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THE DEVELOPMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATION IN THE EXECUTIVE STAFF MEETINGS OF A SOCIAL AGENCY

A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the School of Social Work The University of Southern California

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Social Work

by Katherine R« Booth June 1950

UMI Number: EP66327

All rights reserved INFORMATION TO ALL USERS The quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted. In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion.

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UMI EP66327 Published by ProQuest LLC (2014). Copyright in the Dissertation held by the Author. Microform Edition © ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. This work is protected against unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code

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S*,

'tro

T h is thesis ,w r i t t e n u n d e r the d ir e c t io n o f the ca n d id a te ’s F a c u lt y

C o m m itte e a n d a p p r o v e d

by a l l its m e m b e rs, has been presented to a n d accepted by the F a c u l t y o f the G ra d u a te S c h o o l o f S o c ia l W o r k in p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f the r e ­ q u ire m e n ts f o r the degree o f

M A S T E R O F S O C IA L W O R K

Dean

Date.

Thesis o/._-.KAXBOEHXKE._JiAVX___BQQTH

F a c u lty Com m ittee

Chairman

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER

PACE

I. INTRODUCTION..............................

1

The problem. •

1 .........

6

• • • • • • • • . .

8

The method of study. The agency studied

II. THE NATURE OF COORDINATION IN ADMINISTRATION . . . Review of the literature .

III.

l*f

.................... 19

Principles of coordination................ ...

21

Criteria for identifying coordination. • • • • .

26

THE EXECUTIVE’S ACTIVITY IN THE MEETING AS

IT

RELATES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF COORDINATION . . .

28

The first meeting. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

29

Discussion of the Spring Inter-Association Conference ................

IV.

. . . . . . . .

29

Discussion of the personnel procedures . . . .

*+0

THE EXECUTIVE’S ACTIVITY IN THE MEETING AS

IT

RELATES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF COORDINATION (CONTINUED)...............

58

The second meet i n g ....................... 53 Discussion of the statistical report ........

53

Discussion of the called staff meeting . . . .

61*

Discussion of the Health Education Department proposal . . • • • • • • .............. ...

iii

77

iv CHAPTER V.

PAGE

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS............ . .........

86

Conclusions................... .............

90

BIBLIOGRAPHY

.............................

93

APPENDIXES EXECUTIVE STAFF MEETINGS Appendix A— FirstMeeting.......................

98

Appendix B— SecondMeeting........................ 128

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Studies in administration place great stress on organi­ zation, on planning, on directing, on coordinating, on methods of operation#

These are important to any organization if it

is to accomplish with any degree of success the tasks which it is designed to fulfill#

But central to any real achieve­

ment in this direction are the people who function within the organization and carry on its activities and operations# are the heart of any organizational life#

They

It is the personnel

of the organization who give vitality to it, who make it pos­ sible for the purpose and objectives of the enterprise, its plans and program or services to pass beyond the realm of ideas into actuality# I.

THE PROBLEM

The importance of the personnel of an organization has been receiving increasing attention during recent times#

This

is apparent to some degree in the growing interest and study of the ,#howw of administration as opposed to tfwhat is adminis­ tration# 11 It is evident in the emphasis being placed on per­ sonnel practices; in a growing recognition of the need for greater study and understanding in the whole field of human relations#

While every individual in an organization is

1

2 important to its functioning and to attaining its objectives, — else why is he employed,--it is with, the executive staff group

1

that this study is concerned.

This is the group that

carries major responsibility for leadership and direction of the work to be done, and for implementing policies, procedures and plans. Coordination is an aspect of administrative work that is of utmost importance if an organization is to be productive and achieve its goals in an efficient and effective way.

It

is as significant in the administration of a social agency as in any other kind of setting.

The term when applied to admin­

istration implies the harmonious functioning together of the various parts of the organization and is concerned to a large degree with the harmonious functioning together of the human parts of the organization, the people who carry on the work. As the leadership group of an enterprise, it is obviously essential that this kind of a working relationship exist among the members of the executive staff, if coordination is to be affected among the various parts of the organization. Mary Follett pointed out a good many years ago a then increas­ ing realization among organization engineers that coordination

1

In this study the term "executive staff11 is used to designate line officers at the top level of organization structure, not as staff officers in the public administration sense.

does not occur merely as a result of units "existing harmoni­ ously side by side,*1 but that "units have to make a unity before you can say that you have coordination,"

2

It is not

enough, in other words, for the individual workers of an organization merely to exist side by side, merely to perform assigned tasks and maintain a harmonious relationship with their fellow workers#

For coordination there must be In

addition a realization that the function of each is important, but important only in relation to the function of others, and to the function of the organization as a whole; that each division is significant, but significant only as it relates to the whole#

It is the balanced, harmonious interrelation­

ship of the parts to each other and to the *diole that produces coordination*

Bertha Reynolds writes—

In our own bodies we have the perfect example of organs of specialized structure and function working together as a balanced whole* No organ is unimportant# No organ can live or act alone# In their interdependence there is vitality and strength*^ And it can be added there is coordination# The executive staff as directors of major divisions

o

Renry C. Metcalf and L# Urwick, editors, Dynamic Administration The Collected Papers of Mary Parker Follett (New York: Harper & Brothers, 19^2), p* 192. 3 Bertha C# Reynolds, Learning and Teaching in the Practice of Social Mork (New Yorks Farrar & Rinehart, Inc#, 19^2), p. 35.

k> actually constitute a focal point in the development of coordination within the organization as a whole.

Individually,

as the directors of the divisions, the executive staff are in a position to control and to influence the activities within their respective divisions.

As members of the executive

staff they represent a cross section of the total organiza­ tion, incorporating within their group its major structural divisions.

The chief executive of an enterprise has his most

direct and closest contact with this group and It is through them that he is able to keep in touch with all the operations of the organization.

This is the group that he must rely on

to accomplish his job of administering the total organiza­ tion, including coordinating the work of the organization. His success in this area of his work will depend to a consid­ erable degree on the extent to which he is able to develop unity and harmonious relations among the members of this group. The bringing together of executive staff in executive staff meetings provides the chief executive with a setting and an opportunity for focusing on this aspect of his coordinating function. Recognition of the staff meeting as a means for develop­ ing coordination is seen in Dimock^ statement that f,a prin­ cipal method of securing coordination is through staff

meetings held at regular and stated intervals. M

Through the

staff meeting, he says, it is possible to create a feeling of identity with the total organization; possible for the indi­ vidual to come to feel that he is part of a common effort rather than an unrelated item attached just anyhow to it.

5

The staff meeting provides an opportunity for staff to bring up for discussion matters within their own divisions which may directly or indirectly affect the operations of other divisions of the organization, and to enlist the support of all in determining how to deal with these matters.

It pro­

vides a Mforum in which friction points or areas of inadequate 6 coordination11 may. be brought into the open. Dimock points out, too, that there is a psychological factor that enters into staff meetings which can affect the development of coordination.

Staff meetings give the members

a chance to f,make suggestions and advance criticisms, both of 7 which permit the letting off of steam.11 A chief deterrent to effective administrative work, he says, is the sense of frus­ tration that arises when people go about their work day after

*+ Marshall E. Dimock, The Executive in Action (Hew York Harper & Brothers, 19^5), p. 191* * Ibid., p. 120.

6 Ibid.. pp. 191-192. 7 Ibid.. p. 192.

6 day with their emotions bottled up and with the individual either incapable or unwilling to release them; regular, wellconducted staff meetings can be **a safety valve11 in such situations, and the release of such feelings in an acceptable way must occur if an atmosphere conducive to coordination is to prevail.

8

In his book, Administration of Group Work, Blumenthal has indicated that the staff meeting should make possible Man interpenetration of interests** among the departments; that it should be the means for encouraging in each individual member an interest in areas of the organization* s program other than 9 his own. **Such reciprocity,** says Blumenthal, "leads to unification. II.

THE METHOD OP STUDY

This study has been made to gain some insight into the means by which an executive director of a social agency may promote coordination in the meetings of the executive staff. Stated as a question the purpose of the study would reads How does an executive director function in a staff meeting to

8 Ibid.. pp. 192-193. 9 Louis H* Blumenthal, Administration of Group Work (Hew Yorks Association Press, 19*4-8), p. 153* Loc. cit.

7 bring about coordination? In carrying out the study, staff meetings were analyzed from the point of view of what the executive did in the meet­ ings that could be considered as coordinative in its effect. This necessitated setting forth principles for promoting coordination by which to judge the executive’s activity. These were determined as a result of a study of the litera­ ture pertaining to administration and administrative coordi­ nation.

It was also necessary to develop some means for

determining whether coordination did occur in the meetings. Criteria were therefore established to be used as the evidence iiL identifying coordination.

These too were determined on the

basis of the writings on this subject.

Subsequent to the

analysis certain conclusions were drawn relative to the main question. The executive staff meetings of the Los Angeles YWCA were selected as those to be studied.

This is a large, com­

plex organization with much of its operation and program activities decentralized to serve an area of approximately six hundred square miles.

Because no records of executive

staff meetings existed in this organization, nor were known to the writer to exist in other comparable organizations, it was necessary to do process recording of meetings for the material on which to base the study.

This fact, together

8 with the limited time in which to make the study meant that only two staff meetings could be included.

For this reason

the study must be considered as primarily a pilot study and its findings chiefly as tentative indications of how coordi­ nation in a meeting may be promoted. III.

THE AGENCY STUDIED

The YWCA is a membership organization of women and girls.

Those members who so desire or who serve on a com­

mittee or hold office in the organizational structure or in a club or other program activity make up the voting or electoral membership and are known as electors.

All others who partici­

pate in any continuous fashion in YWCA activities are termed “members” or 11junior members•11 The electoral body delegates to its duly elected representatives, a board of directors, the control and administration of the activities and opera­ tions of the organization.

As a membership organization a

YWCA exists only “if there are members to create such an organization, to elect a board to carry on its work, and to adopt a constitution which provides the basis for its opera11

tion.“

The purpose of the YWCA is a religious one.

It strives

Margaret Logan Clark and Briseis Teall, The Execu­ tive Director on the Job (New Yorks The Woman*s Press, 19*+7)«

9 to bring about a “more abundant life11 for women and girls through improvement of their general welfare, both personal and social, and through the development of a "fellowship* which, in YWCA terminology, is described as "a body of indi­ viduals brought together by shared interests and aims, cornpanions seeking common goals which all hold dear."

12

To

achieve its goals it has developed over the years a program covering a broad area of activity*

These activities include

a program for teenagers; a program for young adults— business, professional and industrial women and young married women; a health education and recreation program for all members; individual consulting services for all members and in some instances non-members; permanent, housing facilities for mem­ bers and temporary housing for members and non-members; a general program for all members.

In addition it promotes,

within these several program areas, social action and educa­ tion (called the Public Affairs Program) ; support of the National YWCA; and support of the World YWCA (called the World Fellowship program)• Each individual division, subdivision, and unit of the entire program of activities has a committee composed of electoral members who are responsible for policy formulation

^

Margaretta Brereton, The General Secretary of a C . 4» s 4 Job Analysis (New Yorks The Woman 1s Press, undated) ,“"p. 11.

Com m unity Y.

and planning and for the operation of that particular part of the program#

Their activity is subject to the approval of

the association board.

A member of the professional staff is

attached to each committee and works with it.

Professional

staff have equal status with others serving on the committee with the exception that they have no voting privileges.

They

are directly responsible for implementing and/or supervising the program of the particular unit of activity for which the committee is responsible.

They share with the committee

responsibility for the operation and administration of the unit. Each association has its executive director whose job is not only that of sharing with the board responsibility for the administration of the organization, but also, and to a larger extent, is centered on the process by which the asso­ ciation works towards its objectives.

The job of the YWCA

executive director has been described as never that of a 13 r,prima donna11 but is rather a “helping function.*1 It is based on the philosophy that administration is responsible for moving the association along in the direction of its purpose} that the responsibility for leadership and administration is jointly shared with the association president and board on a partnership basis} and that the characteristic manner of work

^

Clark and Teall, op. clt.T pp. 15-17♦

11 be democratic5 that is, that wherever possible and feasible tfthe varied Association groups and individuals share in the operative process, thereby enriching their own life experil*f ence and reflecting the basic purpose of the organization*M The Los Angeles YWCA has five branches, one center, five area programs and two permanent residence establishments located within the metropolitan region of Los Angeles.

As a

metropolitan association it has a metropolitan staff of six whose primary function is that of coordinating the activities and operations of the decentralized program.

These six

include a metropolitan executive director5 an assistant execu­ tive director who carries responsibility for coordinating the promotional and education activities of the Association, namely, the Public Affairs and World Fellowship programs, and who, likewise, carries responsibility for coordinating total membership activities and the public relations of the organi­ zation; three metropolitan program directors, each responsible for coordinating the total activities of one of the special­ ized programs— teenage program, young adult program, and health education and. recreation program; a Comptroller, who is responsible for the administration of a centralized system of budgeting and accounting.

Each of the five branches and

the one center has an executive director.

lk

Brereton,

op

. cit.« p.

19.

There is also a

12 director of the larger of the two residences.

The second

residence, a small establishment, is under the direct admin­ istrative supervision of the metropolitan executive.

The

area programs are under the administrative supervision of the metropolitan program directors, the assignment of respon­ sibility of an area being determined by the particular pro­ gram offered in the area, teenage, young adult, or health education and recreation, There is still another member of the staff who is included in the executive staff group.

However, she does not

have the same degree of executive responsibility as do the others.

She is the Director of Individual Services and is

included as one of the executive staff in order that this aspect of YWCA program may be represented in this group. Although this type of work is carried on in some of the branches, it represents a very small part of the branch pro­ gram,

The bulk of this service in the Los Angeles area is pro­

vided through the office of the Director of Individual Services which is housed at the central location of the Association, These fourteen members of the Los Angeles YWCA staff make up the executive staff group whose meetings were con­ sidered by this study#

It should be noted, however, that at

the time the study was made there were only thirteen members in the group due to a vacancy in one of the branch director positions•

13 The nature of coordination in the administrative pro­ cess is considered in Chapter II of the.study and the cri­ teria for identifying coordination and for promoting coordi­ nation within the staff meeting is also discussed and set forth.

Chapter III is devoted to an analysis of the record

of the first meeting; Chapter IV to an analysis of the second meeting.

Chapter V contains a summary of the findings and

conclusions.

CHAPTER II THE NATURE OF COORDINATION IN ADMINISTRATION Coordination is recognized as one of several distin­ guishable functions of the administrator*

Its significance

in achieving effective and efficient operation of an enter­ prise is repeatedly emphasized in the literature dealing with administration and the job of the executive. The practice of organizing the operations of an enter­ prise into divisions and subdivisions is designed to facili­ tate the over-all administration and to increase the efficiency of its operations.

In general it entails the grouping together

of homogeneous functions into an harmonious and systematic relation thereby providing not only a structure within which the organization may operate, but providing as well the framework within which the various operations of the organiza­ tion may be coordinated.

Such arrangements may be termed

structural coordination.

Structural arrangement is, however,

only one part of administrative coordination.

The other part

has to do with the directing of the various divisions once they have been established, so that while they maintain their individual identity and particular function, they at the same time operate together as a smoothly functioning unit. Luther Gulick has described coordination as the activity that deals with interrelating the various parts of the work of the l*f

15 enterprise, and has distinguished between the two parts describing the organizational aspect as coordination of work, and the directing aspect as coordination by ideas.

1

The organization of an enterprise into divisions or parts is in principle based on one of several concepts,— on the basis of the major purpose to be served; on the basis of classification of work, that is the type of work done; on the basis of the persons served or the nature of service; on the basis of where the service or work is done.

Within each

major part there may be further subdivision, following in general these same principles of organization.

In practice

the division of work of an enterprise does not always follow in precise way these patterns for organization.

Likewise,

the degree to which division takes place will vary with the size and program .of the enterprise.

Where there is separation

of total operation into major divisions, each part has an administrative director or executive.

His is the responsi­

bility for seeing that those things are done that should be done by the particular division and its subdivisions.

Within

his sphere of operation he carries out the administrative functions of organizing, planning, directing, reporting and

1

Luther Gulick, !tThe Theory of Organization,n Papers on the Science of Administration (Second edition; New York: Institute of Public Administration, 19^7) > pp. 3-^5.

16 coordinating the activities and operations within that divi­ sion.

And in varying degree, depending upon the policies of

the particular organization, he carries budgeting and staff­ ing responsibilities.

By virtue of his responsibility for

directing the operations and program of the division and the personnel functioning in the division, and by virtue of the authority and control vested in that responsibility, he is a member of the executive staff of the enterprise. The second part of coordination is concerned not only with directing the work so that, although divided into parts, the parts are related to each other and to the whole, but has the equally important concern of dealing with the human ele­ ments of the organization,— the people who perform the work, their attitudes, their interests, and their feelings.

The

measure of success in developing coordinated functioning of the parts rests to a great extent on this human aspect, and on the degree to which those who work in the organization do so in a cooperative and harmonious way. of work be superimposed or forced.

Nor can this unified way Because of the human

aspects involved it will only come about voluntarily. maintains that its development will depend largely on . . . the dominance of an idea, that is, the development of intelligent singleness of purpose in the minds and wills of those who are working together as a group, so that each worker will of his own accord fit his task into the whole with

Gulick

17 skill and enthusiasm*

2

It is a natural and human tendency to identify to a considerable extent with the area of work with which one’s regular duties and responsibilities are closely allied.

This

tendency may become the basis of a developing loyalty to that area, and to the developing of unity and coordinated activity within it.

There is also a natural and human tendency for

those attached to a particular area of work in an organiza­ tion to cloak it with a significance that is out of proportion with other areas of the organization's work; to permit its functions and activities to assume such importance in the opinion of those attached to it as to color their conception of the objectives of the organization as a whole.

This is a

tendency that is common to all who are associated with a par­ ticular division or area of work, the director as well as the operating staff.

There is an inherent danger, particularly

for those organizations having several divisions, that this tendency will result in the organization becoming a collection of parts, and in place of unity there will be disunity.

Like­

wise, too great a focusing of attention on one part of the organization's work tends to narrow the worker's understanding of other parts, and gives rise to misconceptions about the other divisions and the purposes they serve.

2 Ibid., p. 6.

These are

18 conditions that also lead to disunity.

It is of these dan­

gers that Pfiffner speaks when he says "coordination has con­ stantly to try to break down the idea of functional compart3 ments and the isolation of functional compartments," There seems to be considerable basis for the assumption that the highest degree of coordination in an organization takes place within the individual divisions, and the greatest lack of coordination and consequent danger of disunity and friction tends to occur between the divisions or at the points l*. where they overlap. A major point of emphasis for the chief executive of an organization in the work of administrative coordination therefore appears to be in the development of coordinated activity between the divisions.

And this will

mean, primarily, dealing with those who carry responsibility for the operation of the divisions, namely the executive staff. One of the major values of the executive staff meeting Is in the opportunity It affords for developing coordinated activity among the divisions.

For this value to be realized,

however, it is essential that within the meeting itself,— the discussions and deliberations that make up the meeting— there

^ John N. Pfiffner, Public Administration (Hew York: The Ronald Press Company, 19*^6), p. 182. ** Gulick, ojd. cit., p. 83.

19 exist among the participants a unifying, cooperative relation­ ship,

The real value of the staff meeting to administrative

coordination is determined by the extent to which this coordi­ nating relationship obtains in the meeting.

The question

then becomes how to develop such coordination.

This is the

question that faces the executive director as she presides at a meeting of the executive staff. I.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

A study of the literature relating to administrative coordination reveals several concepts held in common by authorities on administration and considered by them as essen­ tial for coordination.

Simon* has stated that coordination

involves wthe development of a plan of behavior for all the members of the grouptf and a willingness on the part of the 5 members to 11permit their behavior to be guided by the plan.1* Barnard states that the adoption by the group of a group or non-personal plan or proposal is a requirement for cooperative activity.

6

He also places great emphasis on the belief that

cooperation in any form is dependent on the willingness of

^ Herbert A. Simon. Administrative Behavior (New Yorks The Macmillan Company, 194-8) , pp. 106-107. ^ Chester I. Barnard, The Function of the Executive (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1938)? pp. 60-6l.

the individual to cooperate and to contribute his efforts to the Meooperative system115 and for such willingness to occur it must be induced by means of positive incentives or by the 7 reducing or eliminating of negative incentives. He likewise stresses compatibility as being of tremendous importance in securing effective and efficient cooperation*

8

In referring to the Job of the administrator in rela­ tion to realizing the objectives of the organization, Boethlisberger writes that the administrator has to secure the willingness of individuals • * . to contribute their services to these pur­ poses, but also he must see to it that by giving their services to these ends they will obtain social satisfactions which make them continuously desirous of cooperating*9 Simon writes that coordination requires that the members of the group be informed of at least some of the critical ele1G ments involved in a situation* Dimock too suggests that bringing out into the open critical points, especially those indicative of friction, will make possible the development of coordination*

^ Ibid., pp* 139-l*+l•

8 Ibid., pp. 22^-227. 9 F* J. Roethlisberger, Managem ent and Morale (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 19^7)> p. 156. 3-0 Simon, o p * cit* * p. 151. ^ Marshall B. Dimock, The Executive in Action (New York: Harper & Brothers, 19^5)> PP* 191-192*

21 Tead

12

and Follett

13

both have emphasized participa­

tion as important aspects of coordination; both have empha­ sized that it should begin in the early stages of planning and policy making*

Follett likewise stresses understanding

as essential in coordination saying, "for coordination we need understanding and for understanding we need openness and lb explicitness.11 She also writes of the importance of a clearly defined purpose or purposes, whether it be of the organization as a whole or a division or unit or special pro­ ject, if there is to be success of any degree in respect to 15 coordination. II.

PRINCIPLES OF COORDINATION

The concepts and ideas of these and other writings on the subject of coordination led to the formulation of five statements in the nature of; and hereinafter referred to, as principles of coordination.

It appeared that as the chief

executive guided her activity in the staff meeting on the

12

Ordway Tead, The Art of Leadership (New Yorks McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1933)> PP« 117-119. 13 ^ Henry C. Metcalf and 1# Urwick, editors, Dynamic AdministrationT The Collected Pacers of Mary Parker Follett (New Yorks Harper & Brothers, 19^2), pp. 210-229* llf Ibid., p. 221. ^

Ibid., p. 261.

basis of these principles, she would be making a substantial contribution to the development of coordination within the meeting.

These five principles with a brief explanation of

their implications were stated as follows 1.

The Principle of Achieving Goals.

The purpose of

administrative coordination is to enable the total organiza­ tion to carry on its operations in the most efficient way possible to achieve its goals. The ultimate objectives or purpose of the organization provide the motivating force of each division as well as of the total organization.

They are the common denominator for

making decisions affecting the operations and activities of each division and the organization as a whole.

If the goals

are to be achieved in an efficient and effective fashion, the various parts must be so related that they function together smoothly, harmoniously and in a balanced and controlled manner.

For this to occur there is need for an understanding

of how eaeh division's purpose is related to the organiza­ tion's purpose and of every division's purpose in that purpose. There must be understanding of the relation of each division to the other division; that each is an independent unit in itself, independently responsible for carrying out its opera­ tions, yet at the same time, bounded in the extent of its independent activity by a larger purpose, which is the goal of the organization.

23 2*

The Principle of Voluntary Cooperation,

The

principal means of achieving administrative coordination is through the voluntary cooperative efforts of the individuals engaged in carrying on the organization*s work*

The executive

director induces voluntary cooperative efforts through the development of incentives to function cooperatively* Cooperation is not something that can be imposed nor forced*

For it to be genuine and truly effective there must

be a desire on the part of the individual to cooperate, a willingness to work together with others.

An individual is

motivated to action on the basis of his needs, his attitudes, on the basis of his past experiences and his immediate situa­ tion.

And in like manner is he motivated to cooperate at any

one time.

To develop incentives that will induce cooperation,

there is need for an understanding of these motivating forces, an understanding of personality and of the basic human needs for security and recognition, success and affection* 3*

The Principle of Functional Relationship *

Adminis­

trative coordination depends on the establishment of a purpose­ ful relationship between the chief executive and the members of the staff group based on a mutual understanding and accept­ ance of the chief executive as the staff leader and person carrying final responsibility for the operation of the total organization: and a mutual understanding and acceptance of the executive staff as responsible members of the

2b administrative groan who share with the executive responsi­ bility for moving the organization toward its goals. As in the case of the structural arrangements so is it important in the case of the people who function in the organ­ ization that they carry on their different functional respon­ sibilities harmoniously, smoothly and in a controlled manner. And in like fashion, too, is it essential that each individual understand his function and that of his fellow workers as they relate to each other and to the organization as a whole. is mere understanding sufficient.

Nor

It must carry with it the

added meaning of acceptance of staff members by the executive as responsible, functioning co-workers with her in realizing the organization's goals; and acceptance by the staff members of their responsibilities to their particular jobs and to the total organization, and acceptance of the chief executive as their leader with whom final administrative authority rests either alone or in conjunction with an administrative board. The Principle of Communication.

Administrative

coordination is dependent on understanding« on the exchange of information and knowledge r and upon a system of communication that makes p q s sible a back and forth transmission of knowledge and understanding throughout the entire organization. If the various divisions and the personnel attached to the divisions are to function together harmoniously, and if

25 there is to be cooperation among the personnel of the organi­ zation, individually and in groups, there is need for an exchange of information relative to division and unit planning and activity.

There is need as well for an understanding of

the thinking and attitudes in relation to issues and problems affecting the work of the organization, particularly in those areas where there is overlapping of division functions.

Such

understanding and knowledge can only come about through com­ munication.

Where there is some systematized plan for the

exchange of information and ideas— regularly scheduled meetings, bulletins, conferences— in addition to informal communicative methods, division personnel as well as the over-all administra­ tive group are enabled to function more intelligently and for the greater good of their division and the organization as a whole*

Furthermore, if there is to be real understanding of

and an effective approach to problems and issues, there is need, too, for frank, explicit, and objective discussion. 5.

The Principle of Comnatibility. Administrative

coordination depends upon a high degree of compatibility among the individuals carrying on the operations of the organization* An organization may be well organized structurally to achieve its goal.

There may be understanding of division and

individual functions and acceptance of responsibility. may be evidence of cooperative activity.

There may be

There

26 provision for an exchange of information and knowledge.

But

if there is to be no breakdown in the unifying affect of these conditions, if they are to be sustained, there is need in addition of a congenial, psychologically comfortable atmos­ phere in the relationships among the personnel of the organi­ zation,

In this atmosphere teamwork and group feelings of

solidarity and loyalty to the organization and to each other will develop which in turn will enhance the effective function­ ing of the organization in achieving its goals. Far more important that what the coordinator does, [says Eckert], is the emotional climate he creates, and the emotional climate is determined by the quality of the human relationships he develops between the people being coordinated, III.

CRITERIA FOR IDENTIFYING COORDINATION

On the basis of the writings on coordination criteria were set up which would serve to identify coordination as it occurred in the meetings.

These criteria were stated as

follows: 1.

A solution, a proposal, a plan, a decision or a way

of proceeding in relation to the matter under discussion is agreed upon by the members of the group as a group and is accepted as the group solution, proposal, plan, decision or

1 (s

Ralph G. Eckert, ^Psychology of Coordination,u (Paper delivered at the annual meeting of the California Con­ ference of Social Welfare, Sacramento, 19*+6) *

27 way of proceeding to be adhered to by the individual. 2.

The objective or objectives of the agency as they

relate to the matter under discussion and/or the objective or objectives of the particular project or activity being con­ sidered are introduced into the discussion prior to the group conclusion. 3*

Critical elements related to the matter under dis­

cussion and/or aspects that may or are causing friction or malcoordination are introduced into the discussion prior to the group conclusion. *f.

A considerable proportion of the members of the

group participated in the discussion relevant to the matter being considered and prior to the group conclusion. 5.

The interaction among the individual members of the

group in discussion is free from strain or tension and is indicative of compatibility within the group. The principles discussed in the preceding pages and the criteria became the basis for studying the executive staff meetings of the Los Angeles YWCA.

The analysis of the two

meetings considered is presented in the succeeding two chap­ ters.

CHAPTER III THE EXECUTIVE'S ACTIVITY IN THE MEETING AS IT RELATES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF COORDINATION In this and the following chapter the process records of the two staff meetings are analyzed.

Agenda items were

considered separately, first, from the point of view of the executive's activity in relation to the five principles set forth in the preceding chapter; and secondly, to determine whether, on the basis of the criteria for coordination stated in Chapter II coordination occurred. The agenda of the first meeting included twelve items; that of the second meeting included eleven.

It appeared that,

in view of the limitations of this study, if it were to be at all meaningful, some selection of the agenda items discussed in the meetings would be necessary.

It was the opinion, too,

that topics which were chiefly in the nature of information, clarification or evaluation were not as important to the study as those that called for some action by the staff*

On the same

basis, it was believed that items pertaining to assignments and announcements could be eliminated.

Of the remaining eight

agenda items, two from the first meeting were selected for analysis, one dealing with a specific agency program activity, the other relating to agency administration; and three were selected from the second meeting, one being concerned with a

29 particular program activity and the other two with administra­ tive matters.

This chapter is devoted to the analysis of the

discussion of the two topics chosen from the agenda of the first meeting; the following chapter to the discussion of the three chosen from the agenda of the second meeting. The executive director chaired the meetings and, except as noted, led the discussions.

The meetings were scheduled

from 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. with an hour break at noon for lunch.

Luncheon was served in the same room as that in which

the meeting was held, but the luncheon table was set up apart from the meeting table.

There was no attempt, nor apparent

plan, for continuing the discussion of agenda topics during the luncheon period.

This hour represented a definite break

in the proceedings of the meeting and can best be described as a social period. It should be pointed out that in these meetings the formality of a motion, to be seconded and voted upon is not usually followed. a question here.

A e t h e r or not this is good practice is not It need only be noted that conclusions were

reached on the basis of a consensus of opinion of the group. I.

THE FIRST MEETING

1 Discussion of the Spring Inter-Association Conference.

See Appendix for the record of this discussion, p. 99•

30 The Spring Inter-Association Conference around idiich this dis­ cussion centers, is one of a cycle of conferences sponsored by the National Board of the YWCA that brings together the members and staff of associations in a specific area to consider matters of concern to all YWCA 1s.

The Regional Director of

the YWCA carries major responsibility for planning and organ­ izing the conference.

However, its success depends solely on

the support of the local associations.

The executive director

had received a letter from the Regional Director asking for suggestions for a suitable time and place for the meetings. The association already had several activities scheduled for the spring months which would require for their success the active support of volunteers as well as staff, ning and in the activities themselves.

2

both in plan­

The individual branches

and divisions likewise had events scheduled that called for similar support.

It was important therefore that in selecting

a time for the inter-association conference an effort be made to avoid in so far as possible choosing a date that would con­ flict with already scheduled activities or that would be so close to them in time as to preclude the desired support of either the conference or the scheduled activity. The executive staff represents the leadership of all

o

"Staff*1 is used in this instance as a general term to include all professional staff employed by the agency.

31 branches and major divisions and thus there was in this group a composite knowledge of all activities scheduled throughout the association for the coming months— the information needed in selecting a suitable date for the conference.

This was the

primary reason for bringing the matter to the group.

The goal

of the discussion was to come to a group agreement on a choice of date or dates that could be passed on to the Regional Director as the group*s suggestion for the conference.

A

secondary goal was a group decision on a meeting place. It was not absolutely essential that the executive bring this matter to the staff meeting for discussion.

She

herself could have studied the schedule of coming events, decided upon a date that appeared to her to be suitable, and merely announced at the meeting that she was suggesting such and such dates for the conference.

However, this was an

activity that affected the total association and by bringing it to the group for its consideration the executive indicated her acceptance of the group members as partners with her in matters affecting the total association.

She likewise made

it possible for the group, individually and as a group, to function as responsible members of the administrative body of the association. The executive introduced the topic by reading the letter from the Regional Director which included, in addition to the request for suggestions for a time and place of

32 meeting, some of the thinking and planning that was being done for these meetings.

Again it was not necessary for the

executive to read the letter.

She might merely have indi­

cated that a letter had been received from the Regional Director and then asked for suggestions of dates for the meet­ ing.

But in sharing the letter with the staff the executive

was supplying the group with the same background knowledge and understanding of the proposed content and arrangements for the conference that she had.

In doing so she tended to

arouse in the group a greater interest in the meetings and a consequent greater concern among the members in the matter of selecting a suitable date. Following the reading, the executive called on the group for their suggestions of dates and meeting place. Although as previously indicated the request for suggestions was directed to her, by asking the members of the group for their suggestions, she was in effect saying that their think­ ing and opinions were important in this respect which was of itself an inducement to voluntary cooperative action. As indicated above a. critical element in the choice of a conference time centered around the selection of a date that would not conflict with other activities.

The group

appeared to be quite conscious of this critical factor and much of the early part of this discussion was concerned with pointing out the various events already scheduled for the

33 coming months— the National YWCA Week celebration in which each division would have some responsibility, the volunteer training conference, the Easter school vacation period which affected the Y-Teen program activities of each branch, branch annual meetings and the Association’s annual meeting*

These

were important considerations, important not only from the point of view of the staff time involved but also from the point of view of the volunteers who would be called upon to give time and effort in planning and attending the activities already scheduled.

It was pointed out, too, that the Easter

season itself was a time when many people made personal plans and therefore would probably not be disposed to attend a con­ ference. While the group appeared alert to these considerations, the executive gave a certain amount of leadership in focusing attention on this aspect of the matter.

In response to a

question immediately following her introduction of this agenda item, she reminded the group of the annual meeting and of the National YWCA Week celebration, thereby pointing up the need of considering these and other scheduled activities in select­ ing a time for the conference.

Her activity at this point

appeared to provide the springboard for an enumeration by various members of the group of all the activities and factors that needed to be taken into account in reaching a decision in this matter.

She thus influenced the discussion in such a way

31* as to bring out the necessary knowledge and understanding for making a decision*

By pointing out these activities, and

thereby stimulating the individual members to point out other activities, she influenced the group to weigh the selection of a time in the light of known facts, encouraged responsible and effective thinking on their part— not alone on her p a rthelped the group become responsible in their judgments and decisions*

While this can be considered to be in the nature

of training, it can also be interpreted as indicating an acceptance by the executive of the staff as a responsible group, capable of making good decisions*

Furthermore, in

reminding the group of other total agency activities to be held during the coming months the executive emphasized the need for relating the various parts of the program so that they would be carried on without disruption and without any ill effect on the total operation of the association*

This

kind of activity is exemplary of several of the principles of coordination, the principle of communication, the principle of functional relationship, and the principle of achieving organizational goals.

Nor can the leadership aspect of this

activity be overlooked. At one point in the discussion Kay B.

3

put a question

^ All names of persons referred to in this study are fictitious and are not the names of those participating in the meetings or of any known persons*

35 to the executive but it was Polly S. rather than the executive who replied*

There is nothing in the record to indicate that

the executive in any way interferred or attempted to prevent Polly from answering the question.

Rather the executive was

seemingly accepting of Polly*s action, for without any further reference to Kay*s question she followed Polly*s answer with a question to the group that implied acceptance of the answer and likewise incorporated a suggestion made by Polly*

By

letting the members of the group answer questions that were raised, when and if they indicated a desire to do so, the executive made it possible for the individual giving the answer to experience feelings of personal worth and satisfac­ tion by virtue of the contribution she was thus enabled to make to the discussion.

In creating such feelings the executive

induced voluntary cooperative effort* Within a relatively short discussion eight periods of time, the majority of them occurring during April, were desig­ nated as poor choices, and eight suggestions were made as to when the conference might be held.

These suggestions indi­

cated a weighing of choice in favor of a time in May*

When it

appeared that all major activities already scheduled had been introduced into the thinking of the group, the executive sug­ gested as a first choice the third week of May and as second choice the second week of May*

The record states, _,fThere was

nodding and indication of general acceptance of these times.*1

36 Although it was the executive who made the proposal that became the group decision in this matter, her suggestion reflected the general trend of group thinking in relation to the problem.

Furthermore, her activity in this respect came

after an opportunity had been given for all who so wished to participate in the discussion.

Although the executive assumed

a leadership role in the final decision, the direction of that leadership came from the group. A review of the discussion as a whole shows that seven of the group of eleven, excluding the executive, participated in the discussion.

In addition the record indicates general

discussion by the group on four separate occasions and one comment by an unrecognized speaker.

It could be that the four

for whom there is no record of participation took part in these general discussions.

In tabulating the overfall con­

tributions made by the members of the group we find sixteen recorded instances of participation in addition to the four general discussion periods.

In contrast to this, we find that,

after her introduction of the topic, the executive partici­ pated on eight separate occasions.

It therefore appears that

not only did a large proportion of the members of the group actively participate in the discussion but that the greater part of the discussion was carried by the members themselves. The record indicates, too, that the executive’s contribution when made was for the most part brief and chiefly in the form

37 of suggestion or question*

By thus limiting the extent of her

participation, the executive made the discussion the group’s, thereby creating an inducement to voluntary cooperation*

At

the same time by participating to some extent she remained a part of the group, sharing with them the consideration of the matter*

In thus avoiding a dominating role, yet remaining in

the discussion, it was possible for her to create the idea of working together and sharing responsibility for the decision. As the leader of the group, the executive’s activity and attitude can. influence the atmosphere of the meeting and the record gives an Indication of her influence In this respect during the discussion*

At one point, when, after several

periods of time had been suggested and the response to these proposals indicated in each case a conflict with some other meeting or activity, the comment was made, “W e ’re going to meet quite a bit in the new year,1’ the records report ’’apprecia­ tive laughter from the group#”

The record further states that

the executive responded in a friendly way to this comment and joined in the laughter that followed it*

This kind of a response

together with her ability to laugh in spite of the complications in finding a suitable date for the conference is expressive of relaxation and ease on her part*

It is the kind of an attitude,

relieved of tension, that helps to create compatibility*

The

report that lfa congenial, friendly atmosphere predominated in the back and forth comments and suggestions” would indicate

38 that compatibility was a characteristic of this discussion. Summarizing the activity of the executive we find that she accepted the staff as a responsible functioning group; she provided background knowledge regarding the conference; she gave leadership in pointing up the kind of information needed in choosing a suitable date; she gave leadership in pointing out the importance of relating the time of the con­ ference to other activities for a smoother operation of agency activities;

she let members of the group, who so wished,

answer questions as they arose; she indicated that the think­ ing and opinions of the group was important; she took leader­ ship in proposing a solution to the question; she participated in the discussion but she did not dominate it; she was relaxed and at ease throughout the discussion.

In all of these activi­

ties, as it has been pointed out within the analysis itself, there is evidence of the principles of administrative coordi­ nation. When this discussion is considered from the point of view of the criteria established to identify coordination in the meetings, there appears to be considerable evidence to conclude that coordination took place.

First, a decision was

reached that can be considered a group decision accepted by the group as a whole.

The second criterion required that

there be some consideration of the objective or objectives of the project under discussion.

There is no direct reference

39 to the purpose of the conference*

The fact that it is one of

a cycle of conferences would preclude to some extent the need for a precise stating of objective.

It can be assumed, how­

ever, that one of the objectives is to bring together as large a representation of members and staff from each associa­ tion as possible, and recognition of this objective is evidenced in the discussion.

The record states, "the focus

of the discussion appeared to be to select a time that would be most propitious for assuring a good attendance by volun­ teers and staff."

On this basis there appears to be justifi­

cation for concluding that, although not specifically stated, a major objective was considered in discussing the matter. The third criterion related to the introduction and consideration of critical elements. discussion.

This too occurred in the

The fourth indicated that a high proportion of

the members would take part in the discussion. occurred...

This also

The fifth called for evidence of compatibility

among the members of the group.

The "congenial friendly atmos­

phere" of the meeting, the easy laughter, and the implication in the recorded discussion that, despite the apparent diffi­ culty in finding a time that would be entirely satisfactory to everyone, the group was able to work together on this matter without tension or strain and come to agreement are all indi­ cations of compatibility.

bO if Discussion of personnel procedures. One of the respon­ sibilities of the Personnel Committee is to formulate the personnel policies and procedures of the agency*

Policies

must be acted upon by the board to become effective, but pro­ cedures become effective on action by the Committee.

The

Committee had just completed revising the procedures and they were being presented to the executive staff for their approval or such other action as they deemed necessary.

It is YWCA

policy that when, in carrying out its responsibilities, action is taken by one group affecting the operations, activities, or functioning of another group, the matter acted upon shall be presented to the second group for its approval, disapproval or modification.

The action of the second group is then

referred back to the originating group and is taken into con­ sideration in the final action by this group in the matter. This policy was being affected in this instance.

Furthermore,

as directors of the major organizational divisions of the asso­ ciation and administrative supervisors of personnel within these divisions, it was important that the executive staff be aware of these contemplated revisions. The statement of procedures had been organized into seven major topics covering employment of staff members,

b cussion.

See Appendix, page 107, for the record of this dis

*hL resignation of staff members, dismissal of staff members, requests for sick leave and vacation, requests for study on the job, requests for participation in the YWCA Retirement Fund, requests for conference attendance.

There was a final

section covering similar provisions for office and mainte­ nance staff where such applied. The executive introduced this topic by saying r,we haven*t discussed the procedures adopted by the Personnel Committee, have we?**, and included in her further introductory comments that while they had been adopted by the committee, they were not necessarily final.

There was no response to

her question or comments and she went on to read the first section of the procedures.

The implication in the executive*s

introductory remarks was that staff thinking would be a factor in shaping the finally adopted procedures, and was in effect a recognition of the principle of functional responsibility as well as the principle of voluntary cooperation.

However,

it is quite conceivable that the statement that the committee had already adopted the procedures would tend to neutralize the coordinative effect of the idea that staff would share in formulating the procedures.

The fact that there was a complete

lack of response to her statement serves to strengthen this opinion. At the conclusion of the reading of the first section a question was raised by Mary J. about terminology that the

b2 executive answered.

There were no further comments.

At the

conclusion of the reading of the second section a question was raised about letters of resignation, and another brief answer was given.

At this point Mary raised another question,

one relating back to the first section and one that indicated some feeling that a branch executive should be involved more directly in the employment of program staff for her branch. The executive replied that this was the job of the Sub­ committee of the Personnel Committee; but before there could be further discussion of this point, Ruth M. began questioning the executive about the organizational relationship of the Sub­ committee and the Personnel Committee.

The record indicates

that there appeared to be misunderstanding by the executive of the real question being raised by Ruth and a failure on the part of both her and Ruth to recognize and clarify this mis­ understanding.

Ruth did not pursue her questioning and the

executive went on to read the next sections of the procedures. Throughout this portion of the discussion there appears to be little if any activity that can be construed as an appli­ cation of the principles of coordination. for identifying coordination observable.

Nor are the elements In fact the discus­

sion can be described as chiefly in the nature of group acquiescence and acquiescence is not coordination.

Later in

the record mention is made of tension and strain being present in the earlier part of the discussion.

The unresponsiveness

*+3 of the group at this point in the proceedings of the meeting, and the fact that during the conversation between Ruth and the executive on the relation of the Sub-committee to the Personnel Committee the members of the group listened but were silent, suggests that there was very little compatibility in the discussion of these sections. However, in the discussion centering around the section on study on the job, the next section of the procedures, a change occurred that led to activity that was indicative of coordination.

And, while not all the remaining procedures

were discussed, the nature and tone of the discussion that took place around this section and that one dealing with con­ ference attendance was such as to indicate that if there had been any feeling of need to modify or change the other sec­ tions it would have been brought out. The point at which coordination began to appear followed closely after the executives response to Maryfs suggestion that the tone of the statement regarding requests for study be softened and to Edith W. S frank and outspoken description of the likely reaction by members of the employee group if the statement remained as it then read.

The executives laughing

rejoinder to these comments and the laughter of the group following it appeared to have had a cathartic effect in reliev­ ing the atmosphere of the tension that was present.

But this

incident would not alone account for the coordination that

Mf subsequently occurred*

The executive*s immediate and ready

acceptance of a critical comment and a suggested change in the procedures appeared to have released the group to the point that the members felt greater freedom than they had earlier to express their opinions of the procedures and to discuss them*

Through this action, the executive provided an

initial incentive for a more responsive and responsible par­ ticipation.

But it was undoubtedly her succeeding activity,

which exemplified the principles of coordination, that brought about the change that occurred. An opinion was expressed by one member of the group that the phrase “regular working hours11 should be clarified; an opinion was expressed concerning an aspect of the relation­ ship between volunteers and staff and was supported by other members of the group; a critical judgment was made by one member that the statement regarding requests for study was too abrupt, would tend to cause irritation and was also sup­ ported by the group; another forthright comment, bringing out even more clearly a negative reaction to the procedure for study requests, was made.

In each of these instances the

executive gave verbal acceptance of the points made and opinions expressed, and through her acceptance of these opinions, opinions which are in the nature of critical com­ ments of the procedures and which bring out critical elements and potential friction-producing features of the procedures,

**■5 she implied that critical judgments were acceptable, would not result in recrimination.

In so doing she encouraged free

and frank expression regarding the procedures.

Furthermore,

she indicated that the thinking of the group was valid and would be considered in these matters \diich, as previouslyindicated, is, in itself, a means of creating feelings of per­ sonal satisfaction and worth.

This is the type of activity

that induces voluntary cooperative effort.

In conjunction

with this accepting activity of the executive we find Edith dropping the point relating to channeling of conference applications which she has been pressing.

While it is probable

that her willingness to do so was in part due to the thought expressed in the rebuttal to her ideas on the matter, her willingness to cooperate at this point may also be attributed to some extent to the accepting attitude of the executive to the opinions expressed by the group. Again, in accepting with ease a blunt negative response by one member to her own proposal regarding channeling the conference application, the executive indicated her acceptance of the right of the individual to express an opinion.

This

type of activity also helps to create in the individual a psychological motive for voluntary cooperative activity inasmuch as it gives recognition to the worth of the individ­ ual which of itself will tend to induce a cooperative atti­ tude.

In examining the amount of recorded participation by the executive and other members of the group in this portion of the discussion it appears that the executive, exclusive of the reading of the sections being discussed and the conversa­ tion occurring as a result of an interruption in the discus­ sion, made fourteen separate contributions to the discussion; that the accumulated individual contributions of the staff, including participation noted as general discussion, totaled forty-three.

It is apparent that in contrast to the earlier

discussion of procedures the major portion of this discussion was again carried by the group.

By inducing participation

through letting the group carry the major portion of the dis­ cussion, and by letting her own participation be chiefly in the form of acceptance and amplification of positive contribu­ tions made by the members of the group the executive created the incentive for cooperative effort. At one point in the discussion, the executive indicated that the Personnel Committee had never turned down a request for study and that the committee was very much interested in staff and in knowing of their interest in further study.

In

giving Information of previous committee action and the atti­ tude of the committee toward staff in this matter, the execu­ tive made possible the development of a more harmonious attitude by staff toward the committee in carrying out its responsibilities.

The developing of harmonious relations

between the parts of the organization is essential for effi­ cient and effective operation in achieving the association’s goal and to the extent that the action of the executive here represented an attempt to develop such a relationship the principle of achieving goals is being affected.

A more direct

application of this principle by means of a statement of the function and responsibilities of the committee and the rela­ tion of its responsibilities to the agency’s purpose might have been made at this point.

However, the explanation given

may be interpreted as having further contributed to relieving the tension that existed in the group thereby making it possible for the discussion to move along to an acceptable group decision. In response to an opinion expressed by a member of the group, the executive pointed up the relation of the thought expressed in that comment to a basic policy of YWCA operation, namely that all staff shall have direct access to the Personnel Committee.

In this activity the executive was again applying

the principle of achieving organization goals as she brought out the importance of relating procedures to over-all agency policy. In the discussion of conference attendance, the remark was made that there are times when the individual feels that she has more important things to attend to in connection with her specific division functions and therefore does not want to

b8 go to a conference.

In responding to this the executive

pointed out the need to take into consideration the total organization and over-all agency objectives in making deci­ sions of this nature, a further application of the principle of achieving organization goals.

However, as in the case of

the Personnel Committee’s function, the question can be raised as to why a more explicit statement of the purpose of the conference and the relation of that purpose to other division purposes and the agency’s purpose was not made. There is indication in the record that there was some support among the members of the group of this attitude toward con­ ference attendance, but despite that the topic was not pursued. This could mean an acceptance of the executive’s comments in relation to this attitude.

But the silence that followed her

response does not necessarily connote acceptance*

It may also

imply resistance and in this instance could be Indicative of a feeling, “We have to attend conference, so why say anything more*"

Resistance to the support of an activity, whatever its

cause and whether it be in relation to a total association activity or a division activity that calls for support from other divisions does not contribute to coordination, nor is mere acquiescence conducive to coordination.

While it does

not appear that any resistance that might have been felt at this point in any way influenced further discussion of this topic, it could well be that a frank discussion_ of the

^9 relation of conferences to other aspects of agency functions could have laid the foundation for greater cooperation and coordination among the divisions in relation to attendance and support of future conferences.

Nor can the value of such

a discussion in relation to other association-wide activities that are dependent for their success upon the coordinated activity and cooperation of the divisions be overlooked.

It

might be wondered too whether the failure to accept such feel­ ings as were expressed in this instance might not be a factor in creating further conscious or unconscious resistance to coordinated activity in relation to conferences.

As was

pointed out earlier in this study, it is a natural tendency to attribute greater importance to one's own particular division activities.

The mere recognition of this human tendency can

be an incentive for a more cooperative attitude that will in turn contribute to coordination.

It is no doubt a fact that

the time available for such a discussion, in the light of the remaining agenda items to be taken up, operated against a pursuance of this point.

However, the question then arises*

How many items can properly be included on an agenda when time is limited?

There is no doubt that the nature of the

items to be discussed becomes a factor in determining the length of an agenda.

Selection of topics then becomes impor­

tant as well as flexibility in the meeting itself in taking up the topics.

These, however, are points that are outside

50 the range of this study, although it is conceivable that they would affect the development of coordination. In clarifying the purpose of the section on requests for study and in pointing out the interest of committee mem­ bers in staff, the executive helped to bring about greater understanding by the group of the thinking of the committee in this matter and of their attitude toward staff.

By accept­

ing critical comments she encouraged staff to bring out points which, if not clarified, would tend to cause controversy and misunderstanding between staff and the top administrative group.

As previously indicated, the principle of communica­

tion implies that coordination is dependent on understanding and as the executive helped, as indicated above, to create better understanding in this discussion, she follows this prin­ ciple. Throughout the latter part of this discussion there is repeated evidence of the willingness of the executive to con­ sider the opinions and thinking of the group in relation to the procedures and thereby an indication of her acceptance of the group as having a responsible role in formulating personnel procedures.

In verbally supporting the validity of certain

opinions, in accepting the rejection of her proposal regarding the conference application, by avoiding a dominating role in the discussion yet still taking part in it she assumed a shar­ ing role with the members in the discussion.

By pointing out

51 that they are f,all working on a coordinated program** and the importance therefore of considering the total organization, she gave leadership to the thinking of the group.

And she

provided leadership as she made the proposals that become the group decisions.

The executive*s activity in these instances

was an application of the principle of functional responsi­ bility. It should be borne in mind that the procedures being discussed would, when finally adopted, apply to the executive staff as well as to all other staff.

In discussing each of

the three sections comments were made suggesting and pointing up features of the procedures that the group felt might cause irritation among the staff.

Since the procedures will apply

equally to executive staff and mindful of the earlier tension that existed, it can be presumed that some of the irritation described was to an extent being experienced by this group as they considered the procedures.

The executive*s verbal recog­

nition of the possibility of irritation, and the relaxed and friendly manner in which she gave recognition did much to relieve tension and prepared the way for a reappearance of the group feeling that had existed earlier.

The record states

that her conduct at this point “had the effect of releasing some of the tenseness that had crept into the atmosphere,** and that as a result, “The earlier friendly and relaxed atmos­ phere returned to the meeting•tl Despite the critical comments

and expressions of opinion toward these certain procedures, the executive appears from the record to have maintained a friendly and relaxed attitude throughout the diseussion. There is no record of criticism by her of the staff for their unwillingness to accept these particular procedures as formu­ lated by the Personnel Committee5 there is no record of an attempt by her to force their acceptance as they stood5 nor is there any indication that she was disturbed in any way at their decision to return these sections to the committee for further study.

This kind of activity is conducive to the

development of compatibility and group feeling among the mem­ bers of the group in meeting. It is evident from the foregoing analysis that the executive*s activity during the latter part of this discussion of the procedures is an application of the several principles of coordination.

Furthermore, the criteria set up for iden­

tifying coordination are also observable.

The group deliber­

ated upon these sections at some length and out of their discussion there came a very definite group decision— namely, that the provisions were not satisfactory as they stood and they should be reconsidered by the Personnel Committee.

A

group decision accepted by the group as a whole is the basis of the first criterion characterizing coordination and this occurred. In considering the matter of requests for study on the

53 job, the point was brought out by the executive that direct access to the Personnel Committee by any member of the staff was in line with YWCA philosophy.

In effect this can be con­

sidered as one of the objectives underlying the procedures for channeling requests of this sort.

The purpose for estab­

lishing procedures relating to study on the job was also brought out by the executive when she said, **. . . the purpose of this section was to keep a staff member from taking on too heavy a load of study in addition to her regular work load. • • .**

In the matter of conference attendance the provisions

were concerned chiefly with the channeling of applications for attendance.

The purpose of this provision was to make sure

that applications cleared through those divisions and/or groups that should know about them,

la/hile it was not specifi­

cally stated, this purpose was implicit in the discussion relating to channeling the application and may be said to have influenced the discussion.

Thus the criterion relating to

objective can be identified. As noted in the preceding analysis, several critical elements and several points around which friction might develop were introduced into the discussion, the evidence needed for identifying the third criterion of coordination.

The import­

ance of channeling the requests for study and conference attendance where knowledge of_this order was necessary; the need for considering total operation and the need for taking

the total into account in determining the wisdom of attend­ ance at a conference; the importance of consulting with branch executives, who know the circumstances of their branch program and are responsible for it, in requesting attendance at eonference— these are matters that are crucial in carrying on the program and could cause confusion and breakdown in effi­ cient operation if not provided for.

The feeling around the

Personnel Committee’s interpretation of regular working hours, the feeling that the tone of the statement dealing with study requests was too abrupt and would cause irritation, the feel­ ing that the committee was being too governing of what staff could do in their free time and that this interpretation might well be magnified by those staff who were not at the meeting all represent friction points.

Their introduction into the

discussion helped to influence the group’s decision that there should be further consideration of the procedures before they became final. There is a marked increase in the amount of participa­ tion in this part of the discussion of the procedures.

There

is a record of participation by eight of the eleven members, excluding the executive, and a record of six instances when there was general discussion.

It could well be that the three

who are not referred to specifically as participating took part in these general discussions.

A high proportion of par­

ticipation is the basis of the fourth criterion characterizing

55 coordination and is evident here. The fifth criterion, compatibility, is also in evi­ dence.

Mention has been made of the tension and strain in

the atmosphere during the reading of the first part of the statement of procedures and that it was relieved following the executivefs acceptance and laughing response to sugges­ tions made by Mary and Edith.

The remainder of the discus­

sion is far freer, more relaxed and suggestive of compati­ bility.

Shortly after this incident the record states “the

group seemed now to be enjoying the discussion.“

Edith*s

willingness to drop the point she was pressing in relation to channeling requests for study and the group fs attention to this point when she reintroduces it in the discussion of the conference application indicates an ability and a willing­ ness on the part of the group to consider the opinions of the various members and to work together in relation to the pro­ cedures.

Nor was there any group ill will apparent in the

response to a blunt rejection of a proposal with respect to this matter of channeling applications. laughter.

The response was

Mhile it was seemingly impossible within the time

available to work out specific suggestions for channeling the conference application that would be acceptable to the group as a whole, the fact that they were able to discuss this sec­ tion and the section dealing with requests for study with evident ease and in a cheerful manner can be interpreted as

56 indicating compatibility

There is a considerable contrast in the subject matter of the two discussions analyzed in the preceding pages.

One

had to do with the detail of an activity in which the associa­ tion would be a participating member and was therefore chiefly objective in nature.

The other had to do with matters

directly associated with the employment relationship of the total staff group, including the executive staff, and was con­ sequently far more subjective.

In each case the executive

was found to be functioning to a considerable degree on the basis of the principles of coordination. nation was identified as occurring.

In each case coordi­

However, the activity

of the executive in the second discussion, as it exemplified the principles of voluntary cooperation and compatibility, stands out as having been of major importance in bringing about coordination in this situation.

It may be assumed on

this basis that in matters that are subjective in nature, where tension may possibly arise, particular attention should be given to these two principles.

In this connection, the

question may also be raised as to whether the position on the agenda of topics that have within them potential friction and tension-producing elements may not affect, positively or negatively the development of coordination.

This question has

not been considered in this study because of limitation of

57 time*

However, it is a point that executive directors might

well consider in planning agenda* In both discussions the leadership role of the execu­ tive in the meeting is apparent*

In the method of approach

to the discussions in introducing the topics and in their sub­ sequent development, in focusing the attention of the group on the major issues involved, in guiding the discussions to avoid undue waste of time and to direct them toward conclusions there is evidence of leadership and of a certain amount of control over the happenings in the meeting*

It appears that

the functional role of the executive as the leader of the group is an important factor in the development of coordina­ tion*

CHAPTER IV THE EXECUTIVE*3 ACTIVITY IN THE MEETING AS IT RELATES TO THE DEVELOPMENT GF COORDINATION (CONTINUED) As previously indicated, this chapter will analyze the discussions that centered around three agenda topics of the second meeting.

The first one related to one aspect of an

association program activity; the other two are concerned with matters of an administrative nature. I.

THE SECOND MEETING

Discussion of the statistical report for Annual Meet­ ing.^" The annual meeting of the YWCA serves a two-fold pur­ pose.

It is the means whereby the Board and the executive

report to the membership on the activities and operations of the YWCA during the preceding twelve-month period.

It also

serves as a means for reporting to the community at large what the association has done and is doing. opportunity for publicizing the YWCA.

As such it provides an A committee had been

appointed to plan and carry out the arrangements for this meeting and had already begun work on the project.

Since this

See Appendix, P* 135, for the record of this discus sion.

58

59 was something that would involve the total association, there was value in the executive staff being informed of the plan­ ning that was being done*

As a total association meeting, a

large attendance by members was desired and executive staff have a responsibility for promoting attendance among those whose chief participation in the YWCA is in branch, center, or residence activities*

In including this item on the agenda

the object therefore was to inform the staff of the plans to date, to obtain their thinking in relation to these plans and specifically to obtain their suggestions or suggestion for presenting the statistical picture of the YWCA*s work during the past year. The first part of the discussion was concerned with the first two objectives noted above and was chiefly informational and evaluative.

It was not considered in this analysis.

The

latter part of the discussion called for some group thinking with respect to a suggestion for presenting the statistical report and is considered. The executive introduced the topic by first asking for suggestions for the program of the meeting and recalled pro­ grams of previous annual meetings.

She then said, tfIs there

any clever way we can get across the statistical report of the association,w

and “some of you bright people be thinking of

it .11 The group*s response to the question and comment was almost immediate.

Suggestions and countersuggestions followed

one after the other#

The executive^ introductory comment

appeared to have provided a stimulus to the members of the group to find ,fa clever way 11 to get across the statistical report#

While the group responded readily to the initial

stimulus, the executive did not let that be her only act for encouraging thinking on the matter.

When Harriet P. proposed

a way of presenting the report that would reduce costs, the executive supported and approved her suggestion*

When Ruth M.

introduced the idea of using photographs, she was enthusiastic in her response and support of this “new idea.11 When Jane C. pointed out the publicity function of the meeting and the need for considering this aspect of the meeting in relation to costs, she indicated support and acceptance of her contri­ bution to the discussion#

When Lucy P. made a further sugges­

tion in relation to the pictorial presentation, she again showed enthusiasm and gave assurance that this additional idea was feasible*

In each of these instances, the executive was

providing the incentive to function cooperatively.

By imply­

ing that the members of the group were capable of thinking up a clever scheme for presenting the statistical report and by giving verbal recognition to their individual contributions and suggestions, she helped to create ego satisfaction and feelings of personal worth which in themselves, as previously indicated, are means for inducing voluntary cooperative effort. And, as a result of her action in this respect# some real

61 contributions were made.

She was, in this respect, following

the principle of voluntary cooperation.

Nor can it be over­

looked that in stimulating the group’s interest in finding a way to present the report, thereby influencing the members to take some initiative in the matter, the executive was provid­ ing leadership. As noted in previous discussions, the extent of the executive’s participation was limited.

The record indicates

that she participated on eleven different occasions, six of these being brief affirmations and expressions of approval or support to suggestions and ideas.

All told, the record indi­

cates eighteen contributions made by staff with general par­ ticipation noted on three occasions.

The executive was again

making it possible for the discussion to be carried on by the members of the group.

As pointed out in the study of the

first meeting, by avoiding a dominating role in the discus­ sion, yet maintaining some part in it, she was in effect observing the principle of functional relationship. At one point the record states, ‘’the executive described a ’stunt’ don© with pictures at an association with which she once worked .11 The sharing of a past experience indicates an intention of friendliness and good will with those with whom it is shared.

As such, this type of activity is a way of

developing an atmosphere in which compatibility will itself develop.

Although the action of the executive in this

62 instance was in all probability intended to support the idea of a pictorial presentation and the use of photographs in this connection, it nevertheless had value as a means for promoting compatibility.

On this basis the executivefs

activity was in effect an application of the principle of compatibility. In considering the discussion from the point of view of the criteria for identifying coordination there appears to~ have been a high degree of coordinated activity among the members of the group.

The record reveals that out of the com­

bined thinking of the group there developed an idea, supported and approved by the group as a whole, for presenting the statistical report— namely, a pictorial presentation.

The

record states, “There was a general feeling of interest and enthusiasm among the group in the ideas that were being expressed relating to the use of photographs in presenting the statistical report*11 This comment coming near the conclu­ sion of the discussion can be interpreted as implying the acceptance by the group of this kind of presentation.

The

fact that the proposal developed out of the discussion and was accepted by the group would justify it as being a group proposal, and as meeting the criterion of a group decision. As previously pointed out, the purpose of the meeting is two-fold, to make a report to the association members on the state of the association— its activities, its operations,

63 and its extent, and to publicize the YWCA to the community. Although not specifically stated the first of these objec­ tives is implicit in the question of the executive in her introduction to the subject matter of the discussion:

11Is

there any • . . way we can get across the statistical report of the association.

• • .**

Later, as a result of Jane*s

comment, the publicity objective of the meeting was brought up for-consideration.— The introduction of-these two-points--into the discussion prior to its conclusion provides evidence that the criterion calling for some consideration of the objective or objectives of the project under discussion was met. A matter of importance to any organization project, and of particular importance in a social agency operating under a limited budget, is the cost entailed in carrying out a project. The executive first introduced this matter of cost early in the discussion.

Later Ruth M. in making the original sugges­

tion that led to the final group proposal, reintroduced it, and Jane C. brought it up again. received further consideration.

In each instance the matter The inclusion in the discus­

sion of this critical factor— the cost involved in presenting the statistical report— is in accord with the third criterion, that one relating to the introduction and consideration of critical elements. The record indicates that eight of the twelve members

6b of the group, excluding the executive, took part in this dis­ cussion.

General discussion was indicated in two instances.

There therefore appears to he justification for concluding that there was a high proportion of participation in this portion of the meeting, the fourth criterion for coordination. Considerable enthusiasm and interest appears to have been generated in this particular discussion.

The warm recep-

tion given to ideas as they were proposed, the use of the_____ ideas by others of the group than those who originated them, the movement from one suggestion to another and the apparent willingness to move from one suggestion to another to the finally developed idea of a pictorial presentation all are suggestive of compatibility among the members of the group in relation to this topic.

It would seem that the criterion of

compatibility is markedly evident in this particular discus­ sion. 2 Discussion of the called staff meeting.

All staff in

the agency, professional, office and maintenance with the exception of the executive director and her assistant had been invited to a meeting, sponsored by a few staff members to talk together about certain aspects of their jobs.

It was the feel­

ing of this sponsoring group that in certain respects the

^ See Appendix, p. lMf, for the record of this discus­ sion.

65 conditions of work were not entirely satisfactory and that it might well be that similar feelings prevailed among other members of the staff*

It was the thinking of this group too,

that in talking together about these conditions some steps might be taken that would lead to an improvement in them. The executive staff are in effect the personnel direc­ tors of the branches and divisions they head and as such have a responsibility for dealing' with personnel matters within their divisions or branches* tion with job conditions.

This would include dissatisfac­

Mien dissatisfaction occurs, staff

may go either to their immediate division director or branch executive, to the agency executive, or directly to the Person­ nel Committee.

This is the organizational provision for hand­

ling such matters. In bringing this situation to the executive staff meet­ ing for discussion the purpose was to consider and to come to some conclusion as to why, in the light of the provisions available for handling dissatisfaction, did certain of the staff feel it necessary to call a special staff meeting in order to effect an improvement of the conditions with which they were at odds.

The implication in the executivefs opening

remarks was that the situation arose out of the failure or neglect of the executive staff to recognize and/or carry out their functions in relation to personnel.

Miy this failure

or neglect occurred might be in part due to misunderstanding

66 or a lack of understanding of the provisions for handling dissatisfaction, or a lack of understanding by the staff of their responsibility with respect to personnel matters of this nature*

The situation, if not dealt with wisely and

adequately could produce a considerable amount of discord within the agency and could in turn affect detrimentally the efficient and effective operation of the total program in achieving its goals*— It seemed, therefore, most appropriate__ that the matter be brought up at the meeting of the executive staff* The executive introduced the topic by saying that she wanted to talk a little about the meeting called for Friday night, not because it was called, but the reason for calling it*

She then went on to point out the responsibility of

executive staff in relation to job dissatisfaction, to review the existing procedures for dealing with dissatisfactions, and to emphasize the willingness and desire on the part of the Personnel Committee to work with staff on matters related to their jobs and to conditions of employment.

The first

responses to her statements indicated that there was a lack of understanding by some members of the group of their respon­ sibilities in relation to dissatisfaction among employees* There was also indication of a lack of understanding by the group as a whole of the function of the employee representa­ tives who served on the Personnel Committee.

In replying to

67 these responses the executive pointed out that now was a good opportunity to clarify some of these points and went on to speak about how policies and procedures could be changed and the kind of action that staff could and should take in such matters• In her introductory remarks to this topic the execu­ tive was acting to some degree on the basis of the principle of functional relationship*

By indicating her expectation of

responsible action by the executive staff, in such matters, and thereby her willingness to accept them as responsible administrators, and by pointing out their responsibilities in this connection, the executive was helping the members of the group to understand more fully their functions in relation to personnel matters.

There was some indication, too, in these

early remarks that the executive was disturbed by the failure of the staff in this matter and implicit in her remarks was the idea of reproof and disapprobation.

The value for coordi­

nation of her activity might therefore be questioned.

On the

other hand, if the agency is to be administered effectively, the executive staff must be fully aware of their responsibili­ ties and are accountable for their performance.

The responses

to her remarks indicated that the fault lay in part to a lack of understanding of executive staff *s function in relation to dissatisfaction.

As this became apparent the executive's

activity changed to that of clarifying their role in this

68 respect*

By recognizing the need for such clarification, by

not pressing the point of failure, but by helping the group to gain a better understanding of its function with respect to personnel matters, the executive made it possible for the coordinative values of her earlier activity to take effect* At the same time she was acting on the basis of the principle of communication.

As a result of this kind of activity the

group-was able, despite its- unquestioned-awareness of failurey to move ahead into a consideration of some of the underlying reasons for dissatisfaction. The executive continued to guide her action on the basis largely of the principle of functional responsibility. When the opinion was expressed that the calling of the meeting might be indicative chiefly of a dissatisfaction with salaries and the salary scale, the executive let the Comptroller describe the thinking and activity of the Board in this matter; also let it be one of the staff members on the Personnel Com­ mittee who amplified and emphasized the Committee!s policy in relation to wage scale.

The executive did not detract from

these explanations by adding to them or rephrasing them. merely indicated that they were correct.

She

By letting those who

were functionally associated with the financial aspects of the agency and with the Personnel Committee present this informa­ tion, she made it possible for them to function in a responsi­ ble way, helped them to carry out a responsible role in

69 relation to these activities. As the staff began to analyze and try to discover why it was that the existing procedures for handling dissatisfac­ tion were not being followed— as they began to assume a responsible role in this situation, the executive*s activity took the form of sharing with the staff in seeking out causes for the ignorance of procedures.

Her participation was

chiefly in the form of asking f o r -group opinions-in relation-to ideas expressed by individual members, in relation to her own expressed and growing doubt, brought about by the discus­ sion itself, as to the adequacy of existing methods for hand­ ling dissatisfaction, in relation to possible ways for correct­ ing the situation.

In the questions she raised, in the

opinions she expressed, and in asking for the group*s opinions in relation to her questions and opinions the executive indi­ cated her willingness to work with the staff in a sharing way in trying to get at the roots of the situation and in trying to correct it.

This kind of activity exemplifies the princi­

ple of functional relationship. Early in the discussion the executive pointed out the desire and intent of the Personnel Committee to work with staff on a cooperative and harmonious basis.

Her interpreta­

tion of the thinking and attitude of the committee was in accord with the principle of communication.

Her introduction

of this idea undoubtedly contributed to the thinking that led

70 to the suggestion that the Personnel Committee he notified of the meeting.

In indicating her approval of this suggestion,

the executive pointed out the disharmony that could result between, the committee, in carrying on its functions, and the staff if they did not know and understand the reason for the called meeting.

In bringing out this point the executive was

emphasizing the importance of harmonious relationships between the various parts of the organization in working towards its goals.

As such it represented an observance of the principle

of achieving goals.

As suggested earlier, but not specifically

stated, the very inclusion of this topic on the agenda is an application of this principle.

And this raises the question

— can the choice of topics brought to the executive staff meet­ ing for discussion be a factor in the development of adminis­ trative coordination,

lalhile this question is not considered

by this study, it seems, that it merits some thought by execu­ tive directors. By permitting Buth M. to describe and explain the action of the Board in relation to salary increases without interference, by supporting Polly S*s explanation of the Personnel Committeefs policy in relation to salary Increases, by supporting the suggestion for notifying the Personnel Com­ mittee of the meeting the executive provided incentive for further participation in the discussion.

By limiting her

participation— fifteen recorded contributions as compared to

71 a total of fifty-seven by the staff— and in no way hindering the free expression of thoughts and opinions in relation to this matter, she provided the incentive for cooperative activity♦

In asking for the group's opinions with respect to

the questions she raised, thereby indicating her willingness to consider their judgment in the matter, and by indicating her willingness to consider the possibility that the proeedtires for handling dissatisfaction were inadequate, sho provided further motivation for voluntary cooperative activity* As already mentioned, the executive indicated by her early remarks a feeling on her part that the staff had failed in carrying out its personnel administrative functions.

How­

ever, the record indicates that remarks of this nature were limited to the first phase of the discussion, her succeeding remarks being concerned with the situation itself and how to deal with it.

The executive, as the person ultimately respon­

sible for the administration of the agency, has a responsibil­ ity for pointing out the inadequacy of the staff in this instance.

In doing so she was fulfilling her leadership role

as director of the agency.

Continued harping on failure would

easily produce tension in the group and contribute to incom­ patibility.

This did not occur, however, and the executive by

limiting this type of comment and by permitting the discussion to proceed to a consideration of the situation itself and how to handle it, made it possible for the group to discuss the

72 matter without noticeable tension or strain.

By this kind of

activity and by indicating her willingness to consider the group*s reasoned opinions and suggestions in regard to the situation and by not forcing her own opinions upon the group she contributed to the development of compatibility. Early in the record of the discussion the impression is gained that the executive was somewhat disturbed by this situation^— However, this appeared to be chiefly in connection with the failure of staff to carry out their responsi­ bilities.

There is nothing in the remaining discussion to

indicate strain or tension on the part of the executive.

This

is a situation having in it potentials that would seriously affect the operations of the agency.

It can be assumed that

the executive was aware of this, nor is it unreasonable to suppose that these potentials and the dissatisfaction of staff itself was disturbing to her. of such in the record.

However, there is no evidence

By controlling the expression and/or

signs of such feelings, by remaining relaxed in her approach to this matter, the executive made possible the development of an atmosphere around a problem situation in which compati­ bility could occur.

In so doing she was again following the

principle of compatibility. Little has been said in the preceding analysis of the leadership taken by the executive in this discussion.

Yet it

was the essence of the entire discussion, and cannot be

73 overlooked.

By helping the group to a greater awareness of

their responsibilities in relation to the personnel they supervised, and by stimulating them to do some thinking about this particular situation (to which it seemed little thought had been given by the executive staff) she was acting as the leader of the group.

Through her own attitude and approach

to the problem she encouraged thoughtful and free inquiry into the conditions contributing to dissatisfaction and thereby---helped to guide the thinking of the group in the direction of a solution to the problem.

Through such activity and through

such an approach she was herself carrying out her own func­ tional responsibilities to the organization. An application of the criteria for determining the presence of coordination indicates that a considerable amount of coordination occurred in this portion of the meeting. Although the group was not specifically asked to come to a precise decision or to develop a precise plan for dealing with this situation, certain group conclusions did develop out of this discussion.

In summarizing the discussion the record

says: It was also evident in the discussion that the group was in agreement that no specific action or decision relating to this matter should be taken until after the meeting. It was quite evident, too, that as a group they felt that there was a real need for a closer association between the staff and the Personnel Committee, and that as a group they felt it important that the Committee be informed about the meeting and why it was being called.

71*These evaluative statements are indicative of group agreement with respect to certain aspects of this situation and with respect to the immediate procedure to be followed in the matter.

There is evidence here of the criterion of

group decision. In the early part of this discussion the record reads: She [the executive] pointed out that the Personnel Committee was sympathetic and understanding, that they_were -anxious, to do a good job-and that -they--------wanted to work with the staff on a friendly basis, they wanted to develop procedures and policies that would be satisfactory to the staff. Inherent in these statements of the executive is the whole philosophy and objective of the YWCA with respect to volun­ teer - staff relations.

In a recent YWCA publication it is

stated: It cannot be too strongly emphasized that in staff relations, in volunteer - staff relations, in volunteer relations— wherever persons are working together closely in a common task— the nature and expression of their work together must be consonant with the aims of the program they are carrying out, or the fulfillment of those aims is stopped at its source.-^ As was pointed out earlier in this study one of the aims of the YWCA Is to develop a fellowship— a group of individuals seeking as companions to achieve common goals.

If the volun­

teer - staff relation is to be consistent with this agency

^ Margaret Logan Clark and Briseis Teall, The Executive Director on the Job (Hew York: The Woman*s Press, 19^7) > p. 4-8 .

75 purpose that relationship must be based on mutual trust and cooperation.

Much of the discussion of this agenda item was

given over to ways and means for developing such a relation­ ship.

It can be concluded, therefore, that the objectives of

the agency as they relate to this particular matter was con­ sidered by the group in the discussion leading up to the group conclusions and that the criterion relating to objective was realized:. Several elements critical to this situation were brought out in the discussions

the financial problems facing the

agency in view of the fact that the Community Chest Campaign had not reached its goal and the effeet this would have on increasing salaries; the fact that the three staff members elected by the staff to serve on the Personnel Committee had no way of knowing how the total staff as a group felt about matters that came up in committee meetings; the fact that the great majority of the staff were not personally acquainted with members of the Personnel Committee and would therefore have some hesitancy in going before the group to register dis­ satisfaction with policies or salary for fear of being labelled trouble makers.

Another critical factor that was

pointed out centered around the possibility of there being personality differences between a branch or division director and a staff member which might cause the staff member to hesi­ tate to express dissatisfaction to her immediate director or

76 go to the agency executive.

Ignorance or lack of understand­

ing by staff of policies and procedures, and ignorance with respect to channels for registering dissatisfaction was still another critical point brought out in the discussion* Some of these points might even be considered as fric­ tional elements.

There were however several other points

introduced into the discussion that may be considered as hav­ ing definite friction-producing qualities*

One had to do with

a feeling on the part of staff that they were being ignored with respect to some of the vital issues of the organization; another that the staff serving on the Personnel Committee were uncertain of what their role or function on the committee really was; another that the Personnel Committee might become alienated from the staff as a result of the called meeting and that this breech might widen if they were not made aware of dissatisfactions among the staff.

Still another was the feel­

ing on the part of some staff that salaries were inadequate; and again, that the relationship between the committee and the staff was too impersonal to promote understanding between the two groups.

The inclusion of these critical and friction-

producing elements in the discussion is evidence that meets the criterion calling for a consideration of critical ele­ ments. Examination of the record indicates that every member of the group participated at one time or another in the

77 discussion of this agenda topic— some to a greater degree than did others*

There is therefore ample evidence to conclude

that a high proportion of the members of the group actively participated in this discussion, a fourth criterion for coordi­ nation* Although the situation reflected some failure by the executive staff in carrying out their responsibilities in relation to personnel, the group was apparently able to discuss this matter with ease and freedom.

Normally it would be

presumed that when faced with the fact of failure, tension and uneasiness would be a natural reaction.

However, there is

nothing in the record indicating such a reaction on the part of members of the group. nounced.

If it did occur, it was not pro­

The individual ideas and opinions expressed were

received and responded to in a way that suggests that the group was willing and able to think together on this matter, to consider the variously expressed thoughts and judgments as to the underlying causes of the situation, and to consider together proposals that might serve to mitigate the situation. On this basis the conclusion can be drawn that compatibility was a characteristic of the interaction in this instance, a fifth criterion for coordination. if

Discussion of the Health Education Department Proposal♦

** See Appendix, p. l6l, for the record of this discussion.

78 The Health Education Department, located in the downtown area activity building, is a separate division not structurally associated with any of the branches or the center*

Its pro­

gram is one chiefly of class instruction in sports and ath­ letic

activities and is the most extensive program of its

kind in the Los Angeles YWCA.

It also has the largest enroll­

ment of constituent YWCA members of all program division*

The

department i-e the only self-supporting division in the Assoeia tion and is expected to be self-supporting, its funds coming from class fees*

The membership fees of those coming into

the YWCA through this department are however credited to the total association membership account and do not appear as income in the Health Education Department budget. The staff of this department had developed a plan which would make it possible for each branch and the center to pro­ mote its local program of activities among those constituent members enrolled in the Health Education Department whose homes were in the particular area served by the branch.

The

Department could carry out its part of the plan without the help of the branches.

But its

success

depended on the

joint action of the department and branches.

In itself the

plan was a method for strengthening the total association pro­ gram.

It would only be put into effect if approved by this

group and therefore was presented for their consideration and action.

The executive did not herself introduce this topic. Instead she introduced Helen R . , the director of the depart­ ment, and she presented the plan.

In the discussion that

followed, a comparatively short one, the executive, omitting her concluding brief remark contributed twice:

once to ques­

tion, 11It will be quite a job, won*t it?1*, the second time to indicate her support and acceptance of the proposal and to a s k H e le n i f

she w is h ed a v o t e o f a p p r o v a l-.— B ut h e r v e r y ----------

lack of active participation was an observance of the prin­ ciples of functional relationship and voluntary cooperation. In letting Helen present the proposal and lead the discussion related to it, she made it possible for her to assume a responsible role in the meeting.

Likewise by this

action she gave recognition to her as the head of the depart­ ment responsible for its operations.

This was not only recog­

nition of functional responsibilities, but was a means for inducing voluntary cooperation as well.

Again, as previously

indicated, by limiting her participation and avoiding the assumption of a dominating role in the discussion, the execu­ tive helped to create an incentive for cooperative functioning within the group.

And, by not separating herself entirely

from the discussion she maintained a sharing role with the members of the group in reaching a decision in the matter being discussed.

By such action she was making it possible

for the group to assume responsibility in relation to this

80 proposal. The executive’s comment, «lt will be quite a job,” served to point up to the group the fact that the department would be adding to its current work load in carrying out the plan.

Following as it did the explanation that it was a

method of strengthening the total program, it served likewise to emphasize the fact that this extra work was being proposed, jaot for the advantages that would accrue to the department, but for the value that might result for the total organization. The plan in itself was in the nature of coordination as it represented a way by which the divisions could work together to carry out more effectively the function of the agency. The executive’s second comment coming close upon the first one, was an expression of approval of the plan and approval is an incentive to cooperative activity.

This is

evident by the fact that the succeeding discussion focused on ways in which the branches could cooperate most effectively In implementing the plan and on suggestions of ways in which they could share in some of the extra work it meant for the Health Education Department.

Although the executive’s action

was limited, it was effective in inducing voluntary coopera­ tion, the basis of the principle of voluntary cooperation. As in early Instances we find the executive giving leadership in bringing the discussion to a conclusion. allowing time for questions, expressions of opinion and

After

81 discussion of ways and means of carrying out the plan most effectively, and after it became apparent that the plan had the approval of the group, she brought the matter to a head by asking the question that resulted in its actual acceptance. Time spent in unnecessary discussion was thus eliminated and, having satisfactorily dealt with this matter, the group was in a position to move on to the next item on the agenda# The record states that, in response to the executive!s question as to ’whether the department should proceed with the plan, 11there was nodding and indication of general group approval of the plan#*1 It can therefore be concluded that there was group acceptance of the proposal#

This is evidence

of the presence of the first criterion of coordination, a group decision accepted by the group as a whole# The criterion relating to introduction into the dis­ cussion of the objective of a particular project or the objective of the agency can also be identified#

In response

to Edith*s expression of enthusiasm, Helen explained that the department had felt that it would be a means for strength­ ening the total program of the YWCA.

In making this state­

ment Helen was in effect stating the objective of the plan# There was no further reference to this objective#

However,

the fact that following its introduction the discussion focused on ways in which the branches might best follow up on the plan can be interpreted to mean tbat the stating of

82 the objective had a positive effect in gaining the approval of the group• The introduction of critical elements relating to the matter being discussed was the basis of the third criterion for coordination and is evidenced in this portion of the meet­ ing* Several points were brought up in the discussion that can be considered as frictional or critical in nature.

One

was centered around the membership fee and was raised by Edith when she asked, "Do we share the membership fee?"

Each branch

has an income item in its budget for memberships.

Under

another agenda topic it was brought out that branches were having difficulty in meeting that income item.

Although it

appeared from the record that the question was raised in a somewhat joking mood, this could become a friction element if allowed to go uncleared.

A second friction element followed

closely on the introduction of the first.

Helen pointed out

that in carrying out the plan the Health Education Department realized that it might be depriving itself of a future_source of income from class fees by diverting the interest of par­ ticipants away from the department’s own program of activities to branch activities.

Although this matter was not a direct

factor in relation to the decision to be made by the group, it was a very real factor, critical as well as frictional, as far as the Health Education Department was concerned

particularly as it affected its budget. made, it was not discussed by this group.

The point was only However, it could

be that the willingness of the department to make the pro­ posal, despite these considerations, had a positive effect in the thinking of the members of the group with respect to it. During the discussion Helen pointed out the importance of time in carrying out the plan and the danger of antagoniz­ ing those they hoped to interest in branch program activities if the promotion was carried on too hastily— a critical point in relation to the effectiveness of the proposal.

She pointed

out that this point had been taken into account and provided for in the plan as it stood. There is a record of seven of the thirteen members of the group, excluding Helen, who was the discussion leader but including the executive, participating in the discussion.

On

two occasions the record indicates that there was “further discussion” but does not name the people who took part.

Some

of those not specifically named may have contributed in these general discussions.

There appears however to be sufficient

evidence to conclude that a considerable proportion of the members actively participated in the discussion, the fourth criterion for coordination. Mention has already been made of Edith*s introduction of the friction point relating to membership fees.

In bring­

ing up this matter the record states that she did so in a

sort of laughing way and continues, lfThere was a shout of laughter in response to her comment in which Helen joined.1* The fact that the group could see a comical side to a poten­ tial friction element would indicate that there was compati­ bility among the members.

This is further substantiated in

the way the various members of the group picked up on the idea, asked questions and discussed together the detailed operation of the plan.

In the exchanges that occurred there

is no evidence that would indicate there was tension or strain. Bather the nature of the interaction among the members of the group was indicative of compatibility, the fifth criterion for coordination.

As in the case of the first meeting, there is consider­ able difference in the subject matter of the three discussions analyzed in this chapter.

Yet in each case coordination

occurred and in each case the executive was found to be observ­ ing to a considerable degree the principles of coordination. It was pointed out at the conclusion of the analysis of the first meeting that when the subject matter of the discussion tended to be subjective in nature, there appeared to be need for greater emphasis on the principles of voluntary coopera­ tion and compatibility in order to bring about coordinated activity in the meeting.

It might be expected that the same

would hold true in relation to the discussion of the called

85 staff meeting in which the failure of the executive staff to fully carry out their responsibility with respect to person­ nel was brought out.

However, this topic was treated for the

most part in an objective way and the major portion of the discussion did not apply as directly to the executive staff as it did in the case of the personnel procedures.

Hor was

the activity of the executive as pronounced an observance of these principles.

This is not to say that the principles of

voluntary cooperation and compatibility were not effective nor had no place in this discussion. that.

The analysis belies

It does appear, however, that where the discussion can

be on an objective basis, coordination can be promoted more readily. The leadership role of the executive again stands out in this meeting.

In recognizing when to take initiative in

the discussion, when to let the group carry the discussion; in helping the group recognize its responsibilities and in stimu­ lating its thinking in relation to problem situations; in the approach to the topics considered and in directing the discus­ sions toward a conclusion there is evidence of leadership by the executive and further corroboration of its importance in developing coordination.

CHAPTER V SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS The major purpose of this study as stated in the intro­ duction was to arrive at some conclusions regarding the ques­ tions

how does the executive director function in a staff

meeting to bring about coordination?

In answering this ques­

tion five principles were set forth in Chapter II which it was believed would serve as guiding rules for developing coordina­ tion*

The records of two staff meetings were then analyzed to

determine whether the executive’s activity in the meeting in any way conformed with the principles and if, in those instan­ ces where it did conform, coordination occurred*

The study has

shown that in the situations analyzed the activity of the exe­ cutive was to a considerable extent in accord with the prin­ ciples and that where such was found to be the case coordination was also identified*

On this basis there would

appear to be justification for the conclusion that the activity of an executive director in the staff meeting, as it repre­ sents an observance of the principles of coordination as defined, is effective in bringing about coordination* The study also indicated that the principles of volun­ tary cooperation and compatibility are of particular impor­ tance where the subject matter of a discussion topic tends to be subjective in nature and/or is of a nature to engender

86

87 feelings of tension and strain#

In other words, where there

is emotional involvement these principles appeared to take on added importance.

There was evidence, too, that coordination

developed with greater facility where the topic being con­ sidered and the discussion itself was treated objectively and impersonally by the executive# It appeared from this study that the development of coordination in the meeting is dependent on the executive taking a leadership role.

By helping the group to realize

its responsibilities and by providing opportunity for the members to function together as a responsible group, the executive functioned as a leader.

By stimulating and encour­

aging the group to develop a “clever” presentation of the statistical report, stimulating them to think together on the causes giving rise to personnel dissatisfaction and how to modify them, she provided leadership.

By making it possible

for the members to express opinions and contribute to the formulation of personnel procedures, by pointing up pertinent factors in connection with the inter-association conference and the Health Education proposal, she gave leadership.

And

as her activity in this respect was patterned after the prin­ ciples of coordination, she guided and influenced the group to function together in a coordinated way.

This is the kind

88 of leadership that has been described as “leading a process. Hor can it be overlooked that in many respects the executive*s activity was similar to that of a discussion leader, who introduces the discussion topics, helps to keep the discussion moving, draws together the thinking of the group by means of questions or brief summations of ideas expressed, encourages all to participate, guides the discus­ sion to a conclusion*

The executive in chairing the meeting

would be expected to function in this manner.

However, these

discussion techniques in themselves contributed to coordina­ tion as they guided the group toward group decisions on the matters being considered.

For there is satisfaction for the

group in having been able to deliberate on a matter and come to some conclusions in regard to it and the ego satisfac­ tions, both collectively and individually, arising out of satisfying experiences provide further motivation for volun­ tary cooperation, as stated by the principle of voluntary cooperation a principal means for achieving coordination* Two types of activity by the executive stand out in particular as a result of the study which, because of their recurrence, are worthy of special note.

The first relates to

the executive*s participation in the meetings.

In each

1 Harleigh B. Trecker, “Research and Study in Adminis t ration ,*1 The Woman *s Press y 6^:10-11, May, 1950.

89 discussion, except that portion of the one on the personnel procedures where coordination was not identified, the extent of her participation was limited, not only in the number of times she contributed, but in.the length of her contributions• The executive, in other words, did not dominate the discus­ sions • them.

But neither did she divorce herself completely from By contributing to some extent she remained a part of

them and shared in the thinking and deliberations of the group.

Inherent in this kind of participation is the idea

of the executive and the executive staff as co-workers work­ ing together in dealing with problems and in carrying on the program of the organization.

It is the kind of participation

that is described as multiple leadership

2

and which can con­

tribute to greater unity and cooperative effort. The second type of activity was particularly conspicu­ ous in the discussions of the inter-association conference, the personnel procedures and the called staff meeting.

Each

of these discussions, had in varying degree certain proble­ matical features about them.

Yet, with but one briefly noted

exception, the record indicates that during these discussions the executive was relaxed and composed, gave no indication that she was disturbed by the difficulties or problems,

Henry C. Metcalf and L. Urwick, editors, Dynamic Administration. The Collected Papers of Mary Parker Follett (Hew York: Harper & Brothers, 19*4-2), pp. 251-252.

90 potential or real, encountered in the situations.

Tension,

strain, worry, a disturbed attitude are not conducive to the harmonious function together of persons*

They are, in fact,

indications of doubt, and insecurity, characteristics that do not lend themselves to coordination.

By maintaining a

composed and relaxed attitude, by maintaining control of her own feelings and reactions the executive helped to create an atmosphere in which it would be possible for coordination to develop. I.

CONCLUSIONS

This study does not, nor was it intended to give a final or all-inclusive answer to the question:

how does the

executive function in the staff meeting to bring about coor­ dination?

As indicated in the first chapter, it was intended

only as a pilot study.

However, it has been able to demon­

strate that the five principles of coordination, formulated in connection with it, are effective in promoting coordination in the meeting.

It has pointed out the leadership function

of the executive in relation to the development of coordina­ tion.

It has suggested two kinds of activity that appear to

have value for inducing coordination.

The study has also

raised certain questions in relation to the agenda of staff meetings that might affect still further the development of coordination in the meeting.

Further study of staff meetings

91 is needed, however, to substantiate these findings and to bring greater insight into the means by which the executive can carry out her administrative function of coordination.

BIBLIOGBAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHY A.

BOOKS

Atwater, Pierce, Problems of Administration in Social Work. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 19^0. 319 pp. Barnard, Chester I., The Function of the Executive. Massachusettss Harvard University Press, 1938.

Cambridge, 331* pp.

Blumenthal, Louis H . , Adml ni gtration of Group Work. Association Press,19^8. 220 pp.

New York:

Clark, Margaret Logan, and Briseis Teall, The Executive Director on the Job. New York: The Woman's Press, 19^7* 128 pp. Dimock, Marshall E . , The Executive in Action. Harper & Brothers, 19^-5* 27& pp«

New York:

Dynamic Administrations The Collected Papers of Mary Parker Follett. Edited by Henry C. Metcalf and Lyndall Urwick; New York: Harper & Brothers, 19^2. 320 pp. Elliott, Harrison S., The Process of Group Thinking♦ Association Press, 19rol 221 pp.

New Yorks

Pfiffner, John N . , Public Administration. Ronald Press Company, 19^*6• 621 pp.

The

New Yorks

Reynolds, Bertha C . , Learning and Teaching in the Practice of Social Work. New Yorks Farrar & Rinehart, Inc., 19^2. 390 pp. Roethlisberger, F. J., Management and Morale. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 19*+7* 19^ PP* Seckler-Hudson, Catheryn, Processes of Organization and Management - Washington, D. C.: Public Affairs Press, 19^0. 296 pp. Simon, Herbert A . , Administrative Behavior. Macmillan Company, 19^8. 259 pp.

New York:

Street, Elwood, Social Work Administration. Harper & Brothers, 1931* ^ 7 pp*

New York:

93

The

95 Tead, Ordway, Human Nature and Management. New York: Hill Book Company, Inc., 1933 • 33$ pp. , The Art of Leadership. 1935. 305^p p .

New Yorks

MeGraw-

Whittlesey House,

______ , and Henry C. Metcalf, Personnel Administration. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1933• 519 pp. Trecker, Harleigh B., Group Process in Administration. New York: The Woman *s Press, 1955. 127 pp« ______ , Social Group Work, Principles and Practices. New York: The Woman*s Press, 1958. 313 pp. B.

PERIODICAL ARTICLES

Gartland, Ruth, "Administration as a Social Work Function," The CompassT 25:17-21, March, 19^3• Leighton, Alexander H. , "Improving Human Relations," Personnel Administrationf 9s5-5, July, 1957• Silver, Harold, "The Executive*s Role in Administration," The Jewish Social Service Quarterly. 25:193-199, December,

1957• Trecker, Harleigh B., "Research and Study in Administration," The Woman*s PressT 65:10-11, May, 1950. Wharton, John F . , "The Anatomy of Cooperation," The Saturday Review of LiteratureT 29s9-10, 28-32, October 26, 1956. C.

ESSAYS

Gulick, Luther, "The Theory of Organization," Papers on the Science of Administration. Luther Gulick and L. Urwick, editors; New York: Institute of Public Administration, 1957. 195 PP* Stone, Donald C., "Notes on the Governmental Executive, His Role and His Methods," New Horizons in Public Administra tion. A Symposium. University, Alabama: University of Alabama, 1955* 155 PP*

95 D.

PUBLICATIONS OF LEARNED ORGANIZATIONS

Johnson, Arlien, “The Administrative Process in Social Work,1* Proceedings of The National Conference of Social Work, 194^. New York: Columbia University Press, 19^7• Pp. 2^6-253. E.

PAMPHLETS

Brereton, Margaretta, The General Secretary of a Community Y. W. C. 4* ^ew York: The Woman*s Press, undated. 189 pp. F.

OTHER MATERIALS

Eckert, Ralph G., “Psychology of Coordination.11 Paper delivered at the annual meeting of the California Confer­ ence of Social Welfare, April, 191*6 •

APPENDIXES EXECUTIVE STAFF MEETINGS

APPENDIX A FIRST MEETING

FIRST MEETING EXECUTIVE STAFF MEETING 10:00 - 1 :1*5 4 G E I D 4 OPENING DISCUSSION ADMINISTRATION Spring Inter-Association Conference Los Angeles Volunteer Training Conference Committee on Revision of By-Laws Retirement Fund Changes Personnel Procedures PROGRAM Membership Meeting - January 21 Annual Meeting - April 29 World Fellowship Contribution 19*+9 FINANCE Budget and Bank Account Anonymous Gift STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES Annual Statistical Report Minutes AgainI OTHER DISCUSSION

99 Present: Miss Brown, Executive Director, Jane Clark, Barbara Doe, Betty Bolt, Edith West, Huth Moss, Harriet Parker, Lucy Pond, Polly Short, Mary Jones, Helen Fisher, Katherine Bailey. Absent: Mary Lou Potter. Opening: The Executive Director (hereinafter designated as ED) called the meeting to order at 10:05 and opened it by reading to the group a New Year's letter from Mrs. Elliott, Executive Director of the National YWCA. At its conclusion she asked if there was someone who would be willing to prepare a sum­ mary of an article referred to in the letter as the opening for the next meeting of the group. There was no immediate response and she turned to Jane saying, "Wouldn't you like to do that?11 Jane replied in a somewhat ‘surprised tone, "Yes, I'd be glad to .*1 Soring Inter-Association Conference (10:15 - 10:30)i As there seemed to be no indication of a wish on the part of the group to discuss the letter further ED moved on to the first item of the agenda. She read a letter sent to her from the Regional Director of the YW concerning plans for a spring Inter-Association Conference which discussed possible dates, place of meeting and other arrangements, and which also asked for her comments on these plans, particularly in rela­ tion to the date and place of meeting. Concluding the reading ED added that she thought it might be a good idea if the group discussed the suggestions made in the letter beginning with the matter of a suitable date. Jane spoke up immediately addressing ED and pointing out that there was already one date set up for late April. ED replied, "Yes, Annual Meeting," and then speaking to the group mentioned that National YWCA WEEK would also be celebrated during April (scheduled for the last week of April-

100 April 23-29) and that possibly they wouldn’t want conference meetings during the same month. Harriet, who will carry major responsibility for planning National YWCA week responded immediately that she wouldn’t want the conference at that time. There seemed to be a general like feeling among the group. D u r in g t h i s exch an g e th e members had g o t t e n o u t t h e i r c a le n d a r s and w ere c h e c k in g d a t e s . ED a s k e d i f t h e r e w ere a n y o t h e r d a te s t h e y c o u ld s u g g e s t and p o in te d o u t t h a t t h e r e w e re tw o w eeks b e tw e e n E a s t e r ( A p r i l 9) and N a t i o n a l YWCA week ( A p r i l 23-29) i n w h ic h i t m ig h t be p o s s ib le t o h o ld t h e m e e t­ in g s . L u cy m e n tio n e d t h a t t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g f o r h e r B ra n c h was s c h e d u le d f o r t h e w eek f o l l o w i n g E a s t e r and E d i t h com­ m ented t h a t she th o u g h t t h a t she w o u ld be as bu sy b e f o r e N a t i o n a l YWCA w eek as a f t e r . H a r r i e t added t h a t she th o u g h t a l l o f th e a s s o c i a t io n w ou ld be bu sy d u r in g t h a t tim e and she a l s o f e l t t h a t t h e w eek b e f o r e E a s t e r and t h e E a s t e r v a c a t io n p e r io d w o u ld be e q u a l l y bad as a tim e f o r t h e c o n fe r e n c e . F u r t h e r d is c u s s io n i n d i c a t e d t h e r e was g e n e r a l a g re e m e n t on t h i s p o in t a b o u t t h e E a s t e r p e r io d . ED s u g g e s te d t h a t maybe a d a t e i n May w o u ld be b e t t e r . B a r b a ra d is r e g a r d in g t h i s s u g g e s tio n , w ondered w h e th e r t h e c o n fe r e n c e c o u ld n ’ t be p la n n e d as a p a r t o f N a t i o n a l YWCA w eek t o w h ic h Kay re s p o n d e d t h a t t h a t w o u ld i n t e r f e r e w i t h t h e a n n u a l m e e t in g . P o l l y spoke up t o s a y t h a t she th o u g h t a w eek i n May w ou ld be b e s t . A t t h i s p o in t t h e d is c u s s io n became v e r y g e n e r a l , t h e members m akin g s u g g e s tio n s and re m a rk s w i t h l i t t l e a t t e n t i o n b e in g p a id t o t h e i n d i v i d u a l comments and w it h a good b i t o f la u g h in g and g e n e r a l l y good-hum ored jo k in g a b o u t t h e d i f f i ­ c u l t y in v o lv e d i n t r y i n g t o f i n d a d a t e t h a t w o u ld s a t i s f y a ll. A c o n g e n ia l, f r i e n d l y a tm o s p h e re p re d o m in a te d i n t h e b a c k - a n d - f o r t h comments and s u g g e s tio n s . ED a g a in a d d re s s e d t h e g ro u p com m enting t h a t no tim e i n A p r i l seemed t o be c o n v e n ie n t . H a r r i e t s p e a k in g t o ED s a id she th o u g h t M a rc h o r May w o u ld be b e t t e r m o n th s . Kay s u g g e s te d t h e w eek o f t h e t e n t h o f May and lo o k in g t o ED s a i d , " I s t h a t OK?" P o l l y re s p o n d e d t o t h i s b y a s k in g , " I s t h e f i r s t w eek o f May good s in c e i t f o llo w s so c l o s e l y t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g ? " She added t h a t she th o u g h t t h e second w eek w o u ld be b e t t e r . ED a g a in s p e a k in g t o t h e g ro u p a s k e d , " S h a l l we g iv e tw o s u g g e s tio n s , t h e second o r t h i r d week o f M ay?" T h e re was no d e f i n i t e r e p l y t o ED ’ s q u e s tio n b u t a g a in s im u lta n e o u s t a l k a b o u t d a te s f o r one a c t i v i t y o r a n o t h e r , a b o u t p la n n in g and a c t i v i t y i n c o n n e c tio n w it h a n n u a l m e e tin g

101 and National YWCA week and the difficulties of planning around the Easter period when there are school vacations and many people make personal plans for the Easter season. ED asked, 11Shall we say the third week in May ?11 to which Harriet replied, “As an alternative, say a week in March .11 To this suggestion Jane pointed out the next item on the agenda and addressing ED indicated that, “We have a training conference in March .11 ED nodded and speaking to the group reminded them that the local volunteer training conference was scheduled for that time and that the Regional Director was coming to assist at those meetings. Kay likewise reminded the group that the city-wide staff meeting was planned for the day preceding the training conference. Jane, turning to ED said in a frank and amused way, “W e 1re going to meet quite a bit in the new year 111 ED laughed easily and agreed with her and there was a ripple of appreciative laughter from the group. At this point ED summed up the discussion and suggested that as first choice they suggest the third week of May and as second choice the second week of May. There was a nodding of heads and an indication of approval by the group of this choice of time. She then asked if one day of the week was better than another and where they thought the association would prefer to meet. Barbara immediately and emphatically said, “Here!** and joined with ED and the others in laughing good naturedly at her outspoken suggestion. Someone suggested Pasadena to which there was general nodding of agreement and comments of “good.11 ED said, “Supposing we say Long Beach or Pasadena and this sug­ gestion too seemed to meet with general agreement in which Barbara joined. Discussion started up again on the dates for the inter­ association conference and the difficulty in finding a time that would be entirely satisfactory to everybody, and one that would not conflict to some degree with the varied activities of the branches and center. However, there was no obvious evidence of discontent or annoyance among the members at having to plan on this conference nor any apparent wish to change the decision already accepted by the group. The whole atmosphere of this discussion appeared to be one of trying to decide upon a date that would create the least amount of conflict with other activities to which both staff and volunteers must contribute time and effort and which required the support and participation of large numbers of association members. The focus of the discussion appeared to be to select a date that would be most propitious for assuring a good attendance by the volunteers, that is to avoid timing it too close to other activities that volunteers would be

102 called on to support and 'which might, therefore dull their interest in attending the conference. Local Volunteer Training Conference - March 30 (10;30-10: **5) ED turned to the next item on the agenda introducing it by saying that it had been hoped that this meeting would follow the inter-association conference but on the basis of the group's agreement it would now precede it. She said she would like to know if the group had any suggestions for leaders for this conference besides Mrs. Jones. There was silence for a moment then Edith asked ED if they might not get someone from one of the near-by universi­ ties. "Who?*1 said ED promptly asking the question not so much in a challenging way as to draw out a specific sugges­ tion. Edith replied to the effect that Mr. P______ was fre­ quently asked for this kind of meeting. “Good ,11 responded ED. Edith went on to say that there was a new person at UCLA, who was very good. The name of another person from a near-by city was mentioned which brought forth a chorus of 11Oh, no I" "No good ,*1 and many side comments regarding the good and bad points of the person mentioned. Barbara said, rfMiss T is very good. She has done a lot of work in volunteer training.11 Referring to Edith's second suggestion ED spoke briefly about the courses being given by this person. She then asked the group, "What are the things we should take up at these meetings?" She reminded the group that the meetings were for the purpose of training volunteers and asked again, "What do you think we should take up?" Edith, addressing her reply first to ED and then to the group suggested, "how to handle people," "getting along with people," and then spoke enthusiastically about the contribution another leader had made in this area of working with people that she felt had been very effective. Mary followed Edith's remarks with the suggestion that the subject matter be prac­ tical, possibly a discussion on how to get new YW members, practical suggestions on how to approach people, etc. Edith agreed that that would be good. ED suggested that for such practical aspects it might be a good idea to have workshop sessions devoted to specific practical problems. Mary voiced agreement and ED enlarged on this idea. Polly, however, pointed out that the workshops should not be too large or the benefits to be gained from participating in them might be lost. what

ED agreed, then asked if it seemed well to have workshops other topics besides membership might be considered. She

reminded the group that one of the emphases for the year -was volunteer training. Mary suggested that one workshop might consider ways and devices for getting more religious emphasis ill the work. At this point Barbara, in a thoughtful voice said, “Don’t we need something besides the practical in these meetings; something that makes them exciting and stimulating.11 This idea was received with nods of agreement and approval. Edith wanted to know, (speaking to ED) if ”we could offer suggestions at this time that had to do with the psychology of attention at such meetings as these?11 Without waiting for a reply to the question she went on to express the opinion that generally there was too much repetition in the content of such meetings and she felt strongly that as a result interest lagged as the meetings progressed and those attending them became bored. She reminded the group that this had occurred at one of the last association conferences. ED replied that a similar criticism of that meeting had already been recorded. She then asked if the group thought a workshop in public relations was needed. This suggestion seemed to the group a good one and she then suggested that a general session in the morning might include an interpretation of YW and asked what else might be included in a general session. Helen went back to the idea of publicity at this point saying that she thought it important to get over to the volunteers the idea that in creating interest you had to begin with something that caught people’s attention, ’’something that catches the eye” 5 that it was important to bear this in mind in trying to draw people into YW activities. Edith suggested that they might get several outstanding volunteers to say some­ thing about why they worked with the YW. It appeared to be Edith’s idea that this be done in the general session. At least that was the way Harriet understood it and she responded, addressing her remark to ED, ’’Don’t you think that that sort of thing could be brought out in the workshop on publicity?” Helen without waiting for a reply from ED answered the question, saying, ’’But if it comes from volunteers it will be more effec­ tive, and it might even be better to have it come in a general session.” ED spoke up at this point suggesting that ”it might be a good luncheon meeting.” General discussion followed E D ’s remark with talking again going on simultaneously. Much.of it seemed to deal with naming volunteers whom it would be good to ask to make such talks. The comments were chiefly enlargements of Helen’s and ED ’s proposals and indicated considerable enthusiasm and approval of the suggestion of a luncheon meeting, and a program in which volunteers would play an important part. There appeared to be a general acceptance of the idea.

10*+ ED brought the meeting back to order by saying, 111 think this is a good idea,1* indicating by her tone of voice and attitude that this proposal appeared to her as a very good one* She also emphasized the point that they could not do everything they might want to do in these meetings but had to be selective* Lucy suggested that in selecting volunteers to speak about "why they work with the YW" they might be chosen on the basis of their interest in a particular aspect of the YW pro­ gram* Select one person on the basis of her known interest in the interracial program of the YW, another on the basis of her interest in the world-wide fellowship aspect, etc* and by following this pattern it would be possible to bring out all the phases of YW program and at the same time assure a presen­ tation that carried conviction and enthusiasm* The response to this suggestion was positive and general; there was a buzz of "Yes" "Yes" "Good" and much nodding of heads in which ED joined* ED brought the discussion of this item to a close at this point saying, "I will turn these suggestions over to the committee and if you have more of any kind you can get in touch with me." Committee on Bevision of By-Laws

(1 0 ^ 5 - 10; 50)

The next item on the agenda had to do with the revision of the by-laws of the association. ED introduced the topic by indicating that their revision wassomething that had to be undertaken soon in order to bring them into line with the new National YWCA constitution adopted at Convention; that she would like to have one member of the staff serve on the com­ mittee that would work on revision; and she wondered if anyone of the group would be particularly interested in working on this project. She explained in a little more detail about the committee and what the work would entail. There was no immediate response and ED turned to Mary and said, "What about you, Mary? Would you be interested?" Mary replied immediately and in a tone indicating real interest, "I would love to do it but..." and went on to say in a regretful way that she didn*t think she should undertake it although she had been thinking about this project as something in which she would like to participate. Mary is the only staff person at her branch and on the basis of a recent study of the program and her work load the Metropolitan Program Planning Committee has recom­ mended that she not take on any additional activities.

105 ED nodded in a m y to indicate to her understanding of Mary’s refusal. Then she turned to Helen and asked, "Do you think you would be interested in this? Are you good at this sort of thing?” Helen shook her head smiling in a some­ what apologetic way. Kay spoke up at this moment addressing ED and saying that she knew a volunteer who would be good. ED asked how she knew she would be good. Kay named the person she had in mind, described briefly a somewhat similar project on which the person had worked and had shown ability. ED, who had been listening attentively replied, "GoodI” in a tone that indicated approval of Kay’s qualifying remarks about the person named and her acceptance of the suggestion. She wrote the name down on her papers. During this bit of conversation Mary had apparently been weighing in her own mind the possibility of serving on the committee and now spoke up again saying, "Put me down Miss Brown. I can work it out.11 ED responded again with a "Good.” It was said in a way that implied that ED was pleased that Mary would be on the committee. Retirement Fund Changes (10:50 - 11:00) ED introduced the next item on the agenda prefacing her remarks with the statement that she assumed that they had all received a communication from the National YWCA Retirement Fund describing the changes in policy that had recently been adopted by the National Board of the YWCA. She went on to enumerate these changes in each instance pointing up the implication of the change and explaining the thinking behind the changes. In doing so it was apparent that she was trying to help the group to a clear understanding of the changes. After going over the items she said that "our move” is to get these changes (which were primarily related to the continued employment of staff beyond age of 60) in "our personnel poli­ cies." She indicated that the Personnel Committee would be meeting during the next week to consider the changes and make recommendations to the Board. She concluded her remarks by saying, "I don’t know whether you have any questions?" and looked around the group inquiringly. Kay spoke up, "Could I ask a question about the fund?" and not waiting for a reply continued, "Is it obligatory for non-professionsIs to take it?" Although her question had been directed to ED, Ruth spoke up that it was an automatic procedure for non-professional workers that became effective ninety days after they were employed. She went on to explain a little further about the

106 p ro c e d u re * H a r r i e t f o l l o w e d R u th w it h t h e com ment, ftWhen a p e rs o n i s em ployed t h e y s h o u ld be n o t i f i e d o f t h i s .*1 The comment was made i n a q u e s tio n in g to n e t h a t im p l ie d tw o ques­ t i o n s — s h o u ld t h e p e rs o n be n o t i f i e d and w ere t h e y n o t i f i e d * H e r comment b ro u g h t a b o u t f u r t h e r d is c u s s io n , and e x p la n a t io n and more d is c u s s io n t h a t to o k p la c e b e tw e e n K a y , R u th , H a r r i e t , and J a n e , w i t h R u th e x p l a in in g t h e p ro c e d u re i n t h i s in s t a n c e * ED b ro k e up t h i s ro u n d o f d is c u s s io n by p o i n t i n g o u t t h e p o s s i b i l i t y f o r i n c r e a s in g o n e ! s s a v in g s u n d e r t h e changed p r o v is io n s o f th e Fund* A t t h i s p o in t H e le n e n t e r e d t h e d i s ­ c u s s io n a s k in g w h e th e r th e fu n d was a v a i l a b l e t o p a r t - t i m e p e o p le . A lth o u g h t h i s q u e s tio n to o was d i r e c t e d t o ED . R u th , f i r s t lo o k in g a t ED e x p la in e d t h e p r o v is io n s f o r p a r t - t i m e e m p lo y e e s . I n b o th in s t a n c e s when R u th r e p l i e d t o q u e s tio n s d i r e c t e d t o ED, ED showed no re s e n tm e n t a t h e r f o r t a k i n g o v e r t h e a n s w e r, n o r made a n y a tte m p t t o i n t e r r u p t h e r e x p la n a tio n s o r t o a n s w e r t h e q u e s tio n s h e r s e l f . R u th as C o m p t r o lle r has t h e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y o f a d m in is t e r in g t h e l o c a l o p e r a t io n s o f t h e fu n d . F o llo w in g R u t h f s e x p la n a t io n ED a s k e d i f t h e r e w e re a n y o t h e r q u e s t io n s . Kay spoke up a g a in p r e f a c in g h e r re m a rk s w i t h t h e comment tfI may seem s o r t o f dumb, b u t . . 11 and t h e n g o in g on t o a s k w h at t h e s e c r e t a r y o r o f f i c e w o rk e r g o t when she l e f t h e r jo b w i t h t h e YW ,— w h e th e r i t was m e r e ly t h e money she had p u t i n t h e fu n d o r i f t h e a s s o c i a t i o n 's c o n t r i b u t i o n a ls o w ent to h e r . B o th R u th and J an e gave an sw ers t o t h e q u e s tio n i n s u c c e s s io n b u t t h e r e was some v a r i a t i o n i n t h e i r a n s w e rs , w h ic h seemed t o c o n fu s e K ay and s e v e r a l o th e r s i n t h e g ro u p . Jane a p p e a re d u n c e r t a i n h e r s e l f o f t h e c o r r e c t an sw er and w ent i n t o some d e t a i l o f a s i t u a t i o n t h a t in v o lv e d a m a in te n a n c e w o rk e r who h ad l e f t t h e em ploy o f t h e YW and w i t h whom t h e r e had d e v e lo p e d some q u e s tio n a b o u t h e r r e t i r e m e n t f u n d . She i n d i ­ c a te d i t had b e e n r e f e r r e d t o t h e N a t i o n a l o f f i c e , b u t no d e f i n i t e w ord had y e t b e e n r e c e iv e d on t h e m a t t e r . R u th made no f u r t h e r comment b u t ED s t a t e d t h a t t h e s e c r e t a r y o r non­ p r o f e s s i o n a l em p lo yee o n ly g o t w h a t t h e y p a id i n t o t h e f u n d . B a r b a r a q u e s tio n e d ED a b o u t s t i l l a n o th e r a s p e c t o f t h e fu n d w h ic h ED e x p la in e d and th e n H e le n a s k e d ED 11I f S o c i a l S e c u r i t y i s changed t o i n c lu d e s o c i a l w o rk e rs w h at w i l l be t h e e f f e c t on t h e r e t i r e m e n t p ro g ra m ? 11 ED r e p l i e d t h a t t h e B o ard w o u ld h a v e t o make t h e f i n a l d e c is io n as t o w h e th e r t o c o n t r i b u t e t v /i c e , th r o u g h S o c i a l S e c u r i t y and t h e R e t ir e m e n t Fund and t h a t i t w o u ld be s o m e th in g f o r b o th th e B o a rd and t h e S t a f f t o c o n s id e r * T h e re was a

107 general burst of comments following her answer to this ques­ tion. It continued for a few seconds and ED interrupted it by addressing the group with the question, "Are there any other questions?11 Harriet spoke up, "I have a question. Are we a part of the Community Chest and Council retirement plan?" ED replied, "No." Kay commented with emphasis, 11It is an excellent plan," and Edith echoed her approval of the plan commenting on why it was so good. When she finished her speaking, ED moved on to the next item on the agenda. In the discussion of this matter there appeared to be acceptance of the fact that Ruth answered many of the ques­ tions raised, and it was apparent that the members of the group recognized and understood that as Comptroller one of her functions was the local administration of the Retirement Fund. Therefore her answers could be accepted as based on knowledge of its operation. Personnel Procedures: (11:00 - 11:50) ED introduced the next item on the agenda by saying, "We haven’t discussed the procedures in personnel mattersaaopte by the Personnel Committee, have we ?"1 It was more of a state­ ment than a question. She went on to say she had hoped to have copies of the procedures for each of the group, but since they were not yet available she would read them. She continued that the procedures have been adopted by the Personnel Com-mittee but are not necessarily final. There was no comment to ED*s introductory statement, and she proceeded to read the first section dealing with the procedure for employing a staff member giving a brief explana­ tion of each item as she read it. The group listened without comment while ED read through the section. She then looked around the group in a manner inviting comment. Mary asked a question about the terminology of one item indicating that she did not understand what was meant.

The Personnel Procedures currently in force are old and the Committee is revising them and bringing them up to date. The Committee knew that the executive staff would dis­ cuss the revisions made by them and that modifications might be in order following their discussion.

108 ED c l a r i f i e d t h e p o i n t i n a way t h a t seemed s a t i s f a c t o r y as M a ry nodded i n a way t h a t gave t h e im p r e s s io n t h a t she u n d e r­ s to o d . ED t h e n w ent on t o t h e n e x t s e c t i o n w h ic h d e a l t w i t h t h e r e s i g n a t i o n o f a s t a f f member. A t i t s c o n c lu s io n B a rb a ra a d d re s s e d h e r w i t h t h e q u e s t io n , "Does t h a t [ r e f e r r i n g t o a l e t t e r o f r e s i g n a t i o n ] h a v e t o be done e v e n a t t h e end o f a c o n t r a c t y e a r ?11 ED r e p l i e d , " W e ll , i t s h o u ld b e 5if B a rb a ra s a i d , " Y e s ," as th o u g h t ED was m e r e ly c o n fir m in g w h a t she a l r e a d y th o u g h t w o u ld be t h e a n s w e r t o h e r q u e s t io n . A t t h i s p o in t M a ry r e f e r r e d b a c k t o t h e f i r s t s e c t io n on e m p lo y in g s t a f f and a s k e d a q u e s tio n a b o u t e m p lo y in g p r o ­ gram p e r s o n n e l i n d i c a t i n g some f e e l i n g on h e r p a r t t h a t b ra n c h e x e c u t iv e s s h o u ld h a v e some s a y i n t h e m a t t e r o f s e l e c t i o n o f p ro g ra m s t a f f . I n r e p l y i n g t o h e r q u e s t io n ED s t a t e d t h a t t h e P e r s o n n e l S u b -C o m m itte e and th e B o ard w e re r e s p o n s ib le f o r em ploym ent o f a l l p r o f e s s i o n a l s t a f f . R u th spoke up h e r e s a y ­ in g " I w a n t t o a s k s o m e th in g h e r e . Does t h e S u b -C o m m itte e h a v e t o go th r o u g h P e r s o n n e l C o m m ittee i n m aking re c o m m e n d a tio n t o t h e B o a rd o r do t h e y go d i r e c t l y t o th e B o ard w i t h recommen­ d a tio n s ? ED e x p la in e d t h a t t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e was a n o v e r ­ a l l p o l i c y m akin g c o m m itte e ; t h a t t h e S u b -C o m m itte e was t h e e m p lo y in g c o m m itte e and was made up o f M e t r o p o l i t a n B o a rd M em bers. She i n d i c a t e d t h a t a c t u a l l y i t had more pow er t h a n t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e i t s e l f and h ad d i r e c t a cc e s s t o t h e B o a rd . R u th q u e s tio n e d a g a i n , "And t h e o b t a in in g o f manpower f o r a n o r g a n i z a t i o n i s a u s u a l f u n c t i o n f o r a s u b -c o m m itte e ?1 1 T h e re was a to n e o f d o u b t i n th e way she p u t t h e q u e s t io n . ED r e p l i e d , " Y e s ," and a g a in s t a t e d t h a t t h e re a s o n t h a t t h e S u b -C o m m itte e c a r r i e d so much pow er was b e c a u s e t h e y w e re a l l B o a rd m em bers. She added t h a t t h e r e had b e e n d i f f i ­ c u l t y i n f i n d i n g a n a p p r o p r ia t e name f o r t h i s c o m m itte e . I t a p p e a re d i n t h i s c o n v e r s a t io n t h a t R u th d o u b te d t h e a p p r o p r ia te n e s s o f t h i s k in d o f s t r u c t u r a l a rra n g e m e n t b e tw e e n t h e tw o c o m m itte e s . I t a l s o a p p e a re d t h a t R u th was q u e s t io n in g t h e l e g a l i t y and a p p r o p r ia te n e s s o f t h e r e l a t i o n b e tw e e n t h e P e r s o n n e l P o l i c i e s C o m m ittee and t h e S u b -C o m m itte e and o f t h e S u b -C o m m itte e h a v in g m ore power t h a n i t s p a r e n t c o m m itte e . ED i n r e p l y i n g , a p p e a re d t o be e m p h a s iz in g th e r i g h t o f t h e

109 S u b -C o m m itte e t o t h e i r pow er b y v i r t u e o f i t s members b e in g B o a rd m em bers. I t seemed a s th o u g h t h e y w e re each t a l k i n g a b o u t a d i f f e r e n t t h i n g w it h o u t th e o t h e r r e c o g n iz in g i t . C e r t a i n l y K u th d id n o t a p p e a r s a t i s f i e d w i t h t h e e x p l a n a t i o n , b u t she d id n o t r a i s e a n y f u r t h e r q u e s tio n s n o r make a n y f u r t h e r comment i n t h e m a t t e r . D u r in g t h i s exc h an g e b e tw e e n R u th and ED t h e r e s t o f t h e g ro u p had l i s t e n e d t o b o th b u t had made no comment. N or was t h e r e a n y f u r t h e r comment on t h e q u e s tio n r a i s e d o r i g i n a l l y b y M a ry . ED w ent on w i t h t h e r e a d in g o f t h e p r o c e d u r e s . The n e x t s e c t io n s o f t h e p ro c e d u re s w e re c o n c e rn e d w it h d i s m i s s a l o f s t a f f m em bers, r e q u e s ts f o r s ic k le a v e and v a c a ­ t i o n t i m e , and o b t a in in g a p p r o v a l f o r a ca d e m ic s tu d y con­ c u r r e n t l y w i t h w o rk in g on t h e jo b . No comments w e re made o r q u e s tio n s asked u n t i l t h e r e a d in g o f t h e l a s t m e n tio n e d it e m when r e f e r e n c e was made i n th e s ta te m e n t t o t a k in g tim e fro m r e g u l a r w o rk in g h o u rs f o r s t u d y . M a ry t h e n a s k e d E D , “What a r e c o n s id e r e d r e g u l a r w o rk in g h o u rs by t h e P e r s o n n e l Com­ m itt e e ? ” Ed r e p l i e d t h a t t h a t was n a tu re o f t h e w o rk b u t t h a t t h e k e e p a s t a f f member fro m t a k i n g i n a d d i t i o n t o h e r r e g u l a r w o rk

h a r d t o d e f i n e b ec a u s e o f t h e p u rp o s e o f t h i s s e c t io n was t o on to o h e a v y a lo a d o f s tu d y lo a d .

E d i t h a s k e d a t t h i s p o in t w hat c h a n n e ls s h o u ld be f o llo w e d i n g e t t i n g e d u c a tio n le a v e o r p e r m is s io n t o t a k e c o u rs e s . She w ent on t o q u e s tio n w h e th e r such a r e q u e s t s h o u ld n o t go th r o u g h t h e C o m m itte e o f Managem ent o f t h e b ra n c h w here t h e s t a f f member w o rked r a t h e r th a n go d i r e c t l y fro m t h e s t a f f p e rs o n t o t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e . P o l l y d e la y e d a n a n s w e r t o t h i s q u e s tio n b y s a y in g , ” 1 s t i l l t h i n k we s h o u ld g e t g r e a t e r c l a r i f i c a t i o n on w h at t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e t h i n k s r e g u l a r w o rk in g h o u rs a r e .11 111 a g r e e , ” s a id ED , “ t h a t ’ s a good p o i n t , ” and she r e i t e r a t e d t h a t t h e r e a l p o i n t h e r e i s t o a v o id t a k i n g tim e away fro m w o rk . As ED madea n o t a t i o n E d i t h spoke up r e f e r r i n g a g a in t o th e p o in t she had j u s t r a i s e d , She e x p re s s e d t h e o p in io n t h a t t h e r e q u e s ts f o r a p p r o v a l o f s tu d y s h o u ld be c le a r e d w i t h o n e 1s C o m m itte e o f Management i n o r d e r t h a t e v e ry o n e w o u ld u n d e rs ta n d and be a w a re o f w hat was g o in g o n . She spbke a b o u t t h e im p o r t ­ an ce o f c o - o r d i n a t i o n among t h e d i f f e r e n t groups o f t h e YWCA and i n d i c a t e d t h a t t h i s was one way o f b r in g in g t h a t a b o u t .

110 She a ls o e x p re s s e d t h e o p in io n t h a t i t was good f o r t h e v o lu n ­ t e e r s w i t h whom one was c l o s e l y a s s o c ia t e d t o know a b o u t such re q u e s ts . H e le n spoke up t o a g r e e w i t h t h e id e a s E d i t h was e x p r e s s in g and P o l l y i n d i c a t e d t h a t she to o th o u g h t i t w ou ld be b e t t e r f o r such m a t t e r s t o c l e a r th r o u g h a c o m m itte e o f m anagem ent. ED s a i d , “As E d i t h s a y s , I t h i n k i t good f o r v o lu n t e e r s t o know when s t a f f i s i n t e r e s t e d i n d o in g f u r t h e r s t u d y .** She w ent on t o s a y t h a t she knew o f no r e q u e s t t h a t had e v e r been tu r n e d down b y t h e C o m m itte e a lth o u g h one r e q u e s t had b een m o d if ie d fro m tw o c la s s e s t o o n e. She a d d e d , “T h ey a r e v e r y in t e r e s t e d in s t a f f . “ M a ry spoke now s u g g e s tin g t h a t maybe t h e words “w o rk in g h o u r s *1 c o u ld be rem oved fro m th e s ta te m e n t and t h a t t h e r e q u e s ts c o u ld come i n th r o u g h t h e C o m m ittees o f Managem ent so t h a t "th e y w ou ld know w h at was g o in g on . " I a g r e e ,11 s a id P o l l y , and t h e r e w e re murmurs o f f u r t h e r a g re e m e n t fro m a ro u n d t h e t a b l e . M ary w en t on t o s a y , s t i l l r e f e r r i n g t o th e s e c t io n on r e q u e s ts f o r s tu d y on t h e j o b , “C o u l d n 't i t be s o f t e n e d . S o m eth in g s a id t o t h e e f f e c t t h a t t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e e n c o u ra g e s s t u d y .*1 “ I t h i n k so t o o , 1* was E d it h * s prom pt r e s p o n s e . “ 'Who t h e d ic k e n s do t h e y t h i n k t h e y a r e * m ig h t v e r y w e l l be a r e a c ­ t io n to t h e s ta te m e n t as i t now re a d ,** she c o n tin u e d em phat­ ic a lly , b u t s m ile d as she s a id i t . ED re s p o n d e d h e r e , “Th ese a r e good s u g g e s tio n s . We d o n * t w ant a n y i r r i t a t i o n s J 11 She s m ile d as she spoke and th e n la u g h e d b u t i n d i c a t e d b y h e r a t t i t u d e t h a t she m eant s e r i o u s l y w h at she s a i d . The g ro u p la u g h e d to o w it h o u t r e s t r a i n t a t h e r comment. T h e re was a n o b j e c t i v e and im p e r s o n a l a t t i t u d e accom­ p a n y in g b o th t h e s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d s u g g e s tio n s made by M a ry and t h e o u ts p o k e n and f r a n k way i n w h ic h E d i t h e x p re s s e d a p o s s ib le r e a c t i o n t o t h e s ta te m e n t as i t s to o d . T h is a t t i t u d e , t o g e t h e r w i t h t h e a p p r o v a l g iv e n by ED t o th e s e s u g g e s tio n s and t h e l a u g h t e r t h a t f o llo w e d h e r spoken r e c o g n i t i o n o f i r r i t a t i o n t h a t m ig h t a r i s e fro m t h e p r o v is io n as i t r e a d had t h e a f f e c t o f r e l e a s i n g some o f t h e te n s e n e s s t h a t had c r e p t i n t o t h e a tm o s p h e re s in c e t h e r e a d in g o f t h e p ro c e d u re s had b e g u n . The e a r l i e r f r i e n d l y r e l a x e d a tm o s p h e re r e t u r n e d t o t h e m e e tin g . tio n ,

E d i t h spoke up a g a in a b o u t t h e c h a n n e lin g o f communica­ e x p r e s s in g a g a in v e r y p o s i t i v e f e e l i n g s o f t h e im p o rta n c e

Ill o f k e e p in g p e o p le in fo r m e d and a b o u t b e in g c o n s is t e n t i n t h e c h a n n e lin g n o t o n ly i n t h e m a t t e r o f r e q u e s ts f o r s tu d y b u t i n o t h e r p ro c e d u re s as w e l l . H a r r i e t had a d o u b t f u l lo o k on h e r f a c e as th o u g h she d id n o t e n t i r e l y go a lo n g w i t h w hat E d i t h was s a y in g . M a ry re s p o n d e d t h a t she l i k e d t h e id e a o f p r o f e s s i o n a l p e r s o n n e l h a v in g d i r e c t a c c e s s t o t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e w ith o u t h a v in g t o c l e a r th r o u g h some o t h e r g ro u p c o n c lu d in g " e v e n th o u g h i t i s n o t good c h a n n e lin g I rt ED s a i d , 111 t h i n k M a ry has a good p o in t t h e r e b eca u s e i t f i t s i n w i t h YWCA p h ilo s o p h y . Vie w ant a l l s t a f f t o f e e l f r e e t o go t o t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m ittee t o h a v e d i r e c t a c c e s s t o t h e C o m m itte e ." E d ith r e p lie d , " W e ll, I don’ t t h in k i t ' s a m a tte r o f l i f e and d e a t h , " w h ic h re s p o n s e was met w it h g e n e r a l la u g h t e r i n t e r r u p t e d b y t h e comment fro m P o l l y , "She r e t i r e s g r a c e ­ fu lly !" T h a t b ro u g h t f o r t h m ore g o o d -n a tu r e d l a u g h t e r . The g ro u p seem ed'now t o be e n jo y in g t h e d is c u s s io n . H e le n came i n t o t h e d is c u s s io n a t t h i s p o i n t . She re m in d e d ED t h a t m ost o f t h e s t a f f i n t h e H e a lt h E d u c a tio n D e p a rtm e n t had v e r y i r r e g u l a r s c h e d u le s becau se o f t h e s c h e d u lin g o f c la s s e s th r o u g h o u t t h e d ay and e v e n in g and S a tu r d a y s . Many o f t h e s t a f f w e re o f f w o rk i n t h e m o rn in g r a t h e r t h a n e v e n in g on c e r t a i n days o f t h e w e ek . She a s ke d w h e th e r s t a f f who w e re w o rk in g th e s e i r r e g u l a r h o u rs h a d t o g e t t h e a p p r o v a l o f t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e t o t a k e c o u r s e s . E d i t h a n sw ered b e f o r e ED c o u ld g iv e a n a f f i r m a t i v e a n s w e r and p o in t e d o u t t h a t i t was a l l p a r t o f t h e same p r o ­ c ess o f t r y i n g t o c o - o r d i n a t e p e o p le s * a c t i v i t i e s . P o l l y a g re e d t o t h i s and added t h a t t h e r e was a ls o a h e a l t h c o n s id e r a t io n i n v o l v e d . " W e l l , " s a id B a r b a ra e m p h a t ic a l ly , o t h e r t h in g s we do a t n i g h t ! "

" t h e y d o n 't lo o k a t

T h e re was a s h o u t o f la u g h t e r a t t h i s comment f o llo w e d b y comments o f " w r i t e t h a t do w n!" "What do yo u do?" e t c . ED , who h ad j o in e d i n th e la u g h in g , spoke up when i t s u b s id e d , " P o l l y y o u 'r e on t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e ." She lo o k e d a t B e t t y and s a i d , " B e t t y , yo u a r e t o o . Do y o u t h i n k we c o u ld t a k e t h i s b a c k t o t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m ittee ? " " Y e s ," s a id P o l l y , "we a r e g r o p in g f o r s o m e th in g h e r e we a r e n ' t g e t t i n g . " B e t t y nodded i n a g re e m e n t. ED a g re e d

112 and s a i d , "We d o n ’ t w an t t o f e e l t h a t t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e i s g o v e rn in g o u r l i v e s # " T h e re was s t i l l some la u g h t e r a ro u n d t h e t a b l e d u r in g t h e s e q u e s tio n s and comments— - s t i l l d i r e c t e d a t B a rb a ra # She was j o i n i n g i n th e l a u g h t e r a t h e r own e a r l i e r comment# H a r r i e t spoke up i n re s p o n s e t o E D ’ s l a s t s ta te m e n t s a y in g t h a t she th o u g h t t h i s m a t t e r was v e r y im p o r ta n t fro m t h e p o i n t o f v ie w o f t h e s t a f f who w ere n o t i n on t h e d i s ­ c u s s io n and who m ig h t v e r y w e l l f e e l t h a t t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e was t r y i n g t o g o v e rn t h e i r l i v e s . T h e re was a g e n e r a l a f f i r m a t i o n by t h e g ro u p t o w h at H a r r i e t s a i d , accom­ p a n ie d b y nods and "y e s e s # " EB i n d i c a t e d a g re e m e n t w i t h H a r r i e t and s a i d , " Y e s , we w i l l t a k e t h i s s e c t io n b a c k t o t h e P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e ." ED t h e n w ent on t o t h e n e x t s e c t io n w h ic h d e a l t w i t h r e q u e s ts f o r a tte n d a n c e a t c o n fe re n c e s and m ethod o f c h a n n e l­ in g th e s e r e q u e s ts when a g e n c y money o r t im e away fro m r e g u l a r w o rk was i n v o l v e d . When she f i n i s h e d r e a d in g t h i s b r i e f s e c t io n P o l l y spoke up i n a q u e s tio n in g to n e t o a s k , "And i f you l i k e n o t t o go t o c o n fe r e n c e ? " She paused and gave an a p o lo g e t ic la u g h . T h e re was a r i p p l e o f a p p r e c i a t i v e l a u g h t e r a ro u n d t h e t a b l e as i f t o i n d i c a t e r e c o g n i t i o n by t h e g ro u p o f s i m i ­ l a r l y e x p e r ie n c e d f e e l i n g s a b o u t c o n fe r e n c e a t t e n d a n c e . ED s a id i n a somewhat p u z z le d to n e t h a t i t w a s n ’ t c l e a r t o h e r w hat P o l l y had i n m in d . P o l l y became s e r io u s and s a i d , "You o f t e n j u s t f e e l t h a t y o u c a n ’ t go t o c o n fe r e n c e 5 t h a t t h e r e i s s o m e th in g more im p o r ta n t t o do h e r e . " "B u t w e ’ r e a l l w o rk in g on a c o - o r d in a t e d p ro g ra m ," r e p l i e d ED w i t h e m p h a s is , "a t o t a l YWCA prog ram and we must t a k e t h e w h o le i n t o a c c o u n t i n d e t e r m in in g w hat i s t h e m ost im p o r ta n t t h i n g f o r us t o d o . The m ost im p o r ta n t t h i n g may be t o go t o c o n f e r e n c e ." T h e re was no re s p o n s e t o E D ’ s com­ m e n t. T h is s e c t i o n on c o n fe r e n c e a tte n d a n c e p r o v id e d t h a t a s t a f f member s h o u ld f i r s t c o n s u lt w i t h h e r p a r t i c u l a r c o m m itte e c h a irm e n and e x e c u t iv e a b o u t a tte n d a n c e a t c o n fe r e n c e and th e n a w r i t t e n re c o m m e n d a tio n s h o u ld be s e n t by e i t h e r o f th e s e t o t h e c h a irm a n o f t h e m e t r o p o lit a n P e r s o n n e l C o m m itte e . F o llo w ­ in g E D ’ s. l a s t re m a rk E d i t h spoke up b e g in n in g w i t h " I guess I ’ m i n a s tu b b o r n mood" and t h e n w ent on t o e x p re s s h e r f e e l i n g t h a t t h e p r o c e d u r e f o r c o n fe r e n c e s h o u ld a ls o go th r o u g h t h e

113 C o m m itte e o f Managem ent o f t h e B ra n c h . She added t h a t i t seemed t o h e r t h e r e was to o much v a r i a t i o n i n t h e c h a n n e lin g o f a l l t h e v a r io u s r e q u e s t s . She c o n c lu d e d t h a t " i t d o e s n Tt seem l i k e good a d m i n i s t r a t i o n .1 1 EB c h a n n e le d so m e th in g m itte e o f

r e p l i e d , "B u t i t i s m o s tly b u d g e t m a t t e r s t h a t a r e th ro u g h t h e c o m m itte e s o f m anagem ent. . When i t i s t h a t a f f e c t s t h e b u d g e t i t m ust go th r o u g h t h e com­ m an agem ent."

E d i t h p e r s i s t e d i n h e r o p in io n s a y in g t h a t she l i k e d t h e u n i f o r m i t y o f c o n t a c t in g t h e C o m m itte e o f M anagem ent; she th o u g h t i t was im p o r t a n t t h a t t h e y be c o n ta c te d f o r e v e r y t h in g ; t h a t o th e r w is e i t was t o o c o n fu s in g , one was n e v e r s u re w hat p ro c e d u re s h o u ld be f o l l o w e d . M a ry a g re e d t h a t u n i f o r m i t y was im p o r ta n t t o an e x t e n t and P o l l y i n d i c a t e d t h a t she f e l t some­ w h at t h e same w ay. B a r b a r a th o u g h t t h a t t h e a p p l i c a t i o n and re c o m m e n d a tio n s h o u ld come th r o u g h t h e B ra n c h E x e c u t iv e r a t h e r t h a n t h e Y -T e e n o r Young A d u lt C o m m ittee C h a irm a n b e c a u s e , she p o in t e d o u t , " i t was t h e B ra n c h E x e c u tiv e who was r e s p o n s ib le f o r t h e \tfork done a t t h e B ra n c h and she w o u ld know b e t t e r t h a n anyone e ls e w h e th e r t h e s t a f f p e rs o n c o u ld be s p a re d t o go t o c o n fe r e n c e .11 T h is d is c u s s io n o f c h a n n e lin g t h e c o n fe r e n c e a p p l i c a t i o n c o n tin u e d f o r s e v e r a l m in u te s w i t h B a r b a r a , H e le n , P o l l y , M a ry and E d i t h a l l t a k i n g p a r t and w i t h E d i t h p a r t i c u l a r l y em p h a s iz­ in g t h e im p o r ta n c e o f t h e a p p l i c a t i o n g o in g th r o u g h t h e C o m m ittee o f M anagem ent. ED who had been l i s t e n i n g t o t h e comments and re m a rk s and o p in io n s spo ke up a t t h i s p o in t s u g g e s tin g t h a t p e rh a p s i t c o u ld be w o rke d o u t so t h a t th e a p p l i c a t i o n w ould be a p p ro v e d by b o th t h e c o m m itte e s o f management and t h e b ra n c h e x e c u tiv e . P o l l y im m e d ia t e ly re s p o n d e d , " I ' m n o t i n f a v o r o f th a t!” She made no f u r t h e r e x p la n a t io n o f why she was n o t i n f a v o r o f t h i s s u g g e s t io n . H o w e v e r, h e r b a ld and c a t e g o r i c a l s ta te m e n t was m et w i t h a c h o ru s o f lo u d l a u g h t e r , i n w h ic h she j o i n e d , c a l l e d f o r t h i n p a r t i t seemed by t h e e m p h a tic way i n w h ic h she s p o k e , and i n p a r t by t h e seem ing h o p e le s s n e s s i n r e a c h in g an y a g re e m e n t on w h at t o d o . ED jo in e d i n t h e la u g h t e r and as i t d ie d away s a i d , " W e l l , s h a l l we t a k e t h i s b a c k t o t h e C o m m itte e , to o ? " A g a in t h e r e was g e n e r a l a g re e m e n t t h a t t h i s s h o u ld be do n e. ED began r e a d in g t h e f i n a l s e c t io n o f t h e p ro c e d u re s t h a t r e l a t e d t o o f f i c e and m a in te n a n c e s t a f f , b u t i n t h e m id s t o f h e r r e a d i n g , a member o f t h e N a t i o n a l B o ard o f t h e YWCA came i n t o t h e m e e tin g . The m e e tin g was t e m p o r a r i l y i n t e r r u p t e d , th o s e who knew M is s D_______ g r e e t i n g h e r and e x p r e s s in g s u r p r is e a t s e e in g h e r . ED e x p la in e d t h a t M is s D was v a c a t io n in g i n

11b Los A n g e le s and she h ad i n v i t e d h e r t o come o v e r t o t h e s t a f f m e e tin g , ED in t r o d u c e d h e r a ro u n d t h e g ro u p and t h e n e x p la in e d t o M is s D t h a t t h e y w e re i n t h e m id s t o f d i s ­ c u s s in g p ro c e d u re s r e l a t e d t o n o n - p r o f e s s io n a l s t a f f . A d d r e s s in g t h e g ro u p a g a in ED a s k e d i f t h e r e w ere a n y su g g es­ t io n s o r comments on t h e l a s t i t e m . No one re s p o n d e d and she w en t on w i t h t h e r e a d i n g . Th e f i n a l it e m had t o do w i t h p ro c e d u re f o r non­ p r o f e s s i o n a l w o rk e rs i n r e q u e s t in g a p p r o v a l f o r s tu d y w h ile i n t h e em ploy o f t h e YW and i n d i c a t e d t h a t t h e same p ro c e d u re s h o u ld be f o llo w e d as i n th e c a s e o f r e q u e s ts fro m p r o f e s s i o n a l s ta ff, R u th w a n te d t o know why i t was n e c e s s a ry f o r n o n p r o f e s s i o n a l s t a f f t o f o l l o w t h e same p r o c e d u r e . She p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h e i r w o rk in g h o u rs w ere m ore d e f i n i t e th a n th o s e o f t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l s t a f f and t h e r e f o r e t h e r e was le s s l i k e l i ­ hood f o r t h e r e t o be c o n f l i c t b e tw e e n r e g u l a r w o rk in g h o u rs and c l a s s e s . The i m p l i c a t i o n o f h e r re m a rk s w e re t h a t she c o u ld s e e no r e a l r e a s o n why o f f i c e and m a in te n a n c e s t a f f s h o u ld be o b lig e d t o r e q u e s t p e r m is s io n t o s t u d y . B a r b a r a s u p p o rte d R u th s a y in g , “ I d o n ’ t know w h e th e r I ’ m s tu b b o r n o r dumb, b u t I d o n ’ t see t h e re a s o n why we s h o u ld r e q u i r e t h i s o f o f f i c e s t a f f .11 ED k id d e d h e r i n a f r i e n d l y way s a y in g , “S t i l l w o r r y in g a b o u t w h at you do a t n i g h t ?11 and t h e r e was a b r i e f la u g h fro m t h e g ro u p . B a r b a ra la u g h e d t o o , b u t t h e n s a id i n a s e r io u s t o n e , “ I c a n see n o n - p r o f e s s io n a l p e o p le b e in g t e r r i b l y u p s e t a b o u t t h a t r e q u ir e m e n t .11 I t was e v id e n t o th e r s o f t h e g ro u p f e l t t h e same w a y . ED re s p o n d e d t h a t maybe t h i s was s o m e th in g e ls e t h a t s h o u ld be r e f e r r e d b a c k t o t h e c o m m itte e . A g a in t h e g ro u p i n d i c a t e d t h e i r unanim ous a p p r o v a l o f t h i s s u g g e s t io n . M a ry s a id t h a t she th o u g h t i t was t h e f a c t o n ly o f b e in g “ on t h e j o b ” t h a t was t h e r e a s o n f o r r e q u i r i n g t h e a p p r o v a l o f t h e c o m m itte e t o s tu d y ; t h a t i t was n o t r e l a t e d t o how one spent o n e’ s p r iv a te l i f e . F o llo w in g h e r re m a rk s t h e r e was g e n e r a l k id d in g o f B a r b a ra r e g a r d in g h e r “n i g h t l i f e .*1 T h ro u g h o u t t h e d is c u s s io n o f t h e p ro c e d u re s ED had l i s t e n e d t o t h e comments and o p in io n s and had made no a t te m p t t o f o r c e on t h e g ro u p h e r o p in io n s o r a t t i t u d e s on t h e s u b je c t u n d e r d is c u s s io n . The comments she made w e re c h i e f l y i n t e r ­ p r e t i v e and t o g iv e i n f o r m a t i o n . T h e re was n o t h in g i n h e r a t t i t u d e t o i n d i c a t e c r i t i c i s m o r d is a p p r o v a l o f a n y re m a rk s made b y members o f t h e g ro u p .

115 M em b ersh ip M e e tin g -

J a n u a ry 21 ( 1 1 : 5 0 -

1 2 :0 5 )

F o llo w in g M a r y f s f i n a l comment a b o u t t h e p r o c e d u r e s , t h e t a l k was g e n e r a l f o r a fe w m in u te s w i t h ED t a l k i n g t o M is s D Then ED tu r n e d b a c k t o h e r p a p e r s , c h e ck ed t h e a g en d a and s p e a k in g t o H a r r i e t s a i d , “ W ould you w ant t o t a l k a b o u t t h e m em bership m e e tin g i n J a n u a r y ?11 H a r r i e t s m ile d and r e p l i e d , “ T h an k yo u * Yes. But I w o u ld p r e f e r o th e r s w o u ld do th e t a l k i n g b eca u se yo u h a v e b e e n on t h e jo b and I h a v e b een on v a c a t i o n . ” She p a u s e d , and th e n w en t o n . “F i r s t , I w onder i f you h av e s u g g e s tio n s f o r a name f o r t h e m e e tin g ?11 She c o n tin u e d g iv in g some o f t h e names t h a t had a l r e a d y b een s u g g e s t e d ,— “YW M e r r y -G o A r o u n d ,“ “ I n s i d e t h e YWCA,“ “YW A d v e n t u r e .11 She added t h a t M rs . W illia m s (who i s t h e v o lu n t e e r i n c h a rg e o f t h e member­ s h ip m e e tin g ) h a d hoped t h a t t h i s g ro u p c o u ld d e c id e on a name; b e c a u s e o f a po stp on em en t i n t im e o f t h e M em bership C o m m itte e m e e tin g i t m ust be d e c id e d w it h o u t w a it in g f o r a c t i o n b y t h a t g ro u p . H a r r i e t th e n ann ou nced t h e new m e e tin g t im e o f th e M em b ership C o m m ittee (w h ic h i s r e s p o n s ib le f o r t h e m em bership m e e tin g ) and e m p h a sized t h e im p o rta n c e o f t h e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s fro m a l l b ra n c h e s b e in g p r e s e n t . She paused and as t h e r e was no re s p o n s e t o w h at she had s a i d , a s k e d a g a i n , “What a r e y o u r s u g g e s tio n s ?11 B e t t y spoke up s u g g e s tin g t h a t a name be s e le c t e d t h a t w o u ld use t h e l e t t e r s Y , W, C , A , b u t t h a t t h e word “ s e e 11 be used i n p la c e o f a w ord b e g in n in g w i t h t h e l e t t e r “C1*. I n re s p o n s e t o t h i s s u g g e s tio n Jan e s u g g e s te d , “You W i l l See A l l .1 1 H a r r i e t m o m e n ta r ily i n t e r r u p t e d f u r t h e r s u g g e s tio n s by e x p l a i n in g some o f t h e c r i t i c i s m s o f names t h a t had b een made o f some o f t h e s u g g e s tio n s . F o llo w in g h e r re m a rk s M a ry s a id she th o u g h t t h e nam e, “M e rry -G o -A ro u n d “ was bad b ec a u s e i t i m p l i e d t h a t “you d o n f t seem t o g e t a n y w h e re .11 She a d d e d , “ I t h i n k r I n s i d e YWCA* i s t h e b e s t . ” T h e re seemed t o be a good b i t o f a g re e m e n t w i t h h e r on t h i s nam e, a lth o u g h i t was n o t u n a n im o u s . H a r r i e t spoke up a g a in s a y in g t h a t t h e y w a n te d some­ t h i n g t h a t a p p e a le d t o a d u lt s as w e l l as t o Y - t e e n s , and w a n te d s o m e th in g t h a t was c a tc h y . H e le n p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h e name “ I n s i d e USA“ was g e t t i n g a l o t o f p u b l i c i t y r i g h t now w i t h t h e p l a y b e in g i n to w n and made a m o tio n t h a t “ I n s i d e YWCA" be t h e name used f o r t h e m e e tin g . M a ry seconded t h e m o tio n .

116 M a ry and H e le n w e re s i t t i n g on t h e same s id e o f t h e t a b l e and H a r r i e t , who was s i t t i n g a t one end o f i t , tu r n e d t o t h e o p p o s ite s id e s a y in g , ffT h is s id e o f t h e t a b l e i s f o r i t , how a b o u t t h i s s i d e ?*1 T h e re was some com m enting and l a u g h t e r among th o s e s i t t i n g on t h a t s id e o f t h e t a b l e , R u th , B e t t y , E d i t h , B a r b a r a , and J a n e . The c e n t e r o f t h e jo k in g and com m enting seemed t o be a ro u n d E d i t h and B a r b a ra and t h e com­ m ents w e re a b o u t th e s tu b b o r n p e rs o n on t h a t s id e o f t h e t a b l e , t h e r e f e r e n c e b e in g t o E d i t h and B a r b a r a . T h e y w e re a d m it t in g t h e i r s tu b b o rn n e s s and j o i n i n g i n t h e la u g h in g . H o w e v e r, s e v e r a l o t h e r comments w e re made by v a r io u s members p o in t in g up t h e a p p r o p r ia t e n e s s o f t h i s t i t l e and i t was a c c e p te d by H a r r i e t as t h e name t h e m a j o r i t y p r e f e r r e d , a lth o u g h no f u r ­ t h e r r e f e r e n c e was made t o t h e m o tio n t h a t had b e e n made* H a r r i e t t h e n t u r n e d t o t h e m a t t e r o f t h e p ro g ram f o r t h e m e e tin g i n w h ic h e a c h b ra n c h and c e n t e r i s h a v in g a p a r t , — e ach p r e s e n t in g i n t a b l e a u o r s k i t fo rm some a s p e c t o f t h e YWCA's t o t a l p ro g ra m . She s a id she f e l t t h a t t h e r e h a d been some m is u n d e rs ta n d in g a b o u t who was d o in g w h at and t u r n e d t o Kay w i t h a n i n q u i r i n g l o o k . Kay s a id y es t h e r e had b een as f a r as t h e i r b ra n c h was c o n c e rn e d and she was g la d i t had b e e n b ro u g h t u p . She t h e n w ent i n t o a somewhat le n g t h y e x p la n a ­ t i o n o f th e v a r io u s r e q u e s t s th e b ra n c h had had t o do a v a r i e t y o f t h i n g s , i n c l u d i n g w o rk in g on a m ap, a w is h in g w e l l , a m e r r y g o -r o u n d , a room r e g i s t r y s k i t and t h a t i t had b e e n a l l v e r y c o n fu s in g as t o w hat t h e y w e re supposed t o be w o rk in g on as t h e y u n d e rs to o d t h e y w e re t o do o n ly one t h i n g . The f i n a l r e q u e s t had b e e n t o do s o m e th in g i n c o n n e c tio n w i t h a Y - t e e n p r e s e n t a t i o n and she f e l t t h a t i t was a s k in g a l i t t l e to o much o f t h e s t a f f and v o lu n t e e r s t o do so many t h i n g s . H a r r i e t e x p la in e d t h e r e a s o n f o r some o f t h e c o n fu s io n and e x p la in e d t h a t t h e Y - t e e n p r e s e n t a t i o n was a t a b l e a u t h a t a l l Y - t e e n s w e re b e in g a s k e d t o t a k e p a r t i n and t h a t i t w o u ld n * t r e q u i r e a g r e a t d e a l o f e x t r a w o rk . B a r b a r a e x p la in e d t h a t t h e y w ere o n ly b e in g a s k e d t o a r r a n g e a t a b l e a u and i t w o u ld n ^ t a k e much t im e o r e f f o r t . Kay lo o k e d d o u b t f u l a b o u t t h i s . ED spoke up a d d r e s s in g f i r s t K a y , t h e n i n c lu d in g a l l members o f t h e grou p and g iv in g r e in f o r c e m e n t t o H a r r i e t * s e x p la n a t io n a b o u t t h e Y - t e e n p r e s e n t a t io n as b e in g a s p e c i a l f e a t u r e o f t h e p ro g ra m and one on w h ic h a l l b ra n c h e s and a c t i v i t i e s w e re b e in g a s k e d t o w o rk . F o llo w in g h e r re m a rk s s e v e r a l o f th e g ro u p spoke up a d d in g t o t h e im p r e s s io n t h a t t h e r e was a good b i t o f c o n fu s io n a b o u t w hat e a ch was supposed t o do and t h e r e was some i n d i c a t i o n o f a f e e l i n g o f re s e n tm e n t

117 among some t h a t t h e y w e re b e in g a s k e d t o do to o much. J an e spoke t o H a r r i e t a s k in g , " I s t h e r e g o in g t o be a n y c o n t i n u i t y t o a l l th e s e scenes t h a t a r e b e in g p r e s e n te d ? Gan y o u t e l l us s o m e th in g more a b o u t t h e pro g ram and how i t w i l l be t i e d t o g e t h e r ? " H a r r i e t e x p la in e d i n some d e t a i l t h e p la n s T o r t h e p ro g ra m and th e n s a id t h a t t h e d e s c r i p t i v e s ta te m e n t t o be s u b m itte d by each b ra n c h and c e n t e r and t o be used i n p a r t o f t h e p ro g ra m p r e s e n t a t i o n was due i n h e r o f f i c e i n J a n u a r y . " T h a t 's t h e f i r s t I ’ v e h e a r d o f t h a t ,11 e x c la im e d Jane i n a s t a r t l e d to n e and w it h a s u r p r is e d lo o k oh h e r f a c e . T h e re was a n im m e d ia te r e a c t i o n by members o f th e g ro u p t o t h i s s t a t e m e n t , a r e a c t i o n t h a t was d i r e c t e d to w a rd J a n e w i t h comments "O h, n o ! " ’' I t was i n t h e l e t t e r ! " "Read t h e l e t t e r ! " H a r r i e t , a p p e a r in g somewhat d is t u r b e d , lo o k e d a t ED who made no comment. H a r r i e t th e n e x p la in e d t o Jane a b o u t t h e r e q u e s t in c lu d e d i n t h e g e n e r a l l e t t e r s e n t t o t h e b ra n c h e s and c e n t e r d e s c r ib in g t h e p la n s f o r t h e m e e tin g . Jane made no d e f i n i t e r e p l y and H a r r i e t ' s re m a rk s w ere f o llo w e d by g e n e r a l d is c u s s io n w i t h much t a l k g o in g on s im u lta n e o u s ly a b o u t t h e p ro g ra m f o r t h e m e e tin g . H a r r i e t lo o k e d a c ro s s t h e t a b l e t o ED and a s k e d , "C o u ld we c o n tin u e t h i s a f t e r lu n c h ? " ED nodded i n a g re e m e n t and s a i d , " I t h i n k lu n c h e o n i s r e a d y ." I t was 1 2 : 0 ? . The m e e tin g b ro k e up w i t h some m oving away fro m t h e t a b l e , some l i n g e r i n g t o t a l k b e f o r e m oving t o t h e lu n c h t a b l e . M e m b ers h ip M e e tin g

( c o n tin u e d )

( Is 00 -

105)

ED ra p p e d on t h e t a b l e t o g e t t h e a t t e n t i o n o f t h e g ro u p and s a i d , " H a r r i e t , w i l l yo u c o n tin u e w i t h t h e d is c u s ­ s io n and t r y t o c l e a r up t h e muddy w a t e r s . " She s m ile d as she spoke i n a f r i e n d l y f a s h i o n . H a r r i e t re s p o n d e d , " I s u r e l y w i l l , " and p ro c e e d e d t o go o v e r t h e p la n s f o r t h e p ro g ram f o r t h e m e e tin g i n d i c a t i n g t h e a s s ig n m e n t t h a t had b e e n w orked o u t f o r e ach b ra n c h and c e n t e r . She c o n c lu d e d b y s a y in g , "As f a r as t h e Y -T e e n p a r t o f t h e p r o ­ gram i s c o n c e rn e d , i f some b ra n c h e s f e e l t h a t t h e y c a n ' t h e lp w i t h t h i s I suppose we c a n f i n d a n o th e r b ra n c h t o do i t . " K ay s a i d , " W e l l , Judy (a member o f t h e b ra n c h s t a f f ) had g o t t e n a l l steam ed up w i t h t h e s k i t f o r Room R e g i s t r y and h ad b een w o rk in g h a r d on i t . Then t h i s o t h e r r e q u e s t came and

118 we d i d n ' t know w h at t o d o , — w h e th e r t o s to p t h a t and t o do t h i s o t h e r . 1* She c o n tin u e d i n t h i s v e i n r e p e a t in g some o f w h at she had p r e v i o u s l y s a id . Then a d d e d , "B u t we may he a b le t o do t h i s o t h e r to o now t h a t we know more a b o u t w hat i t is ." T h e re was a l i t t l e more d is c u s s io n a b o u t th e c o n te n t o f t h e Y - t e e n s k i t , t h e n H a r r i e t re m in d e d t h e g rou p t h a t as a f o l l o w - u p o f t h e p ro g ram t h e r e w e re t o be a s e r ie s o f t o u r s t o t h e v a r io u s c e n t e r s and b ra n c h e s . She s a id t h a t t h e y need ed t o i n d i c a t e t h e d a te s o f t h e t o u r on t h e i n v i t a t i o n t o t h e m em bership m e e tin g and t h e r e f o r e t h e y needed t o c l e a r t o d a y , "when y o u c a n h a v e a buss lo a d o f p e o p le descen d on y o u .11 She w ent o n , 11You w i l l p r o b a b ly w an t t o c le a n u p , h ave some v o lu n t e e r s a t t h e b ra n c h e s and p e rh a p s s e rv e t e a . C o uld yo u lo o k a t y o u r c a le n d a r s and i n d i c a t e now when w ould be a good tim e t o s c h e d u le th e s e to u r s ? Th ey w o u ld t a k e p la c e i n F e b r u a r y , p r o b a b ly t h e f i r s t w eek i n F e b r u a r y , a n o th e r t h e second w eek and so f o r t h . Who w ou ld l i k e t o h a v e t h e f i r s t o n e ?11 She lo o k e d a ro u n d t h e g ro u p . E d i t h a s k e d i f t h e y w e re g o in g t o be on S a tu r d a y s . ftN ot n e c e s s a r i l y ,1 1 s a id H a r r i e t . 11I t w o u ld be a rr a n g e d t o s u i t t h e b r a n c h .*1 Someone a s k e d i f m ore t h a n one b ra n c h o r c e n t e r c o u ld n o t be in c lu d e d i n a t o u r . " Y e s ,11 s a id H a r r i e t t h o u g h t f u l l y , "we c a n do tw o — West B ra n c h and E a s t B ra n c h o r N o r th B ra n c h .11 ED a s k e d ,

"C o u ld we do t h r e e ? "

H a r r i e t a g a in s a i d , " Y e s ," i n a t h o u g h t f u l and some­ w hat h e s i t a n t w a y , a lth o u g h i t seemed fro m t h e way she spoke t h a t t h i s g ro u p in g o f v i s i t s had n o t b ee n c o n s id e r e d b e f o r e and she w a s n f t s u r e o f i t . E d i t h , who i s t h e E x e c u t iv e o f N o r th B ra n c h , lo o k e d a c ro s s t h e t a b l e a t M a ry and l a u g h in g ly s a i d , "T h ey c o u ld h a v e lu n c h a t W est B ra n c h (M a r y 's B r a n c h ) . West B ra n c h w ould lo v e t o h a v e them and th e n come on t o N o r th B ra n c h . M a ry made a la u g h in g r e j o i n d e r . A t th is

p o in t Jane r a i s e d t h e q u e s tio n o f bus f a r e .

ED a s k e d i f i t w e re p o s s ib le t o g e t enough c a rs t o p r o v id e t h e n e c e s s a ry t r a n s p o r t a t i o n . F o llo w in g h e r q u e s tio n Jan e spo ke up a g a in a b o u t t h e c o s t in v o lv e d i n c h a r t e r i n g a bus e x p r e s s in g t h e o p in io n t h a t she th o u g h t i t w o u ld r u n i n t o q u i t e a b i t o f money c o n s id e r in g t h e l e n g t h o f tim e t h e bus w o u ld be n e e d e d .

119 H a r r i e t s a id a g a in i n a t h o u g h t f u l to n e t h a t i t m ig h t be t h a t p r i v a t e c a rs c o u ld be u s e d . Kay a s k e d i f t h e y c o u ld n * t g e t t h e bus company t o d o n a te a b u s . T h e re was some s k e p t ic is m e x p re s s e d o v e r t h i s s u g g e s t io n . A b r i e f d is ­ c u s s io n f o llo w e d on t h e p o in t and on th e a v a i l a b i l i t y o f p r iv a te c a rs . H a r r i e t i n t e r r u p t e d t h e d is c u s s io n t o b r in g i t b a c k t o h e r o r i g i n a l q u e s tio n s a y in g , "A bout t h e d ay f o r t h e t o u r s . . . . " The g ro u p la u g h e d good n a t u r e d l y a t h e r o b v io u s e n d e a v o r t o b r in g them b ack t o t h i s a s p e c t o f t h e t o p i c and HD spoke up s a y in g , " L i s t e n , we c a n ' t t a k e to o much t im e on t h i s ! " She sounded a l i t t l e d is t u r b e d o v e r t h e i n a b i l i t y o f t h e g ro u p t o g e t an yw h ere i n t h e d is c u s s io n . J an e r a i s e d t h e q u e s tio n as t o w h e th e r t h e y th o u g h t p e o p le w o u ld r e a l l y s ig n up t o go on t h e t o u r s a t t h e tim e o f t h e m em bership m e e t in g . W ith o u t r e s p o n d in g t o t h e d o u b t e x p re s s e d b y J a n e , H a r r i e t a d d re s s e d E d i t h , M a ry and Kay a s k in g them t o c o n s id e r a common d a t e t h a t w o u ld be c o n v e n ie n t f o r th e m . B e fo r e t h e r e was a n y r e p l y B a r b a r a re m in d e d t h e g ro u p t h a t Y - t e e n m id w i n t e r c o n fe r e n c e was due t o be h e ld d u r in g t h e n e x t fe w weeks and t h a t i t s h o u ld be b o rn e i n m ind i n d e c id in g on a d a te f o r th e to u r s . D a te s a r e n o t s e t y e t , she s a i d , b u t she c o u ld l e t H a r r i e t know a b o u t th e m . E d i t h , M a ry and Kay began d is c u s s in g d a t e s . A fte r a fe w m in u te s o f t h i s w it h o u t much lu c k i n s e l e c t i n g a tim e t h a t seemed s a t i s f a c t o r y t o t h e t h r e e , ED i n t e r r u p t e d t h e d is c u s s io n s a y in g , " I d o n 't t h i n k we a r e e v e r g o in g t o g e t t o g e t h e r on t h i s . " She spoke th e n d i r e c t l y t o H a r r i e t sug­ g e s t in g t h a t she send o u t a l e t t e r e x p l a i n in g t h e p ro p o s a ls f o r t h e t o u r and a s k in g t h a t each b ra n c h and c e n t e r n o t i f y h e r o f th e b e s t d a te s . Then she and t h e c o m m itte e c o u ld w ork o u t th e f i n a l p la n . T h e re was g e n e r a l a g re e m e n t w i t h t h i s s u g g e s tio n . Jan e a s k e d i f t h e g ro u p c o u ld n f t d e c id e now w h ic h b ra n c h e s and c e n t e r s w o u ld be g rou ped t o g e t h e r on t h e same t o u r and a g a in t h e r e were__nods and " y e s e s " i n a g re e m e n t w i t h t h i s s u g g e s t io n . ED f o l l o w i n g up on t h i s r e s p o n s e , a s k e d , "W hat w o u ld y o u g ro u p t h e r e s id e n c e s w ith ? " H a r r i e t r e p l i e d t h a t p r o b a b ly t h e downtown c e n t e r m ig h t be com bined w i t h t h e r e s id e n c e and lo o k e d i n q u i r i n g l y a t Jane. She nodded t o i n d i c a t e a g re e m e n t w i t h t h i s i d e a . c e n te r,

M a ry s u g g e s te d t h a t t h e t o u r le a v e fro m t h e downtown s to p a t t h e r e s id e n c e and t h e n go on t o t h e b ra n c h e s

120 i n th e n o rth e r n p a r t o f th e c i t y . She p o in t e d o u t t h a t i n t h a t way th e g ro u p m akin g t h e t o u r w o u ld see th e c e n t r a l b u i l d i n g a c t i v i t i e s , a r e s id e n c e and a b ra n c h and w o u ld g e t a good p i c t u r e o f t h e v a r ie d YWCA p ro g ra m . B o th P o l l y and L u cy i n d i c a t e d t h e y th o u g h t t h i s a good i d e a . H a r r i e t a p p a r e n t ly t h i n k i n g t h e d is c u s s io n s h o u ld n o t be c o n tin u e d spoke up s a y in g , “W e l l , I guess 1 * 1 1 h av e t o c o n ta c t y o u a l l b y phone t o w ork o u t t h e a r r a n g e m e n ts .“ E d i t h e x p re s s e d a g a in h e r u n c e r t a i n t y a b o u t w h at h e r b ra n c h was t o do f o r t h e m e e tin g and H a r r i e t s a id she w o u ld s ee h e r a f t e r t h e m e e tin g . K ay im m e d ia t e ly res p o n d e d t o t h i s w i t h “See me t o o J “ w h ic h b ro u g h t f o r t h a la u g h fro m t h e g r o u p , and s e v e r a l o t h e r s echoed t h e same s e n t im e n t . Jane ask ed a b o u t t h e t im e o f t h e m em bership m e e tin g and t h e r e was a c h o ru s o f “ see t h e l e t t e r . “ T h e re seemed t o be a f e e l i n g o f w a n tin g t o g e t on w i t h t h e o t h e r b u s in e s s o f t h e m e e tin g . ED a s k e d , “A re t h e r e a n y more q u e s tio n s ? “ and b o th B a r b a r a and E d i t h echoed e a ch o t h e r i n t h e la u g h in g r e j o i n d e r , “D o n *t a s k th em J“ T h e re w e re a p p r e c i a t i v e c h u c k le s a ro u n d t h e g ro u p . A n n u a l M e e tin g - A o r i l 29

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ED p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g o f t h e YWCA was s c h e d u le d f o r A p r i l 29 and a sked i f t h e r e w e re a n y sug ges­ t i o n s o f p e o p le t o s e r v e on t h e c o m m itte e t h a t w o u ld t a k e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y , f o r a r r a n g in g t h i s a f f a i r . B a r b a r a s u g g e s te d a name w h ic h ED n o te d down. H a r r i e t q u e s tio n e d i f t h i s w a s n f t a m e e tin g t h a t t h e com m unity was i n v i t e d t o and one t h a t em p h a sized p u b l i c r e l a ­ tio n s . ED r e p l i e d , “Y e s , t h a t f s r i g h t .11 E d i t h , f o l l o w i n g up on t h i s p o i n t , s a id she th o u g h t “ i f we c a n h a v e i t a t a g lam o ro u s p la c e i t w i l l b r in g more p e o p le t o t h e m e e tin g ,** t o w h ic h P o l l y re s p o n d e d w i t h , “ I t c o s ts m o re .*1 “ No le s s th a n a n u n glam orou s p l a c e ,*1 r e p l i e d E d i t h e m p h a t i c a l l y , b u t good n a t u r e d l y . ED p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h e r e a s o n f o r a lu n c h e o n m e e tin g was t h a t i t c o s t le s s t o s e rv e a lu n c h e o n , d in n e r s w e re much more e x p e n s iv e and t h a t on t h e b a s is o f t h e e v a l u a t i o n made o f t h e l a s t a n n u a l m e e tin g i t m ig h t be w o r t h - w h ile t o t r y a

121 lu n c h e o n m e e tin g t h i s y e a r . She e x p la in e d some o f t h e a d d i­ t i o n a l t h i n k i n g t h a t h ad gone i n t o t h i s d e c is io n . T h e re w e re no f u r t h e r comments and ED moved on t o t h e n e x t it e m on th e a g e n d a . W o rld F e llo w s h ip C o n t r i b u t i o n , 1 9 ^ 9

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E D tlo o k e d a t H a r r i e t and a s ke d i f t h e r e was a n y r e p o r t on W o rld F e llo w s h ip . ^ Y e s ,” r e p l i e d H a r r i e t and w it h much p le a s u r e announced a sum i n exces s o f $ as h a v in g been r e c e iv e d and fo r w a r d e d t o th e N a t i o n a l o f f i c e f o r W o rld F e llo w s h ip . She e x p la in e d t h a t t h e g o a l s e t f o r t h i s YWCA by N a t i o n a l had b een $_____ ; t h a t a f t e r c o n s id e r in g t h e m a t t e r , t h e W o rld F e llo w s h ip C o m m ittee had d e c id e d t h a t t h e g o a l s h o u ld n o t e x c e e d $ and t h a t m ore th a n t h a t amount had come i n . G e n e r a l s u r p r i s e was r e g i s t e r e d b y t h e g ro u p and com­ m ents o f ”We w ent o v e r ” came fro m s e v e r a l p o in t s a ro u n d th e ta b le . H a r r i e t lo o k e d p le a s e d and w ent on t o s a y t h a t t h e g o a l was s t i l l n o t h ig h enough f o r an a s s o c i a t io n o f t h e s i z e o f t h i s a s s o c i a t io n and t h a t t h e y m ust c o n tin u e t o w o rk t o b r in g i t up h i g h e r . She announced t h a t t h e c o m m itte e had ED a g r e e d t o in c r e a s e t h e g o a l t o $______ f o r t h e n e x t y e a r . p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h e c o m m itte e s h o u ld be s u p p o rte d and e n c o u ra g e d i n t h e i r e f f o r t s ; t h a t W o rld F e llo w s h ip was an im p o r ta n t p a r t o f t h e YWCA w o rk and t h a t e v e ry o n e s h o u ld do h e r b e s t t o h e lp i n r a i s i n g t h i s money t h a t was in t e n d e d t o h e lp c a r r y on t h e w o rk o f t h e W o rld YWCA. B u d g et and Bank A c c o u n ts

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ED t h e n moved on t o t h e n e x t it e m on t h e agenda t u r n ­ in g t o B u th and s a y in g , HR u th do you w an t t o t a l k a b o u t th e b u d g e t? ” R u th nodded and began s p e a k in g i n a m a t t e r o f f a c t and b u s i n e s s - l i k e to n e t h a t t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n was o v e rd ra w n b o th i n th e b a n k a c c o u n t and i n t h e b u d g e t. She r e c a l l e d t o t h e g ro u p t h a t t h e y had b e e n a d v is e d e a r l i e r i n th e f a l l t h a t t h e y m ust w a tc h t h e i r e x p e n d itu r e s c l o s e l y as t h i s v e r y t h i n g m ig h t o c c u r; t h a t she knew t h e y had b ee n d o in g so and th e n added t h a t flyo u h a v e t o s t a r t s a v in g lo n g b e f o r e t h e s a v in g b e g in s t o show up on t h e b u d g e t and a c c o u n t .” She s a i d , 111 h a v e f i g u r e s on e a c h b ra n c h show ing t h e i r f i n a n c i a l s t a t u s a t t h e p re s e n t. S h a l l I r e a d them ?” As she a sk ed t h i s q u e s tio n

122 she lo o k e d a ro u n d t h e g ro u p and a t ED. T h e re was a c h o ru s re s p o n s e o f “Y e s e s 1 1 and “n o s . “ ED s a id “Y e s . “ and B u th c o n tin u e d . rrFew i f an y o f t h e r e p o r t s show t h a t you h ave o v e r s p e n t ,'1 she s a i d . “M o s t ly i t i s t h e incom e t h a t has f a l l e n down and i t i s t h e m em bership it e m i n p a r t i c u l a r t h a t has f a l l e n dow n." She beg an r e a d in g o f f t h e a c c o u n t ite m s t h a t showed up as o v e r - e x p e n d it u r e s i n t h e v a r io u s b ra n c h e s and c e n t e r s b u d g e ts . Mhen she f i n i s h e d Jane re m a rk e d t h a t m em bership in co m e w i l l be h e a v i e r i n J a n u a ry and F e b r u a r y . B u th r e p l i e d , “Y e s , t h a t i s t r u e and we a r e c o u n tin g somewhat, on t h a t .111 She a d d e d , “ I d o n * t know w hat e ls e t o s a y . It seemed b e s t t o t e l l y o u w h at t h e s i t u a t i o n w as . M is s B row n, i s t h e r e a n y t h in g e l s e t h a t s h o u ld b e s a id ? " ED spoke t h e n a t some l e n g t h . “ I t h i n k we h av e each one t o t a k e o u r b u d g e t and a n a ly z e i t , " she s a i d . “ I t ’ s not so m uch, as B u th has s a i d , t h e e x p e n d itu r e s t h a t a r e a t f a u l t b u t i t ’ s t h e in c o m e . I t lo o k s as th o u g h we w o u ld h a v e some k in d o f a d e f i c i t a t t h e end o f t h e y e a r , b u t I hope i t i s n o t to o h i g h . I do t h i n k m em bership i s t h e t h i n g . “ She s m ile d a t t h e g rou p as she made t h i s l a s t s ta te m e n t and by h e r to n e and t h e way i n w h ic h she spoke i n d i c a t i n g t h a t she q u e s tio n e d w h e th e r t h e g ro u p had p u t s u f f i c i e n t em phasis on m em b e rs h ip s . B u t h e r a t t i t u d e o f c r i t i c i s m was made i n a f r i e n d l y w ay. T h e re was no s h a rp n e s s i n h e r to n e o f v o ic e . The comment was made r a t h e r as a f r a n k , o b j e c t i v e s ta te m e n t o f t h e s i t u a t i o n as she saw i t , and a c a u s a t iv e f a c t o r t h a t t h e y m ust c o n s id e r . She w ent on t o s a y i n a m ore s e r io u s b u t s t i l l o b j e c t i v e way t h a t t h e y m ust p u t m ore em p hasis and w o rk on i n c r e a s in g t h e m em bership and p o in t e d o u t t h a t i f t h e money d i d n * t come i n i t w o u ld mean a c u t . She t h e n r e f e r r e d t o a l e t t e r fro m t h e Com m unity C h e st t h a t p o in t e d o u t t h e f a c t t h a t t h e C h e s t had n o t made i t s g o a l and t h a t t h i s w o u ld a f f e c t th e a llo tm e n ts f o r th e n e x t f i s c a l y e a r . She added t h a t t h e y w ere f a c e d w i t h t h e p ro b le m o f w h at t o do u n d e r th e s e c ir c u m s ta n c e s , w h e re t o c u t t h e i r c o s t s . She c o n tin u e d t h a t t h e y knew t h e y w e re g o in g t o h a v e t o lo o k c a r e f u l l y a t t h e i r w h o le p ro g ra m . “ The r e p o r t , “ she s a i d , “ i s t h a t we a r e g o in g t o g e t as much as l a s t y e a r b u t no m o re . That means no r a i s e s i n s a l a r y o r i f t h e r e a r e r a i s e s , a c u t some­ where i n o u r p ro g ra m . I f we f i n i s h t h e y e a r i n t h e r e d , we

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123 do h a v e a b a c k - lo g o r b la c k f i g u r e s fro m p r e v io u s y e a r s t h a t t h e C h e s t w i l l t a k e i n t o c o n s id e r a t io n i n e v a lu a t in g o u r a c c o u n t and t h a t w i l l h e lp * L a s t y e a r we ended up i n t h e r e d and some o f t h e a c c u m u la tio n o f b la c k f i g u r e s fro m o t h e r y e a rs w i l l t h e o r e t i c a l l y d is c o u n t th o s e r e d f i g u r e s . We m ust be c a r e f u l th o u g h t h a t we d o n ’ t g e t o u r e s tim a te s o f in co m e to o h ig h and t h e n spend w it h o u t r e g a r d t o t h e f a c t t h a t t h a t incom e i s n o t a f a c t , b u t m e r e ly an e s t i m a t e . We h a v e t o b r in g i n t h a t in c o m e . We h a v e t o b a la n c e o u r e x p e n d itu r e s a g a i n s t o u r in c o m e .1 1 As she f i n i s h e d s p e a k in g B u th a d d e d , f,We m ust c o n tin u e t o w a tc h o u r expen ses becau se o f t h e b u d g e t as a w h o le .11 She p o in t e d o u t t h a t i f t h e r e i s money i n a b ra n c h b u d g e t i n e x c e s s o f e x p e n d it u r e s i t s h o u ld n ’ t be th o u g h t t h a t you t h e r e f o r e h a v e money t h a t c a n be s p e n t. The i n d i v i d u a l b ra n c h and c e n t e r bud­ g e ts a r e p a r t s o f t h e t o t a l b u d g e t and m ust be c o n s id e r e d i n t h a t w ay. I f t h e r e was a b la c k b a la n c e i n one b u d g e t i t w o u ld h e lp t o d e f r a y o v e r e x p e n d it u r e s i n o t h e r b u d g e ts . No comment was made b y a n y o f t h e grou p t o th e s e re m a rk s a lth o u g h i t was a p p a r e n t t h e y r e a l i z e d t h e p ro b le m . When B u th c o n c lu d e d , ED w en t on t o t h e n e x t it e m on t h e a g en da s a y in g w i t h a s m i l e , "Now I w i l l g iv e you some good n ew s .1 1 She d e s c r ib e d how t h e g e n e r a l m anager o f t h e W e lf a r e F e d e r a t i o n had spo ken t o h e r a t a r e c e n t m e e tin g she had a t te n d e d a s k in g h e r w h at she w o u ld do i f somebody o f f e r e d $500 t o t h e YWCA* She s a id she had b e en so s t a r t l e d she c o u ld n ’ t t h i n k o f a t h i n g b u t h ad t o l d M r . J t h a t she w o u ld l i k e t o t a l k t o some o f t h e s t a f f . M r . J______ had t h e n s a id t h a t someone w is h e d t o make a n anonymous g i f t t o t h e C h est t o be used t o b e n e f i t g i r l s o r young women i n t h e co m m u n ity. ED s a id she h ad sounded o u t H e le n and B a r b a r a , t h a t t h e y had made s e v e r a l s u g g e s tio n s and she h ad passed th e s e and o t h e r on t o Mr * J : t h a t y e s t e r d a y a l e t t e r had come fro m t h e C h e s t e n c lo s in g t h e g i f t o f $500 w i t h t h e s t i p u l a t i o n t h a t i t be used t o r e p l a c e w o r n -o u t f u r n i t u r e and f o r gymnasium e q u ip m e n t. T h e re was s u r p r i s e and p le a s u r e r e g i s t e r e d by t h e g ro u p and B a r b a ra s a id t o E D , ” 1 w onder i f t h e House C o m m itte e w o u ld l i k e some s u g g e s tio n s ?11 ED r e p l i e d t h a t she th o u g h t t h e House C o m m itte e s h o u ld make t h e s u g g e s tio n s * K ay spoke up r e f e r r i n g b a c k t o t h e p r e c e d in g it e m o f d is c u s s io n on b u d g e ts s a y in g t h a t she was a b o u t t o send o u t m em bership r e n e w a l n o t ic e s and she had b een w o n d e rin g w h e th e r

12b f o r c e r t a i n p e o p le a l e t t e r m ig h t n o t be - w r it t e n t h a t w ou ld b r in g i n m ore t h a n t h e $ 1 . 5 0 m em bership d u e s . She s a id she w a n te d t o c l e a r i t w i t h ED f i r s t b u t she th o u g h t t h a t t h e r e w e re a num ber o f p e o p le who w o u ld be g la d t o c o n t r i b u t e some­ t h i n g i n a d d i t i o n t o t h e i r m em bership f e e . ED r e p l i e d , “ I d o n ’ t see why you c o u ld n ’ t , b u t do i t i f i t h a s e le c t e d l i s t . ” She c o n tin u e d t h a t such a c t i o n s h o u ld n ’ t be c a r r i e d on o s t e n s ib ly as a d r i v e f o r f u n d s , b u t i n c e r t a i n c a s e s she c o u ld see no re a s o n why a r e q u e s t f o r a c o n t r i b u t i o n c o u ld n ’ t be m ade. She i n d i c a t e d , la u g h in g a l i t t l e as she s a id i t t h a t she had done t h a t i n c e r t a i n in s ta n c e s .

Harriet warned, f,But don’t call it a $25 membership. Indicate that you are asking for the membership dues and a contribution.11 A nnual S t a t i s t i c a l B e o o rt: ED spoke t o H a r r i e t , s t a t i s t i c a l re p o rts ? *’

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s a y a n y t h in g a b o u t

’• Y e s ,” r e p l i e d H a r r i e t . She s a id she had w r i t t e n f o r some e x t r a fo rm s on w h ic h t h e a n n u a l s t a t i s t i c a l r e p o r t f o r t h e N a t i o n a l o f f i c e a r e r e p o r t e d and she w o u ld l i k e t o know i f t h e y h ad b e e n r e c e iv e d by t h e b ra n c h e s and c e n t e r s , as w e l l as t h e l e t t e r o f e x p la n a t io n on t h e new r e p o r t s . She lo o k e d a ro u n d t h e g ro u p as she s p o k e . T h e re was a g e n e r a l a c c e n t in g t o t h e q u e s t io n e x c e p t fro m P o l l y who i n d i c a t e d t h a t she d i d n ’ t t h i n k she had g o t t e n a n y l e t t e r o r fo r m s . H a r r i e t w en t on t o s a y t h a t t h e y w o u ld f o l l o w t h e same p la n as i n t h e p a s t , e a c h b ra n c h and c e n t e r s e n d in g i n t h e o r i g i n a l fo rm t o h e r when i t had b e en c o m p le te d p lu s a copy f o r th e M e tr o p o lita n f i l e s . She w ou ld s«end on t h e o r i g i n a l t o N a t i o n a l a f t e r t h e f i n a l c o m p ila t io n h ad been m ade. “Do we g e t tw o y e l lo w f o r m s ,” ( t h e y e llo w fo rm s b e in g th e c o p ie s ), asked Jan e. “ I h a v e r e q u e s te d t h a t ,11 s a id H a r r i e t . “L e t me know i f yo u h a v e n o t g o t t e n t h e m .” She t h e n a s k e d i f t h e r e w ere a n y q u e s tio n s and re m in d e d them t o be s u re t o c h e c k t h e i r f i g u r e s on t h e r e p o r t and s ig n i t b e f o r e s e n d in g i t i n . She c o n t in u e d , “ I f t h e r e a r e q u e s tio n s i n c o n n e c tio n w i t h m aking up t h e r e p o r t s , c a l l me u p . And be s u r e t o g e t y o u r r e p o r t s in .”

125 M a ry a s k e d ,

“W h a t*s t h e dead l i n e

?11

“ I h a v e n 11 s e t one y e t .,11 r e p l i e d H a r r i e t . “L e t ! s s e t o n e ,1 1 s a id M a ry . I n a s u r p r is e d and q u e s tio n in g t o n e , E d i t h s a i d , th o u g h t t h e y had t o be down to w n by F e b r u a r y f i r s t ?11

r,I

H a r r i e t r e p l i e d , “N a t i o n a l w an ts them i f p o s s ib le b y F e b r u a r y 1 , b u t M a rc h 1 i s a c t u a l l y th e d e a d lin e .*1 She a d d e d , 111 w i l l g iv e y o u my d e a d l i n e . ” “You c o u ld n f t “L e ^ s

s e t t h a t now c o u ld y o u ? ” a s k e d M a ry .

“W e l l , ” s a id H a r r i e t i n a somewhat d o u b t f u l w a y , seeJ” “How a b o u t F e b r u a r y 1 , ” s u g g e s te d M a ry .

“ Do you t h i n k you c a n g e t i t t o me by F e b r u a r y l ?*1 a s k e d H a r r i e t i n d i c a t i n g by h e r to n e t h a t she th o u g h t i t m ig h t be t o o soon t o a s k f o r th e m . T h e re was a g e n e r a l re s p o n s e t o t h e a f f i r m a t i v e comments o f “Y e s , ” and “S u r e . ”

w ith

M a ry th e n r a i s e d a q u e s tio n t h a t had t o do w i t h t h e r e p o r t i n g o f some ph ase o f t h e Y - t e e n p ro g ra m . S h e , B a r b a ra and H a r r i e t d is c u s s e d t h i s f o r a b i t . ED th e n a s k e d i f t h e r e w e re a n y o t h e r q u e s tio n s a b o u t t h e r e p o r t s . T h e re seemed t o be none and ED w ent on t o t h e n e x t ite m on t h e agenda.

Minutes Again

(ls*K) - JLiitS)

ED in t r o d u c e d t h e n e x t it e m s a y in g , “T h en t h e r e i s j u s t one f i n a l t h i n g . You rem em ber I t a l k e d a t o u r l a s t m e e tin g a b o u t m in u te s o f m e e tin g s and t r y i n g t o im p ro v e t h e i r q u a l i t y ? T h i s , ” and she h e ld up some p a p e r s , “ came fro m t h e E a s t B ra n c h . “ She w en t on t o s p e a k w it h com m endation o f t h e m in u te s t h a t she h e ld i n h e r han d and s u g g e s te d t h a t t h e members o f th e g ro u p lo o k them o v e r . She p u t them on th e t a b l e w h e re t h e y w e re a c c e s s ib le t o t h e g ro u p . O th e r D is c u s s io n ED t h e n s a i d ,

“Does an yo n e h a v e a n y t h in g t h e y w a n t t o

0

126 b r in g t o

t h e g ro u p a t t h i s

t im e ?11

r,May I s a y s o m e th in g ? ” aske d B a r b a r a . ED nodded and B a r b a ra s a id t h a t l a s t y e a r t h e r e had b een c o m p la in ts t h a t p e o p le d id n o t know a b o u t th e Y -T e e n summer c o n fe r e n c e and t h e p la n s f o r i t . To a v o id a r e - o c c u r ­ re n c e o f t h i s she was p u t t i n g o u t a p r e - c o n f e r e n c e b u l l e t i n and w o u ld send i t t o e v e ry o n e so t h a t t h e y w ou ld h a v e c o m p le te i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e c o n fe r e n c e . ED a s k e d , !,I s t h a t a l l ? 1* She had b een lo o k in g th r o u g h h e r p a p e rs and now h e ld up a l e t t e r i n d i c a t i n g t h a t i t was a C h ris tm a s n o te f o r t h e s t a f f and t h e y m ig h t w ant t o lo o k a t it. She p u t i t o u t on t h e t a b l e w here i t c o u ld be s e e n . H e le n t o ED s a y in g r e p o r t fo rm s ED i n d i c a t e d nodded.

spoke up s a y in g , ”T h e re i s one she d id n o t h a v e a cop y o f t h e and ask e d i f she c o u ld g e t one t h a t she c o u ld g e t c o p ie s fro m

t h i n g . ” She spoke annual s t a t is t ic a l in h er o f f ic e . H a r r i e t and H e le n

T h e re w e re s ig n s o f t h e m e e tin g b e g in n in g t o b r e a k u p . A l l ite m s on t h e ag en da had b een d is c u s s e d and some o f t h e members o f t h e g ro u p w ere b e g in n in g t o g a t h e r t o g e t h e r t h e i r th in g s . S id e c o n v e r s a tio n s w e re g o in g on b e tw e e n i n d i v i d u a l s . No one made a n y move t o b r in g up a n y t h in g f u r t h e r and ED s a i d , rlThe m e e tin g s ta n d s a d jo u r n e d .*1

APPENDIX B SECOND MEETING

128

SECOND MEETING EXECUTIVE STAFF MEETING

10:00

-

4 G EN

2:10 D A

OPENING DISCUSSION ADMINISTRATION A re a C o n fe re n c e A p r i l 21 Los A n g e le s V o lu n t e e r T r a i n i n g C o n fe re n c e A n n u a l M e e tin g N a t i o n a l YWCA Week T o u rs o f B ra n c h es a n d A c t i v i t i e s S p e c i a l S t a f f M e e tin g FINANCE B udget PROGRAM E v a l u a t i o n 11I n s i d e YWCA** H e a l t h E d u c a tio n P r o p o s a l H e a l t h E x a m in a tio n s Young A d u lt P ro g ram ANNOUNCEMENTS

129 SECOND RECORD OF EXECUTIVE STAFF MEETING P re s e n ts M is s Brown ( E D ) , Jane C l a r k , B a r b a ra D o e, B e t t y B o l t , E d i t h W est . R u th M o ss , H a r r i e t P a r k e r , Lu cy P o n d , P o l l y S h o r t , M a ry J o n e s , H e le n F i s h e r , M a ry Lou P o t t e r , Kay B a i l e y . V is ito r s Joan T a i t .

Times

10:05 - 2s10.

O p e n in g s

( 1 0 :0 5 -

10s20)

ED c a l l e d t h e m e e tin g t o o r d e r and t u r n i n g t o J a n e , s m ile d and s a i d , “M is s C l a r k h as o u r o p e n in g .*1 Jane r e t u r n e d t h e s m ile and p ic k in g up t h e a r t i c l e she was g o in g t o r e p o r t on spoke e n t h u s i a s t i c a l l y a b o u t i t . T h en t u r n in g t o ED s a i d , “Do y o u w an t t o t e l l us w h ere you g o t t h i s a g a in ? I fo r g e t.” (M is s Brown a t t h e l a s t m e e tin g had t o l d t h e g ro u p a b o u t t h e a r t i c l e and h a d a s k e d Jan e t o sum m arize i t as t h e o p e n in g f o r t h e n e x t m e e t in g .) B o th B e t t y and P o l l y r e p l i e d f o r ED , “From t h e l e t t e r fro m M rs . E l l i o t t ( E x e c u t iv e D i r e c t o r o f t h e N a t i o n a l YWCA.) ED e x p la in e d b r i e f l y t h a t t h a t was w h e re she had f i r s t h e a r d a b o u t i t and Jane w en t on t o p r e s e n t t h e th o u g h ts t h a t w e re e x p re s s e d i n t h e a r t i c l e . When she h ad f i n i s h e d ED commended h e r on h e r p r e s e n t a t i o n and t h e n made a p p l i c a t i o n o f t h e p o in t s she had b ro u g h t o u t t o “ o u r w o rk ” and t o w o rk in g w i t h p e o p le . She t h e n s a i d , “ I w onder i f i t i s a good id e a f o r t h e g ro u p t o h a v e as i t s o p e n in g t h i s k in d o f p r e s e n t a t i o n fro m some book. We m ig h t be a b l e t o t a k e up a b o o k , c h a p te r by c h a p t e r , and d is c u s s i t . T h e re a r e so many good books t h a t s h o u ld be r e a d , t h a t w o u ld g iv e us c o u ra g e i n o u r w o rk w i t h p e o p le and g iv e us id e a s o f how t o w o rk . T h is i s j u s t a s u g g e s tio n . Do y o u w an t t o d is c u s s i t ? “ J an e r e f e r r e d t o a bo ok t h a t she had b e e n r e a d in g and as she f i n i s h e d s p e a k in g Lu cy and P o l l y each i n d i c a t e d t h e y w o u ld be i n t e r e s t e d i n d is c u s s in g t h e book she m e n tio n e d . Jane spoke a b o u t a n o t h e r book and M a ry Lou m e n tio n e d s t i l l a

130 t h i r d hook by t h e same a u t h o r . i n t e r e s t i n E D 's s u g g e s t io n .

T h e re seemed t o be g e n e r a l

ED s a i d , " W h ile we a r e t a l k i n g a b o u t b o o k s , M is s B e t t s g ave me t h e names o f t h r e e books t h a t a r e h e l p f u l t o a d m in is ­ t r a t o r s . rf She named them and t h e i r a u th o r s and t h e members o f t h e g ro u p n o te d them down. A r e a C o n fe re n c e A p r i l 21 - P asadena

( 1 0 :2 5 -

1 0 :3 0 )

ED tu r n e d t o t h e n e x t it e m on t h e agenda and r e a d fro m a l e t t e r fro m t h e B e g io n a l D i r e c t o r c o n c e rn in g th e s p r in g a r e a c o n fe r e n c e . The l e t t e r gave t h e d a te s n o t o n ly o f t h e s p r in g a r e a c o n fe r e n c e , b u t a l s o o f t h e n e x t r e g i o n a l c o n fe r e n c e and n a t i o n a l c o n fe r e n c e o f t h e YWCA. ED p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h i s was t h e t h r e e - y e a r c y c le o f c o n fe re n c e s o f .th e YWCA as a N a t i o n a l o r g a n iz a tio n . The l e t t e r a l s o gave t h e them e o f t h e a r e a con­ f e r e n c e and u rg e d t h a t w ord be s e n t a ro u n d as q u i c k l y as p o s s ib le so t h a t p e o p le w ou ld s av e th e d a t e . When she f i n i s h e d r e a d i n g , ED s a i d , "We m ust b e g in t a l k i n g a b o u t t h e c o n fe r e n c e so t h a t p e o p le w i l l know a b o u t i t . We s h o u ld h a v e a good a t te n d a n c e s in c e i t w i l l be h e ld so c lo s e b y ." ED th e n p o in t e d o u t t h a t t h e r e was a good b i t o f d u p l i ­ c a t i o n o f le a d e r s h ip b e tw e e n t h i s c o n fe r e n c e and t h e a s s o c ia ­ t i o n ' s own v o lu n t e e r t r a i n i n g c o n fe r e n c e t h a t was p la n n e d f o r M a rc h 3 0 , a b o u t t h r e e w eeks b e f o r e t h e a r e a c o n fe r e n c e . The c o m m itte e i n c h a rg e o f t h e t r a i n i n g c o n fe r e n c e had r e c o g n iz e d t h a t p e o p le d o n 't l i k e t o go t o to o many c o n fe r e n c e s and t h e r e was f e a r t h a t w i t h tw o c o n fe r e n c e s s c h e d u le d so c l o s e l y t o g e t h e r w i t h t h e same le a d e r s h ip f o r b o th t h a t a tte n d a n c e a t one o r b o th w o u ld b e a f f e c t e d . A ls o t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g o f t h e a s s o c i a t i o n f o llo w e d c l o s e l y on th e a r e a c o n f e r e n c e . That m eant t h r e e s e p a r a te o c c a s io n s w i t h i n a p e r io d o f a m o n th , when a good t u r n - o u t o f YW v o lu n t e e r s and s t a f f was d e s i r e d . F o r t h e s e v a r io u s re a s o n s t h e c o m m itte e r e s p o n s ib le f o r t h e t r a i n i n g c o n fe r e n c e had d e c id e d t o c a n c e l t h a t c o n fe r e n c e . The f a c t t h a t t h e r e w o u ld be c o n s id e r a b le d u p l i c a t i o n o f l e a d e r s h i p i n t h e a r e a c o n fe r e n c e was t h e m a jo r r e a s o n f o r t h is d e c is io n . Jane a s k e d ,

" Is

" Y e s ," r e p l i e d le tte r

t h e d a t e o f t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g d e f i n i t e ? " ED, " t h e 2 9 t h . "

J a rie , a d d r e s s in g E D , s a i d , cam e, i s n ' t i t ? "

" It 's

fo rtu n a te th a t th is

131 ED a g r e e d and e x p la in e d i n a l i t t l e more d e t a i l t h e t h i n k i n g t h a t h ad gone i n t o t h e d e c is io n f o r c a n c e lin g t h e t r a i n i n g c o n fe r e n c e . to

H a r r i e t a s k e d , uI s i t d e f i n i t e t h a t M rs . B i l l i n g s be a s p e a k e r a t t h e a r e a c o n fe r e n c e ? ** !

is

ED r e p l i e d t h a t she d i d n * t know f o r s u re t h a t she w o u ld be a p r i n c i p a l s p e a k e r b u t she d id h a v e a p a r t i n t h e c o n fe r e n c e . H a r r i e t re s p o n d e d t h a t she th o u g h t i t w ould be good t o know i f she w e re t o be a le a d e r i n some o f t h e m e e t in g s . She a d d e d , **She i s a d ra w in g c a rd and was so w e l l l i k e d a t t h e Long B each m e e t in g s .1 1 P o l l y a g re e d w i t h H a r r i e t and spoke b r i e f l y on t h e v a lu e t o be r e a l i z e d i n b r in g in g p e o p le t o t h e c o n fe r e n c e i f i t w e re known t h a t M r s . B i l l i n g s w o u ld be s p e a k in g . A n n u a l M e e tin g

( 1 0 :^ 0 -

1 1 :0 0 )

ED in t r o d u c e d t h e n e x t it e m on t h e agenda by s a y in g t h a t she w a n te d t o t e l l them o f t h e p la n s t o d a te f o r t h e a n n u a l m e e t in g . She c o n tin u e d t h a t t h e c o m m itte e w o rk in g on t h e m e e tin g w a n te d t h i s g ro u p t o c o n s id e r t h e p la n s w orked o u t so f a r by t h e C o m m ittee and g iv e i t s o p in io n o f th e m . The c o m m itte e a l s o w ants s u g g e s tio n s fro m t h e g ro u p . The p la n s t o d a t e w e re f o r a lu n c h e o n m e e tin g t o be h e ld a t t h e F r i d a y M o rn in g C lu b and ED gave t h e p r i c e t h a t had been d e c id e d upon by t h e c o m m itte e . She a ls o t o l d t h e g ro u p o f t h e t h i n k i n g t h a t l a y b e h in d t h e d e c is io n f o r a lu n c h e o n m e e t­ in g and t h e p r i c e o f t h e m e a l. B u th , who i s s e r v in g on t h i s c o m m itte e , added t h a t t h e y w a n te d t o g e t t h e f e e l i n g o f t h e g ro u p on th e s e p o in t s and a ls o w hat t h e y th o u g h t w ou ld be t h e f e e l i n g o f t h e young p e o p le i n t h e YW ( t h e Y - t e e n s and young a d u l t s ) . J a n e a s k e d , f,What do y o u mean *young p e o p le 1?11 Then she r e f e r r e d t o t h e m em bership m e e tin g h e ld t h e p r e v io u s

! M r s . B i l l i n g s , a l o c a l p e rs o n was t o h a v e had a m a jo r p a r t i n t h e t r a i n i n g c o n fe r e n c e and i s c o n s id e r e d a v e r y a b l e and e f f e c t i v e l e a d e r .

132 S a tu r d a y a f t e r n o o n , p o in t e d o u t t h a t i t was a l o v e l y day and t h a t a l o t o f lfyoung p e o p le ” w ent t o t h e b ea ch on t h a t k in d o f a day* She e x p re s s e d t h e o p in io n t h a t i f t h e S a tu r d a y on w h ic h th e a n n u a l m e e tin g i s p la n n e d was a n o th e r l o v e l y d a y , a l o t o f young p e o p le w o u ld go t o th e b ea ch a g a in r a t h e r th a n go t o t h e m e e tin g . M a ry a n s w e re d , ”B u t we had a l o t t h e m em bership m e e t i n g . ” “ B ecause t h e y p a r t i c i p a t e d

o f young p e o p le a t

i n t h e p r o g r a m ,” r e p l i e d

Jane. B a r b a ra came i n t o t h e d is c u s s io n h e r e a s k in g , flI s t h a t a s u g g e s tio n f o r t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g — t o h a v e g r e a t e r p a r t i c i p a t io n ? 1 1 R u th a n s w e re d , out a l i t t l e l a t e r . ”

11We h a ve an id e a on t h a t t h a t w i l l come

P o l l y s a id she w o u ld l i k e t o p u t i n “h e r tw o c e n t s ” a b o u t young p e o p le . She p o in te d o u t t h a t t h e r e a r e a good many b u s in e s s g i r l s who h a v e t o w ork on S a t u r d a y , a t l e a s t d u r in g t h e m o rn in g h o u r s ; t h a t S a tu rd a y s a r e n o t n e c e s s a r i l y f r e e d a y s ; and t h a t t h a t f a c t s h o u ld be b o rn e i n m ind i f t h e y w e re c o u n tin g on a b ig t u r n o u t o f b u s in e s s g i r l s . ED p o in t e d o u t t h a t h a v in g . t h e m e e tin g on a S a tu r d a y was a n e x p e r im e n t and spoke f o r a b i t on t h e p ro b le m o f f i n d ­ in g a s u i t a b l e d a te t h a t w o u ld s a t i s f y e v e r y o n e . In h er comments she r e f e r r e d a g a in t o t h e m em bership m e e t in g , w h ic h le d i n t o f u r t h e r d is c u s s io n on t h e a t te n d a n c e a t t h a t m e e tin g , t h e number t h e r e , why t h e y cam e, and t h e r e a c t i o n o f th o s e who had a t t e n d e d . H a r r i e t , H e le n , P o l l y , and E d i t h a l l t o o k p a r t i n t h i s d is c u s s io n . H e le n le d t h e d is c u s s io n i n t o a n o th e r v e i n when she commented t h a t a t a m em bership m e e tin g t h e r e was no c h a rg e made— no f e e t o be p a id by th o s e a t t e n d i n g ; t h a t a t t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g t h e r e i s a c h a rg e f o r t h e lu n c h e o n and t h a t t h i s i s a p ro b le m f o r many o f t h e young p e o p le , te e n a g e r s and young a d u l t s . She s a id t h a t t h e comment bad b e e n made t o h e r when she had t a lk e d t o some young a d u lt s a b o u t com ing t o t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g t h a t ” i f i t i s j u s t a f t e r p a y d a y we c a n c o m e .” T h e r e was no re s p o n s e t o t h i s comment and R u th f o llo w e d i t up by a s k in g ED , ” I s t h i s a good p la c e t o b r in g up fo o d s e r v ic e ? ” She w ent on t o e x p l a i n th e t h i n k i n g and ‘ p la n n in g t o d a t e b y t h e c o m m itte e on how t h e m e a l w o u ld be s e r v e d . Jan e a s k e d , ”C o u ld n f t

it

be a b u f f e t

s e r v ic e ? ”

And t h e n ,

133 d ra w in g on h e r own e x p e r ie n c e , d e s c r ib e d how i t seemed t o h e r t h e m e a l c o u ld be s e r v e d . She e x p re s s e d t h e o p in io n t h a t i t was much s im p le r t o s e r v e a l a r g e g ro u p i n t h i s m a n n e r. ED e x p la in e d f u r t h e r a b o u t t h e m ethod o f s e r v in g , c l a r i f y i n g w hat R u th h ad a lr e a d y d e s c r ib e d i n t h i s c o n n e c t io n . J an e re s p o n d e d ,

“T h en t h e m ain , d is h w i l l be s e r v e d ?1 1

R u th i n d i c a t e d i t w o u ld and w e n t on t o p o in t o u t t h a t p r o v i s i o n had t o be made f o r s e t t i n g up th e t a b le s and f o r c l e a r i n g them and s h e , P o l l y , and Jane d is c u s s e d f u r t h e r d e t a i l s i n c o n n e c tio n w i t h s e r v in g t h e f o o d . E d i t h a s k e d , “D id we e v e r t r y s e r v in g j u s t d e s s e r t and c o f f e e and f o l l o w i n g t h a t w it h t h e m e e tin g ?1 1 “ N o ,11 s a id ED. P o l l y , B a r b a r a , and M a ry d is c u s s e d t h i s f o r a moment and H a r r i e t t h e n r e c a l l e d and spoke o f a n a f t e r n o o n a n n u a l m e e tin g t h a t h ad been f o llo w e d by r e f r e s h ­ m ent s . R u th a s k e d , “ What a b o u t t h e id e a o f g e t t i n g p e o p le t o h o s te s s ?11 T h e re was a ch o ru s o f tfY e s , ff w it h H a r r i e t a d d in g , “ T h a t f s one good jo b f o r someone t o head u p ,11 and E d i t h s a y in g , f,I t f s a good way f o r v a r io u s p e o p le t o g e t t o know a b o u t t h e m e e t in g .11 M a ry , B a r b a r a , R u th and E d it h l e d t h e t a l k f o r t h e n e x t fe w m in u te s on h o s t in g c e n t e r in g i t a ro u n d Y - t e e n s s e r v in g as h o s te s s e s and d o in g t h e jo b o f s e r v in g . Th e g e n e r a l them e o f t h e d is c u s s io n was t h a t Y - t e e n s w e re a lw a y s b e in g a s k e d t o do th e s e jo b s and t h e o b j e c t i o n o f E d i t h , M a r y , and B a r b a ra t o t h i s . M a ry a d m itt e d t h a t t h e o b j e c t i o n m ig h t be m ore on t h e s t a f f *s p a r t th a n on t h a t o f t h e Y - t e e n s b u t t h a t i t d id seem t h a t t h e r e was to o much o f it. T h e re was some jo k in g and some l a u g h t e r as th e s e id e a s w ere e x p re s s e d b y t h e t h r e e b u t i t was a p p a r e n t t h a t t h e r e was a good b i t o f f e e l i n g b y b o th E d i t h and B a r b a ra t h a t Y - t e e n s s h o u ld n o t a lw a y s be e x p e c te d t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n t h i s w ay. R u th m e n tio n e d t h a t t h e c o m m itte e had t a lk e d a b o u t h a v in g tw o p r ic e s o f t i c k e t s , t h e lo w e r - p r ic e d t i c k e t b e in g f o r th o s e who s e r v e d , and she a s k e d w h e th e r t h e y th o u g h t t h i s s h o u ld be c a r r ie d o u t. B o th P o l l y and M a ry v o ic e d t h e o p in io n t h a t i t was n o t r e a l l y n e c e s s a r y , an o p in io n t h a t seemed t o h a v e some s u p p o rt fro m o t h e r s o f t h e g ro u p as t h e r e w e re no comments con­ t r a r y t o t h e i r s on t h e m a t t e r . R u th w en t on t o

s a y t h a t t h e c o m m itte e had a ls o t a l k e d

13*+ a b o u t h a v in g a young a d u l t s e rv e on t h e c o m m itte e . M a ry Lou i n d i c a t e d t h a t t h a t m s good. B a r b a r a , im m e d ia t e ly r a i s e d t h e q u e s tio n a b o u t a Y - t e e n s e r v in g on t h e c o m m itte e . R u th re s p o n d e d q u i c k l y , flThe c o m m itte e h a d n * t th o u g h t o f t h a t b u t I t h i n k i t ’ s a good i d e a , d o n * t yo u M is s Brown ?11 111 c e r t a i n l y d o ,’1 r e p l i e d ED. A t t h i s p o in t E d i t h spoke up s a y in g , **May I be r e t r o ­ a c t i v e and go b a c k t o t h e m e a l i t s e l f ?’1 She w e n t on t o s p e a k a b o u t w hat t h e p o s s i b i l i t i e s w ere o f h a v in g a r e a l l y good m e a l and n o t tfa t i r e d o ld p ie c e o f c h ic k e n on a l e t t u e e l e a f i H The fo o d a s p e c t o f t h e m e e tin g a p p e a re d t o h e r t o be an im p o r­ t a n t c o n s id e r a t io n f o r i t s success and t h e r e seemed t o be some q u e s tio n i n h e r m ind w h e th e r t h e p la c e s e le c t e d f o r t h e m e e tin g w o u ld p r o v id e a r e a l l y a p p e t i z i n g m e a l. She seemed t o e v en q u e s tio n w h e th e r enough th o u g h t had b ee n g iv e n t o t h e m a t t e r o f fo o d i n s e l e c t i n g t h e p la c e o f t h e lu n c h e o n . M a ry , J an e, and E d i t h t a l k e d f o r a b i t a b o u t r e s t a u r a n t s and good e a t in g p la c e s and ED e n t e r e d i n t o t h i s d is c u s s io n p o i n t in g o u t v a r i ­ ous c o n s id e r a t io n s t h a t h ad t o be t a k e n i n t o a c c o u n t, i n c l u d ­ in g p r i c e , i n s e l e c t i n g a p la c e . R u th e n t e r e d i n t o t h e con­ v e r s a t i o n a g a i n , in t r o d u c in g h e r re m a rk s w i t h ^ r e g a r d in g t h e t i r e d o ld c h ic k e n 11 and g o in g on fro m t h e r e t o e x p l a i n a new p o l i c y r e c e n t l y a d o p te d b y t h e F r id a y M o rn in g C lu b a b o u t t h e fo o d i t s e r v e s . E d i t h i n d i c a t e d t h a t h e r o n ly c o n c e rn was t h a t t h e m e a l be a good o n e . ED moved t h e d is c u s s io n on a t t h i s p o in t by d e s c r ib in g th e p la n s f o r m a i l i n g n o t ic e s o f t h e m e e tin g t o t h e m em b e rsh ip , as w e l l as t h e b a l l o t f o r b o a rd e l e c t i o n s .1 She s a id t h a t she th o u g h t t h a t t h a t p a r t o f t h e a rra n g e m e n ts f o r t h e m e e tin g w o u ld be t u r n e d o v e r t o t h e M em bership C o m m itte e , and as she spoke she lo o k e d i n q u i r i n g l y a t H a r r i e t . H a r r i e t nodded a g r e e ­ m e n t. ED a l s o t o l d t h e g ro u p t h a t t h e N o m in a tin g C o m m itte e was a l r e a d y a t w o rk on p r e p a r a t i o n o f a b a l l o t and t h a t fo rm s on w h ic h t o s u b m it names o f p e o p le t o be c o n s id e r e d f o r t h e b a l l o t w e re a v a i l a b l e i n h e r o f f i c e . She a d d e d , 11I f you w ant t o s u b m it a nam e, g e t one o f th e s e fo r m s .1 1 M a ry a s k e d , r e f e r r i n g t o b ra n c h c o m m itte e s o f manage­ m e n t, ’’Do c o m m itte e c h a irm e n h a v e th em ?1 1

1 B o a rd e l e c t i o n s o c c u r a t t h i s p e r io d o f t h e y e a r w i t h announcem ent o f t h e r e s u l t s b e in g made a t t h e a n n u a l m e e tin g .

135 “Y e s ,11 r e p l i e d ED , " b u t f o l l o w - u p on th e m *" She added t h a t t h e b e s t way t o g e t good b o a rd members i s f o r " e v e ry o n e t o w o rk on i t . " ED th e n a s k e d i f t h e g ro u p h ad a n y s u g g e s tio n a b o u t t h e k in d o f p ro g ra m t h a t s h o u ld be p la n n e d f o r t h e m e e t in g . She r e c a l l e d program s o f p r e v io u s y e a r s and a s k e d , " I s t h e r e a n y c l e v e r way we c a n g e t a c r o s s t h e s t a t i s t i c a l r e p o r t o f t h e a s s o c i a t io n i n c o n n e c tio n w i t h t h e p ro g ra m p a r t o f t h e m e e t­ in g ? " She i n d i c a t e d t h a t t h i s was p r o v in g a d i f f i c u l t t h i n g f o r t h e c o m m itte e t o w o rk o u t and a d d e d , "Some o f you b r i g h t p e o p le be t h i n k i n g o f i t . " As she f i n i s h e d s p e a k in g she lo o k e d a ro u n d t h e g ro u p s m i lin g . M a ry and Jan e b o th spoke a b o u t u s in g a map t o do t h i s . H a r r i e t i n d i c a t e d t h a t she th o u g h t i t o u g h t t o be a d i f f e r e n t i d e a t h a n l a s t y e a r when a map had b een u s e d . Jan e a s k e d , " C a n ^ we show t h e new g ro w th and d e v e lo p ­ m ent o f t h e p ro g ram d u r in g t h e y e a r j u s t p a s t by s u p e rim p o s in g i t i n some way on t h e map used l a s t y e a r ? " She c o n tin u e d t h a t she f e l t w h a te v e r was done o u gh t t o be t h e k in d o f a p r e s e n t a ­ t i o n t h a t p e o p le c o u ld s e e ; t h a t i t m eant more t o them when t h e y c o u ld see s o m e th in g . H e le n a l s o a s k e d , i n a n y w a y ."

" C a n f t we show s t a t i s t i c s

on a map

H a r r i e t r e c a l l e d t h a t t h e " p r i n t e d prog ram we h ad tw o y e a r s ago was one t h a t im p re s s e d p e o p le v e r y m uch." " Y e s , " re s p o n d e d ED and P o l l y echoed h e r and w ent on t a l k i n g a b o u t t h i s p a r t i c u l a r p ro g ram p ie c e s p e a k in g a b o u t i t w i t h e n th u s ia s m . Jane a ls o spoke o f i t w i t h e n th u s ia s m . ED a g a in s a i d , th o u g h ."

"Y es, i t

was g o o d .

It

c o s ts money

I n r e p l y t o t h i s H a r r i e t s a id i n a q u e s tio n in g to n e t h a t i t c o u ld be m im e o g ra p h e d . ED i n d i c a t e d t h a t t h a t was a good s u g g e s tio n and w o u ld be a p o s s i b i l i t y . Lucy now s u g g e s te d t h a t g ra p h s m ig h t be used as a b a s is f o r p r e s e n t a t i o n and M a ry p ic k e d up on h e r s u g g e s tio n w i t h t h e f u r t h e r s u g g e s tio n t h a t f i g u r e s o r f a c e s m ig h t be used i n p r e ­ s e n t in g t h e f a c t s w h ic h w o u ld make t h e g ra p h s more i n t e r e s t i n g . T h e re a p p e a re d t o be a good b i t o f i n t e r e s t and s u p p o rt among t h e members o f t h e g ro u p o f t h i s id e a f o r t h e use o f g r a p h s . R u th in t r o d u c e d a new id e a by s a y in g ,

"How t h a t we h a v e

136 photographic equipment could we do something with that or would it cost too much ?11 ED responded enthusiastically, “Oh, yesl“ Mary, who has done a good bit with photography and does a good"bit Of the picture taking for the association, indicated that cost would be chiefly for film and development and would not be very great. ED spoke up again saying with enthusiasm in her voice, “This is a new ideal“ Jane asked what the budget allowed for the annual meet­ ing expenses. She went on to raise the question of whether a major aspect of the meeting was not in the publicity it afforded the YW and therefore was that the thing “we have to consider*1 in relation to the cost. “Do we justify the cost of the meeting on the basis of the publicity value in the meeting?*1 she asked. ED responded with definiteness, “Yes, that’s right.11 Helen suggested that “we could use four different pic­ tures of YW activity and then combine them to create a composite picture. Mary enlarged on the idea presented by Helen and Barbara and Jane added other ideas that came to them as Helen and Mary talked. ED described a “stunt11 done with pictures at an associa­ tion with which she had once worked. There was a general feeling of interest and enthusiasm among the group in the ideas that were being expressed relating to the use of photographs in pre­ senting the statistical report. ED said that Mrs. Little, the chairman of the annual meeting committee, had asked her to name members of the staff to work on the presentation of the statistical report. She added, “Miss Pond, Miss Fisher, and Mrs. Tait, will you three work on this?*1 Lucy [Miss Pond] , with a smile, said, “I was about to stick my neck out and suggest that we try and get someone to design something describing the YW program and then apply a screen process on the design and use it for the cover of the program.11 There were appreciative murmurs of “Oh, yesl“ and “Beautiful!“ around the table, nods and general indication that the group thought this a wonderful idea. ED indicated

137 equal enthusiasm Tor this new suggestion and added, r,Now there are people who could be asked to design a cover!rf She then asked if there were any other suggestions. She seemed very pleased with the ideas that had come from the group and Ruth too, looked very pleased. National YWCA Week

(11:00 - 11:25)

ED introduced the next subject by saying, r,Now, YWCA Week!*1 She reminded the group that last year the various club groups and divisions of the YW had worked out individually what they would do to celebrate the period and that Mrs. Little, who also chairs the committee for the planning in connection with National YWCA Week, had thought that the best thing to do was to repeat this again this year. She said that branch execu­ tives probably had received the suggestions from the National YWCA office for National YW Week, Mary and Edith both indi­ cated that they had not received anything from National about this program and there was other shaking of heads around the table to imply that others hadn*t received any suggestions. Joan offered to get the copy ED had given her.that was in' her office and at ED*s nod went to get the material. As she left the room Mary Lou brought up the matter that the Young Adults had set a date for World-Wide Observance and that it would occur during National YWCA Week. The girls had planned a special program in observance of this occasion and she won­ dered if it would fit into National YWCA Week planning. Harriet immediately responded that she thought it would create a conflict with the annual meeting which comes at the conclusion of YWCA week. Mary and Polly thought it would too. Jane asked what the problem was and Mary Lou explained that the difficulty was that with both affairs coming in the same week she was afraid the young adults would not support the annual meeting very well. The question in her mind was whether in encouraging attendance of young adults at both affairs neither would be supported very strongly by members of this group. Polly expressed the opinion that there was no getting around the fact that it would be a problem to promote both among the young adults.

11Is that because of the expense?11 asked Betty. ^No," said Polly and before she could go on Harriet, who had echoed her ^no ,11 spoke up saying that while that was a factor it was also the time involved and the distances the

138 girls had to travel to come to these events and the travel itself. She continued in this vein pointing out that these were factors that made it difficult to gain support of activi­ ties when they were scheduled too closely together. When she finished speaking Mary Lou went on to describe more about World Wide Observance. She said that there was a thrill in this particular program for the young adults. YW business, industrial and professional girls all over this country and the world hold meetings on this date and greetings are exchanged among the girls of the different associations throughout this country and in some cases among associations in different parts of the world. These greetings are read at the meetings and it is a thrilling thing for the girls to know that there were YWCA young adults like them meeting together all over the world and reading similar messages. She added that the girls spend a lot of time working on the greetings that they sent to the young adults of other associations. Jane asked, "Couldn't that be done in connection with annual meeting?" But Mary Lou looked doubtful. Someone raised the question if the meeting of the young adults couldn’t be changed to another time. But the reply was made that if that were done, the young adults in Los Angeles would not be observing the occasion at the same time as other young adults and that was a main feature of the celebration. It was also pointed out that the date had been set by National. Several members of the group joined in bringing out these points. Jane said, "Then, it’s just our local annual meeting date that conflicts?” "Yes,” said ED, "that's right." Mary suggested, "Maybe the thing we should try to do is to have a big representation of young adults at the World Observation program and then could the young adult clubs be represented by one or two at the annual meeting? Could that be a compromise?" There seemed to be some acceptance of this suggestion as a possible solution although no specific comments were made and Barbara spoke up saying, "We're going to run into some of that same problem with our Y-Teen pre-view that comes the Saturday before annual meeting.” (The "preview" is a city-wide teenage program that brings members of Y-teen clubs from all over the city together in a large annual event.) Barbara appeared troubled as to how this difficulty was to be met. Joan had returned with the suggestion list from National and given it to ED. Reading from the memorandum ED indicated

139 that specific dates had been set aside during the National YWCA Week for particular events, one of them being the Young Adult National Observance which was set for Wednesday of the week. She continued to read suggestions that were contained in the memorandum of things that might be done in observance of YWCA Week, reading also a section that emphasized keeping in mind in these observance activities the purpose of the week,— namely, to interpret the local YWCA* When she finished reading, she placed the sheet out on the table saying, hi 111 leave this here in case you want to refer to it.** Joan asked, “Do you think that enough copies will be sent out from New York (home office of the National YWCA) or shall we mimeograph this?11 “A good idea," said ED and she handed the memo to Joan. Edith asked if any attempt had been made to get large outdoor billboard space for publicizing the YW during this special period and spoke briefly on how good she thought this kind of publicity was. ED replied that something had been done about that and Joan explained what that “something” was. Ruth spoke up now saying that she had seen where some organization had gotten firms to sponsor billboards. She wondered if that could be done. Joan replied that that was being tried too. Jane expressed her doubts of such a plan and described some experiences the Red Cross had had in this connection to the effect that the sponsors would not make any contribution in addition to the billboards and that more often than not the billboards they sponsored were not in good locations. There was some agreement with the latter point that she made, but little response to her other expression of opinion. Barbara asked, “What about plugs on national radio broadcast­ ing programs?M She indicated that this was done for the YMCA and explained that what she had in mind was the big programs, comedy programs as well as others* Jane agreed that this was done for other organizations and mentioned a name program that she knew of that had “plugged” an organization. Edith, Helen, and Betty each suggested pro­ grams that they thought it might be good to try and get some publicity on* ED entered the discussion here saying that she thought

ikO

National was alert to this type of publicity, Kay made a suggestion at this point saying, ftI think we can get on Art Linklighter *s program, but what could it be on his program of “People Are Funny?” She sort of laughed as she made the suggestion, Barbara replied, “But he does a plug line at the end of his show,” “Yes ,11 said Kay, “but I was thinking of it in the program itself.” “Oh, wonderful,” replied Barbara and there was a general hubbub of enthusiastic comment, Kay talked some more about her suggestion saying she was sure that it would be possible to get on the program if they could only think of how it could be done and told the group that Mrs, Linklighter had been a former Y-teen adviser both in Northern California and here. She added emphatically, ”You donft have to sell them on the YWCA. They*re already soldi” ED asked about another program on which an approach had been made and Joan replied that they were still working on it. Helen and Lucy each made other suggestions of programs that might be contacted for this type of publicity and Mary and Jane both spoke with approval of these suggestions. ED said, ”1 think there are a lot of opportunities for us in this respect.” Kay now asked, "What do we do about clearing all these announcements?” (She was referring to radio announcements and other announcements and public notices about YWCA Week.) She added, ”The volunteers thought that Metropolitan ought to co-ordinate this.” ED replied, ”Mrs. Tait will do this.” Mary and Edith both asked about the clearing procedure to be followed when they made a direct contact with a radio station or radio program for an announcement. It was explained by both ED and Joan that all such things were to be reported to Joan and that she would serve as a clearing house for all announcements. Edith said she thought it was a very good idea to have a clearing house.

1^1 Mary responded, “I agree, but it’s still not clear to me how it’s going to operate*“ There was some kidding of Mary about having to be shown and having to have pictures drawn for her to which Mary made a laughing rejoinder. ED asked if there was anyone else to whom it was not clear, and Mary indicated that she understood what was to be done. There was some more laughter and then ED said in a serious tone, “I ’m serious about this. It’s important to have this matter clear to every one.1* She looked at Mary as she finished speaking as though asking her if it were really clear to her as to what the procedure was. Mary replied, “I ’m serious too. she nodded her head.

It’s clear now ,*1 and

“All right, then ,11 said ED, and she went on, “There will be a meeting of the National YWCA Week Committee on the 2?th of this month so if you can get reports in by that time on the plans in your divisions, it will be a help .11 YWCA Tours

(11;25 - 11:^0)

ED continued, “Now about the tours.11 She turned to Joan saying, “Will you please talk about this.” Joan began by saying that schedules had been worked out for the tours, which were a follow-up on the membership meeting. She indicated that she would read the plans as they had been worked out and that if they had any suggestions or comments to make on them she hoped they would please do so. She read the plans for the tours. When she finished Helen spoke up saying, “I have a suggestion that has come to us when we have talked about the tours to some of our class members•“ She went on to say that the response had been, “if there was just some place where there could be a nursery,” and that so many of the young marrieds who had small children had indicated that they would like to go on the tours and see the various branches but they had no one to leave the children with and it was hard and cost money to find baby sitters. The children had to be fed and have naps, etc. She wondered whether it would be possible to arrange for a nursery at the YW where the children could be cared for while the mothers took the tour. Jane, Edith, and ED all agreed that this was a very real problem and it was discussed among the group for a bit but no conclusion was reached on how to handle it.

ihz Edith then asked Joan if anything had been done about maps for the tours* Joan replied that they had thought of suggesting routes that people should follow to get to the various branches and other locations but had done nothing about maps* Barbara expressed the opinion that a map was better than describing the route to follow and explained why. Edith expressed a similar feeling— that it was easier to see where you were going if you could refer to a map. Joan asked what exactly Edith had in mind and Edith described a skeleton map idea that she thought could be worked out to show the main route for getting to the particular branch to be visited, one that would identify turns and routes, etc. Harriet and Helen had been talking in low voices to each other and Helen now said, "She wondered how many cars would be returning to the downtown YWCA building.** Harriet spoke again about the nursery and wondered if there was any possibility of there being a nursery. Joan mentioned the hour of leaving on the tours and the time of day most of them would be held as being in the morning and continuing through to the middle of the afternoon. “That’s a problem ,*1 said Helen, and went on to point out that the children needed naps and food in the middle of the day and that there was no provision here in the building for that sort of thing. At this point Mary introduced a new idea to the discus­ sion by saying, "I’d like to ask what the branches are supposed to do if they aren’t serving tea?** She addressed the question to Joan. Joan replied somewhat doubtfully, "Well,— some activity going on might help I" Barbara responded to this with, "A tour would disrupt any activity that was going on." There was some further talk around this point that Mary had raised with a suggestion coming out of the discussion that perhaps the activity could be merely to have people at the branches to greet those on the tour and show them about. There was some kidding and joking going on during this discus­ sion of what might be done. ED called the group back to attention by asking if there were any other questions. She paused for a moment and then said, "If not, let’s move on."

1^3 Before she could introduce the next item on the agenda Helen spoke up inquiring, “Has the question been answered about how many carswill come back to the downtown building?“ ED looked at Joan and asked, “Mrs. Tait has this ques­ tion been answered?*1 Joan replied a little uncertainly, and as though she were not sure herself what the answer was that the people who left from the building would be brought back, if they wanted to come back. Edith pointed out that there was good public transpor­ tation from West Branch into town. “But ,11 said Mary, 11it leaves you at the terminal and then you have to get home from there.tf Joan reaffirmed, with more decision that ,fif we take them from here, we will bring them back .11 Kay now asked if they had any idea of how many would be going on the tour. “No,** replied Joan. She indicated that in the publicity they were asking people to let them know about that and said also that the committee working on the tours realized that the branches that would serve tea would need to have some information. However, she added that it was very difficult to get any kind of an answer to the question. Kay, who has in the past done public relations work, went on to say, f,This is a real promotion job to get people out on tours. I have done this and itfs a jobi** She spoke with a good bit of emphasis. She went on, “You have to call people and really promote it. If you can get volunteers to work on this, to call people, to talk about it in meetings, it will be a success. But it really needs a lot of promotion work .11 Harriet spoke now in a very firm tone and looked around the group, "I think the membership chairman of each branch should be actively building up this project program.tf “It's part of a membership program,“ she added, implying that it was therefore a responsibility of the membership chairmen. Edith followed her comment with the announcement, 111 have an idea. Wiy eouldnft the chairman of the committee of management of the branch to be visited, two or three days before the visit, call up other branch chairmen and expressly invite them to come to their branch on that particular day .11 She went on to say how pleased the chairman of her branch would

lMf be to get a call from the chairman of Kay’s branch. She smiled broadly as she said this and as Kay sort of laughed back at her unbelievingly, she added, 111 really mean it J She would be very pleased;11 "That’s a splendid idea," said Joan with emphasis. "This program needs the personal touch. News stories serve a purpose but they don't do it all. These special services, — the nursery, transportation, maps,— are good but the per­ sonal contact is the thing that counts." There appeared to be acquiescence to the truth of Joan's comments and agreement that Edith's was a good sugges­ tion, but there was nothing to indicate that the group as a whole would follow through on the suggestion. ED asked Joan if there had been clearance with all the branches, the center and the residences regarding the tours and the days each would be visited. Joan nodded and replied that there had been. Kay spoke up again saying, "Miss Brown, I asked Mrs. Baker (Chairman of the East Branch Committee of Manage­ ment) to speak briefly about the history of the branch when the tour comes to East Branch. Is that all right?" "Yes," replied ED, "Good!" and Harriet added, "I think that's good for all branches where there is no special program." Joan asked if there were any other suggestions and then enumerated those that had been made mentioning particu­ larly the nursery and maps. She thanked the group for their suggestions. ED said, "We will go on." Special Staff Meeting

(11:k-0 - 12:05)

ED introduced the next topic by saying that she wanted to talk a little about the meeting1 to be held Friday night, not because a meeting was being called by some of the staff,

1 A meeting of all staff called by a small group of program staff to talk about personnel policies.

3M but because “of the reason it is being called11; because there are evidently among the staff some who are dissatisfied or who are bothered by some aspect of their work with the YW. “Now you ,11 she said, “have a responsibility to talk with the people who are upset, to talk with those who are dissatisfied. Find out what is bothering them and help them get it straightened out.“ “It goes right back to you,” she reiterated, “to go to that person and find out what their problem is and if you can’t handle it to bring it on to me.** She pointed out that channels had been set up for people to use if they were dissatisfied or if they disagreed with some procedure or policy; that one of those channels was through the executives, and another was direct access to the Personnel Committee. She added that the volunteers were will­ ing to discuss such matters, that they wanted to and that they should be given a chance to. When she finished speaking Edith said that she didn’t know how the meeting had gotten started and therefore she was sort of .talking in the dark. “I have heard ,11 she said, ”some complaints about salary.fi She continued that she thought it might be that a girl doesn’t want to go to the Personnel Committee, that they feel self-conscious about going before them with a complaint or with a request for salary raise. I don’t think they know about the channels,11 she added. “Well you have a responsibility to tell them,” said ED with emphasis. At this point Betty spoke up saying that she thought perhaps she should explain her connection with the meeting, and went on to tell that she had been having lunch with the group that was calling the meeting when they had first dis­ cussed it and that the first thing she knew they decided to get all the staff together and that she would chair the meet­ ing. She continued that it was not clear to her whether those staff members who serve on the Personnel Committee (she is one of three staff members, elected by the total staff group to serve on the Personnel Policies Committee) were supposed to do so as representatives of the staff or whether they were sup­ posed to act as individuals on the committee. She supposed, perhaps that they were supposed to be representatives, but she did not feel that as representatives they knew how the majority of the staff felt about the things that were dis­ cussed in Personnel meeting. ED replied that this was a good opportunity to clear all

1*4-6 these things up* She pointed out that procedures don't go to the board Tor action and can always be changed but that it is up to the staff to indicate where they feel changes should be made* She continued that policies can also be changed, that all you have to do is to do something about it. Nothing is static about the procedures or policies, she said. She pointed out that the Personnel Committee was sympathetic and understanding, that they were anxious to do a good job and that they wanted to work with the staff on a friendly basis; they wanted to develop procedures and policies that would be satisfactory to staff* Betty spoke again saying that she felt that the group who were behind the meeting felt it important to raise sala­ ries, that higher salaries would serve to encourage more people to train for their work, and would hold good people in YW jobs. Ruth spoke up at this point saying that she wondered if everyone knew what the Board had done last summer regarding the pay scale. Mary responded that she didn*t think most of the staff even knew the pay scale. Ruth explained that there had been called a meeting of the Board during the summer months to discuss and take action on the new pay scale proposed by the Chest. She described the changes in the pay scale and said that at this called meeting the Board had adopted the proposed change and added that they were one of the first agencies to vote through these increases. The Board felt that the first step in implementing the changes was to start with moving up to the new minimum all those who were below that new minimum wage in any classifica­ tion and then go on from there. She explained that the Chest had not formally adopted the new scale until late Fall after the majority of agencies had approved the plan; that while the Chest had approved the new wage scale they had no money to advance to agencies to help implement it; that it was up to the agencies to try and implement it within the bounds of their current budgets. Those below the new minimum retroactive to October 1, the Board had decided to pay the increases, and had been attempting to find the money to do so within the budget. She explained that to do this would take $1,000 and that "we are already in debt .11 She continued that they wanted to bring these salaries up to the minimum by the first of March if it was at all possible and that these adjustments in salary had been included in the budget for the next fiscal year that had been submitted to the Chest.

Ik-7 Barbara asked if the regular increment was to be granted, and ED replied that the increment would be based on staff evalua­ tions . Polly, who is also one of the three staff serving on the Personnel Committee, the other being a member of the clerical staff, said that the policy of the committee was to get every one at the minimum first and pointed out that the minimum of the new scale was equal to the third level of the old scale. ED agreed that that was right. Edith spoke up again saying that she liked to feel that there could be mutual trust between labor and management. She wondered whether the staff couldn’t say to the Personnel Committee **we need the security that comes with meeting together and discussing these things together. We are not in conflict with you or with these things necessarily, but we want to discuss them together.** Helen interposed that she thought f,we all ought to go to this meeting .11 ED asked in a surprised voice, 11Isn’t everyone going?** It was explained that everyone had been invited to go except the Executive Director and the Assistant Executive Director. The discussion now switched to talk of a union and the thinking by some that that was the real purpose of the meeting and there was a lot of back and forth talk about this point. Ruth seemed to be the one person who thought they were getting too excited about this aspect. She felt that there were only a very few of the staff who were really interested in a union. She did feel though that everyone should go to the meeting and not just those who might be interested in a union. Barbara asked, **Do we want to let those who are behind this meeting talk to the Personnel Committee about the meeting and explain why it is being called so that the Personnel Com­ mittee won’t think it is a gripe session?** There was a chorus of “Yesi**

’’Yesi**

Jane said she didn’t know anything about what this was all about and asked if someone would explain. Betty explained that while some of the staff 'mre eating lunch together one day they had gotten to talking about salaries, and job classifications and about some of the per­ sonnel policies and procedures; that they had also talked about

Ib8 some dissatisfactions they had and that they had thought that other staff might feel the same as they and it might be a good idea for them all to get together and talk about these things, Jane said, "Well do you think we are partly responsible? As the leadership group we get together and talk things over but those who don’t get to meetings like these feel left out and perhaps want meetings too?11 "Yes," said Kay, "I think so too," And added that it meant a lot to those from the branches to meet with other staff. She spoke in a very emphatic way that brought a laugh from the group. She added, also emphatically, "I mean it!" Betty asked, "Shall we ask them to write to the Per­ sonnel Committee about the meeting?" "Good," said ED, "Yesi" And added that it could be very disturbing to the Personnel Committee if they don’t know the reason for the meeting; that having a meeting about per­ sonnel matters without their knowing why the meeting is being held will create a barrier between the committee and the staff, Mary said she thought a telephone call rather than a letter: would be better, that in a telephone conversation you could interpret better, Edith expressed the opinion that she thought it was healthy to have the meeting "here in the building and in the open." She added, "They could have gone ’around a corner and under a tree’ to have the meetingJ" "Yes,” said Jane, "but they haven’t done it right. sort of like an anonymous let ter i"

It’s

At this point ED interrupted the discussion by saying Buth says "the rolls are ready. Can we continue this after lunch?" There were nods and "yeses" and the meeting broke up. Staff Personnel Procedures:

(1:00 - 1:20)

ED called the meeting to order and asked if there was anything else they wanted to say on the matter that they had been discussing before lunch. Harriet spoke saying that the question had been raised

1*4-9 that the staff serving on the Personnel Committee didn’t know how staff felt; it seemed to be the impression that those staff members served on the committee as individuals and not as repre­ sentatives of the staff,— that is they don*t speak for the staff. She expressed the opinion that that point should be cleared. Lucy indicated that she thought it very important for the committee to be aware of what the staff thought and felt. ’’That I think is a crucial point J” said Edith. She went on, "Suppose someone has a feeling about their salary. They may speak to the executive and the executive will tell her that she should take it up with the Personnel Committee, but they may be too timid to go to the Personnel Committee. They need someone to go for them." ED replied, "Doesn’t it depend on the executive to help her go to the committee?” She asked also if it would not be possible for the executive to go with the staff person to the committee. Someone replied— ’’Maybe she would feel more secure if she could go with others of her own level.” Mary Lou expressed the opinion that if the staff member went as an individual they labeled themselves as dissatisfied; that there was security in going with a group; that under those conditions any displeasure that was aroused was not directed only to the individual; that the individual didn't want to be isolated or criticized. She felt that this was part of the feeling that had led to calling the meeting. Betty pointed out that the individual staff might not feel at ease or free to discuss dissatisfaction with her execu­ tive. Mary expressed the opinion that the Personnel Committee was too removed from the staff that they didn’t know them and therefore did not feel free to go to the committee when they were dissatisfied or disturbed about policies. ”1 think you have put your finger on iti” said Edith with emphasis. ’’The executives in general know the committee or at least some of its volunteer members,” she added, ’’but the rest of staff don’t.” Barbara added to this saying that the people in the branches and areas don’t get to know many of the Board or Metropolitan Committee volunteers personally. They know the

150 volunteers in their own branch or activity but not the others and this makes a difference she thought. ED spoke now saying that she had been thinking as they were talking, "What kind of a structure do we have to take care of this?11 She indicated that perhaps there was something missing in the structure that should be added for handling dissatisfaction of staff members. Jane said, “They [the staff under a decentralized pro­ gram] feel out of touch with the volunteers and with other members of the ,staff." "Don't we have our own division staff meetings?" ques­ tioned Helen. Kay replied, "I don't think they get the lift from those that we get from these executive staff meetings* that you do when you are in contact with other staff from other branches •11 Mary said, "Maybe we haven't talked about the right things in our city-wide staff meetings. We've put too much emphasis on 'democracy* and 'Inside YWCA' and not any on salaries•" Edith responded, "And we do have an interest in salaries, too*" Polly suggested that perhaps they should promote the idea that the staff representatives on the Personnel Committee should be the contact people for the staff when they had any­ thing they wanted to get before the committee,— that staff could go to these staff representatives. Jane questioned whether it wasn't the responsibility of these staff members to present matters of concern to the staff to the Personnel Committee on the same basis as a Representative in Congress. "I think you have a point," said Edith. ED asked, "Could staff planning committee’*’ serve as the group to do this?"

**• The staff committee responsible for planning the total city-wide staff meetings held four times a year.

151 Lucy asked if there couldn’t be a short period at each city-wide staff meeting when ’’gripes11 could be talked over. ED said, ’’Maybe some structure will come out of this meeting Friday.” Helen suggested that maybe it was new staff who were the dissatisfied one, and who were encouraging the meeting and it might be because they were ignorant of how the YW operated and of many of the procedures and policies that others knew about. She pointed out that executives have con­ tacts with other divisions and other parts of the program that the program staff don’t often have and thus have an oppor­ tunity to learn more quickly about these things. She suggested that maybe there should be a handbook that would contain all policies and procedures that could be given to the new people. Jane supported this suggestion indicating that she thought it a good idea to have such a handbook. ’’Instead of a handbook maybe a close relation with the people is the thing,” said Edith. ’’You still need something specific to refer to,” replied Helen. Harriet also supported Helen in her suggestion saying ”Yes, there may be something you overlooked, something that you intended to say or tell the new staff person and in the press of other matters or interruptions you forgot to mention it. If there was a handbook, the person could look it up herself.” Edith still insisted that she did not think it was a handbook that was needed, that the trust you were able to build was the important thing. There was indication that some thought that Edith was being too idealistic at this point. BD spoke up here saying, ’’You have the procedures to hand out. Maybe we should have additional copies made of them, but there should be copies in your files.” Helen referred again to a handbook that could be given to the individual by the Personnel Committee when she was hired, that new staff could look over and discuss with the committee or with her executive. She felt this might serve a real need. Jane asked, ”Isn't it possible to discuss the procedures

152 and policies at your evaluation?11 She put thequestion and ED replied, "Yes.”

to ED

"It's a little late then," said Mary. !,Isnft there some possible way Tor the staff to get to know the-Personnel Committee socially, get to know them personally?*1 asked Barbara. And she added that it made such a big .difference when you know the people who are on the com­ mittee and that the staff just doesnft know them. Mary agreed with this and Ruth suggested that maybe they should try to do this at the beginning of the year. Mary wondered whether members of the Personnel Committee couldn't arrange to take some of the new members "under their wing 11 when they first came on the staff. Edith, following along on the same idea of getting to know the members of the Personnel Committee, suggested that perhaps someone from the Personnel Committee could come to the Fall $taff meetings, to the city-wide meetings, the Y-teen staff and young adult staff meetings, might even come to the branch committee of management meetings to talk with the different groups about personnel policies and procedures. In the smaller groups, she pointed out they would be more accessi­ ble and it would be possible to get better acquainted with them which she felt was the important thing. Jane expressed the opinion that there was still some­ thing basically wrong; she wasnft sure what it was but thought that "maybe the meeting would bring it out.** Barbara remarked now that she had talked with some of the staff and she thought a large part of the difficulty lay in the fact that staff did not know the members of the Personnel Committee; that they were too removed from them and that this led to a feeling that Personnel Committee had little personal interest in them; that perhaps the thing that was needed to be done was for the members of the Committee to try in some way to get to know staff and really give some concrete evidence of their interest in staff. Helen supported this opinion. Barbara continued that the people who are new in the city need to feel that there is someone who is interested in them as persons, who will invite them out to dinner, introduce

153 them to people, help them to find some social life for them­ selves*She thought that perhaps this should be a responsi­ bility of the Personnel Committee. “Perhaps we can leave the matter at this point ,11 said ED. f,Let*s see what happens Friday night. Then w e 111 talk again about it. Maybe we can develop a plan that will help these situations.*1 Throughout the discussion there was no evidence of a feeling of tension among the group; personalities were not mentioned, nor was there any evidence of trying to attach any blame to the Personnel Committee. The discussion was more in the nature of an inquiry as to causes giving rise to dissatis­ factory feelings among staff and what to do about them. After first charging the group that it was their responsibility to deal with and prevent dissatisfaction, the Executive Director*s part inthe discussion was chiefly one of listening. Her par­ ticipation was mostly in the form of questions or brief com­ ments to the ideas and thoughts expressed by the various mem­ bers of the group. As the discussion proceeded, a doubt seemed to be growing in her mind as to whether the structure for handling dissatisfactions was adequate. There was no attempt on her part to limit the discussion, or to be critical of the comments made. After her first introductory remarks her attitude was objective and inquiring. The discussion was carried by the group itself with little, if any encouragement from the Executive Director. It was also evident in the discussion that the group was in agree­ ment; that no specific action or decision related to this matter should be taken by them until after the meeting. It was quite evident too that as a group they felt that there was a real need for a closer association between the staff and the Per­ sonnel Committee and that as a group they felt it important that the Committee be informed about the meeting and why it was being called. Budget

(It20 - 1:30)

ED introduced the next item on the agenda by speaking to Ruth and saying, “Miss Moss is there anything about the budget that you want to talk about?11 Ruth smiled and began by saying that she was always glad when she could bring the treasury report into Executive Staff Meeting because it gave the staff fore-knowledge of what the volunteers on the Finance Committee and Board would bring

19+ back to the branches. It also gave staff a chance to discuss together the matters the volunteers would bring back. She went on to say that they were still overdrawn,— to the amount °£ & : that it was the membership item that was still low; the budget called for _____ in memberships and that there was only the one month left to bring in $ .— the present deficit in this item. Barbara asked if that figure represented the amount in default on local membership fees,— that is,^did not include the portion of each fee that went to National. Buth said yes that was right and said she realized that that point had not been clear to everyone. She continued that considering the individual branch budgets singly the deficit in membership fees doesn’t seem like much but when they are combined in the total, over-all budget, the figure mounts up. She added that she knew she didn’t need to tell the group how much needed to be brought in through each branch. She also said that if they were interested in knowing what the over­ drafts were by division budgets, she would read them. ’’Don’t,” wailed Kay. ’’I ’m not sleeping at night!” There was a laugh from the group. Ruth added that she thought it would be better not to read them. Harriet spoke up to remind Buth that the branches were putting on membership drives now and Buth indicated that she knew that. Kay talked for a bit about how appalled and discouraged she and the volunteers at the East Branch had become when they discovered that they had misinterpreted the amount to be raised through memberships. They had thought that the figure in the budget included that part of the membership fee that went to National and when they thought they had raised 50 per cent of their quota they discovered that actually they had only raised one-third of it. ”It was a terrible blow!” she said with feeling. Ruth explained that the figure for memberships in the

^ Fifty cents of each adult membership fee and twenty five cents of each junior membership fee automatically go to the National YWCA.

155 individual budget did not include that part of the membership fee that went to National, that the fifty cents and quarters were collected and turned in to the Finance office but were not credited as income for the branch budgets or the total budget♦ Kay groaned and said, “I know— now !11 Mary announced that she just didn*t pay any attention to the “fifty centses,“ she just counted the dollar part of the membership when she was working toward her quota. Kay asked, in a pleading tone that was at emphatic, “Does anybody have any ideas of how to membership?11 She said that her branch had tried they could think of and they had exhausted every ED spoke up ship was not going needed to meet the we will have to go in enough money to

the same time raise more everything idea.

saying that she believed the $1.00 member­ to bring in the amount of money that was present deficit in the budget. r,I think out for larger gifts if we are going to get balance the budget before the first of March .*1

Kay responded that in those cases that they had selected in which to ask for contributions in addition to the membership fee the result had been very good5 they had made the quota for this part of their campaign right away and it showed that people were willing to contribute more than just the dollar and a half membership fee. She went on to speak about the con­ fusion that existed among the public over the YW membership drive and the YMCA annual fund-raising campaign (which is going on concurrently) 5 that there were a lot of people who were confusing the two organizations and thought they had paid YW membership fees when it was the YM they had sent money to. Other members of the group joined with her in describing similar confusion that they had encountered. Harriet spoke up saying that this only pointed out how important it was for “us to begin on our memberships right after the fiscal year begins and to keep at it all year instead of having this problem situation of competing with the YM drive. When we leave it to the end, there is no time for interpretation. The only thing we can try to do is get the money !11 She spoke with a lot of conviction for this is a point that she has stressed before. ED reminded the group that participants in YW activities must: pay membership and that they must be sure that all par­ ticipants were members. She indicated that she felt that there had been some failure to follow through on this. Kay asked about the policy for resident girls and if

they were supposed to be members. "Yes," replied ED. Barbara inquired if membership was required of those who came in to find living accommodations through the room registry program. Kay replied affirmatively to this question adding that they were doing that in her branch. I?"

"I don'tJ". said Lucy in surprise, and added, "Should She addressed the question to ED.

ED explained that the National policy provided that any women or girls who had a "casual" contact with the YW need not be required to join, that it was up to the individual associations to determine what they meant by "casual." She said that the Los Angeles YW had discussed the matter and had decided that those being served by the Boom Registry Office would be asked to join the YW. She said that the decision was based on the fact of service and that it was felt that when service was given membership should be required. Kay said, "A lot donft want to do this." Then she added in a questioning tone, "But we do it with them, don't we?" ED nodded. Helen said that she had found that a particularly good time for money raising events was from the first of March to the first of June. She thought therefore it was a particularly good time to get members. She added that in their department they were going to concentrate on trying to bring in as much of their budgeted income as they could in the period immedi­ ately following March first. Harriet pointed out that the slogan of National YWCA Week— "A Better World Begins with You. Join the YWCA" fitted in very well with this plan. Evaluation "Inside YWCA" (the theme of the membership meeting)

(1:30 - 1:5ol The time for adjournment was drawing near and there were still several items to be covered so ED moved on to the next item introducing it by saying to Harriet, "Do you want to lead

157 the discussion on the evaluation of the membership meeting, Mrs, Parker?11 Harriet smiled and replied, “Yes .11 She began by saying a few words about the importance of evaluating these programs as it helped in planning for other meetings and then said she would like "your criticisms and comments about the meeting." When she finished speaking Polly said she would like to hear how the meeting turned out financially5 they had heard about the number that were there but she wondered about this other point, Harriet explained what the expenses were in connection with the program, that the dish that had been placed on the tea table for a silver collection to help defray expenses had brought in $27 which had pretty well covered the costs. She added that she did not think that taken all together the expenses had been too great. ED said, "I think it was the cost of the tea that was the thing that was worrying the committee most and the $27 cared for that.fl Harriet nodded and continued that there had been dona­ tions both in connection with the tea and in connection with other parts of the program,— the maps used in the program, for instance, had been donated. There were individual comments by others of the group on the donations that had been made and various other aspects of the program. ED who was watching the time after a bit spoke again saying, "Could we go on to other points because we don*t have much time left.11 Jane spoke up now saying she thought the whole affair had been very good, that the program was dignified and well done. "But," she said, "did we really reach the people we wanted to?" She felt that there was value in having so many people participate, but there was a question in her mind about this other point. Mary said she was disappointed in the number of people who had come to the program from the West Branch, there was only one carload of them. "But," she added with definiteness, "they and those who participated were very enthusiastic and they will talk about it and interest others to come to the other meetings and they will want to come back again, too." Jane responded to these comments by asking, "Do we hold these people from year to year, or do they get dropped by the

158 wayside?" "Oh, Janei" explained Mary in a mockingly shocked andthen she joined with the others in laughing.

voice

Someone mentioned that a special effort should be made * to make the annual meeting program as good and to encourage the same people to come to it; and still another comment was made with regard to whether the people who were there weren’t the ones that always came.— the "old stand-bys." To this Mary Lou responded with, "That’s what my people [program staff] wondered,-— were they the people who would have been there any­ way?" Harriet remarked that that was an important point to consider and there was some other talk around this matter, but nothing new was added to the discussion. Harriet asked if there was anything else they wanted to say about the meeting. ED spoke again saying that from the point of view of the Metropolitan Executive it was a very successful meeting. She amplified her opinion by saying that it was very good for the board members to have participated in the program and to be there to see the various acts depicting what the YW program included. She pointed out that in their meetings they have so many business matters to discuss that there is little time for them to hear about the program itself. She concluded that if there had been no one else at the program it would have been worth while for that reason. Helen commented that the girls from the Health Ed. Dept, classes who had been there were few in number and were partici­ pants in the program, not part of the audience, but they were very enthusiastic and had talked about the meeting since. She said that one of the suggestions that she had heard from among them which appealed to her was that the program be made into a movie about the Los Angeles YWCA. She thought it was too bad not to do something more with it when so much work had gone into it and it was so good. It seemed like a waste of good material. Kay commented that Mrs. Peabody was excellent as the narrator and her professional experience in this work had made it possible to "tie the amateurs together." There was evidence of group agreement with this comment. Betty said she thought the committee deserved a lot of credit for the success of the meeting.

159 Heferring back to Kay*s comment Harriet pointed out that while Mrs. Peabody had done an excellent job she had 11used the material sent in by you from the different branches and YW program divisions and had consolidated that into the sentences and paragraphs that made up the script." Harriet then went on to say that she had heard two criticisms that she would like the group to know about and perhaps comment on. One was that there could have been more pageantry at the point in the program when the flag carriers (girls carrying the flags of the sixty-nine countries in which the YW is located) came from the back of the auditorium to the stage. Barbara, who had helped on this feature of the ■ program agreed heartily with this criticism. The second criticism was the use in the script of the term "working girls." The criticism had been that this was old terminology used by the "lady bountifuls" and was out of place now. She said she thought that this was a valid criticism. She asked again if there were other criticisms of this sort,— that the committee could profit from these. Mary wondered if it had been possible for everyone to hear in the back of the auditorium and Jane replied, "No! In spots you could^t!" ED laughing said she thought the funniest thing was when the arrow that was supposed to have fallen on the stage in one skit, came flying on to the stage in the middle of the next skit. There was a lot of laughter over this and an outburst of talking about why that had happened and about other happenings connected with putting on the program. When it died down Edith spoke to Harriet saying that there had been a criticism from some of the volunteers from the San Fernando Branch. She said they were sold on the program, but in discussing it they kept saying that they knew the YW and they knew its program but how could they get it to others, so that more people would learn about the YW. Mary promptly replied, "Get them to bring a new person to these meetings! Be enthusiastic about the meetings when they talk to others about coming to them! Tell them they* 11 pick them up and bring them!" She then explained how the chairman of her branch had forgotten all about the program and had arranged to go with another group of people, not YW people, to something else. When she remembered the membership meeting she just brought all those people along with her in her car and that they had enjoyed the meeting and been very enthusiastic. Lucy added that the volunteers from her branch had

160 gathered together before leaving and went as a caravan. There were several car loads and they brought a few new people with them. She added that they were very enthusiastic and had reported enthusiastically about the meeting to other volunteers who had not gone. “Well, the annual meeting is the next thing,” said Jane “and we can*t afford not to have it good !11 Helen brought up again the matter of making a movie of the program, asking if the group thought there was any possi­ bility of doing this. She went on to say that the husband of one of the girls in a swimming class was a commercial camera man, he had the equipment for making movies and that his wife seemed to think he could do it during his off time between Jobs. Harriet asked, a little dubiously, “Didnrt we look into that one time? Who has the background on that?” Barbara answered that it had been looked into once, that they had considered a colored movie with an accompanying sound track and that the estimate of cost had been around $10 ,000 . Helen expressed surprise and said that it could be done more cheaply; that a wire recorder could be used instead of a sound track and synchronized with the motion pictures. She went into a little more detail about making such a movie and added that at another association where she had worked they had made a film of a swimming show that ran for about half an hour and that it had cost them $15* There was some further discussion about the movie and Helen introduced the idea of getting programs of this sort on television. Edith Joined in this conversation as well as Mary and Barbara and it was brought out that many television shows need visual programs particularly in the afternoon hours which apparently are not always easy hours to fill; TV stations have used programs of organizations similar to that presented at the membership meeting and that it might be a good idea to find out more about this form of publicity. ED said, “Do you think we can move on now?“ Before a reply could be made she commended Harriet for the hard work and good work that had been done by her in contributing to the success of the meeting. There was a clapping of hands around the table when she finished speaking and smiles directed at Harriet and comments of “Good JobI“

161 Health Education

(Is 50 - 2;05)

ED introduced the next item by saying that Miss Fisher had a couple of suggestions that she wanted to discuss with the group and indicated that Helen would go on from there. Helen said that, as they knew, people came to the Health Education Department for classes of one kind or another from all over the city5 this department had been wondering if the names of the people who came from areas serviced by the branches could not be placed on mailing lists and sent to the various branches so that the branches could contact these people and let them know about the program in this particular locality. She went into a little more detail about how they had thought such a plan could be worked out. When she finished Edith promptly asked in a sort of laughing way, r,Do we share the membership fee?** There was a shout of laughter in response to her comment in which Helen joined. When it dies down Helen replied in her matter-of-fact tone, HNo. We don’t get the membership fees .1,1 Harriet spoke up at this moment to point out that if the interest in the YW was developed among these people by the branches, their membership would come in through the branches another year. Polly asked Helen another question about working but the detail and there was further discussion around this point. Edith then said with emphasis that she thought it was a wonder­ ful idea and would certainly appreciate getting the names and would follow up on them. Edith appeared to be expressing an attitude held by other members of the group. Helen admittedly frankly that there had been some won­ dering by the department if perhaps they weren’t cutting their own throats by interesting the girls in the branch programs but that they felt it would strengthen the total YW program and on that basis 'it was a good plan to try and follow. ED commented, 11It will be quite a job, won’t it?” Helen replied that there wouldn’t be too much extra

Membership fees coming in through the Health Education Dept, are not credited to the department but to a city-wide membership fund.

162 work involved, that they had to sort out their names anyway into mailing zones when they did a promotion mailing and that it would mean chiefly finding out which zones were in the branch areas and preparing the lists* She indicated that the depart­ ment was willing to do this. ED spoke again when she ceased saying that she thought it was a good idea herself, and asked Helen if she wanted a vote of approval to go ahead on the plan. Helen nodded. Before she could call for such a vote Edith spoke up suggesting ’’What if we give you some post cards with our address on them that you could give the girls when they regis­ ter for their medicals and ask them to fill them in and mail them if they would be interested in branch activities?11 Betty thought this was a good idea and said so, but Polly responded with, ’’That means filling out a new card .11 Helen had made no direct comment to Edith*s suggestion but she now said, "They don*t seem to mind filling out forms. They are ^asked to fill out so many forms that one more won*t make a great deal of difference I don’t think]" Harriet commented with respect to Edith*s suggestion and there was some further discussion on how this suggestion might work. Helen, however, stressed the point that she didn’t think the contact with the girl should be made too promptly after she came into a Health Education class; she should be given a chance to get adjusted to the class and get used to coming to the YW, then after a few weeks the contact could be made. If they tried to promote a contact with the branch immediately she felt that the girls would feel that they were being rushed too hard and too fast by the YW. The depart­ ment had thought that they would keep a listing by name and address of the areas in which the girls lived as they registered for their medicals and then every so often would send the accumulated listings to the appropriate branch. Jane thought that was the better idea, that otherwise the girls might have the feeling that the YW was trying to run things for them; it was better not to rush them too hard at first. "Yes," said Helen, lfand then later if a letter could go to the girls from the branches saying something about having seen that you are enrolled in a swimming class downtown, that the YW also has this activity in the branch located near where they live and suggesting that they might want to drop in at the branch for a particular event and see for themselves.11

163 Mary Lou immediately added, “There should be a particu­ lar event to which they are invited.11 “Then ,11 asked ED, “the Health Education Department will send the names and the branches will take the leadership in following up on them?1* There was nodding and indication of general group approval of the plan. “Well ,11 continued ED, “we have two minutes.“ She addressed Helen saying, “Do you want to talk about health examinations?11 Helen smiled and nodded, then turning to the group and said that the Health Education Department realized that there was a lot of feeling about requiring health examination for participation in sports and other active activities. (This is a policy of the YWCA.) She indicated that the feeling was shared by some of the health education program staff as well as by other staff and by volunteers. “Some think it*s a good idea, and some think it*s not so goodI We have questions about this policy tool” She sort of laughed as she made this last remark. She continued that these feelings and attitudes toward the health examination had been discussed by the Health Education Committee and they have asked me to ask you if you would write down the pro*s and con1s as you see them in requir­ ing the health examination. “We want to hear both the good and bad features of required health examinations both from you and your staff. Then the committee will evaluate these state­ ments. “ She added that the staff of the Health Education Department was doing the same thing. She asked that these statements be sent in to her and that they would appreciate getting them as soon as possible. When she finished speaking she looked at ED to indicate that that was all she had to say. Young Adult Program

(2:05 - 2:08)

“The next thing,” said ED, “is the Young Adult program.11 She continued that she didn*t think they should attempt to dis­ cuss this today, it needed a lot of time. “You all know the problem,” she said, “and I thought it would be helpful for this group to discuss it together.*1 She pointed out that there were many business and industrial girls in the health education program but that the numbers in the young adult pro­ gram were very small. “This is a national problem,“ she added. She then referred to a comparative study made in her office of the changes in the number of participants in the various broad program areas offered by the YW during the past threeyear period. She told the group that the study showed that there had been a steady and continuous drop during that period in the number of business, professional and industrial girls

I6h in the Young Adult program and that this drop had grown to large proportions; there had been some drop in the Y-teen pro­ gram; that the great increases had been in the health education program* She added, 11It is time we looked into this.11 Barbara asked, "Does that drop include the co-ed group activities or just the business girls?*1 ED referred back to the report that she held in her hand and replied, "No, co-ed has fallen too .11 Edith asked, "What do the big groups from big companies say when you ask them why they donft participate in YW activi­ ties?" Mary Lou responded, 111 can answer that." She went on to describe how some girls from one company wanted to have group activities and meetings but that they wanted only to swim together as a group. It was explained to them that they had to have a health examination and immediately they were no longer interested* "I wish we could have been there to interpret that," said Helen quickly. Mary Lou made no response. Barbara asked another question, "Don't these large organizations have club and recreational programs for their girls?" "Yes, that's right I" said Mary Lou. "Well, as a YWCA, are we concerned with working with this group who. are cared for, who have programs provided for them?" asked Jane. Mary Lou replied with a good bit of feeling and force behind her words, "But we have to find these individual girls who are not participating in the company programs or in other programs, and we have to look everywhere." She continued that there were so many activities planned for girls and that the YW couldn't compete with many of these activities because of limited budget so that it was partly a matter of devising activities that weren't available elsewhere and that this too was a problem. ED asked, "What is it we can give them that others can't?" "Let us think of that," said Jane.

165 ED went on, 11We* 11 talk about that next time**1 tfA wonderful ideal11 responded Edith. ED referred to her papers again and said with a smile, UI wonft dare go back to the office without talking about the “G *1 reports. Mrs. Read is upset about them, again. She is behind in reporting them to the Chest office because she isn*t getting them from you in time.** “Oh no]“. “Not again]“ were expostulations accompanied with groans from around the table. ED spoke a bit more about this matter. She indicated in her remarks that she felt they were letting these monthly reports wait to the last minute, that if they could perhaps keep their statistical recording up to date as the month went along they would not have the big job of accumulating all the figures at the end of the month. ED made one or two announcements and asked if anyone else wished to make an announcement. There was no response and ED announced that the meeting was adjourned.