The Social Medicine Reader, Volume I, Third Edition: Ethics and Cultures of Biomedicine 9781478004356, 1478004355

The extensively updated and revised third edition of the bestselling Social Medicine Reader provides a survey of the cha

724 72 9MB

English Pages 472 [374] Year 2019

Report DMCA / Copyright

DOWNLOAD FILE

Polecaj historie

The Social Medicine Reader, Volume I, Third Edition: Ethics and Cultures of Biomedicine
 9781478004356, 1478004355

Citation preview

The Social Medicine  ReadeR volume

1 third edition

Ethics and Cultures of Biomedicine

JONaTHaN ±bERLaNDER, MaRa BUcHbINDER, ²aRRy ³. CHURcHILL,  SUE ´. ´sTROff, µaNcy M. P. KINg, BaRRy F. SaUNDERs,  ³ONaLD P. STRaUss, aND ³EbEcca ². WaLkER, EDs.

Duke university Press · Durham a nD LonDon · 2019

© 2019 ¶UkE ·NIVERsITy PREss ALL RIgHTs REsERVED PRINTED IN THE ·NITED STaTEs Of A¸ERIca  ON acID-fREE papER ∞ ¶EsIgNED by MaTTHEw ¹aUcH ¹ypEsET IN MINION PRO by WEsTcHEsTER  PUbLIsHINg SERVIcEs

²IbRaRy Of CONgREss CaTaLOgINg-IN-PUbLIcaTION ¶aTa  µa¸Es: ±bERLaNDER, JONaTHaN, EDITOR. ¹ITLE: °E sOcIaL ¸EDIcINE REaDER / JONaTHaN  ±bERLaNDER, MaRa BUcHbINDER, ²aRRy ³. CHURcHILL,  SUE ´. ´sTROff, µaNcy M. P. KINg, BaRRy F. SaUNDERs,  ³ONaLD P. STRaUss, ³EbEcca ². WaLkER, EDITORs. ¶EscRIpTION: °IRD EDITION. | ¶URHa¸ : ¶UkE  ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2019– | ºNcLUDEs bIbLIOgRapHIcaL  REfERENcEs aND INDEx. ºDENTIfiERs: l»»n 2018044276 (pRINT) l»»n 2019000395 (EbOOk) i¼½n 9781478004356 (EbOOk) i¼½n 9781478001737 i¼½n 9781478001737 (V. 1 ; HaRDcOVER ; aLk. papER) i¼½n 9781478002819 (V. 1 ; pbk. ; aLk. papER) SUbjEcTs: l»¼h: SOcIaL ¸EDIcINE. CLassIficaTION: l»» r¾418 (EbOOk) | l»» r¾418 .¼6424  2019 (pRINT) | dd» 362.1—Dc23 l» REcORD aVaILabLE aT HTTps://LccN.LOc.gOV/2018044276

CONtENts

Ix 

¿reÀ¾»e to the third edition



ºNTRODUcTION

part i. Exp±RI±Nc±S  Of ²llN±SS  ANd ClINIcIAN-³ATI±NT  ´±lATIONSHIpS 7 

SILVER WaTER

Amy Bloom 15 

“ºs  She ´xpERIENcINg ANy PaIN?”: ¶IsabILITy aND THE  PHysIcIaN-PaTIENT ³ELaTIONsHIp

S. K. Toombs 20 

°E COsT Of AppEaRaNcEs

Arthur Frank 25 

°E SHIp POUNDINg

Donald Hall 27 

GOD aT THE BEDsIDE

Jerome Groopman 32 

°E ·sE Of FORcE

William Carlos Williams 36 

SUNDay ¶IaLOgUE: CONVERsaTIONs bETwEEN ¶OcTOR aND PaTIENT

Rebecca Dresser 42 

WHaT THE ¶OcTOR SaID

Raymond Carver

part ii. ³ROf±SSIONAlISM  ANd TH±  CUlTUR±  Of µ±dIcIN± VI 45 

°E ²EaRNINg CURVE

stnetnoC

Atul Gawande 63 

°E PERfEcT CODE

Terrence Holt 78 

COEUR D’ALENE

Richard B. Weinberg 82 

°E “WORTHy” PaTIENT: ³ETHINkINg THE “ÁIDDEN CURRIcULU¸”  IN MEDIcaL ´DUcaTION

Robin T. Higashi, Allison Tillack, Michael A. Steinman,  C. Bree Johnston, and G. Michael Harper 95 

ÁOw ¶OcTORs °INk: CLINIcaL JUDg¸ENT aND THE PRacTIcE  Of MEDIcINE

Kathryn Montgomery 101 

ÁEaLINg SkILLs fOR MEDIcaL PRacTIcE

Larry R. Churchill and David Schenck 111 

°E ÁaIR STyLIsT, THE CORN MERcHaNT, aND THE ¶OcTOR:  A¸bIgUOUsLy ALTRUIsTIc

Lois Shepherd 127 

µEcEssaRy AccEssORIEs

Nusheen Ameenuddin 132 

°E CRITIcaL ÂOcaTION Of THE ´ssay

Barry F. Saunders 140 

°E ART Of MEDIcINE: AsTH¸a aND THE ÂaLUE Of CONTRaDIcTIONs

Ian Whitmarsh 145 

ScRIpT

Mara Buchbinder and Dragana Lassiter 149 

±RDINaRy MEDIcINE: °E POwER aND CONfUsION Of ´VIDENcE

Sharon R. Kaufman 154 

“´THIcs aND CLINIcaL ³EsEaRcH”: °E 50TH ANNIVERsaRy  Of BEEcHER’s BO¸bsHELL

David S. Jones, Christine Grady, and Susan E. Lederer

part iii. ¶±AlTH  CAR±  ETHIcS  ANd TH±  ClINIcIAN’S  ´Ol± VII GLOssaRy Of BasIc ´THIcaL CONcEpTs IN ÁEaLTH CaRE aND ³EsEaRcH

Nancy M. P. King 175 

´THIcs IN MEDIcINE: AN ºNTRODUcTION TO MORaL ¹OOLs  aND ¹RaDITIONs

Larry R. Churchill, Nancy M. P. King, David Schenck,  and Rebecca L. Walker 191 

ÁIsTORIcaL aND CONTE¸pORaRy CODEs Of ´THIcs: °E ÁIppOcRaTIc  ±aTH, THE PRayER Of MaI¸ONIDEs, THE ¶EcLaRaTION Of GENEVa,  aND THE ¾m¾ PRINcIpLEs Of MEDIcaL ´THIcs

197 

´NDURINg aND ´¸ERgINg CHaLLENgEs Of ºNfOR¸ED CONsENT

Christine Grady 212 

¹EacHINg THE ¹yRaNNy Of THE FOR¸: ºNfOR¸ED CONsENT  IN PERsON aND ON PapER

Katie Watson 218 

A ¹ERRIfyINg ¹RUTH

Rebecca Dresser 222 

°E ²IE

Lawrence D. Grouse 224 

¶IscHaRgE ¶EcIsIONs aND THE ¶IgNITy Of ³Isk

Debjani Mukherjee 229 

µO ±NE µEEDs TO KNOw

Neil S. Calman

part iv. ¸±ATH,  ¸YINg, ANd ¹IV±S  AT TH±  µARgINS 239 

FORTy YEaRs Of WORk ON ´ND-Of-²IfE CaRE: FRO¸ PaTIENTs’ ³IgHTs  TO SysTE¸Ic ³EfOR¸

Susan M. Wolf, Nancy Berlinger, and Bruce Jennings 249 

¹Ry TO ³E¸E¸bER SO¸E ¶ETaILs

Yehuda Amichai 251 

FaILINg TO °RIVE?

Kim Sue

stnetnoC

167 

259 

VIII

°E ¶EaD ¶ONOR ³ULE aND ±RgaN ¹RaNspLaNTaTION

Robert D. Truog and Franklin G. Miller 263 

°E ¶aRkENINg ÂEIL Of “¶O ´VERyTHINg”

stnetnoC

Chris Feudtner and Wynne Morrison 267 

¶EaTH aND ¶IgNITy: A CasE Of ºNDIVIDUaLIzED ¶EcIsION MakINg

Timothy E. Quill 273 

AcTIVE aND PassIVE ´UTHaNasIa

James A. Rachels 280 

CLINIcIaN-PaTIENT ºNTERacTIONs abOUT ³EqUEsTs fOR  PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED SUIcIDE: A PaTIENT aND Fa¸ILy ÂIEw

Anthony L. Back, Helene Starks, Clarissa Hsu, Judith R. Gordon,  Ashok Bharucha, and Robert A. Pearlman 301 

My FaTHER’s ¶EaTH

Susan M. Wolf

part v. ºllOcATION  ANd JUSTIc± 311 

GLOssaRy: JUsTIcE aND THE ALLOcaTION Of ÁEaLTH ³EsOURcEs

Rebecca L. Walker and Larry R. Churchill 316 

¶EaD MaN WaLkINg

Michael Stillman and Monalisa Tailor 320 

FULL ¶IscLOsURE: ±UT-Of-POckET COsTs as SIDE ´ffEcTs

Peter A. Ubel, Amy P. Abernethy, and S. Yousuf Zafar 325 

SEVEN SINs Of ÁU¸aNITaRIaN MEDIcINE

David R. Welling, James M. Ryan, David G. Burris,  and Norman M. Rich 335 

WHO SHOULD ³EcEIVE ²IfE SUppORT DURINg a PUbLIc ÁEaLTH  ´¸ERgENcy? ·sINg ´THIcaL PRINcIpLEs TO º¸pROVE ALLOcaTION  ¶EcIsIONs

Douglas B. White, Mitchell H. Katz, John M. Luce, and Bernard Lo

353 

¾½out the editor¼

355 

indeX

PrEfA±E  tO tHE ²HIrD ³DItION

°E  EIgHT EDITORs Of THIs THIRD EDITION Of THE  Social Medicine Reader INcLUDE  sIx  cURRENT aND TwO fOR¸ER ¸E¸bERs Of THE ¶EpaRT¸ENT Of SOcIaL MEDIcINE  IN  THE  ·NIVERsITy Of µORTH  CaROLINa  (un») aT CHapEL  ÁILL  ScHOOL Of MEDIcINE.  FOUNDED IN  1977,  THE ¶EpaRT¸ENT Of SOcIaL MEDIcINE,  wHIcH INcLUDEs  scHOLaRs  IN ¸EDIcINE, THE sOcIaL scIENcEs, THE HU¸aNITIEs, aND pUbLIc HEaLTH,  Is cO¸¸ITTED TO THE pRO¸OTION aND pROVIsION Of ¸ULTIDIscIpLINaRy EDUcaTION,  LEaDERsHIp,  sERVIcE, REsEaRcH, aND scHOLaRsHIp aT  THE  INTERsEcTION Of  ¸EDIcINE  aND sOcIETy. °Is INcLUDEs a fOcUs ON THE sOcIaL cONDITIONs aND cHaRacTERIsTIcs  Of paTIENTs aND pOpULaTIONs; THE sOcIaL DI¸ENsIONs  Of ILLNEss; THE ETHIcaL aND  sOcIaL  cONTExTs Of  ¸EDIcaL  caRE, INsTITUTIONs,  aND  pROfEssIONs;  aND  REsOURcE  aLLOcaTION aND HEaLTH caRE pOLIcy. °Is  TwO-VOLU¸E  REaDER  REflEcTs  THE  syLLabUs  Of  a  yEaR-LONg,  REqUIRED  INTERDIscIpLINaRy cOURsE  THaT Has bEEN TaUgHT  TO fiRsT-yEaR ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs  aT un» sINcE 1978. °E gOaL Of THE cOURsE sINcE ITs INcEpTION Has bEEN TO DE¸ONsTRaTE THaT ¸EDIcINE aND ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE HaVE a pROfOUND INflUENcE ON—  aND  aRE  INflUENcED  by—sOcIaL,  cULTURaL,  pOLITIcaL,  aND  EcONO¸Ic  ¸aTTERs.  ¹EacHINg  THIs  pERspEcTIVE  REqUIREs  INTEgRaTINg  ¸EDIcaL  aND  NON¸EDIcaL  ¸aTERIaLs  aND  VIEwpOINTs.  °EREfORE,  THIs  REaDER  INcORpORaTEs  pIEcEs  fRO¸  ¸aNy fiELDs wITHIN ¸EDIcINE, THE sOcIaL scIENcEs, aND HU¸aNITIEs, REpREsENTINg THE ¸OsT ENgagINg, pROVOcaTIVE, aND INfOR¸aTIVE ¸aTERIaLs aND IssUEs wE  HaVE TRaVERsED wITH OUR sTUDENTs. MEDIcINE’s I¸pacT ON sOcIETy Is ¸ULTIDI¸ENsIONaL. MEDIcINE sHapEs HOw  wE  THINk  abOUT  THE  ¸OsT  fUNDa¸ENTaL,  ENDURINg  HU¸aN  ExpERIENcEs—  cONcEpTION, bIRTH, ¸aTURaTION, sIckNEss, sUffERINg, HEaLINg, agINg, aND DEaTH— as  wELL  as THE  ¸ETapHORs wE  UsE  TO ExpREss  OUR DEEpEsT  cONcERNs. MEDIcaL  pRacTIcEs aND sOcIaL REspONsEs TO THE¸ HaVE HELpED TO REDEfiNE THE ¸EaNINgs  Of agE, RacE, aND gENDER. SOcIaL  fORcEs  LIkEwIsE  HaVE  a  pOwERfUL  INflUENcE  ON  ¸EDIcINE.  MEDIcaL  kNOwLEDgE aND pRacTIcE, LIkE aLL kNOwLEDgE aND pRacTIcE, aRE sHapED by pOLITIcaL,  cULTURaL,  aND  EcONO¸Ic  fORcEs. °Is  INcLUDEs ¸ODERN  scIENcE’s  pURsUIT  Of kNOwLEDgE THROUgH OsTENsIbLy  NEUTRaL, ObjEcTIVE  ObsERVaTION aND ExpERI¸ENTaTION. PHysIcIaNs’  IDEas abOUT DIsEasE—IN facT THEIR VERy DEfiNITIONs Of 

DIsEasE—DEpEND  ON THE  ROLEs THaT  scIENcE aND  scIENTIsTs pLay  IN  paRTIcULaR 

x

cULTUREs, as wELL as ON THE VaRIOUs cULTUREs Of LabORaTORy aND cLINIcaL scIENcE.  ¶EspITE  THE  pOwER  Of  THE  bIO¸EDIcaL  ¸ODEL  Of  DIsEasE  aND  THE  INcREasINg 

n o i t i d E   d r i h T   e h t  o t   e c a f e r P

spEcIficITy  Of  ¸OLEcULaR  aND  gENETIc kNOwLEDgE,  sOcIaL  facTORs  HaVE  aLways  INflUENcED  THE  OccURRENcE  aND  cOURsE  Of  ¸OsT  DIsEasEs.  AND  ONcE  DIsEasE  Has OccURRED, THE pOwER Of ¸EDIcINE TO aLTER ITs cOURsE Is cONsTRaINED by THE  LaRgER sOcIaL, EcONO¸Ic, aND pOLITIcaL cONTExTs. WHILE  THE  ORIgIN  Of  THEsE  VOLU¸Es  LIEs  IN  TEacHINg  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs,  wE  bELIEVE  THE sELEcTIONs  THEy INcLUDE  wILL REsONaTE  wITH a  bROaDER REaDERsHIp  fRO¸ aLLIED  HEaLTH  fiELDs,  THE  ¸EDIcaL  HU¸aNITIEs,  bIOETHIcs,  aRTs  aND  scIENcEs,  aND THE  INTEREsTED  pUbLIc.  °E  ¸aNy VOIcEs  REpREsENTED  IN  THEsE  REaDINgs  INcLUDE INDIVIDUaL  NaRRaTIVEs  Of ILLNEss  ExpERIENcE, cO¸¸ENTaRIEs  by  pHysIcIaNs, DEbaTE abOUT cO¸pLEx ¸EDIcaL  casEs aND pRacTIcEs,  aND cONcEpTUaLLy aND  E¸pIRIcaLLy basED scHOLaRLy wRITINgs.  °EsE aRE REaDINgs wITH  THE  LITERaRy  aND  scHOLaRLy  pOwER  TO  cONVEy  THE  cO¸pLIcaTED  RELaTIONsHIps  bETwEEN ¸EDIcINE, HEaLTH, aND sOcIETy. °Ey DO  NOT REsOLVE THE ¸OsT VExINg  cONTE¸pORaRy IssUEs, bUT THEy DO ILLU¸INaTE THEIR NUaNcEs aND cO¸pLExITIEs,  INVITINg DIscUssION aND DEbaTE. ³EpEaTEDLy, THE REaDINgs THROUgHOUT THEsE TwO  VOLU¸Es ¸akE  cLEaR THaT  ¸UcH  Of  wHaT  wE  ENcOUNTER  IN  scIENcE,  IN  sOcIETy,  aND  IN  EVERyDay  aND  ExTRaORDINaRy  LIVEs  Is  INDETER¸INaTE,  a¸bIgUOUs,  cO¸pLEx,  aND  cONTRaDIcTORy.  AND  bEcaUsE  Of  THIs  INHERENT  a¸bIgUITy,  THE  INTERwOVEN  sELEcTIONs  HIgHLIgHT  cONflIcTs  abOUT  pOwER  aND  aUTHORITy,  aUTONO¸y  aND  cHOIcE,  aND  sEcURITy aND RIsk. By cRITIcaLLy aNaLyzINg THEsE aND ¸aNy OTHER RELaTED IssUEs,  wE caN OpEN Up pOssIbILITIEs, cHaNgE wHaT ¸ay sEE¸ INEVITabLE, aND pRacTIcE  pROfEssIONaL  TRaININg  aND  caREgIVINg  wITH aN  INcREasED capacITy  fOR  REflEcTION  aND sELf-Exa¸INaTION. °E gOaL Is TO IgNITE aND  fUEL THE INNER VOIcEs  Of  sOcIaL aND ¸ORaL aNaLysIs a¸ONg HEaLTH caRE pROfEssIONaLs, aND a¸ONg Us aLL. ANy  scHOLaRLy  aNTHOLOgy  Is  OpEN  TO  cHaLLENgEs  abOUT  wHaT  Has  bEEN  INcLUDED  aND  wHaT  Has  bEEN  LEſt OUT.  °Is  cOLLEcTION  Is  NO  ExcEpTION.  °E  sTUDy  Of  ¸EDIcINE  aND  sOcIETy  Is  DyNa¸Ic,  wITH  LaRgE  aND  EVER-ExpaNDINg  bODIEs  Of  LITERaTURE  fRO¸  wHIcH  TO  DRaw.  WE  HaVE  O¸ITTED  sO¸E  REaDINgs  wIDELy cONsIDERED TO bE “cLassIcs” aND HaVE INcLUDED sO¸E REaDINgs THaT aRE  ExcITINg aND NEw—THaT wE bELIEVE HaVE aN INDELIbLE I¸pacT. WE HaVE cHOsEN  TO  INcLUDE  ¸aTERIaL  wITH  LITERaRy  aND  scHOLaRLy  ¸ERIT aND  THaT  Has  wORkED  wELL  IN  THE cLassROO¸,  pROVOkINg  DIscUssION  aND  ENgagINg  REaDERs’  I¸agINaTIONs.  °EsE  REaDINgs  INVITE  cRITIcaL  Exa¸INaTION,  a  LabOR  Of REaDINg  aND  DIscUssION THaT Is INHERENTLy DIfficULT bUT EDUcaTIONaLLy REwaRDINg.

ÂOLU¸E 1, Ethics and Cultures of Biomedicine, Exa¸INEs ExpERIENcEs Of ILLNEss;  THE ROLEs  aND  TRaININg  Of HEaLTH  caRE  pROfEssIONaLs  aND  THEIR  RELaTION-

xI

caRE ETHIcs; DEaTH  aND DyINg; aND REsOURcE  aLLOcaTION aND  jUsTIcE. ÂOLU¸E  2, 

Differences  and  Inequalities,  ExpLOREs  HEaLTH  aND ILLNEss,  fOcUsINg  ON  HOw  DIffERENcE  aND  DIsabILITy  aRE  DEfiNED  aND  ExpERIENcED  IN  cONTE¸pORaRy  A¸ERIca,  aND  HOw  sOcIaL  caTEgORIEs  cO¸¸ONLy  UsED  TO  pREDIcT  DIsEasE  OUTcO¸Es—gENDER, RacE/ETHNIcITy, aND sOcIaL cLass—sHapE HEaLTH OUTcO¸Es  aND ¸EDIcaL caRE. WE THaNk OUR TEacHINg cOLLEagUEs wHO HELpED cREaTE aND REfiNE aLL THREE  EDITIONs Of THIs REaDER. °EsE cOLLEagUEs HaVE cO¸E OVER THE yEaRs fRO¸ bOTH  wITHIN aND OUTsIDE THE ¶EpaRT¸ENT Of SOcIaL MEDIcINE aND THE ·NIVERsITy Of  µORTH  CaROLINa aT CHapEL ÁILL. ´qUaL  gRaTITUDE gOEs TO OUR sTUDENTs,  wHOsE  cRITIcIs¸ aND ENTHUsIas¸ OVER fOUR DEcaDEs HaVE I¸pROVED OUR TEacHINg aND  HaVE INflUENcED Us gREaTLy IN ¸akINg THE sELEcTIONs fOR THE REaDER. WE THaNk  THE ¶EpaRT¸ENT’s facULTy aND sTaff, pasT aND pREsENT; sTUDENTs aND cOLLEagUEs  fRO¸  ÂaNDERbILT  ·NIVERsITy  ScHOOL  Of  MEDIcINE  aND  WakE  FOREsT  ScHOOL  Of  MEDIcINE  HaVE  sI¸ILaRLy  bEEN  INsTRU¸ENTaL. WE  EspEcIaLLy  THaNk KaTHy  CROsIER,  THE  cOURsE cOORDINaTOR fOR  OUR  fiRsT-yEaR  cLass,  wHO  assIsTED  wITH  THE  pREpaRaTION Of  THE  Reader.  °E  EDITORs  gRaTEfULLy ackNOwLEDgE  sUppORT  fRO¸  THE ¶EpaRT¸ENT  Of  SOcIaL  MEDIcINE,  ·NIVERsITy Of  µORTH  CaROLINa  aT  CHapEL ÁILL ScHOOL Of MEDIcINE; THE CENTER fOR BIO¸EDIcaL ´THIcs aND SOcIETy, ÂaNDERbILT ·NIVERsITy ScHOOL Of MEDIcINE; aND THE CENTER fOR BIOETHIcs,  ÁEaLTH, aND SOcIETy, WakE FOREsT ·NIVERsITy.

n o i t i d E   d r i h T  e h t   o t   e c a f e r P

sHIps wITH  paTIENTs; INsTITUTIONaL cULTUREs Of bIOscIENcE aND ¸EDIcINE; HEaLTH 

This page intentionally left blank

InTRoducT±on

°Is  fiRsT Of THE TwO VOLU¸Es THaT cO¸pRIsE THE  Social Medicine Reader THE¸aTIcaLLy ExpLOREs THE ExpERIENcEs Of ILLNEss; THE ROLEs aND TRaININg Of HEaLTH  caRE pROfEssIONaLs aND THEIR RELaTIONsHIps wITH paTIENTs aLONgsIDE THE bROaDER  cULTUREs  Of  bIO¸EDIcINE; ETHIcs  IN  HEaLTH  caRE; ExpERIENcEs  aND DEcIsIONs  REgaRDINg DEaTH, DyINg, aND sTRUggLINg TO LIVE; aND paRTIcULaR ¸aNIfEsTaTIONs Of  INjUsTIcE IN THE bROaDER HEaLTH sysTE¸. °E VOLU¸E’s REaDINgs, wHIcH INcLUDE  NaRRaTIVEs, Essays, casEs sTUDIEs, ficTION, aND pOETRy, HaVE bEEN “ROaD-TEsTED”  IN sOcIaL scIENcE, ETHIcs, aND HU¸aNITIEs cLassEs IN HEaLTH pROfEssIONaL scHOOLs  aND gRaDUaTE aND UNDERgRaDUaTE pROgRa¸s. °Ey HaVE bEEN UsED TO sTI¸ULaTE  DEbaTE aND s¸aLL-gROUp INTERacTIONs OR ExERcIsEs, aND THEy HaVE sERVED as  LaUNcHINg pOINTs  fOR  LaRgER  cLass  DIscUssIONs. WE  DO  NOT cOVER  aNy  cONTENT  aREa cO¸pLETELy; OUR gOaL INsTEaD Is TO pROVIDE sTI¸ULaTINg sELEcTED REaDINgs  fRO¸ wHIcH TO ENgagE sTUDENTs IN DIscUssION aND DEEpER INVEsTIgaTION. °E EIgHT EDITORs Of THIs VOLU¸E aRE DIVERsE IN THEIR scHOLaRLy backgROUNDs,  ExpERTIsE,  aND TEacHINg sTyLEs. WE  EacH TEacH THE sa¸E ¸aTERIaLs DIffERENTLy  aND  HaVE  LEaRNED  ¸UcH  fRO¸  EacH  OTHER  THROUgH  ¸aNy  yEaRs  Of  facULTy  ¸EETINgs fOcUsED ON TEacHINg aND pEDagOgy. ±UR cOLLabORaTION ExE¸pLIfiEs  THE aDapTabILITy Of THE VOLU¸E’s REaDINgs TO a VaRIETy Of fOR¸aTs, sETTINgs, aND  appROacHEs. BEgINNINg  THIs  VOLU¸E  wITH  ExpERIENcEs  Of  ILLNEss  HELps  TO  gROUND  THE  NaTURE aND ¸EaNINg Of sIckNEss aND HEaLINg IN THE fa¸ILIaR yET UNIqUELy ExpERIENcED sTaTE Of bEINg a paTIENT. ALL HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs HaVE bEEN, aND wILL  bE  agaIN,  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  Of  paTIENTs.  ÂIVID  NaRRaTIVEs  abOUT  ¸aNagINg ILLNEss IN DaILy LIfE HELp bUILD UNDERsTaNDINg Of THE VaNTagE pOINTs  Of paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs wHO paRTIcIpaTE IN ILLNEss ExpERIENcEs. ¹EacHERs aND sTUDENTs UNaccUsTO¸ED TO ficTION aND pOETRy IN THE cLassROO¸ ¸ay bE  sURpRIsED aT HOw REaDILy THEsE ¸aTERIaLs caN sTI¸ULaTE RIcH aND NUaNcED DIscUssION Of pROfOUNDLy sIgNIficaNT IssUEs—EspEcIaLLy wHEN REaD aLOUD. WHILE  THE  fiRsT  paRT Of  THE VOLU¸E  Is  paRTIcULaRLy RIcH  IN THEsE fOR¸s  Of LITERaTURE,  sUcH sELEcTIONs appEaR IN ¸OsT OTHER paRTs Of THE VOLU¸E as wELL. ºN THE sEcOND  paRT  Of THE  VOLU¸E, ¸EDIcaL  sOcIaLIzaTION aND  THE DOcTOR-  paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp aRE cONsIDERED. SOcIaL scIENTIsTs HaVE ExTENsIVELy Exa¸INED 

THE  pROcEssEs  THaT  TRaNsfOR¸ ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs  INTO cOUNsELORs  Of  HEaLTH 

2

aND  INTERVENERs IN  IssUEs Of  LIfE  aND  DEaTH. PROfEssIONs,  LIkE OTHER  sOcIaL  gROUps,  HaVE cULTUREs:  THEy  HaVE spEcIaLIzED  LaNgUagEs  aND ways  Of UNDER-

noitcudortnI

sTaNDINg,  NOR¸s Of  bEHaVIOR,  UNIqUE cUsTO¸s,  RITEs  Of passagE,  aND cODEs  Of  cONDUcT. STUDENTs aRE sOcIaLIzED INTO THE “cULTURE Of bIO¸EDIcINE” IN a TRaININg  pROcEss  THaT cHaNgEs  THE sTUDENT THROUgH  DIREcT cONTacT wITH aND kNOwLEDgE  Of THE ¸OsT pERsONaL aspEcTs Of HU¸aN ExIsTENcE. MaNy sTUDENTs ENTER ¸EDIcaL  scHOOL wITH IDEaLIsTIc VIEws Of ¸EDIcINE, ITs gOaLs, aND ITs basIs IN EVIDENcE. As  THEy LEaRN THE IDEOLOgy aND ETHIcs Of ¸EDIcINE aND UNcOVER THE cO¸pLEx EVIDENcE basE THaT ¸EDIcINE pUTs INTO pRacTIcE, THEy ¸ay facE UNcERTaINTy THaT Is  TOO OſtEN LEſt UNsTaTED IN pUbLIc; THEy ¸ay UNDERgO pROfOUND cHaNgEs IN THEIR  pERspEcTIVEs  aND EVEN THEIR IDENTITIEs. °EsE REaDINgs pRO¸OTE REflEcTION ON  THE ROLEs Of HEaLTH pROfEssIONaL sTUDENTs aND pRacTITIONERs, ON THE cHaLLENgEs  INHERENT  IN  THE  pHysIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp, aND  ON NaVIgaTINg  bETwEEN  pROfEssIONaL aND pERsONaL ExpERIENcEs, VaLUEs, aND TRUTHs. °E THIRD paRT Of THE VOLU¸E TURNs TO a ¸ORE ExpLIcIT fOcUs ON HEaLTH caRE  ETHIcs.  °Is sEcTION INcLUDEs NaRRaTIVEs (ficTION aND  NONficTION) Of cLINIcIaN  aND paTIENT ExpERIENcEs, as wELL as THEORETIcaL fRa¸INg aND pROfEssIONaL gUIDaNcE. ³EaDINgs Exa¸INE ¸ORaL REasONINg aND wHaT IT ¸EaNs TO HaVE a ¸ORaL  LIfE as a cLINIcIaN IN RELaTIONsHIps wITH paTIENTs. FUNDa¸ENTaL ¸ORaL pREcEpTs  IN  HEaLTH  caRE pRacTIcE—TRUTH-TELLINg,  INfOR¸ED cONsENT, pRIVacy,  aUTONO¸y,  aND bENEficENcE—aRE aDDREssED IN THEIR OwN RIgHT aND aLsO pREsENTED IN casEs  aND sTORIEs THaT pOsE pRObLE¸s TO bE UNRaVELED, Exa¸INED, aND DEbaTED fRO¸  a  wIDE  RaNgE  Of  VIEwpOINTs.  ºN  THIs  sEcTION,  cO¸pLEx  ETHIcaL  IssUEs aRE  pREsENTED as DyNa¸Ic: E¸bEDDED IN TI¸E, pLacE, sOcIETy, HIsTORy, aND cULTURE, aND  ENTaNgLED IN ¸ULTIpLE RELaTIONsHIps. °E fOURTH paRT Of THIs VOLU¸E E¸pLOys THE pRIOR THE¸Es TO aDDREss DEcIsION  ¸akINg,  pOLIcIEs,  aND  ExpERIENcEs  aT  THE  ¸aRgINs  Of  LIfE—INcLUDINg  DEaTH, DyINg, aND sTRUggLINg TO LIVE. °E wORk Of THIs sEcTION INcLUDEs aN EffORT  TO  cLaRIfy  cONcEpTs;  aN  Exa¸INaTION Of  sIgNIficaNT  sOcIaL DIsagREE¸ENTs  aND  ¸O¸ENTs  IN END-Of-LIfE  DEcIsION ¸akINg; aND spEcIfic  aTTENTION TO LIfE  pROLONgaTION,  TREaT¸ENT  wITHDRawaL, aND  THE ENDINg  Of  LIfE, wHETHER  wELcO¸E  OR  UNwELcO¸E.  QUEsTIONs aRE  RaIsED  abOUT  THE  LEgaL, ETHIcaL,  aND  pRacTIcaL  ¸EDIcaL  aspEcTs Of END-Of-LIfE  caRE, THE NaTURE aND  pOwER  Of ¸EDIcaL  jUDg¸ENTs,  aND  LONg-sTaNDINg  pROfEssIONaL  aND  pERsONaL  DIsagREE¸ENTs  abOUT  THE END Of LIfE. POETRy, pERsONaL NaRRaTIVE, aND THE VOIcEs Of paTIENTs aND THEIR  fa¸ILIEs OpEN THE pOssIbILITy fOR DIscUssION Of ¸ORaLITy, ¸EaNINg, LOss, gRIEf,  aND pROfOUND UNcERTaINTy IN THE facE Of DEaTH.

°E fiNaL sEcTION Of THIs VOLU¸E appROacHEs jUsTIcE aND aLLOcaTION THROUgH  a  fEw  Exa¸pLEs  NOT  cO¸¸ONLy  aDDREssED  IN  TExTs  ON  DIsTRIbUTIVE  jUsTIcE 

3

HEaLTH-RELaTED  jUsTIcE IssUEs IN OTHER VOLU¸Es, OUR gOaL HERE Is TO  INTRODUcE  THE RELEVaNT cONcEpTs aND ILLUsTRaTE THE wIDE DIVERsITy Of ways IN wHIcH INjUsTIcE Is HIDINg IN pLaIN sIgHT IN ¸EDIcINE. °E VaRIETy Of REaDINgs IN THIs VOLU¸E caN bE aDDREssED pRODUcTIVELy fRO¸  DIffERENT DIscIpLINaRy pERspEcTIVEs aND IN ¸aNy TEacHINg sTyLEs aND fOR¸aTs.  °EsE REaDINgs aRE REaDILy cO¸bINED wITH THOsE fRO¸ VOLU¸E 2 Of THE Social 

Medicine  Reader , TITLED  Differences  and  Inequalities . ³EaDINgs fRO¸ bOTH  VOLU¸Es  caN bE  REsHUfflED  aND  REcO¸bINED, sTaND TOgETHER OR  aLONE, OR  bE  sUppLE¸ENTED by OTHER LITERaTURE. A kEy TO UsINg THEsE REaDINgs sUccEssfULLy  Is TO appROacH THE¸ wITH flExIbILITy—as HELpINg TO sHapE THE RIgHT qUEsTIONs  RaTHER  THaN gIVINg  paRTIcULaR  aNswERs.  ±UR HOpE  Is  THaT  bOTH TEacHERs  aND  sTUDENTs Of ¸aTERIaLs LIkE THEsE wILL gO ON askINg qUEsTIONs, aND fiNDINg DIffERENT aND DEEpER aNswERs, aLL THEIR LIVEs.

noitcudortnI

IN  HEaLTH caRE. BEcaUsE THERE aRE  ¸aNy ¸ORE cO¸pREHENsIVE TREaT¸ENTs Of 

This page intentionally left blank

expeRienceS  oF illneSS and  clinician-paTienT  RelaTionShipS

I

This page intentionally left blank

S±lVeR  WATeR Amy Bloom

My sIsTER’s  VOIcE was  LIkE  ¸OUNTaIN waTER IN a  sILVER pITcHER; THE  cLEaR bLUE  bEaUTy  Of IT cOOLs yOU aND LIſts yOU Up bEyOND yOUR HEaT, bEyOND yOUR bODy.  AſtER wE wENT TO sEE La Traviata, wHEN sHE was fOURTEEN aND º was TwELVE, sHE  ELbOwED ¸E IN THE paRkINg LOT aND saID, “CHEck THIs OUT.” AND sHE OpENED HER  ¸OUTH  UNNaTURaLLy  wIDE  aND  HER VOIcE  ca¸E OUT,  sO  cRysTaLLINE aND  bRIgHT  THaT aLL THE DEpaRTINg OpERagOERs sTOOD fROzEN by THEIR caRs, UNabLE TO TakE OUT  THEIR kEys OR OpEN THEIR DOORs UNTIL sHE  HaD fiNIsHED, aND THEN THEy cHEERED  LIkE HELL. °aT’s  wHaT  º  LIkE TO  RE¸E¸bER,  aND  THaT’s  THE sTORy  º  TOLD TO  aLL  Of  HER  THERapIsTs. º waNTED THE¸ TO kNOw HER, TO kNOw THaT wHO THEy saw was NOT  aLL  THERE was  TO  sEE. °aT bEfORE HER  cONsTaNT TINkLINg  Of cO¸¸ERcIaLs aND  fasT-fOOD  jINgLEs THERE  HaD bEEN  PUccINI aND MOzaRT  aND Hy¸Ns sO  swEET  aND  ¸IgHTy yOU  ExpEcTED JEsUs TO  cO¸E DOwN Off  HIs cROss aND cLap.  °aT  bEfORE  THERE was a ¸OUNTaIN  Of °ORazINED faT, swayINg DOwN THE HaLLs IN  NyLON  ¸aTERNITy  TOps  aND  swEaTpaNTs,  THERE  HaD  bEEN THE  pRETTIEsT  gIRL IN  ARRaNDaLE  ´LE¸ENTaRy ScHOOL,  THE bELLE  Of ²aND¸aRk JUNIOR ÁIgH.  MaybE  THERE wERE  OTHER pRETTy gIRLs, bUT º  DIDN’T sEE THE¸. ¹O ¸E, ³OsE, ¸y bEaUTIfUL  bLOND  DEfENDER,  ¸y  gUIDE  TO  ¹a¸pax  aND  ¸y  ¸OTHER’s  ¸OODs,  was  pERfEcT. SHE HaD HER fiRsT psycHOTIc bREak wHEN sHE was fiſtEEN. SHE HaD bEEN cO¸INg HO¸E ¸OODy aND TEaRfUL, THEN qUIETLy bEa¸INg, THEN sHE sTOppED cO¸INg  HO¸E. SHE wOULD gO OUT INTO THE wOODs bEHIND OUR HOUsE aND NOT cO¸E IN  UNTIL  ¸y ¸OTHER  wENT aſtER  HER aT DUsk, aND  sTEppED  gENTLy INTO  THE bRIaRs  aND  sapLINgs aND pULLED HER OUT, bLaNk-facED, HER paLE bLUE swEaTER cOVERED  wITH cRU¸bLED LEaVEs, HER wHITE jEaNs s¸EaRED wITH DIRT. AſtER THREE wEEks 

A¸y  BLOO¸, “SILVER  WaTER,” fRO¸  Come to  Me:  Short Stories,  by  A¸y BLOO¸.  ©  1993  by A¸y  BLOO¸.  PUbLIsHED  IN  THE  ·NITED  STaTEs  by  ÁaRpERCOLLINs  PUbLIsHERs.  ±RIgINaLLy  appEaRED  IN 

Story , AUTU¸N 1991.  µO paRT Of THIs ¸aTERIaL ¸ay bE REpRODUcED,  IN wHOLE OR paRT,  wITHOUT THE  ExpREss wRITTEN pER¸IssION Of THE aUTHOR OR HER agENT.

Of THIs, ¸y ¸OTHER, wHO Is a ¸UsIcIaN aND wIDELy REgaRDED as EccENTRIc, saID 

8

TO ¸y faTHER, wHO Is a psycHIaTRIsT aND a kIND, saD ¸aN, “SHE’s gOINg Off.” “WHaT Is THaT, yOUR pROfEssIONaL OpINION?” ÁE  pIckED Up THE NEwspapER 

moolB ymA

aND  pUT  IT  DOwN agaIN, sIgHINg.  “º’¸  sORRy,  º DIDN’T  ¸EaN  TO  sNap aT yOU.  º  kNOw sO¸ETHINg’s bOTHERINg HER. ÁaVE yOU TaLkED TO HER?” “WHaT’s THERE TO say? ¶aVID, sHE’s gOINg  cRazy. SHE DOEsN’T NEED a  HEaRT-  TO-HEaRT TaLk wITH MO¸, sHE NEEDs a HOspITaL.” °Ey wENT  back aND  fORTH,  aND  ¸y faTHER saT  DOwN  wITH  ³OsE  fOR  a  fEw  HOURs, aND sHE  saT THERE LIckINg THE HaIRs ON HER fOREaR¸, fiRsT ONE way,  THEN  THE OTHER. My ¸OTHER sTOOD IN THE HaLLway, DRy-EyED aND paLE, waTcHINg THE  TwO Of THE¸. SHE HaD aLREaDy packED, aND wHEN THREE Of ¸y faTHER’s fRIENDs  DROppED by TO OffER fREE cONsULTaTIONs aND REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs, ¸y ¸OTHER aND  ³OsE’s  sUITcasE wERE  aLREaDy IN THE caR. My ¸OTHER HUggED ¸E  aND TOLD ¸E  THaT  THEy wOULD bE back THaT NIgHT, bUT NOT wITH ³OsE. SHE aLsO saID, DIVININg ¸y wORsT fEaR, “ºT wON’T HappEN TO yOU, HONEy. SO¸E pEOpLE gO cRazy aND  sO¸E pEOpLE NEVER DO. YOU NEVER wILL.” SHE s¸ILED aND sTROkED ¸y HaIR. “µOT  EVEN wHEN yOU waNT TO.” ³OsE was IN HOspITaLs, gREaT aND s¸aLL, fOR THE NExT TEN yEaRs. SHE HaD LOTs  Of  TERRIbLE THERapIsTs aND a fEw gOOD ONEs. ±NE pLacE HaD NO  pIcTUREs ON  THE  waLLs, NO wINDOws, aND THE paTIENTs aLL wORE sLIppERs wITH THE HOspITaL cREsT ON  THE¸.  My  ¸OTHER  DIDN’T EVEN  bOTHER  TO gO  TO AD¸IssIONs. SHE  TURNED ³OsE  aROUND  aND  THE  TwO Of  THE¸ ¸aRcHED  OUT, ¸y  faTHER  waLkINg  bEHIND  THE¸,  apOLOgIzINg TO HIs cOLLEagUEs. My ¸OTHER IgNORED THE psycHIaTRIsTs, THE sOcIaL  wORkERs, aND THE NURsEs, aND pLayED ÁaNDEL aND BEssIE S¸ITH fOR THE paTIENTs  ON  wHaTEVER was aVaILabLE. AT sO¸E pLacEs, sHE HaD  a STEINway DONaTED  by a  gRaTEfUL, OR OpTI¸IsTIc, fa¸ILy; aT OTHERs, sHE baNgED OUT “GI¸¸E a PIgfOOT aND  a  BOTTLE Of BEER” ON aN OLD, scaRRED bOx THaT HaDN’T bEEN  TUNED sINcE THERE’D  bEEN ´NgLIsH-spEakINg pHysIcIaNs ON THE gROUNDs. My faTHER TaLkED IN sERIOUs,  appREcIaTIVE TONEs TO THE aD¸INIsTRaTORs aND UNIT cHIEfs aND TRIED TO bE fRIENDLy  wITH wHOEVER was ¸aNagINg ³OsE’s casE. WE aLL HaTED THE fa¸ILy THERapIsTs. °E wORsT  fa¸ILy  THERapIsT wE  EVER  HaD saT IN  a  paLE gREEN  ROO¸ wITH  Us,  VIsIbLy TakINg sTOck Of ¸y ¸OTHER’s ETHEREaL bEaUTy aND HER faDED bLUE ¹-sHIRT  aND  gIRL-sIzED jEaNs, ¸y faTHER’s  RU¸pLED  sUIT aND  sTaINED TIE,  aND  ¸y OwN  UNREaDabLE sEVENTEEN-yEaR-OLD fasHION  sTaTE¸ENT. ³OsE was bEyOND fasHION  THaT  yEaR,  IN  ONE  Of  HER  DaNcINg  TEDDy  bEaR  s¸Ocks  aND  ExTRa-ExTRa-LaRgE  CELTIcs  swEaTpaNTs.  MR.  WaLkER  REaD  ³OsE’s  fiLE  IN  fRONT  Of  Us  aND  THEN  waTcHED IN aLaR¸ as ³OsE bEgaN cROONINg, bEaUTIfULLy, aND sLOwLy ¸assagINg  HER bREasTs. My ¸OTHER aND º LaUgHED, aND EVEN ¸y faTHER sTaRTED TO s¸ILE.  °Is was ³OsE’s UsUaL OpENINg saLVO fOR NEw THERapIsTs.

MR. WaLkER  saID, “º  wONDER wHy IT  Is THaT  EVERyONE  Is  sO  ENTERTaINED by  ³OsE bEHaVINg INappROpRIaTELy.”

9

NaTELy, was DETER¸INED TO DO RIgHT by Us. “WHaT DO yOU THINk Of ³OsE’s bEHaVIOR, ÂIOLET?” °Ey DID THIs sO¸ETI¸Es.  ºN THEIR ¸aNUaL IT ¸UsT say, ºf yOU THINk THE paRENTs aRE TOO wEIRD, TRy TaLkINg  TO THE sIsTER. “º DON’T kNOw.  MaybE sHE’s TRyINg TO gET yOU TO sTOp TaLkINg abOUT HER IN  THE THIRD pERsON.” “µIcELy pUT,” ¸y ¸OTHER saID. “ºNDEED,” ¸y faTHER saID. “FUckIN’ A,” ³OsE saID. “WELL, THIs Is sO¸ETHINg  THaT THE wHOLE fa¸ILy agREEs UpON,” MR. WaLkER  saID, TRyINg TO acT as If HE UNDERsTOOD OR EVEN LIkED Us. “°aT  was NOT  a  sUccEssfUL  INTERVENTION,  FERRET  FacE.”  ³OsE TENDED  TO  fUNcTION bETTER wHEN sHE was aNgRy. ÁE DID LOOk LIkE a bLOND fERRET, aND wE  aLL  LaUgHED agaIN. ´VEN ¸y faTHER, wHO TRIED TO gIVE THEsE pEOpLE a  cHaNcE,  OUT Of sO¸E sENsE Of cOLLEgIaLITy, HaD gIVEN IT Up. AſtER  fOURTEEN ¸INUTEs,  MR. WaLkER  DEcIDED  THaT  OUR  TI¸E  was  Up aND  waLkED OUT, LEaVINg Us gRINNINg aT EacH OTHER. ³OsE was sTILL NUTs, bUT aT LEasT  wE’D aLL HaD a LITTLE fUN. °E  Day  wE ¸ET  OUR  bEsT  fa¸ILy  THERapIsT  sTaRTED  OUT  aL¸OsT  as  baDLy.  WE  scaRED  Off a  REsIDENT  aND THEN  scaRED  Off  HER  sUpERVIsOR,  wHO  sENT Us  ¶R. °ORNE. °REE HUNDRED pOUNDs Of ¹Exas cHILI, cORNbREaD, aND ²ONE STaR  bEER,  fiNIsHED Off wITH bIg bLack cOwbOy bOOTs aND a s¸aLL sTRINg TIE aROUND  THE aREa Of HIs NEck. “± fRabjOUs Day, IT’s BIg µUT.” ³OsE was IN HEaVEN aND sTOppED ¸assagINg  HER bREasTs I¸¸EDIaTELy. “ÁEy, ²ITTLE µUT.”  YOU HaVE TO UNDERsTaND  HOw bIg  a ¸aN wOULD HaVE  TO  bE TO caLL ¸y sIsTER “LITTLE.” ÁE cHRIsTENED Us aLL, RIgHT away. “AND IT’s THE gOOD  ¶OcTOR  µUT,  aND  MaDa¸E  ÁIckORy  µUT,  ’caUsE  THEy  aRE  THE  HaRDEsT  Da¸N  NUTs  TO cRack,  aND  OVER HERE  IN THE OVERaLLs  aND NOT  ¸UcH  ELsE Is  µO ±NE’s  µUT”—a Na¸E THaT sU¸¸ED Up bOTH  ¸y saNITy aND ¸y LONELINEss. WE aLL  RELaxED. ¶R. °ORNE  was  gOOD fOR  Us.  ³OsE  ¸OVED  INTO  a HaLfway  HOUsE wHOsE  DIREcTOR  LOVED BIg  µUT sO  ¸UcH  THaT  sHE kEpT  ³OsE EVEN  wHEN  ³OsE  wENT  THROUgH a pERIOD Of HaVINg sEx wITH EVERyONE wHO passED HER DOOR. SHE was  IN a fEVER fOR a wHILE, TRyINg TO sTILL THE VOIcEs by fUckINg HER bRaINs OUT.

retaW   r e v l i S

³OsE bURpED aND THEN wE aLL LaUgHED. °Is was THE sEVENTH fa¸ILy THERapIsT  wE  HaD  sEEN,  aND  NONE  Of  THE¸ HaD  LasTED VERy  LONg. MR.  WaLkER,  UNfORTU-

BIg µUT saID, “¶aRLIN’, º caN’T. º caNNOT ¸akE LOVE TO EVERy bEaUTIfUL wO¸aN 

10

º ¸EET, aND fURTHER¸ORE, º caN’T DO THaT aND bE yOUR THERapIsT TOO. ºT’s a gREaT  sHa¸E, bUT º THINk yOU ¸IgHT bE abLE TO fiND a REaLLy NIcE gUy, sO¸EONE wHO 

moolB ymA

TREaTs yOU jUsT as swEET aND kIND as º wOULD If º wERE LUcky ENOUgH TO bE yOUR  bEaU.  º  DON’T waNT  yOU  TO sETTLE  fOR  LEss.” AND  sHE sTOppED  pROpOsITIONINg  THE  cRack  aDDIcTs  aND THE aLcOHOLIcs  aND THE  gUys  aT THE  sHELTER. WE LOVED  ¶R. °ORNE. My  faTHER wENT  back  TO  sEEINg  RIcH  NEUROTIcs  aND HELpED  OUT  ONE  Day  a wEEk aT ¶R. °ORNE’s  WaLk-ºN CLINIc. My ¸OTHER fiNIsHED  a REcORDINg  Of  MOzaRT cONcERTI aND pLayED aT fUND-RaIsERs fOR ³OsE’s  HaLfway HOUsE. º wENT  back TO cOLLEgE aND fOUND a wONDERfUL LINEbackER fRO¸ ¹Exas TO sLEEp wITH. ºN  THE DaRk, º wOULD ¸akE HI¸ caLL ¸E “DaRLIN’.” ³OsE TOOk HER ¸EDs, LOsT abOUT  fiſty pOUNDs, aND bEgaN sINgINg aT THE ¾.m.e. ZION CHURcH, DOwN THE sTREET  fRO¸ THE HaLfway HOUsE. AT fiRsT THEy DIDN’T kNOw wHaT TO DO wITH THIs bIg bLOND LaDy, DREssED fUNNy  aND  HOVERINg wIsTfULLy IN THE DOORway DURINg THEIR REHEaRsaLs, bUT  sHE gaVE  THE¸ a fEw baRs Of “PREcIOUs ²ORD” aND THE cHOIR DIREcTOR fELT GOD’s HaND aND  saw THaT wITH THE HELp Of ÁIs swEET cHILD ³OsE, THE PROspEcT STREET CHOIR was  gOINg aLL THE way TO THE GOspEL ±Ly¸pIcs. A¸IDsT a sEa Of bEIgE, U¸bER, cINNa¸ON, aND EspREssO facEs, THERE was ³OsE,  bIggER, bLONDER, aND pINkER THaN aNy TwO  wHITE wO¸EN cOULD bE.  AND ³OsE  aND THE  cHOIR’s cONTRaLTO, ADDIE  ³ObIcHEaUx,  LaID OUT  THEIR gOLD aND sILVER  VOIcEs  aND  wOVE THE¸ TOgETHER  IN sTRaNDs as fiNE  as sILk,  as sTRONg  as sTEEL.  AND  wE wEpT as  ³OsE aND ADDIE,  IN  THEIR bILLOwINg  gaRNET  RObEs, swayED  TOgETHER,  cLaspINg  HaNDs  UNTIL  THE LasT  pERfEcT  NOTE  flOaTED  Up  TO  GOD,  aND  THEN THEy s¸ILED DOwN aT Us. ³OsE wOULD sTILL gO Off fRO¸ TI¸E TO TI¸E aND THE VOIcEs wOULD TELL HER TO  DO  baD  THINgs, bUT ¶R. °ORNE  OR ADDIE OR  ¸y ¸OTHER cOULD  UsUaLLy bRINg  HER  back. AſtER  fiVE gOOD  yEaRs,  BIg µUT DIED. STUffiNg  HIs  facE wITH a  cHILI  DOg, sITTINg IN HIs UN-aIR-cONDITIONED OfficE IN THE ¸IDDLE Of JULy, HE HaD ONE  bIg, ¹Exas-sIzED aNEURys¸ aND DIED. ³OsE HELD ON TIgHT fOR sEVEN Days; sHE TOOk HER ¸EDs, wENT TO cHOIR pRacTIcE, aND REaRRaNgED HER ROO¸ abOUT a HUNDRED TI¸Es. ÁIs fUNERaL was LIkE a  ²OURDEs fOR THE ¸ENTaLLy ILL. ºf yOU wERE psycHOTIc, bORDERLINE, baD-Off NEUROTIc, OR jUsT VERy HaRD TO gET aLONg wITH, yOU wERE THERE. PEOpLE sHakINg sO  baD fRO¸ yEaRs Of HEaVy ¸EDs THaT THEy fELL OUT Of THE pEws. PEOpLE HOLDINg  HaNDs,  cRyINg,  ¸OaNINg,  TaLkINg  TO  THE¸sELVEs.  °E  cRazy  pEOpLE  aND  THE  NOT-sO-cRazy pEOpLE wERE aLL HUDDLED TOgETHER, LIkE pUppIEs aT THE pOUND.

³OsE sTOppED TakINg HER ¸EDs, aND THE HaLfway HOUsE wOULDN’T kEEp HER  aſtER sHE pITcHED aNOTHER paTIENT DOwN THE sTaIRs. My faTHER caLLED THE INsUR-

11

wOULDN’T bEgIN fOR fORTy-fiVE Days. º pUT aLL Of HER sTUff IN a gaRbagE bag, aND  wE waLkED OUT Of THE HaLfway HOUsE, ³OsE wINkINg aT THE pOOR DROOLINg bOy  ON THE cOUcH. “°Is  Is  gOINg  TO  bE  DIfficULT—NOT  aLL  baD,  bUT  DIfficULT—fOR  THE  wHOLE  fa¸ILy, aND  º THOUgHT wE sHOULD DIscUss EVERybODy’s ExpEcTaTIONs. º kNOw  º  HaVE  sO¸E cONcERNs.” My faTHER  HaD cONVENED a  fa¸ILy ¸EETINg as sOON as  ³OsE fiNIsHED pUTTINg EacH ONE Of HER THIRTy sTUffED bEaRs IN ITs OwN spEcIaL  pLacE. “µO ¸EDs,” ³OsE saID, HER EyEs LOwERED, HER sTUbby fiNgERs, THOsE fiNgERs  THaT  HaD bRaIDED ¸y HaIR aND  paINTED TULIps ON ¸y cHEEks, pULLINg HaRD ON  THE HE¸ Of HER DIRTy s¸Ock. My faTHER LOOkED IN DEspaIR aT ¸y ¸OTHER. “³OsIE, DO yOU waNT TO DRIVE THE NEw caR?” ¸y ¸OTHER askED. ³OsE’s facE LIT Up. “º’D LOVE TO DRIVE THaT caR. º’D DRIVE TO CaLIfORNIa, º’D gO  sEE THE bEaRs aT THE SaN ¶IEgO ZOO. º wOULD TakE yOU, ÂIOLET, bUT yOU aLways  HaTED THE zOO. ³E¸E¸bER HOw sHE cRIED aT THE BRONx ZOO wHEN sHE fOUND  OUT  THaT THE aNI¸aLs DIDN’T  gET TO gO  HO¸E aT cLOsINg?”  ³OsE pUT HER Da¸p  HaND ON ¸INE aND sqUEEzED IT sy¸paTHETIcaLLy. “POOR ÂI.” “ºf yOU TakE yOUR ¸EDIcaTION, aſtER a wHILE yOU’LL bE abLE TO DRIVE THE caR.  °aT’s THE DEaL. MEDs, caR.” My ¸OTHER sOUNDED accO¸¸ODaTINg bUT UNENTHUsIasTIc, caREfUL NOT TO HEaT Up ³OsE’s paRaNOIa. “YOU gOT yOURsELf a DEaL, DaRLIN’.” º was  LIVINg abOUT  aN HOUR away THEN,  TEacHINg  ´NgLIsH DURINg  THE Day,  wRITINg pOETRy aT NIgHT. º wENT HO¸E EVERy fEw Days fOR DINNER. º caLLED EVERy  NIgHT. My faTHER saID, qUIETLy, “ºT’s VERy HaRD. WE’RE DOINg aLL RIgHT, º THINk. ³OsE  Has bEEN waLkINg IN THE ¸ORNINgs wITH yOUR ¸OTHER, aND sHE waTcHEs a LOT Of  tv. SHE wON’T gO TO THE Day HOspITaL, aND sHE wON’T gO back TO THE cHOIR. ÁER  fRIEND  MRs. ³ObIcHEaUx  ca¸E  by a  cOUpLE  Of  TI¸Es. WHaT  a  swEET  wO¸aN.  ³OsE  wOULDN’T EVEN  TaLk  TO  HER. SHE jUsT  saT THERE,  sTaRINg  aT THE  waLL  aND  HU¸¸INg. WE’RE NOT DOINg aLL THaT wELL, acTUaLLy, bUT º gUEss wE’RE gETTINg by.  º’¸ sORRy, swEETHEaRT, º DON’T ¸EaN TO DEpREss yOU.” My ¸OTHER saID, E¸pHaTIcaLLy, “WE’RE DOINg fiNE. WE’VE gOT OUR ROUTINE aND  wE sTIck TO IT aND wE’RE fiNE. YOU DON’T NEED TO cO¸E HO¸E sO OſtEN, yOU kNOw.  WaIT ’TIL SUNDay, jUsT cO¸E fOR THE Day. ²EaD yOUR LIfE, ÂI. SHE’s LEaDINg HERs.”

retaW   r e v l i S

aNcE cO¸paNy aND fOUND OUT THaT ³OsE’s NEw, I¸pROVED psycHIaTRIc cOVERagE 

º sTayED away aLL wEEk, afRaID TO pIck Up ¸y pHONE, gRaTEfUL TO ¸y ¸OTHER 

12

fOR  HER  HaRsH  caL¸  aND  HER  RETIcENcE,  THE qUaLITIEs  THaT  HaD  ENRagED  ¸E  THROUgHOUT ¸y cHILDHOOD.

moolB ymA

º ca¸E ON SUNDay, IN THE EaRLy aſtERNOON, TO HELp ¸y faTHER gaRDEN, sO¸ETHINg wE HaD aLways ENjOyED TOgETHER. WE wEEDED aND sTakED TO¸aTOEs aND  kILLED apHIDs wHILE ¸y ¸OTHER aND ³OsE wERE DOwN aT THE LakE. º DIDN’T EVEN  gO INTO THE HOUsE UNTIL fOUR, wHEN º NEEDED a gLass Of waTER. SO¸EONE HaD bROkEN THE pIaNO bENcH INTO fiVE NEaTLy sTackED pIEcEs aND  pLacED THE¸ wHERE THE pIaNO bENcH UsUaLLy was. “WE wERE HaVINg sUcH a NIcE TI¸E, º cOULDN’T bEaR TO bRINg IT Up,” ¸y faTHER  saID, sTaNDINg IN THE DOORway, caREfULLy kEEpINg HIs gaRDENINg bOOTs OUT Of  THE kITcHEN. “WHaT DID MO¸¸y say?” “SHE saID, ‘BETTER THE bENcH THaN THE pIaNO.’ AND yOUR sIsTER Lay DOwN ON  THE flOOR aND  jUsT  wEpT. °EN  yOUR ¸OTHER TOOk HER DOwN TO THE LakE.  °Is  caN’T  gO  ON, ÂI. WE  HaVE  TwENTy-sEVEN Days LEſt,  yOUR ¸OTHER gETs  NO sLEEp  bEcaUsE  ³OsE DOEsN’T  sLEEp, aND  If  º cOULD  jUsT  pay  TwENTy-sEVEN  THOUsaND  DOLLaRs TO kEEp HER IN THE HOspITaL UNTIL THE INsURaNcE TakEs OVER, º’D DO IT.” “ALL RIgHT. ¶O IT. Pay THE ¸ONEy aND TakE HER back TO ÁaRTLEy-³EEs. ºT was  THE pRETTIEsT pLacE, aND sHE LIkED THE aRT THERapy THERE.” “º wOULD If º cOULD. °E pOLIcy sTaTEs THaT sHE ¸UsT bE sy¸pTO¸-fREE fOR  aT LEasT fORTy-fiVE  Days bEfORE HER cOVERagE bEgINs. Sy¸pTO¸-fREE ¸EaNs NO  HOspITaLIzaTION.” “JEsUs,  ¶aDDy, HOw  cOULD  yOU  gET  THaT  kIND  Of  pOLIcy?  SHE  HasN’T  bEEN  sy¸pTO¸-fREE fOR fORTy-fiVE ¸INUTEs.” “ºT’s THE ONLy ONE º cOULD gET fOR LONg-TER¸ psycHIaTRIc.” ÁE pUT HIs HaND  OVER HIs ¸OUTH, TO bLOck wHaTEVER HE was abOUT TO say, aND wENT back OUT TO  THE gaRDEN. º cOULDN’T sEE If HE was cRyINg. ÁE  sTayED  OUTsIDE  aND  º  sTayED  INsIDE  UNTIL  ³OsE aND  ¸y ¸OTHER  ca¸E  HO¸E  fRO¸ THE  LakE.  ³OsE’s  sOggy swEaTpaNTs  wERE  ROLLED  Up TO  HER kNEEs,  aND sHE HaD a bUckETfUL Of sHELLs aND sEawEED, wHIcH ¸y ¸OTHER pERsUaDED  HER TO LEaVE ON THE back pORcH. My ¸OTHER kIssED ¸E LIgHTLy aND TOLD ³OsE  TO gO Up TO HER ROO¸ aND cHaNgE OUT Of HER wET paNTs. ³OsE’s EyEs gREw VERy wIDE. “µEVER. º wILL NEVER . . .” SHE kNELT DOwN aND  bEgaN baNgINg HER HEaD ON THE kITcHEN flOOR wITH RHyTH¸Ic INTENsITy, THROwINg aLL HER wEIgHT bEHIND EacH aTTack. My ¸OTHER pUT HER aR¸s aROUND ³OsE’s  waIsT aND TRIED TO HOLD HER back. ³OsE sHOOk HER Off, NOT EVEN LOOkINg aROUND  TO sEE wHaT was sLOwINg HER DOwN. My ¸OTHER Lay Up agaINsT THE REfRIgERaTOR. “ÂIOLET, pLEasE . . .”

º THREw ¸ysELf ONTO  THE kITcHEN  flOOR,  bEcO¸INg THE  spOT THaT  ³OsE was  s¸ackINg  HER  HEaD agaINsT.  SHE  sTOppED  a  fRacTION  Of aN  INcH  sHORT Of  ¸y 

13

“±H, ÂI,  MO¸¸y, º’¸ sORRy.  º’¸ sORRy, DON’T  HaTE ¸E.”  SHE sTaggERED  TO  HER fEET aND RaN waILINg TO HER ROO¸. My ¸OTHER  gOT  Up aND  wasHED  HER facE  bRUsqUELy,  RUbbINg  IT  DRy  wITH  a  DIsHcLOTH. My faTHER HEaRD THE waILINg aND ca¸E  RUNNINg IN, sLIppINg HIs  LONg baRE fEET OUT Of HIs RUbbER bOOTs. “GaLEN, GaLEN, LET ¸E sEE.” ÁE HELD HER HEaD aND LOOkED cLOsELy fOR bRUIsEs  ON HER paLE, s¸aLL facE. “WHaT HappENED?” My ¸OTHER LOOkED aT ¸E. “ÂIOLET,  wHaT HappENED? WHERE’s ³OsE?” “³OsE gOT UpsET, aND wHEN sHE wENT RUNNINg UpsTaIRs sHE pUsHED MO¸¸y  OUT Of THE way.” º’VE ONLy TOLD THREE LIEs IN ¸y LIfE, aND THaT was ¸y sEcOND. “SHE ¸UsT fEEL TERRIbLE, pUsHINg yOU, Of aLL pEOpLE. ºT wOULD HaVE TO bE yOU,  bUT  º  kNOw sHE  DIDN’T waNT IT TO  bE.” ÁE  ¸aDE ¸y ¸OTHER a cUp Of TEa, aND  aLL THE LOVE HE HaD fOR HER, DEspITE HER sILENT RagEs aND HER VagUE sTaREs, ca¸E  pOURINg THROUgH THE TEapOT, waR¸INg HER cUp, fiLLINg HER s¸aLL, LONg-fiNgERED  HaNDs. SHE REsTED HER HEaD agaINsT HIs HIp, aND º LOOkED away. “²ET’s ¸akE  DINNER, THEN º’LL caLL HER. ±R yOU caLL HER, ¶aVID, ¸aybE sHE’D  RaTHER sEE yOUR facE fiRsT.” ¶INNER  was  fiLLED  wITH  aLL  Of  OUR  sTaRTs  aND  sTOps  aND  ³OsE’s  DEspERaTE  EffORTs  TO cONTROL HERsELf. SHE cOULD baRELy EaT aND HU¸¸ED THE Mc¶ONaLD’s  THE¸E sONg OVER aND OVER agaIN, paUsINg ONLy TO spILL HER jUIcE DOwN THE fRONT  Of HER s¸Ock aND bEgIN wEEpINg. My faTHER LOOkED aT ¸y ¸OTHER aND HaNDED  ³OsE HIs NapkIN. SHE DabbED aT HERsELf LIsTLEssLy, bUT THE TEaRs sTOppED. “º waNT TO gO TO bED. º waNT TO gO TO bED aND bE IN ¸y HEaD. º waNT TO gO TO  bED aND bE IN ¸y bED aND IN ¸y HEaD aND jUsT wEaR RED. FOR RED Is THE cOLOR  THaT  ¸y  baby wORE  aND  ONcE  ¸ORE, IT’s  TRUE, yEs,  IT  Is, IT’s  TRUE. PLEasE  DON’T  wEaR RED TONIgHT, OH, OH, pLEasE DON’T wEaR RED TONIgHT, fOR RED Is THE cOLOR—” “±kay, Okay, ³OsE. ºT’s Okay. º’LL gO UpsTaIRs wITH yOU aND yOU caN gET REaDy  fOR bED. °EN MO¸¸y wILL cO¸E Up aND say gOOD NIgHT TOO. ºT’s Okay, ³OsE.”  My faTHER REacHED OUT HIs HaND aND ³OsE gRaspED IT, aND THEy waLkED OUT Of  THE DININg ROO¸ TOgETHER, HIs LONg aR¸ aROUND HER ¸IDDLE. My ¸OTHER saT aT  THE TabLE fOR a ¸O¸ENT, HER facE IN HER HaNDs, aND THEN  sHE bEgaN cLEaRINg THE pLaTEs. WE cLEaRED wITHOUT TaLkINg, ¸y ¸OTHER HU¸¸INg  ScHUbERT’s “ScHLU¸¸ERLIED,” a LULLaby abOUT THE wOODs aND THE RIVER caLLINg TO  THE cHILD TO gO TO sLEEp. SHE saNg IT TO Us EVERy NIgHT wHEN wE wERE s¸aLL. My faTHER ca¸E INTO  THE kITcHEN aND  sIgNaLED TO  ¸y ¸OTHER.  °Ey  wENT  UpsTaIRs aND ca¸E back DOwN TOgETHER a fEw ¸INUTEs LaTER.

retaW   r e v l i S

sTO¸acH.

“SHE’s asLEEp,” THEy saID, aND wE wENT TO sIT ON THE pORcH aND LIsTEN TO THE 

14

cRIckETs. º DON’T RE¸E¸bER THE REsT Of THE EVENINg, bUT º RE¸E¸bER IT as qUIETLy saD, aND º RE¸E¸bER THE RaRE sIgHT Of ¸y paRENTs HOLDINg HaNDs, sITTINg 

moolB ymA

ON THE pIcNIc TabLE, waTcHINg THE sUNsET. º wOkE Up aT THREE O’cLOck IN THE ¸ORNINg, fEELINg THE cOOL NIgHT aIR THROUgH  ¸y sHEET.  º wENT  DOwN THE HaLL fOR  a  bLaNkET aND  LOOkED INTO ³OsE’s  ROO¸,  fOR  NO REasON.  SHE wasN’T THERE.  º pUT  ON ¸y jEaNs  aND  a  swEaTER aND  wENT  DOwNsTaIRs. º cOULD fEEL HER absENcE. º wENT OUTsIDE aND saw HER wIDE, DRaggy  fOOTpRINTs DaRkENINg THE wET gRass INTO THE wOODs. “³OsIE,” º caLLED, TOO sOſtLy, NOT waNTINg TO wakE ¸y paRENTs, NOT waNTINg  TO sTaRTLE ³OsE. “³OsIE, IT’s ¸E. ARE yOU HERE? ARE yOU aLL RIgHT?” º aL¸OsT  fELL OVER  HER. ÁUgE aND  wHITE IN  THE  ¸OONLIgHT, HER  flOwERED  s¸Ock bLEacHED IN THE LIgHT aND sHaDOw, HER swEaTpaNTs NOw cO¸pLETELy wET.  ÁER  HEaD  was  flUNg  back,  HER  wHITE,  wHITE NEck  ExpOsED  LIkE  a  LOsT  GREEk  cOLU¸N. “³OsIE, ³OsIE—” ÁER  bREaTHINg  was  VERy sLOw,  aND  HER LIps  wERE  NOT  as  pINk as THEy UsUaLLy wERE. ÁER EyELIDs flUTTERED. “CLOsINg TI¸E,” sHE wHIspERED. º bELIEVE THaT’s wHaT sHE saID. º saT wITH HER, UNcOVERINg THE bOTTLE Of wHITE pILLs by HER HaND, aND waTcHED  THE sTaRs faDE. WHEN THE sTaRs  wERE INVIsIbLE aND THE sUN was  waR¸INg  THE aIR, º wENT  back TO THE HOUsE. My ¸OTHER was sTaNDINg ON THE pORcH, wRappED IN a bLaNkET,  waTcHINg  ¸E.  ´VERy  sTEp  º  TOOk  OVERwHEL¸ED  ¸E; º  cOULD  pIcTURE  ¸y  ¸OTHER sLappINg ¸E, sHOOTINg ¸E fOR LETTINg HER faVORITE DIE. “WaRRIOR qUEENs,” sHE saID, wRappINg  HER THIN  sTRONg aR¸s  aROUND ¸E.  “º  RaIsED waRRIOR  qUEENs.” SHE  kIssED ¸E fiERcELy  aND wENT INTO  THE wOODs  by HERsELf. ²aTER IN  THE ¸ORNINg  sHE  wOkE ¸y  faTHER,  wHO cOULD  NOT gO  INTO THE  wOODs,  aND sTILL LaTER sHE caLLED THE pOLIcE aND  THE fUNERaL paRLOR. SHE HUNg  Up THE pHONE, Lay DOwN, aND  DIDN’T gET back OUT Of bED UNTIL  THE Day Of THE  fUNERaL. My faTHER fED Us bOTH aND caLLED THE pEOpLE wHO NEEDED TO bE caLLED  aND pIckED OUT ³OsE’s cOffiN by HI¸sELf. My ¸OTHER pLayED  THE pIaNO aND  ADDIE saNg  HER pURE  gOLD NOTEs  aND º  cLOsED ¸y EyEs aND saw ¸y sIsTER, fOURTEEN yEaRs OLD, LION’s ¸aNE THROwN back  aND EyEs TIgHTLy cLOsED agaINsT THE gLaRE Of THE paRkINg LOT LIgHTs. °aT swEET  sOUND HELD Us TIgHT, flOwINg aROUND Us, EDDyINg THROUgH OUR HEaRTs, RIsINg,  sTILL RIsINg.

“Is SheExPeR±enc±ng  ²ny ³A±n?” ¸ISAbIlITY  ANd TH±  ³HYSIcIAN-³ATI±NT  ´±lATIONSHIp S. K. Toombs

As a pERsON wHO LIVEs wITH cHRONIc pROgREssIVE NEUROLOgIcaL DIsEasE (¸ULTIpLE  scLEROsIs)  aND  sIgNIficaNT  DIsabILITy,  º  HaVE  aN  INTI¸aTE  kNOwLEDgE  Of  THE  pHysIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp  fRO¸  THE  pERspEcTIVE  Of THE  paTIENT.  ±VER THE  yEaRs, º HaVE bEcO¸E  awaRE THaT cHRONIc DIsabILITy pOsEs UNIqUE  cHaLLENgEs  IN  THE  cLINIcaL  cONTExT—cHaLLENgEs  THaT,  If  UNREcOgNIzED,  caN  UNwITTINgLy  UNDER¸INE EVEN  THE  ¸OsT wELL-INTENTIONED EffORTs TO  pROVIDE  OpTI¸aL  caRE. ºN REflEcTINg ON THEsE cHaLLENgEs, º waNT TO bEgIN by sTREssINg THaT cHRONIc  DIsabILITy  ¸EaNs ¸UcH  ¸ORE TO  THE  paTIENT THaN  sI¸pLy a  ¸EcHaNIcaL  DysfUNcTION OR DIscRETE DIsEasE pROcEss. ²IVINg wITH pER¸aNENT INcapacITy REpREsENTs a DIsTINcT way Of bEINg-IN-THE-wORLD, a way Of bEINg THaT affEcTs ONE’s  sENsE Of sELf, ONE’s  RELaTIONsHIps wITH OTHERs, ONE’s abILITy TO INTERacT IN (aND  wITH) THE sURROUNDINg wORLD, ONE’s fa¸ILy aND pROfEssIONaL LIfE, ONE’s  abILITy  TO ExERcIsE  cONTROL aND TO bE aUTONO¸OUs, aND ONE’s  RELaTIONsHIp wITH ONE’s  bODy. Ã GIVEN THE cHRONIc NaTURE Of sUcH bODILy DIsORDER, IT Is NOT pOssIbLE TO  REsTORE THE  paTIENT TO a  fOR¸ER sTaTE  Of HEaLTH  cHaRacTERIzED by  THE absENcE  Of  bODILy  ¸aLfUNcTION.  CONsEqUENTLy, THE  cLINIcaL  gOaL ¸UsT  bE  bROaDENED  TO  ENcO¸pass  NOT ONLy  THE  cURE  Of DIsEasE  bUT,  as  I¸pORTaNTLy, THE  pROjEcT  Of assIsTINg paTIENTs TO LIVE wELL IN THE facE Of ONgOINg bODILy LI¸ITaTION. AN  I¸pORTaNT  way  TO  cONcEIVE  THIs  pROjEcT  Is  TO  fOcUs  ON  pERsONaL  (aND  NOT  sI¸pLy  bODILy) wELL-bEINg. By  fUNcTIONINg wELL  aT THE pERsONaL LEVEL,  º HaVE  IN  ¸IND sUcH  THINgs as bEINg abLE  TO ENgagE IN acTIVITIEs THaT  aRE ¸EaNINgfUL,  sUsTaININg  I¸pORTaNT  RELaTIONsHIps,  aND  RETaININg  a  sENsE  Of  pERsONaL  INTEgRITy.

S. K.  ¹OO¸bs, “ ‘ºs  She ´xpERIENcINg ANy PaIN?’: ¶IsabILITy aND THE PHysIcIaN-PaTIENT  ³ELaTIONsHIp,”  fRO¸  Internal  Medicine Journal 34, NO. 11  (2004):  645–647.  ³EpRINTED  by  pER¸IssION  Of  JOHN WILEy aND SONs.

ºN sTREssINg  pERsONaL,  as OppOsED TO bODILy,  wELL-bEINg,  IT Is  I¸pORTaNT  TO 

16

¸akE a  sHaRp DIsTINcTION bETwEEN THE fUNcTIONINg Of  THE bODy aND THE  fUNcTIONINg Of THE pERsON. °E pREVaILINg bIO¸EDIcaL ¸ODEL Of ILLNEss aND THE OVER-

s b m o o T  . K   . S

RIDINg  fOcUs  ON  pHysIcaL  paTHOLOgy  gIVEs pRIORITy  TO THE  wELL  fUNcTIONINg  Of  THE  pHysIcaL  ORgaNIs¸—wITH THE  assU¸pTION THaT  If THE  bODy fUNcTIONs  wELL  sO DOEs THE pERsON. ºN THE casE Of cHRONIc DIsabILITy, THIs assU¸pTION Is DEEpLy  pRObLE¸aTIc.  FOR Exa¸pLE, qUaNTITaTIVE ¸EasURE¸ENTs  Of DIsabILITy,  IN aND Of  THE¸sELVEs, DO NOT cONVEy wHETHER a paTIENT caN fUNcTION wELL aT THE pERsONaL  LEVEL. ºN ¸y OwN casE, fUNcTIONINg wELL aT THE pERsONaL LEVEL DOEs NOT DEpEND  ON wHETHER º caN waLk, aLTHOUgH IT DOEs RELaTE TO ¸y abILITy TO ¸aNagE ¸y ILLNEss IN sUcH a way THaT º caN pURsUE THOsE pROjEcTs THaT aRE ¸EaNINgfUL TO ¸E. FOcUsINg  pRI¸aRILy  ON assEss¸ENTs  Of pHysIcaL  fUNcTIONINg  as  THE  ¸OsT  accURaTE ¸EasURE Of wELLNEss caN paRaDOxIcaLLy DIsRUpT THE Task Of fUNcTIONINg wELL aT THE pERsONaL LEVEL. PaTIENTs aND ¸EDIcaL pROfEssIONaLs aLIkE ¸IgHT  bE TE¸pTED TO pURsUE ¸EDIcaL INTERVENTIONs THaT aRE ExTRE¸ELy DIsRUpTIVE Of  THE paTIENT’s LIfE aND THaT REsULT IN ¸INI¸aL I¸pROVE¸ENT IN bODILy fUNcTION.  º LEaRNED THIs LEssON pERsONaLLy wHEN UNDERgOINg a cOURsE Of cHE¸OTHERapy  IN aN aTTE¸pT TO sLOw DOwN THE pROgREssION Of ¸y DIsEasE. °E TREaT¸ENT was  wORsE  THaN  THE  ILLNEss.  MONTHLy  INfUsIONs  Of  CyTOxaN  (cycLOpHOspa¸IDE;  BRIsTOL-MyERs SqUIbbs,  µEw YORk,  µY) caUsED  NaUsEa,  VO¸ITINg aND  pROsTRaTINg  wEakNEss fOR  THREE Of EVERy  fOUR  wEEks. AſtER fOUR  ¸ONTHs, º  cHOsE  TO DIscONTINUE THE TREaT¸ENT ON THE gROUNDs THaT IT TOTaLLy DIsRUpTED ¸y LIfE.  ALTHOUgH ¸y NEUROLOgIsT sUppORTED ¸y DEcIsION, HE VOIcED DIsappOINT¸ENT  aND pOINTED OUT THaT TEsTs INDIcaTED a sLIgHT I¸pROVE¸ENT IN ¸y abILITy TO LIſt  ¸y RIgHT LEg. ÁOwEVER, fOR ¸E, THIs ¸INI¸aL gaIN IN pHysIcaL fUNcTION was NOT  wORTH THE EROsION IN ¸y qUaLITy Of LIfE. WEIgHINg THE HaR¸s aND bENEfiTs Of TREaT¸ENT Is ¸ORE DIfficULT fOR THOsE  LIVINg  wITH  cHRONIc  DIsabILITy.  ºf  ONE  Has  aN acUTE  DIsEasE,  ONE kNOws  THaT  THE DIsRUpTION  Of TREaT¸ENT wILL bE sHORT LIVED, wITH aN END REsULT Of  cURE.  CONsEqUENTLy, THE  cERTaINTy Of fUTURE bENEfiT ENabLEs ONE TO  “pUT Up wITH”  TE¸pORaRy DIscO¸fORT, EVEN If IT Is ExTRE¸E. ÁOwEVER, wHEN fUTURE bENEfiT Is  UNcERTaIN aND DIsRUpTION Is ONgOINg, paTIENTs aND pHysIcIaNs ¸UsT TakE sERIOUsLy THE I¸pacT Of THERapy ON THE paTIENT’s qUaLITy Of LIfE. ´VEN NONINVasIVE  TEsTs caN bE paRTIcULaRLy DIfficULT fOR pEOpLE wITH DIsabILITIEs. As aN Exa¸pLE,  fOR sO¸EONE LIkE ¸ysELf wITH cO¸pRO¸IsED bLaDDER aND bOwEL cONTROL, TEsTs  THaT INVOLVE DRINkINg LaRgE a¸OUNTs Of flUIDs (OR cLEaNsINg THE gasTROINTEsTINaL TRacT) caN bE EspEcIaLLy bURDENsO¸E. PHysIcaL baRRIERs  aLsO ¸akE  TEsTINg  DIfficULT  fOR  pEOpLE wITH  DIsabILITIEs.  A  sURVEy  IN  THE ·NITED  STaTEs  sHOwED  THaT  wO¸EN  wITH sEVERE  DIsabILITIEs 

aRE LEss LIkELy TO REcEIVE aNNUaL pELVIc Exa¸s  THaN abLE-bODIED wO¸EN, aND  23 pERcENT Of wO¸EN wITH spINaL cORD INjURIEs REpORTED THaT IT was I¸pOs-

17

gRa¸s. Ä ºNDEED, VERy fEw  DOcTORs’ OfficEs HaVE accEssIbLE Exa¸ININg  TabLEs,  wHIcH ¸akEs EVEN a ROUTINE pHysIcaL Exa¸INaTION pRObLE¸aTIc fOR sO¸EONE  wHO UsEs a wHEELcHaIR. ±NE Of  THE  ¸OsT  DEbILITaTINg  aspEcTs  Of cHRONIc  DIsabILITy Is  THE LOss  Of  bODILy cONTROL. AN I¸pORTaNT Task fOR cLINIcIaNs Is THaT Of assIsTINg paTIENTs TO  DEVELOp cONcRETE sTRaTEgIEs TO cO¸pENsaTE fOR bODILy LI¸ITaTION.  ºT Is VITaLLy  I¸pORTaNT THaT paTIENTs REcOgNIzE THERE Is aLways sO¸E LEVEL Of cONTROL THaT ONE  caN ExERcIsE, EVEN IN THE facE Of INcREasINgLy DIsRUpTIVE sy¸pTO¸s. °Is Task  Is  NOT LI¸ITED TO INsTITUTINg ¸EDIcaL TREaT¸ENT. ³aTHER, IT INVOLVEs  ExpLORINg  wITH THE INDIVIDUaL paTIENT THE spEcIfic ¸aNNER IN wHIcH bODILy ¸aLfUNcTION  DIsRUpTs HIs OR HER LIfE aT THE pERsONaL LEVEL.  ºN THIs cONNEcTION, IT Is  HELpfUL  NOT sI¸pLy TO ask paTIENTs spEcIfic qUEsTIONs, sUcH as “ARE yOU ExpERIENcINg  INcREasED spasTIcITy?,” bUT TO INcLUDE ¸ORE gLObaL INqUIRIEs, sUcH as “WHaT Is  THE  ¸OsT DIfficULT  THINg fOR yOU  TO DEaL wITH IN yOUR DaILy LIfE?”  SO¸ETI¸Es  EVEN  sI¸pLE sTRaTEgIEs,  sUcH as  cONTROLLINg INTakE Of flUIDs  TO ¸INI¸IzE  THE  RIsk Of INcONTINENcE IN sOcIaL sITUaTIONs, LEaRNINg TO aDjUsT DaILy scHEDULEs TO  cO¸pENsaTE fOR faTIgUE, OR acqUIRINg ¸ObILITy aIDs TO cOUNTERacT wEakENINg  ¸UscLEs, caN sIgNIficaNTLy I¸pROVE a paTIENT’s qUaLITy Of LIfE. FOR Exa¸pLE, If a  paTIENT Is gREaTLy faTIgUED by THE EffORT Of waLkINg, UsINg a wHEELcHaIR ¸IgHT  cONsERVE ENERgy aND pER¸IT INcREasED sOcIaL INTERacTION, REsULTINg IN a ¸UcH  fULLER pERsONaL aND sOcIaL LIfE. ºN THIs REspEcT, cHOOsINg TO UsE a wHEELcHaIR  Is NOT TO bE EqUaTED wITH “gIVINg IN” TO THE DIsEasE. ³aTHER, “gIVINg Up” IN ONE  aREa ¸IgHT wELL fREE THE paTIENT TO E¸bRacE OTHER I¸pORTaNT aREas Of LIfE. ±f cOURsE, IT Is VITaL THaT pHysIcIaNs REcOgNIzE THE ExTENT TO wHIcH NEgaTIVE  cULTURaL aTTITUDEs ¸akE IT ExTRaORDINaRILy DIfficULT fOR pEOpLE wITH DIsabILITIEs  TO  RETaIN a sENsE Of  pERsONaL wELL-bEINg  IN THE  facE Of pER¸aNENT pHysIcaL  INcapacITy. WE LIVE IN a cULTURE THaT pLacEs INORDINaTE VaLUE ON INDEpENDENcE,  bEaUTy, HEaLTH, aND pHysIcaL fiTNEss. PEOpLE wITH DIsabILITIEs aRE faR fRO¸ THE  IDEaL.  ºN THE EyEs Of THE abLE-bODIED,  THERE Is  a wIDEspREaD assU¸pTION THaT  DIsabILITy Is INcO¸paTIbLE wITH LIVINg a ¸EaNINgfUL LIfE. WHEN OTHERs ObsERVE  º a¸ IN a wHEELcHaIR, THEy ¸akE THE I¸¸EDIaTE jUDgE¸ENT THaT ¸y sITUaTION  Is  aN  EssENTIaLLy  NEgaTIVE  ONE,  THaT  º  a¸  UNabLE  TO  ENgagE  IN  pROfEssIONaL  acTIVITIEs,  aND  THaT  º a¸  wHOLLy DEpENDENT  ON OTHERs. ±N  ¸aNy  OccasIONs  sTRaNgERs HaVE saID TO ¸E “AREN’T yOU  lucky TO HaVE yOUR HUsbaND?” °Is Is  NOT sO ¸UcH a cO¸¸ENT abOUT ¸y HUsbaND’s cHaRacTER as IT Is a pERcEpTION 

” ? n i a P  y n A   g n i c n e i r e p x E

pOsITIONED  fOR THE¸  OR bEcaUsE THERE was NO accEssIbLE ROO¸ fOR  ¸a¸¸O-

³ ² ±  s I “

sIbLE  TO  HaVE a ¸a¸¸OgRa¸,  EITHER bEcaUsE THE  EqUIp¸ENT cOULD  NOT bE 

THaT  ¸y  RELaTIONsHIp wITH  HI¸ Is pURELy  ONE Of  bURDENsO¸E  DEpENDENcE. 

18

ºN  ObsERVINg ¸y pHysIcaL  INcapacITIEs, pEOpLE assU¸E  THaT ¸y INTELLEcT  Is  LIkEwIsE affEcTED. STRaNgERs INVaRIabLy aDDREss qUEsTIONs TO ¸y cO¸paNION 

s b m o o T  . K   . S

aND REfER TO ¸E IN THE THIRD pERsON: “WHERE wOULD  she LIkE TO sIT?,” “WOULD 

she LIkE  Us TO  ¸OVE  THIs cHaIR?”  SUcH  NEgaTIVE REspONsEs  fRO¸  OTHERs  aRE  DE¸EaNINg  aND  REINfORcE  THE  sENsE  THaT  DIsabILITy  REDUcEs  pERsONaL  aND  sOcIaL  wORTH.  ·NfORTUNaTELy,  sUcH  aTTITUDEs aLsO  ExIsT  IN  THE  cLINIcaL  cONTExT.  ºN  a  NaTIONaL  sURVEy,  wO¸EN  wITH  sEVERE  DIsabILITIEs  REpORTED  THaT  If  THEy  wERE  accO¸paNIED  by  aNOTHER  pERsON,  ¸ORE  OſtEN  THaN  NOT  THE  DOcTOR  aDDREssED qUEsTIONs  TO  THEIR  cO¸paNION RaTHER  THaN  spEakINg TO  THE¸  DIREcTLy (µOsEk  et al.  UNpUbL.  DaTa 1992,  1995): “ºs  she ExpERIENcINg  aNy paIN?” AN  I¸pORTaNT  way  fOR  pHysIcIaNs  TO  pRO¸OTE  pERsONaL  wELL-bEINg  Is  TO  cONscIOUsLy  REjEcT  sUcH  sTEREOTypIcaL aTTITUDEs  abOUT  pERsONs  wITH DIsabILITIEs. ºNDEED, paTIENTs  wITH cHRONIc DIsabILITIEs  HaVE aN EspEcIaLLy I¸pORTaNT  ROLE TO pLay IN THE pHysIcIaN-paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp. °OsE Of Us wHO LIVE wITH  pER¸aNENT  bODILy  DIsORDER  HaVE  aN INTI¸aTE  kNOwLEDgE  Of  OUR  bODIEs as  wE ¸UsT cONsTaNTLy pay aTTENTION TO THE¸. °Us, wE aRE OſtEN awaRE Of EVEN  ¸INUTE cHaNgEs IN fUNcTION aND sENsaTION (cHaNgEs THaT ¸IgHT NOT bE REaDILy  appaRENT  TO THE  pHysIcIaN).  ALTHOUgH  pHysIcIaNs HaVE  THE  ExpERT  ¸EDIcaL kNOwLEDgE TO cO¸pREHEND aND  assEss THE DIsEasE  pROcEss, paTIENTs wITH  cHRONIc  DIsabILITIEs  HaVE  aN EqUaLLy  ExpERT  kNOwLEDgE Of  wHaT Is  “NOR¸aL”  aND  “abNOR¸aL” wITH REspEcT  TO THEIR OwN bODILy ExpERIENcE. BOTH TypEs  Of  kNOwLEDgE aRE EssENTIaL TO THE Task Of assEssINg aND DEaLINg wITH bODILy DIsORDER. PEOpLE wITH DIsabILITIEs aRE aLsO ExpERTs aT kNOwINg HOw bEsT TO wORk  wITH THEIR REcaLcITRaNT bODIEs—a kNOwLEDgE THaT Is TOO OſtEN DIsREgaRDED by  ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssIONaLs. As aN Exa¸pLE,  ³ObILLaRD (a qUaDRIpLEgIc) DEscRIbEs  HIs  fRUsTRaTION wHEN TRyINg TO TELL  Å-Ray cREws HOw TO pOsITION  HIs bODy TO  aVOID  ¸UscLE aND  cOUgHINg spas¸s,  ONLy TO bE IgNORED aND INfOR¸ED ERRONEOUsLy THaT (as pROfEssIONaLs) THEy “kNEw wHaT THEy wERE DOINg.”Æ ºN cONcLUsION, º wOULD LIkE TO sTREss THaT, aLTHOUgH cHRONIc DIsabILITy pOsEs  spEcIfic  cHaLLENgEs, IT aLsO pROVIDEs a  sIgNIficaNT OppORTUNITy IN THE DOcTOR-  paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp. °E  sHIſt IN  fOcUs  fRO¸ bODILy TO  pERsONaL wELL-bEINg  (a sHIſt THaT INVOLVEs ExpLORINg wITH paTIENTs THE ¸ULTIpLIcITy Of ways IN wHIcH  ONgOINg DIsabILITy I¸pacTs ON THEIR DaILy LIVEs) aND THE NEcEssITy Of INcLUDINg  THE paTIENT as aN acTIVE paRTIcIpaNT IN THE LONg-TER¸ ¸aNagE¸ENT Of a cHRONIc  cONDITION pROVIDE aN ExcEpTIONaL  OccasION fOR  cLINIcIaNs TO  fORgE cLOsE aND  REwaRDINg paRTNERsHIps wITH paTIENTs.

notes

19

wER AcaDE¸Ic PUbLIcaTIONs; 2001:247–261. 2  µOsEk  MA,  ÁOwLaND  CA.  BREasT aND  cERVIcaL  caNcER  scREENINg  a¸ONg  wO¸EN  wITH  pHysIcaL DIsabILITIEs.  Arch Phys Med Rehabil . 1997;78(SUppL 5):S39–44. 3  ³ObILLaRD AB.  °e  Meaning of  Disability:  °e  Lived  Experience  of Paralysis .  PHILaDELpHIa: ¹E¸pLE ·NIVERsITy PREss; 1999.

” ? n i a P  y n A   g n i c n e i r e p x E

SK, ED. Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine. ¶ORDREcHT, °E µETHERLaNDs:  KLU-

³ ² ±  s I “

1  ¹OO¸bs SK. ³EflEcTIONs ON bODILy cHaNgE: THE LIVED ExpERIENcE Of DIsabILITy. ºN: ¹OO¸bs 

´he CosT  of ²PPeARAnces Arthur Frank

SOcIETy pRaIsEs ILL pERsONs wITH wORDs sUcH as “cOURagEOUs,” “OpTI¸IsTIc,” aND  “cHEERfUL.”  Fa¸ILy  aND  fRIENDs  spEak  appROVINgLy  Of  THE  paTIENT wHO  jOkEs  OR jUsT s¸ILEs, ¸akINg THE¸, THE VIsITORs, fEEL gOOD. ´VERyONE aROUND THE ILL  pERsON  bEcO¸Es  cO¸¸ITTED  TO  THE  IDEa  THaT  REcOVERy Is  THE ONLy  OUTcO¸E  wORTH THINkINg abOUT. µO ¸aTTER wHaT THE acTUaL ODDs, aN aTTITUDE Of “YOU’RE  gOINg TO bE fiNE” DO¸INaTEs THE sIckROO¸. ´VERyONE wORks TO sUsTaIN IT. BUT  HOw ¸UcH wORk DOEs THE ILL pERsON HaVE TO DO TO ¸akE OTHERs fEEL gOOD? ¹wO kINDs Of E¸OTIONaL wORk aRE INVOLVED  IN bEINg ILL. ±NE kIND  º HaVE  wRITTEN abOUT TakEs pLacE wHEN THE ILL pERsON, aLONE OR wITH TRUE caREgIVERs,  wORks wITH THE E¸OTIONs Of fEaR, fRUsTRaTION, aND LOss aND TRIEs TO fiND sO¸E  cOHERENcE abOUT  wHaT IT  ¸EaNs TO  bE ILL. °E  OTHER  kIND Is  THE  wORk THE  ILL  pERsON  DOEs  TO kEEp  Up aN appEaRaNcE. °Is  appEaRaNcE Is  THE ExpEcTaTION  THaT a  sOcIETy Of HEaLTHy fRIENDs, cOwORkERs, ¸EDIcaL sTaff, aND OTHERs pLacEs  ON aN ILL pERsON. °E appEaRaNcE ¸OsT pRaIsED Is “º’D HaRDLy HaVE kNOwN  sHE was sIck.” AT  HO¸E THE ILL pERsON ¸UsT appEaR TO bE ENgagED IN NOR¸aL fa¸ILy ROUTINEs; IN  THE HOspITaL sHE sHOULD appEaR TO bE jUsT REsTINg. WHEN THE ILL pERsON caN NO  LONgER cONcEaL  THE EffEcTs Of ILLNEss,  sHE Is  ExpEcTED TO cONVINcE  OTHERs THaT  bEINg ILL IsN’T THaT baD. °E ¸INI¸aL accEpTabLE bEHaVIOR Is pRaIsED, faINTLy, as  “sTOIcaL.” BUT THE ILL pERsON ¸ay NOT fEEL LIkE acTINg gOOD-HU¸ORED aND pOsITIVE; ¸UcH Of THE TI¸E IT TakEs HaRD wORk TO HOLD THIs appEaRaNcE IN pLacE. º HaVE NEVER HEaRD aN ILL pERsON pRaIsED fOR HOw wELL sHE ExpREssED fEaR OR  gRIEf OR was OpENLy saD. ±N THE cONTRaRy, ILL pERsONs fEEL a NEED TO apOLOgIzE If  THEy sHOw aNy E¸OTIONs OTHER THaN LaUgHTER. ±ccasIONaL TEaRs ¸ay bE passED  Off as THE ILL  pERsON’s NEED TO “LET gO”;  THE TEaRs aRE caTEgORIzED as TE¸pORaRy  OUTbURsTs  INsTEaD  Of  UNDERsTOOD  as  paRT  Of aN  ONgOINg  E¸OTION.  SUsTaINED 

ARTHUR  FRaNk, “°E COsT Of AppEaRaNcEs,” fRO¸ At the Will of the Body , by ARTHUR W. FRaNk.  © 1991  by  ARTHUR W. FRaNk  aND  CaTHERINE ´. FOOTE.  ³EpRINTED  by pER¸IssION Of  ÁOUgHTON  MIfflIN CO¸paNy. ALL RIgHTs REsERVED.

“NEgaTIVE” E¸OTIONs aRE OUT Of pLacE. ºf a paTIENT sHOws TOO ¸UcH saDNEss, HE  ¸UsT bE DEpREssED, aND “DEpREssION” Is a TREaTabLE ¸EDIcaL DIsEasE.

21

aTE  REspONsE  TO THE  sITUaTION. º a¸ NOT  REcO¸¸ENDINg  DEpREssION  bUT º DO  waNT  TO sUggEsT THaT aT sO¸E ¸O¸ENTs EVEN faIRLy DEEp  DEpREssION ¸UsT bE  accEpTED as paRT Of THE ExpERIENcE Of ILLNEss. A cOUpLE Of Days bEfORE ¸y ¸OTHER-IN-Law DIED, sHE sHaRED a ROO¸ wITH  a wO¸aN wHO was aLsO bEINg TREaTED fOR caNcER. My ¸OTHER-IN-Law was THIs  wO¸aN’s sEcOND DyINg ROO¸¸aTE, aND THE wO¸aN  was sERIOUsLy  ILL HERsELf.  º  HaVE NO DOUbT THaT  HER DIagNOsIs Of cLINIcaL DEpREssION  was accURaTE. °E  IssUE Is HOw THE ¸EDIcaL sTaff REspONDED TO HER DEpREssION. ºNsTEaD Of TRyINg  TO UNDERsTaND IT as a REasONabLE REspONsE TO HER sITUaTION, HER DOcTORs TREaTED  HER  wITH aNTIDEpREssaNT DRUgs.  WHEN a  HOspITaL  psycHOLOgIsT ca¸E  TO  VIsIT  HER,  HIs qUEsTIONs wERE DEsIgNED ONLy TO EVaLUaTE HER “¸ENTaL sTaTUs.” WHaT  Day Is IT? WHERE aRE yOU aND wHaT flOOR aRE yOU ON? WHO Is pRI¸E ¸INIsTER?  aND sO fORTH. ÁIs sOLE INTEREsT was wHETHER THE DOsagE Of aNTIDEpREssaNT DRUg  was TOO HIgH, UpsETTINg HER “cOgNITIVE ORIENTaTION.” °E HOspITaL NEEDED HER  TO  bE  ¸ENTaLLy cO¸pETENT  sO  sHE wOULD  RE¸aIN a  “gOOD  paTIENT”  REqUIRINg  LITTLE ExTRa caRE; IT  DID NOT NEED HER E¸OTIONs. µO  ONE aTTE¸pTED TO ExpLORE  HER fEaRs wITH HER. µO ONE askED wHaT IT was LIkE TO HaVE TwO ROO¸¸aTEs DIE  wITHIN a cOUpLE  Of Days Of EacH OTHER, aND HOw THIs affEcTED HER OwN fEaR Of  DEaTH. µO ONE was wILLINg TO wITNEss HER ExpERIENcE. WHaT ¸akEs ¸E saDDEsT Is sEEINg THE wORk ILL pERsONs DO TO sUsTaIN THIs  “cHEERfUL paTIENT” I¸agE. A cLOsE  fRIEND Of OURs, DyINg Of caNcER, sERIOUsLy  wONDERED HOw HER cONDITION cOULD bE gETTINg wORsE, sINcE sHE HaD bROUgHT  HO¸E¸aDE  cOOkIEs  TO THE  TREaT¸ENT  cENTER wHENEVER  sHE HaD  cHE¸OTHERapy.  SHE bELIEVED THERE HaD TO bE a  caUsaL cONNEcTION  bETwEEN aTTITUDE aND  pHysIcaL  I¸pROVE¸ENT. FRO¸ EaRLy cHILDHOOD ON wE aRE TaUgHT THaT aTTITUDE  aND  EffORT  cOUNT. “GOOD  cITIzENsHIp” Is  sUppOsED  TO  bRINg  Us  ExTRa  pOINTs.  °E NURsEs aLL saID wHaT a wONDERfUL wO¸aN OUR fRIEND was. SHE was THE pERfEcTLy bRaVE, pOsITIVE, cHEERfUL caNcER paTIENT. ¹O ¸E sHE was ¸OsT wONDERfUL  aT THE END, wHEN sHE gRIEVED HER ILLNEss OpENLy, DROppED HER acT, aND cLEaRLy  DE¸ONsTRaTED HER aNgER. SHE LIVED HER ILLNEss as sHE cHOsE, aND by  THE TI¸E  sHE was acTINg ON HER aNgER aND saDNEss, sHE was TOO sIck fOR ¸E TO ask HER  If  sHE wIsHED sHE HaD  ExpREssED ¸ORE  Of THOsE E¸OTIONs EaRLIER. º caN ONLy  wONDER wHaT IT HaD cOsT HER TO sUsTaIN HER Happy I¸agE fOR sO LONg. WHEN º TRIED TO sUsTaIN a cHEERfUL aND TIDy I¸agE, IT cOsT ¸E ENERgy, wHIcH  was  scaRcE. ºT  aLsO cOsT ¸E  OppORTUNITIEs TO ExpREss wHaT  was HappENINg IN 

s e c n a r a e p p A   f o  t s o C   e h T

¹OO fEw pEOpLE, wHETHER ¸EDIcaL sTaff, fa¸ILy, OR fRIENDs, sEE¸ wILLINg TO  accEpT THE pOssIbILITy THaT DEpREssION ¸ay bE THE ILL pERsON’s ¸OsT appROpRI-

¸y  LIfE  wITH  caNcER  aND  TO  UNDERsTaND  THaT  LIfE.  FINaLLy,  ¸y  aTTE¸pTs  aT  a 

22

pOsITIVE I¸agE DI¸INIsHED ¸y RELaTIONsHIps wITH OTHERs by pREVENTINg THE¸  fRO¸ sHaRINg ¸y ExpERIENcE. BUT THIs I¸agE Is aLL THaT ¸aNy Of THOsE aROUND 

knarF ruhtrA

aN ILL pERsON aRE wILLINg TO sEE. °E OTHER sIDE Of sUsTaININg a “pOsITIVE” I¸agE Is DENyINg THaT ILLNEss caN  END IN DEaTH. MEDIcaL sTaff aRgUE THaT paTIENTs wHO NEED TO DENy DyINg sHOULD  bE  aLLOwED TO DO  sO. °E saD  END Of THIs pROcEss  cO¸Es wHEN THE pERsON Is  DyINg bUT Has bEcO¸E TOO sIck TO ExpREss wHaT HE ¸IgHT NOw waNT TO say TO  HIs LOVED ONEs, abOUT HIs LIfE aND THEIRs. °EN THaT pERsON aND HIs fa¸ILy aRE  DENIED a  fiNaL ExpERIENcE TOgETHER; NOT aLL wILL cHOOsE THIs ¸O¸ENT, bUT aLL  HaVE a RIgHT TO IT. °E ¸EDIcaL sTaff DO NOT HaVE TO bE paRT Of THE TRagEDy Of LIVINg wITH wHaT  was LEſt UNsaID. FOR THE¸ a paTIENT wHO DENIEs Is ONE wHO Is cHEERfUL, ¸akEs  fEw DE¸aNDs, aND asks fEwER qUEsTIONs. SO¸E ILL pERsONs ¸ay NEED TO DENy,  fOR  REasONs wE caNNOT  kNOw. BUT IT  Is TOO cONVENIENT fOR TREaT¸ENT  pROVIDERs  TO assU¸E THaT  THE DENIaL cO¸Es  ENTIRELy fRO¸ THE paTIENT, bEcaUsE THIs  aLLOws  THE¸ NOT TO REcOgNIzE THaT  THEy aRE cUEINg THE paTIENT. ²abELINg THE  ILL  pERsON’s bEHaVIOR  as  DENIaL DEscRIbEs  IT  as  a  NEED Of  THE paTIENT,  INsTEaD  Of UNDERsTaNDINg  IT as THE paTIENT’s  response TO  HIs sITUaTION. °aT sITUaTION,  ¸aDE  Up  Of THE  cUEs  gIVEN  by  TREaT¸ENT  pROVIDERs  aND  caREgIVERs,  Is  wHaT  sHapEs THE ILL pERsON’s bEHaVIOR. ¹O bE ILL Is TO bE DEpENDENT ON ¸EDIcaL sTaff, fa¸ILy, aND fRIENDs. SINcE aLL  THEsE  pEOpLE VaLUE  cHEERfULNEss, THE  ILL ¸UsT sU¸¸ON  Up  THEIR  ENERgIEs TO  bE  cHEERfUL. ¶ENIaL ¸ay NOT  bE wHaT THEy waNT OR NEED,  bUT IT  Is wHaT  THEy  pERcEIVE THOsE aROUND THE¸ waNTINg aND NEEDINg. °Is Is NOT THE ILL pERsON’s  OwN  DENIaL,  bUT  RaTHER  HIs  accO¸¸ODaTION TO  THE  DENIaL  Of  OTHERs.  WHEN  OTHERs aROUND yOU aRE DENyINg wHaT Is HappENINg TO yOU, DENyINg IT yOURsELf  caN sEE¸ LIkE yOUR bEsT DEaL. ¹O LIVE a¸ONg  OTHERs Is  TO ¸akE  DEaLs. WE HaVE  TO DEcIDE  wHaT sUppORT  wE  NEED  aND wHaT  wE  ¸UsT gIVE  OTHERs TO  gET THaT  sUppORT. °EN  wE  ¸akE  OUR  “bEsT  DEaL”  Of  bEHaVIOR  TO  gET  wHaT  wE  NEED.  °Is  pROcEss  Is  RaRELy  a  cONscIOUs ONE.  ºT  DEVELOps OVER  a  LONg TI¸E  IN sO  ¸aNy  ExpERIENcEs THaT  IT  bEcO¸Es THE way wE aRE, OR wHaT wE caLL OUR pERsONaLITy. BUT bEHIND ¸UcH Of  wHaT wE caLL pERsONaLITy, DEaLs aRE bEINg ¸aDE. ºN a cRIsIs sUcH as ILLNEss THE  TER¸s Of THE DEaL RIsE TO THE sURfacE aND caN bE sEEN ¸ORE cLEaRLy. ±NE INcIDENT caN sTaND fOR aLL THE DEaLs º ¸aDE DURINg TREaT¸ENT. ¶URINg  ¸y cHE¸OTHERapy º HaD  TO spEND THREE-Day  pERIODs as aN INpaTIENT, REcEIVINg  cONTINUOUs  DRUgs.  ºN  THE  THREE  wEEks OR  sO  bETwEEN  TREaT¸ENTs  º  was  Exa¸INED wEEkLy IN THE Day-caRE paRT Of THE caNcER cENTER. ¶ay caRE Is a LaRgE 

ROO¸  fiLLED wITH Easy  cHaIRs wHERE  paTIENTs sIT wHILE  THEy  aRE gIVEN  bRIEfER  INTRaVENOUs  cHE¸OTHERapy THaN ¸INE. °ERE aRE aLsO  bEDs, cLOsELy spacED 

23

Is bEINg saID. ÁOspITaLs, HOwEVER, DEpEND ON a ¸yTH Of pRIVacy. As sOON as a  cURTaIN Is pULLED, THaT spacE Is DEfiNED as pRIVaTE, aND THE paTIENT Is ExpEcTED  TO  aNswER aLL  qUEsTIONs, NO  ¸aTTER HOw INTI¸aTE.  °E fiRsT  TI¸E wE  wENT  TO  Day caRE, a yOUNg NURsE INTERVIEwED CaTHIE aND ¸E TO assEss OUR “psycHOsOcIaL” NEEDs. ºN THE ¸IDDLE Of THIs ¸EDIcaL bUs sTaTION sHE bEgaN askINg sO¸E  REasONabLE qUEsTIONs.  WERE wE  ExpERIENcINg DIfficULTIEs  aT wORk  bEcaUsE Of  ¸y ILLNEss? WERE wE HaVINg aNy pRObLE¸s wITH OUR fa¸ILIEs? WERE wE gETTINg  sUppORT fRO¸ THE¸? °EsE qUEsTIONs wERE pREcIsELy wHaT a caREgIVER sHOULD  ask. °E pRObLE¸ was wHERE THEy wERE bEINg askED. ±UR REspONsE TO ¸OsT Of THEsE qUEsTIONs was TO LIE. WITHOUT EVEN LOOkINg  aT EacH OTHER, wE bOTH UNDERsTOOD THaT wHaTEVER pRObLE¸s wE wERE HaVINg,  wE  wERE  NOT  gOINg  TO  TaLk  abOUT  THE¸  THERE.  WHy? ¹O  figURE OUT  OUR  bEsT  DEaL, wE HaD TO assEss THE kIND Of sUppORT wE THOUgHT wE cOULD gET IN THaT  sETTINg  fRO¸ THaT  NURsE. µOTHINg sHE DID cONVINcED  Us THaT  wHaT sHE cOULD  OffER was EqUaL TO wHaT wE wOULD RIsk by TELLINg HER THE TRUTH. AD¸ITTINg THaT yOU HaVE pRObLE¸s ¸akEs yOU VULNERabLE, bUT IT Is aLsO THE  ONLy way TO gET HELp. °ROUgHOUT ¸y ILLNEss CaTHIE aND º cONsTaNTLy wEIgHED  OUR NEED fOR HELp agaINsT THE RIsk INVOLVED IN ¸akINg OURsELVEs VULNERabLE.  ºf wE DID  NOT fEEL THaT  sUppORT was fORTHcO¸INg,  wE sUppREssED  OUR NEED  fOR ExpREssION. ºf wE HaD ExpREssED OUR pRObLE¸s aND E¸OTIONs IN THaT VERy  pUbLIc  sETTINg,  wE  wOULD  HaVE  bEEN  ExTRE¸ELy  VULNERabLE.  ºf  wE  HaD  THEN  REcEIVED  aNyTHINg  LEss THaN  TOTaL  sUppORT,  IT  wOULD  HaVE  bEEN DEVasTaTINg.  °E NURsE sHOwED NO awaRENEss OR appREcIaTION Of HOw ¸UcH HER qUEsTIONs  REqUIRED Us TO RIsk, sO wE gaVE ONLy a cHEERfUL “NO pRObLE¸s” REspONsE. °aT  was aLL THE sETTINg sEE¸ED abLE TO sUppORT. MaybE  wE  wERE  wRONg. MaybE  THE  sTaff  wOULD HaVE  sUppORTED Us  If  wE  HaD OpENED Up abOUT OUR pRObLE¸s wITH OTHERs’ REspONsEs TO ¸y ILLNEss, OUR  sTREss TRyINg TO  kEEp OUR jObs  gOINg, aND  OUR fEaRs  aND  DOUbTs abOUT TREaT¸ENT. WE cERTaINLy wERE awaRE THaT OUR REspONsEs cUT Off THaT sUppORT. ºT was  DOUbLE OR NOTHINg; wE cHOsE safETy. ºLL pERsONs facE sUcH cHOIcEs cONsTaNTLy.  WE sTILL bELIEVE wE wERE RIgHT TO kEEp qUIET. ºf THE sTaff HaD HaD REaL sUppORT  TO OffER, THEy wOULD HaVE OffERED IT IN a sETTINg THaT ENcOURagED OUR REspONsE.  WHEN  wE  wERE  aLONE wITH  NURsEs  IN  aN  INpaTIENT  ROO¸,  THE  qUEsTIONs  THEy  askED wERE THOsE ON ¸EDIcaL HIsTORy fOR¸s. ºN THE pRIVacy Of THaT ROO¸ THE  NURsEs  wERE VULNERabLE  TO  THE E¸OTIONs wE  ¸IgHT HaVE  ExpREssED, sO  THEy  askED NO “psycHOsOcIaL” qUEsTIONs.

s e c n a r a e p p A   f o  t s o C   e h T

wITH cURTaINs bETwEEN. ´VERyONE caN sEE EVERyONE ELsE aND HEaR ¸OsT Of wHaT 

ºT was a  LOT Of wORk  fOR Us  TO aNswER THE Day-caRE NURsE’s qUEsTIONs wITH 

24

a  s¸ILE.  GIVINg  HER THE  I¸pREssION  THaT  wE  fELT aLL  RIgHT  was  DRaININg, aND  ILLNEss aND ITs caRE HaD DRaINED Us bOTH aLREaDy. BUT ExpENDINg OUR ENERgIEs 

knarF ruhtrA

THIs way sEE¸ED OUR bEsT DEaL. ANybODy wHO  waNTs TO bE  a  caREgIVER, paRTIcULaRLy  a  pROfEssIONaL,  ¸UsT  NOT  ONLy  HaVE  REaL  sUppORT  TO  OffER bUT  ¸UsT aLsO  LEaRN  TO  cONVINcE  THE  ILL  pERsON THaT THIs sUppORT Is THERE. My DEfENsEs HaVE NEVER bEEN sTRONgER THaN  THEy wERE wHEN º was ILL. º HaVE NEVER waTcHED  OTHERs ¸ORE cLOsELy OR bEEN  ¸ORE  gUaRDED  aROUND THE¸. º  NEEDED  OTHERs  ¸ORE THaN  º  EVER HaVE, aND  º  was  aLsO ¸OsT VULNERabLE TO  THE¸. °E  bEHaVIOR º  wORkED TO LET OTHERs  sEE  was ¸y ¸OsT cONsERVaTIVE EsTI¸aTE Of wHaT º THOUgHT THEy wOULD sUppORT. AgaIN º caN gIVE NO fOR¸ULa, ONLy qUEsTIONs. ¹O THE ILL pERsON: ÁOw ¸UcH  Is THIs bEsT DEaL cOsTINg yOU IN TER¸s Of E¸OTIONaL wORk? WHaT aRE yOU cO¸pRO¸IsINg Of yOUR OwN ExpREssION Of ILLNEss IN ORDER TO pREsENT THOsE aROUND  yOU wITH THE cHEERfUL appEaRaNcE THEy waNT? WHaT DO yOU fEaR wILL HappEN  If yOU acT OTHERwIsE? AND TO THOsE aROUND THE ILL pERsON: WHaT cUEs aRE yOU  gIVINg THE ILL pERsON THaT TELL HER HOw yOU waNT HER TO acT? ºN wHaT way Is HER  bEHaVIOR a REspONsE TO yOUR OwN? WHOsE DENIaL, wHOsE NEEDs? FEaR  aND  DEpREssION  aRE  a  paRT  Of  LIfE.  ºN  ILLNEss  THERE  aRE  NO  “NEgaTIVE  E¸OTIONs,”  ONLy ExpERIENcEs THaT  HaVE  TO bE LIVED THROUgH. WHaT  Is NEEDED  IN  THEsE  ¸O¸ENTs  Is  NOT  DENIaL  bUT  REcOgNITION.  °E  ILL  pERsON’s  sUffERINg  sHOULD bE affiR¸ED, wHETHER OR NOT IT caN bE TREaTED. WHaT º waNTED wHEN º  was ¸OsT ILL was THE REspONsE, “YEs, wE sEE yOUR paIN; wE accEpT yOUR fEaR.” º  NEEDED OTHERs TO REcOgNIzE NOT ONLy THaT º was sUffERINg, bUT aLsO THaT wE HaD  THIs  sUffERINg IN cO¸¸ON.  º caN accEpT THaT  DOcTORs aND  NURsEs sO¸ETI¸Es  faIL  TO  pROVIDE THE cORREcT  TREaT¸ENT.  BUT  º caNNOT  accEpT  IT  wHEN ¸EDIcaL  sTaff, fa¸ILy, aND fRIENDs faIL TO REcOgNIzE THaT THEy aRE EqUaL paRTIcIpaNTs IN  THE pROcEss Of ILLNEss. °EIR acTIONs sHapE THE bEHaVIOR Of THE ILL pERsON, aND  THEIR bODIEs sHaRE THE pOTENTIaL Of ILLNEss. °OsE wHO ¸akE cHEERfULNEss aND bRaVERy THE pRIcE THEy REqUIRE fOR sUppORT DENy THEIR OwN HU¸aNITy. °Ey DENy THaT TO bE HU¸aN Is TO bE ¸ORTaL,  TO  bEcO¸E ILL, aND  DIE. ºLL pERsONs  NEED OTHERs TO sHaRE IN REcOgNIzINg  wITH  THE¸ THE fRaILTy Of THE HU¸aN  bODy. WHEN OTHERs jOIN THE ILL pERsON IN THIs  REcOgNITION, cOURagE aND cHEER ¸ay bE THE REsULT, NOT as aN appEaRaNcE TO bE  wORkED aT, bUT as a spONTaNEOUs ExpREssION Of a cO¸¸ON E¸OTION.

´he Sh±P  ³ound±ng Donald Hall

´acH ¸ORNINg º ¸aDE ¸y way a¸ONg gaNgways, ELEVaTORs, aND NURsEs’ pODs TO JaNE’s ROO¸ TO INTERROgaTE gRaVE HELpERs wHO HaD TENDED HER aLL NIgHT LIkE THE sHIp’s ¸assIVE ENgINEs THaT kEpT ITs pROpELLERs TURNINg. WEEk aſtER wEEk, º saT by HER bED wITH bLack cOffEE aND THE Globe. °E passENgERs ON THIs VOyagE wORE ¸asks OR caNNULaE OR DaNgLED DEVIcEs THaT DRIppED cHE¸IcaLs INTO THEIR wRIsTs, bUT º bELIEVED THaT THE sHIp TRaVELED TO a HaRbOR Of bREakfasT, wORk, aND LOVE. º wROTE: “WHEN THE INfUsIONs aRE INfUsED ENTIRELy, bONE ¸aRROw REsTORED aND Ly¸pHObLasTs RE¸ITTED, º wILL TakE ¸y wIfE, as baLD as MIcHaEL JORDaN, HO¸E TO OUR DOg aND Day.” MONTHs LaTER THEsE wORDs TURN Up a¸ONg papERs ON ¸y DEsk aT HO¸E, as º LIsTEN TO HEaR JaNE caLL fOR HELp, OR spEak IN DELIRIU¸,

¶ONaLD  ÁaLL, “°E SHIp  POUNDINg,” fRO¸  White Apples and the  Taste  of Stone:  Selected Poems, 

1946–2006 , by ¶ONaLD ÁaLL. © 2006 by ¶ONaLD ÁaLL. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of ÁOUgHTON MIfflIN  ÁaRcOURT PUbLIsHINg CO¸paNy. ALL RIgHTs REsERVED.

waITINg TO ¸akE THE agITaTED

26

DRIVE TO ´¸ERgENcy agaIN, fOR RE-aD¸IssION TO THE HUgE

llaH  dlanoD

VEssEL THaT HEaVEs waTER ¸ONTH aſtER ¸ONTH, wITHOUT LEaVINg pORT, wITHOUT ¸OVINg a kNOT, wITHOUT aRRIVaL OR DEsTINaTION, ITs gREaT ENgINEs pOUNDINg.

God AT The Beds±de Jerome Groopman

µOT LONg agO, IN THE ONcOLOgy cLINIc wHERE º wORk, ¸y paTIENT ANNa ANgELO  askED  ¸E  TO  pRay  TO  GOD.  AT  THE  TI¸E,  pRayER  was  faR  fRO¸  THE  fOREfRONT  Of  ¸y ¸IND. ANNa  (HER  Na¸E  Has bEEN cHaNgED  TO  ¸aINTaIN cONfiDENTIaLITy)  Is  a  71-yEaR-OLD wO¸aN  fRO¸  BOsTON’s µORTH  ´ND  wITH  LONgsTaNDINg  caRDIac  aND HEpaTObILIaRy DIsEasE. SIx  yEaRs agO, bREasT caNcER DEVELOpED.  °E  TU¸OR  was  INcURabLE  fRO¸  THE  TI¸E  Of  DIagNOsIs,  sINcE  IT  HaD  aLREaDy  spREaD TO bONE. °E caNcER cELLs TEsTED pOsITIVE fOR EsTROgEN aND pROgEsTERONE REcEpTORs, aND ANNa was TREaTED wITH a sERIEs Of HOR¸ONaL agENTs, wHIcH,  OVER THE ENsUINg yEaRs, LaRgELy cONTROLLED THE DIsEasE. A DEVOUT CaTHOLIc, sHE  REgULaRLy  aTTENDED Mass  aND  cOUNTED HER  pRIEsT a¸ONg HER cLOsEsT fRIENDs.  “GOD Has bEEN gOOD TO ¸E,” ANNa saID aT THE END Of EacH VIsIT. ±VER THE pREVIOUs TwO ¸ONTHs, ANNa HaD bEEN cO¸pLaININg TO HER INTERNIsT  abOUT  LOss  Of appETITE  aND  faTIgUE.  ÁE  ORDERED  bLOOD  TEsTs  aND  THEN  a  »¾t  scaN.  °E  caNcER  HaD  ¸ETasTasIzED  TO  HER LIVER.  A  bIOpsy sHOwED  THaT  THE HEpaTIc ¸ETasTasEs NO LONgER ExpREssED HOR¸ONE REcEpTORs. WHEN ANNa  aRRIVED fOR HER appOINT¸ENT wITH ¸E, sHE HaD aLREaDy bEEN INfOR¸ED Of HER  bIOpsy REsULTs. °E fiRsT THINg sHE saID was THaT sHE waNTED TO LIVE as LONg as  pOssIbLE bUT was cONcERNED abOUT THE TOLL Of cHE¸OTHERapy. º ExpLaINED THaT THE cHOIcE Of a TREaT¸ENT pLaN wOULD NOT bE sI¸pLE, gIVEN  HER  cO¸pLIcaTINg ¸EDIcaL pRObLE¸s.  MaNy Of THE DRUgs  cOULD HaVE  sERIOUs  sIDE EffEcTs ON HER HEaRT  aND wOULD bE ¸ETabOLIzED by HER LIVER.  SO, bEfORE  REcO¸¸ENDINg  a  REgI¸EN, º  wOULD cONsULT  wITH HER INTERNIsT, caRDIOLOgIsT,  aND  gasTROENTEROLOgIsT. ANNa TOOk IN ¸y wORDs aND THEN saID, “¶OcTOR, º’¸  fRIgHTENED. º pRay EVERy Day. º waNT yOU TO pRay fOR ¸E.” ANNa LOOkED sqUaRELy aT ¸E. ºT  was cLEaR sHE waNTED a REspONsE. FOR a  LONg wHILE, º DID NOT kNOw wHaT TO say. A  DOcTOR’s wORDs HaVE gREaT pOwER 

JERO¸E GROOp¸aN, “GOD aT THE BEDsIDE,” fRO¸ THE New England Journal of Medicine 350 (2004):  1176–1178. © 2004 by MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of MassacHUsETTs  MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

fOR a paTIENT; THEy caN HELp TO HEaL, aND THEy caN DO gREaT HaR¸. °E spEcIaLTy 

28

Of ONcOLOgy ROUTINELy INVOLVEs TREaTINg pEOpLE wHO aRE IN DIRE cIRcU¸sTaNcEs  aND  fiND  THE¸sELVEs  facINg  THEIR  OwN  ¸ORTaLITy. MaNy  Of  ¸y paTIENTs  sEEk 

nampoorG emoreJ

sTRENgTH aND sOLacE IN THEIR faITH. µONE Of THE TRaININg º REcEIVED IN ¸EDIcaL scHOOL, REsIDENcy,  fELLOwsHIp,  OR pRacTIcE HaD TaUgHT ¸E HOw TO REpLy TO ANNa. AND aLTHOUgH º a¸ RELIgIOUs,  º cONsIDER ¸y bELIEfs aND pRayERs a  pRIVaTE ¸aTTER. SHOULD º sIDEsTEp ANNa’s  REqUEsT, IN  EffEcT DIsTaNcINg  ¸ysELf fRO¸  HER aT  a  ¸O¸ENT Of  gREaT NEED? ±R  sHOULD  º  cROss  THE  bOUNDaRy  fRO¸ THE  pURELy  pROfEssIONaL  TO  THE  pERsONaL  aND jOIN HER IN pRayER? ¶ILE¸¸as LIkE  THIs  ONE  HaVE  bEcO¸E  pOINTs  Of sHaRp  cONTENTION  IN THE  ¸EDIcaL wORLD. ÁOw sHOULD DOcTORs Exa¸INE aND ENgagE RELIgION IN THE LIVEs  Of  THEIR  paTIENTs aND  IN  THEIR  OwN LIVEs  as cLINIcIaNs?  ºs THERE aNy  pLacE fOR  GOD aT THE bEDsIDE DURINg ROUNDs? °E ·NITED STaTEs Is a DEEpLy RELIgIOUs cOUNTRy, aND sEVERaL sURVEys sHOw  bOTH THaT a LaRgE ¸ajORITy Of paTIENTs waNT pHysIcIaNs TO bE ENgagED IN THEIR  spIRITUaL  LIVEs  aND  THaT  THE sIck  bELIEVE  IN  ¸IRacULOUs  HEaLINg  wHEN  ¸EDIcINE caN OffER NO pROVEN cURE. BUT RELIgIOUs bELIEfs aRE NOT aLways pOsITIVE OR  bENEficIaL. ±NE Of ¸y ¸OsT INsTRUcTIVE ExpERIENcEs Of THE EffEcTs Of RELIgIOUs  bELIEf  OccURRED  sO¸E THREE  DEcaDEs agO,  wHEN  º  was  a THIRD-yEaR  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT. AN ±RTHODOx JEwIsH wO¸aN IN HER 20s was aD¸ITTED TO THE sURgIcaL  sERVIcE wITH a LaRgE bREasT ¸ass. SHE sEE¸ED INTELLIgENT aND aNI¸aTED, aND IT  ¸aDE NO sENsE TO ¸E THaT sHE wOULD HaVE IgNORED a gROwTH IN HER bREasT THaT  was  THE sIzE  Of a  waLNUT.  ºN ¸y NaïVETé, º  THOUgHT THaT  OUR sHaRED HERITagE  pOsITIONED  ¸E TO cO¸¸UNIcaTE wITH HER IN a paRTIcULaRLy  EffEcTIVE way, aND  º ENcOURagED HER TO cONfiDE IN ¸E THE REasON wHy sHE HaD LET THE ¸ass gROw  sO  LaRgE  bEfORE sEEkINg a  sURgEON.  ºT  TURNED  OUT THaT  sHE HaD  HaD  aN  affaIR  wITH HER E¸pLOyER, aND sHE saw HER TU¸OR as GOD’s pUNIsH¸ENT fOR HER sIN.  °ERE was NO HOpE fOR HER, NO REasON TO cONTINUE LIVINg, bEcaUsE HER DEaTH  was GOD’s wILL. º was  IN  OVER  ¸y HEaD. º  HaD bRasHLy TREaDED INTO  THEOLOgIcaL TERRITORy  wITHOUT a cLINIcaL cO¸pass. Was HER cONfEssION ¸EaNT as a caLL fOR  absOLUTION OR  a cONfiR¸aTION  Of HER TRaNsgREssION?  ºT  was  NOT ¸y  pLacE TO  affORD  EITHER, aND wITH a ¸Ix  Of cONfUsION aND sHa¸E, º RETREaTED fRO¸ HER. ²aTER  sHE sHaRED HER sEcRET wITH THE aTTENDINg sURgEON. º NEVER kNEw wHaT HE HaD  saID  TO  HER  THaT  cONVINcED  HER  TO  bE  TREaTED.  µOR,  DURINg  ¸y  sUbsEqUENT  ¸EDIcaL TRaININg, was º EVER TaUgHT HOw TO  spEak TO paTIENTs abOUT ¸aTTERs  Of faITH.

CENTURIEs  agO,  wHEN HEaLERs  ca¸E  pRI¸aRILy  fRO¸ THE  RaNks  Of ¸ONks,  RabbIs, aND I¸a¸s, aND wHEN NURsEs wERE NUNs OR ¸E¸bERs Of RELIgIOUs ORDERs, 

29

Of  aN ILLNEss OR bETwEEN THE  pHysIcaL aND  spIRITUaL  cO¸pONENTs Of ITs TREaT¸ENT.  ºN THE ¸ODERN ERa, RELIgION aND scIENcE aRE UNDERsTOOD TO bE sHaRpLy  DIVIDED,  THE  TwO  OccUpyINg  VERy  DIffERENT  DO¸aINs.  ³ELIgION  ExpLOREs  THE  NaTURE Of  GOD  aND  OffERs RITUaLs fOR  I¸pLE¸ENTINg  GOD’s wILL, wHEREas  scIENcE  EscHEws  aNy  sUcH  ¸ETapHysIcs  aND  THROUgH  ExpERI¸ENTaTION  UNVEILs  THE wORkINgs Of THE ¸aTERIaL wORLD. BUT IN THE ¸INDs Of ¸aNy  Of OUR paTIENTs,  THERE Is  NO sUcH  scHIs¸. ³ELIgION,  pERHaps  ¸ORE  THaN  aNy  OTHER  sINgLE fORcE,  caN  scULpT THE  ExpERIENcE  Of  ILLNEss.  ºN  A¸ERIca  TODay,  RELIgIOUs  INflUENcE  caN  gO  bEyOND  cONcEpTs  E¸bODIED  IN  THE  THREE  AbRaHa¸Ic faITHs.  SO¸E  paTIENTs  aND  THEIR  DOcTORs  HaVE  TURNED  TO ´asTERN  pHILOsOpHIEs, sEEkINg TO  INTEgRaTE BUDDHIsT, ¹aOIsT,  aND AyURVEDIc IDEas aND pRacTIcEs INTO cLINIcaL caRE. ¶IffERENT  faITHs  DIcTaTE  DIffERENT  fOR¸s  Of  bEHaVIOR,  sOcIaL  INTERacTIONs,  aND  VIEws abOUT HOw TO LIVE aND HOw TO DIE. FOR THIs REasON, sO¸E ¸EDIcaL  EDUcaTORs  HaVE  aRgUED  THaT  RELIgION  Is  a  cLINIcaL  VaRIabLE  TO  bE  cONsIDERED  IN  EVERy casE aND THaT  a “spIRITUaL  HIsTORy” sHOULD bEcO¸E a  REgULaR paRT Of  THE paTIENT INTERVIEw. ºNDEED, sUcH  a HIsTORy ¸ay yIELD kEy DIagNOsTIc cLUEs  OR  gUIDE  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs  abOUT  DIsEasE  pREVENTION  aND  sUggEsT  sTRaTEgIEs TO ENsURE  cO¸pLIaNcE wITH TREaT¸ENT. BUT If  THIs kIND Of HIsTORy TakINg  bEcO¸Es cO¸¸ON pRacTIcE, wHEN, by wHO¸, aND HOw sHOULD IT bE DONE? AT  THE fiRsT VIsIT, OR ONLy aſtER a cLOsE bOND Has bEEN fOR¸ED bETwEEN paTIENT aND  DOcTOR?  By THE ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT, REsIDENT, OR aTTENDINg pHysIcIaN? AND HOw  wOULD DOcTORs ¸aNagE THE THEOLOgIcaL faLLOUT? MaNy  DOcTORs,  UNDERsTaNDabLy,  aRE  LEERy  Of ¸OVINg  OUTsIDE THE  sTRIcTLy  cLINIcaL  aND  VENTURINg  INTO  THE  spIRITUaL  REaL¸. As  was  cLEaR  IN  THE casE  Of  THE ±RTHODOx wO¸aN º ¸ET as a sTUDENT, THEOLOgIEs caN sO¸ETI¸Es bE TOxIc.  ³ELIgION caN bE a wELLspRINg Of gREaT sTRENgTH aND cO¸fORT OR a pOOL Of gUILT  aND paIN. ºf wE bEgIN TakINg a spIRITUaL HIsTORy, THEN wE RIsk bEcO¸INg cLINIcaL jUDgEs Of wHaT wE HEaR. BUT aLTHOUgH DOcTORs sHOULD NOT pREsU¸E TO TakE  ON THE ¸aNTLE Of THE cLERgy, º bELIEVE THaT THEy caNNOT aLways aVOID EVaLUaTINg  wHETHER THE pERsONaL RELIgIOUs bELIEfs Of THEIR paTIENTs aRE saLUbRIOUs. ·NfORTUNaTELy, THIs TypE Of EVaLUaTION REqUIREs DEEpER kNOwLEDgE Of DIffERENT RELIgIONs  aND  THEIR cLINIcaLLy bENEficIaL  aND  HaR¸fUL  cONcEpTIONs THaN  ¸OsT Of  Us  pOssEss.  ÂENTURINg  INTO  THE  spIRITUaL  DO¸aIN  aLsO  ¸EaNs  cONfRONTINg  a  paTIENT’s  ExpEcTaTIONs abOUT  THE  OUTcO¸E Of  aN ILLNEss,  paRTIcULaRLy  wHaT  IT 

e d i s d e B  e h t ta   d o G

THERE  was  NO  cLEaR  DIVIDE  bETwEEN  bIOLOgy  aND  acTs  Of  GOD  IN  THE  gENEsIs 

¸EaNs NOT TO bE cURED DEspITE faITH aND pRayER. ºf a paTIENT pRays fOR a ¸EDI-

30

caL  ¸IRacLE aND  IT  DOEsN’T OccUR,  DOEs  THaT  ¸EaN  THaT  GOD DOEsN’T  LOVE  HER  OR  THaT  sHE  Is  UNwORTHy  bEcaUsE  HER  wILL  aND  cHaRacTER  wERE  TOO  wEak TO 

nampoorG emoreJ

ExERT  THE “pOwER  Of pRayER”? POpULaR  cULTURE  ¸akEs ¸UcH  Of THE  abILITy  Of  wILL aND faITH TO ¸IRacULOUsLy OVERcO¸E DREaDED DIsEasEs fOR wHIcH ¸ODERN  ¸EDIcINE  Has NO pROVEN RE¸EDIEs. ³IgOROUs DOcU¸ENTaTION Of sUcH wIDELy  TOUTED  spONTaNEOUs RE¸IssIONs  Is  scaNT,  aND  EVEN IN  THOsE  RaRE TRUE  casEs,  caUsE aND EffEcT aRE ObscURE. A DOcTOR’s pRacTIcE caN aLsO bE INflUENcED, cONscIOUsLy OR sUbcONscIOUsLy,  by HIs OwN RELIgIOUs bELIEfs. MOREOVER, HIs OwN faITH, LIkE THaT Of HIs paTIENTs,  ¸ay  bE  TEsTED by  THE TRaU¸a  aND  TRaVaIL THaT  HE  wITNEssEs. º  ca¸E  fRO¸  a  HO¸E wHERE faITH was sTRONg bUT NOT fUNDa¸ENTaLIsT, wHERE bELIEf cOExIsTED  wITH DOUbT. AſtER spENDINg sIx wEEks ON a pEDIaTRIc ONcOLOgy waRD aT a TI¸E  wHEN  ¸OsT  cHILDREN  wITH  caNcER  DIED  TERRIbLE  DEaTHs,  º  was  ON  THE  VERgE  Of LOsINg  ¸y faITH. °EODIcy,  THE qUEsTION Of wHy a bENEVOLENT GOD wOULD  pER¸IT  sUcH sUffERINg  IN  THE  UNIVERsE, caN  bE  bROUgHT INTO  sHaRp fOcUs  IN  THE HOspITaL. °E INTI¸acy Of THE pHysIcIaN-paTIENT DIaLOgUE cOULD caUsE THIs  qUEsTION TO E¸ERgE. WHaT If ANNa HaD askED ¸E wHy GOD HaD cHOsEN HER TO  sUffER? SHOULD a DOcTOR paRTIcIpaTE IN sUcH a DIaLOgUE? ´VEN as wE  pONDER  wHETHER  OR HOw  wE  sHOULD sTEp INsIDE  THE RELIgIOUs  wORLDs  Of OUR  paTIENTs,  wE  sHOULD aLsO ask  wHETHER ¸E¸bERs  Of THE cLERgy  sHOULD ENTER ¸ORE DEEpLy INTO OUR cLINIcaL spHERE. °ERE Is a gREaT I¸baLaNcE  Of pOwER  bETwEEN paTIENT aND DOcTOR. ±ſtEN, º HaVE  bEEN INsENsITIVE TO THIs  I¸baLaNcE  aND HaVE  TakEN a paTIENT’s sILENcE  TO REpREsENT TacIT assENT  TO ¸y  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs. A ¸E¸bER Of THE cLERgy caN spEak TO a DOcTOR aT EyE LEVEL  aND  acT as aN aDVOcaTE fOR a paTIENT wHO ¸ay bE INTI¸IDaTED by a pHysIcIaN  aND RELUcTaNT TO qUEsTION OR OppOsE HIs OR HER aDVIcE. A pRIEsT, a RabbI, OR aN  I¸a¸  caN HELp paTIENTs TO  DETER¸INE wHIcH cLINIcaL  OpTIONs aRE IN  cONcERT  wITH THEIR RELIgIOUs I¸pERaTIVEs aND caN gIVE THE pHysIcIaN THE LaNgUagE wITH  wHIcH TO aDDREss THE paTIENT’s spIRITUaL NEEDs. FacINg ANNa, º sEaRcHED fOR a REspONsE. º RE¸INDED ¸ysELf THaT wHENEVER  º wEaR THaT wHITE cOaT º a¸ a pHysIcIaN aND THaT wHaTEVER º say OR DO sHOULD  bE  fOR  THE cLINIcaL  bENEfiT  Of  ¸y paTIENT.  º  bRIEfly pONDERED  THE qUEsTION  Of  wHETHER  pRayER  was  “gOOD fOR  HEaLTH.”  °Is  IssUE HaD  capTURED  THE  pUbLIc’s  I¸agINaTION, bUT pUbLIsHED REsEaRcH ON THE sUbjEcT was OſtEN pRELI¸INaRy aND  INcONcLUsIVE. ºT was a LEgITI¸aTE aND INTRIgUINg sUbjEcT Of scIENTIfic INqUIRy,  bUT sO¸EHOw, aT THE ¸O¸ENT, IT sEE¸ED RE¸OTE fRO¸ wHaT ANNa was askINg  fOR—a HEaRTfELT aNswER.

AND  sO,  UNsURE  Of  wHERE  TO  fix  THE  bOUNDaRy  bETwEEN  THE  pROfEssIONaL  aND  THE  pERsONaL, UNsURE wHaT  wORDs  wERE appROpRIaTE,  º DREw  ON THE ¹aL-

31

aND aNswERED HER qUEsTION wITH a qUEsTION. “WHaT Is THE pRayER yOU waNT?” “PRay fOR GOD TO gIVE ¸y DOcTORs wIsDO¸,” ANNa saID. ¹O THaT, º sILENTLy EcHOED, “A¸EN.”

e d i s d e B  e h t ta   d o G

¸UDIc cUsTO¸ Of ¸y aNcEsTORs aND THE pEDagOgIcaL pRacTIcE Of ¸y ¸ENTORs 

´he Use of FoRce William Carlos Williams

°Ey  wERE NEw paTIENTs TO ¸E, aLL  º HaD was  THE Na¸E, ±LsON.  PLEasE cO¸E  DOwN as sOON as yOU caN, ¸y DaUgHTER Is VERy sIck. WHEN º aRRIVED º  was ¸ET by THE ¸OTHER,  a  bIg sTaRTLED LOOkINg wO¸aN,  VERy  cLEaN  aND  apOLOgETIc  wHO  ¸ERELy  saID,  ºs  THIs THE  DOcTOR?  aND  LET  ¸E  IN. ºN THE  back, sHE aDDED.  YOU ¸UsT ExcUsE Us, DOcTOR,  wE HaVE HER IN THE  kITcHEN wHERE IT Is waR¸. ºT Is VERy Da¸p HERE sO¸ETI¸Es. °E cHILD was fULLy DREssED aND sITTINg ON HER faTHER’s Lap NEaR THE kITcHEN  TabLE.  ÁE TRIED  TO gET  Up, bUT  º ¸OTIONED  fOR HI¸ NOT TO  bOTHER, TOOk  Off  ¸y  OVERcOaT aND sTaRTED TO LOOk THINgs OVER. º cOULD sEE THaT THEy wERE aLL VERy NERVOUs, EyEINg ¸E Up aND DOwN DIsTRUsTfULLy. As OſtEN, IN sUcH casEs, THEy wEREN’T  TELLINg ¸E ¸ORE THaN THEy HaD TO, IT was Up TO ¸E TO TELL THE¸; THaT’s wHy THEy  wERE spENDINg THREE DOLLaRs ON ¸E. °E cHILD was faIRLy EaTINg ¸E Up wITH HER cOLD, sTEaDy EyEs, aND NO ExpREssION TO HER facE wHaTEVER. SHE DID NOT ¸OVE aND sEE¸ED, INwaRDLy, qUIET; aN  UNUsUaLLy aTTRacTIVE LITTLE THINg, aND as sTRONg as a HEIfER IN appEaRaNcE. BUT  HER facE was flUsHED, sHE was bREaTHINg RapIDLy, aND º REaLIzED THaT sHE HaD a  HIgH fEVER. SHE HaD ¸agNIficENT bLONDE HaIR, IN pROfUsION. ±NE Of THOsE pIcTURE cHILDREN OſtEN REpRODUcED IN aDVERTIsINg LEaflETs aND THE pHOTOgRaVURE  sEcTIONs Of THE SUNDay papERs. SHE’s HaD a fEVER fOR THREE Days, bEgaN THE faTHER aND wE DON’T kNOw wHaT  IT cO¸Es fRO¸. My wIfE Has gIVEN HER THINgs, yOU kNOw, LIkE pEOpLE DO, bUT IT  DON’T DO NO gOOD. AND THERE’s bEEN a LOT Of sIckNEss aROUND. SO wE THO’T yOU’D  bETTER LOOk HER OVER aND TELL Us wHaT Is THE ¸aTTER. As DOcTORs OſtEN DO  º TOOk a  TRIaL sHOT  aT IT  as a  pOINT Of DEpaRTURE. Áas  sHE HaD a sORE THROaT?

WILLIa¸  CaRLOs  WILLIa¸s, “°E  ·sE  Of FORcE,”  fRO¸  °e  Collected Stories  of  William  Carlos 

Williams ,  by  WILLIa¸  CaRLOs  WILLIa¸s.  ©  1938  by  WILLIa¸  CaRLOs  WILLIa¸s.  ³EpRINTED  by  pER¸IssION Of µEw ¶IREcTIONs PUbLIsHINg CORp.

BOTH paRENTs aNswERED ¸E  TOgETHER, µO . . . µO, sHE says HER THROaT DON’T  HURT HER.

33

ÁaVE yOU LOOkED? º TRIED TO, saID THE ¸OTHER, bUT º cOULDN’T sEE. As IT HappENs wE HaD bEEN HaVINg a NU¸bER Of casEs Of DIpHTHERIa IN THE  scHOOL  TO  wHIcH THIs  cHILD  wENT  DURINg  THaT  ¸ONTH  aND  wE  wERE  aLL,  qUITE  appaRENTLy, THINkINg Of THaT, THOUgH NO ONE HaD as yET spOkEN Of THE THINg. WELL, º saID, sUppOsE wE TakE a LOOk aT THE THROaT fiRsT. º s¸ILED IN ¸y bEsT  pROfEssIONaL  ¸aNNER  aND  askINg  fOR  THE  cHILD’s fiRsT  Na¸E  º  saID,  cO¸E  ON,  MaTHILDa, OpEN yOUR ¸OUTH aND LET’s TakE a LOOk aT yOUR THROaT. µOTHINg DOINg. Aw, cO¸E ON, º cOaxED, jUsT OpEN yOUR ¸OUTH wIDE aND LET ¸E TakE a LOOk.  ²OOk,  º saID OpENINg bOTH HaNDs wIDE, º HaVEN’T aNyTHINg IN ¸y HaNDs. JUsT  OpEN Up aND LET ¸E sEE. SUcH a  NIcE ¸aN,  pUT IN THE ¸OTHER.  ²OOk HOw kIND  HE Is  TO yOU. CO¸E  ON, DO wHaT HE TELLs yOU TO. ÁE wON’T HURT yOU. AT THaT  º gROUND  ¸y  TEETH IN  DIsgUsT.  ºf ONLy THEy  wOULDN’T  UsE  THE  wORD  “HURT” º ¸IgHT bE abLE TO gET sO¸EwHERE. BUT º DID NOT aLLOw ¸ysELf TO bE HURRIED OR DIsTURbED bUT spEakINg qUIETLy aND sLOwLy º appROacHED THE cHILD agaIN. As º ¸OVED ¸y cHaIR a LITTLE NEaRER sUDDENLy wITH ONE caTLIkE ¸OVE¸ENT  bOTH  HER  HaNDs  cLawED  INsTINcTIVELy  fOR  ¸y  EyEs  aND  sHE  aL¸OsT  REacHED  THE¸ TOO. ºN facT sHE kNOckED ¸y gLassEs flyINg aND THEy fELL, THOUgH UNbROkEN, sEVERaL fEET away fRO¸ ¸E ON THE kITcHEN flOOR. BOTH  THE  ¸OTHER  aND  faTHER  aL¸OsT  TURNED  THE¸sELVEs  INsIDE  OUT  IN  E¸baRRass¸ENT  aND  apOLOgy. YOU baD gIRL, saID THE ¸OTHER,  TakINg HER aND  sHakINg HER by ONE aR¸. ²OOk wHaT yOU’VE DONE. °E NIcE ¸aN . . . FOR HEaVEN’s sakE, º bROkE IN. ¶ON’T caLL ¸E a NIcE ¸aN TO HER. º’¸ HERE TO  LOOk aT HER THROaT ON THE cHaNcE THaT sHE ¸IgHT HaVE DIpHTHERIa aND pOssIbLy  DIE Of IT. BUT THaT’s NOTHINg TO HER. ²OOk HERE, º saID TO THE cHILD, wE’RE gOINg  TO  LOOk  aT  yOUR  THROaT.  YOU’RE  OLD  ENOUgH  TO  UNDERsTaND  wHaT  º’¸ sayINg.  WILL yOU OpEN IT NOw by yOURsELf OR sHaLL wE HaVE TO OpEN IT fOR yOU? µOT a ¸OVE. ´VEN HER ExpREssION HaDN’T cHaNgED.  ÁER bREaTHs HOwEVER  wERE cO¸INg fasTER aND fasTER. °EN THE  baTTLE bEgaN. º HaD TO DO IT.  º HaD  TO  HaVE  a  THROaT  cULTURE  fOR  HER  OwN  pROTEcTION.  BUT  fiRsT  º  TOLD  THE  paRENTs THaT IT was ENTIRELy Up TO THE¸. º ExpLaINED  THE DaNgER bUT saID THaT º  wOULD  NOT INsIsT  ON  a THROaT  Exa¸INaTION  sO  LONg  as  THEy  wOULD TakE  THE  REspONsIbILITy.

e c r o F   f o  e s U   e h T

¶OEs yOUR THROaT HURT yOU? aDDED THE ¸OTHER TO THE cHILD. BUT THE LITTLE  gIRL’s ExpREssION DIDN’T cHaNgE NOR DID sHE ¸OVE HER EyEs fRO¸ ¸y facE.

ºf yOU DON’T DO wHaT THE DOcTOR says yOU’LL HaVE TO gO TO THE HOspITaL, THE 

34

¸OTHER aD¸ONIsHED HER sEVERELy. ±H yEaH? º HaD TO s¸ILE TO ¸ysELf. AſtER aLL, º HaD aLREaDy faLLEN IN LOVE wITH 

s m a i l l i W  s o l r a C   m a i l l i W

THE saVagE bRaT, THE paRENTs wERE cONTE¸pTIbLE TO ¸E. ºN THE ENsUINg sTRUggLE  THEy gREw ¸ORE aND ¸ORE abjEcT, cRUsHED, ExHaUsTED wHILE sHE sURELy ROsE TO  ¸agNIficENT HEIgHTs Of INsaNE fURy Of EffORT bRED Of HER TERROR Of ¸E. °E faTHER TRIED HIs bEsT, aND  HE was a  bIg ¸aN bUT THE facT THaT  sHE was  HIs  DaUgHTER, HIs sHa¸E  aT HER bEHaVIOR aND  HIs DREaD Of HURTINg  HER ¸aDE  HI¸ RELEasE HER jUsT aT THE cRITIcaL ¸O¸ENT sEVERaL TI¸Es wHEN º HaD aL¸OsT  acHIEVED sUccEss, TILL º waNTED TO kILL HI¸. BUT HIs DREaD aLsO THaT  sHE ¸IgHT  HaVE DIpHTHERIa ¸aDE HI¸ TELL ¸E TO gO ON,  gO ON THOUgH HE HI¸sELf was  aL¸OsT  faINTINg, wHILE  THE ¸OTHER ¸OVED back aND  fORTH bEHIND Us  RaIsINg  aND LOwERINg HER HaNDs IN aN agONy Of appREHENsION. PUT HER IN fRONT Of yOU ON yOUR Lap, º ORDERED, aND HOLD bOTH HER wRIsTs. BUT as sOON as HE DID THE cHILD LET OUT a scREa¸. ¶ON’T, yOU’RE HURTINg ¸E.  ²ET  gO  Of ¸y HaNDs.  ²ET THE¸  gO º  TELL  yOU. °EN  sHE sHRIEkED  TERRIfyINgLy,  HysTERIcaLLy. STOp IT! STOp IT! YOU’RE kILLINg ¸E! ¶O yOU THINk sHE caN sTaND IT, DOcTOR! saID THE ¸OTHER. YOU  gET  OUT,  saID  THE  HUsbaND  TO  HIs  wIfE.  ¶O  yOU  waNT  HER  TO  DIE  Of  DIpHTHERIa? CO¸E ON NOw, HOLD HER, º saID. °EN º  gRaspED THE  cHILD’s HEaD  wITH  ¸y LEſt  HaND aND TRIED  TO  gET THE  wOODEN  TONgUE  DEpREssOR  bETwEEN  HER  TEETH.  SHE  fOUgHT,  wITH  cLENcHED  TEETH, DEspERaTELy! BUT NOw º aLsO HaD gROwN fURIOUs—aT a cHILD. º TRIED TO  HOLD ¸ysELf DOwN bUT º cOULDN’T. º kNOw HOw TO ExpOsE a  THROaT fOR INspEcTION. AND º DID ¸y bEsT. WHEN fiNaLLy º gOT THE wOODEN spaTULa  bEHIND THE  LasT TEETH aND jUsT THE pOINT Of IT INTO THE ¸OUTH caVITy, sHE OpENED Up fOR aN  INsTaNT  bUT bEfORE º  cOULD sEE  aNyTHINg sHE ca¸E  DOwN agaIN aND  gRIppINg  THE  wOODEN  bLaDE  bETwEEN  HER ¸OLaRs  sHE  REDUcED IT  TO  spLINTERs bEfORE º  cOULD gET IT OUT agaIN. AREN’T yOU asHa¸ED, THE ¸OTHER yELLED aT HER. AREN’T yOU asHa¸ED TO acT  LIkE THaT IN fRONT Of THE DOcTOR? GET ¸E a  s¸OOTH-HaNDLED spOON Of sO¸E sORT, º TOLD THE ¸OTHER.  WE’RE  gOINg THROUgH wITH THIs. °E cHILD’s ¸OUTH was aLREaDy bLEEDINg. ÁER TONgUE  was  cUT aND  sHE was scREa¸INg IN  wILD HysTERIcaL sHRIEks. PERHaps º sHOULD  HaVE  DEsIsTED aND  cO¸E  back IN  aN HOUR OR ¸ORE. µO  DOUbT  IT wOULD  HaVE  bEEN bETTER. BUT º HaVE sEEN aT LEasT TwO cHILDREN LyINg DEaD IN bED Of NEgLEcT  IN sUcH casEs, aND fEELINg THaT º ¸UsT gET a DIagNOsIs NOw OR NEVER º wENT aT IT  agaIN. BUT THE wORsT Of IT was THaT º TOO HaD gOT bEyOND REasON. º cOULD HaVE 

TORN THE cHILD apaRT IN ¸y OwN fURy aND ENjOyED IT. ºT was a pLEasURE TO aTTack  HER. My facE was bURNINg wITH IT.

35

NEcEssITy.  AND  aLL THEsE  THINgs  aRE TRUE.  BUT a  bLIND  fURy, a  fEELINg  Of aDULT  sHa¸E, bRED  Of a LONgINg  fOR ¸UscULaR RELEasE  aRE THE OpERaTIVEs. ±NE gOEs  ON TO THE END. ºN a fiNaL UNREasONINg assaULT º OVERpOwERED THE cHILD’s NEck aND jaws.  º  fORcED THE HEaVy sILVER spOON back Of HER TEETH aND DOwN HER THROaT TILL sHE  gaggED.  AND  THERE  IT  was—bOTH  TONsILs  cOVERED  wITH  ¸E¸bRaNE.  SHE  HaD  fOUgHT  VaLIaNTLy TO kEEp ¸E  fRO¸ kNOwINg  HER sEcRET. SHE HaD  bEEN HIDINg  THaT  sORE  THROaT fOR THREE  Days aT LEasT aND  LyINg TO  HER paRENTs  IN  ORDER TO  EscapE jUsT sUcH aN OUTcO¸E as THIs. µOw  TRULy  sHE  was fURIOUs.  SHE  HaD  bEEN  ON  THE  DEfENsIVE  bEfORE  bUT  NOw sHE aTTackED. ¹RIED TO gET Off HER faTHER’s Lap aND fly aT ¸E wHILE TEaRs Of  DEfEaT bLINDED HER EyEs.

e c r o F   f o  e s U   e h T

°E Da¸NED LITTLE bRaT ¸UsT bE pROTEcTED agaINsT HER OwN IDIOcy, ONE says  TO  ONE’s sELf aT sUcH TI¸Es. ±THERs ¸UsT bE pROTEcTED agaINsT HER. ºT Is sOcIaL 

SundAy  D±Alogue CONV±RSATIONS  b±Tw±±N  ¸OcTOR  ANd ³ATI±NT Rebecca Dresser

The Letter to the editor: °E OLD Days Of ¸EDIcaL paTERNaLIs¸ aRE gONE. ¹ODay wE HaVE sHaRED DEcIsION  ¸akINg,  IN  wHIcH DOcTORs  DEscRIbE TREaT¸ENT  OpTIONs  aND  paTIENTs  cHOOsE  THE ONE THEy pREfER. ºT sOUNDs sI¸pLE, bUT IT’s NOT. º LEaRNED THIs wHEN º HaD TO DEcIDE wHETHER  TO HaVE a fEEDINg TUbE DURINg caNcER TREaT¸ENT. ¶OcTORs ExpLaINED THE TUbE’s  bENEfiTs aND RIsks, THEN LEſt IT TO ¸E TO DEcIDE. º saID NO. º HaD ¸y REasONs—º  DIDN’T waNT a fOREIgN ObjEcT IN ¸y bODy OR aN OVERNIgHT sTay IN THE HOspITaL.  º waNTED TO pROVE THaT º was TOUgH ENOUgH TO gET THROUgH TREaT¸ENT wITHOUT  ExTRa HELp. BUT THIs was a  baD DEcIsION. As TI¸E passED,  º bEca¸E TOO wEak TO cONTINUE  DaILy  RaDIaTION  sEssIONs.  PEOpLE  kEpT  TRyINg TO  gET  ¸E  TO  cHaNgE  ¸y  ¸IND, aND  fiNaLLy  a  NURsE sUccEEDED.  CONsENTINg  TO THE  TUbE  was THE  RIgHT  THINg TO DO, bUT IT TOOk a LOT Of pERsUasION fOR ¸E TO accEpT THaT. ARgU¸ENT  Is  a  LEgITI¸aTE  paRT  Of  sHaRED  DEcIsION  ¸akINg,  bUT  NOT  EVERyONE  UNDERsTaNDs THIs. SO¸E cLINIcIaNs THINk THaT  REspEcT fOR aUTONO¸y  ¸EaNs  THEy  sHOULD  NEVER  DIsagREE  wITH  a  paTIENT.  SO¸E  THINk  THaT  IT  wOULD  bE  cRUEL  TO  qUEsTION wHaT  a sERIOUsLy  ILL  pERsON  says sHE  waNTs.  SO¸E  DON’T  waNT  TO  DEVOTE  TI¸E TO  THE HaRD  cONVERsaTIONs  THaT  pRODUcE  gOOD DEcIsIONs. PaTIENTs aVOID aRgU¸ENTs, TOO. MaNy aRE TOO INTI¸IDaTED TO TakE IssUE wITH  aNyTHINg a DOcTOR says. BUT DOcTORs aREN’T aLways RIgHT, aND paTIENTs wHO aRE 

³EbEcca ¶REssER,  “SUNDay ¶IaLOgUE: CONVERsaTIONs bETwEEN ¶OcTOR aND PaTIENT” (²ETTER TO THE  ´DITOR), fRO¸ New York Times , AUgUsT 25, 2012. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of THE aUTHOR.

afRaID TO aRgUE caN pay THE pRIcE. A fRIEND HaD HIs caNcER pROpERLy DIagNOsED  ONLy aſtER HE cHaLLENgED HIs DOcTORs’ OpINIONs abOUT wHaT was wRONg.

37

aND DOcTORs sHOULD DO THE sa¸E fOR ONE aNOTHER.

Rebecca Dresser ¼t. loui¼, ¾uÇ. 21, 2012

°E wRITER Is a pROfEssOR Of Law aND ¸EDIcaL HU¸aNITIEs aT WasHINgTON ·NIVERsITy  aND THE EDITOR Of Malignant: Medical Ethicists Confront Cancer.

Readers  React Ms. ¶REssER aDVOcaTEs HaVINg paTIENTs TakE a ¸ORE acTIVE ROLE IN qUEsTIONINg  aND  aRgUINg  wITH pHysIcIaNs  TO HELp THE  paTIENTs THINk  THROUgH  THE  cONsEqUENcEs Of THEIR cHOIcEs. AN aLTERNaTIVE bUT ¸ORE aTTRacTIVE appROacH wOULD bE TO sHIſt ¸ORE REspONsIbILITy  back ON  THE pHysIcIaN, wHO Is bETTER EqUIppED TO  ¸aNagE ¸EDIcaL  DEcIsION ¸akINg  THaN DIsTRaUgHT aND  LEss kNOwLEDgEabLE paTIENTs. °Is  caN  bE DONE wITHOUT paTERNaLIs¸. SOcIETy accEpTs ExpERT OpINION. WE aLLOw OUR LawyERs, accOUNTaNTs, DEcORaTORs, aND pLU¸bERs TO TELL Us wHaT TO DO basED ON ExpERTIsE THaT THEy HaVE,  aND THaT wE DO NOT. WHy sHOULDN’T THIs bE TRUE fOR pHysIcIaNs? ±N cONTROVERsIaL IssUEs, sUcH as TREaT¸ENTs fOR bREasT OR pROsTaTE caNcER, THE  pHysIcIaN sHOULD INfOR¸ THE paTIENT Of THE VaRIOUs OpTIONs aND pROVIDE paTIENT-  spEcIfic ExpERT OpINION. CO¸pLETE NEUTRaLITy DOEsN’T wORk, as paTIENTs wILL wIND  Up askINg DOcTORs wHaT THEy wOULD DO If THEIR RELaTIVE HaD THE cONDITION. WHEN THE cHOIcE Is NOT cLEaR bEcaUsE Of cONflIcTINg ¸EDIcaL EVIDENcE OR a Lack  Of IT, THE DOcTOR caN bE HELpfUL by pROVIDINg THE paTIENT wITH wELL-wRITTEN, EasILy  UNDERsTaNDabLE DIscUssIONs Of THE IssUE, LEaVINg THE cHOIcE Up TO THE paTIENT.

Edward R. Burns eXe»utive de¾n  ¾l½ert ein¼tein »olleÇe oÀ medi»ine  ½ronX, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

º a¸ a sEcOND-yEaR ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT aND a CROHN’s DIsEasE paTIENT. BEfORE  sTaRTINg  ¸EDIcaL  scHOOL  º  aLways  jUsT  assU¸ED  THaT  ¸y  DOcTORs  kNEw 

e u g o l a i D  yadnuS

ºN EVERyDay LIfE, aRgU¸ENTs wITH fa¸ILy aND fRIENDs HELp Us THINk THROUgH  THE cONsEqUENcEs Of OUR cHOIcEs aND sO¸ETI¸Es cHaNgE OUR ¸INDs. PaTIENTs 

wHaT  was  bEsT  fOR  ¸E.  º’VE  cO¸E  TO  REaLIzE  THaT THE  ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION 

38

Is faLLIbLE. CROHN’s IN a paTHOLOgy TExTbOOk Is  NOT THE sa¸E as THE CROHN’s º’VE sEEN 

resserD  accebeR

IN  cLINIc  OfficEs, aND  IT’s aLsO NOT  THE sa¸E as wHaT º’VE ExpERIENcED ¸ysELf.  WHILE  wE’RE TaUgHT TO REcOgNIzE THaT EVERy  paTIENT Is  UNIqUE, wHaT wE LEaRN  Is LaRgELy basED ON sTUDIEs Of LaRgE pOpULaTIONs aND DaTa fRO¸ THE LabORaTORy. ¹O bE E¸pOwERED as a paTIENT, yOU REaLLy NEED TO ExpREss wHaT yOUR spEcIfic NEEDs aRE. ¶OcTORs caN gIVE THEIR INfOR¸ED OpINION aND ¸IgHT bE LEgaLLy  aND  ETHIcaLLy HELD REspONsIbLE fOR yOUR sTaNDaRD Of caRE, bUT ULTI¸aTELy IT Is  yOUR OwN HEaLTH aND wELL-bEINg.

R. Jacobowitz v¾lh¾ll¾, nÈ, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

º DIffER wITH bOTH THE DIagNOsIs aND THE cURE. °E Days Of ¸EDIcaL paTERNaLIs¸ aRE faR fRO¸ OVER, aND aRgU¸ENT wORks ONLy wHEN bOTH sIDEs aRE EqUaLLy  EqUIppED.  BUT  IN  THE  wORLD  Of  ¸EDIcINE,  paTIENTs  aRE  a¸aTEURs  wHO  ¸UsT  NEgOTIaTE a scaRy fOREIgN TERRaIN. SO IT’s NO wONDER THaT wE LaTcH ONTO paRENTaL figUREs, fOLLOw bLINDLy wHaTEVER  THEy say, aND  THEN LEaRN, TOO LaTE, THaT THERE wERE a  LOT Of qUEsTIONs wE  sHOULD HaVE askED. As a  ¸aLpRacTIcE aTTORNEy, º OſtEN ¸EET  paTIENTs wHO wIsH THaT THEy HaD  askED ¸ORE qUEsTIONs aND ENgagED IN a DEEpER cONVERsaTION bEfORE agREEINg  TO  THE pROpOsED  TREaT¸ENT. ARgU¸ENT,  THOUgH,  Is  THE wRONg  appROacH. AN  aDULT cONVERsaTION Is NEEDED. JUsT fOR  sTaRTERs: ±N  THE pROVIDER  sIDE: “ÁERE aRE  THE kEy facTs: THE pROs,  THE cONs, THE OpTIONs, THE UNkNOwNs (aLways pLENTIfUL), ¸y OwN bIasEs.” ±N  THE paTIENT sIDE: “ÁERE’s  wHaT scaREs ¸E, aND HERE’s  wHaT ¸y bODy Is  TELLINg  ¸E THaT º’¸ NOT sURE yOU’VE appREcIaTED.”

Patrick Malone ɾ¼hinÇton, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

°E wRITER Is THE aUTHOR Of °e Life You Save: Nine Steps to Finding the Best Medical 

Care—and Avoiding the Worst.

±NE Of THE ¸OsT DIfficULT cHaLLENgEs THaT pHysIcIaNs facE Is aLLOwINg paTIENTs  TO ¸akE wHaT appEaR  TO bE UNwIsE DEcIsIONs—EVEN DEcIsIONs THaT  ¸ay LEaD  TO INcREasED sUffERINg OR pRE¸aTURE DEaTH. °E REasON wE DO THIs Is bEcaUsE 

wE REcOgNIzE THaT THE paTIENT Is ULTI¸aTELy THE bEsT jUDgE Of HER OwN pERsONaL 

39

VaLUEs aND gOaLs.

DO If º fOUND ¸ysELf sTaNDINg IN THEIR sHOEs OR If THEy wERE ¸y OwN RELaTIVE. AT  THE sa¸E TI¸E,  IT  Is  ExTRE¸ELy I¸pORTaNT TO  kEEp IN  ¸IND  THE HIgHLy  UNEqUaL  pOwER  DyNa¸Ic THaT  ExIsTs  bETwEEN pHysIcIaNs  aND  THEIR  paTIENTs.  MaNy paTIENTs aRE EasILy INflUENcED by THE ExpERTIsE Of DOcTORs aND fEaR THaT  REjEcTINg THEIR pHysIcIaN’s aDVIcE wILL LEaD TO LOwER-qUaLITy caRE. SO wHILE  gENTLE  pERsUasION ¸ay  aT  TI¸Es bE appROpRIaTE,  THE  ROLE Of  THE  cLINIcIaN  ¸UsT bE pRINcIpaLLy  TO  INfOR¸ RaTHER THaN  TO INflUENcE.  °ERE Is  a  wORLD Of DIffERENcE bETwEEN HELpINg THE paTIENT figURE OUT wHaT sHE waNTs TO  DO aND pERsUaDINg THE paTIENT TO DO wHaT yOU waNT HER TO DO.

Jacob M. Appel neÉ ÈorÊ, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

°E wRITER Is a psycHIaTRIsT aND ¸EDIcaL ETHIcIsT aT MOUNT SINaI ÁOspITaL.

°E DOcTOR-paTIENT DIaLOgUE Is THE kEy TO sUccEss. ARgU¸ENTs OVER bEsT ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcEs ¸ay NOT bE as sI¸pLE as Ms. ¶REssER DEscRIbEs, pRI¸aRILy bEcaUsE  ONLy ONE paRTy IN THE aRgU¸ENT (THE DOcTOR) Has aT LEasT a DEcaDE Of ¸EDIcaL  EDUcaTION. BUT THE OTHER paRTy (THE paTIENT) caN LEVEL THE pLayINg fiELD by bETTER aRTIcULaTINg THE gOaLs Of TREaT¸ENT. “WILL  THIs  ¸akE  ¸E  fEEL  bETTER?”  Is  aN  I¸pORTaNT  qUEsTION,  bUT  “WILL  THIs aLLOw ¸E TO agaIN bE THE pERsON º waNT TO bE?” Is a bETTER qUEsTION wHEN  facINg a TREaT¸ENT DEcIsION. °E DIaLOgUE THaT wILL ENsUE, abOUT LIfEsTyLE, HObbIEs,  INTEREsTs,  aND  THE  REasONs fOR  NEEDINg TO  gET  HEaLTHIER,  wILL  yIELD bETTER  HEaLTH OUTcO¸Es, HappIER paTIENTs aND ¸ORE sUccEssfUL DOcTORs.

Seth Ginsberg u¿¿er nȾ»Ê, nÈ, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

°E wRITER Is pREsIDENT Of THE GLObaL ÁEaLTHy ²IVINg  FOUNDaTION, a paTIENT aDVOcacy  ORgaNIzaTION.

°E  sTaTUs  Of  THE  pHysIcIaN  Has  sHIſtED  fRO¸ REVERED  ExpERT  TO  HIRED cONsULTaNT.  PHysIcIaNs aRE NO LONgER LOOkED UpON  as THE fiNaL  wORD IN ¸EDIcaL  DEcIsIONs. °E REasONs fOR THIs cHaNgE aRE TwOfOLD.

e u g o l a i D  yadnuS

°aT DOEs NOT ¸EaN THaT DOcTORs sHOULD REfUsE TO OffER REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs OR  pERsONaL pERspEcTIVEs TO paTIENTs. ºf askED, º aLways TELL ¸y paTIENTs wHaT º wOULD 

FIRsT, paTIENTs  HaVE EasILy  aVaILabLE  INfOR¸aTION  fRO¸ THE  ºNTERNET,  aND 

40

cONsEqUENTLy THEy  aRE  ¸UcH  bETTER INfOR¸ED abOUT  THEIR HEaLTH THaN  THEy  wERE  30 yEaRs  agO.  SEcOND,  ¸EDIcINE  Has bEcO¸E  a cO¸¸ODITy sUbjEcT TO 

resserD  accebeR

bEINg  pRIcED  aND REgULaTED  LIkE aNy  OTHER  cO¸¸ODITy.  °E  paTIENT,  as THE  cONsU¸ER Of HEaLTH caRE, acTs LIkE THE cONsU¸ER Of aNy pRODUcT aND cHOOsEs  basED  ON  aVaILabILITy,  pRIcE, INsURaNcE  cOVERagE,  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs,  aND  REpUTaTION. WHETHER  THIs  sHIſt  pROVEs  aDVaNTagEOUs  fOR  THE  HEaLTH  Of  OUR  paTIENTs,  ONLy TI¸E wILL TELL.

Paul W. Adams Christina Frohock oXÀord, Àl, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

¶R. ADa¸s Is a RaDIaTION ONcOLOgIsT. Ms. FROHOck Is a LEcTURER aT THE ·NIVERsITy Of  MIa¸I ScHOOL Of ²aw.

YEs, ¸EDIcaL paTERNaLIs¸ Has bEEN REpLacED by sHaRED DEcIsION-¸akINg, aND  paTIENTs aRE UsUaLLy askED TO cHOOsE a¸ONg OpTIONs pREsENTED by THEIR pHysIcIaNs. AND yEs, sO¸E cLINIcIaNs aRE sO INflUENcED by THE cONcEpT Of paTIENT  aUTONO¸y  THaT  THEy  HEsITaTE  TO  pREss  THEIR  OwN  jUDg¸ENT  aND  wILL  aLLOw  paTIENTs TO DETER¸INE EVERy DEcIsION wITHOUT cHaLLENgE. ¹OO  OſtEN,  HOwEVER,  THE  REVERsE  Is  TRUE. µOTwITHsTaNDINg  THE  DEcLINE  Of  ¸EDIcaL paTERNaLIs¸, sO¸E paTIENTs sTILL TEND TO DEfER TO ¸EDIcaL OpINION aND  accEpT  TREaT¸ENTs THaT THEy wOULD pREfER TO aVOID.  ºN sUcH INsTaNcEs, IT ¸ay  bE HELpfUL TO UsE THE aNaLOgy Of cIVILIaN aUTHORITy OVER THE ¸ILITaRy. ±NcE THE  gENERaLs  HaVE  pROpOsED  THEIR  sTRaTEgIc  pLaNs,  IT  Is  cIVILIaN  gOVERN¸ENT  THaT  ¸UsT  wEIgH  THE  fiNaL  ObjEcTIVEs  aND  DEcIDE ON  THE ULTI¸aTE  sTRaTEgy  (THINk  ¶OUgLas MacARTHUR aND ÁaRRy S. ¹RU¸aN). ºN ¸EDIcaL  DEcIsION ¸akINg, THE  paTIENT sHOULD  sEE HERsELf as  THE ULTI¸aTE  aUTHORITy—payINg cLOsE  aTTENTION TO  pROfEssIONaL aDVIcE  bUT HaVINg  THE sELf-cONfiDENcE TO ExERcIsE HER aUTHORITy aND say yEs OR NO. SUcH a cONcEpT  wILL  ¸akE IT  EasIER fOR  paTIENTs  TO  ENTER  INTO a cONsTRUcTIVE  DIaLOgUE  wITH THEIR pHysIcIaNs.

Peter Rogatz ¿ort É¾¼hinÇton, nÈ, ¾uÇ. 22, 2012

°E wRITER, a DOcTOR, Is VIcE pREsIDENT Of CO¸passION aND CHOIcEs Of µEw YORk,  wHIcH OffERs cOUNsELINg ON END-Of-LIfE cHOIcEs.

The Writer Responds 41 THINg TO LEaRN fRO¸ THE OTHER. ¶OcTORs kNOw ¸EDIcINE, aND ExpERIENcED DOcTORs kNOw HOw pREVIOUs paTIENTs REspONDED TO DIffERENT TREaT¸ENT appROacHEs.  PaTIENTs  kNOw  THEIR  bODIEs,  THEIR  HIsTORIEs,  aND  wHaT  Is  ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT  TO  THE¸  as  INDIVIDUaLs.  ´xpERIENcED  paTIENTs  LIkE  Ms.  JacObOwITz  aLsO  kNOw  wHaT sTRaTEgIEs aRE ¸ORE OR LEss LIkELy TO wORk fOR THE¸. ºT TakEs TI¸E, IN-DEpTH cONVERsaTION aND—sO¸ETI¸Es—aRgU¸ENT fOR THE  NEcEssaRy LEaRNINg TO OccUR. By aRgU¸ENT, º ¸EaN THE ExpREssION Of DIffERENT  VIEws. ARgU¸ENT INVOLVEs gIVINg REasONs fOR ONE’s pOsITION aND THEN HEaRINg  wHaT OTHERs THINk abOUT THOsE REasONs. As ¶R. AppEL pOINTs OUT, paTIENTs HaVE THE fREEDO¸ TO ¸akE UNwIsE DEcIsIONs.  BUT  bEfORE  pUTTINg  THOsE  DEcIsIONs  INTO  EffEcT,  DOcTORs  sHOULD  ask  paTIENTs TO ExpLaIN THEIR cHOIcEs. As º  LEaRNED, UNwIsE  DEcIsIONs  sO¸ETI¸Es  REsT ON ¸IsUNDERsTaNDINg  OR  sHORTsIgHTEDNEss.  º  wOULDN’T  HaVE  LEaRNED  THIs  If  ¸y  DOcTORs,  NURsEs,  aND  fa¸ILy HaDN’T OpENLy aND pERsIsTENTLy qUEsTIONED ¸y TREaT¸ENT REfUsaL. °ERE  aRE  aLsO  TI¸Es  wHEN  paTIENTs  sHOULD  cHaLLENgE  DOcTORs.  º  wIsH  º  HaD  cHaLLENgED  THE  DOcTOR wHO  DIs¸IssED  ¸y  sy¸pTO¸s  aND  DELayED  ¸y  caNcER DIagNOsIs. As sEVERaL LETTER wRITERs ObsERVE, RELaTIVELy fEw paTIENTs aRE  cONfiDENT  ENOUgH  TO  DO  THIs.  BUT  wHaT  MR.  GINsbERg  caLLs  “DOcTOR-paTIENT  DIaLOgUE”  aND wHaT MR. MaLONE caLLs “aDULT cONVERsaTION” OſtEN INVOLVE THE  gIVE-aND-TakE THaT cHaRacTERIzEs cONsTRUcTIVE aRgU¸ENT. µONE Of THIs Is Easy. PaTIENTs aRE facINg sO¸E Of THE ¸OsT DIfficULT DEcIsIONs  THEy  wILL  EVER ¸akE.  ¶OcTORs  aRE facINg  fRIgHTENED  pEOpLE wHO  NEED  LOTs  Of  sUppORT, bUT aLsO cONTROL OVER THEIR ¸EDIcaL caRE. AcTIVE ENgagE¸ENT, NOT passIVITy, Is THE bEsT way TO pROcEED IN THEsE UNwELcO¸E, UNsETTLINg cIRcU¸sTaNcEs.

Rebecca Dresser ¼t. loui¼, ¾uÇ. 23, 2012

e u g o l a i D  yadnuS

WHEN  paTIENTs aND DOcTORs  DIscUss TREaT¸ENT aLTERNaTIVEs, EacH Has sO¸E-

WhAT The  DocToR  SA±d Raymond Carver

ÁE saID IT DOEsN’T LOOk gOOD HE saID IT LOOks baD IN facT REaL baD HE saID º cOUNTED THIRTy-TwO Of THE¸ ON ONE LUNg bEfORE º qUIT cOUNTINg THE¸ º saID º’¸ gLaD º wOULDN’T waNT TO kNOw abOUT aNy ¸ORE bEINg THERE THaN THaT HE saID aRE yOU a RELIgIOUs ¸aN DO yOU kNEEL DOwN IN fOREsT gROVEs aND LET yOURsELf ask fOR HELp wHEN yOU cO¸E TO a waTERfaLL ¸IsT bLOwINg agaINsT yOUR facE aND aR¸s DO yOU sTOp aND ask fOR UNDERsTaNDINg aT THOsE ¸O¸ENTs º saID NOT yET bUT º INTEND TO sTaRT TODay HE saID º’¸ REaL sORRy HE saID º wIsH º HaD sO¸E OTHER kIND Of NEws TO gIVE yOU º saID A¸EN aND HE saID sO¸ETHINg ELsE º DIDN’T caTcH aND NOT kNOwINg wHaT ELsE TO DO aND NOT waNTINg HI¸ TO HaVE TO REpEaT IT aND ¸E TO HaVE TO fULLy DIgEsT IT º jUsT LOOkED aT HI¸ fOR a ¸INUTE aND HE LOOkED back IT was THEN º jU¸pED Up aND sHOOk HaNDs wITH THIs ¸aN wHO’D jUsT gIVEN ¸E sO¸ETHINg NO ONE ELsE ON EaRTH HaD EVER gIVEN ¸E º ¸ay EVEN HaVE THaNkED HI¸ HabIT bEINg sO sTRONg

³ay¸OND  CaRVER,  “WHaT  THE  ¶OcTOR  SaID,”  fRO¸  A  New  Path  to  the  Waterfall,  by  ³ay¸OND  CaRVER.  ©  1989 by  THE  ´sTaTE  Of  ³ay¸OND CaRVER. ·sED  by  pER¸IssION Of  GROVE/ATLaNTIc, ºNc.  ANy THIRD-paRTy UsE Of  THIs ¸aTERIaL, OUTsIDE Of  THIs pUbLIcaTION, Is pROHIbITED.  ALsO fRO¸ All of 

Us: °e Collected Poems, by ³ay¸OND CaRVER. PUbLIsHED by ÁaRVILL PREss. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of °E ³aNDO¸ ÁOUsE GROUp ²I¸ITED. © 1996.

pRoFeSSionaliSM  and The  culTuRe oF Medicine

II

This page intentionally left blank

´he LeARn±ng  CuRVe Atul Gawande

°E paTIENT NEEDED a cENTRaL LINE. “ÁERE’s yOUR cHaNcE,” S., THE cHIEf REsIDENT,  saID. º HaD NEVER DONE ONE bEfORE. “GET sET Up aND THEN pagE ¸E wHEN yOU’RE  REaDy TO sTaRT.” ºT was ¸y fOURTH wEEk IN sURgIcaL TRaININg. °E pOckETs Of ¸y sHORT wHITE  cOaT  bULgED  wITH  paTIENT  pRINTOUTs,  La¸INaTED  caRDs  wITH  INsTRUcTIONs  fOR  DOINg  »¿r aND  REaDINg  eÊÇs aND  UsINg  THE DIcTaTION  sysTE¸,  TwO  sURgIcaL  HaNDbOOks, a sTETHOscOpE, wOUND-DREssINg sUppLIEs, ¸EaL TIckETs, a pENLIgHT,  scIssORs, aND abOUT a DOLLaR IN LOOsE cHaNgE. As º HEaDED Up THE sTaIRs TO THE  paTIENT’s flOOR, º RaTTLED. °Is  wILL  bE  gOOD, º  TRIED  TO  TELL  ¸ysELf:  ¸y  fiRsT  REaL  pROcEDURE.  °E  paTIENT—fiſtyIsH,  sTOUT,  TacITURN—was  REcOVERINg  fRO¸ abDO¸INaL  sURgERy  HE’D HaD abOUT a wEEk EaRLIER. ÁIs bOwEL fUNcTION HaDN’T yET RETURNED, aND HE  was  UNabLE TO EaT. º ExpLaINED TO HI¸  THaT HE  NEEDED INTRaVENOUs NUTRITION  aND THaT THIs REqUIRED a “spEcIaL LINE” THaT wOULD gO INTO HIs cHEsT. º saID THaT  º wOULD pUT THE LINE IN HI¸ wHILE HE was IN HIs bED, aND THaT IT wOULD INVOLVE  ¸y NU¸bINg a spOT ON HIs cHEsT wITH a LOcaL aNEsTHETIc, aND THEN THREaDINg  THE LINE IN. º DID NOT say THaT THE LINE was EIgHT INcHEs LONg aND wOULD gO INTO  HIs VENa caVa, THE ¸aIN bLOOD VEssEL TO HIs HEaRT. µOR DID º say HOw TRIcky THE  pROcEDURE cOULD bE. °ERE wERE “sLIgHT RIsks” INVOLVED, º saID, sUcH as bLEEDINg aND LUNg cOLLapsE; IN ExpERIENcED HaNDs, cO¸pLIcaTIONs Of THIs sORT OccUR  IN fEwER THaN ONE casE IN a HUNDRED. BUT,  Of  cOURsE,  ¸INE  wERE  NOT  ExpERIENcED  HaNDs.  AND  THE  DIsasTERs  º  kNEw abOUT wEIgHED ON ¸y ¸IND: THE wO¸aN wHO HaD DIED wITHIN ¸INUTEs  fRO¸  ¸assIVE  bLEEDINg  wHEN  a  REsIDENT  LacERaTED  HER  VENa  caVa;  THE  ¸aN  wHOsE cHEsT  HaD  TO bE OpENED  bEcaUsE a  REsIDENT LOsT  HOLD Of a  wIRE INsIDE  THE LINE, wHIcH THEN flOaTED DOwN TO THE paTIENT’s HEaRT; THE ¸aN wHO HaD a  caRDIac aRREsT wHEN THE pROcEDURE pUT HI¸ INTO VENTRIcULaR fibRILLaTION. º saID 

ATUL GawaNDE, “°E ²EaRNINg CURVE,” fRO¸ THE New Yorker , JaNUaRy 28, 2002, 52–61. © 2002 by  CONDé µasT PUbLIcaTIONs.  ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of THE aUTHOR.

NOTHINg  Of sUcH  THINgs, NaTURaLLy, wHEN  º askED THE paTIENT’s pER¸IssION TO 

46

DO HIs LINE. ÁE saID, “±K.” º HaD sEEN S. DO TwO cENTRaL LINEs; ONE was THE Day bEfORE, aND º’D aTTENDED 

ednawaG   l u t A

TO EVERy sTEp. º waTcHED HOw sHE sET OUT HER INsTRU¸ENTs aND LaID HER paTIENT  DOwN aND pUT a ROLLED TOwEL bETwEEN HIs sHOULDER bLaDEs TO ¸akE  HIs cHEsT  aRcH OUT. º waTcHED HOw sHE swabbED HIs cHEsT wITH aNTIsEpTIc, INjEcTED LIDOcaINE, wHIcH Is a LOcaL aNEsTHETIc, aND THEN, IN fULL sTERILE gaRb, pUNcTURED HIs  cHEsT  NEaR HIs cLaVIcLE wITH a faT THREE-INcH NEEDLE ON a syRINgE. °E paTIENT  HaDN’T  EVEN flINcHED. SHE  TOLD ¸E  HOw TO aVOID  HITTINg THE  LUNg (“GO IN  aT  a  sTEEp  aNgLE,”  sHE’D saID.  “STay  right UNDER THE  cLaVIcLE”), aND  HOw  TO  fiND  THE  sUbcLaVIaN VEIN,  a  bRaNcH TO  THE VENa caVa  LyINg aTOp  THE LUNg  NEaR ITs  apEx (“GO IN aT a sTEEp aNgLE. STay right UNDER THE cLaVIcLE”). SHE pUsHED THE  NEEDLE IN aL¸OsT aLL THE way. SHE DREw back ON THE syRINgE. AND sHE was IN.  YOU kNEw  bEcaUsE THE syRINgE  fiLLED wITH ¸aROON  bLOOD. (“ºf IT’s bRIgHT  RED,  yOU’VE HIT  aN aRTERy,” sHE saID.  “°aT’s NOT  gOOD.”) ±NcE yOU HaVE  THE TIp  Of  THIs NEEDLE pOkINg IN THE VEIN, yOU sO¸EHOw HaVE TO wIDEN THE HOLE IN  THE  VEIN waLL, fiT THE caTHETER IN, aND sNakE IT IN THE RIgHT DIREcTION—DOwN TO THE  HEaRT, RaTHER THaN Up TO THE bRaIN—aLL wITHOUT TEaRINg THROUgH VEssELs, LUNg,  OR aNyTHINg ELsE. ¹O  DO  THIs,  S.  ExpLaINED,  yOU  sTaRT by  gETTINg  a  gUIDE  wIRE  IN  pLacE. SHE  pULLED THE syRINgE Off, LEaVINg THE NEEDLE IN. BLOOD flOwED OUT. SHE pIckED Up  a  TwO-fOOT-LONg  TwENTy-gaUgE wIRE  THaT  LOOkED LIkE  THE  sTEEL  ¶  sTRINg  Of  aN  ELEcTRIc gUITaR, aND passED NEaRLy ITs fULL LENgTH THROUgH THE NEEDLE’s bORE, INTO  THE  VEIN,  aND ONwaRD  TOwaRD THE  VENa  caVa. “µEVER fORcE  IT IN,”  sHE waRNED,  “aND NEVER, EVER LET gO Of  IT.” A sTRINg Of RapID HEaRTbEaTs fiRED Off ON THE  caRDIac ¸ONITOR, aND sHE qUIckLy pULLED THE wIRE back aN INcH. ºT HaD pOkED INTO  THE HEaRT, caUsINg ¸O¸ENTaRy fibRILLaTION. “GUEss wE’RE IN THE RIgHT pLacE,” sHE  saID TO ¸E qUIETLy. °EN TO THE paTIENT: “YOU’RE DOINg gREaT. ±NLy a fEw ¸INUTEs  NOw.”  SHE pULLED THE NEEDLE OUT  OVER THE wIRE  aND REpLacED  IT wITH a bULLET Of  THIck, sTIff pLasTIc, wHIcH sHE  pUsHED IN TIgHT TO wIDEN  THE VEIN OpENINg.  SHE  THEN RE¸OVED  THIs DILaTOR aND THREaDED THE cENTRaL  LINE—a spagHETTI-THIck,  flExIbLE  yELLOw  pLasTIc  TUbE—OVER THE  wIRE UNTIL  IT  was  aLL  THE way  IN. µOw  sHE  cOULD RE¸OVE THE wIRE. SHE flUsHED  THE  LINE wITH a  HEpaRIN sOLUTION aND  sUTURED IT TO THE paTIENT’s cHEsT. AND THaT was IT. ¹ODay, IT  was  ¸y  TURN  TO TRy.  FIRsT, º  HaD  TO  gaTHER  sUppLIEs—a cENTRaL-  LINE  kIT, gLOVEs, gOwN, cap,  ¸ask, LIDOcaINE—wHIcH TOOk ¸E  fOREVER. WHEN  º  fiNaLLy HaD  THE sTUff  TOgETHER,  º sTOppED  fOR a  ¸INUTE  OUTsIDE THE  paTIENT’s  DOOR,  TRyINg  TO  REcaLL  THE  sTEps.  °Ey  RE¸aINED  fRUsTRaTINgLy  Hazy.  BUT  º  cOULDN’T pUT IT Off aNy LONgER. º HaD a pagE-LONg LIsT Of OTHER THINgs TO gET DONE: 

MRs. A  NEEDED  TO  bE  DIscHaRgED;  MR.  B  NEEDED  aN  abDO¸INaL  ULTRasOUND  aRRaNgED; MRs. C NEEDED HER skIN sTapLEs RE¸OVED. AND  EVERy fiſtEEN ¸IN-

47

NEEDED  TO bE sEEN;  MIss Y’s fa¸ILy was HERE  aND NEEDED  “sO¸EONE” TO TaLk  TO THE¸; MR. Z NEEDED a LaxaTIVE. º TOOk a DEEp bREaTH, pUT ON ¸y bEsT DON’T-  wORRy-º-kNOw-wHaT-º’¸-DOINg LOOk, aND wENT IN. º pLacED  THE sUppLIEs  ON a  bEDsIDE  TabLE, UNTIED  THE paTIENT’s gOwN,  aND  LaID  HI¸  DOwN  flaT  ON  THE  ¸aTTREss, wITH  HIs  cHEsT baRE  aND  HIs  aR¸s  aT  HIs  sIDEs. º flIppED ON a flUOREscENT OVERHEaD LIgHT aND RaIsED HIs bED TO ¸y  HEIgHT. º pagED S. º pUT ON ¸y gOwN aND gLOVEs aND, ON a sTERILE TRay, LaID OUT  THE cENTRaL LINE, THE gUIDE wIRE, aND OTHER ¸aTERIaLs fRO¸ THE kIT. º DREw Up  fiVE  cc’s  Of LIDOcaINE  IN  a  syRINgE,  sOakED  TwO  spONgE  sTIcks  IN  THE  yELLOw-  bROwN BETaDINE, aND OpENED Up THE sUTURE packagINg. S. aRRIVED. “WHaT’s HIs pLaTELET cOUNT?” My  sTO¸acH  kNOTTED. º  HaDN’T  cHEckED. °aT  was  baD:  TOO  LOw  aND HE  cOULD  HaVE  a  sERIOUs  bLEED fRO¸  THE pROcEDURE.  SHE  wENT  TO cHEck  a  cO¸pUTER. °E cOUNT was accEpTabLE. CHasTENED, º sTaRTED swabbINg HIs cHEsT  wITH THE spONgE sTIcks.  “GOT THE  sHOULDER ROLL UNDERNEaTH HI¸?” S. askED. WELL, NO, º HaD fORgOTTEN THaT, TOO.  °E  paTIENT gaVE ¸E a  LOOk. S., sayINg NOTHINg, gOT a TOwEL, ROLLED IT Up, aND  sLIppED IT UNDER HIs back fOR ¸E. º fiNIsHED appLyINg THE aNTIsEpTIc aND  THEN  DRapED  HI¸ sO THaT ONLy  HIs RIgHT UppER cHEsT  was ExpOsED. ÁE  sqUIR¸ED a  bIT bENEaTH THE DRapEs. S. NOw INspEcTED ¸y TRay. º gIRDED ¸ysELf. “WHERE’s THE ExTRa syRINgE fOR flUsHINg THE LINE wHEN IT’s  IN?” ¶a¸N. SHE  wENT OUT aND gOT IT. º  fELT  fOR  ¸y  LaND¸aRks.  Here ?  º  askED  wITH  ¸y  EyEs, NOT  waNTINg  TO  UNDER¸INE THE paTIENT’s cONfiDENcE aNy fURTHER. SHE  NODDED. º NU¸bED THE  spOT  wITH LIDOcaINE.  (“YOU’LL fEEL a  sTIck  aND a  bURN  NOw, sIR.”) µExT,  º TOOk  THE  THREE-INcH  NEEDLE  IN  HaND  aND  pOkED  IT  THROUgH  THE  skIN.  º  aDVaNcED  IT  sLOwLy  aND UNcERTaINLy, a fEw  ¸ILLI¸ETREs aT a  TI¸E. °Is  Is a  bIg gODDa¸  NEEDLE,  º  kEpT  THINkINg.  º  cOULDN’T  bELIEVE  º  was  sTIckINg  IT  INTO  sO¸EONE’s  cHEsT. º cONcENTRaTED ON ¸aINTaININg a  sTEEp aNgLE Of ENTRy, bUT kEpT spEaRINg HIs cLaVIcLE INsTEaD Of sLIppINg bENEaTH IT. “±w!” HE sHOUTED. “SORRy,”  º  saID.  S.  sIgNaLLED  wITH  a  kIND  Of  sURfiNg  HaND  gEsTURE  TO  gO  UNDERNEaTH  THE cLaVIcLE.  °Is  TI¸E,  IT  wENT  IN. º  DREw back  ON THE  syRINgE.  µOTHINg. SHE pOINTED DEEpER. º wENT IN DEEpER. µOTHINg. º wITHDREw THE NEEDLE, flUsHED OUT sO¸E bITs Of TIssUE cLOggINg IT, aND TRIED agaIN.

“Ow!”

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

UTEs  OR  sO  º  was  gETTINg  pagED wITH  ¸ORE  Tasks:  MR. Å  was  NaUsEaTED  aND 

¹OO sTEEp agaIN. º fOUND ¸y way UNDERNEaTH THE cLaVIcLE ONcE ¸ORE. º DREw 

48

THE syRINgE back. STILL NOTHINg. ÁE’s TOO ObEsE, º THOUgHT. S. sLIppED ON gLOVEs  aND a gOwN. “ÁOw abOUT º HaVE a LOOk?” sHE saID. º HaNDED HER THE NEEDLE aND 

ednawaG   l u t A

sTEppED asIDE. SHE pLUNgED THE NEEDLE IN, DREw back ON THE syRINgE, aND, jUsT  LIkE THaT, sHE was IN. “WE’LL bE DONE sHORTLy,” sHE TOLD THE paTIENT. SHE LET ¸E cONTINUE wITH THE NExT sTEps, wHIcH º bU¸bLED THROUgH. º DIDN’T  REaLIzE HOw LONg aND flOppy THE gUIDE wIRE was UNTIL º pULLED THE cOIL OUT Of  ITs  pLasTIc  sLEEVE, aND,  pUTTINg ONE END Of  IT INTO THE  paTIENT, º  VERy NEaRLy  cONTa¸INaTED  THE OTHER.  º fORgOT abOUT THE DILaTINg sTEp UNTIL  sHE RE¸INDED  ¸E. °EN, wHEN º pUT IN THE DILaTOR, º DIDN’T pUsH qUITE HaRD ENOUgH, aND IT  was REaLLy S. wHO pUsHED IT aLL THE way IN. FINaLLy, wE gOT THE LINE IN, flUsHED  IT, aND sUTURED IT IN pLacE. ±UTsIDE THE ROO¸, S. saID THaT º cOULD bE LEss TENTaTIVE THE NExT TI¸E, bUT  THaT  º sHOULDN’T wORRy TOO ¸UcH abOUT HOw THINgs HaD gONE. “YOU’LL gET IT,”  sHE  saID.  “ºT jUsT  TakEs  pRacTIcE.”  º wasN’T  sO  sURE.  °E  pROcEDURE  RE¸aINED  wHOLLy  ¸ysTERIOUs TO  ¸E.  AND  º cOULD NOT  gET OVER  THE IDEa Of  jabbINg a  NEEDLE  INTO  sO¸EONE’s  cHEsT  sO  DEEpLy  aND  sO  bLINDLy.  º  awaITED  THE  Å-Ray  aſtERwaRD wITH TREpIDaTION. BUT IT ca¸E back fiNE: º HaD NOT INjURED THE LUNg  aND THE LINE was IN THE RIgHT pLacE. µOT EVERyONE appREcIaTEs THE aTTRacTIONs Of sURgERy. WHEN yOU aRE a ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT IN THE OpERaTINg ROO¸ fOR THE fiRsT TI¸E, aND yOU sEE THE sURgEON  pREss  THE  scaLpEL  TO  sO¸EONE’s  bODy  aND  OpEN  IT  LIkE  a  pIEcE  Of  fRUIT,  yOU  EITHER sHUDDER IN  HORROR  OR gapE IN awE.  º gapED. ºT  was NOT  jUsT  THE bLOOD  aND gUTs THaT ENTHRaLLED ¸E. ºT was aLsO THE IDEa THaT a pERsON, a ¸ERE ¸ORTaL,  wOULD HaVE THE cONfiDENcE TO wIELD THaT scaLpEL IN THE fiRsT pLacE. °ERE  Is  a  sayINg  abOUT  sURgEONs:  “SO¸ETI¸Es  wRONg;  NEVER  IN  DOUbT.”  °Is  Is  ¸EaNT as  a  REpROOf, bUT  TO  ¸E  IT  sEE¸ED  THEIR  sTRENgTH.  ´VERy  Day,  sURgEONs aRE facED wITH UNcERTaINTIEs. ºNfOR¸aTION Is INaDEqUaTE; THE scIENcE  Is a¸bIgUOUs; ONE’s kNOwLEDgE aND abILITIEs aRE NEVER pERfEcT. ´VEN wITH THE  sI¸pLEsT  OpERaTION,  IT  caNNOT bE  TakEN fOR  gRaNTED THaT  a  paTIENT wILL cO¸E  THROUgH bETTER Off—OR EVEN aLIVE. STaNDINg aT THE OpERaTINg TabLE, º wONDERED  HOw THE sURgEON kNEw THaT aLL THE sTEps wOULD gO as pLaNNED, THaT bLEEDINg  wOULD bE cONTROLLED aND INfEcTION wOULD NOT sET IN aND ORgaNs wOULD NOT bE  INjURED. ÁE DIDN’T, Of cOURsE. BUT HE cUT aNyway. ²aTER, wHILE sTILL a sTUDENT, º was aLLOwED TO ¸akE aN INcIsION ¸ysELf. °E  sURgEON DREw a sIx-INcH  DOTTED LINE wITH a  ¸aRkINg pEN  acROss aN aNEsTHETIzED paTIENT’s abDO¸EN aND THEN, TO ¸y sURpRIsE, HaD THE NURsE HaND ¸E THE  kNIfE. ºT was sTILL waR¸ fRO¸ THE aUTOcLaVE. °E sURgEON HaD ¸E sTRETcH THE skIN  TaUT wITH THE THU¸b aND fOREfiNgER Of ¸y fREE HaND. ÁE TOLD ¸E TO ¸akE ONE 

s¸OOTH sLIcE DOwN TO THE faT. º pUT THE bELLy Of THE bLaDE TO THE skIN aND cUT.  °E ExpERIENcE was ODD aND aDDIcTIVE, ¸IxINg ExHILaRaTION fRO¸ THE caLcU-

49

THaT IT was sO¸EHOw fOR THE pERsON’s gOOD. °ERE was aLsO THE sLIgHTLy NaUsEaTINg fEELINg Of fiNDINg THaT IT TOOk ¸ORE fORcE THaN º’D REaLIzED. (SkIN Is THIck  aND  spRINgy, aND ON ¸y fiRsT pass º DID NOT gO NEaRLy DEEp ENOUgH;  º HaD  TO  cUT TwIcE TO gET THROUgH.) °E ¸O¸ENT ¸aDE ¸E waNT TO bE a sURgEON—NOT  aN a¸aTEUR HaNDED THE kNIfE fOR a bRIEf ¸O¸ENT bUT sO¸EONE wITH THE cONfiDENcE aND abILITy TO pROcEED as If IT wERE ROUTINE. A  REsIDENT  bEgINs,  HOwEVER,  wITH  NONE  Of  THIs  aIR  Of  ¸asTERy—ONLy  aN  OVERpOwERINg  INsTINcT  agaINsT  DOINg  aNyTHINg LIkE  pREssINg  a  kNIfE  agaINsT  flEsH OR jabbINg a NEEDLE INTO sO¸EONE’s cHEsT. ±N ¸y fiRsT Day as a sURgIcaL  REsIDENT, º was assIgNED TO  THE E¸ERgENcy  ROO¸. A¸ONg ¸y fiRsT paTIENTs  was a skINNy, DaRk-HaIRED wO¸aN IN HER LaTE TwENTIEs wHO HObbLED IN, TEETH  gRITTED,  wITH a  TwO-fOOT-LONg wOODEN cHaIR  LEg sO¸EHOw NaILED TO THE bOTTO¸ Of HER fOOT.  SHE ExpLaINED THaT a  kITcHEN cHaIR HaD cOLLapsED UNDER HER  aND, as sHE LEapED Up TO kEEp fRO¸ faLLINg, HER baRE fOOT HaD sTO¸pED DOwN  ON a THREE-INcH scREw sTIckINg OUT Of ONE Of THE cHaIR LEgs. º TRIED VERy HaRD  TO  LOOk  LIkE  sO¸EONE  wHO HaD  NOT  gOT HIs  ¸EDIcaL  DIpLO¸a  jUsT  THE wEEk  bEfORE.  ºNsTEaD, º  was DETER¸INED  TO bE  NONcHaLaNT,  THE  kIND Of  gUy wHO  HaD sEEN THIs sORT Of THINg a HUNDRED TI¸Es bEfORE. º INspEcTED HER fOOT, aND  cOULD sEE THaT THE scREw was E¸bEDDED IN THE bONE aT THE basE Of HER bIg TOE.  °ERE was NO bLEEDINg aND, as faR as º cOULD fEEL, NO fRacTURE. “WOw, THaT ¸UsT HURT,” º bLURTED OUT, IDIOTIcaLLy. °E ObVIOUs THINg TO DO was gIVE HER a TETaNUs sHOT aND pULL OUT THE scREw.  º ORDERED THE TETaNUs sHOT, bUT º bEgaN TO HaVE DOUbTs abOUT pULLINg OUT THE  scREw.  SUppOsE  sHE  bLED?  ±R  sUppOsE  º  fRacTURED  HER  fOOT?  ±R  sO¸ETHINg  wORsE?  º  ExcUsED ¸ysELf  aND  TRackED  DOwN  ¶R. W.,  THE sENIOR  sURgEON  ON  DUTy. º fOUND HI¸ TENDINg TO a caR-cRasH VIcTI¸. °E paTIENT was a ¸Ess, aND  THE  flOOR was cOVERED  wITH bLOOD.  PEOpLE wERE sHOUTINg. ºT was  NOT a  gOOD  TI¸E TO ask qUEsTIONs. º  ORDERED  aN  Å-Ray.  º  figURED  IT  wOULD  bUy  TI¸E  aND  LET  ¸E  cHEck  ¸y  a¸aTEUR I¸pREssION THaT sHE DIDN’T HaVE a fRacTURE. SURE ENOUgH, gETTINg THE  Å-Ray TOOk abOUT aN HOUR, aND IT sHOwED NO fRacTURE—jUsT a cO¸¸ON scREw  E¸bEDDED, THE RaDIOLOgIsT saID, “IN THE HEaD Of THE fiRsT ¸ETaTaRsaL.” º sHOwED  THE paTIENT THE Å-Ray. “YOU sEE, THE scREw’s E¸bEDDED IN THE HEaD Of THE fiRsT  ¸ETaTaRsaL,” º saID. AND THE pLaN? sHE waNTED TO kNOw. AH, yEs, THE pLaN. º wENT  TO fiND  ¶R. W. ÁE  was  sTILL bUsy wITH THE cRasH  VIcTI¸, bUT º was  abLE  TO INTERRUpT  TO sHOw HI¸  THE Å-Ray. ÁE  cHUckLED aT THE sIgHT Of  IT aND 

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

LaTED VIOLENcE Of THE acT, aNxIETy abOUT gETTINg IT RIgHT, aND a RIgHTEOUs faITH 

askED  ¸E  wHaT  º  waNTED  TO DO.  “PULL THE  scREw  OUT?” º  VENTURED.  “YEs,” HE 

50

saID, by wHIcH HE ¸EaNT “¶UH.” ÁE ¸aDE sURE º’D gIVEN THE paTIENT a TETaNUs  sHOT aND THEN sHOOED ¸E away.

ednawaG   l u t A

Back IN THE Exa¸ININg  ROO¸, º TOLD HER THaT º wOULD  pULL THE scREw OUT,  pREpaRED fOR HER TO say sO¸ETHINg LIkE “YOU?” ºNsTEaD sHE saID, “±K, ¶OcTOR.”  AT fiRsT, º HaD HER sITTINg ON THE Exa¸ TabLE, DaNgLINg HER LEg Off THE sIDE. BUT  THaT  DIDN’T  LOOk  as  If  IT wOULD  wORk.  ´VENTUaLLy, º  HaD  HER LIE  wITH HER  fOOT  jUTTINg Off THE TabLE END, THE bOaRD pOkINg OUT INTO THE aIR. WITH EVERy ¸OVE,  HER  paIN  INcREasED. º  INjEcTED  a  LOcaL  aNEsTHETIc  wHERE  THE scREw  HaD  gONE  IN  aND  THaT  HELpED a  LITTLE.  µOw  º gRabbED HER fOOT  IN  ONE HaND, THE bOaRD  IN THE OTHER, aND fOR a ¸O¸ENT º fROzE. COULD º REaLLy DO THIs? WHO was º TO  pREsU¸E? FINaLLy, º gaVE  HER a  ONE-TwO-THREE aND pULLED, gINgERLy  aT fiRsT  aND THEN  HaRD. SHE gROaNED. °E scREw wasN’T bUDgINg. º TwIsTED, aND abRUpTLy IT ca¸E  fREE.  °ERE  was  NO  bLEEDINg. º  wasHED  THE  wOUND  OUT,  aND  sHE  fOUND  sHE  cOULD  waLk. º  waRNED HER Of THE RIsks Of INfEcTION aND THE sIgNs TO LOOk  fOR.  ÁER gRaTITUDE was I¸¸ENsE aND flaTTERINg, LIkE THE LION’s fOR THE ¸OUsE—aND  THaT NIgHT º wENT HO¸E ELaTED. ºN  sURgERy,  as  IN  aNyTHINg  ELsE,  skILL,  jUDg¸ENT,  aND  cONfiDENcE  aRE  LEaRNED  THROUgH  ExpERIENcE,  HaLTINgLy  aND  HU¸ILIaTINgLy.  ²IkE  THE  TENNIs  pLayER  aND THE ObOIsT  aND  THE gUy wHO fixEs  HaRD DRIVEs,  wE  NEED pRacTIcE  TO  gET  gOOD  aT  wHaT wE  DO.  °ERE Is  ONE DIffERENcE  IN ¸EDIcINE,  THOUgH:  wE pRacTIcE ON pEOpLE. My sEcOND TRy aT pLacINg a cENTRaL LINE wENT NO bETTER THaN THE fiRsT. °E  paTIENT  was  IN  INTENsIVE  caRE, ¸ORTaLLy  ILL,  ON  a  VENTILaTOR,  aND  NEEDED  THE  LINE sO THaT  pOwERfUL caRDIac DRUgs cOULD bE DELIVERED DIREcTLy  TO HER HEaRT.  SHE  was aLsO HEaVILy sEDaTED,  aND fOR THIs  º was gRaTEfUL. SHE’D  bE ObLIVIOUs  Of ¸y fU¸bLINg. My pREpaRaTION was bETTER THIs TI¸E. º gOT THE TOwEL ROLL IN pLacE aND  THE  syRINgEs Of HEpaRIN ON THE TRay. º cHEckED HER Lab REsULTs, wHIcH wERE fiNE. º  aLsO ¸aDE a pOINT Of DRapINg ¸ORE wIDELy, sO THaT If º flOppED THE gUIDE wIRE  aROUND by ¸IsTakE agaIN, IT wOULDN’T HIT aNyTHINg UNsTERILE. FOR aLL THaT,  THE pROcEDURE was  a  bUsT. º sTabbED  THE NEEDLE  IN TOO sHaLLOw  aND  THEN TOO DEEp.  FRUsTRaTION  OVERca¸E  TENTaTIVENEss aND º  TRIED ONE  aNgLE  aſtER  aNOTHER.  µOTHINg wORkED.  °EN,  fOR  ONE  bRIEf ¸O¸ENT,  º  gOT  a  flasH Of bLOOD IN THE syRINgE, INDIcaTINg THaT º was IN THE VEIN. º aNcHORED THE  NEEDLE wITH ONE HaND aND wENT TO pULL THE syRINgE Off wITH THE OTHER. BUT THE  syRINgE was ja¸¸ED ON TOO TIgHTLy, sO THaT wHEN º pULLED IT fREE º DIsLODgED  THE NEEDLE fRO¸ THE VEIN. °E paTIENT bEgaN bLEEDINg INTO HER cHEsT waLL. º HELD 

pREssURE THE bEsT º cOULD fOR a sOLID fiVE ¸INUTEs, bUT HER cHEsT TURNED bLack  aND  bLUE  aROUND  THE  sITE.  °E  HE¸aTO¸a  ¸aDE  IT  I¸pOssIbLE  TO  pUT  a  LINE 

51

REsIDENT  sUpERVIsINg  ¸E—a sEcOND-yEaR  THIs  TI¸E—was  DETER¸INED  THaT  º  sUccEED.  AſtER aN Å-Ray sHOwED THaT º HaD NOT  INjURED HER LUNg, HE  HaD ¸E  TRy ON THE OTHER sIDE, wITH a wHOLE NEw kIT. º ¸IssED agaIN, aND HE TOOk OVER.  ºT TOOk HI¸ sEVERaL ¸INUTEs aND  TwO OR THREE sTIcks TO fiND THE VEIN HI¸sELf  aND THaT ¸aDE ¸E fEEL bETTER. MaybE sHE was aN UNUsUaLLy TOUgH casE. WHEN º  faILED  wITH a  THIRD paTIENT  a  fEw  Days LaTER,  THOUgH,  THE  DOUbTs  REaLLy sET IN. AgaIN, IT was sTIck, sTIck, sTIck, aND NOTHINg. º sTEppED asIDE. °E  REsIDENT waTcHINg ¸E gOT IT ON THE NExT TRy. SURgEONs, as a gROUp,  aDHERE TO a cURIOUs EgaLITaRIaNIs¸. °Ey bELIEVE IN  pRacTIcE, NOT TaLENT. PEOpLE OſtEN assU¸E THaT yOU HaVE TO HaVE gREaT HaNDs TO  bEcO¸E  a sURgEON, bUT IT’s NOT TRUE. WHEN º INTERVIEwED TO gET INTO sURgERy  pROgRa¸s, NO ONE ¸aDE ¸E  sEw OR TakE a DExTERITy TEsT OR cHEckED TO sEE If  ¸y HaNDs wERE sTEaDy. YOU DO  NOT EVEN NEED aLL TEN fiNgERs TO bE accEpTED.  ¹O  bE sURE,  TaLENT HELps. PROfEssORs say THaT  EVERy TwO  OR THREE yEaRs THEy’LL  sEE sO¸EONE TRULy gIſtED cO¸E THROUgH a pROgRa¸—sO¸EONE wHO pIcks Up  cO¸pLEx ¸aNUaL skILLs UNUsUaLLy qUIckLy, sEEs TIssUE pLaNEs bEfORE OTHERs DO,  aNTIcIpaTEs  TROUbLE  bEfORE IT  HappENs.  µONETHELEss, aTTENDINg  sURgEONs  say  THaT wHaT’s ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT TO THE¸ Is fiNDINg pEOpLE wHO aRE cONscIENTIOUs,  INDUsTRIOUs, aND bONEHEaDED ENOUgH TO kEEp aT pRacTIcINg THIs ONE DIfficULT  THINg Day aND  NIgHT fOR  yEaRs ON END. As a  fOR¸ER  REsIDENcy DIREcTOR pUT IT  TO ¸E, gIVEN a cHOIcE bETwEEN a PH.¶. wHO HaD cLONED a gENE aND a scULpTOR,  HE’D pIck THE PH.¶. EVERy TI¸E. SURE, HE saID, HE’D bET ON THE scULpTOR’s bEINg  ¸ORE  pHysIcaLLy TaLENTED;  bUT HE’D  bET ON THE PH.¶.’s bEINg LEss “flaky.” AND  IN THE END THaT ¸aTTERs ¸ORE. SkILL, sURgEONs bELIEVE, caN bE TaUgHT; TENacITy  caNNOT.  ºT’s aN ODD appROacH TO REcRUIT¸ENT, bUT IT cONTINUEs aLL THE way Up  THE  RaNks, EVEN  IN  TOp sURgERy DEpaRT¸ENTs.  °Ey  sTaRT wITH  ¸INIONs  wITH  NO ExpERIENcE IN sURgERy, spEND yEaRs TRaININg THE¸, aND THEN TakE ¸ORE Of  THEIR facULTy fRO¸ THEsE sa¸E HO¸EgROwN RaNks. AND  IT wORks.  °ERE  HaVE NOw  bEEN ¸aNy  sTUDIEs Of éLITE pERfOR¸ERs—  cONcERT  VIOLINIsTs,  cHEss gRaND  ¸asTERs,  pROfEssIONaL IcE-skaTERs,  ¸aTHE¸aTIcIaNs,  aND  sO  fORTH—aND  THE bIggEsT  DIffERENcE  REsEaRcHERs  fiND  bETwEEN  THE¸  aND  LEssER  pERfOR¸ERs  Is  THE  a¸OUNT  Of  DELIbERaTE  pRacTIcE  THEy’VE  accU¸ULaTED. ºNDEED, THE ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT TaLENT ¸ay bE THE TaLENT fOR pRacTIcE ITsELf. K. ANDERs ´RIcssON, a cOgNITIVE psycHOLOgIsT aND aN ExpERT ON pERfOR¸aNcE, NOTEs THaT THE ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT ROLE THaT INNaTE facTORs pLay ¸ay bE  IN  a  pERsON’s  willingness TO  ENgagE IN  sUsTaINED  TRaININg.  ÁE Has  fOUND, fOR 

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

THROUgH  THERE aNy¸ORE. º waNTED TO gIVE  Up. BUT sHE NEEDED a  LINE aND  THE 

Exa¸pLE,  THaT  TOp  pERfOR¸ERs DIsLIkE  pRacTIcINg  jUsT  as ¸UcH  as  OTHERs  DO. 

52

(°aT’s wHy, fOR Exa¸pLE, aTHLETEs aND ¸UsIcIaNs UsUaLLy qUIT pRacTIcINg wHEN  THEy RETIRE.) BUT, ¸ORE THaN OTHERs, THEy HaVE THE wILL TO kEEp aT IT aNyway.

ednawaG   l u t A

º wasN’T sURE º DID. WHaT gOOD was  IT, º wONDERED, TO kEEp DOINg cENTRaL  LINEs wHEN º wasN’T cO¸INg cLOsE TO HITTINg THE¸? ºf º HaD a cLEaR IDEa Of wHaT  º was DOINg wRONg, THEN ¸aybE º’D HaVE sO¸ETHINg TO fOcUs ON. BUT º DIDN’T.  ´VERyONE,  Of  cOURsE,  HaD  sUggEsTIONs.  GO  IN  wITH  THE  bEVEL  Of  THE  NEEDLE  Up. µO, gO  IN wITH THE bEVEL DOwN. PUT a  bEND IN THE ¸IDDLE Of THE NEEDLE.  µO,  cURVE THE NEEDLE. FOR a wHILE, º TRIED TO aVOID  DOINg aNOTHER LINE. SOON  ENOUgH, HOwEVER, a NEw casE aROsE. °E cIRcU¸sTaNcEs wERE ¸IsERabLE. ºT was LaTE IN THE Day, aND º’D HaD TO wORk  THROUgH  THE  pREVIOUs  NIgHT.  °E  paTIENT  wEIgHED  ¸ORE  THaN  300  pOUNDs.  ÁE  cOULDN’T TOLERaTE LyINg flaT bEcaUsE THE wEIgHT Of HIs  cHEsT aND abDO¸EN  ¸aDE IT HaRD fOR HI¸ TO bREaTHE. YET HE HaD a baDLy INfEcTED wOUND, NEEDED  INTRaVENOUs aNTIbIOTIcs, aND NO ONE cOULD fiND VEINs IN HIs aR¸s fOR a pERIpHERaL  iv. º HaD  LITTLE HOpE Of sUccEEDINg.  BUT a  REsIDENT DOEs  wHaT HE  Is TOLD,  aND º was TOLD TO TRy THE LINE. º wENT  TO HIs  ROO¸.  ÁE  LOOkED scaRED aND  saID  HE DIDN’T  THINk  HE’D LasT  ¸ORE THaN a ¸INUTE ON HIs back. BUT HE saID HE UNDERsTOOD THE sITUaTION aND  was wILLINg TO ¸akE HIs bEsT EffORT. ÁE aND º DEcIDED THaT HE’D bE LEſt sITTINg  pROppED  Up IN  bED UNTIL  THE LasT  pOssIbLE  ¸INUTE. WE’D  sEE  HOw faR  wE  gOT  aſtER THaT. º wENT THROUgH ¸y pREpaRaTIONs: cHEckINg HIs bLOOD cOUNTs fRO¸ THE Lab,  pUTTINg OUT THE kIT, pLacINg THE TOwEL ROLL, aND sO ON. º swabbED  aND DRapED  HIs cHEsT wHILE HE was sTILL sITTINg Up. S., THE cHIEf REsIDENT, was waTcHINg ¸E  THIs TI¸E, aND wHEN EVERyTHINg was REaDy º HaD HER TIp HI¸ back, aN OxygEN  ¸ask ON  HIs facE. ÁIs flEsH ROLLED Up  HIs cHEsT LIkE a  waVE. º cOULDN’T fiND HIs  cLaVIcLE  wITH  ¸y fiNgERTIps  TO  LINE Up  THE  RIgHT pOINT  Of ENTRy.  AND aLREaDy  HE was LOOkINg sHORT Of bREaTH, HIs facE RED. º gaVE S. a “¶O yOU waNT TO TakE  OVER?” LOOk. KEEp gOINg, sHE sIgNaLLED. º ¸aDE a ROUgH gUEss abOUT wHERE THE  RIgHT spOT was, NU¸bED IT wITH  LIDOcaINE, aND pUsHED THE bIg NEEDLE IN. FOR  a  sEcOND, º THOUgHT IT wOULDN’T bE LONg ENOUgH  TO REacH THROUgH, bUT  THEN º  fELT THE TIp sLIp UNDERNEaTH HIs cLaVIcLE. º pUsHED a LITTLE DEEpER aND DREw back  ON THE syRINgE. ·NbELIEVabLy, IT fiLLED wITH bLOOD. º was IN. º cONcENTRaTED ON  aNcHORINg  THE NEEDLE fiR¸Ly  IN pLacE, NOT ¸OVINg IT a  ¸ILLI¸ETRE as º pULLED  THE syRINgE Off aND THREaDED THE gUIDE wIRE IN. °E wIRE fED IN s¸OOTHLy. °E  paTIENT was sTRUggLINg HaRD fOR aIR NOw. WE saT HI¸ Up aND LET HI¸ caTcH HIs  bREaTH.  AND  THEN,  LayINg HI¸  DOwN ONE  ¸ORE TI¸E,  º  gOT THE ENTRy  DILaTED  aND sLID THE cENTRaL LINE IN. “µIcE jOb” was aLL S. saID, aND THEN sHE LEſt.

º sTILL HaVE NO IDEa wHaT º  DID DIffERENTLy THaT  Day. BUT fRO¸ THEN ON ¸y  LINEs wENT IN. °aT’s THE fUNNy THINg abOUT pRacTIcE. FOR Days aND  Days, yOU 

53

THINg wHOLE. CONscIOUs LEaRNINg bEcO¸Es UNcONscIOUs kNOwLEDgE, aND yOU  caNNOT say pREcIsELy HOw. º HaVE NOw pUT IN ¸ORE THaN a  HUNDRED cENTRaL LINEs.  º a¸ by NO ¸EaNs  INfaLLIbLE. CERTaINLy, º HaVE HaD ¸y faIR sHaRE Of cO¸pLIcaTIONs. º pUNcTURED a  paTIENT’s LUNg, fOR Exa¸pLE—THE RIgHT LUNg Of a cHIEf Of sURgERy fRO¸ aNOTHER  HOspITaL,  NO  LEss—aND,  gIVEN  THE  ODDs,  º’¸  sURE  sUcH  THINgs  wILL  HappEN  agaIN.  º sTILL  HaVE  THE  OccasIONaL  casE THaT  sHOULD  gO  EasILy bUT  DOEsN’T,  NO  ¸aTTER  wHaT º DO. (WE HaVE  a TER¸ fOR THIs. “ÁOw’D IT gO?” a  cOLLEagUE asks.  “ºT was a TOTaL flOg,” º REpLy. º DON’T HaVE TO say aNyTHINg ¸ORE.) BUT OTHER TI¸Es EVERyTHINg UNfOLDs EffORTLEssLy. YOU TakE THE NEEDLE.  YOU  sTIck THE cHEsT. YOU fEEL THE NEEDLE TRaVEL—a DIsTINcT gLIDE THROUgH THE faT, a  sLIgHT caTcH IN THE DENsE ¸UscLE, THEN THE sUbTLE pOp THROUgH THE VEIN waLL—  aND yOU’RE IN. AT sUcH ¸O¸ENTs, IT Is ¸ORE THaN Easy; IT Is bEaUTIfUL. SURgIcaL  TRaININg  Is  THE  REcapITULaTION  Of  THIs  pROcEss—flOUNDERINg  fOLLOwED  by  fRag¸ENTs  fOLLOwED  by  kNOwLEDgE  aND,  OccasIONaLLy,  a  ¸O¸ENT  Of  ELEgaNcE—OVER aND  OVER  agaIN,  fOR  EVER  HaRDER  Tasks  wITH  EVER  gREaTER  RIsks. AT fiRsT, yOU wORk ON THE basIcs: HOw TO gLOVE aND gOwN, HOw TO DRapE  paTIENTs,  HOw TO HOLD THE kNIfE, HOw TO TIE a  sqUaRE kNOT IN a  LENgTH Of sILk  sUTURE  (NOT  TO  ¸ENTION  HOw TO  DIcTaTE,  wORk  THE  cO¸pUTERs,  ORDER DRUgs).  BUT THEN THE Tasks  bEcO¸E ¸ORE DaUNTINg: HOw TO cUT THROUgH skIN, HaNDLE  THE ELEcTROcaUTERy, OpEN THE bREasT, TIE Off a bLEEDER, ExcIsE a TU¸OR, cLOsE Up  a  wOUND. AT THE END Of sIx ¸ONTHs, º HaD DONE LINEs, LU¸pEcTO¸IEs, appENDEcTO¸IEs,  skIN gRaſts, HERNIa REpaIRs, aND  ¸asTEcTO¸IEs. AT THE  END Of  a  yEaR, º was DOINg LI¸b a¸pUTaTIONs, HE¸ORRHOIDEcTO¸IEs, aND LapaROscOpIc  gaLLbLaDDER OpERaTIONs. AT  THE END Of TwO  yEaRs, º was  bEgINNINg  TO DO TRacHEOTO¸IEs, s¸aLL-bOwEL OpERaTIONs, aND LEg aRTERy bypassEs. º a¸ IN ¸y sEVENTH yEaR Of TRaININg, Of wHIcH THREE yEaRs HaVE bEEN spENT  DOINg REsEaRcH. ±NLy NOw Has a sI¸pLE sLIcE THROUgH skIN bEgUN TO sEE¸ LIkE  THE ¸ERE sTaRT Of a casE. °EsE Days, º’¸ TRyINg TO LEaRN HOw TO fix aN abDO¸INaL  aORTIc  aNEURys¸,  RE¸OVE  a  paNcREaTIc  caNcER,  OpEN  bLOckED  caROTID  aRTERIEs. º a¸, º HaVE fOUND, NEITHER gIſtED NOR ¸aLaDROIT. WITH pRacTIcE aND  ¸ORE pRacTIcE, º gET THE HaNg Of IT. ¶OcTORs fiND  IT  HaRD TO TaLk  abOUT  THIs wITH  paTIENTs.  °E ¸ORaL bURDEN  Of pRacTIcINg ON pEOpLE Is aLways wITH Us, bUT fOR THE ¸OsT paRT IT Is UNspOkEN.  BEfORE EacH OpERaTION, º  gO OVER TO THE HOLDINg  aREa IN ¸y scRUbs aND  INTRODUcE ¸ysELf TO THE paTIENT. º DO  IT THE sa¸E way EVERy  TI¸E “ÁELLO, º’¸ 

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

¸akE OUT ONLy THE fRag¸ENTs Of wHaT TO DO. AND THEN ONE Day yOU’VE gOT THE 

¶R.  GawaNDE.  º’¸  ONE  Of  THE  sURgIcaL  REsIDENTs,  aND  º’LL  bE  assIsTINg  yOUR 

54

sURgEON.” °aT Is pRETTy ¸UcH aLL º say ON THE sUbjEcT. º ExTEND ¸y HaND aND  s¸ILE.  º ask  THE paTIENT If  EVERyTHINg  Is  gOINg ±K  sO faR. WE  cHaT.  º aNswER 

ednawaG   l u t A

qUEsTIONs. ÂERy OccasIONaLLy, paTIENTs aRE TakEN aback. “µO REsIDENT Is DOINg  ¸y sURgERy,” THEy say.  º TRy TO  bE REassURINg. “µOT  TO wORRy—º jUsT  assIsT,” º  say. “°E aTTENDINg sURgEON Is aLways IN cHaRgE.” µONE Of  THIs  Is  ExacTLy a  LIE.  °E  aTTENDINg  is IN  cHaRgE,  aND  a  REsIDENT  kNOws  bETTER  THaN  TO  fORgET THaT.  CONsIDER  THE  OpERaTION º  DID  REcENTLy TO  RE¸OVE  a  sEVENTy-fiVE-yEaR-OLD wO¸aN’s cOLON  caNcER. °E aTTENDINg sTOOD  acROss fRO¸ ¸E  fRO¸ THE sTaRT. AND  IT was  HE, NOT º,  wHO DEcIDED wHERE TO  cUT,  HOw  TO  pOsITION  THE  OpENED  abDO¸EN, HOw  TO  IsOLaTE  THE  caNcER, aND  HOw ¸UcH cOLON TO TakE. YET º’¸ THE ONE wHO HELD THE kNIfE. º’¸ THE ONE wHO sTOOD ON THE OpERaTOR’s sIDE Of THE TabLE, aND IT was RaIsED TO ¸y sIx-fOOT-pLUs HEIgHT. º was THERE TO  HELp, yEs, bUT º was THERE TO pRacTIcE, TOO. °Is was  cLEaR wHEN IT ca¸E TI¸E  TO  REcONNEcT  THE cOLON. °ERE  aRE TwO  ways Of  pUTTINg THE ENDs TOgETHER—  HaNDsEwINg  aND  sTapLINg.  STapLINg  Is  swIſtER  aND  EasIER,  bUT  THE  aTTENDINg  sUggEsTED º HaNDsEw THE ENDs—NOT bEcaUsE IT was bETTER fOR THE paTIENT bUT  bEcaUsE º HaD HaD ¸UcH LEss ExpERIENcE DOINg IT. WHEN IT’s pERfOR¸ED cORREcTLy,  THE  REsULTs aRE  sI¸ILaR,  bUT  HE  NEEDED  TO  waTcH  ¸E  LIkE  a  Hawk.  My  sTITcHINg  was  sLOw  aND  I¸pREcIsE.  AT  ONE  pOINT,  HE  caUgHT  ¸E  pUTTINg  THE  sTITcHEs TOO faR apaRT aND ¸aDE ¸E gO back aND pUT ExTRas IN bETwEEN sO THE  cONNEcTION wOULD NOT LEak. AT aNOTHER pOINT, HE fOUND º wasN’T TakINg DEEp  ENOUgH bITEs Of TIssUE wITH THE NEEDLE TO INsURE a sTRONg cLOsURE. “¹URN yOUR  wRIsT ¸ORE,” HE TOLD ¸E. “²IkE THIs?” º askED. “·H, sORT Of,” HE saID. ºN ¸EDIcINE, THERE Has LONg bEEN a cONflIcT bETwEEN THE I¸pERaTIVE TO gIVE  paTIENTs THE bEsT pOssIbLE caRE  aND THE NEED TO pROVIDE NOVIcEs wITH ExpERIENcE.  ³EsIDENcIEs aTTE¸pT  TO  ¸ITIgaTE pOTENTIaL  HaR¸  THROUgH  sUpERVIsION  aND gRaDUaTED REspONsIbILITy. AND THERE Is REasON TO THINk THaT paTIENTs acTUaLLy  bENEfiT  fRO¸  TEacHINg.  STUDIEs  cO¸¸ONLy fiND  THaT  TEacHINg HOspITaLs  HaVE  bETTER OUTcO¸Es  THaN  NONTEacHINg  HOspITaLs.  ³EsIDENTs  ¸ay  bE  a¸aTEURs,  bUT HaVINg  THE¸ aROUND cHEckINg  ON paTIENTs,  askINg  qUEsTIONs, aND  kEEpINg  facULTy  ON  THEIR  TOEs  sEE¸s  TO  HELp.  BUT  THERE  Is  sTILL  NO  aVOIDINg  THOsE fiRsT fEw UNsTEaDy TI¸Es a yOUNg pHysIcIaN TRIEs TO pUT IN a cENTRaL LINE,  RE¸OVE  a  bREasT caNcER, OR sEw  TOgETHER TwO  sEg¸ENTs Of  cOLON. µO ¸aTTER  HOw ¸aNy pROTEcTIONs aRE IN pLacE, ON aVERagE THEsE casEs  gO LEss wELL wITH  THE NOVIcE THaN wITH sO¸EONE ExpERIENcED. ¶OcTORs HaVE NO ILLUsIONs abOUT THIs. WHEN aN aTTENDINg pHysIcIaN bRINgs  a sIck fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER IN fOR sURgERy, pEOpLE aT THE HOspITaL THINk TwIcE abOUT 

LETTINg TRaINEEs paRTIcIpaTE. ´VEN wHEN THE aTTENDINg INsIsTs THaT THEy paRTIcIpaTE as UsUaL, THE REsIDENTs scRUbbINg IN kNOw THaT IT wILL bE faR fRO¸ a TEacH-

55

gOINg TO DO IT. CONVERsELy, THE waRD sERVIcEs aND cLINIcs wHERE REsIDENTs HaVE  THE ¸OsT REspONsIbILITy aRE pOpULaTED by THE pOOR, THE UNINsURED, THE DRUNk,  aND  THE DE¸ENTED.  ³EsIDENTs  HaVE  fEw  OppORTUNITIEs  NOwaDays TO  OpERaTE  INDEpENDENTLy, wITHOUT THE aTTENDINg DOcs scRUbbED IN, bUT wHEN wE DO—as  wE  ¸UsT bEfORE gRaDUaTINg aND gOINg OUT TO OpERaTE ON OUR OwN—IT Is gENERaLLy wITH THEsE, THE HU¸bLEsT Of paTIENTs. AND THIs  Is  THE UNcO¸fORTabLE  TRUTH abOUT TEacHINg.  By  TRaDITIONaL ETHIcs  aND pUbLIc  INsIsTENcE (NOT  TO ¸ENTION cOURT RULINgs),  a paTIENT’s  RIgHT TO  THE bEsT caRE pOssIbLE ¸UsT TRU¸p THE ObjEcTIVE Of TRaININg NOVIcEs. WE waNT  pERfEcTION wITHOUT  pRacTIcE. YET EVERyONE Is  HaR¸ED If  NO ONE Is  TRaINED fOR  THE fUTURE.  SO LEaRNINg  Is HIDDEN, bEHIND DRapEs aND  aNEsTHEsIa aND  THE ELIsIONs Of LaNgUagE. AND THE DILE¸¸a DOEsN’T appLy jUsT TO REsIDENTs, pHysIcIaNs  IN TRaININg. °E pROcEss Of LEaRNINg gOEs ON LONgER THaN ¸OsT pEOpLE kNOw. º gREw Up IN THE s¸aLL AppaLacHIaN TOwN Of ATHENs, ±HIO, wHERE ¸y paRENTs  aRE bOTH DOcTORs. My ¸OTHER Is a  pEDIaTRIcIaN aND ¸y faTHER Is a UROLOgIsT. ²ONg agO, ¸y ¸OTHER cHOsE TO pRacTIcE paRT TI¸E, wHIcH sHE cOULD affORD  TO  DO  bEcaUsE  ¸y  faTHER’s  pRacTIcE  bEca¸E  sO  bUsy  aND  sUccEssfUL.  ÁE  Has  NOw bEEN aT IT fOR ¸ORE THaN TwENTy-fiVE yEaRs, aND HIs OfficE Is cLUTTERED wITH  THE EVIDENcE Of THIs. °ERE Is aN OVERflOwINg waLL  Of ¸EDIcaL fiLEs, gIſts fRO¸  paTIENTs DIspLayED EVERywHERE (bOOks, cERa¸Ics wITH BIbLIcaL sayINgs, HaND-  paINTED  papERwEIgHTs,  bLOwN gLass,  caRVED  bOxEs,  a  figURINE  Of  a  bOy  wHO,  wHEN  yOU pULL DOwN HIs paNTs, pEEs ON yOU),  aND, IN aN acRyLIc casE bEHIND  HIs Oak DEsk, a fEw DOzEN Of THE THOUsaNDs Of kIDNEy sTONEs HE Has RE¸OVED. ±NLy NOw,  as  º gET  gLI¸psEs Of  THE END  Of  ¸y TRaININg,  HaVE  º  bEgUN TO  THINk HaRD abOUT ¸y faTHER’s sUccEss. FOR ¸OsT Of ¸y REsIDENcy, º THOUgHT Of  sURgERy as a ¸ORE OR LEss fixED bODy Of kNOwLEDgE aND skILL wHIcH Is acqUIRED  IN  TRaININg  aND  pERfEcTED  IN  pRacTIcE.  °ERE  was,  º  THOUgHT,  a  s¸OOTH,  UpwaRD-sLOpINg aRc Of pROficIENcy aT sO¸E RaREfiED sET Of Tasks (fOR ¸E, TakINg OUT gaLLbLaDDERs, cOLON caNcERs, bULLETs, aND appENDIxEs; fOR HI¸, TakINg  OUT kIDNEy sTONEs, TEsTIcULaR caNcERs, aND swOLLEN pROsTaTEs). °E aRc wOULD  pEak  aT, say, TEN OR fiſtEEN yEaRs, pLaTEaU fOR a LONg TI¸E, aND pERHaps TaIL Off  a  LITTLE IN  THE  fiNaL  fiVE yEaRs  bEfORE RETIRE¸ENT. °E  REaLITy,  HOwEVER, TURNs  OUT  TO bE  faR ¸EssIER. YOU  DO gET  gOOD aT cERTaIN THINgs,  ¸y faTHER TELLs ¸E,  bUT NO sOONER DO  yOU ¸asTER sO¸ETHINg THaN yOU fiND THaT wHaT yOU kNOw  Is  OUT¸ODED. µEw TEcHNOLOgIEs aND OpERaTIONs E¸ERgE TO sUppLaNT THE OLD,  aND  THE  LEaRNINg cURVE  sTaRTs  aLL  OVER  agaIN.  “°REE-qUaRTERs  Of  wHaT  º  DO 

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

INg  casE.  AND  If  a  cENTRaL LINE  ¸UsT bE  pUT  IN, a  fiRsT-TI¸ER  Is  cERTaINLy NOT 

TODay  º NEVER LEaRNED  IN REsIDENcy,” HE says.  ±N HIs OwN, fiſty ¸ILEs fRO¸ 

56

HIs  NEaREsT  cOLLEagUE—LET aLONE  a  DOcTOR wHO  cOULD  TELL  HI¸  aNyTHINg LIkE  “YOU  NEED TO  TURN  yOUR wRIsT  ¸ORE”—HE Has  HaD  TO LEaRN  TO  pUT  IN  pENILE 

ednawaG   l u t A

pROsTHEsEs,  TO  pERfOR¸ ¸IcROsURgERy,  TO REVERsE  VasEcTO¸IEs,  TO DO  NERVE-  spaRINg  pROsTaTEcTO¸IEs,  TO  I¸pLaNT  aRTIficIaL  URINaRy  spHINcTERs.  ÁE’s  HaD  TO  LEaRN  TO  UsE sHOck-waVE LITHOTRIpTERs,  ELEcTROHyDRaULIc LITHOTRIpTERs, aND  LasER LITHOTRIpTERs (aLL INsTRU¸ENTs fOR bREakINg Up kIDNEy sTONEs); TO DEpLOy  ¶OUbLE  J  URETERaL  sTENTs  aND  SILIcONE  FIgURE  FOUR  COIL  sTENTs  aND  ³ETRO-  ºNjEcT  MULTI-²ENgTH  sTENTs  (DON’T  EVEN  ask);  aND  TO  ¸aNEUVER  fibER-OpTIc  URETEROscOpEs. ALL THEsE TEcHNOLOgIEs aND TEcHNIqUEs wERE INTRODUcED aſtER  HE  fiNIsHED TRaININg. SO¸E Of THE pROcEDUREs  bUILT ON skILLs HE aLREaDy  HaD.  MaNy DID NOT. °Is Is THE ExpERIENcE THaT aLL sURgEONs HaVE. °E pacE Of ¸EDIcaL INNOVaTION  Has  bEEN UNcEasINg, aND sURgEONs  HaVE NO cHOIcE bUT TO gIVE THE NEw THINg a  TRy. ¹O faIL TO aDOpT NEw TEcHNIqUEs wOULD ¸EaN DENyINg paTIENTs ¸EaNINgfUL  ¸EDIcaL  aDVaNcEs.  YET THE pERILs  Of THE LEaRNINg cURVE  aRE INEscapabLE—NO  LEss IN pRacTIcE THaN IN REsIDENcy. FOR THE EsTabLIsHED sURgEON, INEVITabLy, THE OppORTUNITIEs fOR LEaRNINg aRE  faR  LEss  sTRUcTURED  THaN  fOR  a  REsIDENT.  WHEN  aN I¸pORTaNT  NEw  DEVIcE  OR  pROcEDURE  cO¸Es  aLONg,  as  HappENs  EVERy  yEaR,  sURgEONs  sTaRT by  TakINg  a  cOURsE abOUT IT—TypIcaLLy a Day OR TwO Of LEcTUREs by sO¸E sURgIcaL gRaNDEEs  wITH a  fEw fiL¸  cLIps aND  sTEp-by-sTEp HaNDOUTs.  YOU TakE HO¸E a  VIDEO TO  waTcH.  PERHaps  yOU  pay  a  VIsIT  TO  ObsERVE  a  cOLLEagUE  pERfOR¸ THE  OpERaTION—¸y faTHER OſtEN gOEs Up TO THE CLEVELaND CLINIc fOR THIs. BUT THERE’s NOT  ¸UcH by way Of HaNDs-ON TRaININg. ·NLIkE a REsIDENT, a VIsITOR caNNOT scRUb  IN ON casEs, aND OppORTUNITIEs TO pRacTIcE ON aNI¸aLs OR caDaVERs aRE fEw aND  faR  bETwEEN. (BRITaIN, bEINg BRITaIN, acTUaLLy baNs sURgEONs fRO¸ pRacTIcINg  ON aNI¸aLs.) WHEN THE pULsE-DyE LasER ca¸E OUT, THE ¸aNUfacTURER sET Up a  Lab IN COLU¸bUs wHERE UROLOgIsTs fRO¸ THE aREa cOULD  gaIN ExpERIENcE. BUT  wHEN  ¸y  faTHER  wENT  THERE THE  ¸aIN  ExpERIENcE  pROVIDED was  DEsTROyINg  kIDNEy sTONEs  IN TEsT TUbEs  fiLLED wITH a  URINELIkE LIqUID  aND TRyINg TO  pENETRaTE THE sHELL Of aN Egg wITHOUT HITTINg THE ¸E¸bRaNE UNDERNEaTH. My sURgERy  DEpaRT¸ENT  REcENTLy bOUgHT a  RObOTIc sURgERy  DEVIcE—a  sTaggERINgLy  sOpHIsTIcaTED $980,000 RObOT wITH THREE aR¸s, TwO wRIsTs, aND a ca¸ERa, aLL  ¸ILLI¸ETREs IN DIa¸ETER, wHIcH, cONTROLLED fRO¸ a cONsOLE, aLLOws a sURgEON  TO  DO  aL¸OsT  aNy  OpERaTION  wITH NO  HaND  TRE¸OR aND  wITH  ONLy  TINy  INcIsIONs. A TEa¸ Of TwO sURgEONs aND TwO NURsEs flEw OUT TO THE ¸aNUfacTURER’s  HEaDqUaRTERs, IN MOUNTaIN ÂIEw, CaLIfORNIa, fOR a fULL Day Of TRaININg ON THE  ¸acHINE.  AND  THEy  DID  gET TO  pRacTIcE  ON a  pIg aND  ON a  HU¸aN  caDaVER. 

(°E cO¸paNy appaRENTLy bUys THE caDaVERs fRO¸ THE cITy Of SaN FRaNcIscO.)  BUT  EVEN THIs was  HaRDLy THOROUgH TRaININg.  °Ey  LEaRNED ENOUgH TO gRasp 

57

UNDERsTaND HOw TO pLaN aN OpERaTION. °aT was abOUT IT. SOONER OR LaTER, yOU  jUsT HaVE TO gO HO¸E aND gIVE THE THINg a TRy ON sO¸EONE. PaTIENTs  DO  EVENTUaLLy  bENEfiT—OſtEN  ENOR¸OUsLy—bUT  THE  fiRsT  fEw  paTIENTs ¸ay NOT, aND ¸ay EVEN bE HaR¸ED. CONsIDER THE ExpERIENcE REpORTED  by THE pEDIaTRIc caRDIac-sURgERy UNIT Of THE RENOwNED GREaT ±R¸OND STREET  ÁOspITaL, IN ²ONDON, as DETaILED IN THE British Medical Journal LasT ApRIL. °E  DOcTORs DEscRIbED THEIR REsULTs fRO¸ 325 cONsEcUTIVE OpERaTIONs bETwEEN 1978  aND  1998 ON babIEs wITH  a sEVERE  HEaRT DEfEcT  kNOwN as TRaNspOsITION Of  THE  gREaT aRTERIEs.  SUcH cHILDREN aRE bORN wITH THEIR HEaRT’s OUTflOw VEssELs TRaNspOsED: THE aORTa E¸ERgEs fRO¸ THE RIgHT sIDE Of THE HEaRT INsTEaD Of THE LEſt aND  THE  aRTERy TO THE LUNgs E¸ERgEs fRO¸ THE  LEſt INsTEaD Of THE  RIgHT. As a  REsULT,  bLOOD cO¸INg  IN Is  pU¸pED RIgHT  back OUT TO THE bODy INsTEaD Of fiRsT TO THE  LUNgs, wHERE IT caN bE OxygENaTED. °E babIEs DIED bLUE, faTIgUED, NEVER kNOwINg wHaT IT was TO gET ENOUgH bREaTH. FOR yEaRs, IT wasN’T TEcHNIcaLLy fEasIbLE TO  swITcH  THE VEssELs TO THEIR pROpER pOsITIONs. ºNsTEaD, sURgEONs DID sO¸ETHINg  kNOwN  as  THE  SENNINg  pROcEDURE:  THEy  cREaTED  a  passagE  INsIDE  THE  HEaRT  TO  LET  bLOOD  fRO¸  THE  LUNgs  cROss  backwaRD  TO  THE  RIgHT  HEaRT.  °E  SENNINg pROcEDURE aLLOwED cHILDREN TO LIVE INTO aDULTHOOD. °E wEakER RIgHT  HEaRT,  HOwEVER,  caNNOT  sUsTaIN THE  bODy’s  ENTIRE bLOOD flOw  as  LONg  as  THE  LEſt.  ´VENTUaLLy, THEsE paTIENTs’ HEaRTs  faILED, aND aLTHOUgH  ¸OsT sURVIVED  TO  aDULTHOOD, fEw LIVED TO OLD agE. By THE 1980s, a sERIEs  Of TEcHNOLOgIcaL aDVaNcEs ¸aDE IT  pOssIbLE TO DO a  swITcH OpERaTION safELy, aND THIs bEca¸E THE faVORED pROcEDURE. ºN 1986, THE  GREaT  ±R¸OND STREET sURgEONs  ¸aDE THE cHaNgEOVER THE¸sELVEs, aND THEIR  REpORT sHOws THaT IT was UNqUEsTIONabLy aN I¸pROVE¸ENT. °E aNNUaL DEaTH  RaTE  aſtER a  sUccEssfUL swITcH  pROcEDURE  was LEss  THaN  a  qUaRTER THaT  Of  THE  SENNINg, REsULTINg IN a LIfE ExpEcTaNcy Of 63 yEaRs INsTEaD Of 47. BUT THE pRIcE  Of LEaRNINg TO DO IT was appaLLINg. ºN THEIR fiRsT 70 swITcH OpERaTIONs, THE DOcTORs HaD a 25 pERcENT sURgIcaL DEaTH RaTE, cO¸paRED wITH jUsT 6 pERcENT wITH  THE SENNINg  pROcEDURE. ´IgHTEEN babIEs DIED, ¸ORE THaN TwIcE THE NU¸bER  DURINg  THE ENTIRE  SENNINg ERa.  ±NLy  wITH TI¸E  DID  THEy ¸asTER  IT: IN  THEIR  NExT 100 swITcH OpERaTIONs, fiVE babIEs DIED. As  paTIENTs,  wE  waNT  bOTH  ExpERTIsE  aND  pROgREss;  wE  DON’T  waNT  TO  ackNOwLEDgE  THaT THEsE aRE cONTRaDIcTORy DEsIREs. ºN THE wORDs Of ONE BRITIsH pUbLIc REpORT, “°ERE sHOULD bE NO LEaRNINg cURVE as faR as paTIENT safETy  Is cONcERNED.” BUT THIs Is ENTIRELy wIsHfUL THINkINg.

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

THE  pRINcIpLEs Of  UsINg  THE RObOT,  TO  sTaRT gETTINg  a  fEEL fOR  UsINg  IT, aND  TO 

³EcENTLy,  a  gROUp  Of  ÁaRVaRD  BUsINEss  ScHOOL  REsEaRcHERs  wHO  HaVE 

58

¸aDE a spEcIaLTy Of sTUDyINg LEaRNINg cURVEs IN INDUsTRy DEcIDED TO Exa¸INE  LEaRNINg cURVEs a¸ONg sURgEONs INsTEaD Of IN sE¸IcONDUcTOR ¸aNUfacTURE OR 

ednawaG   l u t A

aIRpLaNE cONsTRUcTION, OR aNy Of THE UsUaL fiELDs THEIR cOLLEagUEs Exa¸INE. °Ey  fOLLOwED EIgHTEEN caRDIac sURgEONs aND THEIR TEa¸s as THEy TOOk ON THE NEw  TEcHNIqUE Of ¸INI¸aLLy INVasIVE caRDIac sURgERy. °Is sTUDy, º was sURpRIsED  TO  DIscOVER, Is  THE fiRsT  Of ITs kIND. ²EaRNINg  Is UbIqUITOUs  IN ¸EDIcINE, aND  yET NO ONE HaD EVER cO¸paRED HOw wELL DIffERENT TEa¸s acTUaLLy DO IT. °E NEw HEaRT OpERaTION—IN wHIcH NEw TEcHNOLOgIEs aLLOw a sURgEON TO  OpERaTE  THROUgH a  s¸aLL INcIsION bETwEEN RIbs INsTEaD Of spLITTINg THE cHEsT  OpEN  DOwN  THE ¸IDDLE—pROVED  sUbsTaNTIaLLy ¸ORE  DIfficULT  THaN  THE cONVENTIONaL  ONE.  BEcaUsE  THE  INcIsION  Is  TOO  s¸aLL  TO  aD¸IT  THE  UsUaL  TUbEs  aND  cLa¸ps fOR REROUTINg bLOOD TO THE HEaRT-bypass ¸acHINE, sURgEONs HaD  TO  LEaRN  a  TRIckIER  ¸ETHOD,  wHIcH  INVOLVED  baLLOONs  aND  caTHETERs  pLacED  THROUgH  gROIN  VEssELs. AND  THE NURsEs,  aNEsTHEsIOLOgIsTs, aND pERfUsIONIsTs  aLL  HaD  NEw  ROLEs TO  ¸asTER. As  yOU’D ExpEcT,  EVERyONE  ExpERIENcED a  sUbsTaNTIaL  LEaRNINg  cURVE.  WHEREas  a  fULLy  pROficIENT  TEa¸ TakEs  THREE  TO  sIx  HOURs fOR sUcH aN OpERaTION, THEsE TEa¸s TOOk ON aVERagE THREE TI¸Es as LONg  fOR  THEIR  EaRLy casEs.  °E REsEaRcHERs  cOULD  NOT TRack  cO¸pLIcaTION  RaTEs IN  DETaIL, bUT IT wOULD bE fOOLIsH TO I¸agINE THaT THEy wERE NOT affEcTED. WHaT’s ¸ORE, THE REsEaRcHERs fOUND sTRIkINg DIspaRITIEs IN THE spEED wITH  wHIcH DIffERENT TEa¸s LEaRNED. ALL TEa¸s ca¸E fRO¸ HIgHLy REspEcTED INsTITUTIONs wITH ExpERIENcE IN aDOpTINg INNOVaTIONs aND REcEIVED THE sa¸E THREE-  Day TRaININg sEssION. YET, IN THE cOURsE Of 50 casEs, sO¸E TEa¸s ¸aNagED TO  HaLVE  THEIR  OpERaTINg TI¸E  wHILE  OTHERs  I¸pROVED  HaRDLy aT  aLL. PRacTIcE, IT  TURNED  OUT, DID NOT  NEcEssaRILy ¸akE  pERfEcT. °E cRUcIaL VaRIabLE  was  how THE sURgEONs aND THEIR TEa¸s pRacTIcED. ³IcHaRD  BOH¸ER,  THE  ONLy  pHysIcIaN  a¸ONg  THE  ÁaRVaRD  REsEaRcHERs,  ¸aDE  sEVERaL  VIsITs  TO ObsERVE  ONE Of  THE qUIckEsT-LEaRNINg  TEa¸s  aND  ONE  Of THE sLOwEsT, aND HE was sTaRTLED by THE cONTRasT. °E sURgEON ON THE fasT-  LEaRNINg  TEa¸  was  acTUaLLy  qUITE  INExpERIENcED  cO¸paRED  wITH  THE  ONE  ON  THE sLOw-LEaRNINg  TEa¸.  BUT HE  ¸aDE  sURE  TO  pIck  TEa¸ ¸E¸bERs  wITH  wHO¸  HE  HaD  wORkED  wELL  bEfORE aND  TO  kEEp  THE¸  TOgETHER THROUgH  THE  fiRsT 15 casEs bEfORE aLLOwINg aNy NEw ¸E¸bERs. ÁE HaD THE TEa¸ gO THROUgH  a  DRy RUN bEfORE THE fiRsT casE, THEN DELIbERaTELy scHEDULED sIx OpERaTIONs IN  THE fiRsT wEEk, sO LITTLE wOULD bE fORgOTTEN IN bETwEEN. ÁE cONVENED THE TEa¸  bEfORE  EacH  casE  TO  DIscUss IT  IN  DETaIL  aND  aſtERwaRD  TO  DEbRIEf.  ÁE  ¸aDE  sURE  REsULTs  wERE  TRackED  caREfULLy. AND  BOH¸ER  NOTIcED  THaT  THE  sURgEON  was NOT THE sTEREOTypIcaL µapOLEON wITH a kNIfE. ·NbIDDEN, HE TOLD BOH¸ER, 

“°E sURgEON NEEDs TO bE wILLINg TO aLLOw HI¸sELf TO bEcO¸E a paRTNER [wITH  THE REsT Of THE TEa¸] sO HE caN accEpT INpUT.” AT THE OTHER HOspITaL, by cON-

59

kEEp  IT  TOgETHER.  ºN  THE  fiRsT  sEVEN  casEs,  THE  TEa¸  HaD  DIffERENT  ¸E¸bERs  EVERy TI¸E, wHIcH Is TO say THaT IT was NO TEa¸ aT aLL. AND THE sURgEON HaD NO  pRE-bRIEfiNgs, NO DEbRIEfiNgs, NO TRackINg Of ONgOINg REsULTs. °E ÁaRVaRD BUsINEss ScHOOL sTUDy  OffERED sO¸E HOpEfUL NEws. WE  caN  DO THINgs THaT HaVE a DRa¸aTIc EffEcT ON OUR RaTE Of I¸pROVE¸ENT—LIkE bEINg  ¸ORE  DELIbERaTE abOUT HOw wE TRaIN,  aND  abOUT TRackINg pROgREss, wHETHER  wITH  sTUDENTs  aND  REsIDENTs  OR  wITH  sENIOR  sURgEONs  aND  NURsEs.  BUT  THE  sTUDy’s OTHER I¸pLIcaTIONs aRE LEss REassURINg. µO ¸aTTER HOw accO¸pLIsHED,  sURgEONs  TRyINg sO¸ETHINg  NEw  gOT  wORsE  bEfORE  THEy  gOT  bETTER,  aND  THE  LEaRNINg  cURVE  pROVED LONgER,  aND  was affEcTED  by a  faR  ¸ORE  cO¸pLIcaTED  RaNgE Of facTORs, THaN aNyONE HaD REaLIzED. °Is, º sUspEcT, Is THE REasON fOR THE pHysIcIaN’s DODgE: THE “º jUsT assIsT” Rap;  THE  “WE HaVE  a  NEw  pROcEDURE fOR  THIs  THaT yOU  aRE  pERfEcT  fOR”  spEEcH;  THE  “YOU NEED a cENTRaL LINE” wITHOUT THE “º a¸ sTILL LEaRNINg HOw TO DO THIs.” SO¸ETI¸Es wE  DO fEEL ObLIgED TO aD¸IT wHEN wE’RE DOINg  sO¸ETHINg fOR THE fiRsT  TI¸E,  bUT  EVEN THEN  wE  TEND  TO  qUOTE THE  pUbLIsHED  cO¸pLIcaTION  RaTEs  Of  ExpERIENcED sURgEONs. ¶O wE EVER TELL paTIENTs THaT, bEcaUsE wE aRE sTILL NEw  aT  sO¸ETHINg, THEIR RIsks wILL  INEVITabLy bE  HIgHER, aND  THaT  THEy’D LIkELy DO  bETTER wITH DOcTORs wHO aRE ¸ORE ExpERIENcED? ¶O wE EVER say THaT wE NEED  THE¸  TO agREE TO IT aNyway?  º’VE NEVER sEEN IT. GIVEN THE sTakEs, wHO IN HIs  RIgHT ¸IND wOULD agREE TO bE pRacTIcED UpON? MaNy DIspUTE THIs pREsU¸pTION:  “²OOk, ¸OsT pEOpLE UNDERsTaND wHaT IT  Is  TO bE  a DOcTOR,” a  HEaLTH  pOLIcy ExpERT INsIsTED, wHEN º VIsITED HI¸  IN HIs  OfficE NOT LONg  agO. “WE HaVE  TO sTOp LyINg TO OUR paTIENTs. CaN pEOpLE TakE  ON cHOIcEs fOR sOcIETaL bENEfiT?” ÁE paUsED aND THEN aNswERED HIs qUEsTION.  “YEs,” HE saID fiR¸Ly. ºT wOULD cERTaINLy bE a gRacEfUL  aND Happy sOLUTION. WE’D ask  paTIENTs—  HONEsTLy, OpENLy—aND THEy’D say yEs. ÁaRD TO I¸agINE, THOUgH. º NOTIcED ON  THE ExpERT’s DEsk a pIcTURE Of HIs cHILD, bORN jUsT a fEw ¸ONTHs bEfORE, aND a  cO¸pLETELy  UNfaIR qUEsTION  pOppED  INTO ¸y ¸IND. “SO  DID yOU LET THE REsIDENT DELIVER?” º askED. °ERE was sILENcE fOR a ¸O¸ENT. “µO,” HE aD¸ITTED. “WE DIDN’T EVEN aLLOw  REsIDENTs IN THE ROO¸.” ±NE REasON  º  DOUbT  wHETHER  wE  cOULD  sUsTaIN  a  sysTE¸  Of  ¸EDIcaL  TRaININg  THaT  DEpENDED ON  pEOpLE sayINg  “YEs,  yOU  caN  pRacTIcE ON ¸E”  Is  THaT  º  ¸ysELf HaVE  saID NO. WHEN  ¸y  ELDEsT  cHILD, WaLkER,  was 11  Days  OLD, HE 

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

TRasT,  THE  sURgEON  cHOsE HIs  OpERaTINg  TEa¸ aL¸OsT  RaNDO¸Ly  aND  DID NOT 

sUDDENLy wENT INTO cONgEsTIVE HEaRT faILURE fRO¸ wHaT pROVED TO bE a sEVERE 

60

caRDIac  DEfEcT.  ÁIs aORTa was  NOT  TRaNspOsED, bUT a  LONg  sEg¸ENT  Of IT  HaD  faILED TO gROw aT aLL. My wIfE aND º wERE bEsIDE OURsELVEs wITH fEaR—HIs kID-

ednawaG   l u t A

NEys aND LIVER bEgaN faILINg, TOO—bUT HE ¸aDE IT TO sURgERy, THE REpaIR was a  sUccEss, aND aLTHOUgH HIs REcOVERy was ERRaTIc, aſtER TwO aND a HaLf wEEks HE  was REaDy TO cO¸E HO¸E. WE  wERE by  NO  ¸EaNs IN THE  cLEaR, HOwEVER.  ÁE  was  bORN a  HEaLTHy sIx  pOUNDs  pLUs bUT NOw,  a  ¸ONTH  OLD,  HE  wEIgHED ONLy  fiVE,  aND  wOULD  NEED  sTRIcT  ¸ONITORINg  TO  INsURE  THaT  HE  gaINED  wEIgHT.  ÁE  was  ON TwO  caRDIac  ¸EDIcaTIONs  fRO¸  wHIcH  HE wOULD  HaVE TO  bE  wEaNED. AND IN  THE  LONgER  TER¸, THE DOcTORs waRNED Us, HIs REpaIR wOULD pROVE INaDEqUaTE. As WaLkER  gREw,  HIs aORTa wOULD REqUIRE EITHER DILaTION  wITH a  baLLOON OR REpLacE¸ENT  by sURgERy. °Ey cOULD NOT say pREcIsELy wHEN aND HOw ¸aNy sUcH pROcEDUREs  wOULD  bE  NEcEssaRy  OVER  THE yEaRs.  A  pEDIaTRIc  caRDIOLOgIsT wOULD  HaVE  TO  fOLLOw HI¸ cLOsELy aND DEcIDE. WaLkER was abOUT TO  bE DIscHaRgED,  aND wE  HaD  NOT INDIcaTED wHO THaT  caRDIOLOgIsT wOULD  bE. ºN THE HOspITaL, HE HaD  bEEN caRED  fOR by a  fULL TEa¸  Of caRDIOLOgIsTs, RaNgINg fRO¸ fELLOws IN spEcIaLTy TRaININg TO aTTENDINgs wHO  HaD pRacTIcED fOR DEcaDEs. °E Day bEfORE wE TOOk WaLkER HO¸E, ONE Of THE  yOUNg  fELLOws  appROacHED  ¸E,  OffERINg  HIs  caRD  aND  sUggEsTINg  a  TI¸E  TO  bRINg WaLkER TO sEE HI¸. ±f THOsE ON THE TEa¸, HE HaD pUT IN THE ¸OsT  TI¸E  caRINg fOR WaLkER. ÁE saw WaLkER wHEN wE bROUgHT HI¸ IN INExpLIcabLy sHORT  Of bREaTH, ¸aDE THE DIagNOsIs, gOT WaLkER THE DRUgs THaT sTabILIzED HI¸, cOORDINaTED wITH THE sURgEONs, aND ca¸E TO sEE Us TwIcE a Day TO aNswER OUR qUEsTIONs. MOREOVER, º kNEw, THIs was HOw fELLOws aLways gOT THEIR paTIENTs. MOsT  fa¸ILIEs  DON’T  kNOw  THE sUbTLE  gRaDaTIONs  a¸ONg  pLayERs,  aND  aſtER  a  TEa¸  Has saVED THEIR cHILD’s LIfE THEy TakE wHaTEVER appOINT¸ENT THEy’RE HaNDED. BUT  º  kNEw  THE  DIffERENcEs.  “º’¸  afRaID  wE’RE  THINkINg  Of  sEEINg  ¶R. µEwbURgER,” º saID. SHE was THE HOspITaL’s assOcIaTE caRDIOLOgIsT-IN-cHIEf,  aND  a  pUbLIsHED  ExpERT  ON  cONDITIONs  LIkE  WaLkER’s.  °E  yOUNg  pHysIcIaN  LOOkED  cREsTfaLLEN.  ºT  was NOTHINg agaINsT HI¸, º  saID.  SHE jUsT  HaD ¸ORE  ExpERIENcE, THaT was aLL. “YOU kNOw, THERE Is aLways aN aTTENDINg backINg ¸E Up,” HE saID. º sHOOk  ¸y HEaD. º  kNOw THIs was  NOT faIR. My  sON HaD aN  UNUsUaL pRObLE¸.  °E fELLOw  NEEDED  THE  ExpERIENcE.  As  a  REsIDENT,  º  Of  aLL  pEOpLE  sHOULD  HaVE  UNDERsTOOD  THIs. BUT º was NOT TORN abOUT THE DEcIsION. °Is  was ¸y cHILD. GIVEN  a cHOIcE, º wILL aLways cHOOsE THE bEsT caRE º caN fOR HI¸. ÁOw caN aNybODy 

bE  ExpEcTED TO  DO  OTHERwIsE?  CERTaINLy, THE  fUTURE  Of ¸EDIcINE  sHOULD NOT  RELy ON IT.

61

sTay—ON ¸aNy OccasIONs, NOw THaT º THINk back ON IT. A REsIDENT INTUbaTED  HI¸. A sURgIcaL TRaINEE scRUbbED IN fOR HIs OpERaTION. °E caRDIOLOgy fELLOw  pUT  IN  ONE  Of  HIs  cENTRaL  LINEs.  ºf  º  HaD  THE  OpTION  TO  HaVE  sO¸EONE ¸ORE  ExpERIENcED,  º  wOULD  HaVE  TakEN  IT.  BUT  THIs  was  sI¸pLy  HOw  THE  sysTE¸  wORkED—NO sUcH cHOIcEs wERE OffERED—aND sO º wENT aLONg. °E  aDVaNTagE  Of  THIs  cOLDHEaRTED  ¸acHINERy  Is  NOT  ¸ERELy  THaT  IT  gETs  THE LEaRNINg DONE. ºf LEaRNINg Is NEcEssaRy bUT caUsEs HaR¸, THEN abOVE aLL IT  OUgHT TO appLy TO EVERyONE aLIkE. GIVEN a cHOIcE, pEOpLE wRIggLE OUT, aND sUcH  cHOIcEs aRE NOT OffERED EqUaLLy. °Ey bELONg TO THE cONNEcTED aND THE kNOwLEDgEabLE,  TO INsIDERs  OVER  OUTsIDERs,  TO  THE DOcTOR’s  cHILD bUT  NOT THE  TRUck  DRIVER’s. ºf EVERyONE caNNOT HaVE a cHOIcE, ¸aybE IT Is bETTER If NO ONE caN. ºT Is 2 ¿.m. º a¸ IN THE INTENsIVE-caRE UNIT. A NURsE TELLs ¸E MR. G.’s cENTRaL  LINE Has cLOTTED Off. MR. G. Has bEEN IN THE HOspITaL fOR ¸ORE THaN a ¸ONTH NOw.  ÁE  Is  IN HIs  LaTE sIxTIEs,  fRO¸ SOUTH  BOsTON, E¸acIaTED, ExHaUsTED, HOLDINg  ON by a THREaD—OR a LINE, TO bE pREcIsE. ÁE Has sEVERaL HOLEs IN HIs s¸aLL bOwEL,  aND  THE bILIOUs cONTENTs LEak OUT ONTO  HIs skIN THROUgH  TwO s¸aLL REDDENED  OpENINgs  IN  THE cONcaVITy Of  HIs abDO¸EN. ÁIs ONLy  cHaNcE  Is  TO bE fED by  VEIN aND waIT fOR THEsE fisTULaE TO HEaL. ÁE NEEDs a NEw cENTRaL LINE. º cOULD  DO  IT, º  sUppOsE. º a¸ THE  ExpERIENcED ONE NOw.  BUT ExpERIENcE  bRINgs a NEw ROLE: º a¸ ExpEcTED TO TEacH THE pROcEDURE INsTEaD. “SEE ONE, DO  ONE, TEacH ONE,” THE sayINg gOEs, aND IT Is ONLy HaLf IN jEsT. °ERE Is  a  jUNIOR REsIDENT  ON THE sERVIcE. SHE  Has  DONE ONLy ONE  OR TwO  LINEs bEfORE. º  TELL HER abOUT MR. G.  º ask  HER If sHE Is  fREE TO  DO a  NEw LINE.  SHE ¸IsINTERpRETs THIs as a qUEsTION. SHE says sHE sTILL Has paTIENTs TO sEE aND  a casE cO¸INg Up LaTER. COULD º DO THE LINE? º TELL HER NO. SHE Is UNabLE TO HIDE  a  gRI¸acE. SHE Is bURDENED, as º was bURDENED, aND pERHaps fRIgHTENED, as º  was fRIgHTENED. SHE bEgINs  TO fOcUs wHEN  º ¸akE  HER TaLk  THROUgH  THE sTEps—a  kIND  Of  DRy RUN, º figURE. SHE HITs NEaRLy aLL THE sTEps, bUT fORgETs abOUT cHEckINg THE  Labs aND abOUT MR. G.’s NasTy aLLERgy TO HEpaRIN, wHIcH Is IN THE flUsH fOR THE  LINE. º ¸akE sURE sHE REgIsTERs THIs, THEN TELL HER TO gET sET Up aND pagE ¸E. º a¸  sTILL aDjUsTINg  TO THIs  ROLE.  ºT Is  paINfUL  ENOUgH TakINg  REspONsIbILITy  fOR ONE’s  OwN faILUREs. BEINg HaND¸aIDEN  TO aNOTHER’s Is sO¸ETHINg  ELsE  ENTIRELy.  ºT OccURs TO ¸E THaT º cOULD HaVE bROkEN OpEN a kIT aND HaD  HER DO 

evruC   g n i n r a e L   e h T

ºN a sENsE, THEN, THE pHysIcIaN’s DODgE Is INEVITabLE. ²EaRNINg ¸UsT bE sTOLEN, TakEN as a  kIND Of bODILy E¸INENT DO¸aIN. AND IT was, DURINg  WaLkER’s 

aN acTUaL DRy RUN.  °EN agaIN ¸aybE º caN’T. °E  kITs ¸UsT cOsT a cOUpLE  Of 

62

HUNDRED DOLLaRs EacH. º’LL HaVE TO fiND OUT fOR THE NExT TI¸E. ÁaLf aN HOUR LaTER, º gET THE pagE. °E paTIENT Is DRapED. °E REsIDENT Is IN 

ednawaG   l u t A

HER gOwN aND  gLOVEs.  SHE TELLs ¸E  THaT  sHE Has saLINE TO  flUsH THE LINE  wITH  aND THaT HIs Labs aRE fiNE. “ÁaVE yOU gOT THE TOwEL ROLL?” º ask. SHE fORgOT THE TOwEL ROLL. º ROLL Up a TOwEL aND sLIp IT bENEaTH MR. G.’s back.  º ask HI¸  If HE’s aLL RIgHT. ÁE NODs. AſtER aLL HE’s bEEN THROUgH, THERE Is ONLy  REsIgNaTION IN HIs EyEs. °E  jUNIOR REsIDENT  pIcks OUT  a  spOT  fOR  THE sTIck.  °E  paTIENT Is  HaUNTINgLy THIN.  º sEE  EVERy RIb  aND fEaR THaT  THE REsIDENT wILL pUNcTURE  HIs LUNg.  SHE  INjEcTs THE  NU¸bINg  ¸EDIcaTION. °EN  sHE  pUTs  THE bIg  NEEDLE  IN, aND  THE  aNgLE LOOks aLL  wRONg. º  ¸OTION fOR  HER TO  REpOsITION.  °Is  ONLy  ¸akEs  HER ¸ORE UNcERTaIN. SHE  pUsHEs IN DEEpER  aND º kNOw sHE DOEs NOT HaVE  IT.  SHE DRaws back ON THE syRINgE: NO bLOOD. SHE TakEs OUT THE NEEDLE aND TRIEs  agaIN. AND agaIN THE aNgLE LOOks wRONg. °Is TI¸E, MR. G. fEELs THE jab aND  jERks Up IN paIN. º HOLD  HIs aR¸. SHE gIVEs HI¸  ¸ORE NU¸bINg  ¸EDIcaTION.  ºT Is  aLL º caN DO  NOT TO TakE OVER. BUT sHE caNNOT LEaRN  wITHOUT DOINg, º TELL  ¸ysELf. º DEcIDE TO LET HER HaVE ONE ¸ORE TRy.

´he ³eRfecT  Code Terrence Holt

A  faINT cLIck OpENs THE aIR. A DIsE¸bODIED VOIcE caLLs OUT, “ADULT CODE 100,  ADULT CODE 100, 5 ´asT. ADULT CODE 100, 5 ´asT.” ±R IT ¸IgHT bE “CODE BLUE,  CODE  BLUE 3C, CODE  BLUE 3C.” FRO¸ pLacE  TO pLacE THE wORDINg VaRIEs,  bUT  THE ¸EssagE THINLy HIDDEN IN THE cODE Is aLways THE sa¸E: sO¸EwHERE IN THE  HOspITaL, sO¸EONE Is DyINg. °E NaTURE Of THE E¸ERgENcy VaRIEs as wELL. ÁEaRTs sTOp. ÂITaL sIgNs DROOp.  WE gIVE Up THE gHOsT. BUT wHaTEVER THE NaTURE Of THE E¸ERgENcy, THE REspONsE  Is THE sa¸E: fRO¸ aLL OVER THE HOspITaL THE cODE TEa¸ cO¸Es RUNNINg, aND THE  aTTE¸pT aT REsUscITaTION bEgINs. °E  TEa¸ Is  aN INVENTION Of  THE 1960s,  wHEN EVIDENcE bEgaN TO  sUggEsT  THaT  pEOpLE sUffERINg  caRDIOpUL¸ONaRy aRREsT HaD  a  ¸UcH  bETTER cHaNcE  Of  sURVIVINg  If  ORgaNIzED  HELp REacHED  THE¸  wITHIN  TwO  ¸INUTEs. °E  “cODE”  paRT was a REspONsE TO pUbLIc RELaTIONs cONcERNs THaT THE LaITy ¸IgHT bE UpsET  by aNNOUNcE¸ENTs Of “CaRDIac aRREsT ON 4 µORTH.” ÁENcE THE “CODE”—100,  bLUE,  pIck  yOUR  ¸EaNINgLEss  TER¸.  °aNks TO  TELEVIsION,  º  DOUbT  aNyONE  Is  TakEN  IN by  IT THEsE Days.  BUT IT aDDs aNOTHER  ELE¸ENT  Of INsIDER sTaTUs  TO a  cULTURE THaT VaLUEs THaT sORT Of THINg. ¶EspITE bEINg NO sEcRET TO aNyONE, THE cODE  sTILL HOLDs  ITs ¸ysTERIEs. º’¸  NOT sURE, sTILL, jUsT wHaT º HaVE LEaRNED by RUNNINg TO sO ¸aNy cODEs. BUT THE  ExpERIENcE HaUNTs ¸E, LONg aſtER THE facT.  As If, sO¸EwHERE IN THE TaNgLE  Of  TUbEs  aND wIREs,  kNOTTED sHEETs, BETaDINE,  aND bLOOD,  º LOsT  TRack Of  sO¸ETHINg I¸pORTaNT. ²IsTEN.

ºN THE HOspITaL  wHERE º wORk, cODEs gO  sO¸ETHINg LIkE THIs.  A NURsE  fiNDs a  paTIENT sLU¸pED OVER IN bED. °E NURsE caLLs HER Na¸E. µO aNswER. °E NURsE 

¹ERRENcE ÁOLT, “°E PERfEcT CODE,” fRO¸ Internal Medicine: A Doctor’s Stories, by ¹ERRENcE ÁOLT.  ©  2014 by ¹ERRENcE ÁOLT. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of ²IVERIgHT PUbLIsHINg CORpORaTION, a DIVIsION Of W. W. µORTON.

sHakEs HER.  µO aNswER. ÁaRDER.  STILL NO aNswER.  °E NURsE sTEps TO THE DOOR 

64

aND caLLs, IN TONEs THaT RIsE aT EacH syLLabLE, “º NEED sO¸E HELp HERE.” °E REsT  Of THE NURsEs ON THE flOOR cONVERgE. WITHIN a ¸INUTE, EVERy bysTaNDER wITHIN 

tloH  e c n e r r e T

HEaRINg Is gaTHERED aT THE DOOR. ºN THE basE¸ENT Of THE HOspITaL, a  HOspITaL OpERaTOR LIsTENs INTENTLy TO HER  HEaDsET. SHE flIps a swITcH, aND a faINT cLIck OpENs THE HOspITaL TO THE ¸IcROpHONE ON HER cONsOLE. “ADULT CODE 100, 6 SOUTH. ADULT CODE 100, 6 SOUTH.”  °E ¸EssagE gOEs OUT ON THE HOspITaL ¿¾ sysTE¸, HER bODILEss VOIcE fiLLINg THE  HaLLways.  ºT aLsO  gOEs OUT TO a sysTE¸  Of aNTIqUE  VOIcE  pagERs, fRO¸  wHIcH  THE OpERaTOR’s ¸EasURED wORDs E¸ERgE as INaRTIcULaTE sqUEaLINg. °E pagERs aRE  LaRgELy backUp, IN casE sO¸E ¸E¸bER Of THE TEa¸ Is, say, IN THE baTHROO¸, OR  OTHERwIsE OUT Of REacH Of THE ¿¾ sysTE¸. °E TEa¸  cONsIsTs Of  EIgHT OR  NINE  pEOpLE: REspIRaTORy  TEcHs, aNEsTHEsIOLOgIsTs,  pHaR¸acIsTs, aND  THE  REsIDENTs  ON  caLL  fOR  THE  caRDIac  i»u.  ±N  HEaRINg  THE  sU¸¸ONs,  THE  REsIDENTs  DROp  wHaTEVER  THEy  aRE  DOINg  aND  spRINT.  PEOpLE  RUNNINg fULL-TILT IN  a HOspITaL  Is UNaVOIDabLy a spEcTacLE. ºN  THEIR VOLU¸INOUs wHITE cOaTs, fRO¸ wHOsE pOckETs faLL sTETHOscOpEs, pENLIgHTs,  REflEx Ha¸¸ERs, eÊÇ caLIpERs, TUNINg fORks, baLLpOINT pENs (THEsE cLaTTER acROss  THE  flOORs, TO  bE  scOOpED Up by  THE  ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT wHO  fOLLOws bEHIND),  THE  ¸EDIcaL TEa¸’s  passINg  Is  a cURIOUs  cO¸bINaTION Of  HIgH  DRa¸a  aND  bURLEsqUE. °E ¸EDIcaL TEa¸ aRRIVEs ON a scENE Of BEDLa¸. °E ROO¸ Is sO cROwDED  wITH NURsEs, »n¾s, jaNITORs, aND ¸IscELLaNEOUs ONLOOkERs THaT IT caN bE pHysIcaLLy  I¸pOssIbLE  TO  ENTER.  SHOULDERINg  yOUR  way  THROUgH  THE  ¸Ob  aT  THE  DOOR, yOU aRE sTOppED by a cROwD aROUND THE bED; THE cRasH caRT, a ROLLINg RED  ¸ETaL SEaRs ³OEbUck TOOLcHEsT, Is aLsO IN THE way, ITs OpEN DRawERs a ¸ENacE  TO kNEEs aND ELbOws. °ERE aRE wIREs DRapED fRO¸ THE cRasH caRT, aND TUbINg  EVERywHERE. AT  THE cENTER  Of  aLL  THIs  LIEs THE  paTIENT,  THE  ONLy  ONE IN  THE  ROO¸  wHO  IsN’T sHOUTINg. SHE DOEsN’T ¸OVE aT aLL. °Is TI¸E IT Is aN ELDERLy wO¸aN, fRaIL  TO  THE  pOINT Of  wasTINg; HER  RIbs aRcH  abOVE HER HOLLOw  bELLy. ÁER  EyEs aRE  HaLf  OpEN, HER jaw  Is  sLack, pINk  TONgUE  pROTRUDINg sLIgHTLy. ÁER gOwN aND  THE bEDDINg aRE TaNgLED IN a ¸ass aT THE fOOT Of THE bED; aT a gLaNcE yOU TakE  IN  THE  OLD  ¸asTEcTO¸y  scaR,  THE  scapHOID  abDO¸EN,  THE gRay  TUſt  bETwEEN  HER  LEgs.  AT  THE HEaD  Of THE  bED,  a  NURsE  Is  pREssINg  a  ¸ask OVER  HER  facE,  sqUEEzINg  OxygEN  THROUgH  a  LaRgE  bag;  THE  wO¸aN’s  cHEEks  pUff  OUT  wITH  EacH sqUEEzE, wHIcH IsN’T RIgHT. ANOTHER NURsE Is cO¸pREssINg THE cHEsT, NOT  HaRD ENOUgH. YOU sHOULDER HER asIDE aND pREss TwO fiNgERs UNDER THE aNgLE  Of THE jaw. µOTHINg. A qUIck LIsTEN aT HER cHEsT: ONLy THE HUbbUb IN THE ROO¸, 

DULLED by  sILENT flEsH. PILE  THE HEELs Of bOTH HaNDs OVER HER bREasTbONE aND  sTaRT  TO  pUsH:  THE  bED  ROLLs  away.  FaLLINg  HaLf  ONTO  THE  paTIENT,  yOU  HOLLER 

65

“¶OEs aNyONE HaVE THE cHaRT?” A NURsE NEaR THE DOOR HOIsTs a THIck bROwN bINDER, passINg IT OVER THE HEaDs  ja¸¸INg  THE ROO¸. “CODE  sTaTUs,” yOU  bawL OUT.  “FULL cODE,” THE  NURsE bawLs  back.  YOU  REpOsITION yOUR HaNDs  aND pUsH  DOwN  ON  HER  bREasTbONE.  “WHy’s  sHE  HERE?”  °ERE  Is  a  paLpabLE cRUNcH  as  HER  RIbs  sEpaRaTE  fRO¸  HER  sTERNU¸. “METasTaTIc bREasT caNcER,” THE NURsE caLLs, flIppINg pagEs IN THE cHaRT.  “AD¸ITTED  fOR  paIN  cONTROL.”  YOU  LIgHTEN  Up  THE  pREssURE  aND cONTINUE  TO  pUsH, RHyTH¸IcaLLy, fasT. YOU LOOk aROUND, TRyINg TO pIck OUT fRO¸ THE ¸ass  Of  ExcITED  bysTaNDERs  THE  pEOpLE  wHO  bELONg;  THE  backgROUND  Is  a  wEIRD  fRIEzE  Of  facEs  aND  LI¸bs  REacHINg,  pOINTINg,  gEsTIcULaTINg,  ¸OUTHs  OpEN.  °E  NOIsE Is I¸¸ENsE. ±N  THE  OppOsITE sIDE  Of THE  bED yOU  sEE ONE Of  THE  REspIRaTORy  TEcHs  Has  aRRIVED. “AIRway,”  yOU  sHOUT,  aND THE  TEcH  NODs:  sHE  Has  aLREaDy sEEN THE  pUffiNg cHEEks. SHE  TakEs THE  ¸ask aND bag fRO¸  THE  NURsE aND aDjUsTs THE paTIENT’s NEck. °E paTIENT’s cHEsT sTaRTs TO RIsE aND faLL  bENEaTH yOUR HaNDs. “WHaT’s sHE gETTINg fOR paIN?” “MORpHINE ¿»¾.” “WHaT RaTE?” °E qUEsTION sETs Off a flURRy Of acTIVITy a¸ONg sO¸E NURsEs, ONE Of wHO¸  sTOOps  TO Exa¸INE THE iv pU¸p aT THE paTIENT’s bEDsIDE. “¹wO pER HOUR, ONE  q fiſtEEN ON THE LOckOUT.” “µaRcaN,” yOU ORDER. By THIs TI¸E THE pHaR¸acIsT Has aRRIVED, wHIcH Is fORTUNaTE bEcaUsE yOU  caN’T  RE¸E¸bER  THE  DOsE  Of  OpIaTE-bLOckER.  YOU  DOUbT  THIs  Is  OVERDOsE  HERE,  bUT IT’s THE fiRsT THINg TO TRy. ±UT Of THE cORNER  Of yOUR EyE yOU sEE  THE  pHaR¸acIsT LOaD a cLEaR a¸pULE INTO a syRINgE aND pass IT TO a NURsE. MEaNwHILE,  ON  yOUR  LEſt,  THE  OTHER  REsIDENT  aND  THE  INTERN  aRE  pLUNgINg  LaRgE NEEDLEs INTO bOTH gROINs, pRObINg fOR THE fE¸ORaL VEIN. °E INTERN sTRIkEs  bLOOD fiRsT, RE¸OVEs THE syRINgE, THROws IT ONTO THE sHEETs. “SEND THaT Off fOR  Labs,” yOU sHOUT. BLOOD DRIbbLEs fRO¸ THE NEEDLE’s HUb as THE INTERN THREaDs  a LONg, cOILED wIRE THROUgH IT INTO THE VEIN. °E OTHER REsIDENT sTOps jabbINg  aND waTcHEs THE INTERN’s pROgREss. WITH a fREE HaND sHE fEELs fOR THE fE¸ORaL  pULsE, bUT THE bED Is bOUNcINg. YOU sTOp cO¸pREssINg. °E REsIDENT fOcUsEs,  sHakEs HER HEaD. STaRT cO¸pREssINg agaIN. A NURsE  REacHEs aROUND  yOU ON THE RIgHT,  TRyINg TO fiT  a  paIR Of ¸ETaLLIc  aDHEsIVE  paDs ONTO THE paTIENT’s cHEsT. YOU sHakE yOUR HEaD. “PaDDLEs,” yOU 

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

abOVE THE cO¸¸OTION, “SO¸EbODy pLEasE LOck THE bED.” ALTERNaTE THIs wITH, 

sHOUT.  “GET  ¸E  THE  paDDLEs.”  °EN,  INTO THE  gENERaL  ROaR,  “SO¸EbODy  TakE 

66

THaT  syRINgE  aND  sEND IT  Off fOR  Labs.” A  HaND gRabs  THE syRINgE  aND  wHIsks  IT  Off. “YOU,” yOU sHOUT aT THE ¸ED sTUDENT, wHO Is HaNgINg by THE REsIDENT’s 

tloH  e c n e r r e T

ELbOw. “GET a  gas.” °E REsIDENT THROws a  packagE fRO¸ THE cRasH caRT, THEN  sTEps back TO  gIVE THE sTUDENT  accEss TO THE paTIENT’s gROIN.  °E  sTUDENT  fiTs  THE NEEDLE—IT’s a  sIxTEEN-gaUgE, TwO INcHEs LONg—TO THE bLOOD gas syRINgE,  fEELs  fOR  THE pULsE yOUR cO¸pREssIONs  aRE ¸akINg  IN  THE gROIN,  aND sTabs IT  HO¸E: bLOOD, DaRk pURpLE, fiLLs THE baRREL. °E sTUDENT LOOks wORRIED; HE ¸ay  HaVE  ¸IssED  THE aRTERy.  ºT  DOEsN’T ¸aTTER.  °E  sTUDENT  passEs  IT  aROUND  THE  fOOT Of THE bED TO aNOTHER HaND aND IT VaNIsHEs. °E NURsE aT yOUR ELbOw Is sTILL THERE, HOLDINg THE DEfibRILLaTOR paDDLEs. SHE  sTaNDs as THOUgH sHE Has bEEN HOLDINg THEsE OUT TO yOU fOR sO¸E TI¸E. CLap  THE paDDLEs ON THE paTIENT’s cHEsT. ±VER yOUR sHOULDER  ON THE TINy scREEN Of  THE DEfibRILLaTOR a  waVy LINE Of gREEN LIgHT scRawLs HORIzONTaLLy ONwaRD. YOU  LOOk  back aT THE OTHER REsIDENT. “ANyTHINg?” yOU bOTH say aT ONcE, aND  bOTH  Of yOU sHakE yOUR HEaDs. °E INTERN  Has fiNIsHED wITH THE fE¸ORaL caTHETER,  VERy  fasT.  ÁE  HOLDs  Up ONE  Of  THE  accEss  pORTs. “A¸p  Of  EpI,”  yOU  say,  bUT  THERE’s NO REspONsE. ²OUDER: “º NEED aN a¸p Of EpI.” FINaLLy sO¸EONE sHOVEs  a bIg bLUNT-NOsED syRINgE INTO yOUR HaND. WITHOUT sTOppINg TO VERIfy THaT IT’s  wHaT yOU askED fOR, yOU LEaN OVER aND fiT IT TO THE pORT aND pUsH THE pLUNgER.  ANOTHER  LOOk  aT THE scREEN. STILL  NOTHINg. “ATROpINE,”  yOU caLL OUT,  aND THIs  TI¸E a NURsE Has IT REaDy. “PUsH IT,” yOU say, aND sHE DOEs. STOp cO¸pREssIONs,  cHEck THE scREEN. SUDDENLy THE waVERy TRacINg LEaps INTO LIfE, a jaggED IRREgULaR LINE, TEETH Of  a paINfUL saw. “ fib,” THE OTHER REsIDENT caLLs OUT, aNNOyINg yOU fOR a ¸O¸ENT.  YOU cLa¸p THE paDDLEs DOwN ON THE paTIENT’s RIbs. “´VERyONE cLEaR?” ´VERyONE  Has  ¸OVED back  TwO fEET  fRO¸ THE  bED. YOU cHEck  yOUR OwN  LEgs,  aRcH yOUR  back: “CLEaR?” YOU pUsH THE bUTTON. °E paTIENT spas¸s, THEN LIEs LI¸p agaIN.  °E paTTERN ON THE scREEN Is UNcHaNgED. °E OTHER REsIDENT sHakEs HER HEaD.  YOU  caLL  OVER yOUR  sHOULDER,  “°REE  HUNDRED,” aND  sHOck  agaIN. °E  bODy  TwITcHEs agaIN. AN UNpLEasaNT s¸ELL RIsEs fRO¸ THE bED. °E paTTERN  ON THE  scREEN sUbsIDEs,  back TO THE  LONg  Lazy  waVE. STILL  NO  pULsE. YOU  sTaRT cO¸pREssINg agaIN. “´pI,” yOU  caLL OUT. “ATROpINE.”  °ERE Is  aNOTHER flUTTER Of acTIVITy ON THE scREEN, bUT bEfORE yOU caN sHOck, IT gOEs flaT  agaIN,  aL¸OsT flaT,  pERHaps  THERE  Is  a  sUggEsTION  Of  a  RaggED  RHyTH¸  THERE,  fiNE  sawTEETH. “CLEaR,”  yOU  caLL  agaIN, aND  EVERybODy  DRaws  back.  “°REE-  sIxTy,” yOU RE¸E¸bER TO say OVER yOUR sHOULDER, aND wHEN THE aNswERINg caLL  cO¸Es back yOU sHOck agaIN, kNOwINg THIs Is  fUTILE. BUT THE paTIENT Is  DEaD  aND THERE Is NO HaR¸ IN TRyINg. As THE bODy sLU¸ps agaIN, THERE Is a paLpabLE 

sLackENINg Of THE NOIsE LEVEL IN THE ROO¸, aND EVEN THOUgH yOU gO ON aNOTHER  TEN ¸INUTEs, pUsHINg ON THE cHEsT UNTIL yOUR sHOULDERs aRE bURNINg aND yOUR 

67

THERE Is NOTHINg ¸ORE ON THE ¸ONITOR THaT LOOks RE¸OTELy sHOckabLE. FINaLLy, yOU sTRaIgHTEN Up, aND fiND THE cLOck ON THE waLL. “º’¸ caLLINg IT,”  yOU  say.  AgaINsT THE  waLL, a  NURsE  wITH a  cLIpbOaRD  ¸akEs a  NOTE.  “¹I¸E?”  sHE says. YOU TELL HER. °ERE Is ¸ORE. PIckINg Up, wRITINg  NOTEs, a  pHONE caLL OR TwO. °ERE  Is a  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER IN THE HaLLway, sITTINg sTRIckEN ON a bENcH bEsIDE a NURsE OR  VOLUNTEER HOLDINg a  HaND. YOU NEED TO spEak TO HER, bUT bEfORE yOU DO yOU  HaVE  TO fiND OUT THE paTIENT’s Na¸E.  ±R yOU  DON’T. AND THEN yOU gO  back TO  wHaTEVER yOU wERE DOINg bEfORE THE cODE wENT OUT OVER THE ¿¾.

WHaT º’¸ THINkINg, UsUaLLy, as wE TRIckLE OUT aT THE END, Is THIs: WHaT a ¸Ess. °ERE Is  a gREaT DEaL Of ¸Ess  IN HOspITaL  ¸EDIcINE, LITERaL aND  figURaTIVE,  aND THE cODE bUNcHEs IT aLL Up INTO a DENsE ¸ass THaT ON sO¸E Days sEE¸s  TO  REpREsENT  EVERyTHINg  wRONg  wITH  THE  wORLD.  °E  HasTE,  THE  TUR¸OIL,  THE  aNONy¸ITy,  THE s¸ELL, THE  fUTILITy:  aLL Of IT bROUgHT TO  bEaR ON a sINgLE  bODy,  THE  bODy  INERT  aT  THE cENTER  Of  THE  ¸Ess,  as  If  aT  THE  cENTER  Of  aLL  wRONg IT RE¸aINs sO¸EHOw INVIOLaTE, bEyOND HELp OR HaR¸; as If TO pOINT TO  a  ¸ORaL º wOULD UNDERsTaND bETTER If º  ONLy HaD TI¸E TO sTOp aND cONTE¸pLaTE  IT. WHIcH  º  DON’T,  NOT THaT  Day. WE’RE  aD¸ITTINg aND  THERE  aRE THREE  paTIENTs,  TwO  ON  THE  flOOR  aND  ONE  DOwN  IN  THE  er,  waITINg  TO  bE  sEEN.  °ERE Is  NO TI¸E  TO REaD THE fiNE pRINT  ON aNyTHINg, LEasT Of  aLL THE  ¸ORTaL  cONTRacT jUsT ExEcUTED ON THE aNONy¸OUs wO¸aN LyINg back IN THaT ROO¸.  º  caN  baRELy ¸akE OUT  THE LaRgE bLOck  LETTERs aT  THE TOp: ±UR  PaTIENTs ¶IE.  AND VERy OſtEN THEy DO  sO IN THE ¸IDDLE Of a  scENE wITH aLL THE DIgNITy Of a  fOOD  figHT IN a HIgH scHOOL cafETERIa.  WE caN’T cURE EVERybODy, bUT º  THINk  ¸OsT  Of Us TREasURE as a s¸aLL cONsOLaTION THaT aT LEasT wE caN affORD pEOpLE  sO¸E  kIND  Of  DIgNITy aT  THE END,  sO¸ETHINg  qUIET  aND  sOLE¸N  IN wHIcH  wHaTEVER  ¸EaNINg  REsIDEs  IN  aLL  Of  THIs  ¸ay  bE—If  wE  waTcH  aND  LIsTEN  caREfULLy—pERcEpTIbLE. WHIcH ¸ay bE wHy ONE paRTIcULaR cODE pERsIsTs IN ¸y ¸E¸ORy, LONg aſtER  THE EVENT, as THE pERfEcT cODE.

¶aVID GILLET was THE Na¸E º gOT fRO¸ THE ¸EDIcINE aD¸ITTINg OfficER. º wasN’T  sURE wHaT TO ¸akE Of THE m¾o’¼ sTORy, bUT º kNEw º DIDN’T LIkE IT.

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

bREaTH  Is  sHORT,  aND  a  TOTaL  Of TEN  ¸ILLIgRa¸s Of  EpINEpHRINE  HaVE  gONE IN, 

°E  sTORy was  aN EIgHTy-TwO-yEaR-OLD  gUy  wITH a bROkEN NEck.  ÁE HaD 

68

appaRENTLy  faLLEN  IN HIs  baTHROO¸  THaT ¸ORNINg,  cRackINg  HIs  fiRsT aND  sEcOND VERTEbRaE. º HaD a VagUE ¸E¸ORy fRO¸ ¸EDIcaL scHOOL THaT THIs wasN’T a 

tloH  e c n e r r e T

gOOD THINg—THE ExpREssION “HaNg¸aN’s fRacTURE” kEpT bObbINg Up fRO¸ THE  wELL  Of facTs º DO  NOT UsE—bUT  º HaD a  ¸UcH ¸ORE  DIsTINcT I¸pREssION THaT  THIs was NOT a casE fOR caRDIOLOgy. “AND ±RTHO IsN’T TakINg HI¸ bEcaUsE?” º saID wEaRILy. “BEcaUsE HE’s gOT INTERNaL ORgaNs, DUDE.” º sIgHED. “SO wHy ¸E?” “BEcaUsE THEy gOT aN eÊÇ.” °E m¾o was cLEaRLy ENjOyINg HI¸sELf. º RE¸E¸bERED HE HaD REcENTLy bEEN  accEpTED TO a caRDIOLOgy fELLOwsHIp. º bRacED ¸ysELf fOR THE pUNcH LINE. “AND?” “AND THERE’s EcTOpy ON IT. Ectopy .” ÁE THEN ¸aDE a NOIsE INTENDED TO sUggEsT a gHOsT HaUNTINg sO¸ETHINg. “´cTOpy,” ¸EaNINg LITERaLLy “OUT  Of pLacE,” REfERs  TO a HEaRTbEaT gENERaTED  aNywHERE  IN  THE  HEaRT  bUT  THE  LITTLE  kNOb  IN  THE  UppER  RIgHT-HaND  cORNER  wHERE  HEaRTbEaTs aRE sUppOsED TO  sTaRT. SUcH bEaTs appEaR wITH aN UNUsUaL  sHapE aND TI¸INg ON THE eÊÇ. °Ey caN bE caUsED by aNy NU¸bER Of THINgs,  fRO¸  TOO ¸UcH caffEINE TO faTIgUE TO  aN I¸pENDINg  HEaRT aTTack, bUT IN THE  absENcE  Of  OTHER  waRNINg sIgNs  EcTOpy  Is  NOT  sO¸ETHINg  wE  gENERaLLy  gET  ExcITED abOUT. AND IT sOUNDED  TO ¸E as THOUgH a ¸aN wITH  a bROkEN NEck  HaD  ENOUgH  REasONs  fOR  EcTOpy  wITHOUT  sENDINg  HI¸  TO  THE  CaRDIOLOgy  sERVIcE. “SO?” º saID, TRyINg NOT TO sOUND INDIgNaNT. “SO  HE’s aLsO  gOT a  HIsTORy.  ANgIOpLasTy  abOUT  TEN yEaRs agO,  NO DEfiNITE  HIsTORy Of mi. YOU caN’T REaLLy REaD HIs eÊÇ bEcaUsE HE’s gOT a LEſt bUNDLE, NO  OLD sTRIps sO º DON’T kNOw If IT’s NEw.” WE wERE DOwN TO bUsINEss. “SO º RULE HI¸ OUT.” “YOU RULE HI¸ OUT. ±RTHO says THEy’LL fOLLOw wITH yOU.” “²OVELy. AND ONcE º RULE HI¸ OUT?” “±RTHO says THEy’LL fOLLOw wITH yOU.” º saID sO¸ETHINg UNpLEasaNT. °E m¾o UNDERsTOOD. “SUcks, º kNOw, bUT THERE yOU aRE.” AND THERE º was, DOwN IN THE er ON a SUNDay aſtERNOON, TURNINg OVER THE  sTack Of papERs THaT ¶aVID GILLET HaD gENERaTED OVER HIs sIx HOURs IN THE ed.  °ERE was a sHEaf Of eÊÇs cOVERED wITH bIzaRRE EcTOpIc bEaTs, THROUgH wHIcH 

OccasIONaLLy  E¸ERgED a  sTRETcH Of NOR¸aL sINUs RHyTH¸,  ENOUgH TO sEE THaT  THERE was, INDEED, a LEſt bUNDLE bRaNcH bLOck, aND NOT ¸UcH ELsE.  °E HEaRT 

69

DIsRUpTs a bUNDLE, THE REsULT Is aN eÊÇ TOO DIsTORTED TO aNswER THE qUEsTION  wE  UsUaLLy ask  IT: ºs  THIs paTIENT HaVINg  a HEaRT aTTack? ±f cOURsE, THE  bUNDLE  ITsELf Is NOT a REassURINg sIgN, aND If NEw IT ¸ERITs aN INVEsTIgaTION, bUT pLENTy  Of  pEOpLE IN THEIR EIgHTIEs HaVE THE¸ aND IT’s pRETTy ¸UcH  a sO-wHaT. BUT  THE  EcTOpy  ON  TODay’s sTRIps  was  I¸pREssIVE—If yOU  DIDN’T  kNOw wHaT yOU  wERE  LOOkINg aT  yOU ¸IgHT THINk  HE was sUffERINg  sO¸E caTasTROpHIc  EVENT. º REaD  bETwEEN THE LINEs Of THE cONsULT NOTE THE ORTHOpEDIc sURgEONs HaD LEſt, aND IT  was cLEaR THEy REgaRDED ¶aVID GILLET as a TI¸E bO¸b aND DIDN’T waNT HI¸ ON  THEIR sERVIcE. WHIcH º cOULDN’T HELp NOTINg was ExacTLy HOw º fELT abOUT HaVINg a paTIENT  wITH  a  bROkEN  NEck  ON  ¸y sERVIcE.  BUT  º  DIDN’T gET  TO  ¸akE  DEcIsIONs  LIkE  THaT.  ºNsTEaD º  waDDED  THE sTack  Of  papERs  back IN  THEIR  cUbby  aND  TOOk  a  bRIEf  gLaNcE  THROUgH  THE  cURTaINs Of  Bay  12. FRO¸  ¸y sO¸EwHaT  DIsTORTED  pERspEcTIVE, ¸OsT Of wHaT º saw Of THE paTIENT was HIs fEET, wHIcH wERE LaRgE,  baRE,  aND  pROTRUDINg fRO¸  THE  LOwER  END  Of  HIs  er  bLaNkETs IN  a  way  THaT  sUggEsTED  HE  wOULD bE  TaLL If  º cOULD  sTaND HI¸  Up. AT  HIs sIDE  saT a  s¸aLL,  IRON-HaIRED wO¸aN wHO aT THaT ¸O¸ENT was spEakINg TO HI¸, LEaNINg cLOsE  wHILE  sHE spOkE.  SHE wORE  a  faINT, affEcTIONaTE  s¸ILE ON a  facE THaT  LOOkED  OTHERwIsE TIRED. º waTcHED HER fOR a ¸O¸ENT, HER pROfiLE HELD pREcIsELy pERpENDIcULaR TO ¸y LINE Of sIgHT as THOUgH pOsED. FOR a ¸O¸ENT HER facE TOOk  ON aN aL¸OsT LU¸INOUs cLaRITy, THE sINgLE REaL ObjEcT IN THE paLLID bLUR Of THE  ed,  a  sTUDy IN paTIENcE, IN caRE—aND THEN IT waVERED, REcEDINg INTO a  s¸aLL  TIRED  wO¸aN  wITH  gRay  HaIR  bEsIDE  a  gURNEy  IN  Bay  12.  °E  paTIENT’s  facE  was  ObscURED by  THE pINk  pLasTIc  HORsE cOLLaR  THaT  I¸¸ObILIzED  HIs NEck.  º  waTcHED THE wO¸aN fOR a ¸INUTE. ÁER ExpREssION, THE caL¸ pROgREss Of THEIR  cONVERsaTION, sUggEsTED THaT NOTHINg TOO DRasTIc was gOINg ON. º TOOk a waLk  TO THE RaDIOLOgy REaDINg ROO¸ TO gET a LOOk aT THE NEck fiL¸s. °ERE wERE ¸aNy  Of THEsE,  TOO. °Ey sHOwED  THE VULTURE-NEck sILHOUETTE  aLL  C-spINE  fiL¸s sHaRE.  °ERE wERE  sEVERaL UNUsUaL  VIEws, INcLUDINg  ONE THaT  º DEcIDED  ¸UsT HaVE  bEEN sHOT  sTRaIgHT DOwN THE paTIENT’s OpEN  ¸OUTH:  IT  sHOwED,  fRa¸ED  by  TEETH  paLIsaDED  wITH  spIky  ¸ETaL,  THE  paLE  RINg Of THE fiRsT VERTEbRa, THE ¸assIVE bONE caLLED THE aTLas, aND cLEaR (EVEN TO  ¸E) ON bOTH sIDEs  Of IT  wERE TwO jaggED DaRk LINEs aNgLINg IN ON THE E¸pTy  cENTER wHERE THE spINaL cORD HaD faILED TO REgIsTER ON fiL¸. °E bREak IN THE  sEcOND  VERTEbRa  was  HaRDER TO  ¸akE  OUT,  bUT º  TOOk  THE  sURgEONs  aT  THEIR 

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

Has sEVERaL bUNDLEs, cabLEs IN ITs INTERNaL wIRINg. WHEN sO¸E DIsEasE pROcEss 

wORD:  C1/2  fx.  Will  need immobilization  pending  installation  of  halo. Will 

70

follow w/you.

tloH  e c n e r r e T

º  was NOT IN THE  bEsT Of  ¸OODs as  º ¸aDE ¸y way back TO THE  er, gRabbED  a  cLIpbOaRD, aND  paRTED THE cURTaINs TO Bay  12. º sTILL ¸aNagED  aN aDEqUaTE  s¸ILE as º INTRODUcED ¸ysELf. “¶aVID GILLET?” º saID TENTaTIVELy. °E wO¸aN  aT HIs  sHOULDER  bLINkED Up aT  ¸E, wEaRINg THaT  sa¸E wEaRy  s¸ILE, bRUsHINg aN IRON-cOLORED LOck Of HaIR fRO¸ HER facE. “ºT’s ‘Zhee-ay ,’ ”  sHE  saID, wITH  aN ODD  cO¸bINaTION Of  sELf-DEpREcaTION  aND  sO¸ETHINg  ELsE—pERHaps  IT  was  waR¸TH?—THaT  ¸aDE  ¸E  LIkE  HER.  “ºT’s FRENcH,”  sHE ExpLaINED. ÁER s¸ILE wIDENED, ONE Of THOsE DazzLINg wHITE  THINgs  OLDER  pEOpLE sO¸ETI¸Es  pOssEss  (DENTUREs,  º  bELIEVE),  aND  sHE  wELcO¸ED ¸E INTO Bay 12, wHIcH º HaD bEEN INsIDE Of ¸ORE TI¸Es THaN º caRED TO  cOUNT, wITH a cURIOUs aIR Of apOLOgy, as If cONcERNED abOUT THE qUaLITy Of HER  HOUsEkEEpINg.  º was cHaR¸ED. °Is was sTILL RELaTIVELy EaRLy IN THE Day aND º  was capabLE Of bEINg cHaR¸ED. º sHOOk ¸ysELf a  LITTLE, sTRaIgHTENED ¸y back  (HER  pOsTURE  was  pERfEcT),  TRyINg TO  EscapE  sO¸E Of  THE  LETHaRgy  THaT  HaD  bEEN pILINg ON ¸E OVER THE Day. ÁER  HUsbaND  ¸aDE  a  LEss  DIsTINcT  I¸pREssION.  °E  cERVIcaL  sTabILIzaTION  cOLLaR  TENDs  TO  HaVE a  Da¸pENINg  EffEcT  ON  ¸OsT  pEOpLE,  as  wOULD  THE  EIgHT  ¸ILLIgRa¸s  Of ¸ORpHINE  HE’D  absORbED OVER  THE  pasT  sIx  HOURs, sO  IT  was  a  bLEaRy aND  NOT VERy aRTIcULaTE  HIsTORy º gOT  fRO¸ HI¸. ÁIs wIfE fiLLED  IN  THE RELEVaNT  bITs. µO  pRIOR mi.  ±ccasIONaL cHEsT  paIN,  HaRD TO pIN  DOwN  (aRTHRITIs  IN  THE  pIcTURE  as  wELL,  Of  cOURsE). ±THERwIsE  a  gENERaLLy  HEaLTHy,  aLERT,  aND  acTIVE  ¸aN.  ±N  THE  ONE  REaLLy  cRITIcaL  pOINT—wHaT  HaD  caUsED  THE faLL—MR. GILLET  INsIsTED ON gIVINg accOUNT. ÁE HaD  not faINTED. ÁE  HaD  NOT bEEN DIzzy OR bREaTHLEss OR ExpERIENcED paLpITaTIONs OR aNyTHINg Of THaT  sORT. ÁE HaD  TRIppED. ÁE HaD  caUgHT HIs  TOEs ON THE Da¸NED baTH ¸aT, aND  gONE DOwN LIkE a sTUpID Ox. As HE saID THE LasT HE sHOOk HIs HEaD VEHE¸ENTLy  wITHIN THE cONfiNEs Of HIs cOLLaR, aND º caUgHT ¸y bREaTH: yOU’RE NOT sUppOsED  TO DO THaT wITH a bROkEN NEck. ´VEN  sO  º  was  paRTIaLLy  REassURED.  °E  HIsTORy  DIDN’T  sUggEsT  a  caRDIac  caUsE TO HIs faLL, aND HE DENIED aNy Of THE OTHER sy¸pTO¸s THaT gO aLONg wITH  I¸pENDINg DOO¸. °E pHysIcaL Exa¸ was sI¸ILaRLy REassURINg, aLTHOUgH Ha¸pERED by THE cERVIcaL cOLLaR aND ¸y DREaD Of DOINg aNyTHINg THaT ¸IgHT DIsTURb  HIs  NEck. ÁE was a  TaLL,  bONy  ¸aN, wITH  a  NasTy-LOOkINg cUT  acROss THE  scaLp  abOVE  HIs RIgHT  EyE, aND DRIED  bLOOD cRUsTED  IN HIs bUsHy  EyEbROws.  °E cUT  HaD  bEEN  sUTURED  aLREaDy,  aND  THE  bLOOD  ¸aDE  IT  LOOk  ¸UcH  wORsE  THaN IT 

was. AsIDE fRO¸ THE cUT aND a LaRgE bRUIsE ON HIs RIgHT RIbs (NONE bROkEN), HE  sEE¸ED  fiNE. ´xcEpT  fOR  THE NEck,  Of cOURsE.  º sTayED  aNOTHER  fEw  ¸INUTEs, 

71

ÁE  RULED  OUT  wITH  THE  fOUR  ¾.m.  bLOOD  DRaw  THE  NExT  ¸ORNINg,  wHIcH  º  aNNOUNcED ON ROUNDs a fEw HOURs LaTER wITH LEss pLEasURE THaN º wOULD HaVE  ORDINaRILy. º kNEw wHaT was cO¸INg. “SO NOw wHaT?” THE aTTENDINg askED. “º gUEss º caLL ±RTHO.” ´VERybODy—fRO¸ aTTENDINg TO  fELLOw TO THE OTHER  REsIDENT ON THE TEa¸  aND THE INTERN, EVEN THE TwO ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs—sTaRTED TO s¸ILE. °EN LaUgH. “WELL, º caN caLL THE¸, caN’T º?” “GO aHEaD,” THE aTTENDINg saID. °ERE aRE  aTTENDINgs  wHO wILL acTUaLLy  figHT  TO  ¸akE  a  TRaNsfER  HappEN.  °Ey  wILL caLL THE aTTENDINg  ON THE  OTHER sERVIcE aND  ¸akE THE casE,  aT LEasT.  ·sUaLLy,  wHEN  IT  cO¸Es  TO  THIs, THE  TRaNsfER  gOEs  THROUgH.  WHIcH  ¸IgHT  bE  wHy ¸OsT aTTENDINgs aRE LOaTH TO LET THINgs gET THaT faR. ºf THE paTIENT’s wELfaRE  REqUIREs  IT,  THEy’LL ¸akE THE  caLL  (ExcEpT fOR  THOsE DREaDfUL  INDIVIDUaLs—aND  wE kNOw wHO THEy aRE—wHO bELIEVE THE¸sELVEs capabLE Of caRINg fOR casEs faR  OUTsIDE THEIR sUbspEcIaLIzaTION). ±R If THEy’RE DEaLINg wITH sO¸E cRITIcaL sHORTagE Of spacE. BUT If IT’s sI¸pLy a ¸aTTER Of ONE paTIENT ¸ORE OR LEss ON THEIR cENsUs, ¸OsT aTTENDINgs wILL LET THINgs bE. AND THIs aTTENDINg was ONE Of THE ¸ORE  NOTORIOUsLy LaIssEz-faIRE, Happy ENOUgH TO LET THE HOUsE sTaff RUN THE sHOw. º ¸aDE THE caLL, aND aſtER THREE OR fOUR HOURs THE ±RTHO REsIDENT RETURNED  THE pagE. º kNEw  by THaT TI¸E  THaT º was aLREaDy  DEfEaTED, bUT º wENT aHEaD  aND  askED THE ObLIgaTORy  qUEsTION, aND  REcEIVED THE  INEVITabLE aNswER (THE  ±RTHO REsIDENT HaVINg aNTIcIpaTED as wELL) THaT THE ±RTHO aTTENDINg DID NOT  fEEL  cO¸fORTabLE  TakINg  THE  casE—“aND  bEsIDEs,  IT’s  NOT  THaT  baD  a  bREak.  WE’LL fOLLOw.” “ÁOw LONg?” º askED. “WHaT DO yOU ¸EaN?” “ÁOw LONg DOEs HE NEED TO bE IN THE HOspITaL?” PUzzLED. “WHEN wILL yOU bE DONE wITH HI¸?” “WE’VE bEEN DONE sINcE EIgHT THIs ¸ORNINg.” “YOU ¸EaN yOU’D sEND HI¸ HO¸E?” “´xcEpT fOR THE NEck THINg, yEaH.” “±H.” °Is HE HaDN’T aNTIcIpaTED. “SO wHaT DOEs HE NEED fRO¸ yOU?”

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

¸akINg IDLE cHaT wITH THE wIfE, aND THEN ExcUsED ¸ysELf TO wRITE ¸y ORDERs.

“ÁE NEEDs a HaLO.”

72

º kNEw wHaT a  HaLO was. °Ey’RE THOsE ExcRUcIaTINg-LOOkINg  DEVIcEs yOU  ¸ay  HaVE  sEEN  sO¸EbODy  wEaRINg  IN  THE  ¸aLL:  a  RINg  Of  sHINy  ¸ETaL  THaT 

t l o H  e c n e r r e T

ENcIRcLEs THE HEaD (HENcE THE Na¸E), sUppORTED by a cagE THaT REsTs ON a HaRNEss bRacED ON THE sHOULDERs. FOUR LaRgE bOLTs RUN THROUgH THE HaLO aND INTO  THE paTIENT’s skULL, gRIppINg THE HEaD RIgIDLy IN pLacE LIkE a CHRIsT¸as TREE IN  ITs sTaND. A LITTLE cRUsT Of bLOOD wHERE THE bOLTs pENETRaTE THE skIN cO¸pLETEs  THE pIcTURE. °Ey LOOk TERRIbLE, bUT paTIENTs TELL ¸E THaT aſtER THE fiRsT Day OR  sO THEy DON’T REaLLy HURT. GETTINg ONE pUT ON, HOwEVER: THaT HURTs. “SO wHEN DOEs HE gET IT?” º askED. AgaIN, º kNEw THE aNswER. ºT was aLREaDy  pasT NOON. º was pRETTy sURE IT was MONDay. “WELL,” THE ±RTHO REsIDENT REpLIED, “IT’s aLREaDy pasT NOON.” “AND yOU’RE IN sURgERy.” “YEaH.” “AND TO¸ORROw?” “CLINIc. ALL-Day cLINIc.” º DIDN’T say aNyTHINg. º waITED a LONg TI¸E, bITINg ¸y TONgUE. “º gUEss wE cOULD DO IT TONIgHT.” “°aT’D bE NIcE.” “·NLEss THERE’s aN E¸ERgENcy, Of cOURsE.” “±f cOURsE.” ±f  cOURsE  THERE  was.  AND  cLINIc  RaN  OVERTI¸E  THE  NExT  Day,  OR sO  º  was  TOLD. °EIR NOTEs ON  THE cHaRT (THEy ca¸E by EacH ¸ORNINg aT fiVE fORTy-fiVE)  RaN TO fiVE scRIbbLED LINEs, ENDINg EacH TI¸E wITH Plan halo. Will follow, aND a  sIgNaTURE aND pagER NU¸bER º cOULDN’T qUITE DEcIpHER. °Is LEſt ¸E, Of cOURsE,  HOLDINg THE bag. µOT ONLy HaD º ONE ¸ORE UNNEcEssaRy paTIENT cROwDINg ¸y  cENsUs,  ONE ¸ORE  paTIENT TO  sEE IN  THE ¸ORNINg,  ROUND ON,  aND wRITE  NOTEs  abOUT (THIs DURINg THE ¸ONTH OUR TEa¸ sET THE REcORD fOR aD¸IssIONs TO caRDIOLOgy), bUT º aLsO HaD THE UNpLEasaNT REspONsIbILITy Of waLkINg INTO MR. GILLET’s  ROO¸ ON  ¹UEsDay aND  WEDNEsDay ¸ORNINg  TO fiND HI¸ UNHaLOED,  aND  ¸akINg apOLOgIEs fOR IT. ºT  wOULD  HaVE  bEEN  UNpLEasaNT,  aT  LEasT,  bUT  fOR  MRs.  GILLET.  ÁER  qUIET  gRacE pUT ¸E IN ¸IND Of facEs º’D sEEN IN OLD OIL paINTINgs, LOOkINg Off TO ONE  sIDE aT sO¸ETHINg  bEyOND THE fRa¸E,  EyEs LIT by wHaT sHE saw THERE, THE REsT  Of THE scENE LOsT  IN DaRk  cHIaROscURO. ALL Of wHIcH ONLy  ¸aDE THE sITUaTION  EVEN  ¸ORE INTOLERabLE,  DRIVINg  ¸E  TO waNT  TO  do sO¸ETHINg—aND THE ONLy  THINg º HaD TO OffER Lay IN THE gIſt Of THE INaccEssIbLE ±RTHO REsIDENT. WEDNEsDay  º  was  ON  caLL  agaIN,  aND  HaD  pLEDgED  ¸ysELf,  IN  THE  bRIEf  ¸O¸ENTs  bETwEEN  aD¸IssIONs,  TO  TRack  DOwN  THE  ±RTHO  TEa¸  aND  ¸akE 

THE¸  cO¸E  Up  aND  pUT  THaT  HaLO  ON.  ·NfORTUNaTELy,  THIs  was  THE  Day  wE  aD¸ITTED fiſtEEN paTIENTs,  as THE faILURE cLINIc  OpENED ITs flOODgaTEs aND  THE 

73

was  bLEssEDLy fREE Of cHEsT paIN—bUT  THE sHEER VOLU¸E  Of HIsTORIEs TO TakE,  pHysIcaLs TO pERfOR¸, NOTEs aND ORDERs TO cO¸pOsE was OVERwHEL¸INg. °E  pHONE  caLL—wITH  ITs  NEcEssaRy  sEqUEL  Of waITINg  fOR  THE  pagED  REsIDENT TO  caLL back—NEVER HappENED. SO¸ETI¸E  IN THE LaTE  aſtERNOON, HOwEVER, º  LOOkED Up fRO¸ THE  cOUNTER  wHERE º HaD bEEN LEaNINg, TRyINg TO absORb THE saLIENT fEaTUREs Of yET aNOTHER  faILURE paTIENT’s cO¸pLEx HIsTORy, aND saw THROUgH THE OpEN DOOR Of MR. GILLET’s  ROO¸ a  sTRaNgE  TabLEaU:  TwO  TaLL  ¸EN IN  gREEN  scRUbs  wIELDINg  sOckET  wRENcHEs  aROUND  THE  paTIENT’s  HEaD,  a  TaNgLE  Of  cHRO¸E,  aND  THE  paTIENT’s  HaNDs  qUIVERINg  IN  THE  aIR,  fiNgERs  spREaD  as  If  caLLINg ON  THE  sEas  TO  paRT.  SO¸E TI¸E LaTER º LOOkED Up agaIN aND THE gREEN scRUbs wERE gONE: MR. GILLET Lay pROppED Up IN HIs bED, HIs HEaD IN a HaLO. FRO¸ THE sIDE, HIs NOsE was  a  Hawk’s bEak, THE REsT Of HIs facE sUNk IN DRUggED sLEEp, bUT HIs ¸OUTH sTILL  sNaRLED  as If  IT  RE¸E¸bERED  REcENT paIN.  º RE¸E¸bERED  HI¸  IN  THE er,  THE  flasH  Of  INjURED  pRIDE  HE  HaD  bEEN  abLE  TO  cONjURE  EVEN  THROUgH  THE  ¸ORpHINE. °aT was gONE NOw. ÁE LOOkED LIkE a sTRaNgE, saD bIRD IN a VERy s¸aLL  cagE. STILL LaTER—TI¸E ON THaT sERVIcE bEINg ¸aRkED by ¸IssED ¸EaLs aND sLEEp,  º caN say ONLy THaT º was HUNgRy, bUT NOT yET pUNcHy—a NURsE sTOppED ¸E. “FOURTEEN,” sHE saID. SHE  ¸EaNT  MR.  GILLET.  “ÁOw’s  HE  DOINg?”  º  was  HaRbORINg  sO¸E  VagUE  HOpE THaT HE was awakE aND askINg TO gO HO¸E. “ÁE’s cO¸pLaININg Of cHEsT paIN. ¹EN OUT Of TEN.” “CRap,” º saID. °E NURsE LOOkED aT ¸E. “GET aN eÊÇ.” My VagUE HOpE VaNIsHED  ENTIRELy TEN ¸INUTEs LaTER  as º waTcHED  THE RED  gRapH papER E¸ERgE fRO¸ THE sIDE Of THE bOx. °E sqUIggLE ON IT LOOkED bETTER THaN THE INITIaL sET fRO¸ THE er, bUT THaT was ONLy bEcaUsE THE EcTOpy was  gONE.  WHaT was  THERE INsTEaD—MR. GILLET’s sOUVENIR Of THE  acTIVITIEs Of THE  aſtERNOON—wERE  ¹-waVE  INVERsIONs  ¸aRcHINg  acROss HIs  pREcORDIU¸.  °Is  Is  NOT gOOD. ¹-waVE INVERsIONs gENERaLLy sIgNIfy  HEaRT ¸UscLE THaT  IsN’T gETTINg OxygEN. WHaT º was sEEINg HERE sUggEsTED THaT HIs l¾d—a ¸ajOR aRTERy  sUppLyINg  bLOOD  TO  THE  HEaRT’s  sTRONgEsT  ¸UscLE—was  abOUT  TO  cHOkE  Off.  º LOOkED  Up  aT THE  NURsE.  SHE HaD bEEN  REaDINg  THE  sTRIp  as  wELL—UpsIDE  DOwN, as caRDIOLOgy NURsEs caN. “YOU gONNa ¸OVE HI¸?” sHE askED. “YEaH.”

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

CaTH  ²ab  pU¸pED  OUT  casE  aſtER  casE.  µObODy  was  aNy  TOO  sIck—THE  er 

“WRITE ¸E sO¸E ORDERs.”

74

“º’LL wRITE yOU  ORDERs. JUsT gET HI¸ TO  THE ·NIT. QUIckLy,” º aDDED, wITH a  backwaRD gLaNcE THROUgH THE DOOR Of fOURTEEN. GILLET’s bEakED facE Lay sTILL IN 

tloH  e c n e r r e T

ITs sILVER cagE. º scRaTcHED OUT a sET Of ORDERs aND TURNED TO THE NExT DIsasTER.

º DIDN’T gIVE GILLET ¸UcH THOUgHT THE REsT Of THE EVENINg, bEyOND sEEINg HI¸  sETTLED  IN  THE  »»u,  aND  gETTINg  HI¸  scHEDULED  as  aN  aDD-ON  fOR  THE  CaTH  ²ab  THE NExT Day. AROUND  TwO IN THE ¸ORNINg  THE THREE Of Us—¸y paRTNER  SasHa, THE INTERN  JEff, aND  º—wERE gaTHERED aT ONE END Of THE LONg cOUNTER,  pUsHINg  sTacks Of papER aROUND aND  TRyINg TO cOUNT Up THE scORE.  WE wERE  ON  aD¸IssION  TwELVE fOR  THE  Day,  wE  DEcIDED,  bUT cOULDN’T  RE¸E¸bER  wHO  was  Up NExT. º was  DIggINg IN ¸y pOckETs fOR  a cOIN TO  flIp wHEN ¸y pagER  wENT Off. º swORE as º TUggED IT fRO¸ ¸y bELT, ExpEcTINg TO fiND yET agaIN THE  NU¸bER  fOR  THE  er.  º  fOUND  INsTEaD  THE  NU¸bER  fOR  THE  »»u,  fOLLOwED  by  “911.” AT THaT ¸O¸ENT THE OVERHEaD pagINg sysTE¸ caLLED a cODE IN THE »»u.  °E THREE Of Us RaN. ºT was pERHaps THIRTy yaRDs TO THE »»u, bUT by THE TI¸E wE gOT THERE THREE  Of  THE sIx  NURsEs ON sHIſt  wERE  IN  GILLET’s ROO¸,  ONE  aT THE  HEaD sqUEEzINg  OxygEN  THROUgH  a  bag-VaLVE  ¸ask,  aNOTHER  cO¸pREssINg  HIs  cHEsT,  a  THIRD  REaDyINg  THE  cRasH  caRT.  º  HaD  a  ¸O¸ENT’s  awaRENEss  THaT  sO¸ETHINg  was  UNUsUaL—THE wHOLE THINg LOOkED TOO E¸pTILy sTagED, sO¸E kIND Of DIORa¸a  IN  THE  MUsEU¸  Of ÁU¸aN  MIsERy—bUT  THE  scENE  ONLy  appEaRED THaT  way  fOR aN INsTaNT aND  THEN wE  wERE IN IT  aND pERspEcTIVE fELL apaRT IN a sURgE Of  acTIVITy THaT pIckED Us aLL Up ON ITs back aND HURRIED Us ON. SasHa aND º HaD NEVER ¸aDE aNy fOR¸aL aRRaNgE¸ENT abOUT wHO DID wHaT  IN  a  cODE. º  was  THE fiRsT  ONE ON THE  faR  sIDE Of THE  bED aND  sTaRTED  fEELINg  THE gROIN fOR a pULsE. ºT was faINT, DRIVEN sOLELy by THE NURsE’s cO¸pREssIONs,  bUT cLEaR ENOUgH.  º gRabbED a fiNDER syRINgE fRO¸ THE TRay a  NURsE HELD OUT  TO ¸E aND pLUNgED IT IN. µOTHINg. PULL back, cHaNgE aNgLE, fEEL fOR THE pULsE  agaIN aND DRIVE. µEEDLE gROUND agaINsT bONE. AgaIN, aND ON THIs pass º saw  THE flasH IN THE syRINgE, flUNg IT asIDE aND pUT a THU¸b OVER THE wELLINg bLOOD  wHILE  REacHINg  fOR  THE  wIRE.  °E  NURsE  HaD  IT  OUT  aLREaDy,  HaNDLE  TURNED  TOwaRD ¸E. ºT THREaDED THE VEIN wITHOUT REsIsTaNcE. º HaD THE caTHETER IN pLacE a ¸INUTE OR TwO LaTER, ¸ET aT EacH sTEp IN  THE  pROcEss by THE RIgHT ITE¸ HELD OUT aT THE RIgHT TI¸E. µO ONE spOkE a wORD. ±N  THE  OTHER sIDE  Of  THE bED,  SasHa sTOOD  wITH  HER aR¸s  fOLDED  acROss  HER cHEsT, NODDINg aT TwO NURsEs IN TURN as THEy pUsHED DRUgs, pLacED paDs 

ON THE cHEsT, aND waR¸ED Up THE DEfibRILLaTOR. ÁER EyEs wERE ON THE ¸ONITOR  OVERHEaD, wHERE gREEN LIgHT DREw Lazy LINEs acROss THE scREEN. AT sO¸E pOINT 

75

TUbE DOwN GILLET’s THROaT; REspIRaTORy THERapy was wHEELINg a VENTILaTOR TO THE  HEaD Of THE bED, LOOpINg TUbINg THROUgH THE baRs Of THE HaLO aND cURsINg aT IT. “ÁOLD  cO¸pREssIONs,”  SasHa  saID.  °E  NURsE  sTOppED  pUsHINg  ON  THE  cHEsT.  º saw fOR  THE fiRsT  TI¸E THaT  THE HaLO was sUppORTED by  a  bROaD sHEET  Of  pLasTIc  backED  wITH sHEEpskIN  THaT  cOVERED  THE  UppER  HaLf  Of  THE  cHEsT:  THE  NURsE HaD  TO gET HER HaNDs UNDERNEaTH  IT  TO pREss; wITH EacH  cO¸pREssION GILLET’s HEaD bObbED Up aND DOwN, Up aND DOwN. ÁE was OUT, HIs EyEs  bLaNk aT THE cEILINg. °E NURsE aT ¸y ELbOw was HOOkINg Up THE pORTs Of ¸y  caTHETER, pUsHINg ONE Of THE bLUNT syRINgEs Of EpINEpHRINE. WE wERE aLL sTaRINg aT THE ¸ONITOR abOVE THE bED, THE LONg HORIzONTaL DRIſt Of asysTOLE. As THE  sEcOND a¸p Of aTROpINE RaN IN, THE LINEs aLL LEapT TO LIfE, fRaNTIc pEaks fiLLINg  THE scREEN. “Â-fib,” a NURsE saID qUIETLy. “PaDDLEs,” SasHa REpLIED IN THE sa¸E VOIcE, TakINg THE OffERED HaNDgRIps  Of THE DEfibRILLaTOR fRO¸ THE NURsE as sHE spOkE. “CLEaR,” sHE saID qUIETLy, aND THU¸bED THE bUTTON. ¶aVID  GILLET’s  bODy  ROsE  fRO¸  THE  ¸aTTREss,  HUNg  fOR  a  ¸O¸ENT,  cOLLapsED.  ±N THE  scREEN wE  saw scRa¸bLED gREEN  LIgHT sETTLE fOR  a  ¸O¸ENT, a  RHyTH¸ E¸ERgE. °EN THE pEakED LINEs cONsOLIDaTED INTO a HIgH pIckET fENcE. “Â-TacH,” saID THE NURsE, aND TURNED Up THE pOwER ON THE DEfibRILLaTOR. “CLEaR,” saID SasHa. °E bODy aRcHED aND fELL agaIN. ºT wENT ON fOR  TwELVE ¸ORE ¸INUTEs  (wE kNEw THIs  LaTER, as wE  REVIEwED  THE  pRINTED  sTRIps Of  TELE¸ETRy papER,  TRyINg TO  REcONsTRUcT  wHaT  HaD  gONE  ON),  GILLET’s  HEaRT  flyINg THROUgH  ONE  aRRHyTH¸Ia aſtER  aNOTHER.  ´acH  TI¸E  wE REspONDED IT  wOULD sETTLE bRIEfly INTO sINUs  RHyTH¸ bEfORE  flINgINg OUT  agaIN INTO sO¸E LETHaL VaRIaTION, UNTIL fiNaLLy, aſtER TwO gRa¸s Of ¸agNEsIU¸  sULfaTE aND aNOTHER ROUND Of sHOcks, IT fOUND a RHyTH¸ aND HELD IT THROUgH  aNOTHER  flURRy  Of  acTIVITy  wHEN  HIs  sysTOLIcs  DROppED  TO  THE  sIxTIEs,  THEN  RaLLIED  ON  a  ¸INI¸aL  INfUsION  Of  DOpa¸INE.  AND  THROUgH  aLL  Of  THIs,  as  THE  aT¸OspHERE IN THE ROO¸ ¸aINTaINED ITs EERIE caL¸, THE NURsEs kEpT Up  THEIR  sURREaL  EcONO¸y Of gEsTURE,  aND SasHa INTONED  THE RITUaL  Of THE  ¾»l¼  aLgORITH¸, º fELT ¸y OwN aDRENaLINE sURgINg THROUgH THE NIgHT’s faTIgUE IN aN  appROacH TO ExULTaTION. ºT was aL¸OsT bEaUTIfUL. °Is, º THOUgHT as wE LEſt THE ROO¸, THE LINEs ON THE ¸ONITOR DaNcINg THEIR  sTEaDy  DaNcE,  THE  VENTILaTOR  ¸EasURINg  bREaTH  aND  TI¸E  TO  ITs  OwN  sLOwER 

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

IN  THE  pROcEEDINgs  ANEsTHEsIa HaD  sHOwN  Up aND  sLIppED  aN ENDOTRacHEaL 

RHyTH¸, THIs Is wHaT a cODE sHOULD bE. A cLEaN THINg. A bEaUTIfUL THINg. °E 

76

paTIENT HaDN’T DIED.

tloH  e c n e r r e T

°E  REsT Of  THE  NIgHT was  aNTIcLI¸ax,  Of  cOURsE.  °ERE  was  a  NOTE  TO  wRITE  (THERE Is aLways a NOTE TO wRITE), fOR wHIcH wE HaD TO pUzzLE sO¸E TI¸E OVER  THE  sTRIps  cHURNED  OUT  by  THE  TELE¸ETRy  sysTE¸,  THE  NOTEs  scRIbbLED ON  a  papER  TOwEL  REcORDINg wHaT  DRUgs  HaD  bEEN gIVEN  wHEN,  THE  VaLUEs  caLLED  OVER  THE pHONE fRO¸ CORE  ²ab aND  wRITTEN IN  bLack ¸aRkER  ON THE  LEg Of a  NURsE’s scRUbs. °ERE was THE caLL TO THE wIfE: º HaD TO TE¸pER ¸y ENTHUsIas¸  as º sEaRcHED fOR wORDs TO UsE wHEN caLLINg fRO¸ THE »»u aT 2:35 IN THE ¸ORNINg.  SHE TOOk THE NEws wELL ENOUgH, askED If º THOUgHT sHE NEEDED TO cO¸E  NOw. º assURED HER HE was sTabLE. º assURED HER EVERyTHINg was UNDER cONTROL;  º HaD aNTIcIpaTED THE cODE, º REaLIzED, wHEN º ¸OVED HI¸ TO THE »»u. ÁE was  IN THE safEsT pOssIbLE pLacE. “ºN THE ¸ORNINg, THEN,” sHE saID sOſtLy. “ºN THE  ¸ORNINg,”  º  agREED, aND  TURNED  TO THE  caLL  ROO¸  aT  LasT,  wHERE  º  spENT pERHaps  fORTy-fiVE ¸INUTEs ON ¸y back, REpLayINg THE cODE agaINsT  THE  spRINgs  Of  THE  E¸pTy  bUNk  abOVE  ¸E,  UNTIL  ¸y  pagER  wENT  Off  agaIN  aND  THIs TI¸E IT  was THE er. AND THEN aROUND  fiVE aNOTHER cODE  ON 4  WEsT,  wHERE  wE  fOUND  a  ¸aN  bLEEDINg  fRO¸  a  RUpTURED  aRTERIaL  gRaſt aND  º  HaD  TO  THREaTEN HI¸  wITH  DEaTH  If  HE  DID NOT  HOLD  sTILL wHILE  º  pUT  yET aNOTHER  caTHETER  IN  yET aNOTHER  gROIN,  aND  THIs  TI¸E  THERE wERE  fOURTEEN  NURsEs IN  THE ROO¸, aLL sHOUTINg aT ONcE, sO THaT º HaD TO bELLOw OVER THE¸ TO bE HEaRD  as  º  REqUEsTED, REpEaTEDLy, THE  pROpER caTHETER  kIT, sO¸ETHINg bIg  ENOUgH  TO pOUR IN flUID as fasT as HE was LOsINg IT. °E paTIENT was aLIVE  wHEN º saw  HI¸  LasT, a  scaRED  aND  TOUsLED sURgERy  INTERN  kNEELINg RIgHT  ON TOp Of HI¸  TO HOLD pREssURE as THE ENTIRE UNgaINLy assE¸bLagE—paTIENT, INTERN, aND TREE  Of  iv bags—wHEELED  OUT THE  DOOR TO THE  or. Back TO  NOR¸aL LIfE, º  saID TO  SasHa as wE  TRUDgED back TO  THE caRDIOLOgy waRD.  WHETHER sHE kNEw wHaT  º  was TaLkINg abOUT º cOULDN’T say, aND DIDN’T  REaLLy caRE. º  was sTILL waR¸ED  by a VagUE sENsE Of sO¸ETHINg RIgHT HaVINg HappENED. MR. GILLET HaD cODED,  cODED bEaUTIfULLy, aND HE HaD sURVIVED. WE HaD DONE EVERyTHINg RIgHT.

°E  NExT  ¸ORNINg  ON ROUNDs, wE  wERE cONgRaTULaTED  fOR  OUR ¸aNagE¸ENT  Of MR. GILLET’s aRREsT, aLTHOUgH THERE was aN O¸INOUs pÁ VaLUE fRO¸ a bLOOD  gas  ObTaINED EaRLy ON IN THE  EVENT THaT  OccasIONED  sO¸E sHakINg  Of HEaDs.  ÁE HaD NOT REspONDED sINcE THE cODE, bEINg cONTENT TO LIE THERE UNcONscIOUs  IN HIs HaLO, HIs cHEsT RIsINg aND  faLLINg IN REspONsE TO THE VENTILaTOR’s EffORTs. 

BUT HIs VITaL sIgNs wERE sTabLE, HIs Labs fRO¸ THE fOUR ¾.m. DRaw wERE LOOkINg  gOOD, aND º HaD ¸y HOpEs. µO LONgER fOR aN EaRLy DIscHaRgE, bUT º was HOpE-

77

º sHaRED THEsE HOpEs wITH MRs. GILLET wHEN sHE aRRIVED aT sEVEN. SHE sTOOD  aT  THE  bEDsIDE  LOOkINg  DOwN,  aND HER  EyEs  wERE  wET,  HER ¸OUTH  UNsTabLy  ¸ObILE. SHE REacHED OUT aL¸OsT TO TOUcH THE baRs sUppORTINg THE HaLO, DOwN  ONE Of THE THREaDED  RODs THaT pIERcED  HER HUsbaND’s  skIN abOVE THE TE¸pLE,  aL¸OsT  TOUcHED  THERE, THEN  wITHDREw.  “ºs  THIs  THE . . . THINg?  WHaT DO  THEy  caLL IT?” º was sILENT a ¸O¸ENT. “A HaLO,” º saID fiNaLLy. “°Ey caLL IT a HaLO.” “AH,” sHE saID. º LEſt HER aT THE  bEDsIDE, MRs. GILLET wITH ONE HaND  THROUgH  THE cHRO¸E  THaT cRaDLED HER HUsbaND’s HEaD.

¶aVID  GILLET  DIED  fiVE  Days LaTER,  HaVINg  NEVER  REgaINED  cONscIOUsNEss. As  EacH Day passED aND HE gaVE NO sIgN Of ¸ENTaL acTIVITy, EVENTUaLLy IT bEca¸E  cLEaR  THaT  NOT  aLL  Of  HI¸  HaD  sURVIVED  THE  cODE.  MRs. GILLET DEcIDED,  ONcE  pNEU¸ONIa  sET  IN, TO wITHDRaw sUppORT. º  HaD TO  agREE. ´VEN THOUgH º HaD  aNTIcIpaTED THE pNEU¸ONIa, aND was pRETTy sURE º cOULD gET HI¸ THROUgH IT, º  HaD TO agREE IT was fOR THE bEsT. MUcH as º waNTED TO kEEp HI¸ aROUND. ÁE  HaD  bEcO¸E  sO¸ETHINg  UNREaL  fOR  ¸E—sO¸ETHINg  bEaUTIfUL,  LIkE  a  wORk  Of aRT, bUT UNREaL. A¸ID aLL THE ¸Ess aND  sqUaLOR Of THE HOspITaL, wITH  ITs  bLIND  RaNDO¸ UNRaVELINg  Of LIVEs,  IN THEIR  paTIENT  DIgNITy  aND  kINDNEss  HE aND  HIs wIfE sTOOD apaRT. ºN HIs casE, fOR a LITTLE wHILE aT LEasT, EVERyTHINg  HaD gONE ExacTLy as IT sHOULD HaVE. °E pERfEcT cODE. AND IT HaDN’T ¸aDE aNy  DIffERENcE. µO DIffERENcE aT aLL. º pULLED HIs TUbE EaRLy IN THE aſtERNOON, aſtER a  bEDsIDE sERVIcE, aND TOOk ¸y pLacE aT THE waLL wHILE THE UsUaL DRa¸a wORkED  TO ITs cONcLUsION. SHE sENT ¸E a caRD THaT CHRIsT¸as, MRs. GILLET. º kEpT IT fOR a wHILE, UNTIL  IT  VaNIsHED  IN THE  cLUTTER ON ¸y  DEsk. SHE  HaD  wRITTEN a  TExT  INsIDE,  sO¸ETHINg fRO¸ THE µEw ¹EsTa¸ENT º HaD aD¸IRED aT THE bEDsIDE sERVIcE, bUT sOON  fORgOT.  º DO RE¸E¸bER VIVIDLy THE pIcTURE ON THE caRD. ºT was LIkE HER: sObER,  aTTRacTIVE.  ºT  sHOwED  a  ¸EDIEVaL  NaTIVITy  scENE,  aLL  saINTs  aND  aNgELs  wITH  THEIR bURNIsHED gOLDEN OVaLs OVERHEaD. °EIR facEs wERE sORROwfUL IN pROfiLE, as  If  aNTIcIpaTINg wHaT wILL cROwN THaT ROsy  NEwbORN, pERfEcTION  LaID IN sTRaw,  wITH paIN IN TI¸E TO cO¸E.

e d o C  t c e f r e P   e h T

fUL, aLL THE sa¸E.

CoeuR  d’²lene Richard B. Weinberg

¶EspITE  THE  facT THaT  COLOssUs, OUR  NEw ELEcTRONIc  HEaLTH  REcORD pROgRa¸,  HaD  a  cONfUsINg  INTERfacE  Of  UNINTUITIVE  IcONs,  DEaD-END  cLIck  paTHs,  aND  UNwaNTED fUNcTIONs THaT cOULD ONLy HaVE  bEEN DEsIgNED by a  cabaL Of cO¸pUTER  gEEks  aND  bUsINEss  aD¸INIsTRaTORs,  º  DID  ¸y  bEsT  TO  aDapT  IT  TO  THE  NEEDs Of ¸y pRacTIcE. BUT º I¸¸EDIaTELy NOTED  a DIsTREssINg pRObLE¸: UsINg  COLOssUs  TO  ENTER EVEN THE  sI¸pLEsT  NOTE  REqUIRED ¸ORE  Of ¸y  TI¸E—a LOT  ¸ORE. SOON º was spENDINg as ¸UcH TI¸E TENDINg TO ¸y cHaRTs as º was TaLkINg  TO  ¸y paTIENTs.  AND  COLOssUs  was  ¸ONITORINg  ¸y EVERy  cLIck,  THE a¸OUNT  Of TI¸E a cHaRT sTayED  OpEN, ¸y bILLINg cODEs. ´VERy Day, º was gREETED by  a  ¶OcTOR’s  ¶asHbOaRD  THaT  RaTED ¸y  (sUbpaR)  pERfOR¸aNcE  aND  URgED  ¸E  TO bE fasTER. º DID NOT NEED TO bE RE¸INDED THaT THEsE DaTa wOULD bE UsED TO  DETER¸INE ¸y cO¸pENsaTION. ºT  INTRIgUED  ¸E  THaT  THEsE  IssUEs  DID  NOT  sEE¸  TO  bOTHER  OUR  TRaINEEs.  BORN  INTO  THE  INfOR¸aTION  agE,  fa¸ILIaR wITH  cO¸pUTERs  aND  THE  ºNTERNET  sINcE  INfaNcy, THEy TREaTED  THE  INsTaLLaTION Of  COLOssUs  LIkE THE  appEaRaNcE  Of jUsT aNOTHER s¸aRTpHONE app aND bLITHELy cLIckED THEIR way THROUgH THEIR  paTIENT  ENcOUNTERs  wITH  I¸pREssIVE  spEED.  BUT  IT  TROUbLED  ¸E  THaT  THEIR  EfficIENcy  DID  NOT  NEcEssaRILy  EqUaTE  wITH  DELIVERINg  gOOD  ¸EDIcaL  caRE.  ¶R. MaNNINg,  THE  REsIDENT  assIgNED TO  ¸y cLINIc  ONE FRIDay  ¸ORNINg, was  NO  DIffERENT.  ±UR  fiRsT  paTIENT was  a  54-yEaR-OLD  ¸aN  REfERRED  fOR  cHRONIc  DIaRRHEa. ¶R. MaNNINg ExITED THE Exa¸INaTION ROO¸ aſtER a scaNT 10 ¸INUTEs  bUT  was  abLE  TO  pREsENT  a  REasONabLE,  If  NOT  gENERIc,  DIffERENTIaL  DIagNOsIs  aND  caRE pLaN.  ·pON VIsITINg THE paTIENT, º cONcURRED. “²ET’s gO sEE  THE NExT  paTIENT,” º saID. “YOU caN fiNIsH THE ENcOUNTER NOTE LaTER.” “±H, º’VE aLREaDy fiNIsHED THE NOTE.” “ÁOw DID yOU DO THaT?”

³IcHaRD B. WEINbERg, “COEUR  D’ALENE,” fRO¸ Annals of Internal Medicine 165, NO. 11 (2016): 822– 823. doi:10.7326/m16-0258. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of A¸ERIcaN COLLEgE Of PHysIcIaNs.

“º  UsED  a  DIsEasE-spEcIfic  ¸acRO  TE¸pLaTE  THaT  º  pROgRa¸¸ED  TO  aUTOpOpULaTE wITH paTIENT DaTa  jUsT bEfORE THE VIsIT, THEN º cLIckED IN THE HIsTORy 

79

bEfORE º LEſt THE ROO¸.” º LOOkED OVER aT ¸y cO¸pUTER scREEN  aND saw  THaT, INDEED, HIs  ENcOUNTER  NOTE  HaD  aLREaDy  bEEN  fORwaRDED  TO  ¸y  INbOx  fOR  aUTHENTIcaTION  aND  sIgNaTURE—wHIcH, º REflEcTED saDLy, wOULD pRObabLy TakE ¸E ¸ORE TI¸E THaN  IT TOOk HI¸ TO wRITE IT. º aLsO NOTED THaT aLL Of THE ¸EaNINgfUL UsE bOxEs HaD  bEEN  cHEckED  aND  THE  paTIENT INfOR¸aTION  sHEETs  aND  aſtER-VIsIT sU¸¸aRy  HaD bEEN pRINTED OUT. º REVIEwED HIs NOTE; IT REaD as fOLLOws: »»: DIaRRHEa

×

×

+

±



h¿i: LOOsE sTOOLs  6 ¸O; 4–6 /Day; ( ) pOsTpRaNDIaL, ( ) NOcTURNaL; ( )  HE¸E, fEVER ¿mh, Àh: ON cHaRT



ro¼: aLL OTHER sysTE¸s ( ) ¿ex: {NOR¸aL TE¸pLaTE} ddx: ¶IaRRHEa, INfEcTIOUs V Os¸OTIc V sEcRETORy PLaN: sTOOL fOR Çi paTHOgENs, C. DIff, LacTOfERRIN, Os¸, LyTEs; »½», »m¿,  cELIac sEROLOgy paNEL; cOLONOscOpy w/Bx; TRIaL Of CIpRO; DIaRRHEa INfO sHEET ºT was cONcIsE, EfficIENT—aND sOULLEss. “WHERE’s THE sOcIaL HIsTORy?” º INqUIRED. “°E NURsEs aLREaDy askED HI¸ abOUT TObaccO aND aLcOHOL UsE.” “°ERE’s a bIT ¸ORE TO THE sOcIaL HIsTORy THaN THaT. WHERE was HE bORN?” ÁE  LOOkED aT ¸E  as  If  º HaD  askED HOw ¸aNy  fOLDs  wERE IN  HIs  paTIENT’s  cEREbELLU¸. “º DON’T kNOw,” HE REpLIED IN bEwILDER¸ENT. “ºs HE ¸aRRIED? ¶OEs HE HaVE aNy cHILDREN?” “°aT’s pRObabLy IN THE cHaRT sO¸EwHERE,” HE OffERED La¸ELy. “WHaT DOEs HE DO fOR a LIVINg?” “º’¸ sORRy. º DIDN’T ask.” “SO, yOU DON’T REaLLy kNOw wHO THIs pERsON Is aT aLL, DO yOU?” ¶R.  MaNNINg  LOOkED  DOwN  IN  DIs¸ay.  WHy  was  º  askINg  sUcH  sTRaNgE  qUEsTIONs? “²ET ¸E  TELL  yOU  THE aDVIcE  THaT  ¸y pHysIcaL  DIagNOsIs  TEacHER  gaVE  ¸E  OVER  40 yEaRs  agO. ³IgHT Off,  ask  EVERy  paTIENT fOUR  qUEsTIONs:  WHERE wERE  yOU bORN? ARE yOU ¸aRRIED, aND DO yOU HaVE cHILDREN? WHERE DID yOU gO TO 

enelA’d rueoC

as  º was  TaLkINg TO  THE paTIENT,  ENTERED ¸y ORDERs,  aND  cLOsED OUT THE NOTE 

scHOOL? WHaT kIND Of wORk DO yOU DO? ºf yOU DO THIs, IT wILL bE a RaRE paTIENT 

80

wITH wHO¸ yOU DON’T fiND sO¸E pOINT Of cONNEcTION.” ÁE  sEE¸ED  VERy  DUbIOUs  bUT  sOLDIERED  Off  TO  sEE  OUR  NExT  paTIENT,  a 

g r e b n i e W  . B   d r a h c i R

78-yEaR-OLD  wO¸aN  REfERRED fOR  bLOaTINg  aND  abDO¸INaL  paIN.  AſtER ¸ORE  THaN aN HOUR HE sTILL HaD NOT E¸ERgED fRO¸ THE Exa¸INaTION ROO¸. PERHaps  HE  was TRappED  by a  LOqUacIOUs paTIENT wHO HaD  cO¸¸aNDEERED THE INTERVIEw,  º  ¸UsED.  JUsT  as  º  was  abOUT TO  gO  REscUE  HI¸,  HE  REappEaRED  IN  THE  DOcTOR’s wORkROO¸, HIs facE bEa¸INg wITH ExcITE¸ENT. “º  askED  THE  fOUR  qUEsTIONs,”  HE  aNNOUNcED  pROUDLy.  “My  paTIENT  was  bORN IN COEUR D’ALENE, ºDaHO!” “³EaLLy? µOT ¸aNy ºDaHOaNs HERE IN µORTH CaROLINa.” “YEs,  bUT  º’¸  ONE  Of  THE¸.  º  was  bORN  IN  COEUR  D’ALENE,  TOO!  AND  ¶R. WEINbERg—yOU’RE NOT gOINg TO bELIEVE THIs—HER sIsTER was ¸y fiRsT-gRaDE  TEacHER!  WE sTaRTED  TaLkINg abOUT aLL  THE pEOpLE wE  kNEw back HO¸E, aND º  aL¸OsT fORgOT TO ask abOUT HER pRObLE¸. BUT THEN º askED If sHE was ¸aRRIED,  aND sHE TOLD ¸E THaT HER HUsbaND DIED sUDDENLy LasT yEaR fRO¸ a sTROkE. ÁER  bROTHER LIVEs IN CHaRLOTTE—THaT’s wHy sHE ¸OVED HERE. SHE aND HER HUsbaND  UsED TO EaT DINNER TOgETHER EVERy sINgLE NIgHT fOR 60 yEaRs. SHE caN’T bEaR TO  EaT aLONE aT HO¸E NOw, sO sHE EaTs ¸OsT Of HER ¸EaLs aT a Ë&Ì CafETERIa.” A NaRRaTIVE sTORy! ºN pROsE! “º  THINk  º  kNOw  wHaT’s  wRONg,”  HE  cONTINUED.  “SHE’s  bEEN  EaTINg  a  LOT  Of  SOUTHERN  fOOD—bIscUITs,  cREa¸  gRaVy,  ¸asHED  pOTaTOEs,  cUsTaRD  pIEs.  °ERE’s a LOT Of ¸ILk IN THOsE fOODs THE way THEy ¸akE THE¸ HERE. º THINk sHE  Has LacTOsE INTOLERaNcE, aND IT’s HER NEw DIET THaT’s  caUsINg HER bLOaTINg aND  cRa¸ps! ALL sHE NEEDs Is sO¸E LacTasE pILLs!” WE  RETURNED  TO  THE  Exa¸INaTION  ROO¸,  aND  º  INTRODUcED  ¸ysELf  TO  THE  wHITE-HaIRED LaDy wHO saT NExT TO THE cONsULTaTION DEsk. “º HEaR IT’s bEEN OLD  HO¸E wEEk IN HERE,” º jOkED. “YEs. º THINk THIs fiNE yOUNg DOcTOR Has ¸E  figURED OUT,” sHE REpLIED. SHE  REacHED  OUT aND  TOOk  HIs  HaND. “µOw,  º  kNOw yOU’RE  aN ExpERT,  ¶R. WEINbERg, aND º ¸EaN NO DIsREspEcT, bUT º wOULD LIkE ¶R. MaNNINg TO bE ¸y DOcTOR fRO¸ NOw ON. ÁE kNOws wHERE º’¸ fRO¸.” ¶R. MaNNINg LOOkED Up aT ¸E sHEEpIsHLy; º NODDED back. “º agREE cO¸pLETELy, MRs. SORENsON. YOU’RE IN VERy gOOD HaNDs.” Back  IN  THE  DOcTOR’s  wORkROO¸,  º  pRaIsED  ¸y  REsIDENT.  “´xcELLENT  jOb!  PLEasE kEEp ¸E  INfOR¸ED HOw sHE’s DOINg. µOw, DID yOU wRITE aLL THIs DOwN  IN yOUR pROgREss NOTE?” “µO, NOT yET. º was TOO bUsy TaLkINg. º’LL fiNIsH THE NOTE LaTER TODay. ·H—Is  THaT Okay?”

“YEs, IT ¸OsT cERTaINLy Is.” “°aNk  yOU,  ¶R. WEINbERg.  µO  ONE  Has EVER  TaUgHT  ¸E  sO¸ETHINg  LIkE 

81

“YOU’RE wELcO¸E. AND THaNk yOU fOR sHOwINg ¸E THaT aUTOTExT TRIck. ÂERy  cOOL.” ¶R.  MaNNINg  DEpaRTED  fOR  HIs  NOON  cONfERENcE, aND  º  wENT  TO  sEE  ¸y  LasT  TwO  paTIENTs.  By  NOw,  º was  ¸ORE  THaN  aN HOUR  bEHIND  scHEDULE.  °E  ¶asHbOaRD was  NOT gOINg TO bE kIND TO ¸E, bUT º DIDN’T caRE. º DON’T NEED a  cO¸pUTER TO TELL ¸E HOw TO bE a DOcTOR.

enelA’d rueoC

THIs bEfORE.”

´he “WoRThy”  ³AT±enT ´±THINKINg  TH±  “¶Idd±N  CURRIcUlUM”  IN µ±dIcAl  EdUcATION Robin T. Higashi, Allison Tillack, Michael A. Steinman,  C. Bree Johnston, and G. Michael Harper

¶URINg cLINIcaL TRaININg, ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs aND REsIDENTs IN ¸ajOR ·.S. ¸EDIcaL  scHOOLs LEaRN TO pROVIDE  DaILy  caRE fOR NU¸EROUs  paTIENTs IN a LI¸ITED  a¸OUNT Of TI¸E. PROVIDINg THE “bEsT caRE pOssIbLE” bEcO¸Es a HIgHLy qUaLIfiED, sUbjEcTIVE ENDEaVOR, aND sTRaTEgIEs fOR accO¸pLIsHINg THIs aRE LEaRNED  “ON THE jOb” DURINg cLINIcaL ROTaTIONs. ÁOw DO pHysIcIaNs DEcIDE HOw ¸UcH  TI¸E  TO DEVOTE TO EacH  paTIENT IN ORDER TO  pROVIDE caRE? ÁOw Is THIs  DETER¸INaTION ¸aDE, aND HOw Is THIs pROcEss TaUgHT TO pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg? ºT  Is aRgUED IN THIs papER THaT THEsE DEcIsIONs aRE DIcTaTED by a ¸ORaL EcONO¸y  RaTHER THaN a kNOwLEDgE EcONO¸y IN wHIcH VaLUEs, bEHaVIORaL NOR¸s, aND  ETHIcaL  assU¸pTIONs gUIDE TRaNsacTIONs as ¸UcH,  If NOT  ¸ORE, THaN  kNOwLEDgE aND skILL. ¶RawINg fRO¸ REsEaRcH aT TwO ¸ajOR A¸ERIcaN ¸ETROpOLITaN  TEacHINg  HOspITaLs,  THIs  papER  ILLU¸INaTEs  HOw  THIs  pROcEss  Of  EVaLUaTION  OccURs.

Background »H±  “¶Idd±N  CURRIcUlUM” °E  RITUaL  bEHaVIORs,  assU¸pTIONs,  aND  cO¸¸ONLy HELD bELIEfs  Of  TEacHINg  pHysIcIaNs cONsTITUTE wHaT Has bEEN TER¸ED THE “HIDDEN cURRIcULU¸” (JacksON  1968; ÁaffERTy aND FRaNks 1994; WEaR  1998).à As OppOsED TO  THE fOR¸aL 

³ObIN ¹. ÁIgasHI, ALLIsON ¹ILLack, MIcHaEL A. STEIN¸aN, C. BREE JOHNsTON, aND G. MIcHaEL ÁaRpER,  “°E ‘WORTHy’ PaTIENT: ³ETHINkINg THE ‘ÁIDDEN CURRIcULU¸’ IN MEDIcaL ´DUcaTION,” fRO¸ Anthro-

pology and Medicine 20, NO. 1 (2013): 13–23. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of ¹ayLOR aND FRaNcIs ²TD.

cURRIcULU¸, wHIcH INVOLVEs kNOwLEDgE cO¸¸UNIcaTED VIa sUcH ¸EcHaNIs¸s  as  LEcTUREs, pLaNNED s¸aLL gROUp  acTIVITIEs, TExTs, aND  ONLINE LEaRNINg ¸OD-

83

a cULTURaL pROcEss THROUgH wHIcH sTUDENTs LEaRN wHaT Is aND wHaT sHOULD bE  VaLUED aND HOw TO DIscRI¸INaTE bETwEEN “gOOD” aND “baD” cLINIcaL pRacTIcEs.  ºN  DOINg  sO,  pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg  LEaRN  TO  sUbjEcTIVELy  DEfiNE paTIENTs  IN  ways THaT gUIDE THEIR INTERacTIONs aND INflUENcE DEcIsIONs abOUT THE paTIENT’s  ¸EDIcaL caRE (FINE¸aN 1991). WHILE  THE  fOR¸aL  cURRIcULU¸  Is  I¸pLIcITLy  DIREcTED  aT  HELpINg  sTUDENTs  REsIsT  ¸akINg  VaLUE  jUDg¸ENTs Of paTIENTs,  THE  HIDDEN  cURRIcULU¸ ENcOURagEs  sTUDENTs TO  cULTIVaTE aN INDEx  Of VaLUE  jUDg¸ENTs THaT  ENabLE THE¸ TO  acT  wITHIN a  ¸ORaL EcONO¸y Of  caRE. PERcEpTIONs Of  paTIENT wORTHINEss  aRE  ONE  aspEcT Of THE HIDDEN  cURRIcULU¸, aND  paRTIcIpaNT NaRRaTIVEs sHOw HOw  THE  ¸ORaL EcONO¸y Is TaUgHT  TO  pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg VIa THE HIDDEN  cURRIcULU¸.  ÁOwEVER,  pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg aRE NOT  sI¸pLy passIVE  REcIpIENTs  Of THE HIDDEN cURRIcULU¸ bUT INsTEaD aRE acTIVE agENTs, “pUsHINg back agaINsT  aND  TRaNsfOR¸INg THE sTRUcTURE, EVEN as THEy OpERaTE wITHIN ITs cONsTRaINTs”  (¶aVENpORT 2000, 324).

º µORAl  EcONOMY  Of CAR± °E  cONcEpT Of ¸ORaL EcONO¸y Is  a DERIVaTIVE Of pOLITIcaL EcONO¸y, a  THEORETIcaL appROacH TO UNDERsTaNDINg THE sTRUcTURaL RELaTIONsHIp bETwEEN pOLITIcaL  INsTITUTIONs  aND  EcONO¸Ic  pOwER.  KOHLI  (1987,  125)  DEfiNEs  THE  ¸ORaL  EcONO¸y  as “THE cOLLEcTIVELy sHaRED ¸ORaL  assU¸pTIONs UNDERLyINg NOR¸s  Of  REcIpROcITy  IN wHIcH  a  ¸aRkET  EcONO¸y  Is  gROUNDED.”  ºN OTHER  wORDs,  a  ¸ORaL  EcONO¸y pERspEcTIVE sEEks TO UNDERsTaND THE ETHIcs aND  DIspOsITIONs  THaT INflUENcE EcONO¸Ic ExcHaNgEs, aND VIcE VERsa. FOR Exa¸pLE, THE cONcEpT  Has OſtEN bEEN UsED IN THE cONTExT Of HEaLTH caRE TO UNDERsTaND HOw ¸aNagED  caRE pOLIcIEs aRE INflUENcED  by cULTURaLLy DEfiNED NOTIONs Of basIc ¸EDIcaL  NEEDs  (SpRINkLE 2001). ºN TURN, IDEas abOUT  wHaT cONsTITUTEs basIc  ¸EDIcaL NEEDs aRE REIfiED OR cONTRaDIcTED by INsURaNcE pOLIcIEs THaT DEfiNE wHIcH  sERVIcEs aRE cOVERED. PHysIcIaNs’  OwN cULTURaL  bELIEfs,  ROOTED  IN bIO¸EDIcINE  as sHaRED sOcIaL  VaLUEs,  INcLUDE  ¸ORaLIzINg  assU¸pTIONs  abOUT  paTIENTs  aND  THEIR  ILLNEssEs.  PHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg LEaRN TO UsE THEsE cULTURaL bELIEfs aND VaLUEs TO ¸akE  assEss¸ENTs abOUT paTIENT wORTHINEss, aND THEsE DETER¸INaTIONs gUIDE DEcIsIONs abOUT THE qUaLITy aND qUaNTITy Of caRE pROVIDED TO EacH paTIENT. ºNsTEaD  Of ¸ONEy OR ¸aTERIaL gOODs, TI¸E Is THE cURRENcy THaT Is spENT aND saVED by 

tneitaP   ” y h t r o W “   e h T

ULEs, THE basIc pRE¸IsE Of THE HIDDEN cURRIcULU¸ Is THaT ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION Is 

pHysIcIaNs.  As ExcHaNgE  fOR  THIs  capITaL,  pHysIcIaNs  ¸ay  ExpEcT  TO  REcEIVE, 

84

a¸ONg  OTHER  THINgs,  a  sENsE  Of  cO¸pETENcE  aND  pURpOsE,  ¸EasURabLE  I¸pROVE¸ENT  IN  THE  paTIENT’s  HEaLTH  sTaTUs,  aND  pERHaps  pOsITIVE  fEEDback 

. l a   t e   i h s a g i H .T   n i b o R

fRO¸ THEIR  sUpERIORs OR fRO¸ paTIENTs.  FRO¸ a  ¸ORaL EcONO¸y pERspEcTIVE,  a  paTIENT wHOsE  HEaLTH wILL  I¸pROVE  LITTLE DEspITE ¸EDIcaL  INTERVENTION  Has  LEss capITaL THaN a paTIENT wHO sTaNDs TO ¸akE a fULL REcOVERy gIVEN THE sa¸E  a¸OUNT  Of TI¸E spENT. ºN aRgUINg a ¸ORaL EcONO¸y Of cLINIcaL pRacTIcE, IT Is  NOT pOsITED THaT THE INTERacTIONs bETwEEN pHysIcIaN aND paTIENT aRE REDUcED  TO a sI¸pLE EcONO¸Ic EqUaTION. ºNsTEaD, IT Is aRgUED THaT ¸ORaLIzINg assU¸pTIONs aND VaLUEs aRE INHERENT IN pHysIcIaN TRaININg, aND HOwEVER sUbTLy THEy  ¸ay bE cO¸¸UNIcaTED, jUDg¸ENTs abOUT VaRyINg DEgREEs Of paTIENT wORTHINEss INflUENcE paTIENT caRE.

Methods °E  DaTa  fOR  THIs  papER  wERE  gaTHERED  THROUgH  ETHNOgRapHIc  fiELD  REsEaRcH  OVER a pERIOD Of fOUR ¸ONTHs IN 2005. ³EsEaRcH was cONDUcTED aT TwO TERTIaRy  caRE  TEacHINg  HOspITaLs,  bOTH  LOcaTED  IN a  LaRgE  cITy  IN µORTHERN  CaLIfORNIa.  WHILE bOTH HOspITaLs sERVED ETHNIcaLLy DIVERsE paTIENTs, ONE HOspITaL pRI¸aRILy  caRED fOR LOw-INcO¸E paTIENTs wHILE THE OTHER HaD a ¸ORE EcONO¸IcaLLy VaRIED  paTIENT  pOpULaTION.  ´THNOgRapHIc  REsEaRcH  INVOLVED  fOLLOwINg  a  TOTaL  Of  TEN  ¸EDIcaL TEa¸s, EacH fOR a pERIOD Of ONE wEEk. Ä A TEa¸ TypIcaLLy cONsIsTED Of  ONE aTTENDINg (cLINIcaL facULTy ¸E¸bER), ONE REsIDENT (sEcOND-yEaR REsIDENT),  ONE  INTERN  (fiRsT-yEaR  REsIDENT),  ONE  fOURTH-yEaR  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT,  aND  ONE  THIRD-yEaR ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT. ALL ¸E¸bERs Of THE TEa¸ ExcEpT fOR THE aTTENDINg  wERE DEfiNED as “pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg” aND wERE pOTENTIaL sTUDy paRTIcIpaNTs. ¶aTa  wERE  gaTHERED  UsINg  IN-DEpTH  INTERVIEws  aND  DIREcT  ObsERVaTION,  aLLOwINg  fOR  THE  cO¸paRIsON  Of  bEHaVIORs aND  OpINIONs  ExpREssED  IN  bOTH  ¸ORE aND LEss fOR¸aL ENVIRON¸ENTs. ±bsERVaTIONs  fOcUsED  ON  acTIVITIEs  IN  wHIcH  pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg  INTERacTED wITH OTHER ¸E¸bERs Of THE ¸EDIcaL TEa¸, Na¸ELy DURINg ¸ORNINg  ROUNDs. ºN  THE aſtERNOONs,  paRTIcIpaNTs  wERE ObsERVED IN  UNsTRUcTURED,  LEss fOR¸aL INTERacTIONs,  UsUaLLy IN  aND aROUND THE sTaff wORk  aREa, bUT  aLsO  IN caLL  ROO¸s, THE cafETERIa,  HaLLways, aND sTaIRwELLs. A TOTaL Of 21 INTERVIEws  wERE cONDUcTED,  DIgITaLLy REcORDED, aND  TRaNscRIbED. QUaLITaTIVE  DaTa aNaLysIs cONsIsTs Of ITERaTIVE REaDINgs Of aLL TRaNscRIpTIONs aND ObsERVaTION NOTEs TO  DIsTILL E¸ERgINg THE¸Es, paTTERNs, aND aREas Of INTEREsT (ScHENsUL, ScHENsUL,  aND  ²ECO¸pTE 1999). ºNfOR¸aTION ObTaINED THROUgH INTERVIEws was RELaTED 

TO  ObsERVaTIONaL DaTa, aND  REcURRINg  IDEas  wERE assIgNED cODE  Na¸Es (E.g.,  “fRUsTRaTION,”  “¸ONEy,” “TEa¸ DyNa¸Ic”), wHIcH wERE  UsED TO  ORgaNIzE, caT-

85

ONE Of THE kEy THE¸Es THaT E¸ERgED THROUgH THIs aNaLysIs: paTIENT wORTHINEss.

Who Are the “Less  Worthy” Patients? »H±  “FR±qU±NT  FlY±R” PaRTIcIpaNTs fELT ¸OsT NEgaTIVELy TOwaRD paTIENTs wHO wERE kNOwN TO cycLE IN  aND OUT Of THE HOspITaL. SUcH paTIENTs, wHO wERE OſtEN HO¸ELEss aND/OR DRUg  UsERs OR HaD cHRONIc cONDITIONs, wERE OſtEN DEscRIbED as EspEcIaLLy “fRUsTRaTINg.”  SO¸E  paRTIcIpaNTs OpENLy caLLED THE¸  by THE  pEjORaTIVE “fREqUENT  flyERs” (fOR ¸akINg fREqUENT TRIps TO THE HOspITaL). ºf a paTIENT was aD¸ITTED ON  ¸ULTIpLE OccasIONs, OR  If THE paTIENT HaD pREVIOUsLy LEſt THE HOspITaL  agaINsT  ¸EDIcaL aDVIcE (¾m¾), THIs INfOR¸aTION was INcLUDED DURINg THE pREsENTaTION.  As  ONE fOURTH-yEaR  ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT saID,  “PaTIENTs wHO  aRE VERy  wELL-kNOwN  TO THE DOcTORs, THEy’VE cO¸E IN ¸aNy TI¸Es, aND THEy sIgN OUT ¾m¾. AND yOU  kNOw EVEN If yOU pUT a TON Of ¸ONEy INTO THE¸ THEy’RE gOINg TO LEaVE.” SI¸ILaRLy, aN INTERN sTaTED,  ºT’s fRUsTRaTINg bEcaUsE yOU kNOw IT’s a paTIENT THaT yOU’RE jUsT sORT Of TUNINg Up aND  THEy’RE gOINg  TO gO  HO¸E aND THEy’RE  gOINg TO  cO¸E back IN  THREE Days aND THERE’s NOTHINg yOU caN REaLLy DO abOUT IT . . . yOU HaVE sO  ¸aNy paTIENTs ON yOUR TEa¸ aND yOU HaVE THIs paTIENT THaT Has THE sa¸E  IssUEs EVERy  TI¸E.  AND  If  yOU  kNOw  THaT  pRObabLy  NO  ¸aTTER  wHaT  yOU  DO THEy’RE gOINg  TO END Up gOINg  HO¸E aND cO¸INg back, THEN yOU ¸ay  NOT TRy as HaRD as pOssIbLE TO gET THE¸ INTO a gOOD sITUaTION bEcaUsE yOU  THINk pRObabLy yOU’RE gOINg TO spEND HOURs aND HOURs aND HOURs aND THE  REsULT Is gOINg TO bE THE sa¸E. . . . SO¸E paRTIcIpaNTs REflEcTED ON THE facT THaT NOT aLL “fREqUENT flyERs” wERE  pURpOsELy TakINg aDVaNTagE Of THE sysTE¸, bUT IN facT HaD fEw aLTERNaTIVEs TO  REcEIVE TREaT¸ENT by aNy OTHER ¸EaNs. °Us, wHILE THEy DIDN’T fEEL THaT THEsE  paTIENTs wERE LEss wORTHy  Of caRE, pER sE, THEy fELT fRUsTRaTED by THE facT THaT  sIgNIficaNT HEaLTH caRE DOLLaRs wERE “DRaINED” ON sUcH paTIENTs. ³EflEcTINg ON  THIs  sITUaTION, aN INTERN cO¸¸ENTED,  “WE spEND a LOT Of ¸ONEy ON caRE fOR  paTIENTs  IN THE  HOspITaLs,  bUT wE REaLLy  DEVOTE NONE  TO wHaT  HappENs wHEN  THEy LEaVE THE HOspITaL.”

tneitaP   ” y h t r o W “   e h T

EgORIzE,  aND RaNk kEy THE¸Es IN  aN ONgOINg pROcEss. °Is papER REflEcTs ON 

86

¸RUg ºddIcTS ºN  REspONsE  TO qUEsTIONs abOUT  wHETHER HE  Has REcEIVED NEgaTIVE ¸EssagEs 

. l a   t e   i h s a g i H .T   n i b o R

abOUT  cERTaIN paTIENTs,  ONE INTERN  saID, “ºf  º HaD  TO TaRgET  a  gROUp THaT  was  spOkEN  pOORLy Of  aND  wHO pEOpLE  ROLLED THEIR  EyEs  TO . . . IT  wOULD bE  DRUg  UsERs  aND DRUg  sEEkERs.”  MaNy  paRTIcIpaNTs fELT sUcH  paTIENTs  ExpLOITED  THE  sysTE¸  bEcaUsE THEy sEE¸ED  LEss INTEREsTED  IN REcEIVINg  ¸EDIcaL  caRE  THaN  THEy  wERE  IN  sEcURINg  fOOD  aND  HOUsINg,  aND  bEcaUsE  THEy  wERE  UNLIkELy  TO  ¸akE  aNy cHaNgEs  IN  THE bEHaVIORs THaT  caUsED  THEIR  ¸EDIcaL pRObLE¸s.  ANOTHER INTERN cO¸¸ENTED, °E pROTOTypE paTIENT wHO wOULDN’T  bE wORTHy Of  caRE wOULD bE THE cRack  aDDIcT wHO cO¸Es IN wITH cHEsT paIN, aND THIs Is HIs fiſtH TI¸E THaT HE’s cO¸E  IN REcENTLy, aND waNTs a LUNcH bag, aND IsN’T INTEREsTED IN ¸EDIcaL caRE. ºDEas  abOUT  DIsTRIbUTIVE  jUsTIcE  gOVERNED  ¸aNy  DETER¸INaTIONs  Of  paTIENT  wORTHINEss. SEVERaL paRTIcIpaNTs ExpREssED sTRONg fEELINgs abOUT wHIcH paTIENTs  THEy fELT wERE ¸ORE DEsERVINg Of HEaLTH caRE DOLLaRs, aND wHIcH, IN acTUaLITy,  REcEIVED THOsE REsOURcEs. ±NE sEcOND-yEaR REsIDENT fELT E¸bITTERED by a paRTIcULaR paTIENT, a HO¸ELEss ¸aN wITH a  HIsTORy Of pOLy-sUbsTaNcE abUsE wHO  HaD bEEN aD¸ITTED sEVERaL TI¸Es fOR THE sa¸E UNDERLyINg IssUEs. ÁE assERTED,  fRaNkLy, “°ERE’s pRObabLy NOT a LOT Of REasON TO kEEp UsINg ¸EDIcaL REsOURcEs  ON THEsE pEOpLE aND  REDIscOVERINg THE sa¸E THINgs  THaT yOU aLREaDy  kNEw.”  °Is  paRTIcIpaNT REcaLLED LEaRNINg THIs LEssON EaRLy ON as a ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT.  “ºT’s  NOT  ExpLIcITLy  saID  THaT  THEy  DEsERVE  LEss  caRE,  bUT  IT  is ExpLIcITLy  saID  THaT yOU DON’T NEED TO REINVENT THE wHEEL. ºN OTHER wORDs, THEy’VE HaD a fULL,  sIgNIficaNT  wORkUp OVER  THE cOURsE  Of ¸ULTIpLE HOspITaLIzaTIONs”  (E¸pHasIs  IN ORIgINaL).

»H±  ¼ONAdH±R±NT  ³ATI±NT AL¸OsT  UNIVERsaLLy, paRTIcIpaNTs  fELT  aT  a LOss  TO  UNDERsTaND  wHy  paTIENTs  wOULD REfUsE TO fOLLOw THROUgH wITH VaRIOUs TREaT¸ENT REgI¸ENs wHEN DOINg  sO wOULD REsULT IN aN I¸pROVE¸ENT IN THEIR cONDITION. µONaDHERENT paTIENTs  wERE DEE¸ED LEss wORTHy Of caRE bEcaUsE, IN THE paRTIcIpaNTs’ VIEws, THE TEa¸’s  EffORTs wERE fUTILE IN REsOLVINg THE UNDERLyINg ¸EDIcaL pRObLE¸. ±NE fOURTH-  yEaR sTUDENT INDIcaTED, “YOU kIND Of sTaRT caTERINg yOUR caRE TO wHaT yOU kNOw  THEy wILL DO TO TakE caRE Of THE¸sELVEs.” ºf paTIENTs DIDN’T INVEsT THE TI¸E aND  ENERgy  REqUIRED TO  I¸pROVE  THEIR  ¸EDIcaL  cONDITION,  THEN  paRTIcIpaNTs  fELT  jUsTIfiED IN INVEsTINg LEss IN THE¸ as wELL.

SO¸ETI¸Es NONaDHERENcE cENTERED ON a paTIENT’s REfUsaL TO REfRaIN fRO¸  ENgagINg  IN cERTaIN sELf-HaR¸ bEHaVIORs. ±NE sEcOND-yEaR REsIDENT sTaTED 

87

TakE  THEIR ¸EDs,  aND INsTEaD UsE  ILLIcIT sTUff THaT’s  HaR¸fUL TO  THEIR HEaLTH,  aND  THEy’RE sEEN IN THE HOspITaL  OVER aND  OVER agaIN” aRE LEss wORTHy Is  ONE  THaT  Is  cO¸¸UNIcaTED  EaRLy aND  OſtEN. “º’VE  DEfiNITELy HaD  aTTENDINgs  wHO  fEEL qUITE sTRONgLy ON THaT,” sHE aDDED. °E fRUsTRaTION IN THEsE casEs sEE¸ED  TO fOcUs LEss ON THE facT THaT THE paTIENTs ENgagED IN sELf-HaR¸ bEHaVIORs, bUT  ¸ORE ON THE facT THaT THEy REcEIVED ExpENsIVE TREaT¸ENTs THaT wOULD LIkELy bE  UNDONE by THE paTIENT’s cONTINUED sELf-HaR¸INg. FRO¸ a ¸ORaL EcONO¸y pERspEcTIVE, HEaLTH caRE DOLLaRs sHOULD pROVIDE THE gREaTEsT gOOD fOR THE gREaTEsT  NU¸bER  Of  pEOpLE.  PaRTIcIpaNTs  fELT  sTRONgLy THaT  THE  a¸OUNT  Of  REsOURcEs  spENT ON ONE paTIENT—EspEcIaLLy If  THaT paTIENT HaD acTIVELy caUsED  HIs OwN  ¸EDIcaL pRObLE¸s—wOULD bE bETTER spENT ON pREVENTIVE caRE fOR THOUsaNDs  Of OTHER paTIENTs, wHO pREsU¸abLy DID NOT ENgagE IN sELf-HaR¸.

»H±  ¸±fiANT  ³ATI±NT ³EgaRDLEss  Of THEIR ¸EDIcaL cONDITION, paTIENTs wHO bEHaVED RUDELy TOwaRD  sTaff wERE aL¸OsT UNIVERsaLLy pERcEIVED as bEINg LEss wORTHy Of TI¸E aND aTTENTION.  SEVERaL  paRTIcIpaNTs  REcaLLED ExpERIENcEs  wITH  paTIENTs wHOsE  bEHaVIOR  RaNgED  fRO¸ ¸ODERaTELy  UNpLEasaNT TO pHysIcaLLy  aND  VERbaLLy  abUsIVE.  PaRTIcIpaNTs  aD¸ITTED  THaT  THEy DELIbERaTELy  spENT ¸INI¸aL  TI¸E  wITH sUcH  paTIENTs. FOR Exa¸pLE, DURINg THE wEEk IN wHIcH THE REsEaRcHER ObsERVED HIs  TEa¸, aN INTERN REpORTED THaT ONE Of HIs paTIENTs was THROwINg HIs DIRTy DIapERs aT THE NURsEs aND URINaTINg ON THE flOOR (INsTEaD Of IN a DIapER) bEcaUsE  HE  was  UNHappy  THaT  THE  NURsEs HaD  NOT  REspONDED  qUIckLy ENOUgH  TO HIs  REqUEsT fOR HELp gETTINg TO THE baTHROO¸. FOLLOwINg THIs INcIDENT, THE INTERN  OVERHEaRD sTaff sayINg THEy wOULD DO THE absOLUTE ¸INI¸U¸ fOR THIs paTIENT  aND TRy TO HaVE HI¸ DIscHaRgED OR TRaNsfERRED OUT Of THEIR  UNIT as sOON as  pOssIbLE. SI¸ILaRLy, a  THIRD-yEaR  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT  REcaLLED HER VERy  fiRsT  paTIENT IN  THE DEpaRT¸ENT: FOR  THREE  wEEks  HE  was  VERy  abUsIVE  TO  EVERyONE,  HE  wOULD  swEaR  aT  pEOpLE aND wOULD REfUsE TO DO THINgs aND wOULD caLL pEOpLE VaRIOUs ETHNIc  sLURs  aND  HORRIbLE  THINgs.  SO  pEOpLE  wOULD  TREaT  HI¸  VERy  baDLy  a  LOT Of TI¸Es IN RETURN. . . . [°E INTERN] was spENDINg VERy LITTLE TI¸E wITH  HI¸ aND sO¸E Days NOT EVEN DO a  pHysIcaL Exa¸ ON HI¸ bEcaUsE HE was 

tneitaP   ” y h t r o W “   e h T

THaT  THE  ¸EssagE  THaT  paTIENTs  wHO  “DON’T  TakE  caRE  Of  THE¸sELVEs,  DON’T 

sO UNpLEasaNT. . . . ºT was  a  pERfEcT Exa¸pLE Of  “TREaT OTHERs  THE way  yOU 

88

waNT TO bE TREaTED,” aND HE  was gETTINg baD caRE bEcaUsE HE was TREaTINg  pEOpLE sO baDLy.

. l a   t e   i h s a g i H .T   n i b o R

WHILE  HER TONE  REflEcTED  a  cERTaIN LEVEL  Of DIscO¸fORT wITH  THE way  THE  sITUaTION  was  HaNDLED  aND  sHE  sEE¸ED TO  REcOgNIzE THaT  THE  TEa¸’s bEHaVIOR was ¸ORaLLy qUEsTIONabLE, THIs sTUDENT aLsO cLEaRLy sTaTED THaT THE TEa¸’s  bEHaVIOR wITH THIs paTIENT was “jUsTIfiED IN a LOT Of ways, bUT IT was DIfficULT TO  sEE.” By sayINg “TREaT OTHERs THE way yOU waNT TO bE TREaTED,” THIs pHysIcIaN-  IN-TRaININg INDIcaTEs THaT sHE LEaRNED fRO¸ HER TEa¸ aND fRO¸ HER VERy fiRsT  paTIENT  THaT  REcIpROcITy  Is  VaLUED  aND  pRacTIcED  IN  THE  ¸ORaL  EcONO¸y  Of  cLINIcaL caRE.

»H±  Eld±RlY AN OpINION cO¸¸ONLy VOIcED was THaT OLDER paTIENTs wERE ¸ORE “NEEDy” IN  a  way  THaT ¸aDE  INTERacTIONs sLOw aND  fRUsTRaTINg. SEVERaL paRTIcIpaNTs  fELT  THaT INTERacTIONs wITH OLDER paTIENTs TOOk ¸ORE TI¸E aND fELT LEss pRODUcTIVE.  PaRTIcIpaNTs  saID  THaT  THEy OſtEN HaD  TO  REpEaT THE¸sELVEs  aND  spEak ¸ORE  sLOwLy, aND THaT OLDER paTIENTs TOOk LONgER TO “gET THE wORDs OUT,” waNTED TO  TaLk  a  LONg  TI¸E  abOUT UNRELaTED THINgs, aND  sO¸ETI¸Es  cO¸pLaINED  abOUT  THINgs THaT paRTIcIpaNTs fELT wERE pETTy OR IRRELEVaNT. ±NE INTERN cO¸¸ENTED, A LOT Of OLDER paTIENTs aRE wHaT wE cOULD TRaDITIONaLLy caLL “pOOR HIsTORIaNs.” SO sO¸EONE wHO’s 85 cO¸Es IN . . . aND  caN’T REcaLL HIs sy¸pTO¸s OR  wHEN THINgs sTaRTED OR THE pREcIsE cHaRacTERIsTIcs Of wHaT’s gOINg ON, aND  fOR a pHysIcIaN THaT caN bE REaLLy fRUsTRaTINg. AND º THINk THERE’s a cERTaIN  a¸OUNT  Of  DIscRI¸INaTION  gOINg  ON THaT  THOsE  paTIENTs  ¸ay  NOT  gET  as  gOOD caRE  as sO¸EONE THaT cO¸Es IN  wITH a sI¸ILaR pRObLE¸  wHO’s 10 TO  15 yEaRs yOUNgER aND caN DEscRIbE THE pRObLE¸ wELL aND EsTabLIsH a bETTER  RappORT wITH THE pHysIcIaN. ±THER  paRTIcIpaNTs’  cO¸¸ENTs  REVEaLED  THaT  THEIR  fRUsTRaTION  sTE¸¸ED  LEss  fRO¸  THE  paTIENTs  THE¸sELVEs  THaN  IT  DID  fRO¸  THE  REcOgNITION  THaT  paTIENTs wITH pROgREssIVE  OR cHRONIc  ILLNEssEs, EspEcIaLLy as THEy wERE OLDER,  sI¸pLy DID NOT HaVE a LOT Of aLTERNaTIVEs fOR ¸ORE cO¸pREHENsIVE caRE wITHIN  THE  ¸EDIcaL sysTE¸.  FOR Exa¸pLE, aN INTERN  ExpREssED  THaT IT  was  cO¸¸ON  fOR  OLDER paTIENTs  NOT TO  HaVE ENOUgH  sOcIaL aND  EcONO¸Ic  sUppORT, wHIcH  LEſt HI¸ HELpLEss TO sET Up bETTER, ¸ORE cONTINUOUs caRE OUTsIDE THE HOspITaL.  ±LDER  paTIENTs  wERE pERcEIVED  as fRUsTRaTINg  aND  LEss  wORTHy  Of sO¸E  paR-

TIcIpaNTs’  aTTENTION  pRI¸aRILy  bEcaUsE THEy  wERE  assU¸ED  TO HaVE  ¸ULTIpLE  cHRONIc  ILLNEssEs  THaT  wERE  ULTI¸aTELy  INcURabLE  aND  REqUIRED  INTERVENTION 

89

TI¸E  IN spITE Of THE INTERVENTIONs bEINg RELaTIVELy ¸INOR OR UNExcITINg (E.g.,  REHyDRaTION, basIc aNTIbIOTIcs, ETc.). ·NfORTUNaTELy, THE NET EffEcT Of THEsE NEgaTIVE ExpERIENcEs was aN OVERaLL  fRUsTRaTION DIspLacED ON aLL HO¸ELEss, DRUg aDDIcTED, aND “DIfficULT” paTIENTs,  INcLUDINg NEw aD¸ITs wHO HaD NOT yET bEEN assEssED bUT wHO wERE kNOwN  TO HaVE  cERTaIN UNfaVORabLE cHaRacTERIsTIcs. ºN OTHER wORDs, ¸EssagEs abOUT  a  gIVEN  paTIENT’s wORTHINEss  HaD RIppLINg EffEcTs  bEyOND THaT  sINgLE paTIENT.  °Ey  pREDIspOsED OTHER paTIENTs IN sI¸ILaR cIRcU¸sTaNcEs TO bE LabELED  LEss  wORTHy as wELL.

Who Are the “More Worthy” Patients? PaRTIcIpaNTs spOkE ¸ORE OſtEN Of “LEss wORTHy” THaN Of “¸ORE wORTHy” paTIENTs,  bUT sO¸E REcaLLED ExpERIENcEs IN wHIcH THEIR sUpERIORs cLEaRLy cO¸¸UNIcaTED  THE ¸EssagE THaT cERTaIN paTIENTs sHOULD REcEIVE pREfERENTIaL TREaT¸ENT. PaRTIcIpaNTs  TypIcaLLy  IDENTIfiED  wEaLTHy  paTIENTs  aND  cOLLEagUEs  IN  THE  ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION  as cHIEf  a¸ONg  THEsE.  ±NE REsIDENT  REcaLLED,  “´ITHER THEy’RE  bENEfacTORs  Of  THE HOspITaL  OR  IN  cERTaIN  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs  THEy’VE  bEEN  wIVEs  Of  I¸pORTaNT  aTTENDINg  pHysIcIaNs.”  A  fOURTH-yEaR  sTUDENT  cO¸¸ENTED,  “PEOpLE  wHO  aRE wEaLTHIER  gET THEIR  OwN  ROO¸, aND  THEy  gET TREaTED  bETTER  by THE aTTENDINg. AND If THE aTTENDINg babys THE¸, yOU HaVE TO baby THE¸.”  WHEN askED by THE REsEaRcHER wHaT sHE ¸EaNT by “babys THE¸,” sHE aDDED,  “°E aTTENDINg a LOT Of TI¸Es waNTs TO kNOw as sOON as THEy cO¸E IN, VERsUs  OTHER pEOpLE THEy DON’T NEED TO HEaR abOUT UNTIL THE NExT ¸ORNINg.” ºN aDDITION, paTIENTs wHO wERE DEE¸ED as LIkELy TO REcEIVE bETTER caRE THaN  OTHERs INcLUDED THOsE wHO wERE sOcIaLLy ENgagINg aND INTERacTIVE (as OppOsED  TO UNREspONsIVE OR UNpLEasaNT), wHO HaD aN ILLNEss NOT caUsED by baD HabITs  (bUT  RaTHER,  fOR  Exa¸pLE,  “sO¸ETHINg  gENETIc”),  wHO  wERE  ¸OTIVaTED  TO  DO  wHaTEVER was  NEcEssaRy TO I¸pROVE  THEIR cONDITION, aND  wHO wERE LIkELy TO  ¸akE a fULL REcOVERy. ±NE TRaINEE aD¸ITTED THaT “º TEND TO cONNEcT ¸ORE wITH  paTIENTs  THaT  aRE ¸ORE  LIkE  ¸E—yOUNg,  EDUcaTED,  aND  aRE ¸OTIVaTED TO  gET  bETTER—º gUEss wE jUsT HaVE ¸ORE IN cO¸¸ON, aND sO º fEEL LIkE º UNDERsTaND  ¸ORE wHaT THEy’RE gOINg THROUgH, aND waNT TO HELp THE¸.” As ONE THIRD-yEaR  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT  ObsERVED,  THE  VasT  ¸ajORITy  Of  paTIENTs  wERE  TREaTED  wITH  REspEcT  aND  REcEIVED  gOOD  caRE.  ÁOwEVER,  “If  sO¸ETHINg  cO¸Es  DOwN  TO 

tneitaP   ” y h t r o W “   e h T

aND sUppORT bEyOND THE HOspITaL, aND bEcaUsE TREaTINg THE¸ REqUIRED a LOT Of 

wHERE  THE  ExTRa ¸ILE  NEEDs  TO  bE  gONE, OR  THaT  ExTRa  sO¸ETHINg,”  THE TEa¸ 

90

spENT TI¸E ON paTIENTs wITH wHO¸ THEy “waNT TO . . . NOT HaVE TO” caRE fOR.

. l a   t e   i h s a g i H .T   n i b o R

Negotiating  within the Moral Economy PERcEpTIONs Of paTIENT wORTHINEss IN THIs sTUDy VaRIED accORDINg TO wHETHER  paTIENTs HaD a “cURabLE” (I.E., NOT cHRONIc) ILLNEss OR aN ILLNEss NOT caUsED by  sELf-DEsTRUcTIVE bEHaVIORs, wERE pLEasaNT aND ENgagINg,  aND wERE ¸OTIVaTED  TO  cO¸pLy wITH THE TREaT¸ENT  aDVIsED by THE ¸EDIcaL TEa¸. YET  pHysIcIaNs-  IN-TRaININg  aRE  NOT  sI¸pLy  passIVE  REcIpIENTs  Of  THE  ¸ORaL  EcONO¸Ic  VaLUE  jUDg¸ENTs  TaUgHT THROUgH THE HIDDEN cURRIcULU¸; INsTEaD, THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸y  Is  aRbITRaTED IN  aND  THROUgH pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININgs’ EffORTs  TO OpERaTE  wITHIN (aND OccasIONaLLy agaINsT) ITs sTRUcTUREs. ÁOwEVER, DEspITE THE EffORTs  Of sO¸E Of THE sTUDENTs IN THIs sTUDy TO DELIbERaTELy REjEcT THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸Ic  VaLUaTION Of paTIENT “wORTH” TaUgHT TO THE¸ VIa THE HIDDEN cURRIcULU¸, THEIR  EffORTs  wERE  cONfOUNDED  by  THE  sysTE¸Ic  REqUIRE¸ENTs  Of  THE  HOspITaL  TO  “¸OVE THINgs aLONg” aND THE HIERaRcHIcaL NaTURE Of ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION. AN INTERN DEscRIbED sEVERaL  cONTRaDIcTIONs IN HOw  ¸EDIcaL scHOOL TaUgHT  sTUDENTs TO pRacTIcE ¸EDIcINE aND HOw IT was acTUaLLy pRacTIcED IN cLINIcaL sETTINgs. “ºDEaLLy, yOU’D LIkE TO wORk THINgs Up fRO¸ ¸OsT pRObabLE TO LEasT pRObabLE  OVER TI¸E  IN a RaTIONaL way. . . . ºN pRacTIcE, IT sEE¸s LIkE wE THROw THE bOOk aT  THE¸ aND ORDER as ¸aNy TEsTs—fOR aNyTHINg wE THINk Is a RE¸OTE pOssIbILITy—  jUsT gET IT aLL DONE aT  ONcE RaTHER  THaN RULINg ONE THINg OUT aND THEN  ¸OVINg  TO  THE NExT.” A  fOURTH-yEaR sTUDENT  agREED,  sayINg, “ºT’s  kIND Of  LIkE ¸OVINg  paTIENTs THROUgH  aL¸OsT LIkE a  facTORy, LIkE yOU’RE  pUTTINg paRTs  ON THE¸, bUT  INsTEaD Of paRTs yOU’RE THROwINg ¸EDs aT THE¸ aND RUNNINg TEsTs.” ²EaRNINg HOw TO wORk EfficIENTLy by ¸akINg DIsTINcTIONs REgaRDINg paTIENT  wORTHINEss  Is  paRT  Of  THE  cLINIcaL  TRaININg  pROcEss.  ²IkE  OTHER  VaLUEs  aND  assU¸pTIONs, THEsE ¸EssagEs, ExpLIcIT OR I¸pLIcIT, aRE passED fRO¸ sENIOR TO  jUNIOR  RaNkINg ¸E¸bERs Of a  TEa¸.  AND bEcaUsE THEy  wORk  wITHIN a  sTRIcT  TEa¸ HIERaRcHy, pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg aRE HEaVILy INflUENcED by THEIR sUpERIORs.  ºN facT,  as ONE REsIDENT ExpLaINED, pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg aRE  IN sO¸E  ways  ¸ORE  HEaVILy  INflUENcED  by  THEIR  sUpERIORs  THaN  THEy aRE  by  paTIENTs  bEcaUsE,  ULTI¸aTELy,  THEIR  fUTURE  ¸EDIcaL  caREER  Is  DEpENDENT UpON  THOsE  wHO EVaLUaTE THE¸. YOU sORT Of bEHaVE IN accORDaNcE wITH THE gENERaL aTTITUDE Of THE TEa¸. As  a  ¸ED  sTUDENT,  yOU’RE EVaLUaTED  qUaLITaTIVELy, aND  basIcaLLy  yOUR  gRaDEs 

aRE  a  REflEcTION  Of  HOw  ¸UcH  [yOUR  TEa¸  ¸E¸bERs]  LIkE  yOU,  aND  yOU  waNT TO bE LIkED, aND THaT  ¸OTIVaTION Is  ObVIOUsLy THERE. AND yOU’RE NOT 

91

¸ORE by yOUR TEa¸ THaN by yOUR paTIENTs Is REaL. AND sO If yOUR TEa¸ acTs  LIkE a bUNcH Of DONkEys, yOU fEEL cO¸pELLED TO acT a LITTLE bIT LIkE a DONkEy  TO fiT IN aND TO gET yOUR gOOD gRaDEs. MaNy paRTIcIpaNTs ackNOwLEDgED  THE sTRONg pREssURE TO “fiT IN” wITH THE  REsT Of THE TEa¸. ºNTEREsTINgLy, HOwEVER, sO¸E yOUNgER pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg  IDENTIfiED  INTERacTIONs  wITH  gROUps  Of  paTIENTs  TypIcaLLy  IDENTIfiED  as  “LEss  wORTHy” Of caRE as a ¸EcHaNIs¸ fOR gaININg a sENsE Of agENcy aND I¸pORTaNcE  wITHIN  THE cONfiNEs Of  THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸y ENfORcED by  THE sTRIcT HIERaRcHy  Of ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION. FOR Exa¸pLE, sEVERaL paRTIcIpaNTs pOINTED TOwaRD caRE  Of THE ELDERLy as pROVIDINg a sENsE Of pROfEssIONaL wORTH IN ExcHaNgE fOR THEIR  caRE. AN INTERN sTaTED THaT “wHEN º TakE caRE Of a 30-yEaR-OLD paTIENT, aND º’¸  a  26-yEaR-OLD  DOc,  THEy’RE  LIkE,  ‘±H  yOU’RE THE  REsIDENT’  [UsINg  a  DIs¸IssIVE  TONE].” BUT wITH OLDER paTIENTs, “´VEN If yOU’RE a ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT, If yOU’RE TakINg caRE  Of THE¸ yOU’RE THE DOc. °Ey’LL LIsTEN TO yOU. . . . ±LDER pEOpLE HaVE  THaT ‘yOU’RE THE DOcTOR’ kIND Of aTTITUDE.” As THEsE Exa¸pLEs INDIcaTE, THE abILITy fOR TRaINEEs TO NEgOTIaTE wITHIN THE  sTRUcTURE  Of  THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸y aND  TO  INVEsT  TI¸E wITH  paTIENTs THaT  ¸ay  bE  cONsIDERED OTHERwIsE  “UNwORTHy” Of caRE OffERs  THE pOTENTIaL REwaRD  Of  pROfEssIONaL REcOgNITION aND  a sENsE Of agENcy. ÁOwEVER,  THE OppORTUNITIEs  fOR THIs kIND Of ExcHaNgE aRE LI¸ITED by INcREasINg DE¸aNDs ON TRaINEEs TO bE  ¸ORE EfficIENT  aND caRE fOR a gREaTER NU¸bER Of paTIENTs IN LEss TI¸E as THEIR  TRaININg pROgREssEs. PHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg aRE  OſtEN awaRE Of THE ways THaT  ¸ORaL  jUDg¸ENT  I¸pacTs  ¸EDIcaL  pRacTIcE  aND  sTRUggLE  wITH  THE  cONflIcTs  aND  TENsIONs  bETwEEN wHaT  THEy aRE TaUgHT sHOULD bE “IDEaL”  caRE aND  caRE  basED  ON THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸y.  YET, EVEN fOR  THOsE wHO  REcOgNIzE THE pRObLE¸aTIc NaTURE Of THIs cONflIcT, THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸y RE¸aINs THE ONLy way  TO  OpERaTE wITHIN THE HEaLTH caRE sysTE¸.

Discussion °E  pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg  IN  THIs  sTUDy  LEaRNED fRO¸  THEIR  sUpERIORs THaT  cERTaIN  paTIENTs  aRE  ¸ORE  DEsERVINg  Of caRE,  aND  THaT  cERTaIN Tasks  aRE  LEss  wORTHy  Of THEIR  TI¸E  aND  sHOULD bE DELEgaTED  TO NURsEs aND  aNcILLaRy sTaff.  ¶URINg  THE  pROcEss  Of  bEINg  TaUgHT  HOw TO  bE  a  pHysIcIaN,  THEy  wERE  aLsO 

tneitaP   ” y h t r o W “   e h T

gRaDED  by paTIENTs,  yOU’RE gRaDED  by  THE TEa¸. SO THE  DEsIRE TO  bE LIkED 

TaUgHT  THE  NOR¸s Of REcIpROcITy  aND  HOw ¸EssagEs abOUT  THE RELaTIVE  wOR-

92

THINEss  Of  paTIENTs  aRE  TO  bE  TRaNs¸ITTED  aND  REINfORcED  a¸ONg  ¸E¸bERs  Of THE TEa¸ HIERaRcHy. ºN aDDITION, pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg fREqUENTLy fOUND 

. l a   t e   i h s a g i H .T   n i b o R

THaT  THEIR  EffORTs  TO  REsIsT  ¸akINg  ¸ORaL  jUDg¸ENTs  abOUT  paTIENTs  wERE  cONfOUNDED by THE NEED TO  “¸OVE THINgs aLONg” as wELL as THE HIERaRcHIcaL  NaTURE Of ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION. °Ey LEaRNED THaT IT’s accEpTabLE TO spEND ¸ORE  TI¸E  wITH  NIcER paTIENTs,  aND  TO DEVOTE  ¸ORE ENERgy  TO pOTENTIaLLy  REwaRDINg paTIENTs wITH “fixabLE” ¸EDIcaL pRObLE¸s. ºNDEED, bEINg UNabLE TO “fix” a  paTIENT ¸ay REpREsENT a  cHaLLENgE TO a ¸EDIcaL  pRacTITIONER’s EgO OR pROfEssIONaL  sENsE Of sELf, aND ¸ay pLay aN I¸pORTaNT ROLE IN THE caTEgORIzaTION Of  paTIENTs as ¸ORE OR LEss DEsERVINg Of caRE. STUDENTs  cHaLLENgINg  THIs  ¸ORaL  EcONO¸y  Of  caRE  ExpOsE  THE¸sELVEs TO  pOTENTIaL pERsEcUTION  OR cRITIcIs¸ fRO¸  THEIR sUpERIORs. ÁOwEVER, REgaRDLEss  Of THE pOTENTIaL fOR cRITIcIs¸ OR pOOR EVaLUaTIONs aND IN spITE Of UNpROfEssIONaL  cONDUcT by ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTORs, sO¸E ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs cONTINUE TO cHaLLENgE  THE  VaLUE  jUDg¸ENTs  aND  bEHaVIORs  sUppORTED  by  THE  HIDDEN  cURRIcULU¸.  WHILE  IT  Is cLEaR  THaT NEgaTIVE  ROLE ¸ODELINg  Has a  pOwERfUL I¸pacT  ON  sTUDENTs, THERE Is aLsO EVIDENcE THaT sTUDENTs wHO HaVE pOsITIVE ExpERIENcEs wITH  paTIENT caRE aND fEEL THaT THEIR sUpERIORs sUppORT a paTIENT-cENTERED appROacH  ¸aINTaIN a cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO ETHIcaL cLINIcaL caRE (KRUpaT ET aL. 2009). YET, THE VERy pOssIbILITIEs Of caRE aRE DEfiNED by ¸acROsTRUcTURaL cONsTRaINTs  INcLUDINg  THE HEaLTH  caRE  INsURaNcE sysTE¸,  acaDE¸Ic  TRaININg HIERaRcHIEs,  INsTITUTIONaL pOLIcIEs, aND THE pOLITIcaL EcONO¸y Of DIsEasE (COHEN, CRUEss, aND  ¶aVIDsON  2007;  ÁaffERTy  aND  ²EVINsON 2008).  °Us, LEaRNINg TO caTEgORIzE  paTIENTs basED ON VERy LITTLE INfOR¸aTION bEcO¸Es NOT ONLy a way fOR pHysIcIaNs TO  cONsERVE TI¸E,  bUT OsTENsIbLy  DEfiNEs cLINIcaL EfficIENcy  aND cO¸pETENcy.  °E  caTEgORIEs  Of  paTIENTs  wHO  INcURRED  THE  ¸OsT  ¸ORaL  jUDg¸ENT  sEE¸ED TO DE¸aND ¸ORE ExpENDITURE THaN RETURN ON THE pHysIcIaNs’ REsOURcEs.  °EsE  sa¸E paTIENTs  pROVIDED aN OppORTUNITy fOR  pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg TO  cHaLLENgE  THE  ObjEcTIVEs  Of  THE  HIDDEN  cURRIcULU¸,  yET ULTI¸aTELy  TRaINEEs  REcOgNIzED  THE  ULTI¸aTE aUTHORITy  Of UsINg  ¸ORaL jUDg¸ENTs  TO  DETER¸INE  THE bEHaVIORs Of pHysIcIaNs TOwaRD THEIR paTIENTs. ¶IscUssIONs Of pROfEssIONaLIs¸ wITHIN THE ¸EDIcaL cO¸¸UNITy sTREss THaT  pHysIcIaNs  sHOULD “pROVIDE paTIENTs  wITH THE  bEsT pOssIbLE  caRE” wHILE  aLsO  acTINg “as a  gOOD sTEwaRD  Of sOcIETy’s  ¸EDIcaL REsOURcEs” (¶UgDaLE, SIEgLER,  aND ³UbIN 2008, 550). CLEaRLy, THE sTUDENTs IN THIs sTUDy, wHILE cOgNIzaNT Of  sTRUcTURaL,  EcONO¸Ic, aND  sOcIaL  facTORs  INflUENcINg  paTIENTs’ abILITIEs  (aND  DEsIREs)  TO  fOLLOw  THE  bEHaVIORs  aND  TREaT¸ENTs  pREscRIbED  by  HEaLTH  caRE  pROfEssIONaLs, gENERaLLy RELIED ON ¸ORaL EcONO¸Ic DETER¸INaTIONs Of paTIENT 

wORTH TO DEcIDE wHIcH TypEs Of paTIENTs ¸EDIcaL REsOURcEs wERE “wasTED” ON  OR “wORTHy” Of aTTENTION.

93

¸ENTs  Of paTIENT wORTH  aND VaLUE  cONTINUE TO  cENTER ON INDIVIDUaLs  wHOsE  bEHaVIOR VIOLaTEs THE pOwER HIERaRcHIEs aND NOR¸s Of THE HEaLTH caRE sysTE¸.  ÁOwEVER,  THEsE DEVIaNT OR REbELLIOUs  paTIENTs wERE LabELED  as “LEss wORTHy”  Of caRE NOT bEcaUsE THEIR acTIONs OR HEaLTH DEcIsIONs wERE cONsIDERED ¸ORaLLy  wRONg,  bUT bEcaUsE  THEy  REpREsENTED a  pOOR INVEsT¸ENT  Of  pHysIcIaN TI¸E  aND  EffORT. WHILE  THE  RHETORIc  Of paTIENT  aUTONO¸y  Is  sUppORTED  by  pHysIcIaNs  aND pHysIcIaNs-IN-TRaININg, IN pRacTIcE paTIENTs ¸UsT cO¸pLy wITH THE  gOaLs aND VaLUEs Of THE HOspITaL sysTE¸ TO bE “wORTHy Of caRE.”

notes 1  °E  TER¸ “HIDDEN  cURRIcULU¸”  was  cOINED  by  PHILIp  JacksON  IN 1968  TO  DEscRIbE  THE  aTTITUDEs  aND  bELIEfs  THaT  cHILDREN  ¸UsT  LEaRN  as  paRT  Of  THE  sOcIaLIzaTION  pROcEss  IN  ORDER  TO  sUccEED IN  scHOOL. ÁaffERTy  was  THE  fiRsT  TO  aDapT  THE  cONcEpT TO  THE  aREa  Of  ¸EDIcINE IN 1994. 2  ³. ÁIgasHI, aN aNTHROpOLOgIsT, cONDUcTED aLL fiELD REsEaRcH acTIVITIEs UNDER THE ¸ENTORsHIp Of THREE pHysIcIaNs (M. STEIN¸aN, C. B. JOHNsTON, aND M. ÁaRpER).

re½eren¾es COHEN, J. J., S. CRUEss, aND C. ¶aVIDsON. 2007. ALLIaNcE bETwEEN sOcIETy aND ¸EDIcINE:  °E pUbLIc’s sTakE IN ¸EDIcaL pROfEssIONaLIs¸. Journal of the American Medical 

Association 298: 670–672. ¶aVENpORT,  B. A. 2000. WITNEssINg aND THE ¸EDIcaL gazE: ÁOw ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs LEaRN TO  sEE aT  a fREE cLINIc fOR THE HO¸ELEss. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 14: 310–327. ¶UgDaLE, ². S., M. SIEgLER, aND ¶. ¹. ³UbIN. 2008. MEDIcaL pROfEssIONaLIs¸ aND THE  DOcTOR-paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp.  Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51: 547–553. FINE¸aN, µ. 1991. °E sOcIaL cONsTRUcTION Of NONcO¸pLIaNcE: A sTUDy Of HEaLTH caRE  aND sOcIaL sERVIcE pROVIDERs IN EVERyDay pRacTIcE. Sociology of Health and Illness 13:  354–373. ÁaffERTy, F., aND ³. FRaNks. 1994. °E HIDDEN cURRIcULU¸, ETHIcs, TEacHINg aND THE sTRUcTURE Of ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION.  Academic Medicine 69: 861–871. ÁaffERTy, F., aND ¶. ²EVINsON. 2008. MOVINg bEyOND NOsTaLgIa aND ¸OTIVEs: ¹OwaRDs a  cO¸pLExITy scIENcE VIEw Of ¸EDIcaL pROfEssIONaLIs¸. Perspectives in Biology and 

Medicine 51: 599–615. JacksON, P. W. 1968. Life in Classrooms. µEw YORk: ÁOLT, ³INEHaRT Í WINsTON.

tneitaP   ” y h t r o W “   e h T

¶EspITE THE REcENT INcREasED E¸pHasIs ON THE NOTION Of paTIENT aUTONO¸y  IN  ¸EDIcaL  EDUcaTION  aND  pROfEssIONaLIs¸  TRaININg,  THEsE  NEgaTIVE  jUDg-

KIsHI¸OTO, M., M. µagOsHI, S. WILLIa¸s, K. Á. MasakI, aND P. ². BLaNcHETTE. 2005. 

94

KNOwLEDgE aND aTTITUDEs abOUT gERIaTRIcs Of ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs, INTERNaL ¸EDIcINE  REsIDENTs, aND gERIaTRIc ¸EDIcINE fELLOws.  Journal of the American Geriatric Society 53: 99–102.

. l a   t e   i h s a g i H .T   n i b o R

KOHLI, M. 1987. ³ETIRE¸ENT aND THE ¸ORaL EcONO¸y. Journal of Aging Studies 1: 125–144. KRUpaT, ´., S. PELLETIER, ´. K. ALExaNDER, ¶. ÁIRsH, B. ±gUR, aND ³. ScHwaRTzsTEIN. 2009.  CaN cHaNgEs IN THE pRINcIpaL cLINIcaL yEaR pREVENT THE EROsION Of sTUDENTs’ paTIENT-  cENTERED bELIEfs? Academic Medicine 84: 582–586. ScHENsUL, S. ²., J. J. ScHENsUL, aND M. ¶. ²ECO¸pTE. 1999.  Essential ethnographic methods: 

Observations, interviews, and questionnaires. WaLNUT CREEk, CA: ALTa MIRa PREss. SpRINkLE,  ³. Á. 2001. A ¸ORaL EcONO¸y Of A¸ERIcaN ¸EDIcINE IN THE ¸aNagED caRE ERa. 

°eoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22: 247–268. WEaR, ¶. 1998. ±N wHITE cOaTs aND pROfEssIONaL DEVELOp¸ENT: °E fOR¸aL aND THE HIDDEN  cURRIcULa. Annals of Internal Medicine 129: 734–737.

How DocToRs  ´h±nk ClINIcAl  JUdgM±NT  ANd  TH±  ³RAcTIc±  Of µ±dIcIN± Kathryn Montgomery

The Complexity  of Clinical  Rationality GIVEN THE RaDIcaL UNcERTaINTy Of cLINIcaL ¸EDIcINE as a scIENcE-UsINg pRacTIcE  THaT  ¸UsT  DIagNOsE  aND  TREaT  ILLNEssEs  ONE  by  ONE,  THE cO¸pLEx  REasONINg  pHysIcIaNs UsE REqUIREs a RIcHER cONcEpT Of RaTIONaLITy THaN a spaRE, pHysIcs-  basED,  pOsITIVIsT  accOUNT Of scIENTIfic  kNOwINg. KIRsTI MaLTERUD aRgUEs THaT  TRaDITIONaL ¸EDIcaL EpIsTE¸OLOgy Is aN INaDEqUaTE REpREsENTaTION Of ¸EDIcaL  kNOwLEDgE  bEcaUsE “THE  HU¸aN  INTERacTION aND  INTERpRETaTION wHIcH cONsTITUTEs  a  cONsIDERabLE  ELE¸ENT  Of  cLINIcaL  pRacTIcE  caNNOT  bE  INVEsTIgaTED  fRO¸ THaT  EpIsTE¸Ic pOsITION.” Ã ºN VIEw Of THIs ¸IsREpREsENTaTION  Of cLINIcaL  kNOwINg, ´RIc CassELL Has caLLED INsTEaD fOR a bOTTO¸-Up, ExpERIENcE-basED  THEORy Of ¸EDIcINE: KNOwLEDgE . . . wHETHER Of ¸EDIcaL scIENcE OR THE aRT Of ¸EDIcINE, DOEs NOT  TakE caRE Of sIck pERsONs OR RELIEVE THEIR sUffERINg; cLINIcIaNs DO IN wHO¸  THEsE kINDs Of kNOwLEDgE aRE INTEgRaTED. . . . [M]EDIcINE NEEDs a sysTE¸aTIc aND  DIscIpLINED appROacH TO THE kNOwLEDgE THaT  aRIsEs fRO¸ THE cLINIcIaN’s ExpERIENcE RaTHER THaN  aRTIficIaL DIVIsIONs  Of ¸EDIcaL kNOwLEDgE  INTO scIENcE aND aRT.Ä SUcH ExpERIENcED kNOwINg Is cLINIcaL jUDg¸ENT, THE ExERcIsE Of pRacTIcaL REasONINg IN THE caRE Of paTIENTs. ºT Is EssENTIaL TO ¸EDIcINE aND ITs cHaRacTERIsTIc  Tasks: fiRsT (as ´D¸UND PELLEgRINO ENU¸ERaTEs THE¸) TO DIagNOsE THE paTIENT,  sEcOND, TO cONsIDER THE pOssIbLE THERapIEs, aND fiNaLLy TO DEcIDE wHaT Is bEsT  TO  DO  IN  THIs  paRTIcULaR  cIRcU¸sTaNcE.Æ By  THEIR  NaTURE,  THEsE  aRE  cO¸pLEx 

KaTHRyN  MONTgO¸ERy,  How Doctors  °ink:  Clinical Judgment  and  the Practice  of  Medicine (µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2005), 37–41. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy  PREss,  ·SA.

aND  pOTENTIaLLy  UNcERTaIN Tasks,  NO  ¸aTTER  HOw  aDVaNcED  THE  scIENcE  THaT 

96

INfOR¸s  THE¸,  aND  THE  pHRONEsIs  OR  cLINIcaL  jUDg¸ENT  THEy  REqUIRE  Is  THE  EssENTIaL  VIRTUE  Of  THE  gOOD  pHysIcIaN.  ºT  Is  THE  gOaL TOwaRD  wHIcH cLINIcaL 

y r e m o g t n o M  n y r h t a K

EDUcaTION aND THE pRacTIcE Of ¸EDIcINE sTRIVE. CO¸pLExITy aND UNcERTaINTy aRE bUILT INTO THE pHysIcIaN’s EffORT TO UNDERsTaND THE paRTIcULaR IN LIgHT Of gENERaL RULEs. ºf pHysIcIaNs cOULD bE scIENTIsTs,  THEy sURELy wOULD bE. °E ObsTacLE THEy ENcOUNTER Is THE RaDIcaL UNcERTaINTy  Of  cLINIcaL pRacTIcE: NOT  jUsT  THE INcO¸pLETENEss Of  ¸EDIcaL kNOwLEDgE bUT,  ¸ORE  I¸pORTaNT, THE I¸pREcIsION Of THE appLIcaTION  Of EVEN THE ¸OsT sOLID-  sEE¸INg facT TO a paRTIcULaR paTIENT. °E DEVELOp¸ENT  Of EpIDE¸IOLOgy aND  sTRaTEgIEs fOR ITs UsE wITH INDIVIDUaL paTIENTs sUcH as cLINI¸ETRIcs, cLINIcaL EpIDE¸IOLOgy,  ¸EDIcaL DEcIsION  ¸akINg, aND  EVIDENcE-basED ¸EDIcINE  (e½m)  HaVE  REDUcED  THIs UNcERTaINTy aND  VasTLy  I¸pROVED  paTIENT caRE. FOLLOwINg  ON DEcaDEs Of cLINIcaL REsEaRcH, THE COcHRaNE COLLabORaTION’s EVaLUaTION aND  REcONcILIaTION Of THE REsULTs Of DIspaRaTE, appaRENTLy INcO¸¸ENsURabLE sTUDIEs  Has ENcOURagED THE sENsE  THaT by  UsINg  THE sTRaTEgIEs Of  e½m, INVaRIaNT  pREcIsION—REaL cERTaINTy—IN DEaLINg wITH HU¸aN ILLNEss ¸ay bE jUsT aROUND  THE  cORNER.Î ALTHOUgH  e½m  Has  NEVER  cLaI¸ED  THaT,  ITs  I¸pOssIbILITy  Is  NO  REasON  NOT  TO  wORk  TOwaRD  gREaTER  RELIabILITy IN  DIagNOsIs,  TREaT¸ENT,  aND  pROgNOsIs. BUT,  LIkE  THE DIsTaNcE bETwEEN AcHILLEs aND THE TORTOIsE, THE gap  bETwEEN INVaRIaNT, RELIabLE, UNIVERsaLIzabLE Laws aND THE VaRIabLE ¸aNIfEsTaTIONs Of ILLNEss IN a paRTIcULaR paTIENT RE¸aINs. °aT Is THE NaTURE Of a scIENcE  Of INDIVIDUaLs. WE waNT IT TO bE OTHERwIsE, EspEcIaLLy wHEN THOsE wE LOVE OR  wE  OURsELVEs aRE ILL. BUT DEspITE ¸EDIcINE’s ¸IRacLEs—aND THEy aRE LEgION—  cLINIcaL kNOwINg Is NOT cERTaIN, NOR wILL IT EVER bE. ScIENTIfic  aDVaNcE  wILL  NOT  cHaNgE  THIs.  ºN  THaT  IDEaL  fUTURE  wHEN  THE  paTHOpHysIOLOgy  Of  DIsEasE  Is  THOROUgHLy  kNOwN  aND  THE  EpIDE¸IOLOgy  Of  EVERy  ¸aLaDy  EsTabLIsHED,  aND  bOTH  aRE  aT  THE  fiNgERTIps  Of  THE  ExpERIENcED  pRacTITIONER, ¸EDIcINE wILL RE¸aIN a pRacTIcE. ¶IagNOsIs, pROgNOsIs, aND TREaT¸ENT  Of  ILLNEss  wILL  gO  ON  REqUIRINg  INTERpRETaTION,  THE  HaLL¸aRk  Of  cLINIcaL  jUDg¸ENT.  PHysIcIaNs wILL  sTILL  bE EDUcaTED  aND EsTEE¸ED  fOR  THE casE-basED  pRacTIcaL REasONINg THaT Is sITUaTED, OpEN TO DETaIL, flExIbLE, aND REINTERpRETabLE,  bEcaUsE THEIR Task wILL  cONTINUE TO bE THE DIscOVERy Of  wHaT Is gOINg ON wITH  EacH paRTIcULaR paTIENT. ´VEN wITH THE LasT ¸OLEcULaR fUNcTION UNDERsTOOD, THE  gENO¸E  fULLy ExpLIcaTED, aND caNcER cURabLE, THE caRE Of sIck  pEOpLE wILL NOT  bE  aN  UN¸EDIaTED  “appLIcaTION”  Of  scIENcE.  PEOpLE  VaRy;  DIsEasEs  ¸aNIfEsT  THE¸sELVEs  IN VaRyINg ways. °E INDIVIDUaL paTIENT wILL sTILL REqUIRE cLINIcaL  scRUTINy,  cLINIcaL INTERpRETaTION. °E  HIsTORy  wILL bE  TakEN,  THE bODy  Exa¸INED  fOR  sIgNs, TEsTs pERfOR¸ED,  aND  THE ¸EDIcaL casE  cONsTRUcTED. PaTIENTs 

wILL  gO  ON  pREsENTINg  DE¸OgRapHIcaLLy  I¸pRObabLE  sy¸pTO¸s Of  DIsEasEs;  sO¸E wILL REqUIRE TOxIc THERapy, aND sO¸ETI¸Es TREaT¸ENT wILL cO¸E TOO LaTE. 

97

THE spEcIficITy wITH wHIcH THEy caN IDENTIfy DIsEasE. °ERapIEs Of cHOIcE wILL  bE sEcOND cHOIcE fOR sO¸E paTIENTs aND wILL NEVER cURE qUITE EVERyONE. °E  aTTENTIVE  fOcUs ON THE paRTIcULaR paTIENT THaT Is  THE cLINIcIaN’s ¸ORaL ObLIgaTION wILL cONTINUE TO cO¸pEL THE ExERcIsE Of pRacTIcaL REasON. BEcaUsE  THE  pRacTIcE  Of  ¸EDIcINE  REqUIREs  THE  REcOLLEcTION  aND  REpREsENTaTION  Of sUbjEcTIVE ExpERIENcE, pHysIcIaNs  wILL gO ON INVEsTIgaTINg EacH  cLINIcaL casE: REcONsTRUcTINg TO THE bEsT Of THEIR abILITy EVENTs Of bODy, ¸IND,  fa¸ILy, aND ENVIRON¸ENT. FOR THIs Task scIENTIfic kNOwLEDgE Is NEcEssaRy aND  LOgIc EssENTIaL, EVEN THOUgH THE Task ITsELf  Is NaRRaTIVE aND  INTERpRETIVE. CLINIcIaNs  ¸UsT gRasp  aND  ¸akE  sENsE Of  EVENTs OccURRINg  OVER TI¸E  EVEN  as  THEy  REcOgNIzE  THE  INHERENT UNcERTaINTy  Of  THIs  qUasI-caUsaL, RETROspEcTIVE  RaTIONaL  sTRaTEgy.  PIEcINg  TOgETHER  THE EVIDENcE  Of THE  paTIENT’s  sy¸pTO¸s,  pHysIcaL  sIgNs, aND  TEsT REsULTs  TO cREaTE  a  REcOgNIzabLE  paTTERN  OR  pLOT  Is  a  cO¸pLEx  aND  I¸pREcIsE  ExERcIsE. ºT  Is  sUbjEcT  TO  aLL  THE  fRaILTy Of  HIsTORIcaL  REcONsTRUcTION, bUT IT RE¸aINs THE bEsT—THE LOgIcaL, RaTIONaL bEsT—THaT cLINIcaL REasONERs caN DO. ºT Is NOT scIENcE, NOT IN aNy pOsITIVIsT sENsE, NOR Is IT aRT.

The Misrepresentation  of Clinical  Rationality WHy DOEs ¸EDIcINE cOLLUDE IN THE ¸IsREpREsENTaTION Of ITs RaTIONaLITy? ±NE  ObVIOUs ExpLaNaTION Is THaT ¸EDIcINE’s sTaTUs IN sOcIETy DEpENDs IN LaRgE paRT  ON THE scIENTIfic cHaRacTER Of ¸UcH Of ITs INfOR¸aTION. ¹O cLaI¸ TO bE a scIENTIsT  IN OUR  cULTURE  Is  TO sTakE OUT  aUTHORITy aND  pOwER. BUT  pHysIcIaNs  sUffER  THE  ILL EffEcTs Of  THIs HUbRIs:  as paTIENTs aND as cITIzENs, wE ExpEcT THE¸ TO bE  faR ¸ORE cERTaIN THaN EITHER THEIR pRacTIcE OR THE bIOLOgy ON wHIcH IT Is basED  caN  waRRaNT, aND, fOR ¸aNy REasONs, THEy aRE LIkELy TO TakE THEsE ExpEcTaTIONs  fOR  THEIR  OwN. MaLpRacTIcE  sUITs  THaT aRIsE  ¸ORE  fRO¸  aNgER  OVER  ¸IspLacED  ExpEcTaTIONs aND pERcEIVED NEgLEcT THaN fRO¸ gENUINE ¸IsTakEs aRE THE REsULT.Ï As fOR pOwER, IT aRIsEs ¸ORE sTRONgLy fRO¸ HU¸aN NEED IN TI¸E Of ILLNEss THaN  fRO¸ scIENcE. A wIDEspREaD appREcIaTION Of cLINIcaL jUDg¸ENT wOULD pROVIDE  pHysIcIaNs a HU¸aN aND faLLIbLE bUT sTILL TRUsTwORTHy aUTHORITy. A ¸ORE INTEREsTINg, LEss ObVIOUs REasON fOR DEscRIbINg  ¸EDIcINE as a scIENcE  Is  a  pRacTIcaL  REqUIRE¸ENT  Of  cLINIcaL ¸EDIcINE,  ITs  NEED  fOR  cERTaINTy  wHEN TakINg acTION ON bEHaLf Of aNOTHER HU¸aN bEINg. ÁaNs-GEORg GaDa¸ER  DEscRIbEs  sUcH  a  NEED  (THOUgH  NOT  THE accO¸paNyINg  cLaI¸  TO  scIENcE)  as 

knihT   s r o t c o D woH

¹EsTs wILL HaVE TO bE baLaNcED bETwEEN THEIR sENsITIVITy TO ¸aRgINaL casEs aND 

cHaRacTERIsTIc  Of  aLL  pRacTIcE.  “PRacTIcE  REqUIREs  kNOwLEDgE,”  HE  wRITEs, 

98

“wHIcH  ¸EaNs THaT  IT Is ObLIgED TO TREaT  THE kNOwLEDgE aVaILabLE aT THE TI¸E  as  cO¸pLETE  aND  cERTaIN.”Ð CERTaINLy  ONE  Of  ¸EDIcINE’s  cHIEf  sTRaTEgIEs  fOR 

y r e m o g t n o M  n y r h t a K

¸INI¸IzINg THE INEscapabLE UNcERTaINTy Of ITs pRacTIcE Is TO REgaRD—THOUgH  aLways wITH skEpTIcIs¸—THE bEsT aVaILabLE INfOR¸aTION as REaL, DEpENDabLE,  aND absOLUTE, aND THEsE qUaLITIEs aRE HELD TO bE cHaRacTERIsTIc Of scIENcE. °Is  pRacTIcaL  sTRaTEgy ¸akEs  sENsE  Of aN ODD pHENO¸ENON:  pHysIcIaNs’  Lack  Of  INTEREsT  IN  THE  LaTE  TwENTIETH-cENTURy  DEbaTE  abOUT  THE  sTaTUs  Of  scIENTIfic  kNOwLEDgE  OR  ITs  REpREsENTaTION  Of  REaLITy.  ¶EspITE  sTEREOTypEs  abOUT  pRE¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs,  ¸aNy  pHysIcIaNs HaVE  HaD  a gOOD  LIbERaL EDUcaTION,  aND  aLL  Of  THE¸  HaVE  ¸ET  Up  wITH  THE  assU¸pTION-RaTTLINg pUzzLE  Of  qUaNTU¸  ¸EcHaNIcs  IN  THE  pHysIcs  cOURsEs  REqUIRED  fOR  ¸EDIcaL  scHOOL  aD¸IssION.  WITH THEIR wHITE cOaTs Off, THEy aRE LIkELy TO kNOw as ¸UcH abOUT  THE HIsTORy  aND  pHILOsOpHy  Of  scIENcE  as  OTHER  cOLLEgE  gRaDUaTEs.  °Ey  NEVERTHELEss  sEE¸ TO NEED THE HONORIfic LabEL “scIENcE” as a waRRaNT fOR THEIR cLINIcaL acTs.  MEDIcaL  sTUDENTs wHO  as UNDERgRaDUaTEs  wERE I¸¸ERsED  IN  pHILOsOpHy OR  aNTHROpOLOgy OR cULTURaL sTUDIEs aRE NO ¸ORE LIkELy TO REsIsT THE scIENcE cLaI¸  (wITH  OR wITHOUT  THE aRT HEDgE) THaN THOsE  wHO ¸ajORED IN bIO¸EcHaNIcaL  ENgINEERINg OR EcONO¸Ics. ±NcE IN pRacTIcE, ¸aNy pHysIcIaNs wELL EDUcaTED  IN  THE bIOLOgIcaL scIENcEs aND  kEENLy awaRE Of THE INERaDIcabLE  UNcERTaINTy  Of THEIR  wORk  sTILL REfER  TO ¸EDIcINE as a  scIENcE—aND  wITHOUT aN appaRENT  sHRED  Of EpIsTE¸OLOgIcaL  DOUbT. ºT Is as If, HaVINg E¸baRkED ON a pERILOUsLy  UNcERTaIN  pRacTIcE,  cHaRacTERIzED  by  UNgENERaLIzabLE  RULEs  aND  ExcEpTIONs  TO THOsE RULEs THaT  pROLIfERaTE LIkE EpIcycLEs  Of THE pLaNETs IN PTOLE¸aIc  cOs¸OLOgy, THEy  ¸UsT cLINg fOR  INTELLEcTUaL jUsTIficaTION—bEyOND  THE NEED fOR  sOcIaL  aND  INTERpERsONaL  pOwER—TO  THE  sHaRDs  Of  a  HIsTORIcaL  bUT  by  NOw  ¸ETapHORIc aND INappLIcabLE cERTaINTy. ScIENcE Is REgaRDED as THE “gOLD sTaNDaRD” Of  cLINIcaL ¸EDIcINE pREcIsELy  bEcaUsE IT  pRO¸IsEs RELIabILITy, REpLIcabILITy, ObjEcTIVITy—IN sHORT,  wHaT cERTaINTy  Is  aVaILabLE IN aN UNcERTaIN pRacTIcE. °E  ¸ETapHOR Of THE gOLD sTaNDaRD, sO wIDELy  UsED as aN I¸agE Of bEsT pRacTIcE aND  scIENTIfic cERTaINTy, Is  IRONIcaLLy apT—aND jUsT as UNExa¸INED as THE scIENcE cLaI¸. GOLD NO LONgER  backs  aNy  ¸ajOR  wORLD  cURRENcy. ºT  Has gONE  THE way  Of  pOsITIVIsT  scIENcE.  ²IkE  scIENcE  aND  THE  pOpULaR  cONcEpTION  Of  RaTIONaLITy  IT  sTaNDs  fOR,  gOLD  Is  sTILL aVaILabLE fOR  THE INVOcaTION  Of VaLUE,  bUT IT  was LONg  agO RELaTIVIzED,  RENDERED cONDITIONaL, aND UNDERsTOOD as IN paRT THE pRODUcT Of ITs sOcIaL UsE. ±NE OTHER REasON fOR ¸EDIcINE’s ¸IsDEscRIpTION Is  aN ETHIcaL ONE. PHysIcIaNs  aRgUE THaT  THE bELIEf THaT  ¸EDIcINE Is  a scIENcE  Is EssENTIaL TO ¸EDIcaL  EDUcaTION.  CLINIcaL  kNOwLEDgE, aLTHOUgH  EVOLVINg, Is  aT aNy  gIVEN  ¸O¸ENT 

fixED  aND  cERTaIN, aND  as TEacHERs THEy waNT  TO fOsTER IN THEIR  sTUDENTs aND  REsIDENTs  a  NEaRLy ObsEssIVE aTTENTION TO DETaIL, a DRIVE TO kNOw  aLL THaT  caN 

99

aRE  THE ¸aRks Of THE  gOOD cLINIcIaN. ºT ¸IgHT sEE¸ OUTRagEOUs  TO ask THE¸  sI¸ULTaNEOUsLy TO ackNOwLEDgE cLINIcaL ¸EDIcINE’s IRREDUcIbLE UNcERTaINTy—  aLTHOUgH,  as  º  wILL  sHOw,  cOVERTLy  THEy  ¸aNagE  TO  DO  ExacTLy THaT  aT  EVERy  cLINIcaL  TURN.  PaTIENTs  aRE  REsIsTaNT  TOO.  ¶O  wE  waNT  pHysIcIaNs  TO  TELL  Us  as  THEy  ENTER  THE  Exa¸INaTION  ROO¸  THaT  THEIR  kNOwLEDgE  Is  INcO¸pLETE,  ITs  appLIcaTION  TO  OUR  casE  wILL bE  I¸pREcIsE,  aND  ITs  UsEfULNEss  UNcERTaIN?  µOT UNLEss OUR cO¸pLaINT Is VERy ¸INOR wE DON’T. WE waNT TO THINk Of THE¸  as  pOwERfUL,  DEDIcaTED,  pERfEcT  figUREs. °Is  RIgID ExpEcTaTION  caRRIEs  OVER  INTO  THE  s¸aLLEsT  DETaILs  Of  EDUcaTION  aND  pRacTIcE.  WORk  sHIſts fOR  pHysIcIaNs aND 80-HOUR wEEks fOR REsIDENTs HaVE bEEN REsIsTED bEcaUsE THEy ¸IgHT  LI¸IT THEIR aLL-OUT DEDIcaTION TO paTIENTs. AND paTIENTs, EVEN wHEN THEy kNOw  THE assERTION Is NEcEssaRILy sUspEcT, sTILL waNT TO gO ON HEaRINg  “WE’VE DONE  EVERyTHINg pOssIbLE.” FEw  cLINIcIaNs—OR paTIENTs—HaVE I¸agINED cHaNgINg  THIs  folie a deux. Ñ ºs IT  pOssIbLE  TO EDUcaTE gOOD  pHysIcIaNs  wHILE  REcOgNIzINg  THaT scIENcE  Is  a  TOOL  RaTHER  THaN  THE sOUL  Of  ¸EDIcINE? º  bELIEVE  IT  Is, EspEcIaLLy  If  THaT  EDUcaTION wERE fRa¸ED fOR¸aLLy, as IT NOw Is TacITLy, as a  ¸ORaL EDUcaTION, a  LONg aND  scRUpULOUs pREpaRaTION TO acT  wIsELy fOR THE gOOD Of THEIR paTIENTs  IN aN UNcERTaIN fiELD Of kNOwLEDgE.Ò A fiRsT sTEp wOULD bE TO scRap THE UNExa¸INED  DEscRIpTION  Of cLINIcaL  ¸EDIcINE  as  bOTH  a  scIENcE  aND  aN aRT.  °E  DUaLITy IgNOREs aLL THaT ¸EDIcINE sHaREs wITH ¸ORaL REasONINg aND REINfORcEs  THE cONTE¸pORaRy TENDENcy TO spLIT ETHIcs fRO¸ ¸EDIcINE. MORaL kNOwINg  Is  THE  EssENcE  Of  cLINIcaL  ¸ETHOD,  INExTRIcabLy  bOUND  Up  wITH  THE  caRE  Of  THE  paTIENT.  ºN  ¸EDIcINE, ¸ORaLITy  aND  cLINIcaL  pRacTIcE REqUIRE  pHRONEsIs,  THE pRacTIcaL RaTIONaLITy THaT cHaRacTERIzEs bOTH a RELIabLE ¸ORaL agENT aND a  gOOD pHysIcIaN. AccOUNTs  Of  cLINIcaL  ¸EDIcINE  sHOULD  cELEbRaTE  cLINIcaL  jUDg¸ENT  aND  NOT  THE  IDEa  Of  scIENcE  THaT  pHysIcIaNs  bORROw  fRO¸  µEwTONIaN  pHysIcs.  µOR sHOULD THEy appEaL TO a  VagUELy DEfiNED “aRT”  TO ¸ODIfy OR  ENRIcH THaT  OUT¸ODED IDEa Of scIENcE. CLINIcaL ¸EDIcINE Is bEsT DEscRIbED, INsTEaD, as a  pRacTIcE.  AccOUNTs Of  pHysIcIaNs’ wORk, EspEcIaLLy  cELEbRaTORy ONEs, sHOULD  E¸pHasIzE  THE ExERcIsE  Of  cLINIcaL  REasONINg OR  pHRONEsIs,  THE  DEpLOy¸ENT  Of  cLINIcaL  jUDg¸ENT  ON  bEHaLf  Of  THE  paTIENT.  ºN  EqUIppINg  pHysIcIaNs  TO  pERfOR¸ THaT EssENTIaL Task, ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION Is NEcEssaRILy a ¸ORaL EDUcaTION, fOR IT Is TRaININg TO cHOOsE wHaT Is bEsT TO DO IN THE wORLD Of acTION. ºTs  gOaL Is  THE cULTIVaTION Of pHRONEsIs, THE pRacTIcaL REasON EssENTIaL TO cLINIcaL 

knihT   s r o t c o D woH

bE kNOwN, aND a DEDIcaTION TO THE bEsT pOssIbLE caRE fOR EacH paTIENT. °EsE 

jUDg¸ENT. °E  pRacTIcE Of ¸EDIcINE  REqUIREs kNOwLEDgE Of HU¸aN  bIOLOgy, 

100

a  sTORE  Of  cLINIcaL  ExpERIENcE,  gOOD  DIagNOsTIc  aND  THERapEUTIc  skILLs,  aND  a  fa¸ILIaRITy  wITH  THE VagaRIEs  Of THE  HU¸aN  cONDITION.  °EIR  INTERsEcTION 

y r e m o g t n o M  n y r h t a K

IN  THE  caRE  Of  paTIENTs—THE  pRacTIcE THaT  ¸akEs pHysIcIaNs  wHO  aND  wHaT  THEy aRE—Is NEITHER a scIENcE NOR aN aRT. ºT Is a DIsTINcTIVE pRacTIcaL ENDEaVOR  wHOsE paRTIcULaR way Of kNOwINg—ITs pHRONEsIOLOgy—qUaLIfiEs IT TO bE THaT  I¸pOssIbLE THINg, a scIENcE Of INDIVIDUaLs.

notes 1  KIRsTI  MaLTERUD,  “°E ²EgITI¸acy  Of  CLINIcaL  KNOwLEDgE:  ¹OwaRDs  a  MEDIcaL ´pIsTE¸OLOgy ´¸bRacINg THE ART Of MEDIcINE,” °eoretical Medicine 16 (1995): 183–198; 183. 2  ´RIc  CassELL,  °e  Nature  of  Suffering  and  the  Goals  of  Medicine (µEw  YORk:  ±xfORD  ·NIVERsITy PREss,  1991), xI.  ÁIs  Doctoring: °e  Nature of Primary Care Medicine (µEw  YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy  PREss, 1997), aN ExpERIENcE-basED  EpIsTE¸OLOgy Of  ¸EDIcINE,  DEscRIbEs THE  INaDEqUacy Of scIENcE—ITs  “sUpERficIaLITy”—as a ¸ODEL aND  a sOURcE  fOR  cLINIcaL kNOwINg. 3  ´D¸UND ¶. PELLEgRINO aND ¶aVID C. °O¸as¸a, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Prac-

tice, 125–143. 4  °E COcHaNE COLLabORaTION Is aVaILabLE ONLINE aT www.cOcHRaNE.ORg (accEssED SEpTE¸bER  15, 2004). 5  ²INDa ¹.  KOHN,  JaNET M.  CORRIgaN,  aND  MOLLa S.  ¶ONaLDsON,  EDs.,  To Err  Is Human: 

Building a Safer Health System (WasHINgTON, ¶C: CO¸¸ITTEE ON QUaLITy Of ÁEaLTH CaRE  IN A¸ERIca, ºNsTITUTE Of MEDIcINE, 2000). 6  ÁaNs-GEORg  GaDa¸ER,  °e  Enigma of  Health:  °e  Art  of  Healing  in  a  Scientific Age ,  TRaNs. JasON GaIgER aND µIcHOLas WaLkER (STaNfORD: STaNfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1996), 4. 7  ÁaROLD BURszTajN, ³IcHaRD º. FEINbLOO¸, ³ObERT M. Áa¸¸, aND ARcHIE BRODsky DEscRIbE  HOw IT ¸IgHT bE DONE IN Medical Choices, Medical Chances, 2ND ED. (µEw YORk: ³OUTLEDgE,  1990). 8  CHaRLEs BOsk, Forgive and Remember: Managing  Medical Failure (CHIcagO: ·NIVERsITy  Of CHIcagO PREss, 1979). SEE aLsO PELLEgRINO aND °O¸as¸a, Philosophical Basis of Med-

ical Practice .

HeAl±ng  Sk±lls  foR Med±cAl  ³RAcT±ce Larry R. Churchill and David Schenck

WE THOUgHT wE cOULD cURE EVERyTHINg, bUT IT TURNs OUT wE caN ONLy cURE  a s¸aLL a¸OUNT Of HU¸aN sUffERINg. °E REsT Of IT NEEDs TO bE HEaLED. —r¾»hel n¾omi remen

AT THE cENTER Of ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs Is THE HEaLINg RELaTIONsHIp. —edmund d. ¿elleÇrino

ALL pHysIcIaNs REcOgNIzE THaT THEIR RELaTIONsHIps wITH paTIENTs caN HaVE HEaLINg EffEcTs. CO¸passIONaTE, TRUsTINg RELaTIONsHIps wITH  paTIENTs aRE THE cHIEf  DELIVERy VEHIcLE  fOR THE scIENTIfic  INTERVENTIONs Of ¸ODERN ¸EDIcINE. CLINIcIaNs aRE cONcERNED DaILy wITH cONVINcINg pEOpLE TO UNDERgO pHysIcaL Exa¸INaTIONs;  accEpT  pRObEs  INTO  THEIR  pRIVaTE  LIVEs; ENDURE  DIagNOsTIc  TEsTs;  OR  TakE ¸EDIcaTIONs THaT aRE INcONVENIENT, sO¸ETI¸Es paINfUL, aND OccasIONaLLy  INcUR  RIsk. ³ELaTIONaL  skILLs  aRE  fUNDa¸ENTaL  TO sUccEss  IN  THEsE pERsUasIVE  ENDEaVORs, aND RELaTIONsHIps  THE¸sELVEs HaVE pOTENTIaL  THERapEUTIc VaLUE— IT  Is  DEscRIbED  IN  scIENTIfic  TER¸s  as  THE  “pLacEbO  EffEcT”à OR  THE  “¸EaNINg  REspONsE,”Ä as wELL as IN ETHIcaL TER¸s, as PELLEgRINO aRgUEs. Æ ºN aDDITION, RELaTIONsHIps  wITH paTIENTs  aRE  a  LaRgE paRT Of  THE INTRINsIc  REwaRDs  Of ¸EDIcaL  pRacTIcE. ¶EspITE  THIs  REcOgNITION,  RELaTIONaL  skILLs  aRE  RaRELy  sTUDIED  sysTE¸aTIcaLLy aND aRE OſtEN cONsIgNED TO THE UNscIENTIfic aND ¸ysTIfiED “aRT” Of ¸EDIcINE. ALTHOUgH THERE aRE NU¸EROUs bOOks ON INTERVIEwINgΖРaND  sTUDIEs Of  pHysIcIaN-paTIENT cONVERsaTIONs, Ñ wE kNOw  Of VERy  fEw E¸pIRIcaL  sTUDIEs  Of HOw pHysIcIaNs bUILD RELaTIONsHIps THaT HaVE HEaLINg pOTENTIaL.

²aRRy ³.  CHURcHILL  aND  ¶aVID ScHENck,  “ÁEaLINg  SkILLs  fOR  MEDIcaL  PRacTIcE,”  fRO¸  Annals  of 

Internal  Medicine 149, NO. 10  (2008):  720–724.  ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION  Of  A¸ERIcaN COLLEgE  Of  PHysIcIaNs.

Interviews  with Expert  Healers 102 WE  INTERVIEwED  50  pRacTITIONERs  fRO¸  3  sTaTEs  wHO  wERE  REgaRDED  by  THEIR  k c n e h c S  divaD   d n a  l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L

pROfEssIONaL  pEERs as  EspEcIaLLy  gOOD  aT  EsTabLIsHINg  aND sUsTaININg  ExcELLENT  paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIps. PRacTITIONERs INcLUDED  40 acaDE¸Ic aND cO¸¸UNITy  pHysIcIaNs  acROss  a  wIDE RaNgE  Of  spEcIaLTIEs aND 10  NON-ÓÔ  pRacTITIONERs  IN  cO¸pLE¸ENTaRy aND aLTERNaTIVE ¸EDIcINE. ºNTERVIEwEEs RaNgED IN agE fRO¸  ¸ID-30s TO LaTE 70s, aND 50 pERcENT Of paRTIcIpaNTs wERE wO¸EN. WE cONDUcTED  facE-TO-facE,  sE¸IsTRUcTURED INTERVIEws aND ¸aDE aUDIO  REcORDINgs Of THE  INTERVIEws  aNONy¸OUs. WE THEN INDEpENDENTLy  aNaLyzED TRaNscRIpTs  fOR cORE  THE¸Es aND cONTENT aND REcONcILED aNy DIsagREE¸ENTs IN OUR aNaLysIs THROUgH  DIscUssION.  °E  INsTITUTIONaL  REVIEw  bOaRD  aT  ÂaNDERbILT  ·NIVERsITy  MEDIcaL  CENTER appROVED THE sTUDy, aND ExpERT pRacTITIONERs gaVE INfOR¸ED cONsENT.

Eight Themes ºN REspONsE TO THE basIc qUEsTIONs Of THE INTERVIEws (“ÁOw DO  yOU gO abOUT  EsTabLIsHINg aND ¸aINTaININg HEaLINg RELaTIONsHIps wITH yOUR paTIENTs? WHaT  cONcRETE THINgs DO yOU DO TO bRINg THIs abOUT?”), EIgHT fUNDa¸ENTaL THE¸Es  E¸ERgED (bOx 1).

³RAcTITION±R  ¿KIllS  »HAT  ³ROMOT±  ¶±AlINg  ´±lATIONSHIpS bOX 1 EIgHT  do the little thinǼ ºNTRODUcE yOURsELf aND EVERyONE ON THE TEa¸ GREET EVERybODy IN THE ROO¸ SHakE HaNDs, s¸ILE, sIT DOwN, ¸akE EyE cONTacT GIVE yOUR UNDIVIDED aTTENTION BE HU¸aN, bE pERsONabLE t¾Êe time ¾nd li¼ten BE sTILL BE qUIET BE INTEREsTED BE pREsENT

½e o¿en BE VULNERabLE

103

FacE THE paIN ²OOk fOR THE UNspOkEN Õind ¼omethinÇ to liÊe, to love ¹akE THE RIsk STRETcH yOURsELf aND yOUR wORLD °INk Of yOUR fa¸ILy remove ½¾rrier¼ PRacTIcE HU¸ILITy Pay aTTENTION TO pOwER aND ITs DIffERENTIaLs CREaTE bRIDgEs BE safE aND ¸akE wELcO¸INg spacEs let the ¿¾tient eX¿l¾in ²IsTEN fOR wHaT aND HOw THEy UNDERsTaND ²IsTEN fOR THE fEaR aND fOR THE aNgER ²IsTEN fOR ExpEcTaTIONs aND fOR HOpEs Öh¾re ¾uthoritÈ ±ffER gUIDaNcE GET pER¸IssION TO TakE THE LEaD SUppORT paTIENTs’ EffORTs TO HEaL THE¸sELVEs BE cONfiDENT ½e »ommitted ¾nd tru¼tÉorthÈ ¶O NOT abaNDON ºNVEsT IN TRUsT BE faITHfUL BE THaNkfUL

1. ¸O TH±  ¹ITTl±  »HINgS S¸aLL  cOURTEsIEs  aND  cONgENIaL  ¸aNNERs, sUcH  as  s¸ILINg,  sHakINg  HaNDs,  ackNOwLEDgINg  OTHERs IN THE ROO¸, aND ¸akINg  EyE cONTacT, OſtEN TURN OUT  TO bE HIgHLy sIgNIficaNT, EspEcIaLLy aT THE bEgINNINg Of a RELaTIONsHIp.

ecitcarP   l a c i d e M  r o f   s l l i k S   g n i l a e H

BE bRaVE

±NE Of THE THINgs THaT º ROUTINELy DO Is, wHEN º ENTER THE paTIENT’s ROO¸, º TRy 

104

TO ¸akE EyE cONTacT aND TO sHakE THE  paTIENT’s HaND. º wILL OſtEN ackNOwLEDgE aNyONE  ELsE  THaT THEy  HaVE IN  THE  ROO¸ wITH  THE¸,  THEIR sIgNIficaNT 

k c n e h c S  divaD   d n a  l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L

OTHERs. SO THERE aRE jUsT cERTaIN ObVIOUs sOcIaL gEsTUREs THaT aRE cO¸¸ON IN  aNy NEw RELaTIONsHIp THaT º TRy TO EsTabLIsH RIgHT away. (ºNTERVIEw 21) AT INITIaL ¸EETINgs, a s¸aLL cO¸¸UNITy Is fOR¸INg VERy qUIckLy aND UNDER  UNUsUaL cIRcU¸sTaNcEs. °E pRacTITIONER Has ENOR¸OUs pOwER TO sET THE TONE  aND DIREcTION fOR THIs LITTLE cO¸¸UNITy IN THE fiRsT ENcOUNTER. ºf  sO¸EONE  fEELs  cONNEcTED,  THEN  yOU’RE  ¸ILEs  aHEaD  IN  TER¸s  Of  bEINg  abLE TO affEcT sO¸E sORT  Of pOsITIVE REsULTs OR I¸pacT  ON THE paTIENT, aND  sO  IT’s  REaLLy  EsTabLIsHINg  a  pOsITIVE  aND  UNIqUE  RELaTIONsHIp  wHERE  THE  paTIENT RE¸E¸bERs yOU. ¹OUcH Is ExTRE¸ELy I¸pORTaNT, sO waLkINg IN aND  sHakINg  HaNDs—aND  a  HaND  ON  THE sHOULDER.  °OsE  sORTs Of  THINgs  aRE  VERy, VERy I¸pORTaNT. (ºNTERVIEw 5)

2. »AK±  »IM±  ANd ¹IST±N BEgINNINgs THaT aRE cOURTEOUs ¸ay sHOw THE¸sELVEs TO HaVE bEEN ¸ERE fOR¸aLITIEs UNLEss OpENINgs aRE fOLLOwED by gENUINE pREsENcE. PaTIENTs TypIcaLLy  wONDER, “WILL THE DOcTOR LIsTEN TO ¸E?” A pRacTITIONER’s wILLINgNEss TO bE sTILL  aND qUIET DE¸ONsTRaTEs TO THE paTIENT THaT THERE Is spacE. SO ¸y fiRsT  ¸EETINg Is TO  TRy  TO gET acqUaINTED, aND  wHaT º  kNOw Is  THaT  IT TakEs TI¸E. º ¸ay HaVE a THOUsaND THINgs gOINg, bUT º NEED TO sIT DOwN  aND TRy TO LOOk RELaxED. º ¸IgHT EVEN TakE Off ¸y cOaT, aND TRy TO gIVE THE¸  bODy LaNgUagE THaT [says] “º HaVE TI¸E fOR yOU.” (ºNTERVIEw 19) ¹akINg TI¸E ¸akEs IT pOssIbLE TO LIsTEN wITH caRE TO THE paTIENTs’ aNswERs  TO pRacTITIONERs’ qUEsTIONs. º  sTaRT  TEacHINg  IN  THE  fiRsT ENcOUNTER,  bUT º  spEND  a  LOT  Of TI¸E  LIsTENINg TO THE aNswERs TO  THE qUEsTIONs THaT  º ask, aND  THEN º TRy TO LET sO¸E  sILENcE  TakE pLacE,  EspEcIaLLy IN pEOpLE  wHO aRE VERy  cONcERNED, sO  THaT  THEy caN TELL ¸E wHaT THEy’RE cONcERNED abOUT. (ºNTERVIEw 8) AN I¸pORTaNT paRT Of LIsTENINg Is  LIsTENINg fOR sTORIEs—fOR THE NaRRaTIVEs  THaT gIVE cOHERENcE TO paTIENTs’ LIVEs. º fOUND OUT  EaRLy ON THaT bEINg  abLE  TO LIsTEN TO THEIR LIfE sTORy  cONNEcTED  ¸E bETTER wITH THaT cHILD aND THaT fa¸ILy, aND THEN  wE HaD a RELaTIONsHIp.  (ºNTERVIEw 3)

²IsTENINg Is THE ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT THINg, º bELIEVE. AskINg abOUT THE¸, NOT  jUsT  abOUT  THEIR  DIsEasE.  ²ETTINg  THE¸  TELL  THEIR  OwN  sTORy  wITHOUT  TOO 

105

°ROUgH  LIsTENINg  aND  caRINg  abOUT  paTIENTs’  sTORIEs,  pHysIcIaNs  caN  sO¸ETI¸Es  REINTERpRET kEy paRTs Of THEsE NaRRaTIVEs. STORIEs Of sUffERINg caN  bEcO¸E sTORIEs Of HEaLINg.Ò,×

3. B±  Àp±N PaTIENTs  bRINg  THEIR  wOUNDs,  wHIcH  PELLEgRINO Æ caLLED  THEIR  “Da¸agED  HU¸aNITy,” TO THE pRacTITIONER. ºT TakEs cOURagE ON THE paRT Of THE pRacTITIONER  TO  bE wILLINg  TO bE  OpEN TO  THIs VULNERabILITy,  paTIENT aſtER paTIENT. YET,  OUR  INfOR¸aNTs aRgUE THaT IT Is sUcH wILLINgNEss aND  cOURagE THaT ¸akEs HEaLINg  pOssIbLE. YOU HaVE TO bE HONEsT. YOU ¸IgHT bE abLE TO HELp a LOT Of TI¸Es—IT DEpENDs,  bUT LIsTEN TO  HIs sTORy.  YOU  LIsTEN fOR  THE wOUND  aND yOU  LET THE¸ kNOw  THaT yOU HaVE wOUNDs. YOU aRE NOT pERfEcT. (ºNTERVIEw 13) PaRT Of wHy THIs ¸akEs HEaLINg pOssIbLE Is THaT wHEN THE pRacTITIONER ¸ODELs sUcH wILLINgNEss aND cOURagE, THE paTIENT Has pER¸IssION TO fOLLOw sUIT aND  OffER THE sa¸E. ºN THIs way, I¸¸ENsE pOwER Is gENERaTED. YOU kNOw,  º ¸IgHT gET TEaRfUL, OR  º ¸IgHT gET UpsET, aND sO  º THINk  a  LOT  Of pHysIcIaNs,  aT  THaT  pOINT,  pULL back,  bEcO¸E  ¸ORE  cLINIcaL,  aND  ¸OVE  THROUgH IT, bUT If yOU sTRETcH a LITTLE bIT, aND yOU aLLOw yOURsELf TO fEEL THOsE  E¸OTIONs, IT HELps THE paTIENT TRE¸ENDOUsLy. ºT acTUaLLy Is VERy REwaRDINg,  as ¸UcH as IT’s DIfficULT. (ºNTERVIEw 22)

4. FINd ¿OM±THINg  TO  ¹IK±,  TO  ¹OV± “²OVE” HERE Is NOT sO ¸UcH aN E¸OTION as IT Is a  qUaLITy Of “HEaRT aND sOUL,”  aND IT ¸aNIfEsTs ¸OsT aUTHENTIcaLLy aND ¸OsT pOwERfULLy IN cO¸passION aND  UNDERsTaNDINg. SEEkINg IN EVERy  paTIENT a qUaLITy, aN acHIEVE¸ENT, OR EVEN  jUsT  a  ¸aNNERIs¸  THaT  caN  bE  appREcIaTED  OR  aD¸IRED  ¸ObILIzEs  a  HEaLINg  capacITy IN caREgIVERs. ÃØ,Ãà °Is  was a  sTRONg THE¸E fRO¸ OUR INTERVIEws. YET  THIs cO¸passIONaTE DE¸EaNOR  caNNOT bE a ¸aTTER Of ROTE bEHaVIORs OR gI¸¸Icks—IT ¸UsT bE basED IN sO¸ETHINg REaL. º TOOk a cLass wITH a fa¸OUs psycHIaTRIsT wHO TaUgHT TEcHNIqUEs Of paTIENT  cONVERsaTION, INcLUDINg  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs TO  “LEaN fORwaRD”  aND  TO  “sIT 

ecitcarP   l a c i d e M  r o f   s l l i k S   g n i l a e H

¸aNy INTERRUpTIONs. CaRINg abOUT THE aspEcTs Of THaT sTORy. (ºNTERVIEw 31)

ON THE fRONT EDgE Of yOUR cHaIR.”  º askED: “WOULDN’T IT bE bETTER TO jUsT bE 

106

INTEREsTED IN yOUR paTIENTs?” (ºNTERVIEw 26) FOR sO¸E pRacTITIONERs,  IT  Is  UsEfUL  TO  I¸agINE  THE  paTIENT as  bEINg  LIkE 

k c n e h c S  divaD   d n a  l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L

THEIR  paRENT  OR  spOUsE OR  THEIR  cHILD  OR  gRaNDcHILD,  DEpENDINg  ON THE  agE  aND sEx Of THE paTIENT. ±NcE THE caREgIVER fEELs E¸paTHy aND OpENs TO cO¸passION, aNOTHER REaL¸ Of caRE bEcO¸Es aVaILabLE. º HaVE a HEaRT aND sOUL wHIcH º caN OffER THE¸, wHIcH Is THE way Of bRINgINg THE¸ sO¸E LOVE. ²OVE Is a TOUgH wORD TO TaLk abOUT wHEN yOU aRE TaLkINg abOUT DOcTOR aND paTIENT RELaTIONsHIps. ¶O yOU LOVE yOUR paTIENTs? º  THINk yOU HaVE TO. SO¸E pEOpLE DON’T waNT TO say THaT THEy DO, bUT º THINk  TO REaLLy gET TO THE pOINT Of HEaLINg yOU HaVE TO LOVE. YOU HaVE TO bE cO¸passIONaTE aND UNDERsTaNDINg aND wILLINg TO waLk THE wOUNDED paTH wITH  THE¸. (ºNTERVIEw 13) ±NE pRacTITIONER spOkE fOR ¸aNy OTHERs wE INTERVIEwED: WE’RE IN IT fOR THE ¸O¸ENT wHERE THERE’s THaT  DOUbLE HEaRT OpEN cONNEcTION Of LOVE aND TRUTH. ºT ¸akEs ¸y pRacTIcE DOabLE. (ºNTERVIEw 43)

5. ´±MOV±  BARRI±RS ±UR ExpERT  pRacTITIONERs saID THaT  THEy sEEk TO RE¸OVE  as ¸aNy  baRRIERs TO  a  gENUINE pERsON-TO-pERsON ENcOUNTER as pOssIbLE. BaRRIERs caN bE Of ¸aNy  sORTs: sO¸E aRE pHysIcaL ObjEcTs, OTHERs aRE aTTITUDEs. º NEVER  HaVE  aNyTHINg  bETwEEN  ¸E  aND  THE paTIENT.  º’VE  aLways  HaD  ¸y  DEsk Up agaINsT THE waLL. (ºNTERVIEw 8) ³E¸OVINg aTTITUDINaL baRRIERs OſtEN INVOLVEs aN appREcIaTION Of pOwER DIffERENTIaLs bETwEEN pHysIcIaN aND paTIENT aND aN ELE¸ENT Of HU¸ILITy. º’¸ NOT TOO gOOD TO OpEN a DOOR aND ROLL a paTIENT back INTO THE ROO¸, aND  º’¸ NOT TOO pROUD TO wIpE THE sNOT Off a cRyINg ¸OTHER, OR E¸pTy a  TRasH  baskET . . . OR TO DO aNy Of THOsE THINgs THaT THE LOwEsT-RaNkED E¸pLOyEE Of  THE HOspITaL DOEs. (ºNTERVIEw 20)

º LIkE  TO HaVE THE¸ UNDERsTaND THaT º a¸ a  HU¸aN bEINg, THaT º a¸ NOT a  gOD. º a¸ a pHysIcIaN. (ºNTERVIEw 13)

6. ¹±T  TH±  ³ATI±NT  ExplAIN ±UR INfOR¸aNTs INsIsTED THaT paTIENTs aRE THE bEsT sOURcE Of INfOR¸aTION ON 

107

UNDERsTaNDINg  Of THEIR ILLNEss TO bE spOkEN aND REcEIVED. °Is, IN TURN, pROVIDEs THE OppORTUNITy fOR a REINTERpRETaTION, wHIcH ITsELf Is OſtEN aN EssENTIaL  paRT Of HEaLINg. ±pEN-ENDED qUEsTIONs sEE¸ paRTIcULaRLy EffEcTIVE. A gOOD way TO gET THE paTIENT sTaRTED Is jUsT askINg THE¸ wHaT THEy UNDERsTaND  abOUT  wHaT’s  gOINg  ON  sO  faR.  AND  THaT’s  a  VERy  bROaD OpENINg;  IT  aLLOws THE¸ TO EITHER bE VERy scIENTIfic aND TaLk abOUT THE TEsTs THaT THEy’VE  HaD, OR IT’s aN OpENINg If THE E¸OTIONaL pIEcE Is I¸pORTaNT TO THE¸ aT THaT  TI¸E. ºT gIVEs THE¸ aN OppORTUNITy TO fRa¸E IT fOR wHaT THEy NEED THE ¸OsT,  RaTHER THaN sTaRTINg wITH spEcIfic qUEsTIONs abOUT THE ¸EDIcaL sIDE. (ºNTERVIEw 22) °EN  THE  pRacTITIONER  caN  spEak  back  IN  THE  LaNgUagE  aND  TER¸INOLOgy  THaT Is UNDERsTaNDabLE aND ¸EaNINgfUL TO THE paTIENT.ÃÄ As THE paTIENT  TaLks, THE caREgIVER LOOks fOR THE OpENINg, THE pLacE TO INsERT a cO¸¸ENT OR  aN INsIgHT—THE pLacE TO gO TO fURTHER THE HEaLINg pROcEss. FIRsT, THERE’s  ¸akINg  cO¸fORTabLE  aND  DROppINg  ¸y jUDg¸ENT,  aND  sEcOND, THERE’s LIsTENINg, aND THEN THIRD, Is waITINg fOR THE cUEs, TO sEE wHERE  Is  THE INVITaTION?  º’¸ TaLkINg TO  sO¸EbODy, aND  yOU kNOw  wHEN THEy’RE  REaDy TO  HEaR sO¸ETHINg. YOU kNOw, wHEN º  a¸ LIsTENINg, THERE Is jUsT  a  kNOwINg Of  wHEN THE wORDs  caN cO¸E, aND  sO º  waIT fOR  THE OpENINg.  (ºNTERVIEw 39)

7. ¿HAR±  ºUTHORITY MaNy  pRacTITIONERs  EsTabLIsH THEIR  ExpEcTaTION  Of  sHaRED  REspONsIbILITy fOR  HEaLINg aT THE VERy bEgINNINg. ±NE Of THE INITIaL paRTs Of ¸y cONsULTaTION wITH sO¸EbODy Is THaT º’LL TELL  THE¸, “¹ODay’s  VIsIT Is  aLL  abOUT ascERTaININg  wHETHER  º caN  HELp yOU  OR  NOT. º’LL ¸akE  sO¸E REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs TO yOU.  [BUT] yOU wILL aLways DIcTaTE wHaT yOU waNT TO DO.” (ºNTERVIEw 6) FOR THIs sHaRED REspONsIbILITy TO bEcO¸E sHaRED aUTHORITy—a RaTHER ¸ORE  DIfficULT  RELaTIONsHIp TO EsTabLIsH—THE  pRacTITIONER ¸UsT VIEw THE paTIENT as  a “fELLOw ExpERT.”

ecitcarP   l a c i d e M  r o f   s l l i k S   g n i l a e H

THEIR  cONDITION,  aND  THaT  aN  EssENTIaL  paRT  Of  HEaLINg  Is  aLLOwINg  paTIENTs’ 

WHaT’s  OſtEN  NOT  REcOgNIzED  Is  THE  paTIENT  bRINgs  a  paRTIcULaR  LEVEL  Of 

108

ExpERTIsE, TOO. WHO kNOws ¸ORE abOUT THE¸ THaN THE¸? AND aſtER aLL, IT  Is abOUT THE¸ aND HOw THEy aRE abLE TO gET bETTER. (ºNTERVIEw 40)

k c n e h c S  divaD   d n a  l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L

FOR THE paTIENT TO bE  a fULL  paRTNER, HOwEVER, THE pRacTITIONER ¸UsT HaVE  cONfiDENcE THaT  pROjEcTs ITsELf INTO THE RELaTIONsHIp.Ä PaTIENTs  ¸UsT TRUsT  THE  pRacTITIONER’s abILITy TO HOLD THE HEaLINg spacE sEcURELy, aND TO pROVIDE gUIDaNcE as THEy ¸OVE TOgETHER DOwN THE “wOUNDED paTH.” AND sO, º THINk a LOT Of IT, fOR THE¸, Is a sENsE Of pERcEIVED cONfiDENcE, aND  THaT Has TO DO wITH THE way yOU INTERacT, THE way yOU spEak abOUT OpTIONs,  THE cONfiDENcE THaT yOU HaVE IN yOUR OwN skILLs. (ºNTERVIEw 22)

8. B±  COMMITT±d  ANd  »RUSTwORTHY ±UR  ExpERT  INfOR¸aNTs  REpEaTEDLy  UsED  THE  wORD  “TRUsTwORTHy”  aND  cONNEcTED IT TO a fEaR Of abaNDON¸ENT. ÁENcE, aN INTENTIONaL pLaN TO sUsTaIN THE  RELaTIONsHIp aND caRRy IT fORwaRD Is aL¸OsT aLways NEEDED. ±NE THINg º aLways, aLways TRy TO DO Is ¸akE sURE THaT EVERy paTIENT LEaVEs  wITH a pLaN. . . . º wILL TELL paTIENTs [THIs] Is ONE THINg yOU caN aLways cOUNT  ON. YOU aLways LEaVE wITH a pLaN wITH ¸E. µOw IT ¸IgHT NOT wORk . . . bUT  as LEasT yOU HaVE a pLaN. (ºNTERVIEw 21) BUT THE pLaN, wHaTEVER IT Is, REsTs ON a fOUNDaTION Of TRUsT, wHIcH Is OſtEN  cONNEcTED TO THE pREVIOUs THE¸E Of HEaRINg THE paTIENT’s sTORy (sEE “¹akE ¹I¸E  aND ²IsTEN”). ÁEaLINg  Is  abOUT  cONNEcTIONs,  aND  cONNEcTIONs  aRE  abOUT  LIsTENINg  TO  pEOpLE’s sTORIEs. ²IsTENINg TO pEOpLE’s sTORy Is wHaT ¸akEs Us TRUsTwORTHy—  aND as wE aRE fOUND TRUsTwORTHy, wE aRE abLE TO bE ¸ORE EffEcTIVE. (ºNTERVIEw 3) °E paTIENT’s sTORy cONTINUEs OUTsIDE THE cONsULTINg ROO¸ OR HOspITaL. AND  THE pRacTITIONER sHOws HIs OR HER REcOgNITION Of aND INVOLVE¸ENT IN THaT sTORy  by pRO¸IsINg NOT TO abaNDON THE paTIENT as THE sTORy pROgREssEs. YOUR paTIENTs HaVE TO TRUsT yOU. °Ey HaVE TO TRUsT THaT yOU HaVE THEIR bEsT  INTEREsTs aT HaND, aND THERE’s NOTHINg THaT sOLIDIfiEs THaT TRUsT LIkE sayINg,  “º VaLUE yOU as aN INDIVIDUaL. º VaLUE wHO yOU aRE, wHaT yOU DO, aND wHaT  yOU cONTRIbUTE TO ¸y LIfE, aND bEcaUsE Of THaT, yOU caN ExpLIcITLy TRUsT ¸E  aND wHaT º REcO¸¸END TO yOU.” (ºNTERVIEw 5)

µOTE THE pHRasE “wHaT yOU cONTRIbUTE TO ¸y LIfE.” ±NE Of THE ¸OsT cONsIsTENT THE¸Es Of OUR INTERVIEws was THaT  fiNDINg ¸EaNINg IN ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE 

109

basED  ON REaL TRUsT, aND  THaT sUcH  RELaTIONsHIps  aRE THE pRINcIpaL  REwaRD Of  bEINg a pHysIcIaN.

Discussion ALTHOUgH THERE Is wIDE INTEREsT IN HEaLINg, fEw  E¸pIRIcaL sTUDIEs aRE aVaILabLE THaT  pROVIDE DETaILs ON  HOw pHysIcIaNs  bUILD HEaLINg RELaTIONsHIps. °E  PEw-FETzER  ¹ask  FORcE  REpORT  Of  1994 ÃÆ Is  aN  EaRLy  EffORT  aT  DEfiNINg  THIs  aREa THaT INcLUDEs sO¸E THE¸Es THaT OUR INfOR¸aNTs aLsO IDENTIfiED, sUcH as  THE  cENTRaLITy Of RELaTIONsHIps,  appREcIaTION Of pOwER DIffERENTIaLs,  aND THE  I¸pORTaNcE Of facILITaTINg TRUsT. ¹wO ¸ORE REcENT E¸pIRIcaL  sTUDIEs aRE aLsO  wORTH NOTINg. ÁsU aND cOLLEagUEsÃÎ UsED fOcUs gROUps Of 28 paTIENTs aND 56  cLINIcIaNs TO sEEk a DEfiNITION Of HEaLINg THaT wOULD bE cONcORDaNT bETwEEN  THEsE gROUps. °Ey fOUND sO¸E cONcURRENcE a¸ONg THE paRTIcIpaNTs aROUND  E¸OTIONaL  aND  spIRITUaL  DI¸ENsIONs.  °E  I¸pORTaNcE  Of  RELaTIONsHIps  was  ONE  Of  fiVE  kEy THE¸Es  THEy  IDENTIfiED.  ScOTT  aND  cOLLEagUEsÃÏ cONDUcTED  a  sTUDy  sI¸ILaR TO OURs, IN wHIcH THEy INTERVIEwED sIx  pHysIcIaNs, aND TwO TO  fiVE paTIENTs assOcIaTED wITH EacH pHysIcIaN TO IDENTIfy “¸ODEL cO¸pONENTs”  Of HEaLINg. °Ey pREsENTED THEIR fiNDINgs as “HEaLINg pROcEssEs,” cOUcHED as  IDEaLs  OR sUcH  cONcEpTs  as “pREsENcE,” “paRTNERINg,” aND  “HEaLER cO¸pETENcIEs,”  aND a¸ONg THE cO¸pETENcIEs, “sELf-cONfiDENcE” aND “E¸OTIONaL sELf-  ¸aNagE¸ENT.”  ADVaNTagEs Of  OUR sTUDy  INcLUDE THE  NU¸bER Of  pHysIcIaNs  INTERVIEwED  aND  THE  bROaD  RaNgE  Of  spEcIaLTIEs  REpREsENTED;  THE  INcLUsION  Of  cO¸pLE¸ENTaRy  aND  aLTERNaTIVE  pRacTITIONERs;  aND  a  fOcUs  ON  pRacTIcaL  I¸pERaTIVEs TO pRO¸OTE HEaLINg, RaTHER THaN cONcEpTs. ±UR  sTUDy  Has  sEVERaL  LI¸ITaTIONs.  WE  ENcOUNTERED  sI¸ILaR  paTTERNs  Of  REspONsE  REpEaTEDLy;  HOwEVER,  OUR  fiNDINgs  aRE  pRELI¸INaRy,  aND  wE  wERE  wORkINg wITH a RELaTIVELy s¸aLL, sELEcTED sa¸pLE. ±UR sTUDy aLsO Lacks cO¸paRIsON wITH pRacTITIONERs wHO wERE NOT pEER-NO¸INaTED fOR HaVINg ExcEpTIONaL HEaLINg TaLENTs. FINaLLy,  paTIENT INTERVIEws aND  pERspEcTIVEs wERE NOT  a  paRT Of OUR sTUDy, aND  THEy ¸IgHT REVEaL  a DIffERENT sET Of cORE  skILLs. STILL,  wE  bELIEVE  THaT  OUR  INTERVIEws REVEaL  a  sOUND pRELI¸INaRy  pORTRaIT  Of cORE  RELaTIONaL skILLs fRO¸ THE pRacTITIONER’s pERspEcTIVE. AN I¸pORTaNT agENDa fOR  fURTHER wORk Is TO DETER¸INE wHETHER THERE Is aNy cONNEcTION bETwEEN wHaT 

ecitcarP   l a c i d e M  r o f   s l l i k S   g n i l a e H

Is fUNDa¸ENTaLLy cONNEcTED TO THE capacITy fOR fOR¸INg paTIENT RELaTIONsHIps 

pRacTITIONERs  pERcEIVE  as  I¸pORTaNT TO  HEaLINg RELaTIONsHIps  aND  THE  acTUaL 

110

wELLbEINg Of paTIENTs UNDER THEIR caRE. ³E¸ENÃÐ RE¸INDs  Us  THaT  HEaLINg skILLs RE¸aIN cENTRaL  TO ¸EDIcINE, aND 

k c n e h c S  divaD   d n a  l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L

PELLEgRINO Æ affiR¸s THaT THEsE skILLs aRE NOT jUsT INTERacTION sTRaTEgIEs bUT aRE  EssENTIaL  ELE¸ENTs Of  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs.  °E  bENEfiTs  Of  ¸asTERINg THEsE skILLs  wILL  REpay  THE  EffORT  ¸aNy  TI¸Es  OVER, bOTH  IN  I¸pROVED  paTIENT caRE  aND  IN  THE abILITy Of  pHysIcIaNs TO fiND  DEEpER  ¸EaNINg aND  fULfiLL¸ENT IN  THEIR  pRacTIcEs.

notes 1  BRODy  Á.  Placebos  and  the Philosophy  of  Medicine.  CHIcagO:  ·NIVERsITy Of  CHIcagO  PREss; 1980. 2  MOER¸aN ¶. Meaning, Medicine and the Placebo Effect . µEw YORk: Ca¸bRIDgE ·NIVERsITy PREss; 2002. 3  PELLEgRINO ´¶. Humanism and the Physician. KNOxVILLE, ¹µ: ·NIVERsITy Of ¹ENNEssEE  PREss; 1979:117–129. 4  COULEHaN J²,  BLOck M³. °e Medical Interview:  Mastering Skills for Clinical Practice .  4TH ED. PHILaDELpHIa: FA ¶aVIs; 2001. 5  BILLINgs JA, STOEckLE J¶.  °e Clinical Encounter: A Guide to the Medical Interview and 

Case Presentation . 2ND ED. ST. ²OUIs: MOsby; 1999. 6  MIsHLER ´.  °e Discourse of Medicine: Dialectics  of Medical Interviews. µORwOOD, µJ:  AbLEx PREss; 1984. 7  CassELL ´J. Talking with Patients , ÂOL. º: °e °eory of Doctor-Patient Communication .  Ca¸bRIDgE, MA: mit PREss; 1985. 8  CHaRON ³. Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss; 2006. 9  CHaRON ³, MONTELLO M.  Stories Matter: °e  Role of Narrative in Medical Ethics . µEw  YORk: ³OUTLEDgE; 2002. 10  CHap¸aN ´. °e Caregiver Meditations. µasHVILLE, ¹µ: ±cTObER ÁILL PREss; 2007. 11  GROOp¸aN J. How Doctors °ink . BOsTON: ÁOUgHTON MIfflIN; 2007. 12  KLEIN¸aN A. °e Illness Narratives. µEw YORk: BasIc BOOks; 1988. 13  ¹REsOLINI CP,  PEw-FETzER ¹ask  FORcE. Health Professions  Education and Relationship- 

Centered Care . SaN FRaNcIscO: PEw ÁEaLTH PROfEssIONs CO¸¸IssION; 1994. 14  ÁsU C, PHILLIps W³,  SHER¸aN KJ,  ÁawkEs ³, CHERkIN  ¶C. ÁEaLINg IN pRI¸aRy caRE:  a  VIsION  sHaRED  by  paTIENTs,  pHysIcIaNs,  NURsEs,  aND  cLINIcaL  sTaff.  Ann  Fam  Med .  2008;6:307–314. [ÙÓÚÔ: 18626030] 15  ScOTT JG,  COHEN  ¶,  ¶IcIccO-BLOO¸  B,  MILLER  W²,  STaNgE  KC,  CRabTREE BF.  ·NDERsTaNDINg  HEaLINg  RELaTIONsHIps IN  pRI¸aRy  caRE.  Ann  Fam Med.  2008;6:315–322. [ÙÓÚÔ:  18626031] 16  ³E¸EN  ³.  QUOTED  by:  ¹IppETT  K.  Speaking  of  Faith .  µEw  YORk:  PENgUIN  BOOks;  2007:213.

´he HA±R  STyl±sT,  The  CoRn  MeRchAnT,  And The DocToR ºMbIgUOUSlY  ºlTRUISTIc Lois Shepherd

°E  ¾h¿  CODE  Of  ´THIcs  REqUIREs  ¸E¸bERs  TO  sERVE  THE  bEsT  INTEREsTs  Of  THEIR  cLIENTs,  bE cLEaR  aND HONEsT  wITH THE¸,  aND kEEp  THEIR sEcRETs cONfiDENTIaL.  ME¸bERs  pLEDgE  TO  REpREsENT  THEIR  skILLs aND  qUaLIficaTIONs  HONEsTLy  aND TO ¸akE appROpRIaTE REfERRaLs  TO OTHERs ¸ORE qUaLIfiED wHEN  OUT  Of THEIR DEpTH. à ¾h¿ sTaNDs fOR “AssOcIaTED ÁaIR PROfEssIONaLs,”  OR HaIR sTyLIsTs, bUT THEIR  CODE Of ´THIcs LOOks a LOT LIkE THE ÁIppOcRaTIc ±aTH aND THE cURRENT PRINcIpLEs  Of  MEDIcaL  ´THIcs  Of  THE  A¸ERIcaN  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION.  ALL  Of  THEsE  ETHIcs  sTaTE¸ENTs  E¸pHasIzE  HONEsTy,  cONfiDENTIaLITy,  cO¸pETENcE,  sERVINg  paTIENTs’  (OR cLIENTs’)  bEsT  INTEREsTs, aND  wILLINgNEss TO  REfER TO  OTHER qUaLIfiED  pROfEssIONaLs. BUT IT’s  NOT jUsT  DOcTORs aND HaIR pROfEssIONaLs  wHO HaVE  cODEs Of ETHIcs. °E ¼¿»¿—SOcIETy Of PER¸aNENT COs¸ETIc PROfEssIONaLs—  REqUIREs  ITs  ¸E¸bERs  TO  “¸aINTaIN  HIgH  pROfEssIONaL  sTaNDaRDs  cONsIsTENT  wITH  sOUND  pRacTIcEs,”  “cONDUcT  bUsINEss RELaTIONsHIps  IN a  ¸aNNER THaT  Is  faIR  TO  aLL,”  aND  aVOID  faLsE  OR  ¸IsLEaDINg  sTaTE¸ENTs  TO  THE  EffEcT  THaT  THE  appLIcaTION  Of pER¸aNENT ¸akEUp Is NOT TaTTOOINg, NOT pER¸aNENT, aND  NOT  paINfUL. Ä (PHysIcIaNs  ¸IgHT  cONsIDER  THaT  LasT  pOINT—º’¸  gRaTEfUL  fOR  THE  TI¸E ¸y DOcTOR ONcE waRNED ¸E, “°Is Is REaLLy gOINg TO HURT.”) SO¸E  Of  Us  fRO¸  THE  TRaDITIONaL,  OR  “LEaRNED”  pROfEssIONs—¸EDIcINE,  Law, ¸INIsTRy, TEacHINg—¸IgHT TakE U¸bRagE, THINkINg “THEy’RE NOT LIkE Us.”  BUT THEy  aRE. WE aLL  HaVE pRO¸IsEs TO  kEEp—wHETHER wE ¸aDE THE¸  INDIVIDUaLLy  OR cOLLEcTIVELy,  ExpLIcITLy  OR  I¸pLIcITLy, aND  wHETHER wE  aRE bOUND 

²OIs SHEpHERD, “°E ÁaIR STyLIsT, THE CORN MERcHaNT, aND THE ¶OcTOR: A¸bIgUOUsLy ALTRUIsTIc,”  fRO¸ Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics 42, NO. 4 (WINTER 2014): 509–517. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of SagE PUbLIcaTIONs,  ºNc., JOURNaLs, cONVEyED THROUgH COpyRIgHT CLEaRaNcE CENTER, ºNc.

by  a  pROfEssIONaL  cODE  (OſtEN  THE  REsULT  Of  OUR  acHIEVINg  ¸ONOpOLy  sTaTUs 

112

THROUgH gOVERN¸ENT  LIcENsINg—NOT a DIsINTEREsTED  acT by  aNy ¸EaNs) OR  sI¸pLy bEcaUsE wE aRE NEIgHbORs as fELLOw HU¸aN  bEINgs. °E TRaDITIONaL 

drehpehS sioL

pROfEssIONs  aRE  NO  ¸ORE  NObLE  THaN  aNy  OTHER  LEgITI¸aTE  OccUpaTION,  aND  IT  Is  TI¸E  TO  gIVE  Up  THE  ILLUsION  THaT  THEy  aRE.  µOT  sI¸pLy  bEcaUsE  IT  Is  NOT TRUE bUT bEcaUsE—as º’LL ExpLaIN—IT pREVENTs Us fRO¸ caREfULLy DEfiNINg  wHaT acTUaL REspONsIbILITIEs pROfEssIONaLs DO HaVE aND DETER¸ININg wHETHER  THOsE REspONsIbILITIEs HaVE bEEN ¸ET. °E  ¸EDIcaL pROfEssION  IN paRTIcULaR  Has  a  TRaDITION Of pREsENTINg  ITsELf  as ETHIcaLLy ExcEpTIONaL. Æ ºT Has LONg cLaI¸ED aND sTILL cLaI¸s THaT as a  wHOLE  ITs ¸E¸bERs aRE aLTRUIsTIc—aND ¸ORE sO THaN OTHER pROfEssIONaLs aND  OTHER  pEOpLE.Î WILLIa¸ ±sLER pROcLaI¸ED IN a 1903 sTaTE¸ENT OſtEN qUOTED by THOsE  aDVaNcINg  ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssIONaLIs¸ THaT  “THE  pRacTIcE Of  ¸EDIcINE  Is  NOT  a  bUsINEss aND caN NEVER bE ONE. . . . ±UR fELLOw cREaTUREs caNNOT bE DEaLT wITH  as ¸aN DEaLs IN cORN aND cOaL.”Ï °EsE wORDs HaVE spEcIaL REsONaNcE fOR sO¸E  TODay. ºT  ¸IgHT bE  appEaLINg TO THINk  THaT IN  THE INcREasINgLy cORpORaTIzED,  cO¸¸ERcIaL wORLD Of ¸EDIcaL caRE,Ð pHysIcIaNs wOULD TakE gREaT caRE TO DIsTINgUIsH  THE¸sELVEs  fRO¸  THE HaIR  sTyLIsT aND  THE cORN  ¸ERcHaNT,  aND  THaT  THEy sHOULD DO sO IN LaRgE ¸EasURE by IDENTIfyINg THE¸sELVEs as aLTRUIsTIc. °Is  appROacH  Is  ¸IsTakEN.  °E  cLaI¸  THaT  pHysIcIaNs  aRE  OR  sHOULD bE  ¸ORE aLTRUIsTIc THaN OTHERs DOEs NOT wITHsTaND scRUTINy. AND wHILE  THE cORpORaTIzaTION aND cO¸¸ERcIaLIzaTION  Of THE ¸EDIcaL  wORLD pOsE sO¸E THREaT  TO paTIENT wELL-bEINg aND aUTONO¸y, sO DO REcENT ExpaNsIONs Of DOcTORs’ cONscIENTIOUs  REfUsaL  aND  gROwINg  aTTE¸pTs  TO  fURTHER  bLEND  cLINIcaL  REsEaRcH  aND caRE.Ñ AppEaLs TO aLTRUIs¸ ObfUscaTE RaTHER THaN cLaRIfy pHysIcIaNs’ ROLEs;  THE ¸EDIcaL pROfEssION wOULD DO  bETTER TO HOLD TRUE TO THEIR  basIc DUTIEs TO  paTIENTs aND cO¸¸IT TO HONEsTy, aND pERHaps a ¸EasURE Of HU¸ILITy.

The Claim and Its Merits ALTRUIs¸  OſtEN gOEs  UNDEfiNED IN cLaI¸s  THaT  THE ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION Is, by  DEfiNITION, aLTRUIsTIc OR THaT INDIVIDUaL pHysIcIaNs aRE REqUIRED, as aN ETHIcaL  ¸aTTER, TO bE aLTRUIsTIc IN a way THaT wE DO NOT ExpEcT Of OTHERs. °E EDITORs Of  THE  New England Journal of Medicine DEcLaRED IN 2000 THaT “¸EDIcINE Is ONE  Of THE fEw spHEREs Of HU¸aN acTIVITy IN wHIcH THE pURpOsEs aRE UNa¸bIgUOUsLy  aLTRUIsTIc—IN  ITsELf,  a  RE¸aRkabLE  acHIEVE¸ENT.”Ò °E  sTaTE¸ENT  was  baLD—wITHOUT  aNy ExpLaNaTION OR sUppORT. BEcaUsE THE sTaTE¸ENT pREfacED  THE  EDITORs’ REVIEw Of ¸EDIcaL  acHIEVE¸ENTs Of THE  pREVIOUs ¸ILLENNIU¸,  a 

REaDER ¸IgHT HaVE ExpEcTED THaT sO¸E Of THOsE acHIEVE¸ENTs wOULD HaVE TO  DO wITH aLTRUIsTIc bEHaVIOR, bUT THEy wERE aLL scIENTIfic, wITH scIENTIfic VaLUEs 

113

ºN  1998,  THE  A¸ERIcaN  BOaRD  Of  ºNTERNaL  MEDIcINE  (¾½im),  IN  ITs  Proj-

ect  Professionalism,  DEcLaRED  THaT  “ALTRUIs¸  Is  THE  EssENcE Of  pROfEssIONaLIs¸.” × ¹OgETHER wITH TwO OTHER INflUENTIaL pHysIcIaN ORgaNIzaTIONs, THE ¾½im  aDOpTED  THE “PHysIcIaN CHaRTER” ÃØ IN 2002, wHIcH THE EDITOR  Of THE Annals 

of Internal Medicine wROTE HE HOpED wOULD  bE a “waTERsHED  EVENT IN ¸EDIcINE.” Ãà ºN IDENTIfyINg THE pRINcIpLE Of pRI¸acy Of paTIENT wELfaRE, THE CHaRTER  sTaTEs THaT “aLTRUIs¸ cONTRIbUTEs TO THE TRUsT THaT Is cENTRaL TO THE pHysIcIaN-  paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp.” °ERE Is NO ELabORaTION Of THE cONcEpT, HOwEVER.ÃÄ SO¸E  ¸E¸bERs Of THE pROfEssION HaVE pUsHED fOR aN EVEN ¸ORE pRO¸INENT REcOgNITION  Of  THE  I¸pORTaNcE  Of  aLTRUIs¸,  aND  HaVE  REcO¸¸ENDED  THaT  aLTRUIs¸  bE  cONscIOUsLy  aND  sysTE¸aTIcaLLy  DEVELOpED  a¸ONg  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs  aND  IDENTIfiED  IN  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT  appLIcaNTs.ÃÆ ºT  Is  bEcO¸INg  INcREasINgLy  I¸pORTaNT,  THEN,  TO  UNDERsTaND  wHaT Is  ¸EaNT—OR  pERHaps  ¸ORE  cRITIcaLLy  fOR THIs Essay, wHaT Is not ¸EaNT by THE TER¸. °E VIRTUE  Of aLTRUIs¸—OUTsIDE Of THEsE sTaTE¸ENTs abOUT ¸EDIcaL pROfEssIONaLIs¸—Is cO¸¸ONLy UNDERsTOOD TO ¸EaN a DIspOsITION TO acT IN THE INTEREsTs Of OTHERs aT a cOsT TO THE INTEREsTs Of ONEsELf. ÃÎ ºT Is gENERaLLy UNDERsTOOD  as INVOLVINg acTIONs THaT aRE bEyOND ObLIgaTION, OR DUTy. ºf ONE HaD a DUTy TO  acT  IN THE INTEREsTs Of OTHERs IN a paRTIcULaR sITUaTION—say, bEcaUsE ONE HaD  bEEN paID TO DO sO—THEN wE wOULD NOT caLL acTIONs TakEN fOR THE bENEfiT Of  OTHERs TO  bE aLTRUIsTIc. GLaNNON aND  ³Oss ExpLaIN THaT  wHEN pHysIcIaNs acT  IN THE bEsT INTEREsTs Of THEIR paTIENTs, THEy aRE fULfiLLINg THEIR fiDUcIaRy ObLIgaTIONs. ÃÏ SUcH acTIONs aRE  NOT  “OpTIONaL aND  sUpEREROgaTORy,  bEyOND  THE caLL  Of DUTy.”ÃÐ A cLaI¸ THaT pHysIcIaNs aRE aLTRUIsTIc Has TO ¸EaN ¸ORE THaN THaT  THEy aRE, IN THE  cONTExT Of THE pHysIcIaN-paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp, REcO¸¸ENDINg,  pREscRIbINg,  aND  TREaTINg  THE  paTIENT  IN  ways  THaT  sERVE  THE  paTIENT’s  INTEREsTs aND NOT  THE pHysIcIaN’s INTEREsTs—bEcaUsE THaT Is THEIR jOb, “THEIR  DaILy pROfEssIONaL wORk.”ÃÑ ºT Is NOT ¸UcH DIffERENT fRO¸ wHaT wE ExpEcT fRO¸ a HaIR sTyLIsT. WE wOULD  THINk a HaIR sTyLIsT TO bE acTINg UNETHIcaLLy If HE RUsHED aND bOTcHED a HaIRcUT  TO  INcREasE  pRODUcTION  RaTEs  OR  appLIED  HaIR  cOLORINg  THaT  sUITED  HIs  OwN  pREfERENcEs  RaTHER  THaN  THE  cLIENT’s  OR  THREw  IN  aN  ExTRa,  ExpENsIVE  pRODUcT appLIcaTION  wITHOUT cLIENT appROVaL. °E ¾h¿’s CODE Of ´THIcs ¸ay bE a  HELpfUL  RE¸INDER Of THE sTaNDaRDs Of cO¸¸ON ¸ORaLITy IN  THE sTyLIsT-cLIENT  RELaTIONsHIp,  bUT THOsE  sTaNDaRDs wOULD ExIsT wITHOUT  THE wRITTEN cODE. WE  wOULD  NOT cONsIDER THE  HaIR sTyLIsT aLTRUIsTIc fOR  fOLLOwINg THEsE gUIDELINEs; 

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

aND pURpOsEs.

INDEED, THERE aRE TI¸Es wHEN a sTyLIsT wORks wITH HaIR THaT Is DIRTy, OR ¸aTTED, 

114

OR  cONTaINs LIcE,  OR REaDIEs  a  cORpsE fOR  bURIaL; THE  sTyLIsT IsN’T aLTRUIsTIc fOR  DOINg  HIs  bEsT UNDER  THEsE  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs EITHER—THEsE  acTIVITIEs,  TOO,  caN 

drehpehS sioL

bE paRT Of HIs jOb. ´THIcaL ObLIgaTIONs Of ONE sORT OR aNOTHER INHERE IN EVERy HU¸aN acTIVITy  aND THEREfORE EVERy OccUpaTION, aND IT caN bE HELpfUL TO cLEaRLy sET OUT wHaT  THOsE ObLIgaTIONs aRE—as RE¸INDERs Of HOw ONE OUgHT TO acT. ºN TRUTH, cODEs  Of  ETHIcs  OſtEN  cONTaIN  VERy  basIc  ObLIgaTIONs  THaT  wE  ExpEcT  Of  EVERyONE  wHEN acTINg IN ¸ORaLLy appROpRIaTE ways. ´VEN THE “¸aN wHO DEaLs IN cORN  aND  cOaL,” TO  qUOTE ±sLER, Has ETHIcaL (aND LEgaL)  DUTIEs Of HONEsTy aND  faIR  DEaLINg EVEN If HE DOEs NOT HaVE fiDUcIaRy ObLIgaTIONs sTE¸¸INg fRO¸ a RELaTIONsHIp  Of TRUsT. MOREOVER, If HE  waNTs REpEaT cUsTO¸ERs aND  a gOOD  bUsINEss REpUTaTION, HE wILL TRy TO HELp THE cUsTO¸ER UNDERsTaND wHIcH gOOD OR  pRODUcT  wILL bEsT sERVE  HIs OR HER NEEDs; ¸aNy  ¸ERcHaNTs wILL DO  THE sa¸E  fOR  a  ONE-TI¸E, OUT-Of-TOwN  cUsTO¸ER jUsT  OUT Of  sI¸pLE  HU¸aN  cONsIDERaTION. WHIcH Is aLL TO say THaT THERE Is NOTHINg TERRIbLy ExTRaORDINaRy OR bURDENsO¸E  abOUT  ExpEcTINg  INDIVIDUaLs  wHO  HOLD  THE¸sELVEs  OUT as  ExpERTs  TO  bE  cO¸pETENT  IN  THE  sUbjEcT  ¸aTTER  Of  THEIR  ExpERTIsE  OR  fOR  THOsE  wHO  HaVE INVITED THE TRUsT Of cUsTO¸ERs/cLIENTs/paTIENTs TO ONLy REcO¸¸END aND  pERfOR¸ sERVIcEs IN THE LaTTER’s bEsT INTEREsTs. SO wHaT Is bEHIND THE cLaI¸ THaT pHysIcIaNs aRE UNIqUELy aLTRUIsTIc? ºT caNNOT sI¸pLy bE THaT THEy wILL acT  IN THE paTIENT’s bEsT INTEREsTs, as HaIR sTyLIsTs  HaVE  a  sI¸ILaR ObLIgaTION  TO  THEIR  cLIENTs, aND  wE  DO NOT  gENERaLLy  THINk  Of  HaIR sTyLIsTs as bEINg UNIqUELy aLTRUIsTIc. PERHaps wHaT Is ¸EaNT Is THaT pHysIcIaNs, as a  gROUp aND bEcaUsE Of THEIR  pROfEssION, TEND TO bE pLacED IN sITUaTIONs IN wHIcH ExTRaORDINaRy DE¸aNDs  aRE ¸aDE UpON THE¸. °Is Is a bIT Of a DIffERENT cLaI¸, aND ONE º caN pRObabLy  accEpT.  BUT IT  Is sTILL wORTH askINg wHETHER THEsE sORTs Of DE¸aNDs  aRE TRULy  UNIqUE.  ¹O  bE sURE,  pHysIcIaNs sO¸ETI¸Es  HaVE  a  Lack Of cONTROL  OVER THEIR  TI¸E,  OR facE  RIsk  Of  HaR¸, aND  EVEN  ¸akE  fiNaNcIaL  sacRIficEs.  WE  TEND TO  assOcIaTE THEsE DE¸aNDs wITH THE ¸EDIcaL pROfEssION (INcLUDINg NURsEs, wHO  TypIcaLLy ENjOy  faR LEss fiNaNcIaL  cO¸pENsaTION), THOUgH  wE ¸IgHT qUEsTION  HOw ExcLUsIVELy. WITH REspEcT TO TI¸E, THERE ¸ay OccasIONaLLy bE DIsRUpTIVE  aND DE¸aNDINg caLLs UpON THE pHysIcIaN—E¸ERgENcy ROO¸ cOVERagE IN THE ¸IDDLE Of THE  NIgHT, OR ExTRa LONg  HOURs TO pROVIDE a HOspITaLIzED  paTIENT wITH cONTINUITy  Of caRE—bUT cO¸paRabLE DE¸aNDs aRE ¸aDE Of OTHERs—fiREfigHTERs  baTTLINg  pROLONgED fOREsT fiREs, jOURNaLIsTs cOVERINg fOREIgN cONflIcTs, aND EVEN (pERHaps 

aN  UNLIkELy Exa¸pLE) LEgIsLaTORs, caLLED  INTO spEcIaL  sEssION fOR ¸IDNIgHT  VOTEs.

115

DININg OUT, TO cO¸E TO THE aID Of a cHOkINg DINER, OR wHEN waLkINg aLONg THE  sTREET aND sEEINg  a bysTaNDER cOLLapsE, TO sTOp  aND aD¸INIsTER fiRsT  aID. BUT,  THEN  agaIN, wE  ExpEcT  THIs  Of  aNyONE  capabLE Of  pROVIDINg  HELp—THE  HaIR  sTyLIsT, THE TEacHER, THE LawyER, THE pERsON wHO DEaLs IN “cORN aND cOaL”—THaT  THEy sTEp IN as NEEDED bUT wILL sTEp OUT Of THE way fOR THE pERsON wITH ¸ORE  ExpERTIsE TO TakE OVER. (µEITHER THE pHysIcIaN NOR THE NONpHysIcIaN IN THEsE  sITUaTIONs Has a LEgaL ObLIgaTION TO REscUE.) °E  ¸OsT ExTRaORDINaRy  DE¸aND—aND  pERHaps  THE  sTRONgEsT  casE fOR  a  pROfEssION-wIDE cLaI¸ TO aLTRUIs¸—¸ay bE THE ETHIcaL REqUIRE¸ENT TO caRE fOR  THOsE  wHO aRE DaNgEROUsLy INfEcTIOUs.  MEDIcaL pROfEssIONaLs (agaIN  INcLUDINg,  aND  pERHaps EspEcIaLLy,  NURsEs) REaLLy  aRE  ON THE “fRONT  LINEs”  IN THOsE  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs. °E DIVERgENcE fRO¸ HaIR sTyLIsTs sEE¸s cLEaRER HERE. BUT aRE  THE DaNgERs aNy ¸ORE I¸¸EDIaTE OR THE RIsks aNy ¸ORE cO¸¸ONpLacE THaN  THOsE facED by pOLIcE OfficERs, fiREfigHTERs, sOLDIERs—wHO, NOT INsIgNIficaNTLy,  aRE OſtEN cO¸pENsaTED aT a cONsIDERabLy LOwER RaTE? ÃÒ MOREOVER, If pHysIcIaN aTTITUDEs abOUT caRINg fOR ÛÚÜ  pOsITIVE paTIENTs  IN  THE  EaRLy  Days Of THE  hiv  EpIDE¸Ic aRE  aNyTHINg  TO  gO  ON,  aLTRUIs¸ Of  THIs  NaTURE Is  NOT  a  wIDELy  aDOpTED  NOR¸  a¸ONg  ·.S.  pHysIcIaNs. ¶EspITE  THE ETHIcaL  gUIDaNcE IssUED  IN 1987 by THE ¾m¾’¼ COUNcIL  ON ´THIcaL  aND  JUDIcIaL  AffaIRs  THaT  pHysIcIaNs  cOULD  NOT  ETHIcaLLy  REfUsE  caRE  TO  paTIENTs  wHO  wERE  hiv  pOsITIVE,  sUbsTaNTIaL  NU¸bERs  Of  pHysIcIaNs  (fOR  Exa¸pLE,  TwO-THIRDs Of ORTHOpEDIc sURgEONs accORDINg TO ONE sURVEy) DID NOT bELIEVE  THIs  TO  bE  THE casE.Ã× º  THINk  THEy wERE  wRONg—THaT  THEy DID HaVE  aN  ETHIcaL DUTy TO caRE fOR hiv pOsITIVE paTIENTs, bUT º aLsO DO NOT THINk ¸EETINg THaT  DUTy a¸OUNTs TO aLTRUIs¸. PROVIDINg caRE IN sUcH sITUaTIONs Is THE REspONsIbILITy  THE pROfEssION—aND  THUs ¸E¸bERs Of THE pROfEssION—TOOk ON wHEN  IT  REcEIVED THE  ExcLUsIVE LIcENsE TO  pRacTIcE ¸EDIcINE  aND pREVENTED  OTHERs  fRO¸ DOINg THE sa¸E. FINaLLy, wE sEE¸ TO HaVE a fONDNEss IN THE ·.S. fOR THINkINg THaT  DOcTORs  aRE—OR,  sO¸E  ¸IgHT  THINk,  UsED  TO  bE—wILLINg  TO  sacRIficE  fiNaNcIaL  gaIN  IN THEIR  pURsUIT Of THE gOOD Of THE paTIENT. ºN 2010, a SENaTE caNDIDaTE fRO¸  µEVaDa,  SUE  ²OwDEN,  pROpOsED  a  LEss  REgULaTED  HEaLTH  caRE  ¸aRkET  as  aN  aLTERNaTIVE TO THE AffORDabLE CaRE AcT, a ¸aRkET IN wHIcH INDIVIDUaLs NEgOTIaTE aND EVEN baRTER wITH THEIR DOcTOR. ºN ¸akINg THIs aRgU¸ENT, sHE HaRkENED 

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

ºT  Is  TRUE THaT  pHysIcIaNs  aRE  sO¸ETI¸Es  caLLED  UpON  TO  DELIVER  ¸EDIcaL  sERVIcEs IN THEIR Off-DUTy HOURs. FOR Exa¸pLE, wE ExpEcT a pHysIcIaN, wHEN 

back TO TI¸Es pasT wHEN paTIENTs wOULD pay a pHysIcIaN IN cHIckENs OR OffER 

116

TO paINT THE pHysIcIaN’s HOUsE. WHEN HER RE¸aRks wERE ¸OckED as sI¸pLIsTIc  aND OUT-Of-TOUcH, sHE REspONDED, “º ¸EaN, THaT’s THE OLD Days Of wHaT pEOpLE 

drehpehS sioL

wOULD  DO TO gET HEaLTH  caRE wITH yOUR DOcTORs,” sHE saID. “¶OcTORs aRE  VERy  sy¸paTHETIc pEOpLE. º’¸ NOT backINg DOwN fRO¸ THaT sysTE¸.”ÄØ BUT THERE Is  NO REasON TO THINk  Of sUcH  pRacTIcEs fONDLy. °Ey  REpREsENT  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs  Of  abjEcT  DEpENDENcy  ON  THE  paRT  Of  paTIENTs  aND  LORD-LIkE  pOwER ON THE paRT Of pHysIcIaNs. WE caN appREcIaTE THE wILLINgNEss Of a RURaL  DOcTOR TO wORk  fOR cHIckENs—wE ¸IgHT EVEN cONsIDER IT  aLTRUIsTIc, bUT sEEINg  a paTIENT OUT Of cHaRITy (wHIcH ¸aNy  DOcTORs DO—aND ¸aNy DO  NOT) Is  NOT  by  aNy  ¸EaNs  THE DaILy  way  Of  THE bUsINEss  Of  DOcTORs  OR  THE ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION gENERaLLy. µOR sHOULD wE ExpEcT IT TO bE. WE aRE ¸OVINg, THaNkfULLy,  TOwaRD REcOgNITION Of a  basIc, UNIVERsaL RIgHT TO accEss TO HEaLTH  caRE.  ÁOw TO pay fOR THaT caRE fOR THOsE wHO caNNOT affORD IT wILL REqUIRE cO¸pLEx  aND ITERaTIVE NEgOTIaTIONs aND EVEN ExpERI¸ENT. BUT pHysIcIaNs wILL NOT aND  sHOULD NOT bEaR a gREaTER sHaRE Of THE bURDEN Of THE cOsTs Of sUcH caRE THaN  OTHERs.Äà ¶OcTORs fREqUENTLy OffER THEIR sERVIcEs aT REDUcED RaTEs, OR gRaTIs, as  DO  LawyERs, accOUNTaNTs, aND  ¸EcHaNIcs; THIs Is NEaRLy aLways a gOOD THINg,  bUT IT Is aLsO THE kIND Of OccasIONaL aLTRUIs¸ THaT pEOpLE Of aLL OccUpaTIONs DO  fRO¸ TI¸E TO TI¸E—IT Is NOT sysTE¸aTIc, NOR Is IT REqUIRED (wITH THE ExcEpTION,  TO sO¸E pEOpLE’s sURpRIsE, Of  LawyERs, wHO  sO¸ETI¸Es DO HaVE sTaTE-I¸pOsED  REqUIRE¸ENTs  fOR pRO bONO  OR  REDUcED fEE  sERVIcEs  fOR INDIgENT cLIENTsÄÄ ).  AND DOcTORs DO TEND TO ¸akE a gOOD LIVINg—sO¸E, aN ExcELLENT LIVINg—aND  fEEL THEy’VE EaRNED IT, aND UsUaLLy THEy HaVE. SO¸ETI¸Es  pHysIcIaNs  VOLUNTEER IN  cHaLLENgINg, REsOURcE-REsTRIcTED, aND  EVEN DaNgEROUs REgIONs  Of THE wORLD wITH ORgaNIzaTIONs sUcH as  ¶OcTORs  wITHOUT  BORDERs;  IN THEsE INsTaNcEs, THEy aRE  bEINg aLTRUIsTIc IN THE way  wE  gENERaLLy  UNDERsTaND  THaT  TER¸.ÄÆ BUT  THEsE  acTIVITIEs  aRE  NOT  REqUIRED  Of  pHysIcIaNs, aND wE wOULD NOT THINk Of INDIVIDUaL pHysIcIaNs as bEINg sELfisH  OR ¸ORaLLy INsUfficIENT If THEy DID NOT DO THEsE acTIVITIEs. °ERE aRE aLTRUIsTIc  DOcTORs jUsT LIkE THERE aRE aLL kINDs Of aLTRUIsTIc pEOpLE. WE aD¸IRE THOsE wHO  DO THIs kIND Of wORk, bUT IT caNNOT REDOUND TO THE wHOLE pROfEssION.

What Is Trou±ling  a±out  the Claim? SO  faR º  HaVE TRIED TO DEbUNk  THE NOTION THaT  pHysIcIaNs aRE  REqUIRED TO bE  aLTRUIsTIc  IN ORDER TO  bE aN UpsTaNDINg  ¸E¸bER  Of THE pROfEssION.  º’VE aLsO  cHaLLENgED THE IDEa THaT THE pROfEssION as a wHOLE Is ¸ORE INHERENTLy  aLTRU-

IsTIc  THaN OTHER pROfEssIONs. BUT ONE ¸IgHT REspOND THaT THE cLaI¸ TO aLTRUIs¸ Is aspIRaTIONaL; THaT  IT DOEs NO HaR¸  aND caN ONLy pRO¸OTE gOOD. °ERE 

117

¸ORE  ¸ONEy OR sEcURE  OTHER aDVaNTagEs  by DOINg  THINgs THaT  aRE NOT gOOD  fOR  paTIENTs;  sHOULDN’T  wE  ENcOURagE  THEIR  OwN  INsIsTENcE  ON  THE  VIRTUE  Of  aLTRUIs¸ TO pROTEcT paTIENTs? ¶OEsN’T bELIEVINg THEy aRE aLTRUIsTIc ¸akE THE¸  bETTER DOcTORs? µO. ºN facT, appEaLINg TO aLTRUIs¸ caN HaVE THE OppOsITE EffEcT. As SI¸ON  BLackbURN Has wRITTEN IN Being Good, a NaTURaL REacTION TO ExTRE¸E, UNREaLIsTIc  DE¸aNDs Of ¸ORaLITy Is TO sHRUg Off THOsE DE¸aNDs, TO IgNORE THE¸ IN pRacTIcE THOUgH wE ¸ay cONTINUE TO pREacH THE¸. ÄÎ ºT caN aLsO cONTRIbUTE TO THE  INabILITy  Of DOcTORs,  aND OTHERs, TOO, TO accEpT sO¸E Of OUR ¸ORE HU¸bLINg,  sHaRED HU¸aN faILINgs—LIkE ¸akINg ¸IsTakEs—aND IT caN ¸akE IT ¸ORE DIfficULT fOR Us TO REcOgNIzE aND aD¸IT TO cONflIcTs Of INTEREsT. º LIkE THE ¸EcHaNIc wHO TakEs caRE Of ¸y caR. ÁE kNOws wHaT HE Is DOINg.  ÁE aDVIsEs ¸E agaINsT sO¸E Of THE “ExTRas” THaT ¸IgHT ¸akE HI¸ ¸ORE ¸ONEy  bUT THaT º DON’T NEED. º kNOw THaT HE Has caRRIED ¸ORE THaN a fEw paycHEck-  TO-paycHEck cUsTO¸ERs.  ÁE REcENTLy ¸IsDIagNOsED a  sTaRTINg IssUE wITH ¸y  caR aND INsTaLLED aN UNNEcEssaRy paRT THaT DID NOT fix THE pRObLE¸. ÁE aD¸ITTED THE ERROR, RETURNED  THE paRT, DID NOT cHaRgE  ¸E fOR  HIs LabOR,  aND  ¸aDE  THE cORREcT REpaIR. ºT was THE RIgHT THINg TO DO. ºT was aLsO gOOD bUsINEss—º wILL bE back aND  º  wILL TELL  ¸y fRIENDs  abOUT HIs  HONEsTy aND  cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO HIs  cUsTO¸ERs.  BUT  wHaT If HE bELIEVED THaT by  “TakINg caRE Of ” ¸y caR HE was DOINg ¸E a  faVOR,  THaT HE  was (EVEN THOUgH  º pay HI¸)  DOINg THE  wORk as ¸UcH  OUT Of  THE gOODNEss Of HIs HEaRT as OUT Of pROfEssIONaL ObLIgaTION? °aT HE was bEINg  aLTRUIsTIc.  ºT wOULD  HaVE bEEN HaRD fOR ¸E TO qUEsTION HIs ¸IsDIagNOsIs aND  ERRaNT  REpaIR If  HE HaD NOT OwNED Up TO IT. AND HE  ¸IgHT NOT sO EasILy HaVE  accEpTED REspONsIbILITy fOR HIs ¸IsTakE. AND sO  IT caN bE wITH  DOcTORs, gOOD  DOcTORs; THEy TOO OſtEN bELIEVE  THaT  HOLDINg  THE¸ REspONsIbLE fOR ¸IsTakEs  THEy HaVE  ¸aDE wHEN  THEIR HEaRTs  aRE “IN THE RIgHT pLacE” aND “THEy aRE ONLy TRyINg TO HELp” (saVE a LIfE, pERHaps)  sO¸EHOw casTs aspERsIONs ON THE¸. A sURgEON ONcE INITIaTED a LENgTHy DIscUssION  wITH ¸E abOUT HOw UNjUsT ¸EDIcaL ¸aLpRacTIcE (I.E., TORT) Law was  TO pHysIcIaNs. ÁE aRgUED THaT IT wasN’T RIgHT fOR pHysIcIaNs TO bE sUED wHEN  THEy  HaD  ¸ERELy  ¸aDE  “aN  HONEsT  ¸IsTakE.”  “´VERyONE  ¸akEs  ¸IsTakEs,”  HE  pOINTED OUT.  WHEN  º askED  wHETHER paTIENTs wHO wERE  HaR¸ED  fRO¸ a  ¸IsTakE  LIkE  THE ONE HE  was DEscRIbINg  sHOULD  bE  cO¸pENsaTED, HE saID,  Of cOURsE.

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

aRE  ¸aNy  TE¸pTaTIONs  IN  THE  ¸ODERN  ¸EDIcaL  wORLD  fOR  DOcTORs  TO  ¸akE 

°ERE  was  ObVIOUsLy  a  DIscONNEcT  HERE.  As  a  LawyER,  º  was  fOcUsINg  ON 

118

cO¸pENsaTION  fOR  a  paTIENT’s INjURIEs,  wHIcH wOULD  REqUIRE  pROOf Of  NEgLIgENcE aND INjURy bEfORE bEINg awaRDED aND wHIcH wOULD bE paID by ¸aLpRac-

drehpehS sioL

TIcE  INsURaNcE,  fOR  wHIcH  THE (HypOTHETIcaL)  pHysIcIaN  wOULD  HaVE  aLREaDy  paID THE pRE¸IU¸s. WHaT THE sURgEON was fOcUsINg ON was wHaT THE LawsUIT  appEaRED  TO  say  abOUT  THE  DOcTOR’s  character .  FURTHER,  HE  was  sENsITIVE  TO  wHaT a sTaTE¸ENT abOUT THE cHaRacTER Of THE DOcTOR wOULD DO TO THE DOcTOR— IT wOULD bE psycHOLOgIcaLLy DEVasTaTINg. A  sI¸ILaR  VULNERabILITy was  appaRENT  IN  THE  REspONsEs  Of  ¸aNy  IN  THE  ¸EDIcaL  cO¸¸UNITy  IN  THE  SpRINg  Of 2013  TO  THE  cONTROVERsy  sURROUNDINg  THE  ¼u¿¿ort ¹RIaL,  a  LaRgE  ¸ULTIsITE  sTUDy  Of pRE¸aTURE INfaNTs. ÄÏ °E  bIOETHIcs cO¸¸UNITy  spLIT OVER wHETHER cONsENT fOR¸s UsED IN THE sTUDy wERE  INaDEqUaTE UNDER THE fEDERaL REsEaRcH REgULaTIONs bEcaUsE THEy faILED TO DIscLOsE  TO  THE  paRENTs Of  THE  INfaNTs  ENROLLED  REasONabLy  fOREsEEabLE  RIsks  Of  sERIOUs HaR¸s.ÄÐ °E ±fficE fOR ÁU¸aN ³EsEaRcH PROTEcTIONs (ohr¿) IssUED  a  DETER¸INaTION LETTER IN MaRcH 2013 TO THE ·NIVERsITy Of ALaba¸a, THE LEaD  sITE, askINg  ITs INsTITUTIONaL REVIEw bOaRD (ir½) TO TakE ¸EasUREs TO I¸pROVE  cONsENT  pROcEssEs IN  THE fUTURE.ÄÑ ¶EspITE THE  ExTRE¸ELy ¸ILD NaTURE Of THE  ohr¿’s  REspONsE  (EssENTIaLLy,  “bE ¸ORE  caREfUL  NExT  TI¸E;” fEDERaL  fUNDINg  was  NOT THREaTENED, fOR  Exa¸pLE) aND THE facT THaT  ITs cRITIcIs¸ was LI¸ITED  TO  THE  cONsENT  fOR¸s  aND  DID  NOT  qUEsTION  THE  sTUDy’s  VaLUE  OR  DEsIgN  OR  THE  INTEgRITy  Of  THE  INVEsTIgaTORs, THE  agENcy  aND  THOsE  wHO  sUppORTED  ITs  acTION  wERE gENERaLLy  sEEN as aTTackINg THE cHaRacTER Of THE  INVEsTIgaTORs.ÄÒ °E  EDITORs  Of  THE  New  England Journal  of  Medicine bLasTED  THE  ohr¿  fOR  Da¸agINg REpUTaTIONs aND E¸pHasIzED THaT THE INVEsTIgaTORs wERE acTINg IN  gOOD faITH.Ä× AN OpEN LETTER sIgNED by 46 scHOLaRs IN bIOETHIcs aND pEDIaTRIcs  aRgUED  THaT  THE  ohr¿  sHOULD  NOT  sEcOND-gUEss  ir½s  ON wHETHER  REsEaRcH  ETHIcs sTaNDaRDs HaVE acTUaLLy bEEN ¸ET by INVEsTIgaTORs, bUT sHOULD cONfiNE  ITs INqUIRy TO DETER¸ININg wHETHER ir½s  aRE DULy cONsTITUTED aND  THE LIkE.ÆØ °E ¸EssagE REpLayED OVER aND OVER was THaT THE ¼u¿¿ort INVEsTIgaTORs wERE 

good people—unselfishly devoted to saving—and learning how to save more—  premature babies. ANy cO¸paRIsON TO EaRLIER sTUDIEs THaT aRE paRT Of THE ·.S.  cOLLEcTION Of REsEaRcH “scaNDaLs” was Off LI¸ITs bEcaUsE THOsE EaRLIER sTUDIEs  wERE cONDUcTED by I¸¸ORaL REsEaRcHERs—by pEOpLE NOT LIkE THE¸. (ÁIsTORy  Has  gENERaLLy  TaUgHT Us  OTHERwIsE—THaT ¸aNy  REsEaRcH ETHIcs  LapsEs OccUR  DEspITE THE pREsENcE Of a wELL-¸EaNINg aND UpsTaNDINg INVEsTIgaTOR—THaT Is  wHy wE HaVE REsEaRcH OVERsIgHT.) QUEsTIONs  abOUT  a  DOcTOR’s  acTIONs,  EspEcIaLLy  If  THOsE  acTIONs  HaVE  sO¸E RELaTIONsHIp TO ¸aTTERs Of ETHIcs, aRE pERcEIVED as aN aL¸OsT ExIsTENTIaL 

THREaT.  BUT wHETHER  wE  aRE askINg  If  sTaNDaRDs  Of caRE  wERE  ¸ET IN  REspEcT  TO ExEcUTION Of a sURgIcaL pROcEDURE OR If INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR¸s DIscLOsED 

119

wORTH  cONsIDERINg wHETHER THE sHIELDs pHysIcIaNs  TEND TO pUT Up TO DEflEcT  scRUTINy Of THEIR acTIONs, aND THE acTIONs Of THEIR  pEERs, aRE NEEDED bEcaUsE  THEy HaVE ¸aDE THE¸sELVEs sO psycHOLOgIcaLLy TENDER TO aTTack by ExpEcTINg  THE¸sELVEs TO bE “aLL gOOD” aLL THE TI¸E. Æà °E  sHIELD  Of  aLTRUIs¸  caN  bE  INsIDIOUs.  °Is  Is  NOwHERE  ¸ORE  EVIDENT  THaN IN THE REsIsTaNcE a¸ONg DOcTORs TO ackNOwLEDgE wHEN THEy HaVE a cONflIcT Of INTEREsT. ÁERE, pERHaps ¸ORE THaN IN aNy OTHER spHERE, THE IDEaL Of aN  aLTRUIsTIc  pROfEssION caN bLIND  pROfEssIONaLs  TO THE VERy REaL ENTIcE¸ENTs  Of  gIſts, ¸ONEy, pREsTIgE, aND accLaI¸. ÆÄ ¹O pREsU¸E, as ¸aNy DO, THaT THE gOOD  THEy DO (aND º ¸UsT REpEaT, THEy do good) sETs THE¸ apaRT, ¸akEs THE¸ bETTER  abLE THaN  OTHERs TO  aVOID VIOLaTINg  DUTIEs bEcaUsE Of TROUbLINg cONflIcTs  Of INTEREsTs without requiring rules and policies against these conflicts Is NaïVE  aND, IT ¸UsT bE saID, sO¸EwHaT aRROgaNT. ÆÆ ºT was NOT LONg agO wHEN OUR pREscRIpTIONs wERE wRITTEN wITH pENs sUppLIED by  DRUg cO¸paNIEs aND OUR THROaTs cHEckED by DOcTORs UsINg TONgUE  DEpREssORs  bEaRINg  THE  Na¸E  Of  a  pREscRIpTION  DRUg.  ¶RUg  cO¸paNIEs,  bEfORE aDOpTINg  a VOLUNTaRy baN  IN 2008, UsED TO  HaND THEsE OUT  TO  DOcTORs  LIkE caNDy.  WHaT Is ¸ORE TROUbLINg  THaN  THaT THEsE  ITE¸s pROLIfERaTED  THROUgHOUT  OUR  HEaLTH caRE  sETTINgs  Is THaT ¸aNy  pHysIcIaNs bELIEVED  THaT  THEy  wERE  abOVE  bEINg  INflUENcED by  THE¸. BEfORE  a  sI¸ILaR  baN  IN  2002,  DOcTORs  wERE  bEINg gIVEN VacaTIONs  by  DRUg cO¸paNIEs UNDER THE gUIsE  Of  “cONfERENcEs”  IN  ExOTIc  LOcaTIONs.  ¶OcTORs  gENERaLLy  bELIEVED  THEy  wOULD  NOT  bE  I¸pROpERLy  INflUENcED  by  sUcH  jUNkETs.ÆÎ A  LEgIsLaTOR  wHO  sOUgHT  OfficE  ONLy fOR  THE gOOD Of HER NaTION ¸IgHT bE sUbjEcT TO ¸yRIaD  cONflIcTs  Of INTEREsT RULEs bEcaUsE wE DO NOT TRUsT HER TO aLways bE abLE TO jUDgE wHEN  sHE Is bEINg swayED by spEcIaL INTEREsTs, bUT sO¸EHOw DOcTORs DID NOT NEED  THE sa¸E  ETHIcaL  sTRINgENcy.  °Ey DID, aſtER  aLL, pURsUE  pURpOsEs THaT  aRE  “UNa¸bIgUOUsLy aLTRUIsTIc.”ÆÏ WHILE fREE pENs aND VacaTIONs HaVE gONE by THE waysIDE, THE fiNaNcIaL TIEs  bETwEEN DRUg cO¸paNIEs aND DOcTORs aRE sTRONgER THaN EVER wITH cONsULTINg  fEEs  aND  cONTRacT  REsEaRcH.ÆÐ ¶OcTORs aLsO OwN  I¸agINg facILITIEs,  spEcIaLTy  HOspITaLs, ÆÑ aND  paTENTs.  µONfiNaNcIaL cONflIcTs  Of INTEREsT  caN bE  HaRDER TO  REcOgNIzE  aND  aRE  RaRELy  ackNOwLEDgED  as  a  cONflIcT  Of  INTEREsT—sUcH  as  waNTINg TO aVOID a paTIENT “DyINg ON ¸y waTcH” OR wIsHINg TO DIscOVER scIENTIfic aDVaNcEs NOT fOR fiNaNcIaL gaIN bUT, as º a¸ sURE THE ¼u¿¿ort INVEsTIgaTORs wIsHED, IN ORDER TO ¸akE fUTURE paTIENTs’ LIVEs bETTER. ÆÒ

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

aLL RELEVaNT RIsks, pHysIcIaNs’ acTIONs caNNOT bE I¸¸UNE fRO¸ cRITIcIs¸. ºT Is 

WHILE  LawyERs TEND  TO THINk  Of  cONflIcTs  Of INTEREsT  as  “ObjEcTIVE, sTRUc-

120

TURaL, aND RULE-basED,” DOcTORs sEE THE¸ “as RELaTINg TO THE INDIVIDUaL’s cHaRacTER aND abILITy TO REsIsT TE¸pTaTION.”Æ× As SaNDRa JOHNsON Has wRITTEN, “¹ELL 

drehpehS sioL

DOcTORs THaT THEy HaVE a ‘cONflIcT Of INTEREsT’ IN RELaTION TO a pROpOsED pROTOcOL fOR REsEaRcH wITH HU¸aN sUbjEcTs, aND THEy bELIEVE THaT yOU HaVE accUsED  THE¸  Of UNETHIcaL bEHaVIOR. . . . [¶]OcTORs  TEND TO assU¸E  THaT a  cONflIcT  Of  INTEREsT ExIsTs ONLy wHEN THEy acTUaLLy HaVE ¸aDE a ‘baD’ DEcIsION ¸OTIVaTED  by THEIR fiNaNcIaL INTEREsT.”ÎØ °Is ¸EaNs  THaT If a DOcTOR  acTUaLLy DOEs sO¸ETHINg  improper bEcaUsE  Of  THE TE¸pTaTION pOsED by  a pERsONaL  cONflIcT Of INTEREsT, HE Is  baD; OTHERwIsE, THE cONflIcT Of INTEREsT Is NOT a  pRObLE¸ aND OſtEN gOEs UNNOTIcED. SEEINg THE¸sELVEs aND THEIR pEERs as EITHER “gOOD” OR “baD” ¸akEs THE¸ LEss abLE  aND wILLINg TO sEE, IDENTIfy, aND ¸aNagE cONflIcTs Of INTEREsT—THEIR OwN aND  THOsE Of THEIR cOLLEagUEs. AND cONflIcTs  Of INTEREsTs  aRE EVEN  ¸ORE DIfficULT  fOR paTIENTs  TO sEE.  WE  HaVE LONg bEEN awaRE Of THE pHENO¸ENON Of THE “THERapEUTIc ¸IscONcEpTION”  IN REsEaRcH, UNDER wHIcH paTIENTs ¸IsTakENLy bELIEVE, EVEN If TOLD OTHERwIsE,  THaT  “DEcIsIONs abOUT  THEIR  caRE aRE  bEINg  ¸aDE sOLELy wITH THEIR  bENEfiT IN  ¸IND.” Îà A ¸OTHER Of aN INfaNT ENROLLED IN THE ¼u¿¿ort ¹RIaL ExpLaINED aT a  pUbLIc HEaRINg  THaT sHE DID NOT UNDERsTaND THaT HER cHILD was IN a  REsEaRcH  ExpERI¸ENT; sHE was “UNDER THE I¸pREssION THIs was ¸ORE a sUppORT gROUp.”ÎÄ “WHaT  ¸OTHER  wOULD NOT  waNT  sUppORT?”  sHE askED.ÎÆ ´VEN wHEN sUbjEcTs  UNDERsTaND  THaT  THEy  HaVE  ENROLLED IN  REsEaRcH,  THEy  caN  bE  sURpRIsED TO  fiND  THEy  wERE  ON  THE  pLacEbO  aR¸  Of  a  TRIaL  bEcaUsE  THE  sUbjEcTs—aLsO  paTIENTs—bELIEVE THaT  NO DOcTOR wOULD pUT THE¸ IN DaNgER  by TakINg THE¸  Off ¸EDIcaTION.ÎÎ SI¸ILaRLy, a paTIENT OR fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER  wOULD LIkELy bE sURpRIsED TO LEaRN  THaT a pHysIcIaN ¸IgHT HaVE aN INTEREsT IN ORDERINg ExTRa TEsTs TO bOOsT REVENUEs  aT  THE  I¸agINg  facILITy  IN  wHIcH  HE  Has  aN  INTEREsT,  OR  THaT a  NURsINg HO¸E ¸IgHT bENEfiT fRO¸ HIgHER REI¸bURsE¸ENT RaTEs fOR ¸aINTaININg a  sURgIcaLLy  I¸pLaNTED fEEDINg  TUbE OVER fEEDINg by  HaND, a  LEss INVasIVE aND  ¸ORE pERsONaL fOR¸ Of caRE. WHILE THE HaIR sTyLIsT aLsO Has cONflIcTs Of INTEREsTs, THEy aRE EasIER TO sEE.  °ERE Is a cLEaR pRIcE fOR THE sERVIcEs pERfOR¸ED, aND IT Is NO sEcRET THaT HE OR  sHE Is sELLINg THE HaIR caRE pRODUcTs aT THE fRONT Of THE saLON. °E DELIVERy Of  ¸EDIcaL  caRE  Is ¸ORE  ETHIcaLLy  cO¸pLEx aND ¸ORE  EssENTIaL TO HU¸aN  wELL-  bEINg, IT Is TRUE. BUT THE cOLLEcTIVE INabILITy OR RELUcTaNcE ON THE paRT Of pHysIcIaNs, paTIENTs,  aND THE gENERaL pUbLIc TO IDENTIfy, DIscLOsE, aND DETER¸INE  HOw TO  ¸aNagE THREaTs TO  paTIENT wELfaRE aND paTIENT aUTONO¸y  pOsED by 

cONflIcTs  Of INTEREsT—aND TO ¸akE THE DELIVERy Of ¸EDIcaL caRE less ETHIcaLLy  cO¸pLEx wHEN pOssIbLE by eliminating cONflIcTs Of INTEREsT—DEpENDs IN LaRgE 

121

WE HaVE a LOT Of wORk TO DO IDENTIfyINg ¸ORE ExacTLy wHaT wE ¸EaN wHEN  wE  say a pHysIcIaN Has a DUTy TO acT  IN THE bEsT INTEREsTs Of THE paTIENT. °aT  Is  wHERE  OUR  aTTENTION  NEEDs  TO  gO—NOT  IN  fURTHER ExpLORaTION  Of  wHaT  IT  ¸EaNs fOR a DOcTOR TO bE aLTRUIsTIc, HOw TO IDENTIfy aLTRUIsTIc ¸EDIcaL scHOOL  appLIcaNTs, OR  HOw TO ¸EasURE  wHETHER sTUDENTs  HaVE gROwN  IN THEIR  cO¸¸IT¸ENT  TO aLTRUIs¸  THROUgH THEIR  ¸EDIcaL  scHOOL EDUcaTION.  AbaNDONINg  THE IDEa ¸ay RELIEVE ITs ¸E¸bERs Of UNREaLIsTIc bURDENs THaT caN DIsTORT THEIR  abILITy  TO  ENgagE  IN  cRITIcaL  sELf-REflEcTION.  BEsIDEs,  wHy  wOULD  THE  pROfEssION  waNT  TO HOLD  ITsELf  apaRT? ºf  wHaT  THE pROfEssION REaLLy  ¸EaNs wHEN IT  TaLks  abOUT aLTRUIs¸  Is  NOT sELf-sacRIficE,  bUT INsTEaD  E¸paTHy, UNDERsTaNDINg,  cONNEcTION  wITH  paTIENTs  aND  OTHERs—aND  THaT  ¸ay  bE  wHaT  sO¸E  IN  THE pROfEssION acTUaLLy DO ¸EaN wHEN THEy TaLk abOUT aLTRUIs¸—THEN IsN’T IT  faR  bETTER TO UNDERsTaND  THaT NO sINgLE OccUpaTION OR gROUp Of pEOpLE Has a  sTRONgER cLaI¸ TO bEINg caLLED aLTRUIsTIc? AREN’T wE aLL IN THIs TOgETHER?

Conclusion A  REcENT sTORy  IN THE  NEws TOLD abOUT  aN 8-yEaR-OLD bOy IN  µEw YORk  wHO  wOkE TO DIscOVER fiRE IN HIs gRaNDfaTHER’s ¸ObILE HO¸E, wHERE HE was spENDINg  THE  NIgHT.  AſtER  awakENINg  aND  UsHERINg  OUT  sIx  RELaTIVEs,  INcLUDINg  TwO  OTHER cHILDREN, HE  wENT back IN TO  TRy TO HELp HIs  DIsabLED gRaNDfaTHER  aND  HIs UNcLE gET OUT. BUT wHEN HE DID, HE bEca¸E OVERcO¸E wITH HEaT aND  s¸OkE, aND HE DIED. ¹yLER ¶OOHaN  was a HERO. AND HE was  TREaTED as ONE.  ÁE was  gIVEN  a fiREfigHTER’s fUNERaL, IN  wHIcH  fiREfigHTERs fRO¸ aROUND  THE  sTaTE  wORE DREss  bLUEs aND wHITE  gLOVEs, aND fiRE  ENgINEs LINED THE sTREETs.  ¹yLER was HaILED fOR HIs cOURagE, HIs bRaVERy, HIs sELflEssNEss. ÎÏ ¹yLER ¶OOHaN was NOT jUsT a HERO, HE was aN aLTRUIsTIc HERO. °OUgH gIVEN  THE TITLE Of aN HONORaRy fiREfigHTER IN DEaTH, HE was NOT TRaINED TO figHT  fiREs  OR ExpEcTED  TO aTTE¸pT TO REscUE  OTHERs fRO¸ a  bURNINg bUILDINg. PEOpLE Of  aLL agEs aND TaLENTs aND OccUpaTIONs gO OUT Of THEIR way TO HELp OTHERs aT cOsT  aND  RIsk  TO THE¸sELVEs,  sO¸ETI¸Es ¸akINg  THE ULTI¸aTE sacRIficE.  ALTRUIs¸  DOEs  ExIsT,  aND  wE  NEED TO HONOR  IT.  BUT DOINg  sO  REqUIREs  Us TO  REcOgNIzE  wHaT IT Is aND wHaT IT Is NOT. AbOUT a  wEEk aſtER THE sTORy Of ¹yLER ¶OOHaN, THERE  was aNOTHER INspIRINg  NaTIONaL  NEws  sTORy  abOUT  sO¸EONE wHO  HaD  DONE  sO¸ETHINg  TERRIfic. 

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

paRT, º sUspEcT, ON OUR I¸agE Of DOcTORs as aLTRUIsTIc.

AN  UNExpEcTED aND  sEVERE sNOwsTOR¸ IN ALaba¸a HaD sTRaNDED a  sURgEON, 

122

¶R. ZENkO ÁRyNkIwON, ON  HIs way fRO¸ ONE HOspITaL TO aNOTHER TO pERfOR¸  E¸ERgENcy, LIfE-saVINg bRaIN sURgERy. WHEN TRaVELLINg by caR bEca¸E I¸pOs-

drehpehS sioL

sIbLE bEcaUsE Of bLOckED ROaDs, HE HEaDED OUT ON THE 6-¸ILE TREk IN 20-DEgREE  wEaTHER IN HIs scRUbs, a jackET, aND OpERaTINg ROO¸ sLIp cOVERs OVER HIs sHOEs.  ÁE REcEIVED THE paTIENT’s »t scaN VIa TExT as HE waLkED, was EVENTUaLLy gIVEN  a  LIſt  by  a  passERby fOR  THE  LasT  bIT  Of  THE jOURNEy,  aND  was  IN  sURgERy  TwO  HOURs  aſtER  HE  sET  OUT.  °E  paTIENT was  bELIEVED  TO  HaVE  HaD  a  90 pERcENT  cHaNcE  Of  DyINg wITHOUT  THE sURgERy.  ÁE  LIVED. AccORDINg  TO NEws  REpORTs,  UpON  aRRIVaL TO  THE OpERaTINg ROO¸,  THE cHaRgE  NURsE TOLD ¶R. ÁRyNkIwON,  “YOU’RE a gOOD ¸aN.’” °E DOcTOR REpLIED, “º’¸ jUsT DOINg ¸y jOb.”ÎÐ °Ey wERE  bOTH RIgHT.

notes 1  AssOcIaTED ÁaIR PROfEssIONaLs, Code of Ethics, HTTp://www.INsURINgsTyLE.cO¸/HaIRsTyLIsTs  /¸E¸bERsHIp/aHp-cODE-Of-ETHIcs (accEssED SEpTE¸bER 29, 2014). 2  °E  SOcIETy  Of  PER¸aNENT  COs¸ETIc  PROfEssIONaLs,  Code  of Ethics ,  HTTp://www.spcp  .ORg/INfOR¸aTION-fOR-TEcHNIcIaNs/spcp-cODE-Of-ETHIcs (accEssED SEpTE¸bER 29, 2014). 3  ³. M.  ÂEaTcH,  A  °eory of Medical  Ethics (µEw  YORk:  BasIc BOOks,  ºNc.,  1981):  aT  6,  92–107 (DIscUssINg THE INaDEqUacy Of RELIaNcE ON aNy pROfEssION TO DETER¸INE ITs OwN  ¸ORaL fOUNDaTION THROUgH agREE¸ENT a¸ONg ITs ¸E¸bERs). 4  °E  1847 ¾m¾  cODE  sTaTEs  THaT  “THERE Is  NO pROfEssION,  fRO¸  THE ¸E¸bERs  Of  wHIcH  gREaTER  pURITy  Of  cHaRacTER  aND  a HIgHER  sTaNDaRD  Of  ¸ORaL  ExcELLENcE  aRE  REqUIRED,  THaN THE ¸EDIcaL.” ÂEacH, °eory of Medical Ethics, 93. 5  C.  ³.  MacKENzIE,  “PROfEssIONaLIs¸  aND  MEDIcINE,”  History  of  the  Human  Sciences 

Journal 3, NO. 2 (2007): 222–227 (cITINg W. ±. ±sLER, “±N THE ´DUcaTIONaL ÂaLUE Of THE  MEDIcaL SOcIETy,”  IN  Aequanimitas, with Other Addresses  to Medical Students, Nurses 

and Practitioners of Medicine, 3RD ED. [PHILaDELpHIa: BLakIsTON, 1932]: 395–423). 6  ². ³. CHURcHILL,  “°E  ÁEgE¸ONy  Of  MONEy: CO¸¸ERcIaLIs¸  aND  PROfEssIONaLIs¸  IN  A¸ERIcaN MEDIcINE,” Cambridge Quarterly Healthcare Ethics 16, NO. 4 (2007), 407–414. 7  ³.  FaDEN,  µ.  Kass,  aND  S.  GOOD¸aN,  ET  aL.,  “AN  ´THIcs  FRa¸EwORk  fOR  a  ²EaRNINg  ÁEaLTH CaRE SysTE¸: A ¶EpaRTURE fRO¸ ¹RaDITIONaL ³EsEaRcH ´THIcs aND CLINIcaL ´THIcs,” Hastings Center Report 43, NO. S1 (2013): S16–S27. 8  ´DITORs,  “²OOkINg  Back  ON  THE  MILLENNIU¸  IN  MEDIcINE,”  New  England  Journal  of 

Medicine 342, NO. 1 (2000): 42–49. 9  A¸ERIcaN BOaRD Of ºNTERNaL MEDIcINE,  Project Professionalism (PHILaDELpHIa: A¸ERIcaN BOaRD Of ºNTERNaL MEDIcINE, 1998), 5. 10  PROjEcT  Of  THE  ¾½im FOUNDaTION,  ¾»¿–¾¼im  FOUNDaTION,  aND  ´UROpEaN  FEDERaTION  Of ºNTERNaL MEDIcINE, “MEDIcaL PROfEssIONaLIs¸ IN THE µEw MILLENNIU¸: A PHysIcIaN  CHaRTER,” Annals of Internal Medicine 136, NO. 3 (2002): 243–246.

11  Á. C. SOx, “PREfacE,” Annals of Internal Medicine 136, NO. 3 (2002). 12  FOR a DIscUssION Of THE ¸EDIcaL pROfEssIONaL  LITERaTURE ON DEfiNITIONs aND INVOcaTIONs 

123

Of  pROfEssIONaLIs¸ aND  aLTRUIs¸, sEE  F.  W.  ÁaffERTy, “¶EfiNITIONs  Of  PROfEssIONaLIs¸: 

(2006):  193–204.  ÁaffERTy  NOTEs  THaT  BRITIsH  DEfiNITIONs  Of  pROfEssIONaLIs¸  “DO  NOT  HIgHLIgHT aLTRUIs¸ as a cORE cONcEpT OR aN ORgaNIzINg pRINcIpLE” (199). 13  Á. M. SwIck, “¹OwaRD a µOR¸aTIVE ¶EfiNITION Of MEDIcaL PROfEssIONaLIs¸,” Academic 

Medicine 75,  NO. 6  (2000):  612–616;  ¶.  ¶.  GIbsON, ². ².  COLDwELL,  aND  S. F.  KIEwIT,  “CREaTINg a CULTURE Of PROfEssIONaLIs¸: AN ºNTEgRaTED AppROacH,” Academic Medicine 75, NO. 5 (2000): 509; C. ². BaRDEs, “ºs MEDIcINE ALTRUIsTIc? A QUERy fRO¸ THE  MEDIcaL  ScHOOL AD¸IssIONs  ±fficE,”  Teaching  and Learning in  Medicine: An International 

Journal 18, NO. 1 (2010): 48–49. 14  FRENcH  pHILOsOpHER  AUgUsTE  CO¸TE  cOINED  THE  TER¸  IN  THE  NINETEENTH  cENTURy  TO  DEscRIbE  aN  ETHIcaL ObLIgaTION  “TO  LIVE fOR  OTHERs,”  RENOUNcINg sELf-INTEREsT.  Stanford 

Encyclopedia of Philosophy , s.V.  “AUgUsTE CO¸TE,”  HTTp://pLaTO.sTaNfORD.EDU/ENTRIEs  /cO¸TE/#´THSOc  (accEssED  SEpTE¸bER  29,  2014).  Oxford  Living  Dictionaries DEfiNEs  aLTRUIs¸ as “THE bELIEf IN OR pRacTIcE Of DIsINTEREsTED aND sELflEss cONcERN fOR THE wELL-  bEINg  Of  OTHERs.”  Oxford  Living  Dictionaries,  HTTp://www.OxfORDDIcTIONaRIEs.cO¸/Us  /DEfiNITION/a¸ERIcaN_ENgLIsH/aLTRUIs¸  (accEssED  SEpTE¸bER  29,  2014).  SEE  aLsO  A.  MacºNTyRE, “´gOIs¸ aND ALTRUIs¸,” IN ¶. M. BORcHERT, ED.,  Encyclopedia of Philosophy,  VOL.  2 (µEw YORk: Mac¸ILLaN, 1967): aT  442–466. MacºNTyRE ExpLaINs THaT  aLTRUIs¸ Is  OſtEN  cONsIDERED THE  OppOsITE  Of  EgOIs¸  aND  DEscRIbEs  THE  REsULTINg  pREOccUpaTION  wITH DETER¸ININg wHIcH  Of THEsE  TwO ¸OTIVEs, OR  ways Of LIVINg, gOVERN OUR  acTIONs.  ÁE pROVIDEs a cONTRaRy VIEw, wRITINg THaT “If º waNT TO LEaD a cERTaIN kIND Of LIfE, wITH  RELaTIONsHIps Of TRUsT, fRIENDsHIp, aND cOOpERaTION wITH OTHERs, THEN ¸y waNTINg THEIR  gOOD aND ¸y waNTINg ¸y gOOD aRE NOT TwO INDEpENDENT, DIscRI¸INabLE DEsIREs.” 15  W.  GLaNNON  aND  ².  F.  ³Oss,  “ARE  ¶OcTORs  ALTRUIsTIc?”  Journal  of  Medical  Ethics 28  (2002): 68–69. FOR DIscUssION Of pHysIcIaNs’ fiDUcIaRy ObLIgaTIONs, sEE M. J. MEHL¸aN,  “¶IsHONEsT  MEDIcaL  MIsTakEs,”  Vanderbilt  Law  Review 59,  NO.  4  (2006):  1137–1173;  M. A.  ³ODwIN, “STRaINs IN THE FIDUcIaRy METapHOR:  ¶IVIDED PHysIcIaN ²OyaLTIEs  aND  ±bLIgaTIONs IN a CHaNgINg ÁEaLTH CaRE  SysTE¸,” American Journal of Law and Medi-

cine 21, NOs. 2–3 (1995): 241–257. 16  GLaNNON aND ³Oss, “ARE ¶OcTORs ALTRUIsTIc?” 17  GLaNNON  aND  ³Oss,  “ARE  ¶OcTORs  ALTRUIsTIc?”  SI¸ILaRLy,  ³.  S.  ¶OwNIE  wRITEs  THaT  “MORaLITy  ENTERs ¸EDIcINE  THROUgH  THE  qUaLITy  Of  THE  INDIVIDUaL  DOcTOR’s  wORk,  NOT  by THE DEfiNITION Of THaT wORk.” ³. S. ¶OwNIE, “SUpEREROgaTION aND ALTRUIs¸: A CO¸¸ENT,” Journal of Medical Ethics 28, NO. 2 (2002): 75–76. 18  GLaNNON aND ³Oss, “ARE ¶OcTORs ALTRUIsTIc?” 19  ¶. ±RENTLIcHER, “°E ºNflUENcE Of a PROfEssIONaL ±RgaNIzaTION ON PHysIcIaN BEHaVIOR,” 

Albany Law Review 57, NO. 3 (1994): 583–605. 20  B.  MONTOpOLI, “SUE ²OwDEN STaNDs by  CHIckEN ÁEaLTH  CaRE BaRTER PLaN,”  ´µ± News ,  ApRIL 22, 2010, HTTp://www.cbsNEws.cO¸/NEws/sUE-LOwDEN-sTaNDs-by-cHIckEN-HEaLTH  -caRE-baRTER-pLaN (accEssED SEpTE¸bER 29,  2014).  FOR REpORTINg aND VIDEO  fOOTagE  Of  THE  ORIgINaL  ²OwDEN  cO¸¸ENT  ON  baRTERINg  wITH  pHysIcIaNs,  sEE  ´.  KLEEfELD, “ ¶·- 

±¸¶ CaNDIDaTE  SUE  ²OwDEN  (³):  ‘BaRTER  WITH  YOUR  ¶OcTOR,’ ”  ¹º»,  ApRIL  12,  2010, 

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

A SEaRcH fOR  MEaNINg aND  ºDENTITy,” Clinical Orthopaedics  and Related Research 449 

HTTp://TaLkINgpOINTs¸E¸O.cO¸/Dc/NV-sEN-caNDIDaTE-sUE-LOwDEN-R-baRTER-wITH-yOUR 

124

-DOcTOR-VIDEO (accEssED SEpTE¸bER 29, 2014). 21  FOR  aN  EaRLy  Essay  pREsENTINg  a  moral aRgU¸ENT  fOR  UNDERsTaNDINg  THE  pRacTIcE Of  ¸EDIcINE as a bUsINEss, sEE ³. M. SaDE, “MEDIcaL CaRE as a ³IgHT: A ³EfUTaTION,”  New 

drehpehS sioL

England Journal of Medicine 285, NO. 23 (1971): 1288–1292. SaDE cO¸paREs THE pHysIcIaN  TO a bakER. 22  A¸ERIcaN  BaR  AssOcIaTION  (¾½¾),  Model  Rules  of  Professional  Conduct ,  ³ULE  6.01  (“´VERy LawyER Has a pROfEssIONaL REspONsIbILITy TO pROVIDE LEgaL sERVIcEs TO THOsE UNabLE  TO pay. A LawyER  sHOULD aspIRE TO  RENDER aT  LEasT [50] HOURs  Of pRO bONO pUbLIcO LEgaL  sERVIcEs pER yEaR.”) BEcaUsE THE REqUIRE¸ENT TO pROVIDE pRO bONO sERVIcEs Is sO¸EwHaT  gENERaL, IT  wOULD bE  DIfficULT TO  ENfORcE, EVEN IN THOsE  sTaTEs THaT  HaVE  aDOpTED  ³ULE  6.01 as paRT Of THE  REgULaTIONs gOVERNINg THE cONDUcT  Of LawyERs. µEw  YORk, HOwEVER,  Has REcENTLy  aDOpTED a RULE “REqUIRINg appLIcaNTs fOR aD¸IssION TO THE µEw YORk STaTE  baR TO pERfOR¸ 50  HOURs Of pRO bONO sERVIcEs.” µEw YORk STaTE ·NIfOR¸ COURT SysTE¸, HTTp://www.NycOURTs.gOV/aTTORNEys/pRObONO/baRaD¸IssIONREqs.sHT¸L  (accEssED  SEpTE¸bER 29, 2014). MOREOVER, cOURTs caN appOINT LawyERs TO sERVE paRTIcULaR cLIENTs  IN a casE aND  wHEN THEy DO sO,  THE LawyERs’  cO¸pENsaTION fOR  sUcH  REpREsENTaTION  wILL bE fixED by THE cOURT.  SEE ¾½¾ Model, ³ULE  6.2 (“A LawyER  sHaLL NOT  sEEk TO aVOID  appOINT¸ENT by a TRIbUNaL TO REpREsENT a pERsON ExcEpT fOR gOOD caUsE.”) 23  SEE GLaNNON aND ³Oss, “ARE ¶OcTORs ALTRUIsTIc?” 24  S. BLackbURN,  Being Good (µEw YORk:  ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss  ºNc., 2001):  aT  48–49.  MILLENNIaL ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT gRaDUaTEs ¸ay NOT bE as INcLINED TO sUppORT aND pRO¸OTE  aLTRUIs¸ as  a cORE VaLUE. F. W. ÁaffERTy, “WHaT  MEDIcaL STUDENTs KNOw abOUT PROfEssIONaLIs¸,” Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine 69, NO. 6 (2002): 385–398. ÁaffERTy wRITEs  THaT cLassROO¸ DIscUssION wITH ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs as paRT Of a pROfEssIONaLIs¸ cURRIcULU¸ REVEaLED  LITTLE sUppORT fOR THE  pRINcIpLE THaT pHysIcIaNs sHOULD sUbORDINaTE THEIR  OwN INTEREsTs TO  THE  INTEREsTs Of OTHERs.  °E sTUDENTs ExpREssED  a NEED fOR  “baLaNcE”  IN THEIR  LIVEs,  THE  I¸pORTaNcE Of  TakINg  caRE  Of  ONEsELf IN  ORDER  TO  HELp  OTHERs, aND  a Lack Of  cO¸¸IT¸ENT  TO VagUE  aND  gENERaL pROfEssIONaL  cODEs  aND  OaTHs  I¸pOsED  by  OTHERs.  ÁE  wRITEs,  “STUDENTs  cERTaINLy  VERbaLIzED  a cO¸¸IT¸ENT  TO DOINg  gOOD,  bUT THEy wERE  UNRE¸ITTINgLy cLEaR THaT THE  wHO, wHaT, wHEN, wHERE,  aND wHy wOULD  RE¸aIN UNDER THE  cONTROL Of  THE ‘DO  gOODER.’ ”  WHILE sO¸E Of  THEsE aTTITUDEs aRE NOT  paRTIcULaRLy  pRObLE¸aTIc UNDER  THE  THEsIs  Of  THIs  aRTIcLE,  wE  ¸IgHT  NEVERTHELEss  bE  cONcERNED  THaT  ONcE  “aLTRUIs¸”  Is  REjEcTED  OR  DIscREDITED  as  THE  LEssON  TO  LEaRN,  sTUDENTs ¸ay  NOT bE TaUgHT  OR  ¸ay NOT UNDERsTaND aND  INTERNaLIzE  wHaT THEIR  TRUE  aND  ¸ORE  spEcIfic  ETHIcaL  aND  LEgaL ObLIgaTIONs  aRE TO  paTIENTs. MOsT  cONcERNINg Is  ÁaffERTy’s sTaTE¸ENT THaT THE sTUDENTs “[¸]OsT cLEaRLy aND E¸pHaTIcaLLy . . . REjEcTED  THE  NOTION  THaT  THEy  wERE  ObLIgED  TO DO  aNyTHINg. PERIOD”  (391).  SEE  aLsO ÁaffERTy,  “¶EfiNITIONs Of PROfEssIONaLIs¸.” 25  S.  COONs,  “°E  ¼u¿¿ort  ¹RIaL:  ³Isk  aND  CONsENT  QUEsTIONs  ¶IVIDE  THE  CLINIcaL  ³EsEaRcH CO¸¸UNITy,”  Research Practitioner 14, NO. 5 (2013):  112–117. G. J.  ANNas aND  C. ². ANNas, “²EgaLLy BLIND: °E °ERapEUTIc ºLLUsION IN THE SUppORT STUDy Of ´xTRE¸ELy  PRE¸aTURE ºNfaNTs,”  Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy 30,  NO. 1 (2014):  1–36.  ³. MackLIN  aND  ². SHEpHERD,  “ºNfOR¸ED  CONsENT aND  STaNDaRD Of  CaRE: WHaT  MUsT BE ¶IscLOsED,” American Journal of Bioethics 13, NO. 12 (2013): 9–13.

26  CO¸paRE B. S. WILfOND ET aL., “°E ohr¿ aND ¼u¿¿ort,” New England Journal of Medi-

cine 368,  NO. 25  (2013): E36,  DOI:10.1056/µ´JMc1307008, wITH ³.  MackLIN ET aL., “°E 

125

ohr¿  aND  ¼u¿¿ort—ANOTHER  ÂIEw,”  New England  Journal  of Medicine 369,  NO.  2 

mingham,  MaRcH  7,  2013,  HTTp://www.HHs.gOV/OHRp/DETR¸_LETRs/Y³13/¸aR13a.pDf  (accEssED ±cTObER 1, 2014). 28  SEE, E.g., J. ¶. ²aNTOs, “ohr¿ aND PUbLIc CITIzEN ARE WRONg abOUT µEONaTaL ³EsEaRcH  ON  ±xygEN °ERapy,”  Bioethics  Forum, Hastings Center Report,  ApRIL 18, 2013,  HTTp:// 



=

www.THEHasTINgscENTER.ORg/BIOETHIcsfORU¸/POsT.aspx?ID 6306ÍbLOgID 140  (accEssED  ±cTObER 1, 2014);  sEE aLsO cO¸¸ENTs  pOsTED by K. BaRRINgTON,  ON JUNE 10 2013, TO  ².  SHEpHERD, “°E SUppORT STUDy aND  THE STaNDaRD Of CaRE,” Bioethics  Forum, °e Hast-

ings  Center  Report ,  May  17,  2013,  HTTp://www.THEHasTINgscENTER.ORg/BIOETHIcsfORU¸ 

=



/POsT.aspx?ID 6358ÍbLOgID 140 (accEssED ±cTObER 1, 2014). 29  J. M. ¶RazEN,  C. G. SOLO¸ON,  aND M. F.  GREENE, “ºNfOR¸ED  CONsENT aND  ¼u¿¿ort,” 

New England Journal of Medicine 368, NO. 20 (2013): 1929–1931. 30  SEE WILfOND, “°E ohr¿ aND ¼u¿¿ort.” 31  SEE MacºNTyRE, “´gOIs¸ aND ALTRUIs¸” (wRITINg abOUT OUR ¸IsgUIDED  pREOccUpaTION  wITH UNDERsTaNDINg acTIONs as TakEN EITHER IN sELf-INTEREsT OR bENEVOLENcE, EITHER wITH  baD ¸OTIVEs OR gOOD ¸OTIVEs). 32  SEE  M. Á.  BazER¸aN aND  A. ´.  ¹ENbRUNsEL,  Blind  Spots:  Why We  Fail  to  Do  What’s 

Right and What to Do about It (PRINcETON: PRINcETON ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2011): aT  20–21  (“[M]OsT s¸aRT,  wELL-EDUcaTED DOcTORs  aRE pUzzLED by THE  cRITIcIs¸ agaINsT THE¸, as  THEy aRE  cONfiDENT IN  THEIR OwN ETHIcaLITy  aND THE ‘facT’  THaT THEy aLways  pUT THEIR  paTIENTs’  INTEREsTs  fiRsT. . . . BUT  THE  ¸ORE  pERNIcIOUs  aspEcT Of  cONflIcTs  Of  INTEREsT  Is  cLaRIfiED by  wELL-REpLIcaTED REsEaRcH  sHOwINg THaT wHEN pEOpLE HaVE a VEsTED INTEREsT  IN sEEINg a pRObLE¸ IN a cERTaIN ¸aNNER, THEy aRE NO LONgER capabLE Of ObjEcTIVITy.”). 33  ALTHOUgH a fULL ExpLORaTION  Is bEyOND THE scOpE Of THIs Essay, paTERNaLIs¸ Is aN aDDITIONaL cONcERN THaT OſtEN flOws fRO¸ THE bEsT Of INTENTIONs bUT, NONETHELEss, RaIsEs cONcERNs abOUT  wHIcH a wELL-¸EaNINg  pHysIcIaN  ¸ay NOT  EVEN bE awaRE.  AN OVERbLOwN  sENsE Of aLTRUIs¸ ¸ay, aT LEasT IN paRT, cONTRIbUTE TO THE pERNIcIOUs sELf-RaTIONaLIzaTION  THaT THE DOcTOR aLways kNOws bEsT. 34  J.  P.  ±RLOwskI  aND  ².  WaTEska,  “°E ´ffEcTs  Of  PHaR¸acEUTIcaL  FIR¸  ´NTIcE¸ENTs  ON PHysIcIaN PREscRIbINg PaTTERNs:  °ERE’s µO  SUcH °INg as a  FREE ²UNcH,”  Chest 102, NO. 1 (1992):  270–273; A. WazaNa,  “PHysIcIaNs aND THE PHaR¸acEUTIcaL ºNDUsTRy, ºs a GIſt ´VER JUsT a GIſt?”  ¼½¾½ 283  (2000): 373–380; G. ÁaRRIs aND J. ³ObERTs,  “¶OcTORs’ ¹IEs TO ¶RUg MakERs ARE PUT ON CLOsE ÂIEw,” New York Times, MaRcH 21,  2007, aT A1. 35  SEE ´DITORs, “²OOkINg Back ON THE MILLENNIU¸ IN MEDIcINE.” 36.  J. FIsHER, Medical  Research for Hire: °e  Political Economy of Pharmaceutical Clinical 

Trials (µEw JERsEy: ³UTgERs ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2008); sEE ÁaRRIs aND ³ObERTs, “¶OcTORs’  ¹IEs TO ¶RUg MakERs.” 37  J.  ´.  PERRy,  “PHysIcIaN-±wNED  SpEcIaLTy  ÁOspITaLs  aND  THE  PaTIENT  PROTEcTION  aND  AffORDabLE  CaRE  AcT:  ÁEaLTH  CaRE  ³EfOR¸  aT  THE  ºNTERsEcTION  Of  ²aw  aND  ´THIcs,” 

American Business Law Journal 49, NO. 2 (2012): 369–416.

citsiurtlA  ylsuougibmA

(2013): E3(1)–(3), DOI:10.1056/µ´JMc1308015. 27  ±fficE fOR  ÁU¸aN  ³EsEaRcH  PROTEcTIONs,  Letter  to  the University  of Alabama  at  Bir-

38  SEE  gENERaLLy  ².  SHEpHERD  aND  M. F.  ³ILEy,  “ºN  PLaIN  SIgHT: A  SOLUTION  TO  a  FUNDa-

126

¸ENTaL CHaLLENgE IN ÁU¸aN ³EsEaRcH,”  Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics 40, NO. 4  (2012): 970–989 (DIscUssINg THE pHysIcIaN-REsEaRcHER cONflIcT Of INTEREsT). 39  S. Á. JOHNsON, “FIVE ´asy PIEcEs: MOTIfs Of ÁEaLTH ²aw,” Health Matrix 14, NO. 1 (2004): 

drehpehS sioL

131–140, aT 131. 40  JOHNsON, “FIVE ´asy PIEcEs.” 41  P. S. AppELbaU¸, ². Á. ³OTH, aND C. ²IDz, “°E °ERapEUTIc MIscONcEpTION: ºNfOR¸ED  CONsENT IN PsycHIaTRIc ³EsEaRcH,”  International Journal  of Law and Psychiatry 5,  NOs.  3 Í  4 (1982): 319–329, aT 321;  C. W. ²IDz, P. S. AppELbaU¸, ¹. GRIssO, aND M.  ³ENaUD,  “°ERapEUTIc MIscONcEpTION aND  THE AppREcIaTION Of  ³Isks IN CLINIcaL ¹RIaLs,”  Social 

Science and Medicine 58, NO. 9 (2004): 1689–1697, 1691. 42  S. COOk, “CO¸¸ENTs aT ohr¿ PUbLIc MEETINg ON MaTTERs ³ELaTED TO PROTEcTION Of ÁU¸aN  SUbjEcTs aND ³EsEaRcH CONsIDERINg STaNDaRD Of CaRE ºNTERVENTIONs” (AUgUsT 28, 2013), 



VIDEO REcORDINg, HTTp://www.yOUTUbE.cO¸/pLayLIsT?LIsT P²R17´8KABz1Gc_NDT9gRGg80  _j´5G1³µC;  TRaNscRIpT,  HTTp://www.HHs.gOV/OHRp/NEwsROO¸/Rfc/PUbLIc%20MEET  INg%20AUgUsT%2028,%202013/sUppORT-¸EETINgTRaNscRIpTfiNaL.HT¸L  (accEssED  ±cTObER 1, 2014). 43  S. COOk,  “CO¸¸ENTs aT ohr¿ PUbLIc MEETINg.” SEE aLsO M. ÁOcHHaUsER, “‘°ERapEUTIc  MIscONcEpTION’ aND  ‘³EcRUITINg ¶OUbLEspEak’  IN  THE ºNfOR¸ED  CONsENT PROcEss,”  ¿Àµ: 

Ethics and Human Research 24, NO. 1 (2002): 11–12 (ExpLaININg HOw THE UbIqUITOUs “bRaND  Na¸Es” Of cLINIcaL TRIaLs cONTRIbUTE TO a REsEaRcH sUbjEcT’s THERapEUTIc ¸IscONcEpTION). 44  “CLINIcaL ¹RIaL SUbjEcTs: ADEqUaTE ÕÔÝ PROTEcTIONs?” ÁEaRINg bEfORE THE  CO¸¸ITTEE  ON GOVERN¸ENT ³EfOR¸ aND ±VERsIgHT ÁOUsE  Of ³EpREsENTaTIVEs, 105TH CONgREss  (1998):  152–153,  HTTp://www.gpO.gOV/fDsys/pkg/CÁ³G-105HHRg49827/pDf/CÁ³G  -105HHRg49827.pDf (accEssED ±cTObER 10, 2014). 45  “FIREfigHTERs ²INE  FUNERaL Of  ¹yLER  ¶OOHaN,  8, WHO ¶IED  ¹RyINg  TO  SaVE Fa¸ILy  fRO¸  FIRE,”  ´µ±  News,  JaNUaRy  29,  2014,  HTTp://www.cbsNEws.cO¸/NEws/8-yEaR-OLD-TyLER  -DOOHaN - wHO - DIED - TRyINg -TO - saVE - fa¸ILy - fRO¸ - fIRE - gETs -a - fIREfIgHTERs - fUNERaL  (accEssED ±cTObER 1, 2014). 46  A. ¶IER,  µEwsER, “SURgEON WaLkED 6  MILEs IN ALa.  STOR¸  TO Þß,”  Á±Â Today , JaNUaRy 31, 2014, HTTp://www.UsaTODay.cO¸/sTORy/NEws/NaTION/2014/01/31/NEwsER-aLaba¸a  -sNOwsTOR¸-sURgEON/5078179 (accEssED  ±cTObER 1,  2014);  M.  GRIffO,  “¶OcTOR  WaLks  6 MILEs THROUgH SNOw STOR¸  TO PERfOR¸ ´¸ERgENcy BRaIN SURgERy,”  Huffington Post ,  JaNUaRy 30, 2014, HTTp://www.HUffiNgTONpOsT.cO¸/2014/01/30/DR-zENkO-HRyNkIw-6  -¸ILEs-bRaIN-sURgERy_N_4697195.HT¸L (accEssED ±cTObER 1, 2014).

NecessARy  ²ccessoR±es Nusheen Ameenuddin

My  sTaRcHED  wHITE  cOaT  HUNg ON  a  pLasTIc  HaNgER  sUspENDED  fRO¸ a  gRay  sTEEL bOOksHELf. WORN ONLy ONcE, TwO yEaRs agO aT THE WHITE COaT CERE¸ONy,  aN EVENT THaT wELcO¸ED  fiRsT-yEaR sTUDENTs INTO THE pROfEssION Of ¸EDIcINE,  THE  cOaT  wOULD NOw  bE  UsED  IN  a fUNcTIONaL  capacITy  fOR ¸y  fiRsT cLINIcaL  ExpERIENcE.  °E REsT Of  ¸y ENsE¸bLE HaD  aLsO bEEN caREfULLy  pREpaRED. My  kHakI paNTs wERE NEaTLy pREssED. As º aD¸IRED THE¸, º RaN ¸y fiNgERs aLONg  THEIR cRIsp cREasEs, wHIcH RaRELy gRacED ¸y DaILy wEaR. º LEſt ¸y LOOsE-fiTTINg,  THIgH-LENgTH  bLack aND  bEIgE  DREss  sHIRT  UNTUckED  sO  as  NOT  TO  DEfiNE  THE  sHapE Of ¸y bODy. º  TOOk  ¸y  wHITE  cOaT Off  ITs HaNgER  aND  pUT IT  ON, TUggINg  aT  THE sTIff  LapELs  IN a VaIN EffORT TO ¸akE THE¸  LIE flaT. °E Na¸E Tag  abOVE ¸y UppER  LEſt pOckET REaD  “µUsHEEN A¸EENUDDIN, STUDENT PHysIcIaN.” º baLaNcED ¸y  HUNTER gREEN sTETHOscOpE aROUND ¸y NEck, LETTINg ITs wEIgHT Ta¸E THE INTRacTabLE LapELs aND aLLOwINg THE s¸aLL gOLDEN pIN E¸bOssED wITH THE I¸agE Of a  HEaRT-sHapED  sTETHOscOpE TO bE pROpERLy DIspLayED. °E  pIN, a gIſt fRO¸ THE  ¸EDIcaL scHOOL, sy¸bOLIzED cO¸passION IN ¸EDIcINE. º aDjUsTED ¸y HIjab, a  sI¸pLE  bLack cOTTON  kNIT cLOTH THaT  cOVERED  ¸y HEaD aND  NEck, aND TUckED  sEVERaL sTRay wIsps Of HaIR UNDERNEaTH. BEfORE º LEſt THE ROO¸, º sTOppED fOR  ONE LasT  LOOk IN THE ¸IRROR TO ¸akE  sURE EVERyTHINg was RIgHT. º saw a wO¸aN wHO aT LasT was abLE TO facE THE pUbLIc as bOTH a ¸EDIcaL pROfEssIONaL aND a cO¸¸ITTED MUsLI¸. BUT º wONDERED  wHETHER OTHERs ¸IgHT fiND ¸y appEaRaNcE aN UNaccEpTabLE cONTRaDIcTION. WITHOUT ¸y EVER sayINg a wORD, ¸y wHITE cOaT sTaTEs wHaT º DO, wHILE ¸y  HIjab  sTaTEs wHO º a¸.  ALTHOUgH º  sLIppED INTO  THE wHITE cOaT  EasILy, IT  HaD  TakEN ¸E yEaRs TO wORk Up THE cOURagE TO wEaR a HIjab. ¶URINg ¸y jUNIOR yEaR 

µUsHEEN  A¸EENUDDIN,  “µEcEssaRy  AccEssORIEs,”  fRO¸  What  I  Learned  in  Medical  School: 

Personal  Stories  of  Young  Doctors,  ED.  KEVIN  ¹akakUwa,  µIck  ³UbasHkIN,  aND  KaREN  ÁERzIg  (BERkELEy: ·NIVERsITy Of CaLIfORNIa PREss, 2005), 63–69. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of ·NIVERsITy  Of CaLIfORNIa PREss.

Of HIgH scHOOL, aſtER yEaRs Of waNTINg TO ExpREss ¸y RELIgION ¸ORE  OpENLy, º 

128

waRNED ¸y fRIENDs THaT º was cONTE¸pLaTINg DONNINg a HIjab wHEN º bEca¸E  a sENIOR. WHEN º RETURNED TO scHOOL IN THE faLL wITHOUT IT, a CHRIsTIaN fRIEND 

nidduneemA neehsuN

cHasTIsED ¸E fOR faILINg TO fOLLOw THROUgH wITH ¸y cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO ¸y faITH. FOR THE fiRsT fEw wEEks Of scHOOL THaT faLL, º RETaINED ¸y IDENTITy as a “NOR¸aL” HIgH scHOOL sTUDENT. º fELT UNpREpaRED TO DEaL wITH THE REacTIONs a HIjab  wOULD pROVOkE. SO¸E ¸IgHT sEE IT as INTEREsTINg, EVEN ExOTIc, bUT º kNEw THE  HIjab cONNOTED “fOREIgNNEss.” WEaRINg IT wOULD ¸akE ¸E sTaND OUT as DIffERENT—INTENTIONaLLy DIffERENT fRO¸ THE  REsT Of A¸ERIcaN  sOcIETy. º kNEw  THaT  ONcE º pUT IT ON º cOULD NO LONgER qUIETLy HIDE ºsLa¸ IN ¸y HEaRT aND cHOOsE  TO REVEaL  ¸y faITH ONLy wHEN aND  TO wHO¸ º waNTED. ¹O THE OUTsIDE wORLD,  ºsLa¸ wOULD bEcO¸E THE accEssORy º wORE ON ¸y HEaD, THE fiRsT aND OſtEN THE  ONLy THINg pEOpLE wOULD sEE abOUT ¸E. º fiNaLLy DEcIDED  TO wEaR THE  HIjab aſtER º aTTENDED  aN  ºsLa¸Ic cONVENTION.  °ERE, fOR aN ENTIRE wEEkEND, a¸ONg OTHER MUsLI¸s, º DID NOT NEED TO ExpLaIN  sUcH  THINgs as wHy º wORE LONg sLEEVEs aND sLacks IN THE ¸IDDLE Of sU¸¸ER  (sO THaT  º DID NOT ExpOsE ¸y skIN OR appEaR as a sEx ObjEcT IN pUbLIc) OR wHy  º spENT LUNcH pERIODs IN THE LIbRaRy DURINg THE ¸ONTH Of ³a¸aDaN (as a qUIET  saNcTUaRy,  IT RE¸INDED ¸E  Of ¸y cO¸¸IT¸ENT  TO fasTINg  aND  pRayER). º  DID  NOT  HaVE  TO wORRy  abOUT HOw  TO  INcORpORaTE THE  fiVE DaILy  pRayERs INTO  ¸y  ROUTINE. AT fiRsT, º fELT LIkE a HypOcRITE, pUTTINg ON a HIjab jUsT fOR THE cONVENTION bEcaUsE º kNEw THaT IT wOULD HELp ¸E TO fEEL ¸ORE a paRT Of THE gROUp. µO  ONE wOULD DOUbT ¸y cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO ºsLa¸Ic bELIEfs  aND pRacTIcEs. ºT sTRUck  ¸E THaT THE  wO¸EN aROUND ¸E wORE THEIR  HIjabs sO  cO¸fORTabLy. My  fiRsT  I¸pULsE was TO ask  THE gIRLs ¸y agE If THEy  REaLLy wORE HIjabs IN  pUbLIc aND  HOw THEy DEaLT wITH THE NEgaTIVE REacTIONs. °Is I¸pULsE DIED away as º spENT  ¸ORE TI¸E OpENLy ackNOwLEDgINg ¸y faITH a¸ONg OTHERs wHO DID THE sa¸E.  º NO LONgER fELT LIkE a HypOcRITE OR a cOwaRD. µOw º REsOLVED TO LIVE OpENLy as  a MUsLI¸ aND wEaR ¸y HIjab IN THE LaRgER cO¸¸UNITy. º  RETURNED  TO  scHOOL wEaRINg  ¸y  HIjab  aND  waITED  TO  sEE  wHaT  wOULD  HappEN.  °E  sa¸E CHRIsTIaN  fRIEND wHO  HaD  pREVIOUsLy cHasTIsED  ¸E  NOw  flasHED  ¸E  a  THU¸bs-Up.  ANOTHER  TOLD  ¸E  THaT  sHE  aD¸IRED  ¸E  fOR  gOINg  agaINsT  THE NOR¸.  ±NE fREsH¸aN bOy,  wHO  wORE  a  CONfEDERaTE flag  ON HIs  backpack,  TEasED ¸E,  caLLINg ¸E  a  “sHEET HEaD.” BUT by  THE END  Of THE yEaR,  HE  was  cHaTTINg  wITH  ¸E  abOUT  a  scIENcE  pROjEcT.  SO¸E  pEOpLE  askED  ¸E  abOUT THE HIjab’s sIgNIficaNcE, wHIcH gaVE ¸E THE OppORTUNITy TO sHaRE a paRT  Of  ¸ysELf.  WHaT  cONcERNED ¸E  wERE  THE pEOpLE  wHO DID  NOT  ask  aND  wHO  LIkELy DREw THEIR OwN cONcLUsIONs, accURaTE OR NOT, abOUT ºsLa¸ aND MUsLI¸  wO¸EN.  ´VEN sO, º  REasONED THaT  º  HaD  ¸aDE IT  THROUgH  THE  TOUgHEsT TI¸E 

aND  THaT, bEyOND  HIgH scHOOL, pEOpLE wOULD bE EVEN ¸ORE OpEN, accEpTINg,  aND EDUcaTED.

129

wORDs º HaD REaD IN THE QUR’aN ¸aNy TI¸Es Lay aT THE HEaRT Of wHaT DREw ¸E  TO  ¸EDIcINE: “¹RULy ¸y pRayER  aND  ¸y sERVIcE Of sacRIficE,  ¸y LIfE  aND  ¸y  DEaTH aRE aLL fOR ALLaH, THE CHERIsHER Of THE WORLDs” (QUR’aN 6:162). GROwINg Up, º was INTRODUcED TO ºsLa¸ as a pEacE-LOVINg, sERVIcE-ORIENTED  way  Of LIfE. FOR MUsLI¸s, EVERy  gOOD DEED pERfOR¸ED wITH THE INTENTION Of  pLEasINg GOD Is cONsIDERED wORsHIp, wHETHER IT Is ¸akINg a cHILD s¸ILE, sEEkINg kNOwLEDgE, OR jOININg THE NObLE pROfEssION Of ¸EDIcINE. ´NTERINg ¸EDIcaL scHOOL was ¸y way Of fULfiLLINg ¸y RELIgIOUs DUTy aND ¸akINg ¸y LIfE ON  EaRTH cOUNT. ²IkE RELIgIOUs cLERIcs wHO DEVOTE THEIR LIVEs TO GOD bEcaUsE Of a  caLLINg THEy fEEL DEEp  IN THEIR sOULs, º fELT a pULL TOwaRD ¸EDIcINE aND cOULD  NOT I¸agINE DOINg aNyTHINg ELsE. ºsLa¸ aLsO INflUENcED ¸y caREER pLaNs  bEcaUsE MUsLI¸s (wHO fOLLOw THE  Exa¸pLE Of THE PROpHET MUHa¸¸aD) aRE ExHORTED TO cORREcT INjUsTIcE. ºf wE  caNNOT TakE  acTION, wE ¸UsT OppOsE INjUsTIcE wITH  spEEcH. ºf  spEakINg OUT  Is NOT pOssIbLE, THEN wE ¸UsT fEEL IT IN OUR HEaRTs. º bELIEVED THaT INaDEqUaTE  HEaLTH  caRE was aN  INjUsTIcE THaT º cOULD  HELp TO cORREcT  as a pUbLIc HEaLTH  pHysIcIaN. º was INspIRED by sTORIEs Of ¸y gRaNDfaTHER, wHO pRacTIcED  ¸EDIcINE fOR  DEcaDEs IN MysORE, ºNDIa. MOsT Of HIs paTIENTs HaD LITTLE ¸ONEy, yET HE NEVER  TURNED  aNyONE  away fRO¸ THE  cLINIc  HE  OpERaTED  OUT Of  HIs  HO¸E.  ºNsTEaD,  HE wOULD accEpT THE OccasIONaL LIVE cHIckEN, a pORTION Of RIcE, OR NOTHINg aT  aLL. ºN THE EVENINgs, HE wOULD cHEck ON ¸aNy Of HIs paTIENTs IN THEIR HO¸Es,  OſtEN wITH ¸y faTHER OR ONE Of HIs  fiVE bROTHERs IN TOw. FOR ¸y gRaNDfaTHER,  ¸EDIcINE was a sERVIcE TO ALLaH THaT REqUIRED pERsONaL sacRIficE, aND º waNTED  TO bE LIkE HI¸. º bELIEVED THaT ¸y cO¸¸IT¸ENTs TO ¸EDIcINE aND  TO ºsLa¸ wERE INExTRIcabLy LINkED, bUT º wONDERED wHETHER wEaRINg ¸y HIjab wOULD caUsE OTHERs  IN  THE  ¸EDIcaL  cO¸¸UNITy  TO  sEE  a  cONTRaDIcTION.  ºN  cOLLEgE,  º  HaD  THREE  aDVIsERs, TwO  Of wHO¸ waRNED THaT wEaRINg ¸y HIjab wOULD bE a  pRObLE¸.  °Ey  aRgUED  THaT  gROwINg  Up IN  a  UNIVERsITy  TOwN  HaD  sHELTERED  ¸E  fRO¸  bIgOTRy  aND  THaT cITIzENs IN  sO¸E aREas  Of OUR RURaL sTaTE wERE  UNaccEpTINg  Of  pEOpLE  wHO  DID  NOT  aTTEND  THE  LOcaL  cHURcH.  °Ey  DIscOUNTED  as  NaïVE  ¸y bELIEf THaT as LONg as º was cO¸fORTabLE wITH ¸ysELf, OTHERs wOULD accEpT ¸E  as a pHysIcIaN IN THEIR cO¸¸UNITy. ºN facT, wHEN º was IN ¸EDIcaL scHOOL, ¸y  HIjab DID aT TI¸Es OVERsHaDOw ¸y wHITE cOaT.

seirosseccA  yrasseceN

As º bEca¸E ¸ORE cO¸fORTabLE wEaRINg THE HIjab ON a REgULaR basIs, º aLsO  bEca¸E  INcREasINgLy cO¸¸ITTED TO THE IDEa Of pRacTIcINg ¸EDIcINE. FOR ¸E, 

±NcE, fOR Exa¸pLE, º waLkED INTO aN Exa¸ ROO¸ wITHOUT THE bENEfiT Of aN 

130

INTRODUcTION fRO¸ ¸y sUpERVIsINg pHysIcIaN. WHEN sHE saw ¸E, ¸y paTIENT  sTOppED  IN ¸ID-sENTENcE.  ÁER EyEs  ¸OVED cONspIcUOUsLy fRO¸ ¸y HEaD TO 

nidduneemA neehsuN

¸y fEET aND THEN fixaTED ON ¸y HEaD. SURpRIsED by HER REspONsE, º sTU¸bLED  THROUgH  ¸y  INTRODUcTION  aND  assURED  HER  THaT  º  was, INDEED,  IN  THE  RIgHT  pLacE aND THaT  º wOULD, wITH HER pER¸IssION, bE TakINg HER ¸EDIcaL HIsTORy.  SHE ExcHaNgED a wORRIED LOOk wITH HER HUsbaND, aND ONLy aſtER sEVERaL ¸INUTEs  Of s¸aLL TaLk DID sHE appEaR  TO RELax. SHE  was NOT  THE fiRsT paTIENT, NOR  wOULD sHE bE THE LasT, TO sO ObVIOUsLy ObjEcT TO ¸y appEaRaNcE. º REaLIzED THaT  º wOULD HaVE TO wORk ¸UcH HaRDER THaN ¸y cLass¸aTEs TO pUT ¸y paTIENTs aT  EasE, aND EVEN THEN º ¸IgHT NEVER gaIN THEIR TRUsT. My THIRD aDVIsER, IN cONTRasT, ENcOURagED ¸E TO pURsUE ¸y gOaL Of wORkINg IN a RURaL aREa, wHILE wEaRINg a HIjab. A pOLITIcaL scIENcE pROfEssOR ORIgINaLLy  fRO¸ ºNDIa,  sHE sUggEsTED THaT  º  TRy  TO UsE  ¸y DIffERENcE TO  EsTabLIsH  cONNEcTIONs  wITHIN  THE  cO¸¸UNITy.  ÁER  INsTINcTs  pROVED  accURaTE  IN  ¸y  ExpERIENcE wITH MRs. MayflOwER, a paTIENT º ¸ET wHILE º was aN UNDERgRaDUaTE sTUDENT VOLUNTEERINg aT a ¸EDIcaL cLINIc IN RURaL KaNsas. MRs. MayflOwER ca¸E INTO THE cLINIc aſtER a ¸INOR caR accIDENT. ·NDaUNTED  by  ¸y HIjab, sHE cHaTTED wITH  ¸E abOUT  HOw I¸pORTaNT IT  was TO  HER TO bE  abLE  TO  DRIVE, IN  ORDER TO  ¸aINTaIN HER  INDEpENDENcE aT  THE agE  Of NINETy-  THREE. AT THE END Of HER VIsIT, sHE paTTED ¸E ON THE back aND wIsHED ¸E gOOD  LUck IN ¸y caREER. BEcaUsE Of sUbsEqUENT ¸EDIcaL pRObLE¸s, MRs. MayflOwER ca¸E INTO THE  cLINIc  sEVERaL ¸ORE  TI¸Es OVER THE NExT fEw  wEEks. º LEaRNED THaT  sHE was a  LIfETI¸E  REsIDENT Of THIs  s¸aLL  TOwN. ´VERy  ¸ORNINg, sHE DROVE  HERsELf aND  THREE OTHER ELDERLy LaDIEs TO Mass aND THEN VOLUNTEERED as a DRIVER fOR MEaLs  ON  WHEELs. WHEN THE  DOcTOR aTTE¸pTED  TO DIssUaDE  HER fRO¸ DRIVINg,  sHE  REsIsTED, TELLINg HI¸, “°OsE pEOpLE NEED THEIR ¸EaLs.” º ca¸E TO  THE cLINIc  ONE Day TO fiND THaT  sHE HaD bEEN HOspITaLIzED  wITH  sEVERE INTERNaL bLEEDINg IN HER gasTROINTEsTINaL TRacT. º RUsHED TO HER HOspITaL  ROO¸,  wHERE º  waTcHED fRO¸ a  cORNER as  THE DOcTOR aND  NURsEs wORkED ON  HER. A pRIEsT pERfOR¸ED LasT RITEs wHILE MRs. MayflOwER’s sON sU¸¸ONED THE  REsT Of THE fa¸ILy. º waITED fOR  a bREak  IN THE acTIVITy bEfORE appROacHINg HER bED. º LEaNED  TOwaRD HER aND wHIspERED HER Na¸E. SHE TURNED TOwaRD ¸E aND HER ¸OUTH  OpENED, bUT NO sOUND ca¸E OUT. º s¸ILED aT HER, HOpINg sHE wOULD REspOND,  bUT  HER  HEaD  ROLLED  back  ON  THE  pILLOw  aND  HER  EyEs  cLOsED.  ÁER  sHaLLOw  bREaTHs pRODUcED baRELy a HINT Of sTEa¸ IN HER OxygEN ¸ask. ÁER sHORT wHITE  HaIR was UNkE¸pT. ÁER HEaD TILTED back; HER facE HELD NO TRacE Of ExpREssION. 

SHE RE¸INDED ¸E Of THE OTHER ELDERLy paTIENTs º HaD sEEN IN THE HOspITaL, HO¸OgENEOUs,  Na¸ELEss.  º  was  fRIgHTENED. BUT wHEN  MRs. MayflOwER’s DaUgHTER 

131

aLL abOUT yOU,” sHE saID. STaNDINg IN HER ROO¸ wITH HER fa¸ILy, as º waTcHED wHaT º bELIEVED wERE  HER LasT ¸O¸ENTs, º bEgaN a sILENT pRayER fOR MRs. MayflOwER. º REcITED VERsEs  fRO¸ THE QUR’aN, aND º ¸aDE a sUppLIcaTION, a du’a, askINg GOD fOR HELp. BUT  º LEſt THaT NIgHT ExpEcTINg THaT sHE wOULD pass away by ¸ORNINg. °E NExT Day, HER DOcTOR TOLD ¸E THaT THE bLEEDINg HaD sTOppED aND THaT  MRs. MayflOwER  wOULD LIVE.  º fOUND HER IN HER ROO¸, sITTINg  Up IN bED EaTINg  LUNcH.  ¹RacEs Of DRIED  bLOOD LINED HER  LEſt NOsTRIL, wHERE  a pLasTIc  TUbE  HaD  bEEN  THE  NIgHT  bEfORE.  °E  paLE,  E¸pTy  ExpREssION  sHE  HaD  wORN  THE  pREVIOUs Day was gONE. µOw HER ¸OUTH was sET IN a fiR¸ LINE as sHE assERTED  THaT  THE sURgEON HaD NO RIgHT TO cHaRgE HER fOR pROcEDUREs THaT sHE HaD  NOT  REqUEsTED. SHE HaD NOT LOsT HER sENsE Of HU¸OR. º s¸ILED aND TOOk HER HaND. “YOU gaVE Us qUITE a scaRE,” º TOLD HER. “WELL, º THOUgHT º was gOINg  ON a  TRIp.” SHE paUsED. “YOU pRayED fOR  ¸E,  DIDN’T yOU?” º NODDED. SHE kNEw THaT º HaD RE¸E¸bERED HER aND THaT, DEspITE OUR DIffERENT RELIgIONs, wE TURNED TO THE sa¸E GOD, THE ±NE CREaTOR. SHE bEckONED  ¸E  TO  LEaN IN  cLOsER.  PLacINg  bOTH HaNDs  ON ¸y  facE,  sHE DREw  ¸E  IN  aND  kIssED ¸E ON THE cHEEk. “YOU wILL bE a gOOD DOcTOR,” sHE saID. WEaRINg  a  wHITE  cOaT  pRODUcEs  a  cURIOUs  pHENO¸ENON.  ±THER  pEOpLE  sEE¸  TO REcOgNIzE  ¸E  IN a  DIffERENT  way. AſtER THE  WHITE COaT  CERE¸ONy,  as  º was  gIVINg  ¸y paRENTs a  TOUR  Of  THE ca¸pUs,  a  sENIOR ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENT  DREssED IN gREEN scRUbs saw Us fRO¸ DOwN THE HaLLway. ÁE s¸ILED aT ¸E, aND  HIs  EyEs HELD ¸INE fOR  a fEw ¸O¸ENTs  bEfORE HE  OffERED a NOD Of ackNOwLEDg¸ENT. °E ¸E¸ORy Of HIs gEsTURE sTayED wITH ¸E bEcaUsE º a¸ NOT UsED  TO  HaVINg  pEOpLE accEpT ¸E  sO qUIckLy,  HIjab aND  aLL. My wHITE cOaT aLLOws  ¸E TO bE INsTaNTLy REcOgNIzED as a ¸E¸bER Of ONE Of THE ¸OsT ELITE sOcIETIEs  IN A¸ERIca. º kNOw  THaT THROUgHOUT  ¸y ¸EDIcaL caREER THE sI¸pLE  appROVaL º gET by  wEaRINg ¸y wHITE cOaT wILL cONTRasT wITH REacTIONs TO ¸y HIjab, wHIcH caN bE  DEEpER aND ¸ORE cO¸pLIcaTED, wHETHER THEy aRE pOsITIVE, as wITH MRs. MayflOwER, OR NEgaTIVE, as wITH sO¸E OTHER paTIENTs º’VE sEEN. AND ¸aybE THIs Is  HOw IT sHOULD bE, bEcaUsE wHILE THE wHITE cOaT Is jUsT ¸y UNIfOR¸, THE HIjab  REpREsENTs ¸y UNDERLyINg REasONs fOR pUTTINg IT ON.

seirosseccA  yrasseceN

aRRIVED, sHE gREETED ¸E  waR¸Ly, THOUgH wE  HaD NEVER ¸ET. “MOTHER TOLD Us 

´he CR±T±cAl  µocAT±on  of The EssAy Barry F. Saunders

WHy sHOULD sTUDENTs Of ¸EDIcINE wRITE Essays? °Is  Is a  gOOD  qUEsTION—aND  IT  bEcO¸Es ¸ORE  URgENT  as  Essays  sERVE  ExpaNDINg ROLEs IN ¸EDIcaL “pROfEssIONaLIs¸” cURRIcULa. PROfEssIONaLIs¸ TENDs  TO  E¸pHasIzE  sTUDENTs’  pROpER  bEHaVIOR  aND  pHasED  accO¸¸ODaTION  TO  cLIENT-sERVIcE REspONsIbILITIEs. ºN sO¸E ¸EDIcaL scHOOLs,  sTUDENTs aRE bEINg  askED  TO  DOcU¸ENT  THEIR  NOR¸aTIVE  DEVELOp¸ENT  IN  pORTfOLIOs Of  “Essays”  REVIEwED by facULTy. ´ssayINg Is  ¸ORE  THaN  wRITINg  NONficTION  wITHIN  paRTIcULaR  LENgTH  paRa¸ETERs. FOR MONTaIgNE, sIxTEENTH-cENTURy ORIgINaTOR Of THE gENRE, THE Essay  Is  abOUT  TRyINg, fRO¸  essayer—cOgNaTE  wITH assay—sO aLsO, wEIgHINg, TEsTINg,  bEINg  pUT TO  TEsTs. MEDIcaL sTUDENTs  aRE fa¸ILIaR  wITH TEsTs, bUT LaRgELy  as ¸EaNs  TO aN END: kNOwLEDgE, OR “cO¸pETENcE.” ´ssays, aT THEIR bEsT, aRE  abOUT sO¸ETHINg ELsE. ´ssays THaT ENTIcED ¸E INTO ¸EDIcINE INcLUDED pHysIcIaN ²EwIs °O¸as’s,  fRO¸ THE  New  England Journal of Medicine , cOLLEcTED  IN  °e Lives  of a Cell .  °ERE was a ¸E¸ORabLE ¸EDITaTION ON ENDOsy¸bIOsIs: °O¸as fRETTED THaT  HIs  ¸ITOcHONDRIa  wERE  aLIEN LIfE  fOR¸s,  aND  THaT  THEy ¸IgHT  bE  RUNNINg  THE  sHOw— his sHOw.  STRaNgERs,  cO¸pRIsINg  ¸aybE  HaLf  HIs  DRy  wEIgHT,  ¸OckINg HIs pREsU¸pTION Of sELf-IDENTITy—“OpERaTINg a cO¸pLEx sysTE¸ Of  NUcLEI, ¸IcROTUbULEs, aND NEURONs fOR THE pLEasURE aND sUsTENaNcE Of THEIR  fa¸ILIEs,  aND  RUNNINg,  aT  THE  ¸O¸ENT,  a  TypEwRITER.”à WHaT  a  ¸aRVELOUs  INVERsION Of aNTHROpOcENTRIs¸—aND Of cO¸pETENcE! MONTaIgNE’s Essays wERE wRITTEN IN THE fiRsT pERsON, aLways ENfOLDINg pERsONaL  ExpERIENcE—DIsTINgUIsHINg  THE  Essay  gENRE  fRO¸  THE  “cO¸pENDIU¸  Of aDagEs.” Ä °Ey wERE wRITTEN IN FRENcH RaTHER THaN ²aTIN, REacHINg acROss  cLass  HIERaRcHIEs.  °EIR  cO¸pOsITION  was  UNsysTE¸aTIc.  °Ey  ENDORsED 

BaRRy F. SaUNDERs, “°E CRITIcaL ÂOcaTION Of THE ´ssay—´VEN IN PROfEssIONaL ¶EVELOp¸ENT,” fRO¸ 

Atrium: °e Report of the Northwestern Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program 11 (2013): 1–4.  ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of THE pUbLIsHER.

INqUIRy  OVER kNOwINg.  AND  THEy wERE  cONsTaNTLy  UNDER  REVIsION.  ³EVIsION  aND  cHaNgE  wERE  paRT  Of  MONTaIgNE’s  cONcEpT  Of  sELf:  TO  Essay  was  TO  TEsT 

133

¸ERELy sELf:  THE Essay sTagED a conversation —wITH a  RaNgE Of cLassIcaL INTERLOcUTORs  ON HIs  LIbRaRy sHELVEs,  EspEcIaLLy  THE STOIcs,  wITH HIs  LOsT  fRIEND La  BOETIE, wITH DEaTH. MONTaIgNE’s  LOw  OpINION  Of  pHysIcIaNs—“THEIR  DOg¸as aND  ¸agIsTERIaL  fROwNs” Æ—Is fa¸OUs. MEDIcaL sTUDENTs ¸ay RaTIONaLIzE THIs as a  fUNcTION Of  THE  saD sTaTE  Of ¸EDIcaL kNOwLEDgE IN  THE EaRLy ¸ODERN  pERIOD, bUT wE  DO  wELL TO cONsIDER HIs INDIcT¸ENTs Of THERapEUTIc pREsU¸pTION aND IaTROgENIc  ILLNEss  IN  OUR  HIsTORIcaL  ¸O¸ENT  as  wELL.  MONTaIgNE  was  DEEpLy  skEpTIcaL  abOUT THERapEUTIc INTERVENTION wRIT LaRgE, abOUT ITs INEVITabLE INTERfERENcE IN  ExpERIENcEs  Of cHaNgE,  sUffERINg,  aND DyINg.  “¹O pHILOsOpHIzE,”  MONTaIgNE  ObsERVED  (aſtER CIcERO aND SOcRaTEs),  “Is TO LEaRN  TO DIE.” Î BUT bOTH aRE DIfficULT cO¸¸IT¸ENTs TO INcORpORaTE INTO TODay’s pOTENT INsTITUTIONaL ETHOs Of:  NOT  ON  my sHIſt!  ºN  aNy  casE, THE  bIRTH Of  THE  Essay  I¸pLIcaTEs  sO¸E Of  THE  ¸OsT pOTENT cRITIqUE Of THE ¸EDIcaL ENTERpRIsE EVER wRITTEN. SINcE MONTaIgNE, THROUgHOUT ¸ODERNITy, THE Essay Has RENOUNcED sTRaITs  aND RIgORs Of DIscIpLINaRy gENREs—EscHEwINg sysTE¸aTIcITy, OR pRETENsIONs TO  cU¸ULaTIVE  cERTaINTy.Ï °E  Essay’s THINkINg E¸ERgEs fRO¸ paRTIcULaRs RaTHER  THaN gENERaLITIEs.Ð µOR Is THERE NEcEssaRILy a NaRRaTIVE aRc OR telos: as cULTURaL  cRITIc  °EODOR  ADORNO NOTED,  IN  THE  “fORcE  fiELD”  Of  THE  Essay,  “[T]HROUgH  THEIR OwN ¸OVE¸ENT THE ELE¸ENTs cRysTaLLIzE INTO a cONfigURaTION.”Ñ ²ITERaRy  HIsTORIaN GEORg ²Ukács  caLLED THE Essay  “TOO . . . INDEpENDENT fOR DEDIcaTED  sERVIcE.”Ò ADORNO was ¸ORE E¸pHaTIc: “THE Law Of THE INNER¸OsT fOR¸ Of THE  Essay  Is  heresy.  By  [ITs] TRaNsgREssINg  THE ORTHODOxy Of THOUgHT, sO¸ETHINg  bEcO¸Es VIsIbLE IN THE ObjEcT wHIcH IT Is ORTHODOxy’s sEcRET pURpOsE TO kEEp  INVIsIbLE.” × °E  “fOR¸” Of THE  Essay  fOR ADORNO Is  aN UNExpEcTED  cONsTELLaTION a¸ONg ObjEcTs aND cONcEpTs THaT EscapEs pROTOcOL, REsIsTs DOg¸a, DRaws  back VEILs ON REcEIVED wIsDO¸. WHy  sHOULD  THE  Essay’s  REsIsTaNcE  TO  pROTOcOL  bE  Of  cONcERN  fOR  TRaINERs OR TRaINEEs IN ¸EDIcINE? °E HOspITaL, sEaT Of sO ¸UcH ¸EDIcaL TRaININg,  Is  NOT  ¸ERELy a pLacE wITH a  fEw pROTOcOLs.  ºN sOcIOLOgIsT ´RVINg  GOff¸aN’s  cO¸paRaTIVE  aNaLysIs,  HOspITaLs  aRE—aLONg  wITH  pRIsONs,  ¸ONasTERIEs, aND  bOOTca¸ps—ExE¸pLaRs  Of “TOTaL INsTITUTIONs.”ÃØ WHEN GOff¸aN cOINED THIs  TER¸ IN  THE 1950s, TOTaL REsONaTED wITH “TOTaLITaRIaN.”  ¹OTaL INsTITUTIONs DIcTaTE ways Of THINkINg aND  bEHaVINg: aLL INHabITaNTs HaVE assIgNED ROLEs, aND  aLL  THEIR  NEEDs  aRE  sUppLIED.  MEDIcaL pROfEssIONaLs  aND  TRaINEEs  aRE a¸ONg  THEsE INHabITaNTs.  “ºN ¸OsT TOTaL INsTITUTIONs . . . ¸OsT IN¸aTEs TakE THE Tack 

y a s s E   e h t  f o   n o i t a c o V  l a c i t i r C   e h T

HI¸sELf, ENgagE IN DIaLOgUE wITH HI¸sELf, ENcOUNTER HI¸sELf  in flux. AND NOT 

Of  wHaT  THEy  caLL  pLayINg  IT  cOOL.  °Is  INVOLVEs  a  sO¸EwHaT  OppORTUNIsTIc 

134

cO¸bINaTION Of sEcONDaRy aDjUsT¸ENTs, cONVERsION, cOLONIzaTION aND LOyaLTy  TO THE IN¸aTE gROUp,  sO THaT . . . THE IN¸aTE wILL HaVE a  ¸axI¸U¸ cHaNcE  Of 

s r e d n u a S  .F   y r r a B

EVENTUaLLy gETTINg OUT pHysIcaLLy aND psycHIcaLLy UNDa¸agED.” ÃÃ FORTUNaTELy, GOff¸aN aRTIcULaTED  (ELsEwHERE) aNOTHER  capacITy fOR  INDIVIDUaLs fUNcTIONINg IN ORgaNIzaTIONs: “ROLE  DIsTaNcE.” °Is Na¸Es THE abILITy  wE  aLL HaVE TO REsIsT bEINg fULLy cO-OpTED by OUR ROLEs. ³OLE DIsTaNcE Is wHaT  aN EIgHT-yEaR-OLD DIscOVERs ON THE ¸ERRy-gO-ROUND wHEN sHE affEcTs sTaNDOffisHNEss  abOUT HER RIDE,  fEELINg a LITTLE TOO OLD TO  be a  pRINcEss cLINgINg TO  HER LOyaL  HORsE IN qUITE  THE ENTHUsIasTIc way  a fOUR-yEaR-OLD DOEs. ºN  GOff¸aN’s TER¸s,  TO ExERcIsE ROLE DIsTaNcE, aT wHaTEVER sTagE IN LIfE, Is TO LOOk  aT  ONE’s assIgNED ROLE cRITIcaLLy, skEpTIcaLLy. ´VEN, fOR a ¸O¸ENT,  with disdain.ÃÄ SO ROLE DIsTaNcINg Is  a REflExIVE ExERcIsE, a fOR¸ Of sELf-Exa¸INaTION aND  REsIsTaNcE.  ¹O  THINk  cRITIcaLLy  abOUT ONE’s  ROLE DOEs  NOT REqUIRE  aTTRIbUTION  Of  ¸aLEVOLENcE TO  THE pOwERs REsIsTED—THOUgH  THaT caN  bE HELpfUL IN  TOTaL  INsTITUTIONs. ºT caN sI¸pLy bE a HEURIsTIc DEVIcE, a cLaI¸INg Of flExIbILITy aND  I¸agINaTIVE fREEDO¸. °ERE Is NO INDEx OR ¸ETRIc Of cO-OpTaTION THaT caLLs IT Up.  CLaI¸INg  sUcH DIsTaNcE ¸IgHT  HINgE ON  sENsINg a  kIND  Of DaNgER—pERHaps  EspEcIaLLy THE DaNgER Of ENTHUsIas¸s Of cONVIcTION. °INkINg  cRITIcaLLy:  wHaT  DOEs  THIs  REaLLy  ¸EaN?  POLITIcaL  pHILOsOpHER  JUDITH BUTLER Has wRITTEN a LOVELy Essay ON cRITIqUE, TRacINg sO¸E Of ITs cONcEpTUaL  gENEaLOgIEs.  BUTLER  cITEs  cULTURaL  HIsTORIaN  ³ay¸OND  WILLIa¸s  TO  cLaRIfy THaT cRITIqUE  Is NOT, as Is  pOpULaRLy assU¸ED, ¸ERE faULT-fiNDINg, aND  NOT a swIſt RUsH TO jUDg¸ENT: RaTHER, IT ENTaILs sUspENsION Of jUDg¸ENT.ÃÆ SHE  cITEs ADORNO IN cLaRIfyINg THaT cRITIqUE Is a ¸ODE Of ENgagE¸ENT wITH partic-

ulars—sO, aLways sITUaTED, NEVER aN absTRacT pOsITION. CRITIqUE Is a  practice.  YET as pRacTIcE, cRITIqUE Is  NOT fOcUsED sOLELy ON THE ObjEcT Of cRITIcIs¸ (NOR  ¸ERE ExHIbITION Of THE cRITIc’s ExpERTIsE). FOR BUTLER, cRITIqUE Is, aT ITs cORE, a  qUEsTIONINg Of THE VERy caTEgORIEs THaT ENabLE ITs OwN pRacTIcE.ÃÎ °Is  bRINgs  BUTLER  TO  a  REpRIsE  Of  pHILOsOpHER  MIcHEL  FOUcaULT’s  Essay  “WHaT ºs CRITIqUE?,” aND wHaT HE REfERs TO as “cRITIcaL aTTITUDE.” °ERE aRE TwO  fEaTUREs Of THIs cRITIcaL aTTITUDE TO ¸ENTION HERE. ±NE Is ITs RELaTION TO ¸ODaLITIEs  Of  government:  cRITIcaL aTTITUDE  Na¸Es a  DIspOsITION  TO ask  “HOw  not TO  bE  gOVERNED”—NOT  TO  bE  aN aNaRcHIsT,  TO  RENDER  ONEsELf  RaDIcaLLy  UNgOVERNabLE,  bUT  TO  ask  a  ¸ORE  sITUaTED  aND  ENgagED  qUEsTION:  “ÁOw  NOT  TO  bE  gOVERNED  like  that,  by  THaT, IN  THE Na¸E Of  THOsE pRINcIpLEs,  wITH sUcH  aND sUcH aN ObjEcTIVE IN  ¸IND aND by  ¸EaNs Of sUcH pROcEDUREs,  NOT LIkE  THaT, NOT fOR THaT, NOT by THE¸.” ÃÏ °E sEcOND fEaTURE Is FOUcaULT’s assI¸ILaTION  Of  THIs  cRITIcaL  aTTITUDE  TO  virtue.  °Is  Is sO¸ETHINg  Of  aN  ENIg¸aTIc 

cLaI¸.  FOUcaULT  LINks  THIs  VIRTUE  TO  ¸ODaLITIEs  Of  sELf-kNOwINg  aND  sELf-  sTyLINg  EspEcIaLLy appaRENT  IN ³EfOR¸aTION  REsIsTaNcEs  TO  CHURcHLy DOg¸a 

135

gIVEs HI¸sELf THE RIgHT TO qUEsTION TRUTH ON ITs EffEcTs Of pOwER aND TO qUEsTION pOwER ON ITs DIscOURsEs Of TRUTH.”ÃÐ FOUcaULT aLsO LINks THIs VIRTUE TO THE 

courage figURED IN THE ´NLIgHTEN¸ENT ¸OTTO Of pHILOsOpHER º¸¸aNUEL KaNT,  “DaRE TO kNOw”—wHIcH ENTaILED INqUIRy INTO THE cONDITIONs Of kNOwINg, THE  LI¸ITs Of kNOwINg. ºN THE kNOwLEDgE REgI¸Es Of ¸EDIcINE, sUcH INqUIRy TakEs  cOURagE INDEED! FOUcaULT’s  Essay  ON  cRITIqUE  REflEcTED  ON  KaNT’s  fa¸OUs  Essay  “WHaT  ºs  ´NLIgHTEN¸ENT?” ÃÑ ´NLIgHTEN¸ENT Is, IN KaNT’s fOR¸ULaTION, a pEOpLE’s EscapE  fRO¸  TUTELagE  TOwaRD  fREE ExERcIsE  Of  REasON. °Is  was a¸ONg  OTHER  THINgs  a  cLaI¸  abOUT  LITERaTE pERsONs’  pRIVILEgE,  aND REspONsIbILITy,  TO THINk  IN  pUbLIc.  °E  fUNcTIONaRy  THINkINg  ON  bEHaLf  Of  aN  E¸pLOyER  OR  aD¸INIsTRaTOR  Is  ENgagED  IN a  “pRIVaTE” UsE Of REasON, aND  THEREIN ObLIgED TO ObEy THE RULEs.  BUT IN OUR “scHOLaRLy” VOcaTION—as wRITERs aDDREssINg a cOs¸OpOLITaN REaDERsHIp IN jOURNaLIsTIc wRITINg OR IN acaDE¸Ic jOURNaLs—wE ¸ay ENgagE IN pUbLIc  ExERcIsE  Of  REasON,  wHIcH  ¸UsT  bE  fREE  TO  qUEsTION,  TO  ObjEcT,  TO  pROpOsE  I¸pROVE¸ENTs. ÃÒ ±f NOTE, fOR KaNT, “pUbLIc” DID NOT I¸pLy THE sTaTE. °E sTaTE  Is  ONE Of THE  sOVEREIgN pOwERs THaT  pROVIDE pEOpLE wITH OfficEs aND OfficIaL  DUTIEs.  ºN THE ·NIVERsITy Of KaNT’s Day, THE “HIgHER” FacULTIEs—Of ¸EDIcINE,  Law, aND THEOLOgy—wERE cONsTRaINED IN THEIR  ExERcIsE Of REasON by agENDas  Of sTaTE, ¸ONaRcH, aND cHURcH. ±NLy THE “LOwER,” “pHILOsOpHIcaL” FacULTy was  IN  KaNT’s  VIEw abLE  TO ExERcIsE  fREEDO¸  Of  THOUgHT, TO  THINk  IN  aND  wITH a 

public —INDEED,  sO¸ETI¸Es  abOUT  HOw  NOT  TO  bE  gOVERNED—UNfETTERED  by  ExTERNaL aUTHORITIEs aND by THE ENTIcE¸ENTs Of THOUgHT’s pRIVaTE UsEs.Ã× MEDIcINE TODay RE¸aINs aN INsTITUTION Of TUTELagE, bOUND TO INsTRU¸ENTaL  UTILITIEs Of THE sTaTE, DEEpLy INfOR¸ED by DOg¸as aND by pRIEsTLy aUTHORITy. SO  HOw caN ¸EDIcaL TRaININg cO¸pORT wITH KaNT’s sENsE Of pUbLIc fREEDO¸? °Is  Is  DIfficULT. ¶OcTORs, LIkE  aLL pROfEssIONaLs, aRE gRaNTED ¸ONOpOLy  OVER THEIR  LEaRNED pRacTIcE by THE sTaTE, ON cONDITION THaT THEy sERVE sOcIaL gOODs. PHysIcIaNs aND pHysIcIaN-scIENTIsTs sEEk, INDEED cO¸pETE fOR, sTaTE aND pRINcELy  fUNDINg. ´NTIcE¸ENTs aND fETTERs THaT  caN EasILy pRIVaTIzE,  IN THE KaNTIaN  sENsE, THE cRITIcaL ExERcIsE Of REasON. FOUcaULT’s  E¸pHasIs  ON  qUEsTIONINg  THE  cONDITIONs  Of  OUR  kNOwINg  EcHOEs  KaNT  bUT Is  aLsO  aNI¸aTED  by  THE  RaTHER  ¸ORE  µIETzscHEaN  pROjEcT  Of DaRINg TO kNOw OTHERwIsE. °ERE Is a RaDIcaL E¸bRacE Of UNcERTaINTy aND  Of  E¸ERgENcE  HERE.  ÁOw  TO  pUT  THIs  INTO  pRacTIcE  IN  THE  pOwERfUL  kNOwLEDgE REgI¸Es Of ¸EDIcINE aND ¸EDIcaL TRaININg? °Is RETURNs Us TO EssayINg. 

y a s s E   e h t  f o   n o i t a c o V  l a c i t i r C   e h T

aND  ¸ONasTIc  DIscIpLINE.  “CRITIqUE  Is  THE  ¸OVE¸ENT  by  wHIcH THE  sUbjEcT 

´ssayINg  Is a  fa¸ILIaR  pRacTIcE IN HU¸aNITIEs,  IN qUaLITaTIVE  sOcIaL scIENcEs, 

136

IN  “HU¸aN  scIENcEs.”  YET  HOw  DOEs  THE  Essay  fiT  INTO  TEacHINg  agENDas  IN  ¸EDIcaL  scHOOLs, INTO TRaININg  REgI¸Es sEEkINg cO¸pLIaNcE wITH  NOR¸s Of 

s r e d n u a S  .F   y r r a B

bEHaVIOR aND cO¸pETENcE? CaN EssayINg IN ¸EDIcaL TRaININg bE a VEHIcLE fOR,  OR ExTENsION Of, ExpERIENcEs Of ROLE DIsTaNcE? FORTUITOUsLy,  ONE Of  THE  “cO¸pETENcIEs”  ¸EDIcaL  scHOOLs  HaVE  bEgUN  TO  sEEk  Is “cRITIcaL THINkINg.” YET THERE  IsN’T ¸UcH agREE¸ENT abOUT wHaT THIs  ¸EaNs.  SO¸E Of  IT Is  abOUT skILLs  Of  EVIDENcE-basED pRacTIcE—¸asTERy  Of  pROTOcOLs fOR DIsTINgUIsHINg gOOD fRO¸ baD EVIDENcE. ¹OO LITTLE Of IT Is abOUT  qUEsTIONINg  HOw EVIDENcE aND kNOwLEDgE aRE HIsTORIcaLLy cONDITIONED, NETwORkED,  aND  pRODUcED  IN  agONIsTIc  fiELDs—“qUEsTIONINg  Of  pOwER  ON  ITs  DIscOURsEs Of  TRUTH.”  AND THERE  Is EVEN  LEss agREE¸ENT  abOUT HOw cRITIcaL  THINkINg sHOULD bE TaUgHT. PERspEcTIVEs aND ¸ETHODs fRO¸ HU¸aNITIEs aND  sOcIaL scIENcE DIscIpLINEs—KaNT’s “LOwER” FacULTIEs—sEE¸ NEcEssaRy. FORTUNaTELy, THEy DO fiND sERVIcE IN ¸aNy ¸EDIcaL scHOOLs. ÂaRIOUs  cOLLEagUEs  aND  º  sO¸ETI¸Es  cONDUcT  sE¸INaRs  wITH  ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs  TOgETHER wITH gRaDUaTE  sTUDENTs fRO¸  OTHER DIscIpLINEs.  m¼2s  aND  gRaDUaTE sTUDENTs fRO¸ fiELDs sUcH as LITERaTURE, aNTHROpOLOgy, aND RELIgIOUs  sTUDIEs,  aND  OccasIONaLLy  EVEN  OTHER  pROfEssIONaL  scHOOLs  (Law,  EDUcaTION,  sOcIaL  wORk), gaTHER aT THE sa¸E TabLE fOR  a sE¸EsTER.  AspIRaNTs TO “HIgHER”  FacULTIEs aLONgsIDE THOsE TO “LOwER.” °EsE sE¸INaRs aRE cHaLLENgINg, bUT THEy  OſtEN  gO  RE¸aRkabLy  wELL aND  aRE  THE ¸OsT  fUN  º  HaVE  as a  TEacHER.  ¹O fiND  sHaRabLE  LaNgUagE—cRUcIaL  fOR  a  REaDINg  “pUbLIc”—sTUDENTs  ¸UsT  ExpLaIN  LONg  wORDs  aND  spEcIaL  cONcEpTs  TO  EacH  OTHER.  ¶IscUssIONs  bEaR  a  ¸Ix  Of  skEpTIcIs¸s, pRag¸aTIs¸s, DIscIpLINaRy fRIcTIONs, aND TRaNsLaTIONs. °E REaDINgs cOLLaTED IN a syLLabUs aRE,  aT THE OUTsET Of a sE¸INaR, a kIND Of cONNEcT-  THE-DOT  pUzzLE  wHOsE  cONTOURs  ONLy  bEcO¸E  cLEaR  IN  THE fORcE-fiELD  Of  THE  cROss-DIscIpLINaRy sE¸INaR TabLE. ²IkE aN Essay. ºN  THEsE  aND  ¸OsT  OTHER  HU¸aNITIEs  aND  sOcIaL  scIENcE  cLassEs  IN  OUR  ¸EDIcaL  scHOOL—aND IN ¸aNy ¸EDIcaL  scHOOLs—sTUDENTs aLsO wRITE Essays.  µOT TREaTIsEs, NOT LIsTs, NOT TRUE/faLsE cHOIcEs, NOT caUsaL cHaINs, NOT TabLEs Of  sTaTIsTIcaL cORRELaTION: Essays. ApaRT fRO¸ THINkINg OUT LOUD IN cONVERsaTION,  Essays  ¸ay  bE  THE bEsT  way  fOR sTUDENTs  TO  DE¸ONsTRaTE THEIR  capacITIEs TO  cO¸bINE  aND cO¸paRE  cONcEpTs, TO wEIgH sOURcEs IN  TER¸s Of  gENRE,  RIgOR,  aND  pERsUasIVENEss; TO gENERaTE  INTERpRETaTIONs, fRIcTIONs, aND syNTHEsEs; TO  RELaTE  paRTIcULaRs  TO  gENERaLITIEs;  TO  E¸bRacE UNcERTaINTy; TO  qUaLIfy  agREE¸ENT OR DIsagREE¸ENT; TO THINk REflExIVELy. FacULTy ¸E¸bERs wHO REaD THEsE  Essays  aRE  LIsTENINg  HaRD  fOR  fOR¸s  Of  cRITIcaL  ENgagE¸ENT.  SO¸E  sTUDENTs  HaTE wRITINg  Essays, Of  cOURsE. SO¸E sTUDENTs  yEaRN fOR THE  cO¸fORTs Of  a 

¸ULTIpLE-cHOIcE Exa¸—IN  sERVIcE Of pOsITIVE kNOwLEDgE.  SO¸E DE¸aND  TO  kNOw jUsT HOw EssayINg wILL ¸akE THE¸ bETTER DOcTORs.

137

caL sTUDENTs. °Is Is HappENINg aT ¸aNy INsTITUTIONs. SHORT Essay assIgN¸ENTs  cROp  Up  IN  cLERksHIps,  UNDER  THE  sIgN  Of  “pROfEssIONaLIs¸”  EspEcIaLLy—a  qUaLITy  THaT  cLERksHIp  DIREcTORs  aRE  aT  paINs  TO  DE¸ONsTRaTE  THaT  THEy  caN  bOTH TEacH aND EVaLUaTE. ºN sO¸E pLacEs THEsE “Essays” aRE as bRIEf as a cOUpLE  Of paRagRapHs—a NapkIN-scRawL. AND ¸aNy aRE REaD RaTHER gLaNcINgLy, pERfUNcTORILy:  HOw ¸aNy  cLINIcaL facULTy  ¸E¸bERs aRE  TRaINED TO REaD  sTUDENT  wRITINg  cLOsELy aND  pROVIDE sUbsTaNTIVE cO¸¸ENTaRy? SO¸E  Of THEsE Essays  wIND  Up  fOLDED  INTO  pROfEssIONaLIs¸  pORTfOLIOs,  as  ¸aRkERs  Of  NOR¸aTIVE  pROfEssIONaL  DEVELOp¸ENT. ºT  Is HaRD TO I¸agINE THEsE  cONDITIONs aRE LIkELy  TO fOsTER  THE fREEDO¸s THaT  aRE THE Essay’s  HIsTORIcaL pROVINcE. ´ssays Of pROfEssIONaL  DEVELOp¸ENT  aRE  aT  HIgH RIsk  Of bEINg  pREssED  INTO  THE  sERVIcE  Of  “pRIVaTE”  THINkINg,  UNDER THE  REsTRIcTED TUTELagE  Of THE  “HIgHER” FacULTy  Of  ¸EDIcINE aND ITs EVaLUaTION-bUREaUcRacy—NOT THE fOsTERINg Of ROLE DIsTaNcE,  NOT cONTRIbUTIONs TO a ¸ORE cOs¸OpOLITaN aND “pUbLIc” spHERE Of cRITIqUE. ºf ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs aRE TO LEaRN TO THINk cRITIcaLLy—aND “pROfEssIONaLIs¸”  TO INcLUDE THE sENsE Of aN Exa¸INED LIfE—wE ¸ay NEED TO RETURN TO EssayINg  IN  THE  sHaDOw  Of MONTaIgNE’s  sUspIcIONs Of  pROfEssIONaL  aUTHORITy  aND  HIs  DIscOVERy Of sELàOOD IN wIDER cONVERsaTION. ÁOw caN ¸EDIcaL TRaINEEs fEEL  sUppORTED  IN  ExpREssINg  cONcERNs  abOUT  THE  pROfEssION  ITsELf,  THE  cULTUREs  IN wHIcH IT OpERaTEs, OR THE pOwERs, LI¸ITs, aND RIsks Of ITs ways Of kNOwINg?  SO¸E ¸EDIcaL scHOOLs HaVE cLOsE RELaTIONs wITH THEIR paRENT UNIVERsITIEs: pERHaps wE caN ¸akE bETTER UsE Of THEsE.ÄØ PERHaps wE cOULD  REcRUIT REaDERs Of  “pROfEssIONaLIs¸” Essays fRO¸ OTHER, NON-¸EDIcaL DIscIpLINEs—OR EVEN fRO¸  ¸EDIcINE’s  cLIENTELE, ITs LaITy. PERHaps  wE cOULD  ExpaND THE  TRaININg OffERED  IN sO¸E pLacEs TO THEsE Essays’ ¸ORE ¸EDIcaLIzED REaDERs.Äà PERHaps wE cOULD  DEVELOp OUR facULTIEs’ capacITIEs TO TEacH HOw wE kNOw, HOw aT TI¸Es wE UN-  kNOw,  aND HOw NEw kNOwLEDgE aND NEw ¸asTERy pRODUcE NEw UNcERTaINTy.  ºN aNy casE, REaDERs Of Essays Of pROfEssIONaL DEVELOp¸ENT NEED TO bE abLE TO  pUT pROfEssIONaL NOR¸s aND pROpRIETIEs IN bRackETs OccasIONaLLy—TO bEcO¸E  cONNOIssEURs  Of  sassINEss,  INsUbORDINaTION,  aND  VaRIOUs  OTHER  pRIsINgs  Of  ROLE DIsTaNcE THaT sTUDENT Essays ¸IgHT aRTIcULaTE. ºf sTUDENT wRITINgs wITHIN  a NOR¸aTIVE pROcEss Of pROfEssIONaLIzaTION aRE TO caLL THE¸sELVEs Essays, THEy  sHOULD bE aLLOwED aND ENcOURagED TO ¸akE baLky gEsTUREs, TO bE ¸EaNDERINg,  INTERRUpTIVE . . . TO  bE  REVIsED . . . aND  TO  I¸agINE,  If  NOT  TO  fiND, REaDERsHIps  OUTsIDE THE gUILD—IN a public spacE.

y a s s E   e h t  f o   n o i t a c o V  l a c i t i r C   e h T

As If  IN  aNswER  TO  THIs  LasT  qUEsTION,  LaTELy  aDDITIONaL “REflEcTIVE  Essay”  assIgN¸ENTs HaVE ¸ULTIpLIED wITHIN THE cLINIcaL TRaININg Of THEsE sa¸E ¸EDI-

°E VOcaTION Of THE Essay is cRITIqUE. FREEDO¸ fRO¸ TUTELagE. ´¸ERgENcE, 

138

NOT ¸asTERy, EVEN fOR pROfEssIONaLs IN THE ¸akINg. ÁEREsy.

s r e d n u a S  .F   y r r a B

a¾knoWLeDGment ADapTED fRO¸ aN  Essay pUbLIsHED IN Atrium (µORTHwEsTERN MEDIcaL ÁU¸aNITIEs aND BIOETHIcs PROgRa¸), ºssUE 11 (WINTER 2013)—a fEsTscHRIſt cOLLEcTION fOR KaTHRyN MONTgO¸ERy—  aND  a  LEcTURE gIVEN  aT  THE  4TH µaTIONaL CONfERENcE  fOR PHysIcIaN-ScHOLaRs  IN THE  SOcIaL  ScIENcEs  Í  ÁU¸aNITIEs  (CHIcagO,  ApRIL 2011):  “´ssayINg CRITIqUE  IN  a ¹OTaL  ºNsTITUTION.”  ºNDEbTED TO cONVERsaTIONs wITH ³UEL ¹ysON.

notes 1  ²EwIs  °O¸as,  “±RgaNELLEs as  ±RgaNIs¸s,” IN  °e  Lives  of a Cell (µEw  YORk: ÂIkINg  PREss, 1974), 72. 2  GRaHa¸ GOOD,  “°E ´ssay as  GENRE,”  IN  °e  Observing Self: Rediscovering the Essay (²ONDON: ³OUTLEDgE, 1988), 1–3. 3  MIcHEL  DE  MONTaIgNE, “±f  ´xpERIENcE,” IN  °e  Complete  Essays of Montaigne,  TRaNs.  ¶ONaLD FRa¸E (STaNfORD: STaNfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1958), 835. 4  MIcHEL  DE  MONTaIgNE,  “°aT  TO  PHILOsOpHIzE  ºs  TO  ²EaRN  TO  ¶IE,”  IN  °e  Complete 

Essays of Montaigne, 56–67. 5  GOOD, “°E ´ssay as GENRE,” 4–6. 6  ³. ²aNE KaUff¸aN, “°E SkEwED PaTH: ´ssayINg as ·N-METHODIcaL METHOD,” Diogenes 36 (1988). 7  ¹. W. ADORNO, “°E ´ssay as FOR¸,” TRaNs. BOb ÁULLOT-KENTOR aND FREDERIc WILL, New 

German Critique 32 (SpRINg–SU¸¸ER 1984): 151–171. 8  GEORg ²Ukács, “±N THE µaTURE aND FOR¸ Of THE ´ssay: A ²ETTER TO ²EO POppER,” IN Soul 

and Form, TRaNs. ANNa BOsTOck (Ca¸bRIDgE, MA: mit PREss, 1974), 15. 9  ADORNO, “°E ´ssay as FOR¸” (¸y E¸pHasIs). 10  ´RVINg GOff¸aN, “±N THE CHaRacTERIsTIcs Of ¹OTaL ºNsTITUTIONs,” IN  Asylums: Essays on 

the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates (GaRDEN CITy, µY: ANcHOR  BOOks, 1961), 1–124. 11  GOff¸aN, “¹OTaL ºNsTITUTIONs,” 64–65. 12  ´RVINg GOff¸aN, “³OLE ¶IsTaNcE,” IN Encounters: Two Studies in the Sociology of Inter-

action (ºNDIaNapOLIs: BObbs-MERRILL,  1961),  105–110. °E  ¸ERRy-gO-ROUND  Exa¸pLE  Is  HIs OwN. 13  JUDITH BUTLER, “WHaT ºs CRITIqUE? AN ´ssay ON FOUcaULT’s ÂIRTUE,” IN °e Political: Read-

ings in Continental Philosophy , ED. ¶aVID ºNgRa¸ (²ONDON: BasIL BLackwELL, 2002), 212. 14  BUTLER, “WHaT ºs CRITIqUE?,”  213ff. 15  MIcHEL FOUcaULT, “WHaT  ºs CRITIqUE?,”  TRaNs. ²ysa ÁOcHROTH, IN ºNgRa¸, °e  Political,  193 (E¸pHasEs IN ORIgINaL). 16  FOUcaULT, “WHaT ºs CRITIqUE?,” 194.

17  FOUcaULT, “WHaT ºs CRITIqUE?,” 194–200. 18  KaNT’s Essay  was pUbLIsHED as a NEwspapER aRTIcLE. SEE  FOUcaULT, “WHaT ºs CRITIqUE?,” 

139

194.

BOOks, 1979). CO¸paRE  MONTaIgNE, TwO  cENTURIEs EaRLIER, DIsaVOwINg  aNy pROfEssION  bUT  sELf-INqUIRy: “º  REaDILy  ExcUsE  ¸ysELf  fOR NOT  kNOwINg  HOw  TO  DO  aNyTHINg  THaT  wOULD ENsLaVE ¸E TO  OTHERs.” “±f ´xpERIENcE,” 825. 20  ³ay¸OND Á. CURRy aND KaTHRyN MONTgO¸ERy, “¹OwaRD a ²IbERaL ´DUcaTION IN MEDIcINE,” Academic Medicine 85, NO. 2 (FEbRUaRy 2010): 283–287. 21  °E  I¸agINaTIVE  capacITIEs  aND  TOOL  kITs  Of  “NaRRaTIVE  ¸EDIcINE”  aRE  I¸pORTaNT  HERE—THOUgH THE  Essay Is NOT  aN INTRINsIcaLLy NaRRaTIVE gENRE. ºNDEED,  THE Essay ¸ay  HaVE  ITs  sTRONgEsT  affiNITIEs  wITH  DIaLOgUE/DIaLEcTIc—IN pRINcIpLE  OpEN-ENDED,  OſtEN  ¸EaNDERINg. SEE KaUff¸aN, “°E SkEwED PaTH,” 70, cITINg PaTER.

y a s s E   e h t  f o   n o i t a c o V  l a c i t i r C   e h T

19  º¸¸aNUEL KaNT, °e  Conflict of the Faculties, TRaNs. MaRy GREgOR (µEw YORk:  AbaRIs 

´he ²RT of Med±c±ne ºSTHMA  ANd  TH±  ÁAlU±  Of CONTRAdIcTIONS Ian Whitmarsh

AsTH¸a Is  aN ENIg¸aTIc ENTITy IN  cONTE¸pORaRy ¸EDIcINE. °E cONDITION Is  INcREasINg wORLDwIDE, paRTIcULaRLy IN URbaN aREas aND cOUNTRIEs UNDERgOINg  RapID  DEVELOp¸ENT.  °EsE sTaTIsTIcs  HaVE  ELIcITED VaRIOUs  ExpLaNaTIONs. °E  HygIENE  HypOTHEsIs  sUggEsTs  THaT  ¸ORE  ¸ODERN  HO¸Es  aND  LIfEsTyLEs  ¸ay  REsULT  IN  LOwER  ExpOsURE  TO  INfEcTIONs  aND  bacTERIa  aT  a  yOUNg  agE,  aND  a  cONsEqUENT OVERsENsITIsaTION TO aLLERgENs. AN aLTERNaTIVE ExpLaNaTION I¸pLIcaTEs THE INcREasE IN pOLLUTION assOcIaTED wITH ¸ODERNIsaTION.  SO¸E EpIDE¸IOLOgIsTs aRgUE THaT INcREasED aTTENTION TO THE DIsEasE a¸ONg bOTH ¸EDIcaL  pRacTITIONERs  aND THE pUbLIc Has REsULTED IN  a HIgHER RaTE Of  DIagNOsIs, NOT  a  HIgHER  pREVaLENcE.  A  sI¸ILaR  ExpLaNaTION NOTEs  THE  cHaNgINg  DIagNOsTIc  TEcHNIqUEs  OVER THE  pasT  THREE  DEcaDEs.  °EsE  cO¸pETINg accOUNTs  fOR  THE  INcREasE REVEaL a pUzzLINg DIsEasE caTEgORy. SUcH  DIscORDaNcE  Has  HIsTORIcaLLy  bEEN  fOUNDaTIONaL  TO  THE  caTEgORy  Of  asTH¸a  IN  BRITIsH aND  A¸ERIcaN  ¸EDIcaL  REsEaRcH.  SINcE  THE END  Of  THE  NINETEENTH  cENTURy,  asTH¸a  Has  bEEN  VIEwED as  NEUROsIs  OR  pHysIOLOgIcaL  pREDIspOsITION;  caUsED  by  DUsT,  pOLLUTION,  HEREDITy,  paRENTaL  E¸OTIONs,  THE  UNcLEaN  ¸ODERN  HO¸E (caRpETs HaRbOURINg  DUsT  ¸ITEs),  OR  THE cONTINUaLLy  cLEaNED ¸ODERN HO¸E (UNDERExpOsURE TO INfEcTIONs); aND TREaTED  wITH  sTI¸ULaNTs aND DEpREssaNTs, DIETINg, sTEROIDs, aND VaRIOUs TONIcs. YET DEspITE  THIs DIVERsITy, wHaT Is sTRIkINg abOUT ¸ODERN ¸EDIcINE’s appROacH TO asTH¸a  Is  NOT  THE  pLURaLITy  Of  DEfiNITIONs,  caUsEs,  aND  DIagNOsTIc  TEcHNIqUEs,  bUT  RaTHER THE aTTE¸pT TO REDUcE THIs pLURaLITy. °Is cO¸pULsION  TOwaRDs fiNDINg  a  sINgLE LOcUs Of DIsEasE  Has a  HIsTORy.  BEfORE THE EIgHTEENTH cENTURy, asTH¸a IN wEsTERN ¸EDIcINE was HU¸ORaL,  a  cONgERIEs  Of  sy¸pTO¸s bROUgHT  ON by  ExcEssEs  IN  cOLD  OR ¸OIsT  TE¸pERa-

ºaN  WHIT¸aRsH,  “°E  ART  Of  MEDIcINE:  AsTH¸a  aND  THE  ÂaLUE  Of  CONTRaDIcTIONs,”  fRO¸  °e 

Lancet 376 (2010): 764–765. © 2010 by ´LsEVIER. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of  ´LsEVIER.

¸ENT. °Is HU¸ORaL appROacH bEgaN TO bE REpLacED IN THE EIgHTEENTH cENTURy  by  a  NERVOUs  sysTE¸  appROacH,  bUT  THE  cONDITION  was  sTILL  DEfiNED  by  ITs 

141

cOLDNEss  Of THE  ExTRE¸ITIEs. ºN THIs  appROacH, IT  RE¸aINED UNcLEaR  wHETHER  bLOOD cIRcULaTION caUsED RaRE REspIRaTION, OR THE REVERsE. SUcH a Lack Of spaTIaL  caUsaLITy  was  NO  LONgER pOssIbLE  by  THE  ¸ID-NINETEENTH  cENTURy,  HOwEVER, a pERIOD wHEN THE pHysIcaL  ORIgIN Of a DIsEasE IN THE bODy cONsTITUTED  ITs  DEfiNITION. MEDIcaL  TExTs  ON  asTH¸a  fRO¸  THE  ¸ID-NINETEENTH  cENTURy  ONwaRD sOUgHT THE LOcUs Of THE DIsEasE—ITs sINgLE sTaRTINg pOINT. ´acH TREaTIsE  DURINg  THIs TI¸E  OffERED aN UNa¸bIgUOUs  ORIgIN, REsULTINg  IN  a  wEaLTH  Of cO¸pETINg accOUNTs: asTH¸a was  a DIsEasE  Of THE NERVOUs sysTE¸,  OR THE  LUNgs, OR THE bLOOD, EacH sITE ExcLUsIVE Of THE OTHERs, aND EacH cONsTITUTINg aN  UNEqUIVOcaL DEfiNITION. ¶URINg THE sEcOND HaLf  Of THE NINETEENTH  cENTURy,  TEcHNOLOgIEs bEca¸E  INcREasINgLy  INVOLVED IN caTEgORIsINg asTH¸a, fOR  Exa¸pLE, THROUgH  THE UsE  Of  REspIRO¸ETERs  aND  ¸IcROscOpEs.  °EsE  INsTRU¸ENTs  pROVIDED  spEcIfic  qUaNTITaTIVE ¸EasURE¸ENTs abOUT a cONDITION THaT cONTINUED TO bE ExpLIcITLy  DEfiNED by cONTRasT: as NERVOUs bEcaUsE NO paTHOLOgIcaL LEsIONs wERE fOUND  OR  as  aLLERgIc  bEcaUsE  NO  gER¸  caUsEs  wERE  fOUND.  ºN  THE  EaRLy  TwENTIETH  cENTURy,  THE aLLERgIc appROacH  bEca¸E  wIDEspREaD,  bRINgINg THE OLDER  sITEs  Of  THE DIsEasE INTO  NEw aREas Of REsEaRcH—THE HEREDITaRy pREDIspOsITION IN  THE  bLOOD, THE psycHOLOgIcaL caUsEs Of THE  NEUROsIs, aND THE pHysIOLOgIcaL  REspONsE IN THE LUNgs. °Is HIsTORy Of cONTEsTaTION cONTINUEs TO bE fOUNDaTIONaL TO THE ¸EDIcaL  ¸EaNINg  Of  asTH¸a  TODay.  ¶IscIpLINaRy  bOUNDaRIEs  OffER  DIffERENT  pERspEcTIVEs  THROUgH  wHIcH  TO  Exa¸INE  aND  UNDERsTaND  asTH¸a—fOR  INsTaNcE,  pOpULaTION  DE¸OgRapHIcs,  LUNg  REspONsE,  I¸¸UNE  sysTE¸,  OR  gENE-ENVIRON¸ENT  INTERacTIONs.  ¶IffERENT  appROacHEs  TO  DIagNOsIs  IN  REsEaRcH aDD TO THIs cO¸pLExITy, INcLUDINg REspONsE TO aLLERgENs aND ¸EDIcaTIONs,  sELf-REpORTINg Of sy¸pTO¸s, pHysIcIaN DIagNOsIs,  LEVELs Of aLLERgEN  aNTIbODIEs  IN  THE  bLOOD,  a¸ONg  OTHERs.  SEVERITy  Is sI¸ILaRLy assEssED  wITH  DIffERENT  ¸EasUREs, sUcH  as  sELf-REpORTINg  abOUT  fREqUENcy Of  sy¸pTO¸s,  UsE  Of  ¸EDIcaTION, cHaNgEs IN  pEak  aIRflOw, assEss¸ENT  Of bIO¸aRkERs, OR  fREqUENcy  Of E¸ERgENcy ROO¸ aD¸IssION, aLONgsIDE cONsIDERaTION Of ENVIRON¸ENTaL  RIsk facTORs aND OTHER cO¸ORbIDITIEs.  AND THE caUsEs  Of asTH¸a  cONTaIN  THE  sa¸E  HETEROgENEITy.  °E  VaRIOUs  asTH¸a  TRIggERs—aIR  pOLLUTaNTs, DO¸EsTIc pOLLUTaNTs, pOLLENs, fOODs—I¸pLIcaTE EVERyTHINg fRO¸ HOUsINg  cONDITIONs aND NEIgHbOURHOOD ExpOsURE TO URbaNIzaTION aND ¸ODERN  a¸ENITIEs.

e n i c i d e M   f o trA   e h T

VaRIOUs  sy¸pTO¸s,  sUcH as  wHEEzE, UNUsUaL  bLOOD cIRcULaTION,  fEVER, aND 

°E  TRE¸ENDOUs  ¸aRkET  fOR, aND  REsEaRcH  INTO,  asTH¸a IN  THE  pasT fEw 

142

DEcaDEs Has accENTUaTED THIs  a¸bIgUITy. °EsE EffORTs  HaVE fOcUsED ON THE  VaRIabILITy  Of  asTH¸a DEfiNITIONs  as  ITsELf cONsTITUTIVE.  SO¸E HaVE  aDOpTED 

hsramtihW  naI

THE ¸ULTIpLE cRITERIa Of asTH¸a DIagNOsIs aND sEVERITy TO aRgUE fOR THE INcLUsION Of ¸ORE THaN ONE TEcHNIqUE, EacH INDEpENDENTLy sUfficIENT, cREaTINg aN 

βÄ agONIsTs Is INcREas-

ExpaNsIVE DIagNOsTIc. ºN THIs cONTExT, REspONsE TO THE 

INgLy  UsED TO DIagNOsE asTH¸a. °E  DIsEasE Is HERE DEfiNED IN  TER¸s Of THE  pHysIOLOgIcaL EffEcTs Of THE ¸EDIcaTION—THaT Is, a Lack  Is DEsIgNED INTO THE  cONDITION;  THE  NEED  fOR  THE  pHaR¸acEUTIcaL  Is  aLREaDy  paRT  Of  THE  ¸EaNINg  Of THE  DIsEasE.  ±THER DIagNOsTIc  cRITERIa—ºg´ cONcENTRaTIONs,  wHEEzE,  paTIENT’s  sELf-REpORTINg—sUggEsT  DIffERENT  sITEs  Of  INTERVENTION:  THE  spacE  Of  THE  LUNgs  VERsUs  THE  spacE  Of  pOLLENs,  OR  pROxI¸ITy  TO  pOLLUTaNTs  aND  HazaRDOUs  cHE¸IcaLs.  °Is  Is  RELEVaNT  fOR  THaT  TROUbLED  aREa  Of  ¸EDIcINE  TODay, aDHERENcE. As ¸EDIcaL REsEaRcH aND pOLIcy INcREasINgLy TURN TOwaRDs  cHRONIc DIsEasEs—asTH¸a, HEaRT DIsEasE, caNcER, DIabETEs—THE DaILy TakINg  Of  ¸EDIcaTIONs  Has  bEcO¸E  a  ¸ajOR  fOcUs.  ºN  THE  casE  Of  asTH¸a,  EffORTs  TO  INcREasE  aDHERENcE HaVE OſtEN fOcUsED ON  THE ¸OTHER Of THE  cHILD  wITH  asTH¸a. WO¸EN HaVE bEEN cENTRaL TO  asTH¸a INTERVENTIONs  sINcE THE ¸IDDLE  Of  THE  NINETEENTH  cENTURy.  ºN  THE  LaTE  NINETEENTH  cENTURy, wO¸EN  wERE  cONsIDERED  paRTIcULaRLy  pRONE  TO  “NERVOUs  asTH¸a,”  aN  OVERsENsITIVE  DIspOsITION  REqUIRINg caREfUL ¸ONITORINg. By  THE  EaRLy TwENTIETH cENTURy, THE sHIſt  TO  psycHOaNaLyTIc  ExpLaNaTIONs  Of  asTH¸a  ¸aDE  wO¸EN,  aND  spEcIficaLLy  ¸OTHERs, INTO caUsEs Of sUcH a DIspOsITION: paRTIcULaRLy IN THE ·SA, aN OVERpROTEcTIVE ¸OTHER was I¸agINED TO cREaTE a DELIcaTE aND sHELTERED cHILD pRONE  TO asTH¸a. WITH THE cONTE¸pORaRy TURN away fRO¸ psycHOLOgIcaL ¸EaNINgs  Of asTH¸a  IN  faVOUR Of a  pURELy pHysIOLOgIcaL UNDERsTaNDINg, THE fOcUs  Has  sHIſtED TO THE ¸OTHER as caRETakER Of THE HO¸E. AsTH¸a EDUcaTION aND OUTREacH  TaRgET ¸OTHERs TO REDUcE pOLLEN aND  DUsT ExpOsURE aND TO aD¸INIsTER  ¸EDIcaTIONs TO THEIR cHILDREN. °E pROcEss Of cONsU¸INg asTH¸a TREaT¸ENTs  fRO¸ THE DOcTOR Is a  TRaNsLaTION Of ¸EDIcaL ¸EaNINgs aND  pRacTIcEs. ºN THIs  cONTExT,  TakINg  (OR  NOT  TakINg)  THE  INHaLED  sTEROID  ¸ay  REflEcT  a  paTIENT’s  sUspIcION  abOUT  wHaT  THEIR  DOcTOR  Is  HIDINg  IN  HIs  OR  HER  cONcERN  abOUT  THE  paTIENT’s pOssIbLy fEaRfUL aTTITUDE  TOwaRD THE pHaR¸acEUTIcaL.  WITH THE  pREscRIpTION,  paRENTs aND paTIENTs  aRE accEpTINg  sO¸E paRT Of  THE  ¸EDIcaL  sysTE¸ Of caTEgORIsaTION, gIVINg sO¸E aUTHORITy TO IT, wHILE aT THE sa¸E TI¸E,  by DETER¸ININg wHEN aND HOw THEy cONsU¸E THE pREscRIpTION, aRE pLacINg a  paRT Of IT UNDER THEIR jURIsDIcTION.

CONDITIONs sUcH as asTH¸a REVEaL wHERE INExpERT INTERpRETaTIONs aDOpT a  pLURaLITy THaT ¸ODERN ExpERTIsE DEVaLUEs. °Is caN bE sEEN IN cULTURaL ¸EaN-

143

VaRyINg  DEfiNITIONs, bUT RaTHER a  fUNDa¸ENTaL sLIppagE  IN THE caTEgORy. POLLUTION caN bE DUsT fRO¸ THE HIgHway,  ¸OULD aND cOckROacHEs  IN apaRT¸ENT  waLLs,  wORkpLacE HazaRDs, pEsTIcIDEs, cIgaRETTE s¸OkE. SI¸ILaRLy “asTH¸a” IN  gENERaL UsE caN bE aN aTTack, OR a cONDITION, OR a DIagNOsIs. CULTURaL a¸bIgUITy ¸EaNs ¸UTUaLLy INcONsIsTENT ¸EaNINgs caN cOINcIDE, wHIcH Is wHaT gIVEs  RIcH TER¸s THEIR pOwER. A¸bIgUITy DENOTEs spacEs Of IRREsOLUTION—UNfiNIsHED, sTILL TO bE UNDERsTOOD aND INTERpRETED. ±UR ¸ODERN appROacH TO DIsEasE OſtEN DIsaVOws sUcH  a¸bIgUITy:  ONE  REREaDs  cULTURaL  INTERpRETaTIONs  TO  fiND  HIDDEN  OR  fURTHER  ¸EaNINgs;  wHy REREaD a DIagNOsIs? °E ExTRE¸E cONsIsTENcy Of THE ¸ODERN  ¸EDIcaL  DEsIgNaTION caN bE pREcIsELy  wHaT gIVEs paTIENTs paUsE—a  cLaI¸ TO  cERTaINTy  a¸ID EVIDENT  UNcERTaINTy THaT  ¸ay  LEaD sO¸E  pEOpLE TO  sEEk OUT  OTHER  INTERpRETaTIONs.  °E  cULTURaL  cONTRaDIcTIONs  Of  asTH¸a  gO bEyOND  a  VIEw  Of THE cONDITION as a spEcTRU¸, a cONcEpT Of a¸bIgUITy THaT RELIEs ON  a sINgLE  cRITERION Of DIffERENTIaTION. ºN  THE a¸bIVaLENcE  Of cULTURE, cONTRaDIcTORy  ¸EaNINgs caN  NOT  ONLy bE  ¸aINTaINED bUT caN  aLsO REINfORcE  EacH  OTHER.  ¹O  THE  qUEsTION, “AsTH¸aTIc  as aN IDENTITy  OR as  a  TE¸pORaRy cONDITION?,”  cULTURE  wILL  aNswER:  yEs.  ºN  THE  a¸bIVaLENcE  Of  cULTURE,  cONTRaDIcTORy ¸EaNINgs  kEEp EacH OTHER  IN DOUbT. ºN THE TwENTy-fiRsT cENTURy, sO¸E  ¸EDIcaL appROacHEs TO asTH¸a HaVE INTEgRaTED THIs a¸bIgUITy aND sUggEsTED  THE  DIsEasE  caTEgORy  fOR  asTH¸a  Is  a  syNDRO¸E  OR  a  ¸IsNO¸ER  fOR  sEVERaL  cONDITIONs. SO¸E  paTIENTs wORk TO  bRINg sUcH a¸bIgUITy  back IN wHEN IT Is  baNIsHED  fRO¸ THE  cLINIcaL INTERacTION, aND THEy DO sO  wITH OTHER sOURcEs  Of  aUTHORITy  (fa¸ILy,  HEaLTH  bOOks,  ExpERIENcEs,  aND  sO  ON).  As  ¸ODERN  ¸EDIcINE ¸aps OUT OUR faTE, IT sUggEsTs THE aVENUEs Of EscapE by fOLLOwINg  ¸EDIcaL  INTERVENTIONs, THaT Is, aDHERENcE. ºN THE  cONTEsTED DIagNOsTIc caTEgORy  cO¸pRIsED IN “asTH¸a,” paTIENTs aT TI¸Es ¸akE  aDHERENcE a¸bIgUOUs  TOO, a sOURcE Of cHOIcE RaTHER THaN a DEcREE. °E a¸bIVaLENcE Of cULTURE bOTH  facILITaTEs ¸EDIcaL caTEgORIsaTIONs aND Is THE sOURcE Of aLTERNaTIVEs TO THE¸.  CULTURE  pLacEs ¸EDIcaL caTEgORIEs INTO qUOTEs as THEIR LI¸ITs aRE Exa¸INED  aND  cRITIcIsED  IN  ways  THaT aRE  cONsTITUTIVE  Of  THEIR  sIgNIficaNcE; cREaTINg  a  spacE  fOR  INcONsIsTENcy,  cULTURE  aLLOws  asTH¸a  ITs  LONg  aND  cONTINUINg  HIsTORy Of a¸bIgUITy.

e n i c i d e M   f o trA   e h T

INgs Of “pOLLUTION.” °E a¸bIgUITy Of “pOLLUTION” IN sOcIETaL UsE Is NOT DUE TO 

144

½urther  reaDinG ANON. A pLEa TO abaNDON  asTH¸a as a DIsEasE cONcEpT. Lancet 368 (2006):705.

hsramtihW  naI

BOON, J. A. Other Tribes, Other Scribes: Symbolic Anthropology in the Comparative Study of 

Cultures, Histories, Religions, and Texts. µEw YORk: Ca¸bRIDgE ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1982. JacksON, M. Asthma: °e Biography. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2009. WHIT¸aRsH, º. Biomedical Ambiguity: Race, Asthma, and the Contested Meaning of Gene-

tic Research in the Caribbean. ºTHaca: CORNELL ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2008.

ScR±PT Mara Buchbinder and Dragana Lassiter

±N  JaNUaRy 17,  2014,  CaTHERINE  ´agLEs, a  fEDERaL  jUDgE fOR  THE MIDDLE  ¶IsTRIcT Of µORTH CaROLINa, sTRUck DOwN as UNcONsTITUTIONaL a pORTION Of µORTH  CaROLINa’s 2011 WO¸EN’s ³IgHT TO KNOw AcT. °E pORTION IN qUEsTION wOULD  HaVE  REqUIRED abORTION pROVIDERs IN THE sTaTE TO pERfOR¸ aN ULTRasOUND aND  DIspLay aND DEscRIbE THE I¸agEs pREsENTED TO EVERy wO¸aN sEEkINg aN abORTION.  ´agLEs  cONcLUDED  THaT  THIs  sO-caLLED  “spEEcH-aND-DIspLay  pROVIsION”  was “pERfOR¸aTIVE RaTHER THaN INfOR¸aTIVE” aND THEREfORE sERVED NO ¸EDIcaL  pURpOsE.  SHE  DETER¸INED  THIs  IN  paRT  bEcaUsE  THE  ORIgINaL  TExT  Of  THE  Law  sUggEsTED THaT wO¸EN ¸IgHT cHOOsE not TO LOOk aT THEsE ULTRasOUND I¸agEs:  “Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent a pregnant woman from 

averting  her eyes from the ultrasound images required to be  provided to and  reviewed with her.”à ºN a 42-pagE ¸E¸ORaNDU¸ OUTLININg HER DEcIsION, ´agLEs  wROTE,  “³EqUIRINg a  pHysIcIaN OR  OTHER  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDER  TO  DELIVER  THE  sTaTE’s cONTENT-basED, NON-¸EDIcaL ¸EssagE IN HIs OR HER OwN VOIcE as If THE  ¸EssagE  was  HIs  OR HER  OwN cONsTITUTEs  cO¸pELLED  IDEOLOgIcaL  spEEcH  aND  waRRaNTs THE HIgHEsT DEgREE Of FIRsT A¸END¸ENT pROTEcTION.”Ä AbORTION  RIgHTs  aDVOcaTEs  IN  µORTH  CaROLINa  HaILED  THE  RULINg  as  aN  I¸pORTaNT VIcTORy. YET THE RE¸aINDER Of THE WO¸EN’s ³IgHT TO KNOw AcT sTILL  sTaNDs: wO¸EN ¸UsT REcEIVE cOUNsELINg wITH spEcIfic, sTaTE-¸aNDaTED INfOR¸aTION aT LEasT 24 HOURs pRIOR TO aN abORTION pROcEDURE. ¹O cO¸pLy wITH THE  Law, THEN, aN abORTION pROVIDER ¸UsT “DELIVER a cONTENT-basED, NON-¸EDIcaL  ¸EssagE  IN  HIs  OR  HER  OwN VOIcE.”  ºN  OUR ONgOINg  pROjEcT,  wE  aRE  Exa¸ININg HOw abORTION pROVIDERs IN µORTH CaROLINa HaVE gRappLED wITH THIs LEgaL  ¸aNDaTE. WE HaVE bEEN EspEcIaLLy INTEREsTED IN THE sOcIaL, ETHIcaL, aND cO¸¸UNIcaTIVE DI¸ENsIONs Of scRIpTED abORTION  cOUNsELINg.Æ ScRIpTs pLay a kEy ROLE IN aNTHROpOLOgy aND scIENcE  aND TEcHNOLOgy sTUDIEs. FOUNDaTIONaL cONcEpTs LIkE cultural scripts aND technological scripts REflEcT 

MaRa  BUcHbINDER aND ¶RagaNa ²assITER, “ScRIpT,”  fRO¸  Somatosphere: Commonplaces (µOVE¸bER 17, 2014). ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of THE pUbLIsHER.

a  DIscIpLINaRy  pREOccUpaTION  wITH  THE  ways  IN  wHIcH  cERTaIN  DO¸aINs  Of 

146

HU¸aN  sOcIaL  LIfE  aRE  paRTIaLLy  pREDETER¸INED.  YET THE  pOTENTIaL  fOR  sOcIaL  acTORs TO sTRay fRO¸ THE scRIpT TO I¸pROVIsE NEw pOssIbILITIEs aND cREaTE NEw 

r e t i s s a L  a n a g a r D   d n a  r e d n i b h c u B   a r a M

¸ODEs Of acTION Is aLsO E¸bEDDED IN THEsE cONcEpTs. ºN OTHER wORDs, THE VERy  pREsENcE Of aNy scRIpT I¸pLIEs ITs LOgIcaL OppOsITE: THaT wE aLsO spEak aND acT  IN fUNDa¸ENTaLLy UNscRIpTED ways. ºN THIs way, THE scRIpT REflEcTs LONgsTaNDINg  TENsIONs  IN  cONTE¸pORaRy  THEORETIcaL  DEbaTEs—bETwEEN  sTRUcTURE  aND  agENcy, DETER¸INIs¸ aND E¸ERgENcE, cONsTRaINT aND pOssIbILITy, cO¸pULsION  aND cHOIcE. ScRIpTs  aRE  UbIqUITOUs  IN  scIENcE  aND  ¸EDIcINE.  ÁOspITaL  pROcEDUREs,  INfOR¸ED cONsENT DOcU¸ENTs, ExpERI¸ENT pROTOcOLs, sTaNDaRDIzED THERapIEs,  aND ULTRasOUND TEcHNOLOgIEs aLL RELy ON scRIpTs TO ORDER wORk pROcEssEs, gUIDE  THOUgHTs,  spEEcH, aND  acTION, aND  spEcIfy ROLEs aND RELaTIONsHIps.Î As INsTITUTIONaLLy aUTHORED DOcU¸ENTs, scRIpTs ENacT aND sHapE wORLDs by cONVEyINg  THE  aUTHOR’s  INTENDED ¸EaNINg.  YET scRIpTs DO  ¸ORE THaN RELay  REfERENTIaL  ¸EaNINg.  °Ey  aLsO  pRODUcE  EffEcTs,  sO¸ETI¸Es  UNINTENDED,  THROUgH  THE  ways THaT THEy aRE I¸pLE¸ENTED aND pERfOR¸ED. SUcH pRODUcTIVITy caN HELp  Us TO bypass THE DUaLIs¸s ¸ENTIONED abOVE aND gENERaTE pOTENTIaL NEw sITEs  Of THEORETIcaL INqUIRy. °E scRIpT aT pLay IN sTaTE-¸aNDaTED abORTION cOUNsELINg Is a  HIgHLy fOR¸aLIzED VERsION Of a ¸UcH bROaDER TEcHNO-sOcIaL caTEgORy. CLINIcIaNs RELy ON  VaRIOUs  scRIpTs  IN cONVERsaTIONs  wITH paTIENTs—fOR  Exa¸pLE, askINg  “WHaT  bRINgs yOU IN  TODay?” A  fEw THINgs DIsTINgUIsH  abORTION  cOUNsELINg scRIpTs  fRO¸ cOLLOqUIaL UsEs Of scRIpTs IN ¸EDIcINE: THEIR LEgaLLy cO¸pULsORy NaTURE,  THEIR  sELEcTION  Of  paRTIcULaR  spEEcH  ELE¸ENTs,  aND  THEIR  capacITy  TO  TRaNsfOR¸ HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs INTO agENTs Of THE sTaTE. °E sTaTE, aN a¸ORpHOUs  pOLITIcaL  sUbjEcT,  Has  RELaTIVELy LITTLE pOwER  TO spEak  TO cITIzENs IN  EVERyDay  LIfE. By  cO¸pELLINg pROVIDERs TO  spEak ITs ¸EssagE,  THE  sTaTE flIps  THE scRIpT  UNDERgIRDINg ¸OsT cLINIcaL INTERacTION.Ï MOsT  abORTION  pROVIDERs IN  OUR  sTUDy  fOUND  bOTH  THE  sTaTE’s INTENTIONs  aND THE  pOTENTIaL EffEcTs Of  THE cOUNsELINg scRIpT ON paTIENTs TO bE ObjEcTIONabLE. As ONE pHysIcIaN TOLD Us, “º fiND IT VERy cONDEscENDINg. As If wO¸EN aREN’T  bEINg gIVEN pROpER INfOR¸ED cONsENT OR DEcIsION ¸akINg abOUT THEIR abORTION  caRE.  WHILE  OTHERs,  yOU  kNOw,  LIkE  LEgIsLaTUREs, aRE  TRyINg  TO TakE  away  THEIR  DEcIsION  ¸akINg aND aUTONO¸y.” BEcaUsE Of THIs DIsDaIN fOR THE scRIpT, THE  ¸aNy  pOssIbILITIEs fOR UNDER¸ININg ITs cONTENT HaVE bEEN E¸pOwERINg aND  EVEN  LIbERaTINg.  SO¸E  pROVIDERs pREfacED  THE  scRIpT  wITH  DIscLaI¸ERs  aND  apOLOgIEs.  ±THERs REaD THE  scRIpT  “wORD  by wORD”  TO  sHOw THaT THE  wORDs 

wERE NOT THEIR OwN. STILL OTHERs sET THE scRIpT IN fRONT Of THE paTIENT TO DIsTINgUIsH IT as a LEgaL aRTIfacT THaT THEy VIEwED as faLLINg OUTsIDE Of NOR¸aL cLINI-

147

spEakERs  fRO¸ THE aNI¸aTED cONTENT, aND  INVITE paTIENTs NOT TO LIsTEN. Ð SEVERaL pROVIDERs NOTED THaT sUcH sTRaTEgIEs HaD THE UNaNTIcIpaTED cONsEqUENcE  Of  fOsTERINg paTIENT-pROVIDER RappORT,  REVEaLINg a ¸IsaLIgN¸ENT bETwEEN  pERcEIVED LEgIsLaTIVE INTENT aND THE scRIpT’s pERfOR¸aNcE. °Is HIgHLIgHTs HOw  THE  RIſt  bETwEEN  ¸EaNINg  aND  INTENT  caN  cUT  bOTH ways,  wORkINg  bOTH fOR  aND agaINsT THE aUTHOR’s agENDa. ºN OUR  sTUDy, pROVIDERs ROUTINELy DIsTINgUIsHED scRIpTED abORTION cOUNsELINg fRO¸ THE INfOR¸ED cONsENT pROcEDUREs THaT THEy wERE aLREaDy DOINg pRIOR  TO THE  Law. As aN ENU¸ERaTION Of  THE RIsks aND bENEfiTs assOcIaTED  wITH cLINIcaL  TREaT¸ENT,  DRUg  REsEaRcH,  OR  spEcI¸EN DONaTION,  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  aLsO  RELIEs  ON  scRIpTs.  PROVIDERs  DIsTINgUIsHED THE  scRIpTs  UsED  IN sTaTE-¸aNDaTED  cOUNsELINg aND cLINIcaL INfOR¸ED cONsENT ON THE basIs Of wHETHER THE cONTENT  was  ¸EDIcaLLy  RELEVaNT aND  NEcEssaRy  TO  wO¸EN’s  INfOR¸ED  DEcIsION ¸akINg.  °Is DIffERENcE Is  aLsO I¸pLIcIT  IN JUDgE ´agLEs’s  DIsTINcTION  bETwEEN THE  pERfOR¸aTIVE (I.E., NON-¸EDIcaLLy RELEVaNT) aND INfOR¸aTIVE fUNcTIONs Of THE  sEaRcH-aND-DIspLay pROVIsION. ºN ¸akINg THIs DIsTINcTION, bOTH JUDgE ´agLEs  aND  OUR  INTERLOcUTORs aTTE¸pTED TO  fRa¸E THE  Law  as aN  ILLEgITI¸aTE INsTaNcE  Of  scRIpT-flIppINg—THaT Is, appROpRIaTINg THE LaNgUagE, fOR¸aT, aND aUTHORITaTIVE  VOIcE Of  INfOR¸ED cONsENT  fOR aNOTHER  pURpOsE. YET  INsOfaR  as INfOR¸ED  cONsENT Is bOTH ONE Of THE ¸OsT ROUTINIzED scRIpTs IN ¸EDIcINE aND a paRaDIg¸aTIc Exa¸pLE Of  INfOR¸aTION DELIVERy IN HEaLTH  caRE, THIs DIsTINcTION  bEgINs  TO bREak DOwN.  ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT assU¸Es  THE gENRE Of DIscLOsURE THaT ¸aNy  paTIENTs IN THE  ·NITED STaTEs HaVE LEaRNED TO VIEw as a LEgaL pERfOR¸aNcE, aN  INsTITUTIONaL REqUIRE¸ENT NEcEssaRy TO ¸OVE aLONg ONE’s cLINIcaL caRE.Ñ ºN OTHER  wORDs, INfOR¸ED cONsENT pROcEDUREs HaVE bOTH INfOR¸aTIVE and pERfOR¸aTIVE  DI¸ENsIONs.  By  DIsTINgUIsHINg bETwEEN  sTaTE-¸aNDaTED abORTION  cOUNsELINg  aND sTaNDaRD INfOR¸ED cONsENT pROcEDUREs, THE pROVIDERs IN OUR sTUDy REIfiED  INfOR¸ED cONsENT as pURELy INfOR¸aTIVE, NEgLEcTINg THE  pERfOR¸aTIVE DI¸ENsIONs Of THIs EVERyDay scRIpTED pRacTIcE. STaTE-¸aNDaTED  abORTION  cOUNsELINg Is  a  spEcIaLIzED  casE  Of  THE  UsE  Of  scRIpTs  IN  ¸EDIcINE.  MEDIcINE  RELIEs  ON  ¸aNy  OTHER  TakEN-fOR-gRaNTED  aND  ROUTINIzED scRIpTs. ±NE sTRENgTH Of THE scRIpT fOR scHOLaRs Of scIENcE aND ¸EDIcINE  Is THaT IT “REaDs” acROss THE  ETHIcaL aND  LEgaL, as IN THE  casE Of INfOR¸ED  cONsENT. ºN DOINg sO, IT sHOws HOw THE ¸EDIcaL aND THE LEgaL aRE NOT sEpaRaTE  pROfEssIONaL DO¸aINs bUT NEcEssaRILy cO-cONsTITUTED.

tpircS

caL pRacTIcE. ´acH Of THEsE acTIONs sERVED TO DENOUNcE aUTHORsHIp, DIsaffiLIaTE 

148

notes 1  FOR  THE  fULL  LEgIsLaTIVE  TExT  Of  THE  µORTH  CaROLINa  WO¸aN’s  ³IgHT  TO  KNOw  AcT,  sEE 

r e t i s s a L  a n a g a r D   d n a  r e d n i b h c u B   a r a M



HTTp://www.NcLEg . NET / gascRIpTs / BILL²OOk·p / BILL²OOk·p.pL ? BILLº¶ Á 854ÍSEssION

= 2011.

2  FOR  THE  fULL  TExT  Of  THIs  ¸E¸ORaNDU¸,  sEE  HTTp://DIg.abcLOcaL.gO.cO¸/wTVD/DOcs  /UTRasOUND_RLULINg_011714.pDf. 3  °Is wORk Has bEEN sUppORTED by  gRaNTs fRO¸ THE SOcIETy fOR Fa¸ILy PLaNNINg aND THE  GREENwaLL FOUNDaTION, IN cOLLabORaTION wITH ³EbEcca MERcIER, A¸y BRyaNT, aND ANNE  ¶RapkIN ²yERLy. 4  MaDELINE AkRIcH, “°E DE-scRIpTION Of TEcHNIcaL ObjEcTs,” IN Shaping Technology/Building 

Society. Studies in Sociotechnical Change, ED. W. BIjkER aND J. ²aw (Ca¸bRIDgE, MA: mit  PREss, 1992);  aND STEfaN  ¹I¸¸ER¸aNs, “SaVINg  LIVEs OR  saVINg ¸ULTIpLE IDENTITIEs?:  °E  DOUbLE DyNa¸Ic Of REsUscITaTION scRIpTs,”  Social Studies of Science , 26 (4) (1996): 767–797. 5  CaRR (2011, 191) sUggEsTs THaT scRIpT flIppINg  Is aN Exa¸pLE  Of wHaT BakHTIN (1984) caLLs  VaRI-DIREcTIONaL DOUbLE-VOIcED DIscOURsE, “IN wHIcH ONE’s  spEEcH Has a sE¸aNTIc INTENT  cONTRaRy TO THaT wHIcH  ONE ¸I¸Ics.” SEE ´.  SU¸¸ERsON CaRR,  Scripting Addiction: °e 

Politics  of  °erapeutic  Talk  and  American  Sobriety (PRINcETON:  PRINcETON  ·NIVERsITy  PREss,  2011). SEE  aLsO MIHkaIL  BakHTIN,  Problems of Dostoevksy’s Poetics, TRaNs. aND  ED.  C. ´¸ERsON (MINNEapOLIs: ·NIVERsITy Of MINNEsOTa PREss, 1984). 6  ´RVINg GOff¸aN, Forms of Talk (PHILaDELpHIa: ·NIVERsITy Of PENNsyLVaNIa PREss, 1981). 7  MaRIE-ANDRéE JacOb, “FOR¸-¸aDE pERsONs: CONsENT fOR¸s as cONsENT’s bLIND spOT,” Politi-

cal and Legal Anthropology Review,  30(2) (2007): 249–268. DOI:10.1525/p01.2007.30.2.249

ORd±nARy  Med±c±ne »H±  ³Ow±R  ANd CONfUSION  Of EVId±Nc± Sharon R. Kaufman

°ERE  Is  a  HIDDEN  cHaIN  Of  cONNEcTIONs a¸ONg  scIENcE,  pOLITIcs,  INDUsTRy,  aND  INsURaNcE  THaT  ORgaNIzEs  EVIDENcE  ¸akINg  aND  DRIVEs  THE  ·.S.  HEaLTH  caRE sysTE¸. ÁIDDEN as wELL Is THE ETHOs THaT sUppORTs THOsE cONNEcTIONs aND  I¸pacTs gOVERNaNcE. °E ¸ULTIbILLION-DOLLaR bIO¸EDIcaL REsEaRcH ENgINE, wITH ITs E¸pHasIs ON  THE  cLINIcaL  TRIaLs  ENTERpRIsE,  Is  wHERE  EVIDENcE  ¸akINg  bEgINs.  °E  INfRasTRUcTURE aND HIgH VaLUE Of EVIDENcE-basED ¸EDIcINE aND cLINIcaL TRIaLs pRIORITIzE THINkINg abOUT wHaT cONsTITUTEs REspONsIbLE HEaLTH caRE. AND THEy aRE  THE DO¸INaNT appaRaTUsEs Of TRUTH ¸akINg IN ¸EDIcINE. ÁOw DOEs  THIs  wORk? ¹RIaL  “fiNDINgs”  aRE cONVERTED  INTO  “bEsT EVIDENcE  fOR TREaT¸ENT.” AND THEN, THaT EVIDENcE gENERaTEs TREaT¸ENT sTaNDaRDs. °Is  Is HOw scIENTIfic INNOVaTION ORgaNIzEs pHysIcIaNs’ wORk, HEaLTH caRE fiNaNcEs,  aND  paTIENTs’  aND  fa¸ILIEs’ ExpEcTaTIONs abOUT wHaT  Is  NOR¸aL aND  NEEDED.  °E  cULTURaL  capITaL  Of  EVIDENcE-basED  ¸EDIcINE,  cLINIcaL  TRIaLs,  aND  THE  sTaNDaRDs  THEy  sET cREaTEs  a UNIqUE  qUaNDaRy  IN  cONTE¸pORaRy ¸EDIcINE:  WHEN,  wHERE,  aND  HOw  TO  DRaw  THE  LINE  bETwEEN  TOO  ¸UcH  aND  ENOUgH  INTERVENTION? AND HOw sHOULD ONE LIVE wITH THE TOOLs ¸EDIcINE OffERs? ´VIDENcE-basED ¸EDIcINE Is ITsELf cO¸pLIcaTED by THREE INTERRELaTED DEVELOp¸ENTs THaT pER¸EaTE A¸ERIcaN LIfE, wHIcH aRE INHERENT IN THE gLObaL bIO¸EDIcaL EcONO¸y  aND THaT cONTROL THE qUaNDaRy Of  DRawINg THaT LINE. FIRsT, THERE  Is THE INcREasED ROLE aND INflUENcE Of pRIVaTE INDUsTRy. ºN 1980, 32 pERcENT Of  cLINIcaL REsEaRcH was fUNDED by pRIVaTE pHaR¸acEUTIcaL, DEVIcE, aND bIOTEcHNOLOgy  cO¸paNIEs. ¹ODay,  65 pERcENT  Of  bIO¸EDIcaL  REsEaRcH Is  fUNDED by 

SHaRON ³.  KaUf¸aN, “±RDINaRy MEDIcINE: °E POwER aND CONfUsION Of ´VIDENcE,” fRO¸  Medi-

cine Anthropology °eory 3, NO. 2  (2016): 163–168. ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION UNDER THE CREaTIVE  CO¸¸ONs  ATTRIbUTION 4.0  ºNTERNaTIONaL PUbLIc  ²IcENsE,  aVaILabLE  aT HTTps://cREaTIVEcO¸¸ONs  .ORg/LIcENsEs/by/4.0/LEgaLcODE.

pRIVaTE  INDUsTRy, wHOsE gOaL Is aLways TO INcREasE ¸aRkET sHaRE. SEcOND, aLL 

150

THOsE  cLINIcaL TRIaLs HaVE gENERaTED  ¸ORE EVIDENcE Of THERapEUTIc VaLUE aND  aN EVER-INcREasINg NU¸bER Of sTaNDaRD TREaT¸ENT OpTIONs. °IRD, THE ·NITED 

namfuaK   . R  norahS

STaTEs’  NaTIONaL  pRIORITy  Of  NEw  TEcHNOLOgIEs  Has  INflUENcED  OUR  cOLLEcTIVE  pERspEcTIVE ON THE TI¸INg Of DEaTH. ¹ODay IN THE ·NITED STaTEs, ¸OsT DEaTHs,  REgaRDLEss Of a pERsON’s agE, HaVE cO¸E TO bE cONsIDERED pRE¸aTURE. ALL Of THE OUTcO¸E sTUDIEs, pRacTIcE gUIDELINEs, aND TEacHINg TOOLs wITHIN  THE  VasT  EVIDENcE-basED  ¸EDIcINE  ¸aTRIx  HaVE  a  sINgLE  gOaL:  TO  pROVIDE  a  sTRONgER scIENTIfic fOUNDaTION fOR cLINIcaL pRacTIcE. YET THaT “scIENTIficaLLy basED”  (aND  EspEcIaLLy  NU¸ERIcaLLy  basED)  ¸aTRIx  O¸ITs  THE  sOcIaL,  NONscIENTIfic,  aND  ¸Essy  fEaTUREs Of  HEaLTH  caRE  DELIVERy  THaT  INflUENcE  wHaT  DOcTORs  DO  aND  wHaT HappENs  TO  paTIENTs.  CONsIDER  THE fOLLOwINg  fiVE  DEcIDEDLy NONscIENTIfic fEaTUREs: •  PHysIcIaNs sO¸ETI¸Es acT agaINsT THEIR OwN bEsT jUDg¸ENT aND  REcO¸¸END OR pREscRIbE INTERVENTIONs DEspITE THEIR kNOwN Lack Of  Efficacy. •  PaTIENTs aND fa¸ILIEs ask fOR TREaT¸ENTs THaT HaVE NOT bEEN pROVEN TO  sHOw bENEfiT IN sTUDIEs, aND pHysIcIaNs, NOT INfREqUENTLy, acqUIEscE TO  THEIR REqUEsTs. •  °E pHaR¸acEUTIcaL aND ¸EDIcaL DEVIcE INDUsTRIEs aRE sLOw TO RE¸OVE  DRUgs aND DEVIcEs fRO¸ THE ¸aRkETpLacE THaT Lack bENEfiT (OR THaT  pROVE TO bE HaR¸fUL), aND DOcTORs ¸ay bE sLOw TO REfUsE TO UsE THE¸. •  ±NcE a TREaT¸ENT Is REI¸bURsED by MEDIcaRE, THE DyNa¸Ics Of HOspITaL aND ¸EDIcaL cENTER EcONO¸Ics aND pHysIcIaN pREscRIbINg paTTERNs  ¸akE IT NEaRLy I¸pOssIbLE fOR aLL cONcERNED TO say “NO” TO IT. MEDIcaRE  REI¸bURsE¸ENT THUs sHapEs bOTH sTaNDaRD ¸akINg aND ETHIcaL NEcEssITy. ºT bEcO¸Es THE ETHIcs Of ¸aNagINg LIfE. •  WHETHER TREaT¸ENTs THaT bENEfiT sO¸E caREfULLy sELEcTED TRIaL paRTIcIpaNTs wILL aLsO bENEfiT a ¸ORE DIVERsE gROUp Of paTIENTs, EspEcIaLLy  cHILDREN aND OLDER pERsONs, Is aLways a qUEsTION aND OſtEN a TROUbLINg  ONE fOR DOcTORs. ALL  THEsE  facTORs  wEaVE  THROUgH  THE  fRa¸EwORk  Of wHaT  wE  caLL  EVIDENcE-  basED ¸EDIcINE, sHapINg THE wORk  Of HEaLTH  pROfEssIONaLs aND  THE pRacTIcEs  Of paTIENTs aND fa¸ILIEs. SO HOw DOEs EVIDENcE-basED  ¸EDIcINE pLay OUT IN THE  cLINIc aND  IN REaL  LIVEs?  º DRaw fRO¸ THE Exa¸pLE Of  THE I¸pLaNTabLE caRDIac DEfibRILLaTOR,  THE  i»d, a LITTLE TOOL LIkE a pacE¸akER I¸pLaNTED UNDER THE skIN, DEsIgNED TO cOR-

REcT a  pOTENTIaLLy faTaL HEaRT RHyTH¸. °Is  Is a THERapy  THaT Has sHIſtED fRO¸  bEINg  “UNTHINkabLE”  a  DEcaDE agO  TO  bEINg  ROUTINE aND  sTaNDaRD  fOR  OLDER 

151

TwO  THINgs  HappENED:  EVIDENcE  fRO¸  cLINIcaL  TRIaLs  sHOwED  gOOD  sURVIVaL  RaTEs, aND MEDIcaRE aND pRIVaTE INsURERs bEgaN TO REI¸bURsE fOR ITs UsE. As DEVIcEs sUcH  as i»ds bEcO¸E  s¸aLLER aND  TEcHNIqUEs fOR  I¸pLaNTINg  THE¸ bEcO¸E  safER, pHysIcIaNs aND THE pUbLIc HaVE LEaRNED TO VIEw THE¸ as  sTaNDaRD  INTERVENTIONs  THaT ONE DOEs  NOT  EasILy REfUsE. ºN THE  ·NITED STaTEs  THEsE DEVELOp¸ENTs pRODUcE a sENsE THaT LIfE ExTENsION Is OpEN-ENDED as LONg  as ONE TREaTs RIsk. °aT Is THE pREVaILINg, ORDINaRy LOgIc THaT DRIVEs sO ¸UcH  TREaT¸ENT. BUT wHEN DO wE sTOp TREaTINg RIsk? °E  i»d was UsED  spaRINgLy UNTIL  2002 fOR  THOsE wHO HaD  aLREaDy sURVIVED  a  pOTENTIaLLy  LETHaL  HEaRT  aTTack  aND  wERE  aT  HIgH  RIsk  fOR  aNOTHER  LIfE-  THREaTENINg  caRDIac EVENT.  °EN ITs  UsE  bEgaN  TO  RIsE sUbsTaNTIaLLy.  WHy?  µINE cLINIcaL TRIaLs Of i»d UsE wERE cONDUcTED bETwEEN 2002 aND 2005, EacH  ONE sHOwINg VaRyINg DEgREEs Of bENEfiT a¸ONg paTIENT pOpULaTIONs THaT HaD  NOT ExpERIENcED a pOTENTIaLLy LIfE-THREaTENINg HEaRT RHyTH¸. ¹akEN TOgETHER,  THE fiNDINgs fRO¸ THOsE NINE TRIaLs pROVIDED INcREasINg “EVIDENcE Of bENEfiT”  Of THE i»d fOR  sURVIVaL, aND THaT  EVIDENcE LED MEDIcaRE,  IN 2005, TO ExpaND  THE ELIgIbILITy cRITERIa fOR REI¸bURsE¸ENT  TO INcLUDE pRI¸aRy pREVENTION fOR  THOsE wHO HaD NEVER sUffERED a pOTENTIaLLy faTaL caRDIac RHyTH¸. °E flOODgaTEs OpENED. µOw  THEsE  DEVIcEs  HaVE  bEcO¸E  THE  sTaNDaRD  Of  caRE  fOR  paTIENTs  wITH  ¸ODERaTE TO sEVERE HEaRT DIsEasE. °E I¸pORTaNT THINg abOUT THE i»d Is THaT,  IN  TREaTINg  a  pOTENTIaLLy  LETHaL aRRHyTH¸Ia,  IT  pREVENTs  sUDDEN  DEaTH (THE  sILENT  HEaRT  aTTack  IN  THE  NIgHT),  THE kIND  Of  DEaTH  ¸aNy  say  THEy  acTUaLLy  waNT IN LaTE LIfE. YET THE DEVIcE Is DIfficULT TO REfUsE, EVEN IN VERy LaTE LIfE. WHy?  BEcaUsE  EVIDENcE ORgaNIzEs  ITs  ExpaNDED  UsE,  aND  bEcaUsE  IT  sEE¸s  TO  gO  agaINsT ¸EDIcaL pROgREss aND cO¸¸ON sENsE TO say “NO” TO IT. ºT Has bEcO¸E  aN  ORDINaRy paRT Of  THE ¸EDIcO-sOcIO-ETHIcaL  LaNDscapE. °E  EffEcTs  Of THIs  LOgIc ¸OsT affEcT THE OLDEsT paTIENTs. ¹ODay, ¸ORE THaN 110,000 paTIENTs IN THE ·NITED STaTEs REcEIVE i»ds EacH  yEaR. °ERE Is NO qUEsTION Of THE UNEqUIVOcaL “gOOD” Of THIs DEVIcE fOR  pREVENTINg yOUNg pEOpLE fRO¸ DyINg. YET ¸OsT pEOpLE REcEIVINg i»ds aRE OLDER  aND  sIckER,  wITH UNDERLyINg caRDIac DIsEasE, aND  THE ELEcTRIcaL sHOcks  fRO¸  i»ds  DO  NOT NEcEssaRILy  ExTEND  aN  OLDER  pERsON’s  LIfE  OR I¸pROVE  ITs  qUaLITy.  ºNDEED, THE i»d TRaNsfOR¸s THE I¸¸EDIaTE RIsk Of DEaTH INTO THE NEaR cERTaINTy  Of pROgREssIVE HEaRT faILURE. °E HOpE Of THIs LIfE-ExTENDINg TREaT¸ENT cO¸Es  Up agaINsT a pROLONgED, UNwaNTED kIND Of LaTE LIfE aND DyINg.

enicideM  yranidrO

pERsONs  IN  THE ·NITED  STaTEs TODay. ºT  bEca¸E  THINkabLE, aND DOabLE,  wHEN 

CONsIDER Sa¸ ¹OLLEsON, wHO, LIkE sO¸E OTHER paTIENTs wITH i»ds, ENDURED 

152

THE paIN Of THE DEVIcE’s sHOcks aND THE kNOwLEDgE THaT HIs DEbILITy was bEINg  pROLONgED. AT agE EIgHTy-EIgHT, wHEN º ¸ET HI¸, MR. ¹OLLEsON HaD bEEN LIV-

namfuaK   . R  norahS

INg  wITH  caRDIac  DIsEasE  fOR  TwENTy-fiVE  yEaRs.  ¹aLL  aND  THIN  wITH  pIERcINg  bLUE EyEs aND a sHOck Of THIck wHITE HaIR, HE UsED OxygEN aND waLkED sLOwLy,  bENT OVER HIs  waLkER. ÁE  gRacIOUsLy wELcO¸ED  ¸E TO  sIT DOwN IN  HIs apaRT¸ENT  aND  cHaT.  FOLLOwINg  a  sEcOND  HEaRT aTTack aT  agE EIgHTy, HE  awOkE IN  THE  HOspITaL  aND  was  TOLD THaT  pHysIcIaNs  HaD  I¸pLaNTED a  pacE¸akER  THaT  INcLUDED  a  DEfibRILLaTOR.  °E  pHysIcIaNs  wERE  fOLLOwINg  sTaNDaRD  pRacTIcE,  DOINg wHaT was appROpRIaTE bOTH TO sTabILIzE HIs HEaRT RaTE (THE pacE¸akER)  aND  pREVENT  sUDDEN DEaTH  fRO¸ a  fUTURE  HEaRT  aTTack (THE  i»d). MR. ¹OLLEsON NOTED THaT IT wasN’T UNTIL sO¸ETI¸E aſtER gETTINg THE DEfibRILLaTOR THaT HE  LEaRNED wHaT IT wOULD DO. AbOUT  TwO  yEaRs  bEfORE  wE  ¸ET,  wHEN  HE  was  EIgHTy-sIx,  THE  i»d  HaD  bEgUN TO sHOck HIs pOTENTIaLLy LETHaL caRDIac RHyTH¸s back TO NOR¸aL. ±VER  a pERIOD Of sEVERaL ¸ONTHs, MR. ¹OLLEsON was sHOckED fiſtEEN TI¸Es. “°ERE Is  NO qUEsTION,” HE OffERED, “THaT THOsE sHOcks ExTENDED ¸y LIfE. ºT’s VERy LIkELy  THaT  ONE  Of THOsE  EpIsODEs,  wITHOUT  THE  DEfibRILLaTOR,  wOULD  HaVE  bEEN  ¸y  LasT.”  °E  fiRsT  TEN  sHOcks  wERE,  HE  REpORTED, “spREaD  OUT,  OVER  wEEks.”  BUT  wHEN HE REcEIVED fiVE sHOcks IN ONE Day, HE DEcIDED THaT HE HaD HaD ENOUgH.  “°Ey  wERE  ¸ORE  aND  ¸ORE  paINfUL.  °E  VERy  THOUgHT  THaT  º  was  gOINg  TO  HaVE aNOTHER ONE—º cOULDN’T TakE IT.” SO HE  ¸aDE  aN appOINT¸ENT TO  HaVE  THE DEfibRILLaTOR  paRT Of THE  DEVIcE  TURNED  Off. °Is  cHOIcE  Is HIgHLy UNUsUaL.  ºT sI¸pLy DOEs  NOT OccUR TO  ¸OsT  paTIENTs  OR  THEIR  fa¸ILIEs THaT  THE DEVIcE,  ONcE  pLacED  UNDER THE  skIN,  caN  EasILy  bE  DEacTIVaTED  aND  THaT  paTIENTs  caN  ¸akE  THaT  cHOIcE.  MOsT  pHysIcIaNs NEVER DIscUss THaT pOssIbILITy wITH paTIENTs. MR. ¹OLLEsON NOTED, “BOTH  THE DOcTOR aND  THE TEcHNIcIaN  [fRO¸ THE DEVIcE cO¸paNy] wERE RELUcTaNT TO  TURN IT  Off. BUT º cONVINcED  THE¸ . . . aND THaT DIsTREssED ¸y fa¸ILy TOO. °E  fa¸ILy  was  VERy UpsET  wITH ¸E.  º HaVE  THREE  cHILDREN,  aND  THEy aLL  cRIED. º  HaD  TO TaLk  wITH THE¸  abOUT IT, aND  º fELT TERRIbLE aſtER º  TaLkED wITH THE¸.”  ÁE cONTINUED, “PERHaps º sHOULD jUsT HaVE DONE wHaT THEy waNTED ¸E TO DO:  kEEp THE i»d. BUT LIfE Is gETTINg HaRDER aLL THE TI¸E.” MR. ¹OLLEsON DIED TwO Days aſtER OUR cONVERsaTION. ScIENTIfic  EVIDENcE, ROUTINE  REI¸bURsE¸ENT,  sTaNDaRD  Of  caRE,  spEcIaLIsT  ExpERTIsE,  INDUsTRy’s gOaL TO  sELL DEVIcEs, aND  ¸EDIcINE’s ¸aNDaTE TO ExTEND  LIfE  aRE  aLL sTRONg fORcEs. MR. ¹OLLEsON  fOUND HI¸sELf NEEDINg  TO DEfEND HIs  DEcIsION  TO TURN  Off THE DEfibRILLaTOR,  bOTH TO  HIs fa¸ILy  aND TO  THE ¸EDIcaL  sTaff. ÁE HaD cROssED THE LINE HE DID NOT wIsH TO cROss.

SINcE 20 pERcENT Of THOsE ON THE REcEIVINg END fOR  THE i»d aRE NOw OVER  EIgHTy, aND THE pROpORTION OVER agE NINETy Is gROwINg (IN sO¸E pLacEs gREaTER 

153

TION  TO DEaTH fOR sIgNIficaNT NU¸bERs Of pEOpLE. ºT sTaVEs Off DEaTH bUT DOEs  NOT  I¸pROVE  HEaLTH. ºT  TURNs LIfE-THREaTENINg  DIsEasE  INTO  a  cHRONIc  cONDITION ENabLINg pEOpLE TO gROw OLDER, IN NEED Of ¸ORE INTERVENTION, ¸ORE RIsk  awaRENEss, aND ¸ORE pREVENTION—aLL aT THE sa¸E TI¸E. °Is Is wHERE EVIDENcE  Has cO¸E TO REsT IN THE casE Of THE i»d: IN THE kIND  Of DEaTH wE aRE askED TO  cHOOsE, aND IN a NEw, UNcO¸fORTabLE ENgagE¸ENT wITH ONE’s OwN ROLE IN THE  TI¸INg Of DEaTH. ¹O  cONcLUDE:  ¸akE  NO ¸IsTakE,  THIs  TEcHNOLOgy  ExTENDs waNTED  LIfE  fOR  ¸aNy  pEOpLE.  °aT Is,  Of cOURsE,  THE cRUx  Of THE  ¸aTTER. ºT  Has aLsO OpENED  Up aN EVER-ExpaNDINg  ¸aRkET fOR  OTHER caRDIac DEVIcEs, bEcaUsE wHEN  THIs  ONE  NO  LONgER  DOEs  THE  jOb,  ONE  caN  gRaDUaTE  TO  THE  lv¾d—THE  LEſt  VENTRIcULaR assIsT DEVIcE, OR HEaRT pU¸p, wHIcH cOsTs TEN TI¸Es as ¸UcH. ´acH  DEVIcE  TRIggERs  qUaNDaRIEs abOUT HOw ONE  caN OR sHOULD LIVE  IN RELaTION TO  ¸EDIcaL  TREaT¸ENT, EspEcIaLLy as ONE agEs. µOwHERE a¸ º sEEkINg TO ¸akE a  casE fOR OR agaINsT THE UsE Of THE i»d OR aNy OTHER THERapy. ³aTHER, THE qUEsTIONs fOR ¸E aRE: ÁOw HaVE cLINIcaL NOR¸s aND OUR VERy LIVEs bEEN caUgHT Up  IN  THE  pERfEcT sTOR¸  Of ORDINaRy, EVIDENcE-basED  ¸EDIcINE? ÁOw  aND  wHy  DO  EVIDENcE-basED  THERapEUTIcs  bRINg  INcREasINg NU¸bERs Of  paTIENTs aND  fa¸ILIEs, pOLITIcIaNs,  aND INDEED OUR ENTIRE sOcIETy TO  facE THE qUaNDaRy Of  DRawINg THE LINE, aND TO cO¸pLaIN LOUDLy abOUT THE sysTE¸s THaT cREaTE THaT  LINE?  ÁOw, as  ¸ORE  Of  Us  cO¸E  TO  waNT, NEED,  OR  acqUIEscE  TO THEsE  TREaT¸ENTs,  DO THE pROfOUND  EffEcTs Of EVIDENcE ON ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE aND  EVERyDay LIfE ORgaNIzE OUR “pOsTpROgREss pREDIca¸ENT”?

enicideM  yranidrO

THaN 10 pERcENT), THE DEVIcE Is REsHapINg THE agINg ExpERIENcE aND THE TRaNsI-

“ETh±cs  And Cl±n±cAl  ¶eseARch” »H±  50TH ºNNIV±RSARY  Of B±±cH±R’S  BOMbSH±ll David S. Jones, Christine Grady, and Susan E. Lederer

ÁU¸aN-sUbjEcTs REsEaRcH REcEIVEs INTENsE scRUTINy TODay. ³EsEaRcHERs, INsTITUTIONs,  fUNDERs,  aND jOURNaLs  pay sERIOUs  aTTENTION TO ETHIcaL  cONDUcT. YET  cONTROVERsIEs  cONTINUE,  wHETHER  abOUT  ExpERI¸ENTINg  wITH  OxygEN  LEVELs  IN  NEONaTaL  INTENsIVE  caRE  OR  wITH  THE  DUTy  HOURs  Of  sURgIcaL  REsIDENTs.Ã,Ä SO¸E cO¸¸ENTaTORs HaVE EVEN aRgUED THaT aNxIETy OVER THE ETHIcs Of ´bOLa  REsEaRcH cREaTED DELays THaT REsULTED IN LOsT OppORTUNITIEs.Æ MaNy  REsEaRcHERs  aND  bIOETHIcIsTs  bELIEVE  THaT  sERIOUs  DIscUssIONs  Of  REsEaRcH ETHIcs bEgaN aſtER WORLD WaR ºº.ΖР°E acTUaL HIsTORy Is LONgER aND  ¸ORE cO¸pLEx. µONETHELEss, ÁENRy BEEcHER’s “´THIcs aND CLINIcaL ³EsEaRcH,”  pUbLIsHED 50 yEaRs agO, pLayED aN I¸pORTaNT ROLE. BEEcHER waRNED REsEaRcHERs aND THE pUbLIc abOUT sERIOUs pRObLE¸s wITH REsEaRcH IN THE ·NITED STaTEs  aND  ExHORTED  REsEaRcHERs  TO  REfOR¸.Ñ ³EsEaRcH  REgULaTIONs  pROLIfERaTED  IN  THE  ENsUINg DEcaDEs.  ÁOwEVER,  as  BEEcHER sURELy  aNTIcIpaTED,  NEw pOLIcIEs  aND  pROcEDUREs HaVE  NOT REsOLVED EVERy  DILE¸¸a. µOw, as IN 1966, REasONabLE pEOpLE DIsagREE abOUT REsEaRcH ETHIcs.

Research  Ethics  ±efore  1966:  Regulate  or Rely on Virtue ÁU¸aNs  HaVE  ExpERI¸ENTED ON HU¸aNs fOR  ¸ILLENNIa, aND  THEy HaVE  LONg  bEEN awaRE Of ETHIcaL RIsks.Ò ÁU¸aN REsEaRcH ExpaNDED IN THE LaTE NINETEENTH  cENTURy as pHysIcIaNs TEsTED NEw THEORIEs aND TEcHNOLOgIEs. × ´THIcaL cONcERNs  RE¸aINED  paRa¸OUNT.  CLaUDE BERNaRD  sET  a  HIgH  baR  IN  1865:  “°E  pRINcI-

¶aVID S.  JONEs,  CHRIsTINE  GRaDy, aND  SUsaN ´.  ²EDERER,  “ ‘´THIcs  aND  CLINIcaL  ³EsEaRcH’—°E  50TH ANNIVERsaRy  Of  BEEcHER’s BO¸bsHELL,”  fRO¸  New  England Journal of Medicine 374  (2016):  2383–2389. © 2016 by MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of MassacHUsETTs  MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

pLE  Of ¸EDIcaL  aND  sURgIcaL ¸ORaLITy cONsIsTs IN  NEVER  pERfOR¸INg ON ¸aN  aN ExpERI¸ENT wHIcH ¸IgHT bE HaR¸fUL  TO HI¸ TO  aNy ExTENT, EVEN  THOUgH 

155

WILLIa¸ ±sLER INsIsTED 

THaT  REsEaRcHERs ExpERI¸ENT ON paTIENTs ONLy  If “DIREcT bENEfiT Is LIkELy” aND  ONLy  wITH “fULL cONsENT.” ±THERwIsE  “THE sacRED cORD wHIcH bINDs pHysIcIaN  aND paTIENT sNaps INsTaNTLy.”Ãà SO¸E  REsEaRcHERs HEEDED  THEsE TENETs. WaLTER  ³EED sOLIcITED  VOLUNTEERs  fRO¸ A¸ERIcaN sOLDIERs aND REcENT SpaNIsH I¸¸IgRaNTs IN CUba, OffERED THE¸  pay¸ENT, aND HaD THE¸ sIgN cONTRacTs cERTIfyINg THEIR awaRENEss Of THE RIsks  bEfORE ExpOsINg THE¸ TO yELLOw  fEVER. ±THER REsEaRcHERs TRIggERED scaNDaLs  by  INfEcTINg  paTIENTs,  ORpHaNs,  OR  asyLU¸ IN¸aTEs  wITH paTHOgENs  wITHOUT  THEIR  kNOwLEDgE.Ò,× ºN  1916, WaLTER  CaNNON  pUsHED  THE A¸ERIcaN  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION (¾m¾) TO ¸aNDaTE INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR REsEaRcH.ÃÄ °E ORgaNIzaTION REfUsED, aRgUINg THaT ¸IscONDUcT was a pRObLE¸ Of ROgUE REsEaRcHERs,  NOT REsEaRcH ITsELf. °E ¾m¾ bELIEVED THaT TRUsT, NOT REgULaTION, wOULD fOsTER  bETTER REsEaRcH aND cLINIcaL caRE.× WORLD  WaR  ºº  pRO¸pTED  ExTENsIVE  HU¸aN  ExpERI¸ENTaTION.  A¸ERIcaN  REsEaRcHERs wERE OſtEN scRUpULOUs IN THEIR UsE Of INfOR¸ED, cONsENTINg VOLUNTEERs  bUT sO¸ETI¸Es  pREssURED sOLDIERs TO  VOLUNTEER wITHOUT  fULL kNOwLEDgE  Of  THE  RIsks  aND  sO¸ETI¸Es  UsED  INsTITUTIONaLIzED  pOpULaTIONs.Ò,ÃÆ–ÃÏ GER¸aN  aND  JapaNEsE  REsEaRcHERs  wENT  fURTHER,  cO¸¸ITTINg  aTROcITIEs  IN  THE Na¸E Of scIENTIfic REsEaRcH.ÃÐ,ÃÑ WHEN aLLIED aUTHORITIEs pROsEcUTED µazI  pHysIcIaNs  aT THE WaR  CRI¸Es ¹RIbUNaL, THEy IssUED THE µURE¸bERg  CODE,  spEcIfyINg  THaT  REsEaRcHERs  sHOULD  aLways  REcRUIT  cO¸pETENT  REsEaRcH sUbjEcTs wHO UNDERsTOOD  THE NaTURE Of THE REsEaRcH aND  VOLUNTaRILy cONsENTED  TO paRTIcIpaTE.ÃÒ,Ã× °E  CODE,  HOwEVER,  HaD  NO  bINDINg  LEgaL  aUTHORITy,  aND  A¸ERIcaN  REsEaRcHERs REspONDED IN cO¸pLEx ways. SO¸E gOVERN¸ENT  agENcIEs IssUED  NEw  gUIDELINEs—IN  1953,  fOR INsTaNcE,  THE  sEcRETaRy Of  DEfENsE  ¸aNDaTED  wRITTEN cONsENT IN ¸ILITaRy REsEaRcH ON aTO¸Ic, bIOLOgIc, aND cHE¸IcaL wEapONs (THOUgH THIs pOLIcy was kEpT “TOp sEcRET”).ÄØ °E sa¸E yEaR, THE µaTIONaL  ºNsTITUTEs  Of  ÁEaLTH  (nih)  CLINIcaL  CENTER  I¸pLE¸ENTED  pEER  REVIEw  aND  INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR REsEaRcH ON HEaLTHy VOLUNTEERs. ºN OTHER VENUEs, HOwEVER, ¸UcH was LEſt TO REsEaRcHERs’ DIscRETION.Ò,Äà MaNy ·.S.  scIENTIsTs  bELIEVED  THaT  THE  CODE,  a  REspONsE  TO  THE wORk  Of  ExpERI¸ENTs by µazI REsEaRcHERs, DID NOT appLy TO THE¸. ÄÄ ±THERs UNDERsTOOD  THE  NEED fOR  gUIDELINEs bUT sOUgHT  TO  ¸ODERaTE THE CODE’s sTRIcT  LaNgUagE.  FOR INsTaNcE, as THE WORLD MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION DRaſtED ITs 1964 ¶EcLaRaTION Of  ÁELsINkI, ·.S.  REpREsENTaTIVEs,  wITH fUNDINg  fRO¸ THE pHaR¸acEUTIcaL INDUsTRy, 

” h c r a e s e R   l a c i n i l C   d n a   s c i h t E“

THE REsULT ¸IgHT bE HIgHLy aDVaNTagEOUs TO scIENcE.”

ÃØ

bLOckED  THE  REqUIRE¸ENT  fOR  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  IN  aLL  casEs,  bELIEVINg  IT 

156

wOULD  THREaTEN  pLacEbO-cONTROLLED  DRUg  TRIaLs.  °Ey  aLsO  bLOckED  a  baN  ON  REsEaRcH ON  INsTITUTIONaLIzED cHILDREN aND  pRIsON IN¸aTEs, wHO  wERE  wIDELy 

r e r e d e L   d n a  , y d a r G   , s e n o J

UsED  TO  TEsT  VaccINEs  aND  DRUgs.ÄÆ SI¸ILaRLy,  wHEN  THE  SENaTE  DEbaTED  a  1962 a¸END¸ENT THaT wOULD HaVE ¸aNDaTED INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR REsEaRcH  wITH  ExpERI¸ENTaL  DRUgs,  DOzENs  Of  LEaDINg  REsEaRcHERs  pROTEsTED.  ±NE  DEscRIbED  INfOR¸ED cONsENT  as  “a sNaRE  aND  DELUsION”: “IT  Is fOR  THE  ¸OsT  paRT  I¸pOssIbLE  TO  acHIEVE  aND  Is  cERTaIN  TO  DO  ¸ORE  HaR¸  THaN  gOOD.”  ÁENRy BEEcHER wORRIED THaT THE pROVIsION wOULD cRIppLE THE cOUNTRy’s LEaD  IN  DRUg REsEaRcH, IN paRT by pREVENTINg REsEaRcH  ON cHILDREN  aND THE ¸ENTaLLy ILL.ÄÎ,ÄÏ ScaNDaLs, HOwEVER, RaIsED qUEsTIONs abOUT wHETHER TO TRUsT ·.S. REsEaRcHERs.  ºN  1964,  NEws  bROkE  THaT  22  paTIENTs  aT  THE  JEwIsH  CHRONIc  ¶IsEasE  ÁOspITaL  IN  BROOkLyN  HaD  bEEN  INjEcTED  wITH  caNcER  cELLs  wITHOUT  THEIR  kNOwLEDgE. °E ¸EDIa fiREsTOR¸, HEaRINgs, aND LawsUITs RaIsED fUNDa¸ENTaL  qUEsTIONs abOUT ¸EDIcaL REsEaRcH. ÁOwEVER, THE REsEaRcHERs fRO¸ ME¸ORIaL  SLOaN KETTERINg wHO cONDUcTED THE sTUDy REcEIVED NO sERIOUs saNcTION.ÄÐ

“Ethics  and Clinical  Research” By 1950,  ÁENRy BEEcHER, aN aNEsTHEsIOLOgIsT aT MassacHUsETTs GENERaL ÁOspITaL,  HaD  E¸ERgED  as  a  REspEcTED  REsEaRcHER,  HaVINg  Exa¸INED  baTTLEfiELD  TRaU¸a,  THE  safETy  Of  aNEsTHEsIa,  sUbjEcTIVE  ExpERIENcEs  (E.g.,  paIN,  THIRsT,  aND  NaUsEa),  aND pLacEbO REspONsEs. Î,Ò,ÄÄ,ÄÑ,ÄÒ ÁE aDVOcaTED  caREfUL REsEaRcH  ¸ETHODs,  INcLUDINg THE UsE  Of pLacEbO  cONTROLs. ÁE  HaD  aLsO cONsULTED fOR  THE ¸ILITaRy abOUT THE UsE Of ¸EscaLINE aND  l¼d as “TRUTH sERU¸s,”  REsEaRcH  THaT  INVOLVED  DIscUssIONs  wITH  CENTRaL  ºNTELLIgENcE  AgENcy  INTERROgaTORs  aND  fOR¸ER  GEsTapO  OfficIaLs.Ä× °Is  wORk  gOT  BEEcHER  INTEREsTED  IN  “cERTaIN  pRObLE¸s Of  HU¸aN  ExpERI¸ENTaTION.”ÆØ ºN  1952,  HE  askED PENTagON  OfficIaLs fOR  THEIR NEw  pOLIcy ON  HU¸aN REsEaRcH.  ºN  1955, HE wROTE  TO  aN  ´NgLIsH  cOLLEagUE  TO LEaRN abOUT THE  MEDIcaL ³EsEaRcH COUNcIL INsTRUcTIONs  fOR INVEsTIgaTORs aND EDITORs. ÆØ ºN 1959  aND 1963, BEEcHER pUbLIsHED aRTIcLEs IN ¼½¾½ abOUT THE ROLE cONflIcT facED by pHysIcIaN-INVEsTIgaTORs.ÆÃ,ÆÄ µEITHER gENERaTED  ¸UcH REspONsE.  ÁE  THEN  cOLLEcTED  Exa¸pLEs  Of  TROUbLINg  bEHaVIOR  by  ·.S.,  CaNaDIaN,  aND  ´UROpEaN REsEaRcHERs. FOR INsTaNcE, HE Exa¸INED 100 cONsEcUTIVE aRTIcLEs IN  THE Journal of Clinical Investigation (¼ÃÄ ) aND cONcLUDED THaT 12 wERE “UNETHIcaL OR qUEsTIONabLy ETHIcaL.” ÁE cO¸pILED a sET Of 50 aRTIcLEs ON sTUDIEs fUNDED 

by  gOVERN¸ENT  agENcIEs,  cONDUcTED  aT  LEaDINg  INsTITUTIONs,  aND  pUbLIsHED  IN  LEaDINg jOURNaLs.  ÁE TOOk  caRE  TO ENsURE  THaT  HIs cRITIqUEs wERE  faIR. FOR 

157

abOUT  THE  Journal ’s DEcIsION TO  pUbLIsH a  sTUDy  Of THy¸EcTO¸y  IN cHILDREN;  GaRLaND aD¸ITTED THaT THE ETHIcaL REVIEw HaD bEEN INaDEqUaTE.ÆØ BEEcHER aLsO  REcOgNIzED HIs OwN ¸IsTakEs. ÁE REgRETTED a 1948 sTUDy IN wHIcH REsEaRcHERs  IN  HIs LabORaTORy,  wITHOUT aDEqUaTE  cONsENT, pROLONgED aNEsTHEsIa “bEyOND  THaT NEcEssaRy” TO sTUDy THE EffEcTs ON kIDNEy fUNcTION.ÆØ,ÆÆ BEEcHER THEN accEpTED aN INVITaTION TO spEak aT a cONfERENcE IN MaRcH  1965. ÁE DELIVERED a “bO¸bsHELL.” AſtER REVIEwINg THE JEwIsH CHRONIc ¶IsEasE  ÁOspITaL  cONTROVERsy,  HE pROcEEDED,  wITHOUT Na¸INg  Na¸Es,  TO  DEscRIbE  17 aDDITIONaL casEs IN wHIcH REsEaRcHERs HaD faILED TO ObTaIN cONsENT OR HaD  HaR¸ED  THEIR REsEaRcH sUbjEcTs: “wHaT sEE¸ TO bE  bREacHEs Of ETHIcaL cONDUcT  IN  ExpERI¸ENTaTION  aRE by  NO ¸EaNs  RaRE, bUT  aRE aL¸OsT,  ONE fEaRs,  UNIVERsaL.”ÆØ ³EacTION fRO¸ HIs cOLLEagUEs was I¸¸EDIaTE. °O¸as CHaL¸ERs  aND ¶aVID ³UTsTEIN caLLED a pREss cONfERENcE TO accUsE BEEcHER Of “gROss aND  IRREspONsIbLE ExaggERaTION.”ÆÎ BEEcHER cONDE¸NED THEIR kaNgaROO cOURT aND  accUsED THE¸ Of DEfa¸aTION Of cHaRacTER.ÆØ °E ExcHaNgE REcEIVED ExTENsIVE  ¸EDIa cOVERagE. AſtER aN INqUIRy TO  Science, BEEcHER sUb¸ITTED HIs ¸aNUscRIpT TO  ¼½¾½ IN AUgUsT.  °E EDITOR REjEcTED IT, cITINg ITs ExcEssIVE LENgTH (IT DEscRIbED 50  REsEaRcH sTUDIEs) aND pOOR ORgaNIzaTION. BEEcHER sUb¸ITTED a REVIsED ¸aNUscRIpT TO THE Journal IN µOVE¸bER. GaRLaND sENT IT “TO sO¸E pIckED REVIEwERs,”  ExpEcTINg NO sERIOUs pRObLE¸s. SIx Of THE sEVEN REcO¸¸ENDED agaINsT pUbLIcaTION: THERE wERE TOO ¸aNy casEs; BEEcHER DID NOT aLLOw THE INVEsTIgaTORs TO  TELL  THEIR sIDE  Of THE sTORy; ¸aNy REaDERs  wOULD REcOgNIzE THE “aNONy¸OUs”  casEs;  aND HIs cRITIqUEs HaD aLREaDy REcEIVED ExTENsIVE  ¸EDIa cOVERagE. ±NE  REVIEwER sUppORTED pUbLIcaTION, bUT ONLy If THE Journal ObTaINED a LEgaL OpINION “REgaRDINg aNy pOssIbLE pRObLE¸s.”ÆØ °E EDITORIaL bOaRD VOTED TO REjEcT THE sUb¸IssION, bUT GaRLaND OVERRULED  THE¸. ÆÏ BLURRINg THE  LINE  bETwEEN EDITOR  aND  cOaUTHOR,  HE  HELpED  BEEcHER  REVIsE  THE  ¸aNUscRIpT.  BEEcHER  REDUcED  THE  Exa¸pLEs  TO  25  aND  pROVIDED  GaRLaND wITH THEIR  cITaTIONs. GaRLaND cONVENED  a “bRaIN cabINET” (TwO  cOLLEagUEs) TO assEss BEEcHER’s accUsaTIONs; THEy sETTLED ON a fiNaL LIsT Of 22 casEs.  GaRLaND aLsO ¸ODERaTED BEEcHER’s LaNgUagE:  “º HaVE TRIED TO O¸IT aNyTHINg  accUsaTORy  OR  EspEcIaLLy  cRITIcaL, sINcE  wHaT  wE  waNT  Is  NOT  aN INDIcT¸ENT  bUT a sObER aND UNDRa¸aTIc pREsENTaTION Of wHaT Has bEEN DONE aND Is bEINg  DONE IN VIOLaTION Of basIc ETHIcs.”ÆØ °E Journal pUbLIsHED THE aRTIcLE IN JUNE  wITH aN EDITORIaL by GaRLaND.Ñ,ÆÐ

” h c r a e s e R   l a c i n i l C   d n a   s c i h t E“

INsTaNcE, HE qUERIED New England Journal of Medicine EDITOR JOsEpH GaRLaND 

°E casEs ¸aDE fOR sHOckINg REaDINg. BEEcHER fOcUsED ON HU¸aN ExpERI-

158

¸ENTs IN wHIcH paTIENTs wERE UsED NOT fOR THEIR bENEfiT, “bUT fOR THaT, aT LEasT  IN  THEORy, Of paTIENTs  IN gENERaL.”Ñ ³EsEaRcHERs sO¸ETI¸Es  wITHHELD kNOwN 

r e r e d e L   d n a  , y d a r G   , s e n o J

TREaT¸ENTs.  ºN  THE  casE BEEcHER  cONsIDERED  ¸OsT  EgREgIOUs,  pENIcILLIN was  wITHHELD  fRO¸  109  sOLDIERs  wITH  sTREpTOcOccaL INfEcTIONs;  acUTE RHEU¸aTIc  fEVER DEVELOpED IN  TwO aND acUTE NEpHRITIs IN  ONE. ºN sO¸E casEs, paTIENTs  ExpERIENcED  HaR¸ OR  RIsk Of  HaR¸ wITHOUT  bENEfiT.  ºN  OTHERs, REsEaRcHERs  HaD  NOT ObTaINED cONsENT. °E Exa¸pLEs  wERE NOT fRO¸  a LUNaTIc  fRINgE.Î FOUR  ca¸E  fRO¸  ÁaRVaRD  MEDIcaL  ScHOOL,  THREE  fRO¸  THE  nih  CLINIcaL  CENTER,  aND  THE  REsT  fRO¸  OTHER  pRO¸INENT  INsTITUTIONs.  °E  casEs  HaD  passED pEER aND EDITORIaL REVIEw aT THE Journal (fiVE aRTIcLEs),  ¼ÃÄ (fiVE), ¼½¾½ (TwO), aND Circulation (TwO). BEEcHER INsIsTED  THaT  THE REsEaRcHERs  NOT  bE Na¸ED:  “º  HaVE  NO wIsH TO  pOINT a fiNgER aT INDIVIDUaLs. º was pOINTINg TO aN aLL-TOO-gENERaL pRacTIcE.”ÆØ,ÆÑ GaRLaND accEpTED BEEcHER’s  REqUEsT aND askED REaDERs TO TRUsT THE  Journal’s  assEss¸ENT  Of  THE  VERacITy  Of  BEEcHER’s  accUsaTIONs.  BEEcHER  was  bEsIEgED  by  REqUEsTs TO  IDENTIfy  HIs sOURcEs bUT sTEaDfasTLy  REfUsED.  As HE  ExpLaINED  TO  ARNOLD  ³EL¸aN,  THEN  EDITOR Of  ¼ÃÄ ,  “º  a¸ assURED  by  a  pROfEssOR  IN  THE  ÁaRVaRD  ²aw  ScHOOL  THaT  THE  INDIVIDUaLs  INVOLVED  cOULD  bE  sUbjEcTED  TO  cRI¸INaL  pROsEcUTION, aND  º  HaVE  NO wIsH TO  INVITE  sUcH  acTION.” ÆØ BEEcHER  HaD  DIVIDED LOyaLTIEs. ´VEN as HE  DREw aTTENTION TO ¸IscONDUcT, HE DID NOT  waNT REsEaRcHERs TO sUffER LEgaL cONsEqUENcEs.Î SINcE HE ExpEcTED THaT ¸aNy  casEs wOULD bE REcOgNIzED by THE REsEaRcH cO¸¸UNITy, HE ¸IgHT HaVE HOpED  THaT  THE  REsEaRcHERs  wOULD  bE  sHa¸ED  a¸ONg  THEIR  pEERs,  If  NOT  pUbLIcLy.  ³E¸aRkabLy,  wHEN  THE  REsEaRcHERs  wERE  UN¸askED  IN  1991,  THEy  REcEIVED  LITTLE aTTENTION.Ò,ÆÒ,Æ× ³EacTIONs IN 1966 VaRIED wIDELy. MEDIcaL REsEaRcHERs wERE OſtEN aNgRy aND  DEfENsIVE,  cLINIcIaNs  wERE  OUTRagED  by  REsEaRcHERs’  cONDUcT,  aND  THE  pUbLIc  pILED ON wITH THEIR OwN accOUNTs Of pHysIcIaN ¸IscONDUcT.ÄÒ °E REsEaRcHERs REspONsIbLE  fOR ONE Of BEEcHER’s  casEs pUbLIsHED  a LETTER TO THE EDITOR:  “¶R.  BEEcHER  qUOTEs  OUT  Of  cONTExT,  OVERsI¸pLIfiEs  aND  OTHERwIsE  DIsTORTs  THE  pURpOsE  aND  fiNDINgs Of OUR  INVEsTIgaTION.”ÎØ BEEcHER DIs¸IssED  THE¸:  “º  DO  NOT  bELIEVE  THIs  Is  sO,  aND  ObVIOUsLy  NEITHER  DID  THE  3  EDITORs  wHO  cHEckED ¸y casEs.”ÆÑ ´UgENE BRaUNwaLD, INVOLVED IN THREE Of BEEcHER’s casEs  aT THE nih CLINIcaL CENTER, pREpaRED a pOINT-by-pOINT cRITIqUE, aRgUINg THaT  BEEcHER ¸IsUNDERsTOOD THE ROLE Of paTIENTs aND HEaLTHy VOLUNTEERs aND  THE  ROLE Of cONsENT aT THE CLINIcaL CENTER. BUT REcOgNIzINg THE VaLUE Of sO¸E Of  BEEcHER’s cRITIqUEs, BRaUNwaLD DEcIDED NOT TO REspOND.ÎÃ

ºT  was  cLEaR  THaT  THOUgHTfUL  REsEaRcHERs  cOULD  DIsagREE.  BEEcHER’s  LIsT  INcLUDED sTUDIEs aT THE WILLOwbROOk STaTE ScHOOL, IN wHIcH REsEaRcHERs HaD 

159

As HE  ExpLaINED  TO  ONE cRITIc, 

“°E THOUgHT THaT sO¸E wOULD HaVE agREED THaT DELIbERaTE INfEcTION was aLL  RIgHT sINcE THE sUbjEcTs wERE ¸ENTaL DEfEcTIVEs gIVEs ¸E THE µazI sHUDDERs.”ÆØ °E  sTUDy’s  DEfENDERs,  HOwEVER,  appEaLED  TO  OTHER  jUsTIficaTIONs.  GEOffREy  ´DsaLL, fRO¸ THE MassacHUsETTs ¶EpaRT¸ENT Of PUbLIc ÁEaLTH, TOLD BEEcHER  THaT “If º HaD a cHILD IN WILLOwbROOk, aND If º HaD HaD IT cLEaRLy ExpLaINED TO  ¸E—as  KRUg¸aN ET aL. DID wITH THE paRENTs Of HIs  cHILDREN—THaT ¸y cHILD  was  bOUND TO cO¸E  DOwN wITH HEpaTITIs sOONER OR LaTER, as aLL  THE cHILDREN  DO  IN  WILLOwbROOk;  If  º  was  THEN  askED  TO  pER¸IT  ¸y  cHILD  TO  bE  paRT  Of  aN  ExpERI¸ENT  wHIcH  HOpEfULLy  wOULD  bE  Of  bENEfiT  TO  ¸aN,  º  wOULD  bE  DELIgHTED TO HaVE THaT OppORTUNITy TO aLLOw THE cHILD TO cONTRIbUTE.” ºf ETHIcaL  baRRIERs wERE  sET  TOO HIgH,  ´DsaLL aRgUED,  THEy wOULD  DIsRUpT “THE  TREND  Of  pROgREss  THaT aLL  HU¸aN bEINgs waNT, aND THaT  THE VasT ¸ajORITy aRE  wILLINg  TO cONTRIbUTE TO.”ÆØ

The Aftermath ¶EspITE BEEcHER’s  fERVOR, HIs gOaLs  wERE ¸ODEsT. ÁE qUaLIfiED HIs  “TROUbLINg  cHaRgEs”  wITH THE affiR¸aTION THaT  “A¸ERIcaN ¸EDIcINE  Is sOUND,  aND  ¸OsT  pROgREss IN IT Is sOUNDLy aTTaINED.” Ñ ÁE HOpED THaT sI¸pLy REVEaLINg pRObLE¸s  wOULD bE sUfficIENT TO aDDREss THE¸. As HE TOLD GaRLaND, “¸OsT Of THE ETHIcs  ERRORs aRE OwINg TO THOUgHTLEssNEss OR caRELEssNEss,  NOT a  VIcIOUs DIsREgaRD  fOR THE paTIENTs’ RIgHTs. º a¸ UTTERLy cONVINcED THaT caLLINg aTTENTION TO THE  ETHIcaL  pRObLE¸s  INVOLVED  wILL  LEaD  TO  ELI¸INaTION  Of  THE  VasT  ¸ajORITy  Of  ¸IsTakEs.” ÆØ ÁE  DID  NOT  REcO¸¸END  NEw  REgULaTIONs  OR  fOR¸aL  OVERsIgHT,  INsTEaD  E¸pHasIzINg  THE  I¸pORTaNcE  Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  aND  “THE  ¸ORE  RELIabLE safEgUaRD pROVIDED by THE pREsENcE Of aN INTELLIgENT, INfOR¸ED, cONscIENTIOUs, cO¸passIONaTE, REspONsIbLE INVEsTIgaTOR.”Ñ BEEcHER’s ExpOsé HaD I¸¸EDIaTE I¸pacT. ME¸bERs Of CONgREss wROTE TO  THE  nih  INqUIRINg abOUT  pOssIbLE cORREcTIVE  acTIONs.Ò BEEcHER’s  aRTIcLE  pROVIDED sUppORT fOR a 1965 pROpOsaL by nih DIREcTOR Ja¸Es SHaNNON TO REqUIRE  pEER  REVIEw Of REsEaRcH,  pROTEcT  THE RIgHTs  aND  wELfaRE Of paRTIcIpaNTs, aND  ENsURE  appROpRIaTE INfOR¸ED cONsENT. ÎÆ ÁIsTORIaN ¶aVID  ³OTH¸aN HIgHLIgHTs  1966  as  THE  sTaRT  Of  a  bROaD  TRaNsfOR¸aTION  Of  bIOETHIcs  aND  THE  paTIENT-  DOcTOR  RELaTIONsHIp,  as  paTIENTs,  LawyERs,  aND  ETHIcIsTs  sHapED  ¸EDIcINE’s 

” h c r a e s e R   l a c i n i l C   d n a   s c i h t E“

INfEcTED  DIsabLED  cHILDREN  wITH HEpaTITIs.

Ñ,ÎÄ

¸ORaL cODE. BEEcHER, accORDINg TO ³OTH¸aN, HaD jOINED THE RaNks Of ÁaRRIET 

160

BEEcHER STOwE, ·pTON SINcLaIR, aND ³acHEL CaRsON. Ò °EsE cHaNgEs, HOwEVER, wERE NOT a REspONsE TO a sINgLE aRTIcLE. BEEcHER 

r e r e d e L   d n a  , y d a r G   , s e n o J

HaD pUbLIsHED REpEaTEDLy abOUT REsEaRcH ETHIcs. MaURIcE PappwORTH wORkED  IN  paRaLLEL  IN  ´NgLaND  TO  ExpOsE  UNETHIcaL  REsEaRcH.ÄÄ ºN  FEbRUaRy  1966,  bETwEEN  BEEcHER’s  cONfERENcE  pREsENTaTION  aND pUbLIcaTION  Of  THE aRTIcLE,  THE  ·.S.  SURgEON  GENERaL  REqUEsTED  THaT  HOspITaLs aND  UNIVERsITIEs  EsTabLIsH  REVIEw bOaRDs. Äà MaNy  scHOLaRs  jOINED  THE  DIscUssION  aſtER  BEEcHER.ÎÎ AND  scaNDaLs  cONTINUED  TO  E¸ERgE.  °E  ¹UskEgEE  sypHILIs  sTUDy,  wHIcH  sEIzED pUbLIc aTTENTION IN 1972, was THE ¸OsT fa¸OUs.ÎÏ ºN REspONsE, SENaTOR  ´DwaRD  KENNEDy (¶-MA)  HELD  HEaRINgs ON HU¸aN  ExpERI¸ENTaTION  THaT  LED TO THE µaTIONaL ³EsEaRcH AcT IN 1974  aND THE µaTIONaL CO¸¸IssION fOR  THE PROTEcTION Of ÁU¸aN SUbjEcTs. °E CO¸¸IssION’s 1979 BEL¸ONT ³EpORT  gUIDED THE sysTE¸s THaT cONTINUE TO REgULaTE HU¸aN REsEaRcH IN THE ·NITED  STaTEs.Ò,× WOULD BEEcHER bE saTIsfiED wITH cURRENT aRRaNgE¸ENTs? ÁE pUT HIs TRUsT  IN  TwO  safEgUaRDs:  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  aND  VIRTUOUs  REsEaRcHERs.  ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  Is  aL¸OsT  aLways  ObTaINED  TODay,  THOUgH  IT  RE¸aINs  I¸pERfEcT.ÎÐ ºNVEsTIgaTOR  VIRTUE  Is  HIgHLy  VaLUED,  yET IRONIcaLLy,  THE  cO¸pLIaNcE cULTURE  Of ¸ODERN HU¸aN-sUbjEcTs pROTEcTION assU¸Es THaT INVEsTIgaTORs caNNOT bE  RELIED  ON.ÎÑ ¶IscUssIONs  Of ETHIcs  HaVE  bEcO¸E  UbIqUITOUs  IN  THE  REsEaRcH  cO¸¸UNITy, sO¸ETHINg BEEcHER wOULD HaVE appLaUDED. ÁOwEVER, REsEaRcHERs  cO¸pLaIN THaT  INsTITUTIONaL REVIEw bOaRDs HaVE  LOsT  sIgHT Of THEIR  ORIgINaL pURpOsE Of pROTEcTINg HU¸aN sUbjEcTs, fOcUsINg INsTEaD ON bUREaUcRaTIc  ¸INUTIaE.ÎÒ AND REsEaRcHERs sTILL wORRy THaT ExcEssIVE aTTENTION TO ETHIcs caN  HINDER THE REsEaRcH ENTERpRIsE. ARE wE—50 yEaRs aſtER BEEcHER—bETTER THaN OUR pREDEcEssORs aT REcOgNIzINg  aND pREVENTINg UNETHIcaL REsEaRcH? ALL BEEcHER’s Exa¸pLEs HaD bEEN  pUbLIsHED IN pRO¸INENT jOURNaLs, yET fEw HaD INspIRED aN OUTcRy. WE assU¸E  THaT wE aRE NOw ¸ORE sENsITIVE TO ETHIcaL cONcERNs THaN pasT REsEaRcHERs, aND  wE ¸ay wELL bE. WE HaVE wELL-EsTabLIsHED gUIDELINEs THaT DID NOT pREVIOUsLy  ExIsT. Î× BUT  sENsITIVITy  TO  REsEaRcH  ETHIcs  DID  ExIsT,  EVEN  If  pasT  REsEaRcHERs  REsIsTED  fOR¸aL  REgULaTION:  ¸aNy  UNDERsTOOD  HOw  THEy  OUgHT  TO  bEHaVE  TOwaRD  REsEaRcH sUbjEcTs aND  wORRIED  abOUT THEIR  faILUREs TO  DO  sO.  µEVERTHELEss,  ETHIcaL  faILUREs  OccURRED  THROUgHOUT  THE  TwENTIETH  cENTURy  aND  cONTINUE IN THE TwENTy-fiRsT. °REE LEssONs aRE cLEaR. FIRsT, ETHIcaL VaLUEs cHaNgE OVER TI¸E, aND IT Is  I¸pORTaNT TO UNDERsTaND HOw aND wHy. SEcOND, THERE Is NOT aLways cONsENsUs ON wHaT cOUNTs as ETHIcaL REsEaRcH,  OR wHO caN bE appROpRIaTE REsEaRcH 

sUbjEcTs: THOUgHTfUL pEOpLE OſtEN DIsagREE. ARTIcLEs LIkE BEEcHER’s pLay a cRUcIaL  ROLE IN fOsTERINg DEbaTE THaT caN LEaD TO cONsENsUs abOUT ETHIcaL VaLUEs. °IRD, 

161

LED REsEaRcHERs TO cONDUcT sTUDIEs THEy kNEw TO bE TRaNsgREssIVE. ºT wOULD bE  HUbRIs TO THINk THaT sUcH LapsEs cOULD NOT HappEN agaIN.

notes 1  ¶RazEN JM, SOLO¸ON CG, GREENE MF. ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT aND ¼u¿¿ort.  N Engl J Med.  2013;368:1929–1931. 2  BILI¸ORIa KY, CHUNg JW, ÁEDgEs ²Â, ET aL. µaTIONaL cLUsTER-RaNDO¸IzED TRIaL Of DUTy-  HOUR flExIbILITy IN sURgIcaL TRaININg.  N Engl J Med. 2016;374:713–727. 3  GERIckE CA. ´bOLa aND ETHIcs: aUTOpsy Of a faILURE. BMJ. 2015;350:H2105. 4  ³OTH¸aN ¶J. ´THIcs aND HU¸aN ExpERI¸ENTaTION. N Engl J Med. 1987;317:1195–1199. 5  FaDEN  ³³,  BEaUcHa¸p  ¹².  A  History  and  °eory of  Informed  Consent .  µEw  YORk:  ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1986. 6  ¹RUOg  ³¶.  PaTIENTs  aND  DOcTORs—EVOLUTION  Of  a  RELaTIONsHIp.  N  Engl  J  Med .  2012;366:581–585. 7  BEEcHER ÁK. ´THIcs aND cLINIcaL REsEaRcH. N Engl J Med. 1966;274:1354–1360. 8  ³OTH¸aN  ¶J.  Strangers  at  the Bedside:  A  History  of  How Law  and  Bioethics  Trans-

formed Medical Decision Making . µEw YORk: BasIc BOOks, 1991. 9  ²EDERER S´.  Subjected to Science:  Human Experimentation in  America  before the Sec-

ond World War . BaLTI¸ORE: JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1995. 10  BERNaRD C.  An  Introduction  to the  Study of Experimental  Medicine.  1865; µEw  YORk:  ¶OVER, 1957. 11  ±sLER W. °E EVOLUTION  Of THE  IDEa  Of ExpERI¸ENT  IN ¸EDIcINE.  Trans Cong Am  Phys 

Surg. 1907;7:7–8. 12  CaNNON  WB. °E RIgHT aND  wRONg Of ¸akINg  ExpERI¸ENTs ON  HU¸aN bEINgs.  ¼½¾½ .  1916;67:1372–1373. 13  “´THIcaLLy  º¸pOssIbLE”: ¼td ³EsEaRcH  IN GUaTE¸aLa  fRO¸  1946 TO  1948.  WasHINgTON,  ¶C: PREsIDENTIaL CO¸¸IssION fOR THE STUDy Of BIOETHIcaL ºssUEs, 2011. 14  S¸ITH S². MUsTaRD  gas aND  A¸ERIcaN RacE-basED HU¸aN  ExpERI¸ENTaTION  IN WORLD  WaR ºº. J Law Med Ethics. 2008;36:517–521. 15  S¸ITH S². Toxic Exposures: Mustard Gas and the Health Consequences of World War II 

in the United States . µEw BRUNswIck, µJ: ³UTgERs ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2017. 16  WEINDLINg P.  Nazi  Medicine and the Nuremberg Trials:  From Medical War Crimes  to 

Informed Consent . µEw YORk: PaLgRaVE Mac¸ILLaN, 2004. 17  ÁaRRIs SÁ. Factories of death: Japanese Biological Warfare, 1932–1945, and the Ameri-

can Cover-Up. µEw YORk: PsycHOLOgy PREss, 2002. 18  WEINDLINg P.  “µO  ¸ERE  ¸URDER  TRIaL”:  THE  DIscOURsE  ON  HU¸aN  ExpERI¸ENTs  aT  THE  µURE¸bERg  ¸EDIcaL  TRIaL.  ºN:  ³OELckE  Â,  MaIO  G,  EDs.  Twentieth  Century  Ethics  of 

Human Subjects Research: Historical Perspectives on Values, Practices, and Regulations .  STUTTgaRT, GER¸aNy: FRaNz STEINER ÂERLag, 2004:167–180.

” h c r a e s e R   l a c i n i l C   d n a   s c i h t E“

¸aNy INTEREsTs—¸EDIcaL, pERsONaL, pOLITIcaL, ¸ILITaRy, aND cO¸¸ERcIaL—HaVE 

19  ANNas GJ, GRODIN MA, EDs. °e Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code: Human Rights 

162

in Human Experimentation. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1992. 20  ADVIsORy  CO¸¸ITTEE  ON  ÁU¸aN  ³aDIaTION  ´xpERI¸ENTs.  °e  Human  Radiation 

Experiments. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1996:236. r e r e d e L   d n a  , y d a r G   , s e n o J

21  STaRk ².  Behind Closed Doors: ÄÅÆs and the Making of Ethical Research. CHIcagO: ·NIVERsITy Of CHIcagO PREss, 2012. 22  ´DELsON PJ. ÁENRy K. BEEcHER aND MaURIcE PappwORTH: HONOR IN THE DEVELOp¸ENT Of  THE ETHIcs Of HU¸aN ExpERI¸ENTaTION. ºN: ³OELckE Â, MaIO G, EDs.  Twentieth Century 

Ethics  of Human  Subjects  Research:  Historical  Perspectives  on  Values, Practices,  and  Regulations. STUTTgaRT, GER¸aNy: FRaNz STEINER ÂERLag, 2004:219–233. 23  ²EDERER S´. ³EsEaRcH wITHOUT bORDERs: THE ORIgINs Of THE  ¶EcLaRaTION Of  ÁELsINkI. ºN:  ³OELckE Â,  MaIO  G, EDs.  Twentieth Century Ethics of  Human  Subjects Research:  His-

torical  Perspectives on  Values, Practices,  and Regulations .  STUTTgaRT,  GER¸aNy:  FRaNz  STEINER ÂERLag, 2004:199–217 24  PODOLsky SÁ. °e Antibiotic Era: Reform, Resistance,  and the Pursuit of a Rational 

°erapeutics. BaLTI¸ORE: JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2014:92–93. 25  BEEcHER  ÁK.  Research  and  the  Individual:  Human  Studies.  BOsTON:  ²ITTLE,  BROwN,  1970:231. 26  ²ERNER  BÁ.  SINs  Of  O¸IssION—caNcER  REsEaRcH  wITHOUT INfOR¸ED  cONsENT.  N  Engl  J 

Med. 2004;351:628–630. 27  ÁaRkNEss J,  ²EDERER  S´,  WIkLER ¶.  ²ayINg  ETHIcaL  fOUNDaTIONs  fOR  cLINIcaL REsEaRcH. 

Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79:365–366. 28  FREIDENfELDs  ².  ³EcRUITINg  aLLIEs  fOR  REfOR¸:  ÁENRy  KNOwLEs  BEEcHER’s  “´THIcs  aND  cLINIcaL REsEaRcH.” Int Anesthesiol Clin. 2007;45:79–103. 29  McCOy AW. ScIENcE IN ¶acHaU’s sHaDOw: ÁEbb, BEEcHER, aND THE DEVELOp¸ENT Of »i¾  psycHOLOgIcaL TORTURE aND ¸ODERN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs. J Hist Behav Sci. 2007;43:401–417. 30  Henry  K.  Beecher  Papers,  1848–1976.  BOsTON:  ÁaRVaRD  MEDIcaL  ²IbRaRy,  FRaNcIs  A.  COUNTway ²IbRaRy Of MEDIcINE. 31  BEEcHER ÁK. ´xpERI¸ENTaTION IN ¸aN.  Ç»Â. 1959;169:461–478. 32  BEEcHER ÁK. ´THIcs aND ExpERI¸ENTaL THERapy. ¼½¾½. 1963;186:858–859. 33  BURNETT CÁ, BLOO¸bERg ´², SHORTz G,  CO¸pTON ¶W, BEEcHER ÁK. A cO¸paRIsON Of  THE EffEcTs Of ETHER aND cycLOpROpaNE aNEsTHEsIa ON THE RENaL fUNcTION Of ¸aN.  J Phar-

macol Exp °er. 1949;96:380–387. 34  ±s¸UNDsEN JA. PHysIcIaN scOREs TEsTs ON HU¸aNs. New York Times . MaRcH 24, 1965. 35  ºNgELfiNgER  FJ.  JOsEpH  GaRLaND,  M.¶.,  1893–1973:  THE  EDITOR.  N  Engl  J  Med.  1973;  289:641–642. 36  GaRLaND J. ´xpERI¸ENTaTION ON ¸aN.  N Engl J Med. 1966;274:1382–1383. 37  BEEcHER ÁK. ÁU¸aN ExpERI¸ENTaTION.  N Engl J Med . 1966;275:791. 38  GOLD JA. ³EVIEw Of: Strangers at the Bedside. N Engl J Med. 1991;325:1387. 39  ¹RUOp SB. ³EVIEw Of: Strangers at the Bedside. ¼½¾½. 1991;266:851. 40  ScOTT J²,  BELkIN  GA,  FINEgOLD SM,  ²awRENcE  JS.  ÁU¸aN  ExpERI¸ENTaTION.  N Engl  J 

Med. 1966;275:790–791. 41  ²EE ¹Á.  Eugene Braunwald and the Rise of Modern Medicine. Ca¸bRIDgE, MA:  ÁaRVaRD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2013.

42  ³ObINsON  WM,  ·NRUH  B¹.  °E  HEpaTITIs  ExpERI¸ENTs  aT  THE  WILLOwbROOk  STaTE  ScHOOL. ºN:  ´¸aNUEL ´J, GRaDy C, CROUcH ³A, ET aL., EDs.  Oxford Textbook  of Clinical 

163

Research Ethics . µEw  YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2008:80–5. ´¸aNUEL  ´J,  GRaDy  C, CROUcH  ³A,  ET aL.,  EDs.  Oxford  Textbook  of  Clinical Research 

Ethics. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 2008:541–51. 44  ´THIcaL aspEcTs Of ExpERI¸ENTaTION wITH HU¸aN sUbjEcTs.  Daedalus. 1969;98:219–604. 45  ³EVERby SM. Examining Tuskegee: °e Infamous Syphilis Study and Its Legacy. CHapEL  ÁILL: ·NIVERsITy Of µORTH CaROLINa PREss, 2009. 46  GRaDy  C.  ´NDURINg  aND  E¸ERgINg  cHaLLENgEs  Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT.  N  Engl  J  Med.  2015;372:855–62. 47  KOskI  G.  GETTINg pasT  pROTEcTIONIs¸:  Is  IT  TI¸E  TO  TakE  Off  THE  TRaININg  wHEELs?  ºN:  COHEN  ºG,  ²yNcH  ÁF,  EDs.  Human  Subjects  Research  Regulation: Perspectives  on the 

Future. Ca¸bRIDgE, MA: mit PREss, 2014:341–349. 48  FOsT  µ,  ²EVINE  ³J.  °E  DysREgULaTION  Of  HU¸aN  sUbjEcTs  REsEaRcH.  ¼½¾½ .  2007;298:2196–2198. 49  ´¸aNUEL  ´J,  WENDLER  ¶,  GRaDy  C.  WHaT  ¸akEs  cLINIcaL  REsEaRcH  ETHIcaL?  ¼½¾½ .  2000;283:2701–2711.

” h c r a e s e R   l a c i n i l C   d n a   s c i h t E“

43  McCaRTHy C³.  °E  ORIgINs aND  pOLIcIEs THaT  gOVERN  INsTITUTIONaL  REVIEw bOaRDs.  ºN: 

This page intentionally left blank

healTh caRe  eThicS  and The  clinician’S Role

III

This page intentionally left blank

GlossARy  of BAs±c  ETh±cAl  ConcePTs  ±n  HeAlTh  CARe  And ¶eseARch Nancy M. P. King

autonomy â  °E pRINcIpLE  Of  REspEcT  fOR  aUTONO¸y  aND  THE  RIgHT  Of  sELf-  DETER¸INaTION aRE I¸pORTaNT cONcEpTs IN HEaLTH caRE ETHIcs. “AUTONO¸y” ¸EaNs  THE abILITy TO gOVERN ONEsELf aND THE fREEDO¸ TO DO sO. “SELf-DETER¸INaTION” Is  OſtEN UsED TO ¸EaN aUTONO¸y, EspEcIaLLy IN HEaLTH caRE sETTINgs. A pERsON acTs aUTONO¸OUsLy If THaT pERsON acTs INTENTIONaLLy, wITH  UNDERsTaNDINg,  aND  wITHOUT  bEINg  cONTROLLED  by  OTHERs. BOTH  pERsONs  aND  THEIR  acTIONs  caN  bE  aUTONO¸OUs;  aUTONO¸OUs  pEOpLE  DO  NOT  aLways  acT  aUTONO¸OUsLy,  aND sO¸ETI¸Es pEOpLE wHO aRE NOT aUTONO¸OUs  aRE abLE  TO ¸akE  aUTONO¸OUs DEcIsIONs OR acT aUTONO¸OUsLy IN sO¸E INsTaNcEs. ºT Is I¸pORTaNT  TO  RE¸E¸bER THaT NO  ONE  Is  “fULLy”  aUTONO¸OUs;  wE jUDgE  aUTONO¸y  by THE  ExpEcTaTIONs wE HaVE Of cO¸¸ON HU¸aN bEHaVIOR, aND wE sET a ¸INI¸aL sTaNDaRD Of “sUbsTaNTIaL” aUTONO¸y by wHIcH TO jUDgE pEOpLE aND THEIR acTIONs. ºN HEaLTH caRE, REspEcTINg aUTONO¸y DOEs NOT ¸EaN sI¸pLy LayINg OUT aLL  THE OpTIONs aND TELLINg THE paTIENT, “YOU DEcIDE.” ³EspEcTINg paTIENTs’ aUTONO¸y OſtEN INcLUDEs pRO¸OTINg aN INDIVIDUaL’s abILITy TO DELIbERaTE EffEcTIVELy,  fOR  Exa¸pLE  by  pROVIDINg a  REcO¸¸ENDaTION  aND DIscUssINg  THE  REasONs  bEHIND IT. AUTONO¸y Is  NOT  THE sa¸E  as fREEDO¸,  aND  UsUaLLy  wE  VIEw aUTONO¸y  as INcLUDINg sO¸E REspONsIbILITy fOR THE cONsEqUENcEs Of ONE’s acTIONs. µOw  THaT sOcIETy Has bEcO¸E EspEcIaLLy cONcERNED abOUT THE INTEREsTs OR RIgHTs Of  cO¸¸UNITIEs, THERE Is ¸UcH DIsagREE¸ENT abOUT THE bOUNDaRIEs bETwEEN aN  INDIVIDUaL’s aUTONO¸y aND THE LEgITI¸aTE RIgHTs OR INTEREsTs Of OTHERs. CO¸pETENcE aND  DEcIsIONaL capacITy,  cONcEpTs  RELaTED TO aUTONO¸y, aRE  DEfiNED bELOw.

beneficence/best interests â  °E  pRINcIpLE  Of  bENEficENcE,  OR  THE  bEsT INTEREsTs Of THE pERsON, Is OſtEN cONTRasTED TO aUTONO¸y. °ERE ¸ay, fOR 

Exa¸pLE, bE TI¸Es wHEN a HEaLTH caRE pROVIDER bELIEVEs THaT wHaT aN aUTONO-

168

¸OUs paTIENT waNTs Is NOT IN THaT pERsON’s bEsT INTEREsTs. BENEficENcE fOcUsEs  ON DOINg gOOD. °E cRUcIaL qUEsTION Is, wHO sHOULD bE aLLOwED TO jUDgE wHaT 

g n i K .P   . M  y c n a N

Is gOOD? AN INDIVIDUaL, HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs, fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs, fRIENDs, aND  OTHER aUTHORITIEs ¸ay aLL HaVE DIffERENT jUDg¸ENTs abOUT wHaT Is IN THE INDIVIDUaL’s  bEsT  INTEREsTs.  BEsT  INTEREsTs  ¸ay  bE  DEfiNED  NaRROwLy,  as  IN  “bEsT  ¸EDIcaL INTEREsTs,” OR bROaDLy ENOUgH TO cONsIDER a wIDE VaRIETy Of pERsONaL  facTORs aND VaLUEs. °E ÁIppOcRaTIc ¸axI¸ “AbOVE aLL, DO NO HaR¸” Is TEcHNIcaLLy aN INjUNcTION TO nonmaleficence—aVOIDINg HaR¸—RaTHER THaN TO bENEficENcE—DOINg  gOOD. ºN HEaLTH caRE, THEsE pRINcIpLEs aRE OſtEN cLOsELy RELaTED aND cONsIDERED  TOgETHER. ºf THEy aRE RaNkED IN I¸pORTaNcE, NON¸aLEficENcE gENERaLLy cO¸Es  fiRsT;  HOwEVER,  as  yOU  ¸IgHT  I¸agINE,  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDERs  aND  paTIENTs  ¸UsT OſtEN wEIgH THE RIsk  Of DOINg HaR¸  agaINsT THE cHaNcE  Of DOINg gOOD  wHEN DEcIDINg abOUT TREaT¸ENT. ÁOw “HaR¸” Is  DEfiNED aND  wHO DEfiNEs  IT  aRE pRObLE¸s  fOR NON¸aLEficENcE,  jUsT as  THEy aRE fOR bENEficENcE. AT LEasT ONE sIgNIficaNT  DIffERENcE  ExIsTs bETwEEN THE TwO cONcEpTs: pHysIcIaNs aND OTHER HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs  sO¸ETI¸Es assERT THE RIgHT NOT TO caUsE HaR¸ by wITHDRawINg fRO¸ THE caRE  Of a paTIENT aND sUbsTITUTINg aNOTHER caREgIVER. A paRaLLEL UNILaTERaL RIgHT TO  DO gOOD agaINsT THE paTIENT’s wILL DOEs NOT ExIsT.

coercion â  COERcION Is cONTROL  Of ONE pERsON’s bEHaVIOR by  aNOTHER. ºT Is  aLways INcO¸paTIbLE  wITH aUTONO¸y aND  Is THEREfORE ¸ORaLLy UNaccEpTabLE,  UNLEss  IT  caN  bE jUsTIfiED  by  a  pRINcIpLE  OR INTEREsT  THaT  Is  sUfficIENTLy  cO¸pELLINg  TO  OUTwEIgH  aUTONO¸y  UNDER THE  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs—fOR  Exa¸pLE,  THE  safETy Of OTHER pERsONs pUT aT gRaVE RIsk by aN aUTONO¸OUs acTOR. AcTIONs ¸ay bE cOERcIVE, bUT cOERcION Is UsUaLLy accO¸pLIsHED by THREaTs.  MaNy  INflUENcEs  aRE  LOOsELy  caLLED  cOERcIVE,  bUT  “cOERcION”  sHOULD  bE  REsERVED  fOR  INflUENcEs  THaT  aRE  INTENDED  TO  cONTROL  bEHaVIOR  by  ¸EaNs  Of  a  sEVERE aND IRREsIsTIbLE  THREaT. COERcED  acTIONs aRE INTENTIONaL  acTIONs, bUT  acTIONs abOUT wHIcH THE acTOR “Has NO cHOIcE.” CONTROVERsy caN aRIsE abOUT  cOERcION IN TwO aREas: GENERaLLy, HOw sHOULD wE DEfiNE aND ¸EasURE wHaT Is  “IRREsIsTIbLE”? AND spEcIficaLLy, caN  offers bE sO IRREsIsTIbLE as TO bE cOERcIVE?  (FOR Exa¸pLE, Is THE pRO¸IsE Of paROLE fOR a pRIsONER wHO sUb¸ITs TO ¸EDIcaL  ExpERI¸ENTaTION  sO gREaT  aN OffER as TO OVERwHEL¸  THE pERsON’s  REasONabLE  cONcERNs abOUT THE safETy Of THE ExpERI¸ENT aND INcLINaTION TO say NO?)

SO¸ETI¸Es  pEOpLE  TaLk  abOUT cOERcIVE  sITUaTIONs. ·NpLEasaNT  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs  caN  INDEED  ¸akE  pEOpLE  fEEL  THaT  THEy  HaVE  NO  cHOIcE, bUT  ONLy 

169

INflUENcE  THaT  pERsON’s  bEHaVIOR.  FOR  Exa¸pLE,  THE  sITUaTION  Of  HaVINg  a  sEVERE  ¸ENTaL  ILLNEss  caN  ¸akE  a pERsON  fEEL  THaT  s/HE  Has  NO  cHOIcE  bUT  TO  TakE  a DaNgEROUs  DRUg wITH  UNpLEasaNT  sIDE  EffEcTs. °aT  pERsON Is NOT  cOERcED  by  THE  sITUaTION. BUT  If TakINg THE DRUg  Is REqUIRED  as a qUaLIficaTION  fOR  REcEIVINg  gOVERN¸ENT  assIsTaNcE  IN  HOUsINg  OR  EDUcaTION,  sUcH  REqUIRE¸ENTs—sINcE THEy aRE INsTITUTED wITH THE INTENTION Of ENcOURagINg  ¸ENTaLLy  ILL pEOpLE TO  sTay ON ¸EDIcaTION—¸ay bE  (bUT aRE NOT NEcEssaRILy) cOERcIVE. MaNIpULaTION aND pERsUasION ¸UsT bE DIsTINgUIsHED fRO¸ cOERcION. °Ey  aRE EacH DEfiNED bELOw.

competence â  A  LEgaL  TER¸.  ADULTs  (pEOpLE  agE  18  aND  OVER)  aRE  pREsU¸ED  cO¸pETENT  UNTIL  pROVEN  OTHERwIsE.  °Us, a  sEVERELy  I¸paIRED  aDULT  wHO Has NOT bEEN LEgaLLy DETER¸INED TO bE INcO¸pETENT Is LEgaLLy cO¸pETENT.  °E  DETER¸INaTION Of INcO¸pETENcE Is  ¸aDE IN a  LEgaL pROcEEDINg aND  caN  bE  qUITE  cO¸pLEx aND  DETaILED. A  DETER¸INaTION ¸ay  bE  gLObaL  OR  LI¸ITED.  SO¸EONE  Of  LI¸ITED  cO¸pETENcE  ¸ay  RETaIN  sO¸E  LEgaL  DEcIsION-¸akINg  RIgHTs  wHILE  LOsINg  OTHERs.  FOR  Exa¸pLE,  a  LI¸ITED  gUaRDIaNsHIp  ¸IgHT  bE  EsTabLIsHED fOR fiNaNcIaL ¸aTTERs, bUT THE pERsON wOULD RETaIN THE LEgaL RIgHT  TO ¸akE HEaLTH caRE DEcIsIONs. ºNVOLUNTaRy cO¸¸IT¸ENT Is NOT THE sa¸E as a  DETER¸INaTION Of INcO¸pETENcE. “CO¸pETENcE”  Is OſtEN ¸IsTakENLy cONsIDERED  syNONy¸OUs wITH “DEcIsIONaL capacITy,” wHIcH Is  NOT a  LEgaL TER¸. ºT Is  DEfiNED bELOw.

confidentiality â  CONfiDENTIaLITy Is THE DUTy, ExpEcTaTION, aND/OR pRO¸IsE  THaT  INfOR¸aTION  ExcHaNgED  wITHIN  a  RELaTIONsHIp  wILL  NOT  bE  spREaD  bEyOND THE bOUNDaRIEs Of THaT RELaTIONsHIp (THaT Is, “kEEpINg sEcRETs”). CONfiDENTIaLITy caUsEs pRObLE¸s bEcaUsE sO ¸aNy  DIffERENT RELaTIONsHIps  caN bE  cONNEcTED TO a  cONfiDENTIaL RELaTIONsHIp. SO¸ETI¸Es a pOTENTIaL NEED aRIsEs  TO  pROTEcT  OTHERs  wHO  ¸IgHT  NEED  TO  kNOw  cONfiDENTIaL  INfOR¸aTION  (fOR  Exa¸pLE,  LaNDLORDs  OR  E¸pLOyERs).  SO¸ETI¸Es  THE  pERcEIVED  NEED  ¸ay  bE  TO sHaRE cONfiDENTIaL INfOR¸aTION wITH OTHERs (fOR Exa¸pLE, fa¸ILy OR HEaLTH  caRE pROVIDERs) wHO cOULD bENEfiT THE pERsON wHO ExpEcTs cONfiDENTIaLITy TO 

s t p e c n o C  lacihtE cisaB  fo yrassolG

OTHER  pEOpLE  caN  bE  cOERcIVE,  bEcaUsE  ONLy  OTHER  pEOpLE  caN  INTEND  TO 

bE ¸aINTaINED. SORTINg OUT aND baLaNcINg THEsE cO¸pETINg NEEDs aND INTER-

170

EsTs caN bE ExTRE¸ELy DIfficULT. CONfiDENTIaLITy Is NOT THE sa¸E as pRIVacy, wHIcH Is DEfiNED bELOw.

g n i K .P   . M  y c n a N

conflict  of  interest â  A  gENERaL  TER¸  THaT  caLLs  aTTENTION  TO  a  VaRIETy Of ETHIcaL pRObLE¸s IN sERVIcE RELaTIONsHIps. PEOpLE wHO fiND THE¸sELVEs caUgHT IN a cONflIcT Of INTEREsT ¸ay fEEL THaT THEy aRE TRyINg UNsUccEssfULLy TO sERVE TwO ¸asTERs OR THaT THEy HaVE cONflIcTINg LOyaLTIEs OR DUTIEs TO  OTHERs.  (FOR Exa¸pLE, ¸aNagED  caRE  Has gIVEN  RIsE TO ¸UcH  cONcERN  abOUT  cONflIcTs  Of  INTEREsT,  bEcaUsE  pHysIcIaNs  IN  ¸aNagED  caRE  cONTRacTs  HaVE  INcENTIVEs TO saVE ¸ONEy THaT ¸ay cONflIcT wITH THEIR DUTy Of bENEficENcE TO  paTIENTs. ÁOwEVER, TRaDITIONaL “fEE-fOR-sERVIcE” ¸EDIcINE REwaRDs pHysIcIaNs  fOR DELIVERINg ¸ORE sERVIcEs, wHIcH ¸ay cONflIcT wITH THE DUTy Of NON¸aLEficENcE TO paTIENTs.) ±ſtEN THE fiRsT TypE Of cONflIcT wE THINk Of Is fiNaNcIaL, bUT THERE aRE ¸aNy  OTHERs. FOR  Exa¸pLE, a paRENT’s DEcIsIONs  abOUT ONE cHILD ¸ay  bE affEcTED  by THE NEEDs Of THE OTHER cHILDREN IN THE fa¸ILy; a HEaLTH caRE pROVIDER ¸ay  bE cONcERNED abOUT THE cO¸pETINg NEEDs Of fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs OTHER THaN THE  paTIENT, OR abOUT HOw TO ¸EET THE NEEDs Of ¸ORE THaN ONE paTIENT wHEN TI¸E  Is  LI¸ITED;  aND  THERE aRE  ¸aNy  OTHERs. °E  TER¸ “cONflIcT Of  INTEREsT” HELps  Us flag  cO¸pLIcaTED sITUaTIONs aND sORT OUT THE pOTENTIaLLy cO¸pETINg NEEDs  aND INTEREsTs INVOLVED. CONflIcTs Of INTEREsT aRE cO¸¸ON IN LIfE aND aT LEasT sO¸E ¸ay bE UNaVOIDabLE.  ÁOw THEy sHOULD bE  aDDREssED DEpENDs ON THE cIRcU¸sTaNcEs.  SO¸ETI¸Es  THEy sHOULD bE  ELI¸INaTED;  OTHER TI¸Es,  THEy  ¸ay  bE “¸aNagED,”  fOR  Exa¸pLE, by aN OVERsIgHT ¸EcHaNIs¸; aND sO¸ETI¸Es, DIscLOsINg THE¸ ¸ay  bE  sUfficIENT  TO  aLLOw  THE  pERsONs  pOTENTIaLLy  affEcTED  by  THE¸  TO  REspOND  appROpRIaTELy TO THE RIsks THEy pOsE.

decisional  capacity â  °E  abILITy  TO  ¸akE  sUbsTaNTIaLLy  aUTONO¸OUs  DEcIsIONs.  ºT  Is  assU¸ED  THaT  aDULTs  HaVE  IT.  WHEN  qUEsTIONs  aRIsE  abOUT  sO¸EONE’s DEcIsIONaL capacITy, IT Is ¸EasURED UsINg pRacTIcaLITy aND cO¸¸ON  sENsE, aND wITH REfERENcE TO THE spEcIfic DEcIsION(s) aT IssUE. FOR Exa¸pLE, aN  I¸paIRED pERsON ¸IgHT HaVE THE capacITy TO DEcIDE abOUT gOINg INTO a NURsINg HO¸E bUT Lack THE abILITy TO cHOOsE bETwEEN TwO TREaT¸ENTs fOR a HEaLTH  pRObLE¸ bEcaUsE THaT REqUIREs gREaTER REasONINg skILLs.

ALTHOUgH  sO¸ETI¸Es  wITH ¸ENTaL ILLNEss,  DEcIsIONaL  capacITy  ¸ay  NEED  TO bE  assEssED by aN ExpERT,  sUcH as a  psycHIaTRIsT, IN ¸OsT casEs aN EqUaLLy 

171

TaLkED  wITH  HI¸  OR  HER,  aND  aRE  fa¸ILIaR  wITH THE  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs.  °E  bEsT  TEsT Of sO¸EONE’s capacITy TO ¸akE a paRTIcULaR DEcIsION Is gOINg THROUgH THE  INfOR¸ED cONsENT pROcEss. A VaRIETy Of DIffERENT sTaNDaRDs caN THEN bE UsED;  THEy RaNgE fRO¸ VERy LENIENT (DOEs THE pERsON appEaR TO ExpREss a cHOIcE?) TO  THE  OVERLy sTRIcT (DOEs THE pERsON  ¸akE  THE “RIgHT” DEcIsION fOR  THE “RIgHT”  REasONs?). A ¸ORE appROpRIaTE sTaNDaRD Is pROVIDED by THE DEfiNITION Of sUbsTaNTIaL aUTONO¸y gIVEN abOVE: ¶OEs THIs pERsON sEE¸ TO kNOw THaT THERE Is  a  cHOIcE TO bE ¸aDE,  aND DOEs s/HE sEE¸ TO bE cHOOsINg INTENTIONaLLy, wITH  UNDERsTaNDINg  Of THE  ¸EaNINg  aND  cONsEqUENcEs  Of THE  cHOIcE, aND  wITHOUT bEINg cONTROLLED by OTHERs? ¶IfficULT qUEsTIONs caN aRIsE abOUT wHEN THE  NONLEgaL  DETER¸INaTION  THaT  sO¸EONE  Lacks DEcIsIONaL  capacITy  sHOULD bE  fOLLOwED Up by a LEgaL DETER¸INaTION abOUT cO¸pETENcE.

justice â  JUsTIcE  Is  a  sIgNIficaNT  ETHIcaL  pRINcIpLE  THaT  Has  ¸aNy  DIffERENT  aspEcTs.  GENERaLLy  spEakINg,  wE  wORRy  abOUT  jUsTIcE  ON a  LaRgER  scaLE THaN  THE  INDIVIDUaL—fOR  Exa¸pLE,  fOR  cO¸¸UNITIEs,  spEcIaL  gROUps  (wO¸EN,  ¸INORITIEs,  DIsabLED pERsONs, ETc.), aND  sOcIETIEs. JUsTIcE Is ROUgHLy  syNONy¸OUs wITH faIRNEss, bUT wHaT Is jUsT OR faIR DEpENDs ON THE cIRcU¸sTaNcEs. ºs  TREaTINg  EVERyONE EqUaLLy jUsT? ±R Is  affiR¸aTIVE acTION ¸ORE jUsT  bEcaUsE IT  REDREssEs pasT wRONgs? ¶IsTRIbUTIVE jUsTIcE aDDREssEs HOw sOcIaL gOODs (LIkE  fOOD, sHELTER,  aND HEaLTH caRE) sHOULD bE DIsTRIbUTED. ±NcE agaIN, wE ¸IgHT  ask  wHETHER  EqUaLITy  Is  a  jUsT  pRINcIpLE  Of  DIsTRIbUTION,  OR  wHETHER  “fRO¸  EacH  accORDINg  TO  HIs  abILITy,  TO  EacH  accORDINg TO  HIs  NEEDs”  Is  ¸ORE  jUsT.  FaIR pROcEDUREs aND faIR HEaRINgs aRE aLsO cO¸pONENTs Of jUsTIcE.

manipulation â  MaNIpULaTION Is THE HaRDEsT caTEgORy TO gRasp IN THE TRIO  Of  cOERcION,  ¸aNIpULaTION,  aND  pERsUasION.  MaNIpULaTION  faLLs  IN  bETwEEN  THE  OTHER TwO  aND  caN EssENTIaLLy  bE  ONE Of TwO  THINgs: aN INTENTIONaL  aND  sUccEssfUL  aLTERaTION  Of  a  pERsON’s  aVaILabLE cHOIcEs  by  ¸EaNs  THaT  aRE  NOT  cOERcIVE  (fOR  Exa¸pLE, by a  REsIsTIbLE THREaT  OR OffER), OR  aN INTENTIONaL aND  sUccEssfUL aLTERaTION Of a pERsON’s pERcEpTION Of THOsE cHOIcEs by ¸EaNs THaT  aRE NOT pERsUasIVE, THaT Is, NOT fOcUsED ON REasON (fOR Exa¸pLE, by a sUccEssfUL appEaL TO E¸OTION, OR by psycHOLOgIcaL INflUENcE). A cO¸¸ON HEaLTH caRE 

s t p e c n o C  lacihtE cisaB  fo yrassolG

RELIabLE  DETER¸INaTION  caN  bE  ¸aDE  by  THOsE  wHO kNOw  THE  pERsON,  HaVE 

Exa¸pLE Is  wHEN a  pROVIDER  ¸IsTakENLy bELIEVEs  THaT pERsUasION  Is ¸ORaLLy 

172

wRONg, bUT bELIEVEs THaT a paRTIcULaR cHOIcE Is THE RIgHT ONE fOR a paTIENT, aND  THEREfORE sLaNTs OR sELEcTIVELy pROVIDEs INfOR¸aTION, pERHaps UsINg LaNgUagE 

g n i K .P   . M  y c n a N

cHOsEN fOR a paRTIcULaR E¸OTIONaL EffEcT, IN ORDER TO ENsURE THaT THE INfOR¸ED  cONsENT pROcEss Has THE OUTcO¸E DEsIRED by THE pROVIDER. A cO¸¸ON Exa¸pLE OUTsIDE Of HEaLTH caRE Is aDVERTIsINg. MaNIpULaTION Is  TO  a  LaRgE  ExTENT a  ¸aTTER  Of  DEgREE  aND  a  qUEsTION  Of  cONTExT.  ºT  Is NOT  aLways INcO¸paTIbLE  wITH aUTONO¸y, bUT THERE aRE aL¸OsT  aLways aLTERNaTIVEs THaT HELp TO pROTEcT, pRO¸OTE, aND fOsTER aUTONO¸y, wHIcH  ¸aNIpULaTION DEfiNITELy DOEs NOT.

paternalism â  “PaTERNaLIs¸”  Is  aNOTHER  TER¸  THaT  Is  OſtEN  LOOsELy UsED.  ¹RUE  paTERNaLIs¸, aLsO caLLED sTRONg  paTERNaLIs¸, OccURs wHEN ONE pERsON  OVERRIDEs THE aUTONO¸OUs cHOIcEs aND acTIONs Of aNOTHER IN THE OTHER pERsON’s  bEsT INTEREsTs (fOR Exa¸pLE, pREVENTINg a “RaTIONaL sUIcIDE”). ºT Is NOT paTERNaLIsTIc TO OVERRIDE  sO¸EONE’s acTIONs  OR cHOIcEs  IN ORDER TO bENEfiT, OR pREVENT  HaR¸ TO, THIRD paRTIEs. ºT Is aLsO NOT paTERNaLIsTIc TO OVERRIDE sO¸EONE’s acTIONs  OR  cHOIcEs wHEN  THaT  pERsON Is NOT  acTINg aUTONO¸OUsLy  (fOR Exa¸pLE,  pREVENTINg sUIcIDE by a pERsON wHO Is DELUsIONaL), bEcaUsE THEN bENEficENcE aND  aUTONO¸y aRE NOT IN cONflIcT. ÁOwEVER, THIs Is aLsO OſtEN caLLED paTERNaLIs¸,  OR wEak paTERNaLIs¸. As THE sUIcIDE Exa¸pLEs gIVEN HELp TO sHOw, ¸aNy OccasIONs  wHEN  “paTERNaLIs¸”  Is  ¸ENTIONED  aRE  INsTaNcEs  wHERE  THE  aUTONO¸y  aND bENEficENcE Of THE cHOIcEs aT IssUE aRE qUEsTIONabLE OR IN DIspUTE.

persuasion â  PERsUasION  Is  THE  INTENTIONaL  aND  sUccEssfUL  aTTE¸pT  TO  INDUcE  a pERsON,  THROUgH appEaLs TO REasON, TO fREELy aDOpT  THE bELIEfs,  VaLUEs,  aTTITUDEs, INTENTIONs, OR acTIONs aDVOcaTED by  THE pERsUaDER. ºT Is  cO¸paTIbLE  wITH  aUTONO¸y,  aND  INDEED  OſtEN  facILITaTEs  aUTONO¸OUs  DEcIsION  ¸akINg, bEcaUsE IT Is  basED ON REasONED DIscOURsE aND sHaRED cO¸¸UNIcaTION aND DIscUssION. ´DUcaTION aND pERsUasION aRE cLOsELy LINkED.

privacy â  PRIVacy Has TwO ¸EaNINgs: a cO¸¸ONsENsE ¸EaNINg aND a LEgaL  ¸EaNINg.  °E  cONsTITUTIONaL  RIgHT  Of  pRIVacy  caN  bE  cONfUsINg  bEcaUsE  IT  ¸EaNs  fREEDO¸  fRO¸  gOVERN¸ENTaL  INTRUsION  INTO  cERTaIN  DEcIsIONs  aND  acTIONs RELaTINg TO ONE’s bODy, RELaTIONsHIps, REpRODUcTION, spEEcH, aND IDEas—a 

REaL gRab bag Of pERsONaL acTIONs aND DEcIsIONs. (°Is ¸EaNINg Of pRIVacy Has  bEEN sO¸EwHaT ¸ODIfiED by THE cOURTs, fRO¸ a “cONsTITUTIONaL pRIVacy RIgHT” 

173

CO¸¸ONsENsE  pRIVacy  Is  a  sO¸EwHaT  DIffERENT  gRab  bag.  ºT  REfERs  TO  fREEDO¸ fRO¸ INTRUsIONs UpON  sOLITUDE (bEINg  EaVEsDROppED UpON, pHOTOgRapHED, OR spIED ON IN cIRcU¸sTaNcEs wHERE wE cO¸¸ONLy HaVE aN “ExpEcTaTION  Of pRIVacy,”  sUcH as  aT HO¸E) aND  fREEDO¸ fRO¸ HaVINg  pRIVaTE facTs  ¸aDE  pUbLIc  OR  fRO¸  UNwaNTED  pUbLIcITy  (agaIN,  THIs  Is  ¸EasURED  agaINsT  wHaT  sOcIETy REasONabLy bELIEVEs Is pRIVaTE  aND wHaT Is pUbLIc). °E pRIVacy  Of ¸EDIcaL REcORDs (¸ORE pROpERLy, THE cONfiDENTIaLITy Of THEIR cONTENTs, bUT  pOpULaR aND LEgIsLaTIVE LaNgUagE HaVE cONfUsED THE TwO) Is aN IssUE Of gROwINg I¸pORTaNcE IN THIs INfOR¸aTION agE, aND DETER¸INaTIONs abOUT wHaT ¸ay  aND  ¸ay NOT bE sHaRED wITH OTHERs (sUcH as E¸pLOyERs, INsURERs, aND INfOR¸aTION pURcHasERs) DEpENDs ON wHaT Is cONsIDERED a REasONabLE ExpEcTaTION  Of pRIVacy. “PRIVacy” IN aNy Of ITs ¸EaNINgs Is NOT THE sa¸E as “cONfiDENTIaLITy,” wHIcH  ¸EaNs kEEpINg sHaRED INfOR¸aTION wITHIN a RELaTIONsHIp.

rights â  °E  cONcEpT Of  RIgHTs  IN  HEaLTH caRE  Is  OVERUsED aND  DIfficULT  TO  DEfiNE, bUT IT NEEDs cLaRIficaTION. BEgINNINg IN THE 1960s aND 1970s, A¸ERIcaN  sOcIETy  bEca¸E  accUsTO¸ED  TO  TaLkINg  abOUT  THE  RIgHTs  Of  cO¸paRaTIVELy  DIsaDVaNTagED  gROUps,  sUcH  as  ETHNIc  aND  RacIaL  ¸INORITIEs,  wO¸EN,  aND  paTIENTs.  MORE REcENTLy, pHysIcIaNs aND OTHER HEaLTH caRE pROfEssIONaLs HaVE  pOINTED  OUT THaT  THEy HaVE RIgHTs  TOO (paRaLLELINg THE DEVELOp¸ENT  Of “VIcTI¸s’  RIgHTs”  TO  cO¸pLE¸ENT  THE  RIgHTs  Of  pERsONs  accUsED  aND  cONVIcTED  Of  cRI¸Es).  As  THE  UsEs  Of  THE  TER¸  “RIgHTs”  HaVE  bEcO¸E  ¸ORE  ExTENsIVE,  ITs  ¸EaNINg  Has  faDED.  °ERE  aRE  ¸aNy  DIffERENT  TypEs  Of  LEgaL  RIgHTs,  fOR  Exa¸pLE, sO THaT THE ¸ERE assERTION Of a RIgHT TELLs Us LITTLE abOUT ITs scOpE OR  EffEcT. MUcH spEcIficITy Is NEcEssaRy IN ORDER TO ¸akE a cLaI¸ Of RIgHT cLEaR  aND ¸EaNINgfUL. °E bEsT  way  TO THINk  abOUT RIgHTs  (¸ORaL OR LEgaL) Is  THaT  THEy aRE cORRELaTIVE TO DUTIEs. °Us, If º HaVE a RIgHT TO DO Å, sO¸EONE ELsE—aN INDIVIDUaL  OR pERHaps THE sTaTE—Has a DUTy TO ¸E, EITHER NOT TO INTERfERE wITH ¸y DOINg  Å  OR, IN  sO¸E INsTaNcEs, TO  assIsT ¸E  IN  DOINg Å.  º ¸ay  aLsO HaVE a  DUTy  TO  ExERcIsE ¸y RIgHT REspONsIbLy, sO as NOT TO INTERfERE wITH THE RIgHTs Of OTHERs. ±NE cO¸¸ON pRObLE¸ wITH RIgHTs LaNgUagE Is THE pERcEpTION THaT EVERyONE Has RIgHTs aND NO ONE Has REspONsIbILITIEs. ANOTHER Is THaT RIgHTs bELONg 

s t p e c n o C  lacihtE cisaB  fo yrassolG

TO a “cONsTITUTIONaL LIbERTy INTEREsT.”)

ONLy  TO  INDIVIDUaLs,  sO  THaT  THE RIgHTs  Of  INDIVIDUaLs  aRE  pITTED  agaINsT THE 

174

INTEREsTs  Of  cO¸¸UNITIEs.  ³IgHTs  LaNgUagE  sHOULD  bE  UsED  jUDIcIOUsLy  TO  aVOID THEsE pITfaLLs.

g n i K .P   . M  y c n a N

virtues â  MaNy Of THE basIc cONcEpTs Of ETHIcs TakE THE fOR¸ Of principles,  THaT  Is, RULEs Of gENERaL appLIcaTION. AUTONO¸y, bENEficENcE,  aND jUsTIcE aRE  aLL Exa¸pLEs Of pRINcIpLEs. ³IgHTs aLsO pLay a pRO¸INENT ROLE IN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs bEcaUsE Of THE cONNEcTIONs bETwEEN ETHIcs, pOLIcy, aND Law. BUT THERE aRE  OTHER ways Of cONcEpTUaLIzINg ETHIcs. ±NE way THaT Is wELL kNOwN TO ¸OsT Of  Us Is THROUgH VIRTUEs. ÂIRTUE LaNgUagE Is THE LaNgUagE Of “bEINg” RaTHER  THaN “DOINg.” WHEREas  pRINcIpLEs  pROVIDE “RULEs” fOR  “sOLVINg” ETHIcaL “pRObLE¸s,” VIRTUEs  DEscRIbE  THE kIND Of pEOpLE wE aspIRE TO bE. °Ey sET sTaNDaRDs Of cHaRacTER aND cONsIDER  HOw DIffERENT  TRaITs  Of cHaRacTER  aDD Up  TO a  gOOD pERsON,  OR  a  gOOD  HEaLTH pROfEssIONaL.  °E ¸ORaL LaNgUagE THaT ¸aNy pEOpLE UsE ¸ORE cLOsELy  ¸aTcHEs  VIRTUEs  THaN  IT  DOEs  pRINcIpLEs.  A  pRINcIpLIsT  ¸IgHT  say,  “YOU’RE  wRONg,” OR, “ºT’s THE RIgHT THINg TO  DO.” ºNsTEaD, ¸aNy pEOpLE say THINgs LIkE,  “º wOULDN’T fEEL RIgHT If º DID THaT,” OR, “º’¸ NOT THE kIND Of pERsON wHO cOULD  DO  THaT.” MaNy  cODEs Of ETHIcs  fOR HEaLTH  caRE  pROfEssIONaLs  UsE VIRTUE  LaNgUagE, fOcUsINg ON wHaT IT ¸EaNs TO bE a gOOD DOcTOR OR a gOOD NURsE ¸ORE  THaN ON RULEs aND acTION gUIDEs (fOR Exa¸pLE, “°E NURsE sHOULD bE HONEsT,”  RaTHER THaN, “°E NURsE sHOULD TELL THE TRUTH”). ÂIRTUE  LaNgUagE Is  THE  LaNgUagE Of  ¸aNy  RELIgIOUs  TRaDITIONs aND  fOR¸s  THE basIs Of ¸UcH Of THE ¸ORaL INsTRUcTION THaT fa¸ILIEs pass ON TO cHILDREN,  bUT  THE cONcEpT  Of VIRTUE  ETHIcs aLsO Has  ROOTs IN  ARIsTOTLE. ANy  cO¸pLETE  sysTE¸  Of  ETHIcs  wILL  INcLUDE  bOTH  pRINcIpLEs  aND  VIRTUEs,  sEEINg  THE¸  as  cO¸pLE¸ENTaRy RaTHER THaN cO¸pETINg ways Of cONcEpTUaLIzINg ETHIcs.

ETh±cs  ±n  Med±c±ne ºN ²NTROdUcTION  TO  µORAl  »OOlS  ANd  »RAdITIONS Larry R. Churchill, Nancy M. P. King, David Schenck,  and Rebecca L. Walker

Foreground  Decisions  in a Background  of Relationships ºN THIs VOLU¸E THE REaDER Is cONfRONTED wITH a VaRIETy Of cO¸pLEx ETHIcaL sITUaTIONs IN ¸EDIcINE aND HEaLTH caRE. °EsE sITUaTIONs aRE TypIcaLLy ExpREssED  as pRObLE¸s REqUIRINg sHaRp-EDgED,  EITHER/OR ¸ORaL cHOIcEs: SHOULD  a pHysIcIaN  LIE  TO  a  paTIENT  wHEN  THE  LIE  pRO¸IsEs  paTIENT  bENEfiT? ºs  IT  gOOD  TO  bE caNDID abOUT ¸EDIcaL ¸IsTakEs, aND  If sO, wHOsE gOOD Is sERVED? SHOULD  pHysIcIaNs  aD¸INIsTER LIfE-saVINg  THERapIEs  IN  OppOsITION  TO  paTIENT  DIREcTIVEs TO fORgO sUcH INTERVENTIONs? °Is Essay Is a bRIEf INTRODUcTION TO ETHIcs IN ¸EDIcINE. ±NE Of ITs aI¸s Is  TO  pROVIDE a  skETcH Of  THE ¸ajOR  ETHIcaL THEORIEs  aND  ¸ORaL TRaDITIONs THaT  aRE  cO¸¸ONLy  UsED  as  TOOLs  fOR  aNaLyzINg  aND  REsOLVINg  cO¸pLEx  ¸ORaL  pRObLE¸s. ALTHOUgH ¸ORaL pRObLE¸-sOLVINg Is aN I¸pORTaNT paRT Of ETHIcs, IT  Is  ONLy a  paRT. ALL ¸ORaL pRObLE¸s ExIsT IN a backgROUND Of UNDERsTaNDINgs,  RELaTIONsHIps,  aND  ExpERIENcEs  THaT  pREfigURE  aND  sHapE  THE¸. ºN  THIs  way,  ETHIcs Is aLsO abOUT THE NaTURE aND qUaLITy Of HU¸aN ENcOUNTERs. A pHysIcIaN wHO DEcIDEs  TO LIE TO HER paTIENT TO pROTEcT  HI¸ fRO¸ sO¸E  HaR¸ DOEs sO IN THE cONTExT Of a HIsTORy aND a RELaTIONsHIp ¸aRkED by ¸aNy  NONDEcIsIONaL  ELE¸ENTs,  INcLUDINg  THE  pREVIOUs  UNDERsTaNDINgs  bETwEEN  THE¸,  THE ¸OTIVaTIONs  fOR  jUDg¸ENT  aND  acTION,  aND  sO¸E  DEgREE  Of TRUsT.  °E decision TO LIE Is THUs ONLy a s¸aLL paRT Of “ETHIcs” IN THIs Exa¸pLE. AssU¸INg  THaT  THEIR pREVIOUs  INTERacTIONs wERE  ¸aRkED by HONEsTy,  THE pHysIcIaN  wHO LIEs TO HER paTIENT cHaNgEs THEIR RELaTIONsHIp aND REDEfiNEs HERsELf. SURROUNDINg HER DEcIsION aRE DELIbERaTIONs, I¸agININgs, aND INTENTIONs THaT pREcEDE, INfOR¸, fOLLOw, aND INEVITabLy aLTER wHO THIs pHysIcIaN Is, aND wHO sHE  Is wITH aND fOR THIs paTIENT.

°Is  cO¸pLEx, cONTExTUaL  backgROUND  NEcEssaRILy gIVEs ¸ORaL DEcIsIONs 

176

a  LaRgER ¸EaNINg, bEcaUsE REspONDINg TO ¸ORaL DILE¸¸as REqUIREs DEcIsION  ¸akERs TO IDENTIfy, cRITIcaLLy assEss, aND pRIORITIzE THEIR ¸ORaL VaLUEs IN ORDER 

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

TO fiND acTIONs THaT ExpREss THEsE VaLUEs. YET THIs Is NO sI¸pLE ¸aTTER, fOR THREE  REasONs.  FIRsT,  ¸ORaL acTORs  ¸ay  bE  UNsURE  jUsT  wHIcH cO¸¸IT¸ENTs  THEy  waNT  TO  ExpREss.  ±ſtEN OUR  DEEpEsT cONVIcTIONs aRE  NOT  TRaNspaRENT  TO  Us,  aND  wE ¸ay  HaVE TO  wORk  TO  DIscOVER  THE¸. SEcOND,  pUTTINg  OUR  cONVIcTIONs aND cO¸¸IT¸ENTs INTO pRacTIcE REqUIREs ¸aNy DIffERENT capacITIEs aND  skILLs.  ´THIcs Is  paRT LOgIc  (fOLLOwINg  aN aRgU¸ENT),  paRT LEaps Of  E¸paTHIc  I¸agINaTION (sTEppINg INTO sO¸EONE ELsE’s sHOEs), paRT sTORyTELLINg (wEaVINg a  cOHERENT THREaD THROUgH OUR ¸ORaL ¸OTIVEs, ¸EaNs, aND acTIONs), aND ¸aNy  OTHER  THINgs.  ´THIcs INVOLVEs  ¸aNy  facULTIEs  aND  capacITIEs.  ºT  Is  NOT  jUsT  a  fUNcTION Of cLEaR REasONINg capacITy OR bENEVOLENT fEELINgs, Of HaVINg THE RIgHT  RULEs OR pRINcIpLEs, OR  Of pOssEssINg  gOOD INTENTIONs  OR acHIEVINg  gOOD OUTcO¸Es.  ºNsTEaD,  ETHIcs  INVOLVEs  aLL  Of  THEsE HU¸aN  capacITIEs  IN  ways  THaT  REqUIRE  ¸ORaL  acTORs  TO  UNDERsTaND  THaT  THEIR  wHOLE  sELVEs  aRE  INVOLVED.  °IRD, bEcaUsE ETHIcaL cHOIcEs ENgagE OUR ¸OsT DEEpLy HELD aND sELf-DEfiNINg  ExpREssIONs,  NO  ONE  TER¸INOLOgy  fOR  DEscRIbINg  ETHIcs  pREDO¸INaTEs.  FOR  Exa¸pLE,  IN  ExpLaININg  THE  fiRsT  TwO  pOINTs  abOVE  wE  HaVE  aLTERNaTIVELy  TaLkED  abOUT  “VaLUEs,”  “cO¸¸IT¸ENTs,”  aND  “cONVIcTIONs.”  °Is  ¸ULTIfacETED LaNgUagE sIgNaLs THaT ETHIcs Is ¸ORE THaN aEsTHETIc pREfERENcEs OR TasTEs,  ¸ORE THaN cONsU¸ER-sTyLE cHOIcEs OR DEsIREs. ´THIcs Is TOO LaRgE aND I¸pORTaNT TO bE  cONfiNED TO ONE  sTaNDaRD sET  Of LINgUIsTIc TER¸s,  aND THIs  VaRIETy  caN  sO¸ETI¸Es  LEaD TO cONfUsION.  WE wILL  RETURN TO  THIs pLURaLIs¸  IN ETHIcaL ExpREssION LaTER  IN THIs Essay, wHEN cONsIDERINg  ETHIcaL THEORIEs aND  THE  I¸pORTaNcE Of aN EcLEcTIc appROacH.

Ethics  as Human and Humanizing ´THIcs  appEaRs TO  bE  DIsTINcTIVELy HU¸aN.  MaNy  OTHER  aNI¸aLs sEE¸  TO bE  capabLE Of ¸ORaL bEHaVIOR—sHa¸E,  LOyaLTy, HELpINg OTHERs—aND pRacTIcE IT  ROUTINELy. BUT IT Is THE capacITy TO sysTE¸aTIcaLLy aND cRITIcaLLy REflEcT ON ONE’s  ¸ORaL bEHaVIOR  THaT sEE¸s  TO bE UNIqUELy  cHaRacTERIsTIc Of  ETHIcs. ´THIcs Is  NOT  sI¸pLy skILL IN  DOINg gOOD, bUT kNOwINg  why wHaT ONE Is  DOINg caN bE  caLLED “gOOD,” HaVINg sELf-cONscIOUsLy cHOsEN IT fRO¸ a¸ONg THE aLTERNaTIVEs.  As faR as wE caN DIscERN, ONLy HU¸aNs pRacTIcE ETHIcs IN THIs REflEcTIVE sENsE. ´THIcs Is aLsO a humanizing acTIVITy. CONVERsaTIONs IN ETHIcs REqUIRE VIEwINg  OTHERs wITH REspEcT aND REgaRD; aN ExcHaNgE IN ETHIcs bEgINs wITH THE assU¸p-

TION THaT  OTHERs aRE Of VaLUE aND  aRE sUbjEcTs Of a  RIcH aND  cO¸pLEx LIfE, jUsT  as wE aRE. °Is sI¸pLE gEsTURE Of REspEcT Is HU¸aNIzINg bEcaUsE IT ¸EaNs THaT 

177

pOwER aND sTaTUs IN ORDER TO ENgagE IN ETHIcs DIscUssION wITH aNOTHER. °Is sUspENsION Of sTaTUs aND pOwER ENabLEs aTTENTION TO THE OTHER pERsON—  aND, REflExIVELy, aLsO TO ONEsELf. °Us, ENgagINg IN ETHIcaL DELIbERaTION ¸EaNs  LIsTENINg—payINg aTTENTION—aND DRaws UpON OUR E¸paTHIc capacITy. ´THIcs REqUIREs Us, aND E¸paTHy ENabLEs Us, fiRsT TO REcOgNIzE OTHER pERsONs  as sENTIENT aND REflEcTIVE bEINgs wHOsE ¸ORaL cO¸¸IT¸ENTs aRE as I¸pORTaNT  TO THE¸ as OUR OwN VaLUEs aRE TO Us, aND THEN TO VIgOROUsLy aND REspEcTfULLy  ENgagE wITH OTHERs aND THEIR VaLUEs. °Is ENgagE¸ENT Is NOT Easy. A¸ERIcaNs  TEND TO bE TOLERaNT Of DIffERENcEs aND  sO¸ETI¸Es RELUcTaNT TO DIscUss THE¸.  ±ſtEN THEy fEaR DIsagREE¸ENT aND sEE IT  as cOUNTERpRODUcTIVE OR pOLaRIzINg,  as If ackNOwLEDgINg DIVERgENcE IN ¸ORaL cONVIcTIONs wOULD ¸akE cONVERsaTION  DIfficULT aND  cONsENsUs I¸pOssIbLE.  YET THIs kIND  Of TOLERaNT RELUcTaNcE  caN bE as DEbILITaTINg fOR ETHIcs as Is THE HaRDENED  IDEOLOgIcaL pOsITIONINg IT  sEEks TO aVOID. GENUINE  ETHIcaL  INqUIRy  aRIsEs  fRO¸ THE  RIcH  HU¸aN  backgROUND  wE  HaVE bEEN DEscRIbINg aND Is cHaRacTERIzED by OpENNEss TO aND ExpLORaTION Of  DIffERENcEs.  °Is ¸ORaL  agNOsTIcIs¸  sTaNDs IN  OppOsITION  TO ¸ORaLIzINg  OR  pROsELyTIzINg fOR ONE’s pOsITION aND aLsO IN OppOsITION TO THE TOLERaNT RELaTIVIs¸  THaT  wOULD  aVOID  ENDORsINg aNy  pOsITION  aT  aLL. ºT  says,  “º HaVE  sTRONg  cONVIcTIONs, bUT º aLsO kNOw THaT º aLONE DO NOT pOssEss THE fiNaL TRUTH.” SUcH  a  DE¸EaNOR  sEEks THE  bEsT  OpTIONs  THROUgH  a  caREfUL  Exa¸INaTION  Of  THE  ETHIcaL I¸pLIcaTIONs Of aLL THE pOssIbILITIEs aND a caREfUL pRObINg Of THE LaRgER  ¸EaNINg  Of THEsE  OpTIONs. °E  assU¸pTION THaT  aLL paRTIEs  ENgagED HaVE a  ¸ORaLLy  sIgNIficaNT HU¸aN  VOIcE  (If NOT  fiNaLLy a fULLy  pERsUasIVE  pOsITION  ON REsOLVINg aN IssUE) Is THE basIc cONDITION fOR DIaLOgUE. °Is assU¸pTION  caN aLsO ¸akE cONsENsUs EasIER aND THE LaRgER Task Of cO¸¸UNITy bUILDINg  pOssIbLE. ´NgagE¸ENT wITH OTHERs IN ¸ORaL DIscUssION Is HU¸aNIzINg IN yET aNOTHER  way. °E ¸UTUaL E¸paTHy aND REspEcTfUL REgaRD fOR DIffERENcEs THaT LETs VaLUEs  E¸ERgE IN  aN ExcHaNgE  Is  aLsO a  ¸ODE  Of INTERacTINg  THaT  Is  VasTLy  LEss  HaR¸fUL  fOR  THE paRTIcIpaNTs. ANyONE wHO Has bEEN INVOLVED IN a  sITUaTION  THaT THREaTENED TO TURN VIOLENT wILL I¸¸EDIaTELy gRasp THE I¸pORTaNcE Of THIs  HU¸aNIzINg fUNcTION. ´THIcaL DIscUssION caN bE THOUgHT Of as a way Of DEaLINg wITH DIffERENcEs—ONE THaT Is sUpERIOR TO ¸aNy OTHER ¸ODEs Of HaNDLINg  DIsagREE¸ENTs,  sUcH  as  sHOUTINg  ¸aTcHEs,  HOLDINg  gRUDgEs, fiLINg  LawsUITs,  OR sHOOTINg pEOpLE. ´THIcaL skILLs bEcO¸E EspEcIaLLy I¸pORTaNT aND UsEfUL IN 

enicideM  ni scihtE

¸ORaL  acTORs  aRE wILLINg  TO sET  asIDE, aT LEasT  fOR THE  ¸O¸ENT, DIffERENcEs  IN 

a  cULTURaL ENVIRON¸ENT Of pOLaRIzaTION  aND VILLaINIzINg Of THOsE wITH DIffER-

178

ENT VIEws. PERHaps  ¸OsT  I¸pORTaNT,  THE  assU¸pTION  Of  THE  ¸ORaL  I¸pORTaNcE  Of 

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

¸ULTIpLE VOIcEs  ¸akEs cO¸¸UNITy  pOssIbLE bOTH bEfORE aND aſtER DEcIsIONs  HaVE  bEEN ¸aDE.  BEcaUsE ¸ORaL DIaLOgUE  Is  a  ¸ODE Of ¸UTUaL REcOgNITION  aND  REspEcT,  IT  Has  a  pOsITIVE  EffEcT  ON  HU¸aN  bONDINg  aND  cO¸¸UNITy  bUILDINg EVEN wHEN IT faILs as a ¸EcHaNIs¸ Of pRObLE¸ sOLVINg OR cONsENsUs.  ´THIcs Has INTRINsIc VaLUE, NOT jUsT INsTRU¸ENTaL VaLUE as a ¸EaNs TO aN END. ºT  Is sO¸ETI¸Es saID THaT VIRTUE Is ITs OwN REwaRD. °Is ¸EaNs NOT ONLy THaT THE  VIRTUOUs sHOULD NOT NEcEssaRILy ExpEcT TO bEcO¸E RIcH aND  fa¸OUs bUT aLsO  THaT bEINg VIRTUOUs TEacHEs ONE a bETTER sET Of REwaRDs THaN ¸ONEy OR fa¸E:  THE  bENEfiTs  Of  INTEgRITy,  cO¸passION,  aND  sELf-REspEcT.  ´NgagINg  OTHERs  IN  ¸ORaL  DIaLOgUE  INHERENTLy  aDVaNcEs  pERsONaL  aND  cO¸¸UNaL  LIfE  IN  ways  THaT HaVE LITTLE TO DO wITH DEcIsIONs, OUTcO¸Es, OR cONsEqUENcEs. °Us, wHILE  IT  ¸ay LEaD TO bETTER DEcIsIONs aND OUTcO¸Es, ETHIcs as aN acTIVITy Is aLsO ITs  OwN REwaRD.

Practicality,  Expertise,  and Common  Moral Wisdom ºN  ONE sENsE ETHIcs  Is E¸INENTLy  pRacTIcaL. ºT  Is abOUT  HOw TO LIVE OUR  LIVEs,  wHaT  cHOIcEs  TO  ¸akE,  aND  ULTI¸aTELy  wHO  wE  aRE,  INDIVIDUaLLy  aND  RELaTIONaLLy. A  NU¸bER Of ¸ORaL THEORIEs aND  TRaDITIONs cO¸¸ONLy INVOkED IN  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs aRE DIscUssED  LaTER IN THIs Essay. SO¸ETI¸Es ¸ORaL agENTs, IN  THE THROEs Of a  DIfficULT cHOIcE, bEcO¸E I¸paTIENT wITH THEORIEs aND  sEEk TO  bypass OR  IgNORE THE¸. YET THEORIEs  OſtEN HaVE  pRacTIcaL UTILITy. °Is  UTILITy  aRIsEs  IN  paRT bEcaUsE THEORIEs  OſtEN cONTaIN sO¸E pORTION Of DIsTILLED  wIsDO¸  abOUT wHaT Is gOOD OR RIgHT. ºN aDDITION, THE acTIVITy  Of THEORIzINg  caN  aLsO bE a VERy HELpfUL way TO LOcaTE INcONsIsTENcIEs IN OUR THINkINg, pREcIsELy  bEcaUsE IT REqUIREs Us TO TakE a sTEp back fRO¸ THE paRTIcULaR cONTExT Of DEcIsIONs aND cHOIcEs TO ask how ¸ORaL IssUEs aRE bEINg fRa¸ED, wHaT assU¸pTIONs  wE  aRE  ¸akINg,  aND  wHaT  wOULD  cOUNT  as  a  gOOD  REasON  fOR  DOINg  sO¸ETHINg. MORaL  THEORIzINg Is I¸pORTaNT bEcaUsE as HU¸aNs wE INEVITabLy sEEk  INTELLEcTUaL cOHERENcE fOR OUR LIVEs. GIVEN ITs cO¸pLExITy aND pRacTIcaL I¸pORTaNcE, ETHIcs ¸IgHT bE (INDEED,  Has bEEN) THOUgHT TO bE a fiELD fOR ExpERTs. ºN THE pasT, pHysIcIaNs, pRIEsTs, aND  sO¸ETI¸Es LawyERs wERE THOUgHT TO bE THE ExpERTs IN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs. ºN cONTE¸pORaRy sOcIETy, bIOETHIcIsTs aND ¸ORaL pHILOsOpHERs aRE OſtEN assIgNED THaT  ROLE. WHILE THERE  Is a  pLacE fOR cONsULTINg aUTHORITIEs  aND ¸ORaL  ExpERTIsE— 

aND  REaL bENEfiT fRO¸ sTUDyINg ÁIppOcRaTEs,  ARIsTOTLE, KaNT, aND µIETzscHE,  NOT TO ¸ENTION FREUD, JUNg, GILLIgaN, aND DOzENs Of OTHERs—THE INsIgHTs Of 

179

accEssIbLE  TO  aNyONE.  °E  pRacTIcaL  skILLs  Of  ETHIcaL  DIscERN¸ENT,  REflEcTION, aND DELIbERaTION aRE aLREaDy aVaILabLE TO THOsE wHO TakE THE TI¸E TO bE  THOUgHTfUL aND  NOT REacTIVE IN ¸ORaL jUDg¸ENTs. AND  wITH sO¸E sTUDy, THE  TOOLs Of VaRIOUs TRaDITIONs aND THEORIEs caN bE aVaILabLE as wELL. A ¸ajOR Task  Of ETHIcaL DELIbERaTION Is DETER¸ININg jUsT wHIcH paRTs Of THEsE TRaDITIONs aND  THEORIEs aRE UsEfUL TOOLs fOR ¸ORaL DIscERN¸ENT IN paRTIcULaR casEs. ´THIcaL DEcIsIONs caN bE VERy cHaLLENgINg fOR a VaRIETy Of REasONs. SO¸ETI¸Es wHaT ¸akEs THE¸ cHaLLENgINg Is  a ¸aTTER Of INaDEqUaTE THEORIEs, OR a  pOOR gRasp OR appLIcaTION  Of THEORETIcaL cONsTRUcTs. AT OTHER TI¸Es THE cHaLLENgE  aRIsEs  fRO¸ INsUfficIENT  aTTENTION TO  THE  cONcRETE DyNa¸Ics  Of  ¸ORaL  ENcOUNTER, THaT Is, TO THE sETTINgs aND RELaTIONsHIps IN wHIcH spEcIfic  ETHIcaL  pRObLE¸s DEVELOp. SO¸ETI¸Es wE DO NEED bETTER THEORIEs OR bETTER jUDg¸ENT  abOUT HOw TO appLy THE¸. SO¸ETI¸Es IT Is ¸ORE HELpfUL TO sEEk bETTER ¸ODEs  Of HU¸aN ENgagE¸ENT—TO cREaTE aND ¸aINTaIN a “¸ORaL spacE” (WaLkER 1993)  wITHIN  wHIcH wE  ¸ay  safELy ENcOUNTER  OURsELVEs aND  EacH  OTHER.  ºN  sHORT,  ETHIcaL DIscUssIONs THaT bEcO¸E UNpRODUcTIVE OR pOLaRIzED caN E¸bODy faILUREs Of sEVERaL sORTs: faILUREs Of E¸paTHy, faILUREs Of I¸agINaTION, faILUREs Of  LOgIc aND aNaLOgIcaL REasONINg, OR, TOO OſtEN, ¸ULTIpLE ¸aLfUNcTIONs. °E  fiNaL  aI¸  Of  ETHIcs Is  ¸ORE  THaN  gOOD  DEcIsIONs; IT  Is  a  gOOD  LIfE,  a  LIfE  ¸aRkED by  ¸ORaL wIsDO¸  acqUIRED  THROUgH ExpERIENcE aND  REflEcTION.  ¶EVELOpINg aND cONsULTINg THaT REsERVOIR Of ¸ORaL wIsDO¸ Is a LIfELONg Task.  WE aRE NOT ¸ORaLLy TRaNspaRENT TO OURsELVEs; fiNDINg aND cRITIcaLLy affiR¸INg  OUR  VaLUEs TakEs  REaL wORk  aND  THE HELp Of cONVERsaTION paRTNERs.  °Is was  ONE  Of THE  ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT LEssONs  Of  SOcRaTEs. MORaL  TRaDITIONs  aND  THEORIEs  caN assIsT Us IN THE wORk Of LOcaTINg, aRTIcULaTINg, aND TEsTINg THE VaLUE-  LaDEN cO¸pONENTs Of OUR  ExpERIENcE—EspEcIaLLy wHEN THEy aRE THOUgHT  Of  as TOOLs, RaTHER THaN as REcIpEs fOR acTION OR aNswER bOOks.

Moral Traditions  and Ethical  Theories:  A Beginning  Inventory  of Tools °Us, bEINg aN ETHIcaLLy LITERaTE pERsON ¸EaNs kNOwINg wHaT TOOLs aRE aVaILabLE,  aND bEINg a gOOD DOcTOR ¸EaNs HaVINg a wORkINg acqUaINTaNcE wITH THE TRaDITIONs aND ¸ajOR THEORIEs THaT aRE LIkELy TO bE HELpfUL IN THE sITUaTIONs pHysIcIaNs  TypIcaLLy facE. ºN WEsTERN ¸ORaL TRaDITION, THEORIEs Of ETHIcs caN bE ROUgHLy 

enicideM  ni scihtE

THEsE  scHOLaRs aND THE TRaDITIONs aND THEORIEs THEy REpREsENT  caN bE ¸aDE 

gROUpED  INTO TwO DO¸aINs: pRINcIpLE aND VIRTUE. PRINcIpLE-basED THEORIEs Of 

180

ETHIcs  aRE  cURRENTLy  DO¸INaNT,  bUT  VIRTUE-ORIENTED  appROacHEs  wERE  syNONy¸OUs wITH ETHIcs UNTIL ROUgHLy THE ´UROpEaN aND µORTH A¸ERIcaN ´NLIgHTEN-

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

¸ENT pERIOD (THE EIgHTEENTH cENTURy), aND THEy sTILL pLay aN I¸pORTaNT ROLE. ºN  cONTE¸pORaRy THOUgHT, ´asTERN ¸ORaL TRaDITIONs, sUcH as CONfUcIaNIs¸ aND  BUDDHIs¸, aRE UsUaLLy THOUgHT Of as VIRTUE-basED.

principle- b ased  theories â  ³EasONINg  THROUgH  pRINcIpLEs  Is  VERy  fa¸ILIaR  IN  WEsTERN  THOUgHT;  IT  Is  qUasI-¸aTHE¸aTIcaL  IN  sTyLE,  sEEkINg  TO  DEDUcE RIgHT cHOIcEs fRO¸ THE appLIcaTION Of NOR¸s. PRINcIpLE-basED REasONINg  fOR¸s THE basIs  Of ¸UcH Of A¸ERIcaN  Law  aND pUbLIc  pOLIcy, aND  IT  Has  sTRONgLy INflUENcED ¸ODERN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs. MaNy REcENT pROfEssIONaL cODEs  Of ETHIcs aRE cO¸pOsED Of pRINcIpLEs, aND sO¸E Of THE LEgaL pRINcIpLEs UNDERLyINg  THE  BILL  Of  ³IgHTs—fREEDO¸  Of  spEEcH,  fREEDO¸  Of  RELIgION,  LIbERTy  aND  pRIVacy,  DUE  pROcEss,  aND  EqUaL  pROTEcTION  Of  THE  Laws—HaVE  bEcO¸E  THOROUgHLy  IDENTIfiED wITH HEaLTH caRE ETHIcs as a  REsULT Of THEIR I¸pORTaNcE  IN  DEfiNINg  THE  RIgHTs  Of  paTIENTs.  °E  TRIU¸VIRaTE  Of  paRTIcULaR  pRINcIpLEs  THaT  sHapE  ¸OsT  DIscUssIONs  Of  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs—aUTONO¸y,  bENEficENcE,  aND  jUsTIcE—Has bEEN  THE cENTERpIEcE  Of  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs THEORy  fOR  sEVERaL  DEcaDEs (BEaUcHa¸p aND CHILDREss 2012). °E  pRINcIpLE  Of  aUTONO¸y, OR  ¸ORE  fULLy,  REspEcT  fOR  aUTONO¸y,  Is  THE  pRINcIpLE ¸OsT OſtEN assOcIaTED wITH paTIENTs’ RIgHTs. ÁONORINg THE aUTONO¸y  Of paTIENTs ¸EaNs accORDINg THE¸ sELf-DETER¸INaTION by VIEwINg THEIR DEcIsIONs  aND  cHOIcEs as wORTHy  Of REspEcT; IT  ¸EaNs NOT INTERfERINg wITH THE¸  (THE “NEgaTIVE” RIgHT TO bE LEſt aLONE) UNLEss THEIR acTIONs INjURE OTHERs; aND IT  aLsO ¸EaNs assIsTINg THE¸ IN THE ExERcIsE Of THEIR aUTONO¸y (fOR Exa¸pLE, by  pROVIDINg INfOR¸aTION abOUT HEaLTH caRE DEcIsIONs aND REasONINg wITH THE¸  abOUT THE bENEfiTs aND HaR¸s Of pOTENTIaL INTERVENTIONs). ºN  cONTRasT,  THE  pRINcIpLE  Of  bENEficENcE  fOcUsEs  ON  THE  DUTy  Of  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDERs TO acT IN THE bEsT INTEREsTs Of THE paTIENT. BENEficENcE, wHIcH  ENTaILs bOTH “DOINg NO HaR¸” aND TRyINg TO DO gOOD, Is gENERaLLy sEEN by HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDERs as THE ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT ¸ORaL pRINcIpLE  IN HEaLTH caRE. MORaL  qUaNDaRIEs IN HEaLTH caRE aRE sO¸ETI¸Es pREsENTED, sO¸EwHaT sUpERficIaLLy,  as cONflIcTs bETwEEN THE pRINcIpLEs Of aUTONO¸y aND bENEficENcE, wHIcH aRE  THEN DIcHOTO¸IzED aND OffERED as EITHER/OR cHOIcEs. AN Exa¸pLE Is a paTIENT’s  DEsIRE  fOR a  cOURsE Of acTION  THaT Is  cONTRaRy TO DOcTORs’ DUTy TO pROTEcT  THE  paTIENT’s HEaLTH. ºN THEsE INsTaNcEs, IT Is  I¸pORTaNT TO REcOgNIzE THaT  a NU¸bER Of kEy cONcEpTs aND IssUEs IN HEaLTH caRE ETHIcs—IN paRTIcULaR, INfOR¸ED 

cONsENT, TRUTH TELLINg, aND cONfiDENTIaLITy—cO¸bINE aND wEIgH bOTH cONsIDERaTIONs Of REspEcT fOR aUTONO¸y aND DUTIEs Of bENEficENcE. CaREfUL aNaLysIs 

181

UNDERsTOOD NOT as INEVITabLy cO¸pETINg bUT as pOTENTIaLLy cO¸pLE¸ENTaRy. JUsTIcE Is UsUaLLy UNDERsTOOD TO ¸EaN faIRNEss, aND IT INTRODUcEs a  wIDER  sOcIaL  DI¸ENsION  TO  INDIVIDUaL  caREgIVER-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIps  THaN  THOsE  aspEcTs E¸pHasIzED by aUTONO¸y aND bENEficENcE. JUsTIcE sO¸ETI¸Es ¸EaNs  aDDREssINg  qUEsTIONs  abOUT  THE  DIsTRIbUTION  Of  HEaLTH  caRE  REsOURcEs,  aND  wHaT  IT  ¸EaNs  TO  DO  sO  EqUaLLy  OR  faIRLy.  ºT  sO¸ETI¸Es  ¸EaNs cONsIDERINg  wHETHER HEaLTH caRE sHOULD HaVE a ROLE IN RE¸EDyINg INjUsTIcEs, pasT OR pREsENT.  JUsTIcE aLsO fOcUsEs ON qUEsTIONs LIkE  wHETHER HEaLTH caRE  Is (OR sHOULD  bE)  a  RIgHT,  aND  wHaT  THaT  ¸IgHT  ¸EaN. GROwINg REcOgNITION  Of  THE  LI¸ITs  Of  THE  fiNaNcIaL  aND  ¸aTERIaL  REsOURcEs  THaT  caN  bE  appLIED TO  ¸EET  HEaLTH  caRE  NEEDs Has HELpED TO bRINg THE LaRgER pOLITIcaL aND  sOcIaL DI¸ENsIONs Of  HEaLTH caRE ETHIcs INTO THE fOREfRONT Of DIscUssION aND cONcERN. °E ¸EaNINg  Of jUsTIcE IN HEaLTH caRE, bOTH DO¸EsTIcaLLy aND gLObaLLy, Is a cENTRaL cONcERN  Of THaT INqUIRy. MaNy  Of  THE  ¸ajOR  ¸ORaL  THEORIEs  THaT  HaVE  bEEN  appLIED  TO  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs aRE  pRINcIpLE-basED. °E “DEONTOLOgIcaL” OR DUTy-basED  ¸ORaL THEORy  Of º¸¸aNUEL KaNT (1724–1804), wHIcH E¸pHasIzEs TREaTINg pERsONs as “ENDs  IN  THE¸sELVEs,” RaTHER THaN  as ObjEcTs TO  bE UsED ONLy as  ¸EaNs fOR acHIEVINg THE ENDs Of OTHERs, Has bEEN INflUENTIaL IN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs’ UNDERsTaNDINg  Of THE pRINcIpLE  Of aUTONO¸y  (1985). JERE¸y  BENTHa¸ (1748–1832)  aND JOHN  STUaRT  MILL  (1806–1873)  aRE  THE  ¸OsT  I¸pORTaNT  ExpONENTs  Of  UTILITaRIaNIs¸,  IN  wHIcH RIgHT  acTIONs aRE  THOsE THaT  REsULT  IN  THE gREaTEsT  wELfaRE fOR  THE gREaTEsT NU¸bER. ·TILITaRIaN THEORIEs cONsIDER bENEficENcE TO bE cENTRaL  (bUT MILL aLsO pREscRIbEs THaT acTIONs THaT DO NOT HaR¸ OTHERs sHOULD NOT bE  INTERfERED wITH by sOcIETy, THUs EsTabLIsHINg aUTONO¸y as a UTILITaRIaN gOOD).  °EsE  TwO  THEORIEs—KaNTIaN  DEONTOLOgy  aND  UTILITaRIaNIs¸—aRE  THE  ONEs  ¸OsT  OſtEN  cITED IN  HEaLTH  caRE  ETHIcs.  ¹OO  OſtEN THEy  aRE  VIEwED  as bEINg  IN  OppOsITION, bUT THEy caN bE aND  fREqUENTLy  aRE cO¸bINED as THE basIs  Of  ¸UcH Law aND pUbLIc pOLIcy (STEINbOck, ²ONDON, aND ARRas 2013).

virtue-  o riented theories â  ÂIRTUE (OR cHaRacTER) Is VERy DIffERENT  fRO¸ pRINcIpLE as a way Of THINkINg abOUT ETHIcs. ºT Is NOT qUaNDaRy-fOcUsED  aND  DOEs  NOT pREsENT a  sET  Of RULEs  OR NOR¸s TO appLy  TO a  pRObLE¸. ÂIRTUE  THEORy LOOks aT pERsONs. ºNsTEaD Of TakINg a cHOIcE OR DEcIsION as THE UNIT Of  aNaLysIs, VIRTUE-ORIENTED appROacHEs INsIsT THaT ¸ORaLITy Is fiRsT aND fORE¸OsT  abOUT  THE  ¸ORaL  acTOR.  ºNsTEaD  Of  askINg  wHETHER  aN  acTION  Is  cONsIsTENT  wITH  a pRINcIpLE, sUcH  as “WHaT DEcIsION DOEs  bENEficENcE REqUIRE?,” VIRTUE 

enicideM  ni scihtE

wILL UNcOVER THE RELaTIONsHIps bETwEEN THE¸, sO THaT THEsE pRINcIpLEs aRE bEsT 

THEORIsTs aRE ¸ORE LIkELy TO ask “WHaT DOEs IT ¸EaN TO bE a TRUsTwORTHy pHy-

182

sIcIaN  IN THIs sITUaTION?,” fOcUsINg ON a cHaRacTER TRaIT Of THE pERsON. ÁEaLTH  pROfEssIONaLs’ cODEs aND sTaTE¸ENTs Of ETHIcs aRE OſtEN casT IN VIRTUE LaNgUagE 

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

RaTHER THaN, OR IN aDDITION TO, THE LaNgUagE Of pRINcIpLEs (fOR Exa¸pLE, “°E  NURsE sHOULD bE HONEsT” INsTEaD Of “°E NURsE sHOULD TELL THE TRUTH”). WEsTERN  VIRTUE THEORy Has GREEk ROOTs, wITH ARIsTOTLE’s (384–322 ½»e) ETHIcs bEINg THE  bEsT-kNOwN ExE¸pLaR. °E  TER¸  “cHaRacTER”  Is  OſtEN  assOcIaTED  wITH  VIRTUE  ETHIcs  appROacHEs.  ºT  REfERs TO THE way  a gROUp  Of VIRTUEs cREaTEs a DIsTINgUIsHINg  fEaTURE Of aN  INDIVIDUaL ¸ORaL acTOR, jUsT as wE spEak Of a cHaRacTER IN a DRa¸aTIc pRODUcTION. PaTIENTs  OſtEN fOcUs ON VIRTUE  aND  cHaRacTER ¸ORE  THaN ON pRINcIpLEs;  ¸aNy  RELIgIOUs TRaDITIONs ExpREss THEIR  NOR¸s IN VIRTUE LaNgUagE,  ENjOININg  THEIR  aDHERENTs  TO  LEaD LIVEs  cHaRacTERIzED  by  “faITH,  HOpE, aND  LOVE,” OR TO  “HaVE cO¸passION.” AND VIRTUE-ORIENTED cHaRacTER fOR¸aTION Is THE cHIEf aI¸  Of  ¸UcH Of THE ¸ORaL INsTRUcTION  THaT  fa¸ILIEs sEEk TO pass  ON TO cHILDREN.  °E  fa¸ILIaR cHILDHOOD ¸ORaL INsTRUcTION  “BE gOOD!” Is  VIRTUE LaNgUagE. ºN  paRT bEcaUsE Of ITs fa¸ILIaRITy aND  IN paRT bEcaUsE IT Is  ¸ORE cHaLLENgINg TO  appLy  TO  pRObLE¸s—wHERE  ¸ODERN  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs  fOcUsEs  ITs  aTTENTION—  VIRTUE-ORIENTED THINkINg Has NOT bEEN THE DO¸INaNT appROacH OVER THE pasT  50 yEaRs.  YET ITs  REVIVaL by pHILOsOpHERs  LIkE  ALasDaIR MacºNTyRE  (1984) Has  spawNED  a  RENEwED  INTEREsT  IN  VIRTUE  appROacHEs  TO  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs.  PELLEgRINO  aND °O¸as¸a (1993), fOR Exa¸pLE, HaVE sysTE¸aTIcaLLy  ExpLORED  THOsE  VIRTUEs THEy sEE as EssENTIaL TO ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE: fiDELITy TO TRUsT, cO¸passION, pHRONEsIs (pRacTIcaL wIsDO¸), jUsTIcE, fORTITUDE, TE¸pERaNcE, INTEgRITy, aND sELf-EffacE¸ENT. MOsT  pEOpLE  IN  THEIR  pERsONaL  aND  pROfEssIONaL  LIVEs  ¸Ix  THE  LaNgUagE  Of pRINcIpLEs wITH THE LaNgUagE Of VIRTUEs.  MOsT Of Us  aLsO ¸Ix  ¸ORaL THEORIEs  TOgETHER wHEN wE aRE aDDREssINg  IssUEs, TEsTINg THEIR sUITabILITy fOR  THE  pRObLE¸ aT HaND, RaTHER THaN sTUffiNg THE pRObLE¸ INTO a bOx LabELED “aUTONO¸y” OR “UTILITaRIaNIs¸” aND  cUTTINg Off THE paRTs THaT  wON’T fiT. °Is aL¸OsT  INsTINcTIVELy EcLEcTIc appROacH TO pRacTIcaL ¸ORaL pRObLE¸ sOLVINg REpREsENTs  a pRObLE¸ ONLy If ONE Is IN sEaRcH Of aN aLL-ENcO¸passINg aND fiNaL THEORy Of  ETHIcs. FOR THE EVERyDay bUsINEss Of ¸ORaL REflEcTION, DIaLOgUE, aND pRObLE¸  sOLVINg, a  bROaD pLURaLIs¸ Of THEORIEs aND TRaDITIONs Is bENEficIaL, sINcE IT Is  OpEN  TO  NEw  appROacHEs  aND  THE  REDIscOVERy  Of  fORgOTTEN  ONEs. ±NE  sUcH  THEORETIcaL REDIscOVERy Is  casuistry,  aN aNaLyTIcaL ¸ETHOD REVIVED by ALbERT  JONsEN  aND  STEpHEN  ¹OUL¸IN  (1988)  fRO¸  CaTHOLIc ¸ORaL  THEOLOgy. CasUIsTRy ¸EaNs, sI¸pLy, REasONINg by casEs. ºT E¸pLOys casEs—NOT pRINcIpLEs OR  VIRTUEs—as THE UNIT Of ¸ORaL aNaLysIs, aND REacHEs jUDg¸ENTs ON a casE-by- 

casE basIs, RaTHER THaN aTTE¸pTINg TO appLy OR ExTRacT gENERaL RULEs. CasUIsTRy  Is  paRTIcULaRLy  aTTRacTIVE  fOR  HEaLTH  caRE  ETHIcs bEcaUsE  cLINIcaL ¸EDIcINE  Is 

183

ANOTHER  THEORETIcaL  INNOVaTION  IN  ETHIcs  cO¸Es  fRO¸  REcOgNIzINg  THaT  casEs  INEVITabLy INVOLVE THE wEaVINg Of a  NaRRaTIVE, aND narrative ethics Has  E¸ERgED TO Na¸E a way Of DOINg ETHIcs THaT fOcUsEs NOT jUsT ON THE casE bUT  ON THE sTORy (ÁUNTER 1991; CHa¸bERs 2010). STORIEs HaVE sTORyTELLERs, ¸ajOR  aND ¸INOR cHaRacTERs, RELaTIONsHIps, DRa¸aTIc sTRUcTURE, aND HIsTORy. STORIEs  caN aLsO OſtEN bE TOLD fRO¸ ¸ULTIpLE VIEwpOINTs, E¸pLOyINg fRa¸Es Of REfERENcE  Of  VaRyINg  sIzEs:  fa¸ILy,  INsTITUTION,  cO¸¸UNITy, aND  sOcIETy. ·sINg  a  NaRRaTIVE THEORy Of ETHIcs E¸pHasIzEs THaT “THE facTs” Of a casE aRE NEVER NEUTRaL OR sTaNDINg aLONE; THEy ¸UsT bE sEEN IN THEIR cONTExT IN ORDER TO bE fULLy  UNDERsTOOD aND appREcIaTED. FOR Exa¸pLE, THE paTIENT’s HIsTORy, as pREsENTED  by  THE DOcTOR  accORDINg  TO  THE cONVENTIONs  Of ¸EDIcINE,  ¸ay  bE  DIffERENT  IN  HIgHLy sIgNIficaNT ways fRO¸ THE paTIENT’s sTORy,  TOLD by  THE paTIENT, EVEN  wHEN  THE  facTUaL  DETaILs  Of  THE  paTIENT’s  “cHIEf  cO¸pLaINT”  aRE  IDENTIcaL IN  bOTH accOUNTs. ANOTHER  cLUsTER  Of ¸ORaL  THEORIEs, EVEN  ¸ORE DIfficULT  TO  cHaRacTERIzE,  ¸IgHT bE LOOsELy caLLED difference ethics. °Ey cHaLLENgE THE DEfiNITIVE pOsITION  Of  WEsTERN  ETHIcaL  THEORIEs  aND  assERT  THE  sUpERIORITy  Of  ¸ORaL  TRaDITIONs  OTHER  THaN THOsE  DERIVED fRO¸ THE  GREEks, WEsTERN  RELIgIOUs  TRaDITIONs, OR  THE  ´NLIgHTEN¸ENT.  FE¸INIsT  THEORIEs Of  ETHIcs,  fOR  Exa¸pLE, cHa¸pION  aN  ETHIcs  Of caRE,  cO¸passION,  aND  RELaTIONsHIp  OVER a  TRaDITIONaL  ETHIcs  basED  ON  REasON  aND  jUsTIcE.  ±THER  THEORIEs  bUILD  UpON  cROss-cULTURaL  DIffERENcEs, aRgUINg, fOR Exa¸pLE, THaT INDIVIDUaL aUTONO¸y Is LEss  sIgNIficaNT IN  NON-WEsTERN  cULTUREs,  wHERE  fa¸ILy aND  cO¸¸UNITy  aRE  cENTRaL  OR  wHERE  RELIgIOUs  TRaDITIONs aRE NOT fOcUsED ON THE INDIVIDUaL sELf.  SO¸E THEORIEs Of  DIffERENcE  ETHIcs  gO ON  TO  ¸akE a  DEEpER cRITIqUE  Of  ¸ORaL pHILOsOpHy  IN  gENERaL  by HIgHLIgHTINg  pOwER aND INEqUaLITy  as a cENTRaL bUT UNDIscUssED  IssUE IN ¸ORaL RELaTIONsHIps, bOTH INDIVIDUaL aND sOcIETaL, aND by bRINgINg  qUEsTIONs  abOUT  THE  UsEs  Of  pOwER  TO  THE  fOREgROUND. °OUgH  ¸OsT  OſtEN  assOcIaTED wITH fE¸INIsT ETHIcs, pOwER aNaLysIs Is cO¸¸ON aLsO TO THE sEaRcH  fOR aN AfRIcaN A¸ERIcaN pERspEcTIVE ON bIOETHIcs aND TO INqUIRIEs abOUT THE  RELaTIONsHIp bETwEEN ETHIcs aND ETHNIcITy aND cULTURE (PROgRaIs aND PELLEgRINO  2007; ¹ONg aND BOTTs 2018). ºT aLsO Has VIsIbLE ROOTs IN ¸ODERN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs.  FOR Exa¸pLE, THE REcOgNITION Of  INEqUaLITy Of pOwER aND kNOwLEDgE bETwEEN  paTIENTs  aND pHysIcIaNs fOR¸ED THE basIs fOR THE DOcTRINE Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT  as  IT  DEVELOpED  IN  THE  1950s  aND  1960s  (FaDEN  aND  BEaUcHa¸p  wITH  KINg 1986).

enicideM  ni scihtE

casE-fOcUsED.

Is There a Distinctive  Medical Ethic? 184 ºT  Is  NOTEwORTHy  THaT  pHysIcIaNs  HaVE  NOT  bEEN saTIsfiED  TO  appLy  wHaTEVER  .la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

¸ORaL  sTaNDaRDs wERE aVaILabLE fRO¸  RELIgION, pOLITIcaL pHILOsOpHy,  OR THE  cO¸¸ON ¸ORaLITy Of sOcIETy, bUT HaVE fRO¸ THE bEgINNINg Of WEsTERN ¸EDIcINE INsIsTED ON THEIR OwN cODE Of ETHIcs. ºN askINg wHETHER THERE Is aNyTHINg  THaT  cOULD  bE  caLLED a  DIsTINcTIVE  ¸EDIcaL ETHIc,  wE  aRE askINg  wHETHER  THE  wORk Of pHysIcIaNs  should bE gOVERNED by a spEcIaL ETHIc, a sET Of NOR¸s THaT  aRE paRTIcULaR TO DOcTORs bEcaUsE Of THE wORk THEy DO. °E DEfiNITION Of ¸EDIcINE as a pROfEssION Is LINkED TO THE IDEa THaT pHysIcIaNs aRE IN sO¸E sENsE sET  apaRT by THE NaTURE Of THEIR wORk, DEsTINED fOR a DIffERENT, If NOT HIgHER, sET Of  sTaNDaRDs. °Ey aRE, aſtER aLL, askED TO DO sO¸E DIfficULT THINgs, sUcH as TRaIN IN  RELaTIVE sOcIaL DEpRIVaTION OVER LONg HOURs fOR ¸aNy yEaRs, pERfOR¸ Tasks IN  wHIcH THEIR OwN HEaLTH aND safETy ¸ay bE aT RIsk, aND wORk IN cONTExTs THaT  REqUIRE  paTIENTs TO bE  ExTRaORDINaRILy VULNERabLE, bOTH bODILy aND  IN TER¸s  Of pERsONaL IDENTITy. ¶OEs THIs wORk REqUIRE a sET Of sTaNDaRDs THaT aRE, If NOT  HIgHER, aT LEasT sO¸EwHaT ¸ORE DE¸aNDINg? PHysIcIaNs sINcE THE ÁIppOcRaTIcs HaVE THOUgHT sO. °E ÁIppOcRaTIc OaTH  NOT  ONLy DEscRIbEs  THE  ¸ORaL  aspIRaTIONs  Of a  s¸aLL  sEcT  Of  aNcIENT  GREEk  pHysIcIaNs  bUT  aLsO INVOkEs  sTaNDaRDs THaT  sET  THEsE pHysIcIaNs  apaRT  fRO¸  OTHER kINDs Of HEaLERs ON  ¸ORaL/spIRITUaL gROUNDs. WHEN THIs OaTH was fiRsT  REcITED, IT was a RaDIcaL sTaTE¸ENT Of HIgHLy sTRINgENT bEHaVIORaL sTaNDaRDs fOR  a pRIEsTLy bROTHERHOOD. SO IT appROpRIaTELy bEgINs wITH a pLEDgE TO “ApOLLO,  AscLEpIUs, ÁygIEIa, PaNacEIa, aND aLL THE gODs aND gODDEssEs.” ¹ODay, appROpRIaTELy  saNITIzED Of aNcIENT GREEk DEITIEs,  THE OaTH Has  cO¸E TO bE  sEEN as  sTaTINg  ¸aNy cO¸¸ONLy HELD ¸EDIcaL  VaLUEs. °E  VaRIOUs cODEs aND  sTaTE¸ENTs  Of  pRINcIpLE  THaT  pHysIcIaNs  HaVE  pUT fORwaRD sINcE  THE  ÁIppOcRaTIc  OaTH aLsO sERVE as INDIcEs Of ¸EDIcINE’s DO¸INaNT ¸ORaL sENsIbILITy, INDIcaTINg  ¸EDIcINE’s  VIEw  Of wHIcH  IssUEs aRE  I¸pORTaNT aND  wHaT sTaNDaRDs  sHOULD  gOVERN pHysIcIaNs’ acTIONs. MOREOVER, THEsE cODEs aRE TEsTI¸ONy TO THE NEED  Of  pHysIcIaNs  TO  sTaTE  THEIR  sTaNDaRDs  pUbLIcLy,  as  a  way  TO  sIgNaL  TO  sOcIETy THaT  pHysIcIaNs aRE  “wORTHy TO sERVE  THE sUffERINg”  (THE ¸OTTO Of ALpHa  ±¸Ega  ALpHa, THE NaTIONaL ¸EDIcaL HONOR sOcIETy, as IT appEaRs ON THE TITLE  pagE Of THE jOURNaL Pharos). BEcaUsE pHysIcIaNs HaVE THOUgHT Of THE¸sELVEs  as  TO  sO¸E  DEgREE  sET  apaRT  fOR  aRDUOUs  aND  I¸pORTaNT  wORk,  gRaDUaTINg  cLassEs  Of DOcTORs  aLL OVER  THE ·NITED STaTEs  TypIcaLLy REcITE aN OaTH.  SO¸ETI¸Es THIs Is  a  REVIsED VERsION Of THE ÁIppOcRaTIc OaTH,  wITH THE pagaN DEITIEs  aND sO¸E Of THE ¸ORE  pRObLE¸aTIc INjUNcTIONs (sUcH as THE pROHIbITION  agaINsT  UsINg  THE kNIfE)  ExcIsED. FOR OTHERs  THE  cO¸¸ENcE¸ENT  cERE¸ONy 

INcLUDEs aN affiR¸aTION Of ¸ORaL cO¸¸IT¸ENTs THaT Is DIscUssED aND agREED  UpON by THE gRaDUaTINg cLass ITsELf, OſtEN INcLUDINg ¸aNy Of THE ÁIppOcRaTIc 

185

REflEcT  cONTE¸pORaRy pRObLE¸s,  sUcH  as  pLEDgINg  TO  wORk  fOR  aN INcLUsIVE  sysTE¸ Of HEaLTH caRE cOVERagE. WHILE IT Is cLEaR THaT pHysIcIaNs aND OTHER ¸EDIcaL pRacTITIONERs HaVE spEcIaL ObLIgaTIONs ENgENDERED by THEIR sOcIaL ROLE IN pRO¸OTINg aND pROTEcTINg  THE  HEaLTH  Of  paTIENTs,  THIs  DOEs  NOT  ¸EaN  THaT  THERE Is  a  sEpaRaTE ¸EDIcaL  ETHIc. ºf wE THINk Of ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs as wHOLLy DIsTINcTIVE IN ITs REqUIRE¸ENTs  aND  ¸OTIVaTIONs,  wE  RUN  a  RIsk  Of  IsOLaTINg  THE  ¸ORaL  cODE  Of  pHysIcIaNs  fRO¸ THaT Of THE REsT Of sOcIETy. °Is NOT ONLy wOULD RaIsE pRObLE¸s IN NEgOTIaTINg cONflIcTs  bETwEEN “¸EDIcaL”  ETHIcs aND “cO¸¸ON” ETHIcs,  bUT wOULD  aLsO RIsk sTagNaTION IN a ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs NOT sUbjEcT TO bROaDER sOcIaL ¸ODIficaTION. (SEE SHEpHERD’s Essay IN THIs VOLU¸E fOR ¸ORE ON THIs IssUE.) PERHaps  THE  bEsT pERspEcTIVE  Is TO  VIEw ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs as  sO¸EwHaT DIsTINcTIVE,  bUT  NOT as a sEpaRaTE ETHIc, aND TO sEE ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs aND cO¸¸ON ETHIcs as cONsTaNTLy IN DIaLOgUE. A s¸aLL sa¸pLE Of HIsTORIcaL aND cONTE¸pORaRy cODEs Of ETHIcs Is INcLUDED  IN  THIs  VOLU¸E. °E  REaDER Is  INVITED  TO  cONsIDER NOT  ONLy THE  I¸pLIcaTIONs  Of wHaT  Is REflEcTED aND  O¸ITTED IN THEsE VaRIOUs fOR¸ULaTIONs, bUT aLsO THE  I¸pLIcaTIONs Of HaVINg a sEpaRaTE OR spEcIaL sET Of NOR¸s fOR DOcTORs. CODEs  Of  ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs aRE NOT  jUsT INDIVIDUaL  acTION gUIDEs fOR  pHysIcIaNs. °Ey  aLsO  sERVE  aN  I¸pORTaNT fUNcTION  as  aN  ExpREssION  Of  THE  ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION’s  cONTRacT  wITH sOcIETy, pLEDgINg TRUsTwORTHy bEHaVIOR IN  ExcHaNgE fOR  sOcIaL  TRUsT  aND  pOwER.  ºN  THIs  VEIN, IT  Is  UsEfUL  TO  ask  wHy  sUcH  cODEs aRE  aLways  aUTHORED by pHysIcIaNs, RaTHER  THaN bEINg  cOLLabORaTIVE pRODUcTs Of  ¸EDIcINE’s  DIaLOgUE  wITH  paTIENTs  aND  THE  LaRgER  pUbLIc.  ALsO,  sINcE  cODEs  Of  ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs  sERVE TO  fRa¸E THERapEUTIc RELaTIONsHIps,  sHOULD THERE bE  a  cO¸pLE¸ENTaRy LIsT Of ¸ORaL ExpEcTaTIONs aND REspONsIbILITIEs fOR bEINg a  paTIENT? ºf sO, wOULD THEsE ¸ERELy aDDREss bEINg a “gOOD” INDIVIDUaL paTIENT  wHILE  ONE Is  sIck,  OR sHOULD THEy aLsO aDDREss cOLLEcTIVE  sOcIaL REspONsIbILITIEs, sUcH as THE DIsTRIbUTION Of scaRcE ¸EDIcaL REsOURcEs? MEDIcaL cODEs Of ETHIcs ¸UsT bE cONsIDERED as ONE Of THE ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT  ¸ORaL TRaDITIONs aVaILabLE fOR ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs, sI¸pLy bEcaUsE THEy HaVE bEEN  passED fORwaRD fOR OVER 2,500 yEaRs. “¹RaDITION” Is a TER¸ THaT ¸EaNs LITERaLLy  TO pass aLONg, OR HaND OVER. ±f cOURsE IN THE pROcEss Of HaNDINg OVER, THINgs  cHaNgE;  THIs  Is  HOw TRaDITIONs sTay  VIbRaNT aND  RELEVaNT TO  THEIR  TI¸Es. °E  ¸OsT basIc ETHIcaL cHaLLENgE fOR DOcTORs aND ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs Is TO REcOgNIzE  THE¸sELVEs as paRT Of a  LONg aND cO¸pLEx ¸ORaL TRaDITION, wITH aN ObLIgaTION 

enicideM  ni scihtE

REsTRIcTIONs  (sUcH  as THE DUTy  TO kEEp cONfiDENcEs),  bUT aDDINg  NOR¸s THaT 

TO REflEcT cRITIcaLLy ON wHaT Is bEINg passED aLONg, DIscaRDINg wHaT Is NO LON-

186

gER  UsEfUL  aND  cREaTINg  NEw  ways TO  aRTIcULaTE  aND  E¸bODy  wHaT  Is  as  yET  UNkNOwN aND UNsaID abOUT ¸ORaL LIfE IN ¸EDIcINE.

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

Using Tools to Approach  Pro±lems:  An Illustration ¹O  sTREss  THaT ¸aNy  TRaDITIONs aND  THEORIEs aRE  I¸pORTaNT  TO ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs  Is  TO EscHEw THE VIsION Of a  sINgLE aLL-ENcO¸passINg ¸ORaL fRa¸EwORk. °E  IDEa  THaT  ¸ORaLITy  cOULD  bE  fiNaLLy  aND  DEfiNITIVELy  sEcURED  by  DIscOVERINg  aND  THEN  fOLLOwINg  sO¸E ¸ONOLITHIc THEORy  Is  NOT  jUsT  a  pHILOsOpHER’s  DREa¸ bUT a cO¸¸ON HU¸aN aspIRaTION. A sI¸pLE, UNIfiED THEORETIcaL basIs  fOR  ETHIcs  THaT  cOULD  ELI¸INaTE THE  ENDLEss DIspUTEs  aND  THE  VExINg  UNcERTaINTy  Of ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs DEcIsIONs, UNa¸bIgUOUsLy IDENTIfyINg  wHaT Is gOOD  aND  RIgHT,  wOULD  cLEaRLy bE  cO¸fORTINg. ALL  caNDIDaTEs  fOR sUcH  a  UNIfyINg  sysTE¸ IN THE pasT HaVE pROVED TO bE pROcRUsTEaN bEDs. ºN GREEk ¸yTHOLOgy,  PROcRUsTEs,  a  sON  Of  POsEIDON,  fORcEs  HIs  gUEsTs  TO  fiT  THE¸sELVEs  INTO  HIs  bED, by EITHER sTRETcHINg OR cUTTINg Off THEIR LEgs. ´THIcaL THEORIEs THaT cLaI¸  UNIVERsaL scOpE DO sI¸ILaR Da¸agE, LOppINg Off I¸pORTaNT facETs Of casEs aND  sITUaTIONs  IN  aN  EffORT  TO  ¸akE  THE¸  fiT  THE pREcONcEpTIONs  Of  THEORy  aND  DENyINg  TO ¸ORaL agENTs THE  aLL-I¸pORTaNT ExERcIsE  Of THEIR  OwN  paRTIcULaR  ¸ORaL pERcEpTIONs aND jUDg¸ENTs. ºN THE  absENcE Of sUcH  THEORETIcaL  UNITy, THE Task  bEcO¸Es ONE  Of UsINg  THE wIDE RaNgE Of TOOLs aND TRaDITIONs skILLfULLy. ¹O ILLUsTRaTE HOw sO¸E Of THE  TOOLs wE HaVE DEscRIbED ¸IgHT bE pUT TO UsE, cONsIDER THE fOLLOwINg sI¸pLIfiED casE. A 23-yEaR-OLD fE¸aLE Is bROUgHT TO THE E¸ERgENcy DEpaRT¸ENT by a¸bULaNcE  fOLLOwINg a  ¸OTOR VEHIcLE  cRasH. SHE  Is  IN HE¸ORRHagIc sHOck fRO¸ a  sEVERE  pELVIc  fRacTURE REqUIRINg  sURgERy, aND  Is  cURRENTLy  UNcONscIOUs. SHE  Is  a  JEHOVaH’s WITNEss aND Has sIgNED a  sTaTE¸ENT REfUsINg bLOOD pRODUcTs.  ÁER HUsbaND Is NOT a JEHOVaH’s WITNEss aND waNTs HER TO bE gIVEN bLOOD. °E  paTIENT’s paRENTs aRE aLsO pREsENT aND INsIsT  THaT sHE wOULD NOT  waNT IT. ÁER  HUsbaND  sTaTEs THaT  sHE sIgNED  THE fOR¸ REfUsINg bLOOD bEfORE THE bIRTH  Of  HER 10-¸ONTH-OLD sON, aND THaT  sHE wOULD DO aNyTHINg TO saVE HER OwN LIfE  IN ORDER TO caRE fOR HER sON. SHOULD THIs paTIENT bE gIVEN LIfE-saVINg bLOOD pRODUcTs, OR NOT? °Is Is THE  I¸¸EDIaTE qUEsTION. ºN REspONDINg,  wE wILL fOcUs ON HOw ¸ORaL TRaDITIONs  aND  THEORIEs HELp by bRINgINg TO pRO¸INENcE I¸pORTaNT facETs Of THE sITUaTION  aND by pOsINg  qUEsTIONs TO fRa¸E  aND sHapE OUR pERspEcTIVE. ÁERE aRE 

sO¸E Of THE qUEsTIONs THaT wOULD bE E¸pHasIzED IN THE VaRIOUs appROacHEs  wE HaVE DIscUssED.

187

cHOIcE, IN  THIs casE ¸aDE IN aDVaNcE  Of THE acTUaL sITUaTION? WOULD a  UTILITaRIaN  appROacH,  E¸pHasIzINg  THE  gREaTEsT  OVERaLL  gOOD,  ¸EaN  saVINg  THIs  paTIENT’s  LIfE  IN  ORDER  TO  saTIsfy THE  NEEDs  Of  HER  sON  aND  HUsbaND,  RaTHER  THaN HER paRENTs’ assEss¸ENT Of HER wIsHEs? WHIcH Of THE ¸EDIcaL VIRTUEs Is  IT  I¸pORTaNT TO  ENacT HERE—fiDELITy  TO TRUsT  IN REspEcTINg THE  paTIENT’s RELIgIOUs cONVIcTIONs? ±R pERHaps cOURagE, IN OVERRIDINg HER paRENTs aND DOINg  EVERyTHINg  TO  saVE  THIs  paTIENT’s  LIfE?  (°ERE  aRE  OTHER  pOssIbLE  ¸aNIfEsTaTIONs Of bOTH TRUsT aND cOURagE IN THIs sITUaTION, TOO, sO¸E Of wHIcH LEaD IN  DIffERENT  DIREcTIONs.)  A  fE¸INIsT  INTERpRETaTION  ¸IgHT  HIgHLIgHT  THE  pOwER  sTRUggLE bETwEEN fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs OVER a fE¸aLE paTIENT, wHEREas a NaRRaTIVE  appROacH wOULD waNT TO kNOw wHO cONsTRUcTED THIs VERsION Of THE pRObLE¸,  wHOsE  sTORy IT  Is  THaT  Is bEINg  pLayED OUT HERE.  CaN a  bETTER VERsION Of  THIs  pRObLE¸  bE  cONsTRUcTED?  WHaT  wOULD  ¸akE  IT  “bETTER”—THaT  IT  Is  a  ¸ORE  accURaTE  DEscRIpTION Of  THE ETHIcaL  pRObLE¸s,  OR a  ¸ORE  cO¸pLETE  sTORy,  OR  THaT  IT  ¸IgHT LEaD  TO a  qUIckER  OR DIffERENT  REsOLUTION? °EsE  qUEsTIONs aRE  ILLUsTRaTIVE, NOT DEfiNITIVE OR ExHaUsTIVE. BEINg skILLED IN ETHIcs ¸EaNs kNOwINg HOw TO pIck Up THE cONVERsaTION aND cONTINUE IT. °REE  pOINTs  IN  sU¸¸aRy.  FIRsT, cONsULTINg a  wIDE  RaNgE  Of appROacHEs  caN bETTER EqUIp  ¸ORaL acTORs TO ¸akE  DEcIsIONs THaT THEy (aND OTHERs) caN  LIVE wITH OVER TI¸E, DEcIsIONs THaT HONOR RaTHER THaN sUppREss THE cO¸pLExITy  Of  bOTH THE  IssUEs aND  THE RELaTIONsHIps  INVOLVED.  SEcOND,  THE kEy ELE¸ENT  IN a  gOOD DEcIsION Is ¸akINg DIscERNINg jUDg¸ENTs: sURVEyINg THE aVaILabLE  TOOLs,  sELEcTINg THE RIgHT ONEs  fOR THE jOb, aND  UsINg THE¸  wITH a  ¸ODIcU¸  Of skILL. ÁaVINg a wIDE RaNgE Of TOOLs Is I¸pORTaNT; If ONE’s ONLy TOOL Is a Ha¸¸ER, EVERy pRObLE¸ ¸ay LOOk LIkE a NaIL. BUT Of cOURsE THIs aNaLOgy Of sELEcTINg TOOLs fOR a DEfiNED jOb, wHILE HELpfUL, Is TOO sI¸pLIsTIc aND ¸EcHaNIcaL. As wE HaVE E¸pHasIzED, sO¸ETI¸Es jUsT  fiNDINg THE DEcIsION pOINT fOR acTION fRO¸ wITHIN a cO¸pLEx wEb Of pERsONs,  EVENTs, aND  RELaTIONsHIps Is  a ¸ORE  cHaLLENgINg ETHIcaL Task THaN REacHINg a  DEcIsION. °E HaRD wORk Of ETHIcs ¸ay NOT bE wHaT TO DEcIDE, bUT DIscERNINg 

how TO DEcIDE, OR EVEN REaLIzINg THaT NO DEcIsION Is caLLED fOR. ºT Is cHaRacTERIsTIc Of DIffERENT ETHIcaL THEORIEs THaT THEy pROVIDE Us NOT ONLy wITH DIffERINg  ways  TO sOLVE a  pRObLE¸, bUT aLsO wITH DIffERINg  DEfiNITIONs Of THE pRObLE¸  ITsELf  aND  DIVERgENT  paTHways  fOR  THE ExERcIsE  Of ¸ORaL agENcy,  THaT  Is, DIffERENT pERcEpTIONs Of THE ¸ORaL ROLEs Of THE pERsONs ENgagED IN THE DEcIsION.

enicideM  ni scihtE

WHaT wOULD IT ¸EaN TO sEEk TO TREaT THIs paTIENT as aN END IN HERsELf, aND  NOT jUsT  a ¸EaNs? ¶OEs THE fOR¸ sHE Has sIgNED cONsTITUTE HER aUTONO¸OUs 

WHILE  IT  Is  I¸pORTaNT  TO  REcOgNIzE  a  pLURaLIs¸  IN  THE  TOOLs  Of  ETHIcs, 

188

IT  Is  aLsO  I¸pORTaNT  THaT  THIs  pLURaLIs¸  DOEs  NOT  sI¸pLy  bEcO¸E  a  way  TO  aVOID THE HaRD THINkINg THaT ¸ORaL cHOIcEs DE¸aND. SEEkINg THE bEsT ¸ORaL 

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

TOOLs—sUcH  as THE  THEORETIcaL  cONsTRUcTs  wE  HaVE  DIscUssED—¸EaNs  caREfULLy cONsIDERINg RELEVaNcE, appLIcaTION, aND cONsIsTENcy IN THE UsE Of THEsE  TOOLs, NOT sI¸pLy cHOOsINg a pOsITION wE aRE aLREaDy INcLINED TO TakE. PLURaLIs¸ DOEs NOT ExcUsE Us fRO¸ THE HaRD Task Of REflEcTIVE DIscERN¸ENT. FINaLLy,  wHaTEVER  DEcIsIONaL  appaRaTUs  wE  aDOpT  (OR  REjEcT)  bRINgs  wITH  IT  RELaTIONaL  cO¸¸IT¸ENTs,  bOTH  spOkEN  aND  UNspOkEN.  ³EcOgNIzINg  aND  Na¸INg  THE UNspOkEN  cO¸¸IT¸ENTs Is  aN I¸pORTaNT  NONDEcIsIONaL aspEcT  Of ETHIcs. ºT Is aLsO a NEcEssaRy sTEp IN ¸ORaL ¸aTURITy aND wIsDO¸. °IRD,  ETHIcaL  DEcIsIONs  aRE  syNcHRONIc  ¸O¸ENTs  IN  LaRgER  DIacHRONIc  HIsTORIEs; THEy aRE ONLy sLIcEs Of ¸ORaL LIfE.  ºN spITE Of THEIR HIgH DRa¸a, aND  THE gREaT wEIgHT aND cONsEqUENcE THEy ¸ay HaVE, EspEcIaLLy IN LIfE-aND-DEaTH  sETTINgs, INDIVIDUaL DEcIsIONs ¸ay NOT by THE¸sELVEs bE DEfiNITIVE IN sHapINg  aNyONE’s ¸ORaL  IDENTITy. SO¸ETI¸Es  DIfficULT DEcIsIONs aRE  a ¸aTTER Of DOINg  THE bEsT ONE caN IN TRagIc sITUaTIONs, wHERE aLL THE OpTIONs aRE baD ONEs. WHEN  cLEaR cHOIcEs DO NOT appEaR aND saTIsfyINg REsOLUTIONs sEE¸ UNLIkELy, THE cHaLLENgE LIEs IN cHOOsINg THE “LEasT wORsT” aLTERNaTIVE aND ¸UDDLINg THROUgH. ºN  THEsE casEs, THEN, ¸ORaL ROUTINEs aND HabITs TakE ON cONsIDERabLE I¸pORTaNcE  IN  sHapINg aN  ETHIcaL LIfE  OR bEINg a gOOD DOcTOR,  bEcaUsE THEy ¸akE Up  THE  backgROUND  Of  REsOURcEs  aND  RELaTIONsHIps  agaINsT  wHIcH  ¸ORaL  DEcIsIONs  aRE  UNDERsTOOD  aND  ¸aDE. ·LTI¸aTELy,  ETHIcs  Is  abOUT THE sHapINg  Of ¸ORaL  IDENTITy  aND THE DEVELOp¸ENT  aND appLIcaTION Of ¸ORaL  wIsDO¸ THROUgHOUT  LIfE. ÁOwEVER URgENTLy wE NEED gOOD DEcIsIONs, gOOD INTENTIONs, OR gOOD OUTcO¸Es, NONE Of THOsE INDIVIDUaL ENDpOINTs Is TRULy acHIEVabLE  OR sUsTaINabLE  apaRT  fRO¸  THE LaRgER  EffORT  Of LEaRNINg  TO LIVE  a  gOOD  LIfE.  °E  ¸ODELs aND  TOOLs Of ¸ORaL DEcIsION ¸akINg sERVE THaT LaRgER gOaL aND aRE aLsO sERVED by IT.

Conclusion:  Getting  Grounded ³EaDERs  ¸ay VIEw THIs RIcH ¸ORaL LaNDscapE, fEaTURINg ¸aNy LaNgUagEs aND  appROacHEs TO ETHIcaL pRObLE¸s, aND ¸aNy THEORIEs bEHIND THEsE appROacHEs,  wITH  appREHENsION  OR  DELIgHT  aT THE  pOssIbLE  paTHs  bEfORE  THE¸. ³EcOgNITION Of THE wIDE RaNgE Of ¸ETHODs aND  appROacHEs pOssIbLE IN ETHIcs caN bE  E¸pOwERINg fOR sO¸E, yET fOR OTHERs IT ¸ay sEE¸ paRaLyzINg: WITHOUT a UNIVERsaL, OVERRIDINg ETHIcaL fRa¸EwORk, wHaT Is THERE TO kEEp Us  fRO¸ bEcO¸INg aDRIſt IN RELaTIVIs¸?

°E fEaR Of ¸ORaL RELaTIVIs¸ Has bEEN a NaggINg, bUT ¸IsUNDERsTOOD, pRObLE¸  fOR  WEsTERN  ETHIcs  sINcE bEfORE  PLaTO  (427–347  ½»e).  ³ELaTIVIs¸  Is  THE 

189

fOR ETHIcs, THEN THERE aRE NO sTaNDaRDs aT aLL—EVERyTHINg ¸UsT bE Up fOR gRabs.  °E cHOIcE Is cONcEIVED as bETwEEN ETHIcaL cERTaINTy aND THE ¸ORaL abyss. WITHOUT  OffERINg  a  fULL  DIscUssION  HERE,  wE  sUb¸IT  THaT  THE  pRacTIcaL  ¸ORaL pLURaLIs¸ DEscRIbED IN THIs Essay, wHIcH DRaws fRO¸ ¸aNy ¸ORaL THEORIEs  aND TRaDITIONs, DOEs  NOT LEaD TO RELaTIVIs¸.  A  pLURaLITy  Of REsOURcEs Is  NO ¸ORE pRObLE¸aTIc fOR ETHIcs THaN fOR OTHER DIscIpLINEs. °ERE aRE cO¸pETINg  THEORIEs IN EcONO¸Ics,  psycHIaTRy, ¸aTHE¸aTIcs, aND  pHysIcs—TO Na¸E  jUsT  a  fEw—aND sHIſtINg THEORETIcaL VIEwpOINTs OVER TI¸E IN  aLL THEsE fiELDs,  yET  NO ONE  assU¸Es  THaT  bEcaUsE EcONO¸IsTs  OR  pHysIcIsTs DIsagREE a¸ONg  THE¸sELVEs,  aND  sO¸ETI¸Es  cO¸bINE  THEORIEs  aND  appROacHEs, THEsE  fiELDs  aRE RIDDLED wITH RELaTIVIs¸. AND sO IT Is fOR ETHIcs. °E bEsT pROTEcTION agaINsT bOTH absOLUTIsT aND RELaTIVIsTIc INTERpRETaTIONs  Of ETHIcs LIEs IN THE REcOgNITION THaT THE wHOLE Of ETHIcs Is, aſtER aLL, a HU¸aN  ENTERpRIsE, wITH THE EffORT Of pERsONs aND THEIR HaRD-wON ¸ORaL wIsDO¸ THE  ONLy assURaNcE wE HaVE fOR THE INTEgRITy Of THE EffORT. °OsE wHO wORRy abOUT  RELaTIVIs¸ aND bEcO¸E  skEpTIcaL TypIcaLLy fORgET THaT THE basIc aI¸ Of ETHIcs  Is  NOT  fiNaL  aNswERs,  bUT  pRacTIcaL  gUIDaNcE  aND  cONTINUaL  ¸ORaL  LEaRNINg  fRO¸ LIfE’s ExpERIENcEs aND cHOIcEs. °E pLacE wE HaVE TO sTaND Is NOT UpON a  UNIVERsaL fOUNDaTION Of ETERNaL TRUTH, bUT sI¸pLy ON THE gROUND, ON OUR OwN  fEET. °ERE Is NO kNOck-DOwN aRgU¸ENT TO REfUTE THE RELaTIVIsT OR sILENcE THE  skEpTIc.  °E  aNswER  LIEs  IN  a  cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO  UsE  wHaT  wE  HaVE  TO  pURsUE  THaT wIsDO¸ Of wHIcH wE aRE capabLE, aND TO DO sO HONEsTLy aND pERsIsTENTLy.  MONTaIgNE  (1533–1592) pUT IT  wITH cHaRacTERIsTIc  pUNgENcy: “WE  sEEk OTHER  cONDITIONs bEcaUsE wE DO NOT UNDERsTaND THE UsE Of OUR OwN, aND wE gO OUTsIDE OURsELVEs bEcaUsE wE  DO NOT kNOw wHaT IT  Is LIkE INsIDE. YET THERE Is NO  UsE OUR ¸OUNTINg ON sTILTs, fOR ON sTILTs wE  ¸UsT sTILL waLk ON OUR OwN LEgs.  AND  ON THE LOſtIEsT  THRONE IN THE wORLD wE  aRE sTILL sITTINg ONLy ON OUR OwN  RU¸p” (MONTaIgNE 1965). AT THE bEgINNINg Of THIs Essay wE NOTED THaT ETHIcs  Is OſtEN cONcEIVED sI¸pLIsTIcaLLy as a sERIEs Of sHaRp-EDgED qUEsTIONs REqUIRINg  EITHER/OR DEcIsIONs. WE  HaVE sOUgHT  TO ¸akE  IT cLEaR  THaT THE REspONsEs  gIVEN TO sUcH qUEsTIONs ¸UsT bE NEsTED IN a faR LaRgER cONTExT THaN Is aT fiRsT  EVIDENT. °E qUEsTION “SHOULD a pHysIcIaN LIE TO a paTIENT wHEN THE LIE pRO¸IsEs  paTIENT bENEfiT?” Is ¸EaNINgLEss wITHOUT  cONsIDERINg THE ROLE aND pLacE  Of TRUTHfULNEss IN a THERapEUTIc ENcOUNTER. ²IkEwIsE, “ºs IT gOOD TO bE caNDID  abOUT  ¸EDIcaL  ¸IsTakEs,  aND  If  sO,  wHOsE  gOOD  Is  sERVED?”  ¸UsT bE  pOsED  IN  THE  LaRgER  cONTExT Of  THE NEED  fOR pERsONaL  aND  pROfEssIONaL  fORgIVENEss 

enicideM  ni scihtE

assU¸pTION THaT sINcE THERE Is NO UNIVERsaL aND TI¸ELEss, agREED-UpON sTaNDaRD 

(ARENDT 1957), gIVEN THaT aLL pHysIcIaNs wILL ¸akE ¸IsTakEs THaT caUsE HaR¸. 

190

AND,  “SHOULD pHysIcIaNs  EVER  I¸pOsE  a  LIfE-saVINg  TREaT¸ENT  THaT  paTIENTs  HaVE  cHOsEN TO  fORgO?” REsIDEs wITHIN  a LaRgER  INqUIRy  abOUT THE  pLacE aND 

.la  te  llihcruhC .R yrraL

pURpOsE Of ¸EDIcaL caRE  IN THE INDIVIDUaL’s pURsUIT Of a “gOOD” LIfE. ´THIcs Is  pERsONaL  aND DEcIsIONaL bEcaUsE IT Is fiRsT  sOcIaL aND RELaTIONaL. ºT INEVITabLy  ENTaILs pRObINg INTO THE LaRgER ¸EaNINg Of cHOIcEs aND  sOUNDINg THE DEEpER  REsERVOIRs Of OUR cO¸¸ON HU¸aN wIsDO¸.

re½eren¾es ARENDT, Á. 1957. °e Human Condition. CHIcagO: ·NIVERsITy Of CHIcagO PREss. ARIsTOTLE. 1999.  Nicomachean Ethics. ¹RaNsLaTED by ¹. ºRwIN. 2ND ED. Ca¸bRIDgE: ÁackETT  PUbLIsHINg. BEaUcHa¸p, ¹., aND J. CHILDREss. 2012. Principles of Biomedical Ethics. 7TH ED. µEw YORk:  ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss. CHa¸bERs, ¹. 2010. “²ITERaTURE.” ºN Methods of Medical Ethics . 2ND ED. ´DITED by J. SUgaR¸aN aND ¶. P. SUL¸asy. WasHINgTON, ¶C: GEORgETOwN ·NIVERsITy PREss. FaDEN, ³., aND ¹. BEaUcHa¸p, wITH µ. KINg. 1986.  A History and °eory of Informed 

Consent. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss. ÁU¸E, ¶. 1978.  A Treatise of Human Nature, Book III . 2ND ED. ´DITED by ². A. SELby-  BIggE aND P. Á. µIDDITcH. ±xfORD: CLaRENDON PREss. ÁUNTER, K. M. 1991.  Doctors’ Stories: °e Narrative Structure of Medical Knowledge .  PRINcETON, µJ: PRINcETON ·NIVERsITy PREss. JONsEN, A., aND S. ¹OUL¸IN. 1988. °e Abuse of Casuistry. BERkELEy: ·NIVERsITy Of CaLIfORNIa PREss. KaNT, º. 1985. Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. ¹RaNsLaTED by ². W. BEck. µEw  YORk: Mac¸ILLaN. MacºNTyRE, A. 1984. Aſter Virtue ., µOTRE ¶a¸E, ºµ: ·NIVERsITy Of µOTRE ¶a¸E PREss. MILL, J. S. 1979.  Utilitarianism. ´DITED by G. SHER. ºNDIaNapOLIs, ºµ: ÁackETT PUbLIsHINg. MONTaIgNE, M. 1976. °e Complete Essays of Montaigne. ¹RaNsLaTED by ¶ONaLD FRa¸E.  STaNfORD, CA: STaNfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss. PELLEgRINO, ´. ¶., aND ¶. °O¸as¸a. 1993.  °e Virtues in Medical Practice. µEw YORk:  ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss. PROgRaIs, ². J., aND ´. ¶. PELLEgRINO, EDs. 2007. African American Bioethics: Culture, Race, 

and Identity. WasHINgTON, ¶C: GEORgETOwN ·NIVERsITy PREss. S¸ITH, A. 1976. °e °eory of Moral Sentiments . ´DITED by ¶. ³apHaEL aND A. MaDIE.  ºNDIaNapOLIs, ºµ: ²IbERTy CLassIcs. STEINbOck, B., A. J. ²ONDON, aND J. ARRas, EDs. 2013. Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine: 

Contemporary Readings in Bioethics. µEw YORk: McGRaw-ÁILL. ¹ONg, ³., aND ¹. F. BOTTs, EDs. 2018.  Feminist °ought: A More Comprehensive Introduc-

tion. 5TH ED. WEsTVIEw PREss. WaLkER,  M. ·. 1993. “KEEpINg ¸ORaL spacE OpEN.”  Hastings Center Report 23, NO. 2: 33–40.

H±sToR±cAl  And ConTemPoRARy  Codes  of ETh±cs »H±  ¶IppOcRATIc  ÀATH,  TH±  ³RAY±R  Of µAIMONId±S,  TH±  ¸±clARATION  Of Â±N±VA,  ANd  TH±  ºµº  ³RINcIpl±S  Of µ±dIcAl  ETHIcS

²ath of Hippocrates  (Sixth Century  BCE–First  Century  CE) AssU¸ED  TO  HaVE  bEEN  wRITTEN  by  ÁIppOcRaTEs,  THE  OaTH  ExE¸pLIfiEs  THE  PyTHagOREaN scHOOL RaTHER THaN GREEk THOUgHT IN gENERaL. °E OaTH Of ÁIppOcRaTEs  Is  ONE  Of  THE  EaRLIEsT  aND  ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT  sTaTE¸ENTs  ON ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs. ´sTI¸aTEs Of ITs acTUaL DaTE Of ORIgIN VaRy fRO¸ THE sIxTH cENTURy ½»e  TO  THE  fiRsT  cENTURy »e.  µOT ONLy  Has THE  OaTH pROVIDED THE fOUNDaTION  fOR  ¸aNy  sUccEEDINg  ¸EDIcaL  OaTHs,  fOR  Exa¸pLE,  THE  ¶EcLaRaTION  Of  GENEVa,  bUT  IT Is  sTILL aD¸INIsTERED by  ¸aNy ¸EDIcaL  scHOOLs  TO gRaDUaTINg ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs, EITHER IN ITs ORIgINaL fOR¸ OR IN a sLIgHTLy aLTERED VERsION.

º swEaR by ApOLLO PHysIcIaN aND AscLEpIUs aND ÁygIEIa aND PaNacEIa aND aLL  THE gODs aND gODDEssEs, ¸akINg THE¸ ¸y wITNEssEs, THaT º wILL fULfiL accORDINg TO ¸y abILITy aND jUDg¸ENT THIs OaTH aND THIs cOVENaNT:

“±aTH  Of  ÁIppOcRaTEs,”  TRaNs.  ²UDwIg  ´DELsTEIN,  fRO¸  Bulletin  of  the  History  of  Medicine 3,  sUppL.  1  (1943),  REpRINTED  by  pER¸IssION  Of  JOHNs  ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy  PREss;  “¶aILy  PRayER  Of  a  PHysIcIaN,”  TRaNs. ÁaRRy  FRIEDENwaLk, fRO¸  Bulletin  of the  Johns  Hopkins Hospital 28  (1917);  “¶EcLaRaTION  Of  GENEVa,”  aDOpTED by  THE  2ND GENERaL AssE¸bLy  Of  THE  WORLD  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION,  GENEVa,  SwITzERLaND,  SEpTE¸bER  1948,  aND  a¸ENDED  by  THE  22ND  WORLD  MEDIcaL  AssE¸bLy, SyDNEy, AUsTRaLIa, AUgUsT 1968, aND THE 35TH WORLD MEDIcaL AssE¸bLy, ÂENIcE, ºTaLy,  ±cTObER 1983, aND THE 46TH Ém¾ GENERaL AssE¸bLy, STOckHOL¸, SwEDEN, SEpTE¸bER 1994, aND  EDITORIaLLy  REVIsED by  THE 170TH Ém¾  COUNcIL  SEssION,  ¶IVONNE-LEs-BaINs,  FRaNcE,  May 2005,  aND  THE  173RD Ém¾  COUNcIL  SEssION, ¶IVONNE-LEs-BaINs,  FRaNcE, May 2006,  aND a¸ENDED by  THE 68TH Ém¾  GENERaL AssE¸bLy, CHIcagO, ·NITED STaTEs, ±cTObER 2017; “PRINcIpLEs Of MEDIcaL  ´THIcs,”  fRO¸ THE ¾m¾ CODE Of  ´THIcs, ©  2016 by A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION,  REpRINTED by  pER¸IssION Of  THE A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION. ALL  RIgHTs REsERVED.

¹O  HOLD HI¸  wHO  Has TaUgHT  ¸E  THIs  aRT as  EqUaL  TO ¸y  paRENTs aND  TO 

192

LIVE  ¸y LIfE  IN paRTNERsHIp wITH HI¸, aND  If  HE  Is IN  NEED Of ¸ONEy  TO gIVE  HI¸  a sHaRE Of ¸INE, aND  TO REgaRD HIs  OffspRINg as EqUaL  TO ¸y bROTHERs IN 

s c i h t E   f o  s e d o C

¸aLE LINEagE aND  TO TEacH THE¸ THIs aRT—If THEy DEsIRE TO LEaRN  IT—wITHOUT  fEE aND cOVENaNT; TO gIVE a sHaRE Of pREcEpTs aND ORaL INsTRUcTION aND aLL THE  OTHER LEaRNINg TO ¸y sONs aND TO THE sONs Of HI¸ wHO Has INsTRUcTED ¸E aND  TO pUpILs wHO HaVE sIgNED THE cOVENaNT aND HaVE TakEN aN OaTH accORDINg TO  THE ¸EDIcaL Law, bUT TO NO ONE ELsE. º wILL appLy DIETETIc ¸EasUREs fOR THE bENEfiT Of THE sIck accORDINg TO ¸y  abILITy aND jUDg¸ENT; º wILL kEEp THE¸ fRO¸ HaR¸ aND INjUsTIcE. º wILL NEITHER gIVE a DEaDLy DRUg TO aNybODy If askED fOR IT, NOR wILL º ¸akE  a  sUggEsTION TO THIs EffEcT.  SI¸ILaRLy, º wILL NOT gIVE TO a  wO¸aN aN abORTIVE  RE¸EDy. ºN pURITy aND HOLINEss º wILL gUaRD ¸y LIfE aND ¸y aRT. º wILL NOT UsE THE  kNIfE, NOT  EVEN ON sUffERERs fRO¸ sTONE, bUT wILL wITHDRaw IN faVOR Of sUcH ¸EN as aRE ENgagED IN THIs wORk. WHaTEVER  HOUsEs  º  ¸ay  VIsIT,  º  wILL  cO¸E  fOR  THE bENEfiT  Of  THE  sIck,  RE¸aININg fREE Of aLL INTENTIONaL  INjUsTIcE, Of aLL ¸IscHIEf,  aND IN paRTIcULaR  Of sExUaL RELaTIONs wITH bOTH fE¸aLE aND ¸aLE pERsONs, bE THEy fREE OR sLaVEs. WHaT º ¸ay sEE OR HEaR IN THE cOURsE Of THE TREaT¸ENT OR EVEN OUTsIDE Of  THE  TREaT¸ENT  IN REgaRD  TO  THE LIfE  Of  ¸EN, wHIcH ON NO  accOUNT ONE  ¸UsT  spREaD abROaD, º wILL kEEp TO ¸ysELf HOLDINg sUcH THINgs sHa¸EfUL TO bE spOkEN abOUT. ºf º fULfiL THIs OaTH aND DO NOT VIOLaTE IT, ¸ay IT bE gRaNTED TO ¸E TO ENjOy  LIfE aND aRT, bEINg HONORED wITH fa¸E a¸ONg aLL ¸EN fOR aLL TI¸E TO cO¸E; If  º TRaNsgREss IT aND swEaR faLsELy, ¸ay THE OppOsITE Of aLL THIs bE ¸y LOT.

Daily Prayer  of a Physician  (“Prayer  of Moses Maimonides”)  (1793?) AL¸IgHTy GOD, °OU  Has cREaTED THE HU¸aN bODy wITH INfiNITE  wIsDO¸.  ¹EN  THOUsaND TI¸Es TEN THOUsaND ORgaNs HasT  °OU cO¸bINED IN IT  THaT acT  UNcEasINgLy aND  HaR¸ONIOUsLy TO  pREsERVE  THE wHOLE IN aLL  ITs bEaUTy—THE  bODy  wHIcH  Is  THE  ENVELOpE  Of  THE  I¸¸ORTaL sOUL.  °Ey  aRE  EVER  acTINg IN  pERfEcT ORDER, agREE¸ENT, aND  accORD. YET, wHEN THE fRaILTy Of ¸aTTER  OR THE  UNbRIDLINg  Of  passIONs  DERaNgEs  THIs  ORDER OR  INTERRUpTs  THIs  accORD,  THEN  fORcEs cLasH, aND THE bODy cRU¸bLEs INTO THE pRI¸aL DUsT fRO¸ wHIcH IT ca¸E.  °OU sENDEsT TO ¸aN DIsEasEs as bENEficENT ¸EssENgERs TO fORETELL appROacHINg DaNgER aND TO URgE HI¸ TO aVERT IT.

°OU Has  bLEsT °INE  EaRTH, °y  RIVERs,  aND °y  ¸OUNTaINs  wITH  HEaLINg  sUbsTaNcEs;  THEy ENabLE °y cREaTUREs TO aLLEVIaTE THEIR sUffERINgs aND TO HEaL 

193

INg Of HIs bROTHER, TO REcOgNIzE HIs DIsORDERs, TO ExTRacT THE HEaLINg sUbsTaNcEs,  TO  DIscOVER  THEIR  pOwERs,  aND TO  pREpaRE  aND  TO  appLy THE¸  TO  sUIT  EVERy  ILL.  ºN °INE ´TERNaL  PROVIDENcE °OU HasT cHOsEN ¸E  TO waTcH  OVER  THE  LIfE  aND  HEaLTH Of  °y cREaTUREs. º a¸ NOw  abOUT TO appLy ¸ysELf TO THE  DUTIEs Of  ¸y pROfEssION. SUppORT ¸E, AL¸IgHTy GOD, IN THEsE gREaT LabORs THaT THEy ¸ay  bENEfiT ¸aNkIND, fOR wITHOUT °y HELp NOT EVEN THE LEasT THINg wILL sUccEED. ºNspIRE ¸E wITH LOVE fOR ¸y aRT aND fOR °y cREaTUREs. ¶O NOT aLLOw THIRsT  fOR pROfiT, a¸bITION fOR RENOwN aND aD¸IRaTION, TO INTERfERE wITH ¸y pROfEssION,  fOR  THEsE aRE  THE  ENE¸IEs Of  TRUTH aND  Of  LOVE  fOR  ¸aNkIND  aND  THEy  caN LEaD asTRay IN THE gREaT Task Of aTTENDINg TO THE wELfaRE Of °y cREaTUREs.  PREsERVE THE sTRENgTH Of ¸y bODy aND Of ¸y sOUL THaT THEy EVER bE REaDy TO  cHEERfULLy HELp aND sUppORT  RIcH aND  pOOR, gOOD aND  baD, ENE¸y as wELL as  fRIEND.  ºN THE sUffERER LET ¸E  sEE ONLy  THE HU¸aN bEINg. ºLLU¸INE ¸y ¸IND  THaT  IT  REcOgNIzE  wHaT  pREsENTs  ITsELf  aND  THaT  IT  ¸ay  cO¸pREHEND  wHaT  Is  absENT  OR  HIDDEN. ²ET  IT NOT  faIL TO  sEE wHaT  Is  VIsIbLE,  bUT DO  NOT pER¸IT IT  TO  aRROgaTE TO  ITsELf  THE pOwER  TO sEE  wHaT caNNOT  bE sEEN,  fOR DELIcaTE  aND  INDEfiNITE  aRE  THE bOUNDs Of THE  gREaT aRT Of caRINg  fOR THE  LIVEs  aND HEaLTH  Of °y cREaTUREs. ²ET ¸E NEVER bE absENT-¸INDED. May NO sTRaNgE THOUgHTs  DIVERT ¸y aTTENTION aT THE bEDsIDE Of THE sIck, OR DIsTURb ¸y ¸IND IN ITs sILENT  LabORs, fOR gREaT aND sacRED aRE THE THOUgHTfUL DELIbERaTIONs REqUIRED TO pREsERVE THE LIVEs aND HEaLTH Of °y cREaTUREs. GRaNT THaT ¸y paTIENTs HaVE cONfiDENcE IN ¸E aND ¸y aRT aND fOLLOw ¸y  DIREcTIONs aND ¸y cOUNsEL. ³E¸OVE fRO¸ THEIR  ¸IDsT aLL cHaRLaTaNs aND  THE  wHOLE HOsT Of OfficIOUs RELaTIVEs aND kNOw-aLL NURsEs, cRUEL pEOpLE wHO aRROgaNTLy  fRUsTRaTE THE wIsEsT pURpOsEs  Of OUR aRT aND  OſtEN LEaD °y  cREaTUREs  TO THEIR DEaTH. SHOULD THOsE wHO aRE  wIsER THaN  º wIsH TO I¸pROVE  aND INsTRUcT ¸E, LET  ¸y  sOUL  gRaTEfULLy  fOLLOw  THEIR  gUIDaNcE;  fOR  VasT  Is  THE  ExTENT Of  OUR  aRT.  SHOULD cONcEITED fOOLs, HOwEVER, cENsURE ¸E, THEN LET LOVE fOR ¸y pROfEssION  sTEEL  ¸E agaINsT THE¸, sO THaT º RE¸aIN sTEaDfasT wITHOUT REgaRD fOR agE, fOR  REpUTaTION,  OR  fOR  HONOR,  bEcaUsE  sURRENDER wOULD  bRINg  TO  °y  cREaTUREs  sIckNEss aND DEaTH. º¸bUE  ¸y  sOUL  wITH  gENTLENEss  aND  caL¸NEss  wHEN  OLDER  cOLLEagUEs,  pROUD  Of  THEIR  agE,  wIsH  TO  DIspLacE  ¸E  OR  TO  scORN  ¸E  OR  DIsDaINfULLy  TO  TEacH ¸E. May EVEN THIs bE Of aDVaNTagE TO ¸E, fOR THEy kNOw ¸aNy THINgs  Of  wHIcH º a¸ IgNORaNT,  bUT LET NOT  THEIR aRROgaNcE  gIVE  ¸E paIN.  FOR THEy 

s c i h t E  f o   s e d o C

THEIR ILLNEssEs. °OU HasT ENDOwED ¸aN wITH THE wIsDO¸ TO RELIEVE THE sUffER-

aRE OLD aND OLD agE Is NOT ¸asTER Of THE passIONs. º aLsO HOpE TO aTTaIN OLD agE 

194

UpON THIs EaRTH, bEfORE °EE, AL¸IgHTy GOD! ²ET ¸E  bE  cONTENTED  IN EVERyTHINg  ExcEpT IN  THE gREaT  scIENcE Of  ¸y 

s c i h t E   f o  s e d o C

pROfEssION.  µEVER  aLLOw THE  THOUgHT  TO  aRIsE  IN  ¸E  THaT  º  HaVE  aTTaINED  TO  sUfficIENT  kNOwLEDgE, bUT VOUcHsafE TO ¸E  THE sTRENgTH, THE LEIsURE, aND  THE  a¸bITION EVER TO ExTEND ¸y kNOwLEDgE. FOR aRT Is gREaT, bUT THE ¸IND Of ¸aN  Is EVER ExpaNDINg. AL¸IgHTy GOD! °OU HasT cHOsEN ¸E IN °y ¸ERcy TO waTcH OVER THE LIfE  aND DEaTH Of °y cREaTUREs. º NOw appLy ¸ysELf TO ¸y pROfEssION. SUppORT  ¸E  IN THIs  gREaT Task sO  THaT  IT ¸ay  bENEfiT ¸aNkIND, fOR  wITHOUT  °y  HELp  NOT EVEN THE LEasT THINg wILL sUccEED.

Declaration  of Geneva  (World Medical  Association) »H±  ³HYSIcIAN’S  ³l±dg± ¾¼ ¾ mem½er oÀ the medi»¾l ¿roÀe¼¼ion: i ¼olemnlÈ ¿ledÇe TO DEDIcaTE ¸y LIfE TO THE sERVIcE Of HU¸aNITy; the he¾lth ¾nd Éell-½einÇ oÀ mÈ ¿¾tient wILL bE ¸y fiRsT  cONsIDERaTION; i Éill re¼¿e»t THE aUTONO¸y aND DIgNITy Of ¸y paTIENT; i Éill m¾int¾in THE UT¸OsT REspEcT fOR HU¸aN LIfE; i Éill not ¿ermit cONsIDERaTIONs Of agE, DIsEasE OR DIsabILITy, cREED,  ETHNIc ORIgIN, gENDER, NaTIONaLITy, pOLITIcaL affiLIaTION, RacE, sExUaL ORIENTaTION, sOcIaL sTaNDINg OR aNy OTHER facTOR TO INTERVENE bETwEEN ¸y DUTy  aND ¸y paTIENT; i Éill re¼¿e»t THE sEcRETs THaT aRE cONfiDED IN ¸E, EVEN aſtER THE  paTIENT Has DIED; i Éill ¿r¾»ti¼e ¸y pROfEssION wITH cONscIENcE aND DIgNITy aND IN  accORDaNcE wITH gOOD ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE; i Éill Ào¼ter THE HONOUR aND NObLE TRaDITIONs Of THE ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION; i Éill Çive TO ¸y TEacHERs, cOLLEagUEs, aND sTUDENTs THE REspEcT aND  gRaTITUDE THaT Is THEIR DUE; i Éill ¼h¾re ¸y ¸EDIcaL kNOwLEDgE fOR THE bENEfiT Of THE paTIENT aND  THE aDVaNcE¸ENT Of HEaLTHcaRE;

i Éill ¾ttend to ¸y OwN HEaLTH, wELL-bEINg, aND abILITIEs IN ORDER TO  pROVIDE caRE Of THE HIgHEsT sTaNDaRD;

195

cIVIL LIbERTIEs, EVEN UNDER THREaT; i m¾Êe the¼e ¿romi¼e¼ sOLE¸NLy, fREELy, aND UpON ¸y HONOUR.

Principles  of Medical  Ethics  (American  Medical  Association) preamble â  °E ¸EDIcaL pROfEssION Has LONg sUbscRIbED TO a bODy Of ETHIcaL sTaTE¸ENTs DEVELOpED pRI¸aRILy fOR THE bENEfiT Of THE paTIENT. As a ¸E¸bER Of THIs pROfEssION, a  pHysIcIaN ¸UsT REcOgNIzE REspONsIbILITy TO paTIENTs  fiRsT aND fORE¸OsT, as wELL as TO sOcIETy, TO OTHER HEaLTH pROfEssIONaLs, aND TO  sELf. °E fOLLOwINg PRINcIpLEs aDOpTED by THE A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION  aRE NOT Laws, bUT sTaNDaRDs Of cONDUcT wHIcH DEfiNE THE EssENTIaLs Of HONORabLE bEHaVIOR fOR THE pHysIcIaN. i  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL bE DEDIcaTED TO pROVIDINg cO¸pETENT ¸EDIcaL  caRE, wITH cO¸passION aND REspEcT fOR HU¸aN DIgNITy aND RIgHTs. ii  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL UpHOLD THE sTaNDaRDs Of pROfEssIONaLIs¸, bE  HONEsT IN aLL pROfEssIONaL INTERacTIONs, aND sTRIVE TO REpORT pHysIcIaNs DEficIENT IN cHaRacTER OR cO¸pETENcE, OR ENgagINg IN fRaUD OR  DEcEpTION, TO appROpRIaTE ENTITIEs. iii  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL REspEcT THE Law aND aLsO REcOgNIzE a REspONsIbILITy TO sEEk cHaNgEs IN THOsE REqUIRE¸ENTs wHIcH aRE cONTRaRy TO THE  bEsT INTEREsTs Of THE paTIENT. iv  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL REspEcT THE RIgHTs Of paTIENTs, cOLLEagUEs, aND  OTHER HEaLTH pROfEssIONaLs, aND sHaLL safEgUaRD paTIENT cONfiDENcEs  aND pRIVacy wITHIN THE cONsTRaINTs Of THE Law. v  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL cONTINUE TO sTUDy, appLy, aND aDVaNcE scIENTIfic  kNOwLEDgE, ¸aINTaIN a cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO ¸EDIcaL EDUcaTION, ¸akE  RELEVaNT INfOR¸aTION aVaILabLE TO paTIENTs, cOLLEagUEs, aND THE  pUbLIc, ObTaIN cONsULTaTION, aND UsE THE TaLENTs Of OTHER HEaLTH  pROfEssIONaLs wHEN INDIcaTED. vi  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL, IN THE pROVIsION Of appROpRIaTE paTIENT caRE, ExcEpT  IN E¸ERgENcIEs, bE fREE TO cHOOsE wHO¸ TO sERVE, wITH wHO¸ TO  assOcIaTE, aND THE ENVIRON¸ENT IN wHIcH TO pROVIDE ¸EDIcaL caRE.

s c i h t E  f o   s e d o C

i Éill not u¼e ¸y ¸EDIcaL kNOwLEDgE TO VIOLaTE HU¸aN RIgHTs aND 

vii  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL REcOgNIzE a REspONsIbILITy TO paRTIcIpaTE IN acTIVI-

196

TIEs cONTRIbUTINg TO THE I¸pROVE¸ENT Of THE cO¸¸UNITy aND THE  bETTER¸ENT Of pUbLIc HEaLTH.

s c i h t E   f o  s e d o C

viii  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL, wHILE caRINg fOR a paTIENT, REgaRD REspONsIbILITy  TO THE paTIENT as paRa¸OUNT. iX  A pHysIcIaN sHaLL sUppORT accEss TO ¸EDIcaL caRE fOR aLL pEOpLE.

EnduR±ng  And EmeRg±ng  ChAllenges  of InfoRmed  ConsenT Christine Grady

ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT Is a wIDELy accEpTED LEgaL, ETHIcaL, aND REgULaTORy REqUIRE¸ENT  fOR  ¸OsT  REsEaRcH  aND  HEaLTH  caRE  TRaNsacTIONs.  µONETHELEss,  THE  pRacTIcE  Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT VaRIEs by cONTExT,  aND THE REaLITy OſtEN  faLLs  sHORT  Of  THE  THEORETIcaL  IDEaL.  CONTE¸pORaRy  DEVELOp¸ENTs  IN  HEaLTH  caRE aND  cLINIcaL REsEaRcH  caLL fOR  RENEwED  EffORTs  TO  aDDREss  THE  ENDURINg  aND  E¸ERgINg  cHaLLENgEs  Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT,  sUcH  as  wHaT  INfOR¸aTION  sHOULD  bE  DIscLOsED,  HOw  IT  sHOULD  bE  DIscLOsED,  HOw  ¸UcH  THE  pERsONs  pROVIDINg cONsENT  sHOULD UNDERsTaND, aND  HOw ExpLIcIT cONsENT  sHOULD bE. °E  ¸ORaL  fORcE  Of  cONsENT  Is  NOT  UNIqUE  TO  HEaLTH  caRE  OR  REsEaRcH.  ºNTEgRaL TO ¸aNy INTERpERsONaL INTERacTIONs aND wELL ENTRENcHED IN sOcIETaL  VaLUEs  aND jURIspRUDENcE,  cONsENT caN RENDER  acTIONs ¸ORaLLy pER¸IssIbLE  THaT wOULD OTHERwIsE bE wRONg. FOR Exa¸pLE, wITH cONsENT IT Is fiNE TO bORROw  a  pERsON’s  caR  OR  DRaw  bLOOD,  bUT  THEsE  acTIONs  wITHOUT  cONsENT  aRE  cONsIDERED  THEſt  OR  baTTERy.Ã ³EcENT  REsEaRcH  cONDUcTED by  FacEbOOk  aND  ±kCUpID,  wHIcH ¸aDE  UsE Of  UsER  INfOR¸aTION aND  gENERaTED  aRgU¸ENTs  abOUT wHETHER THE gENERaL cONsENT gIVEN wHEN jOININg a sOcIaL NETwORk sUfficEs as cONsENT fOR sUcH REsEaRcH OR wHETHER ExpREss cONsENT Is REqUIRED,Ä,Æ ILLUsTRaTEs  bOTH HOw DEEpLy ROOTED THE IDEa Of cONsENT Is IN sOcIETy aND THE  cHaNgINg LaNDscapE IN wHIcH IT ¸ay appLy.

CHRIsTINE GRaDy, “´NDURINg aND ´¸ERgINg CHaLLENgEs Of ºNfOR¸ED CONsENT,” fRO¸ New England 

Journal of Medicine 372 (2015): 855–862. © 2015 by MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy. ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION Of  MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

Ethical and Legal  Foundations 198 CONsENT  Is  a LONg-sTaNDINg  pRacTIcE IN sO¸E aREas  Of ¸EDIcINE, yET ONLy IN  ydarG enitsirhC

THE  LasT  cENTURy  Has  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  bEEN  accEpTED  as  a  LEgaL  aND  ETHIcaL  cONcEpT  INTEgRaL  TO  ¸EDIcaL  pRacTIcE aND  REsEaRcH.Î ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT,  IN  pRINcIpLE,  Is  aUTHORIzaTION  Of  aN acTIVITy  basED  ON aN  UNDERsTaNDINg  Of  wHaT THaT acTIVITy ENTaILs aND IN THE absENcE Of cONTROL by OTHERs.Ï ²aws aND  REgULaTIONs  DIcTaTE  THE  cURRENT  INfOR¸ED-cONsENT  REqUIRE¸ENTs,  bUT  THE  UNDERLyINg VaLUEs aRE DEEpLy cULTURaLLy E¸bEDDED—spEcIficaLLy, THE VaLUE Of  REspEcT  fOR pERsONs’ aUTONO¸y aND THEIR  RIgHT TO DEfiNE THEIR OwN gOaLs aND  ¸akE cHOIcEs DEsIgNED TO acHIEVE THOsE gOaLs.Ï °Is RIgHT appLIEs TO aLL TypEs  Of  HEaLTH-RELaTED  INTERVENTIONs, INcLUDINg  LIfE-sUsTaININg INTERVENTIONs.  AN  EaRLy PREsIDENT’s CO¸¸IssION REpORT NOTED, “ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT  Is ROOTED IN  THE  fUNDa¸ENTaL  REcOgNITION . . . THaT  aDULTs  aRE  ENTITLED  TO accEpT  OR REjEcT  HEaLTH  caRE  INTERVENTIONs  ON  THE basIs  Of THEIR  OwN  pERsONaL  VaLUEs aND  IN  fURTHERaNcE Of THEIR OwN pERsONaL gOaLs.”Ð ALTHOUgH INfOR¸ED cONsENT  Is wIDELy  accEpTED IN THE ·NITED  STaTEs aND  IN ¸aNy  OTHER cOUNTRIEs, THIs UNDERsTaNDINg—aND, INDEED, THE fOcUs ON aN  INDIVIDUaL RIgHT TO sELf-DETER¸INaTION—VaRIEs accORDINg TO cULTURE. CULTURaL  DIffERENcEs ¸aNIfEsT IN bOTH THE pRacTIcE Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT—THaT Is, wHaT  Is TOLD TO wHO¸ aND wHO ¸akEs DEcIsIONs—as wELL as IN aN UNDERsTaNDINg Of  THE NOR¸aTIVE UNDERpINNINgs Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT as REspEcT fOR INDIVIDUaL  aUTONO¸y. PERsONs IN ¸aNy  cULTUREs, bOTH IN THE ·NITED STaTEs aND aROUND  THE  wORLD,  RELy  ON  THEIR  fa¸ILIEs  aND  sO¸ETI¸Es  ON  THEIR  cO¸¸UNITIEs  fOR  I¸pORTaNT DEcIsIONs, aND THIs ¸ay bE THE NOR¸ IN cULTUREs THaT sTREss THE RELaTIONsHIp  Of  INDIVIDUaLs TO  OTHERs aND  THE  E¸bEDDEDNEss Of  INDIVIDUaLs wITHIN  sOcIETy.  CO¸¸ENTaTORs aND E¸pIRIcaL  EVIDENcE HaVE sHOwN  THaT cULTURE  INflUENcEs  ¸ORaL  VaLUEs  aND  THaT  OTHER kEy  VaLUEs,  sUcH  as LOyaLTy,  cO¸passION,  aND  sOLIDaRITy,  ¸ay  bE  ¸ORE DO¸INaNT  THaN  aUTONO¸y IN  sO¸E  cULTUREs.Ñ ³EspEcTINg pERsONs INcLUDEs REspEcTINg THEIR cULTURaL VaLUEs aND ¸ay REqUIRE  aDapTINg  THE spEcIfics Of INfOR¸aTION DIscLOsURE OR ObTaININg  aUTHORIzaTION  fOR TREaT¸ENT OR REsEaRcH accORDINgLy. YET REspEcTINg cULTURaL VaLUEs DOEs NOT  NEgaTE THE  NEED TO REspEcT THE  pERsONs fOR wHO¸  caRE OR REsEaRcH Is bEINg  cONsIDERED  OR  THE  NEED  TO  I¸pLE¸ENT  REspEcTfUL  aND  appROpRIaTE  pROcEDUREs.  As GOsTIN pOINTs OUT, “ÂasT pERsONaL, cULTURaL, aND sOcIaL DIffERENcEs  wILL  pERENNIaLLy  pOsE cHaLLENgEs  TO ¸EaNINgfUL  DIaLOgUE  a¸ONg pHysIcIaN,  paTIENT,  aND  fa¸ILy;  IT  Is  THE  REgaRD,  cONsIDERaTION,  aND  DEfERENcE  sHOwN  THE  paTIENT  THaT  RE¸aINs  THE  HaLL¸aRk  Of REspEcT  fOR  pERsONs.”Ò °E  WORLD  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION  ¶EcLaRaTION  Of  ²IsbON  ON  THE  ³IgHTs  Of  THE  PaTIENT 

E¸pHasIzEs THaT paTIENTs EVERywHERE HaVE a RIgHT TO INfOR¸aTION aND TO sELf-  DETER¸INaTION. × °E ¶EcLaRaTION  Of ÁELsINkI  aND  OTHER INTERNaTIONaL  cODEs 

199

THE cONTExT Of REsEaRcH gLObaLLy.ÃØ

Gaps ±etween  Theory  and Practice ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  Is  a  pROcEss  Of  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  bETwEEN THE  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDER OR INVEsTIgaTOR aND THE paTIENT OR REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNT THaT ULTI¸aTELy  cUL¸INaTEs IN THE aUTHORIzaTION OR REfUsaL Of a spEcIfic INTERVENTION OR REsEaRcH  sTUDy. AccORDINg TO THE A¸ERIcaN  MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION, “ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT  Is a basIc pOLIcy IN bOTH ETHIcs aND Law THaT pHysIcIaNs ¸UsT HONOR. . . .” Ãà °E  pROcEss  INVOLVEs  ¸ULTIpLE  ELE¸ENTs,  INcLUDINg  DIscLOsURE,  cO¸pREHENsION,  VOLUNTaRy cHOIcE, aND aUTHORIzaTION. ºN THEORy, pHysIcIaNs aND INVEsTIgaTORs  DIscLOsE UNDERsTaNDabLE INfOR¸aTION TO paTIENTs aND REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNTs TO  facILITaTE INfOR¸ED cHOIcE. Î °EsE pERsONs UsE THIs INfOR¸aTION TO DELIbERaTE  aND  DEcIDE wHETHER THE INTERVENTION OffERED Is cO¸paTIbLE wITH THEIR INTEREsTs aND wHETHER TO aUTHORIzE OR REfUsE IT. PERsONs sHOULD HaVE THE capacITy  TO  UNDERsTaND THE INfOR¸aTION  aND sHOULD bE IN a  pOsITION TO ¸akE  aND  TO  aUTHORIzE a cHOIcE abOUT HOw TO pROcEED. µEITHER ¸EDIcaL NOR REsEaRcH INTERVENTIONs  sHOULD  cO¸¸ENcE  UNTIL  VaLID  cONsENT  Has  bEEN ObTaINED,  ExcEpT  UNDER LI¸ITED cIRcU¸sTaNcEs (E.g., E¸ERgENcIEs). WHEN a paTIENT OR REsEaRcH  paRTIcIpaNT Is  a cHILD OR aN aDULT  wHO Is NOT capabLE Of pROVIDINg INfOR¸ED  cONsENT, pER¸IssION fOR ¸EDIcaL caRE OR REsEaRcH Is OſtEN sOUgHT fRO¸ a sUbsTITUTE DEcIsION ¸akER, sUcH as a paRENT OR LEgaLLy aUTHORIzED pROxy. MOsT accEpT THaT IN pRacTIcE, paRTIcULaR aspEcTs Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT VaRy  by  cONTExT,  aND  bOTH  scHOLaRs  aND  pRacTITIONERs  cONTINUE  TO  DEbaTE  THEsE  aspEcTs—sUcH  as THE scOpE aND LEVEL Of DETaIL pROVIDED aND THE ¸ETHODs Of  DIscLOsURE,ÃÄ,ÃÆ wHETHER aND  HOw TO assEss  cO¸pREHENsION, wHaT cONsTITUTEs  NEcEssaRy  aND sUfficIENT  UNDERsTaNDINg  fOR  VaLID cONsENT, ÃÎ appROacHEs TO  assEssINg  pERsONs’ capacITy TO cONsENT aND sTEps TakEN  wHEN THEy Lack THaT  capacITy, ÃÏ HOw TO kNOw wHEN cHOIcEs aRE sUfficIENTLy VOLUNTaRy,ÃÐ aND IssUEs  cONcERNINg THE DOcU¸ENTaTION Of cONsENT. ÃÑ CONsENT fOR aN ELEcTIVE sURgIcaL  pROcEDURE DIffERs fRO¸ THaT fOR a sI¸pLE ROUTINE bLOOD TEsT OR fRO¸ a cO¸pLIcaTED REsEaRcH sTUDy, fOR Exa¸pLE. CULTURaL, sOcIOEcONO¸Ic, aND EDUcaTIONaL  facTORs  caN  aLsO  INflUENcE  THE  pROcEss  aND  pRacTIcE  Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT,  as  caN DIffERENT DEcIsION-¸akINg pRacTIcEs aND NOR¸s RELaTED TO THE ROLE Of  INDIVIDUaL aUTONO¸y.ÃÒ

tnesnoC demrofnI  fo  segnellahC

Of REsEaRcH ETHIcs sI¸ILaRLy E¸pHasIzE THE cENTRaLITy Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT IN 

»R±NdS  IN TH±  ¶±AlTH  CAR±  ANd  ´±S±ARcH  ¹ANdScAp±  »HAT  ¶AV±  ³´bµ¶ 1CURR±NT  AN Eff±cT  ON  ENdURINg  ANd  EM±RgINg  CHAll±Ng±S  IN ²NfORM±d  CONS±NT Selected 

Emerging  Questions  and Challenges Enduring  Questions  and 

Current  Trends 

Proposed 

Challenges

Strategies

in Health Care ²EaRNINg 

SHOULD INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR 

WHaT Is THE appROpRIaTE 

ºNTEgRaTED 

HEaLTH caRE 

THEsE acTIVITIEs bE ¸ORE sI¸ILaR 

a¸OUNT aND DETaIL Of INfOR-

cONsENT, sHaRED 

sysTE¸s, 

TO REsEaRcH INfOR¸ED cONsENT  OR 

¸aTION fOR VaLID cONsENT IN 

DEcIsION ¸akINg; 

pRag¸aTIc 

cLINIcaL INfOR¸ED cONsENT? ÁOw 

VaRIOUs cONTExTs? WHaT Is 

cONsENT TO bE 

TRIaLs, aND 

¸UcH INfOR¸aTION sHOULD bE gIVEN 

THE bEsT way TO DIscLOsE OR 

gOVERNED, ¸ORE 

qUaLITy 

TO paRTIcIpaNTs IN aDVaNcE? ·NDER 

pREsENT INfOR¸aTION TO bE 

EVIDENcE abOUT 

I¸pROVE¸ENT

wHaT cIRcU¸sTaNcEs (If aNy) Is 

sUfficIENTLy cO¸pREHENsIVE 

wHaT pERsONs 

NOTIficaTION RaTHER THaN ExpREss 

bUT NOT OVERwHEL¸INg? 

gIVINg cONsENT 

cONsENT sUfficIENT? WHEN caN cON-

WHaT aRE THE cONTExTUaL 

waNT TO kNOw, 

sENT bE ETHIcaLLy waIVED OR aLTERED? 

ELE¸ENTs THaT DETER¸INE 

aLTERNaTIVE 

WHaT INfOR¸aTION Is I¸pORTaNT TO 

THE appROpRIaTE a¸OUNT, 

sTRaTEgIEs

paTIENTs aND REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNTs? 

cO¸pLExITy, aND fOR¸aT Of 

ºs IT ETHIcaLLy accEpTabLE fOR a 

DIscLOsURE?

paTIENT OR REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNT TO  pROVIDE cONsENT fOR aN UNspEcIfiED  OR bROaD RaNgE Of acTIVITIEs? ADOpTION 

ÁOw sHOULD INfOR¸aTION bE 

´¸pIRIcaL EVIDENcE sHOws 

·sE Of TEcHNOL-

Of cO¸pLEx 

pREsENTED, aND wHaT LEVEL Of UNDER-

THaT paTIENTs aND REsEaRcH 

Ogy TO pREsENT 

TEcHNOLOgIEs, 

sTaNDINg sHOULD bE sOUgHT  wHEN 

paRTIcIpaNTs OſtEN DO NOT 

INfOR¸aTION; 

sUcH as NExT- 

ObTaININg cONsENT fOR cO¸pLEx 

UNDERsTaND THE INfOR¸a-

bROaD OR DyNa¸Ic 

gENERaTION 

TEcHNOLOgIEs (sUcH as gENETIc 

TION pROVIDED TO THE¸. 

cONsENT; cONsENT 

gENETIc 

sEqUENcINg) cHaRacTERIzED by 

CO¸pLEx INfOR¸aTION aND 

TO bE gOVERNED; 

sEqUENcINg

VOLU¸INOUs aND cO¸pLEx INfOR¸a-

INTERVENTIONs ¸ay bE ¸ORE 

ENHaNcE¸ENT Of 

TION, sUbsTaNTIaL UNcERTaINTy (E.g., 

DIfficULT TO UNDERsTaND, 

scIENcE LITERacy

VaRIaNTs Of UNkNOwN sIgNIficaNcE), 

EspEcIaLLy IN THE sETTINg Of 

INcIDENTaL fiNDINgs, aND I¸pLIca-

LI¸ITED HEaLTH aND scIENcE 

TIONs fOR bLOOD RELaTIVEs?

LITERacy.

CONsENT fOR 

ºs IT ETHIcaLLy accEpTabLE fOR a 

ÁOw spEcIfic DOEs THE 

BROaD cONsENT; 

fUTURE UsE Of 

paTIENT OR REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNT TO 

INfOR¸aTION pROVIDED IN 

DyNa¸Ic cONsENT; 

cLINIcaL DaTa 

pROVIDE cONsENT fOR aN UNspEcIfiED 

THE cONsENT pROcEss NEED 

cONsENT TO bE 

OR bIOLOgIc 

OR bROaD RaNgE Of pOssIbLE fUTURE 

TO bE REgaRDINg fUTURE 

gOVERNED; DEI-

spEcI¸ENs

REsEaRcH OR TO cONsENT TO a pRO-

UsEs Of DaTa OR spEcI¸ENs? 

DENTIficaTION Of 

gRa¸ OR sysTE¸ Of gOVERNaNcE?

¶OEs THE aNswER DIffER If 

DaTa aND  sa¸pLEs

THE DaTa OR spEcI¸ENs aRE  DEIDENTIfiED OR If fUTURE  pROjEcTs aRE sUbjEcT TO  OVERsIgHT?

Selected 

Emerging  Questions  and Challenges Enduring  Questions  and 

Current  Trends 

Proposed 

Challenges

Strategies

in Health Care ¶E¸OgRapHIc 

±LDER agE, DI¸INIsHED ¸ENTaL 

CapacITy Is assU¸ED fOR 

³EspEcTfUL aND 

cHaNgEs wITH 

capacITy, aND DE¸ENTIa pER sE 

aDULTs, aND THE capacITy TO 

EffEcTIVE assEss-

aN agINg 

DO NOT INDIcaTE THaT a pERsON Is 

cONsENT Is ONLy OccasION-

¸ENT Of capacITy 

pOpULaTION 

INcapabLE Of cONsENTINg, yET THE 

aLLy assEssED. CapacITy 

aND TRaININg Of 

aND INcREasE 

INcREasINg NU¸bERs Of ELDERLy 

¸ay bE qUEsTIONED ONLy 

HEaLTH pROfEs-

IN pREVaLENcE 

pEOpLE aND INcREasINg pREVaLENcE 

wHEN a paTIENT OR REsEaRcH 

sIONaLs; cREaTIVE 

Of DE¸ENTIa

Of DE¸ENTIa aND OTHER DIsORDERs 

paRTIcIpaNT DIsagREEs 

appROacHEs TO 

sUggEsT THaT pROfEssIONaLs IN bOTH 

wITH THE pHysIcIaN OR 

pREsENTINg INfOR-

cLINIcaL caRE aND IN REsEaRcH sHOULD 

REsEaRcHER. °E sTaNDaRDs 

¸aTION; INVOLVINg 

cONsIDER a pERsON’s capacITy TO 

fOR sUbsTITUTE DEcIsION 

TRUsTED fRIENDs 

cONsENT aND bE TRaINED IN HOw TO 

¸akERs VaRy by jURIsDIc-

aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸-

assEss capacITy. °ERE Is a NEED fOR 

TION aND aRE DIffERENT 

bERs IN cONsENT 

REspEcTfUL aND EfficIENT TOOLs aND 

fOR cLINIcaL aND REsEaRcH 

DIscUssIONs aND 

pROcEssEs fOR assEssINg capac-

DEcIsIONs.

DEcIsION ¸akINg; 

ITy, pRO¸OTINg DEcIsION ¸akINg, 

sTUDyINg NEw 

appROpRIaTELy INVOLVINg fa¸ILIEs 

paRaDIg¸s fOR 

aND fRIENDs, REspEcTINg cULTURaL 

sUbsTITUTE DEcI-

VaLUEs, aND UsINg sUbsTITUTE DEcI-

sION ¸akINg

sION ¸akERs wHEN appROpRIaTE.

FURTHER¸ORE,  IN  pRacTIcE, E¸pHasIs Is  OſtEN gIVEN TO  THE  wRITTEN DOcU¸ENTaTION  Of cONsENT,  DEspITE  wIDE agREE¸ENT  THaT cONsENT REqUIREs ¸ORE  THaN  a sIgNaTURE ON a fOR¸. FaDEN aND BEaUcHa¸p ackNOwLEDgE THaT THERE  aRE  TwO  cO¸¸ON  aND  sTaRkLy  DIffERENT  ¸EaNINgs  Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT:  aUTONO¸OUs aUTHORIzaTION by a  paTIENT OR REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNT aND  INsTITUTIONaLLy  OR LEgaLLy  EffEcTIVE aUTHORIzaTION, DETER¸INED  by  a  cO¸pLEx wEb  Of  pREVaILINg RULEs, pOLIcIEs, aND sOcIaL pRacTIcEs. Ï °E LaTTER ¸EaNINg, wHIcH Is  NOT NEcEssaRILy accO¸paNIED by aUTONO¸OUs DEcIsIONs, ¸ay OVERE¸pHasIzE  wRITTEN  DOcU¸ENTaTION aND  RIsk cO¸¸UNIcaTION, aND IT sERVEs TO HELp pROTEcT pROVIDERs aND INsTITUTIONs fRO¸ LIabILITy. A sUbsTaNTIaL bODy Of LITERaTURE cORRObORaTEs a cONsIDERabLE gap bETwEEN  THE  pRacTIcE Of  INfOR¸ED cONsENT  aND  ITs  THEORETIcaL cONsTRUcT OR  INTENDED  gOaLs aND INDIcaTEs ¸aNy UNREsOLVED cONcEpTUaL aND pRacTIcaL qUEsTIONs. Ã×–ÄÄ ´¸pIRIcaL EVIDENcE sHOws VaRIaTION IN THE TypE aND LEVEL Of DETaIL Of INfOR¸aTION DIscLOsED, IN paTIENT OR REsEaRcH-paRTIcIpaNT UNDERsTaNDINg Of THE INfOR-

¸aTION, aND IN HOw THEIR DEcIsIONs aRE INflUENcED.ÄÆ PHysIcIaNs REcEIVE LITTLE 

202

TRaININg  REgaRDINg  THE  pRacTIcE  Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT, aRE  pREssED  fOR  TI¸E  aND  by  cO¸pETINg DE¸aNDs,  aND  OſtEN ¸IsINTERpRET  THE  REqUIRE¸ENTs  aND 

ydarG enitsirhC

LEgaL sTaNDaRDs. PaTIENTs OſtEN HaVE ¸EagER cO¸pREHENsION Of THE RIsks aND  aLTERNaTIVEs  Of OffERED sURgIcaL OR ¸EDIcaL TREaT¸ENTs, ÄÎ aND  THEIR DEcIsIONs  aRE DRIVEN ¸ORE by TRUsT IN THEIR DOcTOR OR by DEfERENcE TO aUTHORITy THaN by  THE INfOR¸aTION pROVIDED.ÄÏ,ÄÐ ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR REsEaRcH Is ¸ORE TIgHTLy  REgULaTED aND DETaILED,ÄÑ yET REsEaRcH cONsENT fOR¸s cONTINUE TO INcREasE IN  LENgTH,  cO¸pLExITy,  aND  INcORpORaTION  Of LEgaL LaNgUagE,  ¸akINg  THE¸ LEss  LIkELy TO bE REaD  OR UNDERsTOOD. ÄÒ,Ä× STUDIEs aLsO sHOw THaT REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNTs HaVE DEficITs IN THEIR UNDERsTaNDINg Of sTUDy INfOR¸aTION, paRTIcULaRLy  Of  REsEaRcH  ¸ETHODs  sUcH  as  RaNDO¸IzaTION.ÆØ ³EsEaRcH  paRTIcIpaNTs,  wHO  aRE OſtEN paTIENTs wITH ILLNEssEs, fREqUENTLy ¸IsUNDERsTaND THE way IN wHIcH  REsEaRcH  Is  DIsTINcT fRO¸ INDIVIDUaLIzED  cLINIcaL caRE, aND  sO¸E wORRy  THaT  THIs  “THERapEUTIc ¸IscONcEpTION”  caN  INVaLIDaTE INfOR¸ED cONsENT. Æà °E  fEDERaL  REgULaTIONs REqUIRE  ¸OsT REsEaRcH  INfOR¸ED-cONsENT DOcU¸ENTs TO  INcLUDE  a sTaNDaRD  sET Of INfOR¸aTIONaL ELE¸ENTs aND  TO bE appROVED  by aN  INsTITUTIONaL REVIEw bOaRD bEfORE UsE. ÄÑ ÁOwEVER, REcENT cONTROVERsy OVER a  sTUDy  Of NEONaTEs, THE SURfacTaNT, POsITIVE PREssURE, aND ±xygENaTION ³aNDO¸IzED  ¹RIaL  (¼u¿¿ort)  sTUDy,  ILLUsTRaTEs  THaT  EVEN  wHEN  THEsE  REqUIRE¸ENTs aRE aDHERED TO, REasONabLE pEOpLE DIsagREE abOUT THE aDEqUacy Of THE  INfOR¸aTION pREsENTED ON THE cONsENT fOR¸s.ÆÄ,ÆÆ ÂaRIOUs  sTRaTEgIEs  TO  I¸pROVE  paTIENT  UNDERsTaNDINg  IN  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  HaVE bEEN EVaLUaTED. STUDIEs  sHOw  THaT paTIENTs  UNDERsTaND RIsk bETTER wHEN pHysIcIaNs aRE TaUgHT cO¸¸UNIcaTION sTRaTEgIEs.ÆÎ,ÆÏ ¶EcIsION aIDs  aND  DEcIsION-¸akINg TOOLs ÆÐ aND  a fOcUs  ON  sHaRED  DEcIsION  ¸akINg  aLsO  ENHaNcE  paTIENTs’  UNDERsTaNDINg  aND saTIsfacTION.ÆÑ,ÆÒ WHEN TI¸E  Is spENT  ExpLaININg  INfOR¸aTION abOUT  THE sTUDy,  THE paRTIcIpaNTs’ UNDERsTaNDINg  Of  REsEaRcH  sEE¸s  TO  I¸pROVE.Æ× PRacTIcaL  sTRaTEgIEs,  sUcH  as  syNTHEsIzINg  aND sI¸pLIfyINg  INfOR¸aTION  aND UsINg TEcHNOLOgIcaL  TOOLs aND NONpHysIcIaN pROVIDERs TO ExpLaIN THE REsEaRcH, HaVE bEEN sUggEsTED as ways TO HELp  acHIEVE  THE ETHIcaL  gOaLs Of cONsENT. ÎØ MORE  pROVOcaTIVELy, sO¸E sUggEsT  a  NEED TO REVIsIT THE cONcEpTs aND THE cONTOURs Of accEpTabLE cONsENT, NOTINg  THaT cURRENT NOTIONs Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT ¸ay bE OUTDaTEDÎà OR THaT wE ¸ay  bE  ExpEcTINg TOO  ¸UcH  Of  cONsENT.ÎÄ CLEaRLy, THERE  Is a  NEED  fOR cONTINUED cONsIDERaTION Of THE NOR¸aTIVE aND pRacTIcaL aspEcTs Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT  IN aN  aTTE¸pT TO  REcONcILE pRacTIcE  wITH  THE THEORETIcaL  IDEaL.  SEVERaL  cONTE¸pORaRy  TRENDs  IN  HEaLTH caRE aND  REsEaRcH  accENTUaTE THIs  NEED, as  DEscRIbED IN TabLE 1.

Changing  Models of Health Care and Research 203 aRIsEN  as  HEaLTH  caRE  INsTITUTIONs  aND  pRacTITIONERs  aDOpT  RObUsT  LEaRNINg  ¸ODELs  THaT  HybRIDIzE  paTIENT  caRE  wITH REsEaRcH  aND  EVIDENcE  gENERaTION  TO  EfficIENTLy  INTEgRaTE  I¸pROVED  pREVENTION,  TREaT¸ENT,  aND  caRE-DELIVERy  ¸ETHODs.  °E  ¸ODELs  INcLUDE  THE  ºNsTITUTE  Of  MEDIcINE  ²EaRNINg  ÁEaLTH  SysTE¸s, cONTINUOUs  qUaLITy I¸pROVE¸ENT, cO¸paRaTIVE EffEcTIVENEss  TRIaLs,  pRag¸aTIc  cLINIcaL  TRIaLs,  aND  pRacTIcE-basED  REsEaRcH,  a¸ONg  OTHERs.ÎÆ,ÎÎ AccO¸paNyINg THE aDOpTION Of THEsE ¸ODELs aRE DEbaTEs abOUT HOw spEcIfic  THE  DIscLOsED INfOR¸aTION  sHOULD bE,  abOUT wHEN ExpREss pROspEcTIVE cONsENT  Is  NEcEssaRy  OR wHEN  ROUTINE  DIscLOsURE  OR  NOTIficaTION  ¸IgHT sUfficE,  aND abOUT HOw cLOsELy cONsENT fOR THEsE acTIVITIEs sHOULD REsE¸bLE a REsEaRcH  ¸ODEL Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT.ÎÏ,ÎÐ CONVENTIONaLLy, INfOR¸aTION DIscLOsURE DIffERs bETwEEN cLINIcaL aND REsEaRcH INfOR¸ED cONsENT IN DETaIL, fOR¸aLITy, aND  LEVEL  Of  pRIOR REVIEw;  THEsE  DIffERENcEs  aRE OſtEN  jUsTIfiED by  DIffERENTIaTINg  THE  pRI¸aRy gOaL Of cLINIcaL  caRE—HELpINg THE paTIENT—fRO¸ THE  pRI¸aRy  gOaL  Of  cLINIcaL  REsEaRcH—gENERaTINg  UsEfUL  kNOwLEDgE.ÎÑ,ÎÒ WITH  ¸ORE  REcENTLy  E¸bRacED  LEaRNINg  paRaDIg¸s, THEsE  gOaLs aRE cONVERgINg,  OR  aT  LEasT THE bOUNDaRIEs aRE sHIſtINg.Î× SO¸E aRgUE THaT IN THE cONTExT Of LEaRNINg  acTIVITIEs, “REsEaRcH-LIkE” wRITTEN INfOR¸ED cONsENT ¸ay bE ETHIcaLLy UNNEcEssaRy,  OVERLy  bURDENsO¸E,  aND  LIkELy  TO  THwaRT  I¸pROVE¸ENT  EffORTs.ÏØ,Ïà ¶IsagREE¸ENT  RE¸aINs,  HOwEVER,  abOUT  THE  RIgHT  cONsENT  ¸ODEL  fOR  THEsE  cLINIcaL aND REsEaRcH LEaRNINg acTIVITIEs, aND HIgH-pROfiLE casEs HaVE spURRED  cONTROVERsy. ÏÄ,ÏÆ ±NE aRgU¸ENT agaINsT REsEaRcH-LIkE cONsENT pREsU¸Es THaT  ¸aNy  LEaRNINg acTIVITIEs—fOR Exa¸pLE, EVaLUaTINg THE I¸pORTaNcE Of REpEaT  LabORaTORy TEsTs OR HOw wELL HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs UsE a cHEckLIsT—aDD LITTLE  OR NO RIsk fOR paTIENTs aLREaDy REcEIVINg caRE, INVOLVE DETaILs Of sLIgHT INTEREsT  TO paTIENTs, aND HaVE OVERaLL gOaLs THaT paTIENTs sUppORT. SO¸E wOULD ExTEND  TO LEaRNINg acTIVITIEs a “sI¸pLE” cONsENT OR NOTIficaTION paRaDIg¸ THaT Is UsED  fOR cERTaIN cLINIcaL INTERVENTIONs, UsUaLLy wHEN THE RIsks aRE LOw aND paTIENTs  aRE NOT LIkELy TO HaVE sTRONg pREfERENcEs bETwEEN TREaT¸ENT OpTIONs OR wHEN  THERE Is ONLy ONE LOgIcaL cHOIcE.ÏÎ °E ¼u¿¿ort sTUDy, fOR Exa¸pLE, bROUgHT  TO  THE fOREfRONT THE  UNREsOLVED qUEsTION Of THE ExTENT TO  wHIcH REsEaRcH IN  wHIcH paRTIcIpaNTs REcEIVE sTaNDaRD ¸EDIcaL caRE OR THE caRE THaT THEy wOULD  ROUTINELy REcEIVE OUTsIDE THE sTUDy pOsEs “REsEaRcH RIsks” THaT REqUIRE REVIEw  by aN INsTITUTIONaL REVIEw bOaRD aND cO¸pREHENsIVE DIscLOsURE Of THEsE RIsks  IN  a REsEaRcH INfOR¸ED-cONsENT pROcEss.ÏÏ–ÏÑ FURTHER REsEaRcH aND DIaLOgUE  wILL HELp gUIDE DEcIsIONs abOUT HOw ¸UcH DIscLOsURE Is NEcEssaRy IN DIffERENT 

tnesnoC demrofnI  fo  segnellahC

ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  Is  ONE  a¸ONg  sEVERaL  I¸pORTaNT  cHaLLENgEs  THaT  HaVE 

LEaRNINg cONTExTs,  THE ExTENT TO  wHIcH RIsk  TO paRTIcIpaNTs  ¸aTTERs IN  THEsE 

204

DEcIsIONs,  HOw  wE sHOULD  THINk  abOUT  RIsk  pREsENTED  by  REsEaRcH  INVOLVINg  sTaNDaRD  ¸EDIcaL  INTERVENTIONs,  THE  ROLE  Of  paTIENT  pREfERENcEs,  aND 

ydarG enitsirhC

wHIcH,  If  aNy, acTIVITIEs caN  pROcEED  wITHOUT  ExpLIcIT  pROspEcTIVE  cONsENT.  CRUcIaLLy,  THEsE  EffORTs  sHOULD  INcLUDE  IDENTIfyINg  wHaT  paTIENTs,  REsEaRcH  paRTIcIpaNTs, pROVIDERs, aND OTHERs caRE abOUT IN VaRIOUs cONTExTs.

Consent  and Emerging  Technologies A  sEcOND cHaLLENgE TO INfOR¸ED cONsENT E¸ERgEs fRO¸ THE cO¸pLExITy aND  UNcERTaINTy  Of  THE  INfOR¸aTION  gENERaTED  by  aDVaNcED  TEcHNOLOgIEs  aND  ExpaNDED REsEaRcH OppORTUNITIEs. FOR INsTaNcE, NExT-gENERaTION gENO¸Ic  sEqUENcINg  TEcHNOLOgIEs,  sUcH  as  wHOLE-gENO¸E  sEqUENcINg,  wHIcH  aLLOw  THE qUIck aND INcREasINgLy INExpENsIVE DETEcTION Of VaRIaTION IN THE HU¸aN  gENO¸E, aRE  RapIDLy bEINg aDOpTED  INTO cLINIcaL REsEaRcH aND  ROUTINE cLINIcaL pRacTIcE.ÏÒ ALTHOUgH THE ROUTINE I¸pLE¸ENTaTION Of gENO¸Ic sEqUENcINg  INTO sTaNDaRD cLINIcaL pRacTIcE ¸ay bE pRE¸aTURE, TURNINg back ¸ay bE DIfficULT.Ï×,ÐØ MaNy REcO¸¸END a RObUsT INfOR¸ED-cONsENT pROcEss fOR THE UsE Of  gENO¸Ic sEqUENcINg TEcHNOLOgIEs.ÐÖÐÆ YET THE cO¸pLExITy, VOLU¸E, aND DENsITy Of gENERaTED HEaLTH INfOR¸aTION, THE aNTIcIpaTED DIscOVERy Of VaRIaNTs Of  UNcERTaIN sIgNIficaNcE aND sEcONDaRy aND INcIDENTaL fiNDINgs, aND THE I¸pLIcaTIONs  fOR  bLOOD  RELaTIVEs pREsENT  sUbsTaNTIaL  cHaLLENgEs.ÐÎ,ÐÏ CO¸pREHENsIVELy ExpLaININg IN aDVaNcE THE ELE¸ENTs NEcEssaRy  fOR ObTaININg INfOR¸ED  cONsENT, sUcH as THE ExpEcTED RIsks, bENEfiTs, aND LIkELy OUTcO¸Es Of sEqUENcINg, caN bE DIfficULT bEcaUsE Of THE sHEER VOLU¸E aND INHERENT UNcERTaINTy Of  THE  INfOR¸aTION  gENERaTED. FURTHER,  THE LEVEL  aND  TypE Of DETaILs pREsENTED  IN aN INfOR¸ED-cONsENT pROcEss ¸ay appROpRIaTELy DIffER bETwEEN THE cLINIcaL aND REsEaRcH cONTExTs, as wELL as accORDINg TO pOpULaTION OR sETTINg. FOR  Exa¸pLE,  THE  TypE Of  INfOR¸aTION aND  THE way  IT Is DIscLOsED  TO INfOR¸ED  HEaLTHy cONsU¸ERs wHO pURcHasE DIREcT-TO-cONsU¸ER gENO¸Ic aNaLysIs ¸ay  VaRy fRO¸ THaT fOR ILL paTIENTs sEEkINg cLINIcaL DIagNOsIs aND TREaT¸ENT.ÐÐ ºN aLL  sETTINgs,  DETER¸ININg  HOw TO pREsENT  cO¸pLEx scIENTIfic  INfOR¸aTION Is fURTHER cO¸pLIcaTED by THE LOw pREVaILINg RaTEs Of scIENcE aND HEaLTH  LITERacy. ÐÑ ºT  Has  bEEN  sUggEsTED  THaT  IN  cERTaIN  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs,  IT  ¸ay  bE  accEpTabLE  TO ask  pEOpLE TO cONsENT TO  aN OVERsIgHT ¸EcHaNIs¸ THaT  sERVEs  TO EVaLUaTE spEcIfics (I.E., cONsENT TO bE gOVERNED) RaTHER  THaN TO cONsENT TO  spEcIfic DETaILs;ÎÄ THERE ¸ay aLsO bE a NEED fOR ONgOINg cO¸¸UNIcaTION pROcEssEs  THaT  aLLOw  THE  INcORpORaTION  Of  cHaNgINg  INfOR¸aTION  aND  cHaNgED 

ExpEcTaTIONs OVER  TI¸E.ÎÆ ´NgagINg  paTIENTs IN THE IDENTIficaTION Of sUITabLE  cONsENT ¸EcHaNIs¸s OR IN THE DEVELOp¸ENT Of ¸EcHaNIs¸s Of DyNa¸Ic cONsENT  aRE  aDDITIONaL sTRaTEgIEs THaT HaVE  bEEN sUggEsTED.

205

SI¸ILaR cONsENT 

sTRaTEgIEs HaVE bEEN pROpOsED fOR REsEaRcH INVOLVINg bIOLOgIc spEcI¸ENs aND  DaTa.  ºNspIRED  by  THE  sTORy  Of  ÁENRIETTa  ²acks  (wHOsE  TU¸OR  gaVE  RIsE  TO  ÁE²a cELLs bUT wHOsE pER¸IssION TO UsE HER TU¸OR cELLs fOR REsEaRcH was NOT  sOUgHT),ÑØ scIENTIsTs aND pOLIcy¸akERs aRE INVEsTIgaTINg aND DIscUssINg ¸ODELs Of cONsENT TO IDENTIfy THOsE THaT aRE bOTH ETHIcaLLy aND pRacTIcaLLy sUITabLE  fOR THE fUTURE UsE Of sa¸pLEs aND DaTa.ÑÃ,ÑÄ

Changing  Demographics A THIRD cONTE¸pORaRy cHaLLENgE TO INfOR¸ED cONsENT E¸ERgEs fRO¸ ExpEcTED  sOcIODE¸OgRapHIc  TRENDs.  °E  ·.S.  pOpULaTION  wILL  bEcO¸E  cONsIDERabLy  OLDER aND ¸ORE  RacIaLLy aND ETHNIcaLLy  DIVERsE OVER THE  NExT fEw  DEcaDEs,  wITH  aN  ExpEcTED  DOUbLINg  Of  THE  NU¸bER Of  pERsONs  65 yEaRs  Of  agE  OR  OLDER aND aN EVEN ¸ORE DRa¸aTIc INcREasE IN THE NU¸bER Of THE “OLDEsT OLD”  (85 yEaRs Of  agE OR  OLDER).ÑÆ,ÑÎ PERsONs OLDER THaN  65 yEaRs Of agE gENERaLLy UsE  ¸ORE HEaLTH caRE sERVIcEs, HaVE a HIgHER pREVaLENcE Of cHRONIc DIsEasEs, aND  ¸ORE  OſtEN  HaVE  DEcLININg  pHysIcaL  aND  cOgNITIVE  fUNcTION  THaN  DO  THOsE  wHO  aRE  yOUNgER.ÑÏ °E  NU¸bER  Of  pEOpLE  wITH  ALzHEI¸ER’s  DE¸ENTIa  Is  aLsO ExpEcTED  TO ¸ORE  THaN DOUbLE by  2050  aND TO  INcREasE ¸ORE DRa¸aTIcaLLy  a¸ONg  THE  OLDEsT  OLD.ÑÐ PREpaRINg  fOR  THEsE  REaLITIEs  aND  THEIR  EffEcT  ON  HEaLTH  caRE  Is  cRITIcaL. FOR  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT, THEy  sUggEsT THE  NEED fOR  REspEcTfUL, EffEcTIVE, aND EfficIENT ¸ETHODs Of bOTH ascERTaININg wHETHER pERsONs  HaVE  THE capacITy TO  cONsENT  fOR THE¸sELVEs  aND  facILITaTINg  DEcIsION-  ¸akINg  pROcEssEs  fOR  THOsE  wHO  DO  NOT.  ALTHOUgH  ¸aNy  ELDERLy  pERsONs,  INcLUDINg sO¸E wITH  DE¸ENTIa, RETaIN THE  capacITy TO gIVE INfOR¸ED cONsENT  fOR  cERTaIN  TREaT¸ENT  DEcIsIONs, OTHERs  DO  NOT. CLINIcIaNs,  wHO  OſtEN  Lack  TRaININg  IN assEssINg capacITy,  DO NOT  aLways REcOgNIzE INcapacITy  aND ¸ay  qUEsTION  a  paTIENT’s  capacITy ONLy  wHEN THEy facE a  RIsky  DEcIsION OR  wHEN  THE  paTIENT  DIsagREEs wITH  THEIR  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs.ÑÑ CULTURaL  UNDERsTaNDINgs Of HEaLTH aND ILLNEss caN aLsO sO¸ETI¸Es pLay a ROLE wHEN paTIENTs DIsagREE wITH cLINIcaL REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs. AssEssINg capacITy  aND IDENTIfyINg  appROpRIaTE aND LEgaLLy accEpTabLE aLTERNaTIVE DEcIsION ¸akERs OR pROcEssEs  TakE  TI¸E  aND  REsOURcEs  aND  OſtEN  REcEIVE  sHORT  sHRIſt  IN  a  bUsy  cLINIcaL  OR  REsEaRcH  sETTINg.  AssEssINg  THE  REasONINg  capacITIEs  Of  pERsONs  fRO¸  cULTURaL  backgROUNDs THaT  aRE NOT wELL UNDERsTOOD  by  cLINIcIaNs  caN  aLsO 

tnesnoC demrofnI  fo  segnellahC

ÐÒ,Ð×

pOsE cONsIDERabLE cHaLLENgEs. CLINIcIaNs aND INVEsTIgaTORs sHOULD bE TaUgHT 

206

TO  assEss capacITy aND  sHOULD bE  pROVIDED wITH VaLIDaTED  aND UsEfUL TOOLs ÑÒ aND THE REsOURcEs TO HELp REsOLVE DIfficULT OR bORDERLINE casEs. JOINT DEcIsION-

ydarG enitsirhC

¸akINg  appROacHEs  THaT  sUppORT  THE  ExIsTINg  capacITy Of  EacH  paTIENT  bUT  INVOLVE fRIENDs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs HaVE bEEN REcO¸¸ENDED, bEcaUsE EVEN  “aUTONO¸OUs” DEcIsIONs aRE OſtEN ¸aDE TOgETHER wITH TRUsTED LOVED ONEs.Ñ×,ÒØ PaTIENTs  ¸ay HaVE THE capacITy fOR cERTaIN DEcIsIONs  bUT NOT fOR OTHERs, aND  capacITy caN wax aND waNE, sO paTIENTs sHOULD RE¸aIN INVOLVED IN TREaT¸ENT  DEcIsIONs  TO  THE ExTENT THaT  IT  Is  pOssIbLE.  CREaTIVE aND  appLIcabLE ¸ETHODs  Of  INfOR¸aTION  DIscLOsURE  aRE aLsO NEcEssaRy  fOR  pERsONs  wHOsE  capacITy Is  DI¸INIsHED,  as  wELL  as fOR  THE  INcREasINg  NU¸bERs  Of paTIENTs  wHO  aRE NOT  pRI¸aRILy ´NgLIsH spEakERs. ¶EspITE  THE  ENDURINg  aND  E¸ERgINg  cHaLLENgEs Of  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  IN  HEaLTH  caRE  aND  REsEaRcH,  cONsENT  Is  REcOgNIzED  as  ¸ORaLLy  TRaNsfOR¸aTIVE  aUTHORIzaTION,  ¸akINg  cERTaIN  acTIVITIEs  pER¸IssIbLE  THaT  OTHERwIsE  wOULD  bE wRONg. AssIDUOUs EffORTs TO cLaRIfy aND fiNE-TUNE cONcEpTs, ExpEcTaTIONs,  pRacTIcEs,  aND  THE  cRITIcaL  ROLE  Of  cONTExT  aRE  NEcEssaRy  TO  bRIDgE  THE  gap  bETwEEN THE REaLITIEs Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT aND THE IDEaL. CONTINUED ExpLORaTION  THROUgH  REsEaRcH,  pUbLIc  DIaLOgUE,  aND  cREaTIVE  appROacHEs  wILL  HELp  aDDREss THE ETHIcaL pER¸IssIbILITy  aND pUbLIc accEpTabILITy Of NEw ¸ODELs  Of  cONsENT, sUcH  as aLLOwINg  cONsENT fOR a bROaD sET  Of acTIVITIEs, sO¸ETI¸Es  wITH aN ExpLIcIT sysTE¸ Of gOVERNaNcE OVER spEcIfics;  REcOgNIzINg THE VaLIDITy  Of jOINT  appROacHEs TO  cONsENT aND  DEcIsION  ¸akINg; REfiNINg pROcEssEs  TO  REspEcT  THOsE  wHO caNNOT  cONsENT  fOR  THE¸sELVEs;  aND  fiNDINg  cREaTIVE,  pRacTIcaL,  aND  REspEcTfUL  ways  Of  pREsENTINg  INfOR¸aTION  aND  sUppORTINg  DEcIsION  ¸akINg  TaILORED  TO  EacH  cONTExT.  ³EspEcTINg  aND  pRO¸OTINg  THE  INfOR¸ED  cHOIcEs  Of  paTIENTs  aND  REsEaRcH  paRTIcIpaNTs  OR  pERsONs  acTINg  ON THEIR  bEHaLf RE¸aIN Of paRa¸OUNT I¸pORTaNcE,  DEspITE THE cHaLLENgEs Of  VaRIED aND cHaNgINg cONTExTs, aLTERED capacITy, LI¸ITED HEaLTH LITERacy, cO¸pLEx INTERVENTIONs, aND  sHIſtINg bOUNDaRIEs bETwEEN HEaLTH  caRE aND  LEaRNINg. CONTINUED pERsIsTENT aND THOUgHTfUL EffORTs TO bRINg THE THEORETIcaL aND  pRacTIcaL REaLITIEs Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT cLOsER TOgETHER aRE EssENTIaL.

notes 1  MILLER  FG, WERTHEI¸ER  A,  EDs.  °e  Ethics  of Consent.  µEw  YORk:  ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy  PREss; 2010. 2  ALbERgOTTI  ³.  FUROR  ERUpTs  OVER  FacEbOOk’s  ExpERI¸ENT  ON  UsERs:  aL¸OsT  700,000  UNwITTINg sUbjEcTs HaD THEIR fEEDs aLTERED TO gaUgE EffEcT ON E¸OTION. Wall Street Journal. 

JUNE 30, 2014. HTTp://ONLINE.wsj.cO¸/aRTIcLEs/fUROR-ERUpTs-OVER-facEbOOk-ExpERI¸ENT  -ON-UsERs-1404085840.

207

3  KRa¸ERa A¶, GUILLORy J´, ÁaNcOck J¹. ´xpERI¸ENTaL EVIDENcE Of ¸assIVE-scaLE E¸O-

Practice. 2ND ED. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss; 2001. 5  FaDEN ³, BEaUcHa¸p ¹. A History and °eory of Informed Consent . µEw YORk: ±xfORD  ·NIVERsITy PREss; 1986. 6  PREsIDENT’s  CO¸¸IssION  fOR  THE  STUDy  Of  ´THIcaL  PRObLE¸s  IN  MEDIcINE  aND  BIO¸EDIcaL  aND  BEHaVIORaL  ³EsEaRcH.  Making  Health  Care  Decisions.  WasHINgTON,  ¶C:  GOVERN¸ENT  PRINTINg  ±fficE;  ±cTObER  1982.  HTTps://REpOsITORy.LIbRaRy  .gEORgETOwN.EDU/bITsTREa¸/HaNDLE/10822/559354/¸akINg_HEaLTH_caRE_DEcIsIONs 

=

.pDf?sEqUENcE 1. 7  ¹URNER ².  FRO¸ THE  LOcaL  TO  THE  gLObaL: bIOETHIcs  aND  THE  cONcEpT  Of  cULTURE.  J  Med 

Philos. 2005;30:305–320. 8  GOsTIN  ²±.  ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT,  cULTURaL  sENsITIVITy,  aND  REspEcT  fOR  pERsONs.  ¼½¾½ .  1995;274:844–845. 9  WORLD MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION. Ém¾ ¶EcLaRaTION Of ²IsbON ON  THE RIgHTs  Of THE paTIENT.  ±cTObER 2005. HTTp://www.w¸a.NET/EN/30pUbLIcaTIONs/10pOLIcIEs/L4. 10  WORLD  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION.  Ém¾  ¶EcLaRaTION  Of  ÁELsINkI—ETHIcaL  pRINcIpLEs  fOR  ¸EDIcaL  REsEaRcH  INVOLVINg  HU¸aN  sUbjEcTs.  ±cTObER  2013.  HTTp://www.w¸a.NET/EN  /30pUbLIcaTIONs/10pOLIcIEs/b3. 11  A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION. CODE Of MEDIcaL ´THIcs, OpINION 8.08: INfOR¸ED cONsENT.  HTTp://www.a¸a-assN.ORg/a¸a/pUb/pHysIcIaN-REsOURcEs/¸EDIcaL-ETHIcs/cODE  -¸EDIcaL-ETHIcs/OpINION808.pagE. 12  McMaNUs P², WHEaTLEy K´. CONsENT aND cO¸pLIcaTIONs: RIsk DIscLOsURE VaRIEs wIDELy  bETwEEN INDIVIDUaL sURgEONs. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2003;85:79–82. 13  BOTTRELL  MM,  ALpERT  Á,  FIscHbacH  ³²,  ´¸aNUEL  ²².  ÁOspITaL  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  fOR  pROcEDURE  fOR¸s:  facILITaTINg  qUaLITy  paTIENT-pHysIcIaN  INTERacTION.  Arch  Surg.  2000;135:26–33. 14  WENDLER ¶,  GRaDy C. WHaT  sHOULD  REsEaRcH  paRTIcIpaNTs UNDERsTaND  TO  UNDERsTaND  THEy aRE paRTIcIpaNTs IN REsEaRcH? Bioethics. 2008;22:203–308. 15  AppELbaU¸ PS. AssEss¸ENT Of paTIENTs’ cO¸pETENcE TO cONsENT TO TREaT¸ENT. N Engl J 

Med. 2007;357:1834–1840. 16  MILLER ÂA, ³EyNOLDs WW, ºTTENbacH ³F, ²UcE MF, BEaUcHa¸p ¹², µELsON ³M. CHaLLENgEs IN  ¸EasURINg  a  NEw  cONsTRUcT:  pERcEpTION  Of  VOLUNTaRINEss  fOR  REsEaRcH  aND  TREaT¸ENT DEcIsION ¸akINg.  J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2009;4:21–31. 17  ScHENkER Y, WaNg F,  SELIg SJ, µg ³, FERNaNDEz A. °E I¸pacT Of LaNgUagE baRRIERs ON  DOcU¸ENTaTION Of INfOR¸ED  cONsENT aT a HOspITaL wITH ON-sITE INTERpRETER sERVIcEs. 

J Gen Intern Med. 2007;22(SUppL 2):294–299. 18  KROgsTaD ¶J, ¶IOp S, ¶IaLLO A, ET aL.  ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT  IN INTERNaTIONaL REsEaRcH:  THE  RaTIONaLE fOR DIffERENT appROacHEs.  Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010;83:743–747. 19  CaNDILIs P, ²IDz C. ADVaNcEs IN INfOR¸ED cONsENT REsEaRcH. ºN: MILLER FG, WERTHEI¸ER  A, EDs. °e Ethics of Consent: °eory and Practice. µEw YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss;  2010:329–346.

tnesnoC demrofnI  fo  segnellahC

TIONaL cONTagION THROUgH sOcIaL NETwORks. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2014;111:8788–8790. 4  BERg J, AppELbaU¸  P, ²IDz C, PaRkER ².  Informed Consent: Legal °eory and Clinical 

20  JOffE  S,  ¹RUOg ³.  CONsENT TO  ¸EDIcaL  caRE:  THE  I¸pORTaNcE  Of  fiDUcIaRy  cONTExT.  ºN: 

208

MILLER FG, WERTHEI¸ER A, EDs. °e Ethics of Consent: °eory and Practice . µEw YORk:  ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss; 2010:357–373. 21  ²EcLERcq WK, KEULERs  BJ, ScHELTINga M³,  SpaUwEN PÁ, VaN  DER WILT GJ. A REVIEw Of 

ydarG enitsirhC

sURgIcaL INfOR¸ED  cONsENT:  pasT, pREsENT,  aND  fUTURE:  a qUEsT  TO  HELp  paTIENTs  ¸akE  bETTER DEcIsIONs.  World J Surg . 2010;34:1406–1415. 22  ÁaLL  ¶´,  PROcHazka  AÂ,  FINk  AS.  ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  fOR  cLINIcaL  TREaT¸ENT.  ´»ÂÇ.  2012;184:533–540. 23  McKNEaLLy  MF,  ºgNagNI  ´,  MaRTIN  ¶K,  ¶’CRUz  J.  °E  LEap  TO  TRUsT:  pERspEcTIVE  Of  cHOLEcysTEcTO¸y paTIENTs ON INfOR¸ED DEcIsION ¸akINg aND  cONsENT. J Am Coll Surg .  2004;199:51–57. 24  FaLagas M´, KORbILa ºP, GIaNNOpOULOU KP, KONDILIs BK, PEppas G. ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT:  HOw ¸UcH aND wHaT DO paTIENTs UNDERsTaND?  Am J Surg. 2009;198:420–435. 25  McKNEaLLy MF, MaRTIN ¶K. AN ENTRUsT¸ENT ¸ODEL Of cONsENT  fOR sURgIcaL TREaT¸ENT  Of LIfE-THREaTENINg ILLNEss: pERspEcTIVE Of  paTIENTs REqUIRINg EsOpHagEcTO¸y.  J °orac 

Cardiovasc Surg. 2000;120:264–269. 26  ³UHNkE  GW,  WILsON  S³,  Aka¸aTsU  ¹,  ET  aL.  ´THIcaL  DEcIsION  ¸akINg  aND  paTIENT  aUTONO¸y: a cO¸paRIsON  Of  pHysIcIaNs  aND paTIENTs  IN JapaN  aND  THE  ·NITED  STaTEs. 

Chest. 2000;118:1172–1182. 27  ·.S. CODE  Of  FEDERaL  ³EgULaTIONs, aT  ¹ITLE 45  ãÕß.46.116 aND  21ãÕß.50.  HTTp://www  .HHs.gOV/OHRp/HU¸aNsUbjEcTs. 28  PaascHE-±RLOw  MK,  ¹ayLOR  ÁA,  BRaNcaTI  F².  ³EaDabILITy  sTaNDaRDs  fOR  INfOR¸ED-  cONsENT fOR¸s as cO¸paRED wITH acTUaL REaDabILITy. N Engl J Med. 2003;348:721–726. 29  BEaRDsLEy ´, JEffORD M, MILEsHkIN ². ²ONgER cONsENT fOR¸s fOR cLINIcaL TRIaLs cO¸pRO¸IsE  paTIENT UNDERsTaNDINg: sO wHy aRE THEy LENgTHENINg?  J Clin Oncol. 2007;25(9):E13–E14. 30  MaNDaVa A, PacE C, Ca¸pbELL B, ´¸aNUEL ´, GRaDy C. °E qUaLITy Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT:  ¸appINg  THE  LaNDscapE: a  REVIEw  Of  E¸pIRIcaL  DaTa fRO¸  DEVELOpINg  aND  DEVELOpED  cOUNTRIEs. J Med Ethics. 2012;38:356–365. 31  AppELbaU¸  PS,  ²IDz CW. ¹wENTy-fiVE  yEaRs  Of  THERapEUTIc ¸IscONcEpTION.  Hastings 

Cent Rep. 2008;38:5–6. 32  ÔÛÛÖ ±fficE fOR  ÁU¸aN  ³EsEaRcH  PROTEcTIONs. ²ETTER  TO  THE  ·NIVERsITy Of  ALaba¸a  REgaRDINg  THE  SURfacTaNT,  POsITIVE  PREssURE, aND  ±xygENaTION  ³aNDO¸IzED  ¹RIaL  (¼u¿¿ort). MaRcH 2013. HTTp://www.HHs.gOV/OHRp/DETR¸_LETRs/Y³13/¸aR13a.pDf. 33  ¶RazEN JM, SOLO¸ON CG, GREENE MF. ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT aND ¼u¿¿ort. N Engl J Med .  2013;368:1929–1931. 34  KINNERsLEy P, PHILLIps K, SaVagE K, ET aL.  ºNTERVENTIONs TO  pRO¸OTE INfOR¸ED cONsENT  fOR paTIENTs UNDERgOINg sURgIcaL aND OTHER INVasIVE HEaLTHcaRE pROcEDUREs. Cochrane 

Database Syst Rev . 2013;7:ãÔ009445. 35  ScHENkER Y, FERNaNDEz A, SUDORE ³, ScHILLINgER ¶. ºNTERVENTIONs  TO  I¸pROVE paTIENT  cO¸pREHENsION IN INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR ¸EDIcaL  aND  sURgIcaL pROcEDUREs: a sysTE¸aTIc REVIEw. Med Decis Making. 2011;31:151–173. 36  STacEy ¶, ²égaRé F, COL  µF, ET aL. ¶EcIsION aIDs  fOR pEOpLE facINg HEaLTH TREaT¸ENT OR  scREENINg DEcIsIONs.  Cochrane Database Syst Rev . 2014;1:ãÔ001431. 37  WOOLf SÁ, CHaN ´C, ÁaRRIs ³, ET aL. PRO¸OTINg INfOR¸ED cHOIcE: TRaNsfOR¸INg HEaLTH  caRE TO  DIspENsE kNOwLEDgE fOR DEcIsION  ¸akINg. Ann Intern Med . 2005;143:293–300.

38  KRU¸HOLz ÁM. ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT TO pRO¸OTE paTIENT-cENTERED caRE. ¼½¾½ . 2010;303 

209

:1190–1191. 39  FLORy J, ´¸aNUEL ´J. ºNTERVENTIONs TO I¸pROVE REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNTs’ UNDERsTaNDINg IN 

THE EffORT TO acHIEVE ETHIcaL gOaLs.  ¼½¾½. 2011;305:1130–1131. 41  ÁENDERsON G´. ºs INfOR¸ED cONsENT bROkEN?  Am J Med Sci. 2011;342:267–272. 42  KOENIg BA. ÁaVE wE askED TOO ¸UcH Of cONsENT? Hastings Cent Rep . 2014;44:33–34. 43  ºNsTITUTE Of MEDIcINE. BEsT caRE aT LOwER cOsT: THE paTH TO cONTINUOUsLy LEaRNINg HEaLTH  caRE IN A¸ERIca. 2012.  HTTp://www.IO¸.EDU/REpORTs/2012/bEsT-caRE-aT-LOwER-cOsT-THE  -paTH-TO-cONTINUOUsLy-LEaRNINg-HEaLTH-caRE-IN-a¸ERIca.aspx. 44  ºNsTITUTE  Of MEDIcINE.  °E  LEaRNINg  HEaLTHcaRE  sysTE¸:  wORksHOp  sU¸¸aRy.  2007.  HTTp:// w ww.IO¸ . EDU / REpORTs / 2007 / THE - LEaRNINg - HEaLTHcaRE - sysTE¸ - wORksHOp  -sU¸¸aRy.aspx. 45  FaDEN ³³,  Kass µ´,  GOOD¸aN Sµ,  PRONOVOsT P, ¹UNIs S,  BEaUcHa¸p ¹². AN ETHIcs  fRa¸EwORk  fOR a  LEaRNINg  HEaLTH caRE  sysTE¸:  a DEpaRTURE  fRO¸  TRaDITIONaL REsEaRcH  ETHIcs aND cLINIcaL ETHIcs. Hastings Cent Rep . 2013;43:S16–S27. 46  FaDEN ³³, BEaUcHa¸p ¹², Kass µ´. ºNfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR cO¸paRaTIVE EffEcTIVENEss  TRIaLs. N Engl J Med. 2014;370:1959–1960. 47  µaTIONaL CO¸¸IssION fOR THE PROTEcTION Of ÁU¸aN SUbjEcTs Of BIO¸EDIcaL aND BEHaVIORaL  ³EsEaRcH. °E  BEL¸ONT ³EpORT.  1979. HTTp://www.HHs.gOV/OHRp/HU¸aNsUbjEcTs  /gUIDaNcE/bEL¸ONT.HT¸L. 48  MILLER FG, ³OsENsTEIN ¶². °E THERapEUTIc ORIENTaTION TO cLINIcaL TRIaLs. N Engl J Med.  2003;348:1383–1386. 49  Kass  µ´,  FaDEN  ³³,  GOOD¸aN  Sµ,  PRONOVOsT  P,  ¹UNIs  S,  BEaUcHa¸p  ¹².  °E  REsEaRcH-TREaT¸ENT DIsTINcTION: a pRObLE¸aTIc appROacH fOR DETER¸ININg wHIcH acTIVITIEs sHOULD HaVE ETHIcaL OVERsIgHT. Hastings Cent Rep . 2013;43:S4–S15. 50  PLaTT  ³,  Kass  µ´,  McGRaw  ¶.  ´THIcs,  REgULaTION,  aND  cO¸paRaTIVE  EffEcTIVENEss  REsEaRcH: TI¸E fOR a cHaNgE. ¼½¾½. 2014;311:1497–1498. 51  KI¸  SY,  MILLER  FG.  ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  fOR  pRag¸aTIc  TRIaLs—THE  INTEgRaTED  cONsENT  ¸ODEL. N Engl J Med . 2014;370:769–772. 52  MILLER FG, ´¸aNUEL ´J. QUaLITy-I¸pROVE¸ENT REsEaRcH aND INfOR¸ED cONsENT. N Engl 

J Med. 2008;358:765–767. 53  SHEpHERD ². °E ¼u¿¿ort sTUDy aND THE sTaNDaRD Of caRE: THE ÁasTINgs CENTER BIOETHIcs FORU¸. May 17, 2013. HTTp://www.THEHasTINgscENTER.ORg/BIOETHIcsfORU¸/POsT.aspx 

=



?ID 6358ÍbLOgID 140. 54  WHITNEy Sµ,  McGUIRE  A², McCULLOUgH ²B.  A TypOLOgy  Of sHaRED DEcIsION  ¸akINg,  INfOR¸ED cONsENT, aND sI¸pLE cONsENT. Ann Intern Med. 2004;140:54–59. 55  MagNUs ¶, CapLaN A². ³Isk, cONsENT, aND sUppORT. N Engl J Med . 2013;368:1864–1865. 56  ÁUDsON K²,  GUTT¸acHER  A´,  COLLINs FS.  ºN  sUppORT Of  ¼u¿¿ort—a  VIEw fRO¸  THE  nih.  N Engl J Med. 2013;368:2349–2351. 57  ¶EpaRT¸ENT  Of  ÁEaLTH  aND  ÁU¸aN  SERVIcEs,  ±fficE  Of  ÁU¸aN  ³EsEaRcH  PROTEcTIONs. ¶Raſt gUIDaNcE  ON DIscLOsINg REasONabLy  fOREsEEabLE RIsks IN REsEaRcH  EVaLUaTINg  sTaNDaRDs  Of  caRE.  ±cTObER  20,  2014.  HTTp://www.HHs.gOV/OHRp/NEwsROO¸/Rfc  /cO¸sTDOfcaRE.HT¸L.

tnesnoC demrofnI  fo  segnellahC

INfOR¸ED cONsENT fOR REsEaRcH: a sysTE¸aTIc REVIEw. ¼½¾½. 2004;292:1593–601. 40  ScHENkER Y,  MEIsEL A. ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  IN cLINIcaL caRE: pRacTIcaL  cONsIDERaTIONs IN 

58  WaDE CÁ,  ¹aRINI  BA,  WILfOND  BS. GROwINg Up  IN THE  gENO¸Ic ERa:  I¸pLIcaTIONs Of 

210

wHOLE-gENO¸E  sEqUENcINg  fOR  cHILDREN,  fa¸ILIEs,  aND  pEDIaTRIc  pRacTIcE.  Annu  Rev 

Genomics Hum Genet. 2013;14:535–555. 59  FEERO  WG.  CLINIcaL  appLIcaTION  Of  wHOLE-gENO¸E  sEqUENcINg:  pROcEED  wITH  caRE. 

ydarG enitsirhC

¼½¾½. 2014;311:1017–1019. 60  CHRysTOja CC,  ¶Ia¸aNDIs ´P.  WHOLE gENO¸E  sEqUENcINg  as  a  DIagNOsTIc  TEsT: cHaLLENgEs aND OppORTUNITIEs. Clin Chem . 2014;60:724–733. 61  PREsIDENTIaL  CO¸¸IssION fOR  THE  STUDy Of  BIOETHIcaL  ºssUEs.  Privacy and Progress in 

Whole Genome Sequencing. WasHINgTON, ¶C: ¶EpaRT¸ENT Of ÁEaLTH aND ÁU¸aN SERVIcEs; 2012. HTTp://www.bIOETHIcs.gOV. 62  µaTIONaL  ÁU¸aN  GENO¸E  ³EsEaRcH  ºNsTITUTE.  ºNfOR¸ED  cONsENT  fOR  gENO¸Ics  REsEaRcH. HTTp://www.gENO¸E.gOV/27026588. 63  AppELbaU¸ PS, PaRENs ´, WaLD¸aN C³, ET aL. MODELs Of cONsENT TO RETURN Of INcIDENTaL fiNDINgs IN gENO¸Ic REsEaRcH. Hastings Cent Rep . 2014;44:22–32. 64  MORgENsTERN J, ÁEgELE ³A, µIskER J. SI¸pLE gENETIcs LaNgUagE as sOURcE Of ¸IscO¸¸UNIcaTION bETwEEN gENETIcs REsEaRcHERs aND pOTENTIaL REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaNTs IN INfOR¸ED  cONsENT DOcU¸ENTs. Public Underst Sci. 2014; ApRIL 21. (´pUb aHEaD Of pRINT). 65  CLaRkE AJ. MaNagINg THE ETHIcaL cHaLLENgEs Of NExT-gENERaTION sEqUENcINg IN gENO¸Ic  ¸EDIcINE. Br Med Bull. 2014;111:17–30. 66  SaNDERsON SC, ²INDER¸aN M¶, KasaRskIs A, ET aL. ºNfOR¸ED  DEcIsION-¸akINg a¸ONg  sTUDENTs aNaLyzINg THEIR  pERsONaL gENO¸Es  ON a wHOLE gENO¸E sEqUENcINg  cOURsE: a  LONgITUDINaL cOHORT sTUDy. Genome Med . 2013;5:113. 67  KUTNER M, GREENbERg ´, JIN Y, PaULsEN C.  °e Health Literacy of America’s Adults: Results 

from the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (n»e¼ 2006-483). WasHINgTON, ¶C:  ¶EpaRT¸ENT Of  ´DUcaTION, µaTIONaL  CENTER fOR  ´DUcaTION  STaTIsTIcs;  2006. HTTp://NcEs  .ED.gOV/pUbs2006/2006483.pDf. 68  WEbER GM, MaNDL K¶, KOHaNE ºS. FINDINg THE ¸IssINg  LINk fOR bIg bIO¸EDIcaL DaTa. 

¼½¾½. 2014;311:2479–2480. 69  KayE J, WHITLEy  ´A, ²UND  ¶, MORRIsON M,  ¹EaRE  Á, MELHa¸ K. ¶yNa¸Ic  cONsENT: a  paTIENT INTERfacE fOR TwENTy-fiRsT cENTURy REsEaRcH NETwORks. Eur J Hum Genet. 2014:1–6. 70  SkLOOT ³. °e Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. ²ONDON: PaN Mac¸ILLaN; 2011. 71  ÁUDsON K², COLLINs FS. BIOspEcI¸EN pOLIcy: fa¸ILy ¸aTTERs. Nature. 2013;500:141–142. 72  SI¸ON  CM,  ²’HEUREUx  J,  MURRay  JC,  ET  aL.  AcTIVE cHOIcE  bUT  NOT  TOO  acTIVE:  pUbLIc  pERspEcTIVEs ON bIObaNk cONsENT ¸ODELs.  Genet Med. 2011;13:821–831. 73  CENsUs BUREaU. ·.S. CENsUs BUREaU pROjEcTIONs sHOw a sLOwER gROwINg, OLDER, ¸ORE  DIVERsE  NaTION  a  HaLf  cENTURy  fRO¸  NOw.  ¶EcE¸bER  2012.  HTTp://www.cENsUs.gOV  /NEwsROO¸/RELEasEs/aRcHIVEs/pOpULaTION/cb12-243.HT¸L. 74  ·.S.  ¶EpaRT¸ENT  Of  ÁEaLTH  aND  ÁU¸aN  SERVIcEs  AD¸INIsTRaTION  fOR  CO¸¸UNITy  ²IVINg. AD¸INIsTRaTION ON AgINg (AOA) agINg sTaTIsTIcs. HTTp://www.aOa.acL.gOV/AgINg  _STaTIsTIcs/INDEx.aspx. 75  CHERRy ¶, ²Ucas C, ¶EckER S². Population Aging and the Use of Office-Based Physician 

Services. n»h¼ DaTa bRIEf, NO 41. ÁyaTTsVILLE, M¶: µaTIONaL CENTER fOR ÁEaLTH STaTIsTIcs;  2010. HTTp://www.cDc.gOV/NcHs/DaTa/DaTabRIEfs/Db41.HT¸. 76  ÁEbERT ²´, WEUVE  J, ScHERR PA,  ´VaNs ¶A. ALzHEI¸ER DIsEasE  IN THE ·NITED STaTEs  (2010–2050) EsTI¸aTED UsINg THE 2010 cENsUs. Neurology. 2013;80:1778–1783.

77  SEssU¸s  ²²,  ZE¸bRzUska  Á,  JacksON  J².  ¶OEs  THIs  paTIENT  HaVE  ¸EDIcaL  DEcIsION-  ¸akINg capacITy? ¼½¾½ . 2011;306:420–427.

211

78  ¶UNN  ²B,  µOwRaNgI  MA,  PaL¸ER  BW,  JEsTE  ¶Â,  Saks  ´³.  AssEssINg  DEcIsIONaL 

2006;163:1323–1334. 79  µUffiELD  COUNcIL  ON  BIOETHIcs.  ¶E¸ENTIa:  ETHIcaL  IssUEs,  ±cTObER  2009.  HTTp://  NUffiELDbIOETHIcs.ORg/wp-cONTENT/UpLOaDs/2014/07/¶E¸ENTIa-REpORT-±cT-09.pDf. 80  KI¸ SY, KI¸ ÁM, ³yaN KA, ET aL. ÁOw I¸pORTaNT Is “accURacy” Of sURROgaTE DEcIsION-  ¸akINg fOR REsEaRcH paRTIcIpaTION? PLoS One. 2013;8(1):E54790.

tnesnoC demrofnI  fo  segnellahC

capacITy fOR cLINIcaL REsEaRcH OR TREaT¸ENT: a REVIEw Of INsTRU¸ENTs.  Am J Psychiatry . 

´eAch±ng  The  ´yRAnny  of The FoRm ²NfORM±d  CONS±NT  IN ³±RSON  ANd ON  ³Ap±R Katie Watson

My  cOLLEagUEs  aND  º  IN  µORTHwEsTERN’s  MEDIcaL  ÁU¸aNITIEs  aND  BIOETHIcs  PROgRa¸ TEacH ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs a TExTbOOk VIsION Of INfOR¸ED cONsENT. WE  kNOw pHysIcIaNs DON’T aLways DO IT THaT way IN pRacTIcE, bUT wE figURE TEacHINg HOw IT ought TO bE DONE gIVEs OUR sTUDENTs a figHTINg cHaNcE TO DEcREasE  INEVITabLE gaps bETwEEN THE IDEaL aND THE REaL. ºN  2012  ¸y  faTHER  was  DIagNOsED  wITH TER¸INaL  EsOpHagEaL  caNcER,  ¸y  paRTNER aND  º bOTH HaD ¸INOR sURgERIEs, aND a  ROUTINE cOLONOscOpy TORE  ¸y  ¸OTHER’s  spLEEN aLL IN  THE cOURsE Of sIx ¸ONTHs. My “YEaR Of MEDIcaL MaNagE¸ENT”  ¸aDE  ¸E  REaLIzE  ¸y  TEacHINg  abOUT  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  wasN’T  jUsT  INTENTIONaLLy  IgNORINg  a  THEORy-pRacTIcE  gap—IT  was  IgNORaNT  Of  HOw  THE ¸ODERN ¸EDIcaL wORkpLacE  sEpaRaTEs cONsENT  cONVERsaTION fRO¸ cONsENT DOcU¸ENTaTION, aND HOw THE “¹yRaNNy Of THE FOR¸” caN UNDER¸INE THE  DEcIsION-¸akINg pROcEss IN sURpRIsINg ways. My faTHER  was a  HEaLTHy 75-yEaR-OLD  wHO pLayED HIs 36TH sEasON Of sOſtbaLL IN THE sU¸¸ER Of 2011, bUT IN THE faLL HE DEVELOpED a pERsIsTENT IRRITaTINg  cOUgH,  aND  IN  ¸ID-JaNUaRy  TEsTINg  REVEaLED  aN  ENOR¸OUs  TU¸OR.  ÁE was  qUIckLy  aD¸ITTED  TO THE  HOspITaL TO  figURE OUT  wHaT TO  DO wITH HIs TU¸OR’s  UNUsUaL  fisTULa—a  DyE  TEsT  sHOwED  THaT  EVERyTHINg HE  swaLLOwED  wENT  IN  (aND ¸OsTLy OUT Of) a s¸aLL gap IN HIs TU¸OR, cREaTINg aN INfEcTIOUs pOckET  THaT wOULD bE faTaL If IT bURsT—aND THE HIgH-sTakEs qUEsTION was wHaT TO DO  abOUT IT. MULTIpLE TEa¸s cycLED THROUgH HIs ROO¸ REpORTINg THEIR TEsT REsULTs  aND DIffERINg  assEss¸ENTs Of RIsks  aND bENEfiTs fOR  THE  VaRIOUs  appROacHEs  THEy  aDVOcaTED.  ´VERy OpTION  INcLUDED LIfE-THREaTENINg  RIsks  IN  UNcERTaIN  qUaNTITIEs,  aND THERE  was  NO  cLEaR  aNswER. °E  ¸ORNINg  bEfORE  THE  ENDO-

KaTIE WaTsON, “¹EacHINg THE ¹yRaNNy Of THE FOR¸: ºNfOR¸ED  CONsENT IN PERsON aND ON PapER,”  fRO¸  Narrative Inquiry  in Bioethics 3, NO. 1  (2013):  31–34. ©  2013  by  JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy  PREss. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy PREss.

scOpIc pROcEDURE, ¸y DaD aND HIs ONcOLOgIsT REVIEwED THE pOssIbILITIEs aND  cOLLabORaTIVELy DEcIDED TO acT cONsERVaTIVELy, DEfERRINg THE pOssIbILITy Of aN 

213

OLOgy’s REcO¸¸ENDaTION Of aN ExpLORaTORy scOpE Of HIs EsOpHagUs TO DETER¸INE THE ORIgIN Of HIs TU¸OR aND INsERTINg a fEEDINg TUbE IN HIs sTO¸acH IN  pREpaRaTION fOR a LOw-DOsE paLLIaTIVE ROUND Of RaDIaTION aND cHE¸OTHERapy.  ºT was  a TExTbOOk-pERfEcT Exa¸pLE Of OpTION REVIEw aND cOLLabORaTIVE DEcIsION ¸akINg a¸ONg pHysIcIaN, paTIENT, aND fa¸ILy—scORE ONE fOR INfOR¸ED  cONsENT! °aT aſtERNOON a  sURgERy REsIDENT ca¸E IN TO “cONsENT” ¸y faTHER fOR THE  NExT  Day’s  ENDOscOpy,  aND  as  HE  scaNNED THE  fOR¸,  HE  RaTTLED Off  THaT  THEy  wERE  gOINg TO pLacE a sTENT. “µO, THEy DEcIDED NOT TO DO THaT,” ¸y DaD says.  “°aT’s Okay,” THE REsIDENT says, “gO aHEaD aND sIgN IT aND THEy’LL wORk IT OUT  TO¸ORROw.” My DaD LOOks TO ¸E fRO¸ HIs bED, aND º back HI¸ Up. “°ERE was  a  LOT Of DIscUssION  back aND  fORTH  aND  IT  sOUNDs  LIkE  ¸aybE sURgERy DIDN’T  HEaR  THE fiNaL  DEcIsION. WHy DON’T yOU cHEck wITH ¶R. ¶ [¶aD’s sURgEON] TO  ¸akE  sURE  EVERyONE’s ON THE sa¸E pagE aND  THE fOR¸ LIsTs  THE RIgHT  pROcEDUREs?”  °E REsIDENT waVEs THE  cONsENT  fOR¸ IN  THE  aIR. “°Is  IsN’T a LEgaL  DOcU¸ENT.” º DON’T cORREcT HI¸: º a¸ Off THE LawyER-ETHIcIsT-pROfEssOR cLOck,  TODay  º  a¸ a  DaUgHTER  IN  jEaNs  cURLED  IN aN  UNcO¸fORTabLE cHaIR  wHO  caN  sTILL  baRELy  bELIEVE  HER  HEaRTy  DaDDy  Has bEEN  bEDDED  IN  a  HOspITaL  gOwN.  “ºT’s  NOT  a  cONTRacT,” HE  says  DIs¸IssIVELy.  “JUsT  bEcaUsE  yOU  sIgN IT  DOEsN’T  ¸EaN  wE  have TO DO  wHaT’s  ON HERE—If  IT’s  wRONg  wE  wON’T DO  IT. AND,” HE  says HOpEfULLy, “yOU ¸IgHT waNT a sTENT LaTER.” º s¸ILE. “WELL THEN yOU’D waNT  TO TaLk TO HI¸ abOUT THaT THEN. SIgNINg sO¸ETHINg wE aLREaDy kNOw Is wRONg  sEE¸s  baD  fOR safETy,  yOU  kNOw? WITH  aLL  THEsE DIffERENT TEa¸s . . . DOUbLE-  cHEck wITH ¶R. ¶, Okay?” °E REsIDENT LEaVEs. AN HOUR LaTER ¶aD’s ONcOLOgIsT caLLs ¸y cELL pHONE sOUNDINg cONfUsED: “º  HEaR yOUR DaD REfUsED THE ENDOscOpy?” º ExpLaIN. SHE cHUckLEs. “º’LL spEak TO  THE yOUNg REsIDENT.” ¹wO HOURs LaTER º waLk INTO ¶aD’s ROO¸ aND THE REsIDENT  Is back, THIs TI¸E wITH a RaDIcaLLy DIffERENT DE¸EaNOR. ÁE’D  never waNT Us TO  sIgN  sO¸ETHINg THaT  wasN’T RIgHT,  HE was  jUsT  TRyINg TO  figURE OUT wHaT was  accURaTE sO HE cOULD ¸akE a corrected fOR¸, DOEs this LOOk Okay TO ¶aD aND  ¸E?  Wonderful . ºN  °e Healer’s Power (1992), pHysIcIaN-pHILOsOpHER ÁOwaRD BRODy aNaLyzED THE pOwER Of THE wORkpLacE, bEcaUsE HE THINks DIscUssINg ETHIcaL pRObLE¸s IN TER¸s Of THE TENsION bETwEEN caRE aND wORk bRINgs TO LIgHT ETHIcaLLy  RELEVaNT  fEaTUREs  THaT  aREN’T  RaIsED  by  ¸ORE  TRaDITIONaL  ETHIcs  LaNgUagE  OR  cONcEpTs.

m r o F  e h t   f o   y n n a r y T   e h t   g n i h c a e T

EsOpHagEaL sTENT OR a DRaIN THROUgH HIs back fOR  LaTER, aND gOINg wITH RaDI-

ºN THIs sITUaTION, THE wORkpLacE DIVIsION Of LabOR HaD ONE pERsON gET THE 

214

acTUaL  INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  (¶aD’s  ONcOLOgIsT)  aND  aNOTHER  gET  DOcU¸ENTaTION  Of THaT  cONsENT (THE sURgERy REsIDENT). WHEN THEsE ROLEs aRE sEpaRaTED, 

nostaW   e i t a K

THE pERsON sENT TO DOcU¸ENT cONsENT INVaRIabLy Lacks fULL kNOwLEDgE Of THE  acTUaL cONsENT cONVERsaTION. BUT wHaT accOUNTs fOR THE REsIDENT’s REsIsTaNcE  TO cHaNgINg THE fOR¸ wHEN THE paTIENT INfOR¸ED HI¸ Of ITs ERROR? FRO¸ a  wORkflOw  pERspEcTIVE  THE REsIDENT  was  UNDER asy¸¸ETRIc  pREssURE: If HE’D gOTTEN a sIgNaTURE HE pRObabLy wOULDN’T caTcH TROUbLE fOR aDDINg  aN  INaccURaTE cONsENT fOR¸ TO THE cHaRT UNLEss IT REsULTED IN a sURgIcaL ERROR.  AND,  Of cOURsE,  REVIsINg  THE  fOR¸  LENgTHENs  HIs  TO-DO  LIsT.  BUT  If  IT  DOEsN’T  ¸aTTER  wHaT THE fOR¸  says, wHy aRE  wE sIgNINg  IT  aT aLL? ¶URINg  ¸y faTHER’s  HOspITaLIzaTIONs º  ca¸E TO  THINk Of THE HOspITaL  as a  “HEaLTH facTORy”  wITH  a  gRaVITaTIONaL pULL TOwaRD EfficIENcy THaT caN DIsE¸pOwER bOTH pHysIcIaNs aND  paTIENTs. As BRODy ObsERVEs, “[T]HERE Is a DIREcT cONflIcT bETwEEN THE ROUTINE  aND pOwER Of THE wORkpLacE aND THE gOaL Of paTIENT aUTONO¸y” (p. 68). BRODy INVITEs ETHIcIsTs TO UsE THE LaNgUagE Of pOwER, bUT HE DOEsN’T aNaLyzE  THE pOwER Of LaNgUagE. CONsIDER THE ExpEcTaTION E¸bEDDED IN THE DIREcTIVE  “gO cONsENT HER”—cONVERTINg cONsENT TO a VERb EsTabLIsHEs “yEs” as THE gOaL  aND cONsTRUcTs paTIENT REfUsaL as a faILURE Of THE pERsON sENT TO gET “cONsENT.”  °E  E¸pHasIs  ON OUTcO¸E  IN  “gO  cONsENT  HER” aLsO sUggEsTs  THE  pHysIcIaN  Has a sTakE IN THE paTIENT agREEINg wITH THE REcO¸¸ENDaTION, ONE sTRaND Of  wHIcH cOULD bE bENEficENcE (“º THINk THIs Is bEsT fOR yOU aND a¸ INVEsTED IN  yOUR  wELLbEINg”), aNOTHER  cOULD  bE  pERsONaL  pOwER  (“REjEcTINg  ¸y REcO¸¸ENDaTION  Is aN affRONT TO ¸E  aND/OR ¸y ExpERTIsE”), aND BRODy’s fOcUs ON  wORkpLacE pOwER sUggEsTs a  THIRD sTRaND—THE paTIENT wHO says NO DIsRUpTs  THE ¸O¸ENTU¸ Of a  VERy ExpENsIVE assE¸bLy LINE. (¹wENTy yEaRs LaTER, SHaRON  KaUf¸aN’s  ETHNOgRapHIc  REsEaRcH,  And  a  Time  to Die:  How  American 

Hospitals Shape the End of Life [2005],  cONfiR¸ED BRODy’s INsIgHT abOUT THE  pREssURE TO kEEp THINgs ¸OVINg IN THE HOspITaL.) º UsED TO cHafE aT THIs LaNgUagE (AREN’T THEy sENT TO gET THE paTIENT’s DEcIsION? WOULD THE REspONsE TO REfUsaL cHaNgE If THE sHORTHaND wERE “gO DEcIsION  HER” OR “gO  RIsk-aND-bENEfiT  HER”?). °Is  ExpERIENcE ¸aDE ¸E  RETHINk  ¸y  ObjEcTION: wHEN a  HIgHER-Up Has aLREaDy  HaD  THE  cONVERsaTION aND  THE  “yEs” Is a DONE-DEaL, “gO cONsENT HER” Is aN accURaTE affiR¸aTION Of THE sEpaRaTION Of cONVERsaTION aND DOcU¸ENTaTION. ºN THaT sITUaTION, THE pERsON wHO  LEaVEs  THE ROO¸ wITHOUT  a  sIgNaTURE Has faILED a cLERIcaL Task.  SaDLy fOR THIs  REsIDENT,  a gLITcH IN THE assE¸bLy LINE pUT a faULTy fOR¸ IN HIs  HaND. FRO¸ a  safETy  pERspEcTIVE HE sHOULD HaVE bEEN REwaRDED fOR  caTcHINg aN ERROR, bUT 

HIs  bEHaVIOR ON bOTH OccasIONs  sUggEsTs HE  cOULD HaVE  bEEN REspONDINg TO  pUNIsH¸ENT (fEaRED OR acTUaL) fOR DIsRUpTINg wORkflOw.

215

INg yOUR DEcIsION—aRE cO¸bINED. °aT was THE casE TwO ¸ONTHs LaTER wHEN  º NEEDED sURgERy TO RE¸OVE UTERINE fibROIDs. FIVE Days bEfORE sURgERy º HaD  aN appOINT¸ENT wITH ¸y DOcTOR’s FELLOw  TO REVIEw THE pROcEDURE. °E  FELLOw  DID aN  ExE¸pLaRy  jOb  Of  ExpLaININg RIsks,  bENEfiTs,  aND  aLTERNaTIVEs  IN  pLaIN LaNgUagE aND aNswERINg ¸y qUEsTIONs. º caUgHT THE pROfEssORIaL paRT Of  ¸y  bRaIN  THINkINg, “µOw  this Is INfOR¸ED  cONsENT” as THE  FELLOw spOkE—º  was gENUINELy I¸pREssED wITH HER. °EN  sHE  HaNDED  ¸E  THE  cONsENT  fOR¸,  wHIcH  saID:  “ºf  aNy  pREsENTLy  UNkNOwN  cONDITIONs  aRE  REVEaLED  IN  THE  cOURsE  Of  THE  pROcEDUREs  Na¸ED  abOVE wHIcH caLL fOR DIffERENT OR fURTHER pROcEDUREs, º HEREby cONsENT TO aND  aUTHORIzE THE pERfOR¸aNcE Of sUcH pROcEDUREs as wELL.” º REflExIVELy cROss THIs  OUT  as º REaD IT, aND THE FELLOw LOOks sTaRTLED. º ExpLaIN THaT º aLways cROss  OUT bLaNkET cONsENT sENTENcEs bEcaUsE º’¸ NOT agREEINg TO aNy aND aLL pROcEDUREs, ONLy THE ONE wE DIscUssED. SHE REspONDs IN wHaT º REgIsTER as a paTRONIzINg  TONE:  “WHaT  If  yOU  wERE  DyINg?  WOULDN’T  yOU  waNT  Us  TO  saVE  yOUR  LIfE?”  º  wINcE  aT THE  HINT  Of  aNTagONIs¸,  sITTINg  Up  sTRaIgHT. “YEs.  º  wOULD.  AND yOU’D bE aUTHORIzED TO DO THaT by E¸ERgENcy ExcEpTIONs TO cONsENT. BUT  If yOU fOUND a NONE¸ERgENT cONDITION yOU REcO¸¸ENDED OTHER pROcEDUREs  fOR,  º’D waNT  yOU TO DIscUss  IT wITH ¸y sURROgaTE.”  SHE  says NOTHINg.  FINE. º  REaD ON, REacHINg THE paRTs THaT say º cONsENT TO assIsTaNcE OR ObsERVaTION by  ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs. ¶URINg OUR cONVERsaTION º TOLD THE FELLOw THaT ¸y DOcTOR  was  fiNE  wITH  ¸y  REqUEsT  TO  ExcLUDE  sTUDENTs,  aND  THE  FELLOw  agREED  THaT  ¸aDE pERfEcT sENsE gIVEN ¸y TEacHINg ROLE. µOw º’¸ ¸ORE aNxIOUs, bUT wITH  sUspENDED pEN º say, “SO º sHOULD cROss OUT THE cONsENT TO sTUDENTs, TOO . . .”  aND  sHE  flINcHEs.  “µO,  NO.  YOU  caN’T  cROss  aNyTHINg  ELsE  OUT.”  “WHy  NOT?”  “º’D jUsT HaTE fOR IT TO HOLD Up yOUR sURgERy. PEOpLE sEE sO¸ETHINg scRaTcHED  OUT,  THEN  pEOpLE HaVE  TO  TaLk  abOUT IT. . . .”  “BUT cOULDN’T  yOU jUsT  TELL  THE¸  IT’s aLRIgHT? º jUsT waNT THE fOR¸ TO ¸aTcH wHaT wE saID.” “WE caN’T  guarantee NO sTUDENTs wILL cO¸E  IN.” “°EN wE  sHOULD TaLk  abOUT THaT ¸ORE!”  “ºT’s NOT  THaT, THEy wON’T. . . . º’D jUsT HaTE fOR yOUR sURgERy TO gET HELD Up TO THE pOINT  yOU HaD TO cO¸E back aNOTHER Day.” ºT’s sILENT fOR a ¸O¸ENT as º pROcEss ¸y  OpTIONs. °EN sHE aDDs, “AT sO¸E pOINT yOU jUsT HaVE TO TRUsT Us, RIgHT?” SHE’s RIgHT:  º sHOULDN’T  agREE TO HaVE  ¸y NakED  bODy  jackED  OpEN wHILE  º’¸ UNcONscIOUs UNLEss º TRUsT THE pEOpLE DOINg sO TO TakE caRE Of ¸E. AND 

m r o F  e h t   f o   y n n a r y T   e h t   g n i h c a e T

ºN OTHER INsTaNcEs, THE TwO acTs Of A¸ERIcaN ¸EDIcaL DEcIsION ¸akINg—  DIscUssINg THE pROcEDURE wITH sO¸EONE wHO kNOws abOUT IT aND DOcU¸ENT-

¸EDIcaLLy, º DO. BUT º was askINg THE¸ TO caRE fOR ¸E pERsONaLLy wHEN º askED 

216

THE¸ TO kEEp ¸y sTUDENTs fRO¸ sEEINg ¸E LIkE THaT, aND “aT sO¸E pOINT yOU  jUsT HaVE TO TRUsT Us” fELT LIkE a THREaT, THE ELbOw THaT says º’D bE safER If º TRaDED 

nostaW   e i t a K

fOR¸aL  pROTEcTION (THE fOR¸) fOR  pERsONaL pROTEcTION (HER  wORD, wHIcH sHE  Has jUsT INDIcaTED caN’T bE “gUaRaNTEED”),  wHIcH fRIgHTENs ¸E bEcaUsE NOw º  REaLIzE º NEED HER TO want TO pROTEcT ¸E. “¹RUsT Us” fRa¸Es ¸y DEsIRE TO aLTER  THE  fOR¸ as aN OffENsIVE ExpREssION  Of ¸IsTRUsT, aND  sUDDENLy  THE NEgOTIaTION  Is  pERsONaL:  wHEN º’¸  UNcONscIOUs, Is  sHE ¸ORE  LIkELy TO  baR sTUDENTs  bEcaUsE THE fOR¸ says sO, OR bEcaUsE º DEfERRED TO HER NEED TO aVOID REspONsIbILITy  fOR  a  fOR¸  kERfUfflE  IN  THE  wORkpLacE?  As BRODy  ObsERVEs,  “ºN  THE  HOspITaL, IT ¸ay, IRONIcaLLy, bE THE INTERNs wHO aRE gUILTy Of UsINg  wHaT LITTLE  pOwER  THEy  pOssEss  agaINsT  THE  paTIENTs  INsTEaD  Of  fOR  THE¸. . . . [P]aTIENTs  wHO  DO  aNyTHINg  UNTOwaRD  OR  UNExpEcTED  pREsENT  a  THREaT  TO  THE  INTERN’s  aLL-TOO-LI¸ITED  pOwER  TO cONTROL  HIs ENVIRON¸ENT” (p. 68).  º’¸ THE EpITO¸E  Of THE E¸pOwERED paTIENT (a LawyER  ON THE HOspITaL ETHIcs cO¸¸ITTEE bEINg  TREaTED  aT  HER  OwN  INsTITUTION!),  yET º  fELT bULLIED  INTO  sIgNINg  a  fOR¸  THaT  DIDN’T REflEcT OUR VERbaL agREE¸ENT IN THE HOpEs ¸y DEfERENcE TO HER papERwORk INspIREs HER TO pROTEcT ¸y DIgNITy wHEN º’¸ HELpLEss. BRODy Is cORREcT:  “PaTIENTs qUIckLy pIck Up THE UsUaLLy UNspOkEN ¸EssagE THaT THEy wILL gET THE  bEsT  ‘caRE’ pREcIsELy TO  THE ExTENT THaT THEy facILITaTE aND  DO NOT  I¸pEDE THE  flOw Of THE wORkpLacE” (p. 68). My “YEaR  Of MEDIcaL  MaNagE¸ENT” OffERED  ¸aNy  EVENTs THaT  DEEpENED  ¸y  UNDERsTaNDINg  Of  THE pRacTIcE  Of INfOR¸ED  DEcIsION ¸akINg,  bUT  THEsE  TwO Exa¸pLEs TRaNsLaTE ¸OsT cLEaRLy TO THE cLassROO¸. ºN THIs s¸aLL aNEcDOTaL  sa¸pLE  THERE was  NO THEORy-pRacTIcE  gap—º  was  DELIgHTED THEsE INfOR¸ED  DEcIsION-¸akINg  cONVERsaTIONs  acTUaLLy  ¸ET  THE  TExTbOOk  IDEaL  º  TEacH.  ºT  was  THE  DOcU¸ENTaTION  Of THaT  cONsENT  THaT  TURNED  jUNIOR  pHysIcIaNs INTO  flU¸¸OxED fUNcTIONaRIEs. ±UR TEacHINg IsN’T INcORREcT; IT’s INcO¸pLETE. °E  TExTbOOk  wE UsE  ONLy RE¸aRks THaT  askINg  HOUsE  OfficERs TO  ObTaIN cONsENT  sIgNaTUREs “¸IgHT bE pRObLE¸aTIc” If THE paTIENT Has qUEsTIONs THE INExpERIENcED pHysIcIaN caN’T aNswER (²O, 2009). BUT  NOw  º  bELIEVE  THERE aRE  OTHER  ways  IN  wHIcH  HOUsE  OfficER  aD¸INIsTRaTION  Of  fOR¸s  caN  UNDER¸INE  cONsENT.  ¶aD’s  sURgIcaL  REsIDENT  was  RIgHT THaT  THE fOR¸ Is NOT  a bINDINg  cONTRacT, aND  wRONg THaT IT’s NOT  a LEgaL  DOcU¸ENT—cONsENT  fOR¸s  aRE  spEcIficaLLy cREaTED  as EVIDENcE  THaT  wILL bE  aD¸ITTED IN cOURT If ¸E¸ORIEs Of THaT cONVERsaTION DIVERgE. º NEVER waNT ONE  Of ¸y sTUDENTs TO pREssURE a paTIENT TO sIgN aN INaccURaTE fOR¸, aND º waNT  THE¸ TO UNDERsTaND THaT sayINg “IT DOEsN’T ¸aTTER wHaT THE fOR¸ says” Is DIsINgENUOUs—If ¶aD UNDERwENT aN INcORREcT sURgIcaL pROcEDURE HE sIgNED Off 

ON, THE bURDEN Of pROOf wOULD bE ON HI¸  TO EsTabLIsH THE cONVERsaTION was  DIffERENT. ºN ¸y casE, pERHaps THE FELLOw’s UNDERsTaNDINg THaT wHaT THE fOR¸ 

217

HaD  pRO¸IsED VERbaLLy. º waNT ¸y sTUDENTs TO kEEp THE spOkEN aND  pRINTED  wORD  IN  syNcH,  NEVER  ExpEDIENTLy  agREEINg  TO  sO¸ETHINg  THEy  caN’T  REaLLy  cO¸¸IT  TO. AND  ON aN INsTITUTIONaL  LEVEL,  º NEED  TO cONTE¸pLaTE  wHETHER  º  sHOULD bE TEacHINg abOUT wORkpLacE  pREssURE ON yOUNg  DOcTORs as aN IssUE  Of ORgaNIzaTIONaL ETHIcs.

re½eren¾es BRODy, Á. 1992. °e Healer’s Power . µEw ÁaVEN, C¹: YaLE ·NIVERsITy PREss. KaUf¸aN, S. 2005. And a Time to Die: How American Hospitals Shape the End of Life .  µEw YORk: ScRIbNER. ²O, B. 2009. Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Guide for Clinicians. 4TH ED. BaLTI¸ORE: ²IppINcOTT WILLIa¸s Í WILkINs.

m r o F  e h t   f o   y n n a r y T   e h t   g n i h c a e T

says  does ¸aTTER Is paRT Of wHy sHE DIDN’T waNT TO pRO¸IsE ON papER wHaT sHE 

² ´eRR±fy±ng  ´RuTh Rebecca Dresser

My faTHER DIED Of caNcER wHEN HE was 39 aND º was 12. µO ONE TOLD ¸E OR ¸y  TwO yOUNgER bROTHERs THaT HE was DyINg. ÁE wENT TO THE HOspITaL IN ±cTObER  aND DIED IN ¶EcE¸bER. WE saw HI¸ jUsT TwIcE DURINg THaT TI¸E, fOR THIs was  aN ERa IN wHIcH VIsITINg cHILDREN wERE UNwELcO¸E IN HOspITaLs. ALTHOUgH NO ONE ExpLaINED wHaT  was wRONg wITH ¸y faTHER, wE  kNEw IT  was sO¸ETHINg  baD. My ¸OTHER was  NEVER HO¸E aND  wE spENT ¸aNy HOURs  IN THE caRE Of aUNTs aND OTHER RELaTIVEs. ´VERy sO OſtEN, ONE Of Us wOULD wORk  Up THE cOURagE TO ask wHEN OUR ¶aD was cO¸INg HO¸E. °E VagUE REpLIEs wE  REcEIVED wERE ¸EaNT TO REassURE Us, bUT HaD NO sUcH EffEcT. º’LL NEVER fORgET THIs UNsETTLINg TI¸E. °E OLD wORLD º cOULD cOUNT ON HaD  DIsappEaRED.  °E  aDULTs  aROUND ¸E  acTED  as  THOUgH  EVERyTHINg  was  fiNE,  bUT  wHy was  ¸y  ¸OTHER cRyINg IN  THE ¸IDDLE Of  THE  NIgHT, aND  wHy wERE  wE  EaTINg  cassEROLEs  pREpaRED  by  OUR  NEIgHbORs  fOR  DINNER?  °E  EVENINg  wE LEaRNED THaT ¸y faTHER HaD DIED was HORRIbLE, bUT IT was a RELIEf TO kNOw  THE  TRUTH. º  RE¸E¸bER THINkINg,  Oh, so that’s why everyone’s been acting so 

strangely . °Is Is THE way º LEaRNED THaT pEOpLE sHOULD TELL THE TRUTH abOUT sERIOUs  ILLNEss.  °Is  Is  THE  way  º  LEaRNED  THaT  “sHIELDINg”  pEOpLE  fRO¸  baD  NEws  DOEs THE¸ NO sERVIcE. AND THIs Is THE way º bEca¸E  INTEREsTED IN ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs. CaNcER  was  ¸y INTRODUcTION  TO  TRUTH-TELLINg IN  ¸EDIcINE,  bURDENsO¸E  TREaT¸ENTs, aND END-Of-LIfE caRE. My cHILDHOOD NIgHT¸aRE bEgaN a LIfE-LONg  fascINaTION wITH TOpIcs LIkE THEsE. YEaRs LaTER, jUsT bEfORE º sTaRTED Law scHOOL,  THE KaREN QUINLaN casE was IN THE HEaDLINEs. º fOLLOwED THE casE cLOsELy aND  ENROLLED  IN  EVERy  cOURsE  º  cOULD  THaT  aDDREssED  LEgaL aND  ETHIcaL  IssUEs IN 

³EbEcca ¶REssER, “A ¹ERRIfyINg ¹RUTH,” fRO¸ Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3, NO. 1 (2013): 10–12.  ©  2013 by JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy PREss.  ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION  Of JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy PREss.

¸EDIcINE. º kNEw THERE wEREN’T ¸aNy Law jObs IN THIs aREa, bUT VOwED TO LOOk  fOR aNy OppORTUNITIEs THaT ¸IgHT bE OUT THERE.

219

aDVaNcE  DIREcTIVEs, sURROgaTE DEcIsION ¸akINg, aND cLINIcaL TRIaLs.  ALTHOUgH  º aLways RE¸E¸bERED THE TI¸E Of ¸y faTHER’s ILLNEss, caNcER bEca¸E pRI¸aRILy a pROfEssIONaL RaTHER THaN a pERsONaL ¸aTTER. °EN,  42  yEaRs  aſtER  ¸y  faTHER’s  DEaTH,  caNcER bEca¸E  pERsONaL  agaIN.  AſtER  ¸ONTHs  Of  DIsTURbINg  sy¸pTO¸s  aND  DOcTOR  VIsITs,  º  REcEIVED  ¸y  OwN  caNcER DIagNOsIs. ²IkE aNyONE ELsE, º was sTUNNED TO LEaRN THaT º HaD  caNcER. YET º DIDN’T cO¸pLETELy LOsE ¸y pROfEssIONaL OUTLOOk. WHEN º HEaRD  ¸y DIagNOsIs, º THOUgHT, this doctor is breaking bad news . º HaD sTUDIED aND  TaUgHT ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs abOUT THIs pHysIcIaN REspONsIbILITy, aND NOw º was  sEEINg IT IN acTION. °E  REsT Of caNcER  was  LIkE  THIs,  TOO.  º sTRUggLED  THROUgH  HaRsH  cHE¸OTHERapy  aND  RaDIaTION  TREaT¸ENT  THE sa¸E  way  THaT  OTHER  paTIENTs  DO.  BUT  wHEN º was abLE TO sTEp back fRO¸ THE DE¸aNDs Of TREaT¸ENT, º ¸aRVELED aT  HOw ¸UcH º was LEaRNINg abOUT ¸y pROfEssIONaL fiELD. CaNcER was gIVINg ¸E  a NEw UNDERsTaNDINg Of paTIENT aUTONO¸y, TREaT¸ENT DEcIsION ¸akINg, RELaTIONsHIps  bETwEEN  paTIENTs  aND  cLINIcIaNs,  aND  ¸aNy  Of THE  OTHER  sUbjEcTs  THaT wERE THE fOcUs Of ¸y acaDE¸Ic wORk. ALTHOUgH  ¸y  sEcOND  caNcER  ExpERIENcE  pRODUcED  ¸aNy  Of  THE  sa¸E  fEELINgs º HaD HaD DURINg THE fiRsT ONE—DIsORIENTaTION, fEaR, aND IsOLaTION— IT was aLsO VERy DIffERENT. º kNEw ¸UcH ¸ORE abOUT THE wORLD Of ILLNEss aND  ¸EDIcaL caRE THaN º DID aT THaT EaRLIER  TI¸E. YET HaVINg caNcER ¸ysELf ¸aDE  ¸E REaLIzE HOw ¸UcH  was ¸IssINg fRO¸ ¸y pROfEssIONaL UNDERsTaNDINg  Of  THaT wORLD. º VOwED TO ¸akE  UsE Of ¸y NEw kNOwLEDgE, bUT DIDN’T  THINk º cOULD  DO  IT  aLONE. SO  wHEN  º  wENT  back TO  wORk,  º  gOT  IN  TOUcH  wITH  sO¸E ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs cOLLEagUEs  wHO HaD bEEN THROUgH  THEIR OwN caNcER ORDEaLs.  WE  ¸ET  TO  TaLk  abOUT  OUR  pERsONaL  ExpERIENcEs  aND  EVENTUaLLy  pRODUcED  a  bOOk  caLLED  Malignant: Medical Ethicists Confront Cancer . BUT  THE bOOk  cOULDN’T  cOVER  EVERyTHINg  wE  LEaRNED,  aND  ONE THINg IT  O¸ITs Is  wHaT  caNcER TaUgHT  ¸E  abOUT TRUTH-TELLINg aND  sERIOUs  ILLNEss.  As  a  12-yEaR-OLD, º  LEaRNED HOw  fRIgHTENINg  IT Is wHEN pEOpLE DON’T TELL  yOU THE TRUTH;  as a  paTIENT, º LEaRNED  HOw fRIgHTENINg IT Is wHEN THEy DO. KNOwINg  abOUT  a  LIfE-THREaTENINg  DIagNOsIs  ¸ay  bE  bETTER  THaN  NOT  kNOwINg,  bUT  IT  Is  TERRIbLE  kNOwLEDgE.  WITH  IT  cO¸E  I¸pOssIbLE  TREaT¸ENT 

hturT  gniyfirreT  A

°ROUgH a cO¸bINaTION Of pERsIsTENcE aND gOOD LUck, º fOUND a pOsITION IN a  ¸EDIcaL scHOOL’s ETHIcs cENTER. º bEgaN TEacHINg aND wRITINg abOUT THINgs LIkE 

cHOIcEs—fOR  ¸E,  THE cHOIcE  bETwEEN sURgERy  (pOssIbLy ¸ORE  EffEcTIVE,  bUT 

220

¸ORE  LIkELy  TO  LEaVE  ¸E  UNabLE  TO  spEak  aND  swaLLOw)  aND  cHE¸OTHERapy  (pOssIbLy  LEss  EffEcTIVE,  bUT  ¸ORE  LIkELy  TO  pREsERVE  spEEcH  aND  swaLLOw-

resserD  accebeR

INg). º HaD  NO IDEa HOw TO REcONcILE ¸y DEsIREs  TO LIVE aND TO  pROTEcT wHaT  sEE¸ED TO ¸E EssENTIaL pHysIcaL fUNcTIONs. º NEEDED ¸y DOcTORs’ gUIDaNcE TO  REspOND TO THE TRUTH Of ¸y sITUaTION. AND ONcE º ¸aDE THE DEcIsION TO HaVE cHE¸OTHERapy, º EVaDED THE TRUTH.  °E  TRUTH  was  THaT  TREaT¸ENT  ¸IgHT  bE  INEffEcTIVE,  bUT  º  DIDN’T  waNT  DOcTORs, NURsEs, OR aNyONE ELsE RE¸INDINg ¸E Of THaT. º DON’T THINk º cOULD HaVE  ENDURED  THE  paIN,  NaUsEa,  VO¸ITINg,  aND  OTHER  sIDE  EffEcTs  wITHOUT  sO¸E  pROTEcTION  fRO¸ REaLITy aT  THaT  TI¸E. ´VEN NOw,  as  º appROacH  ¸y aNNUaL  fOLLOw-Up Exa¸INaTION,  º DON’T waNT TO facE THE TRUTH THaT  ¸y caNcER cOULD  RETURN. ºNDEED, sINcE ¸y DIagNOsIs, º HaVE NEVER askED DOcTORs TO gIVE ¸E a  spEcIfic EsTI¸aTE Of ¸y sURVIVaL ODDs. ¹RUTH-TELLINg IN ¸EDIcINE Is NEcEssaRy, bUT cOpINg wITH THE TRUTH Is ¸ORE  DIfficULT THaN º EVER I¸agINED. º caN sEE wHy ¸y ¸OTHER DIDN’T waNT TO TELL HER  yOUNg cHILDREN THaT THEIR faTHER was DyINg. ÁER EffORT TO pROTEcT Us was UNsUccEssfUL,  bUT  º NOw  UNDERsTaND THE  HEaVy bURDENs  THaT TRUTH  I¸pOsEs. BEfORE  HaVINg  caNcER,  º DIDN’T  REaLIzE  HOw ¸UcH  HELp  paTIENTs  aND fa¸ILIEs  NEED  as  THEy DEaL wITH THE TRUTH. My ¸OTHER NEEDED cLINIcIaNs wHO cOULD TaLk wITH HER  abOUT bREakINg THE baD NEws TO HER cHILDREN. º NEEDED cLINIcIaNs wHO cOULD  HELp ¸E cHOOsE a TREaT¸ENT aND THEN LET ¸E pUT asIDE THE TRUTH sO THaT º cOULD  cONcENTRaTE ON gETTINg THROUgH THE ¸ONTHs Of DEbILITaTINg cHE¸OTHERapy aND  RaDIaTION. ¹RUTH-TELLINg  Is  THE  LEasT-wORsT  acTION  wHEN  sERIOUs  ILLNEss  OccURs.  BUT TRUTH-TELLINg Is DEsTRUcTIVE, TOO. ºT INflIcTs a NEw aND TERRIfyINg REaLITy  ON paTIENTs aND THE pEOpLE wHO LOVE THE¸. BEsIDEs TELLINg paTIENTs THE TRUTH,  DOcTORs aND NURsEs ¸UsT acT TO DI¸INIsH TRUTH’s DEsTRUcTIVE EffEcTs. SO¸ETI¸Es  THIs  ¸EaNs  TaLkINg  wITH  paTIENTs  abOUT  HOw  THEy  wILL  cONVEy  THE  TRUTH TO THEIR fa¸ILIEs aND fRIENDs. SO¸ETI¸Es THIs ¸EaNs REcO¸¸ENDINg  a TREaT¸ENT TO a paTIENT OVERwHEL¸ED by THE TRUTH. SO¸ETI¸Es THIs ¸EaNs  DOwNpLayINg THE TRUTH  THaT a bURDENsO¸E TREaT¸ENT  cOULD faIL.  PERsONaL  ExpERIENcE TaUgHT ¸E HOw cO¸pLEx aND DELIcaTE TRUTH-TELLINg IN ¸EDIcINE  caN bE. FOR ¸E, caNcER bEgaN as a pERsONaL  cRIsIs. °EN caNcER bEca¸E a pROfEssIONaL  INTEREsT. AND  THEN,  ONcE  agaIN, caNcER  bEca¸E  pERsONaL. µOw,  wITH  ¸y cOLLEagUEs, º a¸ TRyINg TO bRINg THE pERsONaL aND pROfEssIONaL TOgETHER. º  DO THIs wITH sO¸E TREpIDaTION—º’¸ NOT sURE HOw TO bRIDgE THE gap bETwEEN 

THE  TwO  kINDs Of  UNDERsTaNDINg. BUT º  a¸ sURE  Of ONE THINg.  °E  VOIcEs  Of  THE caNcER paTIENT’s yOUNg DaUgHTER, aND THE caNcER paTIENT sHE LaTER bEca¸E, 

221

re½eren¾es ¶REssER, ³., ED. 2012. Malignant: Medical Ethicists Confront Cancer. µEw YORk: ±xfORD  ·NIVERsITy PREss.

hturT  gniyfirreT  A

bELONg IN THE ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs cONVERsaTION.

´he L±e Lawrence D. Grouse

ANNIE  Is  fRO¸  µEw  Áa¸psHIRE  aND  ca¸E  HERE  TO  THE  fOOTHILLs  Of THE  BLUE  ³IDgE MOUNTaINs fOR THE HORsE sHOw. °E NURsEs aND º caRRy HER fRO¸ THE caR  INTO THE E¸ERgENcy ROO¸ aND gENTLy pLacE HER ON THE gURNEy. SHE was kIckED  IN THE abDO¸EN by HER HORsE aND Lay IN a fiELD fOR OVER aN HOUR UNTIL fRIENDs  fOUND HER aND bROUgHT HER TO THE HOspITaL. ´VEN THOUgH º a¸ wORkINg IN THE  E¸ERgENcy ROO¸ Of a s¸aLL HOspITaL, º a¸ cONfiDENT. °E NURsEs kNOw THEIR  jObs. FacED wITH a sERIOUs sURgIcaL pRObLE¸, wE wORk wELL TOgETHER. WITHIN a fEw ¸INUTEs wE HaVE INsERTED TwO ivs, ONE  IN a fOREaR¸ VEIN,  aNOTHER IN THE ExTERNaL jUgULaR; HER bLOOD pREssURE, HOwEVER, RE¸aINs ¸aRgINaL.  °E  flUID  fRO¸  THE  abDO¸INaL  Tap  Is  gROssLy  bLOODy,  aND  sO  Is  HER  URINE.  ANNIE RE¸aINs caL¸.  ÁER  sERIOUs EyEs  aRE pIERcINg;  º HOLD  HER HaND  TO REassURE HER, bUT aLsO TakE HER pULsE. SHE Is bLEEDINg VERy RapIDLy INTO HER  abDO¸EN. µOTHINg º DO sEE¸s TO HELp, aND  º a¸ scaRED. SHE Is IN sHOck, yET  sHE cONVERsEs pOLITELy aND INqUIREs abOUT HER cONDITION. “°aNk yOU fOR HELpINg ¸E,” sHE says. “³EaLLy, IT wasN’T THE HORsE’s faULT!” “WE’RE NOT wORRIED abOUT THE HORsE, ANNIE,” º say. “°E HORsE Is fiNE.” “ºs IT a sERIOUs INjURy?” SHE paUsEs. “WILL º LIVE?” “´VERyTHINg wILL wORk OUT, ANNIE,” º TELL HER. “ºT ¸ay bE a LITTLE ROUgH fOR  a bIT, bUT IT wILL wORk OUT.” “ARE yOU sURE?” sHE asks, gazINg sTEaDILy aT ¸E. “PLEasE, TELL ¸E HONEsTLy.” º DON’T aNswER fOR a  ¸O¸ENT. º LOOk aT HER. º a¸ aLREaDy fOND Of HER aND  º DO NOT waNT TO LIE. º sqUEEzE HER HaND aND s¸ILE. º a¸ UNsURE HOw sHE wILL  DO, bUT º say, “YEs, º’¸ sURE.” AſtER  a  THIRD  iv  Is  IN  pLacE,  HER  bLOOD  pREssURE  sTabILIzEs.  °E  gENERaL  sURgEON  aND  THE  UROLOgIsT  aRRIVE  aND  pLaN  THEIR  E¸ERgENcy  wORkUp  aND  ExpLORaTORy sURgERy. º bREaTHE a sIgH Of RELIEf as THEy TakE cHaRgE Of HER caRE. 

²awRENcE ¶.  GROUsE,  “°E ²IE,” fRO¸  Archives  of Internal  Medicine 157  (1997): 2153. ©  1997 by  A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION. ³EpRODUcED by  pER¸IssION Of  A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION.  ALL RIgHTs REsERVED.

SUDDENLy, wE fiND THaT THE DOOR TO THE sURgIcaL sUITE IN THE E¸ERgENcy ROO¸  Has bEEN INaDVERTENTLy LOckED aND THE HEaD NURsE’s kEy wON’T OpEN IT. ANNIE 

223

kNOb  sHakINg. °E pITcH Of pEOpLE’s VOIcEs sTaRTs TO RIsE. º bREak INTO a  swEaT.  °E HEaD NURsE yELLs ORDERs INTO THE TELEpHONE aND aL¸OsT I¸¸EDIaTELy THREE  bURLy ¸aINTENaNcE ¸EN wITH cROwbaRs appEaR. “GET RID Of THaT DOOR! µOw!” THE HEaD NURsE bELLOws. °E  DOOR Is  spLINTERED  IN  20 sEcONDs. ANNIE  Is  LaUgHINg,  TELLs Us  NOT TO  wORRy, TELLs Us THaT sHE Is fiNE. SHE THINks IT Is THE fUNNIEsT scENE EVER. AT  sURgERy, wE  fiND  THaT  ANNIE Has  a  sEVERELy  LacERaTED LIVER  aND  a  RUpTURED kIDNEy. °E LIVER Is REpaIRED; THE kIDNEy Is RE¸OVED, bUT wHEN º wakE Up  THE NExT ¸ORNINg aND LOOk IN ON ANNIE, DIssE¸INaTED INTRaVascULaR cOagULaTION Has DEVELOpED aND sHE Is REcEIVINg HEpaRIN. FOUR NURsEs aND TwO pHysIcIaNs HaVE aLREaDy gIVEN bLOOD fOR HER. °E INTENsIVE caRE UNIT HOsTs a sTEaDy  sTREa¸ Of sTaff wHO HaVE HELpED ANNIE aND wHO cO¸E by wITH a fEw ENcOURagINg wORDs. ÁER paRENTs HaVE aRRIVED. ANNIE’s faTHER Is a  cOLLEgE pROfEssOR:  a  TaLL, aNgULaR ¸aN, fEELINg fRIgHTENED aND  OUT Of pLacE. ANNIE’s ¸OTHER Is a  s¸aLL  wO¸aN wITH DELIcaTE  fEaTUREs. °E sURgEON’s  wIfE accO¸paNIEs THE¸.  By  THE fOLLOwINg Day,  wHEN º LEaVE THE HOspITaL aſtER ¸y wEEkEND sHIſt, sEVERaL Of THE sTaff, INcLUDINg THE HEaD NURsE, HaVE EacH gIVEN TwO UNITs Of bLOOD  fOR ANNIE. ¹wO wEEks LaTER—DURINg  ¸y NExT sHIſt—º  a¸ wayLaID aND HUggED  by a  Happy aND a¸bULaTORy ANNIE. “´VERyONE HERE Has bEEN sO gOOD TO ¸E,” ANNIE bEa¸s. As wE sIT OVER a cUp Of cOffEE, HER paRENTs TI¸IDLy INqUIRE wHETHER ANNIE  ¸IgHT  HaVE  bEEN cLOsE  TO  DEaTH ON HER  aRRIVaL aT  THE HOspITaL.  º caN’T HELp  bRaggINg  abOUT  TREaTINg ANNIE  IN  THE  E¸ERgENcy  ROO¸. As  º  LaUNcH  INTO  THE sTORy, º fiND THaT ANNIE RE¸E¸bERs IT aLL, aND sHE cHI¸Es IN wITH aN ExacT  RENDITION Of OUR ENTIRE cONVERsaTION ON THE Day Of THE accIDENT. º a¸ a¸azED!  SHE was IN sHOck, aND sTILL sHE RE¸E¸bERs EVERy wORD º saID. º fiNIsH ¸y sTORy  wITH  a  flOURIsH. “WHEN º  fOUND THaT yOU HaD  abDO¸INaL bLEEDINg aND  º sTILL  cOULDN’T  bRINg Up yOUR bLOOD pREssURE  wITH TwO  ivs, º  HaVE  TO aD¸IT  THaT  º  THOUgHT yOU wERE a gONER.” ANNIE  sEE¸s  sHOckED  TO  HEaR  THIs.  SHE  LOOks  aT  ¸E  aNgRILy  aND  says,  “¶ON’T yOU  RE¸E¸bER? YOU saID yOU wERE  sURE º wOULD  LIVE. º RE¸E¸bERED  THaT  pRO¸IsE aLL THE TI¸E! º pUT a gREaT DEaL Of wEIgHT ON wHaT yOU saID, aND  yOU. . . .”  SUDDENLy,  fOR  THE  fiRsT  TI¸E  sINcE  THE  accIDENT,  aND  TO  EVERyONE’s  sURpRIsE, TEaRs aRE IN HER EyEs aND sHE Is wEEpINg; sHE Is INcONsOLabLE bEcaUsE  º LIED TO HER.

eiL  ehT

aND  a NURsE aRE LOckED INsIDE. °ERE Is a gREaT DEaL Of kEy RaTTLINg aND DOOR-

D±schARge  Dec±s±ons  And  The D±gn±Ty  of ¶±sk Debjani Mukherjee

MRs. S¸ITH’s EyEs fiLLED wITH TEaRs as sHE saID, “º fEEL LIkE º’VE DONE sO¸ETHINg  wRONg. ARE THEy pUNIsHINg ¸E bEcaUsE º’VE bEEN REfUsINg THERapy aND wON’T  gO TO a NURsINg HO¸E?” SHE ackNOwLEDgED THaT sHE HaDN’T aLways LIsTENED TO  HER DOcTORs bUT saID THaT sHE kNEw bETTER NOw aND waNTED  TO gO HO¸E aND  sEE If sHE cOULD ¸akE IT wORk. MaNy sTaff ¸E¸bERs aT OUR REHabILITaTION HOspITaL  HaD ExpLaINED THEIR  safETy cONcERNs TO HER, aND  sO¸E HaD ENLIsTED HER  aDULT DaUgHTER, wITH wHO¸ sHE LIVED, TO cONVINcE HER TOO. °E REHabILITaTION  TEa¸ HaD caLLED ON THE ETHIcs cONsULTaTION sERVIcE, Of wHIcH º a¸ a paRT, TO  HELp figURE OUT wHETHER  MRs. S¸ITH HaD THE capacITy TO  ¸akE  aN INfOR¸ED  REfUsaL Of DIscHaRgE REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs. MRs.  S¸ITH,  wHO  was  IN  HER  fORTIEs,  HaD  HaD  sEVERaL  sTROkEs  aND  HaD  acUTE RENaL  faILURE,  DIabETEs,  aND  LEſt-sIDED wEakNEss  aND ObEsITy.  ÁER pasT  REfUsaL TO TakE HER aNTIHypERTENsIVE ¸EDIcaTION was a cONTRIbUTINg facTOR IN  HER ¸OsT REcENT sTROkE. SHE NEEDED  HE¸ODIaLysIs THREE TI¸Es a wEEk, cOULD  NOT  safELy  TRaNsfER  fRO¸  HER  wHEELcHaIR  wITHOUT  THE  HELp  Of  TwO  TO  THREE  pEOpLE, aND LIVED IN a waLk-Up apaRT¸ENT. ´VERy sINgLE ¸E¸bER Of OUR ¸ULTIDIscIpLINaRy REHabILITaTION TEa¸ agREED THaT THE ONLy safE DIscHaRgE was TO a  skILLED NURsINg facILITy. BUT MRs. S¸ITH DIsagREED. As a LIcENsED cLINIcaL psycHOLOgIsT wHOsE pRacTIcE Is INfOR¸ED by cLINIcaL  psycHOLOgy, bIOETHIcs, aND DIsabILITy sTUDIEs, º fREqUENTLy fiND ¸ysELf ¸EDIaTINg bETwEEN THE HEaLTH caRE TEa¸ aND THE paTIENT DURINg cLINIcaL ETHIcs cONsULTs. °E TER¸ “DIgNITy Of RIsk” OſtEN RINgs IN ¸y EaRs as º TRy TO TEasE apaRT  THE  cO¸pLExITIEs  Of casEs  LIkE  MRs. S¸ITH’s.  ³ObERT  PERskE cOINED  THE  TER¸  wHEN  HE  ObsERVED  pEOpLE wITH  ¸ENTaL RETaRDaTION  IN ScaNDINaVIa  aND  THE  INNOVaTIVE pROgRa¸s  THERE THaT HE  cONTRasTED wITH pROgRa¸s  IN THE ·NITED 

¶EbjaNI MUkHERjEE, “¶IscHaRgE ¶EcIsIONs aND THE ¶IgNITy Of ³Isk,” fRO¸ Hastings Center Report 45, NO. 3 (2015): 7–8. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of JOHN WILEy aND SONs.

STaTEs. Ã “±VERpROTEcTION,”  HE  wROTE,  “ENDaNgERs  THE  RETaRDED  [sic .]  pERsON’s  HU¸aN DIgNITy aND TENDs TO kEEp HI¸ fRO¸ ExpERIENcINg THE NOR¸aL TakINg 

225

¸ENT” (p. 24). “¶IgNITy Of RIsk” Has bEEN UsED by pEOpLE wORkINg wITH INDIVIDUaLs wITH DEVELOp¸ENTaL, pHysIcaL, aND psycHIaTRIc DIsabILITIEs aND Is UsED  EspEcIaLLy a¸ONg THE DIsabILITy RIgHTs cO¸¸UNITy. °E cONcEpT IT REpREsENTs  INVOLVEs  REspEcT  fOR pERsONs, sELf-DETER¸INaTION,  aND  aTTE¸pTs TO ¸INI¸IzE  paTERNaLIs¸ OR paRENTaLIs¸. ºf yOU cO¸bINE cO¸¸ON DIcTIONaRy DEfiNITIONs  Of  “DIgNITy”  aND  “RIsk”  (LIkE  THE  ONEs  bELOw  fRO¸  Merriam-Webster),  THEy  HELp yOU TO UNDERsTaND  THE TER¸ as cONVEyINg THaT  INDIVIDUaLs aRE “wORTHy  Of HONOR aND REspEcT” EVEN wHEN THEy ¸akE DEcIsIONs THaT ¸ay INcREasE “THE  pOssIbILITy THaT sO¸ETHINg baD OR UNpLEasaNT . . . wILL HappEN.” °Is cONcEpT was VERy ¸UcH ON ¸y ¸IND DURINg THE ETHIcs cONsULT. º HaD  NEVER ¸ET MRs. S¸ITH bEfORE. WHaT was RIsky IN HER cONTExT? FOR INsTaNcE, DID  sHE  cONsIDER NOT  TakINg HER  aNTIHypERTENsIVE ¸EDIcaTION a  RIsky bEHaVIOR?  °E cONcEpT Of RIsk ITsELf Is ONE THaT REqUIREs cONTExTUaLIzaTION, assEss¸ENT, aND  jUDg¸ENT aND caN bE ObjEcTIVE OR sUbjEcTIVE. ÁEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs aRE OſtEN  acUTELy awaRE Of ¸EDIcaL RIsks aND HaVE ONLy a s¸aLL cLINIcaL wINDOw INTO THE  cO¸pLExITIEs  Of a  paTIENT’s LIfE.  WHaT ObjEcTIVE RIsks wOULD MRs. S¸ITH OpEN  HERsELf  Up TO If sHE wENT HO¸E?  ÁER apaRT¸ENT was INaccEssIbLE, sHE NEEDED  assIsTaNcE  TO gO  Up  sTaIRs,  aND  sHE  HaD TO  LEaVE aND  ENTER  HER HO¸E aT LEasT  THREE  TI¸Es a wEEk fOR DIaLysIs. BUT “NaTURaL HELpINg sysTE¸s” sUcH  as fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs OR NEIgHbORs OſtEN ENabLE pEOpLE TO LIVE aT HO¸E. AND HOw DO THE  RIsks Of gOINg HO¸E cO¸paRE TO THE RIsks Of INsTITUTIONaLIzaTION? SO¸E INsTITUTIONs Lack IN sERVIcEs, a¸ENITIEs, OR ¸OsT I¸pORTaNTLy, fREEDO¸. WHaT abOUT  THE sOcIaL RIsk  Of IsOLaTION OR THE E¸OTIONaL RIsk Of DEpREssION  DUE TO a  Lack  Of agENcy? ±NE  paTIENT TOLD ¸E THaT  HE wOULD RaTHER “gO TO a  ¸ORgUE” THaN  TO  a NURsINg HO¸E.  ºN aNOTHER casE,  a sURROgaTE  ExcLaI¸ED, “YOU HaVE  yOUR  ETHIcs,  aND º HaVE ¸y ETHIcs,” aND HER ETHIcs wOULD NOT LET HER “sEND a DOg”  TO THE NURsINg HO¸E THaT sHE HaD  VIsITED fOR  HER DaUgHTER. °E RIsks aRE THE  paTIENT’s aND THE fa¸ILy’s TO cONTExTUaLIzE aND assU¸E. °E cULTURE IN REHabILITaTION Is gENERaLLy a “caN DO” ONE: paTIENTs aRE ENcOURagED TO pUsH THE¸sELVEs  TO THEIR  LI¸ITs, ¸EET gOaLs, aND fOcUs ON wHaT THEy  caN accO¸pLIsH. BUT THE pOINT Of DIscHaRgE ¸aRks a cULTURE sHIſt Of sORTs. °E  LIsTs  Of  IssUEs  DELINEaTED  by  OUR  ¸ULTIDIscIpLINaRy  TEa¸—fRO¸  pHysIcaL,  OccUpaTIONaL,  aND  spEEcH-LaNgUagE THERapIEs aND  psycHOLOgy, NURsINg, aND  ¸EDIcINE—aRE  OſtEN  DaUNTINg,  aND  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs  aRE  fRa¸ED  aROUND  “DEficITs.”  FOR Exa¸pLE, wE  OſtEN REcO¸¸END THaT  paTIENTs HaVE 24/7 sUpERVIsION bEcaUsE THEy aRE aT HIgH RIsk fOR faLLs OR fOR aspIRaTINg. ÁOw THaT RIsk 

k s i R   f o  y t i n g i D   e h T

Of  RIsks IN  LIfE  wHIcH Is  NEcEssaRy  fOR  NOR¸aL HU¸aN  gROwTH  aND  DEVELOp-

Is DEfiNED—pERcENTagE Of LIkELIHOOD, pOTENTIaL HaR¸s, RIsk TO sELf OR OTHERs— 

226

OſtEN VaRIEs. WE DIscHaRgE pEOpLE wITH LIsTs Of ¸EDIcaTIONs, fOLLOw-Up appOINT¸ENTs,  aND  INsTRUcTIONs  THaT  sHOULD  cONTINUE  TO  ¸axI¸IzE  THE  gaINs  THEy 

eejrehkuM  inajbeD

HaVE ¸aDE IN REHabILITaTION. AND a paTIENT OR HIs OR HER sURROgaTE Has a RIgHT  TO  ¸akE  aN INfOR¸ED  REfUsaL  Of  ¸EDIcaL  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs,  INcLUDINg  THE  LEVEL  Of  sUpERVIsION  fOLLOwINg DIscHaRgE.  MOREOVER,  THE  E¸pIRIcaL  DaTa  THaT  sUppORT sO¸E REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs (sUcH as ¸EDIcaTIONs) aRE ¸UcH ¸ORE RObUsT  THaN  DaTa THaT sUppORT  OTHERs (sUcH as 24/7 sUpERVIsION). SO¸E paTIENTs faIL  aT HO¸E aND END Up REINjURED OR REHOspITaLIzED, wHEREas OTHERs DO wELL wITH  LEss sUpERVIsION THaN REcO¸¸ENDED. MRs. S¸ITH  was  REfUsINg  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs fOR  DIscHaRgE,  wHIcH  Is  NOT  UNcO¸¸ON.  ±UR HOspITaL  Has a RELaTIVELy  NEw INfOR¸ED REfUsaL pOLIcy THaT  THE ETHIcs TEa¸ DEVELOpED wITH INpUT fRO¸ a ¸ULTIDIscIpLINaRy gROUp Of sTaff  ¸E¸bERs. WE ask If THE REfUsaL IN qUEsTION Is a LOw-, ¸ODERaTE-, OR HIgH-RIsk  ONE. ¶OEs THE paTIENT HaVE  capacITy TO ¸akE THIs paRTIcULaR DEcIsION? ºs  THE  paTIENT UNDER DUREss OR bEINg cOERcED? ºf THE paTIENT Lacks capacITy, DOEs THE  sURROgaTE  HaVE THE  LEgaL RIgHT  TO REfUsE? ºf  IT Is  DETER¸INED  THaT  THE paTIENT  Has  capacITy TO ¸akE  THIs  DEcIsION aND  UNDERsTaNDs THE RIsks  aND  bENEfiTs,  THEN  THE  REfUsaL  Is  DOcU¸ENTED. ºN  sO¸E casEs,  THE  LEgaL  DEpaRT¸ENT  gETs  INVOLVED aND DRaſts a DOcU¸ENT fOR THE paTIENT OR sURROgaTE TO sIgN. ³EHabILITaTION  TEa¸s aRE  UsUaLLy  VERy  gOOD  aT TakINg  a  paTIENT’s cONTExT  INTO accOUNT. °Ey TRaIN wILLINg fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs TO pROVIDE caRE If fULL-TI¸E  paID HO¸E HEaLTH caRE Is UNaffORDabLE, aND THEy wORk HaRD TO figURE OUT a safE  sUppORT sysTE¸ THaT wILL aLLOw sO¸EONE TO gO HO¸E RaTHER THaN TO a facILITy.  BUT  sO¸E  casEs, LIkE  MRs. S¸ITH’s,  INVOLVE  VERy sERIOUs  safETy  cONcERNs.  ºN  THEsE sITUaTIONs, REspEcTINg THE paTIENT’s DIgNITy Of RIsk gETs TRIckIER, aND sTaff  ¸E¸bERs, INcLUDINg ETHIcs cONsULTaNTs, bEcO¸E ¸ORE cONcERNED. MRs. S¸ITH was  aDa¸aNT IN  HER REfUsaL Of DIscHaRgE TO a  NURsINg HO¸E.  SHE  fELT as  THOUgH  sHE  was  bEINg  UNfaIRLy  TEsTED.  AND  sITTINg  IN  HER  ROO¸  LIsTENINg  TO HER  sTORy, º  cOULD  sEE wHy.  SHE  saID THaT  sHE DIDN’T kNOw  wHEN  sHE was aD¸ITTED THaT sHE’D HaVE TO pROVE HERsELf TO bE abLE TO gO HO¸E. SHE  assURED Us THaT wITH HER fa¸ILy, fRIENDs, aND a paRT-TI¸E caREgIVER, sHE wOULD  bE fiNE. SHE saID THaT sHE kNEw sHE cOULD  DIE If sHE ¸IssED DIaLysIs appOINT¸ENTs OR HaD a sERIOUs faLL, bUT sHE HaD NEVER ¸IssED a DIaLysIs appOINT¸ENT  bEfORE. SHE  saID THaT THIs TI¸E sHE wOULD fOLLOw HER DOcTORs’ REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs abOUT ¸EDIcaTIONs. AſtER THE cONsULT, wE, THE ETHIcs cONsULTaTION sERVIcE, cONfERRED wITH THE  paTIENT’s TREaTINg psycHOLOgIsT aND spEEcH paTHOLOgIsT. °Ey agREED wITH OUR  assEss¸ENT  THaT  MRs. S¸ITH’s  cOgNITIVE  I¸paIR¸ENTs fRO¸  HER  sTROkE wERE 

NOT  INTERfERINg wITH  HER pRObLE¸-sOLVINg abILITy,  aLTHOUgH  sHE was  “INflExIbLE” IN HER DEcIsION.

227

DRaſt a  DOcU¸ENT  spEcIfyINg THE RIsks Of REfUsaL.  ´THIcs REcO¸¸ENDED THaT  THE  TEa¸ HaVE  a  backUp  pLaN  IN  pLacE  aND,  wITH  MRs. S¸ITH’s pER¸IssION,  HaVE  a  skILLED NURsINg facILITy REaDy TO  accEpT HER If sHE NEEDED  aD¸IssION.  °E DIscHaRgE pLaN aLsO INcLUDED ¸ORE INTENsE fOLLOw-Up. ºN sO¸E sETTINgs, MRs. S¸ITH’s sTROkE DIagNOsIs wOULD HaVE bEEN assU¸ED  TO  ¸EaN THaT  sHE LackED capacITy,  aND HER DaUgHTER,  wHO ExpREssED sERIOUs  DOUbTs abOUT  HER ¸OTHER’s pLaN  TO RETURN HO¸E, wOULD  HaVE  ¸aDE THE DIscHaRgE DEcIsION. ºN OTHER sETTINgs, MRs. S¸ITH’s REfUsaL ITsELf wOULD HaVE bEEN  pROOf  Of HER INcapacITy.  WE  HONORED MRs. S¸ITH’s DEcIsION aND  REcOgNIzED  THE DIgNITy  Of RIsk, aLTHOUgH  aLL Of THE ¸E¸bERs Of THE HEaLTH caRE TEa¸ fELT  UNcO¸fORTabLE aND wORRIED abOUT HER cHOIcE. WHEN  sHE  was  back  IN  HER  HO¸E  ENVIRON¸ENT,  MRs. S¸ITH ENDED  Up  sHaRINg  OUR cONcERNs. WITHIN TwENTy-fOUR HOURs, sHE DEcIDED THaT  IT wasN’T  safE aND cHOsE TO gO TO THE skILLED NURsINg facILITy. WE DIDN’T INITIaLLy THINk Of  OUR REcO¸¸ENDaTION as a TI¸E-LI¸ITED TRIaL Of DIscHaRgE TO HO¸E, bUT, as wE  HaD THE backUp pLaN IN pLacE, IT EssENTIaLLy was. Was THIs a sITUaTION  wHERE wE  faILED TO cONVINcE a  paTIENT Of safETy cONcERNs OR ONE IN wHIcH wE sUccEssfULLy REspEcTED HER aUTONO¸y aND aLLOwED  HER THE DIgNITy TO faIL? ÁONORINg INfOR¸ED REfUsaL Of DIscHaRgE REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs  Is  NOT  Easy,  EspEcIaLLy  wHEN  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDERs  aND  fa¸ILy  aRE  IN  agREE¸ENT.  °E  ÁOspITaL  ³EaD¸IssIONs  ³EDUcTION  PROgRa¸,  wHIcH was  EsTabLIsHED by THE AffORDabLE CaRE AcT, fOcUsEs ON REaD¸IssION RaTEs DURINg  THE  fiRsT  THIRTy  Days aſtER  DIscHaRgE, aND  HOspITaLs ¸ay,  IN EffEcT,  bE pENaLIzED If THEy REspEcT paTIENTs’ DIgNITy Of RIsk aND THE paTIENTs aRE sUbsEqUENTLy  REaD¸ITTED.  ANOTHER cRITIcaL ETHIcaL IssUE  Is THE Lack Of DIscHaRgE OpTIONs. º  HaD NO REspONsE TO THE RELaTIVE wHO saID, “º wOULDN’T sEND a DOg TO THaT facILITy,” aLTHOUgH IT was ONE Of THE fEw facILITIEs THaT THE paTIENT IN THaT casE was  ELIgIbLE  fOR  ON  pUbLIc  aID. FUNDINg  fOR  paID  caREgIVERs  IN  THE  HO¸E wOULD  aLLEVIaTE sO¸E Of THEsE DIfficULT DIscHaRgE DEcIsIONs, aLTHOUgH IN MRs. S¸ITH’s  casE, sHE aLsO NEEDED aN accEssIbLE apaRT¸ENT. GIVEN OUR cURRENT HEaLTH caRE  aND  sOcIaL sERVIcE sysTE¸s, wE  aRE LEſt baLaNcINg paTIENT pREfERENcEs, safETy,  qUaLITy  Of LIfE, aND  sO¸ETI¸Es, LOUsy OpTIONs fOR DIscHaRgE. AND  wE HaVE TO  REspEcT OUR paTIENTs aND THEIR cHOIcEs, EVEN If THEy cHaNgE THEIR ¸INDs LaTER.  PaTIENTs  HaVE ¸aDE a sERIEs  Of cHOIcEs bEfORE THEy ENTER a REHabILITaTION  (OR  aNy)  HOspITaL, aND aT THE  pOINT Of DIscHaRgE, HEaLTH caRE  pROVIDERs, aR¸ED 

k s i R   f o  y t i n g i D   e h T

ÁER aTTENDINg pHysIcIaN was cONcERNED THaT sHE wOULD bE UNabLE TO ¸akE  IT  TO  DIaLysIs  THREE TI¸Es  a  wEEk, aND  HE  askED fOR  THE  LEgaL DEpaRT¸ENT  TO 

wITH  a  LOT  Of ¸EDIcaL  facTs,  caN EasILy  fOcUs  ON wHaT  wE  kNOw  bEsT,  RaTHER 

228

THaN  ON wHaT THE paTIENT kNOws aND  waNTs. °E DIgNITy  Of RIsk  Is a  cONcEpT  THaT wE ¸UsT kEEp IN THE fOREfRONT Of OUR pRacTIcE; THE RIsks, aſtER aLL, aRE OUR 

eejrehkuM  inajbeD

paTIENTs’ TO TakE.

note 1  ³.  PERskE,  “°E  ¶IgNITy  Of  ³Isk  aND  THE  MENTaLLy  ³ETaRDED,”  Mental Retardation 10,  NO. 1 (1972): 24–27.

No One Needs  To Know Neil S. Calman

My  INDOcTRINaTION  INTO THE  UNDERwORLD  Of ¸EDIcaL  sEcREcy bEgaN  25 yEaRs  agO DURINg ¸y fiRsT cLINIcaL ROTaTION IN ¸y THIRD yEaR Of ¸EDIcaL scHOOL. °E  LEssONs LEaRNED wERE NOT a fOR¸aL paRT Of ¸y ¸EDIcaL scHOOL cURRIcULU¸ bUT  aRE  as  INDELIbLy  ETcHED  INTO ¸y  bRaIN  as aRE  THE  Na¸Es Of THE  bODy  paRTs  º  sTUDIED IN aNaTO¸y. °E VOyagE bEgaN wITH THE caRE  Of a  paTIENT º wILL caLL CHaRLEs  McµIgHT.  JUsT OVER 60 yEaRs OLD, HE HaD cO¸E TO THE ¸EDIcaL cENTER TO REcEIVE THE caRE  Of  OUR  ¸OsT  HIgHLy  skILLED  caRDIOVascULaR  sURgEONs.  °Ey  REpLacED  TwO  Of  HIs  HEaRT  VaLVEs,  pUT  a  gRaſt ON HIs  aORTa,  aND  pERfOR¸ED  bypass sURgERy—  aLL  IN ONE pROcEDURE.  º  DO NOT REcaLL THE DETaILs  Of  HIs caRDIac paTHOLOgy,  bUT  HE saILED  THROUgH THE  sURgERy, aND  HIs RapID  REcOVERy faR  ExcEEDED OUR  ExpEcTaTIONs. º  HaD  gOTTEN TO  kNOw  “CHaRLIE”  bEcaUsE  º  HaD  bEEN  assIgNED  TO  DO  HIs  aD¸ITTINg HIsTORy  aND pHysIcaL, a  TypIcaL jOb IN  THOsE Days fOR ¸EDIcaL  sTUDENTs. ÁIs THIck, pURE  wHITE, SaNTa-LIkE  bEaRD aND  THE waR¸ s¸ILE bENEaTH  IT  INsTaNTLy cHaR¸ED  aLL wHO ¸ET  HI¸. ÁIs wIfE aND  DaUgHTER  wERE  EqUaLLy  ENgagINg.  º bEca¸E  RapIDLy  aND  INTENsELy  INVOLVED IN  HIs  caRE, pROVIDINg  a  HU¸aN  TOUcH—a ROLE THaT ¸EDIcaL sTUDENTs OſtEN pLay ON THE HOspITaL TEa¸  IN LIEU Of ¸akINg ¸EDIcaL DEcIsIONs fOR wHIcH THEy aRE NOT yET pREpaRED.

Crossing  Boundaries My caRE fOR CHaRLIE was bOTH fUELED aND cO¸pLIcaTED by ¸y INfaTUaTION wITH  HIs  DaUgHTER, wHO  was ¸y  agE aND  UN¸aRRIED. ÁER  LIfE as  a sINgLE paRENT  Of  a fOUR-yEaR-OLD  DaUgHTER  gaVE ¸E a¸pLE  sUbsTRaTE ON wHIcH  TO  bUILD a 

µEIL S. CaL¸aN, “µO ±NE µEEDs TO KNOw,” fRO¸ Health Affairs 20, NO. 2 (2001): 243–249. © 2001  by PROjEcT ho¿e /  Health Affairs. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of PROjEcT ho¿e /  Health Affairs. °E  pUbLIsHED aRTIcLE Is aRcHIVED aND aVaILabLE ONLINE aT www.HEaLTHaffaIRs.ORg.

wONDERfUL faNTasy. ºT was sI¸pLE, IT sEE¸ED, TO HELp bRINg CHaRLIE HO¸E, gET 

230

HI¸ wELL,  faLL IN LOVE wITH HIs DaUgHTER, aND bE a  sTEpfaTHER TO HER LITTLE gIRL.  °EsE faNTasIEs kEpT ¸E RETURNINg TO HIs HOspITaL ROO¸.

n a m l a C  . S   l i e N

A fEw wEEks aſtER sURgERy, CHaRLIE was REaDy TO bE DIscHaRgED. ÁE wENT  HO¸E  wITH  INsTRUcTIONs  TO  RETURN  wEEkLy  TO  THE  HOspITaL  Lab  fOR  bLOOD  TEsTs  NEEDED  TO  aDjUsT  HIs  LEVEL  Of  cOU¸aDIN,  a  ¸EDIcINE  HE was  TakINg  TO  pREVENT bLOOD cLOTs.  A  fEw  Days  aſtER DIscHaRgE  º  REcEIVED  a caLL fRO¸  HIs  wIfE  INVITINg  ¸E TO  THEIR HO¸E  fOR DINNER—a  s¸aLL  way  fOR THE¸  TO  THaNk ¸E fOR THE ExTRa caRE º HaD gIVEN CHaRLIE IN THE HOspITaL. º accEpTED,  yET  ackNOwLEDgED  TO  ¸ysELf  ¸y  LEVEL  Of  DIscO¸fORT  IN  DOINg  sO.  º  HaD  cLEaRLy  cROssED  THE  LINE  º  HaD  bEEN  TaUgHT  TO  ¸aINTaIN  bETwEEN  DOcTOR  aND paTIENT; º HaD aLLOwED ¸ysELf TO bEcO¸E pERsONaLLy INVOLVED IN CHaRLIE’s LIfE. ¶INNER TOOk pLacE aL¸OsT a wEEk aſtER CHaRLIE’s DIscHaRgE, aND º  OffERED TO  bRINg THE NEcEssaRy  EqUIp¸ENT TO TakE HIs REqUIRED bLOOD TEsTs  aND  TO TRaNspORT THE bLOOD back TO  THE HOspITaL  Lab. CHaRLIE was gRaTEfUL;  HE LIVED  qUITE a  DIsTaNcE fRO¸ THE HOspITaL  aND was  NOT LOOkINg  fORwaRD  TO  ¸akINg THE TRIp. ¶INNER  was  gREaT.  AſtERwaRD,  CHaRLIE  aND  º  wENT  INTO  aNOTHER  ROO¸  wHERE º DREw HIs bLOOD. º THEN ExcUsED ¸ysELf fOR THE EVENINg. °E REsULTs Of  THE TEsTs wERE fiNE, aND CHaRLIE was DOINg wELL UNTIL a fEw wEEks LaTER, wHEN  HE  bEgaN  TO  ExpERIENcE sO¸E  swEaTs  aND  wEakNEss  aND  THE  sENsaTION  THaT  sO¸ETHINg  was  gOINg  wRONg.  ÁOURs  LaTER  HE  DEVELOpED  a  LOw-gRaDE  fEVER  THaT, wITHIN  TwELVE HOURs, RagED TO 104  DEgREEs. ÁE  caLLED ¸E  aT HO¸E THaT  NIgHT.  º  was  VERy  wORRIED  fOR  HI¸  aND  TOLD HI¸  TO  gO  I¸¸EDIaTELy  TO  THE  HOspITaL. ÁIs wIfE HELpED HI¸ pUT ON a RObE, aND CHaRLIE LEſt HO¸E fOR wHaT  wOULD bE THE LasT TI¸E. º LIVED  ONLy  a  fEw bLOcks  fRO¸ THE  HOspITaL  aND  aRRIVED  aL¸OsT aN  HOUR  bEfORE CHaRLIE aND  HIs wIfE.  º was ExHaUsTED by ¸y aNxIETy. My ROTaTION IN  caRDIOVascULaR sURgERy HaD sINcE ENDED, sO º was THERE as a  fRIEND—a ROLE º  was NOT sUppOsED TO bE pLayINg as a ¸EDIcaL sTUDENT. YET º was cLEaRLy paRT Of  THE INsTITUTION THaT was NOw REspONsIbLE fOR CHaRLIE’s LIfE. CHaRLIE’s wIfE pULLED THEIR caR INTO THE E¸ERgENcy ENTRaNcE. º HELpED HI¸  INTO THE HOspITaL. SwEaT was  bEaDINg ON HIs bROw; HE  was sO wEak HE cOULD  HaRDLy  sTaND.  º  TOOk  ONE  Of  HIs  HaNDs  IN  ¸INE.  ºT  was  cOLD  aND  wET  fRO¸  pERspIRaTION.  My OTHER HaND  gENTLy TOUcHED  HIs  back TO sUppORT  HI¸; EVEN  THROUgH  HIs  RObE aND  TwO  sHIRTs  º cOULD  fEEL THE THER¸aL  sTRUggLE  HIs bODy  was  wagINg agaINsT  sO¸E UNkNOwN INfEcTIOUs  INVaDER. WITHIN ¸O¸ENTs IT  bEca¸E cLEaR TO THE caRDIac sURgERy fELLOw ON caLL THaT CHaRLIE HaD aN INfEc-

TION, aND  aLL  TOO cLEaR abOUT ITs  pRObabLE caUsE. “º a¸ aD¸ITTINg yOU TO  THE  HOspITaL IN INTENsIVE caRE,” HE TOLD CHaRLIE, wHOsE facE LOOkED cLOsE TO DEaTH. 

231

Slippery  Slope A  sHUDDER wENT THROUgH ¸E. º HaD sEEN TwO sI¸ILaR casEs wHILE ON THE caRDIOVascULaR sURgERy sERVIcE. ºN bOTH casEs paTIENTs HaD bEEN DIscHaRgED fRO¸  THE  HOspITaL, HaD  RETURNED wITH  fEVER,  aND  DIED.  º HaD  aLsO  HEaRD THaT  THERE  ¸IgHT  HaVE  bEEN  a pRObLE¸ wITH  a baTcH  Of  caRDIOVascULaR caTHETERs  THaT  wERE  IN UsE  IN  THE  HOspITaL. WEEks  aſtER UsE, sO¸E HaD  bEEN sUspEcTED TO  HaVE  bEEN  cONTa¸INaTED,  pREsU¸abLy  by  THE  ¸aNUfacTURER,  wITH  a  fUNgUs  caLLED caNDIDa. °E paTIENTs wHO HaD bEEN caTHETERIzED wITH THEsE UNITs wERE  sUbjEcT TO pOsTOpERaTIVE INfEcTION wITH THE fUNgUs aND sEE¸ED TO bE REsIsTaNT  TO TREaT¸ENT. By  ¸ORNINg THE  sURgIcaL TEa¸ THaT ORIgINaLLy  TREaTED  CHaRLIE was  by HIs  bEDsIDE. ±NLy ONE  HOpE RE¸aINED: °Ey LOaDED  HI¸ wITH aNTIfUNgaL  DRUgs  aND TOOk HI¸ TO sURgERy TO REpLacE THE INfEcTED gRaſt. º cHaNgED ¸y cLOTHEs aND  wENT  INTO THE  OpERaTINg ROO¸ TO waTcH. °E THOUgHT Of  bEINg abLE  TO aNswER  HIs  fa¸ILy’s qUEsTIONs abOUT THE LONg  aND cO¸pLEx sURgERy was  sO pOwERfUL  THaT IT ObscURED THE paIN THaT DEVELOpED IN ¸y fEET as º sTOOD, OUT Of THE way,  ON a TINy paTcH Of flOOR IN THE or. °E sURgERy wENT wELL aND cONfiR¸ED THE INfEcTION. CHaRLIE was  back IN  THE caRDIOsURgIcaL INTENsIVE caRE UNIT, aND º was by HIs bEDsIDE wITH HIs wIfE  aND DaUgHTER. °E sURgEON appEaRED sHORTLy THEREaſtER aND bRIEfly REassURED  THE fa¸ILy THaT HIs TEa¸ HaD REpLacED THE INfEcTED gRaſt aND THaT CHaRLIE HaD  DONE VERy  wELL IN sURgERy. °E  sURgEON waLkED away. º  sTOOD wITH CHaRLIE’s  wIfE aND DaUgHTER aND  ExpLaINED wHaT º cOULD abOUT wHaT º HaD sEEN IN THE  or, LEaVINg OUT aNy ¸ENTION THaT  THE INfEcTION HE  HaD sUffERED ¸IgHT HaVE  bEEN  caUsED  by  THE cONTa¸INaTED  caTHETERs.  MINUTEs  LaTER, a  bELL sOUNDED,  INDIcaTINg THE END Of VIsITINg HOURs. º LEſt wITH THE¸, as If THE bELL was ¸EaNT  fOR  ¸E, TOO, aND  saT IN THE waITINg  aREa DIscUssINg wITH THE¸ ¸y OpTI¸Is¸  abOUT CHaRLIE’s fUTURE. As  PaVLOVIaN  as  THE  fa¸ILy’s  REspONsE  TO  THE  VIsITINg  HOURs  bELL,  ¸y  REspONsE  TO  THE  HOspITaL’s  E¸ERgENcy  pagINg  sysTE¸  was  EqUaLLy  wELL  pROgRa¸¸ED. º HaD LEaRNED sINcE sTaRTINg ¸y cLINIcaL ROTaTIONs THaT THE ¸O¸ENT  a VOIcE bEgaN TO RINg OUT ON THE pagER, aLL  OTHER INcO¸INg aUDITORy  sIgNaLs 

w o n K   o t  s d e e N   e n O   o N

“YOU HaVE aN INfEcTION, ¸aybE ON yOUR aORTIc gRaſt.”

wERE  INsTINcTIVELy  sHUT OUT.  °E  “cODE” was  caLLED  fOR  THE  caRDIac sURgIcaL 

232

INTENsIVE  caRE  UNIT. º  fROzE  IN fEaR, LIsTENINg  TO  THE aNNOUNcE¸ENT.  º TOLD  CHaRLIE’s fa¸ILy º NEEDED TO REspOND TO THIs, a TOTaL fabRIcaTION, aND LEſt. °E 

n a m l a C  . S   l i e N

cROwD aROUND CHaRLIE’s bED cONfiR¸ED ¸y fEaRs. º was I¸¸ObILIzED by NOT kNOwINg  wHaT TO DO,  by ¸y E¸OTIONs, aND by  THE pEOpLE RUNNINg  IN EVERy  DIREcTION wITH ¸EDIcaTIONs  aND EqUIp¸ENT. A  fEw ¸INUTEs LaTER THE sURgEON wHO HaD jUsT cO¸pLETED CHaRLIE’s gRaſt REpaIR  ca¸E TO THE bEDsIDE. °ERE was NO HOpE. ALL REsUscITaTION aTTE¸pTs faILED TO  REsTaRT HIs HEaRT. As THE cODE was caLLED TO a HaLT, a NURsE HURRIEDLy HaNDED a  ¼t¾t Lab REsULT TO THE sURgEON. °E paTIENT’s sERU¸ pOTassIU¸ HaD sOaRED TO  a LEVEL THaT wOULD HaVE ¸aDE aNyONE’s HEaRT sTOp. º LOOkED OVER THE sURgEON’s  sHOULDER  as HE HELD THE sLIp Of papER wITH THE Lab REsULT, sTaRINg IN DIsbELIEf.  CHaRLIE  HaD  DIED  Of  a  sI¸pLE  ¸IsTakE.  ÁIs  pOTassIU¸ HaD  bEEN  aLLOwED TO  gO  TOO HIgH aſtER sURgERy.  °Is wELL-kNOwN DEaDLy  EVENT was  caUsED by  THE  RELEasE Of LaRgE a¸OUNTs Of pOTassIU¸ INTO THE bLOOD fRO¸ cELLs Da¸agED aT  sURgERy.  °E  EVENT Is  sO  cO¸¸ON  IN caRDIac  sURgIcaL pROcEDUREs  THaT  cLOsE  ¸ONITORINg  Of THE pOTassIU¸ was a  ROUTINE paRT Of pOsTOpERaTIVE caRE. ÁOw  cOULD  sUcH  a  s¸aLL  OVERsIgHT UNDO THE  ¸ONTHs  Of HEROIc  ¸EDIcaL  caRE  THaT  CHaRLIE HaD bEEN gIVEN by THE ¸OsT skILLED sURgEONs IN THE REgION?

Entering  the Dungeon  of Deception °E  sURgEON LOOkED aT ¸E  aND TO ¸y gREaT sURpRIsE pUT HIs  aR¸ aROUND ¸y  sHOULDER.  º was  UNawaRE THaT  HE  HaD  gIVEN  a  ¸O¸ENT’s THOUgHT  TO ¸y ROLE  IN CHaRLIE’s caRE. “SON,” HE bEgaN, “º’VE bEEN VERy ¸OVED by THE INTEREsT aND  cONcERN  yOU  HaVE  sHOwN fOR  THIs  paTIENT. º  aLsO kNOw THaT  yOU  REaLIzE THaT  NOTHINg  gOOD  wOULD  cO¸E  OUT Of  THE  fa¸ILy’s  kNOwINg  abOUT  THE caTHETER  pRObLE¸s OR wHaT HappENED jUsT NOw. µO ONE NEEDs TO kNOw.” ÁE TappED ¸y  sHOULDER TwIcE aND waLkED away. ºN THOsE fEw sEcONDs  IT HappENED. º  HaD bEEN INVITED  TO jOIN  THE UNDERwORLD Of ¸EDIcaL sEcREcy—THaT TERRITORy wHERE DOcTORs TREaD aND wHERE NO  OTHERs ¸ay LOOk IN; wHERE sEcRETs abOUT ¸IsTakEs aND pRObLE¸s aRE bROUgHT  aND wHERE THEy REsIDE fOREVER HIDDEN. º  sTOOD  ¸OTIONLEss.  A  sTREa¸  Of  cONTRaDIcTORy  THOUgHTs  flOODED  ¸y  bRaIN. Was º CHaRLIE’s fRIEND, aND sHOULD fRIENDsHIp pREVaIL? SHOULD º TELL HIs  fa¸ILy EVERyTHINg  º kNEw? ±R was º a  DOcTOR, aLbEIT IN  TRaININg, cO¸¸ITTED  TO kEEpINg THE sEcRETs THaT LIE bEyOND THE paTIENTs’ aND fa¸ILIEs’ gRasp? Was º  paRTIaLLy REspONsIbLE fOR THE fUTURE sURVIVaL Of THE wIfE, DaUgHTER, aND gRaND-

DaUgHTER CHaRLIE HaD LEſt bEHIND? ÁaD º DONE EVERyTHINg º cOULD? º HaD LITTLE  TI¸E TO THINk, aND º NEVER REaLLy ¸aDE a DEcIsION wHaT TO DO. °E sURgEON LEſt 

233

DaUgHTER. º kNEw º HaD TO fOLLOw bUT DIDN’T kNOw If º sHOULD bE sTaNDINg NExT  TO THE fa¸ILy OR NExT TO THE DOcTOR. °E  sURgEON  OffERED  HIs  cONDOLENcEs  TO  THE  fa¸ILy.  ÁE RE¸aINED  ONLy  bRIEfly aND THEN askED If º cOULD sTay wITH THE¸ fOR a wHILE. ÁE was DEpUTIzINg  ¸E—aN acT THaT sUbcONscIOUsLy sUckED ¸E DEEpER INTO THE UNDERwORLD. º was  NOw  REspONsIbLE fOR  ¸aINTaININg THE cHaRaDE THaT  “wE HaD DONE EVERyTHINg  wE  cOULD.”  ºT was  Up  TO ¸E  TO UNDERsTaND THE  I¸pORTaNcE Of THE  sTaTE¸ENT,  “µO ONE NEEDs TO kNOw.” º  saw  CHaRLIE’s fa¸ILy  ONLy  ONcE  aſtER  THaT,  aT HIs  fUNERaL.  ÁIs DaUgHTER  INTRODUcED ¸E TO EVERyONE THERE as ONE Of CHaRLIE’s DOcTORs wHO HaD TakEN  sUcH gOOD caRE Of HI¸. º pLayED THE ROLE wELL. ¶REssED IN ¸y ONLy sUIT, º TOLD  THE¸ HOw ¸UcH HE HaD ENDURED, HOw sIck HE HaD bEEN, aND HOw HE kEpT aLL  Of OUR spIRITs HIgH TO THE END. º gOT IN ¸y caR aND DROVE HO¸E acROss THE cITy IN a pOURINg RaIN. °aT was  THE LasT TI¸E º saw CHaRLIE’s fa¸ILy. º cOULD NOT RE¸aIN IN cONTacT wITH  THE¸  wHILE bEINg fiLLED wITH THE sEcRETs º HaD bEEN I¸pLORED NOT TO REVEaL: THE cONTa¸INaTED  caTHETERs  THaT  ¸IgHT  HaVE  caUsED  HIs  INfEcTION,  aND  THE  ELEVaTED  pOTassIU¸ LEVEL THaT caUsED  HIs HEaRT TO sTOp bEaTINg. º wOULD bE LIVINg a  LIE  EacH  ¸O¸ENT º spENT wITH  HIs fa¸ILy. ´VEN THE cLOsENEss º HaD  fELT TO THE¸,  ¸y  THOUgHTs Of HIs  DaUgHTER,  aND ¸y cONTINUINg sENsE Of REspONsIbILITy fOR  THE¸  wERE  NOT sTRONg  ENOUgH  TO  OVERcO¸E ¸y DIscO¸fORT.  º  kNEw  º cOULD  NOT  VIOLaTE  THE Laws Of  THE sEcRET  sOcIETy  Of ¸EDIcINE  INTO wHIcH  º  HaD jUsT  bEgUN ¸y INITIaTION. BEINg INVITED INTO THE saNcTITy Of THIs DUNgEON Of DEcEpTION was paRT Of THE HONOR Of bEcO¸INg a DOcTOR. ºT ¸aDE ¸E fEEL spEcIaL—aN  ENTRUsTED cOLLEagUE, a REaL DOcTOR. BUT ¸aNy qUEsTIONs flOODED ¸y ¸IND. ÁaD  aNyONE  ELsE DIED  bEfORE CHaRLIE  as  THE REsULT  Of faTaLLy  HIgH pOTassIU¸ aſtER sURgERy? ÁaD aNyONE ExpLORED THE NEED TO cHaNgE THE sysTE¸s by  wHIcH  sUcH  ¸ONITORINg  TOOk pLacE?  ¶ID THE cO¸paNy  THaT  ¸aDE THE  caTHETERs  kNOw THaT sO¸E HaD  bEEN cONTa¸INaTED? WOULD  LawsUITs HaVE  fORcED  THE¸ OUT Of bUsINEss, ¸akINg THEsE DEVIcEs UNaVaILabLE TO OTHERs wHO wOULD  bENEfiT? WOULD THE HOspITaL bE fORcED TO pay ¸ILLIONs TO THOsE wHO DIED as a  REsULT, ERODINg  THE sERVIcEs  IT was  pROVIDINg TO  OTHER paTIENTs? WOULD DOcTORs bE afRaID TO assU¸E THE cHaLLENgEs Of cRITIcaLLy ILL paTIENTs LIkE  CHaRLIE?  ¶ID  CHaRLIE’s fa¸ILy  DEsERVE  TO  bE cO¸pENsaTED  fOR  THE  ERRORs THaT  caUsED  THEIR  LOss? WOULD THE bENEfiTs TO  THaT ONE fa¸ILy OUTwEIgH THE Da¸agE THaT  cOULD bE DONE TO THE pHysIcIaNs aND THE HOspITaL?

w o n K   o t  s d e e N   e n O   o N

¸y sIDE aND wENT TO THE waITINg ROO¸ TO TELL THE NEws TO CHaRLIE’s wIfE aND 

º  HaD  NO  aNswERs  aND  THUs  DID  NOTHINg.  ¹ODay  º  a¸  pUzzLED  by  HOw 

234

qUIckLy º aDapTED TO THIs NEw ROLE Of “kEEpER Of sEcRETs” aND RE¸aIN cONcERNED  THaT OTHERs ENTERINg ¸EDIcINE aRE sTILL TaUgHT IN THE sa¸E way.

n a m l a C  . S   l i e N

Unstated  ²±stacles  to ²penness WHaT kEEps aNy DOcTOR º HaVE EVER kNOwN fRO¸ INITIaTINg DIscUssION Of ¸EDIcaL ¸IsTakEs wITH paTIENTs Is a sET Of REDOUbTabLE  baRRIERs. FIRsT, THERE Is TacIT  agREE¸ENT a¸ONg pHysIcIaNs THaT ¸IsTakEs aRE aN INEVITabLE paRT Of pRacTIcINg ¸EDIcINE. º HaVE ¸aDE ¸y OwN ERRORs OVER THE yEaRs, sO¸E wITH ¸INOR  aDVERsE  OUTcO¸Es,  OTHERs  wITH  HORRIbLE  REsULTs. WHEN  º  DIscOVER aNOTHER  pHysIcIaN’s  ¸IsTakE, º  ONLy  DIscUss IT  If  THE  DOcTOR Is  E¸pLOyED  by ¸E  OR Is  fOR¸aLLy UNDER ¸y sUpERVIsION. WE pHysIcIaNs aRE afRaID TO TURN Up THE HEaT  ON OTHERs, LEsT wE fRy IN OUR OwN fiRE. °EN wE HaVE THE spEcTER Of ¸EDIcaL LIabILITy LawsUITs. WHO wOULD REVEaL  ERRORs TO a  paTIENT aND INITIaTE THE yEaRs-LONg  pROcEss Of DEfENDINg a  ¸EDIcaL  LIabILITy LawsUIT? °E  fiNaNcIaL  bURDEN Of  sUcH aN acTION  aND  THE pUbLIc  HU¸ILIaTION  INVOLVED  aRE  INsUR¸OUNTabLE  fOR  ¸OsT  pHysIcIaNs  aND  DETER  a  ¸ORE  HONEsT  REckONINg  Of  ¸EDIcaL  ERRORs  a¸ONg  pHysIcIaNs  aND  bETwEEN  pHysIcIaNs aND paTIENTs. FINaLLy, LIkE ¸OsT DOcTORs, º wENT INTO ¸EDIcINE TO bE a HELpER aND HEaLER.  ScRUTINy  by  cOLLEagUEs  aND  THE  pROcEss  Of  DIscUssINg  ¸y  ¸IsTakEs  OpENLy  wITH OTHERs cO¸pEL ¸E TO RELIVE, OVER aND OVER, THE paIN Of HaVINg pLayED a ROLE  IN INjURINg sO¸EONE wHO ENTRUsTED ¸E wITH HIs OR HER LIfE. A pROLONgED pRObINg  Of  ¸y ERRORs  wOULD  fORcE a  LEVEL  Of  sELf-DOUbT THaT  wOULD  affEcT  fUTURE  DEcIsIONs  aND  cOULD  pROVE I¸¸ObILIzINg.  WITH  NO  gROUNDs  fOR  cO¸paRINg  ¸y abILITIEs  aND pRacTIcE skILLs wITH THOsE  Of ¸y cOLLEagUEs, º wOULD bE  LEſt  askINg, “¶O º ¸akE ¸ORE ¸IsTakEs THaN ¸y cOLLEagUEs? WOULD aNOTHER DOcTOR HaVE DONE a bETTER jOb TakINg caRE Of THIs paTIENT?” °E fOR¸aL INTERNaL  qUaLITy assURaNcE  DIscUssIONs  THaT HaVE  bEEN  I¸pLE¸ENTED IN sO¸E INsTITUTIONs TakE pLacE IN a pROTEcTED ENVIRON¸ENT aND THUs  pRO¸OTE  a  ¸ORE OpEN REVIEw Of THE caUsE Of ¸EDIcaL ERRORs. SUcH sHELTERED  Exa¸INaTION OſtEN REsULTs IN fixINg sysTE¸Ic pRObLE¸s aND THEREby pROTEcTINg  paTIENTs fRO¸ a sI¸pLE OVERsIgHT LIkE THE ONE THaT kILLED CHaRLIE McµIgHT. BUT  bUILDINg  a  LEgaL fiREwaLL bETwEEN qUaLITy  REVIEw pROcEssEs aND  pUbLIc  scRUTINy faILs TO cREaTE a ¸EcHaNIs¸ fOR THE LEgITI¸aTE cO¸pENsaTION Of paTIENTs  wHO HaVE  bEEN INjURED THROUgH  ¸EDIcaL ¸IsTakEs. STUDIEs HaVE sHOwN THaT 

ONLy  a  s¸aLL  pERcENTagE  Of  sUcH  INjURIEs  aRE  cO¸pENsaTED  THROUgH  LEgaL  acTIONs, wHILE ¸OsT gO UNaDDREssED.

235

aND  TO  ENcOURagE  THE  DIscLOsURE  Of  ERRORs. AT THE sa¸E  TI¸E, EacH Of  Us,  as  pHysIcIaNs  aND  TEacHERs,  ¸UsT  figHT  THE  cONTINUINg  URgE  TO  HIDE  OUR  ¸IsTakEs. WE ¸UsT TEacH THE NExT gENERaTION Of sTUDENTs TO TaLk abOUT ¸EDIcaL ERRORs  as a  paRT Of ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE THaT  wILL aLways bE wITH Us. MOsT  Of  aLL, wE  ¸UsT TEacH EacH  OTHER THaT THE bIggEsT gaffE Of aLL  Is TO cOVER  Up OUR  ¸IsTakEs, THUs pERpETUaTINg baRRIERs TO safE caRE. ´VERyONE NEEDs TO kNOw.

w o n K   o t  s d e e N   e n O   o N

°E pROcEss by wHIcH Law aND ¸EDIcINE HaVE EVOLVED TO DEaL wITH ¸EDIcaL ¸IsTakEs ¸UsT bE DRasTIcaLLy cHaNgED, bOTH TO cO¸pENsaTE THOsE INjURED 

This page intentionally left blank

deaTh,  dying, and liveS  aT The MaRginS

IV

This page intentionally left blank

FoRTy  YeARs  of WoRk  on  End-of-L±fe  CARe FROM  ³ATI±NTS’  ´IgHTS  TO  ¿YST±MIc  ´±fORM Susan M. Wolf, Nancy Berlinger, and Bruce Jennings

MORE  THaN  2.5  ¸ILLION  pEOpLE  DIE  IN  THE  ·NITED  STaTEs  EacH  yEaR,  ¸OsT  Of  THE¸  fRO¸ pROgREssIVE HEaLTH  cONDITIONs. FacINg DEaTH  Is  a pROfOUND  cHaLLENgE  fOR  paTIENTs,  THEIR  RELaTIVEs  aND  fRIENDs,  THEIR  caREgIVERs,  aND  HEaLTH  caRE  INsTITUTIONs.  µEaRLy 40 yEaRs  Of  INTENsIVE  wORk  TO  I¸pROVE  caRE  aT  THE  END Of LIfE Has sHOwN THaT aLIgNINg caRE wITH paTIENTs’ NEEDs aND pREfERENcEs  IN  ORDER TO  EasE THE  DyINg pROcEss  Is  sURpRIsINgLy  DIfficULT—aLTHOUgH THERE  Has bEEN sO¸E INcRE¸ENTaL pROgREss. ´aRLy OpTI¸Is¸ THaT THE EsTabLIsH¸ENT  Of  paTIENTs’ LEgaL aND  ETHIcaL RIgHTs  TO ¸akE  DEcIsIONs abOUT THEIR  OwN caRE  wOULD  LEaD TO  ¸ORE  appROpRIaTE  END-Of-LIfE  TREaT¸ENT  faDED  IN  THE  facE  Of  sObERINg  DaTa  sHOwINg  THaT  DEcLaRINg  THEsE  RIgHTs  was  NOT  ENOUgH TO  aLTER  TREaT¸ENT  paTTERNs  aND THaT  sysTE¸Ic  IssUEs LOO¸ED LaRgE.  °Is  HIsTORy  Has  DE¸ONsTRaTED  THE NEED  TO aTTack THE  pRObLE¸  aT aLL  LEVELs, fRO¸  INDIVIDUaL  RIgHTs,  TO  fa¸ILy  aND  caREgIVINg RELaTIONsHIps,  TO  INsTITUTIONaL  aND  HEaLTH  sysTE¸s REfOR¸.

Securing  Rights (1976–1994) ºN 1976, µEw JERsEy’s HIgHEsT cOURT DEcIDED THE gROUNDbREakINg casE Of KaREN  ANN  QUINLaN,  wHOsE  faTHER  sOUgHT  pER¸IssION  TO DIscONTINUE  ¸EcHaNIcaL  VENTILaTION  wHEN sHE  was  IN  a  pERsIsTENT VEgETaTIVE  sTaTE.  °E  cOURT  fOUND 

SUsaN  M.  WOLf,  µaNcy  BERLINgER,  aND  BRUcE  JENNINgs,  “FORTy  YEaRs  Of  WORk  ON  ´ND-Of-²IfE  CaRE—FRO¸ PaTIENTs’  ³IgHTs  TO SysTE¸Ic ³EfOR¸,”  fRO¸  New England Journal of Medicine 372  (2015):  678–682. ©  2015 by  MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.  ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION Of  MassacHUsETTs  MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

THaT aLTHOUgH “THE DOcTORs say THaT RE¸OVINg KaREN fRO¸ THE REspIRaTOR wILL 

240

cONflIcT wITH THEIR pROfEssIONaL jUDg¸ENT,” KaREN HaD a “RIgHT Of cHOIcE” THaT  cOULD  bE  ExERcIsED  by  HER  faTHER  as  sURROgaTE  DEcIsION  ¸akER.  MaNy  casEs 

s g n i n n e J   d n a   , r e g n i l r e B  ,floW

fOLLOwED  IN  wHIcH  cOURTs  REcOgNIzED  THE  cONsTITUTIONaL  aND  cO¸¸ON-Law  RIgHTs Of paTIENTs TO REfUsE LIfE-sUsTaININg TREaT¸ENT aND THE aUTHORITy Of sURROgaTE DEcIsION ¸akERs fOR paTIENTs wHO LackED DEcIsION-¸akINg capacITy.Ã,Ä COURTs aLsO bEgaN TO aDDREss DEcIsIONs TO fORgO LIfE-sUsTaININg TREaT¸ENT IN  NEwbORNs. ºN  THOsE  EaRLy  Days  Of  EffORTs  TO  cURb  OVERTREaT¸ENT  aT  THE  END  Of  LIfE  aND  TO  I¸pROVE THE  DyINg  pROcEss,  EsTabLIsHINg THE  ETHIcaL  aND  LEgaL RIgHT  TO  REfUsE  LIfE-sUsTaININg  TREaT¸ENT  was  a  pRIORITy.  MORE  cHaLLENgINg  was  EsTabLIsHINg  sURROgaTEs’  aUTHORITy  TO  REfUsE  caRE  ON  bEHaLf  Of  INcO¸pETENT  paTIENTs, aRTIcULaTINg sTaNDaRDs fOR sURROgaTE DEcIsION ¸akINg, aND REacHINg  gENERaL agREE¸ENT ON LI¸ITs TO sURROgaTE aUTHORITy. CasEs INVOLVINg paTIENTs  wHO  wERE  NEVER  cO¸pETENT  TO  ¸akE  DEcIsIONs  abOUT  caRE  aND  INVOLVINg  THE cEssaTION Of aRTIficIaL NUTRITION aND HyDRaTION wERE NOTORIOUsLy DIfficULT,  as was DEcIsION ¸akINg fOR INcO¸pETENT paTIENTs wITHOUT sURROgaTEs. As ¸ORE casEs REacHED THE cOURTs aND pUbLIc aTTENTION INTENsIfiED, ExpERTs  bEgaN  aNaLyzINg  THE  IssUEs  aND  gENERaTINg  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs.  ºN  1983,  THE  PREsIDENT’s  CO¸¸IssION  ON  BIOETHIcs  IssUED  a  REpORT  aDVOcaTINg  THE  RIgHT  Of  paTIENTs  TO  DEcIDE  abOUT  THEIR  HEaLTH  caRE,  wHILE  aDDREssINg  ¸ORaL  aND  LEgaL  LI¸ITs.Æ ºN  1987,  THE  ÁasTINgs  CENTER pUbLIsHED  cO¸pREHENsIVE  ETHIcs  gUIDELINEs  REgaRDINg  END-Of-LIfE  caRE.Î °EsE  gUIDELINEs  fOcUsED  ON REcOgNIzINg  a  paTIENT’s RIgHT TO  REfUsE UNwaNTED LIfE-sUsTaININg TREaT¸ENT aND  ON  aRTIcULaTINg  a THREE-TIER  sTaNDaRD fOR  sURROgaTE DEcIsION  ¸akINg THaT pRIORITIzED fOLLOwINg THE paTIENT’s wIsHEs wHEN kNOwN bUT OTHERwIsE RELIED ON THE  sURROgaTE TO DEcIDE ON THE basIs Of THE paTIENT’s VaLUEs OR, absENT INfOR¸aTION  ON THOsE VaLUEs, IN accORDaNcE wITH THE paTIENT’s bEsT INTEREsTs. °E gUIDELINEs  aLsO  REcO¸¸ENDED  pROcEssEs  fOR  DEsIgNaTINg  sURROgaTEs  fOR  paTIENTs  wITH  NO  fa¸ILy  OR fRIENDs  TO sERVE  IN  THaT  ROLE aND  pROpOsED  UsINg  TI¸E-LI¸ITED  TRIaLs Of TREaT¸ENT TO INfOR¸ DEcIsIONs. °E DOcU¸ENT aDDREssED THE NEED TO  I¸pROVE paIN RELIEf, REcO¸¸ENDED REjEcTINg REqUEsTs fOR TREaT¸ENT THaT cOULD  NOT  accO¸pLIsH  ITs  pHysIOLOgIcaL  ObjEcTIVE,  DIffERENTIaTED  TREaT¸ENT  REfUsaL  fRO¸ pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE aND EUTHaNasIa, aND cONsIDERED ObsTacLEs TO  INDIVIDUaL RIgHTs. ºN  THE  1990  casE  Of  µaNcy CRUzaN—a  MIssOURI  wO¸aN  IN  a  pERsIsTENT  VEgETaTIVE  sTaTE,  wHOsE  paRENTs  waNTED  aRTIficIaL  NUTRITION  aND  HyDRaTION  sTOppED—THE  ·.S.  SUpRE¸E  COURT  fiNaLLy  REcOgNIzED  a  paTIENT’s  RIgHT  TO  REfUsE LIfE-sUsTaININg TREaT¸ENT, aLTHOUgH THE COURT NOTED THaT  sTaTEs cOULD 

REsTRIcT  THE  aUTHORITy  Of  sURROgaTEs  TO  ¸akE  DEcIsIONs  fOR  paTIENTs  LackINg  DEcIsIONaL capacITy. ºN HER cONcURRENcE, JUsTIcE SaNDRa ¶ay ±’CONNOR cITED 

241

wOULD  bE  bETTER  pROTEcTED  If  THE  sURROgaTE  wERE  appOINTED  by  THE  paTIENT  IN  aN aDVaNcE  DIREcTIVE. °E Cruzan OpINION aND THE passagE Of THE fEDERaL  PaTIENT SELf-¶ETER¸INaTION AcT IN 1990 spURRED  EffORTs TO pRO¸OTE aDVaNcE  DIREcTIVEs.Ï

Facing Clinical  Realities  (1995–2009) °E  EsTabLIsH¸ENT  Of paTIENTs’  RIgHTs  aND  THE  OpTION  TO  UsE aDVaNcE  DIREcTIVEs pROVED NEcEssaRy bUT faR fRO¸ sUfficIENT TO aLIgN TREaT¸ENT wITH paTIENTs’  pREfERENcEs.  ºN  1995,  INVEsTIgaTORs  IN  THE  STUDy  TO  ·NDERsTaND  PROgNOsEs  aND  PREfERENcEs fOR  ±UTcO¸Es  aND  ³Isks Of  ¹REaT¸ENTs  (¼u¿¿ort)—a  ¸ULTI¸ILLION-DOLLaR  EffORT  by  THE  ³ObERT  WOOD  JOHNsON  FOUNDaTION  TO  I¸pROVE  END-Of-LIfE  caRE—bEgaN  pUbLIsHINg  fiNDINgs  sHOwINg  THaT  DOcU¸ENTED TREaT¸ENT pREfERENcEs, EVEN wHEN cHa¸pIONED by a NURsE aDVOcaTE,  faILED  TO cHaNgE cLINIcaL  pRacTIcE.Ð As ONE cO¸¸ENTaTOR wROTE,  “º¸pROVINg  THE qUaLITy Of caRE gENERaLLy REqUIREs cHaNgEs IN THE ORgaNIzaTION aND cULTURE  Of THE HOspITaL aND THE acTIVE sUppORT Of HOspITaL LEaDERs.”Ñ FURTHER sTUDIEs aTTE¸pTED TO IDENTIfy pOTENTIaL ROUTEs TO pROgREss, INcLUDINg I¸pROVED accEss TO paLLIaTIVE caRE. ALTHOUgH CONgREss HaD aDDED a HOspIcE  bENEfiT  TO  THE MEDIcaRE pROgRa¸ IN  1982—TO  pROVIDE  paLLIaTIVE  aND  cO¸fORT caRE fOR paTIENTs NEaRINg THE END Of THEIR LIVEs—baRRIERs TO HOspIcE  accEss RE¸aINED,  INcLUDINg THE  REqUIRE¸ENT THaT  DEaTH  bE ExpEcTED  wITHIN  6  ¸ONTHs  aND  THaT  cURaTIVE  TREaT¸ENT  EffORTs  bE  abaNDONED.  °ROUgHOUT  THE  1990s,  pROfEssIONaL  sOcIETIEs  INcLUDINg THE  A¸ERIcaN  COLLEgE Of  PHysIcIaNs,Ò A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION,× aND A¸ERIcaN µURsEs AssOcIaTIONÃØ IssUED  papERs  aND pOLIcIEs aI¸ED  aT  IDENTIfyINg ObsTacLEs TO gOOD  caRE aT  THE  END Of LIfE aND I¸pROVINg cLINIcaL pRacTIcE. µONpROfiT ORgaNIzaTIONs ¸OUNTED  EffORTs sUcH  as THE PROjEcT  ON ¶EaTH IN A¸ERIca, wHIcH fUNDED REsEaRcH ON  I¸pEDI¸ENTs  TO  cO¸passIONaTE  END-Of-LIfE  caRE.Ãà ºN  1997,  THE  ºNsTITUTE  Of  MEDIcINE  (iom)  pUbLIsHED  Approaching  Death:  Improving  Care at  the  End 

of Life, wHIcH aNaLyzED REsEaRcH, EDUcaTIONaL, cLINIcaL, aND pOLIcy cHaLLENgEs  aND E¸pHasIzED THE NEED fOR TOOLs TO ¸EasURE qUaLITy aND OUTcO¸Es Of END-  Of-LIfE caRE.ÃÄ ºN THE facE Of DIfficULTy IN I¸pROVINg END-Of-LIfE caRE aND ENsURINg accEss  TO gOOD  paIN RELIEf aND  OTHER paLLIaTIVE ¸EasUREs, THE ¸OVE¸ENT TO LEgaLIzE 

eraC  efiL-fo-dnE

THE  ÁasTINgs  CENTER  gUIDELINEs  aND  sUggEsTED  THaT  a  sURROgaTE’s  aUTHORITy 

pHysIcIaN  aID TO  TER¸INaLLy ILL paTIENTs  wHO wIsHED TO  END  THEIR  LIVEs gaTH-

242

ERED  sTEa¸. ºN a  1994 baLLOT ¸EasURE,  REcONfiR¸ED IN 1997, ±REgON  bEca¸E  THE  fiRsT  sTaTE  TO  VOTE  fOR  LEgaLIzaTION  Of  pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE  aND 

s g n i n n e J   d n a   , r e g n i l r e B  ,floW

ENacTED  THE ¶EaTH  wITH ¶IgNITy AcT.  °E sTaTUTE  sURVIVED fEDERaL  LITIgaTION  OVER THE aUTHORITy Of THE ·.S. aTTORNEy gENERaL TO LI¸IT THE pRacTIcE (Gonzales 

v.  Oregon, 2006). ºN 1997, THE SUpRE¸E  COURT REjEcTED aRgU¸ENTs  THaT sTaTE  baNs  ON  pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE  VIOLaTED  paTIENTs’  cONsTITUTIONaL  RIgHTs,  aND THE COURT REcOgNIzED sTaTEs’ aUTHORITy TO pROHIbIT OR LEgaLIzE THE pRacTIcE  wITHIN  THEIR bORDERs  (Vacco v.  Quill,  1997; Washington  v. Glucksberg,  1997).  WasHINgTON  STaTE fOLLOwED  ±REgON  aND  Has  NOw bEEN  jOINED by  ÂER¸ONT;  THE  MONTaNa  SUpRE¸E  COURT aND  a  LOwER  cOURT  IN  µEw  MExIcO  HaVE  aLsO  IssUED RULINgs aLLOwINg THE pRacTIcE. As  wORk  pROgREssED  TO  cHaNgE  THE  cLINIcaL  REaLITIEs  Of  END-Of-LIfE  caRE,  fOcUs  TURNED  TO  THE  baRRIERs  facINg  sUbpOpULaTIONs,  sUcH  as  TER¸INaLLy  ILL  cHILDREN.  ºN  THE  2002  pUbLIcaTION  When  Children  Die ,  THE  iom  DEscRIbED  pRObLE¸s IN pEDIaTRIc caRE, INcLUDINg THaT Of paRENTs bEINg fORcED TO cHOOsE  bETwEEN  LIfE-pROLONgINg  TREaT¸ENT  aND  HOspIcE  caRE  fOR  THEIR  cHILDREN.ÃÆ °E iom THEN DETaILED REsEaRcH gaps IN  Describing Death in America, wHIcH  URgED THE UsE Of MEDIcaRE REcORDs as aN I¸pORTaNT DaTa sET.ÃÎ MEaNwHILE,  THERE  was  gROwINg  cONTROVERsy  OVER  DEcIsIONs  TO  END  LIfE-  sUsTaININg TREaT¸ENT IN casEs Of LONg-TER¸ DIsabILITy. PEOpLE wITH DIsabILITIEs  RaIsED cONcERNs THaT sUcH DEcIsIONs wERE sO¸ETI¸Es basED ON INappROpRIaTE  assU¸pTIONs  abOUT  qUaLITy  Of LIfE.  µEUROLOgIc  DIsabILITIEs  RaIsED  aDDITIONaL  cONcERNs, as REsEaRcH DIsTINgUIsHED THE ¸INI¸aLLy cONscIOUs sTaTE, IN wHIcH  paTIENTs  RETaIN  sO¸E pOTENTIaL  fOR  cOgNITIVE REcOVERy,  fRO¸ THE  pER¸aNENT  VEgETaTIVE  sTaTE  (Wendland v.  Wendland,  2001).ÃÏ ºN 2005,  THE casE  Of ¹ERRI  ScHIaVO—a FLORIDa  wO¸aN  wHOsE paRENTs REjEcTED  THE ¸EDIcaL  cONcLUsION  THaT sHE was IN a VEgETaTIVE sTaTE wITH NO pOTENTIaL fOR REcOVERy aND ObjEcTED  TO HER HUsbaND’s DEcIsION as sURROgaTE TO TER¸INaTE TUbE fEEDINg—TRIggERED  NaTIONaL  cONTROVERsy, REVEaLINg  THaT  DEcaDEs Of  pROgREss ON sURROgaTE  DEcIsION ¸akINg cOULD NOT aVERT cONflIcT OVER THE TER¸INaTION Of aRTIficIaL NUTRITION  aND  HyDRaTION  IN  aN  INcO¸pETENT  paTIENT  wHO  was  IN  a  pER¸aNENT  VEgETaTIVE sTaTE wHEN fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs DIsagREED wITH ONE aNOTHER. °E pOLITIcs Of END-Of-LIfE caRE bEca¸E EVEN ¸ORE DIVIsIVE IN 2009, wHEN  OppONENTs Of THE AffORDabLE  CaRE AcT (¾»¾) spREaD THE faLsE assERTION THaT  a  pROpOsED ¾»¾ pROVIsION  ¸EaNT TO aUTHORIzE THE REI¸bURsE¸ENT  Of pHysIcIaNs fOR VOLUNTaRy cOUNsELINg abOUT END-Of-LIfE pLaNNINg wOULD cREaTE “DEaTH  paNELs.”  °E pROVIsION  was  RE¸OVED UNDER pOLITIcaL  pREssURE, aND  a  sI¸ILaR  MEDIcaRE-REfOR¸  pROpOsaL  was  sUbsEqUENTLy  wITHDRawN.  °Us,  a  pERIOD 

THaT  bEgaN wITH a  sObERINg REaLIzaTION THaT  THE VaLIDaTION Of RIgHTs  was  NOT  ENOUgH  TO  cHaNgE cLINIcaL  REaLITIEs  was  ¸aRkED by  I¸pORTaNT REsEaRcH aND 

243

Reforming  End-of-Life  Care Systems  (2010–  ) ºN 2010, CONgREss passED THE ¾»¾, THE LaRgEsT aTTE¸pT aT REfOR¸ Of HEaLTH caRE  fiNaNcE  aND  sysTE¸s  IN DEcaDEs.  WITH  aDVaNcEs IN  sysTE¸Ic  REfOR¸, EffORTs  TO I¸pROVE END-Of-LIfE caRE HaVE bEcO¸E INcREasINgLy fOcUsED ON HEaLTH caRE  INsTITUTIONs,  sysTE¸s,  aND  fiNaNcE. ºN  2014,  THE  iom RELEasED  a  NEw  REpORT, 

Dying in  America. ÃÐ °E  REpORT  aND RELaTED cO¸¸ENTaRy  aNaLyzED  REsEaRcH  sHOwINg  THaT  cURRENT  fiNaNcIaL  INcENTIVEs  DO NOT sUppORT  REaDy accEss  TO  THE  caRE  paTIENTs  waNT  aND  NEED  NEaR  THE  END  Of  LIfE.ÃÑ °E  INTEgRaTION  Of  paLLIaTIVE  caRE  wITH  TREaT¸ENT  RE¸aINs INcO¸pLETE,  DEspITE a¸pLE  EVIDENcE  Of  bENEfiT.ÃÒ ALTHOUgH HOspIcE  UsE Has INcREasED, MEDIcaRE DaTa  REVEaL  paTTERNs  Of  TREaT¸ENT  EscaLaTION  bEfORE  HOspIcE  ENROLL¸ENT.Ã× MEDIcaRE  DaTa  aLsO REVEaL  REgIONaL VaRIaTION IN TRaNsfERs fRO¸ NURsINg HO¸Es TO HOspITaLs,  wHIcH aRE assOcIaTED wITH ¸EDIcaLLy INappROpRIaTE fEEDINg-TUbE INsERTION.ÄØ °E agINg Of THE baby bOO¸ERs wILL ¸EaN a sHaRp INcREasE IN THE NU¸bER Of  ·.S.  paTIENTs  wITH  ALzHEI¸ER’s  DIsEasE,  wHIcH  wILL  pLacE  NEw  pREssUREs  ON  fa¸ILIEs aND caRE sysTE¸s.Äà As ¾»¾ I¸pLE¸ENTaTION DRIVEs sysTE¸ cHaNgEs,  RENEwED  EffORTs  TO I¸pROVE  END-Of-LIfE caRE  aT THE sysTE¸  LEVEL aRE  E¸ERgINg,  INcLUDINg  fUNDINg  fOR  cONcURRENT  HOspIcE  aND  cURaTIVE  caRE  EffORTs  fOR sERIOUsLy ILL cHILDREN aND RENEwED EffORTs TO fUND cONVERsaTIONs bETwEEN  pHysIcIaNs aND paTIENTs fOR END-Of-LIfE caRE pLaNNINg. As pOLIcy INITIaTIVEs HaVE bEcO¸E ¸ORE sysTE¸-fOcUsED  aND ENcO¸passINg,  sO  TOO HaVE  ETHIcs INITIaTIVEs.  ºN 2013,  THE ÁasTINgs CENTER  pRODUcED a  REVIsED,  ExpaNDED EDITION  Of THE 1987 gUIDELINEs, aDDREssINg NOT  ONLy INDIVIDUaL  RIgHTs  aND  THE  cLINIcaL REaLITIEs  Of DEcIsION  ¸akINg  bUT  aLsO INsTITUTIONaL aND sysTE¸Ic IssUEs sUcH as TRaNsfERs bETwEEN INsTITUTIONs, END-Of-LIfE  caRE IN THE cONTExT Of LaRgE aND cO¸pLEx HEaLTH caRE ORgaNIzaTIONs, THE ROLE Of  cOsT IN DEcIsIONs, aND HEaLTH caRE accEss fOR UNINsURED pEOpLE. ÄÄ °E REVIsED  gUIDELINEs  REflEcT THE REaLITy  THaT  paTIENTs  aRE RaRELy  IsOLaTED RIgHTs-bEaRERs;  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs aRE UsUaLLy INVOLVED IN END-Of-LIfE DEcIsIONs aND caRE. BOTH  paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs fURTHER DEpEND  ON cLINIcIaNs TO aNcHOR a  pROcEss  Of sETTINg gOaLs  aND  DEVELOpINg  TREaT¸ENT  pLaNs.  ALTHOUgH REspEcT fOR  aUTONO¸y  RE¸aINs  EssENTIaL  TO  END-Of-LIfE  DEcIsION  ¸akINg,  appROpRIaTELy  INcLUDINg  THE  paTIENT’s  cHOsEN  cONsTELLaTION  Of  RELaTIVEs  aND  fRIENDs  aND 

eraC  efiL-fo-dnE

INNOVaTION—yET gROwINg cONTROVERsy.

HELpINg aLL Of  THE¸ NaVIgaTE caRE sysTE¸s  HaVE E¸ERgED as INTEgRaL TO ETHI-

244

caL pRacTIcE. PERsONs  LIVINg wITH DIsabILITIEs  HaVE aLsO pROVIDED cRUcIaL pERspEcTIVEs ON THE ¸aNagE¸ENT Of cHRONIc cONDITIONs aND TREaT¸ENT DEcIsION 

s g n i n n e J   d n a   , r e g n i l r e B  ,floW

¸akINg OVER TI¸E. °E NEw gUIDELINEs aND THE REcENT iom REpORT sI¸ILaRLy fRa¸E THE caRE Of  DyINg pEOpLE as “paTIENT-cENTERED, fa¸ILy-ORIENTED,”ÃÐ aND DEpENDENT ON sOUND  sysTE¸s Of caRE aND fiNaNcE. °E iom REpORT caLLs fOR a  “¸ajOR REORIENTaTION  aND REsTRUcTURINg Of MEDIcaRE, MEDIcaID aND OTHER HEaLTH caRE DELIVERy pROgRa¸s”  TO  ENsURE  qUaLITy  caRE  THaT  ¸EETs  THE  NEEDs  Of  DyINg  paTIENTs  aND  THEIR  fa¸ILIEs.ÃÐ BOTH DOcU¸ENTs REcO¸¸END cORE ELE¸ENTs Of HIgH-qUaLITy  caRE  NEaR THE END  Of LIfE, INcLUDINg paLLIaTIVE  caRE, aND E¸pHasIzE THE  NEED  fOR bETTER cLINIcIaN EDUcaTION.

Lessons  from 40 Years  of Work ´sTabLIsHINg  INDIVIDUaLs’  RIgHTs  TO  fORgO  LIfE-sUsTaININg  TREaT¸ENTs aND  THE  aUTHORITy Of sURROgaTE DEcIsION ¸akERs wERE sIgNaL acHIEVE¸ENTs IN THE fiRsT  pHasE  Of  wORk  ON  I¸pROVINg  END-Of-LIfE  caRE.  ·NcOVERINg  cLINIcaL  baRRIERs  TO  pROgREss  IN THE sEcOND pHasE  was EssENTIaL.  BUT wE NOw  kNOw THaT  aLL  THEsE  EffORTs ¸UsT bE  NEsTED IN  sysTE¸Ic  REfOR¸. º¸pORTaNT sTRaTEgIEs HaVE  E¸ERgED fOR cONTINUED pROgREss ON aLL LEVELs. FIRsT, cLINIcIaNs caN bE TRaINED TO INfOR¸ aND sUppORT DEcIsION ¸akERs. °E  pROspEcT Of DEaTH INspIREs pOwERfUL E¸OTIONs IN EVERyONE INVOLVED, cREaTINg  a pOTENTIaL fOR cONflIcT. CO¸¸UNIcaTION  TRaININg fOR aLL pROfEssIONaLs  wHO  caRE fOR paTIENTs facINg cRITIcaL  TREaT¸ENT DEcIsIONs caN  HELp sUppORT  INfOR¸ED DEcIsION ¸akINg UNDER sTREssfUL cONDITIONs. ´ssENTIaL skILLs HaVE  bEEN  IDENTIfiED  aND  TOOLs  DEVELOpED  fOR  UsE  by  caRE  TEa¸s.ÄÆ–ÄÐ ³OLE  ¸ODELs  aND  accEss TO NEw TOOLs (INcLUDINg  ELEcTRONIc DEcIsION-¸akINg aIDs aND  “cHOIcE  aRcHITEcTURE”  TEcHNIqUEs TO sTRUcTURE  OpTIONs) caN HELp pROfEssIONaLs  ExpLaIN  THE  OpTIONs  aND  sUppORT  DEcIsION  ¸akERs.ÄÑ,ÄÒ ADVaNcE  caRE  pLaNNINg  aND  THE  ¿ol¼t  (PHysIcIaN ±RDERs fOR  ²IfE-SUsTaININg  ¹REaT¸ENT)  PaRaDIg¸—DEVELOpED IN ±REgON IN aN EffORT TO ENsURE THaT paTIENTs’ pREfERENcEs wERE HONORED IN a RaNgE Of caRE sETTINgs, INcLUDINg caRE by E¸ERgENcy  ¸EDIcaL  sERVIcEs  pERsONNEL—pROVIDE  sTRUcTURED  pROcEssEs  TO  HELp  pROfEssIONaLs aND DEcIsION ¸akERs EsTabLIsH gOaLs, DOcU¸ENT pREfERENcEs, aND cREaTE caRE pLaNs.ÃÐ ¹RaININg pRIORITIEs INcLUDE DIscUssINg caRE pREfERENcEs wITH  paTIENTs  wITH  EaRLy-sTagE  ALzHEI¸ER’s  DIsEasE  wHO  RETaIN  DEcIsION-¸akINg  capacITy aND ENgagINg IN sHaRED DEcIsION ¸akINg wITH cOgNITIVELy I¸paIRED 

paTIENTs  aND  THEIR  sURROgaTEs.  PEDIaTRIc  spEcIaLIsTs’  ExpERIENcE  wITH sHaRED  DEcIsION  ¸akINg  IN  caRINg  fOR  THE  50,000  cHILDREN  wHO  DIE  IN  THE  ·NITED 

245

paTIENTs aND fa¸ILIEs.Ä× SEcOND, sysTE¸Ic I¸pROVE¸ENTs  caN bE DEsIgNED TO assIsT aLL pROfEssIONs  INVOLVED IN caRINg fOR paTIENTs wHO aRE facINg DEcIsIONs abOUT LIfE-sUsTaININg  TREaT¸ENT OR NEaRINg THE END Of LIfE, IN aLL RELEVaNT cLINIcaL aND REsIDENTIaL sETTINgs. CLINIcIaNs sHOULD HaVE accEss TO aT LEasT gENERaLIsT paLLIaTIVE caRE TRaININgÆØ aND  bE  TRaINED TO  cOLLabORaTE acROss  sHIſts, DURINg  TRaNsfERs,  aND  wITH  fa¸ILy caREgIVERs DURINg DIscHaRgE pLaNNINg. ´VIDENcE-basED ¸ODELs fOR safE  caRE TRaNsITIONs caN sUppORT bETTER sysTE¸s fOR END-Of-LIfE caRE.ÆÃ,ÆÄ °IRD, pRODUcTIVE sysTE¸Ic  aND  fiNaNcINg REfOR¸s caN  bE ENacTED.  MIsaLIgNED  fiNaNcIaL  INcENTIVEs  wORk  agaINsT DyINg  paTIENTs’ cHOIcEs,  INTEREsTs,  aND safETy. PRObLE¸s INcLUDE REfERRaLs Of DyINg paTIENTs TO THE INTENsIVE caRE  UNIT  OR  fOR  DIaLysIs  EVEN  wHEN  sUcH  sERVIcEs  wILL  REsULT  IN  LI¸ITED  bENEfiT  aND  HIgH  bURDEN  TO  THE  paTIENT,Ã×,ÆÆ THE  NONbENEficIaL  UsE  Of  fEEDINg  TUbEs  IN  paTIENTs  wITH  END-sTagE  ALzHEI¸ER’s  DIsEasE,ÄØ cOsT-sHIſtINg  TRaNsfERs  Of  DyINg NURsINg HO¸E REsIDENTs aND HOspIcE paTIENTs TO HOspITaLs,ÆÎ,ÆÏ aND LaTE  HOspIcE REfERRaLs fOR paTIENTs wITH caNcER.ÆÐ AbUNDaNT EVIDENcE INDIcaTEs THaT  REI¸bURsE¸ENTs  aND ORgaNIzaTIONaL paTTERNs DRIVE THEsE pRObLE¸s, aND fixINg THE¸ REqUIREs aTTENTION TO sERVIcE-UTILIzaTION ¸aNDaTEs aND pREssUREs.ÆÑ °E  2014 iom REpORT REcO¸¸ENDs cREaTINg fiNaNcIaL INcENTIVEs fOR aDVaNcE  caRE pLaNNINg aND sHaRED DEcIsION ¸akINg, ELEcTRONIc HEaLTH REcORDs TO sUppORT ONgOINg pLaNNINg, aND caRE cOORDINaTION TO REDUcE HOspITaLIzaTIONs aND  E¸ERgENcy DEpaRT¸ENT VIsITs. ´ND-Of-LIfE caRE IN accOUNTabLE caRE ORgaNIzaTIONs aND MEDIcaRE ADVaNTagE  pLaNs sHOULD aLsO  bE RIgOROUsLy EVaLUaTED. ´xpLIcIT DIscUssION Of cOsT  Is  EssENTIaL,  bOTH  IN  cHOOsINg  caRE  OpTIONs aND  IN  aDDREssINg  cOsT  baRRIERs  TO DEsIRED  caRE. WHEN  paTIENTs  Lack THE ¸EaNs  TO  pay  fOR NEEDED LIfE-  sUsTaININg  TREaT¸ENT,  pROfEssIONaLs  caN  aDVOcaTE  fOR  THE¸.  ºN  ONcOLOgy,  fOR  Exa¸pLE,  pROfEssIONaLs  aRE  pUbLIcLy  cHaLLENgINg  EVER-EscaLaTINg  DRUg  pRIcEs.ÆÒ FacINg DEaTH wILL NEVER bE Easy, aND cONTROVERsIaL casEs aRE INEVITabLE. YET  TOO  LaRgE a gULf  RE¸aINs bETwEEN THE THEORy  aND THE pRacTIcE Of END-Of-LIfE  caRE. MORE wORk Is NEEDED aT aLL LEVELs—TO pROTEcT paTIENTs’ RIgHTs TO cHOOsE  caRE  OpTIONs,  TO I¸pROVE  THE qUaLITy  Of cLINIcaL caRE  aND  cLINIcIaNs’  REspONsIVENEss TO paTIENTs aND fa¸ILIEs, aND  TO cREaTE wELL-fUNcTIONINg HEaLTH caRE  fiNaNcE  aND  DELIVERy  sysTE¸s  THaT  ¸akE  HIgH-qUaLITy caRE  gENUINELy  aVaILabLE.  FEDERaL,  sTaTE, aND ORgaNIzaTIONaL aUTHORITIEs caN fOR¸ULaTE ExpLIcIT 

eraC  efiL-fo-dnE

STaTEs EacH yEaR ¸ay OffER bROaDER LEssONs ON EffEcTIVE cO¸¸UNIcaTION wITH 

sTaNDaRDs THaT sUppORT THIs pROgREss. ÁEaLTH caRE LEaDERs, aD¸INIsTRaTORs, aND 

246

cLINIcIaNs  caN  aLsO  IDENTIfy  aND  cONfRONT  pERsIsTINg  caRE  pRObLE¸s  wITHIN  ORgaNIzaTIONs  aND  I¸pLE¸ENT  sysTE¸s  Of  accOUNTabILITy  aT  THE  bEDsIDE,  IN 

s g n i n n e J   d n a   , r e g n i l r e B  ,floW

THE cLINIc, aND IN HEaLTH caRE DELIVERy aND fiNaNcE sysTE¸s. WE caN appLy LEssONs fRO¸ fOUR  DEcaDEs Of wORk  IN ORDER TO aDVaNcE  TOwaRD sOLUTIONs. °E  ¸ILLIONs Of A¸ERIcaNs facINg LIfE-THREaTENINg cONDITIONs DEsERVE NO LEss.

notes 1  ÁafE¸EIsTER ¹², KEILITz º, BaNks SM. °E jUDIcIaL ROLE IN LIfE-sUsTaININg ¸EDIcaL TREaT¸ENT DEcIsIONs. Issues Law Med. 1991;7:53–72. 2  MEIsEL  A,  CER¸INaRa K²,  POpE  ¹M.  °e  Right  to  Die: °e  Law  of End-of-Life  Deci-

sionmaking.  3RD  ED.  µEw  YORk:  AspEN  PUbLIsHERs;  2004,  aND  aNNUaL  cU¸ULaTIVE  sUppLE¸ENTs. 3  PREsIDENT’s CO¸¸IssION fOR THE STUDy Of ´THIcaL  PRObLE¸s IN MEDIcINE aND BIO¸EDIcaL  aND  BEHaVIORaL  ³EsEaRcH.  Deciding  to  Forego  Life-Sustaining  Treatment: Ethical, 

Medical,  and  Legal  Issues  in  Treatment  Decisions.  WasHINgTON,  ¶C:  GOVERN¸ENT  PRINTINg ±fficE; 1983. 4  °E ÁasTINgs CENTER. Guidelines  on the Termination of Life-Sustaining Treatment and 

the Care of the Dying. BLOO¸INgTON: ºNDIaNa ·NIVERsITy PREss; 1987. 5  WOLf  SM,  BOyLE  P,  CaLLaHaN  ¶,  ET  aL.  SOURcEs  Of  cONcERN  abOUT  THE  PaTIENT  SELf-  ¶ETER¸INaTION AcT. N Engl J Med. 1991;325:1666–1671. 6  °E WRITINg GROUp fOR THE ¼u¿¿ort ºNVEsTIgaTORs. A cONTROLLED TRIaL TO  I¸pROVE caRE  fOR sERIOUsLy ILL HOspITaLIzED paTIENTs: THE STUDy TO ·NDERsTaND PROgNOsEs  aND PREfERENcEs  fOR  ±UTcO¸Es  aND  ³Isks  Of  ¹REaT¸ENTs  (¼u¿¿ort).  ¼½¾½ 1995;274:1591–1598.  [´RRaTU¸, ¼½¾½. 1996;275:1232.] 7  ²O B. º¸pROVINg caRE NEaR THE END Of LIfE: wHy Is IT sO HaRD? ¼½¾½ . 1995;274:1634–1636. 8  A¸ERIcaN COLLEgE Of PHysIcIaNs.  PapERs by THE ´ND-Of-²IfE  CONsENsUs PaNEL. HTTps://  www.acpONLINE .ORg / cLINIcaL -INfOR¸aTION /cLINIcaL -REsOURcEs -pRODUcTs /END -Of -LIfE  -caRE/papERs-by-THE-END-Of-LIfE-caRE-cONsENsUs-paNEL. 9  A¸ERIcaN  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION.  ¾m¾  pOLIcy  ON  END-Of-LIfE  caRE.  HTTp://www.a¸a  -assN.ORg/a¸a/pUb/pHysIcIaN-REsOURcEs/¸EDIcaL-ETHIcs/abOUT-ETHIcs-gROUp/ETHIcs  -REsOURcE-cENTER/END-Of-LIfE-caRE/a¸a-pOLIcy-END-Of-LIfE-caRE.pagE. 10  A¸ERIcaN  µURsEs  AssOcIaTION.  POsITION  sTaTE¸ENT:  REgIsTERED  NURsEs’  ROLEs  aND  REspONsIbILITIEs IN pROVIDINg  ExpERT caRE aND cOUNsELINg  aT THE END Of LIfE.  HTTp://www  .NURsINgwORLD.ORg/MaINMENUCaTEgORIEs/´THIcsSTaNDaRDs/´THIcs-POsITION-STaTE¸ENTs  /ETpaIN14426.pDf. 11  AULINO F, FOLEy K. °E PROjEcT ON ¶EaTH IN A¸ERIca. J R Soc Med. 2001;94:492–495. 12  ºNsTITUTE Of MEDIcINE, CO¸¸ITTEE ON CaRE µEaR THE ´ND Of ²IfE,  FIELD MJ, CassEL CK,  EDs. Approaching Death: Improving Care at the End of Life . WasHINgTON, ¶C: µaTIONaL  AcaDE¸IEs PREss; 1997. 13  ºNsTITUTE  Of MEDIcINE, CO¸¸ITTEE ON  PaLLIaTIVE aND ´ND-Of-²IfE CaRE fOR  CHILDREN  aND °EIR Fa¸ILIEs, FIELD MJ, BEHR¸aN ³´, EDs. When Children Die: Improving Pallia-

tive and End-of-Life Care for Children and °eir Families. WasHINgTON,  ¶C: µaTIONaL  AcaDE¸IEs PREss; 2002.

247

14  ²UNNEy J³, FOLEy KM, S¸ITH ¹J, GELbaND Á, ºNsTITUTE Of MEDIcINE.  Describing Death in 

Hastings Cent Rep. 2005;35(2):22–24. 16  CO¸¸ITTEE  ON  AppROacHINg  ¶EaTH:  ADDREssINg  KEy  ´ND-Of-²IfE  ºssUEs.  Dying  in 

America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences near the End of Life.  WasHINgTON, ¶C: µaTIONaL AcaDE¸IEs PREss; 2014. 17  CaRE aT THE END Of LIfE.  New York Times. ±cTObER 4, 2014:A18. 18  GREER JA, JacksON ÂA, MEIER ¶´, ¹E¸EL JS. ´aRLy INTEgRaTION Of paLLIaTIVE caRE sERVIcEs  wITH  sTaNDaRD  ONcOLOgy  caRE  fOR  paTIENTs  wITH  aDVaNcED  caNcER.  CA Cancer  J  Clin.  2013;63:349–363. 19  ¹ENO JM, GOzaLO P², ByNU¸ JP, ET aL. CHaNgE IN END-Of-LIfE caRE fOR MEDIcaRE bENEficIaRIEs: sITE Of DEaTH, pLacE Of caRE, aND HEaLTH caRE TRaNsITIONs IN 2000, 2005, aND 2009. 

¼½¾½. 2013;309:470–477. 20  ¹ENO JM, MITcHELL S², KUO SK, ET aL. ¶EcIsION-¸akINg aND OUTcO¸Es Of  fEEDINg TUbE  INsERTION: a fiVE-sTaTE sTUDy. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011;59:881–886. 21  ÁURD  M¶,  MaRTORELL  P,  ¶ELaVaNDE  A,  MULLEN  KJ,  ²aNga  KM.  MONETaRy  cOsTs  Of  DE¸ENTIa IN THE ·NITED STaTEs. N Engl J Med . 2013;368:1326–1334. 22  BERLINgER  µ,  JENNINgs  B,  WOLf  SM.  °e  Hastings  Center  Guidelines  for  Decisions  on 

Life-Sustaining  Treatment and Care  near the End  of Life.  2ND ED.  µEw  YORk: ±xfORD  ·NIVERsITy PREss; 2013. 23  ScHELL J±, ARNOLD ³M. µEpHRO¹aLk: cO¸¸UNIcaTION TOOLs TO ENHaNcE paTIENT-cENTERED  caRE. Semin Dial . 2012;25:611–616. 24  ±NcOTaLk:  I¸pROVINg  ONcOLOgIsTs’  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  skILLs.  SEaTTLE:  ·NIVERsITy  Of  WasHINgTON. 2013. HTTp://DEpTs.wasHINgTON.EDU/ONcOTaLk. 25  °E i¿¾l pROjEcT: I¸pROVINg paLLIaTIVE caRE IN THE i»u. µEw  YORk: CENTER TO  ADVaNcE  PaLLIaTIVE CaRE. 2013. HTTp://www.capc.ORg/IpaL/IpaL-IcU. 26  Back A², ARNOLD ³M. “ºsN’T THERE aNyTHINg ¸ORE yOU caN DO?”: WHEN E¸paTHIc sTaTE¸ENTs wORk, aND wHEN THEy DON’T. J Palliat Med. 2013;16:1429–1432. 27  BaRfiELD ³C,  BRaNDON ¶,  °O¸psON J,  ÁaRRIs µ, ScH¸IDT M,  ¶OcHERTy S.  MIND  THE  cHILD: UsINg INTERacTIVE TEcHNOLOgy  TO I¸pROVE cHILD INVOLVE¸ENT IN DEcIsION ¸akINg  abOUT LIfE-LI¸ITINg ILLNEss. Am J Bioeth . 2010;10:28–30. 28  BLINDER¸aN C¶,  KRakaUER  ´²,  SOLO¸ON MZ.  ¹I¸E TO  REVIsE  THE  appROacH TO  DETER¸ININg caRDIOpUL¸ONaRy REsUscITaTION sTaTUs.  ¼½¾½. 2012;307:917–918. 29  BERLINgER  µ,  BaRfiELD  ³,  FLEIscH¸aN  A³.  FacINg  pERsIsTENT  cHaLLENgEs  IN  pEDIaTRIc  DEcIsION-¸akINg: NEw ÁasTINgs CENTER gUIDELINEs.  Pediatrics. 2013;132:789–791. 30  QUILL  ¹´,  AbERNETHy  AP.  GENERaLIsT  pLUs  spEcIaLIsT  paLLIaTIVE  caRE—cREaTINg  a  ¸ORE  sUsTaINabLE ¸ODEL. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:1173–1175. 31  WILLIa¸s MÂ, ²I J, ÁaNsEN ²±, ET aL. PROjEcT ½oo¼t I¸pLE¸ENTaTION: LEssONs LEaRNED. 

South Med J. 2014;107:455–465. 32  µayLOR M¶,  AIkEN ²Á, KURTz¸aN ´¹, ±LDs  ¶M, ÁIRscH¸aN KB.  °E caRE spaN:  THE  I¸pORTaNcE  Of  TRaNsITIONaL  caRE  IN  acHIEVINg  HEaLTH  REfOR¸.  Health Aff (MILLwOOD).  2011;30:746–754.

eraC  efiL-fo-dnE

America: What We Need to Know. WasHINgTON, ¶C: µaTIONaL AcaDE¸IEs PREss; 2003. 15  FINs  JJ.  ³ETHINkINg  DIsORDERs  Of  cONscIOUsNEss:  NEw  REsEaRcH  aND  ITs  I¸pLIcaTIONs. 

33  ScH¸IDT ³J, MOss AÁ. ¶yINg ON  DIaLysIs: THE casE  fOR a  DIgNIfiED wITHDRawaL.  Clin J 

248

Am Soc Nephrol . 2013;8:1–7. 34  ¹ENO JM, MITcHELL S², SkINNER J, ET aL. CHURNINg: THE  assOcIaTION bETwEEN HEaLTH caRE  TRaNsITIONs aND fEEDINg TUbE INsERTION fOR NURsINg HO¸E REsIDENTs wITH aDVaNcED cOg-

s g n i n n e J   d n a   , r e g n i l r e B  ,floW

NITIVE I¸paIR¸ENT. J Palliat Med. 2009;12:359–362. 35  PaTHak ´B, WIETEN S, ¶jULbEgOVIc B. FRO¸ HOspIcE TO  HOspITaL: sHORT-TER¸ fOLLOw-Up  sTUDy Of HOspIcE paTIENT OUTcO¸Es IN a ·S acUTE caRE HOspITaL sURVEILLaNcE sysTE¸. Æ¾¼

Open. 2014;4(7):E005196. 36  GOOD¸aN ¶C, MORDEN µ´, CHaNg C, ET aL. ¹RENDs IN caNcER caRE NEaR THE END Of LIfE:  a ¶aRT¸OUTH ATLas Of ÁEaLTH CaRE bRIEf. ÁaNOVER, µÁ: ¶aRT¸OUTH ºNsTITUTE fOR ÁEaLTH  POLIcy aND CLINIcaL PRacTIcE; 2013. HTTp://www.DaRT¸OUTHaTLas.ORg/DOwNLOaDs/REpORTs  /CaNcER_bRIEf_090413.pDf. 37  FENg Z, WRIgHT B, MOR Â. SHaRp RIsE IN MEDIcaRE  ENROLLEEs bEINg HELD IN HOspITaLs fOR  ObsERVaTION  RaIsE cONcERNs  abOUT  caUsEs  aND  cONsEqUENcEs.  Health Aff (MILLwOOD).  2012;31:1251–1259. 38  ´xpERTs IN CHRONIc  MyELOID ²EUkE¸Ia.  °E  pRIcE Of  DRUgs fOR  cHRONIc ¸yELOID  LEUkE¸Ia (»ml) Is a REflEcTION Of THE UNsUsTaINabLE pRIcEs Of caNcER DRUgs: fRO¸  THE pERspEcTIVE Of a LaRgE gROUp Of »ml ExpERTs.  Blood. 2013;121:4439–4442.

´Ry To ¶emembeR  Some DeTA±ls Yehuda Amichai

¹Ry TO RE¸E¸bER sO¸E DETaILs. ³E¸E¸bER THE cLOTHINg Of THE ONE yOU LOVE sO THaT ON THE Day Of LOss yOU’LL bE abLE TO say: LasT sEEN wEaRINg sUcH-aND-sUcH, bROwN jackET, wHITE HaT. ¹Ry TO RE¸E¸bER sO¸E DETaILs. FOR THEy HaVE NO facE aND THEIR sOUL Is HIDDEN aND THEIR cRyINg Is THE sa¸E as THEIR LaUgHTER, aND THEIR sILENcE aND THEIR sHOUTINg RIsE TO ONE HEIgHT aND THEIR bODy TE¸pERaTURE Is bETwEEN 98 aND 104 DEgREEs aND THEy HaVE NO LIfE OUTsIDE THIs NaRROw spacE aND THEy HaVE NO gRaVEN I¸agE, NO LIkENEss, NO ¸E¸ORy aND THEy HaVE papER cUps ON THE Day Of THEIR REjOIcINg aND papER cUps THaT aRE UsED ONcE ONLy.

¹Ry TO RE¸E¸bER sO¸E DETaILs. FOR THE wORLD Is fiLLED wITH pEOpLE wHO wERE TORN fRO¸ THEIR sLEEp wITH NO ONE TO ¸END THE TEaR, aND UNLIkE wILD bEasTs THEy LIVE EacH IN HIs LONELy HIDINg pLacE aND THEy DIE TOgETHER ON baTTLEfiELDs aND IN HOspITaLs. AND THE EaRTH wILL swaLLOw aLL Of THE¸, gOOD aND EVIL TOgETHER, LIkE THE fOLLOwERs Of KORaH, aLL Of THE¸ IN THEIR REbELLION agaINsT DEaTH,

YEHUDa  A¸IcHaI,  “¹Ry TO ³E¸E¸bER  SO¸E ¶ETaILs,”  fRO¸  Selected  Poetry  of Yehuda  Amichai,  TRaNs.  CHaNa BLOcH aND STEpHEN  MITcHELL (BERkELEy:  ·NIVERsITy  Of CaLIfORNIa  PREss,  2013),  158.  ©  2013  by  °E ³EgENTs  Of  THE  ·NIVERsITy Of  CaLIfORNIa.  ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION Of  ·NIVERsITy  Of  CaLIfORNIa PREss.

THEIR ¸OUTHs OpEN TILL THE LasT ¸O¸ENT,

250

pRaIsINg aND cURsINg IN a sINgLE HOwL. ¹Ry, TRy

iahcimA aduheY

TO RE¸E¸bER sO¸E DETaILs.

FA±l±ng  To ´hR±Ve? Kim Sue

“Failure to Thrive” º REcENTLy TOOk caRE Of aN 80-yEaR-OLD paTIENT Na¸ED ´¸¸a (a psEUDONy¸),  wHO was fOUND DOwN, UNREspONsIVE, IN a LaRgE pOOL Of bLOODy VO¸IT IN HER  apaRT¸ENT.  SHE  was  DEscRIbED  IN  HER  cHaRT  as  aN  “80F  aD¸ITTED  wITH  faLL,  UNREspONsIVE, REcENT 30 Lb wEIgHT LOss.” SHE LIVED aLONE aND was cONsIDERED  LUcky  TO  bE  fOUND  RELaTIVELy  qUIckLy  by  a  fRIEND  wHO  sO¸ETI¸Es  ca¸E  TO  cHEck ON HER. ±RIgINaLLy fRO¸ sOUTHERN ´UROpE, sHE HaD bEEN LIVINg IN MassacHUsETTs fOR THE pasT TwENTy yEaRs, aND HER cLOsEsT fa¸ILy was IN CaLIfORNIa.  ´¸¸a was  aD¸ITTED TO  THE INTENsIVE  caRE  UNIT  aND, wITH THE  ¸INIsTRaTIONs  Of ¸ODERN ¸EDIcaL TEcHNOLOgy, INcLUDINg ¸EcHaNIcaL VENTILaTORs aND ¸EDIcaTIONs  TO  HELp  kEEp bLOOD  pREssUREs  HIgH,  sHE  LIVED.  °Is  was  THE  sEcOND  TI¸E  IN  sIx  ¸ONTHs  THaT  sHE  HaD  bEEN  aD¸ITTED  TO  THE  INTENsIVE  caRE  UNIT  aſtER bEINg fOUND UNREspONsIVE IN HER HO¸E. ºN THE INTENsIVE caRE UNIT, THEy  fOUND  sHE HaD  a  VERy  LOw  bLOOD cOUNT  aND  DIscOVERED sHE  HaD  a  gasTROINTEsTINaL  bLEED.  SHE  HaD  aN ExTENsIVE wORk-Up,  INcLUDINg  aN ENDOscOpy aND  cOLONOscOpy,  aND  THEy  sTILL cOULD  NOT  fiND THE  sOURcE.  AſtER sHE was  TRaNsfERRED TO THE gENERaL ¸EDIcaL flOOR, º ca¸E by ON ¸y ROUNDs TO cHEck ON HER  EVERy  ¸ORNINg.  SHE  was INcREDIbLy  fRaIL, sITTINg  wITH HER TINy  LEgs pROppED  Up ON a fOOTsTOOL. ´VERy Day sHE wOULD DENy HaVINg aNy bLOOD IN HER bOwEL  ¸OVE¸ENTs. “µO bLOOD, NO paIN, DOcTOR. CaN º gO HO¸E TODay?” ±R ¸aybE  IT was, “¶OcTOR,  caN º gO HO¸E  TODay?” “µOT jUsT yET,” º’D REpLy,  “ONE ¸ORE  THINg TO DO.” WHaT  was  THE pLaN  fOR  THIs  wO¸aN, wHOsE  DIagNOsIs  HaD  EVOLVED fRO¸  a  gasTROINTEsTINaL  bLEED TO  “faILURE TO THRIVE”?  As º  gRappLED  wITH wHaT was  aT sTakE fOR  HER, aND HaD  TO DENy HER REqUEsT TO gO HO¸E EVERy sINgLE Day,  º 

KI¸ SUE, “FaILINg TO °RIVE?,” fRO¸ Medicine Anthropology °eory 3, NO. 3 (2016): 96–104. © 2016  by  KI¸  SUE. ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION  UNDER THE  CREaTIVE CO¸¸ONs  ATTRIbUTION  4.0 ºNTERNaTIONaL PUbLIc ²IcENsE, aVaILabLE aT HTTps://cREaTIVEcO¸¸ONs.ORg/LIcENsEs/by/4.0/LEgaLcODE.

THOUgHT  abOUT  HOw INcREasINgLy  cO¸¸ON IT  Is  fOR  ¸EDIcaL  pRacTITIONERs TO 

252

UsE THIs TER¸ “faILURE TO THRIVE,” sHORTENED IN OUR NOTEs TO sI¸pLy “Àtt.” “Àtt” Is a ¸EDIcO-LEgaL TER¸ INITIaLLy UsED IN a pEDIaTRIc pOpULaTION (DIs-

e u S  m i K

cUssED  fURTHER  bELOw),  bUT  TODay’s  ºNTERNaTIONaL  CLassIficaTION  Of  ¶IsEasE  (i»d-10,  pUbLIsHED  by  THE  WORLD  ÁEaLTH  ±RgaNIzaTION)  INcLUDEs DIagNOsIs  cODEs fOR  HOspITaL aND  cLINIcaL bILLINg fOR  bOTH cHILDREN (³62.51) aND  aDULTs  (³62.7). °EsE aRE bOTH gROUpED wITHIN THE LaRgE DIagNOsTIc cODE 640: “MIscELLaNEOUs DIsORDERs Of NUTRITION, ¸ETabOLIs¸, flUIDs aND ELEcTROLyTEs.” WITH  REgaRD TO cHILDREN, THE cLINIcaL INfOR¸aTION NOTEs THaT  THERE Is “sUbsTaNDaRD  gROwTH OR DI¸INIsHED capacITy TO ¸aINTaIN NOR¸aL fUNcTION,” aT TI¸Es “DUE  TO  NUTRITIONaL aND/OR  E¸OTIONaL DEpRIVaTION aND REsULTINg  IN LOss  Of wEIgHT  aND DELayED pHysIcaL, E¸OTIONaL, aND sOcIaL DEVELOp¸ENT” (Ého 2016, N.p.).  Àtt  caN  bE Of  ORgaNIc, INORgaNIc,  OR  ¸IxED ETIOLOgIEs,  IN  wHIcH THE fiRsT  Is  UNDERsTOOD TO  bE a pRObLE¸  wITHIN THE paTIENT, THE sEcOND as a  pRObLE¸ IN  THE paTIENT’s ENVIRON¸ENT, aND THE THIRD a cO¸bINaTION Of TwO. FOR aDULTs,  THE  i»d-10  DEfiNITION Is  a  “pROgREssIVE fUNcTIONaL  DETERIORaTION  Of a  pHysIcaL  aND  cOgNITIVE NaTURE. °E INDIVIDUaL’s  abILITy TO  LIVE wITH  ¸ULTIsysTE¸  DIsEasEs,  cOpE  wITH  ENsUINg  pRObLE¸s,  aND  ¸aNagE  HIs/HER  caRE  aRE  RE¸aRkabLy  DI¸INIsHED”  (Ého 2016,  N.p.).  ºN  cLINIcaL  pRacTIcE, IT  caN  bE  UsED  as  a sTaND-IN  fOR  UNExpEcTED wEIgHT  LOss.  ºT  caN  aLsO  bE  UsED  as a pROxy wHEN cLINIcIaNs aND TEa¸s TakINg caRE Of paTIENTs aRE facED wITH  fREqUENT aD¸IssIONs fOR paTIENTs wITH faLLs, faILINg TO ¸EET NUTRITIONaL basIc  caLORIc NEEDs  TO sUsTaIN sTabLE wEIgHT, OR OTHERwIsE ExIsTINg IN a TENUOUs  OR  UNsTabLE LIVINg  ENVIRON¸ENT. ºT appEaRs  THaT wITHIN  THE cO¸¸ON  UsagE  Of THE TER¸ Àtt, ¸EDIcINE Is acTUaLLy gRappLINg wITH THE sTRONg fORcE Of THE  sOcIaL ITsELf.

“Lassitude,  Loss  of Energ· and Joie de Vivre” ÁIsTORIcaLLy,  THE  TER¸  “faILURE  TO  THRIVE”  E¸ERgED  IN THE  LaTE  NINETEENTH  cENTURy.  °ERE  was  aN  ONgOINg  cONTEsT  Of  IDEas  abOUT  wHaT  pREcIsELy  cONsTITUTED  faILURE:  was  IT  RELaTED TO  NUTRITION,  paRTIcULaR  VITa¸IN  DEficIENcIEs,  ¸aTERNaL  NEgLEcT,  cONgENITaL  abNOR¸aLITIEs,  OR  pHysIOLOgIcaL  DEVELOp¸ENT  Of  EssENTIaL  ORgaNs?  °E  VaRIOUs  sTaNcEs  LaRgELy  REflEcTED  THE  cULTURaL  aND  pOLITIcaL  IDEas aND bIasEs  Of THE gROUps fORwaRDINg THE¸. °E LaTE ÂIcTORIaN  ERa was DO¸INaTED by bOTH INcREasED aTTENTION TO cHILD wELfaRE as wELL as THE  E¸ERgENcE Of THE IDEa Of pUbLIc HEaLTH as a DIscIpLINE aND a ¸EaNs Of cOLLEcTIVE INTERVENTION.

ºN THE ·NITED STaTEs, THE TER¸ “faILURE TO THRIVE” bEca¸E pOpULaR IN pEDIaTRIc  cLINIcaL  ¸EDIcINE  IN  THE  LaTE  1960s,  wITH  RObUsT  UsE  IN  THE  LITERaTURE 

253

TRIsTs  assOcIaTED  THE  DIagNOsIs  wITH NEgLEcT  bETwEEN  THE ¸OTHER  aND  cHILD  (sEE BULLaRD ET aL. 1967) OR TO REfER TO aN abERRaNT bOND bETwEEN THE ¸OTHER  aND  THE cHILD (sEE, fOR Exa¸pLE, ´L¸ER 1960). ´VEN THEN, IT was a fRUsTRaTINg  TER¸ TO sO¸E; ÁENRy MaRcOVITcH (1994, 35) NOTEs IT was pRI¸aRILy a “DEscRIpTIVE TER¸, NOT a DIagNOsIs,”  ¸aRkED by “EVIDENcE  Of LassITUDE, LOss Of ENERgy  aND  jOIE DE  VIVRE.”  °OsE wORkINg IN  INpaTIENT HOspITaL  sETTINgs NOTED  THaT  “faILURE  TO  THRIVE” cOULD  bE  DIagNOsED by  wEIgHT  bELOw  THE THIRD  pERcENTILE  “wITH  sUbsEqUENT wEIgHT [gaIN]  IN THE pREsENcE Of appROpRIaTE NURTURINg”;  THEy fELT THaT was “cHaRacTERIsTIc Of THE cHILD wITH faILURE TO THRIVE TO  HaVE  I¸pROVE¸ENT  Of  THEsE  sy¸pTO¸s  wITH  HOspITaLIzaTION”  (BaRbERO  aND  SHaHEEN 1967, 640), sUggEsTINg pRObLE¸s wITHIN THE cHILD’s HO¸E ENVIRON¸ENT. ºNITIaLLy,  THERE  was  a  sTRONg  DIsTINcTION  bETwEEN  “ORgaNIc”  VERsUs  “NONORgaNIc” faILURE TO THRIVE (REaD: bIOLOgIcaL VERsUs sOcIaL). ALTE¸EIER aND  cOLLEagUEs (1985, 361) DEscRIbED “NONORgaNIc faILURE TO THRIVE” as a “fOR¸ Of  ¸aTERNaL  NEgLEcT, bEcaUsE  RapID  I¸pROVE¸ENT  IN  bOTH  gROwTH  aND  DEVELOp¸ENT  fOLLOws aDEqUaTE NUTRITION aND  E¸OTIONaL sUppORT IN  THE HOspITaL.”  YET  INcREasINgLy pEDIaTRIcIaNs  REcOgNIzED THE  cO¸pLEx INTERpLay  bETwEEN a  cHILD’s  pOsITION  wITHIN  gROwTH cURVEs  aND  UNDERLyINg  ¸EDIcaL  cONDITIONs,  paRENTaL  bEHaVIOR, pOVERTy, aND  THE OVERaLL  HO¸E ENVIRON¸ENT  (MaRkOwITz  ET aL. 2008, 481). ºNTEREsTINgLy, THE DIagNOsIs Of Àtt Has bEgUN TO faLL OUT Of faVOR. FOR pEDIaTRIcIaNs  IN  paRTIcULaR,  Àtt Is  NO LONgER  EN  VOgUE.  PaRENTs DIsLIkE  THE TER¸  Àtt  fOR  ITs  VagUE  aLL-ENcO¸passINg  NaTURE  aND  THE  I¸pLIcaTIONs  Of  ¸ORaL  wRONgDOINg.  °ERE Is sTIg¸a abOUT bEINg  a paRENT Of a cHILD wITH Àtt, aND  fOR  THaT REasON IT Is bEcO¸INg INcREasINgLy abaNDONED as a DIagNOsTIc TER¸  IN pEDIaTRIcs. BUT  THE INVERsE  Is  TRUE REgaRDINg  Àtt  aND  aDULTs.  ±VER  THE  pasT  TwENTy  yEaRs,  Àtt  Has bEcO¸E  UsED  IN  RELaTION  TO  THE caDRE  Of  ELDERLy  pEOpLE  LIVINg  aLONE  wHO OſtEN  gO  UNsEEN  OR  UNHEaRD  UNTIL  THEy aRRIVE  IN  THE  HOspITaL  IN DIsTREss. As ³ObERTsON  aND  MONTagNINI (2004, 343) wRITE, “FaILURE TO  THRIVE  DEscRIbEs  a  sTaTE  Of DEcLINE THaT  Is  ¸ULTIfacTORIaL aND  ¸ay  bE caUsED  by  cHRONIc  cONcURRENT  DIsEasEs  aND  fUNcTIONaL  I¸paIR¸ENTs . . . INcLUDINg  wEIgHT  LOss,  DEcREasED appETITE,  pOOR  NUTRITION aND  INacTIVITy.”  ºN  THE HOspITaL  wHERE º wORk, wE sEE paTIENTs wHO aRE ELDERLy, wHO aRE HO¸ELEss,  wHO  aRE DyINg Of ¾id¼ OR caNcER, wHO aRE cHRONIcaLLy ¸aLNOURIsHED; THEy aLL VaRIOUsLy caN bE DIagNOsED wITH Àtt.

?evirhT  ot  gniliaF

THROUgHOUT THE 1970s aND 1980s. ºN THE EaRLy UsE Of THE TER¸, cHILD psycHIa-

ARRIVINg aT THE HOspITaL IN THE way THaT ´¸¸a DID aDDs a cERTaIN I¸¸E-

254

DIacy aND  INTENsIficaTION  TOwaRD THE  sOcIaL wORLDs Of sUcH  paTIENTs by  bOTH  cLINIcIaNs  aND  THE  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs  Of  paTIENTs.  PHysIcIaNs aND  caRE  TEa¸s 

e u S  m i K

IN HOspITaLs aRE ROUTINELy  TaskED wITH aDDREssINg  THE faTEs Of THEsE paTIENTs,  aND  THE way THEy DO sO sHapEs  THE cOURsE  Of THEsE INDIVIDUaLs’ LIVEs. ´¸¸a  Is  NOT  UNIqUE.  °E  New  York  Times pROfiLED a  pERsON  Na¸ED  GEORgE  BELL,  wHOsE OſtEN LONELy LIfE aND LONELy DEaTH was cHRONIcLED IN gREaT DETaIL, as aN  ExE¸pLaR Of aN INcREasINgLy sOLITaRy, agINg pOpULaTION (KLEINfELD 2015). SOcIOLOgIsT ´RIc  KLINENbERg (2001) wRITEs abOUT THIs pHENO¸ENON  IN HIs aRTIcLE  “¶yINg  ALONE:  °E  SOcIaL  PRODUcTION  Of ·RbaN  ºsOLaTION,”  wHIcH  aNaLyzEs  THE  1995  CHIcagO  HEaT waVE  THaT kILLED OVER  sEVEN  HUNDRED  ¸OsTLy  ELDERLy,  IsOLaTED CHIcagO REsIDENTs, aND wHIcH was fOLLOwED by HIs bOOk, Going Solo: 

°e  Extraordinary  Rise  and  Surprising  Appeal  of  Living  Alone (2012).  °E  appEaL Of bEINg aLONE aND LIVINg aLONE Is wOVEN INTO THE A¸ERIcaN  ETHOs Of  sELf-DETER¸INaTION, aUTONO¸y, aND INDEpENDENcE, INcLUDINg THE fREEDO¸ TO  LIVE aND DIE IN cIRcU¸sTaNcEs Of OUR OwN cHOOsINg. ÁOspITaLs aRE pLacEs wHERE pEOpLE wHO Lack a sOcIaL safETy NET, LIkE ´¸¸a  aND  GEORgE  BELL,  aRE  bROUgHT.  ºN  facT,  wE  ROUTINELy  aD¸IT  aND  DIscHaRgE  paTIENTs LIkE THE¸ EVERy Day. WHaT Is ¸y ETHIcaL ObLIgaTION as a pHysIcIaN TO  THEsE paTIENTs—TO DO NO HaR¸, TO pRO¸OTE safETy, TO ENsURE THE bEsT cHaNcEs  Of HEaLTH aND wELL-bEINg—VERsUs ¸y ¸ORaL ObLIgaTION TO HONOR aND REspEcT  aNOTHER  pERsON’s aUTONO¸y?  ºs IT  ¸y ObLIgaTION OR RIgHT  TO DENy ´¸¸a THE  OppORTUNITy  TO  DIE  IN  THE  TI¸E  aND  pLacE Of  HER  OwN cHOOsINg,  as a  DIREcT  REsULT Of wHaT sO¸E ¸IgHT DEE¸ TO bE faILUREs Of sELf-caRE bUT IN THE cONDITIONs Of  HER OwN DETER¸ININg?  SHaRON KaUf¸aN  (2005,  1) aRgUEs  fRO¸ HER  ETHNOgRapHIc wORk ON DyINg IN HOspITaLs THaT as HU¸aN bEINgs aND as pHysIcIaNs  wE  HaVE  a  “DEEp,  INTERNaL  a¸bIVaLENcE  abOUT  DEaTH”;  sHE  aRgUEs THaT  THE pROcEss Of HOspITaLIzaTION ExTENDs aND INDELIbLy aLTERs THE pROcEss Of THE  “gRay zONE aT THE THREsHOLD bETwEEN LIfE aND DEaTH.” º a¸  facED wITH THIs  DILE¸¸a wITH  ´¸¸a. ÁER  HOspITaLIzaTION  pOsEs sIgNIficaNT ExIsTENTIaL qUEsTIONs abOUT THE qUaLITy aND qUaNTITy Of HER LIfE aND THE  INEVITabILITy Of HER DEaTH. º a¸ facED wITH THE I¸¸EDIacy aND sTakEs Of aNOTHER’s  LIfE; º a¸ I¸pLIcaTED IN EITHER  acTION OR  INacTION. WHaT a¸ º cO¸pELLED TO  DO wITH THE pRIVaTE, INTI¸aTE kNOwLEDgE Of aNOTHER’s paTHOLOgy LaID baRE IN THE  HOspITaL REcORDs? As pHysIcIaNs EVERy Day wE cONfRONT THEsE REaLITIEs Of ¸Essy  LIVEs  aND  DEaTHs  sO  OſtEN  HIDDEN  away:  “WE sTaND  IN  THE  THIck  Of HU¸aN  ExpERIENcE,  IN THE spacE Of  HU¸aN pRObLE¸s,  IN THE REaL-LIfE LOcaL  pLacEs  wHERE  pEOpLE LIVE IN THE facE Of DaNgERs, gRaVE aND ¸INOR, REaL aND I¸agINED”  (KLEIN¸aN 1998, 376).

²n  Thriving 255 ONE ELsE’s LIfEwORLD, THaT aT THE VERy LEasT, wE caN REcOgNIzE THE sHIſtINg bELIEfs  aND  NaRRaTIVEs THaT  gROUND ExpERIENcE. BUT ¸y pROfEssIONaL ObLIgaTION  as a  pHysIcIaN,  by aN UNcODIfiED, I¸pLIcIT, bIOETHIcaL sTaNcE, Is  TO assURE  as ¸UcH  safETy as pOssIbLE, TO cREaTE THE cONDITIONs fOR pHysIcaL flOURIsHINg EVEN aT THE  ExpENsE Of HappINEss aND aUTONO¸y. YET VERy RaRELy DO OUR THOUgHT pROcEssEs  TakE INTO accOUNT “wHaT Is  aT sTakE”  (KLEIN¸aN aND  BENsON 2006, E294) fOR  pEOpLE wITHIN THEsE ENcOUNTERs. ºN  ¸aNy  ways,  THEsE  ENcOUNTERs  Of  pHysIcIaNs  wITH  paTIENTs  LabELED  as  “faILURE  TO  THRIVE”  REpREsENT THE  pRObLE¸  Of  wITNEssINg  aND  cONfRONTINg  a  sUffERINg OTHER. ºN ¸y casE, º fEEL cONflIcTED by sHIſtINg ROLEs aND ObLIgaTIONs  as a  HU¸aN bEINg, as paRT Of a cO¸¸UNITy pLagUED  by sOcIaL INEqUaLITIEs IN  wHIcH sO¸E pEOpLE Lack OR sHIRk aDEqUaTE sOcIaL aND fiNaNcIaL sUppORTs, aND  as a  pHysIcIaN wITH a  spEcIfic pROfEssIONaL  ObLIgaTION TO INDIVIDUaL paTIENTs.  WHaT  a¸  º TO  DO  If º  caNNOT  pREscRIbE yOU  THE cO¸¸UNITy  sUppORTs yOU  NEED? CaN º wRITE yOU a  pREscRIpTION fOR LOVE, fOR a fRIEND? CaN º wRITE yOUR  cHILDREN  a  wORk  NOTE  EVERy  Day  fOR  a  ¸ONTH  sO  THaT  THEy  caN  spEND ¸ORE  TI¸E wITH yOU, cHEck ON yOU EVERy Day, aND HELp yOU baTHE aND sHOwER aND  TOILET aND TakE yOUR ¸EDIcaTIONs? CaN º gET yOU a 24-HOUR HO¸E HEaLTH aIDE  If yOU aND yOUR fa¸ILy DON’T HaVE THE REsOURcEs TO DO sO? °Is gENEaLOgy Of faILURE TO THRIVE Is pERHaps IRONIcaLLy cONsIDERED wITHIN  THE  REaL¸  Of ¸y  ¸EDIcaL  INTERNsHIp  aND  REsIDENcy  TRaININg,  wHERE  º  wORk  appROxI¸aTELy EIgHTy HOURs a wEEk IN THE HOspITaL  as paRT Of ONgOINg ¸EDIcaL TRaININg. WHaT DOEs IT ¸EaN TO bE wELL wITHIN THIs cONTExT? WHaT DOEs IT  ¸EaN, gENERaLLy spEakINg, TO cULTIVaTE THE cONDITIONs Of wELLNEss, pROspERITy,  HappINEss, OR sELf-caRE Of THE caREgIVERs? ·.S. DOcTORs kNOw OUR cOLLEagUEs IN  ´UROpE wORk abOUT HaLf THE NU¸bER Of HOURs (appROxI¸aTELy 37 TO 48 HOURs  pER  wEEk)  aND  E¸ERgE wITH sI¸ILaR cO¸pETENcIEs  as paRT Of  ¸ORE EffEcTIVE  HEaLTH caRE aND pUbLIc HEaLTH sysTE¸s wITH OVERaLL bETTER HEaLTH OUTcO¸Es  (¹E¸pLE 2014). ºN  THE  ·NITED  STaTEs,  “INTERN  yEaR,”  THE  fiRsT  yEaR  Of  ¸EDIcaL  REsIDENcy  TRaININg,  Is  OſtEN DIscUssED  as ONE  Of THE  HaRDEsT yEaRs Of a  pHysIcIaN’s  LIfE.  SO¸ETI¸Es IT Is  cHaLkED Up TO “HazINg.” ºNTERN yEaR Is LaRgELy DEfiNED by THE  I¸pOssIbILITy Of aDDREssINg HIgHER-ORDER cO¸pLEx sOcIaL  aND cOgNITIVE pROcEssEs  IN THE absENcE Of ¸EETINg bIOLOgIcaL aND  pHysIOLOgIcaL NEEDs sUcH  as  aDEqUaTE  sLEEp aND fOOD. As yOUNg pHysIcIaNs TRaININg IN THE ·NITED STaTEs,  wE aRE askED TO THINk cRITIcaLLy aND aNaLyTIcaLLy abOUT THE EVERyDay DILE¸¸as 

?evirhT  ot  gniliaF

As aNTHROpOLOgIsTs, wE ¸aINTaIN faITH IN THE bELIEf THaT wE caN accEss sO¸E-

facED by OUR paTIENTs aND REspOND TO THE¸ E¸paTHETIcaLLy, bUT THIs aNaLysIs Is 

256

NOT appLIED TO OURsELVEs as caREgIVERs. ±N THE facE Of IT, THE Task Of caRINg fOR Àtt paTIENTs THaT faLLs ONTO ¸EDIcaL 

e u S  m i K

TRaINEEs sEE¸s I¸pOssIbLE. AND pHysIcIaNs DON’T LIkE DEaLINg wITH THE spacEs  IN-bETwEEN. “FaILURE TO THRIVE” Is  pREcIsELy THaT ¸Essy IN-bETwEEN THaT  bOTH  paTIENTs  aND THEIR caREgIVERs  waNT TO  aVOID. YET IT Is a DIagNOsTIc caTEgORy  THaT  REflEcTs  ONgOINg  TE¸pORaLITy  aND  a  DyNa¸Ic,  UNcERTaIN  pROcEss.  ºT  Is  INcREasINgLy bEcO¸INg a paRT Of agINg IN A¸ERIca, REflEcTINg sOcIaL IsOLaTION  aND THE THIN THREaDs Of cO¸¸UNITy aND UNpaID HOURs spENT by fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs gRappLINg wITH THE VERy sa¸E DILE¸¸as. As MIcHaEL JacksON (2011, xIII)  REflEcTs ON HIs wORk wITH THE KURaNkO pEOpLE IN SIERRa ²EONE: JUsT as HU¸aN ExIsTENcE Is NEVER sI¸pLy aN UNfOLDINg fRO¸ wITHIN bUT  RaTHER aN  OUTcO¸E Of a  sITUaTION, Of a RELaTIONsHIp wITH OTHERs, sO HU¸aN  UNDERsTaNDINg Is  NEVER bORN  Of cONTE¸pLaTINg THE wORLD fRO¸ afaR; IT  Is  aN E¸ERgENT aND pERpETUaLLy RENEgOTIaTED OUTcO¸E Of sOcIaL INTERacTION,  DIaLOgUE aND  ENgagE¸ENT. AND  THOUgH  sO¸ETHINg Of  ONE’s OwN  ExpERIENcE—Of HOpE OR DEspaIR, affiNITy OR EsTRaNgE¸ENT, wELL-bEINg OR ILLNEss— Is aLways ONE’s pOINT Of DEpaRTURE, THIs ExpERIENcE cONTINUaLLy UNDERgOEs  a  sEa  cHaNgE  IN  THE  cOURsE  Of  ONE’s  ENcOUNTERs  aND  cONVERsaTIONs  wITH  OTHERs. ²IfE TRaNspIREs IN THE sUbjEcTIVE IN-bETwEEN, IN a spacE THaT RE¸aINs  INDETER¸INaTE DEspITE OUR aTTE¸pTs TO fix OUR pOsITION wITHIN IT. WHILE aNTHROpOLOgIsTs  HaVE  TRIED  TO  UNDERsTaND  UpsTREa¸ sOURcEs  Of  sUffERINg—wHaT Is HERE caLLED “faILURE TO THRIVE” IN ´¸¸a’s casE—KLEIN¸aN  aND WILkINsON (2016) aRgUE THaT THE sOcIaL scIENcEs, aNTHROpOLOgy INcLUDED,  HaVE  LaRgELy  faILED  TO  ENacT  THE REpaRaTIVE  VIsIONs  Of  sOcIETy  LaID  OUT  by  EIgHTEENTH- aND NINETEENTH-cENTURy THINkERs LIkE ADa¸ S¸ITH, JOHN STUaRT  MILL, JOHN ²OckE, aND ÂOLTaIRE.  SO bOTH  aNTHROpOLOgy aND ¸EDIcINE HaVE,  IN  THEIR  OwN ways,  DONE  INaDEqUaTE jObs  Of  aDDREssINg  THE ROOT  caUsEs  Of  INEqUaLITy aND  THEIR cONsEqUENT  sOcIaL sUffERINg. °E  DENOTaTION Of “faILURE  TO THRIVE” sHOULD bEgET THE qUEsTION Of wHy ONLy sO¸E faIL TO THRIVE. ºN ¸aNy  ways, faILURE TO THRIVE Is THE REsULT Of THE UNEqUaL DIsTRIbUTION Of pOLITIcaL aND  sOcIOEcONO¸Ic pOwER aND capITaL. WHEN º THINk  abOUT THE casEs  Of paTIENTs LIkE  ´¸¸a, º  a¸ pOsITIONED  bETwEEN  OſtEN-cONflIcTINg  wORLDVIEws  aND  sTaNcEs  TOwaRD  INDIVIDUaL  aND  sOcIaL sUffERINg.  YET IN ¸y  ROLE as  a DOcTOR,  º a¸  cO¸pELLED TO TakE  acTION  EVERy  Day. °EsE aRE DEcIsIONs THaT  caN aND DO HaVE a LONg-LasTINg  I¸pacT  ON OTHERs’ LIVEs, aN I¸pacT THaT º ¸ay NEVER ENTIRELy kNOw THE cONsEqUENcEs  Of.  º OſtEN wONDER HOw wE  caN ¸aINTaIN OUR HU¸aNITy IN  THE facE Of aLL  Of 

THIs, INcLUDINg THE pREssUREs fRO¸ HOspITaL sysTE¸s TO ¸OVE paTIENTs qUIckLy  OUT Of THE HOspITaL, TOwaRD aN ULTI¸aTE “DIspOsITION.” ÁOw caN wE aTTEND TO 

257

sITUaTIONs aND THE VERy REaL cONsTRaINTs IN THEIR sOcIaL ¸ILIEUs THaT caNNOT bE  sOLVED wITH a THREE-Day HOspITaL aD¸IssION? As  EssayIsT  ²EsLIE  Ja¸IsON  (2014,  23)  wRITEs  IN  HER  bOOk  °e  Empathy 

Exams, wE sHOULD NOT NEcEssaRILy LOsE HOpE IN OUR abILITIEs TO caRE fOR OTHERs:  “´¸paTHy  IsN’T  jUsT  sO¸ETHINg  THaT  HappENs  TO  Us—a  ¸ETEOR  sHOwER  Of  syNapsEs fiRINg acROss THE bRaIN—IT’s aLsO a cHOIcE wE ¸akE: TO pay aTTENTION,  TO  ExTEND OURsELVEs . . . THE LabOR,  THE ¸OTIONs, THE DaNcE—Of gETTINg  INsIDE  aNOTHER pERsON’s sTaTE Of HEaRT OR ¸IND.” °Is wE caN DO cONfiDENTLy. WE caN  aTTEND  paTIENTLy THE  paRTIcULaRs  Of INDIVIDUaL  sITUaTIONs. WE  caN LIsTEN.  BUT  wE  ¸UsT RE¸E¸bER  TO  DO  THIs  wHILE  aLsO aDDREssINg  THE  OVERaLL  sTRUcTUREs  Of  pOwER  aND  VULNERabILITy,  wHEREby THOsE  aT  THE  sOcIaL  ¸aRgINs  aRE  ¸OsT  affEcTED. AND wE caNNOT fORgET THaT HOw THEsE sTRUcTUREs aRE assE¸bLED aND  INTERacT INflUENcEs OUR abILITy TO aTTEND  TO ONE aNOTHER as wE ENVIsION aLTERNaTE ways Of LIVINg, caRINg, aND DyINg.

re½eren¾es ALTE¸EIER, WILLIa¸, SUsaN ±’CONNOR, KaTHRyN SHERROD, aND PETER ÂIETzE. 1985. “PROspEcTIVE STUDy Of ANTEcEDENTs Of µONORgaNIc  FaILURE TO °RIVE.” Journal of Pediatrics 106: 360–365. BaRbERO,  GIULIO, aND ´LEaNOR SHaHEEN. 1967. “´NVIRON¸ENTaL FaILURE TO °RIVE: A CLINIcaL  ÂIEw.” Journal of Pediatrics 71: 639–644. BULLaRD,  ¶ExTER, ÁELEN GLasER, MaRgaRET ÁEagaRTy, aND ´LIzabETH PIVcHIk. 1967. “FaILURE TO  °RIVE IN THE ‘µEgLEcTED’ CHILD.”  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 37: 680–690. ´L¸ER, ´LIzabETH. 1960. “FaILURE TO °RIVE: ³OLE Of THE MOTHER.” Pediatrics 25: 717–725. FRaNk, ¶., aND S. ZEIsEL. 1988. “FaILURE TO °RIVE.” Pediatric Clinics of North America 35:  1187–1206. JacksON, MIcHaEL. 2011. Life within Limits. ¶URHa¸, µC: ¶UkE ·NIVERsITy PREss. Ja¸IsON, ²EsLIE. 2014.  °e Empathy Exams. MINNEapOLIs, Mµ: GRaywOLf PREss. KaUf¸aN, SHaRON. 2005. And a Time to Die. CHIcagO: ·NIVERsITy Of CHIcagO PREss. KLEINfELD,  µ.³. 2015. “°E ²ONELy ¶EaTH Of GEORgE BELL.” New York Times , 18 ±cTObER, A1. KLEIN¸aN,  ARTHUR. 1998. “´xpERIENcE aND ºTs MORaL MODEs: CULTURE, ÁU¸aN CONDITIONs,  aND ¶IsORDER. °E ¹aNNER ²EcTURE ON ÁU¸aN ÂaLUEs.” PREsENTaTION aT STaNfORD  ·NIVERsITy, PaLO ALTO, CA, 13–16 ApRIL. KLEIN¸aN,  ARTHUR, aND PETER BENsON. “ANTHROpOLOgy IN THE CLINIc: °E PRObLE¸ Of CULTURaL CO¸pETENcy aND ÁOw TO FIx ºT.” PLoS Medicine 3, NO. 10: E294. HTTps://DOI.ORg  /10.1371/jOURNaL.p¸ED.0030294.

?evirhT  ot  gniliaF

THEsE paTIENTs  wITH caRE, ackNOwLEDgINg  THE spEcIficITIEs Of THEIR INDIVIDUaL 

KLEIN¸aN, ARTHUR, aND ºaIN WILkINsON. 2016.  A Passion for Society: How We °ink about 

258

Human Suffering. BERkELEy: ·NIVERsITy Of CaLIfORNIa PREss. KLINENbERg, ´RIc. 2001.  “¶yINg ALONE: °E SOcIaL PRODUcTION Of ·RbaN ºsOLaTION.” Eth-

nography 2: 501–531. e u S  m i K

KLINENbERg, ´RIc. 2012.  Going Solo: °e Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Liv-

ing Alone. µEw YORk: PENgUIN. MaRcOVITcH, ÁaRVEy. 1994. “FaILURE TO °RIVE.” British Medical Journal 308: 35–38. MaRkOwITz, ³ObERT, JOHN WaTkINs, aND CHRIsTOpHER ¶UggaN. 2008. “FaILURE TO °RIVE:  MaLNUTRITION IN THE PEDIaTRIc ±UTpaTIENT SETTINg.” Nutrition in Pediatrics. 4TH ED.,  479–89. Áa¸ILTON, ±NTaRIO: BC ¶EckER ºNc. ³ObERTsON, ³UssELL, aND MaRcOs MONTagNINI. 2004. “GERIaTRIc FaILURE TO °RIVE.” Ameri-

can Family Physician 70: 343–350. ¹E¸pLE, JOHN. 2014. “³EsIDENT ¶UTy ÁOURs aROUND THE GLObE: WHERE  ARE WE µOw?” Æ¾Ã

Medical Education 14: S1–S8. WORLD ÁEaLTH ±RgaNIzaTION. 2016. “ºNTERNaTIONaL STaTIsTIcaL CLassIficaTION Of ¶IsEasEs aND  ³ELaTED ÁEaLTH PRObLE¸s,” 10TH ³EVIsION. HTTp://apps.wHO.INT/cLassIficaTIONs/IcD10  /bROwsE/2014/EN.

´he DeAd  DonoR  ¶ule And ORgAn  ´RAnsPlAnTAT±on Robert D. Truog and Franklin G. Miller

SINcE ITs INcEpTION, ORgaN TRaNspLaNTaTION Has bEEN gUIDED by THE OVERaRcHINg ETHIcaL REqUIRE¸ENT kNOwN as THE DEaD DONOR RULE, wHIcH sI¸pLy sTaTEs  THaT  paTIENTs  ¸UsT bE DEcLaRED DEaD bEfORE THE RE¸OVaL Of aNy  VITaL ORgaNs  fOR  TRaNspLaNTaTION.  BEfORE  THE  DEVELOp¸ENT  Of  ¸ODERN  cRITIcaL  caRE,  THE  DIagNOsIs  Of DEaTH  was RELaTIVELy sTRaIgHTfORwaRD: paTIENTs wERE  DEaD wHEN  THEy wERE cOLD, bLUE, aND sTIff. ·NfORTUNaTELy, ORgaNs fRO¸ THEsE TRaDITIONaL  caDaVERs  caNNOT  bE  UsED  fOR  TRaNspLaNTaTION.  FORTy  yEaRs  agO, aN  aD  HOc  cO¸¸ITTEE aT ÁaRVaRD MEDIcaL ScHOOL, cHaIRED by ÁENRy BEEcHER, sUggEsTED  REVIsINg THE DEfiNITION Of DEaTH IN a way THaT wOULD ¸akE sO¸E paTIENTs wITH  DEVasTaTINg  NEUROLOgIc  INjURy  sUITabLE fOR  ORgaN TRaNspLaNTaTION  UNDER  THE  DEaD DONOR RULE.à °E  cONcEpT  Of bRaIN  DEaTH  Has  sERVED Us  wELL  aND  Has bEEN  THE ETHIcaL  aND LEgaL jUsTIficaTION fOR THOUsaNDs Of LIfEsaVINg DONaTIONs aND TRaNspLaNTaTIONs. ´VEN sO, THERE HaVE  bEEN pERsIsTENT qUEsTIONs abOUT wHETHER paTIENTs  wITH  ¸assIVE bRaIN  INjURy, apNEa,  aND  LOss  Of bRaIN-sTE¸  REflExEs aRE  REaLLy  DEaD.  AſtER aLL, wHEN THE  INjURy  Is ENTIRELy  INTRacRaNIaL, THEsE  paTIENTs LOOk  VERy ¸UcH aLIVE: THEy aRE waR¸ aND  pINk; THEy DIgEsT aND ¸ETabOLIzE  fOOD,  ExcRETE  wasTE,  UNDERgO  sExUaL  ¸aTURaTION,  aND  caN  EVEN  REpRODUcE.  ¹O  a  casUaL  ObsERVER,  THEy  LOOk  jUsT  LIkE  paTIENTs  wHO  aRE  REcEIVINg  LONg-TER¸  aRTIficIaL VENTILaTION aND aRE asLEEp. °E  aRgU¸ENTs  abOUT  wHy  THEsE  paTIENTs  sHOULD  bE  cONsIDERED  DEaD  HaVE  NEVER  bEEN fULLy cONVINcINg.  °E DEfiNITION Of  bRaIN DEaTH  REqUIREs  THE  cO¸pLETE  absENcE  Of  aLL  fUNcTIONs  Of  THE  ENTIRE  bRaIN,  yET  ¸aNy  Of  THEsE  paTIENTs RETaIN EssENTIaL NEUROLOgIc  fUNcTION, sUcH  as THE REgULaTED 

³ObERT ¶.  ¹RUOg aND  FRaNkLIN G. MILLER, “°E  ¶EaD ¶ONOR ³ULE aND  ±RgaN ¹RaNspLaNTaTION,”  fRO¸  New England Journal of Medicine 359 (2008):  674–675. © 2008 by MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL  SOcIETy. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

sEcRETION Of HypOTHaLa¸Ic HOR¸ONEs.Ä SO¸E HaVE aRgUED THaT THEsE paTIENTs 

260

aRE  DEaD bEcaUsE THEy aRE  pER¸aNENTLy UNcONscIOUs  (wHIcH Is TRUE),  bUT If  THIs  Is  THE  jUsTIficaTION, THEN  paTIENTs  IN a  pER¸aNENT VEgETaTIVE sTaTE,  wHO 

r e l l i M   . G   n i l k n a r F   d n a  g o u r T   . D   t r e b o R

bREaTHE  spONTaNEOUsLy,  sHOULD  aLsO  bE  DIagNOsED  as  DEaD,  a  cHaRacTERIzaTION THaT ¸OsT REgaRD as I¸pLaUsIbLE. ±THERs HaVE cLaI¸ED THaT “bRaIN-DEaD”  paTIENTs  aRE DEaD  bEcaUsE  THEIR  bRaIN  Da¸agE  Has  LED  TO  THE  “pER¸aNENT  cEssaTION  Of fUNcTIONINg  Of  THE ORgaNIs¸  as  a  wHOLE.” Æ YET EVIDENcE sHOws  THaT  If  THEsE  paTIENTs aRE  sUppORTED bEyOND  THE acUTE pHasE  Of THEIR  ILLNEss  (wHIcH Is RaRELy DONE), THEy caN sURVIVE fOR ¸aNy yEaRs.Î °E UNcO¸fORTabLE  cONcLUsION TO  bE DRawN fRO¸ THIs  LITERaTURE Is  THaT  aLTHOUgH IT  ¸ay bE  pERfEcTLy  ETHIcaL TO  RE¸OVE VITaL  ORgaNs fOR TRaNspLaNTaTION  fRO¸ paTIENTs  wHO  saTIsfy THE DIagNOsTIc cRITERIa Of bRaIN  DEaTH, THE REasON IT  Is ETHIcaL caNNOT  bE THaT wE aRE cONVINcED THEy aRE REaLLy DEaD. ±VER THE  pasT  fEw yEaRs,  OUR RELIaNcE  ON THE DEaD  DONOR  RULE Has agaIN  bEEN cHaLLENgED, THIs TI¸E by THE E¸ERgENcE Of DONaTION aſtER caRDIac DEaTH  as a paTHway fOR ORgaN DONaTION. ·NDER pROTOcOLs fOR THIs TypE Of DONaTION,  paTIENTs  wHO  aRE  NOT  bRaIN-DEaD  bUT wHO  aRE  UNDERgOINg  aN ORcHEsTRaTED  wITHDRawaL  Of  LIfE  sUppORT  aRE  ¸ONITORED  fOR  THE  ONsET  Of  caRDIac  aRREsT.  ºN  TypIcaL pROTOcOLs, paTIENTs  aRE pRONOUNcED DEaD 2 TO  5 ¸INUTEs aſtER  THE  ONsET Of asysTOLE (ON THE basIs Of caRDIac cRITERIa), aND THEIR ORgaNs aRE ExpEDITIOUsLy RE¸OVED fOR TRaNspLaNTaTION. ALTHOUgH EVERyONE agREEs THaT ¸aNy  paTIENTs  cOULD bE  REsUscITaTED aſtER aN INTERVaL Of 2 TO  5 ¸INUTEs, aDVOcaTEs  Of THIs appROacH TO DONaTION say THaT THEsE paTIENTs caN bE REgaRDED as DEaD  bEcaUsE a DEcIsION Has bEEN ¸aDE NOT TO aTTE¸pT REsUscITaTION. °Is UNDERsTaNDINg Of DEaTH Is pRObLE¸aTIc aT sEVERaL LEVELs. °E  caRDIac  DEfiNITION  Of  DEaTH  REqUIREs  THE  IRREVERsIbLE  cEssaTION  Of  caRDIac  fUNcTION.  WHEREas  THE  cO¸¸ON  UNDERsTaNDINg  Of  “IRREVERsIbLE”  Is  “I¸pOssIbLE  TO  REVERsE,” IN THIs cONTExT IRREVERsIbILITy Is INTERpRETED as THE REsULT Of a cHOIcE  NOT  TO  REVERsE.  °Is  INTERpRETaTION  cREaTEs  THE  paRaDOx  THaT  THE  HEaRTs  Of  paTIENTs wHO HaVE bEEN DEcLaRED DEaD ON THE basIs Of THE IRREVERsIbLE LOss Of  caRDIac fUNcTION HaVE IN facT bEEN TRaNspLaNTED aND HaVE sUccEssfULLy fUNcTIONED  IN THE cHEsT Of aNOTHER. AgaIN, aLTHOUgH  IT ¸ay bE ETHIcaL TO RE¸OVE  VITaL ORgaNs fRO¸ THEsE paTIENTs, wE bELIEVE THaT THE REasON IT Is  ETHIcaL caNNOT cONVINcINgLy bE THaT THE DONORs aRE DEaD. AT THE DawN Of ORgaN TRaNspLaNTaTION, THE DEaD DONOR RULE was accEpTED as  aN ETHIcaL  pRE¸IsE THaT DID NOT  REqUIRE REflEcTION  OR  jUsTIficaTION, pREsU¸abLy bEcaUsE IT appEaRED TO bE NEcEssaRy as a safEgUaRD agaINsT THE UNETHIcaL  RE¸OVaL Of VITaL ORgaNs fRO¸ VULNERabLE paTIENTs.  ºN RETROspEcT, HOwEVER, IT  appEaRs THaT RELIaNcE ON THE DEaD DONOR RULE Has gREaTER pOTENTIaL TO UNDER-

¸INE TRUsT IN THE TRaNspLaNTaTION ENTERpRIsE THaN TO pREsERVE IT. AT wORsT, THIs  ONgOINg  RELIaNcE sUggEsTs  THaT  THE ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION Has bEEN  gERRy¸aN-

261

¸OsT  faVORabLE fOR  TRaNspLaNTaTION.  AT  bEsT, THE  RULE Has pROVIDED ¸IsLEaDINg  ETHIcaL cOVER THaT  caNNOT wITHsTaND caREfUL scRUTINy.  A bETTER appROacH  TO pROcURINg VITaL ORgaNs wHILE pROTEcTINg VULNERabLE paTIENTs agaINsT abUsE  wOULD bE TO E¸pHasIzE THE I¸pORTaNcE Of ObTaININg VaLID INfOR¸ED cONsENT  fOR ORgaN DONaTION fRO¸ paTIENTs OR sURROgaTEs bEfORE THE wITHDRawaL Of LIfE-  sUsTaININg TREaT¸ENT IN sITUaTIONs Of DEVasTaTINg aND IRREVERsIbLE NEUROLOgIc  INjURy.Ï WHaT Has bEEN THE cOsT Of OUR cONTINUED DEpENDENcE ON THE DEaD DONOR  RULE? ºN aDDITION TO fOsTERINg cONcEpTUaL cONfUsION abOUT THE ETHIcaL REqUIRE¸ENTs  Of ORgaN DONaTION,  IT  Has cO¸pRO¸IsED  THE  gOaLs  Of TRaNspLaNTaTION  fOR  DONORs  aND  REcIpIENTs aLIkE.  By  REqUIRINg  ORgaN DONORs TO  ¸EET  flawED  DEfiNITIONs  Of DEaTH bEfORE ORgaN pROcURE¸ENT,  wE  DENy paTIENTs aND  THEIR  fa¸ILIEs  THE OppORTUNITy  TO  DONaTE ORgaNs If  THE  paTIENTs HaVE  DEVasTaTINg,  IRREVERsIbLE NEUROLOgIc INjURIEs THaT DO NOT ¸EET THE TEcHNIcaL REqUIRE¸ENTs  Of bRaIN DEaTH. ºN THE casE Of DONaTION aſtER caRDIac DEaTH, THE IscHE¸Ia TI¸E  INHERENT  IN  THE  DONaTION  pROcEss  NEcEssaRILy  DI¸INIsHEs  THE  VaLUE  Of  THE  TRaNspLaNTs by REDUcINg bOTH THE qUaNTITy aND THE qUaLITy Of THE ORgaNs THaT  caN bE pROcURED. MaNy wILL ObjEcT THaT TRaNspLaNTaTION sURgEONs caNNOT LEgaLLy OR ETHIcaLLy  RE¸OVE  VITaL  ORgaNs  fRO¸ paTIENTs  bEfORE DEaTH,  sINcE  DOINg  sO  wILL  caUsE  THEIR  DEaTH. ÁOwEVER, If THE cRITIqUEs Of THE cURRENT ¸ETHODs Of DIagNOsINg  DEaTH  aRE  cORREcT,  THEN  sUcH  acTIONs aRE  aLREaDy  TakINg  pLacE  ON a  ROUTINE  basIs. MOREOVER, IN ¸ODERN INTENsIVE caRE UNITs, ETHIcaLLy jUsTIfiED DEcIsIONs  aND acTIONs Of pHysIcIaNs aRE aLREaDy THE pROxI¸aTE caUsE Of DEaTH fOR ¸aNy  paTIENTs—fOR INsTaNcE, wHEN ¸EcHaNIcaL VENTILaTION Is wITHDRawN. WHETHER  DEaTH  OccURs  as THE  REsULT  Of VENTILaTOR  wITHDRawaL OR  ORgaN pROcURE¸ENT,  THE  ETHIcaLLy  RELEVaNT  pREcONDITION  Is  VaLID  cONsENT  by  THE  paTIENT OR  sURROgaTE.  WITH  sUcH  cONsENT,  THERE  Is  NO  HaR¸  OR  wRONg  DONE  IN  RETRIEVINg  VITaL  ORgaNs  bEfORE  DEaTH,  pROVIDED  THaT  aNEsTHEsIa  Is  aD¸INIsTERED.  WITH  pROpER safEgUaRDs, NO paTIENT wILL DIE fRO¸ VITaL ORgaN DONaTION wHO wOULD  NOT OTHERwIsE DIE as a REsULT Of THE wITHDRawaL Of LIfE sUppORT. FINaLLy, sURVEys  sUggEsT  THaT  IssUEs RELaTED  TO  REspEcT fOR  VaLID cONsENT  aND THE DEgREE  Of  NEUROLOgIc INjURy ¸ay bE ¸ORE I¸pORTaNT TO THE pUbLIc THaN cONcERNs abOUT  wHETHER THE paTIENT Is aLREaDy DEaD aT THE TI¸E THE ORgaNs aRE RE¸OVED. ºN sU¸, as aN ETHIcaL REqUIRE¸ENT fOR ORgaN DONaTION, THE DEaD DONOR RULE  Has  REqUIRED UNNEcEssaRy  aND  UNsUppORTabLE REVIsIONs  Of THE  DEfiNITION Of 

eluR  r o n o D   d a e D   e h T

DERINg THE DEfiNITION Of DEaTH TO caREfULLy  cONfOR¸ wITH cONDITIONs THaT aRE 

DEaTH. CHaRacTERIzINg THE  ETHIcaL REqUIRE¸ENTs  Of ORgaN DONaTION IN TER¸s 

262

Of VaLID INfOR¸ED cONsENT UNDER THE LI¸ITED cONDITIONs Of DEVasTaTINg NEUROLOgIc INjURy Is ETHIcaLLy sOUND, OpTI¸aLLy REspEcTs THE DEsIREs Of THOsE wHO 

r e l l i M   . G   n i l k n a r F   d n a  g o u r T   . D   t r e b o R

wIsH TO  DONaTE ORgaNs,  aND  Has THE pOTENTIaL  TO ¸axI¸IzE THE NU¸bER aND  qUaLITy Of ORgaNs aVaILabLE TO THOsE IN NEED.

notes 1  A DEfiNITION Of IRREVERsIbLE cO¸a: REpORT Of THE aD HOc cO¸¸ITTEE Of THE ÁaRVaRD MEDIcaL ScHOOL TO Exa¸INE THE DEfiNITION Of bRaIN DEaTH. ¼½¾½ . 1968;205:337–440. 2  ¹RUOg ³¶. ºs IT TI¸E TO abaNDON bRaIN DEaTH? Hastings Cent Rep . 1997;27:29–37. 3  BERNaT  J²,  CULVER  CM,  GERT B.  ±N THE  DEfiNITION aND  cRITERION  Of  DEaTH.  Ann  Intern 

Med. 1981;94:389–394. 4  SHEw¸ON  ¶A.  CHRONIc  “bRaIN  DEaTH”:  ¸ETa-aNaLysIs  aND  cONcEpTUaL  cONsEqUENcEs. 

Neurology. 1998;51:1538–1545. 5  MILLER FG, ¹RUOg ³¶. ³ETHINkINg THE ETHIcs Of VITaL ORgaN DONaTION. Hastings Cent Rep .  2008;38:38–46.

´he DARken±ng  µe±l  of  “Do EVeRyTh±ng” Chris Feudtner and Wynne Morrison

°E  HOUR Is  LaTE aND  THE  sITUaTION DIRE. ÁUDDLED  by THE  paTIENT’s bEDsIDE, a  NURsE  aND REspIRaTORy THERapIsT sTaND jUsT bEHIND THE pHysIcIaN wHO spEaks  TO THE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs. SO¸ETI¸Es THE paTIENT Is a cHILD—pERHaps aN INfaNT,  jUsT  bORN,  wITH  sEVERE  cONgENITaL  aNO¸aLIEs,  OR  ¸aybE  a  TODDLER  wHO  fELL  INTO  a  pOOL  aND  NEaRLy  DROwNED.  ±THER TI¸Es,  THE  paTIENT  Is  faR  OLDER  aND  ¸ay  HaVE  HaD a  sUDDEN ¸assIVE HEaRT  aTTack OR  ¸ay HaVE  bEEN LIVINg wITH  pROgREssIVE caNcER fOR ¸ONTHs OR yEaRs. °E fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs cOULD bE yOUNg  paRENTs  OR  a  spOUsE ¸aRRIED  HaLf  a  cENTURy.  °E cONVERsaTION  fOcUsEs  ON  THE paTIENT’s HIsTORy aND DIagNOsIs, THE gRaVITy Of THE pREDIca¸ENT, aND THE  pOssIbLE TREaT¸ENT OpTIONs, OUTLININg THE pOssIbLE bENEfiTs aND HaR¸s. °EN sO¸EONE says: “¶O EVERyTHINg.” °E pHysIcIaN ¸ay OffER THIs Up as a  pLEDgE: “WE aRE gOINg TO DO EVERyTHINg.” ±R asks THE qUEsTION: “¶O yOU waNT  Us  TO DO  EVERyTHINg?” ALTERNaTIVELy, a fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER  ¸ay UTTER THE pHRasE  as a REqUEsT OR DE¸aND: “WE waNT yOU TO DO EVERyTHINg.” ÁEaDs NOD IN sILENT  agREE¸ENT. WE wILL DO EVERyTHINg. PRObLE¸ Is, NO ONE caN REaLLy bE cLEaR abOUT wHaT Has bEEN saID. WHaT DO  THE wORDs “DO EVERyTHINg” ¸EaN? °E pHRasE Is VagUE aT bEsT aND VacUOUs aT  wORsT,  pER¸ITTINg  aN INcREasINgLy HaR¸fUL  VacILLaTION IN  THE facE Of cRITIcaL  ILLNEss,  wHIcH  caN  EVENTUaLLy  REsULT  IN  ¸EDIcaL  caRE  THaT  Is  HaR¸fUL  TO  THE  paTIENT. Ã,Ä FIRsT, wE  sI¸pLy  caNNOT  DO  EVERyTHINg. °ERE  aRE  sO  ¸aNy—aL¸OsT  TOO  ¸aNy—pOssIbILITIEs. MEDIcaL caRE caN gO IN ¸aNy DIffERENT DIREcTIONs, bUT  NOT  aLL  aT  THE  sa¸E  TI¸E.  ±NE  caNNOT  sI¸ULTaNEOUsLy  cRaDLE  a  gRIEVOUsLy  ILL  INfaNT  IN  ONE’s  aR¸s  aND aT  THE  sa¸E TI¸E  INsERT VascULaR  caNNULas fOR 

CHRIs  FEUDTNER aND WyNNE MORRIsON, “°E ¶aRkENINg ÂEIL Of ‘¶O ´VERyTHINg,’ ” fRO¸  Archives 

of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 166, NO. 8 (2012):  694–695. © 2012 by  A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION.  ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION. ALL RIgHTs REsERVED.

ExTRacORpOREaL ¸E¸bRaNE OxygENaTION; NOR caN ONE HOLD a LOVED ONE’s HaND 

264

wHILE  THEy aRE  DyINg  aT  THE sa¸E  ¸O¸ENT THaT  THE  cODE  TEa¸  yELLs “cLEaR”  aND  aTTE¸pTs  TO DEfibRILLaTE  THE paTIENT’s HEaRT.  ±NE ¸UsT cHOOsE. WHETHER 

n o s i r r o M   e n n y W   d n a  r e n t d u e F   s i r h C

ackNOwLEDgED  OR  NOT, cHOIcEs aRE  wOVEN  THROUgHOUT THE  fabRIc  Of ¸EDIcaL  caRE. °E pHRasE “DO EVERyTHINg,” THOUgH, sEE¸s TO say OTHERwIsE: LET’s aVOID  aNy  cHOIcE  fOR  NOw aND  DO  THIs  aND  DO  THaT. BEHIND  THE  VEIL Of  “DO  EVERyTHINg,” THE cHOIcEs wE INEVITabLy aRE ¸akINg—aND THE REspONsIbILITy fOR THOsE  cHOIcEs—aRE ObfUscaTED. ´qUaLLy ¸UDDLED Is THE ¸IRROR I¸agE pHRasE THaT “THERE Is NOTHINg ¸ORE  wE caN  DO”—fULL sTOp. JUsT as  wE caNNOT DO EVERyTHINg,  wE caN  aLways DO  sO¸ETHINg.  ºNTENsIVE caRE  Is  cO¸pOsED  Of bOTH  INVasIVE caRE  aND  INTENsIVE  caRINg,  aND  EVEN  If  THE fOR¸ER  Is  faILINg,  THE LaTTER  caN  cONTINUE UNabaTED.  ±UR  cO¸¸IT¸ENT  TO  DO  THE-bEsT-sO¸ETHINg-THaT-wE-caN-DO  ¸ay  ¸akE  a  wORLD  Of DIffERENcE. WHEN OpERaTINg wITHIN THE cONfiNEs  Of THE INcREasINgLy  TIgHT cONsTRaINTs THaT pROgREssIVE DIsEasE caN caUsE, cLINIcIaNs NEED TO bE ¸ORE  pREcIsE, cO¸pLETE, aND E¸paTHETIc:Æ º wIsH THERE was  ¸ORE THaT  wE  cOULD  DO THaT  wOULD  HaLT THE pROgREss  Of  THIs DIsEasE, bUT NONE Of  THE TREaT¸ENTs wE  HaVE aRE  abLE TO  DO THIs.  WE  aRE sTILL DEVOTED TO TakINg caRE Of yOUR cHILD aND wILL DO EVERyTHINg IN OUR  pOwER TO kEEp paIN aND DIscO¸fORT away. SEcOND, THE VEIL Of  “DO EVERyTHINg” LEaVEs  a  DIsTURbINg a¸OUNT  Of ROO¸  fOR ¸IsUNDERsTaNDINg wHaT wILL acTUaLLy bE  DONE. Fa¸ILIEs aND pHysIcIaNs  appROacH  THE paTIENT’s  ILLNEss  cRIsIs fRO¸  DIffERENT fRa¸Es  Of REfERENcE  aND  THUs INfUsE THE “DO EVERyTHINg” pHRasE wITH DIffERENT ¸EaNINgs. ³aTHER THaN  assU¸INg  (OſtEN ¸IsTakENLy)  THaT  THE fa¸ILy  UNDERsTaNDs THE  VasT  aRRay  Of  pOssIbLE INTERVENTIONs aND THE DETaILED pHysIcaL I¸pLIcaTIONs Of wHaT “DOINg  EVERyTHINg” ¸IgHT ¸EaN, cLINIcIaNs caN REspOND TO “DO EVERyTHINg” sTaTE¸ENTs  by REspONDINg THaT  “yEs, wE wILL DO EVERyTHINg THaT wE caN DO THaT caN pOssIbLy HELp yOUR LOVED ONE.” °IRD,  wHEN  cONfRONTINg  THE  O¸INOUs  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs  THaT  ENVELOp  THE  paTIENT,  THE  DaRk  VEIL Of  “DO  EVERyTHINg”  pREVENTs  fa¸ILIEs  aND  cLINIcIaNs  fRO¸ ¸akINg gENUINE cONNEcTIONs. °E ETIOLOgy Of THIs VagUE aND UNaTTaINabLE VERbaL I¸pERaTIVE ORIgINaTEs, IN ¸aNy INsTaNcEs, IN aN aNgUIsHED OUTcRy  agaINsT HOw THE cRITIcaL ILLNEss THREaTENs THE paTIENT IN THE bED aND aN URgENT  NEED TO EsTabLIsH aND affiR¸ a basIs Of TRUsT. FOR THE fa¸ILy, “DO EVERyTHINg” caN  bE a way Of askINg THaT THE  cLINIcIaNs sTay cO¸¸ITTED aND ENgagED wITH THEIR  LOVED ONE: “¶ON’T gIVE Up.” “¶ON’T abaNDON Us.” ºN THIs  sENsE, “EVERyTHINg” Is 

NOT  aN ObjEcT; RaTHER, “EVERyTHINg” Is aN aDVERb, DEscRIbINg  a “DOINg” THaT Is  VIgOROUs aND TRUsTwORTHy.

265

(OR HaD THE¸ fRa¸ED by OTHERs) as “DO EVERyTHINg” VERsUs NOT DOINg sO, THEy  ¸ay bE ¸ORE LIkELy TO fEaR THaT caRE Is bEINg RaTIONED fOR sO¸E REasON OTHER  THaN  THE  paTIENT’s  bEsT INTEREsTs.  °Ey  ¸ay  THEN  bEcO¸E  UNwILLINg TO  cONsIDER aLTERNaTIVEs TO wHaT THEy sEE as THE ONE paTH THaT pROVEs THEIR LOVED ONE  Is  NOT  bEINg  sHORTcHaNgED.  ±NcE  a  fa¸ILy ¸ENTIONs  THE  pHRasE  “DO  EVERyTHINg,” cLINIcIaNs ¸ay UsE IT as aN ExcUsE TO EscapE fRO¸ OR sHORTEN a DIfficULT  cONVERsaTION,  THINkINg,  “wELL,  wE  kNOw  wHaT  THEy  waNT.”  BUT  TO  sHy  away  fRO¸ ENgagINg IN THIs DIscUssION DOEs  NOT bUILD a cOLLabORaTIVE paRTNERsHIp  bETwEEN fa¸ILy aND cLINIcIaNs, NOR DOEs IT sERVE THE paTIENT wELL. Î ±URs  Is  NOT aN aRgU¸ENT  fOR  cONfRONTINg DaUNTINg  cHOIcEs bLUNTLy—OR,  wORsE,  bRUsqUELy—RELyINg  cHIEfly  ON  ¸EDIcaL  facTs  aND  cLINIcaL  LOgIc  TO  gRappLE  wITH fRIgHTfULLy DIfficULT  sITUaTIONs.  ³aTHER, wE aRgUE  fOR  TakINg THE  TI¸E IN THEsE cONVERsaTIONs TO ExpLORE THE cHOIcEs THaT cOULD bE ¸aDE. WHEN  cONfRONTED  wITH REqUEsTs OR DE¸aNDs  TO “DO  EVERyTHINg,” wE  VIEw THIs  as a  sTaRTINg pOINT fOR a DIscUssION, NOT aN ENDINg  pOINT.Ï °E DIscUssION sHOULD  NOT sO ¸UcH DEbaTE THE pROs aND cONs Of paRTIcULaR INTERVENTIONs bUT RaTHER  fOcUs ON aND ELabORaTE spEcIfic cO¸¸IT¸ENTs. ±UR REspONsE ¸IgHT bE:Ð º REspEcT HOw DEEpLy cO¸¸ITTED yOU aRE, aND wE aRE aLsO absOLUTELy cO¸¸ITTED  TO  figURINg  OUT wHaT  THE  bEsT  THINg  TO  DO  Is. ²ET’s  TaLk  fOR  a  fEw  ¸INUTEs abOUT wHaT THE DIffERENT OpTIONs ¸IgHT LOOk LIkE. ºN  THE  cRIsIs  THaT  fa¸ILIEs  cONfRONT  wHEN  a  LOVED  ONE  Is  cRITIcaLLy  ILL,  INcREasED cLaRITy  Of spEEcH  Is NOT a  cURE-aLL. STILL, bEINg cLEaR aND  fORTHRIgHT  HELps.  WHEN  a  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bER  TaLks  abOUT  “DOINg  EVERyTHINg,”  cLINIcIaNs  ¸IgHT paUsE TO INsERT a REflEcTIVE cO¸¸ENT:Ñ WE  aLways ask  OURsELVEs wHaT  wE  caN DO  TO HELp THE paTIENT.  ¹O  aNswER  THIs qUEsTION, wE HaVE TO bE cLEaR abOUT wHaT wE aRE HOpINg fOR—REcOVERy,  cO¸fORT, DIgNITy—aND DO aLL THaT wE caN THaT Has a  REasONabLE cHaNcE Of  gETTINg Us THERE. FINaLLy, wITH EacH passINg yEaR, THIs VEIL Of “DO EVERyTHINg” gROws DaRkER.  A  ¸ERE  60 yEaRs  agO,  “DO  EVERyTHINg” wOULD  HaVE  aT  ¸OsT ¸EaNT  LyINg IN  a  HOspITaL bED  ON  a  REgULaR  waRD,  REcEIVINg OxygEN  by  ¸ask  aND  aNTIbIOTIc  INjEcTIONs,  aND  pERHaps  UNDERgOINg  sURgERy.  °ERE  wERE  NO  INTENsIVE  caRE 

lieV  gninekraD  ehT

FOURTH, THE “DO EVERyTHINg” sTaNcE  ¸ay sTIflE  DIscUssION  by fOsTERINg aN  aDVERsaRIaL aIR IN cONVERsaTIONs. ºf a paTIENT OR fa¸ILy Has fRa¸ED THE cHOIcEs 

UNITs,  NO  TELE¸ETRy  ¸ONITORs,  NO  ¸EcHaNIcaL  VENTILaTORs,  NO  DIaLysIs,  NO 

266

TRaNspLaNTaTION, NO ExTRacORpOREaL ¸E¸bRaNE OxygENaTION, aND NO LEſt VENTRIcULaR  assIsT  DEVIcEs.  ±VER  TI¸E,  THE  ¸EDIcaL  aND  sURgIcaL  INTERVENTIONs 

n o s i r r o M   e n n y W   d n a  r e n t d u e F   s i r h C

THaT wE caN DO aRE INcREasINgLy INVasIVE aND EffEcTIVE, aLL Of wHIcH Is NOTHINg  sHORT  Of ¸aRVELOUs; yET,  THEsE ¸IRacULOUs  TEcHNOLOgIEs  aRE aLsO EffEcTIVE  aT  ¸ERELy fOREsTaLLINg DEaTH EVEN IN THOsE casEs wHERE REcOVERy NEVER HappENs,  aND  ¸OsT LIkELy NEVER cOULD  HaVE, wHILE  NONETHELEss cREaTINg IN THEIR  wakE  THE paIN aND sUffERINg assOcIaTED wITH INVasIVE caRE, bEREſt Of aNy bENEfiTs.Ò °E bOTTO¸ LINE Is  sI¸pLE: sayINg THaT wE aRE gOINg TO “DO EVERyTHINg” Is  DaNgEROUs NONsENsE. ºf wE REaLLy DON’T ¸EaN IT, THEN wE REaLLy ¸UsT NOT say  IT.  A ¸ORaTORIU¸  Is  waRRaNTED,  HaLTINg aLL  ¸EDIcaL  pERsONNEL  fRO¸ fURTHER  casUaL UTTERaNcEs Of “DO EVERyTHINg.”

notes 1  ¹ULsky JA. BEyOND aDVaNcE DIREcTIVEs: I¸pORTaNcE Of cO¸¸UNIcaTION skILLs aT THE  END  Of LIfE. ¼½¾½ . 2005;294(3):359–365. 2  ²EVETOwN M; A¸ERIcaN AcaDE¸y Of PEDIaTRIcs CO¸¸ITTEE ON BIOETHIcs. CO¸¸UNIcaTINg  wITH  cHILDREN  aND  fa¸ILIEs:  fRO¸  EVERyDay  INTERacTIONs  TO  skILL  IN  cONVEyINg DIsTREssINg INfOR¸aTION. Pediatrics . 2008;121(5):E1441–E1460. 3  SELpH ³B, SHIaNg J, ´NgELbERg ³, CURTIs J³, WHITE ¶B. ´¸paTHy aND LIfE sUppORT DEcIsIONs IN INTENsIVE caRE UNITs. J Gen Intern Med. 2008;23(9):1311–1317. 4  FEUDTNER C. COLLabORaTIVE cO¸¸UNIcaTION IN pEDIaTRIc paLLIaTIVE caRE: a fOUNDaTION fOR  pRObLE¸-sOLVINg aND DEcIsION-¸akINg. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2007;54(5):583–607. 5  QUILL ¹´, ARNOLD ³, Back A². ¶IscUssINg TREaT¸ENT pREfERENcEs wITH paTIENTs wHO waNT  “EVERyTHINg.”  Ann Intern Med. 2009;151(5):345–349. 6  Back A², ARNOLD ³M, BaILE WF, ´DwaRDs KA, ¹ULsky JA. WHEN pRaIsE Is wORTH cONsIDERINg IN a DIfficULT cONVERsaTION.  Lancet. 2010;376(9744):866–867. 7  FEUDTNER C. °E bREaDTH Of HOpEs. N Engl J Med. 2009;361(24):2306–2307. 8  ³OsENbERg C´. Our Present Complaint: American Medicine, °en and Now. BaLTI¸ORE:  JOHNs ÁOpkINs ·NIVERsITy PREss; 2007.

DeATh  And D±gn±Ty º CAS±  Of ²NdIVIdUAlIz±d  ¸±cISION  µAKINg Timothy E. Quill

¶IaNE  was fEELINg TIRED  aND  HaD a  RasH. A  cO¸¸ON scENaRIO,  THOUgH THERE  was sO¸ETHINg sUbLI¸INaLLy wORRIsO¸E THaT pRO¸pTED ¸E TO cHEck HER bLOOD  cOUNT. ÁER  HE¸aTOcRIT  was 22, aND  THE  wHITE-cELL  cOUNT was  4.3 wITH sO¸E  ¸ETa¸yELOcyTEs  aND  UNUsUaL  wHITE  cELLs.  º  waNTED  IT  TO  bE  VIRaL,  TRyINg  TO  DENy wHaT was sTaRINg ¸E  IN THE facE. PERHaps IN a  REpEaTED cOUNT IT  wOULD  DIsappEaR. º caLLED ¶IaNE aND TOLD HER IT ¸IgHT bE ¸ORE sERIOUs THaN º HaD INITIaLLy THOUgHT—THaT THE TEsT NEEDED TO bE REpEaTED aND THaT If sHE fELT wORsE,  wE  ¸IgHT  HaVE  TO  ¸OVE  qUIckLy.  WHEN  sHE  pREssED  fOR  THE  pOssIbILITIEs,  º  RELUcTaNTLy OpENED THE DOOR TO LEUkE¸Ia. ÁEaRINg THE wORD sEE¸ED TO ¸akE  IT  ExIsT. “±H, sHIT!” sHE saID. “¶ON’T TELL ¸E  THaT.” ±H, sHIT! º THOUgHT, º wIsH  º DIDN’T HaVE TO. ¶IaNE  was  NO  ORDINaRy  pERsON  (aLTHOUgH  NO  ONE  º  HaVE  EVER  cO¸E  TO  kNOw  Has  bEEN REaLLy ORDINaRy). SHE  was  RaIsED IN  aN aLcOHOLIc fa¸ILy aND  HaD fELT aLONE fOR ¸UcH Of HER LIfE. SHE HaD VagINaL caNcER as a yOUNg wO¸aN.  °ROUgH ¸UcH Of HER aDULT  LIfE, sHE HaD sTRUggLED wITH DEpREssION aND  HER  OwN aLcOHOLIs¸. º HaD cO¸E TO kNOw,  REspEcT, aND aD¸IRE HER OVER THE pREVIOUs EIgHT yEaRs as sHE cONfRONTED THEsE pRObLE¸s aND gRaDUaLLy OVERca¸E  THE¸. SHE was aN INcREDIbLy cLEaR, aT TI¸Es bRUTaLLy HONEsT, THINkER aND cO¸¸UNIcaTOR.  As sHE TOOk  cONTROL Of  HER LIfE, sHE DEVELOpED a  sTRONg sENsE  Of  INDEpENDENcE aND cONfiDENcE. ºN THE pREVIOUs 3ä yEaRs, HER HaRD wORk HaD  paID  Off.  SHE  was  cO¸pLETELy  absTINENT  fRO¸  aLcOHOL,  sHE  HaD  EsTabLIsHED  ¸UcH  DEEpER  cONNEcTIONs  wITH  HER  HUsbaND,  cOLLEgE-agE  sON,  aND  sEVERaL  fRIENDs, aND HER bUsINEss aND HER aRTIsTIc wORk wERE bLOssO¸INg. SHE fELT sHE  was REaLLy LIVINg fULLy fOR THE fiRsT TI¸E.

¹I¸OTHy ´.  QUILL, “¶EaTH aND ¶IgNITy: A CasE Of  ºNDIVIDUaLIzED ¶EcIsION MakINg,” fRO¸  New 

England  Journal  of  Medicine 324  (1991):  691–694.  ©  1991  by  MassacHUsETTs  MEDIcaL  SOcIETy.  ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

µOT sURpRIsINgLy,  THE REpEaTED  bLOOD cOUNT  was  abNOR¸aL,  aND  DETaILED 

268

Exa¸INaTION  Of  THE  pERIpHERaL-bLOOD  s¸EaR  sHOwED  ¸yELOcyTEs.  º  aDVIsED  HER TO cO¸E INTO THE HOspITaL, ExpLaININg THaT wE  NEEDED TO DO  a bONE ¸aR-

l l i u Q  . E   y h t o m i T

ROw  bIOpsy  aND  ¸akE  sO¸E  DEcIsIONs  RELaTIVELy  RapIDLy.  SHE  ca¸E  TO  THE  HOspITaL  kNOwINg  wHaT  wE  wOULD  fiND.  SHE  was  TERRIfiED,  aNgRy,  aND  saD.  ALTHOUgH wE kNEw THE ODDs, wE bOTH cLUNg TO THE THREaD Of pOssIbILITy THaT  IT ¸IgHT bE sO¸ETHINg ELsE. °E  bONE  ¸aRROw  cONfiR¸ED  THE  wORsT:  acUTE  ¸yELO¸ONOcyTIc  LEUkE¸Ia.  ºN THE facE Of THIs TRagEDy, wE LOOkED fOR sIgNs Of HOpE. °Is  Is aN aREa  Of  ¸EDIcINE  IN wHIcH TEcHNOLOgIcaL  INTERVENTION  Has bEEN sUccEssfUL,  wITH  cUREs 25 pERcENT Of THE TI¸E—LONg-TER¸ cUREs. As º pRObED THE cOsTs Of THEsE  cUREs,  º HEaRD abOUT  INDUcTION  cHE¸OTHERapy (THREE  wEEks IN THE  HOspITaL,  pROLONgED  NEUTROpENIa,  pRObabLE  INfEcTIOUs  cO¸pLIcaTIONs,  aND  HaIR  LOss;  75 pERcENT Of paTIENTs REspOND, 25 pERcENT DO NOT). FOR THE sURVIVORs, THIs Is  fOLLOwED  by cONsOLIDaTION cHE¸OTHERapy  (wITH sI¸ILaR sIDE EffEcTs; aNOTHER  25  pERcENT  DIE,  fOR  a  NET  sURVIVaL Of  50 pERcENT).  °OsE  sTILL  aLIVE,  TO  HaVE  a  REasONabLE cHaNcE  Of LONg-TER¸  sURVIVaL,  THEN NEED  bONE ¸aRROw  TRaNspLaNTaTION  (HOspITaLIzaTION  fOR  TwO  ¸ONTHs  aND  wHOLE-bODy  IRRaDIaTION,  wITH cO¸pLETE kILLINg Of THE bONE ¸aRROw, INfEcTIOUs cO¸pLIcaTIONs, aND THE  pOssIbILITy  fOR  gRaſt-VERsUs-HOsT DIsEasE—wITH  a  sURVIVaL Of  appROxI¸aTELy  50 pERcENT, OR 25 pERcENT Of THE ORIgINaL gROUp). °OUgH HE¸aTOLOgIsTs ¸ay  aRgUE OVER THE ExacT pERcENTagEs, THEy DON’T aRgUE abOUT THE OUTcO¸E Of NO  TREaT¸ENT—cERTaIN DEaTH IN Days, wEEks, OR aT ¸OsT a fEw ¸ONTHs. BELIEVINg  THaT  DELay  was  DaNgEROUs,  OUR  ONcOLOgIsT  bROkE  THE  NEws  TO  ¶IaNE  aND  bEgaN  ¸akINg  pLaNs  TO  INsERT  a  ÁIck¸aN  caTHETER  aND  bEgIN  INDUcTION  cHE¸OTHERapy  THaT  aſtERNOON.  WHEN  º  saw  HER  sHORTLy  THEREafTER, sHE was ENRagED aT HIs pREsU¸pTION THaT sHE wOULD waNT TREaT¸ENT, aND  DEVasTaTED by THE fiNaLITy Of THE DIagNOsIs. ALL sHE waNTED TO DO was gO HO¸E  aND  bE  wITH HER fa¸ILy. SHE  HaD  NO fURTHER qUEsTIONs abOUT TREaT¸ENT  aND  IN  facT HaD  DEcIDED THaT  sHE waNTED  NONE. ¹OgETHER  wE La¸ENTED HER TRagEDy aND  THE UNfaIRNEss Of LIfE. BEfORE sHE LEſt, º fELT THE NEED TO bE sURE THaT  sHE aND HER HUsbaND UNDERsTOOD THaT THERE was sO¸E RIsk IN DELay, THaT  THE  pRObLE¸  was NOT gOINg  TO gO  away, aND THaT  wE NEEDED TO kEEp cONsIDERINg  THE OpTIONs OVER THE NExT sEVERaL Days. WE agREED TO ¸EET IN TwO Days. SHE  RETURNED  IN  TwO  Days wITH  HER  HUsbaND  aND  sON.  °Ey  HaD  TaLkED  ExTENsIVELy  abOUT  THE  pRObLE¸  aND  THE  OpTIONs.  SHE  RE¸aINED  VERy  cLEaR  abOUT HER wIsH NOT TO UNDERgO cHE¸OTHERapy aND TO LIVE wHaTEVER TI¸E sHE  HaD LEſt OUTsIDE THE HOspITaL. As wE ExpLORED HER THINkINg fURTHER, IT bEca¸E  cLEaR  THaT sHE was  cONVINcED sHE wOULD DIE  DURINg THE pERIOD Of TREaT¸ENT 

aND  wOULD  sUffER  UNspEakabLy  IN  THE  pROcEss  (fRO¸  HOspITaLIzaTION,  fRO¸  Lack  Of cONTROL  OVER  HER  bODy,  fRO¸ THE  sIDE  EffEcTs  Of cHE¸OTHERapy,  aND 

269

¸INI¸IzE HER sUffERINg If sHE cHOsE TREaT¸ENT, THERE was NO way º cOULD say  aNy Of THIs wOULD NOT OccUR.  ºN facT, THE LasT fOUR paTIENTs wITH acUTE LEUkE¸Ia aT OUR HOspITaL HaD DIED VERy paINfUL DEaTHs IN THE HOspITaL DURINg VaRIOUs sTagEs Of TREaT¸ENT (a facT º DID NOT sHaRE wITH HER). ÁER fa¸ILy wIsHED  sHE wOULD cHOOsE TREaT¸ENT bUT saDLy accEpTED HER DEcIsION. SHE aRTIcULaTED  VERy  cLEaRLy  THaT  IT  was  sHE wHO  wOULD  bE  ExpERIENcINg  aLL  THE  sIDE EffEcTs  Of  TREaT¸ENT  aND THaT  ODDs  Of 25 pERcENT wERE  NOT gOOD  ENOUgH  fOR HER  TO  UNDERgO  sO TOxIc a cOURsE Of THERapy, gIVEN HER ExpEcTaTIONs Of cHE¸OTHERapy aND HOspITaLIzaTION  aND THE absENcE Of a cLOsELy ¸aTcHED  bONE ¸aRROw  DONOR.  º HaD  HER REpEaT HER  UNDERsTaNDINg Of  THE TREaT¸ENT, THE ODDs,  aND  wHaT  TO ExpEcT If  THERE wERE NO TREaT¸ENT. º cLaRIfiED  a fEw ¸IsUNDERsTaNDINgs, bUT sHE HaD a RE¸aRkabLE gRasp Of THE OpTIONs aND I¸pLIcaTIONs. º  HaVE  bEEN  a  LONgTI¸E  aDVOcaTE  Of  acTIVE,  INfOR¸ED  paTIENT  cHOIcE  Of  TREaT¸ENT OR NONTREaT¸ENT, aND Of a paTIENT’s RIgHT TO DIE wITH as ¸UcH cONTROL  aND  DIgNITy  as  pOssIbLE.  YET  THERE was  sO¸ETHINg  abOUT HER  gIVINg  Up  a  25 pERcENT cHaNcE  Of LONg-TER¸  sURVIVaL IN  faVOR  Of aL¸OsT  cERTaIN DEaTH  THaT  DIsTURbED  ¸E.  º  HaD  sEEN  ¶IaNE  figHT  aND  UsE HER  cONsIDERabLE  INNER  REsOURcEs  TO  OVERcO¸E aLcOHOLIs¸  aND  DEpREssION, aND  º HaLf ExpEcTED  HER  TO cHaNgE HER ¸IND OVER THE NExT wEEk. SINcE THE wINDOw Of TI¸E IN wHIcH  EffEcTIVE  TREaT¸ENT  caN  bE  INITIaTED  Is  RaTHER  NaRROw, wE  ¸ET  sEVERaL  TI¸Es  THaT  wEEk.  WE  ObTaINED  a  sEcOND  HE¸aTOLOgy  cONsULTaTION  aND  TaLkED  aT  LENgTH abOUT THE ¸EaNINg aND I¸pLIcaTIONs Of TREaT¸ENT aND NONTREaT¸ENT.  SHE  TaLkED  TO  a  psycHOLOgIsT  sHE  HaD  sEEN  IN  THE  pasT.  º  gRaDUaLLy  UNDERsTOOD  THE DEcIsION fRO¸ HER pERspEcTIVE aND  bEca¸E cONVINcED  THaT  IT was  THE RIgHT  DEcIsION fOR  HER. WE  aRRaNgED fOR HO¸E HOspIcE  caRE (aLTHOUgH  aT  THaT TI¸E ¶IaNE fELT REasONabLy wELL, was acTIVE, aND LOOkED HEaLTHy), LEſt THE  DOOR OpEN fOR  HER TO  cHaNgE HER ¸IND, aND  TRIED TO  aNTIcIpaTE HOw TO  kEEp  HER cO¸fORTabLE IN THE TI¸E sHE HaD LEſt. JUsT as  º was aDjUsTINg TO  HER DEcIsION, sHE OpENED  Up aNOTHER  aREa THaT  wOULD  sTRETcH  ¸E pROfOUNDLy.  ºT was ExTRaORDINaRILy I¸pORTaNT TO ¶IaNE  TO  ¸aINTaIN cONTROL Of HERsELf aND HER OwN DIgNITy DURINg THE TI¸E RE¸aININg  TO  HER.  WHEN  THIs  was  NO  LONgER  pOssIbLE,  sHE cLEaRLy  waNTED  TO  DIE. As  a  fOR¸ER DIREcTOR Of a HOspIcE pROgRa¸, º kNOw HOw TO UsE paIN ¸EDIcINEs TO  kEEp  paTIENTs cO¸fORTabLE  aND  LEssEN sUffERINg. º  ExpLaINED THE pHILOsOpHy  Of  cO¸fORT  caRE,  wHIcH  º  sTRONgLy  bELIEVE  IN.  ALTHOUgH  ¶IaNE  UNDERsTOOD  aND  appREcIaTED THIs, sHE HaD kNOwN Of pEOpLE LINgERINg IN wHaT was caLLED 

y t i n g i D  d n a   h t a e D

fRO¸ paIN aND aNgUIsH). ALTHOUgH º cOULD OffER sUppORT aND ¸y bEsT EffORT TO 

RELaTIVE  cO¸fORT,  aND  sHE  waNTED  NO  paRT Of  IT.  WHEN  THE  TI¸E  ca¸E,  sHE 

270

waNTED  TO  TakE  HER  LIfE  IN  THE  LEasT  paINfUL  way  pOssIbLE.  KNOwINg  Of  HER  DEsIRE  fOR  INDEpENDENcE aND  HER DEcIsION TO  sTay IN  cONTROL, º  THOUgHT THIs 

l l i u Q  . E   y h t o m i T

REqUEsT ¸aDE pERfEcT sENsE. º ackNOwLEDgED aND ExpLORED THIs wIsH bUT aLsO  THOUgHT  THaT IT  was OUT Of THE REaL¸  Of cURRENTLy accEpTED  ¸EDIcaL pRacTIcE  aND  THaT  IT  was  ¸ORE  THaN  º  cOULD  OffER  OR  pRO¸IsE.  ºN  OUR  DIscUssION,  IT  bEca¸E  cLEaR  THaT  pREOccUpaTION  wITH  HER  fEaR Of  a  LINgERINg  DEaTH  wOULD  INTERfERE wITH ¶IaNE’s  gETTINg THE ¸OsT OUT Of THE TI¸E sHE HaD LEſt UNTIL sHE  fOUND a  safE way TO ENsURE  HER DEaTH. º fEaRED THE EffEcTs Of a  VIOLENT DEaTH  ON  HER fa¸ILy,  THE  cONsEqUENcEs  Of aN  INEffEcTIVE  sUIcIDE  THaT  wOULD  LEaVE  HER LINgERINg IN pREcIsELy THE sTaTE sHE DREaDED sO ¸UcH, aND THE pOssIbILITy  THaT  a  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER  wOULD  bE  fORcED  TO assIsT  HER,  wITH aLL  THE  LEgaL aND  pERsONaL  REpERcUssIONs THaT  wOULD fOLLOw.  SHE DIscUssED THIs aT LENgTH wITH  HER  fa¸ILy. °Ey  bELIEVED THaT  THEy sHOULD REspEcT  HER cHOIcE. WITH  THIs IN  ¸IND, º TOLD ¶IaNE THaT INfOR¸aTION was aVaILabLE fRO¸ THE ÁE¸LOck SOcIETy  THaT ¸IgHT bE HELpfUL TO HER. A  wEEk  LaTER  sHE  pHONED  ¸E  wITH  a  REqUEsT  fOR  baRbITURaTEs  fOR  sLEEp.  SINcE º kNEw THaT THIs was aN EssENTIaL INgREDIENT IN a ÁE¸LOck SOcIETy sUIcIDE, º askED HER TO cO¸E TO THE OfficE TO TaLk THINgs OVER. SHE was ¸ORE THaN  wILLINg  TO  pROTEcT  ¸E  by  paRTIcIpaTINg  IN  a  sUpERficIaL  cONVERsaTION  abOUT  HER INsO¸NIa,  bUT IT was I¸pORTaNT TO ¸E  TO kNOw HOw sHE pLaNNED TO  UsE  THE  DRUgs aND  TO  bE  sURE THaT  sHE was  NOT  IN  DEspaIR  OR OVERwHEL¸ED  IN  a  way  THaT ¸IgHT cOLOR HER jUDg¸ENT. ºN OUR DIscUssION, IT was  appaRENT THaT  sHE  was  HaVINg  TROUbLE  sLEEpINg,  bUT  IT  was  aLsO  EVIDENT  THaT  THE  sEcURITy  Of HaVINg  ENOUgH baRbITURaTEs  aVaILabLE TO  cO¸¸IT sUIcIDE wHEN aND  If  THE  TI¸E  ca¸E  wOULD LEaVE  HER sEcURE ENOUgH  TO LIVE  fULLy aND  cONcENTRaTE ON  THE  pREsENT.  ºT  was  cLEaR  THaT  sHE was  NOT  DEspONDENT  aND  THaT  IN  facT  sHE  was  ¸akINg  DEEp,  pERsONaL  cONNEcTIONs wITH HER fa¸ILy aND  cLOsE fRIENDs.  º  ¸aDE  sURE  THaT  sHE kNEw  HOw  TO  UsE THE  baRbITURaTEs  fOR  sLEEp,  aND  aLsO  THaT  sHE  kNEw  THE  a¸OUNT  NEEDED  TO  cO¸¸IT sUIcIDE.  WE  agREED  TO  ¸EET  REgULaRLy, aND sHE pRO¸IsED TO ¸EET wITH ¸E bEfORE TakINg HER LIfE TO ENsURE  THaT  aLL OTHER aVENUEs HaD bEEN ExHaUsTED. º wROTE THE pREscRIpTION wITH aN  UNEasy  fEELINg  abOUT THE bOUNDaRIEs  º was  ExpLORINg—spIRITUaL,  LEgaL,  pROfEssIONaL, aND  pERsONaL. YET º aLsO fELT sTRONgLy THaT º was  sETTINg HER fREE TO  gET THE ¸OsT OUT Of THE TI¸E sHE HaD LEſt aND TO ¸aINTaIN DIgNITy aND cONTROL  ON HER OwN TER¸s UNTIL HER DEaTH. °E NExT sEVERaL ¸ONTHs wERE VERy INTENsE aND I¸pORTaNT fOR ¶IaNE. ÁER  sON sTayED HO¸E fRO¸ cOLLEgE, aND THEy wERE abLE TO bE wITH ONE aNOTHER aND  say ¸UcH THaT HaD NOT bEEN saID EaRLIER. ÁER HUsbaND DID HIs wORk aT HO¸E 

sO  THaT HE aND  ¶IaNE cOULD spEND ¸ORE  TI¸E TOgETHER. SHE spENT  TI¸E wITH  HER cLOsEsT fRIENDs. º HaD HER cO¸E INTO THE HOspITaL fOR a cONfERENcE wITH OUR 

271

I¸pORTaNcE Of INfOR¸ED DEcIsION ¸akINg, THE RIgHT TO REfUsE TREaT¸ENT, aND  THE ExTRaORDINaRILy pERsONaL EffEcTs Of ILLNEss aND INTERacTION wITH THE ¸EDIcaL  sysTE¸.  °ERE  wERE  E¸OTIONaL aND  pHysIcaL  HaRDsHIps  as  wELL.  SHE  HaD  pERIODs  Of INTENsE saDNEss  aND aNgER. SEVERaL TI¸Es sHE bEca¸E VERy wEak,  bUT sHE REcEIVED TRaNsfUsIONs as aN OUTpaTIENT aND  REspONDED wITH ¸aRkED  I¸pROVE¸ENT Of sy¸pTO¸s.  SHE HaD  TwO sERIOUs  INfEcTIONs THaT  REspONDED  sURpRIsINgLy  wELL TO E¸pIRIcaL cOURsEs Of ORaL aNTIbIOTIcs. AſtER THREE TU¸ULTUOUs  ¸ONTHs, THERE  wERE TwO wEEks  Of RELaTIVE caL¸ aND wELL-bEINg, aND  faNTasIEs Of a ¸IRacLE bEgaN TO sURfacE. ·NfORTUNaTELy,  wE  HaD  NO  ¸IRacLE.  BONE  paIN,  wEakNEss,  faTIgUE,  aND  fEVERs  bEgaN  TO  DO¸INaTE  HER  LIfE.  ALTHOUgH  THE  HOspIcE  wORkERs,  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs, aND º TRIED OUR bEsT TO ¸INI¸IzE THE sUffERINg aND pRO¸OTE cO¸fORT,  IT  was  cLEaR  THaT  THE  END  was  appROacHINg.  ¶IaNE’s  I¸¸EDIaTE  fUTURE  HELD  wHaT  sHE  fEaRED  THE  ¸OsT—INcREasINg  DIscO¸fORT,  DEpENDENcE,  aND  HaRD  cHOIcEs bETwEEN  paIN  aND  sEDaTION.  SHE  caLLED Up  HER cLOsEsT fRIENDs  aND askED THE¸ TO cO¸E OVER TO say gOODbyE, TELLINg THE¸ THaT sHE wOULD bE  LEaVINg sOON.  As wE HaD  agREED, sHE LET ¸E  kNOw as wELL.  WHEN wE ¸ET,  IT  was cLEaR THaT sHE kNEw wHaT sHE was DOINg, THaT sHE was saD aND fRIgHTENED  TO  bE LEaVINg,  bUT THaT  sHE wOULD bE  EVEN ¸ORE  TERRIfiED  TO sTay  aND  sUffER.  ºN OUR TEaRfUL gOODbyE, sHE pRO¸IsED a  REUNION IN THE fUTURE aT HER faVORITE  spOT ON THE EDgE Of ²akE GENEVa, wITH DRagONs swI¸¸INg IN THE sUNsET. ¹wO Days LaTER HER HUsbaND caLLED TO say THaT ¶IaNE HaD DIED. SHE HaD saID  HER fiNaL gOODbyEs TO HER HUsbaND aND sON THaT ¸ORNINg, aND askED THE¸ TO  LEaVE HER aLONE fOR aN HOUR. AſtER aN HOUR, wHIcH ¸UsT HaVE sEE¸ED aN ETERNITy, THEy fOUND HER ON THE cOUcH, LyINg VERy sTILL aND cOVERED by HER faVORITE  sHawL. °ERE was NO sIgN Of sTRUggLE. SHE sEE¸ED TO bE aT pEacE. °Ey caLLED  ¸E  fOR  aDVIcE abOUT HOw TO pROcEED. WHEN º aRRIVED aT THEIR  HOUsE,  ¶IaNE  INDEED sEE¸ED pEacEfUL. ÁER HUsbaND aND sON wERE qUIET. WE TaLkED abOUT  wHaT  a  RE¸aRkabLE  pERsON  sHE  HaD  bEEN.  °Ey  sEE¸ED  TO  HaVE  NO  DOUbTs  abOUT  THE cOURsE  sHE HaD  cHOsEN  OR abOUT  THEIR  cOOpERaTION,  aLTHOUgH  THE  UNfaIRNEss Of HER ILLNEss aND THE fiNaLITy Of HER DEaTH wERE OVERwHEL¸INg TO  Us aLL. º caLLED THE  ¸EDIcaL Exa¸INER TO  INfOR¸ HI¸ THaT  a  HOspIcE paTIENT HaD  DIED. WHEN askED abOUT THE caUsE Of DEaTH, º saID, “AcUTE LEUkE¸Ia.” ÁE saID  THaT was fiNE aND THaT wE sHOULD caLL a fUNERaL DIREcTOR. ALTHOUgH acUTE LEUkE¸Ia  was THE TRUTH, IT was NOT  THE wHOLE sTORy.  YET aNy ¸ENTION Of sUIcIDE 

y t i n g i D  d n a   h t a e D

REsIDENTs,  aT wHIcH sHE  ILLUsTRaTED IN a  ¸OsT pROfOUND  aND pERsONaL way  THE 

wOULD  HaVE  gIVEN  RIsE  TO  a  pOLIcE  INVEsTIgaTION  aND  pRObabLy  bROUgHT  THE 

272

aRRIVaL  Of aN  a¸bULaNcE cREw  fOR  REsUscITaTION.  ¶IaNE  wOULD  HaVE  bEcO¸E  a  “cORONER’s casE,” aND THE DEcIsION TO pERfOR¸ aN aUTOpsy wOULD HaVE bEEN 

l l i u Q  . E   y h t o m i T

¸aDE aT THE DIscRETION Of THE ¸EDIcaL Exa¸INER. °E fa¸ILy OR º cOULD HaVE  bEEN  sUbjEcT TO  cRI¸INaL pROsEcUTION, aND  º TO  pROfEssIONaL REVIEw,  fOR  OUR  ROLEs IN sUppORT Of ¶IaNE’s  cHOIcEs. ALTHOUgH º TRULy bELIEVE THaT  THE fa¸ILy  aND  º  gaVE HER THE  bEsT caRE  pOssIbLE,  aLLOwINg HER TO  DEfiNE HER LI¸ITs aND  DIREcTIONs as ¸UcH as pOssIbLE, º a¸ NOT sURE THE Law, sOcIETy, OR THE ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION wOULD agREE. SO º saID “acUTE LEUkE¸Ia” TO pROTEcT  aLL Of  Us,  TO pROTEcT ¶IaNE fRO¸ aN INVasION INTO HER pasT aND HER bODy, aND TO cONTINUE TO sHIELD  sOcIETy fRO¸  THE kNOwLEDgE Of  THE DEgREE Of  sUffERINg THaT  pEOpLE OſtEN UNDERgO IN  THE pROcEss Of DyINg. SUffERINg caN bE LEssENED TO  sO¸E ExTENT, bUT IN NO way ELI¸INaTED OR ¸aDE bENIgN, by THE caREfUL INTERVENTION Of a cO¸pETENT, caRINg pHysIcIaN, gIVEN cURRENT sOcIaL cONsTRaINTs. ¶IaNE TaUgHT ¸E abOUT THE RaNgE  Of HELp º caN pROVIDE If º  kNOw pEOpLE  wELL  aND If º aLLOw THE¸ TO say wHaT  THEy REaLLy waNT. SHE TaUgHT ¸E abOUT  LIfE, DEaTH, aND HONEsTy aND abOUT TakINg cHaRgE aND facINg TRagEDy sqUaRELy  wHEN IT sTRIkEs. SHE TaUgHT ¸E THaT º caN TakE s¸aLL RIsks fOR pEOpLE THaT º REaLLy  kNOw aND caRE abOUT. ALTHOUgH º DID NOT assIsT IN HER sUIcIDE DIREcTLy, º HELpED  INDIREcTLy TO ¸akE IT pOssIbLE, sUccEssfUL, aND RELaTIVELy  paINLEss. ALTHOUgH º  kNOw wE HaVE ¸EasUREs TO HELp cONTROL paIN aND LEssEN sUffERINg, TO THINk THaT  pEOpLE  DO  NOT sUffER  IN THE  pROcEss  Of  DyINg  Is  aN  ILLUsION. PROLONgED  DyINg  caN  OccasIONaLLy bE  pEacEfUL, bUT ¸ORE OſtEN THE ROLE  Of THE pHysIcIaN  aND  fa¸ILy Is LI¸ITED TO LEssENINg bUT NOT ELI¸INaTINg sEVERE sUffERINg. º wONDER HOw  ¸aNy fa¸ILIEs  aND  pHysIcIaNs  sEcRETLy HELp  paTIENTs OVER  THE EDgE INTO DEaTH IN THE facE Of sUcH sEVERE sUffERINg. º wONDER HOw ¸aNy  sEVERELy ILL OR DyINg paTIENTs sEcRETLy TakE THEIR LIVEs, DyINg aLONE IN DEspaIR.  º  wONDER  wHETHER  THE  I¸agE  Of  ¶IaNE’s  fiNaL  aLONENEss  wILL  pERsIsT  IN  THE  ¸INDs Of HER fa¸ILy, OR If THEy wILL RE¸E¸bER ¸ORE THE INTENsE, ¸EaNINgfUL  ¸ONTHs  THEy HaD  TOgETHER bEfORE sHE DIED. º wONDER  wHETHER ¶IaNE sTRUggLED  IN  THaT  LasT HOUR,  aND  wHETHER  THE ÁE¸LOck SOcIETy’s way  Of  DEaTH by  sUIcIDE  Is  THE ¸OsT  bENIgN. º  wONDER wHy  ¶IaNE,  wHO gaVE  sO  ¸UcH  TO sO  ¸aNy  Of Us, HaD  TO bE aLONE  fOR THE LasT  HOUR Of HER LIfE. º  wONDER wHETHER  º wILL sEE ¶IaNE agaIN, ON THE sHORE Of ²akE GENEVa aT sUNsET, wITH DRagONs  swI¸¸INg ON THE HORIzON.

²cT±Ve  And ³Ass±Ve  EuThAnAs±A James A. Rachels

°E DIsTINcTION bETwEEN acTIVE aND passIVE EUTHaNasIa Is THOUgHT TO bE cRUcIaL  fOR  ¸EDIcaL  ETHIcs.  °E  IDEa  Is  THaT  IT  Is  pER¸IssIbLE,  aT  LEasT  IN  sO¸E  casEs, TO  wITHHOLD TREaT¸ENT  aND aLLOw a  paTIENT TO DIE, bUT IT  Is NEVER  pER¸IssIbLE TO TakE aNy DIREcT acTION DEsIgNED TO kILL THE paTIENT. °Is DOcTRINE  sEE¸s  TO  bE  accEpTED  by  ¸OsT  DOcTORs,  aND  IT  Is  ENDORsED  IN  a  sTaTE¸ENT  aDOpTED by THE ÁOUsE Of ¶ELEgaTEs Of THE A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION ON  ¶EcE¸bER 4, 1973: °E INTENTIONaL TER¸INaTION Of THE LIfE Of ONE HU¸aN bEINg by aNOTHER—  ¸ERcy  kILLINg—Is  cONTRaRy  TO  THaT  fOR  wHIcH  THE  ¸EDIcaL  pROfEssION  sTaNDs aND Is cONTRaRy TO THE pOLIcy Of THE A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION. °E  cEssaTION Of THE E¸pLOy¸ENT  Of ExTRaORDINaRy  ¸EaNs TO  pROLONg  THE  LIfE  Of  THE  bODy  wHEN  THERE  Is  IRREfUTabLE  EVIDENcE  THaT  bIOLOgIcaL  DEaTH  Is  I¸¸INENT  Is  THE  DEcIsION  Of  THE  paTIENT  aND/OR  HIs  I¸¸EDIaTE  fa¸ILy. °E aDVIcE aND jUDg¸ENT Of THE pHysIcIaN sHOULD bE fREELy aVaILabLE TO THE paTIENT aND/OR HIs I¸¸EDIaTE fa¸ILy. ÁOwEVER, a  sTRONg casE caN bE ¸aDE agaINsT THIs DOcTRINE. ºN wHaT fOLLOws º  wILL  sET OUT sO¸E Of THE RELEVaNT aRgU¸ENTs aND  URgE DOcTORs TO REcONsIDER  THEIR VIEws ON THIs ¸aTTER. ¹O bEgIN wITH a fa¸ILIaR TypE Of sITUaTION, a paTIENT wHO Is DyINg Of INcURabLE  caNcER  Of  THE  THROaT Is  IN  TERRIbLE paIN,  wHIcH caN  NO  LONgER  bE saTIsfacTORILy  aLLEVIaTED.  ÁE  Is  cERTaIN TO  DIE  wITHIN a  fEw  Days,  EVEN If  pREsENT  TREaT¸ENT  Is cONTINUED, bUT HE DOEs NOT waNT TO gO  ON LIVINg fOR THOsE Days  sINcE  THE paIN Is  UNbEaRabLE. SO HE asks THE DOcTOR fOR aN END TO IT, aND HIs  fa¸ILy jOINs IN THE REqUEsT.

Ja¸Es A. ³acHELs, “AcTIVE aND PassIVE ´UTHaNasIa,” New England Journal of Medicine 292 (1975):  78–80.  ©  1975  by  MassacHUsETTs  MEDIcaL  SOcIETy.  ³EpRINTED  by  pER¸IssION  Of  MassacHUsETTs  MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

SUppOsE THE  DOcTOR  agREEs TO  wITHHOLD  TREaT¸ENT,  as  THE cONVENTIONaL 

274

DOcTRINE says HE ¸ay. °E jUsTIficaTION fOR HIs DOINg sO Is THaT THE paTIENT Is IN  TERRIbLE agONy, aND sINcE HE Is gOINg TO DIE aNyway, IT wOULD bE wRONg TO pRO-

slehcaR  .A semaJ

LONg  HIs  sUffERINg  NEEDLEssLy. BUT  NOw NOTIcE THIs.  ºf  ONE  sI¸pLy wITHHOLDs  TREaT¸ENT, IT  ¸ay TakE THE paTIENT LONgER  TO DIE, aND  sO HE ¸ay  sUffER ¸ORE  THaN HE wOULD If ¸ORE DIREcT acTION wERE TakEN aND a LETHaL INjEcTION gIVEN.  °Is  facT pROVIDEs sTRONg REasON fOR THINkINg THaT, ONcE THE INITIaL  DEcIsION  NOT  TO pROLONg HIs agONy  Has bEEN ¸aDE,  acTIVE EUTHaNasIa Is  acTUaLLy pREfERabLE TO  passIVE EUTHaNasIa,  RaTHER THaN THE REVERsE. ¹O say OTHERwIsE Is TO  ENDORsE THE OpTION  THaT LEaDs TO ¸ORE sUffERINg RaTHER  THaN LEss aND Is cONTRaRy TO THE HU¸aNITaRIaN I¸pULsE THaT pRO¸pTs THE DEcIsION NOT TO pROLONg  HIs LIfE IN THE fiRsT pLacE. PaRT Of ¸y pOINT Is THaT THE pROcEss Of bEINg “aLLOwED TO DIE” caN bE RELaTIVELy  sLOw  aND  paINfUL,  wHEREas  bEINg  gIVEN  a  LETHaL  INjEcTION Is  RELaTIVELy  qUIck  aND  paINLEss.  ²ET  ¸E  gIVE  a  DIffERENT sORT  Of  Exa¸pLE.  ºN  THE ·NITED  STaTEs abOUT ONE IN 600 babIEs Is bORN wITH ¶OwN’s syNDRO¸E. MOsT Of THEsE  babIEs aRE OTHERwIsE HEaLTHy—THaT Is, wITH ONLy THE UsUaL pEDIaTRIc caRE, THEy  wILL pROcEED TO aN OTHERwIsE NOR¸aL INfaNcy. SO¸E, HOwEVER, aRE bORN wITH  cONgENITaL  DEfEcTs sUcH  as INTEsTINaL  ObsTRUcTIONs THaT  REqUIRE OpERaTIONs If  THEy  aRE  TO  LIVE.  SO¸ETI¸Es,  THE  paRENTs  aND  THE  DOcTOR wILL  DEcIDE NOT  TO  OpERaTE aND LET THE INfaNT DIE. ANTHONy SHaw DEscRIbEs wHaT HappENs THEN: WHEN sURgERy  Is  DENIED [THE  DOcTOR]  ¸UsT  TRy  TO  kEEp  THE  INfaNT  fRO¸  sUffERINg wHILE NaTURaL fORcEs sap THE baby’s LIfE away. As a sURgEON wHOsE  NaTURaL  INcLINaTION  Is  TO  UsE  THE  scaLpEL  TO  figHT  Off  DEaTH,  sTaNDINg  by  aND waTcHINg a  saLVagEabLE baby DIE Is  THE ¸OsT E¸OTIONaLLy  ExHaUsTINg  ExpERIENcE º kNOw.  ºT Is Easy  aT a  cONfERENcE, IN  a THEORETIcaL DIscUssION,  TO DEcIDE THaT sUcH  INfaNTs sHOULD bE aLLOwED TO DIE. ºT Is  aLTOgETHER DIffERENT TO sTaND by IN THE NURsERy aND waTcH as DEHyDRaTION aND INfEcTION  wITHER a  TINy  bEINg OVER HOURs  aND Days. °Is  Is a  TERRIbLE ORDEaL fOR ¸E  aND THE HOspITaL sTaff—¸UcH ¸ORE sO THaN fOR THE paRENTs wHO NEVER sET  fOOT IN THE NURsERy.* º caN UNDERsTaND wHy sO¸E pEOpLE aRE OppOsED TO aLL EUTHaNasIa aND INsIsT  THaT sUcH  INfaNTs ¸UsT bE aLLOwED TO LIVE. º THINk º caN aLsO UNDERsTaND wHy  OTHER  pEOpLE faVOR DEsTROyINg  THEsE babIEs  qUIckLy aND  paINLEssLy. BUT  wHy  sHOULD aNyONE faVOR  LETTINg “DEHyDRaTION  aND INfEcTION wITHER a  TINy bEINg  OVER HOURs aND Days”? °E DOcTRINE THaT says THaT a  baby ¸ay bE aLLOwED TO  DEHyDRaTE  aND  wITHER bUT  ¸ay  NOT bE  gIVEN aN  INjEcTION THaT  wOULD END  ITs  LIfE wITHOUT sUffERINg sEE¸s sO paTENTLy cRUEL as TO REqUIRE NO fURTHER REfUTaTION. 

°E  sTRONg LaNgUagE Is  NOT INTENDED  TO OffEND, bUT ONLy  TO pUT THE pOINT  IN  THE cLEaREsT pOssIbLE way.

275

CONsIDER agaIN THE casE Of THE INfaNTs wITH ¶OwN’s syNDRO¸E wHO NEED  OpERaTIONs  fOR  cONgENITaL DEfEcTs  UNRELaTED TO THE syNDRO¸E TO  LIVE. SO¸ETI¸Es,  THERE Is  NO OpERaTION,  aND  THE  baby DIEs,  bUT wHEN  THERE Is  NO sUcH  DEfEcT, THE baby LIVEs ON. µOw, aN OpERaTION sUcH as THaT TO RE¸OVE aN INTEsTINaL  ObsTRUcTION  Is  NOT pROHIbITIVELy  DIfficULT. °E REasON wHy sUcH  OpERaTIONs aRE  NOT pERfOR¸ED IN THEsE casEs  Is, cLEaRLy, THaT  THE cHILD Has ¶OwN’s  syNDRO¸E  aND  THE paRENTs  aND  DOcTOR jUDgE  THaT  bEcaUsE  Of  THaT  facT  IT  Is  bETTER fOR THE cHILD TO DIE. BUT NOTIcE THaT THIs sITUaTION Is absURD, NO ¸aTTER wHaT VIEw ONE TakEs Of  THE LIVEs  aND pOTENTIaLs Of sUcH  babIEs. ºf THE LIfE Of sUcH  aN INfaNT Is  wORTH  pREsERVINg,  wHaT  DOEs  IT  ¸aTTER  If  IT  NEEDs  a  sI¸pLE  OpERaTION?  ±R,  If  ONE  THINks  IT  bETTER  THaT  sUcH  a  baby  sHOULD  NOT  LIVE  ON,  wHaT  DIffERENcE  DOEs  IT  ¸akE  THaT  IT  HappENs TO  HaVE  aN UNObsTRUcTED  INTEsTINaL  TRacT?  ºN  EITHER  casE,  THE ¸aTTER Of LIfE aND  DEaTH Is  bEINg DEcIDED ON IRRELEVaNT  gROUNDs. ºT  Is  THE ¶OwN’s syNDRO¸E, aND NOT THE INTEsTINEs, THaT Is THE IssUE. °E ¸aTTER  sHOULD bE DEcIDED, If  aT aLL, ON THaT  basIs, aND  NOT bE aLLOwED TO DEpEND  ON  THE EssENTIaLLy IRRELEVaNT qUEsTION Of wHETHER THE INTEsTINaL TRacT Is bLOckED. WHaT ¸akEs THIs sITUaTION pOssIbLE, Of cOURsE, Is THE IDEa THaT wHEN THERE  Is  aN INTEsTINaL  bLOckagE, ONE  caN  “LET  THE  baby  DIE,”  bUT  wHEN  THERE Is  NO  sUcH  DEfEcT THERE Is NOTHINg THaT caN bE DONE, fOR ONE ¸UsT NOT “kILL” IT. °E  facT THaT THIs IDEa LEaDs TO sUcH REsULTs as DEcIDINg LIfE OR DEaTH ON IRRELEVaNT  gROUNDs Is aNOTHER gOOD REasON wHy THE DOcTRINE sHOULD bE REjEcTED. ±NE REasON wHy sO ¸aNy pEOpLE THINk THaT  THERE Is  aN I¸pORTaNT ¸ORaL  DIffERENcE  bETwEEN  acTIVE aND  passIVE  EUTHaNasIa Is  THaT  THEy THINk  kILLINg  sO¸EONE  Is  ¸ORaLLy  wORsE  THaN  LETTINg  sO¸EONE  DIE.  BUT  Is  IT?  ºs  kILLINg,  IN  ITsELf, wORsE THaN  LETTINg DIE? ¹O  INVEsTIgaTE  THIs IssUE,  TwO casEs  ¸ay  bE  cONsIDERED  THaT  aRE  ExacTLy  aLIkE  ExcEpT  THaT  ONE  INVOLVEs  kILLINg  wHEREas  THE  OTHER INVOLVEs  LETTINg  sO¸EONE DIE. °EN,  IT  caN bE  askED wHETHER  THIs  DIffERENcE  ¸akEs  aNy  DIffERENcE  TO  THE  ¸ORaL assEss¸ENTs.  ºT  Is  I¸pORTaNT  THaT  THE  casEs  bE  ExacTLy  aLIkE,  ExcEpT  fOR  THIs  ONE  DIffERENcE,  sINcE  OTHERwIsE  ONE  caNNOT  bE cONfiDENT  THaT  IT  Is  THIs  DIffERENcE aND  NOT sO¸E  OTHER  THaT accOUNTs fOR aNy VaRIaTION IN THE assEss¸ENTs Of THE TwO casEs. SO, LET Us  cONsIDER THIs paIR Of casEs: ºN THE  fiRsT, S¸ITH  sTaNDs TO  gaIN a  LaRgE  INHERITaNcE  If  aNyTHINg sHOULD  HappEN  TO  HIs  6-yEaR-OLD  cOUsIN.  ±NE  EVENINg  wHILE  THE cHILD  Is  TakINg 

a i s a n a h t u E   e v i s s a P  d n a   e v i t c A

My sEcOND aRgU¸ENT Is THaT THE cONVENTIONaL DOcTRINE LEaDs TO DEcIsIONs  cONcERNINg LIfE aND DEaTH ¸aDE ON IRRELEVaNT gROUNDs.

HIs  baTH,  S¸ITH sNEaks  INTO THE  baTHROO¸  aND  DROwNs THE cHILD,  aND  THEN 

276

aRRaNgEs THINgs sO THaT IT wILL LOOk LIkE aN accIDENT. ºN THE sEcOND, JONEs aLsO sTaNDs TO gaIN If aNyTHINg sHOULD HappEN TO HIs 

slehcaR  .A semaJ

6-yEaR-OLD cOUsIN. ²IkE S¸ITH, JONEs sNEaks IN pLaNNINg TO DROwN THE cHILD  IN HIs baTH. ÁOwEVER, jUsT as HE ENTERs THE baTHROO¸ JONEs sEEs THE cHILD sLIp  aND HIT HIs HEaD, aND faLL facE DOwN IN THE waTER. JONEs Is DELIgHTED; HE sTaNDs  by,  REaDy TO pUsH  THE cHILD’s HEaD back UNDER If IT  Is NEcEssaRy, bUT IT  Is NOT  NEcEssaRy. WITH ONLy a LITTLE THRasHINg abOUT, THE cHILD DROwNs aLL by HI¸sELf,  “accIDENTaLLy,” as JONEs waTcHEs aND DOEs NOTHINg. µOw S¸ITH kILLED THE cHILD, wHEREas JONEs “¸ERELy” LET THE cHILD DIE. °aT  Is  THE ONLy  DIffERENcE bETwEEN THE¸. ¶ID EITHER ¸aN  bEHaVE bETTER,  fRO¸ a  ¸ORaL pOINT  Of VIEw?  ºf  THE DIffERENcE  bETwEEN kILLINg  aND  LETTINg  DIE wERE  IN  ITsELf  a  ¸ORaLLy  I¸pORTaNT  ¸aTTER,  ONE  sHOULD  say THaT  JONEs’s  bEHaVIOR  was LEss REpREHENsIbLE THaN S¸ITH’s. BUT DOEs ONE REaLLy waNT TO say THaT?  º  THINk  NOT. ºN  THE fiRsT  pLacE,  bOTH ¸EN acTED  fRO¸ THE sa¸E ¸OTIVE,  pERsONaL gaIN,  aND bOTH HaD  ExacTLy THE sa¸E END IN  VIEw wHEN THEy acTED. ºT  ¸ay  bE  INfERRED fRO¸  S¸ITH’s cONDUcT  THaT  HE  Is  a  baD ¸aN,  aLTHOUgH  THaT  jUDg¸ENT ¸ay bE wITHDRawN OR ¸ODIfiED If cERTaIN fURTHER facTs aRE LEaRNED  abOUT  HI¸—fOR  Exa¸pLE,  THaT  HE  Is  ¸ENTaLLy  DERaNgED. BUT  wOULD  NOT  THE  VERy sa¸E THINg bE INfERRED abOUT JONEs fRO¸ HIs  cONDUcT? AND wOULD NOT  THE sa¸E fURTHER cONsIDERaTIONs aLsO bE RELEVaNT TO aNy ¸ODIficaTION Of THIs  jUDg¸ENT?  MOREOVER, sUppOsE JONEs pLEaDED, IN HIs  OwN DEfENsE, “AſtER  aLL,  º  DIDN’T  DO  aNyTHINg  ExcEpT  jUsT  sTaND  THERE  aND  waTcH  THE  cHILD  DROwN.  º  DIDN’T kILL HI¸; º ONLy LET HI¸ DIE.” AgaIN, If LETTINg DIE wERE IN ITsELf LEss baD  THaN  kILLINg, THIs DEfENsE sHOULD HaVE aT LEasT sO¸E wEIgHT. BUT IT DOEs  NOT.  SUcH  a  “DEfENsE”  caN  ONLy bE  REgaRDED  as a  gROTEsqUE pERVERsION  Of  ¸ORaL  REasONINg. MORaLLy spEakINg, IT Is NO DEfENsE aT aLL. µOw, IT ¸ay  bE pOINTED  OUT, qUITE pROpERLy,  THaT  THE casEs Of  EUTHaNasIa  wITH wHIcH DOcTORs aRE cONcERNED aRE NOT LIkE THIs aT aLL. °Ey DO NOT INVOLVE  pERsONaL  gaIN  OR  THE  DEsTRUcTION  Of  NOR¸aL  HEaLTHy  cHILDREN.  ¶OcTORs  aRE  cONcERNED  ONLy  wITH  casEs IN  wHIcH THE  paTIENT’s  LIfE  Is  Of  NO  fURTHER  UsE  TO  HI¸, OR IN wHIcH THE paTIENT’s LIfE Has  bEcO¸E OR wILL sOON  bEcO¸E a  TERRIbLE  bURDEN.  ÁOwEVER,  THE  pOINT  Is  THE  sa¸E  IN  THEsE  casEs:  THE  baRE  DIffERENcE  bETwEEN kILLINg  aND LETTINg  DIE DOEs  NOT, IN ITsELf, ¸akE  a ¸ORaL DIffERENcE.  ºf  a  DOcTOR LETs  a  paTIENT  DIE, fOR HU¸aNE  REasONs,  HE  Is  IN THE  sa¸E ¸ORaL  pOsITION as If HE HaD gIVEN THE paTIENT a LETHaL INjEcTION fOR HU¸aNE REasONs.  ºf  HIs  DEcIsION  was wRONg—If,  fOR  Exa¸pLE, THE  paTIENT’s ILLNEss  was  IN  facT  cURabLE—THE DEcIsION wOULD bE EqUaLLy REgRETTabLE NO ¸aTTER wHIcH ¸ETHOD 

was  UsED TO  caRRy IT OUT. AND  If THE DOcTOR’s DEcIsION was  THE RIgHT ONE,  THE  ¸ETHOD UsED Is NOT IN ITsELf I¸pORTaNT.

277

aNOTHER.” BUT aſtER IDENTIfyINg THIs IssUE, aND fORbIDDINg “¸ERcy kILLINg,” THE  sTaTE¸ENT  gOEs ON TO DENy THaT THE cEssaTION Of TREaT¸ENT Is THE INTENTIONaL  TER¸INaTION Of a LIfE. °Is Is wHERE THE ¸IsTakE cO¸Es IN, fOR wHaT Is THE cEssaTION  Of TREaT¸ENT, IN THEsE cIRcU¸sTaNcEs,  If  IT Is  NOT “THE  INTENTIONaL TER¸INaTION Of THE LIfE Of ONE HU¸aN bEINg by aNOTHER”? ±f cOURsE IT Is ExacTLy  THaT, aND If IT wERE NOT, THERE wOULD bE NO pOINT TO IT. MaNy pEOpLE wILL fiND THIs jUDg¸ENT HaRD TO accEpT. ±NE REasON, º THINk,  Is  THaT  IT Is VERy  Easy TO cONflaTE THE qUEsTION  Of wHETHER kILLINg  Is, IN  ITsELf,  wORsE  THaN  LETTINg  DIE,  wITH  THE  VERy  DIffERENT  qUEsTION  Of  wHETHER  ¸OsT  acTUaL casEs  Of kILLINg  aRE ¸ORE REpREHENsIbLE  THaN ¸OsT acTUaL casEs  Of LETTINg DIE. MOsT  acTUaL casEs Of kILLINg aRE cLEaRLy TERRIbLE (THINk, fOR  Exa¸pLE,  Of aLL THE ¸URDERs REpORTED IN THE NEwspapERs), aND ONE HEaRs Of sUcH casEs  EVERy  Day. ±N THE OTHER HaND, ONE HaRDLy EVER HEaRs Of a  casE Of LETTINg DIE,  ExcEpT  fOR  THE  acTIONs Of  DOcTORs wHO  aRE  ¸OTIVaTED  by  HU¸aNITaRIaN REasONs. SO ONE LEaRNs TO THINk Of kILLINg IN  a ¸UcH wORsE LIgHT THaN Of LETTINg  DIE. BUT THIs DOEs NOT ¸EaN THaT THERE Is sO¸ETHINg abOUT kILLINg THaT ¸akEs  IT IN ITsELf wORsE THaN LETTINg DIE, fOR IT Is NOT THE baRE DIffERENcE bETwEEN kILLINg aND LETTINg DIE THaT ¸akEs THE DIffERENcE IN THEsE casEs. ³aTHER, THE OTHER  facTORs—THE  ¸URDERER’s  ¸OTIVE  Of  pERsONaL  gaIN,  fOR  Exa¸pLE,  cONTRasTED  wITH THE DOcTOR’s HU¸aNITaRIaN ¸OTIVaTION—accOUNT fOR DIffERENT REacTIONs  TO THE DIffERENT casEs. º HaVE aRgUED THaT kILLINg Is NOT IN ITsELf aNy wORsE THaN LETTINg DIE; If ¸y  cONTENTION  Is  RIgHT,  IT  fOLLOws  THaT  acTIVE EUTHaNasIa  Is  NOT  aNy  wORsE THaN  passIVE  EUTHaNasIa. WHaT aRgU¸ENTs  caN bE gIVEN  ON THE OTHER sIDE?  °E  ¸OsT cO¸¸ON, º bELIEVE, Is THE fOLLOwINg: °E I¸pORTaNT DIffERENcE  bETwEEN acTIVE aND  passIVE  EUTHaNasIa Is  THaT,  IN passIVE EUTHaNasIa, THE DOcTOR DOEs NOT DO aNyTHINg TO bRINg abOUT THE  paTIENT’s DEaTH. °E DOcTOR DOEs NOTHINg, aND THE paTIENT DIEs Of wHaTEVER  ILLs  aLREaDy  afflIcT  HI¸.  ºN  acTIVE  EUTHaNasIa,  HOwEVER,  THE  DOcTOR  DOEs  sO¸ETHINg  TO  bRINg  abOUT  THE  paTIENT’s  DEaTH:  HE  kILLs  HI¸.  °E  DOcTOR  wHO gIVEs  THE paTIENT  wITH caNcER  a  LETHaL  INjEcTION  Has HI¸sELf  caUsED  HIs  paTIENT’s DEaTH; wHEREas  If  HE  ¸ERELy cEasEs  TREaT¸ENT, THE caNcER  Is  THE caUsE Of THE DEaTH.

a i s a n a h t u E   e v i s s a P  d n a   e v i t c A

°E  ¾m¾  pOLIcy sTaTE¸ENT  IsOLaTEs  THE  cRUcIaL  IssUE  VERy  wELL;  THE  cRUcIaL  IssUE Is  “THE INTENTIONaL  TER¸INaTION  Of THE LIfE  Of ONE HU¸aN  bEINg by 

A NU¸bER Of pOINTs NEED TO bE ¸aDE HERE. °E fiRsT Is THaT IT Is NOT ExacTLy 

278

cORREcT  TO  say  THaT  IN  passIVE  EUTHaNasIa  THE  DOcTOR  DOEs  NOTHINg,  fOR  HE  DOEs  DO  ONE  THINg  THaT  Is  VERy  I¸pORTaNT:  HE  LETs  THE  paTIENT  DIE. “²ETTINg 

slehcaR  .A semaJ

sO¸EONE  DIE”  Is  cERTaINLy  DIffERENT,  IN  sO¸E  REspEcTs,  fRO¸  OTHER  TypEs  Of  acTION—¸aINLy  IN THaT IT  Is a kIND Of acTION THaT ONE ¸ay pERfOR¸ by  way  Of  NOT  pERfOR¸INg  cERTaIN OTHER acTIONs. FOR  Exa¸pLE, ONE  ¸ay LET  a  paTIENT  DIE by way Of NOT gIVINg ¸EDIcaTION, jUsT as ONE ¸ay INsULT sO¸EONE by way Of  NOT  sHakINg HIs  HaND. BUT fOR  aNy pURpOsE Of ¸ORaL assEss¸ENT, IT  Is a  TypE  Of  acTION  NONETHELEss.  °E  DEcIsION  TO  LET a  paTIENT DIE  Is  sUbjEcT  TO  ¸ORaL  appRaIsaL  IN  THE  sa¸E  way  THaT  a  DEcIsION  TO  kILL  HI¸  wOULD  bE  sUbjEcT  TO  ¸ORaL appRaIsaL: IT ¸ay bE assEssED as wIsE OR UNwIsE, cO¸passIONaTE OR saDIsTIc, RIgHT OR wRONg. ºf a DOcTOR DELIbERaTELy LET a paTIENT DIE wHO was sUffERINg  fRO¸ a ROUTINELy cURabLE ILLNEss,  THE DOcTOR wOULD cERTaINLy bE TO bLa¸E fOR  wHaT HE HaD DONE, jUsT as HE wOULD bE TO bLa¸E If HE HaD NEEDLEssLy kILLED THE  paTIENT. CHaRgEs agaINsT HI¸ wOULD THEN bE appROpRIaTE. ºf sO, IT wOULD bE NO  DEfENsE  aT aLL fOR  HI¸ TO  INsIsT THaT  HE DIDN’T  “DO aNyTHINg.”  ÁE  wOULD HaVE  DONE sO¸ETHINg VERy sERIOUs INDEED, fOR HE LET HIs paTIENT DIE. FIxINg  THE caUsE  Of DEaTH  ¸ay  bE VERy  I¸pORTaNT  fRO¸ a  LEgaL pOINT  Of  VIEw,  fOR  IT  ¸ay  DETER¸INE  wHETHER  cRI¸INaL  cHaRgEs  aRE  bROUgHT  agaINsT  THE DOcTOR. BUT º DO NOT THINk THaT THIs NOTION caN bE UsED TO sHOw a ¸ORaL  DIffERENcE bETwEEN acTIVE aND passIVE  EUTHaNasIa. °E REasON wHy IT Is cONsIDERED baD TO bE THE caUsE Of sO¸EONE’s DEaTH Is THaT DEaTH Is REgaRDED as a  gREaT EVIL—aND sO IT Is. ÁOwEVER, If IT Has bEEN DEcIDED THaT EUTHaNasIa—EVEN  passIVE EUTHaNasIa—Is DEsIRabLE IN a gIVEN casE, IT Has aLsO bEEN DEcIDED THaT  IN THIs INsTaNcE DEaTH Is NO gREaTER aN EVIL THaN THE paTIENT’s cONTINUED ExIsTENcE. AND If THIs Is TRUE, THE UsUaL REasON fOR NOT waNTINg TO bE THE caUsE Of  sO¸EONE’s DEaTH sI¸pLy DOEs NOT appLy. FINaLLy, DOcTORs  ¸ay THINk  THaT aLL  Of THIs Is  ONLy Of  acaDE¸Ic INTEREsT—  THE sORT Of THINg THaT pHILOsOpHERs ¸ay wORRy abOUT bUT THaT Has NO pRacTIcaL  bEaRINg  ON THEIR  OwN wORk. AſtER aLL, DOcTORs ¸UsT bE cONcERNED abOUT THE  LEgaL cONsEqUENcEs Of wHaT THEy DO,  aND acTIVE EUTHaNasIa Is  cLEaRLy fORbIDDEN  by THE Law. BUT EVEN sO, DOcTORs sHOULD aLsO bE cONcERNED wITH THE facT  THaT  THE Law  Is  fORcINg  UpON THE¸  a ¸ORaL DOcTRINE  THaT ¸ay  wELL bE  INDEfENsIbLE,  aND  Has  a  cONsIDERabLE  EffEcT  ON  THEIR  pRacTIcEs.  ±f cOURsE,  ¸OsT  DOcTORs aRE NOT NOw IN THE pOsITION Of bEINg cOERcED IN THIs ¸aTTER, fOR THEy  DO  NOT REgaRD THE¸sELVEs as ¸ERELy gOINg aLONg wITH wHaT THE Law REqUIREs.  ³aTHER, IN sTaTE¸ENTs sUcH as THE ¾m¾  pOLIcy sTaTE¸ENT  THaT º HaVE qUOTED,  THEy aRE ENDORsINg THIs DOcTRINE as a cENTRaL pOINT Of ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs. ºN THaT  sTaTE¸ENT, acTIVE EUTHaNasIa Is cONDE¸NED NOT ¸ERELy as ILLEgaL bUT as “cON-

TRaRy TO THaT fOR wHIcH THE ¸EDIcaL pROfEssION sTaNDs,” wHEREas passIVE EUTHaNasIa Is appROVED. ÁOwEVER, THE pREcEDINg cONsIDERaTIONs sUggEsT THaT THERE 

279

¸ay bE I¸pORTaNT ¸ORaL DIffERENcEs IN sO¸E casEs IN THEIR consequences, bUT,  as º pOINTED OUT, THEsE DIffERENcEs ¸ay ¸akE acTIVE EUTHaNasIa, aND NOT passIVE  EUTHaNasIa,  THE  ¸ORaLLy pREfERabLE  OpTION). SO,  wHEREas  DOcTORs  ¸ay  HaVE  TO  DIscRI¸INaTE  bETwEEN  acTIVE  aND passIVE  EUTHaNasIa  TO  saTIsfy  THE  Law,  THEy sHOULD NOT DO  aNy  ¸ORE THaN  THaT. ºN  paRTIcULaR, THEy  sHOULD NOT  gIVE THE DIsTINcTION aNy aDDED aUTHORITy aND wEIgHT by wRITINg IT INTO OfficIaL  sTaTE¸ENTs Of ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs.

note *ANTHONy SHaw, “¶OcTOR, ¶O WE ÁaVE a CHOIcE?,”  New York Times Magazine, JaNUaRy 30,  1972, 54.

a i s a n a h t u E   e v i s s a P  d n a   e v i t c A

Is REaLLy NO ¸ORaL DIffERENcE bETwEEN THE TwO, cONsIDERED IN THE¸sELVEs (THERE 

Cl±n±c±An-³AT±enT  InTeRAcT±ons  AbouT  ¶equesTs  foR ³hys±c±An-  ²ss±sTed  Su±c±de º ³ATI±NT  ANd FAMIlY ÁI±w Anthony L. Back, Helene Starks, Clarissa Hsu,  Judith R. Gordon, Ashok Bharucha, and Robert A. Pearlman

FOR pHysIcIaNs aND OTHER cLINIcIaNs wHO caRE fOR paTIENTs wITH LIfE-THREaTENINg  ILLNEssEs,  REspONDINg  TO  a  paTIENT’s  REqUEsT  fOR  pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE  (¿¾¼)  Is  aN  I¸pORTaNT  cLINIcaL  skILL.  ALTHOUgH  ±REgON  Is  THE  ONLy  sTaTE  TO  HaVE  LEgaLIzED ¿¾¼, paTIENTs IN EVERy  sTaTE REpORT THaT THEy THINk  abOUT ¿¾¼,  aND pHysIcIaNs IN EVERy sTaTE DIscUss ¿¾¼.à ºN a NaTIONaL sURVEy INVOLVINg 988  TER¸INaLLy ILL paTIENTs,  60 pERcENT  Of paTIENTs sUppORTED ¿¾¼  IN a  HypOTHETIcaL sITUaTION, aND 10 pERcENT HaD sERIOUsLy cONsIDERED  ¿¾¼ fOR THE¸sELVEs.Ä ºN pHysIcIaN sURVEys, 18 TO 24 pERcENT Of pRI¸aRy caRE pHysIcIaNs aND  46 TO  57 pERcENT Of ONcOLOgIsTs sTaTED THaT THEy HaVE REcEIVED a REqUEsT fOR ¿¾¼.Æ–Ï WHEN a  paTIENT  asks  fOR  ¿¾¼,  HOw sHOULD  a  cLINIcIaN  REspOND?  ´xpERTs  agREE THaT aN INITIaL cLINIcaL REspONsE sHOULD INcLUDE THE fOLLOwINg: THE cLINIcIaN  sHOULD ask wHy  THE paTIENT Is  INTEREsTED IN  ¿¾¼, ExpLORE THE  ¸EaNINgs  UNDERLyINg  THE  REqUEsT,  assEss  wHETHER  paLLIaTIVE  caRE  Is  aDEqUaTE  (EspEcIaLLy  IN aDDREssINg  DEpREssION), aND REVIsE THE caRE  pLaN TO REspOND TO THE  paTIENT’s cONcERNs.ЖÃà SINcE ¿¾¼ REqUEsTs ¸ay  NOT pERsIsT, THEsE INITIaL cLINIcaL  REspONsEs  aRE  ExTRE¸ELy  I¸pORTaNT.  BEyOND  THE  INITIaL  REspONsE,  HOwEVER, THERE Is cONTROVERsy abOUT wHETHER cLINIcIaNs sHOULD DIscLOsE THEIR OwN 

ANTHONy ².  Back, ÁELENE  STaRks,  CLaRIssa ÁsU,  JUDITH ³. GORDON,  AsHOk BHaRUcHa, aND  ³ObERT A. PEaRL¸aN, “CLINIcIaN-PaTIENT ºNTERacTIONs abOUT ³EqUEsTs fOR PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED SUIcIDE:  A  PaTIENT  aND Fa¸ILy  ÂIEw,”  fRO¸  Archives  of  Internal  Medicine 162,  NO. 11 (2002):  1257–1265.  © 2002  by  A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION. ³EpRINTED  by  pER¸IssION  Of A¸ERIcaN  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION. ALL RIgHTs REsERVED.

¸ORaL bELIEfs abOUT ¿¾¼, OffER sEDaTION fOR REfRacTORy sy¸pTO¸s OR INTOLERabLE sUffERINg, OR pROVIDE a pREscRIpTION fOR ¿¾¼ IN a sTaTE wHERE IT Is ILLEgaL.ÃÄ–ÃÏ

281

TIsE,  LITTLE E¸pIRIcaL  REsEaRcH  Has  bEEN  cONDUcTED  TO  IDENTIfy  ExacTLy wHaT  skILLs aND ExpERTIsE aRE REqUIRED.Ñ–×,Ãà PREVIOUs sURVEys Of pHysIcIaNs sUggEsT  THaT THE ¸OsT pRO¸INENT cONcERNs fOR paTIENTs cONsIDERINg ¿¾¼ aRE NONpHysIcaL cONcERNs abOUT DyINg, sUcH as LOss Of cONTROL aND LOss Of DIgNITy.Æ,ÃÐ YET a  qUaLITaTIVE  sTUDy  Of  pHysIcIaNs  wHO  DEaLT  wITH  ¿¾¼  REqUEsTs  INDIcaTED THaT  pHysIcIaNs fELT LEasT cO¸pETENT IN aDDREssINg ExIsTENTIaL sUffERINg. ÃÑ JUDgINg  by THEsE sTUDIEs IN THE ¸EDIcaL LITERaTURE aND aNEcDOTEs IN THE Lay pREss,ÃÒ–ÄØ IT appEaRs THaT THE NONpHysIcaL cONcERNs abOUT DyINg THaT pRO¸pT paTIENTs TO  cONsIDER ¿¾¼ aRE IssUEs THaT ¸aNy pHysIcIaNs fEEL pOORLy EqUIppED TO aDDREss. WE cONDUcTED aN INTENsIVE qUaLITaTIVE INTERVIEw sTUDy wITH paTIENTs wHO  sERIOUsLy  pURsUED  ¿¾¼  aND  wITH  THEIR  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs. °E  pRI¸aRy sTUDy  ObjEcTIVEs  wERE  TO  DEscRIbE THE  REasONs  THaT  THE paTIENT  was pURsUINg  ¿¾¼,  THE  NaRRaTIVE  Of  EVENTs LEaDINg  TO  DEaTH,  aND  INTERacTIONs  wITH  pHysIcIaNs  aND  OTHER  cLINIcIaNs.  °Is  aRTIcLE  REpORTs  OUR  fiNDINgs abOUT  INTERacTIONs  wITH cLINIcIaNs. WE askED OUR paRTIcIpaNTs TO DEscRIbE THEIR cONVERsaTIONs wITH  THEIR  pHysIcIaNs aND OTHER ¸EDIcaL cLINIcIaNs abOUT ¿¾¼. FRO¸  THEsE DaTa,  wE  IDENTIfiED  THE¸Es  THaT  DEscRIbE  qUaLITIEs  Of  cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  INTERacTIONs abOUT ¿¾¼ THaT paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs VaLUED. ºN DEscRIbINg wHaT  paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs VaLUED wHEN DIscUssINg ¿¾¼, wE HOpE TO pROVIDE  gUIDaNcE  fOR cLINIcIaNs facED wITH THEsE  DIfficULT cONVERsaTIONs,  REgaRDLEss Of  THEIR wILLINgNEss TO pROVIDE ¿¾¼ OR ITs LEgaL sTaTUs. A qUaLITaTIVE DEsIgN was cHOsEN fOR THIs sTUDy bEcaUsE Of THE Lack Of E¸pIRIcaL DaTa DEscRIbINg HOw cLINIcIaNs REspOND TO REqUEsTs fOR ¿¾¼. WE UsED sE¸IsTRUcTURED  INTERVIEws  TO  yIELD  DaTa  THaT  wE  aNaLyzED  aND  DEVELOpED  INTO  a  DEscRIpTION Of I¸pORTaNT qUaLITIEs Of cLINIcIaN-paTIENT cO¸¸UNIcaTION abOUT  ¿¾¼ fRO¸ THE pERspEcTIVEs Of paTIENTs aND THEIR fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs. °E  sa¸pLINg  fRa¸E  fOR  THIs  sTUDy  INcLUDED  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs  wHO  wERE  acTIVELy  sEEkINg INfOR¸aTION  aND  accEss TO  ¿¾¼  bEcaUsE wE  waNTED  TO  DEscRIbE  THE pROcEss  Of  pLaNNINg  aND I¸pLE¸ENTINg  ¿¾¼. °Is  sa¸pLE  INcLUDEs a  sELf-sELEcTED gROUp  Of paTIENTs aND  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs wHO  sOUgHT  OUT aDVOcacy ORgaNIzaTIONs THaT spEcIficaLLy HELp paTIENTs ORgaNIzE a  ¿¾¼. °EREfORE, THE sa¸pLE Is LI¸ITED TO THOsE paTIENTs aND THEIR fa¸ILIEs wHO  wERE ENgagED IN assEssINg ¿¾¼ as a cONcRETE OpTION fOR DETER¸ININg THE TI¸INg aND cIRcU¸sTaNcEs Of THEIR DEaTH. WE  fOcUsED  ON  TwO  gROUps  Of  paRTIcIpaNTs:  (1)  a  pROspEcTIVE  cOHORT  Of 

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

ALTHOUgH ExpERT  REcO¸¸ENDaTIONs fOR  REspONDINg TO ¿¾¼ REqUEsTs  pREsU¸E THaT cLINIcIaNs pOssEss cO¸¸UNIcaTION skILLs aND paLLIaTIVE caRE ExpER-

paTIENTs wHO wERE cURRENTLy  pURsUINg ¿¾¼  (aND THEIR  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs); aND 

282

(2) a RETROspEcTIVE  cOHORT Of fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs wHO HaD bEEN INVOLVED  wITH a  paTIENT  pURsUINg  ¿¾¼. BasED  ON  OTHER qUaLITaTIVE  sTUDIEs,  wE  EsTI¸aTED THaT 

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

abOUT 30 fa¸ILIEs wOULD pROVIDE ENOUgH DaTa sUcH THaT aDDITIONaL DaTa wOULD  faIL TO cONTRIbUTE fURTHER TO ExpLaININg THE pHENO¸ENa bEINg sTUDIED, a cONDITION  caLLED  theoretical  saturation.  ±UR  sa¸pLE  sIzE  Of  35  fa¸ILIEs  was  NOT  INTENDED  TO  bE a  cO¸pREHENsIVE VIEw  Of aLL  paTIENTs sEEkINg  ¿¾¼, bUT  IT was  aDEqUaTE  TO DEscRIbE  THIs paRTIcULaR gROUp  Of paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs.  °IRTy Of THE 35 casEs OccURRED IN a sTaTE wHERE ¿¾¼ Is ILLEgaL. (FOR ¸ORE ON THE  sTUDy paRTIcIpaNTs aND ¸ETHODs, sEE THE appENDIx aT THE END Of THIs cHapTER.)

Results ³ARTIcIpANT  CHARAcT±RISTIcS WE sTUDIED 35 casEs Of paTIENTs wHO pURsUED ¿¾¼ aND THEIR fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs.  ¹abLE 1 aND TabLE 2 gIVE THE cHaRacTERIsTIcs Of THE paRTIcIpaNTs. ¹abLE 1 aLsO LIsTs  THE ¸aNNER Of DEaTH  aND wHERE  THE paTIENTs ObTaINED THEIR LETHaL pREscRIpTION. FOR THE pROspEcTIVE cOHORT, THE ¸EaN TI¸E bETwEEN THE fiRsT INTERVIEw  wITH paTIENTs aND  DEaTH was 10.6 ¸ONTHs (RaNgE, 0.1–30.6 ¸ONTHs). FOR THE  RETROspEcTIVE cOHORT, THE ¸EaN TI¸E bETwEEN THE paTIENT’s DEaTH aND THE fiRsT  INTERVIEw wITH a fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER was 20.2 ¸ONTHs (RaNgE, 2.4–49.5 ¸ONTHs).

»H±M±S MOsT  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  cOULD  REcaLL  THE  ¿¾¼  DIscUssIONs  wITH  THEIR  cLINIcIaNs IN  sUbsTaNTIaL  DETaIL. °EIR  fiRsT-HaND  accOUNTs  Of cLINIcIaN  INTERacTIONs REgaRDINg a ¿¾¼ REqUEsT pROVIDE I¸pORTaNT DaTa abOUT THEIR pERcEpTIONs Of cLINIcaL caRE RELaTED TO ¿¾¼. °E THE¸Es sU¸¸aRIzE wHaT paTIENT  aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs VaLUED IN cO¸¸UNIcaTINg wITH cLINIcIaNs abOUT ¿¾¼.

Openness to Discussion about ±²³ PaTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs HIgHLy VaLUED cLINIcIaNs wHO wERE wILLINg aND  OpEN TO DIscUssINg ¿¾¼. WHEN THEy ENcOUNTERED a cLINIcIaN wHO was wILLINg TO  DIscUss ¿¾¼, THEy fELT abLE TO DIscLOsE ¸aNy cONcERNs abOUT DyINg. °Ey aLsO  fELT LUcky bEcaUsE THEy kNEw ¿¾¼ was cONTROVERsIaL. As ONE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER pUT  IT, wHaT sHE waNTED was “aNOTHER saNE aDULT” wHO cOULD “TaLk IN TER¸s . . . THaT  RE¸OVE THE TabOO fRO¸ THE pROcEss” by gIVINg “a REaL, cLEaR pIcTURE Of pOssIbLE 

CHARAcT±RISTIcS ³´bµ¶ 1³ATI±NT 

283 (n = 12)

Characteristic AgE, ¸EaN (ÖÔ) 

ÑÄ (ÃØ)  [ÐØ–Ò×]

Total Patients 

(n = 23) ÐР(Ã×) [ÆÆ–××]

(N = 35) ÐÒ (ÃÐ) [ÆÆ–××]

[RaNgE], y FE¸aLE

Ð

ÃÃ

ÃÑ

WHITE

ÃÄ

ÄÆ

ÆÏ

Î

ÃÎ

ÃÒ

Ã

Î

Ï

WIDOwED

Ï

Î

×

µEVER ¸aRRIED

Ä

Ã

Æ

ÁIgH scHOOL OR LEss

Ã

Æ

Î

SO¸E cOLLEgE

Ð

Ï

ÃÃ

BacHELOR’s DEgREE

Î

Æ

Ñ

GRaDUaTE DEgREE

Ã

Ï

Ð

·NkNOwN

Ø

Ñ

Ñ

CaNcER

Ò

ÃÎ

ÄÄ

¾id¼

Ã

Î

Ï

µEUROLOgIc

Ã

Î

Ï

±THER†

Ä

Ã

Æ

Ñ

ÃÒ

ÄÏ

Ï

ÃÆ

ÃÒ

´UTHaNasIa§

Ä

Ï

Ñ

·NDERLyINg ILLNEss

Î

Î

Ò

SELf-INflIcTED 

Ø

Ã

Ã

1

0

1

MaRITaL sTaTUs MaRRIED OR LIVINg  wITH paRTNER ¶IVORcED OR  sEpaRaTED

´DUcaTION

·NDERLyINg ILLNEss

³EcEIVED HOspIcE aND/ OR HO¸E HEaLTH caRE MaNNER Of DEaTH PHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE‡

gUNsHOT wOUND STILL aLIVE aT THE END  Of THE sTUDy

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

Prospective  Cases  Retrospective  Cases 

³´bµ¶ 1cONTINU±d

284 Prospective  Cases  Retrospective  Cases  (n = 12)

Characteristic

Total Patients 

(n = 23)

(N = 35)

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

SOURcE Of LETHaL  pREscRIpTION PRI¸aRy OR 

Ð

ÃÆ

Ã×

Æ

Ð

×

Ä

Î

Ð

Ø

Ã

Ã

Ä

×

ÃÃ

FEE fOR sERVIcE

Æ

Ò

ÃÃ

MEDIcaID ONLy

Ø

Æ

Æ

Ï

Ä

Ñ

Ä

Ã

Æ

spEcIaLTy caRE  pROVIDER FRIENDs OR  acqUaINTaNcEs ¶ID NOT ObTaIN  ¸EDIcaTIONs ¶EcLINED TO REpORT

ÁEaLTH INsURaNcE hmo (INcLUDEs  ÂETERaNs AffaIRs)

+

MEDIcaRE 

sUppLE¸ENTaL

+

MEDIcaRE  MEDIcaID

*¶aTa aRE gIVEN as NU¸bER Of paTIENTs, ExcEpT fOR agE. ¶aTa fOR pROspEcTIVE  casEs aRE REpORTED fRO¸ 12 paTIENTs aND 20 Of THEIR fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs; DaTa  fOR RETROspEcTIVE casEs aRE REpORTED abOUT 23 paTIENTs by 28 Of THEIR fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs. ÝÚÔÖ INDIcaTEs acqUIRED I¸¸UNODEficIENcy syNDRO¸E; ÛÓÞ, HEaLTH  ¸aINTENaNcE ORgaNIzaTION. †

±THER INcLUDEs THE fOLLOwINg DIagNOsEs: aUTOI¸¸UNE DIsEasE, bRONcHIOLITIs 

ObLITERaNs, aND DEbILITaTINg UNExpLaINED paIN syNDRO¸E. ‡

¶EaTH by pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE INcLUDED  paTIENTs wHO HaD ¸EDIcaTIONs 

THaT THEy VOLUNTaRILy INgEsTED wITH THE pRI¸aRy  INTENTION Of ENDINg THEIR  LIVEs. §

¶EaTH by EUTHaNasIa INcLUDED paTIENTs wHO askED cLINIcaNs OR fa¸ILy ¸E¸-

bERs TO  aD¸INIsTER a LETHaL DOsE Of ¸EDIcaTION wITH THE pRI¸aRy INTENT Of  caUsINg DEaTH. PaTIENTs wHO DIED by EUTHaNasIa EITHER wERE cO¸pETENT aT THE  TI¸E Of DEaTH bUT NOT abLE TO sELf-aD¸INIsTER ¸EDIcaTIONs, OR wERE DEcIsIONaLLy  INcapacITaTED bUT HaD spEcIficaLLy REqUEsTED THaT ¸EDIcaTIONs bE aD¸INIsTERED  If THEy LOsT DEcIsIONaL capacITy.

CHARAcT±RISTIcS ³´bµ¶ 2FAMIlY µ±Mb±R 

285 Family Mem±ers  Family Mem±ers  Total Family  of Retrospective  Mem±ers 

Cases  (n = 20)

Cases  (n = 28)

(N = 48)

Ã.Ñ (ÖÎ)

Ã.Ä (ÖÆ)

Ã.Π(ÖÎ)

Fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs INTERVIEwED  pER casE, ¸EaN (RaNgE) ³ELaTIONsHIp TO paTIENT SpOUsE OR paRTNER

Ï

ÃØ

ÃÏ

¶aUgHTER

Ï

ÃØ

ÃÏ

SON

Ð

Ä

Ò

±THER IN-Law

Ã

Æ

Î

FRIEND

Æ

Æ

Ð

AgE, ¸EaN (RaNgE), y

Ïà(ÆÖÒÄ)

ÏÄ (Ä×–ÑÎ)

Ïà(Ä×–ÒÄ)

FE¸aLE sEx

ÃÃ

ÃÑ

ÄÒ

WHITE RacE

ÄØ

ÄÑ

ÎÑ

ÁIgH scHOOL OR LEss

Æ

Ø

Æ

SO¸E cOLLEgE

Ï

Æ

Ò

BacHELOR’s DEgREE

Ï

Î

×

GRaDUaTE DEgREE

Ð

ÃÏ

ÄÃ

·NkNOwN

Ã

Ð

Ñ

´DUcaTION

µOTE: ¶aTa aRE gIVEN as  NU¸bER Of ¸E¸bERs, ExcEpT fOR agE.

appROacHEs wITHOUT aDVOcaTINg [¿¾¼].” °E fOLLOwINg cOUNTERExa¸pLE  UNDERscOREs THE I¸pORTaNcE Of cLINIcIaN OpENNEss TO DIscUssION abOUT ¿¾¼. º kNOw THE pHysIcIaN THaT wE HaD—THE cONVERsaTIONs wERE a sTRUggLE wITH  HI¸  bEcaUsE  wE  cOULDN’T  TaLk  abOUT  HasTENINg  THE  DEaTH.  SO THERE  was,  LIkE, a paRT Of Us THaT wE cOULD NOT TaLk abOUT, wHIcH ¸aDE OUR qUEsTIONs  LI¸ITED.  SO IT  was  LIkE  wE  DIDN’T  HaVE  accEss TO  INfOR¸aTION  THaT  wOULD  HaVE aLLOwED OUR cONVERsaTIONs TO bE ¸ORE fULL aND ¸ORE fULLy INfOR¸ED. PaTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs  aTTRIbUTED  cLINIcIaN  UNwILLINgNEss  TO  DIscUss  ¿¾¼  TO  a VaRIETy  Of REasONs.  SO¸E  cLINIcIaNs wERE  UNwILLINg TO  DIscUss  ¿¾¼ bEcaUsE IT was ILLEgaL. °EsE cLINIcIaNs bEHaVED as If DIscUssIONs Of ¿¾¼ IN  aND Of THE¸sELVEs wERE ILLEgaL aND DaNgEROUs. ±NE paTIENT ObsERVED THaT “aLL  [¸y pHysIcIaNs]  TaLk abOUT Is  THE LEgaLITy Of IT,” aND  aNOTHER cONcLUDED THaT 

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

of Prospective  Characteristic

cLINIcIaNs  “HaVE  TO  HIDE  THEIR  fEELINgs  abOUT [¿¾¼],  sO  as NOT  TO  jEOpaRDIzE 

286

THEIR caREERs.” ºN OTHER casEs, paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs REpORTED THaT THE  TOpIc Of ¿¾¼ pROVOkED a sTRONg E¸OTIONaL REspONsE fRO¸ cLINIcIaNs THaT ¸aDE 

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

fURTHER cONVERsaTION awkwaRD. FOR Exa¸pLE,  ONE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER DEscRIbED a  NEUROLOgIsT wHO was “sO aDa¸aNT THaT ¿¾¼ was a TERRIbLE THINg aND THE wRONg  THINg TO DO . . . IT was kIND Of awfUL.” ANOTHER sUbjEcT DEscRIbED a pHysIcIaN’s  REacTION  TO  a  ¿¾¼  REqUEsT  as  “pROTEcTIVE  [Of  HI¸sELf] . . . NOT  aT  aLL  sy¸paTHETIc OR cO¸fORTINg.” ±NE paTIENT DEscRIbED HOw sHE cOULD DETEcT THaT  HER  ONcOLOgIsT  bEca¸E  “REaLLy  UNcO¸fORTabLE”  TaLkINg abOUT ¿¾¼  OR  “aNyTHINg”  abOUT DyINg,  aND sHE cHaNgED THE sUbjEcT fOR HI¸. SHE saID, “º LEaRNED THaT  HE’s a basEbaLL faN aND ¸UcH ¸ORE cO¸fORTabLE If º cHaNgE THE TOpIc TO basEbaLL. . . . ºT’s awfUL wHEN yOU HaVE  TO TRy TO ¸akE THE¸  fEEL cO¸fORTabLE,  bUT  THaT’s THE way IT Is.” ±THER cLINIcIaNs sEE¸ED TO waNT TO ¸aINTaIN a bIO¸EDIcaL fOcUs. ±NE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER saID, “°Ey wON’T TaLk TO yOU abOUT [¿¾¼] EVEN  as  a pOssIbILITy.  ºT’s LIkE,  ‘º kNOw THaT  HappENs,  bUT—wHaT abOUT LET’s DO  THE  cHE¸OTHERapy.’ ” °E VaLUE Of cLINIcIaN OpENNEss TO DIscUssINg ¿¾¼ wENT bEyOND THIs TOpIc  aLONE.  PaTIENTs  fELT THaT  a  cLINIcIaN  wILLINg  TO TaLk  abOUT ¿¾¼  ¸IgHT aLsO bE  wILLINg  TO DIscUss OTHER  wORRIEs, fEaRs, aND  VULNERabILITIEs abOUT ILLNEss aND  DyINg.  As ONE  paTIENT saID, “´VERyTHINg  was LaID  OUT ON THE  TabLE. ±H,  yOU  bET, yEaH. BEcaUsE HE caN’T HELp yOU—NObODy caN HELp yOU If THEy DON’T kNOw  wHaT’s gOINg ON IN yOUR LIfE.” ºN a DIffERENT casE, a fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER DEscRIbED  HOw HER faTHER’s  RELaTIONsHIp wITH THE casEwORkER fRO¸ aN aDVOcacy ORgaNIzaTION  pROVIDED  a  DIffERENT  DI¸ENsION  Of  caRE  THaN  HE  REcEIVED  fRO¸  HIs  ONcOLOgIsT.  °E fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER saID, “ºT  pROVIDED a pLacE wHERE HE cOULD  TaLk  abOUT HIs  ILLNEss.  ÁE DIDN’T  TaLk abOUT  HasTENINg HIs  DEaTH [bEcaUsE HE  was  pREpaRED  aND  DID NOT  THINk  IT  was  TI¸E].  ÁE’s jUsT  DEscRIbINg  TO THE¸  wHaT’s gOINg  ON wITH HI¸ aND sO  ON. BUT IT’s  gOOD TO HaVE a  pLacE LIkE  THaT.”  °Us, paTIENTs ¸ay UsE TaLkINg abOUT ¿¾¼ as a gaTEway TO TaLk abOUT DyINg. ºT’s  NOT  THaT  sHE  [¸y  fRIEND,  THE  paTIENT]  DOEsN’T  waNT  TO  [TaLk  abOUT  DyINg]; THaT’s  THE saD  THINg. SHE’s sITTINg  HERE  HOLDINg aLL  Of THIs sTUff  IN,  aND  TO  ¸E  THE  ¸OsT I¸pORTaNT  EVENTs IN  yOUR LIfE  aRE  yOUR TRaNsITIONs,  yOUR bIRTH aND  yOUR DEaTH . . . THE bEgINNINg aND THE END Of THIs pHysIcaL  ExIsTENcE. BUT yOU caN’T TaLk TO  yOUR DOcTOR abOUT IT wITHOUT THE¸ gETTINg aLL wEIRD, [THINkINg] THaT yOU’RE sUIcIDaL OR sO¸ETHINg. °Is paTIENT, DURINg HER OwN INTERVIEw, wEpT as sHE DEscRIbED HER fRUsTRaTION TRyINg TO TaLk TO ONE Of HER DOcTORs. SHE saID, “YOU’RE TRyINg TO gET a DOcTOR 

TO sIT DOwN aND LIsTEN TO yOU . . . bUT THEy NEVER, EVER gET THE OVERaLL pIcTURE.”  ÁER cLINIcIaNs’ UNwILLINgNEss TO DIscUss ¿¾¼ REsULTED IN ¸IssED OppORTUNITIEs 

287

Of LIfE, HER pROgNOsIs, aND HER sUffERINg. ANOTHER VaLUE Of cLINIcIaN OpENNEss Is THaT IT facILITaTED a cO¸pLETE EVaLUaTION Of a ¿¾¼ REqUEsT.  PaRTIcIpaNTs DEscRIbED cLINIcIaNs  wHO wERE wILLINg  TO  assIsT  paTIENTs  aND fa¸ILIEs  bUT  wHO  aVOIDED  DIscUssINg ¿¾¼  OpENLy  OR  ExpLIcITLy. ºN THEsE casEs, THE cLINIcIaNs fULfiLLED ¿¾¼ REqUEsTs wITH LITTLE EVaLUaTION.  ±NE paTIENT’s  wIfE  saID, “My  HUsbaND,  wITH THE  aDVIcE  Of a  DOcTOR  fRIEND THaT LIVEs IN [aNOTHER sTaTE], wENT TO HIs caRDIOLOgIsT . . . AND HE TOLD  THE DOcTOR THaT HE NEEDED SEcONaL. AND THIs DOcTOR Has kNOwN ¸y HUsbaND  fOR a LONg TI¸E, aND aLL HE saID was, º TRUsT yOU HaVE a gOOD REasON, aND gaVE  IT  TO  HI¸,  a pREscRIpTION fOR  IT.”  ºN  THIs  casE,  a  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bER ObTaINED  a  pREscRIpTION fOR ¿¾¼ fRO¸ a pHysIcIaN wHO HaD NEVER ¸ET THE paTIENT. °Is  Is aN ExTRE¸E casE IN OUR sa¸pLE bUT IT  Is NOT UNIqUE. ¹wO OTHER paTIENTs IN  OUR  sTUDy ObTaINED  pREscRIpTIONs  wITHOUT  aNy  ¸EDIcaL  EVaLUaTION.  ºN  ONE  Of  THEsE  casEs,  a  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bER fOUND  THaT aſtER  a  VIsIT  wITH THE  paTIENT’s  ONcOLOgIsT,  THE NEcEssaRy  pREscRIpTIONs  HaD  bEEN  TUckED  INTO  HER  pURsE  wITHOUT  HER  kNOwLEDgE.  CLINIcIaNs  wHO  DEaL  ObLIqUELy  wITH  ¿¾¼  REqUEsTs  ¸ay ¸Iss OppORTUNITIEs TO fULLy EVaLUaTE aND UNDERsTaND THE IssUEs UNDERLyINg THE REqUEsT.

Expertise in Dealing with the Dying Process ±NE  I¸pORTaNT  TypE  Of  cLINIcIaN  ExpERTIsE  was  THE  abILITy  TO  DEscRIbE  THE  NaTURaL HIsTORy Of ILLNEss aND caRE OpTIONs IN THE LasT Days Of LIfE. PaTIENTs aND  fa¸ILIEs  wERE  ExTRE¸ELy  sENsITIVE  TO  THE ways  IN  wHIcH  cLINIcIaNs TaLkED— OR  aVOIDED  TaLkINg—abOUT THEsE  IssUEs.  A  wO¸aN  wITH  ¸ETasTaTIc  OVaRIaN  caNcER fOUND THaT sHE cOULD NOT gET INfOR¸aTION fRO¸ HER ONcOLOgIsT abOUT  HOw  sHE  wOULD  DIE, sO  sHE  wENT  TO  a  ¸EDIcaL  LIbRaRy  aND  REaD  a  TExTbOOk  ON  gyNEcOLOgIc  caNcER.  WHaT  sHE  LEaRNED  was  THaT  DyINg  Of  OVaRIaN  caNcER  was “LONg, pROTRacTED, NOT VERy Happy . . . ORgaN faILUREs OR bLOckagEs OR  bLOOD pOIsONINg OR pNEU¸ONIa, aND IT TakEs a wHOLE cO¸bINaTION Of THINgs  TO  fiNaLLy  jUsT  bE  faTaL.”  ALTHOUgH  sHE  cONfRONTED  HER  ONcOLOgIsT  wITH  THIs  INfOR¸aTION, sHE LEſt  wITHOUT REassURaNcE THaT  sHE cOULD  aVOID a  LONg, agONIzINg  DEaTH. SHE  cONcLUDED THaT  ¿¾¼  was  pRObabLy THE LEasT wORsT  way fOR  HER TO DIE. ºN a DIffERENT casE, aNOTHER paTIENT was TOLD by HIs pHysIcIaN THaT  IN “aLL THE ¾id¼ casEs IN THE cITy, IT was THE wORsT THRUsH THEy’D EVER sEEN.” ÁIs  paRTNER REpORTED:

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

TO  cONNEcT wITH THIs paTIENT’s DEEpEsT cONcERNs, wHIcH INcLUDED  HER qUaLITy 

±UR DOcTOR  was LIkE, yOU DO  NOT waNT TO DIE  Of  THRUsH, aND THEN  kIND  Of 

288

DEscRIbED HOw IT wOULD  HappEN. BasIcaLLy, HE saID THE  THRUsH wOULD  gROw  aND sHUT Off yOUR  EsOpHagUs, sO THaT yOU’D NOT bE abLE TO swaLLOw . . . [¸y 

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

paRTNER] wOULD DROOL cONsTaNTLy aND END Up sTaRVINg TO DEaTH, bEcaUsE HE  wOULDN’T bE abLE TO pass aNy fOOD DOwN. °E DOcTOR saID, “YOU DON’T waNT TO  DIE LIkE THaT.” AND THaT’s wHEN [¸y paRTNER] DEcIDED TO DO a HasTENED DEaTH. °E paTIENT aND HIs paRTNER INTERpRETED THE pHysIcIaN’s sTaTE¸ENTs, wHIcH  DID NOT INcLUDE a ¸EDIcaL REspONsE TO fEaRs Of DROOLINg aND sTaRVINg TO DEaTH,  as  a  TacIT ENDORsE¸ENT  Of  ¿¾¼  as  THE  bEsT  OpTION  IN  THEIR  cIRcU¸sTaNcEs.  BEfORE  THIs cONVERsaTION,  THE paTIENT was  aLREaDy  cONsIDERINg  ¿¾¼, bUT THIs  cONVERsaTION ¸aRkED a TURNINg pOINT IN HIs INTEREsT. ANOTHER VaLUED TypE Of cLINIcaL ExpERTIsE was DEfiNINg REasONabLE ExpEcTaTIONs  abOUT  DyINg aND  THEN  DELIVERINg  THE caRE  NEcEssaRy  TO  fULfiLL  THOsE  ExpEcTaTIONs.  ±NE wO¸aN wITH LUNg caNcER was  VERy sUspIcIOUs Of DOcTORs  aND HOspITaLs, bELIEVINg THaT “caNcER Is bIg bUsINEss.” SHE DEcLINED aNTIcaNcER  THERapIEs  bUT was  wILLINg  TO  ExpLORE  paLLIaTIVE  caRE  OpTIONs.  ÁER  pHysIcIaN  REfERRED HER TO HOspIcE, aND HER ExpERIENcE THERE ¸aDE HER RETHINk HER cO¸¸IT¸ENT TO ¿¾¼: BEfORE °aNksgIVINg,  º  wENT OVER  TO  THE HOspIcE  [aN  INpaTIENT UNIT] fOR  REspITE caRE. ºT’s a wONDERfUL pLacE. ºT’s absOLUTELy wONDERfUL. ·NLIkE a HOspITaL, yOU DON’T sEE aNy UNIfOR¸s; yOU aRE NOT µO. 14 OR µO. 12; yOU aRE a  pERsON. °E  ONLy THINg THaT  REsE¸bLEs a  HOspITaL Is  THE bED aND  THE TRay  TabLE. ±UTsIDE Of THaT, THERE Is absOLUTELy NOTHINg THaT REsE¸bLEs a  HOspITaL. °ERE Is  NO NOIsE  Of aNyONE bEINg IN paIN. ºT’s wONDERfUL; IT  REaLLy Is.  [My] ¸aIN cONcERN Is TO bE paIN fREE, aND THEy DO TakE caRE Of THaT. SHE ULTI¸aTELy DIED Of pROgREssIVE caNcER aT HO¸E wITH HOspIcE caRE. ANOTHER  casE  Of  a  paTIENT  wITH  aDVaNcED  acqUIRED  I¸¸UNODEficIENcy  syNDRO¸E ExE¸pLIfiEs wHaT caN HappEN wHEN cLINIcIaNs OVERpRO¸IsE a “paIN-  fREE” DEaTH: °E pHysIcIaN ENcOURagED [sTOppINg TOTaL paRENTERaL NUTRITION] as a  NIcE  way TO gO aND saID THaT  THaT wOULD bE pRObabLy a 3-wEEk pROcEss, ¸aybE  4 aT THE ¸OsT, bUT pRObabLy 3.  “°aT’s a VERy pLEasaNT way TO DIE. ºT’s paIN  fREE.” . . . WE wENT IN aND OUT Of THE E¸ERgENcy ROO¸ 3 TI¸Es OVER paIN IN  THE LasT 2 wEEks Of HIs LIfE . . . aND HE HaD gREaT, agONIzINg, LOwER abDO¸INaL  paIN THROUgH  IT aLL.  SO  º  fELT  REaL  cHEaTED  abOUT THaT.  ºT  wasN’T  THIs  qUIET, paIN-fREE ExIsTENcE. . . . ºf yOU’RE  gOINg TO  ¸akE a gUaRaNTEE  THaT  a pERsON  Is  REaLLy  NOT  gOINg TO  bE  IN  paIN,  yOU  NEED  TO  ¸akE  sURE  THaT 

THEy’RE NOT. AND If yOU DON’T THINk THaT yOU caN ¸akE sURE, yOU sHOULDN’T  pRO¸IsE.

289

paRTNER bEgaN TO pLaN a ¿¾¼. A THIRD TypE Of ExpERTIsE was INDIVIDUaLIzINg paIN cONTROL TO ¸EET paTIENT  gOaLs.  ºN  ONE  casE,  THE  absENcE  Of  THIs  ExpERTIsE  LED  TO  a  DEaTH  by  a  sELf-  INflIcTED  gUNsHOT  wOUND.  °E  paTIENT  HaD  paINfUL  bONy  ¸ETasTasEs  TO  HIs  spINE  aND  was “ON 800 ¸ILLIgRa¸s Of ¸ORpHINE a  Day. BEsIDEs aLL THE ³OxIcET HE cOULD  ¸aNagE TO kEEp DOwN.” ÁIs ONcOLOgIsT REfERRED HI¸ TO HOspIcE  fOR  bETTER paIN  ¸aNagE¸ENT.  ÁOwEVER,  THE paTIENT aND  HIs  wIfE fOUND THaT  THEIR HOspIcE pROVIDERs HaD aN agENDa abOUT paIN cONTROL THaT DID NOT aLLOw  fOR  THE facT THaT HIs TOp pRIORITy was TO ¸aINTaIN a sENsE Of cONTROL OVER HIs  sITUaTION. °Ey pUT HI¸ ON a ¸ORpHINE pU¸p. ºT TOOk HI¸ a cOUpLE Of Days TO aDjUsT  IT, aND THEy wERE ExTRE¸ELy caRINg. °Ey HOVERED. °Ey jUsT  abOUT DROVE  HI¸ Up THE  waLL. [°Ey  saID,] “WE’RE gOINg  TO kILL  yOUR paIN.” WELL,  THEy  kILLED HIs paIN. ÁE was UNcONscIOUs fOR aL¸OsT 24 HOURs. FLaT ON HIs back.  ÁE HaD NOT bEEN abLE TO Lay ON HIs back. ÁE was TOTaLLy OUT Of IT. ÁE gOT Up  THE NExT Day aND HE saID, “º fEEL LIkE ³ay MILLaND’s ‘²OsT WEEkEND.’ ” [°aT  ¸OVIE was  abOUT]  aN aLcOHOLIc  wHO jUsT  wENT THROUgH  aLL  sORTs  Of,  jUsT,  dts aND, yOU kNOw, IT jUsT—REaLLy HELL ON wHEELs. AND THaT’s ExacTLy HOw  ¸y HUsbaND fELT. ÁE saID, “º caN’T THINk; º caN’T DO THIs.” °E NExT ¸ORNINg,  THE  paTIENT  fiRED THE  HOspIcE  aND  DIscONTINUED THE  paIN  REgI¸EN.  “±NcE  THE  HOspIcE  pEOpLE  HaD  kNOckED  HI¸  fOR  1  LOOp,  HE  wasN’T  gOINg  TO LET IT  HappEN  agaIN,”  ExpLaINED  HIs  wIfE.  °E fOLLOwINg  Day,  THE paTIENT waRNED HIs wIfE NOT TO fOLLOw HI¸ OUTsIDE, wHERE HE pOsITIONED  HI¸sELf OUT Of sIgHT aND sHOT HI¸sELf IN THE HEaD. °E HOspIcE NURsE wROTE IN  HER bEREaVE¸ENT  caRD, “AT LEasT HE gOT ONE gOOD NIgHT’s sLEEp,” TO  wHIcH HIs  wIfE REspONDED, “º aL¸OsT wENT THROUgH THE cEILINg.” A  fiNaL TypE Of  ExpERTIsE INVOLVED  cLINIcIaN  kNOwLEDgE  abOUT THE  LETHaL  pOTENTIaL  Of ¸EDIcaTIONs.  ºN  casEs IN  wHIcH cLINIcIaNs  HaD THIs  kNOwLEDgE  aND  wERE  wILLINg  TO  pROVIDE a  pREscRIpTION fOR  ¿¾¼,  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILIEs  wERE REassURED THaT If THEy ULTI¸aTELy DEcIDED TO I¸pLE¸ENT a ¿¾¼, IT wOULD  bE sUccEssfUL. As ONE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER saID: °E  psycHIaTRIsT  THaT  [¸y  HUsbaND]  saw  saID  THaT  HE  DIDN’T  UNDERsTaND  wHy ¸y  HUsbaND  NEEDED  TO  bE IN  HELL  aNy¸ORE, OR  ¸ysELf,  aND  THaT  HE  was sEEINg  THaT  a LOT HaD  bEEN TRIED, aND  HE THOUgHT  THaT [¸y HUsbaND] 

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

WHEN  DyINg  pROVED TO  bE  NEITHER  qUIET  NOR  paIN  fREE, THE  paTIENT  aND  HIs 

sHOULD bE  abLE  TO END  HIs  LIfE  If  HE  waNTED. SO  HE  bEgaN DEscRIbINg  THE 

290

cORREcT pILLs, aND sO THERE—aND sO THEN wHEN HE HaD IT, º RE¸E¸bER THERE  was jUsT  a HUgE RELIEf  ON bOTH Of OUR paRTs aND  DEEp gRaTEfULNEss  TO THaT 

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

pERsON. ºN  OTHER  casEs,  HOwEVER,  paTIENTs  OR  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  REcEIVED  INsTRUcTIONs fRO¸ cLINIcIaNs TO INcREasE DOsEs Of ¸ORpHINE aND DIazEpa¸ TO HasTEN  DEaTH  THaT pROVED TO bE INcORREcT. ±NE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER REcaLLED HOw a HOspIcE  NURsE, wITH  ExpLIcIT INsTRUcTIONs  fRO¸  THE  pHysIcIaN,  TaUgHT  HI¸  HOw  TO  UNLOck  aN  INTRaVENOUs  paTIENT-cONTROLLED  aNaLgEsIa  DEVIcE  aND  HOw  TO  aD¸INIsTER a LETHaL DOsE Of ¸ORpHINE. “°Ey TOLD Us THaT wITHIN 3 TO 4 HOURs  HIs  HEaRT  wOULD  sTOp  aND  IT  wOULD  bE  OVER. . . . ÂERy  spEcIfic. AND  wE  wERE  NEVER TOLD aNy aLTERNaTIVE. WE wERE NEVER TOLD IT ¸IgHT NOT wORk. . . . AND Of  cOURsE,  IT DIDN’T wORk.” AſtER 12 HOURs, THE paTIENT wOkE  Up, aND HIs  paRTNER  spENT  Days  fRaNTIcaLLy sEaRcHINg  fOR  INfOR¸aTION  aND  sUppORT.  °E  paTIENT  fiNaLLy  ca¸E  Up  wITH  THE  IDEa  Of  DIssOLVINg  sEcObaRbITaL  TabLETs  IN  saLINE  aND INjEcTINg THE¸ INTRaVENOUsLy. °E fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER caLLED THE pHysIcIaN  aND HOspIcE NURsE fOR HELp, bUT “wHEN  º askED wHaT wENT wRONg,  THEy HaD  NO  IDEa.”  ¶EspITE THEsE fRUsTRaTIONs  wITH cLINIcIaN  ExpERTIsE,  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs  RE¸aINED gENUINELy  appREcIaTIVE  Of cLINIcIaNs’  EffORTs ON  THEIR bEHaLf.

Maintenance of a °erapeutic Patient-Clinician Relationship, Even  When Patient and Clinician Disagree about ±²³ ´VERy  paTIENT  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bER  IN  THIs  sTUDy  REcOgNIzED  THaT  askINg  fOR  ¿¾¼  was  a  spEcIaL  REqUEsT  THaT  wENT  bEyOND  THE  UsUaL  bOUNDaRIEs  Of  a  cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp.  MaINTaININg  THE  cLINIcIaN-paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp  was ¸aDE pOssIbLE by cLINIcIaN OpENNEss TO DIscUssION  aND cLINIcIaN ExpERTIsE. ALsO,  IT INVOLVED ExpLIcIT NEgOTIaTION abOUT THE ROLEs Of EacH paRTy IN THE  RELaTIONsHIp  as wELL as cLINIcIaN sELf-awaRENEss  Of E¸OTIONaL VULNERabILITIEs.  PaTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs wERE  RELIEVED  aND  REassURED wHEN  cLINIcIaNs  ¸aDE  aN  ExpLIcIT  cO¸¸IT¸ENT  TO  assIsT  wITH  ¿¾¼  IN  sO¸E  way.  ÁOwEVER,  wHEN cLINIcIaNs DEcLINED TO paRTIcIpaTE aND wERE abLE TO sET cLEaR bOUNDaRIEs  abOUT THEIR ROLE, as IN THE Exa¸pLE bELOw, THEy cOULD sTILL ¸aINTaIN aN I¸pORTaNT RELaTIONsHIp wITH a paTIENT aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER. My INTERNIsT sI¸pLy wILL NOT DO [¿¾¼], NOT jUsT bEcaUsE Of fEaR Of THE Law,  [bUT] bEcaUsE HIs appROacH Is HE wILL NOT END LIfE. . . . º aDORE ¸y INTERNIsT  wHO, wHEN HE HaD ¸ORE  TI¸E, UsED TO  ¸akE HOUsE VIsITs  TO sEE  [¸y LaTE 

HUsbaND wHEN HE was  DyINg] aND pEp HI¸ Up. WONDERfUL. SO º LOVE  THIs  gUy; º REaLLy DO, EVEN THOUgH º DIsagREE wITH HI¸ ON THIs IssUE. º LOVE HI¸, 

291

WHEN  paTIENTs  HaD  HaD  ¸EaNINgfUL  RELaTIONsHIps  wITH  THEIR  cLINIcIaNs,  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  OſtEN  waNTED  sO¸E  cLOsURE wITH  THE¸.  ºN  OUR  sTUDy,  THIs  OccURRED  bOTH  wHEN  cLINIcIaNs assIsTED  ¿¾¼ IN  sO¸E  way aND wHEN  cLINIcIaNs EVaLUaTED aND DIscUssED ¿¾¼ bUT DID NOT assIsT IN aNy way. FOR Exa¸pLE, ¸E¸bERs Of ONE fa¸ILy wENT TO THE pHysIcIaN’s OfficE THE Day aſtER THEIR  ¸OTHER’s DEaTH: “WE TOOk sO¸E LIVINg flOwERs aND a caRD aND a swEaTER . . .  [¸y ¸OTHER] sENT HI¸ HER faVORITE swEaTER; IT was a ¸EN’s swEaTER aNyway.  SO  wE saw HI¸, aND THaT  was OUR cLOsURE wITH HI¸.” ºN  aNOTHER Exa¸pLE,  ONE  paTIENT’s  pHysIcIaN  was sy¸paTHETIc  TO  HER  sITUaTION,  saID  sHE  wOULD  HELp  as  ¸UcH  as  sHE  cOULD  wITH  ¸axI¸IzINg  cO¸fORT,  bUT  aLsO  saID  THaT  sHE  cOULD NOT pROVIDE a pREscRIpTION fOR ¿¾¼ fOR LEgaL REasONs.  °E fa¸ILy  ObTaINED  a pREscRIpTION  ELsEwHERE,  aND ¸aDE  pLaNs  fOR ¿¾¼,  aLL THE  wHILE  ¸aINTaININg cLOsE cONTacT wITH THE pHysIcIaN. °E fa¸ILy caLLED THIs pHysIcIaN THE Day aſtER THE paTIENT DIED Of ¿¾¼, IN paRT TO REassURE THE pHysIcIaN  THaT  sHE  HaD  DONE a  gOOD  jOb.  “[WE]  TOLD HER  IT  wENT  wELL  aND  THaT  sHE  HaDN’T faILED. SHE HaD cRIED. º ¸EaN sHE waNTED TO TOTaLLy HELp Us aND jUsT  fELT HER HaNDs wERE TIED.” °Us, THE THERapEUTIc aspEcT Of a cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp  DOEs  NOT REsT  ON a  cLINIcIaN’s  wILLINgNEss  TO  pROVIDE  a  LETHaL  pREscRIpTION. ±NE  casE  ILLUsTRaTEs  THE  I¸pORTaNcE  Of  cLINIcIaN  sELf-awaRENEss  Of  E¸OTIONaL NEEDs aND VULNERabILITIEs IN ¸aINTaININg a THERapEUTIc RELaTIONsHIp. As  THE  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER  pUT IT, THEIR  pHysIcIaN “LackED  bOUNDaRIEs.” °Is  pHysIcIaN  HaD  aN  INTENsE RELaTIONsHIp  wITH  THE  paTIENT  THaT  INcLUDED  DaILy  TELEpHONE caLLs aND HO¸E VIsITs, aND ON THE NIgHT THE paTIENT aTTE¸pTED ¿¾¼, THE  pHysIcIaN  I¸pLE¸ENTED  a  backUp  pLaN  aſtER  ORaL  ¸EDIcaTIONs  faILED.  AſtER  THE paTIENT’s DEaTH, THE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER REpORTED THaT “[THE pHysIcIaN] wOULD  gO OVER  TO THE HOspITaL  TO sEE a paTIENT, aND sHE’D  caLL ¸E aT  10 O’cLOck ¿.m.  aND say sHE waNTED TO cO¸E OVER [TO OUR HOUsE] aND sIT IN THE ROO¸ wHERE  HE DIED aND ‘HaNg OUT.’ AND º’D say NO, aND sHE’D cO¸E OVER aNyway.” AſtER a  cOUpLE Of THEsE INcIDENTs, THE fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER wROTE THE pHysIcIaN REqUEsTINg  THaT THEy HaVE NO fURTHER cONTacT bEcaUsE HE fELT bURDENED by THEsE REqUEsTs.  ³EgaRDLEss Of THEIR OwN bELIEfs abOUT ¿¾¼, cLINIcIaNs caN ¸aINTaIN THERapEUTIc  RELaTIONsHIps  wITH  THEIR paTIENTs wHEN  OpEN cO¸¸UNIcaTION, ExpERTIsE,  aND  appROpRIaTE bOUNDaRIEs aRE pREsENT.

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

aND º REspEcT HI¸ as a DOcTOR.

Comment 292 °Is REpORT DEscRIbEs cLINIcIaN-paTIENT INTERacTIONs fRO¸ a UNIqUE sET Of DaTa  . l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

INVOLVINg  35  paTIENTs  (aND  THEIR  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs)  wHO  sERIOUsLy  pURsUED  ¿¾¼.  °E qUaLITaTIVE ¸ETHODOLOgy wE UsED  pROVIDEs aN IN-DEpTH, bEHIND-  THE-scENEs LOOk fRO¸ THE paTIENT aND fa¸ILy pERspEcTIVE ON HOw cLINIcIaNs  DEaLT  wITH  REqUEsTs  fOR  ¿¾¼.  FRO¸  ¸ORE  THaN  3,600  pagEs  Of  TRaNscRIbED  INTERVIEws,  wE  IDENTIfiED  THREE  THE¸Es  DEscRIbINg  qUaLITIEs  Of  cLINIcIaN-  paTIENT INTERacTIONs THaT paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs VaLUED HIgHLy. °EsE  THE¸Es  RaIsE  I¸pORTaNT  cONsIDERaTIONs fOR  pHysIcIaNs aND OTHER  cLINIcIaNs  abOUT  THE  skILLs,  aTTITUDEs,  aND  kNOwLEDgE  NEEDED  TO  HaNDLE  REqUEsTs  fOR  ¿¾¼. °E  cONTROVERsy  OVER  THE  ¸ORaLITy  Of  ¿¾¼,  INcLUDINg  sURVEys  Of  THE  gENERaL  pUbLIc,ÄÄ ExTENsIVE ¸EDIa  cOVERagE  Of  Jack KEVORkIaN, ÄÆ THE 1997  ·.S.  SUpRE¸E  COURT  DEcIsION, ÃÆ,ÄÎ aND  ¸EDIcaL  jOURNaLs, Ð,ÄÏ Has  cREaTED  a  cONTExT  fOR  DIscUssINg  ¿¾¼  THaT  HIgHLIgHTs  pOTENTIaL  cONflIcT  bETwEEN  paTIENTs aND cLINIcIaNs. ¶IscUssIONs abOUT DEaTH aND DyINg—EVEN wITHOUT  ¿¾¼—ENgENDER INTENsE  E¸OTIONs IN paTIENTs, fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs,  aND cLINIcIaNs. ÄÐ,ÄÑ ºT cO¸Es as NO sURpRIsE THaT ¸aNy cLINIcIaNs wOULD RaTHER aVOID  THE  TOpIc  aLTOgETHER.  ±UR  fiNDINg  THaT  cLINIcIaNs  HaD  VaRyINg  DEgREEs Of  OpENNEss  TO  DIscUssION  abOUT ¿¾¼  (THE¸E  1),  aND  bROaDER  DIscUssIONs Of  DyINg as wELL, LEaDs  Us TO wONDER wHETHER pUbLIsHED sURVEys Of pHysIcIaNs  acTUaLLy  UNDEREsTI¸aTE  THE  DEgREE  TO  wHIcH  paTIENTs  wIsH  TO  TaLk  abOUT  ¿¾¼. WHEN pHysIcIaNs  say  THaT THEIR paTIENTs NEVER  ask abOUT  ¿¾¼, IT ¸ay  bE  bEcaUsE THEy bLOck THE DIscUssION. MagUIRE ÄÒ Has DEscRIbED HOw cLINIcIaNs  bLOck aND  aVOID  THE cONcERNs THaT  paTIENTs wITH caNcER  HaVE  abOUT  DyINg.  ±UR  DaTa  sUggEsT  THaT  ¿¾¼  Is  aNOTHER  paTIENT  cONcERN  THaT  Is  fREqUENTLy bLOckED. °E  ¸EDIcaL  LITERaTURE  ON  REspONDINg  TO  ¿¾¼  REqUEsTs  ackNOwLEDgEs  THaT THEsE  DIscUssIONs  caN  bE  UNcO¸fORTabLE  aND  awkwaRD,  cHaRacTERIsTIcs  THaT caN bE baRRIERs fOR pHysIcIaNs. BUT wHaT Has NOT bEEN DEscRIbED IN THE  LITERaTURE  Is  THE way  THaT  paTIENTs IN  OUR  sTUDy  UsED DIscUssIONs  abOUT ¿¾¼  as a  sTaRTINg pOINT fOR  DIscUssIONs abOUT DyINg THaT RaNgED  faR bEyOND  ¿¾¼.  ºN  a  ¸EDIcaL  cULTURE  THaT  VIEws  DEaTH  as  a  faILURE,  DyINg paTIENTs  ¸ay  fEEL  as  If THEy  HaVE  faILED.Ä× PHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE  pROVIDEs a  DIffERENT kIND  Of END-Of-LIfE  sTORy fOR  paTIENTs,  ONE THaT E¸pHasIzEs  INDIVIDUaL VaLUEs aND  pERsONaL cHOIcE, ÆØ aND DaTa fRO¸ paTIENTs IN ±REgON UNDERscORE THE I¸pORTaNcE Of aUTONO¸y fOR paTIENTs wHO cHOOsE ¿¾¼.à ±UR DaTa INDIcaTE THaT ¿¾¼ 

caN  sERVE as THE ENTRy pOINT fOR  DIscUssIONs THaT gO  bEyOND THE RIgHT TO DIE  TO  ExpLORE cONcERNs abOUT  DyINg. ³EcOgNIzINg  THIs caN  ENabLE cLINIcIaNs TO 

293

INg ¿¾¼?” IT ¸IgHT bE UsEfUL TO ask, “ÁOw DO yOU waNT yOUR DEaTH TO gO?” OR,  “ÁOw DO yOU waNT IT TO LOOk?” A Lack Of OpENNEss TO DIscUssINg ¿¾¼ ¸ay REsULT IN a “DON’T ask, DON’T TELL”  pOLIcy fOR bOTH paTIENT aND cLINIcIaN. CLINIcIaN OpENNEss ¸ay bE cRUcIaL fOR  paTIENTs TO fEEL cO¸fORTabLE IN ExTENDINg a ¿¾¼ DIscUssION bEyOND TEcHNIcaL  ¸EDIcaL IssUEs, sUcH as a LETHaL pREscRIpTION, aND TOwaRD DIfficULT TOpIcs sUcH  as  DyINg aND  sUffERINg, wHIcH caN cONsTITUTE aN UNackNOwLEDgED  “ELEpHaNT  IN  THE  ROO¸.”ÆÃ,ÆÄ °E  Lack  Of  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  THaT  wE  ObsERVED  abOUT  ¿¾¼  sUggEsTs  THaT  a  kIND  Of  cOLLUsION  ¸ay  OccUR  THaT  ENabLEs  bOTH  paTIENT aND  cLINIcIaN  TO  aVOID  DIfficULT  sUbjEcTs,  as  Has  bEEN  DEscRIbED  IN  OTHER  sITUaTIONs. ÄÒ,ÆÆ COLLUsION  ¸ay  aLLOw a  cLINIcIaN TO  aVOID  a  ¿¾¼  DIscUssION  THaT  Is  awkwaRD aND DIfficULT, bUT aT THE cOsT Of ¸IssINg aN OppORTUNITy TO REassURE  paTIENTs THaT THEIR cONcERNs wILL bE aDDREssED aND THaT THEy wILL NOT bE abaNDONED. ÆÎ,ÆÏ ±UR DaTa sUggEsT THaT THE pREsENcE Of cOLLUsION ¸ay bE a ¸aRkER  fOR  INaDEqUaTE cLINIcIaN cO¸¸UNIcaTION skILLs  OR cLINIcIaN DIscO¸fORT wITH  DyINg, aND ¸ay LEaD TO THE pROVIsION Of a LETHaL pREscRIpTION fOR ¿¾¼ wITHOUT  paTIENT EVaLUaTION. PaTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  aLsO VaLUED  ExpERTIsE  IN  DEaLINg  wITH  THE  DyINg pROcEss  (THE¸E 2). °E  spEcIfic aspEcTs Of ExpERTIsE THaT  OUR sUbjEcTs  ¸ENTIONED INcLUDED cO¸¸UNIcaTION skILLs, sETTINg REasONabLE ExpEcTaTIONs,  INDIVIDUaLIzINg  paIN  cONTROL,  aND  kNOwLEDgE  abOUT  THE  LETHaL  pOTENTIaL  Of  cO¸¸ONLy  UsED  ¸EDIcaTIONs.  °E  cO¸bINaTION  Of  cOgNITIVE  aND  affEcTIVE  skILLs ENcO¸passED IN THEsE ObsERVaTIONs REsONaTEs wITH OTHER wORk DEscRIbINg  cURRIcULaR  NEEDs  fOR  cLINIcIaNs  IN  END-Of-LIfE  caRE.ÆÐ ±UR  wORk  aLsO  UNDERscOREs THE NEED fOR cLINIcIaNs TO HaVE bOTH spEcIfic cONTENT kNOwLEDgE  IN  DIscUssINg  aND  ¸aNagINg  DyINg  aND  paTIENT-cENTERED  cO¸¸UNIcaTIONs  skILLs IN ORDER TO REspOND TO REqUEsTs fOR ¿¾¼.ÆÑ,ÆÒ °E cO¸bINaTION Of OpENNEss  TO DIscUssIONs abOUT ¿¾¼  aND ExpERTIsE IN  DEaLINg wITH THE DyINg pROcEss aRE wHaT ¸akE a cONTINUED cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp pOssIbLE wHEN a paTIENT pURsUEs a HasTENED DEaTH. ±UR DaTa sUggEsT  THaT EVEN fOR THIs HIgHLy sELEcTED  gROUp, a  THERapEUTIc cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp  ¸ay bE  as OR ¸ORE  I¸pORTaNT TO paTIENTs aND  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs  INTEREsTED IN ¿¾¼ THaN a LETHaL pREscRIpTION. WHEN THE paTIENTs IN THIs sTUDy  appROacHED  THEIR  cLINIcIaNs abOUT ¿¾¼,  THEy wERE  UsUaLLy LOOkINg  fOR ¸ORE  THaN  jUsT  a  pREscRIpTION.  °Ey  wERE  LOOkINg  fOR  sO¸EONE wITH  wHO¸  THEy 

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

pRObE bEyOND THE IssUE Of ¿¾¼. ºN aDDITION TO askINg, “WHy aRE yOU cONsIDER-

cOULD  bUILD a  THERapEUTIc aLLIaNcE—a  pERsON  wHO cOULD  acT  as a  sOUNDINg 

294

bOaRD  OR gUIDE THE¸ THROUgH THE DyINg pROcEss. ALTHOUgH sO¸E ExIsTINg  gUIDELINEs  fOR  REspONDINg  TO  ¿¾¼  REqUEsTs  aDDREss  THE  REqUEsT  as  a  sINgLE 

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

EVENT, OUR DaTa E¸pHasIzE THE I¸pORTaNcE Of THE pROcEss Of REspONDINg TO a  REqUEsT OVER TI¸E IN THE cONTExT Of a cLINIcIaN-paTIENT RELaTIONsHIp. PaTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs wERE ¸INDfUL Of THE I¸pORTaNcE Of bOUNDaRIEs IN THERapEUTIc RELaTIONsHIps. ±UR DaTa sHOw HOw UNDERINVOLVE¸ENT OR  OVERINVOLVE¸ENT  by a cLINIcIaN  caN bE pRObLE¸aTIc IN  DEaLINg wITH paTIENTs  REqUEsTINg  ¿¾¼.  °EsE  bEHaVIORs  ¸ay  REflEcT  THE  cLINIcIaN’s  pERsONaL  E¸OTIONs. BLOck aND BILLINgs× aND MILEsÆ× HaVE OUTLINED, basED ON cLINIcaL ExpERIENcE aND a caREfUL REaDINg Of psycHOLOgIcaL aND psycHIaTRIc LITERaTURE, HOw  THE pERsONaL E¸OTIONs Of cLINIcIaNs ¸IgHT INflUENcE THEIR bEHaVIOR IN DEaLINg  wITH a paTIENT cONsIDERINg ¿¾¼. FOR cLINIcIaNs, THEsE IssUEs Of pERsONaL E¸OTION, wHIcH ¸ay INcLUDE sELf-awaRENEss, bOUNDaRIEs, TRaNsfERENcE, OR cOUNTERTRaNsfERENcE,  REqUIRE aTTENTION  bEcaUsE THEy caN facILITaTE  OR cO¸pLIcaTE  THE  cLINIcaL  RELaTIONsHIp.ÎØ–ÎÄ ±UR  fiNDINgs  REINfORcE  OTHER  wORk  sTREssINg  THE I¸pORTaNcE fOR cLINIcIaNs TO ¸ONITOR THEIR OwN fEELINgs aND TO EsTabLIsH  bOUNDaRIEs IN THEIR RELaTIONsHIps wITH paTIENTs. WHILE  THE  sTRENgTHs  Of  THIs  sTUDy  aRE  IN  ITs  DETaILED,  “THIck”  DEscRIpTION  Of  a  s¸aLL  gROUp  Of  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs,  IT  aLsO  Has  cORREspONDINg  LI¸ITaTIONs.  °E  sTUDy  paRTIcIpaNTs  wERE  a  sELf-sELEcTED  sa¸pLE  Of  paTIENTs aND  THEIR fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs wHO  wERE HIgHLy ¸OTIVaTED TO  pURsUE  ¿¾¼,  INTEREsTED  IN  TELLINg  THEIR  sTORIEs,  aND  pHysIcaLLy  abLE  TO  sEaRcH  fOR  aND  fiND  pEOpLE  wILLINg  TO  HELp  facILITaTE  ¿¾¼.  µEaRLy  aLL  OUR  paRTIcIpaNTs  ObTaINED accEss  TO  LETHaL  pREscRIpTIONs  DEspITE  THE  ILLEgaLITy.  °EsE  paRTIcIpaNTs ¸ay NOT bE DIREcTLy cO¸paRabLE TO THOsE Of OTHER ¿¾¼ sTUDIEs  IN  wHIcH  THE  paTIENTs  wERE  ENROLLED fRO¸  INpaTIENT paLLIaTIVE  caRE UNITs ÎÆ OR  HaD a UNIfOR¸ ¸EDIcaL  DIagNOsIs.ÎÎ,ÎÏ ºN aDDITION,  OUR paRTIcIpaNTs NOT  ONLy ExHIbITED a DEsIRE fOR ¿¾¼, as Has  bEEN sTUDIED IN OTHER OUTpaTIENTs,ÎÐ bUT aLsO acTIVELy ¸aDE pLaNs aND TRIED TO I¸pLE¸ENT THE¸ IN ORDER TO HaVE  a HasTENED DEaTH. ANOTHER sTUDy  LI¸ITaTION Is THaT  wE wERE NOT abLE TO  INTERVIEw THE cLINIcIaNs  INVOLVED wITH  OUR  sTUDy  paRTIcIpaNTs.  ºT Is  pOssIbLE  THaT  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILIEs  THE¸sELVEs  cONTRIbUTED  TO  THE  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  IssUEs  DEscRIbED  HERE. FOR Exa¸pLE, paTIENTs wHO wERE sEcRETIVE abOUT THEIR INTENTION TO pURsUE ¿¾¼ ¸ay NOT HaVE aLERTED THEIR cLINIcIaN TO THEIR NEED TO ExpLORE a DEsIRE  fOR  ¿¾¼, OR THEy ¸ay  HaVE  cOLLUDED wITH THEIR  cLINIcIaN  TO aVOID  DIscUssINg  ¿¾¼.ÆÆ

fOR  ´±SpONdINg  TO  A ³ATI±NT  ´±qU±STINg  ³HYSIcIAN-ºSSIST±d  ³´bµ¶ 3ÂUId±lIN±S  ¿UIcId±  (Pas) ¿Ugg±ST±d  bY »H±S±  ¸ATA

295

Ä. Ask abOUT wHaT kIND Of DEaTH THE paTIENT wOULD LIkE TO HaVE.

Æ. AſtER UNDERsTaNDINg paTIENT wIsHEs aND ExpEcTaTIONs, OffER TO DIscUss HOw DyINg  cOULD bE ¸aNagED. Î. CHEck paTIENT pERcEpTION by askINg, “WHaT aRE yOU TakINg away fRO¸ OUR TaLk TODay?” Ï. ³E¸E¸bER THaT THE pROcEss Of bUILDINg a THERapEUTIc RELaTIONsHIp Is ¸ORE I¸pORTaNT  THaN pROVIDINg a LETHaL pREscRIpTION. Ð. MONITOR yOURsELf fOR UNDERINVOLVE¸ENT OR OVERINVOLVE¸ENT IN THE cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp.

FINaLLy,  THE  THE¸Es wE  REpORT  aRE  basED  ON paTIENT  aND  fa¸ILy ¸E¸bER  REpORTs Of THEIR pERcEpTIONs Of cO¸¸UNIcaTION RaTHER THaN ON TRaNscRIpTs OR  VIDEOTapEs Of acTUaL cONVERsaTIONs. ÁOwEVER, paTIENT aND fa¸ILy pERcEpTIONs  aRE  ExTRE¸ELy  I¸pORTaNT,  aND  THE THREE  THE¸Es  THaT  wE  DEscRIbE aRTIcULaTE  paTIENT  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bER  cONcERNs  THaT  wERE  pREsENT  IN  THE  ¸ajORITy  Of  INTERVIEws wE cONDUcTED. BasED ON THIs  sTUDy, wE sUggEsT a  sET  Of gUIDELINEs THaT  cLINIcIaNs ¸IgHT  UsE wHEN REspONDINg TO paTIENT REqUEsTs fOR ¿¾¼ (¹abLE 3). °EsE gUIDELINEs  ¸ay aLsO bE UsEfUL fOR EDUcaTORs wHO aRE TEacHINg cO¸¸UNIcaTION skILLs THaT  aRE RELEVaNT TO END-Of-LIfE caRE.

Conclusions ³EspONDINg TO a paTIENT REqUEsT fOR ¿¾¼ Is aN I¸pORTaNT aND cO¸pLEx cLINIcaL  skILL.  °EsE  cLINIcaL  DIscUssIONs  OccUR  a¸ID  pROfOUND  ¸ORaL  cONTROVERsy,  THE E¸OTIONs ENgENDERED  by DEaTH aND DyINg, aND THE TEcHNIcaL cO¸pLExITIEs Of cONTE¸pORaRy ¸EDIcaL caRE. ±UR paTIENT aND fa¸ILy accOUNTs REVEaL  ¸aNy ¸IssED OppORTUNITIEs fOR cLINIcIaNs TO ENgagE IN THERapEUTIc RELaTIONsHIps  INVOLVINg  DIscUssIONs  abOUT  ¿¾¼,  DyINg,  aND END-Of-LIfE  caRE.  CLINIcIaNs  REspONDINg  TO  paTIENTs  REqUEsTINg  ¿¾¼  NEED  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  skILLs  THaT  wILL  ENabLE  THE¸  TO  DIscUss  ¿¾¼  aND  DyINg  OpENLy,  aN  abILITy TO  TaLk 

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

Ã. ADDREss THE ¿¾¼ REqUEsT ExpLIcITLy aND OpENLy.

abOUT  DyINg  IN  a paTIENT-cENTERED  way,  aND paLLIaTIVE  caRE ExpERTIsE.  °Ey 

296

aLsO NEED ExpERTIsE IN sETTINg REasONabLE ExpEcTaTIONs, INDIVIDUaLIzINg paIN  cONTROL,  aND  pROVIDINg  accURaTE INfOR¸aTION  abOUT  THE  LETHaL  pOTENTIaL  Of 

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

¸EDIcaTIONs.

aPPenDiX:  Parti¾iPants  anD methoDs ³ARTIcIpANT  ´±cRUITM±NT  ANd  ²NfORM±d  CONS±NT WE askED INTER¸EDIaTE sOURcEs sUcH as  paTIENT aDVOcacy ORgaNIzaTIONs  THaT cOUNsEL pERsONs  INTEREsTED  IN  ¿¾¼,  HOspIcEs,  aND  gRIEf  cOUNsELORs  TO  INTRODUcE  OUR  sTUDy TO  pOTENTIaL  paRTIcIpaNTs.  ±UR INTER¸EDIaTE sOURcEs  gaVE DETaILED  wRITTEN INfOR¸aTION sTaTE¸ENTs  DEscRIbINg THE sTUDy TO pROspEcTIVE paTIENTs wITH LIfE-THREaTENINg ILLNEssEs (aND THEIR fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs)  wHO ExpREssED  a sERIOUs  INTEREsT IN ¿¾¼  aND  wERE aTTE¸pTINg  TO  ObTaIN ¸EDIcaTIONs  fOR ¿¾¼. ±UR DEfiNITION Of  family member INcLUDED UN¸aRRIED paRTNERs aND cLOsE  fRIENDs. WE aLsO askED OUR sOURcEs TO ¸aIL INfOR¸aTION sTaTE¸ENTs TO fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs wHO  HaD  bEEN INVOLVED  IN ¿¾¼.  °EsE  INfOR¸aTION sTaTE¸ENTs  askED pOTENTIaL  paRTIcIpaNTs TO  caLL OUR OfficE If THEy wIsHED TO paRTIcIpaTE OR ask qUEsTIONs abOUT THE sTUDy. ±NE INVEsTIgaTOR  (Á.S.) spOkE wITH  EacH pOTENTIaL paRTIcIpaNT TO ExpLaIN sTUDy pROcEDUREs, aNswER qUEsTIONs,  ObTaIN VERbaL INfOR¸ED cONsENT, ENROLL paRTIcIpaNTs, aND cOLLEcT DE¸OgRapHIc DaTa. ¹O  pROTEcT  THE  cONfiDENTIaLITy  Of  OUR  paRTIcIpaNTs,  NO  wRITTEN  cONsENT  fOR¸s  OR  aNy  OTHER  fOR¸s  wITH  IDENTIfyINg  DaTa  wERE  ¸aINTaINED  by  THE  INVEsTIgaTORs.  °E  DETaILED  INfOR¸aTION  sTaTE¸ENTs  DEscRIbED  THE  pURpOsE  Of  THE  sTUDy,  INTERVIEw  pROcEDUREs,  aND  paRTIcIpaNTs’  RIgHT  TO  REfUsE  TO  aNswER  qUEsTIONs  OR  TO  wITHDRaw  fRO¸  THE  sTUDy  aT  aNy  TI¸E.  PROspEcTIVE paTIENTs HaD  TO  HaVE aN ONgOINg RELaTIONsHIp  wITH a casE  ¸aNagER aND  ¸EDIcaL caRE pROVIDERs TO bE ELIgIbLE fOR THE sTUDy. SUbjEcTs IN THE pROspEcTIVE cOHORT wERE  INfOR¸ED VERbaLLy aND IN THE wRITTEN INfOR¸aTION sTaTE¸ENT THaT If INTERVIEwERs IDENTIfiED  a sERIOUs ¸EDIcaL OR psycHIaTRIc IssUE THaT was NOT bEINg aDDREssED, OR If a psycHIaTRIc IssUE  was  caUsINg DEcIsIONaL  INcapacITy, INVEsTIgaTORs wOULD INfOR¸ THE paTIENT’s casE ¸aNagER  aND  wE wOULD DIscONTINUE INTERVIEws wITH THE paTIENT aND  HIs OR HER fa¸ILy. °EsE IssUEs  wERE  DIscUssED  wITH paRTIcIpaNTs IN  DETaIL,  aND INfOR¸ED  cONsENT  was  ObTaINED VERbaLLy  bEfORE EacH INTERVIEw. ALsO, THE INTERVIEw gUIDE fOR pROspEcTIVE paTIENTs cONTaINED a sTaTE¸ENT  assURINg  paTIENTs  THaT  wE  wERE  INTEREsTED  IN THEIR  cONcERNs  aND  DEcIsION-¸akINg  pROcEssEs aND wOULD cONTINUE TO fOLLOw THE¸ REgaRDLEss Of wHETHER OR NOT THEy ULTI¸aTELy  DEcIDED TO pURsUE ¿¾¼. STUDy pROcEDUREs wERE REVIEwED aND appROVED by THE ºNsTITUTIONaL  ³EVIEw BOaRD Of THE ·NIVERsITy Of WasHINgTON, SEaTTLE.

¸ATA COll±cTION WE  cONDUcTED  ¸ULTIpLE  qUaLITaTIVE,  sE¸IsTRUcTURED  INTERVIEws  wITH  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs.  FIVE  INVEsTIgaTORs  cONDUcTED  INTERVIEws,  aND  THE  sa¸E  INVEsTIgaTOR  INTERVIEwED aLL  paRTIcIpaTINg  ¸E¸bERs Of  a fa¸ILy.  °E pROspEcTIVE  casEs INcLUDED  INTERVIEws  wITH 12 paTIENTs aND 20 fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs. °E RETROspEcTIVE casEs INcLUDED INTERVIEws wITH  28 fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs cONcERNINg  23 paTIENTs. ºN TOTaL, wE cONDUcTED  159 INTERVIEws wITH 60 

paRTIcIpaNTs fRO¸ abOUT 35 fa¸ILIEs (12 pROspEcTIVE aND 23 RETROspEcTIVE), REsULTINg IN 3,613  pagEs  Of TRaNscRIpTs. °E INTERVIEw gUIDE  INcLUDED qUEsTIONs  abOUT (1) paTIENT aND  fa¸ILy 

297

INTERacTIONs  wITH  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDERs  REgaRDINg  ¿¾¼  REqUEsTs,  (2)  HOw  THEsE  REqUEsTs 

paRTIcIpaNTs TO pROVIDE DETaILs abOUT THE ¸aNNER Of DEaTH aND aNy cO¸pLIcaTIONs Of a ¿¾¼  aTTE¸pT.  WE  aLsO  askED fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  TO  DEscRIbE  THEIR  pERsONaL  REacTIONs  TO  THE  ¿¾¼  REqUEsT  aND  sUbsEqUENT  EVENTs.  ±THER  TOpIcs  wERE  cOVERED  bUT  aRE  NOT  INcLUDED  IN  THIs  aNaLysIs.

COdINg  ANd ºNAlYTIc  µ±THOdS ALL  INTERVIEws wERE aUDIOTapED aND TRaNscRIbED, wITH IDENTIfyINg DaTa DELETED. ´acH  casE  was  DIscUssED  aT  wEEkLy  ¸EETINgs  by  THE  ¸ULTIDIscIpLINaRy  REsEaRcH  TEa¸  REpREsENTINg  ¸EDIcaL  ONcOLOgy, paLLIaTIVE  caRE,  HEaLTH  sERVIcEs, psycHOLOgy,  aNTHROpOLOgy,  psycHIaTRy,  gERIaTRIcs,  aND  bIOETHIcs.  °E  aNaLyTIc  appROacH  was  basED  ON  gROUNDED  THEORy,  wHIcH  INVOLVEs OpEN cODINg (a pROcEss Of Exa¸ININg, cO¸paRINg, cONcEpTUaLIzINg, aND caTEgORIzINg  DaTa), fOLLOwED by  axIaL cODINg (a  pROcEss Of REassE¸bLINg DaTa INTO gROUpINgs basED  ON RELaTIONsHIps DIscOVERED IN THE DaTa) aND, fiNaLLy, sELEcTIVE cODINg (a pROcEss Of IDENTIfyINg  aND DEscRIbINg cENTRaL pHENO¸ENa IN THE DaTa). WE cODED paTIENTs’ aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs’ fiRsTHaND accOUNTs Of INTERacTIONs wITH cLINIcIaNs,  aND  DID  NOT  cODE  HEaRsay  accOUNTs. ´xa¸pLEs  Of  pRI¸aRy  cODEs INcLUDE  “REasONs  fOR  pURsUINg  ¿¾¼,”  “INTERacTIONs  wITH  HEaLTH  caRE  pROVIDERs,”  aND  “pLaNNINg  fOR  DEaTH.”  °E  INTERVIEwER aND  aNOTHER INVEsTIgaTOR INDEpENDENTLy  cODED aLL  TRaNscRIpTs, cO¸paRED  cODINg,  aND REsOLVED  DIsagREE¸ENTs  IN  cODINg.  SIgNIficaNT  cODINg  DIscREpaNcIEs  wERE  DIscUssED aT THE wEEkLy TEa¸ ¸EETINg. AxIaL cODINg  INVOLVED  aLL  sEcTIONs Of  TRaNscRIpTs  assIgNED  THE  pRI¸aRy  cODE  “INTERacTIONs wITH HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs” fOR THE aNaLysIs pREsENTED HERE. ¹wO INVEsTIgaTORs (A.².B.  aND  Á.S.)  DEVELOpED  sEcONDaRy  cODEs  THaT  cLassIfiED  cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  INTERacTIONs.  °E  INTENT Of THE sEcONDaRy cODINg was TO cHaRacTERIzE cLINIcIaN-paTIENT cO¸¸UNIcaTION abOUT  ¿¾¼, NON-¿¾¼ END-Of-LIfE IssUEs, aND paLLIaTIVE caRE. SEcONDaRy cODEs wERE UsED TO cLassIfy  sUbjEcT  pERcEpTIONs  Of  ¿¾¼  cONVERsaTIONs;  cLINIcIaN kNOwLEDgE,  aTTITUDEs, aND  skILLs;  aND  cLINIcIaN-paTIENT  RELaTIONsHIp  IssUEs.  ´xa¸pLEs  Of  sEcONDaRy  cODEs  INcLUDE “ExpLIcIT  ¿¾¼  DIscUssION,”  “cLINIcIaN  wILLINgNEss TO  DIscUss DyINg,” aND “cLINIcIaN  E¸paTHy.” °E sEcONDaRy cODEs  wERE REfiNED THROUgH  REVIEw wITH THE  ¸ULTIDIscIpLINaRy  REsEaRcH  TEa¸. AT  THIs  sTagE, paRTIcIpaNTs’ sTaTE¸ENTs abOUT wHaT THEy VaLUED IN THEIR cLINIcIaN’s REspONsE TO a ¿¾¼  REqUEsT, OR wHaT THEy waNTED bUT DID NOT gET IN THEIR cLINIcIaN’s REspONsE TO a ¿¾¼ REqUEsT,  E¸ERgED as cENTRaL IssUEs. FINaLLy,  IN  sELEcTIVE  cODINg,  THE  kEy  pHENO¸ENa  THaT  RELaTED  TO  THE  IssUE  Of  HOw  paTIENTs aND fa¸ILy ¸E¸bERs waNTED cLINIcIaNs TO REspOND TO ¿¾¼ REqUEsTs wERE IDENTIfiED.  ±UR  aNaLysIs aT THIs sTEp DIffERs fRO¸ sO¸E OTHER  gROUNDED-THEORy sTUDIEs  IN THaT  wE DID  NOT aTTE¸pT TO bUILD a cO¸pLETELy NEw THEORy Of cLINIcIaN-paTIENT cO¸¸UNIcaTION. ³aTHER,  wE fOcUsED ON paTIENT aND fa¸ILy pERcEpTIONs Of cLINIcIaN-paTIENT cO¸¸UNIcaTION IN ORDER  TO DEscRIbE kEy aTTRIbUTEs Of cO¸¸UNIcaTION abOUT ¿¾¼. °E THREE ¸ajOR THE¸Es wE REpORT  aRE  THE  pRODUcTs  Of  THIs  aNaLysIs. °EsE  THE¸Es wERE  sHaRED  a¸ONg  paTIENTs  aND  fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs  aND DID NOT DIffER bETwEEN pROspEcTIVE aND RETROspEcTIVE sUbjEcTs.

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

wERE  EVaLUaTED,  aND  (3)  THE  pROVIDER’s INVOLVE¸ENT  wITH  ¿¾¼  I¸pLE¸ENTaTION.  WE askED 

¹O ENHaNcE TRUsTwORTHINEss, EacH  sTEp Of THE aNaLysIs was REVIEwED IN wEEkLy INVEsTI-

298

gaTOR  ¸EETINgs TO ENsURE THaT THE  aNaLysIs was aNcHORED TO spEcIfic IDENTIfiabLE DaTa fRO¸  TRaNscRIpTs.  ¾tl¾¼.TI sOſtwaRE was UsED TO facILITaTE  DaTa ¸aNagE¸ENT aND aNaLysIs. ÄÃ °E  THE¸Es fRO¸  THIs aNaLysIs wERE  pREsENTED aT  a ¸EETINg Of  OUR paTIENT aDVOcacy INTER¸E-

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

DIaTE  sOURcEs (a  gROUp THaT  INcLUDEs cLINIcIaNs,  aDVOcaTEs,  aND fa¸ILy  ¸E¸bERs), aND  wE  REcEIVED  VERbaL  aND  wRITTEN  fEEDback cONfiR¸INg  THE  VaLIDITy  Of  OUR  aNaLysIs.  µO  ¸ajOR  cHaNgEs wERE ¸aDE as a REsULT Of THIs pREsENTaTION.

notes 1  CHIN A´, ÁEDbERg K, ÁIggINsON GK, FLE¸INg ¶W. ²EgaLIzED pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE IN ±REgON—THE fiRsT yEaR’s ExpERIENcE. N Engl J Med. 1999;340:577–583. 2  ´¸aNUEL  ´J,  FaIRcLOUgH  ¶²,  ´¸aNUEL  ²². ATTITUDEs  aND  DEsIREs  RELaTED TO  EUTHaNasIa aND pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE a¸ONg TER¸INaLLy ILL  paTIENTs aND  THEIR caREgIVERs. 

¼½¾½. 2000;284:2460–2468. 3  Back A², WaLLacE Jº, STaRks Á´, PEaRL¸aN ³A. PHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE aND EUTHaNasIa  IN WasHINgTON STaTE: paTIENT REqUEsTs aND pHysIcIaN REspONsEs. ¼½¾½ . 1996;275:919–925. 4  MEIER ¶´, ´¸¸ONs CA, WaLLENsTEIN S, QUILL  ¹, MORRIsON  ³S, CassEL CK. A NaTIONaL  sURVEy Of pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE aND EUTHaNasIa IN THE ·NITED STaTEs. N Engl J Med .  1998;338:1193–1201. 5  ´¸aNUEL  ´J,  FaIRcLOUgH  ¶²,  ¶aNIELs  ´³,  CLaRRIDgE  B³.  ´UTHaNasIa  aND  pHysIcIaN-  assIsTED sUIcIDE: aTTITUDEs aND ExpERIENcEs Of ONcOLOgy paTIENTs,  ONcOLOgIsTs, aND THE  pUbLIc. Lancet. 1996;347:1805–1810. 6  FOLEy KM. CO¸pETENT caRE fOR THE DyINg INsTEaD Of pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE. N Engl 

J Med. 1997;336:54–58. 7  ´¸aNUEL  ²².  FacINg  REqUEsTs  fOR pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE:  TOwaRD  a pRacTIcaL  aND  pRINcIpLED cLINIcaL skILL sET. ¼½¾½. 1998;280:643–647. 8  QUILL ¹´, CassEL CK, MEIER ¶´. CaRE Of THE HOpELEssLy ILL: pROpOsED cLINIcaL cRITERIa fOR  pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE. N Engl J Med. 1992;327:1380–1384. 9  BLOck S¶, BILLINgs JA. PaTIENT REqUEsTs TO HasTEN DEaTH: EVaLUaTION aND ¸aNagE¸ENT IN  TER¸INaL caRE.  Arch Intern Med. 1994;154:2039–2047. 10  BLOck S¶, BILLINgs JA. PaTIENT REqUEsTs fOR EUTHaNasIa aND assIsTED sUIcIDE IN TER¸INaL  ILLNEss: THE ROLE Of THE psycHIaTRIsT. Psychosomatics . 1995;36:445–457. 11  ´¸aNUEL ²², VON GUNTEN CF, FERRIs F¶, PORTENOy ³K. Education for Physicians in End- 

of-Life Care (¸º¸´) Trainer’s Guide . CHIcagO, º²: A¸ERIcaN MEDIcaL AssOcIaTION; 1999. 12  QUILL ¹´, ByOck º³. ³EspONDINg TO INTRacTabLE TER¸INaL sUffERINg: THE ROLE Of TER¸INaL  sEDaTION aND  VOLUNTaRy REfUsaL  Of fOOD aND  flUIDs: ¾»¿-¾¼im  ´ND-Of-²IfE  CaRE CONsENsUs  PaNEL:  A¸ERIcaN COLLEgE  Of  PHysIcIaNs–A¸ERIcaN  SOcIETy  Of  ºNTERNaL MEDIcINE. Ann Intern Med. 2000;132:408–414. 13  ±RENTLIcHER ¶. °E SUpRE¸E COURT aND pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE—REjEcTINg assIsTED  sUIcIDE bUT E¸bRacINg EUTHaNasIa. N Engl J Med. 1997;337:1236–1239. 14  SUL¸asy ¶P, ·Ry WA, AHRONHEI¸ JC, ET aL.  PUbLIcaTION Of papERs ON assIsTED sUIcIDE  aND TER¸INaL sEDaTION.  Ann Intern Med. 2000;133:564–566.

15  QUILL ¹´. ¶EaTH aND DIgNITy: a casE  Of INDIVIDUaLIzED DEcIsION ¸akINg.  N Engl J Med.  1991;324:691–694.

299

16  ÂaN  DER  WaL  G, VaN  ´Ijk  J¹, ²EENEN  ÁJ,  SpREEUwENbERg C.  ´UTHaNasIa  aND  assIsTED 

REqUEsTs fOR assIsTED sUIcIDE.  Arch Intern Med. 2000;161:657–663. 18  ¶UIN S, BaRNETT ´. BRIaN’s jOURNEy. Oregonian. µOVE¸bER 25, 1998:A1. 19  ³OLLIN B. Last Wish. µEw YORk: SI¸ON Í ScHUsTER; 1985. 20  Ja¸IsON S. Final Acts of Love: Family, Friends, and Assisted Dying. µEw YORk: GP PUTNa¸’s SONs; 1995. 21  MUHR ¹. ATLAS.ti [cO¸pUTER pROgRa¸]. ÂERsION 4.0. BERLIN, GER¸aNy: ScIENTIfic SOſtwaRE; 1999. 22  BLENDON ³J, SzaLay ·S,  KNOx ³A. SHOULD pHysIcIaNs aID  THEIR paTIENTs  IN DyINg? THE  pUbLIc pERspEcTIVE. ¼½¾½ . 1992;267:2658–2662. 23  BRODy Á. KEVORkIaN aND assIsTED DEaTH IN THE ·NITED STaTEs. Æ¾¼. 1999;318:953–954. 24  BURT ³A. °E SUpRE¸E COURT spEaks—NOT assIsTED sUIcIDE bUT a cONsTITUTIONaL RIgHT TO  paLLIaTIVE caRE. N Engl J Med. 1997;337:1234–1236. 25  ANgELL M. °E SUpRE¸E  COURT aND pHysIcIaN-assIsTED sUIcIDE—THE  ULTI¸aTE RIgHT. 

N Engl J Med. 1997;336:50–53. 26  SIEgEL  B.  CRyINg  IN  sTaIRwELLs:  HOw  sHOULD  wE  gRIEVE  fOR  DyINg  paTIENTs?  ¼½¾½ .  1994;272:659. 27  PaRkEs CM. °E DyINg aDULT. Æ¾¼ . 1998;316:1313–1315. 28  MagUIRE P. º¸pROVINg  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  wITH  caNcER  paTIENTs.  Eur  J Cancer .  1999;35:  1415–1422. 29  FIELD MJ, CassEL CK.  Approaching Death: Improving Care at the End of Life. WasHINgTON, ¶C: µaTIONaL AcaDE¸y PREss; 1997. 30  ÁU¸pHRy ¶.  Final Exit . ´UgENE, ±³: ÁE¸LOck SOcIETy; 1991. 31  QUILL  ¹´. ºNITIaTINg END-Of-LIfE  DIscUssIONs wITH sERIOUsLy ILL paTIENTs:  aDDREssINg THE  “ELEpHaNT IN THE ROO¸.” ¼½¾½. 2000;284:2502–2507. 32  ²O B, QUILL ¹, ¹ULsky J. ¶IscUssINg paLLIaTIVE caRE wITH paTIENTs: ¾»¿-¾¼im ´ND-Of-²IfE  CaRE CONsENsUs PaNEL: A¸ERIcaN COLLEgE Of PHysIcIaNs-A¸ERIcaN SOcIETy Of ºNTERNaL  MEDIcINE. Ann Intern Med. 1999;130:744–749. 33  °E AM,  Áak ¹, KOETER  G, VaN  DER WaL G. COLLUsION  IN DOcTOR-paTIENT  cO¸¸UNIcaTION abOUT I¸¸INENT DEaTH: aN ETHNOgRapHIc sTUDy. West J Med. 2001;174:247–253. 34  QUILL  ¹´,  CassELL  CK.  µONabaNDON¸ENT:  a  cENTRaL  ObLIgaTION  fOR  pHysIcIaNs.  Ann 

Intern Med. 1995;5:368–374. 35  ´psTEIN ³M, MORsE ¶S, FRaNkEL ³M, FRaREy ², ANDERsON K, BEck¸aN ÁB. AwkwaRD  ¸O¸ENTs  IN  paTIENT-pHysIcIaN  cO¸¸UNIcaTION  abOUT  hiv  RIsk.  Ann  Intern  Med.  1998;128:435–442. 36  CURTIs J³, WENRIcH M¶, CaRLINE J¶, SHaNNON S´, A¸bROzy ¶M, ³a¸sEy PG. ·NDERsTaNDINg pHysIcIaNs’ skILLs aT pROVIDINg END-Of-LIfE caRE pERspEcTIVEs Of paTIENTs, fa¸ILIEs, aND HEaLTH caRE wORkERs. J Gen Intern Med . 2001;16:41–49. 37  ³OTER  ¶², ²aRsON  S,  FIscHER  GS, ARNOLD  ³M,  ¹ULsky  JA. ´xpERTs pRacTIcE wHaT  THEy  pREacH: a DEscRIpTIVE sTUDy Of bEsT aND NOR¸aTIVE pRacTIcEs IN END-Of-LIfE DIscUssIONs. 

Arch Intern Med. 2000;160:3477–3485.

ediciuS detsissA-naicisyhP

sUIcIDE, ºº: DO ¶UTcH fa¸ILy DOcTORs acT pRUDENTLy? Fam Pract . 1992;9:135–140. 17  KOHLwEs ³J, KOEpsELL ¹¶, ³HODEs ²A, PEaRL¸aN ³A. PHysIcIaNs’ REspONsEs TO paTIENTs’ 

38  ´¸aNUEL  ´J,  FaIRcLOUgH  ¶,  CLaRRIDgE  BC,  ET  aL.  ATTITUDEs  aND  pRacTIcEs  Of  ·.S. 

300

ONcOLOgIsTs  REgaRDINg  EUTHaNasIa  aND  pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE.  Ann  Intern  Med .  2000;133:527–532. 39  MILEs SÁ. PHysIcIaNs aND THEIR paTIENTs’ sUIcIDEs. ¼½¾½. 1994;271:1786–1788.

. l a  te  kcaB  . L  y n o h t n A

40  µOVack ¶Á,  SUcH¸aN A², CLaRk  W, ´psTEIN  ³M,  µajbERg  ´, KapLaN C.  CaLIbRaTINg  THE pHysIcIaN: pERsONaL awaRENEss aND EffEcTIVE paTIENT caRE: WORkINg GROUp ON PRO¸OTINg PHysIcIaN PERsONaL AwaRENEss, A¸ERIcaN AcaDE¸y ON PHysIcIaN aND PaTIENT. 

¼½¾½. 1997;278:502–509. 41  FaRbER  µJ,  µOVack  ¶Á,  ±’BRIEN  MK.  ²OVE,  bOUNDaRIEs,  aND  THE  paTIENT-pHysIcIaN  RELaTIONsHIp. Arch Intern Med. 1997;157:2291–2294. 42  BaLINT M. °e Doctor, His Patient, and the Illness. µEw YORk: ºNTERNaTIONaL ·NIVERsITIEs  PREss ºNc; 1957. 43  BREITbaRT  W,  ³OsENfELD  B,  PEssIN  Á,  ET  aL.  ¶EpREssION,  HOpELEssNEss,  aND  DEsIRE  fOR  HasTENED DEaTH IN TER¸INaLLy ILL paTIENTs wITH caNcER. ¼½¾½. 2000;284:2907–2911. 44  GaNzINI ², JOHNsTON WS, McFaRLaND BÁ, ¹OLLE SW, ²EE MA. ATTITUDEs Of paTIENTs wITH  a¸yOTROpHIc LaTERaL  scLEROsIs  aND  THEIR  caRE  gIVERs  TOwaRD assIsTED  sUIcIDE.  N  Engl  J 

Med. 1998;339:967–973. 45  CHOcHINOV ÁM, WILsON KG, ´NNs M, ET aL. ¶EsIRE fOR DEaTH IN THE TER¸INaLLy ILL.  Am 

J Psychiatry. 1995;152:1185–1191. 46  ²aVERy  JÂ,  BOyLE  J,  ¶IckENs  BM,  MacLEaN  Á,  SINgER  PA.  ±RIgINs  Of  THE  DEsIRE  fOR  EUTHaNasIa aND assIsTED sUIcIDE IN pEOpLE wITH hiv-1 OR ¾id¼: a qUaLITaTIVE sTUDy. Lan-

cet. 2001;358:362–367.

My FATheR’s  DeATh Susan M. Wolf

¶UTy: AN acT . . . REqUIRED Of ONE by pOsITION, sOcIaL cUsTO¸, Law, OR  RELIgION. . . . MORaL ObLIgaTION. — American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed.

My  faTHER’s  DEaTH  fORcED ¸E  TO RETHINk  aLL  º  HaD  wRITTEN  OVER  TwO  DEcaDEs  OppOsINg  LEgaLIzaTION  Of  pHysIcIaN-assIsTED  sUIcIDE  aND  EUTHaNasIa.à °aT  sHOULD NOT HaVE sURpRIsED ¸E. YEaRs agO, wHEN º sTaRTED wORkINg ON END-Of-  LIfE  caRE, HE cHaLLENgED ¸y VIEws ON aDVaNcE  DIREcTIVEs by INsIsTINg THaT HE  wOULD  waNT  “EVERyTHINg,”  EVEN IN  a  pERsIsTENT VEgETaTIVE  sTaTE.  “º ¸aDE  THE  ¸ONEy,  sO º  caN  spEND IT.”  MORE DEEpLy,  HE  aRgUED  THaT  THE  ÁOLOcaUsT was  INcO¸paTIbLE  wITH  THE  ExIsTENcE  Of  GOD.  °ERE  Is  NO  aſtERLIfE,  HE  cLaI¸ED.  °Is Is IT, aND HE waNTED EVERy LasT bIT Of “IT” ON aNy TER¸s. My faTHER was a  s¸aRT, saVVy LawyER, THE fa¸ILy paTRIaRcH. ÁE was  fORcEfUL, EVEN INTI¸IDaTINg aT TI¸Es. WE HaD fOUgHT OVER THE yEaRs, EspEcIaLLy as º  NEaRED cOLLEgE. °aT was pRObabLy NEcEssaRy—¸y sEpaRaTINg aND OUR DIsENgagINg. WHEN º was a cHILD, IT was a fa¸ILy jOkE HOw OſtEN HE aND  º saID THE  sa¸E THINg aT THE sa¸E TI¸E. WE wERE aLIkE IN ¸aNy ways. My faTHER was DIagNOsED wITH a ¸ETasTaTIc HEaD aND NEck caNcER IN 2002.  ÁIs  pREDIcTabLE  VIEw  was “spaRE  NO EffORT.”  A  TOp HEaD  aND  NEck sURgEON  wORkED THROUgH  cONflIcTINg paTHOLOgy REpORTs TO LOcaTE THE pRI¸aRy TU¸OR  IN THE THyROID aND ExcIsE THE gLaND. METasTasEs wOULD cROp Up fRO¸ TI¸E TO  TI¸E,  bUT RaDIaTION  aND  THEN CybERKNIfE RaDIOsURgERy  kEpT THE¸  IN cHEck.  FOR fiVE yEaRs HE DID wELL. °INgs cHaNgED IN JUNE Of 2007. °E LasT CybERKNIfE TREaT¸ENT was bILLED  as THE wORsT, wITH sIgNIficaNT paIN LIkELy TO fOLLOw. SURE ENOUgH, TEN Days LaTER,  ¸y  faTHER’s paIN  ON swaLLOwINg  bEca¸E sEVERE.  ÁE  bEgaN LOsINg wEIgHT—a 

SUsaN M.  WOLf, “CONfRONTINg PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED  SUIcIDE aND ´UTHaNasIa:  My FaTHER’s  ¶EaTH,”  fRO¸  Hastings  Center  Report 38,  NO. 5 (2008):  23–26.  ³EpRINTED by  pER¸IssION  Of  JOHN  WILEy  aND SONs.

LOT Of IT. ÁE  wEakENED. ÁE fELL TwIcE IN HIs  apaRT¸ENT.  ÁIs REgULaR INTERNIsT 

302

was OUT Of TOwN, sO HE wENT TO THE E¸ERgENcy ROO¸ Of a LOcaL HOspITaL. ¶OcTORs  DID  LITTLE  fOR  THIs  79-yEaR-OLD  ¸aN  wITH a  5-yEaR  HIsTORy  Of ¸ETasTaTIc 

f l o W   . M  n a s u S

THyROID caNcER pLUs E¸pHysE¸a aND cHRONIc ObsTRUcTIVE pUL¸ONaRy DIsEasE. ÁE  was  bRIEfly  DIscHaRgED TO  HO¸E  bUT fiNaLLy  ¸aDE  IT  TO  THE HEaD  aND  NEck  sURgEON wHO  HaD fOUND THE  pRI¸aRy TU¸OR IN  2002. ±NE LOOk  aT  ¸y  faTHER aND THE sURgEON aD¸ITTED HI¸, ORDERINg a gasTROsTO¸y TUbE TO DELIVER  NUTRITION.  µOw  ¸y  faTHER  was  IN  aN ExcELLENT  HOspITaL, wITH  THE  HEaD  aND  NEck, pUL¸ONOLOgy, aND gasTROENTEROLOgy sERVIcEs wORkINg HI¸ Up. °E ¸OOD  bRIgHTENED  aND  THE fa¸ILy gaTHERED aROUND  HI¸. º spENT  Days IN HIs  sUNNy  HOspITaL  ROO¸ RE¸INIscINg, pLOwINg THROUgH THE  New York Times wITH HI¸,  sINgINg THE cOLLEgE figHT sONgs HE OffERED as LULLabIEs wHEN º was LITTLE. WITH ¸ULTIpLE sERVIcEs fOcUsINg ON ¸y faTHER’s cONDITION, º HOpED THE pIcTURE  wOULD  sOON cO¸E cLEaR. º waITED fOR a  sINgLE pHysIcIaN TO pUT  THE pIEcEs  TOgETHER. AND THE ¸EDIcaL pIcTURE was bEcO¸INg wORsE. A sURgIcaL pROcEDURE  REVEaLED caNcER IN THE LIVER. PUL¸ONOLOgy aDDED pNEU¸ONIa TO THE ROsTER Of  LUNg aIL¸ENTs. MEaNwHILE, DIppINg OxygEN saTURaTION NU¸bERs DROVE a  TRIp  TO  THE INTENsIVE caRE  UNIT. ATTE¸pTED ENDOscOpy REVEaLED a  TU¸OR bETwEEN  THE EsOpHagUs aND  TRacHEa, NaRROwINg THE EsOpHagUs. BUT NO pHysIcIaN was  pUTTINg  THE wHOLE  pIcTURE TOgETHER. WHaT  TREaT¸ENT aND paLLIaTIVE OpTIONs  RE¸aINED,  If  aNy?  WHaT  paTHways  sHOULD  HE—aND  wE—bE  cONsIDERINg  aT  THIs pOINT?

He Said He Wanted to Stop My  faTHER  was  bEcO¸INg  INcREasINgLy  wEak.  ÁE  was  fiNDINg  IT  DIfficULT  TO  “fOcUs,” as HE pUT IT. ÁE cOULD NOT REaD, DO THE New York Times cROsswORD  pUzzLEs  HE  UsED TO  kNOck Off IN  aN  HOUR,  OR EVEN  waTcH  tv. FORTUNaTELy,  HE  cOULD TaLk, aND wE spENT HOURs ON TRIps HE HaD TakEN aROUND THE wORLD, fa¸ILy  HIsTORy, HIs aDVENTUREs as a LITIgaTOR. BUT HE was cONfiNED TO bED aND DID LITTLE  wHEN HE was aLONE. °EN ONE ¸ORNINg  HE saID HE waNTED TO sTOp. µO ¸ORE TUbE fEEDINg. µO  ONE was pREpaRED fOR THIs swITcH fRO¸ a LIfETI¸E Of “spaRE NO EffORT.” ÁE TOLD ¸E  HE fEaRED HE was NOw a TERRIbLE bURDEN. º pROTEsTED, kNOwINg THaT º wOULD wILLINgLy bEaR THE “bURDEN” Of HIs ILLNEss. º sUspEcT THaT wHaT OTHERs saID was ¸ORE  pOwERfUL, THOUgH. º was LaTER TOLD THaT THE DOcTOR URgED HI¸ NOT TO sTOp, waRNINg THaT HE wOULD sUffER a paINfUL DEaTH, THaT ¸ORpHINE wOULD bE REqUIRED TO  cONTROL THE DIscO¸fORT, aND THaT ¸y faTHER wOULD LOsE cONscIOUsNEss bEfORE 

THE Day was OUT. ºNsTEaD Of assURINg ¸y faTHER THaT HEaLTH pROfEssIONaLs kNOw  HOw  TO ¸aINTaIN cO¸fORT  aſtER TER¸INaTION  Of aRTIficIaL NUTRITION aND HyDRa-

303

wOULD wIsH aLOUD THaT HE HaD caRRIED THROUgH wITH THIs DEcIsION. CONVINcED NOw THaT  HE HaD  NO cHOIcE, ¸y faTHER sOLDIERED ON. BUT HOspITaL pERsONNEL  aNNOUNcED THaT IT was TI¸E fOR HI¸ TO LEaVE THE HOspITaL. WE  wERE  INcREDULOUs.  ÁE cOULD  NOT sTaND,  waLk,  OR EaT.  ÁE  HaD  bEDsOREs. ´VEN  TRaNsfERRINg  HI¸  fRO¸  bED TO a  cHaIR was  DIfficULT.  AND THE RIgORs  Of TRaNspORTINg HI¸ IN THE EaRLy AUgUsT HEaT wERE wORRIsO¸E. BUT THEy URgED TRaNsfER  TO  a  REHabILITaTION  facILITy.  My  faTHER  was assURED  THaT  wITH  cONTINUED TUbE  fEEDINg aND REHab, HE cOULD bE waLkINg INTO THE sURgEON’s OfficE IN ±cTObER. ºT  sEE¸ED  TO  ¸E  ¸y  faTHER  was  bEINg  abaNDONED.  ÁIs  pROgNOsIs  was  cLEaRLy  baD  aND  HE  HI¸sELf  HaD  NOw  RaIsED  THE  pROspEcT  Of  sTOppINg  TUbE  fEEDINg aND DyINg, bUT IT sHOckED ¸E TO sEE THE HOspITaL TRy TO gET RID Of HI¸.  YEs, THE HOspITaL saID HE cOULD RETURN (sO¸EHOw) IN LaTE SEpTE¸bER TO sEE THE  ent  ONcOLOgIsT. BUT as faR as º kNEw, THaT  pHysIcIaN HaD NEVER EVEN ¸ET ¸y  faTHER. AND  º DOUbTED ¸y faTHER  wOULD ¸akE  IT  TO SEpTE¸bER.  STILL, NO ONE  was  INTEgRaTINg THE  bIg pIcTURE.  °ERE sEE¸ED TO bE  LITTLE cHOIcE. My faTHER  was  sUccEssfULLy TRaNspORTED by a¸bULaNcE TO aNOTHER  HOspITaL wITH a wELL-  REgaRDED REHabILITaTION UNIT. °E TRaNsfER  pROVIDED bRIEf REspITE. My faTHER was  DELIgHTED THaT  HE was  NOw ONLy bLOcks fRO¸ HIs apaRT¸ENT, aND THE ENTIcINg pOssIbILITy Of acTUaLLy  gOINg HO¸E bEckONED. BUT THE REHab UNIT DE¸aNDED HOURs pER Day Of RIgOROUs  wORk  fRO¸ EacH paTIENT.  My faTHER was  TOO wEak.  AND HIs  pNEU¸ONIa  was aN IssUE. ÁE was ¸OVED Off REHab TO THE ¸EDIcaL flOOR. A cO¸passIONaTE  aND aTTENTIVE HOspITaLIsT appEaRED, TRyINg TO pUT TOgETHER THE bIg pIcTURE. SHE  sET abOUT cOLLEcTINg THE REpORTs fRO¸ THE pRIOR TwO HOspITaLs aND INTEgRaTINg  THE¸. AgaIN, ¸aNy  TEa¸s wERE ON bOaRD, INcLUDINg RHEU¸aTOLOgy NOw fOR  flaRINg gOUT. º REqUEsTED THE paLLIaTIVE caRE TEa¸. ´VEN THOUgH ¸y faTHER cOULD bE LUcID  aND  “HI¸sELf,”  º  LIsTENED  paINfULLy  as  HE  faLTERED  THROUgH  THE qUEsTIONs  ON  THEIR  ¸INI–¸ENTaL Exa¸.  ºT was  HaRD TO accEpT THaT  THIs paRagON Of aNaLyTIc  aND  VERbaL  pREcIsION was  faILINg.  º  aLERTED  a  ¸E¸bER  Of  THE  paLLIaTIVE  caRE  TEa¸  THaT  ¸y faTHER  HaD  EVIDENTLy bEEN  ¸IsINfOR¸ED aT  THE pRIOR  HOspITaL  abOUT  THE  cONsEqUENcEs  Of  sTOppINg  aRTIficIaL  NUTRITION  aND  HyDRaTION.  º  URgED HER TO fiND  a TI¸E  TO REassURE HI¸ THaT  HE INDEED HaD  cHOIcEs, cOULD  REfUsE  TREaT¸ENTs If  HE  waNTED TO,  aND  cOULD  bE cONfiDENT THaT  HIs  cO¸fORT  wOULD bE ¸aINTaINED. º ¸aDE cLEaR TO HER THaT º HOpED HE wOULD cHOOsE TO  sTay THE cOURsE fOR NOw aND RE¸aIN wITH Us, bUT THaT HE DEsERVED TO kNOw 

htaeD  s’rehtaF  y M

TION,  ¸y  faTHER  was  scaRED  away  fRO¸  THIs  OpTION.  WEEks  LaTER,  ¸y  faTHER 

THaT HE HaD THE cHOIcE. My faTHER HaD DEsIgNaTED HIs TwO pROxy DEcIsION ¸ak-

304

ERs  (ONE  Of  THE¸ ¸E),  bUT  cOULD  sTILL  paRTIcIpaTE  IN  THE  ¸EDIcaL  DEcIsION  ¸akINg. ÁIs VaLUEs aND HIs sUbjEcTIVE ExpERIENcE—wHETHER HE waNTED ¸ORE 

f l o W   . M  n a s u S

INTERVENTIONs OR HaD REacHED HIs LI¸IT—wERE kEy. STILL  UNREsOLVED,  THOUgH,  was  THE  qUEsTION  Of  wHERE  wE  wERE  HEaDED.  COULD  TUbE  fEEDINg  aND  REHab bRINg  HI¸ HO¸E  aND  EVEN waLkINg  INTO  THE  sURgEON’s OfficE IN ±cTObER? Was THERE TREaT¸ENT THaT cOULD sLOw THE gROwTH  Of THE NEwLy  DIscOVERED caNcER IN  HIs LUNg? SHOULD  wE INsTEaD pURsUE HOspIcE  caRE? AT  TI¸Es, ¸y faTHER’s  ILLNEss sEE¸ED LIkE  Rashomon,  a sTORy  wITH  cONflIcTINg  VERsIONs aND pOssIbLE  TRajEcTORIEs. BUT sOON ¸y faTHER was  back  IN  THE  i»u,  wITH OxygEN  saTURaTION  pERcENTagEs DIppINg  INTO  THE sEVENTIEs.  ¹UbE fEEDINg was sO UNcO¸fORTabLE THaT IT was aD¸INIsTERED sLOwLy THROUgH  THE NIgHT. PaIN ¸EDIcaTION was a cONsTaNT. ¶EspITE THIs, HE HELD cOURT IN HIs  ROO¸,  ENjOyINg THE  baNTER, aND OffERINg  HIs OwN wITH  THaT  wRy s¸ILE aND  cOckED EyEbROw. ÁE was bRIEfly TRaNsfERRED TO THE pUL¸ONaRy caRE UNIT, as THE ¸OsT pREssINg IssUEs aT THIs pOINT wERE acTUaLLy NOT caNcER bUT LUNg ¸UcUs aND sEcRETIONs,  as  wELL as  pNEU¸ONIa. º aRRIVED  ONE ¸ORNINg  TO fiND  HI¸ UpsET. ÁIs NURsE  was NOT aNswERINg HIs caLLs, aND HIs I¸¸ObILITy LEſt HI¸ aT HER ¸ERcy. º sU¸¸ONED THE HIgHLy ExpERIENcED aND E¸paTHETIc sUpERVIsOR, bUT EVEN bEHIND  cLOsED DOORs wITH HER HE was afRaID TO spEak pLaINLy. º saw THIs TOUgH-as-NaILs  LITIgaTOR REDUcED TO fEaRfUL DEpENDENcE.

“Can We Accelerate?” By  ¸ORNINg  THERE was a  NEw pRObLE¸.  My faTHER HaD  DEVELOpED a  ¸assIVE  bLEED.  µURsINg HaD fOUND HI¸ IN a pOOL Of HIs OwN bLOOD, LyINg a¸ONg THE  cLOTs.  °E gasTROENTEROLOgIsTs  TOOk HI¸  IN fOR  a  pROcEDURE, spENDINg HOURs  TRyINg TO fiND THE sOURcE Of THE bLEED. °Ey NEVER fOUND IT. My faTHER REqUIRED  TRaNsfUsION Of ¸OsT Of HIs bLOOD VOLU¸E. °E bLEEDINg abaTED, bUT wE kNEw  IT cOULD REsU¸E aNy TI¸E. °aT was IT—THE fiNaL  bLOw. My faTHER was  back IN THE i»u NOw,  bUT THE  bLEED aND THE HOURs spENT sEaRcHINg fOR ITs sOURcE wERE TOO ¸UcH. ÁE waITED  UNTIL wE  gaTHERED aT HIs bEDsIDE. ÁIs spEEcH  was HaLTINg NOw, bUT HIs DETER¸INaTION ObVIOUs. “¹ELL ¸E ¸y cHOIcEs.” WE wENT THROUgH EacH OpTION—yOU  caN kEEp gOINg LIkE THIs, OR yOU caN gO back TO THE flOOR If THE i»u Is bOTHERINg yOU, OR yOU caN HaLT THE TUbE fEEDINg aND iv HyDRaTION. YOU aLsO caN waIT,  RaTHER THaN DEcIDINg RIgHT NOw.

FOR cLOsE TO aN HOUR wE sTayED IN a TIgHT cIRcLE aROUND HIs bED, sTRaININg  TO HEaR HIs EVERy wORD, cRyINg, REspONDINg TO EacH qUEsTION. AT ONE pOINT, º 

305

2  ¾.m.,” HE  saID. ÁE  waNTED  a  DEcIsION NOw. “°aT’s  wHaT º  waNT. ¹O  TER¸INaTE.” ÁE ¸aDE IT cLEaR HE waNTED TO sTOp TUbE fEEDINg aND iv HyDRaTION. BUT  THaT wasN’T ENOUgH. ÁE waNTED cONsENsUs. WITH THE  DEcIsION ¸aDE, wE  sET  abOUT cO¸¸UNIcaTINg IT TO  THE caREgIVERs  aND gETTINg  NEw ORDERs wRITTEN. ºT was  THEN THaT HE  UTTERED THREE wORDs  THaT  sHOOk  ¸E. “CaN  wE accELERaTE?”  ºT  sEE¸ED HE  was askINg  fOR  ¸ORE—a  fasT DEaTH, by assIsTED sUIcIDE OR EUTHaNasIa. ³EflExIVELy, º saID NO, bUT wITH a  pRO¸IsE—wE caN ¸akE absOLUTELy cERTaIN THEy kEEp yOU cO¸fORTabLE. ´VEN  If  yOU  caN’T  TaLk,  EVEN  If  yOU  appEaR  cO¸aTOsE,  If  yOU  ¸ERELy  fURROw  yOUR  bROw, wE’LL kNOw yOU NEED ¸ORE paIN ¸EDIcaTION. º kNEw RIgHT away THaT  º NEEDED TO THINk THROUgH ¸y “NO.” ºN REaLITy, wE  wERE  IN  THE  i»u  Of  a  ¸ajOR  HOspITaL  IN  a  jURIsDIcTION  THaT  aLLOwED  NEITHER  assIsTED sUIcIDE NOR EUTHaNasIa. ºNDEED, NO jURIsDIcTION IN THE ·NITED STaTEs  aLLOws  EUTHaNasIa,  aND  ¸y faTHER  was  bEyOND  assIsTED sUIcIDE  by  swaLLOwINg pREscRIbED LETHaL ¸EDIcaTION, as HE cOULDN’T swaLLOw aNyTHINg. BUT º sTILL  NEEDED TO THINk THIs THROUgH. º  kNEw  THaT  IN  sO¸E  ways,  ¸y  faTHER  pREsENTED  wHaT  pROpONENTs  Of  assIsTED  sUIcIDE  aND  EUTHaNasIa  wOULD  REgaRD  as  a  sTRONg  casE.  ÁE  was  cLEaRLy DyINg Of pHysIcaL caUsEs,  UNLIkE THE cONTROVERsIaL 1991  Chabot casE  IN  THE µETHERLaNDs INVOLVINg a paTIENT wHO was ¸ERELy DEpREssED. ÁE cERTaINLy HaD LEss THaN sIx ¸ONTHs  TO  LIVE. ÁE was pRObabLy  DEpREssED by  HIs  ILLNEss,  bUT  IN  a way  THaT  was appROpRIaTE  TO  HIs sITUaTION.  ÁIs  DEcIsIONaL  capacITy HaD sURELy DEcLINED, bUT HE was abLE TO ExpREss DEfiNITE TREaT¸ENT  pREfERENcEs. MOREOVER, HE wasN’T  askINg  fOR a cHaNgE IN pOLIcy OR  Law.  STaTEwIDE OR  NaTIONaL  cHaNgEs  IN  pOLIcy  REqUIRE  cONsIDERINg  a  HUgE  RaNgE  Of  paTIENTs,  aNTIcIpaTINg THE pREDIcTabLE ERRORs aND abUsEs. °E ¶UTcH HaVE bRaVELy DOcU¸ENTED  aLL  Of  THIs  THROUgH  E¸pIRIcaL  sTUDy  Of  THEIR  pRacTIcE  Of  LEgaLIzED  EUTHaNasIa—VIOLaTIONs  Of  THE  REqUIRE¸ENT fOR  a  cONTE¸pORaNEOUs  REqUEsT  by  a  cO¸pETENT  paTIENT,  DOcTORs  faILINg TO  REpORT  THE  pRacTIcE as  REqUIRED,  aND  pRacTIcE  faLLINg  DOwN  THE  sLIppERy  sLOpE  TO  EUTHaNasIa  Of  NEwbORNs.Ä ±REgON  Has DOcU¸ENTED  ITs ExpERIENcE wITH LEgaLIzED  assIsTED sUIcIDE,  TOO,  bUT ONLy THE casEs REpORTED as REqUIRED, LEaVINg gREaT UNcERTaINTy abOUT casEs  NOT  REpORTED.Æ My  faTHER  wasN’T  askINg  fOR  sOcIETaL  cHaNgE,  THOUgH,  ONLy  wHETHER HE HI¸sELf cOULD “accELERaTE.” º facED THE HIgHLy INDIVIDUaL qUEsTION  Of HOw TO DO RIgHT by ¸y OwN faTHER.

htaeD  s’rehtaF  y M

THOUgHT HE waNTED TO waIT, bUT HE caLLED Us back. “ºT cOULD HappEN agaIN. AT 

We Kept Vigil, around the Clock 306 ºN  TRUTH, IT  was  LIfE  THaT  aNswERED THE qUEsTION,  NOT LOgIc.  ºN sO¸E ways,  IT  f l o W   . M  n a s u S

wOULD HaVE bEEN psycHOLOgIcaLLy EasIER, OR aT LEasT fasTER, TO bRINg THE ORDEaL  wE aLL wERE ExpERIENcINg TO a qUIck END. º was IN a cITy faR fRO¸ ¸y HUsbaND  aND cHILDREN, DOINg sHIſts aT ¸y faTHER’s bEDsIDE aT aLL HOURs, fEaRfUL Of ¸ORE  LOO¸INg  ¸EDIcaL DIsasTERs INcREasINg HIs  DIscO¸fORT. BUT INsTEaD Of ENDINg  aLL Of THIs aND flEEINg, wE sTayED, REDOUbLINg OUR aTTENTION TO HI¸. º sTROkED  HIs  THIck wHITE HaIR. ÁE  aND º RE¸INIscED. ÁE was  aLways a gREaT RacONTEUR.  WE  TaLkED aND TaLkED OVER THE NExT Days. °E  DEcIsION TO sTOp TUbE fEEDINg  acTUaLLy sEE¸ED TO LIgHTEN HIs LOaD. A DEcIsION. ºN a way, IT was a RELIEf. AND  ExEcUTINg THE  DEcIsION TOOk  wORk, ITsELf  a  DEVOTION.  ºT was  aROUND  6  ¿.m. wHEN THE DEcIsION was ¸aDE. °E  i»u DOcTOR ca¸E TO THE bEDsIDE TO  cONfiR¸ THE NEw pLaN aND  assURE ¸y faTHER THaT HE wOULD  bE kEpT cO¸fORTabLE.  BUT THE  paLLIaTIVE caRE  pROfEssIONaL,  abOUT TO gO  Off-DUTy,  INsIsTED THaT  ¸y faTHER wOULD NEED TO LEaVE THE HOspITaL. º was asTONIsHED. Was sHE sayINg  HE cOULD  NOT TER¸INaTE TREaT¸ENT HERE? °aT THE HOspITaL HaD  NO IN-paTIENT  HOspIcE  caRE? °aT yOU cOULD accEpT INVasIVE TREaT¸ENT aT THIs HOspITaL, bUT  NOT  REfUsE  IT? AſtER  yEaRs Of wORkINg ON  END-Of-LIfE IssUEs,  º  kNEw  bETTER. º  cONfRONTED  HER: “YOU  kNOw  THaT  ¸y faTHER  Has  a  cONsTITUTIONaL  aND  cO¸¸ON Law  RIgHT TO  REfUsE INVasIVE TREaT¸ENT, INcLUDINg IN  THIs HOspITaL.” SHE  accEDED, bUT INsIsTED THaT HE wOULD NO LONgER ¸EET THE cRITERIa fOR HOspITaLIzaTION;  HE wOULD  NEED TO LEaVE, TO  a HOspIcE  facILITy OR HO¸E. °E  HOspITaL  EVIDENTLy HaD NO HOspIcE TO OffER. FINE, wE wOULD sET abOUT aRRaNgINg aD¸IssION TO HOspIcE. °ERE  was  ¸ORE—cONcERNs  OVER  wHETHER  THE  flUID  flOwINg  THROUgH  a  RE¸aININg LINE wOULD wRONgLy pROLONg HIs LIfE aND wHETHER gIVINg ¸ORpHINE  by  pU¸p RaTHER THaN  THROUgH HIs  LINE wOULD DO  THE sa¸E. º  REacHED OUT by  cELL pHONE aND E¸aIL TO cOLLEagUEs wHO wERE ExpERT IN ¸aINTaININg cO¸fORT  wHEN  aRTIficIaL NUTRITION  aND  HyDRaTION  aRE  sTOppED. WE  sIgNED THE  papERs  REqUEsTINg TRaNsfER TO HOspIcE. AT ONE pOINT, ¸y faTHER askED, “WILL º sEE THE  END cO¸INg OR faDE away?” µO ONE IN THE HOspITaL was cOUNsELINg ¸y faTHER.  º wORkED ¸y cELL pHONE fOR aNswERs aND caRRIED THE¸ TO ¸y faTHER’s bEDsIDE.  ¹O  a  ¸aN wHO  cOULD HOLD  NO faITH  aſtER THE ÁOLOcaUsT,  º EVEN  bROUgHT THE  wORDs aND ExpERIENcE Of ¸y RabbI. WE kEpT VIgIL, aROUND THE cLOck. ÁE was OUT Of THE i»u NOw, IN a HOspITaL  ROO¸ awaITINg TRaNsfER TO HOspIcE. As HE  bEgaN TO  DOzE ¸ORE aND TaLk  LEss,  wE  waTcHED caREfULLy fOR  THE sLIgHTEsT sIgN Of DIscO¸fORT. WE  HaD pRO¸IsED  wE wOULD assURE HIs cO¸fORT. °aT ¸EaNT cONsTaNT VIgILaNcE.

°E LasT TI¸E º saw ¸y faTHER, HE was ¸OTIONLEss. ÁIs EyEs wERE cLOsED. ÁE  HaD  sTOppED  spEakINg.  ÁE  appEaRED  UNREspONsIVE. ÁIs  bREaTHINg  was  qUI-

307

sTROkED HIs HaIR, sTILL fULL aND sILVERED. º spOkE TO HI¸ fRO¸ THE HEaRT, wORDs  THaT  RE¸aIN bETwEEN HI¸ aND  ¸E. °EN º HEaRD ¸ysELf say, “ºf º a¸ a gOOD  ¸OTHER,  IT’s bEcaUsE yOU wERE a gREaT faTHER.” AND TO ¸y sURpRIsE, HE ¸OVED  HIs  jaw. µOT HIs LIps OR HIs ¸OUTH. BUT HE OpENED HIs jaw THREE TI¸Es. ºT was  OUR  sIgNaL,  THE  ONE wE’D wORkED  OUT IN  THE i»u.  °REE  ¸EaNs “º-LOVE-yOU.”  ¹EaRs sTREa¸ED DOwN ¸y facE. º sTRUggLED, RE¸E¸bERINg THE RabbI’s caUTION  THaT THE ONEs wE LOVE ¸OsT ¸ay NEED pER¸IssION TO LEaVE Us, TO DIE. “º kNOw  yOU ¸ay HaVE TO LEaVE bEfORE º gET back. °aT’s Okay.” ºT fELT NEaRLy I¸pOssIbLE  TO LET HI¸ gO. My cHEsT was bURsTINg. °E paIN was cRUsHINg. WHEN º fiNaLLy LEſt, º was wORkINg TO bREaTHE. ¹akINg ONE sTEp THEN aNOTHER.  BREakINg  DOwN,  cOLLEcTINg ¸ysELf,  bREakINg  DOwN  agaIN. ÁE  DIED  NOT LONg  aſtER.

In the End º  wILL  NOT  pRETEND—THERE was  a  pRIcE  TO bE  paID  fOR  gOINg  THE  LONgER  way,  NOT  THE sHORTER. My faTHER  DIED sLOwLy. ÁE  HaD TO  TRUsT THaT  wE wOULD  kEEp  a  fEROcIOUs VIgIL,  DE¸aNDINg  wHaTEVER  paLLIaTIVE  caRE  HE  NEEDED.  ºT was  HE  wHO TRaVELED THaT ROaD, NOT ¸E. º paID ¸y OwN pRIcE, THOUgH. º fELT THE HEaVy  wEIgHT Of HIs  TRUsT aND THE ObLIgaTION TO figHT  fOR HI¸. º was scaRED º ¸IgHT  faIL. º fELT VERy cLOsE TO THE jaws Of DEaTH. BUT wITH EVERy ¸E¸ORy wE sHaRED wHILE  HE cOULD  spEak, EVERy LILT Of HIs  EyEbROw aND  wRy s¸ILE, wE  baskED TOgETHER IN LIfE, REVELED IN a  bIT ¸ORE  Of  54 yEaRs  TOgETHER aND  HIs NEaRLy 80 ON THIs EaRTH. Fa¸ILy aND caREgIVERs DID  ¸aNagE TO kEEp HI¸ cO¸fORTabLE. ÁE DIED LOVED aND LOVINg. º gRIEVE sTILL. º REREaD THE LETTERs HE wROTE HO¸E fRO¸ ±xfORD IN HIs 20s, º  pORE  OVER THE gENEaLOgy  cHaRTs  HE paINsTakINgLy  cONsTRUcTED OVER DEcaDEs,  º fiNgER THE abacUs HE kEpT IN HIs Law OfficE. º gO TO E¸aIL HI¸, THEN RE¸E¸bER. º wOULD NOT waNT TO bEaR THE bURDEN Of HaVINg “accELERaTED,” Of caUsINg  HIs  DEaTH by EUTHaNasIa OR assIsTED sUIcIDE; THIs Is  HaRD ENOUgH.  My faTHER’s  DEaTH  ¸aDE  ¸E  RETHINk  ¸y  ObjEcTIONs  TO  LEgaLIzINg  assIsTED  sUIcIDE  aND  EUTHaNasIa,  bUT  IN  THE  END  IT  LEſt  ¸E  aT  EasE  wITH  wHaT  º’VE  wRITTEN.  STayINg,  kEEpINg VIgIL, figHTINg TO sEcURE a  cO¸fORTabLE DEaTH, sTROkINg  HIs HaIR,  sTaNDINg gUaRD as DEaTH  appROacHED was  ¸y DUTy. ºT was  THE fiNaL RIpENINg  Of ¸y LOVE. WE bOTH cHaNgED, EVEN cLOsER aT THE END.

htaeD  s’rehtaF  y M

ETER, Rasps gONE wITH DEHyDRaTION. º TOOk HIs HaND. º TOLD HI¸ º LOVED HI¸. º 

308

notes

f l o W   . M  n a s u S

1  ºN  THE ¸ID-1980s, º HaD  LED THE ÁasTINgs CENTER  pROjEcT THaT DEVELOpED  Guidelines  on 

the Termination of Life-Sustaining  Treatment and the Care  of the Dying (ºNDIaNapOLIs:  ºNDIaNa  ·NIVERsITy  PREss,  1987).  FOR  a  sa¸pLE Of  ¸y  sUbsEqUENT  wORk  ON  pHysIcIaN-  assIsTED  sUIcIDE,  sEE  “GENDER,  FE¸INIs¸,  aND  ¶EaTH:  PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED  SUIcIDE  aND  ´UTHaNasIa,”  IN  Feminism  and  Bioethics:  Beyond  Reproduction,  ED.  S.  M.  WOLf  (µEw  YORk: ±xfORD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1996), 282–317; “PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED SUIcIDE IN THE CONTExT Of  MaNagED CaRE,”  Duquesne Law Review 35  (1996): 455–479; “PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED  SUIcIDE, AbORTION, aND ¹REaT¸ENT ³EfUsaL: ·sINg GENDER TO ANaLyzE THE ¶IffERENcE,” IN 

Physician-Assisted  Suicide,  ED.  ³.  WEIR (ºNDIaNapOLIs: ºNDIaNa  ·NIVERsITy PREss,  1997),  167–201;  “FacINg  AssIsTED  SUIcIDE  aND  ´UTHaNasIa  IN  CHILDREN  aND  ADOLEscENTs,”  IN 

Regulating How We Die: °e Ethical, Medical, and Legal Issues Surrounding Physician-  Assisted Suicide, ED. ². ². ´¸aNUEL (Ca¸bRIDgE, MA.: ÁaRVaRD ·NIVERsITy PREss, 1998),  92–119, 274–294;  “PRag¸aTIs¸  IN THE  FacE Of  ¶EaTH: °E  ³OLE Of  FacTs IN THE  AssIsTED  SUIcIDE ¶EbaTE,” Minnesota Law Review 82 (1998):  1063–1101; aND “AssEssINg PHysIcIaN  CO¸pLIaNcE  wITH  THE  ³ULEs fOR  ´UTHaNasIa aND  AssIsTED SUIcIDE,”  Archives  of Internal 

Medicine 165 (2005): 1677–1679. 2  º DIscUss aLL Of THIs IN ¸y wORk cITED abOVE. SEE aLsO P. J. VaN DER Maas ET aL., “´UTHaNasIa  aND ±THER MEDIcaL ¶EcIsIONs CONcERNINg THE ´ND Of ²IfE,”  Lancet 338 (1991): 669–674;  ². PIjNENbORg ET aL., “²IfE-¹ER¸INaTINg AcTs wITHOUT ´xpLIcIT ³EqUEsT Of PaTIENT,” Lancet 341 (1993): 1196–1199; P. J. VaN DER Maas ET aL., “´UTHaNasIa, PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED SUIcIDE,  aND ±THER MEDIcaL PRacTIcEs ºNVOLVINg THE ´ND Of ²IfE IN THE µETHERLaNDs, 1990–1995,” 

New England Journal of Medicine 335 (1996): 1699–1705; G. VaN DER WaL ET aL., “´VaLUaTION  Of  THE  µOTIficaTION PROcEDURE  fOR  PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED ¶EaTH  IN THE  µETHERLaNDs,”  New 

England  Journal of Medicine 335  (1996): 1706–1711; A.  VaN  DER ÁEIDE  aND  P. J. VaN  DER  Maas, “MEDIcaL  ´ND-Of-²IfE ¶EcIsIONs MaDE fOR µEONaTEs aND ºNfaNTs  IN THE  µETHERLaNDs,”  Lancet 350 (1997):  251–255; B. ¶.  ±NwUTEaka-PHILIpsEN  ET aL., “´UTHaNasIa aND  ±THER ´ND-Of-²IfE  ¶EcIsIONs  IN THE  µETHERLaNDs  IN 1990,  1995, aND  2001,”  Lancet 362  (2003): 395–399; ¹. SHELDON,  “±NLy ÁaLf  Of ¶UTcH ¶OcTORs  ³EpORT ´UTHaNasIa, ³EpORT  Says,” British Medical Journal 326 (2003): 1164; ¹. SHELDON, “¶UTcH ³EpORTINg Of ´UTHaNasIa  CasEs FaLLs—¶EspITE ²EgaL  ³EpORTINg ³EqUIRE¸ENTs,”  British Medical  Journal  328 (2004):  1336; B. ¶. ±NwUTEaka-PHILIpsEN  ET aL., “¶UTcH ´xpERIENcE Of  MONITORINg  ´UTHaNasIa,”  British Medical Journal 331  (2005): 691–693;  ´. ÂERHagEN  aND P. J. J.  SaUER,  “°E GRONINgEN PROTOcOL: ´UTHaNasIa IN SEVERELy ºLL µEwbORNs,”  New England  Journal 

of Medicine 352 (2005): 959–962;  A. VaN DER ÁEIDE  ET aL.,  “´ND-Of-²IfE PRacTIcEs IN THE  µETHERLaNDs  UNDER THE ´UTHaNasIa AcT,”  New England Journal  of Medicine 356 (2007):  1957–1965. 3  SEE K. FOLEy aND Á. ÁENDIN, “°E ±REgON ³EpORT: ¶ON’T Ask, ¶ON’T ¹ELL,” Hastings Cen-

ter Report 29, NO. 3 (1999): 37–42;  ´. J. ´¸aNUEL,  “±REgON’s PHysIcIaN-AssIsTED  SUIcIDE  ²aw: PROVIsIONs aND PRObLE¸s,” Archives of Internal Medicine 156 (1996): 825–829.

allocaTion and JuSTice

V

This page intentionally left blank

GlossARy JUSTIc±  ANd TH±  ºllOcATION  Of ¶±AlTH  ´±SOURc±S Rebecca L. Walker and Larry R. Churchill

ÁEaLTH-RELaTED  REsOURcEs  aRE aLLOcaTED  IN  a  VasT aRRay  Of DIffERENT ways aND  by  ¸ULTIpLE agENTs. A¸ONg THE ¸aNy  aLLOcaTINg agENTs aRE INDIVIDUaL cLINIcIaNs,  INsTITUTIONs  sUcH  as  HOspITaLs,  INsURERs, aND  cO¸¸UNITIEs,  as  wELL  as  LEgaL aND gOVERN¸ENT bODIEs. °E LEVELs Of aLLOcaTION aLsO RaNgE fRO¸ ¸IcRO  TO ¸acRO. FOR Exa¸pLE, REsOURcEs caN bE aLLOcaTED bETwEEN aND a¸ONg INDIVIDUaL  paTIENTs, gROUps  Of paTIENTs, aND  cO¸¸UNITIEs, aND  by UsINg  cRITERIa  sUcH  as INsURaNcE TypE, REsIDENcy, aND INsTITUTIONaL affiLIaTION, a¸ONg ¸aNy  OTHERs.  ÁEaLTH-RELaTED  REsOURcEs  aRE ¸UcH  bROaDER  THaN ¸EDIcaL  INTERVENTIONs, DRUgs, aND DEVIcEs. ±THER, pERHaps ¸ORE sIgNIficaNT, REsOURcEs INcLUDE 

health care access (INcLUDINg aDEqUaTE INsURaNcE aND aVaILabLE aND aTTENTIVE  pROVIDERs), public health resources (INcLUDINg cLEaN waTER, I¸¸UNIzaTIONs, aND  HEaLTH bEHaVIOR pROgRa¸s), aND THE social determinants THaT HELp sHapE HEaLTH  OUTcO¸Es  (INcLUDINg  wEaLTH,  EDUcaTION,  aND sOcIaL  sTaTUs). ÁOw  wE  aLLOcaTE  HEaLTH-RELaTED REsOURcEs Has ¸UcH TO DO wITH THE TypE Of REsOURcE, THE agENTs  DOINg THE aLLOcaTION, aND THE LEVEL aT wHIcH THE REsOURcE Is bEINg DIsTRIbUTED. FOR Exa¸pLE, aLLOcaTION Of sOLID ORgaNs fRO¸ DEcEasED DONORs Is ¸aNagED  wITHIN  THE ·NITED  STaTEs by  a  sINgLE bODy—THE ·NITED  µETwORk  fOR ±RgaN  SHaRINg—a  pRIVaTE  NETwORk  THaT  THE  fEDERaL  gOVERN¸ENT  Has  cONTRacTED  wITH sINcE 1986 TO RUN THE NaTION’s ±RgaN PROcURE¸ENT aND ¹RaNspLaNTaTION  µETwORk. °E  NETwORk UsEs ¸ULTIpLE  cRITERIa fOR DIffERENT ORgaN sysTE¸s  TO  aLLOcaTE, by  REgION, a¸ONg INDIVIDUaLs ON a  NaTIONaL waIT LIsT. ALLOcaTION Of  HEaLTH INsURaNcE,  ON THE OTHER HaND, DEpENDs ON ¸ULTIpLE facTORs INcLUDINg  INDIVIDUaL abILITy TO pay, gOVERN¸ENT aLLOcaTION Of fUNDs aND pOLIcIEs DETER¸ININg  ENROLL¸ENT  (fOR  Exa¸pLE,  fOR  MEDIcaID),  jOb  sTaTUs  (fOR  INsURaNcE  THROUgH E¸pLOyERs), aND I¸¸IgRaTION sTaTUs. µO ¸aTTER THE LEVEL aT wHIcH HEaLTH-RELaTED REsOURcEs aRE aLLOcaTED, HOwEVER,  ETHIcaL  cONsIDERaTIONs  Of  jUsTIcE  cO¸E  INTO  pLay.  ²aRgER-scaLE  pHILOsOpHIcaL  THEORIEs  REgaRDINg  distributive  justice HaVE  INcLUDED  egalitarian

THEORIEs,  wHIcH  TRack  THE  ¸ORaL  EqUaLITy  Of  pERsONs  by  aI¸INg  fOR  sO¸E 

312

kIND  Of  EqUaLITy  IN  THE  DIsTRIbUTION  Of  sOcIaL  gOODs;  utilitarian THEORIEs,  wHIcH  aI¸  TO  ¸axI¸IzE  THE  cOLLEcTIVE  wELfaRE  OUTcO¸Es  fOR  aLL  THOsE 

l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L   d n a   r e k l a W  . L   a c c e b e R

affEcTED by a paRTIcULaR aLLOcaTION; aND  libertarian THEORIEs, wHIcH E¸pHasIzE fREEDO¸ by ENVIsIONINg THaT whatever DIsTRIbUTION aRIsEs fRO¸ THE fREE  ExcHaNgE  Of  gOODs  aND  sERVIcEs  bETwEEN  pOLITIcaLLy  EqUaL  INDIVIDUaLs  Is  jUsT.  SUcH  bROaD-scaLE THEORIEs, HOwEVER, ¸UsT  bE INTERpRETED  THROUgH THE  LENs Of paRTIcULaR aLLOcaTION pRINcIpLEs aND ¸ETHODs THaT fURTHER THE UNDERLyINg VaLUEs  THaT THE THEORIEs  pRO¸OTE. BELOw wE LIsT  a NU¸bER Of pRINcIpLEs  aND ¸ETHODs Of aLLOcaTION THaT HaVE bEEN pROpOsED as RELEVaNT TO THE aLLOcaTION  Of  HEaLTH  REsOURcEs.  ºT  Is  I¸pORTaNT  TO  NOTE  THaT  ¸OsT  REaL-wORLD  aLLOcaTION ¸ETHODs appEaL TO OR INcLUDE ¸ULTIpLE aLLOcaTION pRINcIpLEs.

willingness to pay â  AccORDINg  TO  THIs ¸ETHOD, pEOpLE’s  wILLINgNEss  TO pay fOR HEaLTH REsOURcEs (OR HEaLTH INsURaNcE) ¸IRRORs THE VaLUE THEy pLacE  ON  THEsE  REsOURcEs  as  OppOsED  TO  OTHER  gOODs  THEy  aLsO  VaLUE.  ¶IsTRIbUTINg accORDINg TO wILLINgNEss TO pay by UsINg ¸aRkETs THUs aLLOws ¸axI¸U¸  fREEDO¸ Of cHOIcE bETwEEN DIffERENT kINDs Of gOODs. °Is ¸ETHOD Is IN kEEpINg wITH  pHILOsOpHIcaL LIbERTaRIaN THEORIEs Of  DIsTRIbUTIVE  jUsTIcE  THaT pLacE a  pRE¸IU¸ ON bOTH INDIVIDUaL fREEDO¸ Of cHOIcE aND REspONsIbILITy fOR cHOIcEs.  ºT DOEs NOT aTTEND TO sOcIaL DETER¸INaNTs Of cHOIcEs OR TO EqUaLITy Of OUTcO¸Es.

merit justice â  Is “backwaRD LOOkINg” IN THaT IT cONsIDERs a pERsON’s pasT  acTIONs IN DEcIDINg HOw TO aLLOcaTE HEaLTH REsOURcEs. WITH REspEcT TO HEaLTH  caRE, THIs pRINcIpLE TakEs INTO accOUNT THE ROLE Of INDIVIDUaL REspONsIbILITy fOR  HEaLTH  OUTcO¸Es.  °OsE wHO  appEaR  TO  bE THE  ¸OsT  bLa¸ELEss  wITH REgaRD  TO  THEIR  HEaLTH  caRE  NEEDs REcEIVE  REsOURcEs  aND  sERVIcEs  fiRsT aND/OR  THOsE  sEEN as NEgLIgENTLy REspONsIbLE fOR THEIR HEaLTH ¸IgHT REcEIVE LEssER pRIORITy.  MERIT  jUsTIcE ¸IgHT aLsO TakE a  bROaDER VIEw Of INDIVIDUaL “¸ERIT” aND aLLOcaTE  fEwER REsOURcEs  TO THOsE pERsONs  wHO HaVE  cO¸¸ITTED  cRI¸Es OR HaVE  OTHERwIsE “EaRNED” LEss sUppORT fRO¸ sOcIETy. °Is pRINcIpLE ¸ay bE IN kEEpINg wITH a LIbERTaRIaN THEORy Of DIsTRIbUTIVE jUsTIcE IN sO faR as IT E¸pHasIzEs  pERsONaL cHOIcE aND REspONsIbILITy.

justice as social worth â  Is  “fORwaRD LOOkINg”  bEcaUsE IT  TakEs  INTO  cONsIDERaTION fUTURE sOcIETaL cONTRIbUTIONs wHEN aLLOcaTINg HEaLTH caRE. °Is 

Is NOT ¸ERELy pREfERENcE fOR THOsE wITH gREaTER sOcIaL sTaTUs (sUcH as THE pREsIDENT OR fa¸OUs pEOpLE), bUT RaTHER pRO¸OTEs THOsE wHO cONTRIbUTE IN VaRI-

313

jObs  sUppORTINg sOcIaL  INfRasTRUcTURE,  THOsE wHOsE  IDEas  ¸ay  LEaD TO  gREaT  fUTURE  HEaLTH caRE  bREakTHROUgHs, OR EVEN THOsE wHO caN  ENTERTaIN OTHERs).  ºN  gENERaL, ¸ORE  EffORT  Is ExpENDED  ON THOsE wHO  caN REcOVER aND  bE  pRODUcTIVE.  A  UTILITaRIaN  THEORy  Of  DIsTRIbUTIVE  jUsTIcE, accORDINg  TO  wHIcH wE  aLLOcaTE sO as TO acHIEVE THE gREaTEsT HappINEss fOR THE gREaTEsT NU¸bER, wILL  TakE sUcH cONsIDERaTIONs INTO accOUNT (as LONg as TakINg sUcH cONsIDERaTIONs  INTO accOUNT DOEsN’T ITsELf UNDULy UNDER¸INE UTILITy).

cost- b enefit  analysis  (cba) â  Is  cLOsELy  RELaTED  TO  sOcIaL  wORTH  cONsIDERaTIONs  bUT  fOcUsEs  ON sOcIaL  cONTRIbUTIONs  IN  DOLLaR  a¸OUNTs  aND  fUTURE  fiNaNcIaL  DRaIN  as  wELL  as  ON  cOsTs  Of  THE  HEaLTH  INTERVENTIONs.  °E  aI¸ Is  TO aLLOcaTE HEaLTH REsOURcEs  IN ways THaT gIVE THE ¸OsT OVERaLL fiNaNcIaL  gaIN aND  THE  LEasT OVERaLL  fiNaNcIaL  ExpENDITURE fOR  THE  gREaTEsT HEaLTH  bENEfiT. °Is ¸ETHOD TakEs INTO accOUNT sUcH NONHEaLTH OUTcO¸Es as abILITy  TO  RETURN TO wORk  aND  THE OVERaLL  cOsT Of a  pERsON’s  cONTINUED ILL HEaLTH  ON  sOcIaL REsOURcEs. »½¾ Is cO¸paTIbLE wITH a LI¸ITED-scOpE UTILITaRIaN aNaLysIs  (E.g., ONE fOcUsED NOT ON bROaDER wELfaRE, bUT ON sOcIaL cONTRIbUTION as ¸EasURED EcONO¸IcaLLy).

cost- e ffectiveness  analysis  (cea) â  Is  cLOsELy  RELaTED  TO  cOsT-  bENEfiT  aNaLysIs,  bUT  DOEs  NOT  TakE  INTO  accOUNT  NONHEaLTH  OUTcO¸Es  OR  fUTURE  cOsTs. »e¾ aI¸s TO  acHIEVE THE ¸OsT HEaLTHy LIfE yEaRs OVERaLL fOR  THE  pOpULaTION  sERVED  aT  THE  LEasT  fiNaNcIaL  cOsT  fOR  THE  INTERVENTION  aT  IssUE.  °Is ¸ETHOD Is OſtEN sEEN as syNONy¸OUs wITH cHOOsINg THE ¸OsT “EfficIENT”  HEaLTH  REsOURcE  DIsTRIbUTION. ²IkE  »½¾,  »e¾  Is  cO¸paTIbLE  wITH  a  LI¸ITED-  scOpE UTILITaRIaN aNaLysIs (fOcUsED ON HEaLTH-RELaTED qUaLITy Of LIfE ¸EasUREs).

resource egalitarianism â  aI¸s TO gIVE  EacH pERsON  aN EqUaL  sHaRE  Of  sOcIaL  REsOURcEs. SOcIaL  REsOURcEs  aRE  THOsE  REsOURcEs  THaT  EVERyONE  Has  sO¸E  cLaI¸  ON  bEcaUsE  THEy  aRE  gaINED  THROUgH  sOcIaL  cOOpERaTION.  FOR  Exa¸pLE,  THOsE  REsOURcEs  THaT  THE  gOVERN¸ENT  LEgITI¸aTELy  gaINs  THROUgH  TaxaTION ¸ay bE caLLED “sOcIaL REsOURcEs.” WITH REspEcT TO HEaLTH caRE, THIs TypE  Of THEORy ¸IgHT sUppORT EqUaL HEaLTH INsURaNcE fOR aLL. ±THER HEaLTH-RELaTED 

n o i t a c o l l A   d n a  e c i t s u J   : y r a s s o l G

OUs ways TO OTHER pEOpLE IN sOcIETy (THOsE caRINg fOR DEpENDENTs, THOsE wITH 

EgaLITaRIaN pRINcIpLEs, IN aDDITION TO THOsE LIsTED bELOw, sTRIVE fOR EqUaLITy IN 

314

HEaLTH OUTcO¸Es OR IN HEaLTH saTIsfacTION.

l l i h c r u h C   . R   y r r a L   d n a   r e k l a W  . L   a c c e b e R

capacity egalitarianism â  aI¸s  fOR  aLL  TO  HaVE  EqUaL  capacITIEs  TO  cHOOsE bETwEEN VaRIOUs VIsIONs Of “THE gOOD LIfE.” ±N THIs THEORy, DIsTRIbUTINg REsOURcEs EqUaLLy Is NOT REaLLy EqUITabLE sINcE pEOpLE HaVE DIffERENT VIEws  Of wHaT THEy waNT TO DO aND wHO THEy waNT TO bE, aND aLsO sTaRT Off wITH VERy  DIffERENT capacITIEs. WHaT wE REaLLy waNT Is TO DIsTRIbUTE EqUaLLy THE capacity OR  freedom TO acHIEVE THOsE ENDs.

prioritarian princi  p le â  AccORDINg  TO  THIs pRINcIpLE, wE  sHOULD DIsTRIbUTE  REsOURcEs  IN a  way  THaT ¸axI¸IzEs  THE pOsITION  Of THE LEasT wELL-Off  pERsON.  WITH  REspEcT  TO  HEaLTH  REsOURcEs,  THIs  wILL  ¸EaN  THaT  wE  HaVE  TO  assIsT  THE  most  ill first.  ºN aN E¸ERgENcy sITUaTION, fOR  Exa¸pLE, THIs pRINcIpLE  pRIORITIzEs REscUE fOR  THOsE NEaREsT TO  DEaTH. ºN a  DIffERENT cONTExT,  LIkE  pROVIDINg  INsURaNcE, THIs  pRINcIpLE wOULD pRIORITIzE INsURINg THOsE ¸OsT IN  NEED  Of  HEaLTH  caRE  aND  wITH  THE  LEasT  abILITy  TO  sELf-pay.  °Is  pRINcIpLE  Is  OſtEN sEEN as fOLLOwINg fRO¸ aN EgaLITaRIaN THEORy Of jUsTIcE.

princi p le of restorative justice â  ·sINg THIs pRINcIpLE, REsOURcEs  aRE  pRIORITIzED fOR  THOsE wHOsE ¸aLaDIEs aRE  caUsED OR ExacERbaTED by  pREVIOUs  sOcIaL  OR  EcONO¸Ic  INjUsTIcEs.  FOR  Exa¸pLE,  THE  cURRENT  cONcENTRaTION  Of sO¸E RacIaL  OR ETHNIc ¸INORITy pOpULaTIONs  IN NEIgHbORHOODs  wITH  HIgH  RaTEs  Of  ENVIRON¸ENTaL HazaRDs  (LEaDINg TO  HIgHER  RaTEs Of  cHILDHOOD  asTH¸a, LEaD pOIsONINg, aND OTHER ILLNEss)  ¸ay bE LINkED TO pasT sOcIaL aND  EcONO¸Ic  INjUsTIcEs, INcLUDINg DIscRI¸INaTORy LENDINg  pOLIcIEs. ³EsTORaTIVE  jUsTIcE  Is  cO¸paTIbLE  wITH  bOTH  EgaLITaRIaN  aND  LIbERTaRIaN  THEORIEs.  MOsT  cLEaRLy,  REsTORaTIVE  jUsTIcE  Is  cO¸paTIbLE  wITH  EgaLITaRIaN  THEORIEs  THaT  aRE  INTEREsTED IN REcTIfyINg pERsIsTENT INEqUaLITIEs. ÁOwEVER, bEcaUsE LIbERTaRIaN  THEORIEs TakE pOLITIcaL EqUaLITy as a NOR¸aTIVE sTaRTINg pLacE, THOsE INDIVIDUaLs wHO  aRE NOT pOLITIcaLLy  EqUaLLy sITUaTED bEcaUsE Of pasT  INjUsTIcE sHOULD  bE cO¸pENsaTED.

honor long-  s tanding  obligations â  ÁERE  a  ¸ORaL  cRITERION  fOR  DIsTRIbUTINg REsOURcEs Is  LOyaLTy TO  THOsE wHO HaVE bEEN pREVIOUsLy TREaTED, 

OR TO wHO¸ fiDELITy Is OwED bEcaUsE Of pRIOR ObLIgaTIONs—sUcH as THE ELDERLy  aND  pERsONs  aLREaDy  DEpENDENT  ON  ExIsTINg  pROgRa¸s,  sERVIcEs, aND  TEcH-

315

wITH, THOUgH IT sEE¸s TO pLay a ROLE IN ¸EDIcaL ETHIcs NOR¸s by appEaLINg TO  ¸ORaL pRINcIpLEs LIkE fiDELITy aND THE DUTy NOT TO abaNDON paTIENTs.

draw  the  winners  from  a  hat â  °Is  LOTTERy  appROacH  ¸IgHT  bE  UsED  wHEN aLL sERVIcEs  OR REcIpIENTs aRE  THOUgHT  TO bE EqUaLLy  ¸ERITORIOUs,  OR  wHEN  THEIR  RELaTIVE  wORTH  caNNOT bE  (OR  sHOULD NOT  bE)  jUDgED.  PROpONENTs Of a LOTTERy ¸ETHOD say IT gIVEs EVERyONE aN EqUaL cHaNcE. ±ppONENTs  caLL  IT  ga¸bLINg aND  cONsIDER  IT a  cHOIcE by  DEfaULT. °Is  ¸ETHOD  cOULD  bE  appEaLINg TO DIffERENT THEORIEs Of jUsTIcE UNDER THE RIgHT cIRcU¸sTaNcEs. FOR  Exa¸pLE,  aN  EgaLITaRIaN  THEORy  cOULD  sUppORT  THIs  aLLOcaTION ¸ETHOD  If  aLL  paRTIcIpaNTs TRULy aRE OTHERwIsE EqUaL. A UTILITaRIaN THEORy cOULD sUppORT THE  ¸ETHOD If INTRODUcTION Of RaNDO¸NEss IN THE DIsTRIbUTIVE ¸EcHaNIs¸ ¸akEs  pEOpLE HappIER OVERaLL wITH THE aLLOcaTION.

n o i t a c o l l A   d n a  e c i t s u J   : y r a s s o l G

NOLOgIEs. ºT Is NOT cLEaR wHIcH THEORIEs Of jUsTIcE THIs pRINcIpLE Is cO¸paTIbLE 

DeAd  MAn WAlk±ng Michael Stillman and Monalisa Tailor

“SHOckED” wOULDN’T bE accURaTE, sINcE wE wERE accUsTO¸ED TO OUR UNINsURED  paTIENTs REcEIVINg  INaDEqUaTE ¸EDIcaL caRE. “SaDDENED”  wasN’T RIgHT, EITHER,  ONLy pEckINg aT THE EDgE Of OUR REspONsE. AND “DIsHEaRTENED” jUsT s¸ackED  Of  VIcTI¸HOOD. AſtER  HEaRINg  THIs  sTORy,  wE  wERE  NEITHER sHOckED NOR  saDDENED NOR DIsHEaRTENED. WE wERE sI¸pLy appaLLED. WE  ¸ET  ¹O¸¸y  ¶aVIs  IN  OUR  HOspITaL’s  cLINIc  fOR  INDIgENT  pERsONs  IN  MaRcH 2013  (THE Na¸E aND  DaTE  HaVE bEEN cHaNgED TO  pROTEcT  THE paTIENT’s  pRIVacy). ÁE  aND  HIs  wIfE HaD  bEEN cHRONIcaLLy UNINsURED  DEspITE wORkINg  fULL-TI¸E jObs aND wERE NOw facINg DIsasTROUs cONsEqUENcEs. °E wEEk bEfORE THIs appOINT¸ENT, MR. ¶aVIs HaD cO¸E TO OUR E¸ERgENcy  DEpaRT¸ENT wITH abDO¸INaL paIN aND ObsTIpaTION. ÁIs Exa¸INaTION, LabORaTORy  TEsTs, aND »t scaN HaD cOsT HI¸ $10,000 (HIs ENTIRE LIfE saVINgs), aND aT EVENINg’s END HE’D bEEN sENT HO¸E wITH a DIagNOsIs Of ¸ETasTaTIc cOLON caNcER. °E yEaR bEfORE, HE’D HaD sI¸ILaR sy¸pTO¸s aND VIsITED a pRI¸aRy caRE  pHysIcIaN, wHO  HaD TakEN  a  cURsORy HIsTORy, TOLD  MR. ¶aVIs HE’D  NEED INsURaNcE  TO  bE aDEqUaTELy  EVaLUaTED, aND  bILLED  HI¸ $200  fOR THE  appOINT¸ENT.  SINcE MR. ¶aVIs was pOOR aND INELIgIbLE fOR KENTUcky MEDIcaID, HOwEVER, HE’D  sI¸pLy UsED ENE¸as UNTIL HE was UNabLE TO DEfEcaTE. By THE TI¸E Of HIs E¸ERgENcy  DEpaRT¸ENT  EVaLUaTION,  HE  HaD  a  fULLy  ObsTRUcTED  cOLON  aND  wIDEspREaD DIsEasE aND cHOsE TO fORgO TREaT¸ENT. MR. ¶aVIs HaD HaD aN INkLINg THaT sO¸ETHINg was awRy,  bUT  HE’D bEEN  UNabLE TO pay fOR aN EVaLUaTION. As HIs wIfE sObbED NExT TO HI¸ IN OUR Exa¸INaTION ROO¸, HE REcOUNTED  HIs ¸ONTHs  Of wEIgHT LOss, THE UNbEaRabLE paIN  Of HIs  bOwEL ¸OVE¸ENTs, aND HIs  gNawINg sUspIcION  THaT HE HaD  caNcER. “ºf  wE’D fOUND IT sOONER,”  HE cONTENDED, “IT  wOULD HaVE ¸aDE a  DIffERENcE. BUT  NOw º’¸ jUsT a DEaD ¸aN waLkINg.”

MIcHaEL STILL¸aN aND MONaLIsa ¹aILOR, “¶EaD MaN WaLkINg,” fRO¸ New England Journal of Med-

icine 369 (2013): 1880–1881. ©  2013 by MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.  ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION  Of  MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

FOR ¸aNy Of OUR paTIENTs, pOVERTy aLONE LI¸ITs accEss TO caRE. WE REcENTLy  saw a  ¸aN wITH ¾id¼ aND a fULL-bODy RasH wHO cOULDN’T affORD bUs faRE TO a 

317

bEcaUsE  THEy aRE  UNabLE  TO  cOVER  EVEN a  $4  cOpay¸ENT.  BUT  a  faIR  NU¸bER  Of OUR paTIENTs—THE ¸EDIcaL “HaVE-NOTs”—aRE DENIED basIc sERVIcEs sI¸pLy  bEcaUsE THEy Lack INsURaNcE, aND OUR cOUNTRy’s REspONsE TO THIs pRObLE¸ Has,  aT TI¸Es, sEE¸ED TOOTHLEss. ºN OUR cLINIc, UNINsURED paTIENTs fREqUENTLy fiND NEcEssaRy caRE UNObTaINabLE.  AN  ObEsE  60-yEaR-OLD wO¸aN  wITH  sy¸pTO¸s aND  sIgNs  Of  cONgEsTIVE HEaRT  faILURE  was  REcENTLy  EVaLUaTED  IN  THE  cLINIc.  SHE  cOULDN’T  affORD  THE  EcHOcaRDIOgRa¸  aND EVaLUaTION  fOR IscHE¸Ic  HEaRT  DIsEasE THaT ¸OsT INTERNIsTs  wOULD  HaVE ORDERED, sO fUROsE¸IDE TREaT¸ENT  was INITIaTED aND  aDjUsTED TO  RELIEVE  HER  sy¸pTO¸s.  °Is  pasT  spRINg,  OUR  cOLLEagUEs  saw a  wO¸aN  wITH  a  NEwLy DIscOVERED  LUNg NODULE THaT  was  HIgHLy sUspIcIOUs fOR  caNcER. SHE  was  REfERRED TO a  THORacIc sURgEON, bUT HE INsIsTED THaT  sHE fiRsT HaVE  a  ¿et  scaN—a TEsT fOR wHIcH sHE cOULDN’T pOssIbLy pay. ÁOwEVER UNcONscIONabLE wE  ¸ay fiND THE sTORy Of MR. ¶aVIs, a ·.S. cITIzEN  wHO wILL DIE  bEcaUsE HE  was  UNINsURED,  THE LITERaTURE  sUggEsTs THaT  IT’s  a  cO¸¸ON  TaLE. A  2009  sTUDy  REVEaLED a  DIREcT cORRELaTION  bETwEEN  Lack  Of  INsURaNcE aND INcREasED ¸ORTaLITy aND sUggEsTED THaT NEaRLy 45,000 A¸ERIcaN  aDULTs DIE EacH yEaR bEcaUsE THEy HaVE NO ¸EDIcaL cOVERagE.à AND aLTHOUgH  wE  caN’T cONfiDENTLy aRgUE THaT MR. ¶aVIs wOULD HaVE  sURVIVED HaD HE bEEN  INsURED,  REsEaRcH sUggEsTs THaT pOssIbILITy; fOR¸ERLy UNINsURED aDULTs gIVEN  accEss TO ±REgON MEDIcaID wERE ¸ORE LIkELy THaN THOsE wHO RE¸aINED UNINsURED TO  HaVE a UsUaL pLacE Of caRE aND  a pERsONaL  pHysIcIaN, TO aTTEND OUTpaTIENT  ¸EDIcaL  VIsITs,  aND  TO  REcEIVE  REcO¸¸ENDED  pREVENTIVE  caRE.Ä ÁaD  MR. ¶aVIs bEEN INsURED, HE ¸IgHT wELL HaVE bEEN OffERED TI¸ELy aND appROpRIaTE scREENINg fOR cOLOREcTaL  caNcER, aND  HIs abDO¸INaL paIN aND  ObsTIpaTION  wOULD sURELy HaVE bEEN URgENTLy EVaLUaTED. ´LEcTED OfficIaLs bEaR a gREaT DEaL Of bLa¸E fOR THE appaLLINg VULNERabILITy Of  THE 22 pERcENT Of A¸ERIcaN aDULTs wHO cURRENTLy Lack INsURaNcE. °E AffORDabLE CaRE AcT (¾»¾)—THE ONLy LEgITI¸aTE LEgIsLaTIVE aTTE¸pT TO pROVIDE NEaR-  UNIVERsaL  HEaLTH  cOVERagE—RE¸aINs  UNDER aTTack fRO¸  sO¸E ¸E¸bERs  Of  CONgREss,  aND  OUR  OwN  TwO  sENaTORs  aRgUE  THaT  ENHaNcINg  ¸aRkETpLacE  cO¸pETITION aND ENacTINg TORT REfOR¸ wILL pROVIDE sEcURITy ENOUgH fOR OUR  NaTION’s pOOR. ºN DIscUssINg  (aND gRIEVINg  OVER)  wHaT Has  HappENED TO  MR. ¶aVIs aND  OUR ¸aNy cLINIc paTIENTs wHOsE HEaLTH sUffERs fOR Lack Of INsURaNcE, wE HaVE  cONsIDERED OUR OwN ObLIgaTIONs. As sO¸E cONgREsspEOpLE aTTE¸pT TO DEfUND 

gniklaW   n a M   d a e D

DER¸aTOLOgy appOINT¸ENT. WE sO¸ETI¸Es pay fOR OUR paTIENTs’ ¸EDIcaTIONs 

±ba¸acaRE, aND  as sO¸E sTaTEs’  gOVERNORs aND  aTTORNEys gENERaL DELIbERaTE 

318

OVER wHETHER TO I¸pLE¸ENT HEaLTH INsURaNcE ExcHaNgEs aND ExpaND MEDIcaID ELIgIbILITy, HOw caN wE as pHysIcIaNs ENsURE THaT THE NEEDs Of paTIENTs LIkE 

r o l i a T   a s i l a n o M  d n a   n a m l l i t S   l e a h c i M

MR. ¶aVIs aRE ¸ET? FIRsT, wE  caN  HONOR  OUR  fUNDa¸ENTaL  pROfEssIONaL DUTy  TO  HELp.  SO¸E  HaVE aRgUED THaT THE ONUs fOR pROVIDINg accEss TO HEaLTH caRE REsTs ON sOcIETy aT LaRgE RaTHER THaN ON INDIVIDUaL pHysIcIaNs,Æ yET THE ÁIppOcRaTIc ±aTH  cO¸pELs  Us  TO  TREaT  THE  sIck  accORDINg  TO  OUR  abILITy  aND  jUDg¸ENT  aND  TO  kEEp  THE¸ fRO¸  HaR¸  aND  INjUsTIcE.  ´VEN  as  wE cONTINUE  TO  HOpE  fOR  aND  wORk TOwaRD a fUTURE  IN  wHIcH  aLL A¸ERIcaNs  HaVE HEaLTH  INsURaNcE,  wE bELIEVE  IT’s OUR INDIVIDUaL  pROfEssIONaL REspONsIbILITy TO TREaT  pEOpLE IN  NEED. SEcOND, wE caN fa¸ILIaRIzE OURsELVEs wITH LEgIsLaTIVE  DETaILs aND EDUcaTE  OUR paTIENTs  abOUT pROpOsED HEaLTH  caRE REfOR¸s.  ¶URINg OUR  appOINT¸ENT  wITH  MR.  ¶aVIs,  HE  wORRIED  aLOUD  THaT  UNDER  THE  ¾»¾,  “THE  gOVERN¸ENT  wOULD  Tax HI¸ fOR  NOT HaVINg INsURaNcE.” ÁE was UNawaRE (as ¸aNy  Of OUR  pOOR aND UNINsURED paTIENTs ¸ay bE) THaT UNDER THaT Law’s fiNaL RULE, HE aND  HIs  fa¸ILy  wOULD  ¸EET  THE  ELIgIbILITy cRITERIa  fOR  MEDIcaID aND  HENcE  HaVE  accEss TO cO¸pREHENsIVE aND affORDabLE caRE. FINaLLy, wE caN pREssURE OUR pROfEssIONaL ORgaNIzaTIONs TO DE¸aND  HEaLTH  caRE  fOR  aLL.  °E  A¸ERIcaN  COLLEgE  Of  PHysIcIaNs, THE  A¸ERIcaN  MEDIcaL  AssOcIaTION, aND THE  SOcIETy Of GENERaL ºNTERNaL MEDIcINE HaVE ENDORsED  THE pRINcIpLE Of UNIVERsaL HEaLTH caRE cOVERagE yET HaVE gENERaLLy RE¸aINED  sILENT DURINg yEaRs Of pOLITIcaL DEbaTE. ²ack Of INsURaNcE caN bE LETHaL, aND wE  bELIEVE  OUR pROfEssIONaL  cO¸¸UNITy sHOULD  TREaT INaccEssIbLE  cOVERagE  as a  pUbLIc HEaLTH caTasTROpHE aND sTaND bEHIND pEOpLE wHO aRE aT RIsk. SEVENTy pERcENT Of OUR cLINIc paTIENTs HaVE NO HEaLTH INsURaNcE, aND THEy  aRE  aLL  fRIgHTENINgLy  VULNERabLE;  THEIR  caRE  Is  ERRaTIc,  THEy  aRE  DIsqUaLIfiED  fRO¸ REcEIVINg cERTaIN pREVENTIVE aND scREENINg ¸EasUREs, aND THEIR Lack Of  REsOURcEs pREVENTs THE¸ fRO¸ paRTIcIpaTINg IN THE ¸EDIcaL sysTE¸. AND THIs  Is  NOT a  cO¸¸UNITy- OR sTaTE-spEcIfic pRObLE¸. A  REcENT sTUDy  sHOwED THaT  UNDERINsURED  paTIENTs  HaVE  HIgHER ¸ORTaLITy  RaTEs aſtER  ¸yOcaRDIaL INfaRcTION,Î aND  IT Is  wELL DOcU¸ENTED  THaT OUR  cOUNTRy’s UNINsURED  pREsENT wITH  LaTER-sTagE  caNcERs  aND  ¸ORE  pOORLy  cONTROLLED  cHRONIc  DIsEasEs  THaN  DO  paTIENTs  wITH  INsURaNcE.Ï WE  fiND  IT  TERRIbLy  aND  TRagIcaLLy  INHU¸aNE  THaT  MR. ¶aVIs aND TENs Of THOUsaNDs Of OTHER cITIzENs Of THIs wEaLTHy cOUNTRy wILL  DIE THIs yEaR fOR Lack Of INsURaNcE.

1  WILpER  AP,  WOOLHaNDLER  S,  ²assER  K´,  McCOR¸Ick  ¶,  BOR  ¶Á,  ÁI¸¸ELsTEIN  ¶·.  ÁEaLTH INsURaNcE aND ¸ORTaLITy IN ·S aDULTs. Am J Public Health. 2009;99:2289–2295. 2  FINkELsTEIN  A, ¹aUb¸aN S,  WRIgHT B,  ET aL.  °E ±REgON HEaLTH  INsURaNcE ExpERI¸ENT:  EVIDENcE fRO¸ THE fiRsT yEaR. Q J Econ . 2012;127:1057–1106. 3  ÁUDDLE ¹S, CENTOR ³M. ³ETaINER ¸EDIcINE: aN ETHIcaLLy LEgITI¸aTE fOR¸ Of pRacTIcE THaT  caN I¸pROVE pRI¸aRy caRE. Ann Intern Med. 2011;155:633–635. 4  µg ¶K, BROT¸aN ¶J, ²aU B, YOUNg JÁ. ºNsURaNcE sTaTUs, NOT RacE, Is assOcIaTED wITH ¸ORTaLITy aſtER aN acUTE caRDIOVascULaR EVENT IN MaRyLaND. J Gen Intern Med. 2012;27:1368–1376. 5  ºNsTITUTE  Of  MEDIcINE.  America’s  Uninsured  Crisis:  Consequences  for  Health  and 

Health  Care.  WasHINgTON,  ¶C:  µaTIONaL AcaDE¸IEs  PREss;  FEbRUaRy 23,  2009.  HTTp://  www.NaTIONaLacaDE¸IEs .ORg / H¸D / ³EpORTs / 2009 / A¸ERIcas -·NINsURED - CRIsIs  -CONsEqUENcEs-fOR-ÁEaLTH-aND-ÁEaLTH-CaRE.aspx.

319

gniklaW   n a M   d a e D

notes

Full D±sclosuRe ÀUT-Of-³OcK±T  COSTS  AS  ¿Id±  Eff±cTS Peter A. Ubel, Amy P. Abernethy, and S. Yousuf Zafar

FEw  pHysIcIaNs  wOULD  pREscRIbE  TREaT¸ENTs  TO  THEIR  paTIENTs  wITHOUT  fiRsT  DIscUssINg I¸pORTaNT sIDE EffEcTs. WHEN a cHE¸OTHERapy  REgI¸EN pROLONgs  sURVIVaL, fOR  Exa¸pLE, bUT aLsO caUsEs sERIOUs  sIDE EffEcTs sUcH  as I¸¸UNOsUppREssION OR HaIR LOss, pHysIcIaNs aRE TypIcaLLy THOROUgH abOUT INfOR¸INg  paTIENTs  abOUT  THOsE  EffEcTs, aLLOwINg  THE¸  TO  DEcIDE  wHETHER THE  bENEfiTs  OUTwEIgH  THE  RIsks. µEVERTHELEss,  ¸aNy  paTIENTs IN  THE ·NITED  STaTEs ExpERIENcE  sUbsTaNTIaL  HaR¸  fRO¸  ¸EDIcaL  INTERVENTIONs  wHOsE  RIsks  HaVE  NOT  bEEN fULLy DIscUssED. °E UNDIscLOsED  TOxIcITy? ÁIgH  cOsT, wHIcH caN caUsE  cONsIDERabLE fiNaNcIaL sTRaIN. SINcE HEaLTH caRE pROVIDERs DON’T OſtEN DIscUss pOTENTIaL cOsTs bEfORE ORDERINg DIagNOsTIc TEsTs OR ¸akINg TREaT¸ENT DEcIsIONs, paTIENTs ¸ay UNkNOwINgLy  facE  DaUNTINg  aND  pOTENTIaLLy  aVOIDabLE  HEaLTH  caRE  bILLs.  BEcaUsE  TREaT¸ENTs  caN  bE  “fiNaNcIaLLy  TOxIc,” à I¸pOsINg  OUT-Of-pOckET  cOsTs  THaT  ¸ay  I¸paIR paTIENTs’ wELL-bEINg, wE cONTEND THaT pHysIcIaNs NEED TO DIscLOsE THE  fiNaNcIaL cONsEqUENcEs Of TREaT¸ENT aLTERNaTIVEs jUsT as THEy INfOR¸ paTIENTs  abOUT  TREaT¸ENTs’  sIDE EffEcTs.  ÁEaLTH  caRE  cOsTs  HaVE  RIsEN  fasTER  THaN  THE  CONsU¸ER PRIcE ºNDEx fOR ¸OsT Of THE pasT 40 yEaRs. °Is gROwTH IN ExpENDITUREs  Has  INcREasINgLy pLacED a  DIREcT  bURDEN ON  paTIENTs,  EITHER bEcaUsE  THEy aRE UNINsURED aND  ¸UsT pay OUT Of pOckET fOR aLL THEIR  caRE OR bEcaUsE  INsURaNcE pLaNs sHIſt a pORTION Of THE cOsTs back TO paTIENTs THROUgH DEDUcTIbLEs, cOpay¸ENTs, aND cOINsURaNcE. °E cURRENT REaLITy Is THaT IT Is VERy DIfficULT, aND OſtEN I¸pOssIbLE, fOR THE cLINIcIaN TO kNOw THE acTUaL OUT-Of-pOckET  cOsTs  fOR  EacH paTIENT,  sINcE  cOsTs  VaRy by INTERVENTION, INsURER, LOcaTION  Of  caRE,  cHOIcE  Of  pHaR¸acy  OR  RaDIOLOgy  sERVIcE,  aND  sO  ON;  NONETHELEss, 

PETER A. ·bEL, A¸y P. AbERNETHy, aND S. YOUsUf ZafaR, “FULL ¶IscLOsURE—±UT-Of-POckET COsTs as  SIDE ´ffEcTs,” fRO¸ New England Journal of Medicine 369 (2013): 1484–1486. © 2013 by MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy. ³EpRINTED by pER¸IssION Of MassacHUsETTs MEDIcaL SOcIETy.

sO¸E gENERaL INfOR¸aTION Is kNOwN, aND sOLUTIONs THaT pROVIDE paTIENT-LEVEL  DETaILs aRE IN DEVELOp¸ENT.

321

°E  aDDITION Of  bEVacIzU¸ab  TO  cHE¸OTHERapy  ExTENDs LIfE  by  aN  aVERagE  Of appROxI¸aTELy 5 ¸ONTHs OVER cHE¸OTHERapy aLONE. °E DRUg Is faIRLy wELL  TOLERaTED,  bUT  a¸ONg  OTHER  RIsks,  paTIENTs  REcEIVINg  bEVacIzU¸ab  HaVE  a  2 pERcENT INcREasE IN THE RIsk Of sEVERE caRDIOVascULaR TOxIc EffEcTs. ±VER THE  cOURsE  Of  a  ¸EDIaN  Of  10  ¸ONTHs  Of  THERapy, bEVacIzU¸ab  cOsTs  $44,000.Ã A  paTIENT  wITH  MEDIcaRE  cOVERagE  aLONE  wOULD  bE  REspONsIbLE  fOR  payINg  20 pERcENT Of THaT  cOsT,  OR $8,800, OUT Of pOckET, aND THaT  pRIcE Tag  DOEsN’T  INcLUDE  pay¸ENTs  fOR  OTHER  cHE¸OTHERapy, DOcTOR’s  fEEs, sUppORTIVE  ¸EDIcaTIONs, OR  DIagNOsTIc TEsTs. MOsT  pHysIcIaNs INsIsT  ON DIscUssINg THE 2 pERcENT RIsk Of aDVERsE caRDIOVascULaR EffEcTs assOcIaTED wITH bEVacIzU¸ab, bUT  fEw wOULD ¸ENTION THE DRUg’s pOTENTIaL fiNaNcIaL TOxIcITy. °Is Exa¸pLE Is NOT IsOLaTED, aND THE cONsEqUENcEs fOR paTIENTs aRE gRI¸.  °E pRObLE¸  Is pERHaps sTaRkEsT IN caNcER caRE, bUT IT appLIEs TO aLL cO¸pLEx  ILLNEss.  °E CENTER fOR A¸ERIcaN  PROgREss Has EsTI¸aTED THaT IN MassacHUsETTs, OUT-Of-pOckET cOsTs fOR bREasT-caNcER TREaT¸ENT  aRE as HIgH as $55,250  fOR wO¸EN wITH HIgH-DEDUcTIbLE INsURaNcE pLaNs; THE OUT-Of-pOckET cOsTs Of  ¸aNagINg  UNcO¸pLIcaTED  DIabETEs a¸OUNT  TO  ¸ORE  THaN  $4,000  pER  yEaR;  aND  OUT-Of-pOckET cOsTs  caN  appROacH  $40,000 pER  yEaR fOR  a  paTIENT wITH  a  ¸yOcaRDIaL INfaRcTION REqUIRINg  HOspITaLIzaTION.Ä °E CENTERs  fOR ¶IsEasE  CONTROL  aND  PREVENTION  EsTI¸aTEs  THaT, OwINg IN  paRT TO  sUcH  HIgH OUT-Of-  pOckET  cOsTs, IN 2011 abOUT a THIRD Of ·.S. fa¸ILIEs wERE EITHER sTRUggLINg TO  pay ¸EDIcaL bILLs OR DEfaULTINg ON THEIR pay¸ENTs (sEE figURE 1).Æ °Is  HEaLTH caRE–RELaTED fiNaNcIaL  bURDEN  caN caUsE sUbsTaNTIaL  DIsTREss,  fORcINg  pEOpLE TO cUT cORNERs IN ways THaT  ¸ay affEcT THEIR  HEaLTH aND wELL-  bEINg. ºN OUR REsEaRcH, wE DIscOVERED THaT ¸aNy INsURED paTIENTs bURDENED  by  HIgH  OUT-Of-pOckET cOsTs  fRO¸ caNcER  TREaT¸ENT  REDUcE  THEIR  spENDINg  ON fOOD aND cLOTHINg TO ¸akE ENDs ¸EET, OR THEy REDUcE THE fREqUENcy wITH  wHIcH THEy TakE pREscRIbED ¸EDIcaTIONs.Î WHETHER bEcaUsE Of INsUfficIENT  TRaININg OR TI¸E, ¸aNy  pHysIcIaNs DON’T  INcLUDE INfOR¸aTION abOUT THE cOsT Of caRE IN THE DEcIsION-¸akINg pROcEss.Ï BUT  DIscUssINg  cOsTs  Is  a  cRUcIaL  cO¸pONENT  Of  cLINIcaL  DEcIsION  ¸akINg.  FIRsT,  DIscUssINg OUT-Of-pOckET  cOsTs  ENabLEs  paTIENTs TO  cHOOsE LOwER-cOsT  TREaT¸ENTs  wHEN  THERE  aRE  VIabLE  aLTERNaTIVEs.  PaTIENTs  ExpERIENcE  UNNEcEssaRy  fiNaNcIaL  DIsTREss  wHEN  pHysIcIaNs  DO  NOT  INfOR¸  THE¸  Of  aLTERNaTIVE TREaT¸ENTs THaT aRE LEss ExpENsIVE bUT EqUaLLy OR NEaRLy as EffEcTIVE. WE 

s t c e f f E   e d i S   s a  s t s o C   t e k c o P - f o - t u O

CONsIDER  a  MEDIcaRE  paTIENT  wITH  ¸ETasTaTIc  cOLOREcTaL  caNcER.  CO¸¸ONLy,  a  cO¸pONENT  Of  fiRsT-LINE  THERapy  fOR  THIs  DIsEasE  Is  bEVacIzU¸ab. 

A

Americans