Proceedings and Addresses at Allentown, November 2, 1906

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PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES V./7

ALLENTOWN, NOVEMBER

2,

190G

/

VoL. XVII Pt

PUBLISHED HV THE ScX'TETV 1

90S -

THE PENNSYLVANIA-GERMAN SOCIETY.

180;^099

C-CUZ^

EDITION

575

COPIES

publication Committee

JULIUS

F.

SACHSE, LITT.D.

DANIEL W. NEAD, M.D. HENRY M. M. RICHARDS

CoPiRIGHTED

igoS

i

BY

The Pennsylv.ania-German Society

Press

The Hew Era p- s-ihg Cchrant Lahcaster.

Pa.

TABLE OF CONTENTS. Contents

......

Officers of the Society Minutes of Meeting at Allentown Address of Welcome by Rev. John A. W. Haas, Response by Thomas C. Zi.m.merman, L.H.D. President’s Address, Hon. Gustav A. Endlich Report of Secretary, H. M. M. Richards Report of Treasurer, Julius F. Sachse

3

4

.



,

'>

Action on Proposed Amend.ments Miscellaneous Business Election of Officers Obituaries

.... ...... —

D.D

8 1

19

33 35

36 36 37 39

The German Influence in its SettleIPennSPlVauia ment AND Development Part XVIII. The Pennsylvania-German in the Revolutionary War, i 775-1 7S3. The Gun Makers of Old Northampton, by William Jacob Heller.

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OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY FOR

1Q06-1907.

President

Bexj-amin'

Matthias Xead,

Vice-Presidents

Prof. George T. Ettixger, Ph.D.

Prof. Johot Eyermax. Secretary

H. M. M. Rich.^rds. Treasurer 1906-

Julius F. S.^chse, Litt.D. Executive Committee 19071907.

Thomas

C.

Zimmermax, L.H.D.

Abr-aham S. Schropp. 19081908.

Rev. Theo. E. Schmauk, D.D. Sch.aeffer, Ph.D., D.D. Rev. N.athax C. 19091909.

Evans, D.D. Rev. L. Kryder 1910Dr. John Fr.\xklix Mextzer. 1910.

Dr. Daniel

W.

Hon. Maurice

Ne.ad.

C. Eby.

1911.

Na-aman H. Keyser, D.D.S. Dr. W. K. T. Sahm.

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ILLUSTRATIONS. Benjamin M. Nead,

Eso.,

Rev, Gottlob F. Krotel. Rev.

Wm. Ashmead

Henry

President

frontispiece

D.D

Schaeffer,

facing page

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A. Schuler

M. ]\I. Richards Battle of Long Island Genl. Daniel Morgan

Lieut. H,



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46 56

frontispiece Richards

facing page “ “

Washington Crossing the Delaware Surrender of Col. Rahl Washington at Valley Forge B.attle of



Monmouth

Molly Pitcher AT THE Battle OF Monmouth Gen, Anthony Wayne Battle of Germantown ^Massacre at Wyoming Thayendanegea as a Freemason Genl. John Sullivan Genl. Peter Muhlenberg Michael Hillegas Baron* von Steuben Young’s Gun Factory

81





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“ ”



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176 182





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328 360











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Address of JVelcome.

9

of ^'ise and judicious economy seconded by earnest and persistent labor.

Pennsylvania and

its

Germans have

something to teach our land, vhere prosperin' is so often wasteful, and vhere thrift, that promises perpetuin- to

what has been gained, is seldom found in the wild desire to enjoy and spend. Again I find among Pennsylvania-Germans a large Contentment may be hindrance measure of contentment. to advance, but it may also be a power to hold and really value blessings.

German

And

this side

of

it

the Pennsylvania-

which dissatisfaction in which a larger amount of comforts and advantages, private and public, is

has.

In an age of unrest,

the increasing social feeling,

in

and

than that of the fathers, is still not enjoyed with a restful The mind and mind, we need people that are content. heart of the Pennsylvania-German can and ought to be a wholesome leaven in American life. The Pennsylvania-German is marked also by perse-

verance and persistence.

He

does not gain his end, as a

general thing, rapidly, but must needs work and forge ahead steadily and at times by plodding. But the persevering Pennsylvania-German, when he has taken hold, does not let go; he keeps on firmly and consistently. There is a great power in this steadiness of persevering pursuit. It may well be added as a counteracting ingredient in the total of the American character. The average American, especially in our large cities, is rather quick, mobile as the Frenchman. He is verv'- adaptable, and the highest type of bright, changeable adaptability is the American girl. But adaptability often lacks solidity'. This solidity’, steady, strong, persevering and persistent, the Germanic element has and can add to our final American The Pennsylvania-German, who has for a centur}’ tyrpe.

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The Pennsylvania-German

10

and more kept racial

this

valuable

trait,

Society.

can well put his good

element Into the mobility of American

life

and

thought.

There has remained to the Pennsylvania-German that power of the soul, best designated by the German word “ Gemiith.” Under an outward solidity there rests depth of feeling and soul, as It appears In pathos and wit. With the

trend to

with the quick changes of

superficiality,

American temperament, the combination of “ Gemiith,” will be of high worth.

It

will

Interpret to America,

though language change, much of the highest moral and spiritual strength of Teutonic character.

With “ Gemiith ” there dwells In the PennsylvaniaGerman devoted piety. There Is no native criticism of The powers that be are looked up to state and church. everywhere.

In home, country and church deep, lasting

attachments to leaders and respect for them

With

the readiness to criticize evident

there

is

is

found.

among Americans,

coupled the dangers of disregarding the great

need of honor and respect for the office, and through it The Pennsylvania-German can help to for its bearers.

overcome this danger by his devotion and piety. And now, after I have outlined these few traits, may I express the hope that you shall receive larger justice in American history and literature. The school histories ought to tell not only of the Puritan and Virginian chevalier, but also of the sturdy Pennsylvania-German with his love for his country and his sacrifices for it. The writers of fiction who have set themselves up to amuse by dialect, have not portrayed types. Few are the Pennsylvania-German fathers that are like Tilly’s father. The average lover Is not vacillating Benjamin Gaumer. There is more character In the general Pennsylvania-German

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The Penns-jlvama-German

12

Society.

returning thanks for the words of hearty welcome to the Society, said

among

other things: “ \Ye will endeavor to

acquit ourselves in such manner that in coming years Allentown will take pleasure in inviting us to meet here again, and the Society will gladly come again to this prosperous Pennsylvania-German city with an English name.” The 1 6th annual meeting finds us here once more after a lapse of eight years, the inference of which is that Dr.

Schantz’s mild admonition to the Society to maintain

its

good behavior, meanwhile, has been heeded, and another reunion in your city

made

possible under such flattering

conditions as confront us In this beautiful temple of learn-

ing surrounded as

it

is

with a wealth of natural beauty

in extent and loveliness. During the more than fifteen years of

unsurpassed

Its

existence, the

annual meetings of the Society, have been held as follows:

Twice

Harrisburg, twice in ReadLebanon, and twice, counting this meeting, in Allentown. Meetings w'ere also held In each of the following places: Bethlehem, Easton, Ephrata, York and in Lancaster, twice in

ing, twice in

Philadelphia.

From

mere handful at the time of organization, the membership has grown to upwards of 500, the list embracing members not only from our own State, but from New York, New Jersey, Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, Misa

souri, Illinois,

Wisconsin, Nebraska, rvllchigan, Connecti-

and Massachusetts, as also from the District of CoCanada, and the Philippine Islands. All of which indicates a healthy condition and a spirit of progressiveness, on the part of the Society, that we may well feel proud of. cut

lumbia,

The

great success which has attended the

work of

this

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