Northern Tales : Traditional Stories of Eskimo and Indian Peoples : Stories from the Native Peoples of the Arctic and Sub-Arctic Regions 0394540603, 9780394540603

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Northern Tales : Traditional Stories of Eskimo and Indian Peoples : Stories from the Native Peoples of the Arctic and Sub-Arctic Regions
 0394540603, 9780394540603

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NOBTHBRN **

TALCS Traditional. Stories

»i

of

Eskimo and Indian Peoples ocoooo


0^^

xiii$>$>

are a year-round entertainment.

Hiroko Sue Hara reported that among

the Hare Indians, "storytelling

is

year

in

a

pastime throughout the

camps

may be accounts

of the

Indians

stories to

tell

each other. These stories

own hunting

speaker's

experiences, old timers' anecdotes and folktales.

Stories are often told with gestures utters

common

the tent or cabin. Especially during long nights in winter

'e'e

n

e'

,

interjection

men who

e

n

,'

when

and imitative sounds. The audience

the speaker pauses awhile after a sentence. Such

considered to heighten the

is

can

welcome

stories are

tell

mood

by the hosts and

often asked to recite stories

In The Last Kings of Thule, his

of the storyteller.

Old

the tents at night and are

in

children."

remarkable account of

life

among

the

Eskimos of Greenland from 1950 to 1951, Jean Malaurie wrote: Oqaluttuarpoq!

Someone

telling a story. In this instance, the story

is

being told on Kutsikitsoq's sledge Usually stories are told igloo,

people

toward the

lie

on the

illeq,

becomes peaceful and

rhythm of nighttime, two people, other their secret thoughts

The soothing begins to

The

tell

Someone

low voices. Their

flame of the oil-lamp

takes

their heads close together, soft

on the

tell

each

murmuring does

is

slowly sinking into a half dream

is

lowered.

It is

then that the mother

the story, slowly, in a low voice. Everyone listens in silence.

next morning,

about some

in

man who

not disturb the solitary

is

the family

heads toward the center of the igloo, feet

their breathing

wall,

in

will

when and

detail,

correct

the children

difficult

wake

up, they will ask questions

sentences they will repeat several times.

them And

that

is

They

all

will

remember

it

forever In the early 1980s, the writer

and

Lawrence Millman de-

folklorist

scribed an enlightening happenstance.

was

1

sitting in a tent in Auyittiq National Park

companion was an Eskimo

storyteller

Annanack. For several days, heavy

been lashing our .

.

.

He

But

when Ken

tent.

At

started to

first

rains

on

Baffin Island

and

a

howling autumn gale had

the talk had been

tell stories, his

somewhat desultory

voice took on

a

new

intensity.

me about a man who tried to eat the weather heard man who was transformed into a salmon and an entire group told

I

transformed into bears.

wind more stories,

mere

(oqalugtuat).

stories

My

from Pangnirtung named Ken

The wind howled and

were hurled, long untold

local anecdotes (oqalualat),

about of

a

men

into the teeth of this stories,

and even

a

half

forgotten

few larger myths

^Introduction

®^

These more recent testimonies

The

work

past

and native people themselves paths

in

are part of a historical continuum.

of missionaries, ethnographers, travel writers, linguists, in

recording folktales naturally crosses

the present. "In 1823," Victor

governor of Michigan Territory, sent customs to

One

tion.

traders, military

men and

of the questions was:

Barnouw

"Lewis Cass,

relates,

a questionnaire

about Indian

Indian agents under his jurisdic-

Do

they relate

stories,

or indulge

in

any work of the imagination?" For nearly two centuries there has been education to be had from native

a vast tales

Many

tale-tellers.

were recorded one-on-one, so to speak, between

hundreds of

and

teller

listener,

often outside traditional settings. Pencil in hand, tape recorder on the table, the listener a limited

way



—who sometimes speaks upon the generosity

community Malaurie As

for myself,

I

his

first

Men

in

only

and

of the teller

his or her

says:

achieved most of

during the long winter nights

work

into French of the

in

decidedly privileged circumstance. Such collab-

in a

is

orations are built

the native tongue

in

my

progress

learning Polar Eskimo

in

Siorapaluk by making rough translations

Knud Rasmussen about

written in Eskimo by

stay in Thule: Auantfarnisalerssarutit Okalualut ("Legends of the

the North").

I

was aided immeasurably

in this

endeavor by

my

Greenlander friend John Petrussen, the catechist, and by the Polar Es-

kimos The Eskimos were particularly helpful long paraphrases or totally

unknown

in

pantomimes

who

from which he

set

in

recent

work

is

number

Knud Rasmussen,

1910 established an

out on

"descriptions of the Polar ing, sensitivity

a



explaining

often in

of words and expressions

to me.

Malaurie acknowledges ethnographer,



in

a

number

Eskimo

the Danish explorer and

arctic trading post at Thule,

of expeditions

[that] display a

and insight that are unequaled in part

an

homage

These resulted

depth of understand-

in arctic literature." All

to the predecessors in the field

concise history of northern ethnographic research can be found

Handbook

of

North American Indians, volumes 5 and

6.

is

Father Jules Jette,

the turn of the century lived in the

who

Koyukon

and ethnography

(his

"On Ten'a

Folk-lore"

is

I

for thirty years

village of

an astonishing archive of invaluable research into

in

A The

Naturally, today

another northern folklorist well might mention luminaries include here There

in

Nulato

Koyukon

do not around

He

left

linguistics

especially illuminating).

&&$>Nortbern T a

I

00&Z^^

33

summer

In the

woman met other people and showed them where

the

her husband had been cutting her arm to see

two brothers of the woman were

went out with

often

his wife,

"I

their brother-in-law.

cannot hold

off

she was

if

living with their mother.

any longer.

I

One day guess

the

The

brothers

young man

will kill

I

Later, the

fat.

told

your brothers

He went way off to a beaver lodge to work beaver. After he the woman told her brothers their lives were in danger and that

today." left,

they would be killed that day.

The

old

man and

her.

There was

tent.

The

the woman's father were sitting in the tent with

a large

stone by the

on the opposite

fire

old people stayed in the tent with their daughter.

He

and was going to throw out the stone. the way."

The

Her

it

and pulled

right

it

in

The

father got

"The stone

said,

stone was a very big one and was stuck

he got hold of

finally

side of the

brothers went off after the husband at the beaver lodge.

up

lying in

is

the sand, but

up and threw

it

right out

The stone was so large that no other person could have The old man watched the man moving such a big stone and

of the tent. lifted

it.

throwing

The

it.

three

young

fellows were working at the beaver lodge during

They had shut the beaver in a runway in the bank, not in The young husband told one of the brothers, "You feel for beaver." He had decided that when the brother was feeling for the

this time.

his lodge.

the

beaver he would run

a chisel into the

back of

his neck. Just as

he was

about to spear the man, the other brother caught the chisel and knoc ed it

one

to

side so

it

up, took the chisel,

missed.

Then

and threw

jumped

the brother being attacked

away.

it

The two brothers were very strong and were in no way frightened of the young murderer. They grabbed hold of the man and wrestled with him, using only their hands. While one of the brothers wrestled with the murderer, the other ran to the lake and

made

a

hole

in

the

ice.

Both

the brother and the murderer were about the same strength, and before

the ice-hole was finished they were tired out.

and started wrestling

and

it

sounded

just like thunder.

voice was far louder.

went

just as

to the lake

So the brother

They continued

and finished making

was big enough to shove

a

The

other brother came

the murderer called out with

person

all

his might,

called out too,

and

his

to wrestle while the other brother a

down

hole in the it,

ice.

When

the hole

they tried to throw the mur-

&»Northern T a

derer

in.

At

e s

I

last,

3&$&^^

they got him

in

the hole and shoved

him under the

ice.

The man was alive under the ice for a long time and he was singing. That is why the ice now makes a humming noise. The two brothers never left the lake until they were sure that the young, husband was not moving. Then they went back to the tent. When they came to the tent they started to sing out, "We have killed the one who was always wanting to kill us." They entered the tent and said, "We have killed the one who always wanted to kill us." The old man was sitting inside the tent, so they said to him, "Come out. We will kill you, too We do not want to make a mess of blood in our tent." The father was sitting bare-legged in the tent, he had been

telling those in the tent

had expected

The

old

his

son to

man crawled

were outside holding

came out

kill

about

all

the people he had killed, as he

the two brothers.

out of the tent, he did not walk.

on

their chisels

their shoulders.

The

brothers

As the old man

of the tent, the brothers struck both his legs with the chisels

and broke them. So when of his bones.

and shoved

The it

his legs

were broken the marrow came out

brothers took the

in his

marrow from the old man's bones

mouth As they did

that they asked him,

"Is

it

The old man answered, "Of course it is rich have killed many people it is bound to be rich." The brothers gave him a good so clip on the head when he said that. So that finished the murderers. pretty rich?"

I

Alder-Block

OYUKAGHIRO There

lived an old

woman who had

neither son nor daughter

One

time after cooking her supper, she climbed to the roof of her house to stop

up the chimney-hole. Then she heard from within

child's voice.

She was much frightened, but

still

and ran into the house. An infant boy was lying on the swaddled him and prepared food

for

floor

She

him She fed him on blood soup

and minced meat, and he grew from year

name Alder-Block He was an

a small

she descended hastily

to year.

She gave him the

excellent carpenter, and

of boards and of hollowed tree-trunks

made

fine

canoes



N ortbern T a

e s

I

>®&$&^^

many miles from the home of the giant. The next morning he got up and spent by himself

in

the canoe. But by the end of the third afternoon he began

He

to get lonely.

himself.

the whole day just paddling

So he

decided

wasn't

it

much

fun paddling around

started looking for a partner.

As he paddled along the

*

beach, he began singing this song: Vud

sba dab'

Who Before long a

"How

g'a

yu

a?

wants to come along with

by

me

for a ride?

moose heard him singing and walked out on

the beach.

go along with you

for a ride."

about me?" he asked.

"I'd like

to

"Oh, not you!" said the young man. "Your hooves are too sharp.

They might make you

a

hole

in

the bottom of

my

canoe. No,

I

don't

want

for a partner."

A porcupine came out next, and said, "How about me? I'd like to come out and go for a ride with you." "No. Not you," said old Chulyen. "Your quills are too sharp. They might make holes in the sides of my canoe." popped up alongside the canoe and

Pretty soon then a nice fat seal said,

"How

about taking

"You're just the one

As the the old

seal

crow

I

me

for a partner? I'd like to ride in

want," said the crow.

"Come on and

climbed into the boat, he looked so started thinking right

your canoe."

fat

away about how

get

in."

and juicy that

to

kill

him and

eat him.

Chulyen

told the seal that

and make camp

He

said he

it

was getting

knew

of a

late

and they'd better stop

good spot So they went ashore

and pulled the canoe up out of the water. Then old Chulyen turned back into

a

crow and

started walking

following along behind. far

He was

up

into the

heading for

woods with

a place

the seal

he remembered

The crow knew that the seal very long without water. Old Chulyen was pretty

inland where there wasn't any water.

couldn't survive for

wise and very crooked

When

they

finally

reached the spot they made camp, and the crafty

down next to the fire "What are we going to eat?" he asked.

old crow sat

"I

don't know," said the seal

The crow thought do

I'll

cut

my

"I'm getting

for a while

foot off and roast

"I'm

it

Then he on

hungry

"

hungry too said,

a stick for

"I

"

know what we can

you over the

fire,

and

"

$>®®&^^

you can cut

4i

off

one of your

But the seal said,

don't

"I

"No, no," said Chulyen,

you won't even

And

feel

flippers

and cook

want

do

to

that.

it

hurt too much."

It'll

doesn't hurt at

"See" said the crow,

Then he whacked

all,"

seal's

word

Then

was roasting

seal

quickly he spit on the

right over.

own

skinny foot for the

while his quite

sizzling sounds as

own

flipper

So

fair.

how

was

soon

as

shriveled

it

burnt

like a

fat

all

at

it

Soon they

feel that he'd

up and turned

all.

But the

seal's

just rolling off the

sputtered in the

fire.

dried-up and skinny the crow's foot was,

and greasy, and that the trade

as the seal

grease from the flipper

seal.

But the seal began to

fire.

brown and grease was

a juicy

remarked

crow grabbed an

the

hard and black, and didn't look very good to eat

making

so

said the seal.

wound healed

been cheated. As the crow's foot cooked,

The

it

told you."

"I

off his

were both sizzling over the

sides,

make

over.

it all

As they watched, the

flipper

I'll

it."

axe and chopped off one of his flippers.

"Why,

1

for me."

won't hurt. You watch.

"it

before the seal could say another

wound and rubbed

it

didn't

seem

turned his back the crow smeared

over his foot, which by that time looked

stick.

"Look," he said. "Grease

is

coming out

all

over

my

foot

now

The seal looked, and sure enough, real grease was rolling liberally down the grizzled remains of Chulyen's spindly foot. He felt a litt e better

Soon the meat was done, and the two partners feast.

The

seal's flipper

tasted excellent

and made

but the crow's foot tasted even worse than it

did was

need

"I

can

I

find

make

some

The

settled

meal

looked.

fit

back

for a

for a chief,

The only

thing

the seal thirsty.

a drink,"

he

said.

"That dried-up foot made

me

thirsty.

Where

some water?"

"You wait right find

it

a

I'll

seal

here," said Chulyen.

bring

thought

said, yes, that

it it

back here

"I'll

go look

for water.

fine.

I

for you."

was nice of the crow to make such an

would be

When

So old Chulyen went

offer

and

off to search for

water.

For the longest time, however, he didn't even leave camp.

hung around

in

the bushes and watched the blubbery

He

just

seal get thirstier

N

or\bern T a

and

^

e s

I

Then, when the old crow did

thirstier.

By the time he

quite a while.

he stayed away for

leave,

came

finally

back into camp

strolling

with some water, the

seal

him But

they reached each other, the crow tripped and

and

fell

just before

thought he was going to die and ran to meet

spilled the water

all

The

over the ground.

seal

almost had a

heart attack

Chulyen apologized sp much the he

"Come on

said,

with me.

I'll

fainting seal forgave him.

show you where you can

get

Then some

water."

So they

started

They went

walk.

the ground.

in

he lunged

in as

a

all

it!



slaves drink

So the

for the

a seal of at.

seal,

first

well.

You

You

the middle-class people

At

man



said,

"Hold

plunged

the ordinaiy villagers

head

began gorging himself.

Chulyen jumped

at

is

the

the one

fully

He

well. But before

You

can't drink at

prominence Only

— drink

and

there.

You must

rich men."

comment toward

hurled himself without

his

on!

of your position and

thirst at the well of the chiefs

that, the seal

He

Why

can't drink there!"

without a word, rushed on to the second

that well That's not for a

well

can't drink at that well.

your prestige and dignity. That well

he could immerse himself, the crow

quench your

he could hardly

the seal could do to keep from diving right

But the old crow said, "Wait! idea of

thirst

long way before they came to three wells of water

was

It

weak from

the seal so

off,

the last

beneath the surface of the water and

was completely dried

him and began pecking

guts out from behind. Just once the seal

out. Right

hole

a

popped

him

in

his

away old

to pull his

head above the

water.

"Ouch!" he

"Why, you

said.

"What

are

re so dirty," the

And he went on The seal was

said. "I'm trying to

clean

you

up."

pecking.

dunked

his

head under the water

Soon old Chulyen had pecked

into the seal (for a seal's hide

is

a

hole right

tender) and pulled his guts out

The

died then, and the crow feasted on blubber for several days

At the end of

changed back his

crow

so thirsty he just

again and kept drinking.

seal

you doing?"

this time,

when

the meat had

all

been eaten, Chulyen

into a man. Returning to the water's edge, he launched

canoe and paddled on down the shoreline to

a

nearby

village.

00^«x*3*3x^3X*>>^^

said Chulyen.

first,"

it

bear he tried

first

The

in a stream.

The

I

bear didn't see him at

right

on was

it

big brownie fishing for salmon

a

old crow flew up behind him and landed on a rock.

behind him. But

and Chulyen fidgeted

first,

as

soon

Chulyen jumped backward and flew

said. "But

The magpie decided

off.

him when he came back

"You're scared," they told

"No, I'm not," he

for several minutes

bear turned and spotted him,

as the

to try

you guys make too much

when

the others by lasting longer than Chulyen did. But started to reach out for him, he lost his nerve

The water

noise."

next on the same bear, and he surprised

it

and flew

the bear

off.

ouzel was sure he could do better than his partners, so

after the bear

had

settled

back down to fishing again, the tiny black

bird flew over and landed right beside him, but facing the other way.

Since the

little bird's tail

meal for

sure.

swooped

in

was toward him, the bear thought he had

But just as he reached out to grab

and cut the bear under

the

it,

arm and the bear died

his

After that the water ouzel killed lots of bears for the three of to eat. In fact, there store It

was so much meat they had

to build a

them

house to

it in.

wasn't long, however, before they noticed that the meat and

seemed

to

fat

be disappearing from the cache-house during the night So

one evening the with

a

ouzel

little

water ouzel hid inside the door of the house

little

and waited

a stick

After dark he heard

to see

who was

stealing their food

someone walking around

outside.

When

the

door slowly pushed open, the ouzel jumped out and began hitting the thief with his stick. But before

the intruder ran

The

he could capture him or

next morning Chulyen showed up with scars

When

tell

who

it

was,

off.

asked about

it,

he

said,

"I

hit

myself with

all

over him

a stick."

But the magpie and the ouzel were suspicious now, and several nights later

both of them waited inside the cache for the

Chulyen showed up they knew

thief

When

old

he was the one, but they waited until

he was inside and starting to eat the meat before they jumped him. "I

wasn't stealing anything," he told

handed "You guys falling out

I

was

didn't tie the

just fixing

it

up."

them

after

they caught him red-

meat down very good and

it

was



N orthern T a

When

e s

I

e*$x$>>^^

up the Indian and

said that in his

Ta

said, "Stop.

You

cut off

my

ear."

Indian

he had been dreaming and asked what the president was doing

room. The president said that he suspected that the Indian had

another family because he was shouting children's names

The

The

Indian said, "No,

I

don't have any other family."

The

in his sleep.

end.

1

mi

mnrriiroonc t-

fc

iirrw

i

Hiimnii

"

gcic

PHRT TC13D Why with

Wings Outspread

How

Things Got to Be

the

XTXtKvX

Owls Die

Way

They Are

"THE WAY-BACK TIME Metis man, "was

a

of ancestors

when we

and

began to

first

Sam Beulie, know anything." Whether spirits," said

explaining a feature of the landscape, the smallest zoological particular, or the larger workings of the cosmos, origin tales are infused with a sense of revelation wonderfully invoked in the King Island Eskimo verb cfaugri,

which means the increase

takes place in childhood. In tales ." .

.

in curiosity

fact, certain

which address the oldest of mysteries "The

How

did

human beings

snowshoes?

How

origin of the sun

first

appear on earth?

first

knowledge, such

earliest technical

and consciousness that

Athapaskan

as

how

tribes

begin those

time this happened

Who

imparted the

to build an igloo or fashion

did the constellations get to the sky?

What

is

the

and moon? By answering the hows and whys of

life,

such tales provide successive generations with

core of belief, uniting

a

people in the same common knowledge "When tell my grandchildren how the world got this way," Mary Piwese, a Cree woman, remarked, "I am satisfied it is the same way was educated." I

I

Accounts of creation chronicle the inception of order out of viously inchoate condition. Raven of the

most

common

— or

in Siberia,

Big Raven

a pre-

—was one

of creators, Yet throughout the North, accounts

of humankind's appearance

on earth reveal

a

number

of creators at

work. According to the Abenaki, Micmac, and other Maritime Indian the great

tribes,

god Kuloscap used

taneously produce liness

but also

human

for

the

beings.

He

his

most potent magic to spon-

did this partly to cure his lone-

entertainment of animals,

whom

he had

systematically shrunk from giants to the size they are today. Kuloscap

then went on to defeat every malevolent demon, wizard, witch, and ice giant that

threatened his beloved creatures who, like himself, walked

on two

But finally Kuloscap could not save

feet.

own devices. human beings

In

one Abenaki

to his

story,

humankind from

when Kuloscap

companion wolves, the wolves

fell

first

its

displayed

into hysterical

laughter. "Kuloscap," they cried, "you have a great sense of humor!" In the region of the Mackenzie Delta Eskimo, several cosmogonic myths maintain that the Great Beaver created two brothers: one was

Northern T a

$$*$>«^^

e s

I

"Who's chasing

"Some other

it

now?"

one."

"Who?" "The-One-Who-Chases."

"One time

was out walking. Out

I

at night.

heard

I

a

loud

flint-

"

scrape "Flint-scrape?" "Yes.

And

looked up to the sky."

I

"The sound traveled down "Yes. "It

A

to you?"

flint-scrape."

was him, The-One-Who-Chases

other one wouldn't stop to make a

wasn't the other one.

He'd be found

that

K- H(f

W*Why

It

fire like

Owls Die

The out."

Hflt

Wings Outspread

with

OSWAMPY CREEO In a

hunting camp lived

Owl Old Man. He had many moods each day a mood at you and at

and did not hide them Sometimes he threw

other times he took them out on the ice to throw them around,

away from people.

It

was

also

known

that his

moods caused

far

various

owls.

One

person said he saw a

clump

and before

That

is

how

mood

of

Owl Old Man

clump of snow This happened up on

owl out of fell,

a

it

it

hit the

went with

his

ground

it

a

cause

a

snowy

branch The snow-

was an owl, which flew away

moods sometimes

mood caused a decoy-mouse to scamper away! It came alive from his mood That decoy-mouse was out inviting an owl down onto it an owl from one of Owl Old Man's moods. One time, also, while he was sitting in a cabin, an old woman was Another time

his



sweeping out the ashes from

a fireplace.

She swept them away down

000O00«^^

husband would eat asked the

girl

why

looked for her for away. tain.

a

When

as well.

oil,

they were eating, the mother

The mother told how they had to know how the girl got

she had got

lost.

whole

She wanted

year.

The daughter and her husband were eating behind the gut curThe old folks were eating too. They were eating what their

daughter brought, things

Now

She

about.

like dried

the daughter started to said she hadn't

but that the

man

tell

wanted

want her

didn't

look for her, but he wouldn't

let

caribou meat with tallow.

her mother of the things she asked

to leave without telling her parents,

to

tell

them. She

her

tell

them.

knew they would

The mother knew now why her daughter was always outside. And the man was from the moon. It was so stormy he carried her on his back, that time last year. The father thanked the man. He told him to come again. The mother made a sealskin parka, sealskin pants, getting ready for the couple to leave They stayed one year. The parents could see their daughter, but they could only see the man's

One

time, another

man came

to them.

to see

there.

That man came

in

and

ate.

He

moon, but they talked and he heard

That person would always

outside.

He

couldn't see those

two from the

their voices. After they ate, that

looked to see what kind of sled these

had. Their dogs' harnesses and lines were sled

against the curtain.

what they were doing. He came while the couple stayed

come

man went

shadow

was made of wood,

its

made

visitors

of caribou hides Their

runners had no shoes But the father

mac le

new sled with whalebone shoes. That man who came stayed overnight for the first time. He went home when it was daylight When he got back to his home, he told about the two people who were staying with the old folks. He told about everything these visitors had: their dogs' chains were made of wood and the lines of caribou skin, the dogs' chains turned around the them

a

posts but he couldn't see the dogs.

These dogs even

ate, still

he couldn't

see them.

After one year,

when

it

was becoming

spring, the couple

go home. They wanted to take home some skin rope but

ucjruk oil,

no things of caribou. They loaded

wanted

to

dried skins, and

their sled.

They went on the ground for a while, then they went in the air. Then the parents couldn't see them

They in

the

started. air,

up

Ta

Northern T a

1

1 s

&&XX>>Nortbern T a

e s

I

&V^^

Giant They keep doing

The

mountain.

last

time Beaver

squeeze his muscles. They

on top

that Giant has

till

"You might

as well kill

hand That's where

my

they get to the very top of that

this until

roll

is

above the Giant, he jump on him,

down

to the

bottom

Little

Beaver stays

no more strength.

me

now," Giant

strength

is.

says.

"Poke

in

You made me weak.

middle of I

my

am no good

nothing now."

for

Man pokes him in the hand and he bleeds Then Beaver Man cuts up that Giant in pieces. He So Beaver

and wherever those pieces drop he

pieces,

rabbit

he

— those

little

them

throws these

to turn into rock

tiny white rabbits. Every time he throws a piece

him, "Turn into rock rabbit."

tell

"Thut."

noise or

He make

it

noise like that. People not supposed to

make

that Giant, he start

kills

more about why people

O

left

down

again. He's trying to

trail

that river.

BEAVERMAN MEETS MINK LADY

Next place he comes sees that she tans

to,

sees that

human

Mink

being's skin

Woman

—long

She's

smoking

arms, long legs

he comes up she put that skin away quick. But he already see

know what "Oh,

my

tries to fool

"Since "I'll

it

skin.

When it

and

"

She

was

husband," she say "I'm just going to look for you

him

when

I'm

your husband?" Beaver

go get water, cook

for you," she tell

she wants to sleep with him right away. animals

that

brings on cold weather

After he find out

He

tells

to death.

— mink—

live inside

her

ask.

him

He

When

she comes back

looks at her and he sees

"

107

&>>Nortkern T a

I

e s