, 8:119-121

Poisons

Politi,



Postage Stamps

Poison Oaks, 7:208

Prayers for Every Day, 1:146-147

Praying Mantis: see Mantes Pony, from Mother Goose, 1:38

Pony, 11:61

Pony Stepping High, 11:61 Pony Stepping High, song, 11:61

Pregnancy, 13:3-8 father's responsibilities,

hospital

13:20-24

management, 13:17

Prejudices: see

Human

Relations

Prenatal Growth, 13:4-6

In DEX Prendergast, Joseph

Need Time

Children

important for overanxious children, 13:2 is importance of how you handle events, 12:13-14

and Hobbies,

for Play

14:101-105

of expectant parents, 13:'>

Preschool Child

Information

found

in

on the preschool child may be Childcraft volume 13

Presents: see Gifts

Pretending: sec Imagination Prevey, Esther E.

Harold Lee,

107,

120,

227-240; 4:8-12,

121,

Norman,

illustrations. 6:29, 52, 33,

80-82

Prickett, Helen, illustrations, 8:77, 79, S3, 84, 86,

89-91, 93, 95, 97, 98,

87,

101,

103,

106;

11:32, 33, 48, 56, 57, 65, 98, 100, 101, 114, 141;

12:5, 43,

13:16, 39, 48, 49, 63,

122;

225, 226, 227, 228, 249;

14:65,

101, 224,

228, 269 Pride



Grimm and

Grimm, 3:93-101 il-

Princesses: see Fairy Tales

Prince Wicked and the Grateful Animals, retold Printing Presses



Pictures, 9:279

wagon up hill, 9:200 by animals, 9:26

]ac\-o' -Lantern by Colby. 5:4(1 46

Property, Respect for, 13:205

Animals

Pumpkin-Eater, from Mother

Halloween, 11:111 Halloween Song, 11:111

Pumpkins

12, 13, 14, 15

Promotions, 14:158-159

tection; Fire





Pumpkins

Protection: see

Mountain Lions

see

Theme in Yellow by Sandburg, What Am I? by A Id is. 1:140

14:266-269

Information on problems in

Why Do

9:194

Goose, 1:25

Problems

umes

pulley,

Pumpkin Blossoms Pictures, 7:140 Pumpkin, pumpkin round and fat. 11:111 Pumpkins Poems Peter, Peter,

game, 8:25 26

Private Schools

may

Pulling

Blac\ and Gold by Turner, 1:141

by Babbitt, 3:102

of,

Pulleys, 9:194-195

Pulling Bee, The. by Henry. 4:131

Mughal

luminated manuscript, 10:34

choice

Most of Your Public Library by

the

Prince Riding on an Elephant from

Prisoner's Base,

the

Hewitt, 14:231-235 Public Schools: see Schools

nails, 9:1

Stories

Fisherman and His Wife, The, by

with

Water Supply Public Libraries

Making

14

Price,

Mental Health; Personality Family Guidance Services by Sutherland, 15:162-166

3:102, 103, 106,

illustrations,

US,

109,

s

Psychological Tests: see Testing Programs Psychology: see also Adolescence: Imagination;

Puberty, 14:33-34; see also Adolescence Public Health: see Contagious Diseases: Hospitals:

Schools Influence Personality, 14:133-138 Price,

2 59

Who

.he Mentally Retarded by

Martens, 12:281-283

Pupae



Pictures, 9:19

moth. 7:134 Puppets and Marionettes by Hoben, 8:231

Puppet Shows

on

—Pictures

television.

9:275



Childcraft

»6o

— Rabbits—

Poems Bunny Romance, A, by Herford,

Puppies, 7:62-64

— Puritans— Puppies

Rabbits

Pictures, 7:61; 9:11

color plates, 7:60a, b Stories: see also

Pilgrim Fathers

]ac\-o -Lantern by Colby, 5:40-46

Purple Cow, The,

poem by

Tale of Peter Rabbit, The, by Potter, 3:37-42

Burgess, 2:87

Purple horses with orange manes, 1:83

"Purple Robe, The," by Matisse, 10:122a

Raccoons, 7:45-46

Raccoons



Pictures, 7:46; 9:14, 61

color plate, 7:44b

Racial Understanding: see

Purses

make, 8:216-219, 252-253

to

Pussywillows

Willow

—Poems

Cats, The, by

Widdemer, 1:120

make, 8:184-185

Pyle, Katherine

Mul as and Pyramids



Relations

backward, 8:29 bear, 8:29

egg and spoon, 8:24

and

heel

8:29

toe,

hopping, 8:29 peanut, 8:24 potato, 8:29 sack, 8:29

three-legged, 8:29

walking, 8:29

wheelbarrow, 8:29 Racing Stories



Hare and the Tortoise, The, by Aesop, 3:239 Radford, Ruby Lorraine Victor and the Pirate, 5:129-135

Puzzles: see also Riddles to

Human

Racing

Pushing air through a straw, 9:209 heavy objects, 9:189 pedals pushed by legs on tricycles and bicycles. 9:182, 188 propeller pushes airplane forward, 9:183 propellers push ships through water, 9:182, 188 Pussycat, Pussycat, from Mother Goose, 1:20 Pussycat's Whiskers, game, 8:21 Pussywillows, 7:237-238

how

the Brave by Mukerji, 4:8-14

Hare's Birthday Party by Kozisek, 4:15-20

Stories

how

Bunny

2:1 13-1 15

Stories

the Golden Touch, 6:226-228

Pictures, 10:115

Radio broadcasting a play, 9:274

sound

Pythons, 7:181

effects,

9:274

Values, 9:274

Radio— Pictures,

9:270, 274

Radio and Television by Shayon, 15:10 Qiian gh Wangle's Hat, The,

poem by

Lear, 1:194

Radishes, 7:218

Quarantine: see Contagious Diseases

Raggedy Man, The, poem by

Quarreling

Raggle, song,

among

children

of

same family, 12:137-140,





Pictures, 9:124,

Quebec Stories Madelon Dances by

248

Ragweed, 7:207-208 service to mothers, 13:229-230

Railroads— Models, 8:187-188 Phillips,

5:146-153

Rain, 9:101. 142

Rain Rain

Queen ant,

Riley, 2:142

:62

Railroads, 9:265; see also Locomotives; Trains

146-147

Quarrying

1 1

7:128-130

— —Poems

Pictures, 9:133

April Showers by Stephens. 2:41

bee, 7:123-127

Queen Anne's Lace, 7:194 Queen of Hearts, The, from Mother Goose, 1:44 Questions, of children: see Curiosity

Quiet Play by Murphy, 8:35

Down Drums

the Rain Falls by Coatsworth, 1:123 of the Rain by Davies, 1:123

Umbrella Brigade, The, by Richards, 2:62-63 Rain Songs

— Rain —

Timothy Tim-o, 11:68 Stories

Hoosier Barbecue by Wilson, 5:113-121 Rabbits, 7:35-37

Rabbits— Pictures, 9:11,

Rain, 34; 10:69

color plate, 7:60d cottontail, color plate,

7:44b

poem by

Stevenson, 1:122

Rainbow, The, poem by Rossetti, 1:127 Rainbows, 9:13^-140 Rainbows Pictures, 9:133



Index Rain, Rain,

Go Away, Old Rhyme,

Records: see also Books; also kinds, as Writing

1:122

Rainy Day Fun: see Childcraft volume tive Play and Hobbies

8,

Crea-

7:83-84

Home

—Poems —

Sam



Art;

see

Entertainment

Clubs;

for

Convalescents; Experiments, Scientific; Games;

Handicraft; Hobbies; Holidays; Leisuretime;

on the Range, A, 2:198-199 Ranch Life Songs Home on the Range, 11:92-93 Yippi Ti-yi-yo, Git Along, Little Dogies, 11:90-91

Ranch Life

12:182-188

Recreatidn:

sheep, 7:84-85

Ranch Life

Family Keeps Records, The, by Reynolds, Records, Phonograph: see Phonograph Records

Ranch Life cattle,

26

Stories

Volney, Cowboy, by Stong, 5:136-139

Rands, William Brighty

Music; Parties; Play: Puzzles: Reading: Storytelling;

Vacations

Redbirds: see Cardinal Birds

Redheaded Woodpeckers: see Woodpeckers Red leaves falling down, 11:112 Red-Spotted Purple Butterflies

—Pictures

color plate, 7:124b

World, The, 1:68

Redwoods, 7:241

Ransome, Arthur

Redwoods

Salt, 3:132-143



Pictures, 9:7

Reese, Lizette

Rapid Learners: see Exceptional Children Rapttnzel by Grimm and Grimm. 3:144 Rare Provider, A, by Brink, 4:1 12

Woodworth

Christmas FolkjSong, A, 2:76 Refrigeration, 9:234, 251

Regional Stories

Rattlesnakes, 7:181-183

Bluebonnets for Luanda by Savers. 5:7^ Christmas Ere on Beacon Hill by Cavanah,

Rattleweeds, or Locoweeds. 7:208

Rayon, 7:235; 9:241 5:57

Read, Dr. Grantly Dick, 13:7. 17

Christmas

Readiness

in the

Piney

on the place of readiness in a development may be found throughout Childcraft volumes 12, 13, 14, 15

Information child's

Reading: see also Books; Literature

Hoosier Barbecue by Wilson. 5:113-121 Juan Brings a Valentine by Rushing, 5:1^-24 Juan, the Yaqui by Harrington. 5:86-93

Locked

In by Enright, 5:104-1 12

beginning, 13:314-315

Sam

Comics by Sondergaard. 15:26-32 Maying the Most of Your Public Library by

Will Rogers. Immortal

Hewitt, 14:231-235 stories for oral: see

Childcraft volumes 3-6

5:94-

Ye Pure

Rejoice,

in Heart, song. 11:158

to a

Child by Artley,

Grandparents and Other Relatives by Grossman, 12:49-56

Reading—Pictures,

150

9: 2 70; 15:119.

can read aloud to children, 15:99,

101

Reading for Parents, 15:181-182 Reading Readiness. 12:76; 13:313-314; 14:171-174

Reading Together by Betzner, 12:189 Real Princess, The, by Andersen, 3:1 10



Grace: Hymns; Myths Greece and Rome: Myths — Northmen; Prayers; Spiritual

Religion:

Values church records. 12:183 Religion

— Pictures

child at prayer, 12:292

Religious Art: see also

Cathedral: Notre

Reason

Can They Understand Reasons 5

.

13:206-207

5-year-olds, 13:171

He Grows More Reasonable. What About Disobedience 1

.

Rebecca,

206

Relatives

14:171-176

sitters

Cowboy by Stong, 5:136-139 Cowboy Humorist. 6:196-

103

the newspaper, 9:2,9

What Reading Means

Volney,

Young Mountainx Singer by Simmonds,

Stimulates Thinking, 15:150-151

babv

Woods by Simon.

5:68-76

poem by

14:5

14:47 4^

Belloc, 2:97

Recipes, suitable for children, 8:194-20')

Recording Machines



Pictures, 9:270

Book

Dame

of Kelts:

Chartrcs

Cathedral

"Blessing. The." by Chardin. 10:26a

Indian Wall Painting, An, 10:46 "Little Garden of Paradise" by

man

Unknown

Ger-

Painter. 10:122d-122e

"Meeting of Saint Anthony and

St.

Paul" by

Sassetta. 10:581-59 "St.

George and the Dragon" by

Crivelli, 10:58c

Childcraft

262 'St.

Martin and the Beggar" by El Greco,

"Temptation of Saint Anthony by Bosch, 10:44

Erwin C,

Rendall,

illustrations,

(detail),

7:195;

The,"

8:2,

3,

10-12, 14, 18, 21, 23, 27, 232, 233, 235-239

5-7,

Renoir, Pierre Auguste

"Claude

12:284-286

Rhinoceroses

at the Easel," 10:21

"Girl with a Watering Can," 10:frontispiece

Report Cards, 14:155-157 Reports and Promotions by Shane, 14:155

Reproduction, 9:8-13; 13:4-5, 7-8; see also Plants

—Reproduction;

Rice

names of reptiles, as Turtles Lizards, and Other Reptiles by Bron-

Reptiles: see also



Pictures,



Pictures, 9:72

Richards, Laura E. Alice's Supper, 2:58-59

Ballad of China, A, 2:116-119 Buffalo, The, 2:86

7:175-187

Resourcefulness

Becoming Resourceful by Hymes, 15:58-63 of modern children, 15:8-9 Respect: see also Self-Respect

Grandparents and Other Relatives by Grossman,

Cave-Boy, The, 2:30-31 Eletelephony, 2:83

Utile Muffin Man, The, 1:112-113 Mrs. Snip^in and Mrs. Wobblechin, 1:163 Talents Differ, 2:51

12:49-56

To

Respect for Property, 13:205

Why Do

Pictures, 9:40

Antonio, 2:121

son, 7:175-188

Reptiles



Rhymes, Nonsense: see Nonsense Rhymes Rhymes, Nursery, 1:15-62 Rhyme Time, game, 8:69 Rhythm, 11:9-26 Exploring the World of Music, 13:298-301

Sex Education

explaining to a child, 14:28-31

Turtles,



War in America Songs Yankee Doodle, 11:137 Rewards and Punishments: see Discipline Reynolds, Marjorie K. Family Keeps Records, The, 12:182-188 Rheumatic Fever, Children with, by Josselvn, Revolutionary

10:58b

Children Steal

2 ,

14:53-56

Respiration: see Breathing

Who

Wriggles, 2:96



Responsibility

Accident Prevention

the Little Girl

Umbrella Brigade, The, 2:62-63 Richmond, Julius B. Doctor and the Dentist Your Child's Friends,

Your

Is

Responsibility by

The, 13:254-260 Riddles

Dietrich, 15:51-57

aim of good discipline, 14:148-149 assumed by child as he grows, 14:51

Do You Know. ...

5-year-olds, 13:164-165, 166-168

from Mother Goose, 1:48-49

for library books, 14:233-234

Riddling Knight, The, 2:168-169

What Ami? by Aldis, 1:140 Riddling Knight, The, poem, Author Unknown,

for time, 15:49-50 in

household

in

modern

tasks, 12:163-165

life.

15:6-9

2:168

of a child for his acts, 15:109 of older children for

younger ones, 12:136

of 6- and 7-year-olds for time, 15:49-50 decisions are for parents,

12:118-119

Rest, Baby, Rest, song, 11:39

Who

Are Mentally, by Mar-

—Poems War

in

This

Riding

Paul Reveres Ride by Longfellow, 2:180-184 Revolutionary

Cow-

2:162-167 1:77

Is

the

Way

the Ladies Ride,

from Mother

Goose, 1:43

tens, 12:281

Revere, Paul

Diverting History of John Gilpin, The, by

Paul Revere's Ride by Longfellow, 2:180-184 Ride a Cockhorse, from Mother Goose, 1:17

4-year-olds, 13:108

Retarded, Children

13:149-155

—Poems

Highwayman, The, by Noyes, Huntsmen, The, by De la Mare,

children's needs, 14:71

rooming-in and, 13:17-18

and

Asl^s Endless Questions,

Riding

per, 2:152-161

Rest: see also Sleep

3-

Ride a Cockhorse, from Mother Goose, 1:17 Ridenour, Nina

He

of parents, 15:167-168

some

by Wegert, 1:75

Flea, The, by Sawyer, 3:125-131

America

—Poems

Paul Revere's Rule by Longfellow, 2:180-184 Yankee Doodle, Author Unknown, 2:185

— Songs

Here Come Three Dukes A-Riding, 11:103 Rig a Jig fig, song, 1 1 '5 James Whitcomb Nonsense Rhyme, A, 2:102-103 (

:

Riley,

1

!

Index Raggedy Man, The, 2:142-143

When

on the Punkjn, 2:68-69 Ring-Around-a-Rosy, from Mother Goose, 1:18 Ring-Around-a-Rosy, game, 8:29-30 Ring Around the World, poem by Wynne, 2:37 Ringing in the New Year by Meigs, 5:S the Frost

Is

Ringlety-jing!, 2:102

how

make, 8:1S J



Sometimes Friends by

Neis-

Pictures

Myths: see Myths Greece and Rome Rombauer, Irma S., and Torno, Jane Crawford Cooking Up Fun, 8:193-2(1'.'

Roosevelt, Franklin Delano, 6:140-144 drill,

Roads—Pictures,

Roosevelt, Theodore, 6:124 127

9:210

Roosters: see Chickens

9:259, 260

"Roosters" by Jakuchu, 10:28-29

clover-leaf crossing, 10:106

Road Scrapers



Roots

Pictures, 9:178

Robert Fulton Makes the Paddles

Work by

Jud-

son, 6:54

function tree,

poem by Madox

Robert of Lincoln, Roberts, Elizabeth

Roses



Pictures, 9:46, 57

color plate, 7:220b

color plate, wild rose. 7:204a

Firefly, 1:98

Milling Time, 1:88 Woodpecker, The, 1:99

Ross,

Mary Newlin Rosa Bon hew Breaks Her Needle,

Ross,

Helen

Parents Play

Roberts,

6:95-102

Wanda

M.

Mam

Parts. 12:S2-89

I.

George Washington Carter. 6:MH-109 Rossetti, Christina

Learn About Other People, 15:113-

120

Robin

7:214-215

Roses, 7:220-221

Circus, The, 2:28

Children

of,

7:227-228

Rosa Bonheur Breaks Her Needle by Roberts. 6'95

Bryant, 2:52

Butterbean Tent, The, 1:81

Robertson,



Roman

Rooming-ln by Jackson, 13:15

color plate, 7:108h

Roads pneumatic

Never Had Roller SkjOes,

Romp, The, poem by Turner, 2:54 "Room at Aries" by Van Gogh, 10:26b

Pictures, 9:71, 72



Stories

The, by Woodward, 4:178-183

12:131-140

Road Runners

6:196-206

(iarst,

Who Had

Family

River Horses: see Hippopotamuses Rivers

Rogers, Will by

— Roller Skates —

13:76

Rivals,

Rocky Mountain Goats: see Mountain Goats Rodents: see names of rodents, as Chipmunks

Skates— Pictures, 9:1 S3, 191 Poems Wings and Wheels by Turner, 2:25

Rivalry: see also Jealousy

ser,

1

Roller Skates

at bedtime, 13:189-190

Sometimes

:

Rocks, 9:124

Roller

(

to

8:10-1

Rituals

at 2'/2 years,

"Rocking Chair" by Moore, 10:25 Rock of Ages, song. 1 1 60

Roller Coasters, 9:202

Ring-on-the-Nose, game, Ringtoss, game,

263

Hood and Maid Marian

by Harvey, 6:247

Bread and Mi/{ for Breakfast. 1:68 Caterpillar, The. 2:60 City Mouse and the Garden Mouse, Tin. 1:94

Robins, 7:93-95

Clouds. 1:126

Robins

Growing in the Vale, 2:40 //; the Meadow, 1:119 Mix a Pancake, 1:64

7:165 — 7:10Xa Robins— Poems Pictures,

color plate,

Robin

Little

Redbreast,

from

Mother

Goose,

1:40

North

Wind Doth Blow,

The, from Mother

Goose, 1:39 Talents Differ by Richards, 2:51

Robinson Crusoe's Story, poem by Carryl, 2:136

Rockefeller Center

Rockets





Rocking Beds, 13:33

Field. 1:184

Pictures, 10:113

Pictures, 9:173

Skylark and Nightingale, 2:4s Three Plum Buns. 1

What Does the Bee Do° 1:65 Who Has Seen the Wind?, 1:125 .

Roszak, Theodore

Rochabye, Baby, song, 11:29

Rock-A-By Lady, The, poem by

Mother's Song, A, 1:67 Rainbow. Tin. 1:127

J.

"Spatial Construction." 10:80

Roth, Salo, illustrations. 14:159

Round

the

Turner.

May

Pole

1:12')

Now We

Dance, poem by

Childcraft

264

— Safety —

Poems Stop— Go by Baruch,

Rousseau, Henri

Safety

Waterfall, The," 10:42-42a

Routines

change between 15 and 18 months, 13:94 changes affect sleep. 13:188-189

1:100

Stories

Juan, the Yaqui by Harrington, 5:86-93

Town Mouse and Country

for convalescents, 13:277-278

Mouse, The, by

Aesop, 3:228-229

Home,

too rigid, 13:138-139

Safety at

while traveling, 13:229, 230

Safety at Play, 13:233; 15:56-57

Rowe, Dorothy

morning, 13:190-191

in early

Two, and Three, The,

Brothers One,

5:226-231

and

3-

13:81, 82-83; 15:52-54

4-year-olds, 13:106

Royt, Mary, illustrations, 1:64-67, 74, 75, 198, 199 Rub-a-D lib-Dub, from Mother Goose, 1:34

Safety in Travel, 12:179-180; 13:227; 15:54-55

Rubber, 9:263

Sahara (desert)



Rubber Trees Ruby-Throated

Pictures, 9:263

Safety Patrols: see School Police

Said the

Hummingbirds:

see

Humming-

Duck

Kangaroo, 1:192

Wind

to

the

Moon,

will

"I

Sailing— Pictures, 9:94, 267

5:113-115, 118, 119, 122, 123, 125-127

Sailing

—Poems

Bobby Shajto, from Mother Goose, 1:34 Ingenious Little Old Man, The, bv Bennett.

Matisse, 10:49

Rules, 13:82 are necessary, 12:291, 293

1:162

Saw

a Ship A-Sailing, Old Rhyme, 1:158 Rub-a-Dub-Dub, from Mother Goose, 1:34 Sea Fever by Masefield, 2:38 Sea Gypsy, The, by Hovey, 2:39 Sing Me a Song by Stevenson, 2:125

co-operative planning, 12:44

/

of camps, 14:262 of getting along, 13:203-205 of libraries, 14:233

on vacations, 12:178



Running Pictures, 9:188 Running Away, 14:56-57 Running Games, 8:24-29 Run, Sheep, Run, game, 8:24-25

Sailing, song, 11:94

Rural Schools discipline, 14:153-154

Day, party for, 8:87-88 St. Valentine's Day: see Valentine's Day Salamanders, 7:120-121 Salamanders Pictures, 9:52, 60

"St.

—Poems

Saint Nicholas: tee Nicholas, Saint St. Patrick's



fuan Brings a Valentine, 5:18-24 G. W.: see A. E.

Sally

Russell,

see

Art

—Union

of

Soviet

Socialist

Re-

U.S.S.R.— Biography. U.S.S.R.— Folk and U.S.S.R. Stories Ruth, "Babe," George Herman, 6:135-139 Ruud, Herbert, illustrations, 5:146, 148, 149, 152, publics;



Tales,

George and the Dragon" by Crivelli, 10:58c Martin and the Beggar" by El Greco, 10:58b

"St.

Rushing, Lilith Sanford

Russia:

blow you

out!", 2:144

illustrations, 4:53, 54, 56, 57, 59;

Rugs "Mimosa Rug" by

Pictures, 9:73

Said the Table to the Chair, 1:196 Said the

birds

Rudeen, Herbert,



to the

Go Round

the

Moon,

song,

11:47

Salmon, 7:156-158

Salmon Salt

Sam



Pictures, 9:230

9:127

Salt,

by Ransome, 3:132 Volncy, Cowboy by Stong. 5:136

Sand

153

and play, 10:99 Use Sand and Clay?, 9:123 Sandboxes, how to make, 8:181-182 Sandburg, Carl for building

How Do We

Safety: see also

Dogs

for the Blind: First Aid:

Fog, 2:67

Playgrounds; Police; Traffic

Accident Prevention

Is

Your

Responsibility by

Dietrich, 15:51-57

neighborhood, 15:132-133 of toys, 13:67

Safety



Pictures

small child needs protection from danger,

13:167

Small Homes, 1:99

Theme

in Yellow, 2:66

San Francisco, California Golden Gate Bridge, 10:105 San Geronimo, Father "Count of Calves, The." by Pablo de Jesus and San Geronimo, 10:54

Index

—Poems: Nicholas, Santa poem, Author Unknown. Santa Claus — Songs Santa Claus

see

Saint

Claus,

new



experiences

Pictures

mav

be challenging or frighten

ingi 13:311

Anne

readiness to be left alone, 13:223, 224

Sassetta

Schools

"Meeting of Saint Anthony and

Paul."

St.

10:581-59

poem by Edelman,

1:74

Saturn (planet), 9:168

Men and

for the

Sayers, Frances Clarke

Need Time

and Hobbies by

for Play

TV

viewing

and

listening to radio,

the Language, 14:184-189 Schweitzer, Albert by McNeer, 6:207-212

Childcraft volumes 7 and 9

14:196-201

A, from Mother Goose, 1:47

and Industry, Childcraft volume 9

Scienct

Scientific

by Hale, 1:55

Experiments: see Experiments. Scientific

Scientists: see also Inventors

Stories

Johnny and His Mule by Credle, 4:138-146 Juan Brings a Valentine by Rushing, 5:18-24 Little Black Bear Goes to School, A, by Sickels,

George Washington, 6:103-109

Carver. Scissors

are levers, 9:198

Scorpion, The, 9:151

—Pictures

School Problems: see also Kindergarten Child Information on the place of school problems in

growth may be found volume 14

a child's

co-operation

with

of children of

home

in

standards,

Childcraft

Scott, Elizabeth

My

recently, 15:94-96

Manson

Hid, 1:67

Scott, Jane, illustrations. 12:222. 22" Scott,

13:204-205

working mothers, 15:80-81

who have moved



Songs Loch Lomond, 11:100-101

Scotland

responsibility of children, 15:8

of children

1:95

Ruby Writing and Speaking

Discovering the World of Science by Hlough,

—Poems

School Police

Schulz, Lillian

Science: see

Responsibility for Time. 15:40-50

rooming-in, 13:18

4:68-74

14:135

of Songs, 11:172-173

Fuzzy Wuzzy, Creepy Crawly,

15:13-16



also

Schuyler,

feeding baby, 13:41-43

School Life

Create Atmosphere,

The Great Writer

Prendergast, 14:101-105

Lamb

and groups of parents help, 15:1 2'-* Schools— Equipment, 9:287; 14:119120; see Playgrounds Equipment

Schubert's Cradle Song, song, 11:42

Schedules: see also Routines

Mary's

PTA

Schubert, Franz

color plate, 7:108d

Dillar, a Dollar,

Schoolteacher, bv Pace.

Schools Influence Personality by Prevey. 14:133

Pictures

Scenery, for plays, 8:136-137

School Life

i

handicapped, 14:143-144

Buildings

Calls?, 2:44

for child's

a



Blucbonncts for Luanda, 5:78-85



in

Cmiux.rai

161

the Elephant, The, 2:122-123

Tanagers

Young

in

George Washington Cairo by Ross. 6:103-109 Home and School Are a Team by Lane, 15:15 3

The, 3:125-131

Children

the school

6:83-88

Saxe, John Godfrey

Blind

the place of

growth may be found volume 14

Clara Barton, the

Money; Thrift Sawmills: see Lumbering Sawyer, Ruth Saving: see

Flea,

Information on child's

Saturday Shopping,

Who

Child Be Ready for First (hade? by

Stendler, 13:309-316

School Problems

Sapsuckers, color plate, 7:108c

Scarlet

My

Will

1:152

Christmas Eve, 11:118-119 Sari, pseud.: see Fleur,

265

Marguerite Klinke,

130,

131,

176,

Scrapbooks, 8:44-45 Screws, 9:203

alone, 13:221-223

reason for kindergarten child's dislike of school, 13:144-145

teacher can help second-best child, 12:144

\Ul.

1:106 109, 163,

166-

Scottish Lullaby, song. 11:30

of the gifted child. 12:251-252 left

111.

I6S, 170. 171: 6:214. 215. 218, 219, 221

of mentally retarded, 12:282-283

readiness to be

illustrations,

177; 3:110.

Scrolls

"Burning of the Sanjo Palace (detail). The." by a Japanese Artist. 10:53 "Kittens" by H'Suan Tsung, 10:30

I

Childcraft

>66

"Spring Festival on the Yellow River," part of a Chinese scroll, 10:60-61

Sculpture: see Clay Modeling; Space Designs

from commendation, 13:311-312 from pleasurable feeding, 13:40-41, 43-44 given troublemakers by teachers

Sculpture, Bronze

"Egyptian Bronze Dog, An," 10:30 "Rocking Chair" by Moore, 10:25

News

Interpreting the

12:10

problems of children of divorce, 12:215-221 problems of separation during hospitalization,

Sculpture, Stone

"Elephant" by Flannagan, 10:33 Picture Carved in Stone, A,

from The Chartres

Cathedral, 10:28 "Statue of a Brave Soldier, A," by Donatello,

13:267-272

problems of twins, 12:150 What Leaving Home Means

Stone Carvings from Notre

Dame

Cathedral,

When

"Three Jaguars" by

Unknown

Costa Rican Art-

Children Are Anxious by Langmuir,

Column, 10:59 "Wild Boars" by Warneke, 10:126 Sculpture, Wire: see Wire Sculpture

Seeds

Trajan's

flower, 7:189, 190

how



Anemones Pictures, 7:151, 152 Sea Fever, poem by Masefield, 2:38 Sea

Seed Dispersal, 7:193, 194 Seed Dispersal Pictures, 7:195



10:127

plants grow, 7:213-214

planting, 7:211-212 tree,

7:232-233

Sea Gulls: see Gulls

Seeds—Pictures,

Sea Gypsy, The, poem by Hovey, 2:39

Seegmiller, Wilhelmina

As white

Sea Horses, 7:155

poem by

— Seashore— Poems Seashore

Daw, from Mother Goose,

See-Saw, Margery

Lowell, 1:107

See them dance, so!

Pictures, 9:280

so!,

Lilies,

7:202-203

Self-Confidence

Seasons, 9:80-8

sounds, 11:7

—Poems:

Seasons

see also

of seasons, as

—Poems

Weather

—Poems;

Autumn —Poems;

also

Spring

Months, The, by Coleridge, 1:114-115

Seasons— Songs,

1 1

: 1

09- 1 34

Camps and Camping by

Haskell, 14:255-263

gained through telling a

story,

in toilet training,

14:185-186

13:54

needed for healthier personality, 15:174 needed to accept others as equals, 15:114-120 through creative expression, 14:124 Self-Expression: see Creative Expression

Stories

Persephone by Cooke, 6:229-233 Sea Turtles, 7:178

Selfishness: see Sharing

Self-Reliance

Gangs: Mental Health: Safety:

Security: see also

Self-Confidence

aim

of

at

year. 13:31

1

good

discipline, 14:148-149

Adopted Child, The, by Sherwin, 12:231-238

at 6

crying for needs, 13:32-33 doctor inspires confidence, 13:255-257

Becoming Resourceful by Hymes. 15:58-63 Can We Let Them Be Daring 13:147 148

early emotional growth, 13:31

children need independence, 15:172

every child needs, 15:172

Discipline for Self-Reliance by

Family Life

1:18

11:88

See the pretty snowflakes, 2:78

Sego

Picnic, The, by Aldis, 1:80

names

as milk, 1:48

Seeing and Discovering, 10:1 19-134

Pictures, 9:14

Sea Shell, The,

7:195, 215, 216; 9:24-25

See here comes the big procession, 11:72

Seals, 7:158-159



Small Child

13:209-218

10:41

Seasons

to a

by Stapley, 13:221-225

10:52



by Snyder, 15:33-40

Parents Are Important by Frank and Frank,

"Affection" by Zorach, 10:23

Seals

find time,

lack of: see Fear; Separation; Spoiled Child

Sculpture, Marble, 10:124

ist,

who

14:152

Ojemann, 15:43-50 Family Ups and

Downs

by Ellenwood, 12:222-

,

working mothers, 15:79-81

Washburn,

12:107-114

encouragement of, 14:42-43 endangered by excessive TV viewing, 15:12 for

228 for children of

1

Preparation for Adult Life by

Is

months, 13:62-63

grandparents,

in dressing at 2'

.

12:2 (>4

vcirs. 13:77

8

Index in is

first

grade, 13:312-313

267

Service to Others: see Doctors; Fire Departments:

self-assertion necessary?, 12:70-71

Helpfulness; Police: Social Service

Seward, V. A.,

of adolescents, 14:272-274

illustrations. 7:97.

109,

134: 8:49.

52, 63, 64, 210-226, 228, 263-269, 271-272

of convalescent, 13:280

Sewing

of handicapped, 12:260, 261

of 3-year-olds, 13:105-106

aprons and bolero, 8:257-25*) beanbag and stuffed animals, 8:244 246

of kindergarten child, 13:143-148

of toddler, 13:97-100

caps, 8:250-251

of 2-year-olds, 13:85-89

common

self-feeding, 13:92-94

Indian costume for boys, 8:254-256

Traveling Alone and Visiting by Burgess,

purses and bags. 8:252-253

stocking dolls, 8:246-250

14:249-254

Your Child Moves Beyond the Family

Circle by



Self Reliance

Crow

solving



problem,

Fun by Anderson,

8:241

Sewing Machines, 8:256 257 Sewing Machines Pictures, 9:192 Sex as a Part of Life by Vander Veer, 14:26

Pictures



4-year-old solving problem, 12:113 2-year-old

trimmings, 8:253-254 Selling for

Baldwin, 14:3-9 Self-Reliance

seams, 8:259-260

12:110-111

Sex Differences

Stories

cause differences in activities, 14:66

and the Pitcher, The, by Aesop, 3:233

Sex Education: see also Reproduction

Self-Respect

He

through self-expression, 14:131

Learns About Differences Between Boys and by Levine and Seligmann, 13:123-129

Girls

Self-Understanding

of adolescents. 14:275 5-year-olds, 13:161

Seligmann, Jean H. He Learns About Differences Between Boys and Girls by Levine and Seligmann, 13:123-120 Senn, Milton

J.

E.

Sex as a Part of Life by Winder Veer, 14:26-34 trend toward mixed groups, 14:13-15 Sex Play dealing with. 13:59; 14:32: 15:112

Sexual Relationship in Marriage, 12:34-35

Some Children Have Trouble

Sleeping, 13:185-

192

Shadows— Pictures, Shadows

Senses: see also

Touch, Sense of

kindergarten child's use

of,

My Shadow

13:158-159

Shaftel,

of newborn, 13:27-31

tel,

used by blind, 12:268

Ariel's

Boarding Schools by Hamilton. 14:264-269 Divorce and Separation by Baruch, 12:215-221 Losses Through Death by Franklin, 12:2(17-214 of family during moving, 15:92-93

who

differed, 14:274

13:267-272

School Means Leaving

Home, 14:131 Away from Home

Over Dale,

2:61

Shane, Harold G. Reports and Promotions. 14:155-161

Shannon, Monica Shapes, 10:97-1

a

by

IS.

123-130. 132-134

home

with parents. 12:5$

by nursery

child, 13:131-132.

creative dramatics to

Woi\ by

Beers, 15:75-

Ms

with the family. 14:22^ -22o

easier for older children.

12:14^

family jobs. 12:120

81

What Leaving Home Means by Staplcy, 13:221-225 Sequoias, 7:241

Sequoias



Pictures, 9:7

Seredy, Kate Fair,

Song, 2:61

Hill.

Sharing: sec also Co-operation

Fathers Must Be

Dowley, 15:82-87 Some Mothers Go Out

Over

Uncle Frank. 1:109

problems of separation during hospitalization,

Some

Live Together by Michaelis and Shaf-

14:202-208

Shakespeare, William

Separation

of sisters

by Stevenson, 1:179

Fannie R.

How We

toddler learns through, 13:80

10:129

—Poems

The, 5:181-190

to a

Small Child

handicapped share the work. 12:264-2

Some Children Have Trouble

-

Sleeping Beauty by

Singing: see also Songs

Sleep,

216 Cannot Carrv

Who

Helping the Child 14:215 Singing



1

Tune.

a

5:

(

M

poem by

Ballads; Nursery

Sing

poem by

song of

a

Sinnickson,

Rhymes

Dance, The, by Lindsay. 2:110-112

a Song,

Thomas

is

gone, 2:125

L., illustrations, 5:86, 87. 89-

set

Brother Sister Rela-

la

Mare. 2:1

s

Helen Edell, illustrations, 12:197, 201 Slobodkin, Louis, illustrations, 6:245. 246 Sloan,

see Learning, Difficulties in

Smalley, Janet, illustrations. 1:120-123,

128,

129

Small Homes, poem by Sandburg, 1:99 Smart, Mollie S. likes to Be Busy. 13:105-1 10

Smart, Russell C. Father in

Family. The. 12:121-128

tin

of. 13:6]

Shumway

Popcorn Man, The. 2:2"

Sister-Sister Relations

Building Friendlier heelings by Lasko, 12:141-

Smith, Isabel

Drawing and Painting by Howlett and Smith.

148

during adolescence, 14:273-274 Sometimes Rivals, Sometimes Friends bv Neisser,

Smiling, development

Smith, Fredrika

tions

Hate an

Influence by Lowndes. 15

Moyne

Creating

1

Rice

Through Language and Dramatics,

14:224-228

Playmaking and Play Acting. 8:130-148 Smith, Samuel Francis

Size, 9:6

Skating, Roller: see Roller Skates

Skates

8:149-162 Smith. John, Captain. 6: Smith,

12:131-140

Choosing a Sitter. 15:97-98 Sitting Up, 13:29

— Poems:

Roller

—Stories

see also

America,

2:

( l

>6

Snacks

Arithmetic; Drawing; Language:

Painting: Reading: Solving Problems; Speech:

why and what?, Snails,

Snails—Pictures,

l

611

9:4. 43, 51, 52

Snakes, 7:1 79-1 83

related to real life. 14:123 Skinny Mrs. Snipkin. 1:163 "Skipping"

boa constrictor. 7:180-181 garter, 7:180

disadvantages to school child. 14:158-159 Skipping Rope, game. 8:8-9 Skunk Cabbages Pictures, 9:46



nonpoisonous, poisonous. 7:1

pythons.

Snakes

Skunks, 7:46-47



Skunks Pictures. 9:45 Sky Poems Wynken, Blyn\en, and Nod by

14: s

7:152

freshwater. 7:1

Spelling

necessary to living. 12:159-161



poem by De

slumber. 11:36

Smelt—Pictures, 9:230

Sister-Brother Relations:

Skills:

Sleepyhead,

He

Stevenson, 2:125

a lad that

93

Sitters

my babe, lie still and O Babe, song. 11:32

Slow Learner:

Stevenson, 1:122

Singing Games, 8:29-34; see also Folk Songs and

Me me

3:172

Slipping softly through the sky. 1:136

Stories

Potatoes'

Grimm and Grimm,

Sleeping Princess, The, song, 11:67

Sleet—Pictures, 9:104

103

Sing

Sleeping bv Senn.

13:185

Sleep,

5.

Young Mountainy Singer bv Simmonds. Singing,

25(1-251; 14:71

bed, 13:191-192

Simon Says Thumbs Up, game, 8:2 Simple Simon, from Mother Goose, 1:57 Sing a Song of Sixpence, from Mother Goose. 1:56 children sing at play, 14:2

Rossetti, 2:4s

baby. 13:34-35

Simmonds, Martha F. Young Mountainy Singer, 5:94-103 Simon, Charlie

and Nightingale, poem by Naps

Sleep: see also



7: s

l

coral.

1

n

s

7:1M

Pictures, 9:44

copperhead. 9:44 Field, 1:180-181

s 1

9:44

garter. 9:44

1

^

v

I

1

Childcraft

270

Some day I'm going to have a store, 1:84 Some days are fairy days, 2:32 Some Fathers Must Be Away from Home by

rattlesnake, 9:44

water moccasin, 9:44

Snapping Turtles, 7:177 "Snap the Whip" by Homer, 10:58j-58k Snip, game, 8:69 Snow, 9:103

Snow

Dowley, 15:82

Some holly in the doorway, 11:118 Some Mothers Go Out to Work by Beers, 15:75 Some One, poem by De la Mare, 1:173 Some one came knocking, 1:173 Sometimes, poem by Fyleman, 2:32

—Poems

Christmas Eve by Jones, 2:78

Snow

First

by Allen, 1:148

First Snowfall, The,

Look

Snow Man,

Sometimes

by Lowell, 2:70

Snow! by

at the

Davies. 2:71

The, by Meigs. 2:73

Sondergaard, Arensa

White Fields by Stephens, 2:72 Wittier by Aldi's, 1:148

Snow



Comics, 15:26-32

Song Song

Stories

Juan, the Yaqui by Harrington, 5:86-93

Old

Little

Ringing Snowflakes

Truck., The, by Jones, 4:172-177

in the



New

Year by Meigs, 5:8-17

Pictures, 9:103 1:1

4S

Snow-White and Rose-Red by Grimm and Grimm, 3:162

Snowy

Egrets



color plate,

hymns, 11:145-160

selection.

14:215-216 festivals,

11:109-134

Sorrow

Through Death by Franklin, 12:207-214 see also kinds of sounds and means of reproduction, as Music; Telephone

Losses

Manners and Cus-

see

Human Relations: Manand Customs; Peoples of Other Lands We Lire Together by Michaelis and

Shaftel. 14:202-208

Sound,

Chicago Family Guidance Services by Sutherland, 15:162-166 Erosion

—Pictures

around you, 11:3 and country, 11:8

all

city

How

Sound Works

9:122

for Us.

in 3-

for Us,

9:224

4-year-oId's use of language. 13:113

and

sent by radio. 9:274

is

not

all

the same, 11:4

sounds you

Made, 9:121

Works

11:1-26;

indoor and outdoor, 11:6

Social Service: see also Hull-House.

Soil

11:135-144

patriotic songs.

toms

Soil Is

11:27-42

nursery songs. 11:43-72

Social Sciences: see also

How How

ballads, 11:73-108



News, 15:33-40

and Customs:

Soils: see also

and

folk songs

Songs of the Seasons and Festivals, 11:109-134 Soo Canal Pictures, 9:114

Social Graces: see Etiquette

How

Games

Songs: see also Singing

Songs, Nursery, 11:43-72

7:108h

Interpreting the

ners

poem by Morley, 2:14

Wa\eupworld, poem by Cullen, 2:2

songs of the seasons and Pictures

Snyder, Agnes

Social Life

for a Little House,

of the

lullabies.

Snow makes whiteness where it falls, Snow Man, The, poem by Meigs, 2:73

Sometimes Friends by Neisser,

Rivals,

12:131

11:5

like,

through the year, 11:7 What Is Sound 2 9:223 .

importance of earthworms. 7:166 preparing for planting, 7:21

Sound

!

home

for

Soldiers



Sound

Pictures, 9:230

Some Children Have Trouble

Resist the Toilet by Weinfeld.

13:193

12:149

1:118

11:190-191



Sleeping by Senn.

13:185

Liss,

flute!.

The March King.

aids growth, 14:137-138 basic to citizenship. 14:204

Some Combinations Are

the

Sousa, John Philip

Solving Problems

Some Children

dramatics. 14:228

Sounds, Animal: see Animal Sounds

Lee. Robert Edward. 6:80-82 Sole

Effects

a Special Challenge by

South America: see also Art Peru animals: see Animals South America South America plants: see Plants





mined in. South America tin

9:



/;;

Honor

of a

5:154-163

1

_S

Stories

Gaucho by Pollock (Argentina),

Index South Dakota

Spiritual Values

gold mined

Sowbugs



271

in,

9:129

from

transition

in

Pictures, 9:52

childhood

Sows: see Pigs

pari of healthy personality. 15:152

Space Designs, 10:78-84, 93-96, 125 Space Travel, 9:172-174; story 4:222-225

Spitalny,'

Spackey, Shirley, illustrations, 3:19-22

Spoiled Child: see also

Terry

What Does He Like

Do

to

Best'.',

care of convalescents, 13:275-276

Adventures in Handwork by Parkhill and Spaeth, 8:210-230 Spain art: see Art Spain Spain Folk Tales Flea, The, by Sawyer, 3:125-131 Spanking, 12:1 12

Do



Grandparents Spoil a Child 1 12:53 do not allow handicapped to be. 12:2^1-262 tense and misunderstood, 12:14-15 When Are Children Spoiled? by Momyer, ,

13:135-140 Sponges, 7:151

— 9:58 Spoonbills— Pictures Spoonbills — Sponges

Pictures,

Spoonbill and the Cloud, The, by Hudson, 4:82

Sparrows, 7:98-99



Sparrows Pictures Gambel's sparrow, color plate, 7:108c "Spatial Construction" by Roszak, 10:80 Special Needs of Various Handicaps, 12:266 Speech Children Who Are Hard of Hearing by Brill, 12:270-272 development in newborn, 13:29-30 How to Use the Telephone, 9:272-273 improving that of 3- and 4-year-olds, 13:111-

roseate spoonbill, color plate,

of cerebral palsied child, 12:276

response of toddler

Spoonbill and the Cloud, The, by Hudson, 4:82-

89

— —Poems:

Spores Sports

Pictures, 9:10,

Sports

ter

to,

being Spring,

Spring

13:94

Are Some Babies Slow in Talking?, 13:30 Writing and Speaking the Language by Schuy-

27

Roller

Skates

— Poems;

a

good

poem by

—Poems:

April

loser,

15:46-47

Spelling

Down

Art of Spelling, The, by Horn, 14:177-183

names of months,

Pictures, 7:21

before April, The, by Davies, 1:119

Sunny Taster Meadow by Turner,

a

1:121

//;

the

in the Vale

Meadow

by Rossetti, 2:40

by Rossetti, 1:119

Spring Morning by Milne, 2:42-43 Who Calls? by Savers, 2:44

Willow

Cats. The, by

Widdemer, 1:120

Year's at the Spring, The, by Browning, 2:40

Spiders, 7:143-149

"Spring Festival on the Yellow Ri\er," part of

Spiders— Pictures, 9:10, 59

Chinese scroll. 10:60-61 Spring Morning, poem by Milne, 2:42

golden garden, 9:23

—Poems

Miss Muffet, from Mother Goose, 1:26 Spider Wasps, 7:148-149

Spring of the Year. The. song, 11:132 Spring's Arrival, song. 11:134

Spiderwebs, 7:143-146

Spruce Trees, 7:240 241

Little

— Spindles— Spinning— Spiderwebs

Squirrels, 7:32 J5

Pictures, 9:105

7:^4: — Squirrels — Poems Whisky Frisky, Author Unknown. Stagecoaches — Pictures, 9:207 Squirrels

Pictures, 9:238

Pictures,

9:'>4

color plate, 7:44a

Stories

Sleeping Beauty by

as

— Poems

Growing

Armstrong

Ghost of the Lagoon. 5:232-240 Spider Crabs, 7:154 Spider Monkeys, 7:20



1:118

Daffodils by Wordsworth, 2:47

Day

Monkeys

lilakc.

see also

Buds by Davies, 1:128

Speed with machines, 9:188

Grimm

and Grimm, 3:172-

176

Tom

Win

— Poems

Crocus, The, by Crane, 1:128

14:184-189

ler,

Spiders

see

Sportsmanship

Why

Spider

7:108h

Stories

learned in organized groups, 14:244

112

Sperry,

13:97-102

Temper Tantrums

Spaeth, Dorothy



adulthood,

to

15:40

Tit Tot, retold by Jacobs, 3:77-83

1:90

a

2~2

Childcraft

Stagecraft: see Plays

—Production



Living

mov-

15:21-25 15:31-32

Reports and Promotions by Shane, 14:155-161 begins to develop his own.

6-year-old

14: 5-6

vary in different families, 15:123

Breakfast Time, 1:69

Starbuck,

J.

to a

Small Child,

E.. Jr., illustrations. 2:32. 33. 90. 91.

and Castendyck, Elsa Handicapped Child in the Family, The. 12:258-

Van Gogh. 10:42b

We

Find Nordi Stars— Pictures, 9:134, 169

—Poems —

Lamplighter, The, 1:134

Land at

Twinkle, Twinkle,

Night-, 9:87

Land, The, 1:153 Shadow, 1:179

My

Little Star

by Taylor, 1:135

Ram, 1:122 Singing, 1:122

Little Star,

11:46

Me a Song, 2:125 Swing, The, 1:132 Sing

up on high. 2:45

Star-Spangled Banner Girl by Bailey. 5:32 "Statue of a Brave Soldier. A." by Donatello,

10:52

Time to Rise, Where Go the

1:68 Boats?, 1:106

Wind, The, 1:124 Wintertime, 1:149

Statue of a Javanese

girl,

9:255

Statues: see Sculpture. Bronze: Sculpture. Marble:

Suck

Steadfast Tin Soldier, The. by Andersen. 3:112 Stealing, 14:53-56. 59-60: see also Honesty

Stolz.

Pictures, 9:47

Herbert R.

Growth

game. 8:6

— Steamboats—

9:39



in

Size.

Strength,

and Co-ordination,

14:63-69 Stolz. Lois

Steam. 9:102, 213 Steamboats

Robert Fulton Makes the Paddles Judson, 6:54-59

Insects,

Sticklebacks

Sculpture. Stone

Meek

Families Shape Personality, 12:99-106

Work by

Pictures, 9:259: see also Ships

"Us Kids," 14:10-17 Stone

—Pic-

Collecting Stones, 9:125

Stone— Pictures,

tures

Stories

Pogo Goes to Sea, 4:201-208 Steam Comes Upriver by Phillips. 4:184-191 Steam Comes Upriver by Phillips. 4:184 Steam Shovels— Pictures, 9:178. 199 Steel.

of Counterpane, The, 1:178

Little

Star-Span gled Banner, The, song by Key, 11:140

Steamboats

1:63

Pirate Story, 2:109

Twink}e, Twinkle, Stars Songs

Steal Sucks,

Fairy Bread, 1:170

Hayloft, The, 2:57

9:144-158

Stars are twinkling

Autumn Fires, 1:138 in Summer, 1:166

Happy Thought,

Pictures, 9:59

"Starry Night" by

Stars

Pictures, 13:45

Stern, Edith M.,

Farewell to the Farm, 1:200

7:152

Can

and Stepchildren by Frank, 12:239



Sterilizing

Bed

138, 139, 142. 143

How

Fields, 2:72

Stepparents

Stevenson. Robert Louis, 6:110-112

13:221-225

Stars,

Child Be Ready for Fust Grade?,

13:309-316

265 Messenger

What Leaving Home Means



Mx

Will

Standing. 13:29 Stapley. Virginia

Starfish

1-73:

Stendler, Celia Burns

White

reading depend on presentation.

Starfish,

,

April Showers, 2:41

choosing, criticizing, developing taste for

in

illustrations. 4:60-62, 64-68,

5:174. 178, 179

Stephens, James

Standards

ies.

Harve,

Stein,

Stamens (Flower), 7:190 Stamens (Flower) Pictures. 7:191 Stamps: see Postage Stamps Standard of Living: see Cost and Standard of

9:251

Steffens, Lincoln

Miserable Merry Christmas, A, 4:W>-(>~

9:245. 24S; 10:130

Stone, L. Joseph

He

Still

Learns Through His Play. 13:156-161

Stone Callings from Notre

Dame

Cathedral.

10:41

Stone Sculpture: see Sculpture. Stone Stong, Phil

Sam Stop

Volney,

Con

— Go, poem

boy. 5:136-139

by Baruch, 1:100



Index

—Pictures —

What Does His "No, Wo"

Stores

Grocery store, 9:228, 235 Stores Poems: see also Shopping

Animal

— Poems

Achievement

how

— Stories;

Courage

Sugar Maple Trees, 7:238 Sugar Maple Trees Stories

birds, 7:93-112



3:227-240

Sugar Snow, The, by Wilder, 5:122-128 Sugar-Plum Tree, The, poem by Field, 1:182 Sugar Snow, The, by Wilder, 5:122

favorite nursery. 3:7-50

and

Stories

Sucking: see Breast Feeding: also see Thumb-sucking

animal, 4:7-170 biographies, 6:7-212

fairy,



Adventures of Famous Persons, 6:8-212

adventure, in our country, 5:77-172

and

Submarines, 9:185 Subways, 9:266 Success

adventure, in other lands, 5:173-240

folk songs

make. 8:244-245. 246

to

Stuttering, 13:111, 215

Stories

folk

Mean* by

Stuffed Animals

Stoic, The, by Field, 1:85

Stories: see also

Really

Chittenden, 13:85

General Store by Field, 1:84

fables,

273

3:51-226 ballads,

11:73-108

Summer

holiday, 5:7-76

—Poems

myths and legends, 6:2 14-256

Balloon Man, The, by Fylem.in, 1:111

pets, 7:57-74

Barefoot Days by Field. 1:131

realistic,

4:171-240

writing

stories,

Bed in Summer by Stevenson. 1:166 Ice-Cream Man, The. by Field. 1:110

8:166-168

About the World's Great Music Makers,

Stories

11:161-192

Young Children by Hilliard, Many Lands, 5:173 240

Stories for Stories of

Storks



13:290

composition and value, 9:137

the Stork, The, by Aesop, 3:234

Storms: tee Weather

size

Madison, The, by Monsell, 6:50 Story of fane Add.ims. The, by Wagoner, 6:128 Story of Kattor, The, by Travers, 4:104 Story of King Arthur, The, by Farjeon, 6:240 Story of Do//\

Burnham, 6:80

Story of Robert E. Lee, The, by Story of William 6:245

Tell,

The, retold by Baldwin,

4, 5,

Young Children by

Hilliard. 13:290-

Sunflowers



Pictures, 9:5

Sunlight

What Makes and Other I'ocms. Childcraft

Storytelling

ume 2 Storytelling

vol-

Sunsets



Sky Blue?, 9:136

the

Pictures. 9:

^

1

Suppositories

Poems and

Ballads, 2:109-200

'Picador" by

De

in

bowel training. 13:52

Susie Stocky Car by Konkle, 4:209-215

Stovepipe Sculpture Creeft,

10:81

Strangers

Susquehanna River



Pictures, 9:71

Sutherland, Robert L.

baby's attitude toward, 13:62-64

Straw

Animals Made

in

Finland, 10:84

Stringed Instruments to

Pictures, 9:51

color plate. 7:204b

296

how



Sunflowers, 7:197

of recordings. 11:193-198

Stories for

Sundials, 8:229

Sunfish

6

gives self-confidence in speaking, 14:185-186 list

and distance from the earth, 9:138

— —

Sun Poems Magnanimous Sun, The, by Lindsay, 2:108 Sun Stories Wind and the Sun, The, by Aesop, 3:238 Sundews, 7:206 Sunfish, 7:161

Childcraft volumes library program, 14:234-235

Storytelling: see as a

Tunc, The, by Fyleman. 2:33

On the Hill by Armstrong. 1:131 Summer Morning, A, by Field, 2:48 Summer Morning, A, poem by Field. 2:48 Sun

Stories

Fox and

Little

make. 8:27(1-272

Stubbornness

Family

Guidance

Services,

15:162-166

Suydam, Margaret Jane Keeping a Baby Comfortable by Montgomery and Suydam. 13:32-39 Swallowtail Eutterflics

— Pictures

Tiger Swallowtail, color plate, 7:124b



Childcraft

274 Swamps- -Pictures, 9:75 Swans Pictures, 9:60 Swans Stories

Hide and Seek, 8:25

— —

Pom Pom

Ugly Duckling, The, by Andersen, 3:213-226 "Swapping," 13:134 Sweden Biography Lind, Jennys A New, Bright World for Jenny



hind, 6:64-68



Sweden Songs Around the Christmas

Tree, 11:119

Tidler's

Ground, 8:26

"Tahitian Mountains" by Gauguin, 10:122b

George E. Alexander Graham

Tait,

Talents Differ,

Sleeping Princess, The, 11:67 Swedish Cradle Song, song, 11:37 Sweet Potatoes Pictures, 9:26 Sweet Williams Pictures, color plate, 7:220c Swifts (lizards), 7:184

— —

—Poems

Bell, edited by,

6:159-160

poem by

Richards, 2:51

Tale of Peter Rabbit, The, by Potter, 3:37 Tall{ by Courlander and Herzog, 3:1 18 Talking: see Speech

Tambourines, how to make, 8:264-265 Tanagers Pictures

— Tankers—

scarlet tanagers, color plate,

7:108d

Pictures, 9:268

Benjamin Jones Goes Swimming by Fisher,

Tantrums:

Temper Tantrums

see

Tapestry

2:100-101

"Swimming Pool, The," by Sally, 10:134 Swinburne, Algernon Charles White

Tom

variation of, 8:26-28

Taking Turns, 15:48

Christmas Eve, 11:118-119

Swimming

Pullaway. 8:25

Prisoner's Base, 8:25-26

Butterflies, 2:60

Famous French

Tapestry, A, 10:62-63

Unicorn Tapestry, 10:35 Tarantulas, 7:146-147

Swine: see Pigs

Tattling

Swing, The, poem by Stevenson, 1:132



Swinging Pictures invokes co-operation, 15:44

5-year-olds, 13:165

how Taxis,

Swing Song, A, poem by Allingham,

1:133

Swing, swing, 1:133 Switzerland Switzerland art: see Art Switzerland Folk Tales Story of William Tell, The, by Baldwin, 6:24^ Sycamore Trees, 7:238





14:23

to deal with,

poem by

Field, 1:101

Taylor, Jane

Cow, The, 1:89 Little Pussy, 1:86

Twinkle, Twinkle, Tchaikovsky, Petr

The Land Teacher

Little Star, 1:135

Ilich

Sugar Plum game, 8:5-6

of the

Ball,

Fairy, 11:180-181

Teachers aid children in personal relationships, 14:138

T.P.

and Ja\c by Benton, 6:167-169

Taba, Hilda Your Neighbors

—Dictators,

Troublemakers, or

Friends, 15:121-126

Table and the Chair, The, poem by Lear, 1:196 Table Croquet, game, 8:14 Table Decorations: see Parties

Table Etiquette, 15:140-141 of child in high chair, 13:181-182 Table Etiquette—Pictures, 15:139, 140

how

foster friendship, 14:25

keep on learning, 14:124 make the school, 14:126-128 personality is important, 14:134-135 promote friendliness. 14:13 qualifications, 14:119, 120

Teachers



Stories

Clara Barton, the

Teaching Methods:

Tag Games

Teams:



to

Schoolteacher, by Pace,

Johnny and His Mule by Credle, 4:138-146 Little B/acl{ Bear Goes to School, A, by Sickels,

make, 8:180 Table Tennis, game, 8:13-14 Tadpoles: see Frogs; Toads Tadpoles Pictures, 9: 3, 18 Tables,

Young

6:83-88

4:68 see Arithmetic;

1

Blindman's Buff, 8:26, 81 Fox and Geese, 8:27

Hare and Hounds, 8:26

Language;

Reading: Science; Social Science; Spelling see

Teamwork:

Games see Co-operation

Teasdale, Sara April, 2:41

Index Autumn Dus\, 1:135 May Night, 2:49

275

Tennyson, Alfred Hrook, The, 2:64 65

Teasing

Lady

other children, 14:15-16

James G.,

Teason,

Clare, 2:170-173

What Does

of older brothers, 12:137-138

Little Birdie Say?, 1:92

Tenpins, game, 8:1 1-12

illustrations,

7:227;

8:39-42,

Terrariums, 9:52-53

56-59, 70-74; 9:1, 18, 19, 34, 35, 50-53, 56, '65,

Testing Programs

67, 76-81, 95, 98, 99, 113,

225, 229-233, 235, 242, 243, 254, 257, 270, 271,

How Is Progress Measured?, 14:124 Measuring Achievement and Ability by Krugman, 14:162-168 Tether-Ball, game, 8:60

288

Texas,

162,

165,

175,

195,

202,

203,

180,

183,

209,

121,

145,

[60,

190,

191,

194,

215-217,

220,

221,

184,

212,

131,

s;ilt mine. 9:127 Texas Stories Bluebonnets jar Luanda by Savers, 5:78-85



Teddy Roosevelt by Weir, 6:124 Teen Age: see Adolescence

Sam

Teeny, Tiny Lady, retold by Bailey, 3:28 are levers, 9:198

how

Textiles: see also Cotton

make, 8:178-179 Teeter-Totters— Pictures, 9:186, 198 Teeth eruption of permanent, 14:63-64

wool, cotton,

to

Your Teeth

Tragic Story, A, 2:120 party for, 8:100-102

Child's Teeth by Sillman, 13:261-266



How

10:66

— Telephone — Alexander Graham 9:170, Telescope —

Bell, ed.

by Tait, 6:

15').

160

171

Television, 9:270, 275

Television, Radio and, by Shayon,

15:10

Temperature: see Climate; Heat; Thermometers;

Weather Temper Tantrums, 13:75 77 cause and prevention, 13:205-206 "Temptation of Saint Anthony (Detail), The," by Bosch, 10:44

game

Badminton, Deck Tennis, and Paddle Tennis, 8:60-62

Sidewalk Tennis, 8:7-8 Table Tennis, 8:13-14

W. Who

Tenny, John Children

Are

Pilgrims Came, 'The, by

— —

Wynne, 2:75

Thanksgiving Day Songs Come, Ye Thankful People. Come, 11:112-113 Thanksgiving Day Stories Indians for Thanksgiving by Heiderstadt, 5:47Thanksgiving Day, poem by Child. 1:142 Thank you. pretty cow. that made. 1:89 Thank You for the world so sweet, by Leathan, 1:146

eyes, 15:16-17

Tell, William, 6:245-246

Tennis,

Unknown,

56

Stories

Pictures,

—Poems

Thanl( Thee, Author

2:74

Use the Telephone, 9:272-273

Elete/ephony by Richards, 2:83

on

We

Father,

knowing how to use is an achievement, 15:60 Where Does Your Telephone Reach?, 9:271 Telephone—Pictures, 9:270, 271-273, 279 Telephone Poems

effect

I

Thanksgiving Day

works, 9:224

to

Thanksgiving Day Pictures "What Did on Thanksgiving Day" by George,

poem by Wynne, 2:36

Telephone it

Rayon,

Thanksgiving Day

Thirty white horses, from Mother Goose, 1:48

how

— Pictures;

synthetics. 9:236-241

silk,

Thackeray, William Makepiece

—Poems

Telegraph, The,

Volney, Cowboy, by Stong, 5:136-139

Texas Bluebonnets, 7:197-198

Teeter-Totters

Epileptic, 12:27*

280

Thaw, poem by Tietjens, 1:116 The buds have come to town, 1:128

The The The The The The The The The The The The The The

Buffalo, the Buffalo, 2:S6

Bunnies are Camel's

a feeble folk, 2:1

hump

is

13

an ugly lump. 2:^*

children were shouting together, 2:45 city has streets. 2: $5

city

mouse

coach

at

is

lives in a

house, 1:94

the door at

last.

1:200

dav before April. 1:11')

dog

is

drum

black or white or brown. 2:S4 is

our big window pane'. 1:123

fog comes, 2:67

gingham dog and

the calico cat. 1:188

golden crocus reaches up, 1:128 Grasshopper, the Grasshopper, 1:97

2-6 The The The The The The The The

Childcraft green bug sleeps in the white

lily

ear.

1:99

was paved with buttercups. 1:131 house of the mouse, 1:94 Kangaroo said to her son, 1:160 hill

leaves are fresh after the rain, 2:41 litde girl

who

lives

next door. 1:117

came to town. 2:76 the Moon. 2:108

little

Jesus

Man

in

Theme in Yellow, poem by Sandburg. 2:66 The mocking bird is the talkingest bird. 2:50 The moon: It is a griffin's egg. 2:19 The moon's the Xordi Wind's cooky. 1:137 The more we sing together. 11:45 The morns are meeker dian they were. 2:66 The mountain and the squirrel. 2:124 The night was diick and hazy. 2:136 The night will never stay. 2:19 The Owl and the Pussycat went to sea. 1:186 The Painted Cart, 4:234-240 The Pilgrims came across the sea. 2:75 The Queen of Hearts. 1:44 The rain is raining all around. 1:122 There are 1:11

at die

fairies

bottom of our garden!.

There dwelt a miller, hale and bold. 2:140 There is something in the Autumn. 2:67 There lived a sage in days of yore. 2:120 There must be magic. There's nothing by a cat desired. 1:75 There was a boy of other di 2:1 There Was a Crooked Man. from Mother Goose, 1

1:33 a little boy. 2

There Was a

Little

Girl,

poem bv Longfellow,

1:164

There was

steamboat

litde

ll: _s

woman.

is

a slowpoke. 1:105

street cars are,

Sun.

sun

2:

always in the sky. 1:69

is

tulips

1:148

-

now

are pushing up. 1:121

Vulture eats between his meals. 2:S6 is warm. 11:152 wind came dashing from the wood. 2:54 wind is out with a leap and a twirl. 1:125 wind was a torrent of darkness. 2:162 w ires spread out far and w ide. 2:36

weadier

woodpecker pecked out

round

hole.

The world is so full of a number of things. They call them pussy willows, 1:120 They chose me from my brothers. 1:140

1:63

year's at die spring. 2:40

They strolled down the lane together. 2: s 2 They went with axe and rifle. 2:190 Things Aren't the Same by Kehm, 12:43 T/iirt\ Days Hath September, from Mother Goose. 1:115 Thirty white horses, from Mother Goose. 1:48

This

is

how

This

Is

My

This

is

die house that Jack built. 1:60

the big

Man and He Was Mad. song. man lived in the moon, 11:56 There was an Old Man who supposed, bv

This

Is the

This

Is

Way My Way

the

Dolly

11:81

11:

Thomas Aha

Young

Edison.

Scientist

bv Wise.

6:118

a

Lear.

Thompson. D'Arcy W. id

man

Walk^s, song.

the Ladies Ride, from Mother

1:165

with a beard, bv Lear.

1:165

There was an old person of Ware, by Lear. 1:165 There Was an Old Woman, from Mother Goose. 1:21

His Wife, The. 1:162

Thompson. Dorothy Brown Tomorron 2: v Thorne-Thomsen. Gudrun Three

Goats Graff. The. 3:35-36

Billy

Billy

Goats Gruff. The. retold by Thorne-

Thomsen.

3

5

There Was an Old Woman, from Mother Goose.

from Mother Goose. 1:21 by North. 1:8

1:41

em

There was an old

woman who

lived in a shoe.

1:31

"Three Jaguars" bv

Unknown

Costa Rican Artist.

10:12"

There was There was thor

Indian. 11:58

tall

Nose. game. 8:69

Thisdes. 7:206-207

There Was a

There was an old

a little

1:99

Goose. 1:43

a litde turde. 1:96

There was a

There was

The The The The The The The The The The The The

The

B

There was

There were three sisters fair and bright. 2:16S Thermometers. 9:109-110 The Rock-a-By Lady from Hush-a-By street. 1:184 The roofs are shining from the rain. 2:41 The snow had begun in the gloaming. 2:70 The snow is soft, and how it squashes!. 1:116 The spring is fresh and fearless. 2:49

a pretty Princess, 11:67 a

young maid who

Unknown. 1:164

said.

"Why," Au-

Three Three Three

jolly

gentlemen.

Little

Kittens,

Little Pigs.

1:

from Mother Goose, 1:52

The. retold bv Jacobs, 3:10

Index Three of us

meadow

afloat in the

by the swing,

2:109 Three Pirates, song, 11:108 Three Plum Buns, poem by Rossetti, 1:69 Three Wishes, The, play outline, 8:139-141 Three Wishes, The, retold by Jacobs, 3:84

277

Tippett, James S.

Pern -Boats, 1:104 Trains, 1:102 Tiskct,

A

Tas\et, A, song, 11:54

Tit-Tat-Toe, game, 8:73 Tit-Tat-Toe, Circle, game, 8:2-3

Thrift

Toads, 7:119-120

What About the Spendthrift, 15:69-71 Through all the pleasant meadow-side, 2:57 Throwing Things

Toads—Pictures, Toadstools

as exercise in self-control, 13:92

Thrushes

/://

—Pictures

To

in the

thumb-place, 1:73

Thumb-Sucking

and

—Poems

Dormouse, The, by Herford, 1:171

the

a Firefly,

Tobin, Don,

on teeth, 13:263 early months, 13:57-58

poem by

Jones, 2:45



illustrations.

13:78,

191; 14:74

Toddlers: see also Two-Year-Olds

effect in

60

Tobacco Worms Pictures, 9:2 ^ Tobey, Barney, illustrations, 15:16

color plate, 7:108a

Thumbs

7:1 13; 9:52,

frog and toad orchestra, 7:1 14

accidents, 13:253

Thunder,' 9:106-107

prevention

of, 15:51-6,

57

Tick, tock, tick, tock, 1:64

activity, 13:83-4, 93-4

Tiddly winks, game, 8:18-19

adults, relationship with, 13:204-5

Tiedeman, Berthold, 90, 91,

100,

illustrations, 9:28, 29, 37, 47,

104, 106, 107, 110,

119,

111,

123, 130, 134, 137, 138, 139, 140, 161, 167, 168,

179,

177,

189,

205,

236,

244,

affection, 13:73-4, 84, 97

anger, 13:86. 96, 202-3 anxiety, 13:83-4, 209-18

247.

245,

help

279, 284, 285, 286, 287; 11:34, 45, 67; 12:110. Ill,

118,

187,

215,

232, 268, 269, 298; 215, 239, 250: 174,

289;

247,

79, 80, 82, 83, 96, 99.

120,

13:3,

121.

74,

14:1, 59, 75, 80,

15:1, ii, 34, 70, 93,

199, 206. 130.

109,

175

13:217-18

sources of, 13:213-14

75.

123, 217, 226.

for,

signs of, 13:215

appetite, 13:74-5, 177-81 in

convalescence, 13:278

approval, 13:97-8

awakening, 13:97

Tietjens, Eunice

early, 13:190-1

April, 1:121

away from home, 13:221-5

Moving, 2:17

babyish ness, 13:208

Thau; 1:116 Tiger Lilies

bedtime, 13:189-90, 25]

—Pictures

biting, 13:203

color plate, 7:220a

books

Tigers, 7:14-17

—Pictures Tigers— Tigers

12:197; 13:74

child care centers, 13:2 ^2

children, other. 13:100

color plate, 7:28a

2.

202-5

choices, 13:76, 86, 87-8, 89, 96

Stories

Story of Kattor, The, by Travers, 4:104-1

Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies



Pictures

1

1

clothing for out of doors. 13:2^2 constipation, 13:195

contagion, 13:253: 14:89

color plate, 7:124b

contrariness, 13:75. 85-9

Tile

made from

for,

characteristics, 13:73-4

clay,

convalescence, 13:273-80

9:123

Time: see also Calendars; Clocks— Picture-. For new experiences, 13:143

courage, 13:224 -5

planning: see Schedules Responsibility for Time, 15:49-50

Time to Rise, poem by Stevenson, Timothy Tim-o, song, 11:68

1:68

crying, 13:75, 206. 258

dancing. 13:300-1

dawdling. 13:96. 202

Tin, 9:128

Tin-Can Building Blocks, 8:2 Ting ting, tinkle, ting!, 11:4''

co-operation, 13:76-7, 78, B5-9, 90-6, 207-8

co-operative nursery school. 13:232

dentist. 13:254. 260. 265-6 1

4-2

1

5

discipline.

12:80,

107-14;

84, 85-9, 90-6, 203-4,

13:"'

I,

82,

4

1

Childcraft

278

separation from, 13:222-3, 267-8

diseases, contagious. 13:253; 14:89

who

disobedience, 13:85-9, 90-6

choosing

music, 13:77. 297-303

13:255-6

a,

examinations by, 13:253 visits to,

13:256

works, 15:76-8, 79

moving. 15:92-3, 96

doctor. 13:255. 257-8

naps. 13:77, 187, 251

negativism, 13:85-89

1

dreams. 13:192

nervous habits, 13:215

dressing, 13:77-8

new baby and.

excursions. 13:3048

new experiences. 13:221-5

family, relationship with, 13:75-6, 83-4, 95 in convalescence,

13:2~3

12:132-3, 197-8, 224

nightmares, 13:189. 192

5

night wetting, 13:54. 200

nursery groups. 13:231-6, 237-44

father. 12:S3: 13:95,99, 251

fatigue. 13:251

advantages

fear. 13:214-15, 215-17

fathers participate in, 13:242-4

causes toilet difficulties, 13:199-200

nursery school, 13:222. 232

advantages of for parents, 13:234-5 discipline in, 13:234

of animals, 13:216 of dark. 13:214 -15 of losing love. 13:210. 213-14 of

new

music

prevention

from

parents, 13:199, 224

in

x

overfeeding. 13:1

9

parties. 8:77; 12:171

13:92-3, 182

food, for health. 13:249-50

and

13:233-4

other children, relationship with, 13:100-2

feeding, 13:177-84 self,

13:303 of,

starting in, 13:236

13:216-17

of,

at,

program

experiences. 13:216

of separation

of. 13:231-4, 236, 240-1

play, 13:93, 97-8, 99, 100 in convalescence. 13:279-80

teeth, 13:2(>2-3

convalescence, 13:2~S

overcomes

preferences. 13:~4-5. 934, 179-SO, 182

fears, 13:2, 2

place for, 13:100

fresh air, 13:221

play group, organizing. 13:23,-44

friendliness, 13:221

play school. 13:232

playing alone, 13:99

grabbing, 13:102 grandparents, 12:50-3.

politeness. 13:202-4: 15:135-42

(>2

growth, 12:74-81; 13:90-1, 24S

punishment. 13:96

hair twisting, 13:21^

reading

health. 13:247-53, 254 60

recordings. 11:163: 13:77. 301-2

examination. 13:253 in traveling. 12:1"°

to.

12:189-90. 195. 197; 13:74, 290-6

respect for property, 13:205

rewards. 13:258

helpfulness. 12:159-60; 13:74

rituals.

hitting, 13:102. 202-3

routines, 13:94-5

home, reluctance

to leave. 13:223-5

in convalescence. 13:2

honesty, 13:202

B

rudeness. 13:201-2

hospitalization, 13:2t>~

independence.

13:76

12:111;

2

safety, 13:81, 82

13:77-8,

85-9,

92.

95.

at

221-5; 15:58-9

\ 253: 15:51-7

home. 15:52

3

at play. 15:56-7

inoculations. 13:252-3

in

automobile. 13:227-8; 15:54

instability, 13:75-6

security. 12:102-3; 13:212-13

jealousy, 12:131-2; 13:197-9.213

self-assertion. 12:70-1: 13:S5-9; 15:168-9

kicking, 13:203

self-confidence, 13:221-5

language. 13:/

self-reliance. 12:1

learns through senses. 13:80

sharing. 13:102

love. 13:169-170, 1S4. 209, 218

shvness. 13:222-5

mental development, 13:90-1 mother, relationship with. 13:81-2, in illness, 13:267-8

1

separation from parents. 13:189, 199, 222. 224

leaving home. 13:221-5

95, 97-100

singing, 13:297, 2"". 301 si

e,

13:24