Men of the Battle of Britain
 9781473847675, 1473847672

Table of contents :
CONTENTS
Dedication
Foreword
Author’s Acknowledgments
Author’s Introduction
The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust’sIntroduction and Acknowledgements
The Men
The Memorials
The Squadron Rolls
Selected Bibliography
Glossary
Additional Images

Citation preview

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MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

A Biographical Directory of The Few

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust is the custodian of the National Memorial to The Few on the cliffs between Folkestone and Dover. The Trust and the Memorial were founded by the late Wing Commander Geoffrey Page, who was shot down and terribly burned in 1940, becoming a founder member of the Guinea Pig Club. At the centre of the site is the Memorial itself – a seated airman looking out over the Channel with no indication visible of his rank or nationality. Another major feature is the Christopher Foxley-Norris Memorial Wall on which are listed the names of the aircrew who earned the Battle of Britain Clasp. In March 2015 Her Majesty the Queen, accompanied by His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, visited the National Memorial and declared open The Wing, a new visitor centre in the shape of a Spitfire wing. A major feature of The Wing is The Scramble Experience, an interactive and atmospheric re-telling of the events of 1940. The Memorial is supported by the Friends of The Few, offering a range of benefits to members.

Frontline Books, an imprint of Pen & Sword Books Limited, 47 Church Street, Barnsley, S. Yorkshire, S70 2AS. Email: [email protected] www.frontline-books.com

Almost 3,000 Allied airmen flew in the Battle of Britain. Over 500 of them died during the Battle. First published in 1989 this seminal work has been extensively updated and expanded with many new photographs.

Men of

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN A Biographical Directory of The Few

After its first publication in 1989 this book became the standard work of reference on the aircrew who took part in the Battle of Britain. Now Men of the Battle of Britain has been painstakingly revised, updated and many new photographs have been included for the 75th anniversary of the Battle. The book has more than 600 pages packed with information on ‘The Few’, much of it never previously published. Researchers from across the United Kingdom and overseas have combined to create this treasure chest of knowledge. This is an invaluable book for the historian, researcher, aviation enthusiast, medal collector or anyone with an interest in the men who fought against the Luftwaffe in the summer and autumn of 1940.

MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN A Biographical Directory of The Few

Published in association with The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust, PO Box 337, West Malling, Kent, ME6 9AA. www.battleofbritainmemorial.org Design by: Dave Cassan Front jacket: Pilots of 32 Squadron’s ‘B’ Flight resting between sorties at RAF Hawkinge, July 29th 1940. (ww2images; coloured by Jon Wilkinson)

£60

Frontline Books in association with

Kenneth G Wynn

Kenneth G Wynn www.frontline-books.com

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust

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MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN A Biographical Directory of The Few

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The 1939-1945 Star with the clasp ‘Battle of Britain’ was issued to all aircrew from across the Empire and its allies who flew operationally with any of the squadrons listed below between the July 10th and October 31st 1940. The following squadrons and units were eligible for the Battle of Britain clasp: Squadrons 1, 1 (RCAF), 3, 17, 19, 23, 25, 29, 32, 41, 43, 46, 54, 56, 64, 65, 66, 72, 73, 74, 79, 85, 87, 92, 111, 141, 145, 151, 152, 213, 219, 222, 229, 232, 234, 235, 236, 238, 242, 245, 247, 248, 249, 253, 257, 263, 264, 266, 302, 303, 310, 312, 501, 504, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 607, 609, 610, 611, 615 and 616. Flights 421, 422 and the Fighter Interception Unit Fleet Air Arm 804 and 808 Naval Air Squadrons Those pilots and other aircrew who may have been on the strength of any of the above units but who did not fly operationally, or those from other units who may have been in combat, did not receive the clasp.

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MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN A Biographical Directory of The Few

The pilots and other aircrew from throughout the British Empire and its allies who flew with the Royal Air Force, Fighter Command, between July 10th and October 31st 1940, and earned the ‘immediate’ award of the 1939-1945 Star with Battle of Britain Clasp. With a foreword by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales.

Kenneth G. Wynn

FRONTLINE BOOKS

In association with

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MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN A Biographical Directory of The Few First published in 1989 by Gliddon Books, Norwich, Norfolk. This edition published in 2015 by Frontline Books, an imprint of Pen & Sword Books Ltd, 47 Church Street, Barnsley, S. Yorkshire, S70 2AS. This edition published in association with The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust, PO Box 337, West Malling, Kent, ME6 9AA. www.battleofbritainmemorial.org The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust is the charity charged with caring for the National Memorial to the Few at Capel-le-Ferne in Kent. The Trust also works to preserve the memory of Churchill’s ‘Few’, the men who took part in the Battle of Britain and helped protect the United Kingdom from invasion in the summer and early autumn of 1940.

Copyright © The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust, 2015. The right of Kenneth G. Wynn to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. ISBN: 978-1-47384-767-5. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the publisher. Any person who does any unauthorized act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims for damages. CIP data records for this title are available from the British Library. Printed and bound by CPI UK. Typeset in 8/9 point Garamond For more information on our books, please email: [email protected], write to us at the above address, or visit:

www.frontline-books.com

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CONTENTS

Dedication Foreword

vi vii

Author’s Acknowledgments Author’s Introduction

viii ix

The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust’s Introduction and Acknowledgements

x

The Men

1

The Memorials The Squadron Rolls Selected Bibliography Glossary Additional Images

586 587 601 603 604

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For Anah For her constant encouragement, unfailing support and invaluable commonsense

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AUTHOR’S ACKNOWLEDGMENTS My books on the Battle of Britain have always contained much information kindly supplied by people interested in this endlessly-fascinating subject. Their generosity in passing information on to me has always been a major factor in each subsequent edition. This one is no exception.

It is impossible to thank all who have helped, but the following people have all made such important contributions to this latest edition that I feel they merit a special mention:

Ron Durand. An unfailing supplier of obituaries from British newspapers over many years. Living as I do in New Zealand, the information contained therein would never have reached me otherwise.

The late Bruce Burton. His help over the years was invaluable. He was a researcher-extraordinaire, spending so much time at The National Archives and then sending me information gathered in instalments alphabetically. It was when he had reached the letter K that Bruce was told that he was very ill.

Laurie Chester. I thank him for information sent and questions answered immediately on the telephone. Always patient, ever helpful, and extremely knowledgeable, Laurie has always been there. Simon Muggleton. For the supply of information and photographs. Simon is very knowledgeable and so very willing to help.

When he realised how serious things were, he put all the information destined for me on to a CD and this disc, with an accompanying letter, was handed to me by his sister, Cherry, at Bruce’s funeral. I was leaving New Zealand for the United Kingdom on the Friday, intending to go and see Bruce soon after my arrival. On the Thursday evening, the day before I left, Cherry telephoned me to say that her brother had died earlier that day. It was such a shock for me.

Andy Saunders. For his pioneering work on aircraft excavation and recovery of pilots’ remains. The information he has brought to light over so many years has been invaluable. A good friend to me for a long time. Dean Sumner. For information on some of the participants but particularly for telling me about relatives of Battle of Britain men who also died on active service during the war.

The letter he left for me was particularly poignant. It began: ‘Dear Ken, I am not very well at present and I do not know what the future holds. I did not want to let you down, so I have been spending every possible moment in going through the remainder of the alphabet.’ The letter ended: ‘I wish you all the best for the future. It has been a pleasure helping you and I am only sorry that I cannot take it any further. With very best wishes, Bruce.’

Group Captain Patrick Tootal OBE, DL. Without whose instant enthusiasm for the project and rapid action, this edition would never have been published. To all those survivors of the Battle of Britain and widows and relatives of deceased participants who have been wonderfully helpful in providing me with records of service, photographs, information and, in many cases, hospitality over the past twenty years.

My memories of Bruce and knowing that he would have wished me to complete his work have been over-riding factors in the effort I have put into this updated version of Men of the Battle of Britain. I felt it was the very least I could do in his memory.

Last but by no means least, my dear wife, Anah, who has always been a major driving force and is always there for me with sound advice and help when I seem to need it most, which is quite frequently on a project like this.

Sam Cope. My friend and mentor in all things technological as far as data transfer and computers are concerned. His help was always given ungrudgingly and patiently whenever I asked for it. Without Sam I would not have been able to get it all down in a usable and reproducible state.

I thank all of the above people and I hope that the reader will find this updated edition of the book to be an informative and worthwhile addition to the literature of the Battle of Britain.

Gerry Burke. A veritable miracle worker where the supply of photographs for the book has been concerned. Gerry has been so involved in sending me so many, otherwise unobtainable, pictures. I am so grateful to him.

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AUTHOR’S INTRODUCTION This book does not give an account of the Battle of Britain, nor will it deal with the events leading up to it or with the technical details of the types of aircraft which took part. These aspects of the Battle have all been very adequately covered in hundreds of books over the past sixty years.

been included in previous books of mine. In other cases, where inclusion is questionable, I have left in the men concerned, on the basis of their long-time acceptance by the Battle of Britain Fighter Association.

‘The Few’ is a term that was immortalised by Winston Churchill in his speech to the House of Commons on August 20 1940. In fact the term is rather deceptive. ‘The Few’ numbers over 2,900 men who qualify for the Battle of Britain clasp to the 1939-1945 Star, a campaign medal. The clasp is a symbol which denotes that its wearer was a pilot or aircrew member in the Battle of Britain and who served in an eligible squadron or unit of Fighter Command, or to have served in one of the Coastal Command or Fleet Air Arm squadrons that were seconded to Fighter Command for periods between July 10 and October 31 1940. The minimum requirement for the award of the clasp was to have flown at least one authorised operational sortie between these dates, whilst serving with one of the 71 eligible units.

In this edition, new names have been added, which, as far as I know, have never previously appeared on the Roll. These inclusions are backed up by documentary evidence, again principally from The National Archives. Some have appeared in my previous editions as ‘unknowns’, about whom no information had been found. Identifying information has now come to light for them. Also included this time are some men from 263 and 616 Squadrons. The Operations Record Books of these two units are somewhat lacking, with the result that documentary evidence is not available to confirm the eligibility of the said men. However, I have made this quite clear in each man’s individual account. Until such time as confirmation or denial can be proven, they have been included.

The vast majority of ‘The Few’ were British. Many men served in the pre-war Royal Air Force, either as officers with permanent, non-permanent or short service commissions, or as NCO pilots, many of whom had originally joined asaircraft apprentices or had re-mustered from their basic technical trades or as Airmen aircrew, flying as air gunners or observers.

As far as illustrations are concerned, nearly 300 new ones have been added. The quality of some of the photographs still leaves much to be desired but this is inevitable with enlargements from copies of copies, many of which are from original photographs taken with what are now considered primitive box cameras.

Flying alongside these career airmen in the Battle were the ‘weekend fliers’ of the Auxiliary Air Force, the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and men from the University Air Squadrons. These were men who had trained in their spare time and were mobilised shortly before the outbreak of war. In addition there were other men flying in the Battle, mainly in aircrew categories, who volunteered for aircrew in the early months of the war and then completed their training in time to be posted to operational units to take part in the Battle. Finally, there were more than 50 pilots of the Fleet Air Arm, some flying in the Battle with RAF fighter squadrons and the remainder serving with 804 and 808 Naval Air Squadrons on dockyard defence.

It is a source of satisfaction to me that this edition contains likenesses of so many of the men who flew in the Battle of Britain. I feel that it adds the human aspect of those involved. As a subject of interest, the Battle of Britain seems to be gaining momentum with each succeeding generation, rather than losing it. Its importance to the war’s final outcome cannot be over-stated, in spite of some opinions expressed in a few recently-published books.

From the Commonwealth came pilots from Australia, Canada, Rhodesia, South Africa and Ireland and pilots, observers and air gunners from New Zealand and one observer from Jamaica. Also in the cosmopolitan make-up of ‘The Few’ were pilots from Czechoslovakia, France, Poland and the United States and pilots and a few wireless operator/air gunners from Belgium. To complete the number of participants, there was one stateless man, who had been Austrian before 1938.

As ever, I continue to have an unbounded admiration for ‘The Few’, for the men who won the Battle of Britain. This new edition is a further attempt on my part to record those men for posterity, to tell who they were and to give some account of what became of the survivors after the Battle and their subsequent activities in every theatre of war.

Research on many of these airmen is ongoing and will continue to be so, at least for the foreseeable future. This edition includes the results of a further ten years’ research, undertaken since the publication of the previous, second, edition in 1999. The vast majority of individual write-ups have been amended, with varying amounts of new information.

I am very proud to have been in the Royal Air Force myself and to have trained for aircrew. Peter Townsend’s reference to the RAF being ‘the best flying club in the world’ would seem to be a very apt description.

There is a continuing discussion as to whether certain men on the Battle of Britain Roll should in fact be on it at all. In the light of documentary evidence, principally from The National Archives, I have omitted some men that have

Kenneth G. Wynn Auckland, New Zealand, 2015

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INTRODUCTION The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust is honoured to be instrumental in the publication of this third edition of Men of the Battle of Britain by Kenneth G. Wynn. Since it first appeared in 1989 this book has gained a deserved reputation as the foremost repository of information on the Allied airmen who qualified for the 1939-1945 Star with Battle of Britain Clasp, while fighting to save the United Kingdom from invasion. Now, through the enormous generosity of a supporter, the Trust owns the rights to the book and is able to present this new and greatly updated and expanded edition.

HRH The Prince of Wales has reminded us that ‘The Few’ must always be remembered. This edition of Kenneth G. Wynn’s Men of the Battle of Britain, so painstakingly masterminded by Geoff, will go a long way to ensure that this will happen.

Everybody with an interest in the events of the summer and autumn of 1940 owes a tremendous debt for the monumental task Ken Wynn has undertaken, over many years, in recording the lives of the airmen. We salute his achievement. This edition has been prepared for publication by Geoff Simpson, a Trustee of the Memorial Trust. ‘The Few’ themselves, and their relatives, were a vital source of information and photographs. Many other people have assisted Geoff and their invaluable help is identified below.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael Graydon, GCB, CBE President, The Battle of Britain Memorial Trust

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN MEMORIAL TRUST’S ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Many people have assisted Geoff Simpson in the preparation of this edition. His immediate team consisted of Gerry Burke, Laurie Chester, Robin Green, Richard Hunting CBE, Martin Mace, Edward McManus, Wing Commander Andy Simpson, Margaret Simpson and Group Captain Patrick Tootal, OBE, DL.

Pitchfork MBE, Dr Jiri Rajlich, Fergus Read, Wing Commander Jim Routledge, Andy Saunders, Mark Sheridan, Colin Smith, Dean Sumner, John Sutton, John Sweeney, Justine Taylor, Cleland Thom, Victoria Thompson and Janet Tootal BEM.

Others who gave invaluable assistance and advice included: Kristen Alexander, Colonel Pierre-Alain Antoine, Bryan Badham, Craig Brandon, Ian Brentnall, David Brocklehurst MBE, Derek Broughton, Dr Stephen Bungay, Simon Butler, John Clarke, David Cook, Adrian Cork, Bob Cossey, Sebastian Cox, Dr Jeremy Crang, Hazel Crozier, Philip Curtis, Group Captain Alex Dickson OBE QVRM AE, Tom Dolezal, Andy Dunn, Alice Eckersley, Fik Geuens, Rt Hon Sir Martin Gilbert CBE, Gary Godel, Geoffrey Goodman CBE, Margaret Hobbs, Wing Commander ‘Jeff ’ Jefford MBE, Eileen Jones, David Long, Dr Tony Mansell, Barry M. Marsden, Sara Mitchell, Peter Moore, Wendy Mott, Geneviève Moulard, Simon Muggleton, Tim Pierce, Air Commodore Graham

Much help was also given by the archivists, librarians and historians of many schools, museums and other institutions, including the Air Historical Branch (RAF), RAF College Cranwell and the Imperial War Museum. Squadron associations have contributed their knowledge, including those associated with Nos. 74, 504 and 610 squadrons.

Websites consulted included: www.bbm.org.uk www.fcafa.wordpress.com www.oxforddnb.com www.themerseysidefew.com

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THE MEN

“What General Weygand called the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the War. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward to broad sunlit lands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say ‘This was their finest hour’.” Winston Churchill, June 18 1940

“The gratitude of every home in our Island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen, who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of the world war by their prowess and devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.” Winston Churchill, August 20 1940

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AUTHOR’S NOTES To clarify information given in the individual entries, the following notes will be of help in using this book:

2. Honours and awards for all men other than Polish or Czech personnel are followed by the date of The London Gazette in which they were announced.

1. The service details under each name heading are as follows: • The service number is the man’s final one. If he was in the ranks or an NCO during the Battle of Britain and was later commissioned, his officer’s number is given in the heading and his original airman’s number is provided in brackets in the text. If he was never commissioned, the man’s original airman’s number is listed in the heading. • The rank given is the highest gazetted rank attained during the Battle of Britain period. • The aircrew category is that in which the man was employed during the Battle of Britain period. In squadron ORBs of 1940, Radar Operators are described as Radio Operators. I have used the term Radar Operator throughout to avoid confusion. • The nationality given is that held at the time of the Battle of Britain. • The squadrons and units given in the headings are those in which the man served with or was attached to during the Battle of Britain period. Where an individual, such as a Station Commander, flew an operational sortie, the squadron given is that with which he flew the sortie, although he was neither on the strength of that squadron or attached to it. He qualified for the Battle of Britain clasp by flying such an authorised sortie.

3. For Polish and Czech personnel, the date given is that of their respective Air Force Orders which listed the awards. 4. Commissioned rank details are listed at the bottom of each entry. Once a man was on full-time service, no differentiation is made as to whether his commission is AAF, RAFVR, etc. The dates given are The London Gazette announcement dates. 5. Abbreviations which appear in the entries are explained in a glossary at the end of the book. 6. As an additional reference aid, a complete list of eligible squadrons and units appears at the end of the book, with all the men who served with or were attached to them during the Battle of Britain period. They are listed alphabetically and the rank given is, in the case of officers, the highest gazetted rank attained during the period. Acting ranks have not been taken into account because of their purely temporary nature.

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A HUBERT HASTINGS ADAIR 580088

Sgt

Pilot British

course. Over Dunkirk on June 2 Adams shot down a Ju 87 and probably destroyed a Bf 109. Flying from Ternhill on July 22, he made a forced-landing on the beach at Colwyn Bay, in Spitfire N 3062. The aircraft was towed on to the promenade by the Army, to escape the incoming tide. On September 21 Adams was sent up to investigate an unidentified aircraft over Liverpool and sighted a Do 215 of 2(F)/121 on photo-reconnaissance. He climbed to intercept and tried to turn the aircraft back to Hooton Park. The German pilot did not comply and Adams shot the aircraft down at Dolgelly, Merionethshire. It crash-landed at Trawsfynydd. One crew-member was killed and the other three captured, wounded. Adams joined 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on September 29 and three days later shared in destroying a Bf 109. On October 7 he was shot down by return fire from a Do 17 and baled out of Spitfire N 3267, landing at Douglas Farm, Postling. On October 30 he damaged a Bf 109. Adams was posted away from 41 Squadron in April 1941. He was in the RAF until 1943, when he was released as a Squadron Leader. He later went to live in South Africa and died there in 1995.

151 and 213 Squadrons

Adair, who was born in 1917, was educated at the City of Norwich School. He entered the RAF as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot in 1936. He reported for elementary flying training on January 6 and after successfully completing the course, he was sent to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on March 2 1936 for formal enlistment. Adair went to 3 FTS, South Cerney on March 16 for No 17 Course, which he completed on December 17 1936, passing out as a Sergeant-Pilot. He joined 35 Squadron at Worthy Down on the 20th, to fly Fairey Gordons. On September 25 1939 Adair joined 88 Squadron, equipped with Fairey Battles and then based at Mourmelon in France, with the AASF. The squadron returned to England in mid-June 1940 and in August Adair volunteered for Fighter Command and was sent to Digby on September 4, to join 151 Squadron. He moved to 213 Squadron at Tangmere on the 16th. After being involved in a night landing accident on November 5, Adair was back in action again the following afternoon and did not return from combat over the Southampton area. Adair is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 11. It is now believed that Hurricane, V 7602, which crashed at Pigeon House Farm, Widley, Hampshire was Adair’s. It was excavated on October 6 1979 and the pilot’s remains were found. They were later sent to the Portchester Crematorium for ‘disposal’. This aircraft was almost certainly shot down by Major Helmut Wick of JG 2.

APO (AAF) 11.10.38

FO

Pilot British

FO 3.9.40

FL 3.9.41

SL 1.7.44

ERIC HENRY ADAMS 742165

Sgt

Pilot British

236 Squadron

Adams joined the RAFVR in May 1938 and did his elementary flying training at 29 E&RFTS, Luton. Called up on September 1 1939, he went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 9, for No 42 Course. Adams completed his training on March 23 1940 and, after converting to Blenheims at the Coastal Command Landplane Pilots Pool at Silloth, he joined 236 Squadron at Filton in June. The squadron was with Fighter Command during the early months of the Battle of Britain and then returned to Coastal Command. Adams was posted with his flight to Aldergrove on November 19 1940, where it joined a flight of 235 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. He flew his first operational sortie with 272 on December 1. Later in the month Adams was posted to 252 Squadron, recently reformed at Aldergrove. Early in 1941 Adams contracted a throat virus and was in hospital for four months. He was taken off operational flying and in September 1941 went to Henlow as a test pilot for newly-assembled Hurricanes, testing Packard-Merlin engines. In mid-1943 Adams did a flying control course and was afterwards posted to N’dola, Northern Rhodesia, a staging post on the South Africa/Egypt route. He returned to the UK in October 1944 and became an aircraft controller at RAF Carnaby. Adams was released in April 1946, as a Warrant Officer. He was a successful estate agent until his retirement in 1982. He died in 2003.

DENNIS ARTHUR ADAMS 90537

PO 26.8.39

611 and 41 Squadrons

Born in Banbury on May 6 1913, Adams was educated at Liskeard High School, Wallasey. He passed the entrance examination for Cambridge University but then decided to do an apprenticeship in the light leather industry. He finished his time at a tannery in Northampton and took a job with the firm there. On April 14 1936 he joined Class ‘F’ of the RAF Reserve, on a five year engagement and became a Sergeant u/t Pilot the next day. He began flying training at 7 E&RFTS, Desford. The course required nine weeks full-time training in the first six months, on Tiger Moths, and two weeks in the second six months on Harts, still at Desford. No uniform was given. After the RAFVR was formed, Adams transferred into it in early 1937, as a SergeantPilot, having qualified after his Hart training. The RAFVR flying weekends were spent at 28 E&RFTS at Meir in Staffordshire. In 1938 Adams applied to join 610 Squadron, AAF but there were no vacancies, so he applied to 611 Squadron at Speke in July 1938 and was accepted. He was commissioned and given L60 uniform allowance to spend at Gieves, Liverpool. The squadron went to camp at Duxford on August 13 1939 and was mobilised on to a war footing on the 24th. Adams was detached to RAF Locking on February 18 1940 for a week-long parachute

HUGH CHARLES ADAMS 85645

PO

Pilot British

501 Squadron

Adams, from Oxted, Surrey, joined the RAFVR in January 1938 (741254). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training and was with 501 Squadron in early May 1940, as a Sergeant-Pilot. He was flown to France, with other squadron personnel, in a Bombay transport on May 11. The aircraft crashed, when it landed at Betheniville. Adams was among those injured and he was repatriated to England. He rejoined 501 on July 17 1940 and made his first flight on the 21st. Adams destroyed

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MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

He is buried in the churchyard at Noordwolde, Weststevllingwerf, The Netherlands, where the Halifax crashed.

a Bf 109 on September 2 and was then himself shot down in combat S of Ashford, in Hurricane V 7234. On the 6th he was shot down and killed in action over Ashford. His aircraft, Hurricane V6612, crashed at Clavertye, near Elham. His commission was gazetted on the day he was killed and in the casualty list he was down as ‘killed in action’ as a Sergeant.

WILLIAM NATHAN ADDISON 62268

Pilot British

29 Squadron

Adams was born on May 17 1911. He began his training with the RAF on January 27 1936, as a pupil pilot. Commissioned in March, he was posted to 2 FTS, Digby on May 2. On completion of the course, he joined 29 Squadron at Debden on January 10 1937. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on May 12 1939 and appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander. He was still with 29 in July 1940. During the night of August 19/20 1940 Adams sighted an enemy aircraft and chased it for fifty minutes before making contact off the South Coast. After attacking his quarry over the sea and having apparently destroyed it, Adams returned to Digby and landed with both fuel gauges reading nil. This action was mentioned in the citation when Adams was awarded the DFC (24.9.40). On October 28 he was posted to 303 Squadron at Leconfield, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. He was posted away on December 3 1940 and took command of 151 Squadron at Wittering two days later. He held this appointment until October 1941, when he was posted to staff duties at HQ 12 Group. Adams returned to operations in April 1942, taking command of 256 Squadron at Squires Gate, as an Acting Wing Commander. He remained with the squadron until October. On April 5 1943 he was posted to a staff job at the Air Ministry, in the Directorate of Operations (Air Defence). A further tour of operations followed in 1944, with 226 Squadron, for which Adams was awarded a Bar to the DFC (29.8.44). In 1945 he was CFI at the OTU at Mitchels. Adams stayed in the RAF after the war and retired on July 27 1958 as a Wing Commander, retaining the rank of Group Captain. In 1958 he was appointed Commander in the Order of Orange Nassau.

RAYMOND CHARLES ANDRE AEBERHARDT 42781

Air Gunner

British

Pilot British

19 Squadron

On May 10 1940 Aeberhardt arrived at 10 B&GS, Warmwell, with the Advanced Training Squadron of 6 FTS for armament training. He completed the course on May 17 and then moved to 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 18th. He converted to Spitfires and joined 19 Squadron at Duxford on June 9. On August 31 1940 the squadron intercepted an enemy force attacking Debden. In the ensuing combat, Aeberhardt’s Spitfire, R 6912, was hit and the glycol system damaged. He returned to Fowlmere and attempted a landing without flaps, which were not working. The aircraft went over on to its back and caught fire. Aeberhardt was killed.

REGINALD THOMAS ADAMS Sgt

PO

Aeberhardt, from Walton-on Thames, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying course on August 14 1939, as a pupil pilot. He moved on to 6 FTS, Little Rissington on November 6, on No 16 Course.

APO 30.3.36 PO 27.1.37 FO 27.10.38 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41 WC 1.7.44 WC 1.10.46

759300

23 Squadron

He volunteered for aircrew duties in mid-1940 and was sent on a short radar course at RAF Yatesbury. On August 18 Addison joined 23 Squadron at Wittering and served with it in the Battle of Britain. In early 1941 Addison was posted to 85 Squadron at Debden, with Havocs, and began what was to prove to be a long and highly successful partnership with a Canadian pilot, Flight Lieutenant Gordon Raphael. During the night of May 13/14 1941 Raphael and Addison destroyed a He 111 off the Thames Estuary and probably destroyed another near Gravesend. A Ju 88 was shot down at night on June 23/24 and the team destroyed another He 111 on the night of July13/14. Addison was awarded the DFM (15.7.41) and promoted to Sergeant. The team shot down a Ju 88 during the night of September 16/17 1941, damaged another on July 30/31 1942 and had their final victory together in a Mosquito on January 17/18 1943, destroying a Ju 88. Addison, who had been promoted to Warrant Officer on May 1 1942, was awarded the DFC (19.2.43). About this time he was posted away for a rest. In July 1944 Addison returned to operations, joining 488 Squadron at Colerne. He was to have flown with the CO but he was killed just prior to Addison’s arrival. So he was teamed up with Flying Officer Douglas Robinson and when Robinson went for a rest, Addison flew with Flight Lieutenant Cook until he returned. During his time with 488, Addison assisted in the destruction of a Ju 88. When 488 was disbanded on April 26 1945, Addison went with Robinson to 219 Squadron, where they stayed until the war ended. Addison was released in 1945, still a Warrant Officer.

JACK SYLVESTER ADAMS FL

British

Addison joined the RAF in October 1938 and trained as a Wireless Operator (Ground).

PO 6.9.40

37728

AC 1 Radar Operator

264 Squadron

Adams, from Marten in Wiltshire, joined the RAFVR on August 29 1939 at Southampton, in the Aircraft Crew Section, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG.

APO 23.10.39 PO 18.5.40 He went to 3 EFTS, Hamble on a wireless operator course. He was later called to full-time service and then sent to 4 ITW, Bexhill. Following a posting to Debden, Adams was sent to No 1 AAS Manby on July 27 1940, on No 12 Air Gunners Course. He passed out on August 10 1940, was promoted to Sergeant and posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 16th. Adams joined 264 Squadron, with Defiants, at Kirton-inLindsey on September 7. He was posted away from the squadron on December 16 1940 and joined 256 Squadron, then reforming at Catterick with Defiants. Adams crewed up with Flying Officer D R West, who was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander. Just before midnight on April 7 1941 West and Adams intercepted and shot down a Ju 88 of II/KG 54. It crashed at Banks Marsh, Southport, 256’s first victory. In the early hours of May 8 West and Adams shot down a He 111 that was raiding Liverpool. It crashed at Wrexham. During this action three of Adams’ four guns jammed. On September 15 1941 ‘A’ Flight of 256 Squadron was moved to Ballyhalbert, to form the nucleus of 153 Squadron. When the squadron converted to Beaufighters, the air gunners were posted away. Adams, then a Flight Sergeant, went to Bomber Command, joining 405 (RCAF) Squadron at Pocklington, equipped with Halifaxes. Adams failed to return from a raid on Bremen on June 30 1942. His Halifax, W 1113, was shot down by a night fighter and all the crew were lost. Adams was 21 years old.

NOEL le CHEVALIER AGAZARIAN 72550

FO

Pilot British

609 Squadron

Born on December 26 1916, he was the son of an Armenian father and a French mother. Agazarian was the third of four brothers to be educated at Dulwich College. A fine athlete, he left from the Modern VI and he went up to Wadham College, Oxford in 1935. He achieved an Honours degree in Jurisprudence in 1938. He was in the University Air Squadron and after coming down he joined the RAFVR and was granted a commission in February 1939. Called to full-time service on September 26 1939, Agazarian was posted to 3 ITW, Hastings in early October, where he met Richard Hillary, who described him as ‘cosmopolitan by nature, intelligent and a brilliant linguist’. In November both men were posted to 14 FTS, Kinloss, on No 4 Course, which ran from November 20 1939 to May 11 1940. With the course completed, they went to No 1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum on May 20 for further training, on No 7 Course. On June 23 Agazarian went to 5 OTU, Aston Down and after converting to Spitfires, he joined

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609 Squadron at Warmwell on July 8. On September15 he shared a Do 17 with Pilot Officer Curchin of 609, on the 25th he shared a He 111, destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged two Do 17s on the 26th, shot down a Bf 110 on the 27th and damaged a He 111 on the 30th. Another Bf 109 was destroyed on October 15. Agazarian’s final victory with 609 came on December 2, when he shared a Do 17 off Southampton with Flying Officer Nowierski of 609 Squadron. Having volunteered for the Middle East, Agazarian was posted there in late January 1941 and joined 274 Squadron on April 6 at Amriya in the Western Desert. He shot down a Bf 109 over Tobruk on May 1 1941 but on the 16th he was shot down and killed, when 274 was intercepted by Bf 109s over Gambut. Agazarian is buried in Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Acroma, Libya and he is remembered on a plaque at Dulwich College, unveiled on March 14 2002. His Spitfire from 1940, R 6915, is now in the Imperial War Museum in London. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in 1940. Agazarian’s brother, Flight Lieutenant J C S Agazarian was attached to the SOE in France, working as an agent. He was captured, interrogated and tortured by the Gestapo. After a long period of solitary confinement, he was executed by the SS on March 29 1945, aged 29. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial. Another brother served in the RAF and a sister, Monique, was a pilot in the ATA.

936218

Sgt

British

HENRY ALOYSIUS AITKEN 129498

Sgt

23 Squadron

enemy territory. Aitken turned towards the nearby sea, his engine cut out and he made a successful crash-landing on a beach. He then laid low until it was dark, before making his way eastwards. After some hours he saw figures against the skyline. He waited until dawn and was very relieved when he found them to be Australians. Aitken was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant and he died in 1993. PO 20.7.42 FO 20.1.43 FL 20.7.44

The Hon JOHN WILLIAM MAXWELL AITKEN 90128

23 Squadron

Ainge enlisted in the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. He was called up on September 1 1939 and with training completed, he joined 23 Squadron at Ford on October 3 1940. He flew only one operational sortie during the Battle of Britain period, on October 9. There is no further mention of him in the 23 Squadron ORB up to the end of 1940. No other service details traced. Ainge died on November 30 1979.

SIDNEY AINSWORTH 1002750 AC 1 Radar Operator

British

Pilot British

601 Squadron

Educated at Westminster School and Pembroke College, Cambridge, Aitken joined the Auxiliary Air Force in 1935 and was commissioned in September, with 601 Squadron. He was a noted member of the social set and a keen sportsman in the 1930s and his photograph was often in society magazines. Aitken was embodied for full-time service with 601 on August 26 1939. He took part in the squadron’s first operation on November 28, when six of its Blenheims joined with six from 25 Squadron to attack the German seaplane base at Borkum. They took off from Bircham Newton and all returned safely, landing at Debden. It was the first fighter attack of the war on a German target. Three He 115 floatplanes were destroyed and three damaged. Aitken received a Mention in Despatches. On May 18 1940 he flew to Merville in France with the Hurricanes of ‘B’ Flight of 601, to reinforce 3 Squadron. During the short period of his attachment he had some success, destroying one He 111 and probably another over Brussels on May 18, shooting down a He 111 and a Ju 87 on the 19th and probably destroying a second Ju 87 and a Bf 110 the same day and on the 23rd damaging a Bf 109. Aitken returned to England and on June 7 he was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and given command of 601. He destroyed a He 111 off Brighton during the night of June 25/26. For this and his victories in France in May he was awarded the DFC (9.7.40). Aitken’s final victory with 601 came on July 7 1940, when he shared a Do 17 over the Channel with four other pilots. He was posted away on July 17 and went to the Air Ministry on the 20th, as a staff officer in the Directorate of Operational Training. He did not return to operations until February 1941, when he took command of 68 Squadron at Catterick, newly-formed with Blenheim 1fs for night-fighting. The squadron was declared operational in April 1941 but it was much later in the year before it achieved any success. On June 25 1941 Aitken, flying a Spitfire of 610 Squadron, shot down a Bf 109 during a sweep over the coast of France. Still commanding 68 Squadron, then flying from Coltishall mostly with Czech crews, Aitken destroyed a Do 217 at night on April 30/May1 1942, shot down another during the night of May 29/30 and also damaged a Ju 88 and on July 23/24 he destroyed a Ju 88 and a

ERIC DOUGLAS AINGE British

FL

Max Aitken was born in Montreal on February 15 1910, the elder son of William Maxwell Aitken, who was created 1st Baron Beaverbrook in 1917.

PO 30.10.43 FO 30.4.44 FL 30.10.45

Air Gunner

54 Squadron

On completion of his flying training, he joined 54 Squadron at Catterick from 7 OTU, Hawarden on October 6 1940 and remained with it into 1941. Aitken joined 213 Squadron in the Western Desert in May 1942. Commissioned on July 20, he damaged Bf 109s on July 3 and 15. On November 3 1942 Aitken was attacking a German lorry, when it exploded and threw his aircraft out of control. Hit by ground fire, his engine faltered and he prepared to make a forced-landing. He switched off his engine but restarted it when continuing ground fire showed that he was still over

He went to RAF Yatesbury for a short radar course, after which he was posted to 23 Squadron at Wittering in August. Aindow carried out his first operational sortie on the 25th and flew 26 night operations during the Battle of Britain, without success. In March 1941 he was posted to 85 Squadron at Debden but after a short navigation course at Cranage, he was transferred in July to Tangmere, on Turbinlite Bostons. The aircraft were each fitted with a searchlight in the nose. On patrols the Bostons were each accompanied by two fighters. When an enemy aircraft was located, approached and illuminated, the fighters would then attack and destroy it. The scheme was eventually abandoned. In early 1943 Aindow, then a Warrant Officer joined 157 Squadron at Castle Camps. He flew on Mosquito night intruder patrols over the Continent, patrolling German airfields and attacking trains. In November 1943 the squadron moved to Predannack, attached to Coastal Command and flying daylight patrols down to the Bay of Biscay. Aindow and his pilot, Flight Lieutenant Dyke, had great success early on. On November 20 they probably destroyed a Ju 88 and damaged another and on December 1 they shot down two Ju 88s. Commissioned in October 1943, Aindow was rested in February 1944 and became a navigation instructor. He was later with a Radar Ground-Controlled Approach Unit, as an Air Controller. The Unit went to Germany and he was released from there in December 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Sgt

Pilot British

Aitken joined the RAFVR in about June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754240). He was called up on September 1 1939.

Aindow volunteered for the RAFVR in September 1939. He was called up on June 4 1940 (1002660) and after his basic training he applied for aircrew duties.

751890

219 Squadron

He joined 219 Squadron at Catterick in July 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on the 29th. Aitken is last mentioned in the squadron ORB on September 19. No other service details traced. He died in 1989.

CHARLES ROBERT AINDOW AC 2 Radar Operator

British

Aitken enlisted in the RAFVR in September 1939 for the duration of hostilities at No 2 RAF Depot, Cardington. He was serving with 235 Squadron at North Coates on March 31 1940, as an AC 2 Air Gunner.

PO (RAFVR) 14.2.39 PO 26.9.39 FO 14.8.40

162980

Air Gunner

23 Squadron

Ainsworth enlisted in the RAFVR in May 1940 at No 3 RAF Depot, Padgate, for the duration of hostilities. After training, he joined 23 Squadron at Ford on September 20 1940, as a Radar Operator, and flew his first operational sortie on the 23rd. He flew eleven operational sorties with 23 during the Battle of Britain period, the last on October 20 1940. There is no further mention of him in the 23 Squadron ORB and no other service details have been traced. Ainsworth died on October 21 1975.

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Do 217. He was awarded the Czech Military Cross (11.8.42), the DSO (14.8.42) and the Air Efficiency Award (1.1.43). With his operational tour completed, Aitken was posted away in January 1943 and in February he was posted to HQ Eastern Mediterranean, to serve in the Fighter Tactics Branch. On March 5 1944, at night over the Aegean Sea in a Beaufighter of 46 Squadron, Aitken shot down two Ju 52s, probably destroyed a third and damaged a fourth. He later returned to the UK, to command the Banff Mosquito Strike Wing, operating in Norwegian waters against German shipping. After being released from the RAF in early 1946, as a Group Captain, Aitken again took command of 601 Squadron in June and held the appointment until 1948. He had been returned as Conservative Member of Parliament for Holborn in the 1945 General Election, holding the seat until 1950. He succeeded his father, as Lord Beaverbrook, in 1964 but on June 11 of that year he disclaimed the peerage. He retained his father’s Baronetcy and became Sir Max. In 1968 Aitken became Chairman of Beaverbrook Newspapers and was then President from 1977 until his death on May 1 1985. Aitken’s portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in 1940.

82708

Pilot British

152 Squadron

Born on September 6 1913, Akroyd joined the RAFVR in January 1937 (740043), as an Airman u/t Pilot, and was called up on September 1 1939. He became a flying instructor at Kinloss. He served with 152 Squadron at Warmwell during the Battle of Britain. On August 15 1940 Akroyd claimed a Ju 87 destroyed. On that day he returned in the afternoon, after a combat over Portland, his Spitfire, R 6910, damaged and the rudder jammed. He landed safely. In combat with German fighters over Lyme Regis in the afternoon of October 7, Akroyd was shot down. His Spitfire, N 3039, crashed and burned out at Nutmead, Shillingstone. He was severely burned and died the next day in Dorchester Hospital, with his wife Irene at his bedside. She stayed at the Frampton Arms, near Warmwell, and gave the landlady there, Mrs Miller, her late husband’s wings, as a keepsake. The wings, together with Akroyd’s medals, are now in the Military Aviation Museum at Tangmere. Akroyd is buried in the churchyard of Holy Trinity, Warmwell.

PO 27.7.40 FO 27.7.41

FREDERICK JOSEPH ALDRIDGE 42381

Pilot British

Pilot British

610 and 41 Squadrons

He was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on the 21st for intermediate and advanced training, on No 40 Course, which he completed on February 17 1940. It is almost certain that he did an Army Co-operation course before joining 4 (AC) Squadron in France on May 12 1940. Aldridge volunteered for Fighter Command and was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 22. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 610 Squadron at Acklington on September 3 1940 and went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on October 1. The squadron was heavily engaged at that time and Aldridge claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on October 17, another one on the 30th and on November 17 he destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another. Aldridge is believed to have been posted to the recently-formed 308 (Polish) Squadron at Baginton on December 9 1940. He was posted away to the Middle East in early 1941 and he joined 250 Squadron, when it reformed at Aqir, Palestine on April 1. Later in 1941 Aldridge joined 238 Squadron in the Western Desert. On December 6 he destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another. Early in 1942 he was posted to 274 Squadron and on February 6 he damaged a Ju 88 near El Adem. Aldridge was released from the RAF in 1947 as a Squadron Leader.

ANTONY VICTOR ALBERTINI Sgt

PO

Aldridge joined the RAF in 1939, as a candidate for a short service commission. He began his elementary flying training, as a pupil pilot, on June 12 1939 at 22 E&RFTS, Cambridge. Having successfully completed the course, he went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on August 5 for a short induction course.

PO 26.9.40

119844

610 and 41 Squadrons

Aldous joined the RAFVR in September 1938 (745796). He was called up on September 1 1939. After completing his elementary flying training, he went to 9 FTS, Hullavington on April 11 1940, on No 18 Course, on completion of which he joined 610 Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 27 1940. Aldous was detached to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 29th to convert to Spitfires and he rejoined 610 on August 12 and flew his first operational sortie on the 22nd. In combat off Dover on August 24, Aldous probably destroyed a Bf 109. His Spitfire, R6641, was damaged but he returned safely to base. On the 29th he damaged a Do 17 and next day he shot down a He 111. Aldous joined 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on September 12 and on the 18th he damaged a Bf 109. On the 28th he was in action over Charing and made a crash-landing at Pluckley in Spitfire X 4345, slightly wounded. He was sent immediately on seven days sick leave. He was posted away from 41 on December 7 to 55 OTU, to instruct. On August 7 1941 Aldous joined 615 Squadron at Prestwick. Flying from Manston on October 16, he was shot down and killed during an attack on storage tanks at Flushing. He is buried in Vissingen Northern Cemetery, Flushing, Netherlands. At the time of his death, Aldous was an Acting Flight Lieutenant. He is remembered on a memorial plaque at Dulwich College, unveiled on March 14 2002.

HAROLD JOHN AKROYD PO

Pilot British

Born on January 1 1918, Aldous, of Sanderstead, Surrey, was at Dulwich College from 1931 to 1935 and afterwards went to work for Charrington’s, the coal merchants.

PO (AAF) 11.9.35 FO (AAF) 14.4.37 FO 26.8.39 FL 24.5.40 SL 3.5.41 WC 1.9.42 SL (AAF) 1.8.46

86360

PO

600 Squadron

Albertini was born at Baldwyn’s Park, Bexley, Kent on September 29 1920 and attended City of London School. He enlisted in the Auxiliary Air Force in 1938 for four years, (800544). He qualified as an Air Gunner and applied successfully for pilot training in the first half of 1939. He was called up on August 24 1939 and went to 5 EFTS, Hanworth on October 21, as an LAC u/t Pilot.

APO 5.8.39 PO 4.3.40 FO 4.3.41 FL 4.3.42 Albertini completed his elementary training and moved to 3 FTS, South Cerney on March 23 1940, for No 33 Course, which ended on July 11, with him passing out as a SergeantPilot. He rejoined 600 Squadron on the 14th. He was detached to RAF Uxbridge on July 26 for an R/T course and on August 3 he moved to 5 OTU, Aston Down for further training on Blenheims. He rejoined 600 Squadron on August 17 and flew his first operational sortie on the 20th. He was posted to 263 Squadron, flying Whirlwinds, on May 17 1941. On November 6 1941, while in the flying control room with several other airmen he received a serious injury to his right eye in an accident involving a shotgun. He was in hospital in Bath and a posting to 137 Squadron was cancelled. As a result of the injury he did not fly again. Albertini was commissioned in May 1942. During 1943 and 1944 he was a controller at several stations, including Coltishall. He served in Prague in 1945 and 1946 and was involved in the establishment and operation of flying control at the airport. He received the Czech Military Medal for Merit (1st Grade). Albertini was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in August 1992.

KEITH RUSSELL ALDRIDGE 91039

PO

Pilot British

501 Squadron

Born in April 1918, Aldridge was in the Auxiliary Air Force and joined 501 Squadron in 1937 and later underwent part-time flying training. He was embodied for full-time service and commissioned on August 24 1939. Aldridge was posted to 5 EFTS, Hanworth on October 21, completed his elementary flying and went on to 3 FTS, South Cerney for his intermediate and advanced flying training on March 25 1940, on No 33 Course, which ended on July 11. He rejoined 501 Squadron at Middle Wallop next day. On July 17 Aldridge was detached to RAF Uxbridge for an R/T course. From the 20th he was attached to the Biggin Hill Sector Training Flight for further training. On August 18 he was attached to 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill and he damaged a Do 17 on that day, on his first operational sortie. Next day he rejoined 501 Squadron, then based at Gravesend. In an engagement on August 24, Aldridge shot down a Ju 88 near Maidstone and damaged another but was

PO 13.5.42 FO 29.6.43 FL 13.5.44

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JOHN WILLIAM EDWARD ALEXANDER

himself shot down and he baled out, suffering burns and multiple fractures of an arm and shoulder. His Hurricane, L 1865, crashed near Pells Farm, West Kingsdown. After a spell in hospital, Aldridge was posted to RAF Kenley as non-effective sick on October 2 1940 and was transferred to RAF Hospital at Halton on December 5. On recovery, he was posted to the operations room at Rudloe Manor and he later went to Exeter, as a Controller. In early 1942 he did a refresher course at Hawarden, converted to Spitfires and then joined 33 Squadron in the Western Desert. Aldridge later went to 206 (Maintenance) Group as a test pilot and became Chief Test Pilot, Middle East, responsible for supplying pilots to units from Cyprus down to Khartoum. After his release from the RAF in 1946, Aldridge took up gliding, an interest he followed for the next forty years.

42178

Pilot British

151 Squadron

Alexander arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on December 28 and went to 2 Ferry Pilot Pool on January 26 1940. He was posted to No 1 Air Armament School at Manby on March 2, as a staff pilot. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on June 17, converted to Hurricanes and then joined 151 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on July 1 1940. Flying from North Weald on August 28, Alexander’s aircraft was set alight in a combat over the Thames Estuary and he baled out, badly burned. The burning Hurricane, L 2005, crashed into a bungalow at Millthorpe, Godmersham at 4.30 pm. Alexander was admitted to hospital and was later transferred to the RAF Hospital at Halton. He returned to 151 Squadron, then at Digby, on November 21 and then seems to have been given two periods of sick leave before finally rejoining 151 on December 27 1940. Nothing further is known of Alexander’s service career but it would appear that he went on to the Reserve at the end of 1942 and was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

AYLMER JAMES MARTINUS ALDWINCKLE PO

Pilot British

Joining the RAF on a short service commission, Alexander began as a pupil pilot on May 1 1939 at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham. He moved on to 10 FTS, Ternhill on July 10, on No 12 Course, and completed his training on December 9 1939.

APO 24 .8.39 PO 27.5.40 FO 27.5.41 FL 27.5.42

83288

PO

601 Squadron

Aldwinckle was born on March 29 1911 in Mendoza, Argentina, of British parents. He was educated in South Africa and then at the College of Aeronautical Engineering at Chelsea and Brooklands, qualifying as a Licensed Inspector on March 12 1936.

APO 24.6.39 PO 27.12.39 FO 27.12.40 FL 27.12.41 FL (RAFO) 1.1.43

GEOFFREY ALLARD 44551

His first job was with Imperial Airways, on DH 86s, Empire flying boats and DH and Bristol aero engines. On August 25th 1936 he joined Class ‘F’ of the RAF Reserve, as an Airman u/t Pilot (700659) and was with it until December 1937, when he transferred to the RAFVR, again as an Airman u/t Pilot (740909). He resumed his flying training at the Bristol Flying School at Filton, flew at 15 E&RFTS, Redhill from January 12 to December 3 1938 and then at 3 E&RFTS, Hamble from February 8 1939 until he was called to full-time service on September 4 1939. Aldwinckle was posted to 6 EFTS, Sywell on March 8 1940, moved on to 9 FTS, Hullavington on May 13 and on completion of the course there he went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on August 19. After converting to Hurricanes, Aldwinckle joined 601 Squadron at Exeter on September 11. In a squadron interception over Frome on the 25th he probably destroyed a Bf 110. On October 7 he claimed the probable destruction of a Do 215, which went down with both engines smoking. During a patrol on the 9th, Aldwinckle intercepted a He 111, which escaped into cloud. He was posted away from 601 on November 2 1940 and four days later joined 605 Squadron at Croydon. On the 15th he attacked a Bf 109, which dived through low cloud and was not seen again. Aldwinckle later learned that it landed in Kent and was captured. On another patrol later the same day, he probably destroyed a Bf 109. With his tour completed, Aldwinckle was posted to 55 OTU at Ouston on June 1 1941, as an instructor. In October 1941 he was sent to Calshot, to be in charge of the overhaul of Sunderland flying boats and self-sealing fuel tanks, for use on convoy patrol duties. This move came about because of his pre-war experience with Imperial Airways. In September 1942 Aldwinckle transferred to the Technical Branch (Engineering) and remained in it until his release from the RAF in 1946 as a Wing Commander. He returned to South Africa and took up civil flying. Aldwinckle formed the Swazi-Air Charter Company, which later became Swaziland’s national airline. On retirement, he returned to England to live. He died on April 5 2005.

PO

Pilot British

85 Squadron

Born in York on August 20 1912, Allard went to the Priory Higher Grade School there. He joined the RAF on September 3 1929, as an Aircraft Apprentice (563859). He passed out as an LAC Metal Rigger on August 19 1932 and he was posted to the maintenance staff at RAF College, Cranwell. He was there until March 3 1936, when he was posted to No 2 Armament Training Camp, North Coates. Allard later applied for pilot training. He was selected and on December 21 1936 he began his ab initio course at 2 E&RFTS, Filton. He was posted to 9 FTS, Thornaby on March 20 1937, moved with the unit to Hullavington on July 9, passed out as a Sergeant-Pilot on October 23 and then joined 87 Squadron

He was posted from 2 FTS, Brize Norton to 236 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on December 16 1939. He was still with 236 in July 1940 and served with it throughout the Battle of Britain. Alexander was commissioned in November 1940 and he was killed on February 25 1941, aged 22 and still with 236. He was flying a Blenheim on patrol from St Eval that was attacked and shot down by a Bf 109. The Blenheim fell into the sea and Sergeant E K Lindsay and Sergeant B M Mansfield were also lost. Alexander is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 31.

at Debden. On June 1 1938 Allard was posted to 85 Squadron, then being reformed with Gladiators at Debden. The squadron began receiving Hurricanes from September 1938. On September 9 1939 85 flew to France but saw little action before the blitzkrieg started on May 10 1940. On that first day Allard destroyed a He 111 and shared another, on the 11th he destroyed two He 111s, on the 12th he shot down two more, on the15th destroyed a He 111 and on the 16th another. He may have made further claims. After heavy losses, 85 was withdrawn to Debden on May 21.Allard was awarded the DFM (31.5.40). On July 8 he destroyed a He 111, on the 9th another and on the 30th he shared a Bf 110. Allard shared in the destruction of a Do 17 on August 6 with two other pilots, on the 24th he shot down a Bf 109, on the 26th he shared three Do 17s, on the 28th he destroyed two Bf 109s, on the 30th two He 111s, on the 31st a Bf 109 and probably two Do 17s and on September 1 he shot down a Bf 109 and shared a Do 17. Allard, who had been promoted to Flight Sergeant on July 10, was commissioned in August and in a squadron severely depleted by losses, he was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on September 6 and given command of ‘A’ Flight. He was awarded a Bar to the DFM (13.9.40) and the DFC (8.10.40). 85 Squadron was withdrawn from Croydon to Church Fenton on September 5, moving north for a rest. On the 22nd Allard, Flight Lieutenant J E Marshall and Flying Officer J A Hemingway flew a patrol over the western area of the Church Fenton sector. In poor weather conditions over Lancashire they ran low on fuel and each had to make a forced-landing, Allard near Clitheroe and Marshall and Hemingway near Burnley. All three aircraft were repairable. In November 1940 85 went to Gravesend to take on a night-fighting role. After returning to Debden in January 1941, the squadron began to convert from Hurricanes to Havocs in February. On March 13 Allard took off from Debden in a Havoc, with Pilot Officer W H Hodgson and Sergeant F R Walker-Smith as passengers. Shortly afterwards, the aircraft crashed at Mill Field Ley, just S of Wimbish. The three pilots were killed. It is believed that an insecurely-fastened nose panel flew off and jammed in the rudder, causing the aircraft to become uncontrollable. Allard is buried in Saffron Walden Borough Cemetery, Essex. His portrait was done by both Eric Kennington and Cuthbert Orde.

PO 27.11.40

PO 17.8.40

PO 17.8.40 FO 17.8.41 FL (T) (e) 1.9.42

SL (T) (e) 11.3.45

EDWARD ARISS ALEXANDER 88648

Sgt

Pilot British

236 Squadron

Alexander, of Steyning, joined the RAFVR as an Airman u/t Pilot (741595) in May 1938. He may have been one of the group of fifty RAFVR pilots who were attached to the RAF for six months of continuous training at 2 FTS, Brize Norton on July 15 1939.

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PETER OWEN DENYS ALLCOCK 42179

PO

Pilot British

the School of Naval Co-operation on flying duties and remained there until joining 151 Squadron at North Weald on February 13 1939. Allen went to France with other pilots of 151 on May 16 1940 to reinforce 87 Squadron, which had suffered heavy losses in the fighting. On the 19th he shared in the destruction of a Hs 126. He was wounded in his left arm by a bullet in the action and repatriated to England. He rejoined 151, then at Martlesham Heath, on June 5 1940. On the 30th he probably destroyed a Bf 109 over Vignacourt, Northern France. On July 12 the squadron was ordered off to protect a convoy, code-named ‘Booty’, from an approaching German formation. 151 attacked two staffeln of Do 17s about 20 miles E of Orfordness. Allen was caught in a withering cross-fire and his Hurricane, P 3275, was last seen gliding down with a dead engine. He is believed to have drowned. Allen is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 5.

229 Squadron

Allcock, from Herne Hill, London, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training on April 17 1939, as a pupil pilot. He completed his course at FTS, arrived at 6 OTU on April 28 1940 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 17 Squadron on May 12, moved soon afterwards to 213 Squadron and finished up joining 229 Squadron at Digby on May 20 1940. On September 23 he was shot down whilst acting as weaver on a squadron patrol. He baled out, wounded, and after landing at Westcliff he was admitted to Southend Hospital. His aircraft, Hurricane, P 2789, crashed on St Mary’s Marshes, Hoo. Allcock went with 229 to the Middle East in May 1941. On December 17 the squadron was part of the escort for Hurribombers of 80 Squadron, detailed to attack enemy vehicles near Mechili. The raid was frustrated when the British aircraft were attacked by Bf 109s and Mc 202s. Allcock was shot down and killed by Leutnant Hoffmann of 1/JG 27. With no known grave, Allcock is remembered on the Alamein Memorial, Column 240. He was 22 years old.

APO 9.8.37 PO 24.5.38 FO 24.12.39

JOHN LAURANCE ALLEN 70008

PO

Pilot British

54 Squadron

APO 10.6.39 PO 6.4.40 FO 6.4.41 Allen began his elementary flying training on May 31 1937, as a civilian. Commissioned for five years in Class ‘A’ of the RAFO, he reported to No1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on August 9 1937, as an Acting Pilot Officer.

HUBERT RAYMOND ALLEN 42582

PO

Pilot British

66 Squadron

He went to 8 FTS, Montrose on August 21.Whilst on a training flight on January 18 1938 he disappeared in fog over Forfarshire. Early next morning an RAF search plane spotted wreckage on Glen Dye Moor, Kincardineshire. Beside the wreck was a rescue party, laying down and spelling out the word ALIVE. An ambulance plane picked up Allen, badly injured. After a long stay in hospital, he finished his training and went on to the Reserve on September 18 1938. Allen applied for a short service commission and was granted one on December 5 1938. On this day he relinquished his RAFO commission and joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch. Allen was still with 54 in 1940. On May 21, between Dunkirk and Calais, Allen probably destroyed a Ju 88, 54 Squadron’s first victory. Two days later he and Alan Deere escorted Squadron Leader J Leathart, flying a Master, to Calais Marck airfield to pick up the CO of 74 Squadron, who was stranded there. Twelve Bf 109s attacked the Master but were engaged by Allen and Deere, who between them shot three down and badly damaged three, of which Allen destroyed one and damaged two others. On May 24 Allen shot down a Bf 109 in the Calais area, on the 25th he destroyed two Bf 110s and in the morning of the 26th another Bf 110 and probably a second. In this engagement his engine was hit by a cannon shell and he baled out over the Channel and was picked up by a corvette. Allen returned to his squadron later the same evening, dressed in a naval lieutenant’s uniform and carrying a kitbag. On the 27th he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 over the Dunkirk beach area. He was awarded the DFC (11.6.40) and received it from the King in a ceremony at Hornchurch on June 27, in company with Leathart and Deere, who were awarded the DSO and DFC respectively. Allen destroyed a Ju 88 on June 17 and shared in destroying a He 59 and probably a Bf 109 on July 9. His engine was damaged in combat with Bf 109s over Margate on July 24. He stalled while trying to reach Manston. He was then seen making for Foreness in a controlled descent with a dead engine, which suddenly restarted, causing him to again make for Manston. The engine stopped again and, trying to turn for Foreness a second time, he stalled and spun in and was killed, when his Spitfire, R 6812, crashed and burned out near the Old Charles Inn at Cliftonville. Allen was 24. He is buried in Margate Cemetery, Kent.

Born on March 19 1919, Allen joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on July 10 1939 at 11 E&RFTS, Perth. In late August he was posted to Hullavington for kittingout and a disciplinary course, after which he went to 15 FTS at Lossiemouth. After completing the course, Allen was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on April 6 1940. He converted to Spitfires and then joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on May 10. He damaged a Ju 88 on June 19. On August 30 Allen shared in destroying a Do 17, on September 9 he shared a He 111, on the 15th he shot down a He 111 and damaged a Do 17, on the 18th he destroyed a Bf 109 and probably another on the 30th. On October 11 Allen was concussed, when he made a forced-landing at Hawkinge, following combat, in which he got a probable Bf 109. He resumed operational flying on the 24th. On November 14 he destroyed a Ju 87 and damaged another. Over Edenbridge on the 28th, in Spitfire P 7492, Allen collided with Sergeant Willcocks in P 7491. Allen baled out and landed safely but Willcocks was killed. On December 11 Allen destroyed a Bf 109. He was wounded in the right arm on February 14 1941, after being jumped by Bf 109s. He crashed at Biggin Hill. Allen shot down a Bf 109 and shared another on June 20 and on August 20 he shared in the probable destruction of a Bf 109 off the Dutch coast. After being awarded the DFC (22.7.41), Allen was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader in October 1941 and given command of 66 Squadron. He was posted away in December 1941 to 286 Squadron, which carried out anti-aircraft co-operation duties. On August 19 1942, flying as a supernumerary with 131 Squadron, Allen damaged a Do 217 over the Channel. It was his last operational flight. Allen’s final war-time posting was as Officer i/c flying at a 2nd TAF airfield. After the war he remained in the RAF. He commanded No 1 Squadron from January to October 1946 and 43 Squadron from December 1949 to February 1952. He was a graduate of the RAF Staff College and retired on January 1 1965 as a Wing Commander. Allen died on May 31 1987. APO 2.9.39 PO 24.3.40 FO 24.3.41 FL 1.1.42 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.7.54

JAMES HENRY LESLIE ALLEN 39957

FO

Pilot New Zealander

APO (RAFO) 9.8.37 PO (RAFO) 18.9.38 PO 5.12.38 FO 5.7.40

151 Squadron

JOHN WATSON ALLEN

Born in Remuera, Auckland on November 13 1914, Allen was orphaned at four, when his parents both died in the 1918 influenza epidemic. He was brought up by his aunt and educated at Huntly School and Napier Boys’ High School.

135866

Sgt

Pilot British

266 Squadron

Allen joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748321). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training and joined 266 Squadron at Wittering from 7 OTU, Hawarden on October 7 1940. He was posted away to 64 Squadron at Hornchurch on November 27. On February 2 1941 Allen made a forced-landing at Stone, near Faversham, because of a lack of fuel, and was unhurt.

In 1931 Allen went to England for sea training and he joined HMS Conway in May. He won His Majesty’s Gold Medal in July 1933, as the most efficient cadet, and in August he joined the Blue Funnel Line, as a midshipman. In June 1936 Allen applied for a short service commission in the RAF. He was successful and began his ab initio training at No 1 E&RFTS, Hatfield on May 24 1937. After a short induction course at RAF Uxbridge, Allen was posted to 10 FTS, Dumfries. In March 1938, with his training completed, he was posted to

Allen was still with 64 on June 1 1941 but he disappears from the squadron ORB after this date. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in November 1942 but no other service details have been traced. It is believed that Allen was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. PO 23.11.42 FO 23.5.43 FL 23.11.44

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KENNETH MERVYN ALLEN 146710

F/Sgt Pilot British

The cause of the crash is unknown. Allgood is buried in St Mark’s Burial Ground, Grantchester, Cambridge. Allgood’s elder brother, Flight Sergeant-Pilot E A Allgood died on May 28 1942, whilst operating with 120 Squadron, flying in Liberators from Nutts Corner, Co Antrim, aged 30.

257, 43 and 253 Squadrons

Allen joined the RAFVR as an Airman u/t Pilot (754497) in May 1939. He was called up on September 1 and with training completed, he went from 5 OTU, Aston Down, to join 257 Squadron at Debden on September 1 1940.

JACK WHITWELL ALLISON 104382

He moved to 43 Squadron at Usworth on the 11th and to 253 at Kenley on the 28th. He was still with 253 in November 1940. Allen was commissioned from Warrant Officer in April 1943 and released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1984.

LESLIE HENRY ALLEN Sgt

Air Gunner

British

Pilot British

41, 611 and 92 Squadrons

Allison, of Eltham, London, joined the RAFVR in November 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742613). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training and was with 41 Squadron at Hornchurch by June 5 1940. On July 8 he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88.

P0 24.4.43 FO 24.10.43 FL 24.4.45

129967

Sgt

On October 12 Allison was posted to 611 Squadron at Digby but moved on to 92 Squadron, also at Digby, on October 27. He damaged a Bf 109 on November 17 1940. Commissioned in August 1941, Allison was killed on October 15 1942, serving with 32 MU, as a Flying Officer. His Mosquito broke up in the air. Flying Officer C M B Symons was also killed. Allison was 26 and was cremated at Pontypridd Crematorium, Glamorganshire.

141 Squadron

Allen was born in London on February 5 1921 and educated at Tottenham Grammar School. After leaving, he worked as a clerk in a solicitor’s office.

PO 15.8.41 FO 15.2.42 He joined the RAFVR in August 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758116). Called to full-time service on September 1, Allen went on an elementary flying course at No 1 EFTS, Hatfield but failed on ground subjects. He re-mustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner on June 1 1940 and went to No 1 Air Armament School, Manby on the 22nd for No 9 Air Gunners’ Course. After completing this, he was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 6, to convert to Defiants. Allen joined 141 Squadron at Prestwick on August 6 1940 and served with it through the Battle of Britain. He remained with it until August 5 1941, when he was posted to 410 (RCAF) Squadron, then forming at Drem with Defiants. Whilst with the squadron, Allen went to CGS, Sutton Bridge for a Gunnery Leaders’ course. On March 5 1942 he joined 96 Squadron at Wrexham, again on night duties in Defiants. When the squadron was re-equipped with Beaufighters later in 1942 the air gunners were posted away and Allen went to 281 Squadron at Ouston, an ASR unit. Commissioned in August 1942, Allen applied for Pilot training, was accepted and in November he went to ITW at Torquay. In April 1943 he went to EFTS at Wolverhampton and in May he was posted to Canada. Allen was initially at Neepawa and in July moved to 33 FTS, Carberry, where he gained his wings on November 11 1943. After return to the UK, Allen served as a staff pilot at navigation training schools. Released from the RAF in February 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant, Allen went into cinema management, firstly at Southend-on-Sea and later in Sheffield. He retired in 1986 and died on December 16 2005 in Sheffield.

HAROLD GORDON LEACH ALLSOP 32184

SL

Pilot British

66 Squadron

Born on October 25 1909, Allsop joined the RAF on a short service commission in June 1932. He was posted to 4 FTS, Abu Sueir on August 26 and joined 84 Squadron at Shaibah, Iraq on August 25 1933. Allsop returned to Britain in 1936 and on November 30 he went to 608 Squadron, AAF at Thornaby, as Adjutant and Flying Instructor. He was granted a Permanent Commission on August 12 1938 and was still with 608 squadron, at the outbreak of war. In early 1940 Allsop was serving in France. He was posted back to England and arrived at RAF Digby on April 9 for Ops duties. On May 22 Allsop arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down for a refresher course and from June 5 he was attached to 66 Squadron at Coltishall, on administrative duties. He flew one operational sortie, a sector patrol on July 10. He was posted away to 6 FTS, Little Rissington on July 13, as CFI. He was posted from there on October 23 1941 for Air Staff duties. He retired from the RAF on October 25 1956 as a Wing Commander. Allsop died on January 12 1991. APO 12.8.32 PO 12.8.33 FO 12.3.35 FL 12 3.37 SL1.4.39 WC 1.3.41 WC 1.10.46

LESLIE CHARLES ALLTON 745436

Sgt

Pilot British

266 and 92 Squadrons

PO 21.8.42 FO 21.2.43 FL 21.8.44 Allton was born in Nuneaton in 1920, the son of a coal miner. He was at King Edward VI Grammar School from 1931 to 1937, where he was Captain of the school, as well as Captain of cricket football and hockey.

HAROLD HENRY ALLGOOD 565462

F/Sgt Pilot British

85 and 253 Squadrons

When he left, Warwickshire County Cricket Club wanted to sign him but he decided to join the more secure Midland Bank at Atherstone. On March 22 1939 Allton joined the RAFVR and began his weekend flying at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty. He was called to full-time service on September 1 and on October 7 he was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton. With training completed, Allton was posted to 12 OTU, Benson on March 25 1940, to convert to Battles. He joined 98 Squadron in France on May 18. After suffering heavy losses, the squadron withdrew to Gatwick on June 10. Allton was posted to 4 Ferry Pilot Pool at Kemble on August 1 1940. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 3, converted to Spitfires and joined 266 Squadron at Wittering on the 16th. He moved to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 30th. Allton was killed on October 19 1940, when he crashed at Tuesnoad Farm, Smarden, in Spitfire R 6922. The circumstances are not known but Allton’s name appeared in the casualty list as ‘Killed in Action’. He is buried in the Oaston Road Cemetery in Nuneaton. The site of the crash was excavated in the late 1970s and the engine, propeller and other items were recovered.

Born in Cambridge in 1915, Allgood went to the Central School there. He left school in July 1931, joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice in September and passed out as a Metal Rigger in August 1934. He won the BarringtonKennett trophy for swimming in 1932. Allgood applied for pilot training and was recommended by the AOC on September 13 1938 but did not begin his ab initio course until July 1939. He went to 11 FTS, Shawbury on September 25 and completed the course on April 6 1940. He went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on April 19 and after converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to 85 Squadron in France on May 14. When 85 was withdrawn to Debden on the 21st, Allgood was not with it. He was officially reported back on June 22 and was sent on leave because of a damaged collar bone, the result of being shot down during the latter stages of the campaign in France. He rejoined 85 Squadron for duty in July. On August 11 1940 Allgood claimed a Bf 110 destroyed in combat over a convoy off the east coast. He returned to base with his mainplane damaged by a Bf 110. He escaped unhurt from Hurricane P 2827, when he crashed making a dusk landing at Church Fenton on September 9. Allgood was posted to 253 Squadron at Kenley on September 28. He was killed on October 10, when his aircraft, Hurricane L 1928, crashed into houses at Albion Place, Maidstone. The aircraft hit No 63 but cut through the two adjoining houses, Nos 61 and 59. The Merlin engine was found in the cellar of No 59. Three women and five children were killed, from two families.

CHARLES FRANCIS AMBROSE 42583

PO

Pilot British

46 Squadron

Ambrose joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on July 10 1939, as a pupil pilot. He completed his training and was posted to 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on February 23 1940.

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postings and command positions, he volunteered for pilot training and went to the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov on June 1 1929. Upon completion of his pilot training Ambrus was assigned, as Co-Commander, to the 6th Air Regiment at Kbel, on November 15 1929. During the 1930s he distinguished himself as a skilled aerobatic pilot in national and international events including in Europe and Africa. Due to his skill as a pilot, Ambrus was appointed Commander of the 1st Experimental Squadron at Prague –Letnany airbase on April 30 1934. Here he was testing prototype aircraft for military use including the Zlin XIII. He was promoted to Major-Lieutenant on July 1 1935. During 1937 and 1938 he attended Military College for Staff Officers. He was, at this time, the highest ranking Slovak national in the Czechoslovak Air Force. When the Germans marched into Czechoslovakia on March 15 1939 Ambrus was stationed in Prague. Being a Slovak he was repatriated to the newly formed “puppet state” of Slovakia, promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and appointed to a senior role in the Slovak Ministry of Defence. Due to poor, equipment, personnel and internal politics, Ambrus resigned on August 1 1939. On September 3 1939, with the assistance of the Yugoslav Consul General, in Bratislava, Ambrus escaped across the Slovak border and made his way to Yugoslavia from where he travelled on to France. On October 15 1939 he was posted to the Czechoslovak CSVS Department, in Paris. In April 1940 Ambrus enlisted in l’Armee de l’Air and on April 15 was posted to Chatres for retraining on to French equipment. Between May 16 1940 and June 13 1940, during the Battle of France, he flew operationally with l’Escadrille de Defense legere at Chatres. When France capitulated, Ambrus was evacuated, from Bordeaux, aboard the ship Ary Schaeffer, bound for Falmouth, England. He arrived in England in June 1940. Ambrus enlisted in the RAFVR and was commissioned, on July 12 1940, as a Pilot Officer with an acting rank of Squadron Leader. He joined 310 Squadron at Duxford, then serving as a receiving unit for Czech personnel. He was posted to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on August 17. After converting to Hurricanes, Ambrus went to Duxford on September 9 to be joint Commanding Officer of the newlyformed 312 Squadron, sharing the command with Squadron Leader F H Tyson. On October 13 Ambrus, Flight Lieutenant Comerford and Sergeant Stehlik attacked a pair of Blenheim aircraft of 29 Squadron which they mistook for enemy aircraft. One L-6637 (RO-S) was shot down near Point of Ayr, Flintshire, with the crew not surviving. On the 15th Ambrus, Comerford and Pilot Officer Vybiral were flying as Yellow Section on a routine patrol. They lost their bearings and were soon low on fuel. Ambrus made a wheels up landing at Carnforth. His Hurricane, V6846, was slightly damaged. Vybiral baled out and Comerford made a forced landing in the same area. All three men were unhurt. After joining the Czech Inspectorate General, in London, on December 17 1940, Ambrus did no more operational flying. On March 7 1941 he was promoted to Wing Commander and, in June, was posted to Canada as a member of the Czechoslovak Military Mission which recruited amongst the Czechoslovak expatriate communities in Canada and neutral USA. When the Military Mission ceased, in 1943, Ambrus was appointed as Czechoslovak Military and Air Attaché for Canada, based in Ottawa. On January 24 1945 Ambrus was awarded the OBE. After the war, Ambrus returned to Czechoslovakia and, in December 1945, was promoted to Brigadier General in command of VO4 in Bratislava. Following the takeover of Czechoslovakia by the communists in February 1948, Ambrus requested his release from the Czechoslovak Air Force. On March 21 1948, assisted by the US military authorities he escaped from Czechoslovakia into the American zone in Germany. From there he travelled to England and then on to the USA. Ambrus died on January 2 1994, in Chicago, USA.

He converted to Hurricanes and joined 46 Squadron at Digby on April 1. Ambrose served in Norway with 46 in late May/early June and was evacuated by the Royal Navy on June 8. He rejoined the squadron when it was reformed at Digby on June 15 1940. Ambrose damaged three Bf 110s on August 18 and shot down a Bf 109 on September 2, which made a crash landing at Tile Lodge Farm, Hoath, with the pilot captured. Two days later Ambrose was shot down by Bf 109s, in combat over Rochford. He baled out of Hurricane P 3066, unhurt. On September 8 he probably destroyed a Bf 110 and a Bf 109 and damaged a Do 17, on October 7 he damaged a Bf 109 and on the 29th he destroyed another. He was flying with Pilot Officer P W Lefevre of 46 in the early afternoon of November 3 near Gravesend, when they intercepted a Do 17 of 8/KG 3, which was being fired on by anti-aircraft guns. They shot the bomber down and it crashed at Bexley, with four of the crew killed and one captured. This man died of his wounds the following day. On November 30 Ambrose had to bale out again when he was shot down in combat over Dungeness. He was awarded the DFC (24.12.40). In March 1941 Ambrose joined 71 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey but returned to 46 Squadron a few weeks later. On May 20 1941 46’s pilots sailed in HMS Ark Royal, ultimately bound for the Middle East. The carrier made for Malta, where the pilots flew off their Hurricanes, landing at Ta Kali airfield. 46’s ground crews had sailed earlier, through the South Atlantic, via the Cape, en route to the Middle East. As there would be no aircraft available when these personnel arrived at their destination, the pilots were retained in Malta. On June 28 1941, 126 Squadron was reformed at Ta Kali with the pilots of 46 Squadron and new ground crews. Ambrose was posted away from 126 on November 9 1941 and flew to Egypt in a Sunderland. He joined 112 Squadron at Sidi Barrani, as a Flight Commander, to fly Tomahawks. On December 5 he probably destroyed a Fiat G 50 in the Tobruk/El Adem area. In January 1942 Ambrose was posted to the newly-formed Air Fighting School at Edku, Egypt, remaining there until October, when he joined 73 Squadron in the Western Desert. After return to the UK in September 1943, he joined the staff of 53 OTU, Kirton-inLindsey. He did no more operational flying. Ambrose remained in the RAF after the war. He commanded 43 Squadron from March 1946 to May 1947, was awarded the AFC (29.10.48) and held staff appointments in Britain and overseas. He qualified on the Senior Officers’ War Course at the Royal Naval War College, was a graduate of the RAF College of Air Warfare and qualified in Staff Studies. Ambrose was made a CBE (8.6.68) and he retired on January 27 1972 as a Group Captain. He died in 1986. APO 2.9.39 PO 24.2.40 FO 24.2.41 FL 24.2.42 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.1.57 GC 1.1.62

RICHARD AMBROSE 73040 PO Pilot British 25 and 151 Squadrons Ambrose was educated at Ellesmere School. He went on to Imperial College, where he read Engineering at the School of Mines. He was a member of the London University Air Squadron. Commissioned in the RAFVR in June 1939, Ambrose was called up on October 21. With training completed, he joined the Autogiro Flight at Odiham on April 20 1940, which moved to France shortly afterwards to carry out communications duties. Ambrose was posted as a staff pilot to 5 Radio Maintenance Unit at Duxford on July 22, the duty of which was to provide calibration for the RDF stations. He left the unit on August 7 1940 to go to 5 OTU, Aston Down, where he converted to Blenheims. He joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on August 18 but moved to Stapleford on the 26th, to join 151 Squadron. He was 21 years old and is buried in Epping Cemetery, Essex.

PO 12.7.40 WC 7.3.41

CYRIL ANDERSON 47589

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

FIU

Born on July 15 1914, Anderson joined the RAF in August 1935, as an Aircraft hand (522682). At some time he re-mustered and trained as an Air Gunner.

PO (RAFVR) 20.6.39 PO 21.10.39 In October 1940 he was serving with the Fighter Interception Unit and he flew some operational sorties during the Battle of Britain. Anderson probably later had training in radar operation and became a Radio Observer. He was still a Sergeant when he was commissioned in the Technical Branch on October 21 1941. He received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.42). He was posted away from the FIU to 23 Squadron at Ford on January 31 1942. Anderson retired on October 27 1955, as a Flight Lieutenant.

JAN AMBRUS 81883

SL

Pilot Czechoslovakian

312 Squadron

Ambrus was born on May 19 1899 in Goma Mitropolia, Bulgaria. At the time of his birth his family were expatriate Slovaks living in Bulgaria. On completion of his schooling Ambrus joined the Austo-Hungarian army as a cadet and entered a 4 year training course at the Artillery College in Traiskirchen, near Vienna. He graduated on August 21 1919 and was assigned to 21 Mountain Artillery Regiment at Ruzomberk.

PO 21.10.41 FO 21.4.43 FL 1.9.45

DONALD JOHN ANDERSON 79739

PO

Pilot British

29 Squadron

Anderson was born in London on April 19 1919 and went to West Leigh School and Westcliff High School for Boys. He joined the RAFVR on April 5 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745607), and began his flying training at 34 E&RFTS, Rochford.

He volunteered for the newly formed Czechoslovak Air Force on March 31 1925 and was sent to the Military Aviation Academy at Chleb where he trained as an aerial artillery observer. Following training he was posted to the 1st Air Regiment at Prague-Kbely. Following several promotions, unit

Called up on September 1 1939, he went to 4 ITW, Bexhill at the end of October and

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to Sergeant in March 1942. Anderson applied for pilot training and was accepted in September 1942. In 1943 he was a deputy controller at a small radar station at Goldsborough, Yorkshire. In September 1943 Anderson began his pilot training but he had still not qualified when training was terminated in April 1945. Anderson was then posted to RAF Atherstone for a GCA course, after which he went to 10 GCA, RAF Hemswell in November 1945 as a Flight Sergeant. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in June 1955, Anderson retired from the RAF on January 31 1973 as a Squadron Leader. He then joined Customs and Excise and retired again on April 22 1984. Anderson died on April 25 2007.

then to 11 FTS, Shawbury on November 19. With the course completed, Anderson was commissioned and posted to No 2 School of Army Co-operation, Andover on June 15 1940 but a week later he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down for conversion to Blenheims, after which he joined 29 Squadron at Digby on July 7. He remained with the squadron until July 20 1941 and after an attachment to RAF Kirton-in-Lindsey he was posted to 89 Squadron, then forming at Colerne with Beaufighters. The squadron flew out to the Middle East in late November 1941 and began operating from Abu Sueir, Egypt in the night defence of the Delta. In early March 1942 Anderson was medically regraded A2B and posted to No 1 Section Aircraft Delivery Unit, Wadi Natrun. Six months later he lost his flying category and was posted to a ground radar unit. Over the next eighteen months he served at a number of units in the Middle East. From April 2 1944 Anderson was Camp Commandant at Makadini, a Catalina base on the coast of East Africa. In early September he returned to radar units and for a spell in October 1944 he was Fighter Direction Officer on HMS Ulster Queen, scanning the Greek Islands. After five months as a Station Adjutant, Anderson embarked for home on December 12 1945. He was at RAF Wartling until his release on June 28 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. Anderson died in 2000.

PO 8.6.55 FO 8.12.55 FL 18.11.58

MICHAEL FREDERIC ANDERSON 90206

Pilot British

253 Squadron

Anderson was born on November 22 1916 in Brockley, London. He worked for a time in the menswear cutting department of C&A, but then went into the RAF in the mid1930s, as a Boy Entrant (555829). In 1939 he began training as an Airman Pilot. He appears to have been involved in an accident on April 26 1940. Anderson joined 253 Squadron in early June 1940. On the 12th he was checked out in a Miles Master by the CO, Squadron Leader Gleave. The squadron had two old Fairey Battles for hack work. On August 3 Anderson was tasked to fly one from Northolt to |Turnhouse. Over Co Durham the aircraft caught fire. An airman passenger in the rear gunner’s well was too shaken to jump and Anderson, despite the flames, climbed along the fuselage trying to persuade the airman to do so. Unfortunately Anderson was blown off by the slipstream and landed by parachute after suffering some burns. The airman eventually pulled his rip-cord while still in the well and was snatched clear by the open parachute, breaking a leg on the main plane but otherwise landing safely. Anderson’s gallant action did not become known until much later. In the evening of September 14 he was shot down in combat with Bf 109s and crashed near Faversham, in Hurricane P 3804. Admitted to Faversham Hospital with severe burns, he was later moved to the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, where he underwent plastic surgery, becoming a Guinea Pig in the process. Commissioned from Warrant Officer on July 8 1943, Anderson was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flying Officer. He worked as a specialist in the management of grain and root crops. He died, following illness, on May 28 1978.

PO (AAF) 4.11.30 FO (AAF) 4.5.32 FL (AAF) 6.6.35 FL 24.8.39 SL 1.3.40 WC 1.6.42

CHRISTOPHER JOHN DRAKE ANDREAE 70018

Pilot British

64 Squadron

Andreae was called to full-time service on December 15 1939 and completed his training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell, on No 8 Course, which ran from March 6 to June 22 1940. He went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on June 22, converted to Spitfires and joined 64 Squadron at Kenley on July 20. On August 11 he returned to base, in Spitfire N 3293, with damage caused by cannon fire from an enemy fighter engaged off Dover. Four days later Andreae failed to return from a combat with Bf 109s over the Channel. He was 23 years old. He was never heard of again and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 5.

JOHN DENIS ANDERSON British

FO

A Londoner, Andreae was educated at Shrewsbury School from 1930 to 1935 and then went to Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he read Natural Science. He was with the University Air Squadron there, was commissioned into Class ‘AA’ of the RAFO on March 16 1937 and was commissioned in the RAFVR in January 1938.

PO 8.7.43 FO 22.3.45

1052185 AC2 Radar Operator

604 Squadron

In the pre-war years he attended camps and courses and was with 23 Squadron, at Biggin Hill in March 1935 and at Northolt in July 1937. Called to full-time service on August 24 1939, Anderson was then ‘A’ Flight Commander of 604. He was detached from the squadron to the AFDU at Northolt on February 5 1940, for a ten-day course. Anderson assumed command of 604 Squadron on March 28 1940 and led it throughout the Battle of Britain. On August 11 he shared in the destruction of a He 59 in mid-Channel. On October 30 he flew the first operational patrol in a Beaufighter and in the evening of November 28 he probably destroyed a Ju 88 off Warmwell. On December 20 1940 Anderson went to No 1 Blind Approach School at Watchfield, on No 9 Course, rejoining 604 on January 4 1941. During the evening of March 14 1941 Anderson shot down a He 111 into the sea off Beer Head, in Lyme Bay. He was awarded the DFC (25.3.41). The citation stated that he had carried out many night operational flights and that, in addition to the He 111, he had probably destroyed a Ju 88 at night and one enemy aircraft in daylight. In early April 1941 Anderson was posted to RAF High Ercall, to command. After three months he went to HQ 9 Group, Preston, then to the Middle East, to serve at HQ 250 Wing, Ismailia. A series of staff appointments followed, the last being at Air HQ, Levant. Anderson was released from the RAF on October 3 1945 as a Wing Commander. He died in 1993.

JOHN ANTHONY ANDERSON Sgt

Pilot British

A member of the Stock Exchange, Anderson joined 604 Squadron, AAF on October 4 1930 and was commissioned a month later.

PO 9.6.40 FO 9.6.41 FL 9.6.42

187307

SL

604 Squadron

Born on April 22 1922, Anderson joined the RAFVR at No 3 RAF Depot, Padgate on June 6 1940. At the end of the month he was posted to No 2 Electrical and Wireless School at RAF Yatesbury, for what he expected to be the start of a Wop/AG course. Instead, he found himself learning about airborne radar and in late July he was posted to 604 Squadron at Gravesend, never having flown.

PO (RAFO) 16.3.37 PO (RAFVR) 1.1.38 PO 15.12.39

FO 15.12.39

STANLEY ANDREW 740169

Anderson flew operationally with 604, firstly in Blenheims and then Beaufighters, until December 1940, when he was posted back to Yatesbury for another radar course. In these five months Anderson flew operationally without rank or brevet, receiving three shillings per day, which included one shilling flying pay. In January 1941 he was posted to a radar station at Saligo, Islay, Scotland. He went to No 1 Radio School at Cranwell in May, as an instructor. Then a Corporal, he was made up

Sgt

Pilot British

46 Squadron

Andrew, from Swanland, Yorkshire, joined the RAFVR in April 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot. Having reached the required high standard, Andrew was given the opportunity to have six months training with the regular RAF. He joined 46 Squadron at Digby in April 1939. Still with the squadron at the outbreak of war, he was retained.

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was ordered to the Middle East and embarked on the carrier HMS Argus. At Gibraltar pilots and aircraft were transferred to HMS Ark Royal and they flew off for Malta on November 12. On December 29 1941 he was shot down into the sea by a Bf 109 and rescued by an ASR launch. A detachment of 605 Squadron Hurricanes arrived at Hal Far, Malta on January 10 1942 and Andrews was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and given command of it. The unit operated as 605, although the main body of the squadron was in the Far East. Andrews relinquished his command and acting rank on February 27 1942, when the 605 unit was disbanded. He was then posted to Egypt. On August 9 1942 Andrews was killed in a flying accident, whilst serving with 3 Aircraft Maintenance Unit. The engine of the Tomahawk he was flying failed while landing at Moascar, Egypt and the aircraft struck a building. He is buried in Ismailia War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

On May 18 1940 he sailed with the squadron for Norway in the carrier HMS Glorious. The Hurricanes flew off the carrier, landing at Skaanland on the 26th. The campaign was shortlived. On June 7 46’s surviving Hurricanes were flown back on to the Glorious, the first time such a landing had been attempted. The carrier was sunk next day, when it met the two German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. Only two of the squadron’s pilots were among the few survivors. Andrew was among other members of the squadron, evacuated from Norway by sea on June 8. Back at Digby, the squadron reformed on June 15 and was operational again on the 26th. On September 1 46 moved south to Stapleford Tawney. On the 8th Andrew shot down a Do 17 of 5/KG 2, which exploded over Leeds Castle, near Maidstone, killing the crew. In the same sortie he also damaged another Do 17. His own aircraft, Hurricane P 3525, was damaged by a Bf 109 over Sheppey but he got back safely to base. During an uneventful patrol on September 11, Andrew, flying the same aircraft, was killed when the Hurricane crashed and burned out. He is buried in the churchyard of All Saints, North Ferriby, Yorkshire. Andrew was 21 years old. He is remembered on a memorial plaque at Swanland Primary School.

PO 2.9.40 FO 2.5.41

TADEUSZ ANDRUSZKOW P 5125

Sgt

Air Gunner

New Zealander

He reported to the Air Observers’ School, Ohakea on March 11 1940, to train as an observer but soon afterwards he re-mustered to trainee air gunner. With the course completed he sailed for Britain on April 26. He arrived in early June and went to No 1 RAF Depot, at Uxbridge. On July 17 1940 Andrews was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down. After converting to Defiants, he joined 264 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on August 29. He served with the squadron in the Battle of Britain. Andrews was commissioned in early June 1942 and when the squadron converted to Mosquitos later in the month he was posted away, joining 277 (Air Sea Rescue) Squadron on July 15. When he left 264, Andrews had flown 122 operational sorties. Early in 1942 Andrews applied for pilot training and on August 22 he left 277 for 13 ITW. After completing his ground course he moved to 26 EFTS, thence to Heaton Park, Manchester, to await a posting overseas. He sailed for Canada in March 1943, completed his training at various flying schools and passed out as a twin-engine pilot in January 1944. Two months later he was repatriated to New Zealand. Andrews was posted as a staff pilot to the School of Navigation and Reconnaissance at New Plymouth, where he was eventually appointed a Flight Commander. He was transferred to the Reserve on December 24 1945 and returned to Hamilton, where he died on March 24 1971.

JAMES ANGUS 55202

Air Gunner

British 23

Squadron

At some time he trained as an Air Gunner and he was with 23 Squadron at Collyweston in early June 1940, as an LAC. He was a Sergeant by September 7 and was still with 23 in November 1940. Angus was commissioned in June 1943 and remained in the RAF after the war, serving in the Aircraft Control Branch. He retired on June 1 1965, as a Flight Lieutenant. Angus died on October 14 1984.

SYDNEY ERNEST ANDREWS Pilot British

Sgt

Born on May 21 1915, Angus enlisted in the RAF in June 1935, as an Aircrafthand (520663).

PO 3.6.42 FO 3.12.42 FL 3.6.44

PO

303 Squadron

He qualified as a fighter pilot at Krosno in 1939, was posted to the 6th Air Force Regiment, Lwow and joined 162 Fighter Squadron. After the fighting in September 1939, the unit went to Romania. He eventually reached France, where he trained on French fighter aircraft. When France fell, he escaped to England, arriving there in July 1940. Andruszkow then was sent to the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool, to await a posting. He joined 303 Squadron at Northolt on August 21. The squadron converted its own pilots to Hurricanes but some that were felt to be in need of further training were sent to 5 OTU, Aston Down. Andruszkow went there on August 27 1940 and rejoined 303 on September 10. He shared in the destruction of a Do 17 on the 15th. On the same day he was himself shot down in combat with Bf 109s over Dartford and he baled out, unhurt. His Hurricane, P 3939, is believed to be the one which crashed that day in Lower Stoke. Andruszkow destroyed a He 111 on September 26. On the following morning he was shot down over Horsham and killed when his aircraft, Hurricane V 7246, crashed in flames at Holywych Farm, Cowden. Andruszkow was 19 years old and he is buried in Northwood Cemetery, Middlesex. He was posthumously awarded the KW (1.2.41).

264 Squadron

At the outbreak of war Andrews was running a motor engineering and garage business in Hamilton. At 29, he was old by normal aircrew standards, when he volunteered for flying duties and was accepted.

44567

Pilot Polish

Born in Lwow on November 18 1920, Andruszkow entered the PAF NCOs Training School at Bydgoszcz in 1936.

MAURICE RAYMOND ANDREWS 40615

Sgt

32 and 257 Squadrons

Andrews joined the RAF as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot in 1936 (580319). He began his elementary flying training on August 24 and after having successfully completed the course, he was formally enlisted in the RAF on October 19.

P0 11.6.43 FO 11.12.43 FL 11.6.45 FL 11.12.47

ROBERT ALEXANDER ANGUS 748062

He was serving with 150 Squadron at Benson in August 1939, flying Battles, and went with it to France on the day before the outbreak of war, September 2 1939. During the Battle of France, the squadron suffered heavy losses and it was withdrawn to England on June 15 1940, to its new base at Abingdon. Andrews volunteered for Fighter Command and he was commissioned on September 2 1940, with effect from May 10. On September 9 he joined 32 Squadron at Acklington and moved to 257 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on the 22nd of the month. Andrews was awarded the DFM (5.11.40) for service in France. Both his regular crew members received the award as well. 257 Squadron had great success when it met the Italian Air Force, making its only raid on London, on November 11 1940. Andrews shared in the destruction of a Fiat BR 20. He was posted away on December 25 to 55 OTU, Aston Down, as an instructor. In October 1941 he was with 242 Squadron at Valley, as a Flight Commander. The unit

Sgt

Pilot British

611 and 41 Squadrons

Angus, of Edinburgh, joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot, in May 1939. He was called up for full-time service on September 1 1939. He did his elementary flying at 12 EFTS and was on No 49 Course at 5 FTS, Sealand from June 17 to September 7 1940, passing out as a Sergeant-Pilot. He converted to Spitfires at 7 OTU, Hawarden and then joined 611 Squadron at Ternhill on September 29. Angus damaged a Do 17 on October 11. He went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch next day and on October 30 he damaged a Bf 109. On February 20 1941 Angus was shot down by Werner Mölders over Dover, in Spitfire P 7322. He was seen to bale out over the sea but was never found. He was 21 years old. Angus is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 38.

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MICHAEL JOHN APPLEBY 90962

PO

Pilot British

after the war and was commissioned in the RAFVR in October 1947. He died on September 1 1952.

609 Squadron

PO 22.8.43 FO 29.2.44 FL 30.8.45 FO (RAFVR) 31.10.47 FL (RAFVR) 31.12.48

Appleby went to The Leys School at Cambridge. He joined 609 Squadron, AAF in December 1938 and was called up on August 24 1939. He was placed on the strength of RAF Yeadon on the 27th.

PAUL WADE ARBON 41893

He was posted to 6 FTS, Little Rissington on October 9, on No 15 Course. He was at 10 B&GS, Warmwell on April 24 1940 with the Advanced Training Squadron of 6 FTS, for armament training. The course ended on the 27th and he rejoined 609 on May 5. Appleby claimed a Ju 87 shot down and shared in the probable destruction of two more on July 9 1940 and destroyed a Bf 110 on August 8. On this day his Spitfire was damaged in combat with Bf 110s over the Isle of Wight. On August 13 he got a probable Bf 109 and damaged a Ju 87, on September 15 he shared a Do 17 and damaged three others and on the 30th he destroyed a Bf 109. From November 26 to December 24 1940, Appleby was at CFS, Upavon, for an instructors’ course on Masters and Tutors. He served as an instructor at 11, 17 and 21 EFTS, from January 1941 until he was released from the RAF in September 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 2003. Appleby’s portrait was drawn by Cuthbert Orde in November 1940.

Pilot British

66 Squadron and 421 Flt

Appleford was born on September 16 1921, making him one of the youngest pilots in the Battle of Britain. As a candidate for a short service commission, he began his ab initio training at 12 E&RFTS, Prestwick on August 8 1939. After a short induction course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge he was posted to 11 FTS, Shawbury on September 26. With his training completed, Appleford joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on May 13 1940. He was shot down over the Thames Estuary on September 4 and baled out, slightly wounded. His Spitfire, P 9316, crashed near Howe Green Farm, Purleigh. He was sent on seven days sick leave. Appleford was occasionally attached to 421 Flight. On October 17 1940 he carried out a W/T test and on November 9 he flew a patrol with 421. Posted from 66 Squadron on December 13 1940, Appleford went to 8 FTS, Montrose for an instructor’s course, after which he was posted to Southern Rhodesia, to instruct at 22 SFTS, Gwelo. He was hospitalised on November 3 1941, firstly in Nairobi and then Durban until midApril 1942. Appleford went north and joined the Aircraft Delivery Unit, Cairo on June 2, staying with it until January 10 1943, when he was posted to 274 Squadron, Benghazi, to fly Hurricanes on coastal defence. His tour completed, Appleford was posted to 71 OTU, Ismailia, as an instructor. After six weeks he returned to the Aircraft Delivery Unit and on November 15 1943 he went south again to the Central Flying School, Bloemfontein. From early February 1944 until May 1945 Appleford instructed at Air Schools in South Africa. He returned to Britain on July 1 1945 and joined 587 Squadron at Weston Zoyland on August 24. Robin Appleford was released from the RAF in August 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died on April 17 2012.

APO 15.4.39 PO 6.11.39 FO 6.11.40 FL 6.11.41 SL 17.7.44

JOHN ARBUTHNOT 564104

Pilot British

Pilot British

1 and 229 Squadrons

He joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice in January 1930 and passed out as a Metal Rigger in December 1932. He signed an engagement for twelve years on February 13 1932, his eighteenth birthday. Arbuthnot later applied for pilot training and was selected. He began his elementary flying training at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty on September 27 1937, as an LAC. He moved to 10 FTS, Ternhill on December 13, on No 7 Course. With this completed on September 27 1938, he joined 43 Squadron at Tangmere. On December 15th 1939 Arbuthnot baled out of Hurricane L 1725, after spinning in cloud. The aircraft crashed on peat moorland, burying itself deeply. It was dug out in 1978. On the evening of April 8 1940 a force of German bombers was sent to attack the naval base at Scapa Flow. 43 was scrambled from its base at Wick to intercept the raiders. Arbuthnot was one of the first of the squadron to make contact and he emptied his guns into a He 111, which dived into a layer of cloud. Posted to France, to join No 1 Squadron on May 16, Arbuthnot was soon in action. He returned to base at Boos after a combat on June 4, with his radiator shot away. He was with the squadron during the Battle of Britain and made his last flight with No 1 on October 1 1940 and then joined 229 Squadron at Northolt, flying his first operational sortie on the 5th. On February 4 1941 229 Squadron was ordered to provide an escort for an aircraft carrying the American politician Wendell Wilkie. Arbuthnot crashed and was killed during this duty, aged 26. His body was washed ashore on April 14 near Garston. He is buried in Wilton Cemetery, Carluke, Lanarkshire.

IVOR KENNETH ARBER Sgt

Sgt

Arbuthnot was born on February 13 1914 at Cobbinshaw, West Lothian. He went to Braehead and Carranshore schools.

APO 9.10.39 PO 18.5.40 FO 18.5.41 FL 18.5.42

156944

85 Squadron

After a short induction course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, Arbon went to 6 FTS, Little Rissington, where he completed his flying training. On November 20 1939 he went to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum for a short course, after which he joined the Pilots’ Pool at Andover in early January 1940. Arbon returned to Old Sarum on the 16th of the month and joined 16 Squadron. Equipped with Lysanders, the squadron went to France on April 8 but was withdrawn on May 19. Arbon volunteered for Fighter Command and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on September 8. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 85 Squadron at Church Fenton on the 26th and served with it in the Battle of Britain. He left 85 Squadron on June 15 1942 and went soon afterwards to 54 OTU, Charter Hall, as an instructor. A return to operations came on January 31 1943, when Arbon joined 29 Squadron at West Malling, as a Flight Commander. He was awarded the DFC (14.4.44) and he took command of the squadron on April 29, as an Acting Wing Commander. With his tour completed, Arbon was posted to RAF Bradwell Bay on July 11 1944, as Station Commander. He moved to RAF Hunsdon, to command, on March 22 1945. A month later he was appointed to a staff job at HQ Transport Command. Arbon was posted to 216 Group, Heliopolis on June 11 1945, taking command of 249 Wing at Bari two weeks later. He returned to England at the end of the year and was released in 1946, as a Wing Commander. Arbon started an Auction and Estate Agency in Hertfordshire. In 1967 he was elected the first President of the National Association of Estate Agents. The Association’s HQ in Warwick is called Arbon House. He died on November 21 1968, after a car accident in France.

ALEXANDER NELSON ROBIN LANGLEY APPLEFORD PO

Pilot British

Born in Sydenham on February 8 1921, Arbon was educated at Brockley County School. He joined the RAF on a short service commission, went to 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham on January 23 1939 and finished his ab initio training at 11 E&RFTS, Scone.

APO 24.8.39 PO9.12.39 FO 9.12.40 FL 9.12.41

42736

PO

603 Squadron

Arber joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742741), in December 1938 and was called up on September 1 1939. He did his advanced flying training at 8 FTS, Montrose and completed the course in May 1940. He probably joined 603 Squadron at Dyce in the latter half of June.

HAROLD THORPE ARCHER

On July 3 Arber shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 off the east coast of Scotland and on the 12th he shared a He 111 with Pilot Officer Gilroy and Sergeant Caister, in an engagement over Aberdeen. The enemy aircraft, from 9/KG 26, crashed and burned out, killing the crew of four. On August 2 1940 Arber crashed at Inkhorn, Aberdeenshire, in Spitfire R 6717. The squadron ORB gives no details and there is no further mention of Arber therein. Commissioned in August 1943, Arber was awarded the AFC (1.1.45). He left the RAF

747939

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

23 Squadron

Archer joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in May 1939, as a u/t Wop/AG. He was called up on September 1. With training completed, he joined 23 Squadron at Ford on October 1 1940. In 1941 he

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JOSEPH FOX ARMITAGE

was with 7 Squadron, flying in Stirlings from Oakington, Cambridgeshire. Archer failed to return from an operation to Hamburg on June 30 1941, in Stirling N6001, shot down by a night fighter of 6/NJG 1. He is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Soltau, Germany.

741932

Sgt

Wop/AG

British

He went to 4 Ferry Pilot Pool on May 12 1940 but was posted to the AASF in France on the 29th. He had joined 242 Squadron before June 24 and may even have joined it in France before it was withdrawn from there to England on June 18 1940. The last reference to Armitage in the 242 Squadron ORB is on August 2 1940, after which he was, presumably, posted away. He was killed on June 17 1941, serving as a Flight Sergeant with 234 Squadron at Portreath. With no known grave, Armitage is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 35.

Archer was a member of the crew of Blenheim Z 5729, which was flying over Pembroke Dock on the afternoon of August 20, when it was damaged by anti-aircraft fire. The captain, Pilot Officer G Campbell, returned the aircraft safely back to base at St Eval. Archer was posted away with his flight to Aldergrove on November 19 1940, which was combined with a flight of 235 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. He flew his first operational sortie with 272 on the 23rd. Some time later Archer was captured by the Germans. He was in Stalag Luft 7 at Bankau, near Kreulberg in Upper Silesia (PoW No 90105). When freed in May 1945 Archer was a Warrant Officer. He stayed in the RAF, becoming a Master Signaller on February 10 1956. Archer died in 1980.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG 41812

Pilot British

PO

602 Squadron

On July 5 1940 Aries joined 602 Squadron, also at Drem. He went south with the squadron to Westhampnett in mid-August. On the 26th Aries claimed a Do 17 destroyed off Selsey Bill. He claimed a Do 17 shot down near Biggin Hill on September 7. His own aircraft, Spitfire K 9839, was damaged by return fire and Aries made a crash-landing at Wrotham, Kent. He only flew one more sortie with 602, an uneventful patrol on September 14, in Spitfire X 4269. He was then grounded and to use his own words, ‘I was put in charge of a room full of registered mail at Tangmere, as a supernumerary’. Aries eventually returned to flying and became an instructor. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.45) and at the end of the war he was at the Empire Central Flying School. Released from the RAF in 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant, Aries was commissioned in the AAF in April 1947, as a Flying Officer serving with 604 Squadron on flying duties. He died in 1976.

APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39 FO 23.10.40 FL 23.10.41

STANLEY JOHN ARNFIELD 46253 Sgt Pilot British 610 Squadron Arnfield, born on October 3 1913, went to the Royal Masonic School, Bushey. He joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice (564115) in January 1930. He passed out in December 1932, as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He signed on for twelve years on October 3 1931, his eighteenth birthday.

PO 2.6.40 FO 2.6.41 FL 2.6.42 FO (AAF) 1.4.47

DENNIS LOCKHART ARMITAGE PO

Pilot British

Arnfield later trained as a pilot. He joined 610 Squadron on September 24 1939 and was detached to Farnborough on March 20 1940 for an oxygen course. He shared in the destruction of an enemy aircraft with Flight Lieutenant John Ellis on June 12 1940, when they shot it down into the sea off Margate. On August 15 he damaged a Bf 109, on the 16th damaged another and claimed two Bf 109s destroyed on the 18th. On the 24th he baled out of Spitfire R 6686, after an attack by a Bf 109 off Ramsgate. He broke an ankle on landing and was admitted to Victoria Hospital, Deal. His stricken aircraft crashed in flames at Hammill, near Eastry. Arnfield was commissioned in July 1941. He later served with Bomber Command and was with 166 Squadron from September 1943, flying Lancasters from Kirmington. He was awarded the DFC (30.6.44), as a Flight Lieutenant with 166. He retired from the RAF on February 12 1951 as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. His post-war service was in the Secretarial Branch. Arnfield died of a heart attack on September 24 1954.

266 Squadron

Armitage learned to fly at the Lancashire Aero Club, gaining his ‘A’ licence. He joined the RAFVR at Hythe in December 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741076). Having reached the required standard, he was given the chance to train continuously with the regular RAF for six months, from July 15 1939. He accepted and went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton. At the end of the course, he was granted a commission and he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on December 10 1939. Armitage was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on August 3 1940, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. On the 12th he probably destroyed a Ju 88 and damaged another and on the 15th, during the interception of an enemy formation off Folkestone, he shared in probably destroying another Ju 88; a cannon shell fired from below exploded between the cockpit and tail unit of Armitage’s aircraft, causing considerable damage, including to the rudder controls. Despite this, Armitage was able to return to Manston. Armitage was posted from 266 in May 1941 and was awarded the DFC (18.7.41) for service with the squadron. He was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and took command of 129 Squadron on June 20 1941, forming with Spitfires at Leconfield. On September 21, on a Wing-escort for bombers attacking targets in France, he was shot down. He baled out and was captured (PoW No 3800). Armitage was released from the RAF in late 1945, as a Squadron Leader. He died on March 5 2004 and was privately cremated, after a funeral service at East Meon Church, Hampshire. PO 10.12.39 FO 4.11.40

54 and 74 Squadrons

With training completed he was posted to RAF Ringway, as a staff pilot. He went from there to 4 Ferry Pilot Pool on June11 1940. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 3, converted to Spitfires and joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on the 23rd. Armstrong joined 74 Squadron at Biggin Hill on October 28 and on November 14 he was shot down off Dover after destroying two Ju 87s, whether by a Bf 109 or anti-aircraft fire is not known. He baled out and his aircraft, Spitfire P 7836, crashed on Dover Road, Sandwich. On February 5 1941 Armstrong shared in destroying a Do 17, with three other pilots, and on May 8 he destroyed a Bf 109. Armstrong died aged 21, on February 18 1943, as a Flight Lieutenant with the Ferry Pilots’ Pool at Gibraltar. He is buried in Dely Ibrahim War Cemetery, Algeria.

Aries joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741835), on July 23 1938. He was called up on September 1 1939. With his training completed, he was commissioned and arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 10 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 263 Squadron at Drem on June 23, where it was reforming after losing most of its pilots when the carrier HMS Glorious was sunk, returning from Norway.

76573

Pilot British

Armstrong, who came from Darlington, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began flying, as a pupil pilot, on January 23 1939.

ELLIS WALTER ARIES PO

242 Squadron

236 Squadron

Archer enlisted before the war in 603 Squadron, AAF, as an Aircraft hand. Called up on August 24 1939, he later re-mustered as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. With his training completed, he joined 236 Squadron on July 19 1940.

79555

Pilot British

Armitage joined the RAFVR in August 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939 and with training completed, he joined 7 B&GS, Stormy Down, as a staff pilot.

SAMUEL ARCHER 803473

Sgt

PO 26.7.41 FO 26.7.42 FL 26.7.43 FL 1.9.45

CHARLES IAN ROSE ARTHUR 41241

FO

Pilot Canadian

141 Squadron

Arthur was born in Fort Garry, Manitoba. He left for England in the Athenia on August 13 1938, to take up a short service commission in the RAF. He began his ab initio course at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham on August 29 and after a two week induction course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, he went to 8 FTS, Montrose on November 12. With the course completed, Arthur went to 3 AOS, Aldergrove on June 25

FL 19.9.41

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at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge. Ash transferred to the General Duties Branch on October 30 1939, having volunteered for aircrew duties. He completed his gunnery training and was posted to 149 Squadron at Mildenhall, as Gunnery Leader. He requested a transfer to Defiants and visited the Central Gunnery School on June 19, in search of information on Boulton and Paul gun turrets. He joined 264 Squadron at Duxford next day. On the morning of August 28 1940 Ash was airborne in Defiant L 7021 with his pilot, Squadron Leader G D Garvin. They got into combat with Bf 109s and both baled out, when the aircraft was shot down, afterwards crashing in flames at Luddenham Marsh, Faversham. Garvin landed with minor injuries but Ash was dead on landing, from bullet wounds, probably machine-gunned as he floated down. He was 31 years old and is buried in the Western Cemetery, St Andrews, Fife.

1939, as a staff pilot. He joined 141 Squadron on October 10, then reforming at Turnhouse. In April 1940 the squadron received its first Defiants, as a day-fighter unit. On July 12 it flew south to Biggin Hill and on the 19th, in a disastrous action off Dover, lost six aircraft with most of their crews. 141 was withdrawn and shortly afterwards it returned to Scotland to begin training for night operations. On October 21 1940 Arthur was admitted to hospital with eye trouble. On October 25 he was sent to Gatwick, to join a 141 Squadron detachment, which was operating from there at night. Whilst there, he flew no operational sorties. Arthur was with the squadron until May 23 1941, when he was posted away to join 145 Squadron at Tangmere, as a Flight Commander. He destroyed a Bf 109 on June 25 and shared

PO 6.1.33 FO 6.1.34 FL 14.4.39

another on the 30th. With his tour completed, Arthur went to CFS, Upavon on October 18 1941, for an instructor’s course. He instructed at 5 (P) AFU, Ternhill from December 1941 to June 1942, when he moved to 7(P) AFU, Peterborough. Arthur returned to operations on November 2 1942, with a posting to 411(RCAF) Squadron at Digby, as a supernumerary Flight Lieutenant. He moved to 122 Squadron at Hornchurch on January 6 1943 but the stay was a short one and he joined 81 Squadron at Tingley in North Africa on March 1. Eight days later Arthur rejoined 242 Squadron, then at Souk-el-Khemis, as a Flight Commander. On June 1 1943 he took command of 232 Squadron at Protville, Tunisia. Four days later it was posted to Ta Kali, Malta. On June 29 Arthur shared in the destruction of a Bf 109. On July 17 he damaged a Bf 109 off Sicily and on August 12 he damaged a Mc 202. Arthur commanded 232 until December 25 1943. After a rest, on attachment to RAF Aleppo, Syria, Arthur was given command of 72 Squadron at Lago, Italy on April 12 1944. He destroyed a Bf 109 on May 7 and shared another on the 16th. He was awarded the DFC (9.6.44). He took the squadron to Sisteron, France on August 25 1944, to cover the landings in Southern France. 72 returned to Italy on October 2 and Arthur shared in the destruction of a Me 410 on the14th. He was promoted to Acting Wing Commander on November 21 and posted to command 5 Refresher Flying Unit at Perugia. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (29.12.44). On July 9 1945 Arthur was appointed Wing Leader 239 Mustang Wing at Lavariano. He returned to the UK and took command of 19 Squadron at Molesworth on April 26 1946, holding the command until August 5 1948. Arthur left the RAF on November 3 1954 as a Squadron Leader, retaining the rank of Wing Commander. He returned to Canada to live.

ALFRED EDWARD ASHCROFT 112736

Pilot British

GLYNN ASHFIELD 36225

248 Squadron

ROBERT CLIFFORD VACY ASH British

Pilot British

FIU

Ashfield was then posted to 23 Squadron at Kenley, as an LAC. On July 30 1932 he was posted to 28 Squadron, which he joined at Ambala, India on October 25 1932. Whilst with the squadron in India Ashfield applied for pilot training. He was selected and posted away for training on March 6 1934. He began his flying at 4 FTS, Abu Sueir, Egypt on April 1 1934, as an Acting Sergeant. After completing the course on January 6 1935, he joined 30 Squadron in Iraq, as a Sergeant-Pilot. Ashfield returned to the UK in August 1937 and joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 22nd, as a Flight Sergeant. He was granted a Permanent Commission on September 27 1939 and was posted to 14 FTS, Kinloss, as an instructor. Ashfield joined the Fighter Interception Unit at Tangmere on April 7 1940. At night on July 23 he was captain of an AI-equipped Blenheim, which shot down a Do 17 of 2/KG 3 off the Sussex coast. The other crew were Sergeant R H Leyland, radar operator, and Pilot Officer G E Morris, observer. It was the FIU’s first successful interception, leading to the destruction of an enemy aircraft at night. Ashfield was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on September 8 1940. He escaped unhurt when he made a forced-landing in Beaufighter R 2059 at Tangmere one night in September, after his cockpit roof flew off during a patrol, and he collided with an unlit truck on landing. For his work at FIU, Ashfield received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.41) and was awarded the AFC (17.3.41). During the night of June 25/26 1941 he destroyed a He 111. Ashfield was posted away to 157 Squadron at Castle Camps on February 22 1942, to be senior Flight Commander. The squadron was recently-reformed and was not yet fully equipped with Mosquitos. It became operational on April 27 1942. On the night of May 29/30 1942 Ashfield probably destroyed a Do 217 S of Dover, on July 27/28 he probably destroyed another and on October 19 he damaged a Ju 88 by day. He was awarded the DFC (4.12.42). Ashfield was killed on December 12 1942, with his radar operator, Pilot Officer D D Beale, when their Mosquito struck a tree during an Army co-operation exercise. He was 30 and he is buried in St Peter’s churchyard, Limpsfield, Surrey.

APO 13.5.39 PO 6.11.39

Air Gunner

FO

Ashfield, from Oxted, Surrey, joined the RAF in September 1928, as an Aircraft Apprentice (562411). He was at RAF Halton from September 5 to 26, at Flowerdown from September 27 1928 to August 1 1929 and at the Electrical and Wireless School, Cranwell from August 2 1929 to July 31 1931.

He began his elementary flying training on March 13 1939, as a pupil pilot. With his training completed, Arthur joined 248 Squadron on October 30 1939, at Hendon, where it was reforming. Arthur was attached to 92 Squadron on January 10 1940, to convert to Blenheims. A Coastal Command squadron, 248 was seconded to Fighter Command for part of the Battle of Britain. Arthur was lost on August 27 1940, when his Blenheim failed to return from a reconnaissance flight to the South Norwegian coast. The aircraft is known to have crashed into the sea. The body of the gunner, Sergeant R C R Cox, was washed up on the Swedish coast. The bodies of Arthur and his observer, Sergeant A E Ringwood, were never found. Their names are on the Runnymede Memorial, Panels 7 and 22 respectively. Arthur was 22 years old.

FL

141 Squadron

PO 26.11.41 FO 1.10.42 FL 26 11.43

Arthur, of Radyr, Glamorgan, joined the RAF on a short service commission.

31023

British

With training completed, he joined 141 Squadron in July 1940 and served with it in the Battle of Britain. When 141 got Beaufighters, he retrained as a Radio Observer. Early on May 7 1941, Ashcroft was flying with Squadron Leader E C Wolfe. They shot down a Ju 88 near Lennoxtown, Stirlingshire. When Wolfe took command of 456 (RAAF) Squadron in March 1942, he took Ashcroft with him. In the early hours of July 30 1942 they shot down a He 111. Ashcroft, who had been commissioned in November 1941, was with 29 Squadron in 1943. He was awarded the DFC (22.2.44). In the second half of 1944 Ashcroft was flying with 157 Squadron from Swannington, intruding over German night-fighter airfields. On October 6 he failed to return from a sortie. Ashcroft was 24 at the time of his death. He is buried in Brussels Town Cemetery, Belgium.

CHARLES JOHN ARTHUR PO

Air Gunner

Ashcroft, from Cobham, Surrey, joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745591). Called up on September 1, he re-mustered to Airman u/t Air Gunner.

APO 29.10.38 PO 29.8.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.42 SL 1.7.44

42090

Sgt

264 Squadron

Ash was granted a permanent commission in the Stores Branch of the RAF in January 1933 and in August went to Cranwell on Supply duties. On September 1 1934 he went overseas to the Aircraft Depot, Hinaidi, Iraq, moving to the Central Supplies Depot there on May 23 1936. In December 1938 Ash was serving at the Supplies Depot, Habbaniya but was back in England in 1939. He was posted on May 1 to the Equipment Branch, 24 (Training) Group

PO 27.9.39 FO 28.9.40 FL 27.9.41

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DENNIS GARTH ASHTON 76574

PO

Pilot British

posted on August 10 1940 to No 1 (Coastal) OTU, Silloth, from where he joined 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton on September 23. He was a member of a Blenheim crew returning from an attack on two armed enemy merchant vessels on November 23. During the action the pilot, PO J T Davison, had been wounded and the aircraft sufficiently damaged to make necessary a crash-landing at base. Unbeknown to Davison, a bomb had remained on the rack and this exploded on impact of the landing, severely injuring Aslett and setting fire to the aircraft. Davison and his observer, Sergeant Brazier, jumped clear but on realising that Aslett was still in the blazing aircraft, they went back, regardless of their own safety, and dragged him out. They were both badly burned whilst doing so and their gallantry was recognised in March 1941, Davison being awarded the GM and Brazier the BEM. Aslett spent some time in Ely Hospital, eventually returning to Bircham Newton, where he was put on instruction duties. He later joined 279 (Air Sea Rescue) Squadron, was commissioned in December 1943 and, on finishing his tour in early February 1944, he was posted to No 1(Coastal) OTU at Turnberry, as an instructor. Later in the year Aslett went to 111 OTU, Nassau, Bahamas for Liberator crewing. He joined 224 Squadron on his return to Britain on January 9 1945 and remained with the squadron until the end of the year. Aslett was released in February 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.

266 Squadron

Ashton joined the RAFVR in June 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741657). He was later given the opportunity of having six months continuous flying training with the regular RAF. Ashton accepted and went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on July 15 1939. At the outbreak of war he was retained for the duration and went on to complete the course there. He was commissioned on December 12 1939 and he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on the 16th from 2 FTS. On July 18 Ashton, in Spitfire N 3170, collided with a stationary tractor at base but was unhurt. He lost two months’ seniority for this incident, gazetted after his death. In combat with enemy aircraft off Portsmouth on August 12, Ashton was reported ‘Missing’ when his aircraft, Spitfire P 9333, was shot down in flames. His body was recovered in September by the mine sweeper HMS Cedar and buried at sea. Ashton, who came from Keyworth, Nottinghamshire, was 20 years old. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial Panel 7. PO 10.12.39

PO 20.12.43 FO 20.6.44 FL 20.12.45

DENNIS KENNETH ASHTON 741212

Sgt

Pilot British

32 Squadron

DONALD JAMES ASLIN 102097

Ashton, of Carlton, Nottinghamshire, joined the RAFVR in January 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. In September 1939 the FAA was short of pilots and after Ashton was called up, he was posted to Donibristle and joined the Torpedo-Spotter-Reconnaissance Flight.

Air Gunner

British

PO 18.7.41 FO 18.7.42 FL 18.7.43 FO (RAFVR) 27.2.48

WILLIAM RADCLYFFE ASSHETON 41979

29 Squadron

PO 13.9.42 FO 13.3.43 FL 13.9.44

ARTHUR THOMAS RAYNER ASLETT Wop/AG

British

Pilot British

222 Squadron

Assheton went on to 14 FTS, Kinloss in mid-May, on No 1 Course, and after completing his intermediate and advanced training there on November 6, he joined 236 Squadron at Stradishall on the 8th. He was posted to 222 Squadron at Duxford on the 22nd of the month. The squadron was then equipped with Blenheims and began to receive its first Spitfires in March 1940. The squadron moved to Hornchurch in late May. On July 25 Assheton shared in the destruction of a He 111. On August 30 he crash-landed at Bekesbourne Aerodrome, in Spitfire R 6720, after combat over Canterbury. On September 11 he made a forced-landing on Parsonage Farm, Fletching, in Spitfire R 6638, after an action over the Maidstone area. On September 4 he probably destroyed two Bf 109s. Assheton’s third escape came on September 20 when he baled out with slight burns, after being shot down in a surprise attack by Bf 109s over the Thames Estuary. He landed at Latchington and was admitted to St Peter’s Hospital, Maldon. His aircraft, Spitfire K 9993, crashed and burned out at Linkhouse Farm, West Hanningfield. After returning to the squadron, Assheton’s next operational sortie was not until November 17. He was posted from 222 Squadron on December 13 1940 and joined 611 Squadron at Ternhill. On the 29th he was sent to CFS, Upavon, for an instructor’s course. Assheton was awarded the DFC (10.4.45) for service with 540 Squadron, a Mosquito photographic-reconnaissance unit. He remained in the RAF after the war, graduated from the RAF Staff College and retired on November 22 1957 as a Squadron Leader.

By June 1 Ashworth had been promoted to Sergeant. He was still with 29 Squadron on December 8 1940. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in September 1942, Ashworth was released in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Sgt

PO

Born on December 12 1917, Assheton joined the RAF with a short service commission. He began his elementary flying training on March 6 1939, as a pupil pilot. After being accepted as suitable, he was commissioned at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on April 29.

Ashworth joined the RAF, as an Aircraft hand (616585), in July 1938 and later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. He was posted to 29 Squadron at Digby, as an Aircraftsman, in early April 1940.

170758

32 and 257 Squadrons

He then went to 7 OTU, Hawarden and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 29 and on August 22 he damaged a Do 17. Aslin moved to 257 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on September 22. The following morning he was shot down during a patrol over the Thames Estuary and baled out, suffering from burns. Initially he was treated at Sick Quarters at RAF Detling, before being taken to Minster Hospital. His aircraft, Hurricane P 2960, crashed at Grove, near Eastchurch. Aslin was later moved to the Queen Victoria Hospital at East Grinstead, where he underwent plastic surgery by Archie McIndoe and became a Guinea Pig in the process. Commissioned in July 1941, Aslin was released in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. In February 1948 he was commissioned in the RAFVR. Aslin died on July 3 1988.

JACK ASHWORTH Sgt

Pilot British

Aslin joined the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745171). He was called up on September 1 1939 and carried out his intermediate and advanced training at 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 46 Course, from February 1 to June 26 1940.

He was later posted to 770 Squadron for deck-landing training on HMS Argus, in the Western Mediterranean. He was offered a transfer to the FAA but declined and was posted to 3 B&GS, Aldergrove, as a staff pilot. On May 4 1940 Ashton was recalled to the FAA and joined 759 (T) Squadron at Eastleigh for a refresher deck-landing course. By May 23 he had joined 804 Squadron at Hatston. By early June the RAF was short of pilots and Ashton was recalled and sent to 7 OTU, Hawarden on June 11. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 1 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on the 13th. Within two weeks Ashton was posted to RAF Uxbridge and became one of a group of nine sergeants and one officer. They went to Hullavington, picked up Hurricanes, flew them to Abbotsinch and were embarked on the carrier HMS Argus. They were joined by four more officers, told their destination was Malta and that they were now 418 Flight. The Argus sailed on July 23, arrived at Gibraltar and sailed for Malta on the 31st. At dawn on August 2 the pilots flew their Hurricanes off to Luqa. 418 Flight and the Malta Fighter Flight were amalgamated into 261Squadron on August 16 1940. Ashton was flying one of two Hurricanes which intercepted three Fiat CR 42s on November 26 1940. He shot one down and was then shot down himself into the sea by one of the others and killed. He was 26 years old. He is buried in Capuccini Naval Cemetery, Malta.

49946

Sgt

235 Squadron

Born in 1920, Aslett began work as an apprentice printer with a Kent newspaper in 1934. In early 1939 he joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (755648) at Rochester. Called up on September 5 1939, he completed his basic training and went to Air Service Training Ltd, Hamble for initial wireless theory and operation. This was followed by advanced wireless work and flying experience at Cranwell. After a three week course at 9 Bombing and Gunnery School, Penrhos, Aslett was

APO 29.4.39 PO 6.11.39 FO 6.11.40 FL 6.11.41 SL 1.7.45 SL 1.8.47

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FREDERICK PETER JOHN ATKINS

GORDON BARRY ATKINSON

903401

42091

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

141 Squadron

PO

Atkins joined the RAFVR at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge in September 1939 for the duration of hostilities. He volunteered for aircrew duties and trained as an Air Gunner.

On November 3 1940 he returned to Sumburgh, with a damaged oil cooler caused by return fire from a He 111, attacked over the North Sea. He and his crew were unhurt. In 1943 Atkinson was with 603 Squadron in the Mediterranean, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. Normally a fighter squadron, 603 was then operating as a Coastal Strike Unit, with Beaufighters. Atkinson was awarded the DFC (14.12.43), the citation stating that he had flown a large number of sorties, including many attacks on shipping. He remained in the RAF after the war, graduated from Staff College, was made an MBE (1.1.63) and retired on March 18 1976 as a Wing Commander.

ALLAN ARTHUR ATKINSON PO

Air Gunner

British

23 Squadron

Atkinson joined the RAFVR in April 1940 for the duration of hostilities, with a commission as a direct-entry Air Gunner. He was at 7 B&GS from May 6 to June 1 1940, on No 12 Air Gunner Course.

HAROLD DERRICK ATKINSON

He then joined 23 Squadron at Wittering later in June. In the early hours of the 29th he probably destroyed a He 111 SE of Norwich, flying in a Blenheim captained by Pilot Officer D A Willans. On October 30, operating from Ford, he was a member of the crew of Blenheim L 6721 on a routine night patrol. The aircraft crashed at Orchard Way Road, South Bersted after R/T failure in deteriorating weather conditions, searching for base. Atkinson, Flying Officer H J Woodward, pilot, and AC 2 H T Perry, radar operator, were all killed. Atkinson was 32. He is buried in St Mary’s churchyard, Clymping.

33418

Pilot British

151 Squadron

Born in Blyth, Northumberland on June 16 1915, Atkinson was educated at Blyth Secondary School and joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (565476), on September 2 1931. He signed for a twelve-year engagement on June 16 1933, his eighteenth birthday. He trained as a Metal Rigger at No 1 S of TT, Halton, passed out on August 16 1934 and was posted to the staff at the RAF College, Cranwell. Atkinson was posted to No 4 Aircraft Park, Atbara, Sudan on September 4 1935 and joined 47 Squadron at Khartoum on August 13 1936. Whilst there, he applied for pilot training. He was selected and returned to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on July 13 1937. Atkinson did his elementary training at 8 E&RFTS, Woodley from September 26 to November 29 1937, after which he went back to Uxbridge and moved to 3 FTS, South Cerney on December 11. After passing out on July 7 1938 Atkinson was posted to No 1 AAS, Eastchurch, as a staff pilot. He joined 151 Squadron at North Weald on September 3 1939. On May 17 1940 the squadron went to France and on this day Atkinson shared in probably destroying a Ju 87. On the 18th he probably destroyed a He 111 and damaged another, on the 21st he shot down a Hs 126 and on the 22nd he shot down another Ju 87. On July 29 Atkinson damaged a Bf 110 and on August 14, flying in Hurricane P 3310, Atkinson was shot down into the sea off Margate during a combat with Bf 109s. He baled out, was picked up by a boat and then transferred to the Margate lifeboat. Taken to a hospital near Maidstone with shock, Atkinson returned to North Weald after three weeks, to find 151 was at Digby. The ground crews were still at North Weald, salvaging Hurricanes, and Atkinson spent two weeks collecting spares in a Magister and flying the almost-serviceable aircraft to Henlow. He was not declared fit for flying duties officially until September 24. He was awarded the DFM (7.3.41) and stayed with 151 until October 31 1941, when he went to 60 OTU, East Fortune, as an instructor. He was commissioned in November 1941 and joined 96 Squadron at Wrexham on March 26 1942, rejoining 151 Squadron at Wittering on April 15. He went to Canada in September 1943, again as an instructor. From October 15 1943 until June 30 1944 Atkinson was at 36 OTU, Greenwood, Nova Scotia. He moved to 8 OTU, also at Greenwood, on July 1 and was there until returning to the UK on December 31 1944. Atkinson was posted in mid-January 1945 to 54 OTU, Charter Hall, where he was killed in a flying accident in a Mosquito on March 1. He is buried in Blyth Cemetery. PO 24.11.41

Pilot British

213 Squadron

Atkinson joined 213 Squadron at Wittering on August 14 1939. He went with ‘B’ Flight to Merville, France on May 17 1940. The pilots flew their Hurricanes across the Channel and the ground crews flew over in an Ensign and a Bombay. The flight was attached to 79 Squadron at Merville and operated from there. On May 18 Atkinson destroyed a Bf 110 and damaged a Do 17, on the 19th he shared in the destruction of two Hs 126s and damaged a Do 17 and a He 111 and on the 20th he probably destroyed a Bf 110 and shared in destroying a Do 17 and a Hs 126. The stay in France was short, with 213 returning to England on the 21st, ‘A’ Flight going to Manston and ‘B’ Flight to Wittering. The squadron took part in the operations covering the evacuation from Dunkirk. On May 27 and 28 Atkinson shot down two Bf 109s and on the 29th he claimed a probable He 111 and shared in damaging a Ju 88. For his successes during May, Atkinson was awarded the DFC (25.6.40). 213 Squadron was based at Exeter in August 1940 and over a period of seven days Atkinson claimed the destruction of six enemy aircraft, on the 12th two Bf 110s, on the 13th a Bf 110 and on the 14th a He 111. In this last action he returned to Exeter, in Hurricane R 4099, damaged by return fire from a He 111 engaged over Lyme Bay. He was slightly wounded by shell splinters in the arm. On the 16th he claimed a Bf 109 and another two days later. He failed to return from a combat over Warmwell on August 25. His aircraft, Hurricane P 3200, is believed to have crashed into the sea and Atkinson’s body was recovered. He is buried in Market Weighton Cemetery, Yorkshire.

GEORGE ATKINSON Sgt

PO

Born at Wintringham, Yorkshire on August 19 1918, Atkinson was educated at Aysgarth Preparatory School, Yorkshire and then Shrewsbury School from 1932 to 1937, where he was a member of the First XI. He entered RAF College, Cranwell, as a Flight Cadet, in September 1937 and graduated on July 29 1939, with a Permanent Commission.

APO 12.4.40 PO 1.6.40

47413

248 Squadron

Born on July 7 1921, Atkinson entered the RAF as a candidate for a short service commission and began training as a pupil pilot on December 28 1938. With training completed, he joined 248 Squadron at Hendon on October 30 1939.

He was with 141 Squadron at Turnhouse in July 1940. He went south with the squadron to West Malling on July 12. Atkins was in one of the nine Defiants attacked by Bf 109s of III/JG 51 off Dover on July 19. His aircraft, Defiant L 7015, was shot down into the Channel. The pilot, Pilot Officer R Kidson, was never found but Atkins’ body was washed up on the French coast. He was 26 years old and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France.

78740

Pilot British

PO 29.7.39

MATTHEW RICHARD ATKINSON 39364

FL

Pilot British

3 Squadron

Atkinson, of Gosforth, Northumberland, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training as a pupil pilot on November 16 1936. He was posted to 11 FTS, Wittering on February 6 1937 and after completing his training, he joined 52 Squadron at Upwood, on September 4 1937. At that time 52 was using Audax and Hart light bombers and was re-equipped with Battles in 1939. On March 18 1939 Atkinson was detached to RAF Manston for a short navigation course. The squadron began acting as a training unit on April 1 1939. Atkinson was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on August 29 1939 and appointed Flight Commander of the newly-formed ‘C’ Flight. On April 8, 1940 52 and 63 Squadrons were amalgamated to form 12 OTU, remaining on their common base at Benson, Oxfordshire. Atkinson continued to serve as an instructor with 12 OTU until August 5 1940, when he relinquished his acting rank on being posted to 12 Squadron at Binbrook. He flew night operations against targets in France. After the start of the Battle of Britain on July 10 1940, Atkinson had volunteered for Fighter Command and he flew his last sortie with 12 Squadron on September 17, a night attack on barges in Boulogne Harbour, before leaving to join 43 Squadron at Usworth on the 20th. He was posted away from 43 on December 17 1940 to the Air Ministry on the Special Duties List. Atkinson was lost with his crew on June 26 1942, with 1481 Flight, Bomber Command, as a Squadron Leader. He was taking part in the “1000 Bomber” attack on

FO 1.10.42 FL 24.11.43

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Bremen. With no known grave, he is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 65. Atkinson was 26.

September 9 Austin was appointed temporary ‘B’ Flight Commander when Flight Lieutenant N W Burnett was hospitalised. He led the flight on sorties until October 30, when Burnett resumed flying duties. Austin was posted away from 46 on December 13 1940 to 8 FTS, Montrose, as an instructor. On March 17 1941 Austin was killed in a training accident off the Isle of Man, serving as a Flight Lieutenant at 5 B&GS, Manby. He is buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, Clevedon, Somerset.

APO 25.1.37 PO 16.11.37 FO 16.6.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41

RONALD ATKINSON 79530

PO

Pilot British

242, 600, 111 and 213 Squadrons

Atkinson, from Gillingham, Kent, joined the RAFVR in February 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742854). He was called up on September 1 1939 and did his training at 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 44 Course, which ended on May 20 1940. Atkinson was commissioned on the 19th and he joined 242 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 26th.

APO 3.5.37 PO 1.3.38 FO 1.11.39

SYDNEY AUSTIN 101002

ALBERT LAWRENCE AUSTIN Radar Operator

British

604 Squadron

Austin enlisted in the RAFVR at No 1 Depot, Uxbridge in March 1940 for the duration of hostilities. He was with 604 Squadron at the start of the Battle of Britain, having had some radar training.

Air Gunner

British 29

219 Squadron

DAVID HART AYERS 740696

Sgt

Pilot British

600 and 74 Squadrons

Ayers, from Herne Bay, Kent, was educated at Kent College, Canterbury from 1926 to 1931. He joined the RAFVR in July 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot and was called up on September 1 1939, already a trained pilot. Ayers joined 600 Squadron from 11 Group Pool, St Athan on September 16. He was still with the squadron in July 1940 and made his last flight with it on the 29th of the month.

ANTHONY THOMAS AUSTIN Sgt

British

PO 14.7.41

On August 25 he was flying as a member of the crew of Blenheim L 6782, when the aircraft crashed near Witheredge, Exeter, whilst on an operational sortie. The cause of the crash is unknown. Sergeants J G B Fletcher, air gunner, and C Haigh, pilot, were both killed and Austin died the next day. Austin was 25 and is buried in Northwood Cemetery, Middlesex.

129122

Air Gunner

After completing No 11 Air Gunner course at 5 B&GS, Manby, from May 20 to June 15 1940, he joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on August 8. Austin was crewed with Sergeant H F Grubb. They had two lucky escapes in landing mishaps. On August 26 1940 their Blenheim undershot the runway at Catterick, landing in a sudden rainstorm at night. When landing at Redhill on October 16, they overshot the runway and hit the boundary fence. On November 22 1940 Austin was probably with Grubb, when he destroyed an enemy aircraft at night off Beachy Head. Austin retrained as a Radio Observer and in the evening of February 17 1941 he was flying with Squadron Leader J H Little in a Beaufighter. They shot down a Do 17, which crashed at Oakley Court, Bray. Austin was awarded the DFM (30.5.41), for assisting in the destruction of three enemy aircraft at night. Commissioned in July 1941, Austin joined 85 Squadron at Hunsdon. He was killed on October 30 1941, as a Flying Officer. With no known grave, Austin is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 29.

PO 19.5.40

LAC

Sgt

Austin joined the RAFVR at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge in September 1939 (903071) for the duration of hostilities.

He was with 242 when it went to Chateaudun on June 8, to cover the rearguard actions being fought by the Army on its retreat to the Atlantic coast. The squadron withdrew on the 16th, to Coltishall. Atkinson was posted to 600 Squadron at Manston on August 10 1940 but on the 24th he moved to 111 Squadron at Debden. On August 31 he damaged a Bf 110. He went to Tangmere on September 19, to join 213 Squadron. He damaged a Do 17 on the 25th, claimed the destruction of a Bf 109 on the 30th and damaged another Do 17 on October 10. Atkinson was killed on October 17 1940, shot down by Bf 109s in Hurricane P 3174, which crashed at Weeks Farm, near Pluckley. He was 19 and is buried in Woodlands Cemetery, Gillingham.

917258

FL 1.11.40

Squadron

Austin joined 600 Squadron, AAF in early 1939 (800675), as an Aircraft hand. He was called up on August 24, volunteered for Air Gunner training and with that completed, he joined 29 Squadron at Digby on July 1 1940, from 5 B&GS, Jurby, as an AC 2.

On August 3 Ayers was posted to 5 OTU and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 74 Squadron at Wittering on August 17 1940. He made his first flight with the squadron on the 22nd. Whilst on a routine patrol on September 23, in Spitfire P 7362, Ayers baled out into the sea SE of Southwold. His body was recovered on October 4. He was 26. Ayers is buried in Ipswich Cemetery, Suffolk.

When he flew his first operational sortie on July 21, he had already been promoted to Sergeant. Austin was commissioned in May 1942 and was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1994. PO 20.5.42 FO 20.11.42 FL 20.5.44

CHARLES ALBERT HENRY AYLING 561455

Sgt

Pilot British

43 and 66 Sqdns, 421 Flight

FREDERICK AUSTIN 39627

FO

Pilot British

46 Squadron

Ayling joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in September 1927. He passed out in August 1930 and later trained as a pilot.

Austin joined the RAF on a short service commission. He began as a pupil pilot on March 1 1937. He completed his ab initio course and was commissioned at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on May 3.

He was with 43 Squadron in September 1939. On June 7 1940 he crash-landed his badly-damaged Hurricane at RouenBoos in France. Ayling got away from Garnay aerodrome on the 10th, in a Hurricane with a punctured wing-tank, and reached Tangmere. On July 12 1940 Ayling shared a He 111 and on August 8 he damaged two Bf 109s. He went to 66 Squadron at Kenley on September 10 and then moved to 421 Flight at Gravesend on October 8. Three days later, in Spitfire P 7303, he was killed when he crashed at Newchurch, after combat with enemy aircraft over Hawkinge. He was 28. Ayling is buried in St Nicholas’ Cemetery at Monkton, Pembrokeshire, close to his wife’s home.

On May 8 he was posted to 3 FTS, South Cerney and after passing out from the advanced training section of the course, he joined 3 Squadron at Kenley on November 27 1937. Austin went to CFS, Upavon on August 7 1938 for a course, after which he was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton, as an instructor. He was on the HQ staff at RAF Martlesham Heath by mid-June 1940. On July 27 he was appointed Officer i/c Parachute Section there and he relinquished this post on August 14 and joined 46 Squadron at Digby the next day. On

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B CYRIL FREDERICK BABBAGE 89298 Sgt Pilot British 602 Squadron

in early April to Chittagong. On April 9 1943 Bachmann was killed in action, aged 25. He is buried in Chittagong War Cemetery.

Babbage was born in Ludlow, Shropshire on June 25 1917. He joined the RAFVR in October 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742134).

PO 6.11.39

FO 6.11.40

FL 23.9.41

CHARLES HARVEY BACON 74324 FO Pilot British 610 Squadron

Called up on September 1 1939, he finished his training and was with 602 Squadron at Drem by June 1940. On August 18 Babbage claimed a Ju 87 destroyed, on the 19th he shared a Ju 88 and on the 25th destroyed a Do 17 and a Bf 110. After probably destroying a Bf 109 on the 26th over Selsey Bill, Babbage was himself shot down by Hauptmann Mayer of 1/JG 53. He baled out, was picked up by the Bognor lifeboat and then admitted to Bognor Hospital. His aircraft, Spitfire X 4188, crashed into the sea. Back with the squadron, Babbage was in combat with Bf 110s over Selsey Bill on September 11. He shot one down and returned to Westhampnett, in Spitfire X 4269, with a damaged starboard wing. On the 15th Babbage damaged a Do 17, on the 26th he shot down a He 111 and on the 27th, after destroying a Ju 88 off Dungeness, he returned to Westhampnett, in Spitfire X 4160, after himself being damaged by Bf 109s. In another engagement on the 27th, Babbage claimed a Bf 109 as being probably destroyed. Over the Channel on October 12, Babbage shared in destroying a Ju 88. His Spitfire, X 4541, was damaged by return fire and he overturned when he made a forced-landing at Iford Farm, near Lewes. He was unhurt. Babbage was awarded the DFM (25.10.40) and commissioned in late November. In June 1941 he was posted to 41 Squadron at Merston, which began ‘Rhubarb’ operations over the Continent. On September 18 Babbage shot down an unidentified aircraft, now known to be an early model FW 190. Its pilot, German ace Hauptmann Walter Adolph, was killed. On October 14 1941 Babbage damaged a Bf 109. Later in the war Babbage did an operational tour on Mosquitos, during the course of which he was twice shot down. He remained in the RAF after the war and was a Qualified A1 Instructor, having completed the course at CFS. Babbage retired from the RAF on June 25 1964 with the rank of Wing Commander. He died in 1977.

A Demi (Half Fellow) of Magdalen College, Oxford, Bacon was born on January 15 1919. He joined the Oxford University Air Squadron and transferred to the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754287). He was called up on September 1. Commissioned on September 26 1939, Bacon was on No 6 Course at RAF College FTS, Cranwell from November 6 1939 to May 9 1940. Bacon arrived at 10 B&GS, Warmwell with the Advanced Training Squadron from Cranwell FTS on April 26. With the course completed, he joined 98 Squadron in France in early May 1940, flying Battles. It was withdrawn to England in early June. It re-assembled at Gatwick on the 15th and in July it was preparing for a move to Iceland for coastal patrol duties. When 98 departed on July 27, Bacon stayed at RAF Gatwick, as a supernumerary. He joined 4(C) Ferry Pilot Pool on August 1. Along with other pilots with Merlin engine experience, he went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 3. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 610 Squadron at Acklington on the 16th. On the 30th Bacon was killed when his Spitfire crashed on Alnmouth beach. He is buried in an extension to St Mary’s churchyard, Windermere. PO 26.9.39 FO 26.9.40

DOUGLAS HIRAM BADDELEY 814205 Sgt Air Gunner British

25 Squadron

Baddeley, from Dalton, Huddersfield, enlisted before the war for four years in 616 Squadron, AAF, for ground duties. Called up on August 24 1939, he later volunteered for Air Gunner training and with a gunnery course completed he joined 25 Squadron at North Weald on October 4 1940. He was a Flight Sergeant, when he was killed on June 26 1942, at the age of 25.

PO 29.11.40 FO 29.11.41 FL 29.11.42 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.7.55

JACK HENRY BACHMANN 76568 PO Pilot British 145 Squadron

Baddeley is buried in Kiel War Cemetery, North Germany. His unit at the time of his death is not known.

Bachmann joined the RAFVR in July 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740687). Called up on September 1 1939, he was sent on No 13 Course at 10 FTS, Ternhill on the 9th. He completed the course and joined 98 Squadron at Hucknall on November 6, flying Battles.

DOUGLAS ROBERT STEUART BADER 26151 SL Pilot British 242 Squadron

On April 16 1940 Bachmann went with the squadron to France. He moved to 88 Squadron at Mourmelon on May 12 1940. The squadron was withdrawn to England in June, arriving at Driffield on the 14th. After volunteering for Fighter Command, Bachmann was posted to 145 Squadron at Drem on August 18 1940. He damaged a He 111 on November 13. In June 1942 Bachmann was given command of 67 Squadron, then reforming at Alipore, India, with Hurricane IIcs. In February 1943 the squadron went to the Akyab front, moving

Probably the most widely-known participant in the Battle of Britain, Bader was born in St John’s Wood, London on February 21 1910. His early years were spent in India, where his father was in the Civil Service. Bader returned to England, where he attended a preparatory school at Temple Grove, Eastbourne.

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Badger was posted away from 151 to RAF Hendon on May 16 1940 and he joined 87 Squadron in France soon afterwards. He destroyed a Bf 109 on the 19th. The squadron was withdrawn to England and arrived at Debden on May 24. On August 11 1940 Badger claimed the destruction of a Bf 109 and damaged another. He damaged a Ju 88 and a Bf 109 on the 25th. In early 1941 Flight Lieutenant D H Ward of 87, who had flown with Badger in the 151 aerobatic team, thought it would be good for 87 Squadron morale if it had such a team. Badger was co-opted as a member, with Ward and Pilot Officer R P Beamont. It was apparently of great benefit to the squadron. Badger was commissioned in May and on the 19th he shot down an Arado Ar 196 floatplane off the Scilly Isles. He was posted to the Middle East in November 1941 and joined 94 Squadron in the Western Desert in December. In March 1942 he went to 73 Squadron and on the 20th he took part in an attack on Derna airfield, during which several enemy aircraft and an illuminated flarepath were destroyed. Badger took part in other successful attacks on enemy airfields and on July 11 1942 he destroyed a Bf 109. When his operational tour ended, he was awarded the DFC (18.9.42). Badger returned to Britain and in July 1944 he transferred to the Technical Branch (Engineering). He remained in the RAF after the war and retired on August 12 1961 as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He died in 1995.

He later won a scholarship to St Edward’s School, Oxford. In 1928 he won a prize cadetship to RAF College, Cranwell and began the course there in September. After passing out in July 1930, Bader was granted a Permanent Commission and on August 25 he was posted to 23 Squadron at Kenley. In 1931 he represented 23 in the Pairs Aerobatic flying competition at the Hendon Air Display, when the squadron won for the third year running. On December 14 1931 Bader crashed in a Bulldog, after attempting a roll at very low level. Miraculously, he was not killed but lost his legs, the right one above the knee and the left below. After being fitted with artificial limbs, Bader remained in the RAF but most unhappily because he was not allowed to fly. He was retired by the Air Ministry on April 30 1933. He got a job with the Asiatic Petroleum Company, which later became Shell. Following the outbreak of war, Bader became increasingly insistent about rejoining the RAF in a flying capacity. Finally, on October 18 1939, he went to CFS, Upavon for a flying test, which was conducted by Squadron Leader RHA Leigh (qv). Bader passed the test and was re-employed as a regular officer on November 26, as a Flying Officer, with seniority of January 26 1932. After a refresher course at Upavon, Bader joined 19 Squadron at Duxford on February 7 1940. On March 12 he was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and he was posted to 222 Squadron on April 16, also based at Duxford, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. On June 1 Bader scored his first victory, when he shot down a Bf 109 near Dunkirk and shared in the probable destruction of a He 111. On June 24 1940 Bader was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and given command of 242 Squadron at Coltishall, a unit made up mainly of Canadian pilots. Morale was low and discipline was lax when Bader set himself the task of bringing 242 back to a good operational standard. On July 11 Bader shot down a Do 17 into the sea off Cromer. He was granted a Permanent Commission on July 26. He shot down another Do 17 into the sea near Yarmouth on August 21 and claimed two Bf 110s destroyed on the 30th. Bader claimed two Bf 110s and a Bf 109 destroyed on September 7, a Do 17 shot down and two others damaged on the 9th, another Do 17 destroyed and two more damaged on the 15th, a Ju 88 and a Do 17 destroyed on the 18th and a Bf 109 shot down and probably a second on the 27th. After receiving a Mention in Despatches (1.1.41), Bader’s final victory with 242 was a shared Ju 88 on January 22 1941, shot down into the North Sea, E of Yarmouth. He was promoted to Acting Wing Commander and posted to Tangmere as Wing Commander Flying on March 18 1941. In June he began to add to his victories in sweeps over France, on June 21 a Bf 109, on the 26th a Bf 109 and another shared and on July 2 another Bf 109 and one damaged. Bader shared another Bf 109 and damaged a second on July 21 and damaged another on the 23rd. He led the Wing on August 9, to escort bombers to Bethune. From the start things went wrong and he found himself alone and involved with several Bf 109s. In the ensuing combat, S of Le Touquet, he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and probably a second before he was downed in still unproven circumstances. Bader baled out and was captured on landing, minus his right artificial leg. For the Germans he was a difficult prisoner and he eventually finished up in Colditz. He was released from there on April 4 1945. After rest and recuperation, Bader was posted to Tangmere, as a Group Captain, to command the Fighter Leaders’ School. Many things had changed since 1941 and it was not a successful appointment. After a short period, Bader was given command of the North Weald Sector, from where he organised and led the Battle of Britain flypast in September 1945. Bader retired on July 21 1946, retaining the rank of Group Captain. He had received the following orders and decorations, DSO (1.10.40), Bar to the DSO (15.7.41), DFC (7.1.41), Bar to the DFC (9.9.41), Legion d’Honneur, Croix de Guerre and three Mentions in Despatches. After retiring, Bader rejoined Shell. In 1952 he was made Managing Director of the Shell aircraft fleet, an appointment which necessitated a lot of overseas travel. Somehow, he always found time to encourage disabled people, particularly children and young people. For his public service, Bader was made a CBE in 1956 and knighted in 1976. He flew his own aeroplane for the last time on June 4 1979, when he made a local flight from White Waltham. On September 5 1982, after attending a dinner in honour of Marshal of the RAF Sir Arthur Harris, Bader died in the car as his wife drove him back to their Berkshire home. PO 26.7.30 WC 1.7.45

FO 26.1.32

Retired 30.4.33

IVOR JAMES BADGER 45975 F/Sgt Pilot British

FO 26.11.39

FL 24.9.40

PO 8.5.41 FO 10.3.42 FL 10.3.43 FL (T) (e) 1.9.45

JOHN VINCENT CLARENCE BADGER 33046 SL Pilot British 43 Squadron Born in Lambeth, London in 1912, Badger was educated at the Belfast Academical Institute. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (562677), in September 1928. He passed out in August 1931 and was awarded a flight cadetship at RAF College, Cranwell. He entered in September 1931, as a Flight Cadet. He graduated in July 1933, winning the Sword of Honour and granted a Permanent Commission. He was posted to 43 Squadron on the 15th. At this time the RAF was supplying pilots for the Fleet Air Arm and on October 3 1934 Badger went to the School of Naval Co-operation, Lee-on-Solent. He joined 821 (Fleet Spotter-Reconnaissance) Squadron on May 4 1935, shorebased at Eastleigh and at sea on the aircraft carrier HMS Courageous. Badger was posted to the Marine Aircraft Establishment at Felixstowe on October 25 1937. On July 24 1939 Badger was posted to the Air Staff 13 Group, which had just been formed, as Squadron Leader Intelligence. On January 5 1940 he went to 11 Group Pool, St Athan, for a flying refresher course. He was posted from there to France on the 13th. Badger arrived at Achicourt on the 18th, to take up duties as Squadron Leader Orginisation at HQ 14 Group. On June 21 1940 he went to 43 Squadron at Tangmere, as a supernumerary Squadron Leader, to gain operational and administrative experience. On July 9 the CO, Squadron Leader C G Lott, was shot down and badly wounded and Badger assumed command of 43. On the 12th he shared a He 111 and on August 8 Badger got a probable Bf 109, on the 13th damaged two Ju 88s, on the 14th and 15th destroyed two others, on the 16th shot down three Ju 87s and on the 26th destroyed a He 111 and shared a second. Badger was shot down by Bf 109s on August 30. He baled out but was grievously wounded when he landed in trees. His Hurricane, V 6458, crashed S of Woodchurch. He was taken to Ashford Hospital. He was posted to RAF Tangmere as non-effective sick. Badger was later moved to the RAF Hospital at Halton and he died there as a result of his injuries on June 30 1941. He is buried in the churchyard of St Michael and All Angels, Halton, Buckinghamshire. Badger was 28. He was awarded the DFC (6.9.40) and also received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.41).

SL 18.6.41 PO 15.7.33 FO 15.1.35 FL 15.1.37 SL 1.4.39

COLIN CYRIL BAILEY 102088 AC 2 Radar Operator

87 Squadron

Born on September 12 1912, Badger went to Shaftesbury Grammar School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice in September 1929 (563629), and passed out in August 1932 as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He signed on for a twelve-year term on his 18th birthday, September 12 1930.

British

23 Squadron

Bailey joined the RAFVR at No 2 RAF Depot, Cardington in January 1940 for the duration of hostilities, as an Aircraft hand (947374). He later took a radar course and joined 23 Squadron at Wittering on July 23 1940. He later trained as a Radio Observer and was promoted to Sergeant after the Battle of Britain. Commissioned in July 1941, Bailey was awarded the DFC (30.11.43), as a Flight Lieutenant with 219 Squadron.

In the mid-thirties he applied for pilot training and in 1938 he was a Sergeant-Pilot in 151 Squadron at North Weald and a member of the squadron’s aerobatic team.

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JAMES RICHARD ABE BAILEY 74325 FO Pilot British 264 and 85 Squadrons

He was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. PO 13.7.41 FO 14.7.42 FL 14.7.43

GEORGE JOHN BAILEY 106355 Sgt Pilot British

Bailey was born on October 23 1919, son of Sir Abe Bailey Bt. He was at Winchester College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

234 and 603 Squadrons Bailey was a member of the University Air Squadron and transferred to the RAFVR in June 1939 (754310). Called up on September 1, he went to No 1 ITW, Cambridge in November and on December 30 he was posted to RAF College FTS, Cranwell, on No 7 Course. Bailey completed his flying training at 5 FTS, Sealand and then went to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum. On June 10 1940 he was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down and after he had converted to Defiants, Bailey joined 264 Squadron at Duxford on June 19. In late August Bailey took part in 264’s last day-fighting engagements. On the 28th his Defiant was severely damaged in combat with Bf 109s of JG 26. He made a forced-landing at Court Lodge Farm, Petham. Both he and his gunner, Sergeant O A Hardy, were unhurt. Before being shot down, they damaged a He 111. On October 22 Bailey joined 85 Squadron at Castle Camps, as it went over to nightfighting. He was with the squadron until July 1941, when he went to 1452 Flight, then forming at West Malling with Turbinlite Havocs. Soon afterwards, at his own request, he returned to 264 Squadron. On January 1 1942 Bailey moved to 125 Squadron at Fairwood Common, as a Flight Commander. Flying a Beaufighter on September 20 1942, he damaged a Ju 88 and on November 10 shot another down E of Montrose. When his tour was completed, Bailey was attached to the 415th Night Fighter Squadron, USAF on April 1 1943, as a Liaison Officer. In July he went to 54 OTU, Charter Hall as an instructor. He later moved to RAF Honiley, to help form 60 OTU for night-fighter pilots, and he was appointed CFI. Bailey was posted to Italy in November 1943 and he joined 600 Squadron at Monte Corvino on December 3. During the night of February 29/March 1 1944 he shot down a Ju 88 near Rome, on June 2/3 a Ju 87 and a Bf 110, on July 6/7 another Ju 88 and on the 10/11th another Ju 87. Bailey completed his tour and was awarded the DFC (8.9.44). He returned to Britain and was given a staff job at the Air Ministry. After release from the RAF, Bailey returned to Oxford, gaining a BA in 1947 and an MA in 1949. He returned to South Africa, where he went farming and later moved into publishing. Bailey died in 2000.

Bailey joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741820), on July 26 1938 and did his elementary flying training at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty and 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham. Called up in early October 1939, he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on the 9th, for No 43 Course. With his training completed on April 27 1940, he joined 234 Squadron at Leconfield on May 4. Bailey shared Ju 88s on July 8 and 27, he damaged a Bf 109 on August 18 and he damaged two Bf 110s on September 4. He joined 603 Squadron at Hornchurch on September 10. He claimed a Bf 109 shot down on the 15th and another on October 2. In late October Bailey went to 7 FTS, Peterborough, as an instructor. He was posted to Canada on January 7 1941 and as an instructor at 31 SFTS, Kingston, Ontario, he taught FAA pilots dive-bombing, formation techniques and advanced flying. He was commissioned in May 1941. After his return to Britain in October 1943, Bailey was posted as an instructor to 15 (P) AFU on December 7, as an instructor. Bailey left Training Command on May 2 1944 and went to 105 (Transport) OTU, Bramcote, then to 107 OTU at Leicester East before joining 271 Squadron at Down Ampney. He left the RAF on November 25 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant, and he died in 2001. PO 27.5.41 FO 27.5.42 FL 27.5.43

GRAHAM GEORGE BAILEY 83987 PO Pilot British 257, 43, 79 and 56 Squadrons Bailey, of Henleaze, Gloucestershire, joined the RAFVR in July 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748110). He was called up on September 1 1939 and with training completed, he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down, converted to Hurricanes and joined 257 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on September 8 1940.

PO 26.9.39 FO 26.9.40 FL 26.9.41 SL 1.7.45

He moved to 43 Squadron, Usworth on September 10, then to 79 Squadron at Pembrey on the 13th. Bailey’s final move came on October 15, when he joined 56 Squadron at Boscombe Down. Posted to Malta, Bailey flew off HMS Ark Royal on April 27 1941. He joined the newly-formed 185 Squadron at Hal Far on May 12. He shared in shooting down a SM 79 on July 27. On November 9 1941 two Hurricanes from 185 went out to patrol over a returning naval force. They intercepted a force of enemy torpedo-bombers, attempting to attack the ships. Bailey, in one of the Hurricanes, did not come back and was thought to have been hit by return fire. He may have destroyed one of the bombers before he was himself shot down. Bailey was 25 years old and is remembered on the Malta Memorial, Panel 1, Column 1.

JOHN CYRIL LINDSAY DYSON BAILEY 74660 PO Pilot British 46 Squadron Born in March 1920, Bailey was the elder son of Air Commodore G C Bailey. He was educated at Tonbridge School from 1933 to 1937. He went on to Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, where he read Mechanical Sciences. Bailey was a member of the University Air Squadron and transferred to the RAFVR in June 1939 (754319). He was called up on September 1 1939 and completed his training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell, on No 8 Course, which began on March 6 1940. With the course completed, he went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on June 22 1940 and after converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to 46 Squadron at Digby on July 20. On September 2, flying Hurricane P 3067 from Stapleford, he was shot down in an engagement over the Thames Estuary. He died of his injuries at Detling Aerodrome and was buried in Maidstone Cemetery on September 11. Bailey is remembered on a plaque at Tonbridge School, unveiled on November 26 2003.

PO 17.8.40 FO 11.8.41

HENRY NOEL DAWSON BAILEY 84957 PO Pilot British 54 Squadron

PO 3.10.39

Born on December 15 1917, Bailey joined the RAFVR in September 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742506), and did his weekend flying at Derby.

PAUL ABBOTT BAILLON 86331 PO Pilot British 609 Squadron

Called up on September 1 1939, he went to ITW, was then posted to 5 EFTS, Hanworth in March 1940 for elementary flying training, after which he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 49 Course, from June 16 to September 7 1940. With his training completed, Bailey went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 7 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on the 28th. He remained with the squadron until September 1941, when, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant, he was posted to 58 OTU, Grangemouth as a Flight Commander instructor. Bailey joined an Air Ministry Unit attached to Rolls Royce, Derby and Hucknall for flying duties in January 1942 and remained there until March 1946, when he was released from the RAF, as a Squadron Leader. He continued flying for Rolls Royce, eventually becoming Chief Test Pilot. Bailey flew the first jet lift machine, the ‘Flying Bedstead’, in 1954.

Born on April 1 1914 at Upton, near Northampton, Baillon was educated at Ratcliffe College. He was articled to a firm of solicitors in Northampton from 1933 and was admitted as a solicitor on July 1 1938. Baillon joined the RAFVR in September 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748022), and began his weekend flying at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell. Called up at the outbreak of war, he went to No 1 ITW, Hastings for about three months, followed by flying training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell, on No 11 Course, from June 8 1940. Baillon went to 7 OTU on September 7, converted to Spitfires and joined 609 Squadron at Middle Wallop on the

PO 7.9.40 FO 7.9.41 FL 7.9.42

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back in mid-June, on fighter patrols in the Montrose/Aberdeen area, in support of 603 Squadron. Baird was on a reconnaissance flight off the south-west coast of Norway on the morning of October 20 1940, in Blenheim P 6952. After engaging and shooting down a Do 17, the Blenheim was attacked by three Bf 109s. One engine was put out of action and the cockpit filled with smoke. Baird got down to low level, flying blind and skimming the sea, feeling for the surface at a speed of 150 mph. The aircraft struck and the silence was complete, as the fuselage filled with water. Baird freed himself and opened the hatch. He then managed to float out the unconscious Sergeant D L Burton but was unable to rescue Sergeant R Copcutt, also unconscious, before the aircraft sank. Further back the Wop/AG, Sergeant SV Wood, managed to get out and launch the dinghy. The three survivors were made PoW. Baird’s long captivity was spent in various camps and he returned to Britain on VE Day 1945. He was repatriated to New Zealand but in late 1947 applied to rejoin the RAF and was granted an extended commission. After refresher courses on Oxfords and Wellingtons, he converted to Lincolns and joined 35 Squadron at Mildenhall, as a Flight Commander. In February 1950 Baird went on an Air Traffic Control course. He served as a Controller at stations in the UK, the Far East and Germany and retired from the RAF on December 2 1963 as a Flight Lieutenant. He returned to New Zealand and settled back in Foxton.

29th. On October 27 his Spitfire, P 9503, was severely damaged by return fire from an enemy aircraft engaged over Andover. Baillon baled out near Upavon, unhurt. In combat with Bf 109s over the Channel in the late afternoon of November 28 1940, Baillon was shot down into the sea, in Spitfire R 6631. His body was later washed ashore on the French coast and he is buried in Bayeux War Cemetery. Baillon’s brother, Mark, was killed on December 28 1940, serving as a Flight Lieutenant with 42 Squadron, Coastal Command. PO 7.9.40

GEORGE STOBIE PRESTON BAIN 85647 PO Pilot British 111 Squadron Bain joined the RAFVR in Edinburgh in July 1939 (758205). He was called up in September and posted to 3 ITW, Hastings in November. He went to 12 EFTS, Prestwick for his elementary flying and on to 5 FTS, Sealand on No 47 Course, which began on April 29 1940. For some unknown reason, Bain completed his training on September 7, with No 49 Course. Bain was then posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down and after converting to Hurricanes he joined 111 Squadron at Drem on October 3 1940 and made his first flight next day, a formation practice. The squadron moved soon afterwards to Dyce and it was flying from there on May 8 1941 that Bain crashed, suffering injuries that barred him from further operational flying. While he was in hospital, 111 moved south to North Weald and Bain was able to arrange a posting there, as a trainee Operations Room Controller. He took over as Controller in September 1941 and continued there until February 1944, when he was posted to Tangmere as Deputy Controller. Bain received a Mention in Despatches for his work during the Invasion. He became Senior Controller at Tangmere and later at the joint Tangmere and Middle Wallop operations room at Middle Wallop. In early 1945 Bain was posted to HQ 11 Group, Uxbridge and in April he became CO at RAF Lerwick, Shetland. He closed the station in August 1945 and served as a Staff Officer at Group HQ, Inverness until released in November 1945 as a Squadron Leader. Bain died in 1996.

APO 13.5.39 PO 16.3.40 FO 6.11.41

AUBREY CYRIL BAKER 64892 Sgt Pilot British

FL 1.9.45

610 and 41 Squadrons

Baker joined 610 Squadron, AAF, as an Aircrafthand (810145), for four years before the war. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot. After being called up on August 24 1939, Baker was posted from 610 to 8 EFTS, Woodley on October 29, as an AC 2. He moved to 9 FTS, Hullavington, on No 18 Course, on April 18 1940 and on completion, he rejoined 610 at Biggin Hill on July 27. With no experience of Spitfires, Baker and three other new arrivals were sent to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 29th. After converting to Spitfires, they rejoined 610 on August 12. Baker claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on August 24, shot down another Bf 109 and also probably destroyed a Bf 110 and a Do 17 on the 29th and probably destroyed another Do 17 on the 30th. He was posted away to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on September 29 1940. On October 20 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and probably another on January 10 1941. Commissioned in April 1941, Baker later went to the Middle East and joined 112 Squadron in the Western Desert in February 1942. On June 6 Baker destroyed a Bf 109 and on July 19 he damaged a Ju 88. On completing his operational tour, he was awarded the DFC (4.12.42). Baker was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant and he died in 1978.

PO 7.9.40 FO 7.9.41 FL 7.9.42

CYRIL EDGAR JOSEPH BAINES 26152 SL Pilot British 238 Squadron Baines, who was born on November 24 1909, went to Haileybury College. He entered RAF College, Cranwell, as a Cadet, in September 1928. He represented the College at Rugby Union and graduated in July 1930, with a Permanent Commission, and joined 32 Squadron at Kenley on the 26th. He was sent to RAF Calshot on October 2 1932 for a Flying Boat course, after which he joined 209 (Flying Boat) Squadron at Plymouth. Posted to 24 (Communications) Squadron at Hendon on November 13 1934, Baines’ stay was short and he went to RAF College, Cranwell on March 11 1935, as a flying instructor. Baines joined the Administrative Staff at HQ Fighter Command on March 7 1938 and remained there until May 18 1940, when he was given command of 238 Squadron, then reforming at Tangmere. He was posted away on July 15 1940 and is believed to have sailed in the aircraft carrier HMS Argus, which left Greenock on July 23 for Malta. She docked at Gibraltar on the 30th and on August 2 two Sunderlands of 10 (RAAF) Squadron flew to Malta, carrying ground crews, to service the Hurricanes that Argus would shortly deliver there. Baines is believed to have been on one of the Sunderlands and possibly joined the Air Staff at RAF Mediterranean at Malta. A career officer, Baines retired from the RAF on March 1 1958 as a Group Captain. He was made CBE (1.6.53), was a graduate of the Joint Services Staff College, the Army Staff College and was a Qualified A1 Instructor, Central Flying School. He died on April 20 1992.

PO 24.4.41 FO 24.4.42 FL 24.4.43

BARRIE BAKER 935961 Sgt Air Gunner

British

264 Squadron

Baker, from Kings Norton, Birmingham, enlisted in the RAFVR for the duration of hostilities at 2 RAF Depot, Cardington in September 1939. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner and after completing his gunnery training, he was with 264 Squadron at Kirton in-Lindsey by June 1940. After a period of night-fighting, following heavy losses over Dunkirk, 264 moved to Hornchurch on August 21 for daylight patrols.

PO 26.7.30 FO 26.1.32 FL 26.1.36 SL 1.10.38 WC 1.12.40 GC 1.1.44 GC 1.7.47

GEORGE MAURICE BAIRD 42094 PO Pilot New Zealander

FL 6.11.42

Five days later Baker was flying with Flight Lieutenant A J Banham in Defiant L 6985. They had just destroyed a Do 17 over Thanet, when they were attacked and shot down by Bf 109s. Their aircraft crashed two miles off Herne Bay. Banham baled out and was rescued from the sea but Baker was never found. He was 27 years old. With no known grave, Baker’s name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 11.

248 Squadron

Born in Foxton, North Island on October 28 1913, Baird applied for a short service commission in April 1938. Provisionally accepted, he sailed for the UK on February 1 1939 in the RMS Tainui. He began his ab initio course at 10 E&RFTS, Yatesbury on March 16 1939. He moved on to 5 FTS, Sealand on May 30. With training completed, Baird joined 248 Squadron at Hendon on November 6 1939. It was moved from Fighter to Coastal Command in February 1940 but it was seconded

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CLIVE CONRAD MAHONEY BAKER 40499 FO Pilot British 23 Squadron

another Bf 109 and damaged another and a few days later Baker shared a Bf 109 and damaged another. Towards the end of 1940 he went on loan to 306 (Polish) Squadron at Ternhill, which had only recently become operational. On January 11 1941 421 Flight was renumbered 91 Squadron. Baker was posted away and joined 74 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 23rd. On a ‘Rhubarb’ operation on May 26 he shot down a Bf 109. With his tour completed in late July 1941, Baker spent the next six months instructing at 51 OTU, Debden and later 52 OTU, Aston Down. After a period in hospital, followed by a convalescence at Torquay, Baker was posted to a fighter squadron in the Western Desert in May1942. Promoted to Acting Squadron Leader, Baker took command of 229 Squadron at Ta Kali, Malta in September. On October 12 and 13 he damaged two Bf 109s. In December 1942 Baker returned to the UK and in January 1943 he went to RAF HQ Northern Ireland, as OC Tactics and Training. In April he became an instructor at 55 OTU, Annan, Scotland but in May went to Gibraltar, to take part in ferrying 300 Hurricanes to Cairo. New pilots took them on to Teheran, where they were picked up by Russian pilots. Back in Britain in July 1943, Baker was posted to 118 Squadron, Coltishall, as a supernumerary Flight Lieutenant. In January 1944 he was based at Croydon, as a ferry pilot and in March he went to CFS, Montrose for an instructors’ course, following which he went to Wrexham as CFI. Baker’s next posting, in January 1945, was as CGI at 17 FTS, Cranwell and after another ground job at RAF Kimbolton later in the year, he was released from the RAF on January 1 1946 as a Squadron Leader. He worked on a tea estate in Ceylon and for the Peruvian Central Railway, returning to the UK in 1953 and developing a business career, particularly in shipping. He became a company Managing Director. Baker died on July 3 2013.

Born on October 7 1919, Baker was educated at Malvern College. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training on November 29 1937. Baker went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on February 19 1938 for a short disciplinary course, after which he was then posted to 9 FTS, Hullavington on March 5. With training completed, Baker joined 23 Squadron at Wittering on September 17 1938. The squadron was converted from Demons to Blenheims in January 1939 and at the outbreak of war was employed on North Sea shipping fighter-escort patrols. In April 1940 the squadron went over to night-fighting. Baker was with 23 throughout the Battle of Britain. He went with ‘B’ Flight to Ford on September 12 1940. From December 9 to 20 he was at No 1 Blind Approach School at Watchfield, on No 7 Course. At the end of the year Baker was posted to 2 CFS, Cranwell, for an instructors’ course, and in March 1941 he was sent to instruct at 3 FTS, South Cerney, as a Flight Commander. In March 1942 Baker was posted away to the newly-formed Empire Central Flying School, as a tutor. Later Baker did a Beaufighter refresher course at 54 OTU, Charter Hall. He was retained there as an instructor for a while and he then joined 25 Squadron at Church Fenton, on Mosquitos. In September 1943 Baker was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander. From June to September 1944 he attended RAF Staff College at Gerrards Cross and in October he was posted to HQ British Air Forces South East Asia, as Squadron Leader Ops. Promoted to Wing Commander in October 1944, Baker joined 224 Group, which reformed as Air HQ Malaya in August 1945. He returned to the UK in November 1945. Baker remained in the RAF. He was made an OBE (9.6.49) and subsequently he held many flying, staff and command appointments at home and overseas until he took an early retirement on July 31 1971 as an Air Commodore. He was a graduate of the Staff College, Joint Services Staff College, the RAF Flying College and was an ‘A’ category CFS instructor. Baker died on July 30 2005. APO 19.2.38 PO 29.11.38 FO 29.8.40 FL 29.8.41 AC 1.7.68

APO 17.9.38 PO 25.7.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.7.44

LOUIS VICTOR BAKER 157151 Sgt Observer British

236 Squadron

Baker joined the RAFVR as an Airman u/t Observer (749361) in December 1938. He was called up on September 1 1939 and with training completed, he joined 236 Squadron at St Eval in August 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on September 3. Baker was posted with his flight to Aldergrove on November 19 1940, where it was combined with one from 235 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. He flew his first operational sortie with 272 on the 21st. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in March 1943 and he was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

SL 1.7.43 WC 1.1.53 GC 1.1.62

PO 15.3.43 FO 15.9.43 FL 15.3.45

ERIC DEBNAM BAKER 740057 Sgt Pilot British

145 Squadron RONALD DAVID BAKER 518293 Sgt Pilot British

Baker was born in Finsbury Park, Middlesex on August 14 1911. He joined the RAFVR in January 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on September 1 1939, he went to 11 Group Pool, St Athan on the 2nd and after converting to Blenheims, he was posted to 145 Squadron on October 7, then about to reform at Croydon. From March 1940 it began to re-equip with Hurricanes.

56 Squadron

Baker joined the RAF in October 1934, as an Aircraft hand. He later successfully applied for pilot training and with that finished, he arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan from 7 FTS, Peterborough on September 9 1939.

On May 16 1940 Baker was posted from 145 Squadron to RAF Hendon, for allocation to a squadron in France. Apparently he was not called upon and he rejoined 145 on May 25. On August 8 1940 Baker was reported ‘Missing’ after a combat over the Channel, S of the Isle of Wight in Hurricane, P 3381. He was 28. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 11.

After converting to Hurricanes, Baker went to Digby on October 6 and he was with 56 Squadron at Martlesham Heath in early 1940. Over Dunkirk, he damaged a He 111 on May 27 and another one two days later. On July 13 he claimed the destruction of a Ju 87 and he made a forced-landing at Rodmersham, following damage to his Hurricane, P 2985, in a combat over the Channel. Baker was killed on August 11 1940. His Hurricane, N 2667, was said to have been shot down into the sea by a lone Spitfire during a convoy patrol. He baled out but was dead when picked up. He is buried in Letchworth Cemetery, Hertfordshire. Baker was 23.

HENRY COLLINGHAM BAKER 41146 FO Pilot British 41 Squadron and 421 Flight Baker was born on May 19 1920 at Clowne, Derbyshire and was a pupil at King’s College, Taunton. As a candidate for a short service commission, Baker began his flying training at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty on July 25 1938, as a pupil pilot. After a disciplinary course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, he went to 9 FTS, Hullavington in September.

STANLEY BAKER 80811 PO Pilot British

600, 54 and 66 Squadrons

Baker went to the London Choir School, after which he went to Pitman’s College at Croydon. He joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754136). He was called up on September 1. With training completed, Baker was commissioned in June 1940 and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 22. He converted to Blenheims and joined 600 Squadron at Manston on July 9.

With training completed, he was posted to No 1 Electrical and Wireless School, Cranwell in May 1939, as a staff pilot. After a spell with 616 Squadron at Doncaster from September 19, Baker went to 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on October 17 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford on December 15. Over Dunkirk on June 1 1940 he shot down a Bf 110 and damaged another. After being involved in a car accident, Baker spent two months in hospital. Fit again, he was posted to 41 Squadron in late August 1940 and flew his first operational sortie with the squadron on September 14. On the 15th he shared in the destruction of a He 111 and damaged another and on the 30th he claimed a Bf 109. On the 19th he force landed in Spitfire X4409 following combat with Bf 109s. On October 8 1940 Baker joined the newly-formed 421 Flight at Hawkinge. On November 1 he shot down a Bf 109 and damaged another, on the 24th he destroyed

Baker was detached to No 2 School of Army Co-operation, Andover on July 11, for night-flying training. He rejoined 600 on the 16th. On August 5 Baker went to 5 OTU, Aston Down. On the 7th he crashed in Spitfire P 9518 but was unhurt. After finishing the conversion course, he joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch on August 18. He claimed a Bf 109 probably destroyed on September 1 and shared a Bf 110 on the 3rd. Baker moved to 66 Squadron at Gravesend on September 19. He claimed a Bf 110 destroyed on the 27th, damaged a Bf 109 on October 11, probably destroyed one on the 13th and another on the 25th.

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School at Catfoss. Awarded a Bar to the DFC (14.11.44), he received it from the King at Buckingham Palace on July 3 1945. Released from the RAF in 1946, Bamberger returned to Lever Brothers and he rejoined 610 Squadron at Hooton Park, becoming its CO in 1950. When the Korean crisis came he was recalled to the RAF. In February 1951 he was granted a Permanent Commission and in May 1952 he moved to an Intelligence unit, assessing strike capabilities of the Chinese and Korean forces. Bamberger retired on January 29 1959 as a Squadron Leader and he became Managing Director of a small packaging materials company which he had started in 1954. On retirement, he had an antique shop in Hampshire. Bamberger died on February 3 2008. In 2011 a plaque in his honour was unveiled at St John Plessington Catholic College, Bebington, Cheshire.

Baker was reported ‘Missing’ on February 11 1941, after he was shot down by a Bf 109 of LG 2 off Boulogne. He was 21 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 31. PO 9.6.40

GEORGE ERIC BALL 39842 FO Pilot British

242 Squadron

Ball, from Tankerton, Kent, was a candidate for a short service commission, when he began his elementary flying training on May 10 1937, as a pupil pilot.

PO 9.2.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 9.2.44 SL 1.1.47 SL (RAuxAF) 1.4.50 On July 17 he was posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough and on completion of the course, he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford on February 19 1938. Ball was still with 19 in May 1940. Over Dunkirk on the 26th, Ball destroyed a Bf 109 and was wounded himself. During the night of June 18/19 he shot down a He 111 N of Colchester. On June 24 Ball joined 242 Squadron at Coltishall, as ‘A’ Flight Commander, with the rank of Acting Flight Lieutenant. On August 30 he destroyed a He 111, shared another and damaged a Bf 110, on September 7 he destroyed a Bf 110 and damaged a Bf 109, on the 9th destroyed a Bf 109, on the 18th a Ju 88 and on the 27th he damaged another Bf 109. Ball was awarded the DFC (1.10.40), as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. Posted from 242 on January 29 1941, he joined 73 Squadron in the Western Desert, as a Flight Commander. On April 11 1941, very soon after his arrival, Ball flew into a sandstorm and was forced down and taken prisoner (PoW No 2319). At some time he was held in Stalag Luft 3. After his release and return to the RAF Ball was given command of 222 Squadron at Fairwood Common in October 1945. He was killed in a flying accident on February 1 1946, when his Meteor, EE 448, dived into the ground at Fairmile, Devon. Ball was 27. He is buried in Exeter Higher Cemetery.

JAMES JULIUS FREDERIC HENRY BANDINEL 74326 FO Pilot British 3 Squadron Bandinel was at Charterhouse School and went on to Oriel College, Oxford, where he read Law. He joined the University Air Squadron and then transferred to the RAFVR on June 15 1939 (754311) and was commissioned on September 26. He reported for full-time service in October 1939 and completed his training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell. On June 22 1940 Bandinel went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 3 Squadron at Wick on July 20. Bandinel served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. He was posted away to 260 Squadron at Castletown on December 3 1940. The squadron embarked for the Middle East on May 19 1941. On December 14 he failed to return from operations over the Gazala area. Bandinel is remembered on the Alamein Memorial, Column 240. PO (RAFVR) 26.9.39 FO 26.9.40 FL 26.9.41

ARTHUR JOHN BANHAM 37565 FL Pilot British 264 and 229 Squadrons

APO 5.7.37 PO 10.5.38 FO 10.2.40 FL 20.2.41

CYRIL STANLEY BAMBERGER 116515 Sgt Pilot British 610 and 41 Squadrons

Educated at The Perse School, Cambridge, Banham entered the RAF as a candidate for a short service commission and began his training at 7 E&RFTS, Desford on November 25 1935, as a pupil pilot. He was posted to 11 FTS, Wittering on February 22 1936 and with training completed, he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford on August 24.

He was born in Port Sunlight on May 4 1919. After school he began a five-year electrical engineering apprenticeship at Lever Brothers in 1934. He joined 610 Squadron, AAF in 1936, as an Aircraft hand (810024).

By January 1 1939, Banham was ‘B’ Flight Commander and he was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on March 2 1939. He joined 611 Squadron, also at Duxford, on September 26 1939. He was posted to 12 Group Fighter Pool, Aston Down on January 18 1940, as Squadron Leader Flying, with the rank of Acting Squadron Leader. In March the unit was redesignated 5 OTU. Banham relinquished his acting rank on June 1 1940, when he joined 264 Squadron at Duxford, as ‘A’ Flight Commander, with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He damaged a Ju 88 on August 24. On the 26th Banham was flying with Sergeant B Baker in Defiant L 6985. After destroying a Do 17 over Thanet, they were attacked and shot down by Bf 109s. The aircraft crashed two miles off Herne Bay. Having ordered Baker to bale out, Banham did so himself. He was rescued from the sea but Baker was never found. Banham was promoted on September 6 and given command of 229, a Hurricane squadron then at Wittering. It moved soon afterwards to Northolt. On September 15 he damaged a He 111, on the 27th he damaged two Ju 88s and on the 30th he damaged another. On October 15 Banham was shot down in flames, in Hurricane P 3124. He baled out, badly burned, and the aircraft crashed on to buildings at South Street Farm, Stockbury. Banham underwent plastic surgery by Archie McIndoe at Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead. He was posted to Air Ministry in January 1941 and apart from three months spent at Staff College in early 1942 he remained there until April 1943, when he was posted to Cranwell for a flying refresher course. Some short courses followed at Grantham and 51 OTU, Cranfield, after which Banham went to 604 Squadron, Scorton as a superrnumerary. He was posted to command 108 Squadron in Malta on December 22 1943. Banham took command of 286 Wing at Grottaglie, Italy on July 19 1944, served at No 1 Base Area, Naples for two months from October 13 and on December 13 1944 he took command of 287 Wing, Ancona, an appointment he held until returning to the UK for release in July 1945. Banham died in 1987. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in 1940.

He remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot in April 1939. Bamberger was called to full-time service on August 24 1939 and on October 8 he was posted from 610 Squadron to 8 EFTS, Woodley. He later went to 9 FTS, Hullavington to complete his training and he rejoined 610 at Biggin Hill on July 27 1940. With no experience on Spitfires, he was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 30. After converting to Spitfires, Bamberger rejoined 610 on August 12. He claimed a Bf 109 probably destroyed on August 28. He was posted to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on September 17 and on the 23rd he damaged a Bf 109 and on October 5 he shot down another. After volunteering for Malta, Bamberger left 41 on October 19 1940. On the 21st he went to RAF Northolt, where he spent an hour flying one of 615 Squadron’s Hurricanes, his first experience in the aircraft. Bamberger then went direct to King George V Dock in Glasgow and reported to HMS Argus on the 23rd and then sailed for Malta. Luckily for him, he did not fly off for Malta with the twelve Hurricanes and two navigating Skuas that did. Only five of the fourteen aircraft reached their destination. Bamberger eventually reached Malta on November 28 on the destroyer HMS Hotspur and on arrival he joined 261 Squadron. On January 18 1941 he destroyed a Ju 87 and another the next day. 261 Squadron was disbanded on May 21 1941. Bamberger had moved on the 12th to the newly-formed 185 Squadron at Hal Far. He was posted back to England on June 12 and sent to Central Gunnery School at Sutton Bridge. Commissioned in February 1942, he was posted to Northern Ireland as a Gunnery Officer, with Americans who were converting to Spitfires. In March 1943 Bamberger volunteered for North Africa and he joined 93 Squadron at Hal Far, Malta in May. On July 13, operating over Sicily, he shot down a Ju 87. In August Bamberger joined 243 Squadron in Sicily, as a Flight Commander. He was awarded the DFC (28.9.43). On October 16 Bamberger damaged a Bf 109, his first success after 243 crossed to Italy. On May 25 1944 he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and on June 15 a Mc 202 damaged. Bamberger came off operations in July for medical reasons and returned to the UK. He was sent on an instructors’ course and in early 1945 was posted to the Gunnery

APO 3.2.36 PO 25.11.36 FO 26.6.38 FL 18.4.40 SL 1.9.41 WC 1.7.43

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THOMAS HENRY BANISTER 48228 Sgt Air Gunner British

September 29. He did not fly his first operational sortie until October 28 1940. In August 1942 Baraldi was posted to 111 Squadron at Kenley, as a Flight Commander, and in October he went with it to Gibraltar and then to North Africa on November 11. He damaged a Ju 88 E of Bone on November 18. He was posted away from 111 on January 11 1943, having had some trouble with his eyes. He was then 30 years old. Baraldi was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Squadron Leader. He died in 1988.

219 Squadron

Banister joined the RAF in April 1934, as an Aircrafthand (517215). He later trained as an Air Gunner and he joined 219 Squadron at Catterick from 5 OTU, Aston Down on August 5 1940. On the 15th of the month he was flying in Blenheim L 8698, with Sergeant O A Dupee, when the aircraft was hit by return fire from a He 111, engaged off Scarborough. Dupee was wounded in the arm. Banister went forward, assisted Dupee from his seat and took control of the damaged aircraft. Dupee, although weak from loss of blood, directed Banister, who was thus enabled to make a forced-landing, with undercarriage retracted, at RAF Driffield. For this action, both men were awarded the DFM (24.9.40). Banister was commissioned in March 1942 and released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

PO 7.9.40 FO 7.9.41 FL 7.9.42

WIENCZYSLAW BARANSKI P 0249 FO Pilot Polish 607 Squadron Baranski was born on September 9 1908 at Solec, Wisla, Poland and joined the PAF in 1930. He was commanding 113 Eskadra in September 1939. On the 4th Baranski shared in the destruction of a Ju 87, destroyed one on the 5th and shared a He 111 on the 6th.

PO 20.3.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 20.3.44

WILLIAM HENRY BANKS 47102 Sgt Pilot British 245, 32 and 504 Squadrons

When Poland fell, Baranski escaped to Romania, then to France, where he joined l’Armée de l’Air. In early 1940 he commanded a flight of three Polish pilots in Groupe de Chasse III/6. They flew D 520 Dewoitine fighters from Coulommiers. During the fighting in June, he shared in the destruction of a Fiat BR 20. In the middle of the month the unit moved to Perpignan and a few days later flew to North Africa. Baranski escaped to England, via Gibraltar and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on September 25. After converting to Hurricanes, Baranski joined 607 Squadron at Turnhouse on October 9 1940, for further training. On November 7 he was posted to 303 Squadron at Leconfield. He joined on the 12th, as a Flight Lieutenant. He was awarded the KW (1.2.41) and on February 22 1941 he went to the newly-formed 316 Squadron at Pembrey, as a Flight Commander. His first operational tour over, Baranski went to 316’s Operations Room on July 19 1941. A year later he moved to 308 Squadron’s Operations Room at Heston. Baranski returned to operations on May 16 1943, when he took command of 302 Squadron at Hutton Cranswick. He was awarded a Bar to the KW (7.7.43) and a second Bar (20.10.43), when he was posted away to be Polish Liaison Officer at HQ 12 Group. Baranski moved to HQ PAF at Blackpool on April 3 1944, was awarded the VM (5th Class) (15.5.44) and went to a course at Polish Staff College on November 28 1944. He was released from the PAF on November 20 1946.

Born on October 4 1916, Banks enlisted in the RAF in February 1936, as an Aircrafthand (528637). He later applied for pilot training and with training completed he was with 245 Squadron early in 1940. He flew with the squadron on patrols over Dunkirk and on June 14, on a patrol over France, his aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire. Banks was attached to 32 Squadron at Acklington on September 19 1940 but five days later he moved to 504 Squadron at Filton. On the 30th of the month he made a forcedlanding in Hurricane P 3774, following a combat over the Yeovil area. Commissioned in October 1941, Banks remained in the RAF after the war, retiring on May 30 1958 as a Squadron Leader. He died on January 16 1980. PO 29.10.41 FO 1.10.42 FL 29.10.43 FL 1.9.45 SL 1.7.52

ERIC SAMUEL BANN 741589 Sgt Pilot British

238 Squadron

A native of Macclesfield, Cheshire, Bann was educated at Athey Street School and studied aeronautical engineering at Manchester College of Technology.

ROBERT HUGH BARBER 42385 PO Pilot British 46 Squadron

He joined the RAFVR in May 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot, and was called up at the outbreak of war. Bann completed his training at 6 FTS, Little Rissington, on No 16 Course, which began on November 6 1939. He went on to 10 B&GS, Warmwell, with the Advanced Training Squadron of 6 FTS, on May 10 1940, for armament training. The course ended on May 17 and Bann joined 253 Squadron at Kenley and he moved to 238 Squadron at Tangmere on the 21st. On July 13 he destroyed a Bf 110 and shared a Do 17, on August 11 he claimed the destruction of a He 111, on the 13th destroyed a He 111 and on September 21 he shared a Ju 88. Bann’s Hurricane, V 6776, was severely damaged in combat over Fareham on September 28 and he baled out over Brading Marshes but was killed when his parachute failed to open. Bann was 26. He is buried in Macclesfield Cemetery, Cheshire. His cousin, SergeantObserver Jack Bann, was lost on a patrol with 53 Squadron on August 28 1940, operating from Detling in Blenheims. He was 22 and he is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial. E S Bann’s brother served as groundcrew with 617 Squadron.

Barber was born on December 19 1915 at Hatfield, Hertfordshire. He moved to Lincolnshire as a child and was educated at Oakham School. He went into estate agency but in 1935 he went to London and joined the Metropolitan Police. Barber entered the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training at 22 E&RFTS, Cambridge on June 12 1939. After being accepted, he was posted to 12 FTS, Grantham in late August. In early 1940 Barber went to RAF Manby for an armament course and was then posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 29 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 46 Squadron on August 15 at Digby. On September 4, acting as weaver, Barber was jumped by a Bf 109 over Rochford. His glycol system was damaged and he was soaked in fluid. He dived from 15000 feet and made a belly-landing at Chigborough Farm, Heybridge. He was admitted to St Margaret’s Hospital, Epping, with three fractured vertebrae in his neck and his jaw broken in three places. He was in hospital for six months. Barber’s medical category barred him from further operational flying and he went to HQ 10 Group, as an assistant to the Controller. When Wing Commander AG Malan formed CGS at Sutton Bridge, Barber was one of his early pupils. After the course, Barber commanded Armament Practice Camps at Warmwell, Martlesham Heath and Southend. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.43). Early in 1944 Barber went to the Gun Research Unit at Exeter, flying with the new gyro gunsight. He was then given command of a non-operational Spitfire squadron at Southend, to train pilots on the new sight, including some Americans. Later in the year, the squadron moved to North Weald. Barber had to return to Southend to clear up some matters. He was to be flown there in an Oxford. The aircraft

FERDINAND HENRY RAPHAEL BARALDI 86332 PO Pilot British 609 Squadron A member of the RAFVR from July 1939 (754760), Baraldi was called up in September and after ITW, he was at No 1 EFTS, Hatfield from December 4 1939 to May 10 1940. He went to RAF College FTS, Cranwell on June 8, on No 11 Course. On completion, he was commissioned on September 7 and posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden. After converting to Spitfires, Baraldi joined 609 Squadron at Middle Wallop on

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crash-landing. At 500 feet the Bf 109 attacked again, this time setting the Defiant on fire. Before crashing, Barker shot the enemy fighter down and it crashed a short distance away. He and Thorn had only slight injuries. For this action they were each awarded a Bar to the DFM (11.2.41). They destroyed a He 111 at night on April 9 1941. The partnership broke up when Thorn was posted to 32 Squadron in October 1941. Barker remained with 264 until 1943. He was then posted to the Middle East, as an air gunnery instructor. He was commissioned in April 1944 and released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flying Officer.

swung on take-off and crashed. The pilot was killed and Barber was in hospital for several months. He returned to the APC at Warmwell and later joined a Disarmament Group, about to move to Germany. After a motor accident on a mined bridge and another spell in hospital, Barber was posted to Sylt, to set up an APC for Squadron training. Barber was released from the RAF in 1947 and did not live in the UK again. He eventually settled in New Zealand and died there in 2000. APO 5.8.39 PO 2.3.40 FO 2.3.41 FL 2.3.42

RICHARD GEORGE ARTHUR BARCLAY 74661 FO Pilot British 249 Squadron

PO 25.4.44 FO 25.10.44 Born at Upper Norwood, Surrey on December 7 1919, Barclay was a member of the banking family. He was educated at Stowe School and then went to Trinity College, Cambridge, to read Economics and Law.

GEORGE LEONARD BARKER 44571 PO Observer British 600 Squadron Barker, from Diss, Norfolk, joined the RAF in September 1934, as an Aircrafthand (517937), and served in Palestine, as an LAC, in the 1930s. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Observer, completed his training and passed out as a Sergeant-Observer.

In October 1938 he joined the University Air Squadron and enlisted in the RAFVR in June 1939 (754320), as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up in October, he went to 3 ITW on November 8. He began his flying training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell on January 1 1940. The course completed, he was then posted to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum on June 2 1940. Eight days later he went to 5 OTU, to convert to Hurricanes, and on June 23 he joined 249 Squadron at Leconfield. On September 2 1940 Barclay damaged a Bf 110, on the 7th he shot down a Bf 109 and damaged a Do 17 and a He 111, on the 15th he shot down a Do 17, probably destroyed two others and damaged another, on the 18th probably destroyed a He 111, on the 19th shared a Ju 88 and on the 27th claimed a Bf 109 and a Ju 88 destroyed. During an attack on Ju 88s on that day, Barclay, in Hurricane V 6622, was shot down S of London and made a forcedlanding at West Malling. He probably destroyed Bf 109s on October 14 and 15, two probable Bf 109s on November 7, shared a He 59 destroyed on the 11th and shared another Bf 109 on the 14th. He was awarded the DFC (26.11.40). On November 29 1940 Barclay was shot down by a Bf 109 and wounded in the ankle, legs and elbow. He spent two months in hospital and did not return to 249 until March 1941. He was posted to 52 OTU, Debden on May 7, as an instructor. Three months later he joined 611 Squadron at Hornchurch, as a Flight Commander. During a sweep over St Omer on September 20 1941, Barclay was attacked by Bf 109s and his engine was damaged. He made a forced-landing at Buyschoeure, after breaking high tension cables. With the help of the French Resistance, he crossed the Spanish frontier, arriving in Barcelona on November 7. He reached the British Embassy, left for Gibraltar on December 7 and arrived back in the UK two days later. After a short attachment to HQ Fighter Command, Barclay was posted to HQ 9 Group, as Tactics Officer. On April 4 1942 he was given command of 601 Squadron, then about to go to the Middle East. The squadron embarked at Liverpool on April 10 in HMT K6 (SS Rangitata) and reached Port Tewfik on June 4, having gone via South Africa. Barclay did not get a chance to lead 601. He went to command 238 Squadron at Amriya on July 2 1942. On the 16th he shot down a Bf 109. In the afternoon of the 17th he destroyed a Ju 87. In the evening 238 was on a patrol of the Alamein area, acting as top cover for 274 Squadron. As 238 went for some Ju 87s, it was jumped by Bf 109s and Barclay was shot down and killed, possibly by Leutnant Werner Schroer of III/JG 27. Barclay is buried in the El Alamein Cemetery and he is remembered on a plaque in Cromer Parish Church, where his father was vicar from 1939 to 1946. Barclay’s elder brother, Lieutenant G C Barclay, died serving with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Norfolk Regiment. He is buried in Kohima War Cemetery, India.

In early 1940 he was serving with 59 Squadron, Coastal Command. On July 6 Barker volunteered to fly with a new pilot on his first operational sortie. They were attacked by two Bf 109s for a period of 15 minutes. With great coolness, although the rear gun had been put out of action, Barker assisted the gunner by telling the pilot what tactics to employ. For this action he was awarded the DFM (13.9.40). Commissioned on September 7 1940, Barker was detached from 59 Squadron to 600 Squadron at Redhill on the 19th, for wireless duties. It seems that he made no flights with 600 before rejoining 59 on the 24th. Barker was again attached to 600 Squadron on September 28, this time for ‘specialist wireless and navigation duties’. He flew two operational sorties, on October 2, in a Blenheim, and October 6, in a Beaufighter. There is no record of Barker returning to 59 Squadron and at some point he did go on to the strength of 600. He was posted away from 600 on March 20 1941, to join 85 Squadron at Debden, to be AI operator to the CO, Squadron Leader P W Townsend. From November 8 1941, Barker was attached to 456 (RAAF) Squadron at Valley, to instruct the squadron’s radar operators. In August 1942 Barker was gazetted as a Flight Lieutenant. At some time after this he went for pilot training and qualified. In July 1944 he was attached to 51 OTU. During the evening of July 18 1944, Barker’s Beaufighter, R 2080, crashed into anti-V1 balloon cables over Kent. He was killed when the aircraft crashed at Weike Farm, Kingsdown. His navigator survived the crash. Barker was 30. He is buried in Diss Cemetery, Norfolk. PO 7.9.40 FO 28.8.41 FL 28.8.42

JOHN KEETH BARKER 566251 Sgt Pilot British

Barker joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in January 1933 and passed out, as a Wireless Operator, in December 1935. Barker later applied for pilot training and was accepted. He began his ab initio course on December 28 1938, as a Corporal. He went to 10 FTS, Ternhill on March 20 1939, on No 11 Course. With training completed, he joined 152 Squadron direct from 10 FTS on October 2 1939, on its reformation at Acklington. Barker was still a Corporal at that time. On August 18 1940 he claimed a Ju 87 destroyed and on the 25th a Bf 109. Barker did not return from a sortie on September 4 1940. He is believed to have been shot down by return fire from a Do 17, engaged 25 miles off Bognor, in Spitfire R 6909. He baled out but was killed. His body was washed up on the French coast and he is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France. Barker was 23.

PO 3.10.39 FO 3.10.40 FL 3.10.41

FREDERICK JAMES BARKER 178549 Sgt Air Gunner British

152 Squadron

264 Squadron

Born in Bow, London on March 16 1918, Barker went to Old Palace School and Coopers’ Company School.

ERIC CHARLES BARNARD 178934 Sgt Air Gunner British

He joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (747751). Called up on September 1, he joined 264 Squadron on its reformation on October 30. He teamed up with Sergeant E R Thorn. Over Dunkirk on May 28 1940 they destroyed three Bf 109s, on the 29th two Ju 87s and a Bf 110 and on the 31st a He 111 and shared another. Both men were awarded the DFM (14.6.40). When 264 moved to Hornchurch on August 21 1940, Thorn and Barker were again in action. On the 26th they destroyed two Do 17s and, as they went for a third, they were attacked by a Bf 109. With their aircraft damaged, Thorn spun down and prepared for a

600 Squadron

Barnard joined 601 Squadron, AAF on March 6 1936 for ground crew duties (801384) and later trained as an Air Gunner. He was called up on August 24 1939. In February 1940 601 exchanged its Blenheims for Hurricanes and he was posted to 600 Squadron at Manston on May 11 1940, as an AC 2 Air Gunner but was later promoted to Sergeant.

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WILKINSON BARNES 90294 FO Pilot British

Barnard was flying as a member of the crew of Blenheim L 1111 on September 8, when they became lost, following an R/T failure during a night patrol. With fuel exhausted, the crew, Barnard, Pilot Officer H B L Hough, pilot and Sergeant A Smith, radar operator, all baled out safely. The aircraft crashed near Odiham. On July 1 1941 Barnard went to 125 Squadron at Colerne, as an Air Gunner. He was with the squadron until January 28 1942, when he was posted to Training Command, for training as a Navigator. Barnard qualified at 2 Air Observers’ School, Edmonton Canada on April 16 1943. He returned to the UK and qualified as an Observer Radio at 62 OTU, Ouston on September 14 and finished as Navigator Radar at 63 OTU, after which he was posted to 25 Squadron at Acklington on January 18 1944. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in April 1944, Barnard was posted to 85 Squadron, Swannington on April 27 1945 and remained with the squadron until his release from the RAF on July 24 1946. Barnard died in 2002.

Born in Sunderland on July 13 1913, Barnes was educated at Tunstall Boys’ School, Sunderland and Durham School. He trained as a Chartered Surveyor and Auctioneer and joined the family firm, becoming a partner in 1937. Barnes joined 607 Squadron, AAF at Usworth in early 1938. He was mobilised on August 24 1939 and on October 7 was posted from 607 to 7 FTS, Peterborough, for No 12 Course. With his training completed, Barnes joined 615 Squadron on March 6 1940. He moved to 504 Squadron at Debden on the 17th, on a temporary posting, which apparently became permanent. On May 12 he flew to France with the squadron, which was withdrawn on the 22nd, after losing most of its aircraft. Barnes returned to England by boat from Boulogne, after dumping his logbook and kit in the harbour. 504 Squadron reformed at Wick, later moving to Castletown. On September 4 1940 it flew south, via Catterick, and arrived at Hendon on the 5th. The squadron was heavily involved in the Battle of Britain until moving to Filton on October 26. In late July 1941 ‘A’ Flight was re-numbered 81 Squadron, for service in Russia. ‘B’ Flight went to Ballyherbert, with Barnes as Flight Commander. In December 1941 he went to 55 OTU, Crosby-on-Eden, as an instructor. In January 1942 Barnes received a Mention in Despatches. He was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader in April 1942 and appointed CO at RAF Brunton. In October Barnes went to 1529 BAT Flight at Wittering, for a Beam Approach course. On the 28th he took off in Master AZ 803, with Pilot Officer Hay as instructor. There was a fog and the beam was taken to help a bomber in distress. The Master crashed. Hay was not strapped in and was killed. Barnes was severely injured and was in RAF Hospital, Ely until June 1943. He went to the Rehabilitation Unit at Loughborough in August, moving later to Newcastle. Barnes was invalided out in March 1944 as a Flight Lieutenant. He rejoined the family firm and retired in 1978. A well-known figure in Sunderland, Barnes died there on May 19 1980.

PO 24.4.44 FO 24.10.44 FL 24.4.46

JOHN GUY CARDEW BARNES 90101 FL Pilot British 600 Squadron Born on March 1 1911, Barnes was educated at Windlesham Preparatory School, Bradfield College and l’Ecole de Commerce, Lausanne, Switzerland. In 1930 Barnes went to New York and studied banking at Columbia University. Whilst in New York, he taught modern harmony piano playing and wrote songs on Broadway. In 1940 and 1941 his song ‘My ACW 2’ was published and broadcast on both sides of the Atlantic. In 1935 Barnes returned to London and in 1937 he joined 600 Squadron, AAF at Hendon. He went to camp at Manston in August 1937 and learned to fly. Barnes was called to full-time service on August 24 1939 and served with 600 throughout the Battle of Britain. On December 28 1940 he was posted to CFS, Cranwell, for an instructor’s course, after which he went to 14 EFTS at Elmdon, which is now Birmingham Airport. In early 1942 Barnes was promoted to Wing Commander and appointed OC Troops on the Queen Mary and in 1943 on the Queen Elizabeth. In April 1944 Barnes was attached to the Invasion Planning Committee at Southampton. His job was to supervise and command an RAF special communications group that would take over and control Fighter Air Cover in the event of HMS Bulolo, the HQ ship, being sunk. So, following the invasion on June 6 1944, Barnes spent a week on a destroyer half a mile off the French coast at Arromanches. Once the landings were fully established, the ship returned to Southampton. In 1945 Barnes was with a Disarmament Wing in Germany, moving with the Army, collecting documents and technical material before it could be destroyed by the Germans. Barnes was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Wing Commander. He died in 1998.

PO (AAF) 2.8.38 PO 24.8.39 FO 2.8.40 FL 2.8.41

RICHARD EDGAR BARNETT 26222 SL Pilot British 234 Squadron Barnett was at Cheltenham College and went to RAF College, Cranwell, as a Flight Cadet, in January 1930. He graduated in December 1931, with a Permanent Commission, and joined 54 Squadron on the 19th. Barnett joined 6 Squadron in Egypt on November 1 1932. He went to the RAF Depot at Aboukir in July 1935. In the Coronation Honours List, Barnett was made an MBE (11.5.37), for operations in Palestine from April to October 1936. After returning to the UK, he went to the A&AEE at Martlesham Heath on August 16 1938. When the CO of the newly-formed 234 Squadron was badly injured in a car accident on November 2 1939, Barnett took command on the 6th. He did not fly very often and after an interview with the AOC of 10 Group on August 12 1940 he relinquished his command next day. Barnett joined 111 Squadron at Dyce, as a supernumerary Squadron Leader. He resigned his commission on August 11 1941 and left the RAF. After the war Barnett worked in Kenya and died on January 2 1970.

PO (AAF) 17.8.37 FO (AAF) 17.2.39 FO 24.8.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41

LESLIE DENIS BARNES 60325 Sgt Pilot British

504 Squadron

615, 607 and 257 Squadrons

Barnes joined the RAFVR in August 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741915). Called up on September 1 1939, he was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 9, for No 42 Course. Having completed his flying training, he joined 103 Squadron in April 1940, flying Battles.

PO 19.12.31 FO 9.6.33 FL 7.9.36 SL 1.6.39

He volunteered for Fighter Command and was posted to 615 Squadron, joining it at Prestwick on September 4 1940. He moved to 607 Squadron at Tangmere on the 21st. On October 4 he shared in the probable destruction of a He111. Barnes went to 257 Squadron at North Weald on October 20 and took part in the engagement with the Italians on November 11 1940, probably destroying a Fiat CR 42. Commissioned in January 1941, Barnes was with 46 Squadron when it sailed for the Middle East in late May, in the carrier HMS Argus. At Gibraltar the pilots and aircraft were transferred on to HMS Ark Royal and Furious. They flew off to Hal Far, Malta on June 6 and were absorbed into 126 Squadron. Barnes was appointed a Flight Commander on January 1 1942. He probably destroyed a Bf 109 on February 22, destroyed two Mc 200s in a combat over Ta Kali on June 27 and shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 over Luqa on December 30. Barnes was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.

RUPERT VICTOR BARON 78741 PO Air Gunner British

219 Squadron

Baron, of Highbury, London, volunteered for aircrew duties. He was commissioned in April 1940, as a direct-entry Air Gunner. He was on No 12 Air Gunner Course at 7 B&GS, Manby from May 6. With training completed, Baron joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on June 1. He was detached to CGS on July 12 for a course, rejoining 219 on August 9 1940. On October 12 Baron was flying, as crew, in Blenheim L 1113 on a routine night patrol. Unexpected engine vibration was experienced and the pilot, Pilot Officer G M Head throttled back. This action caused a high speed stall. Both men baled out but Baron’s parachute failed to open. The aircraft crashed at Court Lodge Farm, Ewhurst. Baron was 40. He is buried in Sittingbourne and Milton Cemetery.

PO 15.1.41 FO 15.1.42 FL 15.1.43

APO 12.4.40 PO 1.6.40

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RONALD GEORGE VICTOR BARRACLOUGH 66487 Sgt Pilot British 266 Squadron

squadron ORB on August 17, when he flew his first operational sortie. He was still with 25 on November 1 1940. Barrett was awarded the DFM (29.12.42), serving as a Flight Sergeant with 207 Squadron at Langar, operating in Lancasters. He was with 83 Squadron at Wyton, when he was shot down and captured on March 11 1943. He was in Stalag 357 in 1945 (PoW No 886). Barrett was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Warrant Officer.

Barraclough joined the RAFVR in January 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741221). He was one of fifty VR Airmen u/t Pilots, who were offered six months continuous flying training with the regular RAF. He went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on July 15 1939. With the course completed, he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge from 2 FTS on December 16 1939.

NORMAN PERCY GERALD BARRON 88649 Sgt Pilot British 236 Squadron

He damaged a Ju 88 on August 12 1940, damaged a He 111 on September 11 and destroyed a Do 17 on December 26. Commissioned in May 1941, he left the squadron on July 19 1941. Barraclough commanded 137 Squadron on the Continent from December 1944 until March 1945. He left the RAF after the war. PO 1.5.41 FO 25.11.41

Born in 1918, Barron joined the RAFVR in January 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741255) and trained at No 1 E&RFTS, Hatfield. He was one of a group of fifty VR u/t Pilots who were offered six months continuous flying training with the regular RAF. He went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on July 15 1939 and with training completed, he joined 236 Squadron at St Eval on December 16 1939.

FL 25.11.42

STANLEY MICHAEL BARRACLOUGH 46029 Sgt Pilot British 92 Squadron

Barron served with 236 throughout the Battle of Britain. He was commissioned in November 1940 and on the 30th of the month he was involved in combat with a Blohm and Voss floatplane. His Blenheim was damaged and two of his crew wounded. Posted away on October 7 1941, Barron went to 19 Group, firstly to a drogue-towing unit at Roborough and later to an Armament Practice Camp at Carew Cheriton, where he flew Lysanders. On August 1 1942 Barron was posted to 172 Squadron at Chivenor, flying Leigh-Light Wellingtons on anti-submarine work. He went with a squadron detachment to Malta on June 9 1943. In early September he was sent to 22 PTC, Almaza, Cairo, from where he was posted to Southern Rhodesia. After an instructors’ course at 33 FIS, Norton, Barron went to 22 SFTS, Thornhill on January 9 1944. He instructed there on Harvards until returning to the UK in September 1945. Barron spent a further year instructing, firstly at 17 FTS, Spitalgate and then at 19 FTS, Cranwell before he was released in April 1947. He joined KLM in January 1948 and flew with the airline until 1978.

Barraclough was born in Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia on April 2 1917. His father was a senior civil servant. When Barraclough was three he returned to the UK with his mother and lived at Shoreham, Sussex, where his grandfather was vicar. They later moved to Chichester. After attending local schools, Barraclough went to the Training Ship Mercury at Hamble. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (566190), in September 1932 and passed out in August 1935, as a Metal Rigger. He later applied for pilot training and was remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot on June 12 1939. His rank was Corporal when he did his ab initio course at 2 E&RFTS, Filton in July/August 1939. Barraclough went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on August 21, on No 40 Course. He completed training on February 17 1940 and was with 92 Squadron by mid-May. On May 23 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and a Bf 110 in the Boulogne/Dunkirk area. On July 10 he shared a Ju 88 and on August 14 he shared another. He flew his final sortie with 92 on September 3. He was then probably posted to CFS for a course, since he was a flying instructor at 15 FTS, Lossiemouth in February 1941. Commissioned in June 1941, Barraclough stayed in the RAF after the war, re-forming 604 Squadron in 1946, retiring on May 28 1958 as a Squadron Leader. He was a graduate of RAF Staff College and a Qualified A1 Instructor, Central Flying School. Barraclough worked in whisky exports amd as an administrator for a construction company. He died on April 27 2006.

PO 27.11.40

FL 27.11.42

HECTOR JACK RAYMOND BARROW 745659 Sgt Pilot British 43, 607 and 213 Squadrons Barrow, from Isleworth, Middlesex, joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and with training completed, he joined 43 Squadron at Tangmere in late July 1940.

PO 28.6.41 FO 28.6.42 FL 28.6.43 SL 1.8.47

He was attached to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge from August 3. After converting to Hurricanes, Barrow rejoined 43 on the 24th. He flew his first operational sortie on August 29. Barrow was detached to 607 Squadron, also at Tangmere, on September 15 and he flew an operational sortie on that day. He joined 213 Squadron, then also at Tangmere, on the 20th. On September 27 Barrow destroyed a Bf 110 and damaged another and on the 30th he damaged a Bf 110. He was reported ‘Missing’, following a Wing patrol with 602 Squadron over Tangmere on November 28. His aircraft, Hurricane V 6691, probably went into the sea and Barrow’s body was washed up on the French coast. He is buried in Colleville-sur-Mer churchyard, France. Barrow was 21.

PHILIP HENRY BARRAN 90323 FO Pilot British 609 Squadron Born at Chapel Allerton, Leeds on April 20 1909, Barran joined 609 Squadron, AAF in early 1937. He was then a trainee mining engineer and manager of a brickworks at a colliery owned by his family. He was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander early in 1939, called to full-time service on August 24 1939 and made up to Acting Flight Lieutenant on October 14 1939. Barran was detached to RAF Northolt on November 27 for a ten-day Air Fighting course. He went to RAF Farnborough on April 9 1940 for an oxygen course and on the 17th to RAF Turnhouse for instruction in Controller duties. Barran was to become one of the earliest casualties in the Battle of Britain. On July 11 1940 his aircraft, Spitfire L 1069, was severely damaged in a morning combat with Bf 109s of III/JG 27 over a convoy off Portland. He tried to reach the coast but was forced to bale out five miles off Portland Bill. He was picked up, wounded and badly burned, but he died before reaching land. Barran was 31. He is buried in Lawnswood Cemetery, Leeds.

NATHANIEL JOHN MERRIMAN BARRY 72514 FO Pilot South African 3 and 501 Squadrons Barry came from Keerweder, Franschhoek, South Africa. In 1938 he was an Engineering undergraduate at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He joined the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in November 1938. Called up at the outbreak of war, Barry completed his flying training and was then posted as ADC to Air Vice Marshal de Crespigny. He requested a posting to fighters and was with 3 Squadron in June 1940. On September 26 Barry joined 501 Squadron at Kenley. Four days later he made a forced-landing at Pembury, in Hurricane L 1657, following a combat with Bf 109s over Maidstone. On October 7, Barry was shot down by a Bf 109 over Wrotham. He baled out but fell dead at Wilmington. His aircraft crashed at Lane End, Darenth. Barry was 22 years old. He is buried in the churchyard of St Andrew’s, Finghall, Yorkshire.

PO (AAF) 20.4.37 FO (AAF) 20.10.38 FO 24.8.39

WILLIAM ERIC BARRETT 751810 Sgt Air Gunner British

FO 27.11.41

25 Squadron

Barrett enlisted in the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. He was called up on September 1 and with training completed at a B&GS he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 21 1940 for further training on Blenheims. He joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath in August and is first mentioned in the

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squadron went to North Africa in November. Bartlett destroyed a Ju 88 on January 10 1943. The squadron moved to Monte Corvino, Italy in October. Bartlett was posted away in January 1944 and he was awarded the DSO (3.3.44). Bartlett was appointed military commander of the island of Vis, in the Adriatic, where an airfield had been constructed. He was given the US Legion of Merit, for organising the rescue of USAAF crews, who had ditched in the Adriatic Sea. In 1945 Bartlett became Personal Staff Officer to the AOC Middle East. In 1965 he was one of the Battle of Britain veterans who took part in Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral procession. He retired from the RAF on June 20 1966 as a Group Captain.

On May 26 2007 a memorial, provided by the Shoreham Aircraft Museum, was unveiled at the site of Barry’s crash. PO (RAFVR) 15.11.38 PO 3.9.39 FO 15.5.40

PATRICK PETER COLUM BARTHROPP 41542 FO Pilot British 602 Squadron Barthropp was born in Dublin on November 9 1920. He was educated at St Augustine’s Abbey School, Ramsgate; St Joseph’s College, near Market Drayton and Ampleforth College, North Yorkshire, after which he went to Rover on an engineering apprenticeship.

PO 31.7.41 FO 11.5.42

FL 31.7.43

SL 30.4.44

SL 1.9.45 WC 1.7.53 GC 1.1.60

ANTHONY CHARLES BARTLEY 41816 PO Pilot British 92 Squadron

As a candidate for a short service commission, he began his elementary flying at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham on October 31 1938, as a pupil pilot. After a short induction course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, he was posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough on January 31 1939 and completed his training in late July. After a month at No 1 Armament Training Camp, Catfoss, Barthropp went to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum on the day the war started. On October 9 1939 he was posted to 613 (AC) Squadron at Odiham. Barthropp volunteered for Fighter Command in August 1940. On the 21st he was sent to 7 OTU, Hawarden, to convert to Spitfires, and on September 8 he joined 602 Squadron at Westhampnett. On the 21st he damaged a Do 17, on the 27th shared a He 111 and on October 2 shared a Ju 88. Barthropp joined 610 Squadron on January 7 1941 and on February 5 he went to 91 Squadron at Hawkinge. On April 27 Barthropp damaged a Do 17, on June 4 he probably destroyed a Bf 109, on the 9th he shot down a Bf 109 and on August 17 he shot down one Bf 109 and damaged another. On August 24 1941 Barthropp rejoined 610 Squadron, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. He was awarded the DFC (26.9.41) and posted to 61 OTU, Heston on October 23, as an instructor. He returned to operations on May 15 1942, joining 122 Squadron at Hornchurch. Two days later, on a Boston escort-operation, he was shot down over Audruicq, near St Omer, baled out and was captured on landing. From June 1942 until his release on May 2 1945, near Lübeck, Barthropp was in several PoW camps, (PoW No 759), including Stalag Luft 3. After the war, in early September 1945, he was sent to Norway, to locate graves of shotdown airmen and confirm their identities. On January 2 1946 Barthropp began a course at the Empire Test Pilots’ School, Cranfield, followed by a posting on May 23 to ‘A’ Fighter Test Squadron at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down. In mid-1948 he was posted to HQ Fighter Command at Bentley Priory, as Ops Day. In March 1952 Barthropp went to RAF Waterbeach as Wing Commander Flying. In 1953 he led a formation of twenty-four Meteors in the Coronation Review Flypast. In March 1954 he went to Air HQ Hong Kong, as Staff Officer i/c Admin, in April 1955 to RAF Honiley, to command, in March 1957 to RAF Coltishall, as Wing Commander i/c Admin. He was awarded the AFC (10.6.54) for his work at Waterbeach. Barthropp retired on December 28 1957 as a Squadron Leader. He then started, what later became, a very successful chauffeur-driven car hire business in London. He died on April 16 2008.

The son of a District Judge, Bartley was born in Dacca, Bengal on March 28 1919. He was educated at Stowe School and learned to fly at the West Malling Flying Club in 1938. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and did his elementary flying at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell from January 23 1939, as a pupil pilot. Bartley went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on April 1 and he was posted to 13 FTS, Drem on the 15th. With his training completed, Bartley was posted to 92 Squadron at Tangmere on October 22 but went directly from 13 FTS to a Blenheim conversion course at RAF Hendon, on attachment from 92. He joined the squadron on November 20 1939. The squadron began to convert to Spitfires in March 1940. On May 23 Bartley claimed a Bf 109 and a Bf 110 shot down over Dunkirk, on the 24th two Bf 110s damaged and on June 2 four He 111s damaged. On July 10, when 92 was at Pembrey, Bartley may have shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. On September 8 the squadron moved to Biggin Hill. On the 14th Bartley damaged a Do 17 and a Bf 109, on the 15th he shot down a Do 17 and probably a second, on the 18th another Do 17 and on the 27th he claimed a Ju 88. He was awarded the DFC (25.10.40), the citation crediting him with at least eight enemy aircraft destroyed. On November 1 1940 Bartley shared a Bf 109, claimed two more on the 5th and 15th and shot down a He 111 on February 3 1941. He was posted to 74 Squadron in March 1941, as a Flight Commander. It was not a happy posting and he left the squadron in May, to go to 56 OTU, Sutton Bridge, moving soon afterwards to 53 OTU, Heston. In June he served briefly at 61 OTU, as an instructor. In July he was posted to Vickers-Supermarine as a production test pilot. Bartley returned to operations in February 1942, as a Flight Commander with 65 Squadron at Debden. On April 27 he damaged a FW 190 on a sweep over France. In early May he took command of 65 after the CO was killed. In July 1942 he went to CGS, Sutton Bridge for a course and in August he was given command of 111 Squadron at Kenley. The squadron was destined for overseas and on October 20 sailed for Gibraltar. Bartley led the squadron off on November 11 and flew to Algiers, moving to Bone three days later. On the 16th he claimed a Mc 202, on the 25th two Ju 87s probably destroyed, on the 29th and December 4 two Bf 109s and on the 28th one Bf 109 shot down and another damaged. In mid-January 1943 Bartley was posted from the squadron and on the 29th he left Gibraltar, in a Liberator, for the UK. Following the loss of two engines, the aircraft made a crash-landing on a Welsh airfield. Bartley was awarded a Bar to the DFC (16.2.43) and was posted in May to HQ 83 Group, Redhill, to help train squadrons in ground attack and army support. In early October he sailed for America, for a course at the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, moving in February 1944 to the School of Air Tactics at Orlando, Texas. After returning to Britain in the Queen Elizabeth in April, he was posted, as Liaison Officer, to the 70th Fighter Wing of the US Ninth Air Force. On October 24 1944 he went to RAF Transport Command, to set up staging posts in Europe. Bartley volunteered for service in the Far East and sailed from Liverpool on the Mauretania on July 3 1945. He reached Sydney on August 8 and was posted a week later to the Palau Islands, to set up a Transport Command staging post. He requested repatriation, was granted leave, and returned home in a DC 4, which was returning to England for a major overhaul. On November 28 1945 Bartley married film actress Deborah Kerr. After release from the RAF in 1946, he joined Vickers Armstrong as a test pilot and sales executive. Bartley died in April 2001.

APO 14.1.39 PO 3.9.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.7.44 SL 1.8.47

LEONARD HAROLD BARTLETT 102959 Sgt Pilot British 17 Squadron Bartlett, born in Muswell Hill, Middlesex on June 20 1916, joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745808). Called up on September 1, he completed his training and went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 1 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 17 Squadron at Debden on July 15. On August 21 Bartlett shared in the destruction of a Ju 88, on September 5 he shared a He111 and on the 19th he shared a Ju 88. On October 28 he damaged a Do 17, on November 8 he destroyed a Ju 87 and probably a second and on the 11th he shot down a Ju 87 and probably another. On March 17 1941 Bartlett was shot down over Chiddingly, Sussex, in Hurricane Z 2704. He baled out. The aircraft crashed at Stream Farm. Commissioned in July 1941, Bartlett was posted to 137 Squadron at Matlask in February 1942. On July 6 he damaged a Ju 88 off Yarmouth in a Whirlwind. In September 1942 he was given command of 253 Squadron at Hibaldstow. The

APO 1.4.39 PO 21.10.39 FO 21.10.40 FL 21.10.41 SL 1.7.45

ANTHONY RICHARD HENRY BARTON 81623 PO Pilot British 32 and 253 Squadrons Barton, of Oakleigh Park, Middlesex entered Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, as a cadet. He graduated on May 1 1931 and went into the RN Executive Branch as a midshipman. Promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in September 1935, he was granted a temporary commission in the RAF (30104) on May 17 1936, for service with the FAA, with the rank of Flying Officer and he was posted to No 1 FTS, Leuchars.

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December 1942 he went to HQ 9 Group for Air Staff duties, as a Wing Commander. Barton served in more non-flying staff appointments, although he did fly a few Mustang sorties in 1945. He was made an OBE (14.6.45) and remained in the RAF. He retired on February 27 1959, as a Wing Commander, and returned to Canada to live in 1965. He died in 2010.

On August 24 1937 he went to RAF Gosport, as a supernumerary and on October1 he joined 823 (Torpedo Spotter-Reconnaissance) Squadron. Barton relinquished his temporary RAF commission on July 26 1939 and went to the FAA in September. He was on HMS Warspite in December 1939; with HMS St Angelo, a depot ship at Malta in February 1940; back on Warspite in April and May and in June he was with HMS Daedalus. Barton’s RN commission was terminated on July 5 1940. He was commissioned in the RAFVR, as a Pilot Officer, and arrived at 6 OTU on July 6. After converting to Hurricanes he joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on August 3. On the 11th he destroyed a Bf 109 and next day he was shot down, in Hurricane N 2596, in a combat over Dover, crashing near Hawkinge. Two days later he made a forced-landing at Hawkinge, after being attacked by Bf 109s. On August 16 he destroyed two Bf 109s, on the 18th a Ju 88, on the 24th Barton damaged a Bf 109 and on the 25th he shared in destroying a Hs 126. Barton was posted to 253 Squadron at Kenley on September 10. Next day he shared in the destruction of three Do17s and on the 15th he claimed a Do 17 shot down over the Thames Estuary. His aircraft, Hurricane V 6698, sustained damage in the engagement which necessitated a forced-landing at Hawkinge. On September 20 Barton was shot down and his Hurricane, R 2686, crashed and burned out. He was severely wounded and admitted to Ashford Hospital. On October 5, after discharge from the hospital, he was posted to RAF Kenley as non-effective sick and he did not return to operational flying until February 1941. Barton was later posted to 124 Squadron at Castletown, as a Flight Commander. He went to 126 Squadron in Malta in March 1942, flying the squadron’s first Spitfire off the carrier HMS Eagle on the 29th. On April 2 Barton damaged a Ju 88, on the 9th damaged two more, on the 22nd he destroyed a Ju 87 and probably another, on the 24th claimed a Ju 87 destroyed, shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 and damaged another and on the 30th damaged another Ju 88. In May 1942 Barton took command of 126 Squadron. He damaged a Mc 202 on the 9th and got probable Bf 109s on the 10th and 11th and on the 14th he destroyed a Bf 109 and probably another. He had been awarded the DFC (10.4.42) and then a Bar (7.7.42). Barton was posted back to the UK in August 1942. He was killed in a collision on the runway on April 4 1943, whilst serving as a Squadron Leader instructor at 53 OTU, Llandow. He was 29 years old. He is buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, Totteridge, Hertfordshire.

APO 23.3.36 PO 27.1.37 FO 27.10.38 FL 3.9.40

JINDRICH BARTOS 83220 PO Pilot Czechoslovakian

312 Squadron

Bartos was born on November 16 1911 at Lugansk, Ukraine. He joined the Military Academy at Hranice for his basic military training then transferred to the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov for pilot training. He qualified as a field pilot in 1935 and then served with the Second Air Regiment at Prague-Kbely. Following the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in March 1938 Bartos was dismissed from the Czechoslovak Air Force, which was disbanded. Bartos escaped to Poland and then sailed from Gdynia to France where he was required to join the French Foreign Legion for five years, with an assurance that, should war be declared, he would be able to transfer to a French military unit. War having been declared Bartos was, on October 9 1939, transferred to CIC, Chartres, for retraining on French equipment which he completed on May 11 1940. He was posted to GC I/3 at Cannes, Maux-Esbly which was equipped with Dewoitine D.520 aircraft. Due to the rapid advance of the invading German Army, the unit moved quickly, on the following day, to Wex-Thuisy in north eastern France. On June 3, during the Battle of France, he damaged a He 111 over Paris, but, in the fight, his D.520 was shot down. He suffered light injuries in the resulting crash landing. Two weeks later the unit flew to Oran, Algeria, to avoid capture by the Germans. Bartos and other Czechoslovak airmen were released from French service and made their way to Casablanca, where they boarded a ship bound for Gibraltar. Here they transferred to the David Livingstone which took them to Cardiff where they arrived on August 5 1940. Bartos enlisted in the RAFVR and was commissioned in August 1940 for the duration of hostilities. He joined 312 Squadron at Duxford from the Czechoslovak Depot at Cosford on September 5 1940. He converted to Hurricanes on the squadron which moved to Speke, with a detachment at Penrhos, on September 26 1940. Bartos was promoted to Flying Officer on January 9 1941. On February 13 1941, whilst practising dog-fighting with Sgt Votruba, near Talagre, Prestatyn, Bartos’s Hurricane I (V 6885) was seen to go into a dive at about 5000 ft and, with a diving turn, crashed into the ground. Bartos was 29 and was buried, on February 18 1941, in Section 11 of West Derby Cemetery, Liverpool, in a joint grave with another Czech pilot, Sergeant Otto Hanzlicek (grave 392).

Midshipman 1.1.31 Acting Sub-Lt 1.5.34 Sub-Lt 9.9.35 FO 17.5.36 Lt (RN) 16.11.36 PO 6.7.40 FO 6.7.4 FL 30.7.42

ROBERT ALEXANDER BARTON 37664 FL Pilot Canadian 49 Squadron Barton was born in Kamloops, British Columbia on June 7 1916. He was a candidate for an RAF short service commission in 1936 and began his ab initio training on January 27, as a pupil pilot. Having been accepted, he moved on to 9 FTS, Thornaby on April 4.

PO 17.8.40 FO 9.1.41

ERIC GORDON BARWELL 77454 PO Pilot British 264 Squadron

With training completed, Barton joined 41 Squadron at Catterick on October 11 1936 and remained with it until posted to 249 Squadron at Church Fenton on its reformation on May 16 1940, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on the 24th. The squadron moved south to Boscombe Down on August 1. On the 15th Barton claimed a Bf 110 shot down and another damaged, on the 24th a Bf 109 shared, on September 2 a Do 17 shared, on the 11th a He 111 damaged, on the 15th two Do 17s probably destroyed, on the 18th a He 111 damaged and on the 27th a Bf 110 destroyed. After 249’s CO, Squadron Leader J Grandy was wounded on September 6 Barton led the squadron on operations for the remainder of the Battle of Britain. On October 29 he destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged two more, on November 7 probably destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 11th shot a bomber down into the sea, probably an Italian BR 20. Barton was awarded the DFC (20.10.40) and was decorated by the King at Duxford in January 1941. He had been promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and given command of 249 on December 13 1940. On a convoy patrol on February 4 1941, Barton destroyed a Bf 110 and shared a second, his final victories in the UK. In mid-April 249 Squadron re-equipped with Hurricane IIs and in early May sailed from Liverpool in the carrier HMS Furious. At Gibraltar 249’s aircraft were transferred to HMS Ark Royal and on May 21 1941 they were flown off the carrier and, after some mishaps, eventually all reached Malta safely. The squadron was very successful over the next few months, with Barton destroying a SM 79 at night on June 3, a BR 20 at night on June 8, an Mc 200 on July 17 and another on the 25th, a probable Mc 200 and another damaged on September 4, a shared SM 81 on October 19 and an Mc 202 on November 22. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (31.10.41) and posted away for a rest on December 8 1941. In December 1941 Barton was posted to 52 OTU, Aston Down as OC Training. In

Born on August 6 1913 in Clare, Suffolk, Barwell was educated at Wellingborough School. He worked in the family business near Cambridge and in July 1938 he joined the RAFVR (741745), doing his elementary flying at 22 E&RFTS, Cambridge. Called up at the outbreak of war, Barwell was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 8 1939. He completed his training, was commissioned on December 12 and joined 264 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on the 21st. Barwell was sent to 11 Group Fighter Pool, St Athan on the 31st and after converting to Defiants, he rejoined 264 on February 5 1940.On May 12 1940 he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 and took part in the successful actions of the squadron over Dunkirk, destroying a Bf 110 and two Ju 87s on May 29 and a Bf 109 and a He 111 on the 31st. In the latter engagement, Barwell was hit by return fire and turned for home but was unable to maintain height and landed on the sea between two destroyers, some five miles from Dover. The aircraft broke up and Barwell and his gunner, Pilot Officer Williams, who had been knocked unconscious in the crash, were thrown into the sea. Barwell held up Williams until they were rescued. Credited with the destruction of a Bf 109 on August 24 1940, flying with Sergeant A Martin, Barwell was awarded the DFC (11.2.41). During the night of April 10/11 1941, again with Martin Barwell shot down a He 111 and probably a second. Promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on July 1 1941, he was posted to the newlyformed 125 Squadron at Colerne, as a Flight Commander. He took command of the

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On September 27 1940 he shared a Ju 88, on October 4 and 18 he damaged two more and on December 12 he shared in destroying a Bf 109. 229 Squadron was posted to the Middle East in May 1941 and sailed in HMS Furious. The pilots flew six Hurricanes off to Malta on May 21and after refueling they flew on to Mersa Matruh, Egypt. On arrival, Bary was attached to 274 Squadron in the Western Desert and on June 3 he destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 17th damaged a Ju 88. Bary was temporarily attached to the Ferry Pool at Takoradi, until September 1 1941, when 229 was brought together again and it began night-defence duties in the Mersa Matruh area. In early October 1941 Bary was posted to 250 Squadron at Sidi Heneish, as a Flight Commander. On November 20 he destroyed a Bf 109 and probably a Ju 87, on December 4 he probably destroyed a Bf 109, on the 5th damaged another, on the 9th shared a Bf 110 and on the 24th he destroyed a Ju 52 on the ground. He was awarded the DFC (7.4.42) and soon afterwards went to No 1 Middle East Training School at El Ballah, as an instructor. Bary took command of 80 Squadron at Bu Amoud, Libya on January 23 1943. In midJune he was given command of 239 Kittyhawk fighter-bomber wing, which he took to Malta on July 9 to take part in the invasion of Sicily on the following day. The Allies invaded Italy on September 3 1943 and 239 Wing flew in support of the Army, based initially in Sicily and later in Italy. In late January 1944, tour-expired, Bary returned to the UK. He was posted to the Fighter Leaders’ School at Milfield for a course and on July 27 he was appointed an instructor there. He later joined the staff of the Central Fighter Establishment at Milfield. Bary returned to operations, when he flew to Naples in December 1944 to take command of 244 Wing, Desert Air Force, flying in support of the Eighth Army. On April 12 1945 he took off with two Spitfires of 92 Squadron, to make a close-support bombing attack on a target NE of Imola. On reaching the area, Bary dived to drop his two 500 lb bombs. At somewhere between 4000 and 5000 feet, his aircraft exploded and disintegrated. There was no flak, no enemy aircraft were seen and it is assumed that the explosion was caused by a faulty fuse detonated when the bombs were released. Bary’s body was recovered and he is buried in the British Empire Cemetery at Faenza. He was awarded the DSO (12.2.46), with effect from the day prior to his death. The citation described him as ‘an outstanding Wing Leader’. Bary was 29.

squadron in December 1941 and held it until February 1942, when it became a Wing Commander post. The squadron began to receive Beaufighters from February 1942 and during the night of July 1/2 Barwell damaged a Do 217 near Cardiff. On September 6 he was posted to HQ 10 Group as Ops Night. Barwell returned to 125 Squadron, then at Fairwood Common, on March 31 1943, again as a Flight Commander. The Squadron re-equipped with Mosquitos from February 1944. Barwell shot down two Ju 88s during the nights of April 23/24 and June 24/25 and on August 10 1944 he shot down a V 1 flying bomb over the sea. On completing his tour, Barwell was awarded a Bar to the DFC (15.8.44). He was posted to the Fighter Interception Unit on August 18. A month later he went to the Main HQ 2nd TAF, as an Acting Wing Commander. He moved to 148 Wing on April 4 1945, as Wing Commander Flying, and took command of 264 Squadron at Rheine, Germany in late June. The squadron was disbanded there on August 25 and Barwell left the RAF on September 2 1945 as a Wing Commander. Barwell died on December 12 2007. He was the younger brother of Group Captain P R Barwell. PO 10.12.39 FO 10.12.40 FL 10.12.41 SL 20.12.44

PHILIP REGINALD BARWELL 22062 WC Pilot British 242 Squadron Born on July 2 1907 at Knowle Warwickshire, Barwell went to Perse and Wellingborough Schools. He was granted a short service commission in the RAF in September 1925 and posted to 19 Squadron at Duxford, under instruction, to gain his flying badge. On September 9 1929 Barwell went to a staff job at CFS, Upavon and on August 5 1930 he was posted to the Home Aircraft Depot, Henlow for an engineering course. With this completed, he went to the Aircraft Depot, Hinaidi, Iraq. Barwell was granted a Permanent Commission on September 1 1931. On June 1 1933 Barwell moved to the engineer section at Hinaidi, on the staff of Iraq Command. He returned to Britain in late 1934 and on January 7 1935 he was posted to CFS, Upavon as an instructor. Barwell took command of 46 Squadron at Digby on January 4 1937 and led it until October 28 1939. One of his last operational sorties with 46 was on October 21, when he led a flight of six Hurricanes to intercept German seaplanes approaching a British convoy, some thirty miles out. Barwell shot down a He 115 and shared in the destruction of a second. For this action he was awarded the DFC (28.11.39). In November 1939 Barwell was posted to command RAF Sutton Bridge, as a Wing Commander. He moved to HQ 12 Group, Watnall on June 14 1940, as Wing Commander Ops, and whilst there he flew three operational sorties with 242 Squadron on October 5 from Coltishall, in Hurricane R 4115, thus qualifying for the Battle of Britain clasp. On October 21 1940 Barwell was posted to HQ Fighter Command for Air Staff duties. He took command of RAF Biggin Hill in June 1941, as a Group Captain, and sometimes flew as No 2 to Sailor Malan on fighter sweeps. On July 4 1941 he shared a probable Bf 109 with Malan and on the 11th he destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another. One day in early 1942 Barwell’s engine cut out on take-off and he crash-landed just beyond the runway and broke his back. Although he continued to fly, he took no part in operations whilst in his plaster cast. On July 1 1942 Barwell, in company with Squadron Leader R W Oxspring, took off from Biggin Hill an hour before sunset on a standing patrol between Dungeness and Beachy Head. Control at Biggin Hill warned of unidentified aircraft in the area, they proved to be two Spitfires from Tangmere, flown by inexperienced pilots. Barwell, apparently oblivious to the warning, was attacked by one and shot down into the sea. Although Oxspring saw him trying to open his hood, Barwell did not bale out. Despite intensive searches, no trace of him was found. Barwell’s body was later washed up on the French coast and he is buried in the Calais Canadian War Cemetery. He was the elder brother of E G Barwell.

APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39 FO 23.10.40 FL 23.10.41 SL 16.10.43

HENRY BASHFORD 141156 Sgt Observer

British

248 Squadron

Bashford joined the RAFVR about September 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742073). He later remustered as a u/t Observer and was called up on September 1 1939. With his training completed, he joined 248 Squadron in May 1940. On the 31st he was attached to No 1 (C) OTU at Silloth and, after training on Blenheims, he rejoined 248 on June 29 at Dyce and served with it throughout the Battle of Britain. Bashford was posted away in July 1941 to 404 (RCAF) Squadron at Skitten, a maritime reconnaissance and coastal strike unit. He served with it until April 1942. Commissioned in January 1943, Bashford was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. He joined the RAFVR in September 1948. PO 14.1.43 FO 14.7.43 FL 14.1.44 FO (RAFVR) 27.9.48

FRANCIS BERNARD BASSETT 41982 PO Pilot British 222 Squadron Bassett, of Wembley Park, Middlesex, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on March 6 1939, as a pupil pilot.

PO 28.9.25 FO 28.3.27 FL 14.5.30 SL 1.12.36 WC 1.1.40

RONALD EDWARD BARY 41818 PO Pilot New Zealander

He served with 222 Squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. He flew only two operational sorties, on August 30 and September 5 1940. It is not known when he was posted away from 222. In 1942 Bassett was with 152 Squadron. In October it became non-operational, prior to going overseas. It went to Gibraltar and on November 14 1942 took off for Algiers, to take part in the invasion of North Africa. En route, Bassett’s engine failed and he baled out over the sea. His body was never found and he is remembered on the Malta Memorial, Panel 2, Column 1. Bassett was 22.

229 Squadron

Born in New Plymouth on June 9 1915, Bary was employed as a law clerk at the Department of Justice in Palmerston North. He was accepted for an RAF short service commission and left New Zealand on December 16 1938 for the UK. Bary’s training began at No 1 E&RFTS, Hatfield on January 23 1939, as a pupil pilot. He completed his training at 11 FTS, Shawbury and joined the recently-reformed 229 Squadron at Digby on October 26 1939. Over Dunkirk on June 1 1940, Bary probably destroyed a Ju 87 and on the 27th he shared a Ju 88.

APO 29.4.39 PO 6.11.39

31

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GORDON HERBERT BATCHELOR 86343 PO Pilot British 54 Squadron

IAN NORMAN BAYLES 74327 FO Pilot Australian

Batchelor, of Higham, Kent, joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748532). He was called up on September 1 and with his training completed at RAF College FTS, Cranwell on September 20 1940, he went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 23rd. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on October 14 1940.

Born in Melbourne on August 13 1918, Bayles went to England with his parents in 1923 and was educated at Winchester College. He returned to Australia in 1937 but when it was decided that he should read Law, he went back to England to study at Trinity College, Oxford, with the intention of returning to Melbourne to practise.

On October 27 he damaged a Ju 88. Batchelor was still with the squadron, when he was shot down near Lens on a Circus operation on July 9 1941. Batchelor died, as a PoW, on April 15 1942. He is buried in Hamburg Cemetery, Ohlsdorf, Germany. He was 23.

Bayles joined the University Air Squadron on October 19 1938 and then transferred to the RAFVR (754313) in June 1939. He was commissioned in the RAFVR on September 26, completed his flying training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell and joined 152 Squadron at Acklington on April 20 1940. The squadron had recently received its first Spitfires. Bayles was sent to 5 OTU, Aston Down on May 5, to convert to Spitfires. On May 29 he was posted to 249 Squadron at Leconfield but, following pressure from 152’s CO, he rejoined 152 Squadron on June 9 1940. Bayles damaged a Bf 110 on August 13, claimed a Ju 88 destroyed and a He 111 damaged on September 25, damaged a Bf 110 on the 27th and a He 111 on the 30th. He was posted away from 152 on August 18 1941, to instruct. In mid-1942 Bayles took a short gunnery course and was posted to 224 Group in India. He returned to operations on February 5 1943, when he was given command of 135 Squadron at George, operating along the Arakan coast in Hurricanes. Bayles led 135 until November 1943. He commanded 273 Squadron at Maunghnama and later Kyaukpyu from December 16 1944 until April 14 1945, when he was appointed Wing Commander Flying, 902 Wing. He was awarded the DFC (2.10.45). Bayles was posted back to the UK in late 1945. He was released from the RAF in July 1946 and returned to Australia with his family in 1947. He died in August 1998.

PO 21.9.40 FO 14.9.41

LESLIE GORDON BATT 145514 Sgt Pilot British

238 Squadron

Batt was born on November 27 1916 and educated at Bablake School and Coventry Technical College. He was an engineering apprentice at Daimler’s, when he joined the RAFVR in April 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741474). He did his flying at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty. Called up on September 1 1939, Batt was posted to 6 FTS, Little Rissington on October 9 1939, on No 15 Course. A rugby injury caused his transfer to No 16 Course. He went to 10 B&GS, Warmwell on May 10 1940, with the Advanced Training Squadron of 6 FTS, for armament training, the final part of the course. He joined 253 Squadron at Kenley on the 17th and moved to 238 Squadron on May 21. On July 13 Batt shared a Bf 110, on the 21st he shared a Do 17, on August 8 he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and on the 13th he destroyed a He 111. On this day he made a forced-landing at Eartham, in Hurricane P 2989, after an attack by a Bf 109 S of the Isle of Wight. Batt went to Egypt with 238 in May 1941 and remained with the squadron until December. In January 1942 he had his first long leave since May 1940, in Cairo, and in February he joined the Aircraft Delivery Unit there. In August 1942 Batt was posted away and returned to the UK in November. He went to 55 OTU, Annan, as an instructor, in early December 1942 and was commissioned from Warrant Officer in March 1943. A return to operations came on August 11 1943, when Batt was posted to 198 Squadron, flying Typhoons from Martlesham Heath. He went for a course to 7 FIS, Upavon on November 24, after which he was posted to 15(P) AFU, Babdown, as an instructor, remaining there until his release in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde. Batt died on February 4 2004.

PO 26.9.39 FO 26.9.40 FL 26.9.41 SL 30.6.45

EDWARD ALAN BAYLEY 741004 Sgt Pilot British

British

32 and 249 Squadrons

Bayley was born in Rye, Sussex on March 27 1911. He was educated at Caterham School and Eastbourne Grammar School for Boys. He went to Canada and was at Agricultural College there in 1929/30. Back in the UK, Bayley ran a silver fox farm. He was later a service engineer for milking machines and then became Manager of Walsall Aerodrome. Bayley joined the RAFVR in December 1937. Having achieved a high standard of proficiency and the required number of flying hours, he was given the chance of six months of training with the RAF. On June 1 1939 Bayley joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill. Still with the squadron at the outbreak of war, he was taken on to the squadron strength on September 6. He was ordered to RAF Hendon on May 17 1940, for onward posting to France, but he rejoined 32 on May 24 and there is no evidence that he ever served in France. Bayley destroyed a Bf 109 on June 8, shared a Do 17 on July 3, probably destroyed a Bf 110 on the 20th, damaged a Do 17 on August 12, damaged a Bf 110 on the 16th and claimed a Do 17 destroyed and a Bf 110 damaged on August 18. He was posted to 249 Squadron at North Weald on September 17. He was killed on October 10 1940 when his Hurricane, V 7537, crashed at Shades House, Cooling Marsh, during a routine patrol. The cause of the crash is not known and may have been the result of Bayley losing consciousness because of oxygen failure. However, it is more likely that he was shot down. Bayley is buried in St Luke’s Cemetery, Bromley, Kent.

PO 24.3.43 FO 24.9.43 FL 24.3.45

SIDNEY BAXTER 566388 Sgt Pilot

152 Squadron

222 Squadron

Baxter, from Chester le Street, Co Durham was educated at the secondary school there. He joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice in January 1933 and passed out in December 1935, as a Fitter. He remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot on March 6 1939 and began his training at 14 FTS, Kinloss on April 13 1939, on No 1 Course. With training completed, Baxter joined 236 Squadron at Stradishall on November 8 1939. He was posted away to 222 Squadron at Duxford on November 25 1939. Over Dunkirk on June 1 1940, Baxter shot down a Bf 110. On September 2 he probably destroyed a Bf 110, damaged another and a Do 17, on the 3rd he again probably destroyed a Bf 110 and on the 11th he destroyed a Ju 88 and probably destroyed a He 111. In the afternoon of September 14 1940 Baxter’s aircraft, Spitfire X 4275, was damaged in combat with Bf 109s. He was killed, attempting to land near Rochford. Baxter was cremated at West End Crematorium, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He was 23 years old.

DEREK BAYLISS 42183 PO Pilot British

604 Squadron

Bayliss joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on March 6 1939, as a pupil pilot. With his flying training completed, he joined 601 Squadron at Biggin Hill in late 1939. He was posted away to 604 Squadron at Northolt on February 21 1940. On October 8 Bayliss crashed and wrecked Blenheim L 1281, when he overshot the flare path at Middle Wallop, coming in from a night patrol. He and his crew were unhurt. Bayliss came off flying in 1941 and was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. APO 10.6.39 PO 18.11.39

32

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ERNEST JOHN BAYLISS 581431 Sgt Observer British

Bayne went to 11 Group Pool, St Athan on June 27 1939, as an instructor. The unit moved to Sutton Bridge and became 6 OTU on March 9 1940. Bayne was made a Flight Commander on the 16th. He was posted to 17 Squadron on June 8, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. On July 29 he shared a He 111 on August 25 he claimed a Bf 109, a probable Bf 110 and shared another. On this day Bayne was himself shot down in combat. He baled and was rescued from the sea, unhurt. His Hurricane, V 7407, crashed off Portland. On the 27th Bayne shared another Bf 110, on the 31st claimed a Bf 109, on September 3 shared a Bf 110 and a Do 17, on the 5th claimed a Bf 109, on the 11th a Bf110 and on October 2 he shared a Do 17. On November 8 1940 Bayne led 17 Squadron against a force of heavily-escorted Ju 87s, which were attacking destroyers E of Clacton. In the action he shot down one Ju 87 and probably a second. Bayne claimed a Bf 110 shot down and one damaged on the 17th and a Do 17 damaged on the 21st. He was awarded the DFC (26.11.40). On July 7 1941 Bayne was given command of 132 Squadron, about to be formed at Peterhead with Spitfires. He relinquished this command in February 1942, when he was posted to the Far East. In May Bayne took command of 30 Squadron at Ratmalana, Ceylon and led it until February 1943, when he took over 136 Squadron at Chittagong. On March 15 Bayne claimed an Oscar and on April 14 he probably destroyed another. When his tour ended in May 1943 he was posted away. Bayne was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Wing Commander and he died on May 28 1963.

248 Squadron

Bayliss, of Christchurch, Hampshire, enlisted for four years in the RAF in July 1939, as a direct-entry Airman u/t Observer. He completed his training and joined 248 Squadron at Dyce in May 1940. He was attached to No 1 (C) OTU, Silloth on the 31st and after training on Blenheims, he rejoined 248 on June 25 and served with it while it was seconded to Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain. On November 3 1940 Bayliss was a member of the crew of a Blenheim, which was last seen attacking a He 111 over the North Sea. It was presumed to have been shot down by return fire. Also lost were Sergeant W J Garfield, pilot and Sergeant A Kay, Wop/AG. Bayliss is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 11. He was 21 years old.

JAMES BAYLY 39899 Sgt Pilot

New Zealander

111 Squadron

Born at Waitara on March 18 1917, Bayly was educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School. In 1934 he became an apprentice electrician. On September 1 1938 he joined the Civil Reserve of Pilots and gained his ‘A’ Licence at the Western Federated Aero Club. Called for full-time service at the outbreak of war, Bayly completed his ground training and then went to 2 EFTS, New Plymouth. In late January 1940 he was posted to 2 FTS, Woodbourne and gained his wings on May 2. He sailed for the UK on July 12, in the RMS Rangitane. After arriving on August 27 1940, Bayly went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge next day. He was posted from there to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on September 11 and, after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 111 Squadron at Drem on the 28th. Bayly was posted from 111 to 4 Ferry Pilot Pool, Kemble on December 11 1940. He became ill in January 1941, spending a month in hospital. In his absence, he was posted to RAF Kemble for a twin-engine conversion course, after which he went to an aircraft ferry and maintenance unit at St Athan. In February 1942 he converted to Hudsons at RAF Oulton and in March he was posted to India. He flew from Cornwall in a Hudson, via Gibraltar, Mersa Matruh, Iraq, Persia and Karachi to Delhi. Bayly’s first job was as a staff pilot at a paratroop training school, flying Vickers Valentias at 70 mph. He returned to operations on January 4 1943, going to 62 (Bomber) Squadron at Cuttack. On the night of March 16, he was detailed to attack Japanese positions at Magwe. The Hudson’s radio was knocked out and the port engine badly damaged by heavy anti-aircraft fire over the target. Bayly decided to switch off the engine and head for Chittagong. The starboard fuel tank ran low and it was impossible to switch to the port one because of damage to the fuel lines. He could not reach Chittagong on the little fuel left and, after some discussion with his crew, it was decided to turn inland and bale out before the now-faltering starboard engine stopped, a forced-landing in the jungle being out of the question. After they landed, it took the four men two days to find each other. Friendly Bengalis helped them to evade Japanese patrols and they eventually reached Chittagong. On return to Cuttack, the subsequent Court of Enquiry found that Bayly had made an error of judgement in switching off the port engine too soon. The finding resulted in Bayly having a heated verbal exchange with his CO and it was recommended that he be reduced in rank and disciplined. At an interview, the AOC told Bayly that he considered the right action had been taken in the Hudson but that Bayly’s insubordination could not be overlooked and he forfeited a year’s seniority. To his relief, Bayly did not return to 62 Squadron but he and his crew were posted to 31 (Transport) Squadron. After a short leave in Calcutta, Bayly remained behind to see the adjutant and his crew went ahead in a Dakota. The aircraft crashed soon after take-off and they were killed. Commissioned in October 1943, Bayly flew Dakotas with 31 until April 9 1944, carrying out supply drops to the Army, often in hazardous conditions. He returned to New Zealand and in September 1944 he became a staff pilot at the School of Navigation. In November Bayly became a Dakota captain, with 40 (Transport) Squadron at Whenuapai. He was released from the RNZAF in June 1945.

APO 24.8.36 PO 29.6.37 FO 29.3.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41

DAVID WALTER BAYNE 26077 SL Pilot British

257 Squadron

Born on April 17 1908, Bayne went to Haileybury. He entered RAF College, Cranwell, as a Flight Cadet, in September 1926. On graduation, he was granted a Permanent Commission on December 15 1928 and posted to 12 Squadron at Andover. On January 21 1930 Bayne went overseas to 5 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Quetta, India, flying Bristol Fighters. He moved to 20 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Peshawar on September 1 1933. In 1935 Bayne had a flying accident and lost a leg. He returned to the UK and was non-effective sick at RAF Depot, Uxbridge for a long period. On July 1 1937 Bayne was appointed to the staff at Uxbridge and moved on to the HQ staff at Kenley on August 8 1938. He was Squadron Leader Admin on January 1 1939 and by November 1 1939 he was Sector Controller at Kenley. He was detached to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on January 28 1940 but returned to Kenley three days later. Although he had an artificial leg, he was given the task of forming 257 Squadron at Hendon from May 17 1940. Bayne was posted away on July 22 1940 to HQ Fighter Command but he had flown at least one operational sortie. No details are known of Bayne’s service during the remainder of the war. In 1948 he was Military and Air Attaché in Rio de Janeiro. He retired from the RAF on August 29 1955, as a Group Captain. PO 15.12.28 FO 15.6.30 FL 15.2.35 SL 1.8.38 WC 1.12.40 GC 1.7.43 GC 1.7.47

GEOFFREY THEODORE BAYNHAM 41518 FO Pilot British 234 and 152 Squadrons Baynham was born on December 15 1915 at Dartford, Kent. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on October 6 1938, as a pupil pilot. Baynham was posted to 4 (C) Ferry Pilot Pool, Kemble from 12 OTU, Benson on June 15 1940. From the Pool, he went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 3 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 234 Squadron at St Eval on the 15th. He moved to 152 Squadron at Warmwell on October 9 and rejoined 234 Squadron, then also at Warmwell on December 16 1940. On May 19 1941 he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and on July 17 another three, shot down over the Channel. At the end of his operational tour, he was posted to 53 OTU as an instructor. In April 1943 Baynham went overseas, rejoining 152 Squadron, then at Souk el Khemis, Tunisia, as a Flight Commander. On May 8 he shared in destroying a Bf 109 and on July 25 he shot down a Ju 52 and shared another, both over Sicily. Baynham was awarded the DFC (10.9.43). Released from the RAF in 1945, he later went to live in Rhodesia. He moved to South Africa and died in Cape Town in 1990.

PO 19.10.43 FO 19.4.44

ALFRED WILLIAM ALEXANDER BAYNE 39014 FL Pilot British 17 Squadron Bayne attended Malvern College. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on June 29 1936, as a pupil pilot. On September 5 he went to 10 FTS, Ternhill and after completing the course, he joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch on April 24 1937.

APO 14.12.38 PO 3.9.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.3.42

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JAMES MICHAEL BAZIN 90281 FL Pilot British 607 Squadron

When he was mobilised on September 1, he had flown almost fifty hours in Tiger Moths at 33 E&RFTS, Whitchurch, Bristol. Beake was posted to 3 ITW, Hastings but did not reach 15 EFTS, Redhill until March 26 1940. Two months later Beake went to 15 FTS, Middle Wallop, finishing the course at its Advanced Training Squadron at Chipping Norton. On August 31 Beake was commissioned and posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 64 Squadron at Leconfield on September 22. After the Battle of Britain, he was with the squadron at various stations, until posted to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill on June 27 1941. He damaged a Bf 109 on September 27. Beake left 92 and went to 601 Squadron at Duxford on December 29 1941. He came off operations in late March 1942 and went to 58 OTU, Grangemouth, as an instructor. He did an instructor’s course at 7 FIS, Upavon in April/May 1942, after which he returned to Grangemouth, later moving to Balado Bridge. Returning to operations, Beake joined 193 Squadron, then forming at Harrowbeer, on December 22 1942, as a Flight Commander. He went to RAF Charmy Down on June 10 1943 for a short course at the Fighter Command School of Tactics, afterwards returning to his squadron. On February 8 1944 he destroyed a FW 190. Another short course at the Fighter Leaders’ School, Milfield came in March 1944 and after a short spell at 84 Ground Support Unit at Aston Down, Beake took command of 164 Squadron at Thorney Island on May 30 1944. Beake destroyed a FW 190 on D Day, June 6. The squadron moved to France in midJuly. He was posted back to the Fighter Leaders’ School on September 10 1944, this time as an instructor. He received a Mention in Despatches (8.6.44). Beake was awarded the DFC (5.9.44), the citation stating that he was credited with two enemy aircraft destroyed. He was released from the RAF on January 21 1946 as a Squadron Leader and went to work for an animal feed company.

Born in Kashmir, India on December 2 1913, Bazin was brought up in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He joined 607 Squadron, AAF at Usworth in May 1935. He flew his first solo on November 11 1935 and he was commissioned in December. He was called for full-time service on August 28 1939. 607 Squadron was ordered to France in November, to join the Air Component of the BEF. On the 13th its Gladiators were flown from Acklington down to Croydon and two days later to Merville. On May 10 1940 Bazin shared a He 111 N of Douai and next day he destroyed another and shared a second near Brussels and on the 14th he destroyed an unidentified enemy aircraft. By this time 607 was equipped with Hurricanes. The squadron suffered heavy losses in the fighting in France and was withdrawn to England, re-assembling at Croydon on May 22. Both its Flight Commanders had been lost and by early June Bazin was commanding ‘B’ Flight, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. He claimed a He 111 probably destroyed on August 15, a Do 17 destroyed and another damaged on September 15 and on the 30th he claimed a Ju 88 shot down and probably a second. Bazin, who had been shot down once in France, crash-landed at Hurn on October 5, when his engine failed, in Hurricane P3668. Bazin was awarded the DFC (25.10.40). Although the citation stated that he had destroyed ten enemy aircraft, most were shot down in France and details are not known. He was posted away from 607 on December 15 1940 to RAF, Catterick, for Ops duties. At some time he served as a Controller in the 14 Group Operations Room at Inverness. He did a flying refresher course in November 1943, a Beam Approach Training course in December and in January 1944 Bazin was posted to16 (Bomber) OTU. He converted to Lancasters at 1660 Conversion Unit and, after Lancaster Finishing School he joined 49 Squadron at Fiskerton in May 1944. In late June he was given command of 9 Squadron at Bardney. By the end of the war, Bazin had carried out twenty-five operational sorties, including a raid on the German battleship Tirpitz. He was released from the RAF in May 1945, as a Wing Commander and was awarded the DSO (21.9.45). Bazin resumed his career as an engineer and rejoined 607 Squadron in November 1946, commanding it from late 1949 until 1951. Bazin died on January 9 1985. He was cremated at Randalls Park, Leatherhead and his ashes were scattered in Tangmere churchyard. PO (AAF) 9.12.35 SL (RAuxAF) 1.10.49

FO (AAF) 9.6.37

FO 24.8.39

FL 3.9.40

PO 31.8.40 FO 31.8.41 FL 31.8.42

FRANCIS VICTOR BEAMISH 16089 WC Pilot Irish 151, 56, 249 and 257 Squadrons Born at Dunmanway, Co Cork on September 27 1903, Beamish was educated at the Coleraine Academical Institute. He entered RAF College, Cranwell, as a Flight Cadet, on September 14 1921. After graduation in August 1923, with a Permanent Commission, he went to 4 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Farnborough on September 18. In January 1925 he was posted to the School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum. Beamish went overseas later in the year and joined 31 Squadron at Ambala on November 18 but stayed only four months before moving to 60 Squadron at Kohat. He was back in the UK in October 1926, for a course at CFS, Wittering. With this completed, he went to 5 FTS, Sealand as an instructor. On September 16 1927 Beamish went back to Cranwell, this time on the staff. He went to Canada on March 22 1929, on exchange with an RCAF officer. When he returned two years later, he was posted to 25 Squadron at Hawkinge, as a Flight Commander. In January 1932 Beamish was appointed as Personal Assistant to the AOC-in-C ADGB at Uxbridge. A year later he went into hospital, suffering from tuberculosis, and its effects caused him to retire on October 18 1933. Desperately unhappy, Beamish got a job as a civilian assistant at 2 FTS, Digby. He returned to Ireland in 1936 and became civilian Adjutant at RAF Aldergrove on May 18. This was a non-flying appointment in Class ‘C’ of the Air Force Reserve. Beamish was reinstated with full category as a Flight Lieutenant on January 27 1937 and was posted to command 2 Armament Training Camp and Met Flight at Aldergrove. His comeback was complete when he was given command of 64 Squadron at Church Fenton on December 8 1937. Beamish was awarded the AFC (1.1.38) for establishing the Met Flight. After a course at RAF Staff College, Andover, he took command of 504 Squadron at Digby on September 13 1939. He returned to Canada in mid-January 1940 on Air Staff duties but, back in the UK, he took over RAF North Weald on June 7 1940. Beamish flew operational sorties with his station squadrons whenever he could. On June 18 he claimed two Bf 109s destroyed, on July 9 a Bf 110 damaged, on the 12th a Do 17 shot down, on August 18 a probable Ju 88, on the 24th a Do 17 damaged and on the 30th two probable Bf 110s. On September 6 Beamish claimed two Ju 87s, on the 11th a probable He 111, on the 15th a share in a He 111 and on the 18th and 27th probable Bf 109s. He damaged a Bf 109 on October 12, probably destroyed one and damaged another on the 25th and probably shot down another on the 30th. Beamish was awarded the DSO (23.7.40) and the DFC (8.11.40). On November 7 1940 Beamish collided with Pilot Officer T F Neil of 249 Squadron whilst on patrol and made a forced-landing at Leeds Abbey. In all his sorties in 1940 he was damaged by enemy action three times, on each occasion getting his aircraft down safely. On November 11 1940, the day the Italians attempted a raid, Beamish got a probable

SL 1.12.41

SYDNEY HOWARTH BAZLEY 90359 FL Pilot British 266 Squadron A native of Southport, Lancashire, Bazley joined 611 Squadron, AAF in early 1937 and was commissioned in April of that year. He was called to full-time service on August 26 1939 and was temporary ‘A’ Flight Commander from September 4 to 26. Bazley was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on January 18 1940 and was made an Acting Flight Lieutenant on the 25th. He was temporarily detached from 611 on February 29 to 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge and assumed command of ‘B’ Flight there. On March 19 1940 Bazley’s attachment ceased and he went on the 266 Squadron strength posted away from 611. On August 12 Bazley claimed a Bf 110 destroyed, another probably destroyed and another damaged. Four days later his aircraft was set alight in combat and he baled out over Canterbury. The Spitfire, P 9312, is believed to be that which crashed near Wickhambreux. Bazley suffered burns and minor injuries. His next operational sortie was not made until September 11 and on this day he claimed a Do 17 probably destroyed. Still with 266, Bazley was killed in a flying accident on March 2 1941, aged 27. He was cremated at Leicester City Crematorium. PO (AAF) 4.4.37 FO 26.8.39 FL 3.9.40

PERCIVAL HAROLD BEAKE 84923 PO Pilot Canadian 64 Squadron Beake, from Bristol, was born in Quebec in 1917. He was educated at Victoria Park School and Bristol Grammar School. He joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745864).

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Beamont was leading the Wing when he was shot down over France on October 12 1944 and taken prisoner. After being released from the Germans, he was finally released by the Russians on May 21 1945. He formed the first Tempest Wing for service in the Far East but was then appointed to command the Air Fighting Development Squadron at the Central Fighter Establishment. Beamont left the RAF in January 1946. He joined the RAuxAF and commanded 611 Squadron from 1949 to 1951. He went to Gloster Aircraft as No 3 Test Pilot. He left there for de Havilland, to be a demonstration pilot and in May 1947 he moved to English Electric as Chief Test Pilot. In this capacity Beamont established several records in Canberra and P 1 aircraft. In 1955 Beamont was made Manager of Flight Operations and then Special Director of English Electric Aviation in 1960. He became Director of Flight Operations, BAC Preston in November 1965, was made a CBE (1969) and later appointed Director of Flight Operations, Panavia Aircraft. In 1978 he resigned his BAC directorship to concentrate on development of the Tornado. Following the first flight of the production aircraft, Beamont retired on July 31 1979. Beamont was awarded the DFC (US) (14.6.46). He was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant for Lancaster in 1977. He died on November 19 2001.

CR 42 biplane fighter. Two days later he damaged a Bf 109 near Dover. On January 10 1941 he shot down a Bf 109 over the Channel. Beamish was posted to HQ 11 Group on March 17 1941. He did not claim again until August 9 1941, with a probable Bf 109 near Mardyck. He was awarded a Bar to the DSO (25.9.41). On January 25 1942 Beamish went to RAF Kenley to command and again flew with his squadrons. With Wing Commander R F Boyd, he took off on the morning of February 12 ‘to see what was happening on the other side’. After chasing two Bf 109s, they saw part of the German Fleet making its ‘Channel Dash’. The ships had been reported ten minutes earlier by two pilots of 91 Squadron but the news was received with complete incredulity at 11 Group. Beamish’s confirmation was enough to set in motion a series of uncoordinated attacks on the ships. On February 13 Beamish had a share in the destruction of a He 114 over the Channel. On March 9 he claimed a FW 190 destroyed and another on the 26th, as well as a Bf 109. Leading the Kenley Wing and flying with 485 (NZ) Squadron on March 28, Beamish saw a force of Bf 109s and FW 190s a few miles S of Calais. He turned the Wing towards them. In the ensuing engagement, Beamish was seen to be attacked and damaged by a Bf 109. He requested a vector over the R/T and was last seen entering a cloud near Calais. It is presumed that, possibly wounded and perhaps unconscious, he went into the Channel. Victor Beamish was one of that small band of near-legendary figures in the RAF. He was photographed by Cecil Beaton and his portrait was done by both Cuthbert Orde and Eric Kennington. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 64. PO 15.8.23 WC 1.3.40

FO 15.2.25

FL 12.12.28

RONALD BEAMISH 127044 Sgt Pilot British

FL (RAFO) 18.5.33

sFL 27.1.37

APO 1.4.39 PO 21.10.39 FO 21.10.40 FL 21.2.42 SL 17.5.44 SL (AAF) 1.9.47

JOHN MAURICE BENTLEY BEARD 89588 Sgt Pilot British 249 Squadron

SL 1.4.37

Born on December 20 1918 in Shoreham, Sussex, Beard went to Leamington College. He was working for the Midland Bank when he joined the RAFVR in June 1937 (740502). He began his flying at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty on July 10 and trained on Avro Cadets and Hawker Harts.

601 Squadron

Beamish joined the RAFVR in July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758103). Called up on September 1, he went to No 1 EFTS, Hatfield for his elementary flying training. On May 13 1940 he went to 10 FTS, Ternhill, on No 20 Course.

Called up on September 2 1939, he went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 7. With the course completed, he joined 609 Squadron at Drem on December 15. From April 9 to 14 1940 he was detached to Farnborough for an oxygen course. Beard was posted to 249 Squadron on May 14 1940, when it was reforming at Church Fenton. On September 2 Beard damaged a Do 17, on the 6th destroyed a Bf 109, on the 18th a Bf 110, on the 27th two Bf 109s, a Bf 110 and another probable and a Do 17 damaged, on the 28th a Bf 109 destroyed and on October 12 a Bf 109 damaged. He was awarded the DFM (22.10.40). Beard was shot down by Bf 109s over North Kent on October 25. He baled out, wounded, and was admitted to Pembury Hospital. His Hurricane, P 3615, is believed to have crashed on Rankin’s Farm, Linton. He was posted from 249 to SHQ North Weald on November 6 as non-effective sick, date of rejoining 249 not known. Commissioned in December 1940, Beard was sent to RAF White Waltham for ferrying duties on February 6 1941, as 249 prepared to re-equip with Hurricane IIs. Next day he crashed, whilst flying a Spitfire, and went to hospital. On recovery, he went directly to 52 OTU at Debden on April 30 1941, as an instructor. He moved to CGS, Sutton Bridge on March 18 1942, as a founder-member of the Pilot Gunnery Wing there and took charge of the Live Firing Flight. The PGW later moved to Catfoss, to become part of the Central Gunnery School. Beard was a member of the Fighter Command Test Board and he made visits to the Gunnery Research Unit at Exeter, to carry out tests on new pieces of armament equipment. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.45). In May 1945 Beard went to Milfield, to take charge of a Tempest rocket-training unit. In July he moved to RAF Charter Hall to be Station Admin Officer. He was sent to HQ 229 Group, New Delhi in October 1945, as Air Training 2. His last job was to arrange the return of 120 Lease-Lend Expeditors to the Americans at Munich in early 1946. He flew the last one back himself. Beard was released from the RAF, on reaching the UK, as a Squadron Leader. He died on November 21 2000.

With training completed, Beamish arrived at 6 OTU on August 17 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 601 Squadron at Exeter on September 11. He may have moved to 213 Squadron at Tangmere in early November 1940. Beamish was commissioned from Warrant Officer in June 1942. Nothing further is known of his service in the RAF, from which he was released in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. PO 26.6.42 FO 12.12.42 FL 26.6.44

ROLAND PROSPER BEAMONT 41819 FO Pilot British 87 Squadron Beamont was born in Chichester on August 10 1920. Educated at Eastbourne College, he entered the RAF on a short service commission and began as a pupil pilot on January 23 1939. After elementary flying training at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham and a short spell at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, for a short disciplinary course, he completed his training at 13 FTS, Drem. He arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on October 13 1939 and on November 20 Beamont joined 87 Squadron in France. On May 13 1940 he destroyed a Do 17, shot down a Bf 110 on the 14th, destroyed a Do 17 on the 15th, and a Ju 88 on the 17th. The squadron was withdrawn to England on May 22 and after a few days at Debden, it moved to Church Fenton. On July 5 it went south again, to Exeter, and on the 24th Beamont shared in the destruction of a Ju 88, on August 15 he shot down one Bf 110 and probably a second and on the 25th he claimed a Do 17 and a Bf 109 destroyed. Beamont damaged a Ju 88 on September 3 1940, damaged a Bf 110 on October 11 and probably destroyed a Bf 109 on the 12th. In early 1941 Beamont was a member of the 87 Squadron Aerobatic team, with Fight Lieutenant D H Ward and Flight Sergeant I J Badger. He damaged a Ju 88 on April 5. He was awarded the DFC (6.6.41) and posted to 79 Squadron, as a Flight Commander. In December 1941, Beamont went to the Special Duties List, reporting to Hawker Aircraft as a test pilot. In May 1942 he went to 56 Squadron at Manston, as a supernumerary Flight Lieutenant. On June 29 he joined 609 Squadron at Duxford. During the night of September 4/5 1942 Beamont damaged a Ju 88 near Dover. He took command of 609 Squadron in October, was awarded a Bar to the DFC (29.1.43) and at the end of his tour, the DSO (6.5.43). A return to test flying came in May 1943 and Beamont went back to Hawker’s but in February 1944 he was asked to form the first Typhoon Wing, No 150, at Castle Camps. On June 18 he destroyed a Bf 109 and on October 2 an FW 190. Between June 16 and August 22 he destroyed 26 V 1 flying bombs and shared 5 more. Beamont was awarded a Bar to the DSO (25.7.44).

PO 18.12.40 FO 18.12.41 FL 18.12.42

ERIC WALTER BEARDMORE C 820 FO Pilot Canadian 1 (RCAF) Squadron Beardmore was born in Berlin on August 29 1911, He was commissioned in the Non-Permanent Active Air Force in Canada on September 1 1937, redesignated the Auxiliary Active Air Force on December 1 1938. He was with No 1 (RCAF) Squadron, when it arrived in the UK on June 20 1940. Beardmore was detached to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on July 10 1940 for a short R/T course. He was shot down in combat over the Thames Estuary on September 18. He baled out, slightly wounded, and he did not return to duty until October 1 and on the 5th he damaged a Bf 109.

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609, gaining his wings in August 1937. He was one of 609’s original Flight Commanders but in January 1939 he handed over to Flying Officer PH Barran, because of business and other commitments. Embodied on August 24 1939, he took ‘B’ Flight over after Barran was killed on July 11 1940. Beaumont served with 609 until he was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 2 1940, as an instructor. The unit was redesignated 57 OTU on November 1 1940. Beaumont was posted to the newly-formed 59 OTU, Turnhouse on December 22 1940. He was made an OBE (1.1.45) and was a Group Captain at 84 Group when he was released in 1945. Beaumont went on to hold a wide range of civilian appointments including Deputy Coroner for Wakefield. He died in September 1997.

He was posted away from the squadron on November 9 1940, en route for Canada, but was not repatriated until March 1941. Beardmore reformed 118 (RCAF) Squadron at Rockcliffe, Ottawa. He was released from the RCAF on October 18 1945 as a Wing Commander. He died on August 23 1966. PO 1.9.37 FO 8.12.38 FL 7.11.40

ROBERT ARTHUR BEARDSLEY 100607 Sgt Pilot British 610 and 41 Squadrons Born at Charlton, London on January 19 1920, Beardsley was educated at the Roan School, Blackheath. He joined the RAFVR (741411) on April 2 1938 and carried out his elementary flying training at 20 E&RFTS, Gravesend.

PO (AAF) 24.4.36 FO (AAF) 24.10.37 FO 24 8.39 FL 12.3.40 SL 1.6.41 WC 1.6.42

Called up on September 1 1939, he was sent to 3 ITW, Hastings, after which he was posted to 15 FTS, Lossiemouth moving later to Middle Wallop and Chipping Norton. With training completed, Beardsley went directly to 610 Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 27 1940. He was attached to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 30th and after converting to Spitfires, he rejoined 610 on August 12. Beardsley claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on the 25th, probably destroyed a Do 17 and a Bf 109 on the 29th and shot down a He 111 on the 30th. The next day the squadron flew north to Acklington but Beardsley went south again on September 18, to join 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. On this day he damaged two Bf 109s and on the 30th he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and a Do 17. On this sortie Beardsley was attacked by Bf 109s off Dungeness and, after his engine caught fire, he made a forced-landing at Hawkinge, unhurt. Again off Dungeness, on October 25 1940, Beardsley was in hectic combat with Bf 109s. After shooting one down, his Spitfire, P 7371, was hit and a cannon shell went through his starboard camshaft. He managed to make a forced-landing at Hawkinge, once again unhurt. Commissioned in June 1941, Beardsley remained with 41 Squadron On August 18 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another. From late July 1941 the squadron was based at Merston, as part of the Tangmere Wing. He was awarded the DFC (17.10.41) and posted from 41 Squadron on November 22 1941. A period was spent instructing at a Spitfire OTU, before going to Andreas, where 93 Squadron was being reformed in June 1942. Beardsley went with the squadron to the invasion of North Africa in November. On the 25th of the month he probably destroyed an FW 190. After returning to England in 1943, he again went instructing at an OTU. After the invasion of Europe, Beardsley joined 222 Squadron at Tangmere and went with it to France. He later had a staff job in Cairo and was released from the RAF on December 20 1945. Beardsley rejoined the RAF on April 19 1949 as a Flight Lieutenant and after a flying refresher course and conversion to jets, he served with 74 Squadron at Horsham St Faith, as a Flight Commander in 1950 and 1951. Afterwards, he transferred into Fighter Control, on trial and mobile convoys in Germany, Singapore and Borneo. He did two tours at the School of Fighter Control, the second as CO. When he retired on July 31 1970, Beardsley was stationed at HQ 11 Group, Bentley Priory. After retirement, he took a mature teacher-training course, afterwards joining the staff at Butley Middle School, Woodbridge Suffolk. Beardsley died on October 17 2003.

WALTER BEAUMONT 76308 PO Pilot British

152 Squadron

Beaumont was born in Dewsbury, Yorkshire. He went to Scout Road School, Mytholmroyd then Hebden Bridge Grammar School. He went on to study for a BSc at Goldsmiths’ College at the University of London. From January 1937 he was a member of the RAFVR (740000). This number would seem to indicate that Beaumont was the very first man to join the RAFVR. He was then living at Coulsdon, Surrey. He did some flying at the Blackburn Aircraft Flying School at Brough, whilst he was on a course at Leeds College of Physical Education. He obtained a teaching post at Enfield Grammar School and whilst there he married and had a son. Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training and joined 152 Squadron at Acklington on December 15 1939. On August 12 1940 Beaumont damaged two Ju 88s, on the 13th he damaged a Bf 110, on the 16th he claimed two Bf 109s destroyed, on the 18th two Ju 87s and a shared Bf 109, on the 22nd a Ju 88 shot down, on the 25th another Bf 109 and on the 27th he shared in the destruction of a He 111. On this day Beaumont was hit by return fire from a Ju 88 and baled out safely. His Spitfire, R 6831, crashed into the sea eight miles off Portland. On September 7 Beaumont damaged a Do 17. He failed to return from an operational sortie on September 23. His Spitfire, R 7016, is believed to have crashed into the Channel, cause unknown. He was awarded the DFC after his death (22.10.40). Beaumont is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7. He was 26 years old. He is also remembered with a memorial plaque, presented to Calder High School, Mytholmroyd, unveiled on September 23 1999, on the anniversary of his death. His name was also used for Beaumont House, one of six school houses at Churchill School in Salisbury, Zimbabwe, which were named for Battle of Britain pilots. PO 10.12.39

HUGH JOHN SHERARD BEAZLEY 73023 PO Pilot British 249 Squadron The son of a judge, Beazley was born on July 18 1916. He was educated at Cheltenham College and Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read History. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and transferred to the RAFVR in December 1937 (741134).

PO 28.6.41 FO 28.6.42 FL 28.6.43 FL 13.2.48 SL 1.7.65

MARCUS ALFRED BEATTY 69455 Sgt Pilot British 266 Squadron

Beazley was called up on September 25 1939 and commissioned. He went to RAF College FTS, Cranwell on November 6, for No 6 Course. Beazley made a forced-landing, en route from Cranwell to 10 B&GS, Warmwell on April 26 1940, where he was going for armament training, the last phase of his course. With his training completed on May 9 1940, Beazley joined 249 Squadron, when it reformed at Church Fenton on May 16. On July 8 Beazley shared a Ju 88 and on the 15th he destroyed a Bf 110. On September 2 he probably destroyed a Bf 110 and was then himself shot down in flames over Rochester by a Bf 110 of 5/ZG 26. He baled out over Gillingham and landed in Boxleywood. His Hurricane, P 2988, crashed near Rainham, on Eccles Recreation Ground. On September 5 Beazley probably destroyed a Bf 109, on the 6th he got a probable Ju 88, on the 7th he shared a Do 17 and on the 15th he destroyed another. He was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on September 18, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. On the 19th he shared a Do17 and damaged another on the 26th. Beazley shared a Bf 110 on the 27th and received a bullet wound in the foot. On October 15 1940 he was posted from 249 to SHQ North Weald, as non-effective sick and did not fly for some time. In May 1941 249 Squadron sailed for Malta, arriving there on the 21st, having flown off HMS Ark Royal. On June 8 Beazley shared a probable Fiat BR 20, on December 21 he

Beatty joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748226). Called up on September 1, he did his elementary training at 12 EFTS, Wick, after which he was at 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 49 Course, which ran from June 16 to September 7 1940. He converted to Spitfires at 7 OTU, Hawarden and joined 266 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on September 30 1940. Beatty was commissioned in June 1941 and released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. He may have died in Cairo in 1959. PO 19.5.41 FO 3.6.42 FL 3.6.43

STEPHEN GERALD BEAUMONT 90319 FL Pilot British 609 Squadron Born in 1910, Beaumont learned to fly at West Riding Aero Club, Yeadon in 1935. He was junior partner in a firm of solicitors and was the first privately-trained pilot to join 609 Squadron, AAF, when it formed at Yeadon on February 10 1936. Beaumont was commissioned in April and was one of the first three pilots trained with

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in 1947 as a Flying Officer in the Aircraft Control Branch. The date of his leaving the RAF has not been traced. He died in November 1994.

damaged a Bf 109 and on December 26 he assumed command of 249, when the CO was wounded. On January 19 1942 Beazley’s Hurricane, BV 174, was hit by ground fire during a strike on Comiso airfield and he made a crash-landing back at Luqa. He was posted away from the squadron on February 16 1942. Beazley later served with 89 Squadron, as a Flight Commander, and was awarded the DFC (7.3.44). He was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Wing Commander. He worked for the family shipping business, spent 10 years in Nigeria with the Colonial Office, then became a Chartered Accountant. He was Treasurer and later a Life Vice President of the Battle of Britain Memorial Trust. Beazley Way at the National Memorial to The Few at Capelle-Ferne is named after him. John Beazley died on June 13 2011.

PO 1.12.41 FO 1.10.42 FL 1.12.43 FO 18.7.47

CYRIL SYDNEY FRANK BEER 751495 Sgt Wop/AG British 235 Squadron Beer, from Southend-on-Sea, joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in June 1939 as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. Called up on September 1 and with training completed, he joined 22 Squadron.

PO 25.9.39 FO 25.9.40 FL 25.9.41 SL 13.6.44

ANTONI BEDA P 1900 Sgt Pilot

Polish

Beer was attached to 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton on August 23 1940, length of stay unknown. He was killed on September 10 1940, on an operational sortie with 22 Squadron. He was 22 years old and is buried in Den Burg General Cemetery, Texel, The Netherlands.

302 Squadron

Beda was in the PAF before the war. After the fall of Poland he escaped to France and joined l’Armée de l’Air. In May 1940 he was serving with Groupe de Chasse I/2. On the 10th he shared in probably destroying a He 111, on the 11th he shared in the probable destruction of two Ju 88s and on June 5 he shared a Hs 126.

HENRY WILLIAM BEGGS Sub-Lieutenant (FAA) Pilot British

A man of this name joined the RAF with a short service commission in November 1936. He was gazetted as an Acting Pilot Officer, completed his training and was posted to 115 (Bomber) Squadron on September 4 1937. For an unknown reason Beggs’ commission was terminated on December 28 1937, on cessation of duty.

After the French collapse Beda made his way to England. He was enlisted in the RAFVR (793548) and went to the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool. From there he joined 302 Squadron at Leconfield on August 20 1940. Beda was attached to 5 OTU, Aston Down on September 2 and after converting to Hurricanes, he rejoined 302 on the 26th. Awarded the KW and Bar (1.2.41), Beda was posted from 302 to 87 Squadron at Colerne on September 27 1941. He was with 307 Squadron at Exeter from April 22 1942 and was commissioned in June. Beda was awarded the C de G (Fr) (7.7.43) and on July 7 1943 he was posted to 3 FIS but rejoined 307 Squadron on September 15. Rested from operations, Beda moved to HQ 216 Group. He went on to transport duties, when he joined 301 Squadron on April 28 1945. On January 24 1946 he was posted to 304 Squadron. Beda left the PAF in December 1946 and went to the USA. He later moved to Canada, where he died in 1960.

Beggs entered the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on May 1 1939, with the rank of Acting Sub-Lieutenant. He carried out his elementary flying training at 24 EFTS, Sydenham Belfast and was at No 1 FTS, Leuchars from November 6 1939 to April 21 1940, on No 6 Course. He was attached to the RAF on June 15 1940, sent to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 17th, converted to Hurricanes and joined 151 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on July 1. Beggs probably destroyed a Ju 88 on August 5 and destroyed a Bf 109 of 4/JG 52 over Kent on August 14. The next day he was shot down, in Hurricane P 3605, in combat with Bf 109s over Dover and crashed at Shorncliffe, wounded. He was attached to RAF North Weald as non-effective sick. After recovery, Beggs joined 46 Squadron at North Weald in early December 1940. He moved to 29 Squadron on January 15 1941. He returned to the FAA shortly afterwards. In January 1942 Beggs was posted to 883 Squadron (FAA) and he was lost when HMS Avenger was sunk on November 15 1942. He was 25 and is remembered on the Fleet Air Arm, Lee-on-Solent Memorial, Bay 3, Panel 1.

PO 1.6.42 FO 1.6.43 FL 1.6.44

ERNEST HORACE BEE 751768 Sgt Air Gunner

British

29 Squadron

Bee joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. Called up on September 1, he trained as an Air Gunner. He joined 29 Squadron on May 17 1940.

APO 25.1.37 Acting Sub-Lt 1.5.39 Sub-Lt 14.3.40 Lt 1.11.41

MARIAN BELC P 1901 Sgt Pilot

Just before midnight on June 18, flying in a Blenheim piloted by Pilot Officer J D Humphreys, Bee was involved in the destruction of a He 111 off the Norfolk coast. He was one of the crew of Blenheim K 7135, flying off the East Coast on October 13, when they were attacked at dusk by Hurricanes of 312 Squadron. Although the aircraft was damaged, the pilot returned to base at Ternhill. Another Blenheim of 29 was not so lucky. It was shot down and the crew killed. Bee was posted away from 29 Squadron on March 22 1941 and nothing further of his war service is known. He left the RAF after the war as a Warrant Officer and died in 1987.

ALFRED FRANCIS BEECHEY 113913 Sgt Air Gunner British

151 Squadron

Polish

303 Squadron

Born in Poland on January 27 1914, Belc was in the PAF before the war. He began flying training in 1935 and after qualifying in 1936, he joined 143 Eskadra at Mysliwska. When the unit was disbanded in 1937, he went to 152 Eskadra at Wilno. He was still with 152 in September 1939 and on the 3rd he destroyed a Bf 110. When Poland fell, he escaped to Romania and later to France. He joined l’Armée de l’Air and served with Groupe de Chasse II/ 1, flying Morane 406s. After the fall of France Belc escaped to England arriving there on June 22 1940 and was enlisted into the RAFVR (793344). He went to the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool, to await a posting. Belc joined 303 Squadron, when it was formed at Northolt on August 2. After a routine training flight on the 8th, he crashed on landing, in Hurricane R 4100. Belc was taken off flying for a while. Belc’s first operational sortie was made on September 15 and his first victory was a Bf 109, claimed on the 26th. On October 5 he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on the 7th a Bf 109. In late 1940 he was sent to the Cadet Officers’ School and after being commissioned in May 1941, he rejoined 303 Squadron. Belc was awarded the KW (1.2.41). He shared in damaging a Ju 52, taxying on an aerodrome near St Inglevert, on May 15 1941, and on the same sortie he damaged a minelayer and another vessel. He claimed a Bf 109 on June 24 1941 and another on the 28th. He was awarded a Bar to

141 Squadron

Beechey joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/ AG. (746873) He was called up on September 1. With his training completed, he joined 141 Squadron, as an Air Gunner, and served with it in the Battle of Britain. Beechey was posted away from 141 on August 2 1941, to 410 (RCAF) Squadron, newly-formed at Ayr. He was commissioned from Flight Sergeant in December 1941 and posted to Bomber Command in 1942. He was awarded the DFC (12.1.43) and at that time was acting as Gunnery Leader with 101 Squadron, operating in Lancasters from Holme-on-Spalding Moor, Yorkshire. Beechey was released from the RAF in 1946 but rejoined

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Bell flew his first operational sortie on October 5 and on the 9th he crashed on landing at St Eval, in Spitfire R 6621, following the destruction of a Do 17 off Newquay. On March 2 1941 Bell was reported ‘Missing’, still with 234. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 39.

the KW (15.7.41) and the VM (5th Class) (10.9.41). Belc’s final victory was a Bf 109, claimed on October 24 1941. He was posted away to 58 OTU, Grangemouth in late April 1942. Belc later went to 3 Flying Instructors’ School at Baladown, Gloucestershire for a course. On August 27 1942 he was flying dual with another trainee, in Master W 8664 when they made too low an approach. The plane crashed on Babdown Farm and both men were killed. Belc is buried in Northwood Cemetery. He was awarded the DFC (15.11.42) and a further two Bars to the KW (31.10.47).

DEREK BELL 621608 Sgt Air Gunner

British

23 Squadron

PO 21.5.41 Bell, of South Shields, Co Durham, joined the RAF in September 1938, as an Aircrafthand. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. After training, he joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston.

LAWRENCE GEORGE BELCHEM 26172 SL Pilot British 264 Squadron

In the early hours of June 18 1940 Bell, flying in a Blenheim piloted by Flight Lieutenant R M B D Duke-Woolley, was involved in the destruction of a He 111 near Sheringham, Norfolk. Bell was killed on December 27 1941, serving with 50 Squadron, operating in Hampden bombers from Skellingthorpe, Lincolnshire. His aircraft had taken off from Wick to support the Vaagso commando operation and was shot down by flak. The pilot was picked up by a British ship. Bell was 23 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 39.

Belchem went to Crewkerne School. He entered RAF College, Cranwell in September 1928, as a Flight Cadet. He graduated on December 20 1930, with a Permanent Commission, and was posted to 19 Squadron at Duxford. On June 4 1933 Belchem went to 204 (Flying Boat) Squadron at Plymouth. He moved to 3 FTS, Grantham on July 3 1934, as an instructor. He went for a course to RAF Gosport on September 1 1935 and on October 23 1936 Belchem joined 824 (Fleet SpotterReconnaissance) Squadron, based on HMS Hermes in the Far East. On December 9 1938 Belchem was flying a Magister from the station flight at Linton-onOuse when the aircraft suffered engine failure. It was wrecked in the resultant forcedlanding. Belchem went to 5 OTU on June 7 1940 for a refresher course. He flew only one operational sortie during the Battle of Britain period, a convoy patrol with 264 Squadron on July 18 1940, with Sergeant A Berry as gunner. Belchem was not on the squadron strength. He was killed on July 14 1942, as a Squadron Leader with 119 Squadron, operating in Catalinas from Lough Erne. Belchem is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial.

JOHN SWIFT BELL 90051 FO Pilot British

Bell was commissioned in the Special Reserve of the RAF Reserve on April 22 1935. He resigned his commission on conversion of the Special Reserve to the Auxiliary Air Force on May 1 1936 and was commissioned in 503 Squadron AAF at Waddington on the same day. On November 1 1938 503 was disbanded.

PO 20.12.30 FO 20.6.32 FL 1.4.36 SL 1.12.38

Bell relinquished his Special Reserve commission in 503 and was then commissioned in Class ‘A’ of the AAF Reserve of Officers. He joined 616 Squadron on being mobilised on August 24 1939. Over Dunkirk on June 1 1940, he destroyed a Bf 109 and was then himself shot down into the sea and picked up by the Royal Navy. In the late evening of the 19th Bell intercepted and probably damaged a He 115 near Hull, which jettisoned its bombs. On July 1 he shared in destroying a He 111 E of Spurn Head. On August 25 Bell probably destroyed a Bf 109. On the 30th he was shot down in a head-on attack on Bf 109s over West Malling. His Spitfire, X 4248, crashed and burned out and Bell was killed. He was 23 and is buried in St Peter’s Cemetery, Lincoln.

ROBERT WILFRED GARTH BELEY 43022 PO Pilot Canadian 151 Squadron Beley was born in Nelson, British Columbia on December 13 1919 and moved with his family to Rossland, British Columbia, in 1923. He was provisionally selected by an RCAF Board for a short service commission in the RAF in 1939. He began his flying training on September 25. He went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on March 25 1940, on No 46 Course. After completing his training, Beley joined 151 Squadron at North Weald from 2 FTS on July 14. He was attached to the North Weald Sector Training Flight, to convert to Hurricanes. He rejoined 151 and was declared operational on August 2, when, with three other pilots, he was sent on forward deployment to Rochford. They were not scrambled from there and later returned to North Weald. In an action with Bf 109s off Ramsgate on August 12, Beley was shot down, in Hurricane P 3304, and crashed into the sea. He was rescued but died of his wounds at RAF Manston. Beley was 20 and is buried in Margate Cemetery, Kent.

PO (RAFR) 22.4.35 FO (AAF) 24.8.39

PO (AAF) 1.5.36

RALPH BELL 565216 Sgt Air Gunner

British

FO (AAF) 20.7.37

FO (AAFRO) 1.11.38

219 Squadron

Bell joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in January 1931 and passed out in December 1933. He later remustered as an Air Gunner.

APO 23.3.40 PO 13.7.40

CHARLES ALGERNON BELL 76595 PO Air Gunner British

He was with 219 Squadron at Catterick in June 1940. On August 2 1940 he was crew in Blenheim L 8962, which overshot the runway at RAF Leeming during a practise landing, not using flaps. The pilot, Pilot Officer W G M Lambie, deliberately raised the undercarriage to avoid running on to the Great North Road. Both men were unhurt. Bell was still with 219 in November 1940. Nothing further is known of his RAF service. He died on September 17 2005.

29 Squadron

Bell was commissioned in the RAFVR in December 1939, as a direct-entry Air Gunner. With gunnery training completed, he had joined 29 Squadron at Digby before April 4 1940.

DAVID BASIL BELL-SALTER 41895 PO Pilot British 253 Squadron

On September 6 he was involved in a car accident, with Pilot Officers A S Steele and J R D Braham. There is no further information on Bell, except for the fact that his commission was terminated on December 9 1940, reason unknown.

Bell-Salter was granted a short service commission in the RAF. He began his ab initio course at 11 E&RFTS, Perth on February 6 1939, as a pupil pilot.

APO 30.12.39 PO 26.2.40

CHARLES HENRY BELL 754849 Sgt Pilot British

616 Squadron

He went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on April 15 for a short induction course and moved on to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on May 1, on No 39 Course. With training completed, Bell-Salter joined the newlyformed 253 Squadron at Manston on November 6 1939. He became ill on the 27th and was admitted to Princess Mary’s RAF Hospital at Halton. On December 23 1939 Bell-Salter was posted from 253 to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, as non-effective sick, with effect

234 Squadron

Bell joined the RAFVR in August 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot, and was called up at the outbreak of war. He did his elementary flying training at 32 EFTS and moved on to 5 FTS, Sealand on June 16 1940, on No 49 Course. With training completed on September 7, Bell was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden, where he converted to Spitfires before joining 234 Squadron at St Eval on September 29.

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Home again in 1948, Benn was posted to a Radar/Signals Unit at Chicksands, to RAF Luqa, Malta in 1949, returned to the UK in 1952 and was discharged to pension on October 16 1954 as a Warrant Officer. He was employed by Orient Line. He died on February 2 2005.

from November 27. He rejoined 253 Squadron on January 13 1940. He was sent to France, with ‘A’ Flight of 253, on May 18, to Poix. On this day Bell-Salter destroyed a Fi 156 Storch. Later the same day he was reported ‘Missing’ and he rejoined the Flight on the 22nd. On the 24th he destroyed a Hs 126 and the Flight was withdrawn to Kirton-in-Lindsey. On September 2 1940 Bell-Salter was shot down in a combat over the Sussex coast. He attempted to get out of his cockpit but he was flying without gloves and, with his hood open, his hands were too cold to pull out the harness pin. Down to 1500 feet, he finally managed it and shot out by kicking his feet on the floor. The aircraft, being in a full-throttle dive, made the airflow such as to render him unconscious as he went through it. Bell-Salter came to at only 100 feet from the ground, hanging upside down by one leg with a single rigging line caught behind his knee. The parachute was torn across and flapping and his harness was completely off and hanging beside him. On hitting the ground Bell-Salter passed out again. He sustained several badly-crushed vertebrae, both shoulders were dislocated, one knee was broken and his right heel smashed. He was admitted to Rye Hospital. Bell-Salter was posted from 253 Squadron on October 5 1940 to RAF Kenley, as noneffective sick, with effect from September 2. He was in various hospitals for several months. In June 1941 Bell-Salter was instructing at 53 OTU, Heston. He was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1998. APO 15.4.39 PO 6.11.39

FO 6.11.40

CLARENCE CHARLES BENNETT 42097 PO Pilot Australian 248 Squadron Bennett was born at Mallala, South Australia on November 28 1916. He was educated at Kapunda High School and was employed by the railways as a junior clerk. He became interested in flying and in 1936 joined the Adelaide Gliding Club. He took flying lessons at Mount Gambier in 1937. After applying for an RAF short service commission, Bennett was provisionally accepted in December 1938. He sailed for England on February 2 1939 and began his ab initio training on March 13 1939, as a pupil pilot. With training completed, he joined 248 Squadron on November 6 1939, when it was reformed at Hendon. It was then a fighter squadron but in February 1940 it was transferred to Coastal Command. Bennett went to the Blind Approach Training Unit at Boscombe Down on May 13 1940, on No 18 Course. He rejoined 248 0n the 25th. On September 28 Bennett engaged and damaged a Do 18 flying boat over the North Sea. His aircraft was hit by return fire and Bennett and his observer, Sergeant G S Clarke, were slightly wounded. With a fuel tank damaged, Bennett headed rapidly for home. It transpired that the enemy aircraft landed on the sea and was abandoned by its crew before it sank. Bennett failed to return from a reconnaissance operation to the Norwegian coast on October 1 1940, in Blenheim R 3626. He and his crew, Sergeants Clarke and G B Brash, Wop/AG, were reported ‘Missing’. All three men are remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 12.

FL 6.11.41

HOWARD JOHN BELL-WALKER 103515 Sgt Pilot British 64 and 72 Squadrons Bell-Walker was born on August 7 1920 in Birmingham and educated at Rynaby School, Banbury and Bloxham School. He joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748216), and began training at 8 E&RFTS, Woodley. He was called up in November 1939 and went to 7 EFTS, Desford. On April 11 1940 he was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill, on No 19 Course. He was awarded his flying badge in June and the course ended on July 24 1940. Bell-Walker went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on August 3, converted to Spitfires and joined 64 Squadron at Leconfield on the 19th. He moved to 72 Squadron at Croydon on September 11. On the 14th he baled out, unhurt, following a combat over Ashford. His Spitfire, K 9960, crashed and burned out at Orlestone. Four days later Bell-Walker was shot down in a surprise attack by Bf 109s during a squadron patrol over Gravesend. He was seriously wounded and in hospital for some time. On November 25 1940 Bell-Walker rejoined 64 Squadron, at Kenley. In early 1941 he was posted to 602 Squadron at Prestwick and was commissioned in August. On August 12 1941 he took part in a Blenheim escort to Lille, flying as No 2 to the CO, Squadron Leader A C Deere. The squadron was surprised by Bf 109s and Bell-Walker was shot down, before he could break away. He baled out, wounded and was captured. At some time Bell-Walker was held in Stalag Luft 3 (Pow No 9664). He stayed on in the RAF after the war, transferred into the Engineering Branch and was made an MBE (30.4.54). Bell-Walker retired on December 1 1967 as a Squadron Leader. He later went to live in Canada.

APO 13.5.39 PO 6.11.39

HECTOR ERNEST BENNETT 758075 Sgt Pilot British 43 Squadron Bennett joined the RAFVR around July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1, did his elementary flying at No 1 EFTS, Hatfield and completed his training at 9 FTS, Hullavington, on No 20 Course, which ran from June 9 to September 7 1940. He went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on September 7 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 43 Squadron at Usworth on the 28th. Bennett moved to 249 Squadron at North Weald on November 10 1940 and then to 17 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on the 16th. He was posted to 257 Squadron, also at Martlesham, on the 28th and joined it on December 5. His final move was to 145 Squadron at Tangmere, which he joined on December 21 1940. Bennett was killed on February 4 1941, in Oxford P 1081 of CFS, when he crashed on approach to Alton Barnes. He was 22. Bennett was cremated at Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bristol.

PO 7.8.41 FO 7.8.42 FL 7.8.43 FL 30.5.48 SL 1.1.56

GORDON WILLIAM BENN 513418 Sgt Air Gunner British

219 Squadron GEOFFREY RYDING BENNETTE 42387 PO Pilot British 17 Squadron

Joined the RAF on October 16 1930 at the age of 18, as an Aircrafthand. After three months of training at Uxbridge, Benn was posted to a Vimy bomber squadron at Hawkinge.

Bennette was born on June 8 1917 in Birkenhead, the son of a dentist. He was educated at Birkenhead Preparatory School and went to Park High School in January 1930. The family moved south in July and Bennette completed his education at Wellington County School for Boys in Surrey.

In July 1931 he went to 423 Flight, HMS Furious, with Fairey Flycatchers. The unit was transferred in 1932 to HMS Courageous, Mediterranean Fleet. Benn left the FAA in 1933 and went to RAF Gosport, then on to HMS Hornet, a Repair Unit for Air-Sea Rescue vessels. In 1935 he was in 28 Squadron, Ambala, as a trainee air gunner. He served on the North-West Frontier and got the India General Service Medal in 1937. Benn returned to the UK in January 1938 and joined 217 Squadron as a Corporal Air Gunner, flying in Ansons. At the outbreak of war he was posted to 219 Squadron, then being reformed at Catterick. He flew with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain and on October 25 1940 he shot down a Do 17. After flying operationally for three years, Benn came off in 1942 and went to 53 MU, Charlwood, a depot supplying bombs to the squadrons on a 24 hour basis. In August 1945 Benn went to Singapore with 5353 Airfield Construction Wing, to build metal runways at Changi. After this he joined 314 MU at Seletar, where fourteen RAF men, with the aid of two hundred Japanese PoWs, were dismantling or disposing of Japanese bombs.

He entered the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio training on June 2 1939, as a pupil pilot. With training completed, Bennette arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on April 6 1940, converted to Hurricanes, and joined 17 Squadron at Debden on May 6. On July 9 he shared in the destruction of a He 111. He was posted away to 6 OTU on October 16 1940, as an instructor. Bennette was reported ‘Missing’ after operations over the English Channel on August 19 1942 as a Flight Lieutenant with 245 Squadron. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 65. APO 5.8.39 PO 6.4.40 FO 6.4.41 FL 6.4.42

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GEORGE HERMAN BENNIONS 43354 PO Pilot British 41 Squadron

With his tour completed, Bennison returned to the UK in October 1943, where he was posted to an instructor’s course at 62 OTU, Ouston. In January 1944 he went to 51 OTU, Cranfield, as an instructor, and was commissioned in February. Repatriated to New Zealand in early June, he went on to the Reserve on September 22 1944. He joined the Active Reserve at its inception in 1949, with his original number of 130806, and continued to do so until transferred to the General Reserve on December 31 1969. He was awarded the Air Efficiency Medal and two clasps. Bennison died on April 30 2011.

Born at Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent on March 15 1913, Bennions went to Longton High School. He joined the RAF at Halton in January 1929, as an Aircraft Apprentice (563057). He passed out as an LAC Engine Fitter in December 1931.

PO 26.2.44 FO 27.2.56

Later recommended for a cadetship at RAF College, Cranwell, Bennions did his ab initio flying training there but the cadetship did not materialise. Bennions later applied for pilot training, was accepted and in 1935 he continued his flying training at 3 FTS, Grantham. After qualifying in January 1936, he joined 41 Squadron at Khormaksar, Aden, as a Sergeant-Pilot. Promoted to Flight Sergeant in November 1938, Bennions was commissioned in April 1940. In June he was detached to the School of Air Navigation, St Athan, for a course. He rejoined 41, then based at Catterick, on the 30th. On July 28 and 29 1940 he claimed Bf 109s destroyed. On the 29th Bennions was himself shot down over Dover and he made a crash-landing at Manston with damaged flaps, in Spitfire N 3264. On August 15 Bennions claimed a Bf 110 and another damaged, on September 5 a Ju 88 destroyed, a Bf 109 probably destroyed and a Ju 88 damaged. On the 6th he claimed two Bf 109s shot down and on the 7th his undercarriage collapsed on landing at Rochford after combat, in which he probably destroyed a Bf 109. Another Bf 109 was claimed on the 9th and he damaged a Bf 110 on the 11th. On this day Bennions landed at Hornchurch, with a shell splinter in his heel. A Bf 109 was claimed as destroyed and a Do 17 damaged on the 15th, a Bf 109 shot down on the 17th and a Bf 109 destroyed, two more probably destroyed and one damaged on the 18th. Bennions destroyed another Bf 109 on the 23rd, probably two more on the 28th probably another on the 30th and his final victory, another Bf 109, came on October 1 1940. On this day, in combat with Bf 109s over Henfield, Bennions had a cannon shell explode in his cockpit, blinding him in one eye and wounding his right arm and leg. He baled out, landing at Dunstalls Farm, and after emergency treatment at Horsham Hospital, he was transferred to Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead. His Spitfire, X 4559, crashed on Heatenthorn Farm, Alborne. Bennions underwent plastic surgery by Archie McIndoe and became a Guinea Pig. His DFC (1.10.40) was gazetted on the day he was shot down. When fully recovered, Bennions was anxious to fly again and after a test at CFS he was given an A2B non-operational category, which allowed him to fly only by day and with a passenger, who could look out. In 1943 Bennions was posted to North Africa, where he was appointed Liaison Officer to an American Fighter Group, which had recently received Spitfires. In Sicily he flew Spitfires on convoy patrols but took no part in combat. In October 1943 Bennions was commanding a Ground Control Interception unit. He suffered shrapnel wounds, when the landing craft he was in, at Ajaccio, Corsica, was sunk by enemy action. He returned to the UK and was once again a patient at East Grinstead. After release from the RAF in 1946, as a Squadron Leader, Bennions became a school teacher. He died on January 30 2004.

JAMES GHILLIES BENSON 81365 PO Pilot British 141 Squadron Benson was born on July 17 1914 in London. He was educated at Westminster School and worked for Esso Petroleum Ltd in the years before the war. In early June 1939 Benson joined the RAFVR (754580) and did his weekend flying at 15 E&RFTS, Redhill. Called up on September 1, he went to No 1 ITW, Cambridge on the 18th, moving on to 6 EFTS, Sywell on October 21 and then to 8 FTS, Montrose on March 7 1940. With training completed, Benson was commissioned and posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 7 1940. He converted to Defiants and joined 141 Squadron at Prestwick on the 24th. The squadron was still recovering from its heavy daylight losses off Folkestone five days earlier. In a night-fighting role and operating from Gravesend, 141 was more successful and on December 23 1940 he destroyed a He 111 at 06.05 hrs, which crashed at Underwoods House, Etchingham. After being posted away from 141 early in 1941, Benson went to an Operational Conversion Unit in Scotland before joining 62 OTU, as an instructor. In October 1941 he rejoined 141 Squadron and teamed up with Lewis Brandon, to form a highly successful partnership which, except for a five month break in 1943, was to go on until they came off operations in January 1945. Their first victory was a Do 217 on February 15 1942 and on June 4 they probably destroyed a Do 217 and damaged another. On July 17 1942 both men were sent to 62 OTU, Usworth, as instructors. They were each awarded the DFC (2.10.42). They moved to 54 OTU, Charter Hall on October 27, to instruct. A return to operations for them came on February 16 1943, with a posting to 157 Squadron at Castle Camps. On April 15 Benson and Brandon destroyed a Do 217 at night and on an intruder patrol on July 3, over St Trond airfield, they shot down another Do 217. In early August 1943 Brandon was posted away but he rejoined 157, then at Predannack, in January 1944. Reunited, Benson and Brandon destroyed a Ju 188 on June 12 and in the next five weeks they shot down six V1s at night. In July Benson was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and appointed a Flight Commander. The final months of 1944 were very successful, with two Ju 188s shot down on September 11/12, a Ju 88 damaged on the 13/14, a Ju 88 destroyed on November 10/11, a Ju 88 damaged on December 17/18, another damaged on the 23/24th and a Bf 110 destroyed on the 24/25th. Both men were awarded Bars to the DFC (20.10.44). Their final victory was a He 219 on January 5/6 1945. Benson was posted to Great Massingham on January 21 1945, as a Wing Commander, to form and command 1692 Bomber Support Training Unit. Brandon went with him as CGI with the rank of Squadron Leader. Benson was awarded the DSO (13.3.45) and released from the RAF in October. He returned to Esso, as an Aviation Manager. He served with 613 Squadron, RAuxAF and continued to fly with it and Esso in the 1950s. Benson died on July 12 1987.

PO 1.4.40 FO 1.4.41 FL 1.6.42

ALAN BENNISON 40601 Sgt Air Gunner

New Zealander

25 Squadron

Bennison was born in Ashburton on March 5 1918 and educated at the Hampstead School and the Technical School there. He volunteered for aircrew duties in early 1939 but was not called up until February 13 1940 (130806).

PO 6.7.40 FO 6.7.41 FL 6.7.42 SL 20.4.45 FO (AAF) 21.1.47

NOEL JOHN VICTOR BENSON 33485 PO Pilot British 603 Squadron

After completing his initial training, Bennison sailed for the UK, arriving on June 8. He was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 17, for further training and, after being awarded his Air Gunner’s badge, he joined 25 Squadron at North Weald on September 21 1940. From October the squadron began to receive Beaufighters, equipped with radar. Bennison remustered as a Radar Operator (Air) in late December 1940 and, after a navigation course at Cranage, he became a Navigator Radar in July 1941. Bennison was posted to 89 Squadron, then forming at Colerne, in October 1941. The squadron flew to the Middle East, as two flights, in November. As well as night defence of the Delta, 89 Squadron also flew long day patrols over the Mediterranean, searching for FW Kondors, which were preying on Allied shipping. In August 1942 Bennison was posted to India but he fell sick and remained at Air HQ Middle East, on Operations Room duties. He rejoined 89 in February 1943 but went to 46 Squadron at Edku on April 13.

Born on December 11 1918 at Great Ouseburn, Yorkshire, Benson went to Sedbergh School. He entered RAF College, Cranwell on April 28 1938, as a Flight Cadet. After the outbreak of war, Cranwell cadets who had not completed their courses were enlisted in the RAF on September 7 1939 as Airmen u/t Pilots and each given an airman number. Benson (581680) graduated at Cranwell on October 23, with a Permanent Commission. He immediately went to 11 Group Fighter Pool, St Athan, converted to Blenheims and joined 145 Squadron at Croydon on October 30. He joined ‘A’ Flight, 603 Squadron at Prestwick on December 16 1939. Benson was still with 603 in July 1940. On

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HUGH RICHARD ADEN BERESFORD 37150 FL Pilot British 257 Squadron

the 23rd he shared in the destruction of a Do 17. His Spitfire, N 3229, was hit by return fire and his starboard undercarriage leg collapsed on landing and the aircraft tipped up. On August 27 603 went south to Hornchurch. Next day Benson was shot down in combat with Bf 109s and killed, when he crashed in flames on Great Hay Farm, Leigh Green, Tenterden, Kent. He was 21 and is buried in the extension to St Mary’s churchyard, Great Ouseburn. Benson’s brother, Captain Brian Joseph Nodder Benson, Royal Corps of Signals, was killed on April 15 1945 and is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany.

Born at Ampthill, Bedfordshire in 1915, Beresford was the son of the Rector of Hoby, Leicestershire. He joined the RAF on a short service commission in February 1935 and after completing his training, he was posted to 3 Squadron at Port Sudan on March 6 1936. Beresford returned to the UK with the squadron in August 1936 and on April 1 1937 he was posted to the staff of No 1 Anti-Aircraft Co-operation Unit at Biggin Hill. On October 4 he was appointed Personal Assistant to the AOC 11 Group. On May 14 1940 Beresford was posted from 11 Group. He was briefly attached to CFS for a short refresher course, after which he joined the newly-reformed 257 Squadron at Hendon, as a Flight Commander, on May 17. Beresford probably destroyed a Bf 110 on August 12, shared in destroying a He 111 on the 18th and claimed a Bf 110 on the 31st. In Hurricane P 3049, Beresford was shot down in combat over the Thames Estuary on September 7 1940. The aircraft crashed at Elmley, Spitend Point, Sheppey and he was reported ‘Missing’. Excavations in 1979 revealed that his remains were still in the cockpit. He was buried at Brookwood Military Cemetery on November 16 1979 with full military honours. Beresford was 24 when he was killed.

PO 23.10.39

BENJAMIN BENT 52078 Sgt Radar Operator

British

25 Squadron

Bent was born on August 22 1919 at Coatbridge, Scotland. He joined the RAF on November 8 1937, as an Aircraft hand (545819) and began a Wireless Operator course at No 1 Electrical and Wireless School at Cranwell in February 1938. The course ended in November and Bent was posted to Biggin Hill on January 9 1939. In June 1940 he volunteered for aircrew duties and he joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on August 6. Bent was detached to 604 Squadron at Middle Wallop on the 31st, for AI training, after which he rejoined 25 Squadron. Bent began operational night-flying, as an LAC, but without a flying badge. On September 27 1940 he was promoted to Sergeant, with the category of Wireless Operator

APO 16.4.35 PO 16.4.36 FO 16.1.38 FL 16.1.40

VACLAV BERGMAN 81884 PO Pilot Czechoslovakian

(Air). On his first operational tour Bent assisted in five successful night interceptions, all with Squadron Leader H P Pleasance, in Beaufighters. On the night of May 4/5 1941 they intercepted and damaged an unidentified enemy aircraft, on the 7/8th and 8/9th two Do 17s were destroyed, on the 11/12th a He 111 was damaged and during the night of June 13/14 a Ju 88 was destroyed. Bent remustered as a Radio Observer on July 10 1941. Tour expired, he was posted to 54 OTU, Charter Hall on April 29 1942 as an instructor. On July 23 Bent was reclassified as a Navigator Radio and he rejoined 25 Squadron, then at Church Fenton, on September 8 1942 for his second tour. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in April 1943. On March 21 1944 he assisted in destroying two Ju 88s and at 00.43 hrs on June 6 a Bf 110 over the North Sea, possibly the first enemy aircraft shot down on D-Day. Awarded the DFC (26.5.44), Bent finished his tour in July and then served as Night Fighter Liaison Officer in France, with P 61 Squadron, USAAF. Bent was released from the RAF on February 2 1947 as a Flight Lieutenant. He rejoined on October 4 1950, on a short service commission in the Fighter Control Branch. Granted a Permanent Commission on April 1 1952, Bent retired from the RAF at his own request on December 5 1970 as a Flight Lieutenant.

310 Squadron

Bergman was born on August 27 1915 at Domousice/Louny, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He was educated at Rakovnik Grammar School, and joined the Czech Air Force in 1935.

Benzie carried out further training there, on Hurricanes, was posted to 242 Squadron on January 26 1940 and joined it on February 3 at Church Fenton. He went to France with the squadron on May 16. On the 23rd he was attacked by Bf 109s near Ypres. He baled out S of Dunkirk, wounded, was evacuated to England by sea and admitted to the RAF Officers’ Hospital, Torquay. Benzie rejoined 242 on July 11. He did a short parachute course at 8 S of TT, Weeton, Lancashire from August 2. He failed to return from a combat over the Thames Estuary on September 7 1940. He was 25 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7. Benzie Lake, Manitoba, Canada, was named in his honour in 1953. Research led to an aircraft crash site being excavated more than once at Theydon Bois, Essex, which was thought to be his. An oxygen mask connector with “BENZIE” scratched on it was among items discovered. However, the evidence was officially ruled inconclusive and the human remains found were buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery as ‘An Unknown Pilot’.

With training completed at the Military Air School at Prostejov, he joined the Observation Flight of the 1st Air Regiment at Cheb on July 1 1936. Bergman underwent further training at the Military Academy at Hranice na Morave and graduated as a fighter pilot. On June 3 1938 he joined the Fighter Flight of the 4th Air Regiment at Prague/Kbely airfield. After the Germans marched into Czechoslovakia on March 15 1939, Bergman was demobilised on the 17th and went to work for the Avia Aircraft Company in Prague/Letnany. On June 17 he fled to Poland and reached France in July. After the outbreak of war, Bergman joined l’Armée de L’Air. He did a conversion course on to French fighter aircraft and was posted to the Escadrille Legere, flying in defence of Chartres. When France fell, he went to England on the MS Karanan, was commissioned in the RAFVR and on July 12 1940 he joined 310 Squadron, then being formed at Duxford. The squadron became operational on August 18. Bergman was shot down on the 26th, attacking Do 17s over Clacton. He baled out, slightly wounded. His Hurricane, P3960, crashed and burned out at Rumbolds Farm, Goldsands, Southminster. In September, Bergman destroyed a Bf 110 on the 9th and shared a Ju 88 on the 18th. He shared in probably destroying a Ju 88 on October 28. Bergman probably destroyed a Ju 88 on August 13 1941. He was appointed a Flight Commander in April 1942 and on June 5 he damaged a FW 190. He completed his tour in October 1942. On January 1 1943 Bergman joined 313 Squadron at Churchstanton, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. In September 1943 he was posted to Czech Air Force HQ in London. He rejoined 313 Squadron, then at Ibsley, on January 31 1944, as Commanding Officer. He was posted away on May 22 to 19 Sector, 2nd TAF. He was awarded the DFC (3.7.44). In February 1945 Bergman was sent for a course to the War College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, after which he returned to London in June and went to RAF Staff College at Gerrards Cross. Bergman returned to Czechoslovakia in February 1946 and was given command of the 2nd Air Regiment (Fighter) at Ceske Budejovice. He joined the Staff of the Czech Air Force on April 15 but, after the Communist coup in 1948, he was discharged on June 1. In September 1948 Bergman fled again to England and rejoined the RAF. He retrained as a flying boat pilot and joined 209 Squadron at Seletar, Singapore, flying Sunderlands. He flew operationally in Malaya and Korea and received a Mention in Despatches (21.3.52) for service in Malaya and was awarded a Bar to the DFC (24.4.53). He was in the Aircraft Control Branch, when he retired on April 30 1969 as a Squadron Leader. Bergman died in Dumbarton, Scotland on December 31 2002.

APO 24.6.39 PO 9.12.39

PO 12.7.40 SL 1.1.63

PO 24.4.43 FO 24.10.43 FL 24.4.45 FO 23.12.47 FL 27.5.54

JOHN BENZIE 42185 PO Pilot

Canadian

242 Squadron

Benzie was born in Winnipeg on March 14 1915 and graduated from St John’s Technical High School. He served in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry before joining the RAF on a short service commission. He began his training on May 1 1939, as a pupil pilot, and on completion, he went to 11 Group Pool, Aston Down on December 28.

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THOMAS COLQHOUN EDMONDS BERKLEY 754377 Sgt Pilot British 85 Squadron

BRONISLAW BERNAS 76820 PO Pilot Polish

302 Squadron

Berkley, from Tullahogue, Co Tyrone, was in the RAFVR from about June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1, went to ITW, then completed his elementary flying training and was posted to 14 FTS, Kinloss on April 28 1940, on No 7 Course.

Born in Lwow on August 6 1906, Bernas qualified for an engineering degree in the University there. In 1929 he learned to fly and from September 1931 to August 1932 Bernas was at the Polish Air Force Officers’ School at Deblin. He took part in annual exercises from 1932.

He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on August 3 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 85 Squadron at Croydon on September 2. In early 1941 the squadron was a night-fighter unit, equipped with Hurricanes, Defiants and Havocs. On the night of April 16, Berkley damaged a He 111, one of some 700 bombers attacking London. On a night sortie on June 14 1941, Berkley was shot down in a Havoc over the Thames Estuary. He and his radar operator were both reported ‘Missing’. Berkley was 23. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 35.

Bernas was called up on August 24 1939 and fought in Poland until September 17, escaping then and going to France. He finally reached England on April 9 1940 and he was commissioned in the RAFVR in early May. After spells at RAF Eastchurch and at the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool, Bernas was posted to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum on August 23. He was on the 5th Polish Pilots’ Course, for testing and grading. At the end of the short course, he was posted to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on September 1, for conversion to Hurricanes. On the 23rd Bernas joined 302 Squadron at Leconfield. Over Selsey Bill on March 13 1941, he shared in damaging a Ju 88. He was posted to 58 OTU, Grangemouth on April 15, as an instructor. Bernas joined the newly-formed 288 (Anti-Aircraft Co-operation) Squadron at Digby on November 24 1941. He remained with the unit until August 4 1943, when he came off flying and joined 5010 Airfield Construction Squadron. Bernas spent the rest of his RAF service with the Directorate of Works and Airfield Construction. He married and remained in Britain after the war. He died in Folkestone on September 1 1980.

FRANTISEK ANTONIN BERNARD 120209 Sgt Pilot Czechoslovakian

310, 601 & 238 Sqdns

Bernard was born on July 23 1914 at Stary Ehrenberk, Sluknov, Czechoslovakia. He joined the NCO Military School at Chleb for training to become an aircraft mechanic in 1936. The following year he transferred to the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov for elementary flying training. He was selected for fighter pilot training and sent to the Military Academy at Hradce Hralove. When the Germans took over the country on March 15 1939 the Czech Air Force was disbanded and Bernard was demobilised on the 17th. On June 6 he fled to Poland and with other Czechoslovak airmen he sailed on the Kastelholm from Gdynia to France arriving on August 24 1939. In France he was required to enlist in the French Foreign Legion for five years, with the assurance that should war be declared he would be transferred to a French military unit. After war broke out he was transferred to l’Armée de l’Air and assigned to the Chartres airbase for retraining on French equipment. He was posted to GC II/2, at Chissey, on May 13 1940, which was equipped with ME406C aircraft. The rapid advance of German forces during the Battle of France caused the unit to move constantly to avoid capture; to Feurs on June 15 1940, St Etienne-Bouteon on June 16 1940, St Symphoroen d’Ozen on June 17 1940 and Montpellier-Frejorques on June 23 1940 followed by Perpignan. With the capitulation of France imminent, Bernard was released from service with l’Armee d l’Air and, with other Czechoslovak airmen, he made his way to Port Vendres from where he sailed on the General Chanza to Oran, Algeria. He then travelled by train to Casablanca, Morocco from where he sailed to Gibraltar. He changed ships and then arrived in England on July 12 1940 and joined the RAFVR (787543) on July 26 1940. Initially he was posted to the Czechoslovak Transit Camp at Cholmondeley with the rank of Sergeant from where he was transferred to the Czechoslovak Depot at Cosford. He joined 310 Squadron, newly-formed at Duxford, on August 6 1940. He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on August 17, with 19 other Czech pilots from Duxford for re-training on to Hurricane aircraft. After completing his training, Bernard joined 601 Squadron at Exeter on September 10. He moved to 238 Squadron at Chilbolton on October 28. He shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 with Flight Lieutenant E J Morris on March 23 1941. Whilst returning from a night patrol in Hurricane Z 5 222 on August 25 1941 he was unable to land at his home airfield at Fairwood Common due to the weather and was diverted to Angle airfield at Pembrey. The flarepath at Angle was still under construction and on landing in the dark his aircraft hit a steamroller which had been parked very close to the edge of the runway. No blame was attached to Bernard for this incident. Bernard was commissioned on April 9 1942 and, in December, having completed his operational tour, he was posted to 56 OTU as an instructor. On June 8 1942 he was posted to 3EFTS at Shellingford. He returned to operational duties on August 6 1942 with 313 Squadron. On June 22 1943 he was posted to 1648 Flight where he remained until March 1944 when he went to the Czechoslovak Inspectorate General (CIG). On May 22 1944 he was posted to 310 Squadron as Commander of ‘B’ Flight. He remained in this post until the end of the war. Bernard was released after the war and returned to Czechoslovakia in August 1945. Following the Communist takeover in February 1948, he escaped to the American Zone of Germany and travelled to England where he rejoined the RAF in 1950. He received a Mention in Despatches (6.3.56) for distinguished service in Kenya and was awarded the AFC (1.1.57). He retired on July 23 1964 as a Flight Lieutenant. In the same month Bernard emigrated to New Zealand where he died on June 17 1990.

PO 3.5.40

HORACE WALTER WILLIAM BERRIDGE 115634 Sgt Air Gunner British 219 Squadron Born in 1912, Berridge was in the printing business before the war. He joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (747743), and was called up on September 1. With training completed, he joined 219 Squadron at Catterick in September 1940. Next month the squadron began to convert to Beaufighters and he retrained as a Radar Operator, later becoming a Radio Observer. In late 1940 Berridge teamed up with Flying Officer J G Topham and so began a long and successful night-fighting partnership. On the night of March 13/14 1941 they destroyed a He 111, on June 13/14 they shot down an unidentified enemy aircraft over Worthing and on July 17/18 a Ju 88 over Tangmere. Berridge was commissioned in January 1942. During the night of April 25/26 he and Topham shot down a Do 17, on May 7/8 they destroyed a He 111 and on June 8/9 a Ju 88, which crashed into the sea at Nettlestone Point, Isle of Wight. Awarded the DFC (23.6.42), Berridge assisted in the destruction of a Do 217 on July 6/7, two more on the 25/26th and another on September 19/20, which crashed into the sea off Tynemouth. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (20.10.42). Topham and Berridge were rested after completing their first operational tour. In January 1943 Berridge was posted to 157 Squadron at Predannack and flew with the CO, Wing Commander V J Wheeler. In October 1943 Topham was given command of 125 Squadron at Exeter and he took Berridge with him, as his navigator. On the night of April 26/27 1944 they destroyed a Ju 188, two nights later a Ju 88, on May 27/28 they damaged a Me 410 off the Cherbourg Peninsula and on the night of June 18/19 they destroyed two Ju 88s, the team’s final victories. Berridge was awarded the DSO (17.8.45), being then credited with assisting in the destruction of at least twelve enemy aircraft. Berridge was released from the RAF in late 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1958. PO 5.1.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 5.1.44

ALAN BERRY 968035 Sgt Air Gunner

British

264 Squadron

Berry came from Longsight, Manchester. He joined the RAFVR at No 3 RAF Depot, Padgate in September 1939. He later volunteered for training as an Air Gunner. With training completed, he was with 264 Squadron in July 1940. The squadron, which had sustained heavy losses over Dunkirk, moved to Hornchurch on August 21 1940 for another try at day operations. On August 24 the squadron was refuelling at Manston when a force of enemy bombers

PO 9.04.42 FO ? FL 18.5.56

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He was awarded the DFC (25.10.40). On November 7 Berry shared a Bf 110, on the 8th damaged a Bf 109, on the 17th destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 23rd he shot down an Italian CR 42 and probably another. These biplane fighters were escorting bombers attacking coastal shipping. By January 1941 Berry was ‘A’ Flight Commander, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. When his operational tour ended in April, Berry went to Turnhouse on the 25th, as a Fighter Controller. In January 1942 he was given command of 81 Squadron. The pilots had just returned from Russia, leaving their aircraft there. In October the squadron sailed for Gibraltar, where it picked up tropical Spitfire Mark Vcs. On November 8 1942, the day of the landings in North Africa, 81 put in at Maison Blanche, probably the first Allied squadron to land. Next day Berry destroyed a Ju 88 and shared in destroying a Ju 88 and a He 111, on the 11th he damaged another Ju 88, on the 14th damaged a Mc 200, on the 26th damaged two Bf 109s and on the 28th shared another. Berry shared a FW 190 on December 3, destroyed another on the 6th and shot down a SM 79 on the 10th. He was promoted and appointed Wing Leader, 322 Wing on January 23 1943. The Wing was made up of 81, 152, 154, 232 and 242 Squadrons. He destroyed Bf 109s on January 31 and February 25, got a probable Bf 109 on March 2, damaged a FW 190 on April 3, damaged a Ju 87 on the 5th, probably destroyed a Bf 109 on the 13th, damaged Bf 109s on the 25th and 26th, destroyed a Ju 52 on the ground on May 6 and six Bf 109s on the ground next day. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (2.3.43), took command of 322 Wing on March 13 1943 and at the end of his operational tour he was awarded the DSO (1.6.43). Berry returned to the UK and on June 29 1943 he joined 53 OTU, Kirton-in-Lindsey, as OC Training Wing. He went to HQ ADGB in April 1944 and later took a course at the Army Staff College at Camberley. He commanded RAF Acklington in 1945/46, graduated from the Joint Services Staff College in 1955 and held a series of staff appointments in Fighter and Bomber Commands before his retirement on January 29 1969 as an Air Commodore. In 1965 he had taken part in Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral procession. Berry was made an OBE (1.1.46) and a CBE (1965). He died in September 2000.

was reported. The Defiants took off as the first bombs fell. Before they could form up, three were shot down by the fighter escort, Bf 109s from JG3. Berry’s aircraft, Defiant, L 7027, was one of the victims and he and his pilot, Flying Officer I G Shaw, were reported ‘Missing’. Berry was 23. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 12.

FREDERICK GEORGE BERRY 563426 F/Sgt Pilot British 1 Squadron Born on January 4 1914 at Fort William, Calcutta, Berry was the son of a physical training instructor of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. Mr Berry took up a post at the Victoria Boys’ School, set up in the hills to provide an English public school type of education for children in India with a British background. Berry was educated at the School. His father applied successfully for him to become an Aircraft Apprentice in the RAF and Berry sailed for England, reporting to the No 1 S of TT, Halton on August 27 1929. On completion of the course, Berry passed out, as an AC 1 Metal Rigger on August 19 1932. On his 18th birthday, January 4 1932, Berry had signed on for a 12 year engagement in the RAF. He was then posted to 5 FTS, Sealand, promoted to LAC in August 1933 and on March 27 1934 he went to ‘C’ Flight, 24 Squadron at Hendon. On January 21 1935 Berry returned to RAF Halton for further training and was remustered as a Fitter I on May 11 1936. He had earlier volunteered for pilot training, was selected and on July 6 1936 Berry was posted to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, moving to 9 FTS, Thornaby on the 18th for flying training. After qualifying, Berry was posted to 43 Squadron at Tangmere on February 21 1937 as a Sergeant-Pilot. He joined No 1 Squadron on August 29 1939 and went with it to France at the outbreak of war. Promoted to Flight Sergeant on April 1 1940, Berry probably destroyed a Bf 109 on April 20, destroyed a Bf 110 on June 4 and a He 111 on the 5th. On No 1’s final operational patrol in France on June 17 1940, Berry was leading a section over the docks at St Nazaire when He 111s came in at low level to attack troopships loading there. Berry led his section to attack but could not stop the leading bomber from scoring direct hits on the Lancastrian, setting it on fire and causing it to sink later with heavy casualties amongst the 4000 troops on board. Berry shot the He 111 down in flames into the river. For this action he was awarded the DFM (20.8.40). On August 16 1940 Berry probably destroyed two He 111s in the Portsmouth area. He was shot down and killed on September 1, in combat with Bf 109s. His Hurricane, P 3276, crashed at Brisley Farm, Ruckinge. He received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.41). Berry is buried in Pinner New Cemetery, Harrow, Middlesex.

RONALD BERRY 78538 PO Pilot British

PO 1.12.39 FO 1.12.40 FL 1.12.41 SL 23.2.43 SL 1.9.45 WC 1.7.52 GC 1.7.59 AC 1.1.66

ROBERT CHARLES BERWICK 745915 Sgt Wop/AG British 25 Squadron Berwick, from Manor Park, Essex, joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. With training completed, he was with 25 Squadron by April 11 1940, as an LAC. He was promoted to Sergeant in June and served in the Battle of Britain. In early 1941 he was posted to 78 Squadron at Dishforth, as a Flight Sergeant, to fly in Whitleys. His aircraft failed to return from a bombing operation to Bremen on June 19 1941. Berwick was 22. He is buried in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery.

CHARLES BEVERIDGE 54030 Sgt Air Gunner British

219 Squadron

Beveridge was born on June 7 1915. He joined the RAF, as an Aircrafthand, in August 1935 (522807). He later remustered for training as an Air Gunner. With training completed, he joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on August 1 1940.

603 Squadron Five days later the Magister he was flying in, P2385, collided with high tension cables and crashed into the River Tees at Pierce Bridge, near Darlington, during a searchlight cooperation flight. Both he and the pilot, Flying Officer J C Carriere, escaped but both suffered injuries. Beveridge was treated for facial injuries and returned to duty but Carriere was non-effective sick for several weeks. Awarded the AFM (1.1.43), Beveridge was commissioned in August 1943 as a Flight Engineer. He was given an extended commission and he retired from the RAF on September 1 1952 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Born in Hull on May 3 1917, Berry was educated at Riley High School and Hull Technical School. After leaving he was employed in the department of the City Treasurer. He joined the RAFVR (740170) in April 1937 and did his weekend flying training at 4 E&RFTS, Brough. In February 1939 he spent three weeks with the RAF. He was attached to 66 Squadron at Duxford, to fly Spitfires. Called up at the outbreak of war, Berry spent a short time at a Gunnery School before joining 603 Squadron at Turnhouse on October 17 1939. In November he was one of a detachment sent to Montrose to protect the airfield there. On December 7 the 603 pilots drove off a formation of He 111s and damaged at least two. On June 30 1940 Berry damaged a Ju 88, on July 3 he shared a Ju 88, on the 23rd and 30th shared a Do 17 and a He 111 respectively, on August 28 probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another and on the 31st he destroyed three Bf 109s. On September 2 he destroyed a Bf 109, on the 11th damaged a Bf 109, on the 15th probably destroyed two Bf 109s and shared a Do 17, on the 17th he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 27th he destroyed two Bf 109s, probably a third and shared a probable fourth. On the 29th Berry probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another, on the 30th destroyed a Bf 109 and shared another, on October 8 probably destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 27th and 28th he damaged Bf 109s.

PO 22.8.43 FO 22.2.44 FL 22.8.45 FL 22.2 47

MICHAEL LEO ffRENCH BEYTAGH 39057 FL Pilot British 73 Squadron Beytagh was born in Shanghai in 1916, the son of a prosperous Irish business man. When his parents separated, Beytagh, his brother and sister were put in the care of Miss Esylt Newbery, who eventually became their guardian. After very unsettled schooldays, Beytagh was adopted at 13 by a Mr Morton, a wealthy American, and taken to the US. They did not get on and later he returned to Miss Newbery. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course at 5 E&RFTS, Hanworth on June 29 1936. He went for a short induction course at 24 (T) Group on August 24 and moved on to 8 FTS, Montrose on September 5.

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completed, Bicknell was posted to 29 Squadron at Debden in late September 1938. He moved to 23 Squadron at Wittering on September 9 1939 and was still with it in July 1940. The last mention of Bicknell in the 23 Squadron ORB is on September 4 1940. No further service details of Sergeant Bicknell have been traced.

With training completed, he joined 23 Squadron at Northolt on April 24 1937. Beytagh had a landing accident in Blenheim L 1424 on October 8 1939. He was unhurt but the aircraft was seriously damaged. Two days later he was taken off flying duties, on orders from HQ 12 Group. Beytagh was posted to 7 B&GS, Manby on December 13 1939, on flying duties. He moved to 10 B&GS on January 10 1940 and was still with the unit on July 1, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. He was posted to 73 Squadron at Church Fenton on July 24 1940 as ‘B’ Flight Commander. On September 5 he damaged a Ju 88, on the 6th he probably destroyed a Bf 109, on the 7th he claimed a Bf 110 shot down and on the 11th another damaged. From September 15 to 26 Beytagh took temporary command of the squadron, whilst the CO, Squadron Leader M W S Robinson, was recovering from wounds received when he was shot down on the 14th. In November 1940, 73 Squadron sailed for the Middle East, in the aircraft carrier HMS Furious. It flew off to Takoradi on December 1, to fly the ferry route north to Heliopolis. In December the pilots of 73 were attached to 274 Squadron in the Western Desert. In early January 1941 the squadron began to operate on its own account from Sidi Heneish. On the 5th Beytagh destroyed a CR 42 and on April 5 he got a Ju 87. In Takoradi for a rest, Beytagh and four other pilots were ordered to fly a Blenheim and two Hurricanes to Freetown on June 21 1941. Bad weather necessitated a forcedlanding in the jungle. Unable to take off again, they walked 72 miles in two days and three nights and arrived at the Firestone Rubber Plantation, 35 miles from Monrovia, Liberia. Beytagh returned to the UK in September 1941 and was posted to 52 OTU, Aston Down on December 17, as an instructor. He moved to 53 OTU, Llandow on December 31, as CFI. He went to 55 OTU, Annan on January 18 1942, again as CFI. On October 2 1942 Beytagh took command of 602 Squadron at Skeabrae, stationed there for the defence of Scapa Flow. In January 1943 602 flew south to Perranporth. On August 19 Beytagh damaged a FW 190 over Amiens/Glisy airfield. He received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.43) and was awarded the DFC (1.10.43), the citation crediting him with five enemy aircraft destroyed. On October 25 1943 Beytagh was posted to Air Ministry, in the Directorate of Air Transport Policy and Operations. On January 8 1945 he went for a course to RAF Staff College and on July 9 1945 he returned to Air Ministry as Deputy Director Plans. Beytagh left the RAF on January 10 1946 and in April went to Uganda, as an Administrative Officer in the Colonial Service. In March 1949 he was posted to Pemba, Tanganyika as District Commissioner. In 1950 he was moved to Zanzibar and later back to Pemba. He died there on August 12 1952 and was buried at sea.

LESLIE CHARLES BICKNELL 33131 SL Pilot British 23 Squadron Born on April 9 1913, Bicknell joined the RAF in January 1930, as an Apprentice (564112). He signed an engagement for 12 years on April 9 1931, his 18th birthday. Bicknell entered RAF College, Cranwell on a cadetship in January 1933. On his graduation on December 15 1934, with a Permanent Commission, he joined 29 Squadron at North Weald on the same day. He was posted to 65 Squadron at Hornchurch on December 30 1936, as a Flight Commander. In April 1938 Bicknell collided with Pilot Officer R R S Tuck, whilst they were practising aerobatics, and although his tail unit was sheared off, he managed to land safely. Bicknell went to the School of Photography at Farnborough on January 1 1939, as a supernumerary. He joined 23 Squadron at Wittering from HQ 6 Group on January 20 1940 and assumed command on the 23rd. He held the appointment until August 12 1940, when he was posted away to Fighter Sector, Wick, for Ops Room duties. Bicknell later graduated from RAF Staff College. He retired from the RAF on June 20 1949 as a Wing Commander, retaining the rank of Group Captain. He later went to live in South Africa and died there in 1991. PO 15.12.34 FO 15.6.36 FL 15.6.38 SL 1.8.39 WC 1.3.42 WC 1.10.46

ERIC GEORGE BIDGOOD 42098 PO Pilot British 229 and 85 Squadrons A Devonshire man, Bidgood joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on March 13 1939, as a pupil pilot. With training completed, he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on November 6 1939.

APO 24.8.36 PO 29.6.37 FO 29.1.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.3.42

JOHN LAURANCE BICKERDIKE 36266 PO Pilot New Zealander

He moved to 229 Squadron at Digby on the 25th of the month and served with it in the Battle of Britain until September 1940, flying his last operational sortie on September 11. Bidgood then joined 85 Squadron at Church Fenton but appears not to have flown any operational sorties with the squadron before being posted to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on October 19 1940, en route to Malta. In fact he did not go to Uxbridge but reported direct to the aircraft carrier HMS Argus at King George V Dock in Glasgow on October 23. In mid-November the Argus sailed from Gibraltar with Hurricanes for Malta. Bidgood was one of six pilots who flew off the carrier on November 16 1940, in the second flight of Hurricanes, led by an FAA Skua. A series of mishaps saw the Hurricanes run out of fuel and fall, one by one, into the sea, with the loss of all six pilots. At the time of Bidgood’s death, his father was vicar of the Parish Church at Arkengarthdale in Yorkshire. With another local airman, lost in 1942, he is commemorated by a lectern and altar table in the church, dedicated to their memory. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 5.

85 Squadron

The son of a policeman, Bickerdike was born on February 11 1919, in Christchurch. He was educated at King’s Preparatory School and King’s College, Auckland excelling in athletics. He got a job as a radio announcer in Christchurch. He was accepted for an RNZAF short service commission in June 1939. He did his flying training at Wigram, completed the course, and sailed for England in early March 1940. He relinquished his RNZAF commission and transferred to the RAF in April 1940. Bickerdike went to No 1 Flying Practice Unit at Meir on April 28 and then to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on May 14. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 85 Squadron at Debden on May 24 1940. Bickerdike was with a section of the squadron, ordered off on July 12 to help protect convoy ‘Booty’ against an approaching raid by a large force of Do 17s and He 111s. The section intercepted the bombers before they could disperse. In this action, his first encounter with the Luftwaffe, Bickerdike shared in destroying a He 111. On July 22 1940 he was killed when he crashed near Debden during an aerobatic exercise. His funeral was held on the 26th and he is buried in Wimbish Parish Church cemetery, Essex.

APO 13.5.39 PO 6.11.39

IVOR KENNETH JACK BIDGOOD 748111 Sgt Pilot British 213 Squadron Bidgood, from Bristol, joined the RAFVR about May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on November 6 1939, on No 44 Course.

PO (RNZAF) 12.2.40 PO 13.4.40

N BICKNELL No unknown Sgt

Pilot

British

With training completed, he arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on May 18 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 213 Squadron at Wittering on the 25th. He flew his last operational sortie with the squadron on August 21 1940. Bidgood was killed on June 2 1941, aged 23, serving as a Flight Sergeant at 56 OTU at Sutton Bridge. His aircraft, Hurricane P 3162 collided with a Hurricane flown by Flight Sergeant J T Craig (qv) over Terrington St John, near King’s Lynn. Bidgood is buried in Canford Cemetery, Bristol.

23 Squadron

Bicknell was serving as an LAC in the regular RAF in 1937. He applied for pilot training and was selected. He did his ab initio course at 8 E&RFTS, Woodley in January and February 1938. He moved on to 9 FTS, Hullavington on March 5 1938. With his flying training

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ARTHUR JAMES BIGGAR 32168 SL Pilot British 111 Squadron

COLIN NORMAN BIRCH 41519 FO Pilot British 1 Squadron

Born on April 20 1914, Biggar joined the RAF on a short service commission in early 1932. On April 16 he was posted to 3 FTS, Grantham. He went on a further course at 2 FTS, Digby on March 21 1933, after which he joined 16 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Old Sarum.

Birch was born on November 27 1918 and joined the RAFVR in December 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741184). He joined the RAF on a short service commission in September 1938 and completed his flying training at 2 FTS, Brize Norton. In June 1939 Birch was posted to No 1 Squadron at Tangmere and he went with it to France at the outbreak of war. He returned to England on May 24 1940, reason unknown. No1 was not withdrawn until June 18. On August 19 Birch blundered into the London balloon barrage during a night patrol. He baled out and landed on the roof of a house. It took him a long time to convince the local people that he was British. His Hurricane crashed and burned out in Chatterton Road, Finsbury Park. Birch claimed a He 111 destroyed on August 30 and a Bf 109 on September 1. He was posted from No 1 to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on October 18 1940. The unit was redesignated 56 OTU in November. In 1941 Birch did an instructors’ course at CFS, Upavon. The unit moved to RAF Tealing in March 1942. He was at HQ Fighter Command in 1942 and the Fighter Leaders’ School at Aston Down in 1943. Awarded the AFC (8.6.44), Birch was posted to ADGB, Bentley Priory, moving in 1945 to the Central Fighter Establishment, West Raynham. In 1946 Birch served on the staff at Air HQ Northern Italy. He was Commandant of No 2 RAFVR Centre in 1947 and in 1948 he was granted a Permanent Commission. From 1949 until he retired on March 28 1958, Birch held a number of appointments, the final one being at Air Ministry on Intelligence duties. He retired on March 28 1958 as a Squadron Leader. Birch died on November 2 2005.

Biggar was posted to India, to join 20 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Peshawar on October 18 1933. Back in the UK in 1936, he was appointed to the staff of No 1 Armament Training Camp at Catfoss on September 27. A move to the permanent staff of 604 Squadron, AAF at Hendon came on July 31 1937. He was granted a Permanent Commission on April 1 1938. Biggar was posted away to HQ 13 Group on August 6 1939, as Squadron Leader Training and Auxiliary Liaison Officer. He left 13 Group for 6 OTU on September 18 1940, for a refresher course. After converting to Hurricanes, Biggar joined 111 Squadron at Drem on October 3 and took command two days later, staying with it until February 1941. He received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.41). Biggar remained in the RAF after the war, graduating from the Joint Services Staff College and the Army Staff College. He was made a CBE (2.1.56) and retired from the RAF on June 1 1958 as a Group Captain. He died in 1975. APO 1.4.32 PO 1.4.33 FO 1.10.34 FL 1.10.36 SL 1.4.39 WC 1.3.41 GC 1.7.44 GC 1.7.50

JOHN EDWARD BIGNELL 616568 Sgt Air Gunner British

25 Sqdn and FIU APO 14.11.38

Bignell, of Romford, Essex, joined the RAF, as an Aircrafthand, in July 1938. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. With training completed, he was with 25 Squadron in 1939.

PO 3.9.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.7.44 SL 1.8.47

RONALD ARTHUR BIRD Lieutenant (FAA) Pilot British

He took part in the attack on the Luftwaffe seaplane base at Borkum on November 28 1939. Twelve Blenheims took off from Bircham Newton, six from 25 Squadron and six from 601 Squadron. All aircraft returned safely and landed at Debden. Three He 115s were destroyed and another three damaged. It was the first fighter attack of the war on a German target. Bignell was still with 25 in July 1940 and flew his last operational sortie with the squadron on August 10. He later joined the Fighter Interception Unit and flew operationally with it in October 1940. He was still serving with the Unit, when he was killed on September 4 1941, as a Flight Sergeant. Bignell and his pilot, Flying Officer D M Lake, crashed in Beaufighter R 2335 at Eastergate, Sussex. Both men were killed. Bignell is buried in Romford Cemetery.

804 Squadron

Bird was born on May 7 1916 in North Witchford, March, Cambridgeshire. After leaving school, he worked as a clerk until joining the Royal Navy on November 1 1931, for boy service. On his 18th birthday, May 7 1934, he signed on for a regular engagement, as a Seaman Gunner (JX138002). Bird served on HMS Valiant, Ramilles and Curlew and, after some shore postings, he was commissioned from Acting Petty Officer to Acting Sub-Lieutenant on September 1 1937, in the Executive Branch of the Royal Navy. From June 6 1939 Bird was on the minesweeper HMS Niger. He was attached to the Fleet Air Arm on October 9 1939. He did his elementary flying course at 14 EFTS, Elmdon and went on to 7 FTS, Peterborough on December 11, on No 7 (FAA) Course. With training completed on May 27 1940, Bird did fighter courses with 759 and 769 (FAA) Squadrons, after which he was posted to 804 Squadron at Hatston on July 20 1940. The squadron was seconded to Fighter Command and its Sea Gladiators were used on dockyard defence. 804 was reformed as a Catapult Fighter Unit in March 1941, with Fulmars and Sea Hurricanes, Bird was assigned to the SS Ariguani. He was launched in a Fulmar twice, on April 30 and May 20 1941, landing each time at Sydenham, Northern Ireland. On October 4 1941 Bird was launched in a Hurricane from the Ariguani against a FW Kondor, which he intercepted and damaged. He baled out and was picked up by the ship’s boat 50 minutes later. In January 1942 he joined 881 Squadron on HMS Illustrious, from which he took part in operations in Madagascar. On May 6 1942 he shared in destroying a Potez 63. From March 1943 Bird commanded 881 Squadron, then on HMS Furious. On July 8 1943 he shared in the destruction of a BV 138. In November 1943 he took up a staff posting at Largs, Scotland. In November 1944 Bird was given command of 882 Squadron, then on HMS Formidable and later on HMS Searcher. On March 26 1945 he destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another. He was awarded the DSC (26.6.45) for ‘courage, daring and tenacity in air strikes whilst serving with HMS Searcher off Norway’. He was awarded a Bar to the DSC (7.8.45) for ‘outstanding courage in air attacks against U-boat bases at Kilbotn, Norway’. On April 10 1946 Bird was killed in a flying accident in a Seafire whilst serving as CFI of 794 Squadron in HMS Garnet, an OTU at Eglinton, Northern Ireland. Bird was 29. His name is on the Fleet Air Arm Memorial at Lee-on-Solent.

ARTHUR EDWARD BINHAM 161311 Sgt Pilot British 64 Squadron Binham joined the RAFVR on January 2 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741204), and did his flying at 8 E&RFTS, Woodley. Called up on September 1 1939, he went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 8. After completing his training, he joined 64 Squadron at Church Fenton on December 18 1939. He operated over Dunkirk in June 1940. On July 13 Binham’s Spitfire, K 9795, was hit by anti-aircraft fire during combat with Bf 109s over Dover. He made a belly-landing at Hawkinge, unhurt. On the 29th his Spitfire, R 6643, was damaged by return fire from a Ju 87 over the Channel. Binham was escorted back to the coast by Pilot Officer J A A Gibson of 501 Squadron. Binham made a forced-landing near St Margaret’s Bay, again unhurt. Binham flew his last sortie with 64 on August 15 and then seems to have been attached to the Kenley Station Flight on the 19th. He was posted to 15 FTS, Chipping Norton on September 24 1940, as an instructor. He was sent to CFS, Upavon for an instructors’ course in January 1941, returning to 15 FTS in March. Binham was posted to 15 (P) AFU, Leconfield on February 10 1942. He was later sent as an instructor to 24 Air School, Nigel, South Africa, remaining there until August 1945. He was commissioned in October 1943 and awarded the AFC (14.6.45). He was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Acting Sub-Lt 1.9.37 Sub-Lt 26.1.39 Acting Lt 1.4.39 Acting Lt-Cdr 1943

PO 24.10.43 FO 24.4.44 FL 24.10.45

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HAROLD ARTHUR COOPER BIRD-WILSON 40335 FO Pilot British 17 Squadron

Beaufighter crashed in daylight near Edenbridge and he and his air gunner, Sergeant C E P Castle, were killed. Birkett was 26 and is buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, near his home at Chew Magna, Somerset.

Bird-Wilson was born at Prestatyn on November 20 1919, the son of a Bengal tea-planter. He started at an English boarding school at the age of four and a half, whilst his parents stayed in India. He went on to Liverpool College.

PO 10.10.40

MAURICE ANDREW BIRRELL Midshipman (FAA) Pilot British

He joined the RAF on a short service commission in 1937. His elementary flying began at 7 E&RFTS, Desford on September 27 1937, as a pupil pilot. He completed his training at 3 FTS, South Cerney. In August 1938 Bird-Wilson joined 17 Squadron at Kenley. He was immediately sent to Brough on a navigation course. On September 19, flying back to Brough in a BA Swallow, he ran into a storm and made for Cranwell. In bad weather he crashed and his pilot-passenger was killed. Bird-Wilson had severe facial injuries and was operated on four times by Archie McIndoe, the last time in October 1939, making him one of the first “Guinea Pigs”. Bird-Wilson arrived at 12 Group Pool on December 28 and after converting to Hurricanes he rejoined 17 Squadron on February 24 1940. He went to France with a squadron detachment on May 17. On the 18th he shared in the destruction of a Do 17, on the 19th damaged a Bf 109 and on the 21st shared a Hs 126. The 17 Squadron Hurricanes were withdrawn to England on the 23rd and then took part in operations over Dunkirk. Bird-Wilson damaged a Ju 87 on the 25th and shared a Ju 88 on the 26th. 17 Squadron returned to France on June 5 and operated from Le Mans and Dinard. Withdrawn on the 17th, via Jersey, it reached Tangmere on the 19th. He probably destroyed a Bf 109 on June 14. Bird-Wilson shared in destroying a He 111 and damaging a Bf 110 on July 29 1940, he shared a Ju 88 on August 21, shot down a Bf 109 on the 25th, destroyed another and probably a second on the 31st, shared a Do 17 on September 3 and probably destroyed another on the 15th. Bird-Wilson was awarded the DFC (24.9.40). He was shot down by Adolf Galland on September 24. He baled out, burned, and was rescued from the sea by an MTB and admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Chatham. His Hurricane, P3878, crashed into the sea off Chatham. He returned to 17 Squadron on October 1and was posted to 56 OTU, Sutton Bridge in November, 1940, as an instructor. On January 17 1941 Bird-Wilson was posted to 55 OTU, Aston Down, then joined 234 Squadron at Warmwell on March 10, as a Flight Commander and on May 11 he got a probable Bf 109. He left the squadron and went to 52 OTU, Aston Down on August 9 1941 and on December 16 took command of ‘A’ Squadron there. In April 1942 he was given command of 152 Squadron at Eglinton, Northern Ireland. On November 17 1942 he took command of 66 Squadron at Zeals. In May 1943 Bird-Wilson was appointed Wing Leader 122 Wing. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (29.10.43) and rested in January 1944. He was sent to a Command and General Staff Course at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He returned to the UK in April and was posted to 85 Group, Uxbridge, as Wing Commander Training, but on June 9 he was appointed to lead the Harrowbeer Spitfire Wing, moving later to lead the Bentwaters Mustang Wing. On August 11 1944 he shot down a Bf 109. For his Wing activities, Bird-Wilson was awarded the DSO (9.1.45). In February 1945 he was posted to 11 Group, Uxbridge and in May 1945 he took command of 1335 Jet Conversion Unit, Colerne. In 1945 he was awarded the Czechoslovak Medal of Merit 1st Class and the Dutch DFC. In a long post-war career, Bird-Wilson held many responsible appointments He was awarded the AFC (1.1.46) and a Bar (1.1.55) and was made a CBE in 1962. Bird-Wilson retired on June 1 1974, as an Air Vice-Marshal and he died on December 27 2000.

Birrell joined the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on July 1 1939, rated as a Midshipman (A). He did his elementary flying training at 14 EFTS, Elmdon and went on to 7 FTS, Peterborough on December 11, on No 7 (FAA) Course. He completed his training on May 27 1940. In response to Churchill’s request to the Admiralty for pilots, Birrell was one of those attached to the RAF on June 15 1940. He arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 17th, converted to Hurricanes, and joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 1. When the squadron was sent to Acklington for a rest on July 13, Birrell had flown only one operational sortie, on July 9, during which he damaged a Bf 109. He did not stay with 79 but returned to the Fleet Air Arm on July 20. He carried out fighter training with 760 Squadron at Eastleigh, before joining 804 Squadron at Hatston on August 31 1940. Birrell was slightly injured on active service on October 28 1940. After a short spell with 802 (FAA) Squadron, he returned to 804 when it became a Catapult Fighter Unit in March 1941. Birrell was the first pilot to be catapulted from a CAM ship. He sailed in the Michael E on May 28 1941, bound for New York. Five days out from Belfast, the ship was torpedoed by U 108 on June 2 in the Central North Atlantic and Birrell was among the survivors picked up after twenty hours in the boats. His next ship was the Ariguani. On August 26 he was shot off in a Fulmar to deal with a FW Kondor. He fired one burst before it vanished into cloud. Birrell headed for Northern Ireland, landed on a beach but, on enquiry, found that it was neutral Donegal. He took off again and reached Eglinton, almost out of fuel. In late October 1941 he survived when the Ariguani was torpedoed 300 miles off Lisbon on the 26th. Birrell was awarded the DSC (3.10.52) for service in HMS Glory in Korea. He retired in 1972 as a Commander and he died in 1990. Midshipman 1.7.39 Sub-Lt 23.4.42 Lt 25.5.43 Acting Lt-Cdr 1944 Cdr 31.12.56

JOHN DEREK BISDEE 76575 PO Pilot British

Lt-Cdr 25.5.51

609 Squadron

Born at Weston-super-Mare on November 20 1915, Bisdee was educated at Marlborough College and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. A member of the RAFVR from July 1937 (741770), he was called up on September 1 1939, completed his training and was commissioned in December. He joined 609 Squadron on the 26th. Bisdee was with 609 at the start of the Battle of Britain. On July 18 he shared in damaging a He 111, on August 11 he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed, on the 25th another damaged, on September 7 a Bf 110 destroyed and one damaged, on the 26th a He 111 probably destroyed, on the 27th a Bf 110 shared, on the 30th a Bf 109 probably destroyed and on October 7 Bf 110 destroyed. In sweeps over France, Bisdee shared a Bf 109 on May 21 1941, shot down Bf 109s on June 17 and 22, probably destroyed another on the 24th and destroyed one on July 9. He was awarded the DFC (11.7.41) and went to 61 OTU, on July 31, as a Flight Commander. He was given command of 601 Squadron at Acaster Malbis on March 10 1942. On April 20 he led twelve 601 Spitfires off the US aircraft carrier Wasp, off Algiers, to fly to Malta. The next day, flying from Malta, Bisdee destroyed a Ju 88 but was then jumped by Bf 109s and he was shot down. He baled out and paddled ashore in a dinghy. On May 10 1942 Bisdee shot down a Cant 1007 and next day he probably destroyed a Bf 109. 601 Squadron left Malta on June 23 1942 for the Western Desert. Bisdee damaged a Me 210 on July 5 near Aboukir. On August 21 he was posted to HQ Middle East, as Fighter Training Officer, as Squadron Leader. He later went to Tunisia, as Wing Commander Day Fighters. In July 1943 Bisdee was appointed Military Governor of Lampedusa and in 1944 he commanded 323 Wing at Bone. He later took the Wing to Foggia, in Italy, where he was responsible not only for his Spitfire squadrons but also a Welligton anti-shipping squadron, 225 (Night fighter) Squadron and an ASR squadron. Bisdee was made an OBE (14.6.45) and released from the RAF in 1945 as a Group Captain. He had a successful post-war business career. He died on October 21 2000 and his ashes are buried in St Luke’s churchyard, Milland, Sussex.

APO 30.11.37 PO 27.9.38 FO 27.6.40 FL 27.6.41 SL 1.7.43 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.1.53 GC 1.1.58 AC 1.1.63 AVM 1.1.70

THOMAS BIRKETT 87634 PO Pilot British

79 and 804 Sqdns

219 Squadron

Birkett joined the RAFVR about July 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741782). Having reached a high standard of training, he was one of the fifty VR pilots, who were offered six months of continuous training with the regular RAF. He took the opportunity and went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on July 15 1939. With training completed, Birkett joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on December 17 1939. He was pilot of a Blenheim, which made a belly-landing at Catterick on July 30 1940, when its undercarriage could not be lowered. The propellers and the under-fuselage were damaged but Birkett and his passenger, Sergeant E R Lacey, were both unhurt. Birkett was commissioned in October. On November 13 1940 his

PO 10.12.39 FO 10.12.40 FL 10.12.41 SL 18.6.43 WC 10.6.45

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DOUGLAS LEONARD BISGOOD 41896 PO Pilot British 3 Squadron

crashed into the sea off Land’s End following an engine failure during a patrol. He attempted to bale out but the canopy jammed and he was unable to leave the aircraft. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial.

Bisgood joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training at 11 E&RFTS, Perth on February 6 1939, as a pupil pilot. He went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on April 15 for a short induction course and moved to 2 FTS, Brize Norton in June. Training completed, he joined the newly-formed 253 Squadron at Manston on November 6 1939.

APO 16.3.34 PO 16.3.35 FO 16.9.36 FL 16.9.38 SL1.6.40 WC 1.12.41 WC 1.10.46

ALLAN BLACK 107476 Sgt Pilot British

54 Squadron

Black joined the RAFVR about October 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740809). He was called up on September 1 1939 and after completing his training, he joined 4 (C) Ferry Pilot Pool on May 12 1940 from 7 B&GS, Stormy Down.

Bisgood, together with Pilot Officers C G St D Jefferies and J B Hobbs, flew Hurricanes to France on May 13 1940 from Kenley, via Manston. The three pilots were taken on to the strength of 3 Squadron at Merville on the 14th. Bisgood shared a Do 17 on the15th and is believed to have had another victory before the squadron was withdrawn to Kenley on May. At Wick on July 23 1940 he collided with a Hudson of 269 Squadron, which was taking off downwind. Bisgood was taking off into the wind and they crashed head-on. He was seriously injured and the four members of the Hudson’s crew were killed. His Hurricane, P 2862, was written off. In early 1941 Bisgood was posted to 1403 Met Flight at Bircham Newton. On one occasion in April 1941, flying a Blenheim, he saw three Ju 88s heading back from a raid. He is believed to have shot one down into the sea. No further details known. Bisgood was awarded the DFC (2.1.42) for carrying out a large number of met flights, often in unfavourable weather conditions. At the time of the award, he was credited with three enemy aircraft destroyed. Bisgood was killed on April 18 1947 as a Squadron Leader with 202 Squadron, a Halifax unit, based at Aldergrove and carrying out meteorological flights over the Atlantic. With no known grave, Bisgood is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 286. He was 27.

He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 7, converted to Spitfires and joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on the 29th and made his first flight with it next day. Commissioned in September 1941, Black was killed on February 1 1944 as a Squadron Leader with 239 Squadron. He was 30 and is buried near his home in Knadgerhill Cemetery, Irvine, Ayrshire. PO 24.9.41 FO 6.7.42 FL 6.7.43

HERBERT ERNEST BLACK 740749 Sgt Pilot British 32, 257 and 46 Squadronss Black was born in Measham, Leicestershire. He joined the RAFVR (740749) about August 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939 and was posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough on October 9, on No 12 Course. With training completed, he joined 226 Squadron in France on March 6 1940, to fly Fairey Battles. After the squadron was withdrawn to England on June 16, Black volunteered for Fighter Command. He was posted to OTU and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 32 Squadron at Acklington on September 3 1940. On the 17th he went to 257 Squadron at Martlesham Heath and he made his last operational sortie wth the squadron on October 15. Black probably joined 46 Squadron at Stapleford Tawney on the 22nd. On October 29 Black was shot down in combat with Bf 109s and is believed to have crashed in Hothfield Park, near Ashford. He was wounded and badly burned. His wife was at his bedside when he died in Ashford Hospital on November 9 1940. Black was 26 and is buried in St Denys’ churchyard, Ibstock.

APO 15.4.39 PO 6.11.39 FO 6.11.40 FL 6.11.41

ERNEST RALPH BITMEAD 34139 SL Pilot British 29, 310, 229, 266 and 611 Sqdns Bitmead was born in 1913 in Cholsey, Berkshire. He joined the RAF on a short service commission in March 1934. On April 3 he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand and on completion of his flying training, Bitmead joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch on March 4 1935. He went as an instructor to 6 FTS, Netheravon on November 5 1936 and on July 16 1938 he went to 501 Squadron, AAF at Filton, on the permanent staff. He was posted to CFS, Upavon on January 9 1939, to instruct.

WILLIAM FRANCIS BLACKADDER 90282 FL Pilot British 607 Squadron

On July 8 1940 he took command of 29 Squadron at Digby but was posted away, non-effective sick, to SSQ, Digby on the 10th. He was transferred to RAF Hospital, Rauceby on the 11th and he was reposted to 29 Squadron on July 16, as a supernumerary, non effective sick. Bitmead was attached to HQ 12 Group at Duxford on August 22 1940 and on the 29th he joined 310 Squadron, also at Duxford, as CO, but this was cancelled by Air Ministry on the same day. He left Duxford on September 2 and joined 229 Squadron at Wittering, as a supernumerary. He flew one operational sortie with 266 Squadron from Wittering on September 15, patrolling Duxford. On the 16th Bitmead was posted from 229 to RAF Wittering, for Ops duties. On September 30 he went to Duxford, to take charge of the station, in the absence of Wing Commander A B Woodhall. Whilst there he flew seven sorties with 310 Squadron, between October 5 and 12. Bitmead left Duxford on October 16, on being posted to 611 Squadron at Digby. He assumed command on the 19th and flew his first operational sortie with 611 on November 10 1940. On December 21 Bitmead damaged a Do 17 and in January 1941 he destroyed a Bf 109 and a Do 215. In May, after an engagement over the Channel, his aircraft was damaged and he made a forced-landing in a field near East Grinstead. An insecure hood fractured the base of his skull. Bitmead was posted from 611 and on August 14 1941 he was given command of 71 (Eagle) Squadron at North Weald. After a week, he felt that he was not fit enough and relinquished his command. Bitmead was awarded the DFC (21.11.44) as an Acting Group Captain. He stayed on in the RAF after the war. He died of natural causes on December 17 1955, whilst still serving. He was cremated at Headington (Oxford) crematorium. Bitmead’s two brothers also died whilst serving with the RAF. Flying Officer P A Bitmead was killed on November 16 1941 when a Wellington of 148 Squadron was shot down by flak whilst attacking Benghazi. He is commemorated on the Alamein memorial. Flight Lieutenant E W Bitmead was killed on May 1 1943 with 65 Squadron. His Spitfire

Blackadder went to Edinburgh University. He joined 607 Squadron, AAF in early 1936. He was embodied for fulltime service on August 24 1939 and then flew to France with the squadron on November 15 1939 in a Gladiator. He was an Acting Flight Lieutenant and ‘A’ Flight Commander by April 1940. On May 11, the day after the Blizkrieg began, Blackadder shared in destroying a He 111 and claimed another destroyed, which was not confirmed. On the 18th Blackadder claimed a Do 17 destroyed but his Hurricane was hit by return fire and he made a crash-landing near Denais. The squadron suffered heavy losses in the fighting. It was withdrawn to England on the 20th and re-assembled at Croydon on May 22. Blackadder was awarded the DSO (4.6.40), the citation stating that he had shot down three enemy aircraft and carried out several very important reconnaissances of bridges and roads, at a time when information was hard to come by. At the start of the Battle of Britain, 607 was in the North, stationed at Usworth. On August 14 Blackadder damaged two He 111s and next day he destroyed one near Seaham. On both days the Germans were attempting to raid targets on the North East Coast. The squadron moved south to Tangmere on September 7 1940. On the 9th Blackadder shared in the destruction of a Do 17, on the 13th he damaged a Ju 88, on the 14th he shared two Ju 88s, on the 26th he shot down a He 111 and on October 4 he shared a probable He 111. On October 24 1940 Blackadder was detached to RAF Turnhouse, as Sector Controller in the Operations Room. This was made a permanent posting on November 6. He later did the same job at Usworth, Ouston, Prestwick and Ayr. He received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.41). He commanded 245 Squadron at Aldergrove from June 1941 to July 13 1942, when he was posted to 10 Group, as Controller at Rudloe Manor. Blackadder went for a course to the Army Staff College, Camberley on January 1 1943, after which he was posted to HQ Fighter Command, as Wing Commander Tactics, on May 7 1943. He moved to HQ Allied

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KENNETH HUGHES BLAIR 39704 FL Pilot British 151 Squadron

Expeditionary Forces on September 28. Blackadder’s final wartime posting was as CO of the Air Fighting Development Unit at Wittering. He was made an OBE (1.1.45) and was released from the RAF on November 19 1945. He rejoined 607 Squadron at Ouston in September 1946 and served with it until December 1948, after which he became CO of the Northumberland Wing, ATC until February 1951. Blackadder died in 1997.

Blair was born on February 15 1918 at Heaton Moor, Stockport. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his flying training on March 15 1937, as a pupil pilot. On June 5 he went to 11 FTS, Wittering and on June 1 1938, with training completed, he joined 85 Squadron at Debden.

PO (AAF) 1.6.36 FO (AAF) 1.12.37 FO 24.8.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41 FL (AAF) 26.9.46

GEORGE DOUGLAS MORANT BLACKWOOD 32181 FL Pilot British 213 and 310 Squadrons

He went to France with the squadron at the outbreak of war. On May 10 1940 Blair destroyed a He 111 and shared another and on the 13th he destroyed two more. He was awarded the DFC (31.5.40). After the squadron’s return to Debden on May 22, Blair was posted away to 151 Squadron at Martlesham Heath. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and made ‘B’ Flight

Educated at Eton, Blackwood was commissioned in Class ‘AA’ of the RAFO on June 26 1930. He relinquished this commission when he was granted a five year short service commission in the RAF on April 25 1932.

Commander on the 26th. Blair claimed a Bf 110 probably destroyed on July 29 1940, a Bf 109 destroyed on August 5, a Bf 110 shot down and another damaged on the 18th, a He 111 probably destroyed on the 24th, a He 111 destroyed on the 30th and a Do 17 destroyed, a Bf 109 probably destroyed and a Do 17 damaged on the 31st. On September 30 he shared a Ju 88. Blair and Sergeant P Copeland intercepted a Do 17 on a pre-dawn sortie over the East Coast on November 9, off Skegness. Although they claimed it as destroyed, it managed to reach Gilze-Rijen, with two of the crew wounded. On January 15 1941 Blair claimed a Ju 88 probably destroyed. On July 10 1941 Blair took command of 1453 Flight at Wittering, operating with Turbinlite Havocs and 151 Squadron Hurricanes. He was posted away on September 4 1942. In June 1943 Blair returned to operations, as a Flight Commander with 25 Squadron at Church Fenton. In October 1943, he was given command of 613 Squadron, at that time just transferred to 2 Group as a light bomber squadron, with Mosquito VIs, to specialise in low-level daylight attacks on particular buildings. The first operational sortie was made by Blair on December 19 1943. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (23.5.44) at the end of his tour. Blair stayed in the RAF and was serving at RAF Lindholme when he died on October 31 1953. He is buried at Hatfield Cemetery, South Yorkshire.

He did his flying training at 2 FTS, Digby. On August 26 1933, with training completed, he was posted to 25 Squadron, Hawkinge and took part in the 1934 Hendon Air Display, flying one of the tied-together Furies. In September 1934 Blackwood was seconded from the squadron to be Personal Assistant to the AOC Coastal Area, Lee-on-Solent. He returned to Hawkinge on July 1 1935. Six months later Blackwood was posted to 600 Squadron, AuxAF at Hendon, as Assistant Adjutant and Flying Instructor. After being granted an extension of service on April 25 1937, he went to Class ‘AA’ of the RAFO on April 25 1938 and joined the family publishing business. Recalled on September 1 1939, Blackwood was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand, as an instructor. He was serving on the staff at HQ 23 Group in January 1940. On May 20 he was posted from there to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge, for a refresher course, after which he requested an operational flying posting. Blackwood went to Fighter Sector, Dyce on June 5 1940, as Squadron Leader Ops. On the 7th he was posted to 213 Squadron at Wittering, as a supernumerary. He made his last flight with it on July 16. Blackwood was posted to Duxford on the 18th, to form and command 310, the first Czech fighter squadron. It became operational on August 17 1940 and on the 26th Blackwood destroyed a Do 17. He was himself shot down and baled out, unhurt. His Hurricane, P3887, crashed at Maldon. On October 28 he damaged a Do 17. He was awarded the Czech Military Cross (24.12.40) and posted away to HQ 12 Group on December 31 1940. Blackwood went to Northern Ireland for a year, commanded a station in 10 Group and then formed 134 Wing in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. He was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Wing Commander. Blackwood died in March 1997. PO (RAFO) 26.6.30 APO 25.4.32 PO 25.4.33 FL (RAFO) 25.4.38 FL 1.9.39 SL 1.12.40 WC1.3.42

CHARLES EDWARD BLAIR 78743 PO Air Gunner British

FO 25.10.34

APO 18.5.37 PO 15.3.38 FO 15.10.39 FL 15.10.40 SL 1.12.40 SL 1.12.41 WC 1.1.52

PIERRE MICHEL BLAIZE 30490 Adjudant Pilot French

111 Squadron

Blaize was born at Sainte Leocadie on November 1 1915. When the Armistice was signed on June 22 1940, he was a instructor at Meknes, in North Africa. Seeing that the continuation of the war was a vain hope, Blaize and Georges Perrin (qv) decided to escape to England. They took the personal aircraft of the base commandant, a Caudron Goeland, and flew it to Gibraltar on June 30. They sailed from there on July 3, in the French armed trawler President Houduce, and reached Liverpool on the 13th. They were sent to a Receiving Centre at Olympia, London on the 19th. Blaize moved to 4 S of TT, St Athan on July 27 1940 and on the 29th he was posted to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum, for testing and grading. He went to RAF Odiham on August 10, where he spent a week flying in Tiger Moths and Hectors, before going to 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 18th. After converting to Hurricanes, Blaize joined 111 Squadron at Drem on October 10 1940. In mid-March 1941 he was posted to 615 Squadron at Kenley, to replace Bouquillard (qv). On April 15, during a patrol over the Pas de Calais, Blaize fell behind the squadron because of some unknown technical reason. He was attacked from the rear by two Bf 109s and, with his aircraft badly damaged. He baled out some ten miles from the English coast. His descent was covered right down to the sea by one of his squadron. Blaize was seen to release himself from his parachute before a shortage of fuel forced the 615 aircraft to return to base. When rescue craft came, the parachute was there but Blaize had disappeared, never to be seen again.

FL 25.10.36

600 Squadron

Blair, from Wallington, Surrey, was educated at Whitgift School, Croydon. He volunteered for aircrew duties in the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was commissioned in April 1940, as a direct-entry Air Gunner. He was at 7 B&GS, Manby on No 12 Air Gunner Course from May 6 to June 1 1940. He joined 600 Squadron at Manston in early June and made his last flight with the squadron, an operational sortie, on July 15. Blair was posted away soon afterwards and joined 98 Squadron at Newton, a Fairey Battle unit, which was soon to leave for Iceland. He flew from Wick to Kaldadarnes, in Battle P 6570, on September 14. He was slightly injured, when the pilot made a forcedlanding on arrival in Iceland. Blair returned to Britain in the SS Antonia on October 26 1940 and was at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge by November 8. From there he was later posted to 218 Squadron at Oakington. He was killed on April 25 1941, serving with 218 Squadron, based at Marham, Norfolk. Blair was rear gunner in Wellington R 1507, which took off from Marham at 20.54 hrs on an operation to Kiel. A W/T call from the aircraft was picked up at 23.56 hrs, asking for assistance, and a bearing taken from the transmission placed the Wellington 80 miles off the Dutch coast. Blair was 33 and with no known grave, he is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 31 and on a memorial plaque at Whitgift School, unveiled on November 10 2006.

ARTHUR GILES BLAKE Sub-Lieutenant (FAA) Pilot

British

19 Squadron

Blake was born in 1917 and educated at Slough Grammar School. After leaving, he worked for Naylor Brothers, Slough. In 1938 he successfully applied for a commission in the Royal Navy, with a view to gaining entry to the Fleet Air Arm. Blake entered the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on May 1 1939, as a Midshipman (A), and went to Greenwich Naval College for basic training, on Pilots’ Course No 6, from May 2.

APO 12.4.40 PO 1.6.40

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JOHN WELLBURN BLAND 90895 PO Pilot British 601 and 501 Squadrons

In late August 1939 he went to 14 E&RFTS, Elmdon and then moved on to No 1 FTS, Leuchars on November 6 1939, on No 6 Course. Awarded his wings in March 1940, Blake went to HMS Raven at Southampton, for deck-landing training, with 759 and 760 Squadrons. After completing his training, Blake went into Fleet Air Arm service. On June 15 1940 he was attached to the RAF and posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden, to convert to Spitfires. On July 1 he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford. On September 3 Blake damaged a Bf 110, on the 9th destroyed a He 111, on the 15th he destroyed a Bf 109, shared a He 111 and damaged a Do 17 and on the 27th he destroyed two more Bf 109s. Blake was acting as weaver during a patrol over South London on October 29 1940, when he was shot down and killed, probably picked off by a Bf 109. His Spitfire, P 7423, crashed in London Road, Chelmsford. Before his death, he had been recommended for the DFC. He is buried in St Mary’s churchyard, Langley, Buckinghamshire.

Bland was born on May 9 1910, the son of the Vicar of St Matthew’s, Cotham Park, Bristol. He was educated at Monkton Coombe School, near Bath, after which he went on to Bristol University. It is believed that he later qualified as an accountant. He joined 501 Squadron, AAF before the war and was granted a commission in June 1939. Called to full-time service on August 24, Bland was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on October 9 1939, on No 43 Course. He completed his training on April 27 1940 and joined 601 Squadron at Tangmere. Bland made his first flight with the squadron on May 14, Hurricane experience. He flew his first operational sortie on the 22nd and claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on June 7, shot down E of Treport. On July 11 he shared a Do 17. On July 12 Bland was posted back to his old squadron, 501, then based at Middle Wallop. He rejoined it there on the 20th. He claimed a Ju 87 shot down over Dover on the 29th. His own port mainplane was hit by return fire but Bland got back to base. On August 18 he was shot down and killed, by Oberleutnant Schoepfel of JG 26. His Hurricane, P 3208, crashed at Calcot Hill, Sturry, Kent. Bland was 26. He is buried in Gravesend Cemetery.

Midshipman 1.5.39 Acting Sub-Lt 16.9.39 Sub-Lt 14.6.40

MINDEN VAUGHAN BLAKE 36095 SL Pilot New Zealander

238 and 234 Sqdns

Blake was born on February 13 1913 at Eketehuna and was educated at Southland Boys’ High School and Canterbury University. He graduated in 1934 with an MSc and he gained Honours in mathematics. In 1935 he was appointed a lecturer in Physics at Canterbury.

APO (AAF) 12.6.39 APO 24.8.39 PO 4.5.40

WILLIAM HIGGINS BLANE 1052333 AC 2 Radar Operator

After just missing a Rhodes Scholarship two years running, Blake applied to join the RAF as a University Entrant. Against stiff competition, he was accepted, possibly because of an outstanding athletic record. Blake sailed for England in November 1936 and on December 21 he began an elementary flying course at the Civil Reserve Flying School at Brough. Having proved his aptitude for flying, he was granted a Permanent Commission on March

British

604 Squadron

Blane joined the RAFVR in June 1940 at 3 RAF Depot, Padgate, as an Aircrafthand. After a short radar course at RAF Yatesbury, he was posted to 604 Squadron at Gravesend on July 20, as aircrew but with no flying training, rank or brevet. He flew at least one operational sortie during the Battle of Britain period, on September 5 1940, with Flight Lieutenant C D E Skinner as pilot. Blane was still with 604 in November 1940. No further service details traced.

9 1937. In late March he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand and with the course completed on October 20, he joined 17 Squadron at Kenley. Blake was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander in June 1938. On September 8 1939 Blake was approaching Croydon to land, when, realising that he was going to overshoot, he opened his throttle and his engine stopped. At 300 feet, he slowed to stalling speed, hit the chimney of a nurses’ home and flipped on to his back into the foundations of the new Purley Hospital. The cause of the engine failure was found to be hay in the air intake, the result of parking aircraft in the open at Croydon for the first time. A small modification by Rolls Royce stopped any further occurrence. Blake escaped with a cut head. On April 10 1940 he was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill, as an instructor, but on August 11 he went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge for a refresher course and took temporary command of 238 Squadron at St Eval on the 16th, as a Flight Lieutenant, when the CO, Squadron Leader H A Fenton was hospitalised after being shot down on August 8. On the 21st Blake destroyed a Ju 88, shared a Do 17 on the 27th, destroyed a Ju 88 on September 11 and a He 111 on the 15th. Blake relinquished his command when Fenton returned on the 13th and he left 238 on September 21, to take command of 234 Squadron, also at St Eval. He shared a Do 215 on November 24 and two Do 17s on the 29th, when 234 escorted the damaged destroyer HMS Javelin into Plymouth. On December 20 he damaged a Do 17. He was awarded the DFC (20.12.40). Blake shared a Bf 110 on March 11 1941, destroyed a Ju 88 on May 8 and a Bf 109 four days later. On July 10 234 escorted Blenheims to attack shipping at Cherbourg. After shooting down two Bf 109s and probably another, Blake was hit and ditched in the sea seven miles from the French coast. In twelve hours, with a favourable wind, he paddled his dinghy to within two miles of the Isle of Wight and was picked up. In late July 1941 Blake was appointed Wing Leader of the Polish Wing at Exeter and two months later he went as Wing Leader to Portreath. He was awarded the DSO (27.7.42). Over Dieppe on August 19 1942, Blake destroyed a FW 190 but was then himself shot down into the sea. After paddling all day and the following night, he was picked up by a German launch, when only five miles from Dover. Blake spent his long captivity working on a new kind of rotary engine, which in post-war years proved to be too expensive to develop. Released in May 1945, Blake remained in the RAF, holding staff appointments at home and overseas. He retired in January 1958 as a Wing Commander. He died in England on November 30 1981.

HOWARD PETER BLATCHFORD 37715 FL Pilot Canadian 17 and 257 Squadrons Blatchford, from Edmonton, Alberta, was born on February 25 1912. He was educated at Concordia College and Eastwood High School. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on February 3 1936, as a pupil pilot. On April 18 he was posted to 6 FTS, Netheravon and on January 10 1937, with training completed, he joined 41 Squadron at Catterick. On October 17 1939 Blatchford gained the first Canadian victory of the war, when he shared in the destruction of a He 111 25 miles E of Whitby. Blatchford joined 234 Squadron at Leconfield on November 1 1939, as a Flight Commander. This proved to be an administrative error and he rejoined 41 Squadron on the 4th. In April 1940 he went to 212 Squadron at Heston. Blatchford went to France to photograph bridges, concentrations of troops and movements. He flew back to Heston in early June. The squadron was disbanded on the 18th and absorbed by the Photographic Development Unit. On July 1 1940 Blatchford moved to St Eval, with ‘B’ Flight of the PDU. The Flight was redesignated the Photographic Reconnaissance Unit on July 8. Blatchford returned to Heston on August 17 and on September 30 1940 he joined 17 Squadron at Debden. He shared in destroying a Do 17 on October 2 and then had to make a forced-landing near Bacton, out of fuel. On October 4 Blatchford was posted to 257 Squadron at North Weald, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. The squadron met the Italian Air Force on November 11 1940 and Blatchford destroyed a Fiat BR 20 and shared another and damaged a Fiat CR 42 by ramming it with his propeller, he being out of ammunition. On November 17 he shot down a Bf 109 into the sea. He was awarded the DFC (6.12.40). On March 19 1941 he got a probable Ju 88 and on the night of May 11/12 he shot down a He111. Blatchford took command of 257 in July, when Squadron Leader R R S Tuck left to lead the Duxford Wing. n September Blatchford was promoted, to lead the Canadian Wing at Digby. On February 18 1942 he damaged a Do 217 and on April 25 shot down a FW 190. Soon after this Blatchford was rested. A return to operations, as Wing Leader of the Coltishall Wing, came on February 5 1943.

PO 9.3.37 FO 9.9.37 FL 9.9.39 SL 1.9.40 WC 1.10.46

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Netheravon from November 1941 to late January 1942. He was at 17 AFU, Watton until mid-March 1942, when he moved to 60 OTU, East Fortune. In July 1942 he joined 287 Squadron at Croydon, an AACU, equipped with Defiants. In January 1943 Blomeley went to 51 OTU, Cranfield, to convert to Mosquitos and in early April he joined 605 Squadron at Castle Camps, flying Mosquitos on night-intruder operations. During the night of August 17/18 1943 he destroyed a Bf 109 E of Schleswig. On September 21 Blomeley shot down two Ju 88s near the entrance of the Skagerrak and on November 9 he shot down a Bf 110 W of Aalborg. He was awarded the DFC (26.10.43). At this time Blomeley’s Mosquito had 14 swastikas painted on the nose, 9 of which he claimed as ‘confirmed’. Posted away in February 1944, he went to 60 OTU, High Ercall, as CFI. In mid-April he moved to 13 OTU, as Gunnery Leader and instructor. In July 1945 he carried out trials of the Tempest II at Middleton St George. Blomeley was released from the RAF in March 1946 and began training as a forester at the Forest of Dean Foresters’ School. He rejoined the RAF in early 1950, held several instructing posts and took part in the Coronation Review Flypast in 1953. Blomeley received the Queen’s Commendation in 1953 and was awarded the AFC (10.6.54). He was in 40 Squadron, flying Canberras at Wittering in 1954 and joined 138 Squadron at Gaydon in February 1955. The squadron’s Valiants took part in the Suez operations in October 1956, carrying out bombing raids on airfields at Fayid and Almanza, flying from a base in Malta. The squadron returned to Marham in December. Blomeley retired on February 20 1958 as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He lived in New Zealand for many years and was at some time working in the Forest Service. He retired to England in 1985 and died there on June 17 1991.

He destroyed two Fw 190s on March 18, damaged another on April 4 and probably another on May 2. The Wing escorted bombers to attack the power station at Amsterdam on May 3 1943. Blatchford was shot down and ditched in the sea forty miles off the English coast. Searches failed to find any trace of him. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 118. APO 30.3.36 PO 3.2.37 FO 3.11.38 FL 3.9.40

SL 1.12.41

ADOLF JARVIS BLAYNEY 90538 FO Pilot British 609 Squadron Blayney was educated at Stowe School. He joined the RAFVR on January 25 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740001). In 1938 Blayney transferred to 609 Squadron, AAF and was commissioned on November 20. He was called to full-time service on August 24 1939. On July 11 1940 Blayney destroyed a Bf 109. On July 29 he blacked out at 12000 feet, came to at 1000 feet and landed at Boscombe Down. Taken off operational flying, he went from 609 to 4 Ferry Pilot Pool on August 16. Blayney went to CFS on August 25 for an instructor’s course, after which he was posted to Training Command, remaining with it until his release from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. For his services as an instructor, Blayney was awarded the AFC (2.4.43). He died in 1997.

APO 7.5.38 PO 7.3.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.1.44 FL 21.5.46 APO (AAF) 20.11.38 PO 24.8.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41

FRANK BLENKHARN 1002007 Sgt Radar Operator

ERNEST BLOOR 564830 Sgt Pilot British

British

46 Squadron

25 Squadron Bloor went to Cockburn High School, Leeds. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in September 1930 and passed out in August 1933, as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He later applied for pilot training and was selected.

Born on April 28 1920, Blenkharn joined the RAFVR in May 1940 at 3 RAF Depot, Padgate for the duration of hostilities. After a short radar course, he was posted to 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath in September. He flew three operational sorties in October.

Bloor was with 46 Squadron by June 25 1940. On July 22 he shared a Do 17, on September 2 he destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 3rd he damaged a Do 17 but was himself shot down in combat over Canewdon and baled out, with burns on his face. His Hurricane, P 3024, crashed into the sea wall at Beckney Farm, South Fambridge. There is no further mention of Bloor in the squadron ORB up to the end of 1940, so his burns may have been serious enough to keep him off operations. He was killed on August 27 1941, when his Hurricane, Z 3843, crashed near Horsham, whilst on a searchlight cooperation flight. At the time of his death he was 27 and serving with No 1 Squadron. Bloor was buried near his home, in Stamford Cemetery, Lincolnshire. In the 1990s the site of Bloor’s fatal crash was included in a housing development and a road was named after him.

In the evening of December 7 1940 Blenkharn was one of the crew of a Blenheim, detailed to check the black-out over Peterborough. During the patrol the weather deteriorated and a bad storm developed. In very bad visibility the Blenheim collided with an aircraft which had been training pilots in night landings at Peterborough aerodrome. Blenkharn’s pilot, Flight Lieutenant J McC M Hughes and the gunner, Sergeant J R Friend, were both killed and six men from the other aircraft also lost their lives. Blenkharn himself spent three weeks in Peterborough Hospital and then four months in RAF Hospital, Rauceby. He did not fly again but went on to Flying Control duties, serving in various parts of Britain. He spent his last six months of service at Dum Dum in India. He was released from the RAF in early 1947. Blenkharn died in 1996.

DAVID HENRY BLOMELEY 40665 FO Pilot British 151 Squadron

KENNETH LESLIE OWEN BLOW 751684 Sgt Observer British 235 Squadron

Blomeley was born on May 12 1916, son of a headmaster. He was at King Edward’s School, Stafford in 1933/34. He applied for a short service commission in the RAF in December 1937 and was provisionally accepted.

Blow joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR about June 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer. He was called to full-time service on September 1. With training completed, he joined 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton from 4 B&GS, West Freugh on March 26 1940 and was with it throughout the Battle of Britain.

He began his ab initio flying at 7 E&RFTS, Desford on March 7 1938 and was posted to 11 FTS, Shawbury on May 7 1938. With training completed, he joined No 1 Squadron at Tangmere on December 17 1938 and he was still with it when it went to France in September 1939. Blomeley moved to 92 Squadron at Croydon on March 8 1940, then to 25 Squadron on the 21st and finally to 151 Squadron at North Weald on April 13 1940. He was attached to 607 Squadron in France from May 13 to 26, during which time he claimed to have destroyed five enemy aircraft. After rejoining 151 on May 27, Blomeley claimed a Bf 110 destroyed over Dunkirk on May 29. On June 8 1940 he was shot down by flak over Amiens and baled out. Evading capture, he escaped from Cherbourg in late June, with survivors from the 51st Highland Division. Back with 151, he damaged a Bf 110 on July 29. Blomeley made his last flight with the squadron on August 16, an uneventful one, from North Weald to Rochford. He was posted away to 9 FTS, Hullavington, as an instructor. Blomeley later took an instructors’ course at CFS, Upavon and instructed at No 1 FTS,

On November 19 1940 Blow was posted with his flight to RAF Aldergrove, where it combined with a flight from 236 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. He flew his first operational sortie with 272 on the 24th. In 1943 Blow was with 487 Squadron, as a Warrant Officer, flying in Mosquitos. Awarded the DFC (15.6.43), he was lost on December 10 1943 when his aircraft failed to return to Sculthorpe from a sweep over Germany. Blow was 22. He is buried in Den Ham General Cemetery, Netherlands. The pilot, Flight Sergeant Thomas Mair was also killed and is buried in the same cemetery.

MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER BINDLOSS BODDINGTON 88017 Sgt Pilot British 234 Squadron Boddington, who was born at Hawkshead in Lancashire, joined the RAFVR in 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740604). Called up on September 1 1939, he was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill on the 9th, on No 13 Course, for advanced training only, which he completed on November 6 1939.

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he commanded 152 from November 14 1940 to June 17 1941, when he was posted to 59 OTU, Crosby-on-Eden. On September 18 1941 Boitel-Gill was killed, when he dived into the fuel dump at Crosby-on-Eden. He was then Wing Commander Flying at 59 OTU. He was 30. Boitel-Gill was cremated at West Norwood Crematorium.

His whereabouts until he arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on May 6 1940 are unknown. He converted to Spitfires and then joined 249 Squadron on May 29. Boddington was posted to 234 Squadron at Church Fenton on June 9 1940. He claimed a Do 17 destroyed on August 12, he shot down a Ju 88 on the 14th, two Bf 110s on September 4 and destroyed BF 109s on the 5th and 6th. Boddington destroyed a Ju 88 on October 28, damaged a He 111 on November 2, damaged a Ju 88 on the 29th and destroyed a Do 17 on December 5. He was commissioned in November and awarded the DFM (26.11.40). Boddington damaged a Ju 88 on February 15 1941. Soon afterwards he was posted to 118 Squadron at Filton, as a Flight Commander. With his operational tour completed in September 1941, he went to HQ 10 Group and towards the end of the year he joined 286 Squadron at Filton, on anti-aircraft co-operation duties. In September 1942 Boddington was given command of 19 Squadron at Perranporth and led it until December. In May 1943 he was posted to North Africa, to command 242 Squadron. He took it to Malta in June and to Lentini East in Sicily in July. Boddington claimed a Bf 109 and a He 111 destroyed on July 10, shared a Ju 88 the next day and destroyed a Bf 110 on the 13th. He was awarded the DFC (10.9.43). He commanded 242 until its disbandment at Gragnano on November 4 1944. Boddington was released from the RAF in February 1946 as a Squadron Leader. He died in 1977, possibly in New Guinea. PO 11.11.40

PO 13.9.29 FO 13.3.31 FO (RAFO) 13.9.34 FL 22.4.40 SL 1.12.40

HENRY ALBERT BOLTON 754530 Sgt Pilot British 79 Squadron Bolton, of West Hartlepool, joined the RAFVR about July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and after his elementary training, he moved to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on March 25 1940, on No 46 Course. With training completed on July 11, Bolton joined 79 Squadron at Acklington two days later. The squadron moved south on the 27th, to Biggin Hill. On August 30 Bolton probably destroyed a Bf 109. Next day he was shot down in combat over Kenley, in Hurricane V 7200. He was killed, whilst attempting to make a forced -landing at Haliloo Farm, Warlingham. Bolton was 21. He is buried in Stranton Cemetery, Hartlepool.

FO 21.5.41 FL 21.5.42

CRELIN ARTHUR WALFORD BODIE 42790 PO Pilot British 66 Squadron

CAMILLE ROBESPIERRE BONSEIGNEUR 42791 PO Pilot Canadian 257 Squadron

Bodie was born at Kirton in 1920, and went to Ipswich School. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training on August 14 1939.

Bonseigneur was born in Gull Lake, Saskatchewan on May 27 1918. He joined the Royal Canadian Signals on September 28 1937 and was discharged by purchase on June 13 1939.

He went on to 9 FTS, Hullavington on November 6, on No 15 Course. With training completed, Bodie was posted to 66 Squadron at Duxford on May 13 1940. On July 8 he claimed a He 111 destroyed, on August 8 shared a He 111, on the 19th shared a probable He 111 and on the 20th he shared in destroying two Bf 110s. On the 31st Bodie shared a Do 17, on September 2 shared a He 111, on the 4th got a probable Bf 109, on the 6th damaged two Bf 109s, on the 11th destroyed a He 111 and on the 15th destroyed two Do 17s and shared in the destruction of two others. Bodie claimed a He 111 destroyed on September 18, a Bf 109 probably destroyed on the 24th, a Ju 88 damaged on October 5, a Bf 109 destroyed on the 11th, two more probably destroyed and two others damaged on the 12th and three probably destroyed on the 13th, 25th and November 14. He was awarded the DFC (8.11.40). In March 1941 Bodie was posted to 310 Squadron at Duxford, as a Flight Commander. He moved to 152 Squadron at Portreath in June 1941. He was killed in a flying accident on February 24 1942, possibly whilst performing aerobatics. He was 21. Bodie is buried in the churchyard of St Canice, Eglinton, Co Antrim.

Interviewed in Canada for an RAF short service commission, he was provisionally granted one. He went to England and began his elementary flying training on August 14 1939, as a pupil pilot. With his training completed, Bonseigneur was posted to 257 Squadron, at its reformation at Hendon on May 17 1940. He shared in the destruction of a Do 17, shot down into the sea off Brighton, on July 19. Shot down by Bf 109s over Essex on September 3 1940, Bonseigneur baled out but fell dead at The Grove, Ingatestone. His Hurricane, P 3518, crashed at Lodge Farm, Galleywood, Essex. He was 22 and is buried in Saffron Walden Cemetery, Essex. APO 23.10.39 PO 11.5.40

PETER VICTOR BOOT 76455 PO Pilot British

1 Squadron

Boot was born in Walsall on September 12 1916 and he was educated at Bishop’s Heath School, Sutton Coldfield. He joined the RAFVR in July 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740531), and he was called up on September 1 1939.

APO 23.10.39 PO 18.5.40 FO 18.5.41

DEREK PIERRE AUMALE BOITEL-GILL 28142 FL Pilot British 152 Squadron

He was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill on the 9th, on No 13 Course, for advanced flying training only. After completing his training, Boot joined 235 Squadron at Manston on November 6 1939. He arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on February 1 1940. The unit was redesignated 6 OTU on March 6. Boot converted to Hurricanes and was posted to No 1 Squadron on March 23. He joined the squadron in France on the 30th. Boot claimed a Bf 109 damaged on May 12, shared a Bf 110 on the 14th and destroyed a Do 17 on the 16th. On June 5 Boot forced a He 111 to land in a field near Rouen. Having expended all his ammunition in combat, he made diving passes on the straggling bomber until it went down. Boot also shot down a Do 17 on the same day. He flew back to England with the squadron on June 17. On August 31 1940 Boot damaged a Bf 110 and on September 1 he destroyed a Bf 109. Awarded the DFC (1.10.40), he was posted to 5 OTU on October 18, as an instructor. He was posted to CFS on February 22 1941. On September 8 1941 Boot joined 4 SFTS in Canada, as an instructor. There is a possibility that he may have returned to operations towards the end of the war. Released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant, Boot joined the family quarry

Boitel-Gill was born in 1911 at Thames Ditton and educated at Milbourn Lodge School and Steyne School, Worthing. He joined the RAF in 1929, went to 5 FTS, Sealand and joined 3 Squadron at Upavon on September 9 1930. He went on to the RAFO in 1934. Sometime personal pilot to the Nizam of Hyderabad, Boitel-Gill was a pilot with Imperial Airways. He was recalled to the RAF in April 1940 and on the 12th he joined 152 Squadron as a Flight Commander. On May 5 1940 Boitel-Gill was attached to 5 OTU, Aston Down. After he had converted to Spitfires, he was retained to assist in instructing new pilots on Defiants and rejoined 152 Squadron on July 27 1940. Boitel-Gill destroyed a Ju 88 on August12. On this day he took command of ‘A’ Flight, after Flight Lieutenant L C Withall was posted ‘Missing’. On the 15th Boitel-Gill destroyed two Bf 110s and a Ju 87, on the 18th another Ju 87, on September 25 a Ju 88 and a Bf 109, on the 26th a Ju 88 and on October 19 he damaged a Ju 88. Awarded the DFC (22.10.40),

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JAN BOROWSKI P 0250 FO Pilot

and mining business. When some of it was nationalised by the Labour Government, he went into property development and management. He died in September 1984. PO 1.12.39 FO 6.11.40 FL 6.11.41

FRED BOOTH 1002642 AC 2

Radar Operator

British

23 Squadron

Borowski arrived in England, probably from France after that country fell in June 1940. On September 25 Borowski went to 5 OTU, Aston Down and converted to Hurricanes and joined 302 Squadron at Northolt on October 17. The next day, in deteriorating weather conditions, Borowski was in Green Section of ‘B’ Flight, which became lost returning to Northolt from a patrol of the Maidstone area. Borowski was killed, when his Hurricane, P 3930, went into a steep dive, then crashed and burned out on Kempton Park racecourse, whilst attempting a forced-landing. Pilot Officer P E G Carter, also of Green Section 302, crashed and was killed within 200 yards of Borowski, on the racecourse. Two other 302 pilots, Pilot Officers S Wapniarek and A Zukowski were also killed in the same incident but crashed in other locations. Borowski was 28. He is buried in Northwood Cemetery, Middlesex.

He flew his first operational sortie on the 24th and continued to operate with 23 Squadron for the remainder of the Battle of Britain period. He was still serving with the squadron in November 1940. No further service details traced.

GLENDON BULMAR BOOTH 748586 Sgt Pilot British 85 Squadron Booth, of Sydenham, was educated at Brockley County School and worked for the County of London Electricity Company. He joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939.

REGINALD ARTHUR BOSWELL 742295 Sgt Pilot British 266 and 19 Squadrons

With training completed, he joined 85 Squadron at Debden from 7 OTU on July 15 1940. He damaged a Bf 109 in combat on August 29. The pilot managed a forced-landing at Pevensey and was captured. On the 30th Booth damaged a Bf 110 and on the 31st he probably destroyed another. On September 1 Booth was shot down by Bf 109s over Tunbridge Wells. He baled out, with burns and his parachute alight and was further injured in a heavy landing. His Hurricane, L 2071, crashed at Kingswoosd,

Boswell joined the RAFVR about October 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939, completed his flying training and was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 266 Squadron at Wittering on September 16 1940. Boswell flew no operational sorties with 266 and he went to 19 Squadron at Fowlmere on September 28. He flew his first operational sortie on October 9 and was still with the squadron in November 1940. No further service details traced.

Sanderstead. Booth died from his injuries on February 7 1941. He is buried in Crystal Palace Cemetery. He was 20 years old.

British

302 Squadron

Borowski was in the Polish Air Force before the war and in September 1939 he was serving with 113 Eskadra. He destroyed a Bf 109 on September 1 and shared in the destruction of Ju 87s on the 4th and 5th. He also probably destroyed a He 111 around the same time.

Booth joined the RAFVR at Padgate in June 1940, probably as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator. He later went to RAF Yatesbury for a short radar course, after which he joined 23 Squadron at Wittering on August 22.

JOHN JAMES BOOTH 171689 Sgt Air Gunner

Polish

600 Squadron

ROGER JOHN ERIC BOULDING 41249 FO Pilot British 74 Squadron

Booth joined 600 Squadron, AAF for four years before the war, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (800271). Called up on August 24 1939, he completed his training and had rejoined 600 Squadron at Northolt prior to June 1940.

Born on November 19 1919, Boulding joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell on August 29 1938, as a pupil pilot. He went to 8 FTS, Montrose and finished training at 11 FTS, Shawbury in June 1939.

He flew his first operational sortie on July 19 and continued to fly regularly throughout the Battle of Britain period and was still with 600 Squadron in November 1940. Booth later served in the Middle East and Malta. Commissioned in January 1944, he was released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flying Officer. He died in 1995.

With training completed, he joined 41 Squadron at Catterick on March 2 1940. His father, Air Commodore J A Boret, had commanded the squadron from May 1933 to February 1937. On August 15 1940 Boret probably destroyed a Ju 88 and on October 5 he damaged a Bf 109. On October 19 Boret was posted away from 41 to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, for service in Malta. Boret did not go to Uxbridge but may have gone to RAF Northolt with Sergeant C S Bamberger (qv) on October 21, for Hurricane experience in a 615 Squadron aircraft. Boret went direct to King George V Dock in Glasgow and reported to HMS Argus on the 23rd and then sailed for Malta. He was one of six pilots who flew off on November 16, in a flight of Hurricanes, led by an FAA Skua. A series of mishaps saw the Hurricanes run out of fuel and fall, one by one, into the sea, with the loss of all six pilots. Boret was 20. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7.

After a month at the Armament Training Camp at Penrhos, Boulding joined 52 Squadron at Upwood on July 27. Posted to 98 Squadron at Hucknall in October, he was sent to France, where he joined 142 Squadron at Berry-au-Bac on November 29 1939. The squadron was withdrawn to England on June 15 1940. In August Boulding volunteered for Fighter Command and joined 74 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on the 21st. He damaged a Ju 88 on September 14 and damaged a Do 17 on the 24th. He shared in the destruction of a Do 17 on October 5 1940, destroyed a Bf 109 on December 5, probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another on May 7 1941 and shot down a He 111 at night on May 10/11, which crash-landed, wheels up, in a field near Ashford, Kent. On a sweep over the French coast on June 17 1941, Boulding was shot down in Spitfire W 3251 by a Bf 109. He baled out and was taken prisoner. At some time he was in Stalag Luft 3 (PoW No 1353). Released in May 1945, Boulding went to 6(P) AFU on September 25, was posted to 10 OTU, Abingdon on February 12 1946, converted on to Lancasters at 1553 Heavy Conversion Unit at North Luffenham and took command of 35 Squadron at Stradishall on January 30 1947. He was posted away to HQ Bomber Command on October 22 1948. Boulding went to 203 AFT, Driffield in May 1950, followed by two months at the Central Fighter Establishment at West Raynham. He then took command of 249 Squadron on October 24 1950 at Deversoir, Egypt, with Vampires. He commanded the squadron until May 2 1953. He retired from the RAF on November 29 1966 as a Wing Commander. Boulding died on March 2 1993.

APO 19.8.39 PO 2.3.40

APO 29.10.38 PO 29.8.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.7.44 WC 1.1.54

PO 21.1.44 FO 22.7.44

ROBERT JOHN BORET 42554 PO Pilot British

41 Squadron

Boret joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary training on June 26 1939, as a pupil pilot.

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JOHN CLIFFORD BOULTER 37757 FL Pilot British 603 Squadron

which he was posted to Marrakesh, in Morocco. After the French Armistice in June 1940, Bouquillard and other pilots boarded a British ship at Casablanca that was transporting Polish troops to Britain. After arriving in London on July 19, the French pilots were sent to 4 S of TT St Athan. Eleven of them were posted to No 1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum on July 29 for testing and grading, including Bouquillard. On August 10 he went to RAF Odiham, where he flew Tiger Moths and Hectors with No 1 Fighter Training Squadron of the Free French Air Force. On the 18th he was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 245 Squadron at Aldergrove on September 12, moved to 615 Squadron at Prestwick on the 18th and to 249 Squadron at North Weald on October 1. Bouquillard damaged a Do 17 on October 16 and two days later he made a forcedlanding at Padfields Farm, Church Road, Thornwood Common, after running out of fuel on the landing circuit. He was shot down by a Bf 109 over North Kent on October 25 and made a forced-landing at Rochester. Seriouly wounded, Bouquillard was admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital at Chatham. He was posted from 249 to SHQ North Weald on November 6, as non-effective sick. After a short convalescence, he rejoined 249 in late November 1940. Bouquillard rejoined 615 Squadron, then at Northolt, on December 4. He was the oldest pilot on the squadron. Commissioned in February 1941, Bouquillard was appointed Compagnon de la Liberation. He was shot down by two Bf 109s on March 11 1941 and was killed when he dived into the ground. He was buried on the 15th. Bouquillard later became the first member of the Free French Air Forces to be appointed Membre du Conseil de l’Ordre de la Liberation. His remains were repatriated to France after the war.

Boulter was born in Barnes, London in 1912. He was commissioned in Class ‘AA’ (section ii) of the RAFO on March 20 1933 for five years. He relinquished his commission in April 1936, on being granted a short service commission in the RAF. On April 18 he went to 7 FTS, Peterborough and on completion of his course he joined No 1 Squadron at Tangmere on October 25. Boulter moved to 72 Squadron at Church Fenton on its being reformed there on March 23 1937. By September 2 1939 he was serving in the Ops Room at RAF Usworth. On October 6 he was posted to 603 Squadron, Turnhouse, for flying duties, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. On October 16 1939 he fired on a He 111 E of Aberdour. On March 20 1940 Boulter collided with a stationary Airspeed Oxford when landing at Montrose, in Spitfire l 1022. He was admitted to hospital, injured. His attachment to 603 ceased on May 27 1940 and Boulter was put on the squadron strength. On August 27 603 moved south to Hornchurch. Next day Boulter shot down a Bf 109 and he regained base, slightly wounded. On September 11 he damaged a He 111 and on the 14th he destroyed a Bf 109. Boulter was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on the 15th. On the 17th he shared a Bf 109, on the 23rd destroyed one and on the 30th damaged another. Boulter probably destroyed a Bf 109 on October 2 and damaged another on the 12th, shared a Bf 110 on November 7, shot down a Bf 109 on November 17 and probably destroyed a Fiat CR 42 over the Channel on the 23rd. He was awarded the DFC (6.12.40). On February 17 1941, Boulter had just landed, when his Spitfire was struck by a Spitfire taking off. He died next day from his injuries and is buried in Dirleton Cemetery, East Lothian. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in February 1941. His brother, SergeantPilot H H Boulter, was killed in an accident taking off from 11 OTU on August 13 1940. He is buried in Bassingbourn Cemetery. PO (RAFO) 20.3.33 FL 3.9.40

FO (RAFO) 20.9.34

APO 6.4.36

PO 10.2.37

CHARLES EARLE BOWEN 39488 FL Pilot British 607 Squadron

FO 10.11.38 Bowen was born at Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire in May 1916 of Anglo-Spanish parents. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training on December 21 1936, as a pupil pilot.

JOHN ERIC BOULTON 40362 FO Pilot British

310 Squadron

He went to 9 FTS, Thornaby on March 20 1937 and with training completed, he joined 77 Squadron at Honington on October 23. On May 2 1938 he was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill, as an instructor. Bowen joined 145 Squadron at Croydon on November 16 1939 from Training Command and on the 29th he went to 2 Ferry Pilot Pool at Filton. He joined 615 Squadron at Vitry-en-Artois in France on December 17 but moved to 607 Squadron the same day, based on the same aerodrome. On May 10 1940 Bowen shared in the probable destruction of a He 111 and damaged another. The squadron was withdrawn to England on May 22 and on July 1 1940 Bowen was detached from 607 to AFDU, Northolt, for a course. He rejoined 607 on the 13th. On August 15 he claimed a He 111 destroyed, another probably destroyed and another damaged, on September 15, flying from Tangmere, he claimed a Do 17 destroyed, a Bf 110 shared and a Ju 88 damaged. On the 26th he was shot down in a combat over the Isle of Wight. Bowen baled out over Calbourne and landed unhurt. On the 30th he damaged a Bf 110. On October 1 1940 Bowen was reported ‘Missing’, after a combat with Bf 110s over the Isle of Wight. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 4. He was 24 years old.

Boulton was born at Bosham, Sussex on November 24 1919. His father had been a Warrant Officer in the XIth Hussars before the Great War and he was later commissioned in the Sussex Yeomanry, serving in Gallipoli, Egypt and Palestine. He died in a car crash in 1929. Boulton was educated at Hastings Grammar School. He worked for the Buick Motor Company in London. He joined the RAF on a short service commission in October 1937. He began his flying training at No 1 E&RFTS, Hatfield on the 25th, as a pupil pilot. Boulton was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on January 22 1938. With training completed, he joined 29 Squadron at Debden on August 20 and moved to CFS, Upavon on October 23, for an instructors’ course. He returned to 2 FTS on December 23 1938, as a Qualified Flying Instructor. Boulton was attached to 310 Squadron at Duxford from 2 FTS on July 14 1940, to check the newly-arrived Czech pilots and help their conversion to Hurricanes. When 310 became operational in mid-August, Boulton, still only on attachment, asked if he could fly on operational sorties and was given consent by the Air Ministry. He flew his first one on August 20. He shared in destroying a He 111 on September 7. In an engagement over Croydon on the 9th, Boulton collided with Flight Lieutenant Sinclair of 310, lost control and struck a Bf 110. He did not bale out. The Hurricane, P 3888, crashed and burst into flames in Woodmansterne Lane, Woodmansterne. Sinclair, in Hurricane R 4084, baled out and sprained his ankle landing in a wood at Caterham. Boulton is buried in Bandon Hill Cemetery, Beddington, Surrey. He was awarded the Czech Military Cross (10.1.41).

APO 8.3.37 PO 21.12.37 FO 21.7.39 FL 3.9.40

NIGEL GREENSTREET BOWEN 41984 PO Pilot British 266 Squadron The elder son of the Rector of St Mary’s, Wallingford, Berkshire, Bowen was educated at Christ Church Cathedral School, Oxford and afterwards at St Edward’s School, Oxford. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on March 6 1939, as a pupil pilot. On completion of training, he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on November 6 1939, one week after its being reformed. Over Dunkirk on June 2 Bowen damaged a Bf 109. On August 12 he claimed a Ju 88 destroyed and another damaged. He was shot down and killed during a combat with Bf 109s on August 16 1940, in Spitfire N 3095, crashing in flames at

APO 9.1.38 PO 25.10.38 FO 25.4.40

HENRI JACQUES BOUQUILLARD 30495 Adjudant Pilot French 245, 615 and 249 Sqdns Bouquillard was born at Nevers on June 14 1908. A member of a well-to-do family, he had his own aeroplane in the 1930s. He was a Sergeant in the Reserve of the Chasseurs Alpin before the war. His interest in flying enabled him to transfer to l’Armée d l’Air, to carry out pilot training.

Adisham, Kent. Bowen was 20. He is buried in Wallingford Cemetery. APO 29.4.39 PO 6.3.40

Called up at the outbreak of war, Bouquillard went on an instructor’s course, after

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PETER DUNCAN BOWEN 42481 PO Pilot British 264 Squadron

then went to the Aircraft Delivery Unit at Takoradi. In July 1942 he was posted to 260 Squadron in the Western Desert and moved to 601 Squadron at LG 92 in October. He was killed on October 24 1942 when he crashed, after being seen to spin during a turn. Bowerman, aged 26, was a Warrant Officer. He is remembered on the Alamein Memorial, Column 249.

Bowen, from Ashford, Kent, joined the RAF as a candidate for a short service commission. He began his elementary flying training, as a pupil pilot, at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham on May 1 1939. He went on to 10 FTS, Ternhill on September 9 1939, on No 14 Course, which he completed on January 27 1940.

LEONARD DOUGLAS BOWMAN 174743 Sgt Air Gunner British 141 Squadron

He arrived at 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on March 8 1940. The unit was redesignated 5 OTU one week later. After converting to Defiants he joined 504 Squadron at Debden on April 13. Bowen was posted to 264 Squadron at Duxford on May 22 and served with it throughout the Battle of Britain. On March 18 1941 Bowen was seriously injured when, as he was taking off, he hit another Defiant, which had just landed and was taxying down the flare path instead of turning off it. In January 1944 Bowen was serving with 169 Squadron at Little Snoring. The unit was equipped with Mosquitos and carrying out intruder operations against enemy night fighters, ahead of heavy bomber raids on German targets. Bowen was reported ‘Missing’ after a night operation on February 13 1944. He was 23. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 201.

Born in Camberwell, London on October 19 1917, Bowman was the last of ten children, three boys and seven girls. One brother was killed in France, just before he was born and the other, originally in the London Scottish, volunteered for the RFC and qualified as a pilot. Bowman enlisted in the RAFVR at No 2 RAF Depot, Cardington in September 1939, for the duration of hostilities. He could not get on a pilots’ course but was accepted for Air Gunner duties (937487). He did a three week gunnery course at No 1 AAS, Manby from July 7 1940 and then joined 141 Squadron at Grangemouth on August 8. When the squadron converted to Beaufighters in August 1941 Bowman was posted to 410 (RCAF) Squadron on the 7th, recently formed at Ayr with Defiants. He went on a Gunnery Leaders’ Course on April 17 1942, after which he joined 159 Squadron on May 10. The squadron flew its Liberators to the Middle East, where it carried out long-range daylight raids. Bowman also served with 160 Squadron, which was later absorbed into 178 Squadron. Whilst with 178, he was awarded the DFM (27.4.43). Bowman had flown many operational sorties, including eight daylight attacks on targets in the Middle East. He returned to the UK in 1943 and instructed for a while at RAF Jurby, Isle of Man. Back in the Middle East, Bowman served with 31 (SAAF) Squadron on Liberators. Commissioned in April 1944, he went to Southern Rhodesia and instructed at Moffat. Bowman returned to the UK in 1945, spent some time as Adjutant at Boreham, near Chelmsford and was released in November 1945, as a Flying Officer. He died on July 4 1995.

APO 19.8.39 PO 1.5.40 FO 1.2.41 FL 1.2.42

HUGH BOWEN-MORRIS 758084 Sgt Pilot British

74, 66, 64, 616 & 92 Sqdns

Bowen-Morris joined the RAFVR in June 1939 and began flying training at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty. He was called up on September 1, went to 3 ITW at Hastings and then to 3 E&RFTS, Hamble in November. He went to 14 FTS, Kinloss, on No 7 Course. The FTS moved to Cranfield in April 1940.With training completed on August 3, he arrived at 7 OTU next day. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 74 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on the 26th but stayed only one day, moving on to 66 Squadron at Coltishall on the 28th. After being posted to 64 Squadron on September 10, Bowen-Morris moved to 616 Squadron two days later. He is last mentioned in 616 Squadron’s ORB on September 20, an aerobatics exercise. Bowen-Morris finally went to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill and flew his first operational sortie there on September 27, during which he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 and damaged a Do 17 and then made a crash-landing back at Biggin Hill, damaging Spitfire, R 6760. On October 29 he probably destroyed a Bf 110. Still with 92, Bowen-Morris shared a Ju 87 on February 5 1941, destroyed a Bf 109 on May 9 and another on June 16. He was shot down during a fighter sweep over Northern France on June 23 1941. He was captured, seriously wounded and had his right arm amputated. In an exchange of prisoners in October 1943, Bowen-Morris was repatriated. He was discharged from the RAF in November 1943 as a Warrant Officer. He was a director of john brown shipbuilders and died in 1991.

PO 5.4.44 FO 5.10.44

BENJAMIN HARVEY BOWRING 90105 FO Pilot British 600 and 111 Squadrons Born in April 1918, Bowring was educated at Uppingham School and learned to fly at the Brooklands Flying Club in 1937. He joined 600 Squadron, AAF in 1938 and was commissioned in July. Called up to full-time service on August 24 1939, he served with 600 until August 24 1940, when he was posted to 111 Squadron at Debden. On August 30 he damaged a Bf 110, on the 31st probably destroyed a Bf 110 and damaged another, on September 2 he probably destroyed a He 111 and damaged a Bf 110, on the 4th destroyed a Bf 109, on the 5th destroyed a Bf 109, probably destroyed another and damaged a hird and on the 6th destroyed a Ju 88. Bowring was wounded in the arm on the 6th and did not return to the squadron until October 24. He was shot down in early November and admitted to hospital, wounded. After recovery, he joined 260 Squadron at Skitten on December 7 1940, recentlyreformed at Castletown, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. In May 1941 the squadron embarked on the carrier HMS Victorious. At Gibraltar it transferred on to HMS Ark Royal and on June 14 flew off to Malta. After refuelling, it went on to Egypt and eventually arrived in Haifa to take part in the Syrian campaign. Bowring served with the squadron detachment at Beirut. He returned to the UK in October 1941 and was posted to an Armament Officer’s course. He later took command of 278 (ASR) Squadron at Coltishall. Bowring led the squadron until its disbandment in September 1945. By that time it had rescued 998 men from the sea. Bowring was released in 1945 as a Squadron Leader. He died in 1994.

OSWALD ROBERT BOWERMAN 741649 Sgt Pilot British 222 Squadron Bowerman, of Ealing, Middlesex, joined the RAFVR about May 1938. In September 1939 the FAA was short of pilots and after Bowerman was called up, he was posted to Donibristle and joined the Torpedo-Spotter-Reconnaissance Flight. He was later posted to 770 Squadron for deck-landing training on HMS Argus, in the Western Mediterranean. He was offered a transfer to the FAA but declined and was posted to 3 B&GS, Aldergrove as a staff pilot. On May 4 1940 Bowerman was recalled to the FAA and joined 759 (T) Squadron at Eastleigh, for a refresher deck-landing course. He was with 804 Squadron at Hatston by May 23. By June the RAF was short of pilots and Bowerman was recalled on the 11th and posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 17th. After converting to Spitfires he joined 222 Squadron at Hornchurch on July 1 1940. He flew his first, and only, operational sortie with the squadron on July 15, a convoy patrol. On July 18 Bowerman was detached and told to report to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, where he became one of a group of nine sergeants and one officer. They were flown to Hullavington, picked up Hurricanes, flew them to Abbotsinch and were embarked on the carrier HMS Argus. They were joined by four more officers, told their destination was Malta and they were now 418 Flight. The Argus sailed on July 23, arrived at Gibraltar and left for Malta on the 31st. At dawn on August 2 the Hurricanes flew off to Luqa. On August 3 Bowerman was formally posted to 418 Flight. The Flight and the Malta Fighter Flight were amalgamated into 261 Squadron on August 16 1940. Bowerman left Malta for Egypt on April 7 1941. He ferried a Hurricane to Greece and

PO (AAF) 18.7.38 PO 24.8.39 FO 18.1.40 FL 15.1.41 SL 1.3.42

WALTER STAFFORD BOWYER 39607 FL Pilot South African 257 Squadron Bowyer was born in Durban on April 16 1914 and went to Durban High School. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty on March 1 1937.

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Called up in September 1939, Boyd was posted in October to 2 FTS, Brize Norton, on No 42 Course, which began on October 9 and ended on March 23 1940. With training completed, he arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on April 6 1940 and, after converting to Blenheims, he joined 604 Squadron on May 8 and moved to 600 Squadron at Manston on May 11. On September 30 1940 Boyd flew 600’s first Beaufighter patrol, with Pilot Officer R C Haine. In November 1940 Boyd teamed up with Pilot Officer A J Glegg, forming another of those long and successful night-fighting partnerships. From December 16 to 28 1940 Boyd was at No 1 Blind Approach School at Watchfield, on No 8 Course. On May 16 1941 Boyd and Glegg destroyed a Ju 88, on October 10 a He 111, on December 2 another He 111 and on January 25 1942 a He 111. They were both awarded the DFC (9.1.42). On March 7 they shot down a He 115 within sight of the airfield at Predannack. Boyd was posted to HQ Fighter Command, as Squadron Leader Night Training in September 1942. He took command of 219 Squadron at Scorton in March 1943, again flying with Glegg. The squadron went to North Africa in early June 1943, became operational at Algiers on June 30 and on that day Boyd and Glegg shot down two Ju 88s. On August 25 they destroyed another, on September 6 a He 111 and on the 18th another. Boyd was awarded the DSO (3.3.44). The squadron returned to the UK in February 1944 and Boyd commanded it until August, when he went to HQ Fighter Command, as Wing Commander Night Operations. In May 1945 he was appointed Air Attaché in Dublin. He was released from the RAF in February 1946 and went to work for Vickers-Armstrong in March. Boyd died in 2014.

He went on to 3 FTS, South Cerney. Training completed, he was posted to 3 Squadron at Kenley in late November 1937. Bowyer was detached to 3 Armament Training Station, Sutton Bridge on February 6 1939, to take an Air Firing Instructor’s course. He rejoined 3 Squadron on March 1 and was still with it at the outbreak of war. He went to France with the squadron on May 10 1940, to Merville. On the 12th he destroyed two Ju 87s near Louvain and on the 14th he shared in destroying a Bf 110. The squadron was withdrawn to Kenley on May 20. When 257 Squadron was reformed at Hendon on May 17 1940, Bowyer joined it on the 19th, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant and ‘B’ Flight Commander. He relinquished this post on June 4, on the arrival of Flight Lieutenant N M Hall. Bowyer flew one operational sortie before becoming non-effective sick with jaundice on July 17. After returning to the squadron from sick leave, he went down with appendicitis and after more sick leave, Bowyer was posted away to 2 AACU, Gosport on October 4 1940. He was killed on January 24 1942, as a Squadron Leader with 2 AACU. In Gladiator K 7935, he collided with a balloon cable and crashed at Fort Grange, Gosport. Bowyer is buried in Ocklynge Cemetery, Eastbourne, Sussex. APO 3.5.37 PO 1.3.38 FO 1.9.39 FL 3.9.40

ADRIAN HOPE BOYD 39101 FL Pilot British

145 Squadron Born on January 1 1913 in Sialkot, India, Boyd enlisted in the Royal Navy as a cadet in 1926. He passed out at Naval College on May 1 1930 and was commissioned as a Midshipman in the Executive Branch of the Royal Navy on January 1 1931. In 1933 he became an Acting Sub-Lt and on May 3 1934 he resigned.

PO (RAFVR) 18.10.38 FO 18.4.40 FL 18.4.41 SL 1.6.42

ROBERT FINDLAY BOYD 90165 FL Pilot British 602 Squadron

He entered the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio training on July 13 1936, as a pupil pilot. He was posted to 2 FTS, Digby on September 19 and with his training completed, he joined 65 Squadron at Hornchurch on May 22 1937. Boyd went to 145 Squadron at Croydon on October 22 1939, as ‘B’ Flight Commander and he was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant. In May 1940 145 was operating over Northern France. Boyd destroyed two Ju 87s and probably another on May 22 and two Bf 110s and probably another on the 27th. Next day he was shot down into the sea near Dunkirk and was picked up. On June 1 he destroyed a Bf 109 and a Bf 110 and damaged another Bf 110. For the actions of these ten days, he was awarded the DFC (21.6.40). He took temporary command of 145 on June 15 and 16th. On July 3 Boyd shared in destroying a He 111, on the 11th he claimed a Bf 110 shot down, on the 18th he shared a He 111, on the 22nd he shared a Do 17 and on August 8 destroyed two Bf 109s, two Bf 110s, a Ju 87 and damaged another Ju 87. He again took temporary command of 145 from August 12 to 25. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (20.8.40) and attended an investiture at Buckingham Palace on September 3. During the night of August 26/27 Boyd damaged a He 111 off St Abb’s Head. He took command of 145 Squadron, with effect from September 16 1940, as an Acting Squadron Leader, in the absence of Squadron Leader J R A Peel.He shared in the destruction of an Arado Ar 196 S of St Catherine’s Point on October 12 and on the 15th shot down a Bf 109 off the Isle of Wight. Boyd relinquished his command on November 18, when Peel returned. He was posted away to A & AEE, Boscombe Down on November 25. In December 1940 Boyd was posted to an OTU, as an instructor, but returned to operations when he took command of 501 Squadron at Ibsley in mid-June 1941. On July 7 he destroyed a Ju 88 at night and on the 24th he claimed two Bf 109s. Boyd was appointed Wing Leader at Middle Wallop on August 2 1941 and on October 13 he damaged a Bf 109. When he was awarded the DSO (2.12.41), he was credited with sixteen enemy aircraft destroyed. In 1944 Boyd commanded 281 Wing in Italy, as an Acting Group Captain. He left the RAF in 1947 as a Wing Commander and died on January 21 1975. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in October 1940. Midshipman 1.5.30 Acting Sub-Lt 1.5.33 FL 3.9.40 SL 2.11.41 WC 1.1.44

APO 7.9.36

PO 13.7.37

Born in East Kilbride, Scotland on June 8 1916, Boyd joined 602 Squadron, AAF in 1935 and was commissioned in November. He was called to full-time service in early September 1939. On November 30 Boyd was on an afternoon flight from Markinch when he saw an enemy aircraft going into cloud. He closed and fired a two second burst from 400 yards but the enemy aircraft disappeared with no apparent sign of damage. On May 20 1940 Boyd was attached to RAF Turnhouse from 602 for Ops Room duties. He rejoined the squadron on June 3. On July 7 1940 he shared in destroying a Ju 88 off St Abb’s Head. The squadron moved south in August to Westhampnett. On the 15th Boyd shared a Do 17, on the 16th he shot down a Ju 87 and shared a He 111 and on the 18th he destroyed a Bf 109, a Ju 87 and damaged another. Boyd shared a Ju 88 on August 19, destroyed two Bf 109s on the 25th, another Bf 109 and a Do 17 on September 4, got a Bf 109 on the 11th and damaged another. On the 21st he shared a Ju 88, on the 26th shot down a Bf 109 and probably another, on October 2 he shared a Ju 88 and on November 13 he shared a Ju 88. Boyd was awarded the DFC (24.9.40) and a Bar (25.10.40). On December 21 1940 Boyd took command of 54 Squadron at Catterick. He destroyed a Bf 110 on April 17 1941, probably destroyed a Bf 109 on June 22, shot down a Bf 109 on the 26th, destroyed one and damaged another on July 8 and destroyed two more on July 10 and 17. Soon afterwards Boyd was posted to 58 OTU, Grangemouth, then moved to 57 OTU, Hawarden in October, remaining there until December 1941, when he was appointed Wing Leader at Kenley. Boyd was flying with Victor Beamish on February 12 1942, when they spotted the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau in the Channel. On February 19 Boyd damaged a Bf 109, on the 28th he got a probable FW 190 and on April 12 he damaged two FW 190s. The citation for Boyd’s DSO (10.4.42) stated that he had destroyed a total of twentytwo enemy aircraft. In June 1942 Boyd was posted to the Far East and at some time commanded 293 Wing in Burma. Boyd received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.45). He was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Group Captain. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in October 1940. In the post-war years Boyd flew charter flights for Scottish Aviation, later tried pig farming and herring fishing. He then moved to Skye, where he kept the Ferry Inn at Uig. Boyd died suddenly on February 22 1975 at the home of his old RAF friend George Pinkerton.

FO 13.1.39

ARCHIBALD DOUGLAS McNEILL BOYD 72461 FO Pilot British 600 Squadron Born in Sheffield in 1918, Boyd went to Harrow School and then Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Engineering. He learned to fly there with the University Air Squadron in 1938. Boyd was commissioned into the RAFVR in October 1938 and he continued his flying at 18 E&RFTS, Fairoaks.

PO (AAF) 2.11.35 FO (AAF) 2.5.37 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.40 WC 1.3.42

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CYRIL BOYLE 143495 Sgt Observer

British

Awarded the DSO (9.10.42), Braham was promoted to Acting Wing Commander in January 1943 and he took command of 141 Squadron at Ford, taking Gregory with him. During the night of the 20/21st they destroyed a Do 17, on June 14/15 a Bf 110, on the 16/17th they damaged a Ju 88 and on the 24/25th they shot down a Bf 110. Gregory left the squadron soon after. On August 9/10 Braham, again flying with Jacobs, shot down a Bf 110, on the 17/18th two more Bf 110s, on September 27/28 a Do 217 and on the 29/30th he destroyed a Bf 110 and damaged a Ju 88. Braham was awarded a second Bar to the DFC (15.6.43) and a Bar to the DSO (24.9.43). He led 141 Squadron until October 1943, when he was sent for a course at the Army Staff College at Camberley. In February 1944 Braham was posted to a staff job at 2 (Light Bomber) Group, to assist in the work of night interdiction. He was joined by Gregory and Jacobs. Braham had been given the AOC’s permission to fly occasional sorties. On March 5 1944 he shot down a He 177, on the 24th a Ju 52 and a Ju W-34 and on April 4 a Bu 131. On each sortie he flew in a Mosquito of 613 Squadron. On April 13 Braham shot down a He 111 and a FW 58 and on the 29th a FW 190. Both sorties were in a Mosquito of 305 Squadron. Using one from 21 Squadron, Braham destroyed a Ju 88 N of Copenhagen on May 7 1944 and on the 12th, in a 107 Squadron Mosquito, he destroyed a FW 190 near Aalborg; then, damaged and out of fuel, he crash-landed on the sea and was picked up by a Royal Navy trawler. It was Braham’s twenty-ninth and final victory. Braham’s 1944 victories on March 5, April 4, 13 and 29 and May 12 were all partnered by Gregory. Braham was awarded a second Bar to the DSO (13.6.44) and on June 25 1944 he was shot down by Leutnant Robert Spreckels in a FW 190. He crashed at Ringköbing Fiord and he and his Australian navigator were captured. Braham was sent to Stalag Luft 3 at Sagan (PoW No 6623). He was later moved to Marlag Milag Nord, near Bremen and, after a forced march to Lübeck, he was released there on May 2 1945. As well as his other awards, Braham had the C de G (Belg), with Palm and the Belgian Order of the Crown, with Palm. Granted a Permanent Commission after the war, he was awarded the AFC (1.1.51) and he resigned in May 1952 to take up an appointment in the RCAF. In 1954 he commanded 432 Squadron, an all-weather jet fighter unit at North Bay, N of Toronto. In 1960 he was posted to the staff of SHAPE HQ, Paris. Braham retired from the RCAF in 1970 as a Group Captain. He settled in Nova Scotia and died there on February 7 1974.

236 Squadron

Boyle joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR about June 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer (755315). He was called up on September 1 1939 and went to 4 ITW. He was on No 1 Air Observer Course at 11 Air Observer Navigation School, Hamble from November 20 1939 to March 9 1940, after which he was posted to a B&GS to complete his training. Boyle joined 236 Squadron at Thorney Island on July 31 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on August 3. He was posted with his flight to RAF Aldergrove on November 19, where it combined with a flight from 235 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. He flew his first sortie with 272 on the 20th. Commissioned in January 1943, Boyle was released in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died on July 6 1971. PO 24.1.43 FO 24.7.43 FL 24.1.45

JOHN GREER BOYLE 40204 FO Pilot Canadian

41 Squadron

The son of a doctor, Boyle was born on March 27 1914 in Castlemain, Ontario. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his flying training on August 23 1937, as a pupil pilot. He was posted to 9 FTS, Hullavington on October 24 and after completing his training, he went as a staff pilot to No 1 Air Observers’ School at North Coates on August 15 1938. Boyle joined 41 Squadron at Catterick on May 5 1940. He was attached to 5 OTU, Aston Down on May 22, where he converted to Spitfires. He ceased to be attached on June 9 and joined 611 Squadron at Digby on the 11th. He rejoined 41 Squadron at Catterick on June 15. On August 11 Boyle shared in the destruction of a Ju 88, on September 5 he destroyed a Bf 109, on the 9th a He 111, on the 15th destroyed a Bf 109 and shared a He 111 and on the 17th he destroyed two Bf 109s. On September 28 1940 Boyle was shot down and killed in combat over Charing. His Spitfire, X 4426, crashed and burned out at Erriotts Farm, Dadmans, Lynstead. Boyle was 26. He is buried in Lynstead New Churchyard, Kent.

APO 7.5.38 PO 7.3.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 22.3.43 SL 1.8.47

HENRY GEORGE KENELM BRAMAH Sub-Lieutenant (FAA) Pilot British 213 Squadron Bramah entered the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on March 13 1939, with the rating of Midshipman (A).

APO 24.10.37 PO 23.8.38 FO 23.3.40

JOHN RANDALL DANIEL BRAHAM 40667 FO Pilot British 29 Squadron

He did his elementary flying training at 20 E&RFTS from June 26 1939 and moved on to No 1 FTS, Leuchars on September 4, on No 5 Course, which ended on January 13 1940. Bramah was one of the pilots attached to the RAF on June 15 1940. He arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on June 17, where he converted to Hurricanes and then joined 213 Squadron at Exeter on July 1. Bramah flew three times on July 15. On the first sortie, a scramble, he destroyed a Do 17. The second was a convoy patrol. On the third, another scramble, he was shot down by return fire from a Do17 over Old Mill Creek, near Dartmouth. He baled out, badly wounded and was rescued from the sea by the destroyer HMS Scimitar. He refused to have his arm amputated. His recovery was slow and he did not return to 213 Squadron. In 1945 Bramah was Flight Deck Officer on HMS Glasgow. He stayed on in the Navy, retired in 1955 and died in 1973.

Braham was born in Bath on April 6 1920, the son of a vicar. He was educated at Taunton Grammar School, left there in late 1936 and went to work as a boy clerk for the Lancashire County Police at Wigan. Braham applied for an RAF short service commission in December 1937 and began his ab initio course at 7 E&RFTS, Desford on March 7 1938, as a pupil pilot. He moved on to 11 FTS, Shawbury on May 7. At the end of the course he joined 29 Squadron at Debden on December 17 1938. Braham’s first victory came on the night of August 24 1940, flying with Sergeant A A Wilsdon, with a He 111 shot down in the Humber area. On September 6 Braham and two others were injured in a car accident. He was admitted to RAF Hospital Rauceby, with a badly lacerated back. He was discharged on the 27th and sent on sick leave. Braham returned to duty in October and flew his next operational sortie on the 11th. He was on No 7 Course at No 1 Blind Approach School, Watchfield from December 9 to 20 1940. He was awarded the DFC (17.1.41) and decorated by the King in a ceremony at RAF Waddington. On March 13 1941 Braham destroyed a Do 17 and on May 8 a He 111. In June 1941 he teamed up with Sergeant W J Gregory. It was the start of a long and successful partnership. During the night of June 23/24 they probably destroyed a He 111, on July 6/7 they shot down a Ju 88, on September 12/13 a He 111, on the 28/29th they damaged a He 111, on October 19/20 destroyed a Do 17 and on the 24/25th another He 111. Braham was awarded a Bar to the DFC (25.10.41) and rested from operations, going to 51 OTU, Cranfield as an instructor in January 1942. During the night of June 6/7 1942, flying in a Beaufighter of 29 Squadron, Braham shot down a Do 217 into the sea off Sandwich. Later in the month he rejoined 29 at West Malling, as a Flight Commander. Braham, again flying with Gregory, shot down a Do 217 during the night of August 9/10. He got a probable Ju 88 on the 24/25th and destroyed a Ju 88 and damaged another on the 28/29th, these three flying with Flight Lieutenant H Jacobs. Braham, flying with Gregory, damaged a Do 217 in daylight on October 19 and destroyed a Do 217 during the night of October 31/November 1. He shot down a Ju 88 in daylight on October 26, flying with Sergeant Heywood.

Midshipman 13.3.39 Acting Sub-Lt 13.1.40 Sub-Lt 14.6.40 Lt 13.7.42 Lt-Cdr 13.7.49 Cdr 31.12.52

GUY RAUSTROM BRANCH 90137 FO Pilot British 145 Squadron Educated at Eton, Branch went to Balliol College, Oxford. He joined 601 Squadron, AAF in late 1936 and was commissioned in May 1937. On February 11 1938 he was on an instructional crosscountry flight in a Demon, with Flying Officer Crawley. After refuelling at RAF Netheravon, they took off in poor weather, just missed the hangars and crashed in flames on the road nearby. Branch extricated himself from the wreckage, but finding Crawley still trapped, he went back into the flames and pulled him out. For this act he was awarded the Empire Gallantry Medal (25.3.38). Branch went to France with ‘A’ Flight of 601Squadron on May 17 1940. On the 20th he destroyed a Do 17. The flight

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convert to Hurricanes. On October 2 he made a forcedlanding in Hurricane L 1581, following engine failure. On October 10 Brejcha joined 43 Squadron at Usworth. During November 1940 he was posted to 257 Squadron at Coltishall. On February 4, flying Hurricane P 3705 he shot down a Do 17, which had probably already been damaged by anti-aircraft fire and fire from Pilot Officer Barnes of 257 Squadron.. It crashed off shore, near Corton, Lowestoft. On June 19 1941, while flying Tiger Moth N 6825, from Farnborough, Brejcha crashed into the sea between Southwold and Lowestoft. He baled out and his body was washed ashore. Brejcha is buried in Scottow Cemetery, Norfolk.

rejoined the squadron at Tangmere on May 22. Branch was posted to 145 Squadron, also based at Tangmere, on June 1. On July 15 1940 Branch shared in the probable destruction of a Do 17 and on August 8 he claimed the destruction of two Ju 87s. He failed to return from a combat S of Swanage on August 11. His Hurricane, P 2951, crashed into the sea and his body was later washed up on the French coast. He was 26 and is buried in the churchyard at Quiberville in France. PO (AAF) 7.5.37 FO (AAF) 29.1.39 FO 24.8.39

GEORGE BROWN BRASH 639109 Sgt Wop/AG British

248 Squadron

Brash, from Edinburgh, joined the RAF in March 1939, as an Aircrafthand. He remustered as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. With training completed, Brash was posted to 248 Squadron at Dyce in July 1940. He flew his first operational sortie on August 9.

JACK STEPHEN BRENNAN 391875 Sgt Air Gunner New Zealander

23 Squadron

Brennan was born in Auckland on July 18 1918. He volunteered for aircrew duties in September 1939 and reported for ground training at Weraroa on December 18, moving to Ohakea in mid-January 1940 for gunnery training.

On September 28 Brash was one of the crew of a Blenheim which engaged and damaged a Do 18 over the North Sea. His aircraft was hit by return fire and the pilot, Pilot Officer C C Bennett, and the observer Sergeant G S Clarke were slightly wounded. With his fuel tanks damaged, Bennett headed rapidly for home. It transpired that the enemy aircraft had to land on the sea and was abandoned by its crew before it sank. Brash failed to return from a reconnaissance operation to the Norwegian coast on October 1 1940, in Blenheim R 3626. He, Pilot Officer Bennett and Sergeant Clarke were all reported ‘Missing’. They are remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 12.

On March 23 Brennan sailed for England in the SS Akaroa and arrived at Tilbury on May 9. He was posted to 5 OTU, firstly at Chivenor and then Aston Down. Brennan joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston on July 6 1940. In the evening of August 21, on flarepath duty, Brennan was struck by a Blenheim coming in to land and he was killed. He is buried in All Saints’ churchyard, Wittering, Cambridgeshire (formerly Northamptonshire).

REGINALD ARTHUR BREEZE 54089 Sgt Pilot British 266 and 222 Squadrons COLIN PETER NOEL BRETT 39850 FO Pilot British 17 Squadron

Breeze joined the RAF in September 1933, as an Aircrafthand (516456). He remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot on August 8 1939, as a Corporal.

Brett was born on September 5 1912 in Norwich and grew up in the city. His father served in the Royal Flying Corps in the First World War. C P N Brett joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on May 10 1937, as a pupil pilot.

He did his elementary flying training at 12 E&RFTS, Wick, and moved on to 3 FTS, South Cerney on October 23, on No 30 Course, which ended on April 27 1940. He went to No 1 B&GS, Pembrey, as a Sergeant-Pilot. Breeze was attached to No 4 (C) Ferry Pilot Pool on May 15 1940. On the 28th he made a forced-landing at Tangmere, in Hurricane P 3590, when the port wheel would not retract. On June 7 he crashed into telephone wires in poor visibility at St Cyrus, whilst ferrying a Tiger Moth from Cambridge to Lossiemouth. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 2, converted to Spitfires, joined 266 Squadron at Wittering on the 16th and went to 222 Squadron at Hornchurch on October 1. On November 8 Breeze’s Spitfire, N 3164, was damaged in combat and he landed at Martlesham Heath. As he took off again, the aircraft caught fire and crashed and burned out at Oakley Poultry Farm, Mundersley Heath. Breeze escaped unhurt. He was posted from 266 to 611 Squadron on December 13 1940 and he joined it at Rochford on the 14th. He was commissioned in September 1943 and was killed on January 28 1945, serving with 151 Repair Unit (Aircraft). Breeze is buried in Calais Southern Cemetery, France.

He was posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough on July 17 and with training completed, he joined 29 Squadron at Debden on February 19 1938. On August 2 he and Leading Aircraftman Miller abandoned a Hawker Demon near High Wycombe owing to ground mist and lack of petrol. Both landed by parachute uninjured. The aircraft crashed near the Old Plow Inn at Speen. On July 1 1940 Brett was posted away from 29 to 5 OTU, Aston Down and, after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 17 Squadron at Debden on the 12th. He was posted away to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 16, possibly as a flying instructor. On September 21 he was caught in an air raid in London, near Shepherd Market, Mayfair and was buried in rubble from a building, but seems to have suffered no significant injury. He was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. Brett worked as an advertising account executive for a time. Brett died in 1984. APO 5.7.37 PO 31.5.38 FO 31.1.40 FL 31.1.41

PO 3.9.43 FO 3.3.44

JOHN BREWSTER 90995 PO Pilot British

VACLAV BREJCHA 787506 Sgt Pilot Czechoslovakian

Brewster was born, on March 16 1916 at his parents’ house, Winsley Hurst, Hartwith, Yorkshire and was educated at Repton and St John’s College, Cambridge. He trained as a land agent.

43 Squadron

Brejcha was born in Zivotice on April 13 1915. He was in the Czech Air force before the war. When the Germans took over the country on March 15 1939 the Czech Air Force was disbanded and Brejcha was demobilised. He fled to Poland and, with other Czechoslovak airmen, he sailed from Gdynia to France.

616 and 615 Squadrons

He joined 616 Squadron, AAF at Doncaster before the war. He was called to full-time service on August 24 1939. On September 22 Brewster was slightly injured as a passenger in Hind K 6757 which stalled on take off for an instructional flight due to incorrect assembly of elevator controls. On October 7 Brewster was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton, on No 42 Course. With training completed went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 28, where he converted to Hurricanes. On May 15 Brewster and others were posted to PDC, Uxbridge, for allocation to a squadron in France. Instead, on June 2, he returned to 616 Squadron at Rochford.On July 1, with the Squadron now at Leconfield, Brewster shared in destroying a He 111 over the Yorkshire coast. On August 19 he went south with the squadron to Kenley. On August 25 Brewster was

On arrival in France he enlisted in l’Armee de l’Air and was initially assigned to CIB at Pau and on October 6 1939 he transferred to CIC Chartres for retraining on French equipment. On May 27 1940 he was posted, with the rank of Sergeant, to GCIII/10 and then on June 4 1940 to GCI/4, equipped with Curtiss H-75Cs. With the French capitulation imminent he was released from service with l’Armee de l’Air and evacuated to England. Brejcha was accepted into the RAFVR with the rank of Sergeant and he arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge from the Czechoslovak Depot, Cosford, on September 20 1940, to

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MICHAEL FEATHERSTONE BRIGGS 86346 PO Pilot British 234 Squadron

attached to 615 Squadron, also stationed at Kenley. During the afternoon of the 26th, he claimed a Bf 109 probably destroyed over the Thames estuary, during one of three sorties he flew that day. By September 1 Brewster was back with 616 and claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and two others damaged on that day. On November 5 he crashed in a Spitfire at Kirton-inLindsey, landing in bad visibility and adverse weather conditions. He was unhurt. On January 5 1941 Brewster attacked a Dornier Do 17 but made no claim. On February 24 he was posted, as an experienced pilot, to 118 Squadron which had re-formed at Filton four days previously. He immediately applied to be returned to 616 and his CO

Briggs, from Cookham, Berkshire, went to Oundle School. He joined the Test Section of the Fairey Aviation Company in 1939. Briggs joined the RAFVR about July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758115). He was called up on September 1, completed his flying training and was then commissioned. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 22 1940 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 234 Squadron at St Eval on October 6. Briggs joined 41Squadron at Hornchurch on November 4 1940. He was killed in a flying accident at Washington, near Richmond, Yorkshire on April 2 1941, in Spitfire P 8049. He was still with 41 Squadron. Briggs was 20. He is buried in Cookham Cemetery.

asked for him back. Brewster was killed on April 6 1941, still serving with 118 Squadron. He was involved in a mid-air collision during a practice attack. He was 25 and is buried in St Giles’ churchyard extension, Stanton St Quintin, Wiltshire next to Pilot Officer H A Williams who was killed in the same incident. In 2014 a local memorial to the two pilots was unveiled.

PO 22.9.40

APO (AAF) 23.7.39 PO 3.12.39 FO 3.12.40

VERNON MAXWELL BRIGHT 41250 FO Pilot British 229 Squadron

YVES BRIÈRE 30500 Adjudant

Bright joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on August 29 1938, as a pupil pilot. With training completed, he joined a fighter squadron, possibly 213 at Wittering.

Pilot

French

232 Squadron

Brière was born on August 12 1919. He joined l’Armée de l’Air as a pupil-pilot at Istres in 1938. When the Armistice was signed in June 1940, Brière was on a course on Morane 406s at Oran.

On May 21 1940 Bright was posted to 229 Squadron at Digby. Over Dunkirk on the 29th he destroyed a Bf 109 and two days later he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and a Bf 109 probably destroyed. On September 11 he shared in the destruction of a He 111, on the 15th he shared another He 111 and on the 27th he destroyed another, probably destroyed a Bf 109 and shared a Ju 88 and on the 29th he probably destroyed a Do 17. On October 15 Bright damaged a Bf 109, on the 18th damaged a Ju 88 and on December 12 he shared in the destruction of a Bf 109. He was posted away to 55 OTU, Aston Down in March 1941, as an instructor. Bright was killed on September 24 1942, as a Squadron Leader with the A&AEE, Boscombe Down. He died in a crash, testing prototype Beaufighter EL 329, equipped with eight 3.5 inch rockets. He was 26 and was cremated at Southampton Crematorium.

After deciding to go to England, he flew to Casablanca and boarded a ship, which reached England on June 29. Brière was posted from 4 S of TT, St Athan to No 1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum on July 29 for testing and grading. He went to RAF Odiham on August 10, where he flew 15 hours on Tiger Moths and Hectors with No 1 Fighter Training Squadron of the Free French Air Force. On the 18th Brière, with other French pilots, was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down, where he converted to Hurricanes. Brière and Adjudant C P Guerin were posted to RAF Castletown on September 10, to join 232 Squadron. They arrived at Castletown on the 17th and the squadron flew in next day. On December 17 1940 Brière was posted to 615 Squadron at Kenley. On May 13 1941 he was lost, when his Hurricane crashed into the sea, possibly because of engine failure.

CARL E BRIESE C1591 FO Pilot

Canadian

APO 29.10.38 PO 29.8.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41

GEORGE WILLIAM BRIMBLE 745431 Sgt Pilot British 242 Squadron Brimble, from Ward End, Birmingham, joined the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1, completed his flying training and arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 28 1940.

1 (RCAF) Squadron

After converting to Hurricanes, he went to PDC, Uxbridge on May 15, for allocation to a squadron in France. He joined a detachment of 242 Squadron there soon afterwards. The detachment was withdrawn on June 16, to Coltishall. On August 30 Brimble claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and probably another, on September 5 he damaged a He 111 and on the 18th he destroyed a Do 17. On November 6 he was posted to 73 Squadron and embarked on the carrier HMS Furious. Brimble flew off on November 29 to Takoradi, to fly the Middle East ferry route to Heliopolis. En route, on December 1 1940, he was killed in a flying accident. He is buried in Khartoum War Cemetery, Sudan.

Briese, of New Westminster, joined the RCAF Special Reserve, as an Aircrafthand, on August 22 1935. He learned to fly in 1937 and he was later commissioned as a pilot. He arrived in the UK with 1 (RCAF) Squadron on June 20 1940. He served with it in the Battle of Britain and was still with it in February 1941. He was repatriated to Canada in 1942. Briese was given command of 128 (RCAF) Squadron at Sydney, Nova Scotia on August 27, using Hurricanes on East Coast defence. He was posted away on April 18 1943. Briese retired from the RCAF on August 20 1962 as a Wing Commander. He died in Canada on November 20 1983.

JOHN JOSEPH BRIMBLE 741563 Sgt Pilot British 73 Squadron Brimble, of Knowle, Bristol, joined the RAFVR in May 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called to full-time service on September 1 1939 and with training completed he was posted to 10 B&GS, as a staff pilot. From there he joined 4 Ferry Pilot Pool on May 16 1940. Brimble was posted to the AASF, France on May 29 and he joined 73 Squadron at Gaye on the 31st. Still with 73, Brimble was shot down in combat with Bf 109s over the Tonbridge area and killed on September 14. His Hurricane, P 2542, crashed at Parkhouse Farm, Chart Sutton, Kent. Brimble was 23. As, apparently, he had no known grave, his name appears on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 12.

DENNIS RUSHWORTH BRIGGS 580535 Sgt Observer British 236 Squadron Briggs, from Bradford, Yorkshire, joined the RAF for four years in August 1938, as a direct-entry Airman u/t Observer. After completing his training, he joined 236 Squadron on July 24 1940. He failed to return from a reconnaissance sortie over Brest on December 21 1940. Briggs was 24 and he is buried, with the other two members of his crew, in Bayeux War Cemetery, France.

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HENRY WILFRED ARTHUR BRITTON 42458 PO Pilot British 17 Squadron

However, when his aircraft was excavated on September 14 1980, Brimble’s remains were still in the cockpit. He was buried with full military honours in Brookwood Cemetery, Surrey, on October 16 1980.

FRANCIS NOEL BRINSDEN 40338 FO Pilot New Zealander

Britton was born at Crowborough on July 8 1921, the son of a Major in the Royal Corps of Signals. His education began in an Army School in Egypt and continued at others in Aldershot and Catterick.

19 Squadron

He later went to Bedford Modern School and finished at George Heriot’s School in Edinburgh and was there from 1935 to 1938. After leaving, Britton worked with his father in a civilian job with the Royal Corps of Signals. He successfully applied for an RAF short service commission and began his ab initio training at 11 E&RFTS, Perth on May 30 1939, was later at 30 E&RFTS and moved to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on August 21, for No 40 Course. With training completed on February 17 1940, Britton arrived at 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on the 23rd. The unit became 5 OTU in March. After converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to 229 Squadron and joined it at Digby on March 25. Britton moved to 27 MU at Shawbury on April 26 but rejoined 229 from RAF Turnhouse on May 5 1940. He was posted away on the 25th and joined 17 Squadron at Kenley. He was killed on August 6, when his Hurricane, N 2456, crashed and burned out in Debden Park shortly after take-off on a routine air test, from an unknown cause. Britton is buried in All Saints’ churchyard, Wimbish, Essex. He is remembered on a memorial plaque at George Heriot’s School, unveiled on November 11 2005.

Born in Auckland on March 27 1919, Brinsden was educated at Takapuna Grammar School and after leaving he worked as a bank clerk. He applied for a short service commission in 1937. He was provisionally accepted and sailed for England in the RMS Arawa in mid-August. Brinsden began his elementary flying at 7 E&RFTS, Desford on September 27 1937, as a pupil pilot. In midDecember he was posted to 3 FTS, South Cerney and on July 9 1938, with training completed, he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford. Over Dunkirk on May 26 1940 Brinsden destroyed a Ju 87 and shared another and on the 27th he shared in destroying a Hs 126 over Ypres. On August 31 Brinsden was late taking off. Trying to catch up with the squadron, he met a Bf 110 head-on at 22000 feet. The German pilot fired first and his Spitfire, R 6958, went into a dive. Brinsden baled out at 5000 feet and landed unhurt. On September 9 he shared in probably destroying a probable He 111. On November 6 1940 he was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and posted from 19 Squadron to RAF Leconfield. He joined 303 Squadron there the next day, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. Brinsden was appointed British Liaison Officer with 303 from January 1 1941, when Polish officers took command of the squadron.He returned to operations on March 26 1941, when he joined the newly-formed 485 Squadron at Driffield, as a Flight Commander. He went to the MSFU at Speke on July 22 1941, as Port Loading Officer. Brinsden took command of 3 ADU at High Ercall in mid-August 1942. He was posted to 54 OTU, Charter Hall in February 1943, for a night-fighting conversion course, after which he joined 25 Squadron at Church Fenton. On August 17 1943 Brinsden was captain of Mosquito HX 826, supporting bombers raiding Peenemunde. He decided to bomb Sylt airfield and successfully attacked the hangars at rooftop height. He was then picked up and blinded by searchlights. With vision almost lost, he headed out to sea but struck the surface of the water and broke both airscrews. Brinsden ditched the aircraft. He and the navigator got into their dinghy and attempted to sail out of the bay under an offshore breeze. Dawn brought a wind change and at midday on the 18th they were blown ashore into the arms of German troops, who had been watching them for six hours. Eventually, Brinsden found himself in Stalag Luft 3. He was released on May 9 1945, went on a pilot refresher course and then took command of No 3 Missing Research and Enquiry Unit, tracing Allied aircrew. After a leave in New Zealand in March 1947, Brinsden was given a Permanent Commission in June. He served in a number of ground and flying appointments before his retirement on December 31 1966 as a Wing Commander. He went to live in Western Australia and he died there in 1993.

APO 8.8.39

HARRY BROADHURST 24035 WC Pilot British

1 Squadron

Born on October 28 1905 at Frimley, Surrey, Broadhurst went to Portsmouth Grammar School. He joined the Territorial Army on May 21 1925, in the Hampshire Heavy Brigade, RA (TA) and was commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant in the Royal Artillery. In 1926 he transferred to the RAF and on October 1 was posted to 11 (Bomber) Squadron at Netheravon, under instruction. The squadron went out to India and Broadhurst received a Mention in Despatches for service on the NorthWest Frontier (26.6.31). Back in Britain, he was posted to 41 Squadron at Northolt on September 16 1931. He received a medium service commission on October 1 1931. Broadhurst went to RAF Calshot, under instruction, on September 18 1933, moved to 19 Squadron at Duxford on November 26 and was awarded the AFC (1.2.37). He was granted a Permanent Commission on June 1 1936. Broadhurst joined the Personnel Staff of 2 (Bomber) Group at Andover on September 2 1937, leaving there on January 24 1938, for a course at RAF Staff College, Andover. In January 1939 Broadhurst took command of 111 Squadron at Northolt. He was awarded the DFC (2.1.40) for taking off alone on November 29 1939, in very bad weather conditions, to intercept an approaching enemy aircraft. He found it and attacked, causing it to dive into cloud very close to sea level, so close that he almost went into the sea himself. Broadhurst left 111 on January 24 1940 and went to HQ 11 Group, as an Acting Wing Commander. He was posted from HQ 11 Group to RAF Coltishall on May 10 1940, as a Squadron Leader. He joined 60 Wing in France on May 18 and on the 20th he destroyed a Bf 110 near Arras. Broadhurst returned to England on May 29, after being appointed Station Commander at RAF Wittering. During the Battle of Britain he flew occasional operational sorties with No 1 Squadron, thus qualifying for the clasp. On December 23 1940 Broadhurst took command of RAF Hornchurch and, apart from a few weeks in October/November 1941, he held it until May 1942. On February 25 1941, flying with the Hornchurch Wing, Broadhurst destroyed a Bf 109 and probably a second, on March 5 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another, on June 17 destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another, on the 21st destroyed two Bf 109s, on the 24th damaged two more, on the 25th probably destroyed another two Bf 109s, on July 3 shot down a Bf 109 and probably a second, on the 4th destroyed two Bf 109s, on the 7th destroyed two more and probably a third, on September 24 shot down a Bf 109 and on October 1 damaged another. He was awarded the DSO (4.7.41) and a Bar (19.12.41), the citation for the latter crediting him with twelve Bf 109s destroyed and four probables. Broadhurst’s tally of German fighters continued to increase in 1942. On February 12, the day of the Channel Dash by the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, Broadhurst got a probable Bf 109, on April 27 he damaged a Bf 109 and a FW 190 and on August 19, during the Dieppe Raid, he destroyed a FW 190 and damaged three others. Broadhurst had been Deputy SASO at 11 Group since May 1942 and returned to Hornchurch to lead the Wing to Dieppe. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (29.9.42). Posted to the Middle East as SASO to the AOC Western Desert in late 1942, he took over as AOC Allied Air Forces, Western Desert in 1943. He commanded 83 Group Allied Expeditionary Air Force in 1944-45. On October 1 1956 Broadhurst was the co-pilot and one of two survivors when an Avro Vulcan crashed at Heathrow airport returning from a round-the-world tour.

APO 30.11.37 PO 27.9.38 FO 27.3.40 FL 27.3.41 SL 1.6.42 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.1.54

ALLAN WALTER NAYLOR BRITTON 72033 FO Pilot British 263 Squadron Britton, of Wallasey, Cheshire, went to Fettes School. He was at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he got an Honours degree in Classics. Britton was a member of the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in November 1937. Called up on September 25 1939, he went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 9, on No 42 Course. He completed his flying training on March 23 1940 and arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 24th. He converted to Hurricanes and joined 263 Squadron at Filton on April 21 but does not appear to have been with it on either of its two expeditions to Norway in April and May 1940. Britton served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. He was killed on December 12 1940, when his Whirlwind crashed into the sea off Burnham. He was 23 and his name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 5. PO (RAFVR) 23.11.37

PO 24.2.40

PO 25.5.39 FO 3.12.39

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Broadhurst retired from the RAF on March 1 1961, as an Air Chief Marshal, after a most distinguished career, spanning thirty-five years. As well as his gallantry awards, he was made a CB (1944), KBE (1945), KCB (1955), GCB (1960), Knight Grand Cross of Order of Orange Nassau, and Legion of Merit (US). Broadhurst’s portrait was undertaken by Captain Cuthbert Orde in 1941. Broadhurst died in August 1995.

by a Sea Otter. He led the Wing until July 1944. He was awarded the DSO (1.12.44). He returned to operations in January 1945, to lead 122 Wing, Volkel. He damaged a Bf 109 on February 22. Brooker was shot down and killed on April 16 1945, leading 486 Squadron on a Wing operation. Brooker was awarded a Bar to the DSO (12.2.46), which was given with effect from the day before his death. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 264.

PO 1.10.26 FO 1.4.28 FL 1.6.32 SL 1.6.37 WC 1.6.40 AC 1.7.47 AVM 1.7.49 AM 1.1.54 ACM 14.2.57

APO 12.7.37 PO 5.4.38 FO 5.1.40 FL 5.1.41 SL 1.3.42

GC 1.6.42

AC 31.1.44

RICHARD WALLER BROOKMAN NZ 40186 Sgt Observer New Zealander

JOHN WILLIAM BROADHURST 41898 PO Pilot British 222 Squadron

235 Sqdn

Born at Waitara on November 24 1912, Brookman was educated at New Plymouth Boys’ High School and Wellington College.

Broadhurst, from Crayford, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on February 6 1939, as a pupil pilot. He did his ab initio course at 11 E&RFTS, Perth and in April he went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton.

A commercial traveller, Brookman volunteered for aircrew duties at the end of September 1939 and was accepted as a trainee Observer. He completed the ground course at Weraroa and did his flying training at the Air Observers’ School, Ohakea. Brookman sailed for the United Kingdom in the RMS Rangitata on June 6 1940. Soon after arrival, he was posted to 17 OTU, Upwood and on October 2 he joined 106 (Bomber) Squadron at Finningley but after ten days he was posted to 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton. On February 22 1941 Brookman was in a Blenheim on a patrol over the coast of Denmark. After attacking an enemy aircraft thirty miles W of Borkum, the Blenheim was seen to crash into the sea and the crew were reported ‘Missing’. Brookman is named on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 63.

Broadhurst was posted to 222 Squadron, at its reformation at Duxford on October 5 1939. Initially flying Blenheims, the squadron began receiving Spitfires in March 1940. On May 29, after a patrol over Dunkirk, Broadhurst failed to find Hornchurch in bad visibility, ran out of fuel and made a crash landing. On August 31 Broadhurst claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and another damaged, on September 4 a Bf 109 destroyed and another damaged, on the 7th a Bf 109 destroyed, on the 9th a Bf 109 damaged, on the 11th a Ju 88 probably destroyed, on the 15th a Bf 110 damaged and on the 27th a Bf 109 destroyed. He was shot down on October 7 1940, during an attack on enemy bombers. He baled out but fell dead at Longhurst. His Spitfire, P 9469, crashed and burned out at Baileys Reed Farm, Hurst Green, Salehurst. Broadhurst was 23. He is buried in Hornchurch Cemetery, Essex.

PHILIP WILLIAM BROOM 50924 Sgt Air Gunner British

25 Squadron

APO 15.4.39 PO 6.11.39 Broom joined the RAF in June 1938, as an Aircrafthand (613534), and later volunteered for aircrew training. He was with 25 Squadron at North Weald by April 11 1940, as an Aircraftsman.

RICHARD EDGAR PETER BROOKER 39931 FO Pilot British 56 Squadron

He was an LAC by May 25 and a Sergeant by June 21 1940. He was still with 25 Squadron in November 1940. Broom was promoted to Warrant Officer on March 1 1942, commissioned in December 1942 and released from the RAF in 1949 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Born in Chessington, Surrey in 1918, Brooker was at the Royal Masonic School, Bushey, Hertfordshire. After leaving, he trained as a school master.

PO 15.12.42 FO 15.6.43 FL 15.12.44 FL 16.6.46

Brooker joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on April 5 1937, as a pupil pilot. On July 17 he was posted to 9 FTS, Hullavington and with training completed, he joined 56 Squadron at North Weald on February 19 1938. Brooker was posted to No 1 Recruit Centre, Uxbridge for duty on May 8 1940. He rejoined 56 from HQ 11 Group on the 21st. On July 13 1940 Brooker claimed a Ju 87 destroyed, on the 25th he damaged a Bf 109, on August 16 he damaged a Do 17 and on the 21st he shared a Do 17. In this engagement he was shot down by return fire and slightly injured, when he made a forced-landing at Flowton Brook, Bramford. His Hurricane, P3153, burned out. Brooker was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on September 1, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. On September 30 he damaged a Do 17, on October 7 he claimed a Bf 110 and a Do 17, both probably destroyed. In late 1940 Brooker was posted to CGS, Sutton Bridge, as an instructor. A return to operations came in late April 1941, when Brooker was given command of No 1 Squadron. During the night of May 11/12 he shot down a He 111 over London and attacked three more. Brooker damaged a Bf 109 on May 21 and destroyed another on June 21. He was awarded the DFC (30.5.41). Brooker was posted to the Far East on November 3 1941. He took command of 232 Squadron at Singapore on January 20 1942, after the CO was killed. On the 26th Brooker shot down a Kawasaki Ki 27 and on February 13 a Ki 48. During the retreat in late February, 232 Squadron reached Java, where it combined with the ground staff of 242 Squadron, whose pilots and aircraft had remained in Malta. On March 4 Brooker destroyed a Japanese fighter. It was decided to destroy the squadron‘s remaining Hurricanes, after which Brooker and some pilots flew in a Lodestar to Australia. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (27.3.42). Whilst in Australia, Brooker helped form and then commanded 77 (RAAF) Squadron, flying Kittyhawks. He was posted back to the UK and commanded No 1 SLAIS and later he temporarily commanded 59 OTU, Milfield. After a spell on the staff of the Fighter Leaders’ School there, Brooker was appointed Wing Leader of 123 Wing in May 1944, which he did until July. He had been flying the Typhoon MN 143, which he had brought with him from Milfield. On May 23 Brooker had to abandon this aircraft and bale out into the sea. He was picked up

PETER MALAM BROTHERS 37668 FL Pilot British 32 and 257 Squadrons Brothers, from Prestwich, was born on September 30 1917 and educated at North Manchester School. He learned to fly at 16 and joined the RAF on a short service commission, beginning as a pupil pilot on January 27 1936. He was posted to 9 FTS, Thornaby on April 4 and joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on October 11 1936, becoming a Flight Commander in late 1938. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on March 2 1939. Still with 32 Squadron in 1940, Brothers claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on May 18, a Bf 110 on the 23rd, Bf 109s on July 19, 20 and 29, a Bf 110 on August 16, a Bf 109 and a Do 17 on the 18th and Bf 109s on the 22nd and 24th. Brothers was posted to 257 Squadron at Debden on September 9, as ‘B’ Flight Commander, and on the 15th he destroyed a Do 17 and a Ju 88. He probably destroyed a Bf 109 on October 22. He was awarded the DFC (13.9.40).Brothers was posted to 55 OTU, Aston Down on December 16 1940 and he moved to 52 OTU, Debden in February 1941, as an instructor. He was sent to CFS, for a course. Brothers was posted to Baginton in June 1941, to form 457 (RAAF) Squadron, with Australian pilots and RAF ground crews. On March 26 1942 he destroyed a Bf 109 and on April 29 a probable FW 190. He took command of 602 Squadron at Redhill in June 1942 and on the 26th he damaged two FW 190s, on August 18 he destroyed a FW 190 and on the 19th damaged another. In October 1942 Brothers was appointed Wing Leader at Tangmere. He destroyed a FW 190 on January 26 1943 and was awarded a Bar to the DFC (15.6.43). On July 29 Brothers was posted to 61 OTU, Rednal and moved to a staff job at HQ 10 Group on November 22. He destroyed a FW 190 on January 12 1944.

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attachment to fly off, penetrate the fuselage and hole the main fuel tank. Brown jettisoned his two bombs and turned back, making a forced-landing on Herne Bay golf course. He volunteered for Fighter Command in August 1940 and went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 22nd. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 610 Squadron at Acklington on September 3 1940. Brown moved to 72 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 20th. Three days later he was shot down by a Bf 109 over Gravesend. Wounded, with no control over the aircraft, Brown baled out and landed on marshy ground near Eastchurch, wounded in one leg and an elbow by cannon shell splinters. He was admitted to Minster Hospital and later transferred to Maidstone. Brown was posted from 72 to RAF Biggin Hill, as non-effective sick. On recovery, he went to 8 FTS, Montrose on November 29 1940, for an instructors’ course, after which he was posted to Rhodesia, subsequently instructing at Cumalo near Bulawayo. Brown returned to England in early 1943 and did a Transport Command course at Bramcote. He became a ferry pilot, flying between the United Kingdom and the Middle East. On January 1 1944 he transferred to the RNZAF and at the end of the year was flying Halifaxs on ferrying duties. He was released in 1945 to be a first officer on Dakotas with BOAC. Brown later joined BEA and flew with the airline until his retirement in 1972. He then returned to New Zealand to live.

A return to operations came in April 1944, when Brothers was appointed Wing Leader at Exeter. There were six squadrons in the Wing, scattered over various airfields and difficult to control. Brothers split the Wing into two parts. He continued as Culmhead Wing Leader and Wing Commander H A C Bird-Wilson took over the Harrowbeer Wing. On August 7 Brothers destroyed a FW 190. In October 1944 he was posted away and awarded the DSO (3.11.44). Brothers went to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas for a course at the Command and General Staff School. After returning to Britain, he was posted to the Central Fighter Establishment, where he stayed until leaving the RAF in March 1947. In September 1945 Brothers took part in the first Battle of Britain flypast over London, led by Douglas Bader. He joined the Colonial Service and served in Kenya, where he flew his own aircraft. Brothers rejoined the RAF in 1949, was posted to Bomber Command and given command of 57 Squadron. He took it to Singapore on March 15 1950, the first bomber squadron to participate in the Malayan campaign He returned to Britain on July 11. A long and distinguished career in the RAF followed, ending with Brothers’ retirement on April 4 1973, as an Air Commodore. He was made a CBE in 1964 and in the following year was one of The Few who took part in Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral procession. He was Chairman of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association from 2003 until his death, which occurred on December 18 2008. APO 23.3.36 PO 27.1.37 FO 27.10.38 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41 WC 1.7.45 SL 5.8.46 WC 1.1.53 GC 1.1.59 AC 1.7.66

APO 13.1.39 PO 15.11.39

ARCHIBALD WILKINSON BROWN 78744 PO Air Gunner British 25 Squadron

FO 3.9.40 FL 15.11.41

CHARLES WALTER DRYBURGH BROWN 902211 Sgt Air Gunner British 236 Squadron

Brown was commissioned as a direct-entry Air Gunner in April 1940. He was on No 12 Air Gunner Course at 7 B&GS at Manby from May 6 to June 1.

Brown, of Ightham Common, Kent, enlisted in the RAFVR in September 1939 at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, as an Aircrafthand. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner.

On completion, he was posted to 25 Squadron at North Weald. Brown was attached to CGS from July 15 to August 9. On September 14 1940 he was flying with Pilot Officer MJ Herrick in a night sortie over London. They intercepted and shot down a He 111, which crashed at Newmans End, near Sheering, Essex. No further details are known of Brown’s time in the RAF. He was released in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1997.

With training completed, he joined 236 Squadron in 1940. He was posted to Bomber Command in early 1941and joined 7 Squadron, based at Oakington. Brown failed to return from an operation to Hamburg on June 30 1941. His aircraft, Stirling N 3664, was shot down by a night-fighter of 6/NJG 1 36 kilometres NE of Bremen. At the time of his death Brown was a Flight Sergeant. He is buried in Becklingen War Cemetery, Soltau, Germany.

APO 12.4.40 PO 1.6.40 FO 1.6.41 FL 1.6.42

CYRIL BOB BROWN 109525 Sgt Pilot British

ARTHUR EDGAR BROWN 112389 Sgt Pilot British 234 Squadron

Brown, who was born on January 17 1921, was educated at Southend Grammar School. He joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745065), and did his elementary flying at 34 E&RFTS, Rochford.

Brown enlisted in 611 Squadron, AAF for four years in mid-1935, as an Aircrafthand (811139). He later applied for pilot-training and had already begun flying tuition before being called to full-time service on August 24 1939.

Called up at the outbreak of war, Brown completed his training at 11 FTS, Shawbury and RAF College FTS, Cranwell, converted to Hurricanes at 5 OTU and then joined 245 Squadron at Aldergrove on October 4 1940. Brown was posted to 253 at Kenley in late November 1940. He was commissioned in October 1941 and in early 1942 he joined 616 Squadron at King’s Cliff. On May 25 1942 Brown attacked a Do 17 over Leicester. Return fire shattered his hood and a splinter of perspex entered his right eye. He managed to land at North Luffenham. The eye was removed and Brown went back to 616 to continue his tour. He was checked in a dual trainer and then soloed in a Spitfire. He stayed on operations due to the intercession of Basil Embry. Brown was later posted to 532 Turbinlite Havoc Squadron at Wittering. In 1943 he became a test pilot at the Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.46). In late 1946 he went on a course at the Empire Test Pilots’ School at Cranfield, after which he returned to Boscombe Down. In 1948 he was appointed as a tutor at the Empire Test Pilots’ School. Brown held a number of appointments and commands, including 220 (Maritime Reconnaissance) Squadron in 1954-56, before he retired on January 17 1972 as an Air Commodore. He was made CBE in 1966. He died on November 1 2003.

Brown was posted to 11 EFTS, Perth from 611 on October 21. He moved on to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on April 28 1940, on No 47 Course. He completed his course on August 3. Brown was posted back to 611 Squadron on the 10th. He was immediately attached to 7 OTU, Hawarden, to convert to Spitfires. On September 6 it was learned at 611 Squadron that Brown had been posted from 7 OTU to 234 Squadron at Middle Wallop, instead of returning to 611. It would seem that he was posted to 234 on or about September 2 1940. He did not return to 611. Brown was posted away to 2 CFS from 234 on January 12 1941, for an instructor’s course. He was commissioned in October 1941. No other service details traced. PO 24.10.41

BERNARD WALTER BROWN 41548 PO Pilot New Zealander

245 Squadron

610 and 72 Sqdns

Born at Stratford, New Zealand on December 6 1917, Brown was educated at Stratford Technical High School and subsequently worked for the Post Office. He applied for a short service commission in February 1938, was accepted and left for England on September 22 in the RMS Rangitane.

PO 11.10.41 FO 11.10.42 FL 11.10.43 SL 1.7.50 WC 1.7.56 GC 1.7.60 AC 1.1.67

De PEYSTER BROWN C 1094 PO Pilot American

Brown began his training at 5 E&RFTS, Hanworth on October 31 1938, as a pupil pilot. In late January 1939 he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand. At the end of August, with training completed, he went to No 1 School of Army Co-Operation at Old Sarum, for a course on Lysanders, and joined 613 Squadron at Odiham on October 6 1939. In May 1940 the squadron was made operational and moved to Hawkinge. On the 26th Brown was flying one of six Hectors detailed to dive-bomb gun emplacements near Calais. En route, he test-fired his forward gun but the omission of a split pin caused the muzzle

1 (RCAF) Squadron

Brown was commissioned in the Auxiliary Active Air Force, as a Pilot Officer, on September 9 1939. He was with 112 (RCAF) Squadron in May 1940, when it was based at Rockcliffe, Ontario. The squadron left Canada on June 9 and arrived in the UK on the 20th, where it became a holding unit for Canadian pilots.

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He was attached to 5 OTU, Aston Down on August 19, to convert to Hurricanes, after which he joined No 1 (RCAF) Squadron at Northolt on August 31. On September 27 Brown claimed a Ju 88 destroyed and shared another and on the 30th he damaged a Bf 109. He was still with No 1 (RCAF) in November 1940. He transferred to the USAAF on May 25 1942.

Brown was 28 years. He was buried in Neuer Friedhof Cemetery, Lingen (Ems). He was later reinterred in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Cleves, Germany. PO 27.5.43

MARK HENRY BROWN 37904 FL Pilot Canadian

FREDERICK SYDNEY BROWN 46784 F/Sgt Pilot British 79 Squadron

Brown was born on October 9 1911 at Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. After leaving school, he worked for the Bank of Montreal, in Saskatchewan.

Brown, who was born on November 27 1912, joined the RAF as an Apprentice Clerk on April 24 1929 (590264). He passed out on April 28 1931. He signed a twelve-year engagement on November 27 1930, his 18th birthday.

He left Saskatoon for England in early 1936. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training on May 11 1936, as a pupil pilot. He went to 9 FTS, Thornaby on July 18 and after completing the course, he joined No 1 Squadron at Tangmere on February 21 1937. Brown went to France with the squadron soon after the outbreak of war. On November 23 1939 he shared in destroying a Do 17, on March 2 1940 he shared a Do 17 and on April 20 destroyed a Bf 109. On May 10 Brown shared a Do 17, on the 11th destroyed two Bf 110s, on the 14th a Bf 109 and a Ju 87, on the 15th a Bf 110, on the 17th another Bf 110 , on the 18th a Hs 126, on the 19th a He 111 and on the 21st another. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on May 31. On June 1 Brown damaged a Bf 109, on the 5th he destroyed a Do 17 and on the 14th a He 111 and a Bf 109. He was shot down on June 15 and baled out over France. He managed to get a lift to Brest and then got on a boat to Southampton. The squadron pilots flew their Hurricanes from France to Tangmere on the 18th and Brown arrived there that evening. For his efforts in France, Brown was awarded the DFC (30.7.40). No 1 was fully operational again by the end of July. On August 11 Brown claimed a Bf 110 destroyed. Four days later he was shot down and baled out, slightly injured, into the sea and was rescued by a trawler. On September 6 he damaged a Ju 88 and on October 24 he shared in the destruction of a Do 17. Brown took command of the squadron on November 10 1940, when the CO was killed in a flying accident. On February 8 1941 he damaged a Bf 109 on the ground, when he led No 1 Squadron on a ‘Rhubarb’ to Arques. At the end of April Brown was promoted and posted to 58 OTU, Grangemouth, as Squadron Leader Flying. Promoted again on July 1, he went to 57 OTU, Hawarden, as CO Training Wing. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (23.5.41). In late October 1941 Brown was posted to Malta, as Wing Commander Flying. On November 12 he was leading 249 Squadron over Sicily on his first Wing operation. Hit by flak, he was last seen gliding down. On the night of December 6 the Italians dropped a note, saying that Brown had crashed and been killed and that he was buried with military honours in Catania War Cemetery, Italy.

He later applied for pilot training and was accepted. Brown was with 79 Squadron at the outbreak of war. On November 21 1939 he shared in the destruction of a Do 17 S of Hawkinge, which crashed into the Channel. On July 4 1940 Brown damaged a Do 17. Brown was commissioned in September 1941 from Warrant Officer and retired on December 9 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died on December 14 1956. PO 30.9.41 FO 30.9.42 FL 30.9.43

GEORGE ALFRED BROWN 39851 FO Pilot British 253 Squadron Born in India on July 6 1912, Brown joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham on May 10 1937, as a pupil pilot, and flew his first solo on the 31st. On July 17 he went to 5 FTS, Sealand. On completion of the course, Brown was posted to SHQ Duxford. He flew his first Spitfire on November 24 1938, details unknown. He joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on January 30 1939. The squadron went on a sortie to Holland on May 12 1940, to attack German bombers over Rotterdam. Brown shot down a Ju 87 and damaged another. Hit by return fire, he landed at Knocke, Belgium to assess damage and refuel. One of his tyres had been punctured by a bullet and he swerved on landing and ended up in a bomb crater, upside down. The Belgians issued Brown with a travel permit but suspicious French authorities detained him for two days at the border. He was freed after consultation with an RAF liaison officer, who sent him on to Dunkirk, where he embarked on HMS Codrington, which was taking Princess Juliana and Prince Bernhardt to England. Brown was posted to 253 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on May 26 1940, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant, ‘A’ Flight Commander. He was shot down on August 30 in combat with Bf 109s, and made a forced-landing near Maidstone, in Hurricane P 3802. Brown, wounded in the shoulder and with shell splinters in the legs, was admitted to Preston Hall Hospital. On October 1 1940 Brown was posted to 71 (Eagle) Squadron, recently-reformed at Church Fenton, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. He was with the squadron until August 1 1941, when he left to command 133 (Eagle) Squadron, then forming at Coltishall. In November 1941 he went to a staff job at HQ Fighter Command and was awarded the DFC (26.12.41). Brown was posted to command 257 Squadron at Exeter on September 23 1942. In April 1943 he went to 55 OTU, Annan, as CFI. He was later on the staff at HQ Eastern Mediterranean at Alexandria, commanded RAF Gaza from March 22 1945 and later commanded RAF Nicosia. Brown retired from the RAF on July 6 1962 as a Group Captain. From 1962 to 1967 he was Regional Liaison Officer, ATC, Wales and from 1967 to 1977 he was Commandant, ATC, Wales. Brown died in 1998. His ashes were buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, Tangmere.

APO 6.7.36 PO 11.5.37

FO 11.12.38

FL 3.9.40

MARVIN KITCHENER BROWN 42101 PO Pilot Canadian 242 Squadron Brown, of Kincardine, Ontario, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on March 13 1939, as a pupil pilot. After completing his flying training, he was posted to 242 Squadron at Church Fenton on November 6. Brown was sent to France on May 16 1940 and attached to 85 Squadron. Two days later he was shot down and suffered bullet wounds in the right leg. He was evacuated to England and rejoined 242 on July 13. Brown was on a local flight in Hurricane N 2476 on February 21 1941, when he crashed at Grange Farm, Alderton and was killed. He is buried in Ipswich Cemetery.

APO 5.7.37 PO 10.5.38 FO 10.12.39 FL 10.12.40 SL 1.3.42 WC 1.10.46 GC 1.7.53

JAMES WOOD BROWN 144933 Sgt Air Gunner British

1 Squadron

600 Squadron

Brown, of Broadmayne, Dorset, joined 600 Squadron AAF for four years in 1936, as an Aircrafthand (800416). He later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner.

APO 13.5.39 PO 6.11.39

Called up on August 24 1939, he completed his training and had rejoined 600 Squadron at Northolt by June 1 1940. During the Battle of Britain, Brown flew sixteen operational sorties. He later retrained as a pilot. He was commissioned in May 1943, possibly on completion of his pilot training. Brown was killed on November 22 1943 as a Pilot Officer with 158 Squadron, operating in Halifaxs from Lissett, Yorkshire. On an operation to Berlin, his Halifax, HR 977, was shot down and crashed near Klein Berssen, 13 Km E of Meppen.

MAURICE PETER BROWN 40796 FO Pilot British 611 and 41 Squadrons Brown was born in London on June 17 1919 and was educated at Holloway School. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his flying training on April 4 1938, as a pupil pilot. In mid-June Brown went to 5 FTS, Sealand and gained his wings in September. At the end of the course he went to No 1 Electrical and Wireless

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went out of control and he and the air gunner were ordered to bale out, which they did and landed safely. The pilot regained control of the Blenheim and returned to Middle Wallop. Brown flew operationally with 604, firstly in Blenheims amd then Beaufighters until December 1940, when he was posted back to Yatesbury for another radar course. In these five months he flew without rank or brevet, receiving three shillings a day, including one shilling flying pay. After completing the radar mechanic course and gaining practical experience, Brown was attached to RAE, Farnborough, where he remained until his release in February 1946.

School at Cranwell in January 1939, as a staff pilot. On September 21 Brown joined 611 Squadron at Duxford. During the winter of 1939/40 the squadron flew convoy patrols, losing several pilots because of atrocious weather conditions. Over Dunkirk on June 2 1940, in an action with a large formation of Bf 109s, Brown’s Spitfire was damaged and he landed back at base with a burst tyre. He shared in the destruction of a Do 17 on August 21, over the sea, off Mabelthorpe. During September 611 flew as part of the Duxford Wing. On the 15th Brown destroyed a He 111 and shared a probable Do 17. On September 29 1940 Brown went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. Next day he damaged a Do 17. He shot down a Bf 109 on October 20 and the pilot baled out near Ashford. Brown landed at West Malling and collected the German pilot’s lifejacket, as confirmation of his victory. The squadron jumped a formation of forty Bf 109s on the 25th. Brown attacked one and claimed it as a probable, when it disappeared into cloud, streaming glycol. This aircraft was later confirmed as destroyed. In January 1941 Brown was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander. He was posted away on June 28 to 61 OTU, Heston, as a Flight Commander. On July 15 1942 he was transferred to the Empire Flying School at Hullavington and qualified as a flying instructor in October. Brown was then posted to 56 OTU, Tealing, again as a Flight Commander. From July 21 1943 Brown was attached to 17 FTS at Cranwell, where he trained Turkish pilots on Spitfires to operational level. On January 1 1944 he was posted to Training Command, as Squadron Leader Flying and OC Satellite at 5, 9 and 14 AFUs, flying Harvards and Oxfords. Awarded the AFC (1.1.46), Brown was released from the RAF later in the year, as a Squadron Leader. He entered the plastics industry and in 1965 gained a Fellowship of the Plastics Institute. After retirement, Brown continued as a management consultant. For many years he was busy as a healer, working with cancer patients and in a healing clinic. Brown died on January 20 2011.

RONALD CLIFFORD BROWN 41822 FO Pilot British 229 Squadron Brown was educated at Dulwich College. He joined the RAF on January 23 1939, as a candidate for a short service commission. He did his ab initio course, as a pupil pilot, and with flying training completed, he joined 229 Squadron at Digby on October 23 1939. Over Dunkirk on May 29 1940 he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and on October 15 he claimed another. Brown later served with 111 Squadron. He damaged a FW 190 over Dunkirk on April 25 1942. He was in hospital early in 1945, after injuring his knee, playing for the RAF in a rugby match. Brown was released from the RAF later in 1945, as a Squadron Leader, and died on March 19 1988, aged 67. He is remembered on a plaque at Dulwich College, unveiled on March 14 2002. APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39 FO 23.10.40 FL 23.10.41

APO 4.6.38 PO 4.4.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.1.44

RONALD JOHN WALKER BROWN 44925 PO Pilot British 111 Squadron NORMAN McHARDY BROWN 84958 PO Pilot British 611 and 41 Squadrons

Born on March 9 1914, Brown went to John Ruskin Central School, Croydon. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (563611), in September 1929 and passed out in August 1932. After an Engine Fitter course, he was posted to the Flying Wing at RAF College, Cranwell, as an AC 1.

Brown was born in Edinburgh on July 27 1919 and educated at South Morningside Primary School and George Heriot’s School. He joined the RAFVR in August 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758257).

He received many ‘unofficial’ hours dual training on Tutor and Atlas aircraft there. He applied for pilot training and was selected in late 1935. In December 1935 Brown joined 10 (Bomber) Squadron at Boscombe Down, solely on the strength of his soccer prowess as an RAF football representative. He went to 9 E&RFTS, Ansty in May 1936, then to 9 FTS, Thornaby in July, received his wings in November and joined 111 Squadron at Northolt on February 22 1937. The squadron was the first to be equipped with Hurricanes, in December 1938, and was used a great deal in tactical trials. In May 1940, 111 Squadron carried out daily patrols over France, sometimes operating from French airfields, returning to Northolt in the evening. On May 31 over Dunkirk, Brown got a probable Bf 109. On June 6 he was shot down by a Bf 109, when escorting Blenheims in the Abbeville area. He baled out and luckily was picked up by a Guards unit moving south, taken to a field hospital, put on a train and then sent in a hospital ship back to England. Brown rejoined his squadron on August 15 1940. Three days later he shared a Do 17, which crashed and burned out at Leaves Green, near Biggin Hill. On August 24 he damaged a Bf 109 and on September 2 he shared in destroying a He 111 and damaging another Bf 109. Commissioned in September, Brown was posted to 260 Squadron at Castletown on December 7 1940, to train new pilots. On February 2 1941 he went to the AFDU at Duxford, where he flew many types of enemy and American aircraft. In October 1941 Brown was posted to the Ministry of Aircraft Production and transferred to the RAF Engineering Branch, closely involved with aircraft development and much later with the Martin Baker ejector seat. Brown retired from the RAF on May 12 1947, as a Squadron Leader, retaining the rank of Wing Commander. He joined Percival Aircraft as Technical Sales Manager. In 1962 he moved to BAC and retired from British Aerospace in April 1979, as Executive Director (Marketing and Sales). He was made an MBE for services to exports. He died on November 9 2003.

Called up on September 1, Brown went to 3 ITW, Hastings, until April 1940, when he moved to 16 EFTS, Shoreham. He went to 5 FTS, Sealand on No 49 Course, which ran from June 15 to September 6. He was commissioned next day. On the 7th Brown arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden, to convert to Spitfires. He was posted from there on September 28 to 611 Squadron at Digby. He moved to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on October 12 1940. Brown was one of a flight of Spitfires that overshot Hornchurch in poor visibility on November 1 and went into the London Barrage Balloon area. He struck a cable, seriously damaging his aircraft. He made a forced-landing on a small piece of open ground in the built-up area of Dagenham. This incident was a contributing factor to his being posted away from the squadron in late February 1941 and discharged from the RAF in April. After leaving, Brown worked for the Forestry Commission in Scotland and continued this career after the war, becoming a senior manager. He was District Commissioner for the West of Scotland. Brown died on December 16 2013 PO 7.9.40

ROBERT SYDNEY BROWN 1003565 AC 2 Radar Operator

British

604 Squadron

Brown was born on October 2 1915 in Gateshead and was educated at Shipcote School and Gateshead Secondary School. He joined the RAFVR in early June 1940 at 3 RAF Depot, Padgate. After initial training, he volunteered for flying duties. At the end of June he went to RAF Yatesbury for a short course on airborne radar and on July 20 he was posted to 604 Squadron at Gravesend, never having flown. On the night of November 1 Brown was in a Blenheim on a fighter patrol. The aircraft

PO 26.9.40 FO 25.4.41 FL 25.4.42 SL 22.4 45 SL 1.7.45

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CHARLES BROWNE 127561 Sgt Air Gunner

British

destroyed and probably a Hs 126 and on the 11th he claimed two Bf 109s destroyed and a Ju 88 damaged. Bruce was detached to the School of Air Navigation, St Athan on July 2 1940, for a navigation course. He rejoined the squadron on August 25, was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and given command of ‘B’ Flight. Next day he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on September 2 he shared a He 111 and damaged a Bf 110. Bruce was reported ‘Missing’ on September 4, after being shot down by Bf 109s. His Hurricane, R 4172, is believed to have crashed into the Channel five miles E of Folkestone. He was 22. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 4.

219 Squadron

Browne enlisted in the RAFVR on September 8 1939 at 2 RAF Depot, Cardington, as an Airman u/t Air Gunner (936385), for the duration of hostilities. He went to 3 B&GS, Aldergrove on January 8 1940. On completion of a gunnery course, he was posted to 235 Squadron at Manston on February 25. He was still an AC 2 on March 31 1940. He moved to 219 Squadron at Catterick on May 23 1940. Browne crash-landed in a Blenheim on August 2, baled out of another on October 19, when ordered to do so by the pilot, who later made a successful crash-landing, and on December 12 Browne was involved in a crash-landing in a Beaufighter. He was posted to 77 Squadron on June 3 1941, flying in Whitleys from Topcliffe in Yorkshire. Browne left the squadron on August 21 and was graded as medically unfit for flying in January 1942. He was commissioned in the RAF Regiment in August 1942 and posted to the Middle East. Browne was released from the RAF on October 26 1945 as a Flying Officer. He died in 1993.

APO 5.7.37 PO 10.5.38 FO 10.12.39

NORMAN BRUMBY 742228 Sgt Pilot British

615 and 607 Squadrons

Born in Kingston-upon-Hull, Brumby was educated at Thoresby Primary School and Boulevard Secondary School. He joined the RAFVR in October 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939, completed his training and joined 103 Squadron, flying Battles.

PO (RAF Regt) 28.8.42 FO (RAF Regt) 28.8.43

DENNIS OWEN MATTHEW BROWNE 41234 PO Pilot British 1 Squadron

Brumby was in France with the squadron. He was shot down on June 14 1940 and made a forced-landing near Laval. He rejoined the squadron the same day. He volunteered for Fighter Command and joined 615 Squadron at Prestwick on September 4 1940. He moved to 607 Squadron at Tangmere on the 21st. He was shot down and killed on October 1, in combat with Bf 109s over the Isle of Wight. Brumby was 20. He is buried in Hull Northern Cemetery, Yorkshire.

Browne was born on November 6 1918 in Willesden, Middlesex. His family moved to Hove and he was educated at Hove College and then Xaverian College, Mayfield, from 1928 to 1934. His first job was as a clerk at a motor engineering company in Hove and from 1937 he was a sales representative with another Hove company. Browne joined the RAFVR on December 5 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot (740894). He began his flying training at 16 E&RFTS, Shoreham. He then successfully applied for a short service commission in the RAF, was discharged from the RAFVR on October 16 1938 and posted to 6 FTS, Little Rissington on the 17th. Browne was awarded his flying badge on February 24 1939 and after completing his advanced flying training, he joined 74 Squadron at Hornchurch on April 15. During the last months of 1939, Browne was involved in a series of crashes. On October 29 he crashed in Spitfire K 9951, from which he escaped uninjured and with only slight damage to the aircraft. On November 7, piloting Magister P 6345, he hit high tension cables and on the 17th Browne crashed in Spitfire K 9875, again escaping without injury and with only slight damage to the aircraft. On December 1 Browne was posted to No 1 AACU at Farnborough. He later flew Henleys from Penrhos, towing drogues. Browne was posted to No 1 Squadron in France on May 21 1940. The squadron moved westwards as the Germans advanced and the pilots flew their Hurricanes back to Tangmere on June 18. After reorganising, the squadron was declared operational again on July 3 1940. On the 19th Browne was one of a section which intercepted a He 111 over the South Downs. The three pilots expended all their ammunition, without any apparent result. Browne continued to pursue the Heinkel until his Hurricane was set alight by return fire, causing him to make a crash-landing near Brighton. He got clear before the fuel tanks exploded. The He 111 was shot down by Hurricanes of 145 Squadron five miles off Shoreham. Browne failed to return from an afternoon engagement with Bf 109s and 110s on August 15 1940, off Harwich. His Hurricane, R 4075, is believed to have gone down into the sea. He was 22. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7.

GEOFFREY CLIFFORD BRUNNER 43941 PO Pilot British 43 Squadron Born on April 7 1911, Brunner went to Bridgnorth Grammar School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in September 1926 (560535) and passed out in August 1929, as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot and began his flying at 2 FTS, Digby in July 1932. Brunner joined 17 Squadron at Upavon in August 1933, as a Sergeant-Pilot. In November 1936 Brunner went to 66 Squadron at Duxford. He took part in the Hendon Air Displays in 1935, 1936 and 1937, in converging dive-bombing attacks on a set piece and formation aerobatics with smoke. In October 1937 Brunner was appointed as a test pilot in the Performance Testing Section at the Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment, then at Martlesham Heath, but from September 1939 at Boscombe Down. From May 13 to 25 1940 he was on No 18 Course at the Blind Approach Training and Development Unit at Boscombe Down, detached from the A&AEE. Commissioned in June 1940, Brunner arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on June 2, for a refresher course. Seven days later he joined 43 Squadron at Tangmere. On July 7 he damaged a Do 17 in a low-level chase across the Channel, which ceased only when his ammunition was exhausted. Brunner was taken off operational flying on July 10, pending a posting back to the A&AEE but when it did not come, he returned to operations on August 24. Two days later 43 was deployed against a large raid on Portsmouth. After probably destroying a He 111, Brunner was hit and badly damaged by a Bf 109. Wounded in the ankle, he made a wheels-up landing at Tangmere and was admitted to the Royal West Sussex Hospital at Chichester. He was posted to RAF Tangmere, as non-effective sick on August 26. He was discharged from hospital on September 10. Brunner returned to duty with 43 Squadron on October 19. He was posted back to the A&AEE at Boscombe Down on October 30 1940. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.42) and Bar (21.7.43), the latter for successfully landing the prototype Westland Welkin, after engine and structural failure whilst on a test flight. On January 8 1945 Brunner went to RAF Staff College. He transferred to the Aircraft Control Branch in September 1945. In 1965 he took part in Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral procession. He retired on July 1 1966 as a Group Captain. Brunner died in 1989.

APO 17.10.38 PO 17.10.39

DAVID CAMPBELL BRUCE 39853 FO Pilot British 111 Squadron Bruce joined the RAF as a candidate for a short service commission and began his ab initio course on May 10 1937, as a pupil pilot. On July 17 he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand and after completing his training, he joined 111 Squadron at Northolt.

PO 21.6.40 FO 2.5.41 FL 2.5.42 SL 1.7.49 WC 1.1.58 GC 1.7.63

On April 8 1940 Bruce shared in probably destroying a He 111 off Scapa Flow. After the German onslaught on May 10, the squadron operated over France, sometimes from French airfields, returning to Northolt in the evening. Over Dunkirk on May 18 and 31 he claimed Bf 109s destroyed, on June 2 he possibly shot down a He 111 and damaged a Bf 109 and a Hs 126, on the 6th he claimed a Bf 109

Bryant was born on August 15 1920 and attended Solihull School, Warwickshire. He entered the Royal Navy in 1938, opting for the FAA. On June 25 1940 he was attached to Fighter Command and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down, where he flew Spitfires.

REGINALD FRANK BRYANT Midshipman (FAA) Pilot 245 Squadron

On July 6 he was posted to 263 Squadron at Grangemouth, moving to 219 Squadron, based at Catterick, on July 10. Another move, this time to 245 Squadron at Turnhouse, came on July 12. With 245 Bryant flew Hurricanes for the first time. He made two local flights on July 13 in Hurricane P 3549. Bryant took part in a patrol on the morning of July 15 and on

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STANISLAW BRZEZINA 76782 FL Pilot Polish 74 Squadron

the evening of that day he was involved in an action in which a Do 17 was damaged. On July 20 Bryant moved to 760 Naval Air Squadron at Eastleigh. He later served with 807 Squadron (Fulmars) aboard HMS Furious and at HMS Wara, Takoradi, Gold Coast, where aircraft were assembled and flown to Egypt via Sudan. He went on to serve with various squadrons in Egypt, Crete and the UK. From July 1944 to early 1945 he was in Ceylon. Bryant took command of 808 Squadron on HMS Khedive in June 1945 and flew in attacks on Sumatra and the liberation of Malaya. Bryant remained in the Navy after the war, transferring to the Ordnance Department in 1946. He was second in command of the gunnery range at Pendine Sands, south Wales. Later service included spells at Bath, Fort Halstead and the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich. He retired from the Navy in 1960, with the rank of Commander and became a senior executive or director with a number of companies including Ford and Mercedes Benz. Bryant died in 1974 following a coronary thrombosis.

Born in Poland on March 5 1904, Brzezina was in the Polish Air Force before the war. He arrived in England in early 1940 and was commissioned in the RAFVR in February. He was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down in July 1940, converted to Spitfires and joined 74 Squadron at Hornchurch on August 5. The next day Brzezina was transferred to the Polish Air Force but he continued to serve with 74. On August 13 he shot down a Do 17 and damaged another over the Thames Estuary but his own aircraft was hit by return fire. There was an explosion in the cockpit and Brzezina baled out unhurt, and landed safely. On September 25 he was posted away to take joint command of 308 Squadron, then being formed at Baginton. This was an administrative error and Brzezina went to HQ 12 Group on October 24, for staff duties. He returned very briefly to 308 on November 9 1940, on attachment, but went to HQ 9 Group two days later, also on attachment. Brzezina returned to HQ 12 Group on November 19 and then reported to RAF Leconfield on temporary duty. Brzezina went back to HQ 9 Group on January 12 1941. He was awarded the VM (5th Class) (1.2.41.) He took command of 317 Squadron at Colerne in June 1941. On July 10 he destroyed a Bf 109. In August 1941 he was appointed Wing Leader of No 2 Polish Wing at Exeter, made up of 302, 316 and 317 Squadrons. Brzezina was awarded the KW (10.9.41). On December 22 he became Deputy Senior Liaison Officer at HQ Fighter Command. He took command of RAF Heston in October 1942, holding the post until March 1943, when he was appointed a lecturer at the Polish Staff College. On September 19 1945 Brzezina was posted to HQ BAFO, for liaison duties, as a Group Captain. He was killed in a flying accident en route from Germany to England on February 13 1946, in a Dakota of 435 Squadron. Brzezina is buried in St Mary Cray Cemetery, Orpington, Kent.

LEOFRIC TREVOR BRYANT-FENN 40985 FO Pilot British 79 Squadron Born on April 9 1917, Bryant-Fenn was at Cranleigh School from 1930 to 1934. He became a student apprentice at the General Aircraft Company at Feltham in 1936 and remained there until June 1938, when he joined the RAF on a short service commission. He began his ab initio training on June 27 1938, as a pupil pilot. In early September he went to 11 FTS, Shawbury. With his flying training completed, Bryant-Fenn was posted to 9 Air Observer School, Penrhos on September 27 1939, as a staff pilot. The unit was redesignated 9 B&GS on December 1 1939. Bryant-Fenn joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill from there on June 29 1940. On August 28 1940 he shared in the destruction of a He 59 floatplane, on the 30th he damaged a Bf 109 and on the 31st he probably destroyed another. In combat over Biggin Hill on September 1, his aircraft was severely damaged by Bf 109s. Bryant-Fenn baled out, wounded in one leg, landed at Dunton Green and was admitted to Sevenoaks Hospital. He did not return to the squadron until 1941. In late 1942 he was a Flight Commander with 264 Squadron at Colerne. When his operational tour finished, he was awarded the DFC (3.9.43). In 1944 Bryant-Fenn was on staff duties at the Air Ministry and was sent on a course at RAF Staff College in 1945. He was then posted overseas and served in Burma, Siam and India until 1948, when he returned to the UK. He joined the Forecasting and Planning Staff at Air Ministry and was later Air Attaché in Prague and Rome. Bryant-Fenn retired from the RAF on October 19 1968 as a Group Captain. He died on February 28 1988. APO 20.8.38 GC 1.1.61

PO 27.6.39

JOHN BRYSON 41823 PO Pilot

FO 3.9.40

Canadian

FL 3.9.41

SL 1.1.44

SL 1.8.47

PO 20.2.40

MICHAL BRZEZOWSKI P 5122 Sgt Pilot Polish

303 Squadron

Brzezowski was born in Dawidgrodek, Poland on February 26 1920. He entered the Polish Air Force NCOs’ Training School at Bydgoszcz in 1936. He qualified as a fighter pilot at Krosno in 1939. Brzezowski was posted to the 5th Air Force Regiment at Lida and joined 151 Fighter Eskadra. After the fighting in early September his unit went to Romania on the 18th. Brzezowski made his way to France, where he joined l’Armée de l’Air. In June 1940 he was serving with Groupe de Chasse II/ 6. On the 15th he shared in the destruction of a Hs 126. When France collapsed, Brzezowski headed for England, reaching there on July 7 1940. He joined 303 Squadron at Northolt from the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool on August 21 1940. Brzezowski claimed the destruction of two He 111s on September 11. Four days later he failed to return from a combat with Bf 109s over the Thames, off Gravesend. His Hurricane, P 3577, is presumed to have crashed into the Estuary. Brzezowski is remembered on the Polish War Memorial at Northolt. He was awarded the KW (23.12.40).

WC 1.8.55

92 Squadron

Bryson, of Westmount, Quebec and formerly of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, joined the RAF in January 1939, on a short service commission.

JACK BUCHANAN 79735 PO Pilot British

He began his ab initio training on January 23 and moved on to 13 FTS, Drem on April 15, on No 1 Course. After completing his training on October 21, he joined the recentlyreformed 92 Squadron at Tangmere on the 22nd. Bryson was posted to 604 Squadron at Northolt in March 1940 but rejoined 92, then at Croydon, on April 1. On May 23 Bryson destroyed a Bf 109 in the Boulogne/Dunkirk area and over Dunkirk on June 2 he destroyed a He 111 and probably another. Bryson was reprimanded by the AOC on July 18, for low flying. On July 24 he shared in shooting down a Ju 88 that was bombing shipping in the Bristol Channel. It crashed on Martinhoe Common, Devon. Bryson was shot down and killed on September 24 1940. His Spitfire, X 4037, crashed and burned out near North Weald. He was 27 and is buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, North Weald Bassett, Essex.

29 Squadron

Buchanan, of Sandsend, joined the RAFVR in May 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741542). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training, was commissioned on June 2 1940, and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 10th. After converting to Blenheims, he joined 29 Squadron at Digby on June 23. Buchanan was on a patrol on September 28, when his starboard wing was hit by British anti-aircraft fire but he returned safely to Digby. Still with 29 Squadron, Buchanan was killed on February 15 1941. He was 23 and is buried in Easington Cemetery, Yorkshire. PO 2.6.40

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JAMES RICHEBOURG BUCHANAN 77033 PO Pilot British 609 Squadron

GEORGE OLIVER BUDD 90209 FL Pilot British 604 Squadron

Buchanan, of Iden, Sussex, joined the RAFVR in December 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741117). He was fully trained when called up on September 1 1939. He was commissioned in December and he joined 609 Squadron at Drem on the 30th.

Born at Reigate in 1911, Budd joined 604 Squadron, AAF at Hendon and was commissioned for five years on June 15 1935. He was called for full-time service on August 24 1939 and remained with the squadron. On May 22 1940 Budd damaged a He 111 over Dunkirk and on June 16 he damaged two more. On the night of April 10/11 1941 he destroyed a He 111 and damaged another, on May 2/3 he destroyed a Ju 88, on June 11/12 he damaged a He 111 and on the 13/14th he destroyed another. He was awarded the DFC (4.7.41), the citation crediting him with three enemy aircraft destroyed at night and four more damaged. On July 11 1941 Budd was posted to 54 OTU, Church Fenton, as OC ‘D’ Squadron. He was posted away on January 26 1942, to command 1455 Turbinlite Flight at Tangmere, which he did until August 1942. Thereafter, until the end of the war, he had a series of staff jobs, including Senior Air Liaison Officer with Anti-Aircraft Command from September 1943 until 1944. He was OC 141 Wing in 1944, at HQ 46 Group 1944 to 1945 and at HQ 111 Wing in 1945. Budd was released from the RAF on September 8 1945 as a Wing Commander.

Flying from Drem on February 27 1940, Buchanan shared in the destruction of a He 111, attacking a convoy near St Abb’s Head. On May 31 he destroyed a He 111 and damaged a Bf 109. On July 27 1940 Buchanan was reported ‘Missing’, after being shot down by Oberleutnant Framm of 1/JG 27, in combat over a convoy off Weymouth. Buchanan’s Spitfire, N 3023, crashed into the sea. He was 25. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7. PO 10.12.39

PO (AAF) 15.6.35 FO (AAF) 11.4.37 FO 24.8.39

MAURICE SIMON HENRI CHARLES BUCHIN 81626 PO Pilot Belgian 213 Squadron

JAN BUDZINSKI 780665 Sgt Pilot

An instructor in the Belgian Air Force, Buchin escaped to France in May 1940 and was employed by l’Armée de l’Air there, ferrying aircraft.

145 and 605 Squadrons

Budzinski was born in Poland in 1916. He served in the Polish Air Force and was with 141 Eskadra in September 1939. He reached England in January 1940 and was sent to RAF Eastchurch, where he was enlisted in the RAFVR.

In mid-June he sailed from Bayonne in a cargo ship bound for Britain, which arrived on the 23rd. He was commissioned in the RAFVR and went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 12 1940. After Buchin converted to Hurricanes, he joined 213 Squadron at Exeter on the 22nd, making his first flight next day. Buchin shot down a Ju 88 on August 11 and four days later he was reported ‘Missing’. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7 and has a memorial grave at the Pelouse d’Honneur Cemetery of Brussels at Evre. Buchin was 34.

JAMES ALAN BUCK 742235 Sgt Pilot British

Polish

He was at the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool from June 1 1940. He was on the 3rd Polish Pilots’ Course at No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum from July 22 to 29, for testing and grading. Budzinski was then sent to 7 OTU, Hawarden and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 145 Squadron at Westhampnett on August 12 and went to 605 Squadron at Drem on the 31st. The squadron went south to Croydon on September 7 and on the 11th Budzinski claimed a Bf 109 destroyed, on the 27th a Bf 110 and on October 7 he shared another Bf 109. He was non-effective sick, with meningitis, from December 31 1940. He was awarded the KW (1.2.41) and on April 27 1941 he was posted to 302 Squadron at Kenley. Budzinski received a Bar to the KW (15.7.41). On August 8 he was posted to No 2 Air Observers’ School, as a staff pilot. One month later he went to 2 AGS at Dalcross. Budzinski was posted to 2 FIS, Montrose on July 28 1942 and at the end of the course he went as an instructor to 16 (Polish) FTS, Newton. He remained there until November 20 1945, when he went to 3 PHU for release, as a Warrant Officer.

43 Squadron

Buck, from Chorltonville, Manchester, joined the RAFVR in October 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training and then joined 43 Squadron at Acklington on February 5 1940. On patrol over France on June 7, he landed at Rouen-Boos with a burst tyre but he returned to Tangmere the next day. On July 7 he shared a Do 17. On the 19th Buck was shot down in combat with Bf 109s of III/JG 27 off Selsey. He baled out, wounded, but drowned. His Hurricane, P 3531, crashed into the sea. Buck was 24. He is buried in Stretford Cemetery, Lancashire. His brother, Flight Lieutenant H A Buck, a pilot, died in unknown circumstances on April 27 1945, aged 31. He is buried in Stretford Cemetery.

CECIL HALFORD BULL 37594 FO Pilot British

25 Squadron

Bull was born in India, the son of a Commissioner in the Indian Civil Service. The family returned to the UK in 1926. Bull joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on January 6 1936, as a pupil pilot. He was posted to 3 FTS, Grantham in March. After completing his training, he was posted to No 1 Anti-Aircraft Co-operation Unit at Biggin Hill on April 26 1937, as a staff pilot. He went on a course to the School of Air Navigation, Manston on November 14 1938. He commanded RAF Flimstone training camp in Pembrokeshire. At some time Bull joined 25 Squadron at Hawkinge. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on April 13 1939 and appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander. He took part in the attack on the Luftwaffe seaplane base at Borkum on November 28 1939. Twelve Blenheims took off from Bircham Newton, six from 25 Squadron and six from 601 Squadron. All aircraft returned safely, landing at Debden. Three He 115s were destroyed and another three damaged. It was the first fighter attack of the war on a German target. Bull received a Mention in Despatches. In early July 1940 Bull was still with 25 Squadron, then at North Weald. He was killed in a shooting incident near Orielton, Pembrokeshire, close to his wife’s family home, on August 8 1940, whilst on leave. A verdict of accidental death was recorded at the inquest. Bull was 24 years old. He is buried in St David’s churchyard, Hindleton, Pembrokeshire.

JOHN STANLEY BUCKNOLE 745402 Sgt Pilot British 54 Squadron Bucknole joined the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and did his elementary flying at 16 EFTS, Shoreham. He went on to 5 FTS, Sealand on June 16 1940, on No 49 Course. With training completed on September 7, Bucknole went to 7 OTU, Hawarden and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on the 29th. He was posted away in October, making his last flight with the squadron on the 13th. In 1941 he was serving with 103 Squadron, flying in Wellingtons from Elsham Wolds. He failed to return from an operation to Brest on July 24 1941 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 40.

APO 2.3.36 PO 6.1.37 FO 6.9.38

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JOHN CECIL BULL 79227 PO Air Gunner

British

DOUGLAS CAMPBELL BUNCH 115674 Sgt Air Gunner British

600 Squadron

Bull was born on April 5 1905. He joined the RAF in May 1940 and was commissioned as a direct-entry Air Gunner. After a short gunnery course, he was posted to 600 Squadron at Manston in June and served with the squadron in the Battle of Britain. He was still with 600 in November 1940.

219 Squadron

Born on February 1 1920, Bunch joined 615 Squadron, AAF in March 1938, as an Aircrafthand (819020). He was called up on August 24 1939. He remustered as an Air Gunner and with training completed he went to 219 Squadron at Catterick on August 2 1940.

Bull stayed on in the RAF and transferred to the Secretarial Branch in 1946. He retired on November 19 1962 as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He went to live in Jamaica and died there in 1965.

Bunch retrained as a Radar Operator in late 1940 and flew his first sortie in a Beaufighter on January 7 1941. He was still with 219 Squadron when he was commissioned in January 1942. Late in the year he teamed up with Flight Lieutenant J E Willson and they had their first victory, a Do 217, on February 3 1943. They destroyed two Do 217s and probably another on March 11 and a Do 217 and an unidentified enemy aircraft on March 15. Bunch and Willson went with a squadron detachment to Malta in May 1943. During the night of June 29/30 they shot down a He 111 into the sea off Sicily and on July 3/4 they destroyed a Ju 88 in the same area. Soon afterwards Bunch returned to the UK and was awarded the DFC (13.7.43). In 1944 Bunch was posted to 157 Squadron at Swannington. In September he teamed up with Flight Lieutenant R D Doleman. During the night of the 12/13th they destroyed a Bf 110 on a high-level support patrol over the Frankfurt area. On October 19/20 they shot down a Ju 88 and damaged another, on November 6/7 they destroyed two Bf 110s and a Ju 88 and in three nights from December 22 to 24 they claimed three Bf 110s and a Ju 88 destroyed and another Ju 88 probably destroyed. Their final victory came during the night of March 14/15 1945, with another Ju 88 destroyed. Bunch was awarded a Bar to the DFC (9.3.45) and the DSO (21.9.45). He stayed on in the RAF and retired on May 1 1968 as a Squadron Leader, retaining the rank of Wing Commander. He died in 1972.

APO 18.5.40 PO 15.6.40 FO 15.6.41 FL 15.9.42 FL 18.5.46

GEOFFREY GORDON ROBSON BULMER Sub-Lieutenant (FAA) Pilot British 32 Squadron Born on January 5 1920, Bulmer entered the Air Branch of the Royal Navy for seven years on July 1 1939, as a Midshipman (A). He served with HMS President at Greenwich and later with HMS Frobisher and HMS St Vincent. On October 9 1939 he was posted to HMS Pembroke and he did his elementary flying training at 24 E&RFTS, Sydenham Belfast. Bulmer went on to 7 FTS, Peterborough on December 11 1939, gained his wings there on March 14 1940 and on May 26 he was posted to Eastleigh for fighter and deck-landing courses with 759 and 760 Squadrons. He was one of the naval pilots attached to the RAF on June 15 1940. After converting to Hurricanes at 7 OTU, Hawarden, Bulmer joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hilll on July 1. On the 10th he shared in destroying a Do 17. He was shot down by Oberleutnant Priller in combat off Dover on July 20 1940. He baled out into the sea but was drowned. His Hurricane, N 2670, may have crashed at Lydden. Bulmer is remembered on the Fleet Air Arm Memorial at Lee-on-Solent, Bay 1, Panel 3.

PO 5.1.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 5.1.44 FL 1.9.45 SL 1.1.51

SAMUEL HOSKIN BUNCH Sub-Lieutenant (FAA) Pilot British

804 Squadron

Midshipman (A) 1.7.39 Acting Sub-Lt 14.3.40 Bunch, of Roehampton, Surrey, entered the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on May 1 1939, rated as Midshipman (A). He did his elementary flying training at 14 EFTS, Elmdon, then went on to No 1 FTS, Leuchars on November 6 1939, on No 6 Course, which ended on April 21 1940.

RONALD FREDERICK BUMSTEAD 53138 Sgt Pilot British 17 and 111 Squadrons He was born at Goudhurst, Kent on August 7 1915. Bumstead joined the RAF, as an Airman u/t Rigger (Airframes), in September 1935 (523725).

Bunch joined 804 Squadron at Hatston on June 20 1940, flying Sea Gladiators on dockyard defence. He was still with 804 in November 1940. He was killed in a night-flying collision with a Swordfish on June 11 1941, serving at the RNAS station, Arbroath. He was 22. Bunch is buried in Arbroath Western Cemetery, Fife, Scotland.

He was posted to 74 Squadron at Hornchurch in September 1936, as an AC1 Rigger. In February 1937 he went to 64 Squadron at Martlesham Heath for flying and ground duties, as a Rigger/Air Gunner. He applied for pilot training and was selected in May 1938. On August 10 1939 he was sent to 12 E&RFTS, Prestwick, as an LAC, and then moved on to 3 FTS, South Cerney on October 23, on No 30 Course, which ended on April 27 1940. Bumstead went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on May 3, converted to Blenheims and then joined 29 Squadron at Debden on June 8. He was posted to 6 OTU on July 16 for conversion to Hurricanes, after which he joined 17 Squadron at Debden on the 18th. Bumstead moved to 111 Squadron, also at Debden, on August 26 1940. He was detached to RAF Kenley, possibly to the Kenley Sector Training Flight, until September 14, when he rejoined the squadron, which had moved north to Drem. Bumstead was posted from 111, then at Dyce, on December 21 1940 to 605 Squadron at Croydon. On the 28th he was posted to 57 OTU, Hawarden, as an instructor. He went to 60 (Night Fighter) OTU at Leconfield on June 13 1941 and joined the recently-formed 409 (RCAF) Squadron at Coleby Grange on July 18. In mid-September 1941 he was posted to 1451 Turbinlite Flight at Hunsdon and on December 9 Bumstead went to 287 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Croydon. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in October 1943 and on December 15 he joined 525 Squadron, newly-formed with Warwicks. Bumstead’s last posting was on September 5 1944, to 147 Squadron, then being reformed at Croydon, for transport duties with Dakotas. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.46), released in June 1946 and he joined Sabena Airlines in December. In May 1953 he became an Inspector of Air Accidents and in June 1955 he joined the Goodyear Tyre Company, in the Aviation Division. Bumstead died on October 1 1977.

Midshipman 1.5.39 Acting Sub-Lt 14.3.40 Sub-Lt 28.6.40

ROBERT WILTON BUNGEY 40042 FL Pilot Australian 79 and 145 Squadrons Bungey was born at Fullarton, South Australia on October 4 1914. He was educated at Glenelg Primary School and Adelaide High School and after leaving, he was employed as an insurance clerk. He joined the RAAF and trained at Point Cook from July 1936. With flying training completed, he sailed for England on July 22 1937 and after arrival, he transferred to the RAF in August with a short service commission. Bungey joined 226 Squadron at Harwell on November 27 1937. The squadron took its Battles to France on September 2 1939, as part of the AASF. It was in action throughout the Battle of France and was withdrawn to England on June 16 1940 from Brest. Bungey had been serving as ‘A’ Flight Commander but he relinquished this on July 9 1940. In August he responded to a call for volunteers for Fighter Command and he joined 79 Squadron at Acklington from 226 on August 19 and moved to 145 Squadron at Dyce on September 19 1940. Bungey was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander on the 24th. He was shot down on November 7 and baled out into the sea near the Isle of Wight, with an injured knee. He damaged a Ju 88 on the 9th and shared in the probable destruction of a He 111 on December 11 1940. He shared a Ju 88 over the Channel on March 10 1941. With his knee still giving trouble, Bungey was posted from the squadron

PO 24.10.43 FO 24.1.44 FL 24.7.45

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rank of Private and dismissed from the Czechoslovak Air Force. He was then only permitted to do menial work until his retirement. Burda died on February 23 1988 in Brno, Czechoslovakia.

on March 30 1941, to go into hospital for an operation. He took command of the recently-formed 452 (RAAF) Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on June 10 1941. Bungey was awarded the DFC (7.10.41) and he destroyed a Bf 109 on December 6. He was posted away from the squadron on January 25 1942. During 1942 Bungey had some staff postings. He transferred back into the RAAF in January 1943 and he and his English wife, Sybil, went to Australia. She died suddenly, after giving birth to a baby son. Bungey was distraught and took his own life on June 10 1943. He and his wife are buried at St Jude’s Church, Brighton, South Australia. He was 28. A Spitfire flown by Bungey is in The Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

PO 2.8.40

ALAN GEORGE BURDEKIN 143405 Sgt Air Gunner British

Born on June 26 1917, Burdekin joined the RAFVR at Derby on March 29 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (746828). He was called up on September 1 and was posted to 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on October 31. The squadron was then equipped with Fairey Battles.

PO 26.8.37 FO 26.5.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.2.41

FRANTISEK BURDA 82540 PO Pilot Czechoslovakian

600 Squadron

Burdekin was posted to 9 Air Observers’ School, Penrhos on November 28. After qualifying as an LAC Air Gunner, he rejoined 266 on January 9 1940. He moved to 264 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on February 1 and he spent eight weeks in an Experimental Flight in April and May. He was promoted to Sergeant on June 6 and then posted from 264 on the 13th to 5 OTU, Aston Down, to convert to Blenheims. On July 7 1940 Burdekin joined 600 Squadron at Manston. He was posted to 10 Signals School at Blackpool on September 21, for a wireless course. He completed this at 2 Electrical and Wireless School at Yatesbury, from January 4 to March 31 1941, qualifying as a wireless operator. He then rejoined 600 Squadron and remained with it until July 16, when he joined 125 Squadron at Colerne. On October 13 1941 Burdekin went to 278 (ASR) Squadron. He was commissioned in January 1943 and remained with the squadron until March 18 1944. He then went to 577 (AA Co-op) Squadron. Burdekin was released from the RAF on December 29 1945, as a Flying Officer. He emigrated with his family to New Zealand in October 1947. Burdekin was in the RNZAF Active Reserve from 1953 to 1958 and then served in the 1st Battalion, Nelson, Marlborough, West Coast Regiment, as a captain, from April 1958 to October 1962. Burdekin died in June 2008.

310 Squadron

Burda was born on January 21 1915 in Osicky. On October 1 1935 he joined the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov for military service where he did his basic training and was trained to be an aerial-observer. In June 1936 he was assigned to the 1st Air Regiment at Prague-Kbely. He decided that he wanted to remain in the Czechoslovak Air Force following his military service and. On October 1 1936, he was posted for further training to the Military Academy at Hranic. In October 1937, with the rank of Pilot Officer, he returned to the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov for pilot training. In June 1938 he was posted to the 40th Squadron of the 4th Air Regiment. When the Germans occupied Czechoslovakia on March 15 1939 his unit was based at Dolni Mecholupy but it was quickly disbanded and Burda was demobilised. In June he travelled to Ostrave and, with the assistance of the underground movement, he was smuggled on to a freight train which took him to Poland. He reported for duty to the Czechoslovak Consulate, in Krakow and was then sent to a transit camp at nearby Maly Bronowice. In late July, along with other Czech airmen, he travelled to Gdynia, Poland, and boarded the Kastelholm which took him to France, arriving on August 24 1939. In France he was required to enlist in the French Foreign Legion for five years, with the assurance that should war be declared he would be transferred to a French military unit. On October 9 1939 he joined l’Armée de l’Air and was assigned to the Chartres airbase for retraining on French equipment. On May 27 1940 he was posted to GCI/4, equipped with Curtiss H-75s. During the Battle of France he made his first sortie on June 3 and achieved success on the 5th, when he shared in the destruction of a Bf 109. He had to make a forced landing following this success due to shortage of fuel. With the rapid advance of the German forces, CGI/4 were constantly retreating south through France and eventually was forced to fly to Oran, Algeria. The Czech airmen on the unit were released from l’Armee de l’Air service and they travelled to Casablanca where they boarded a ship bound for Gibraltar. Here they changed ships and sailed to England, arriving in Liverpool on July 16. On July 24 Burda was accepted into the RAFVR with the rank of Pilot Officer. In late September he was posted to 6 OTU, at Sutton Bridge, for retraining on Hurricanes. He was posted to 310 Squadron, at Duxford, on October 15 and flew five sorties during the closing days of the Battle of Britain. He completed his first operational tour on August 20 1941 and, during the required break from operational flying, he was detached to an air-gunnery instructors’ course at 8 OTU at Sutton Bridge and a VHF Blind Approach Course at West Malling. He returned to 310 Squadron on October 9 1942 and was appointed Commander ‘B’ Flight in the next month. On February 27 1943, whilst escorting US Liberator bombers on an air raid on Brest, Burda was shot down in his Spitfire Vb, RP 287, by flak, near the island of Vierge. He baled out and landed safely but was captured and spent the remainder of the war as a Prisoner of War (PoW 245). He was held in a number of different prison camps, Schubin, Stalag Luft II and Barth before finishing up at Colditz from where he was liberated by the Americans on April 16 1945. Burda returned to Britain on April 20 1945 and was at the Czechoslovak Depot, Cosford for convalescence and rest until June 29 when he returned to 310 Squadron at Manston. He returned to Czechoslovakia, with 310 Squadron, on August 24 1945. The Squadron became the 310st Squadron of the 10th Air Regiment of the Czechoslovak Air Force and Burda was appointed as its Commander. On July 1 1946 he was appointed Staff Captain at the Operational Department of the Czechoslovak Air Force HQ in Prague. Following the communist takeover in February 1948 Burda was transferred to the 7th Air Regiment, as Commander and, on October 24 1948, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. However, within a year, because of his service with the RAF, he was demoted to the

PO 3.2.43 FO 3.8.43

JOHN HENRY BATEMAN BURGESS 67601 Sgt Pilot British 222 Squadron Burgess, born in 1920, was at Leyton County High School for Boys and worked for an insurance company before the war. He joined the RAFVR on July 23 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741839), and did his ab initio training at 21 E&RFTS, Stapleford. Called up on September 1 1939 he went to No 1 ITW, Cambridge on November 15. He was posted to 11 FTS, Shawbury on February 1 1940. He went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 6, converted to Spitfires and then joined 222 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on July 29. Burgess claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on September 7, shared a Bf 109 on October 15, probably destroyed a Bf 109 on the 17th and shared another on the 29th. In the latter engagement his Spitfire, P 9318, received damage to the glycol system and he made a forced-landing on a dummy aerodrome at Lenham. The Bf 109 crashed on Sheerlands Farm, Pluckley. Burgess damaged a Ju 88 on April 27 1941. Commissioned in May, he probably destroyed a Bf 109 on August 21 and damaged a Bf 109 on September 17. He was posted to 129 Squadron at Westhampnett on October 18, as a Flight Commander. On December 27 he went to 53 OTU, Llandow, as an instructor. In midFebruary 1942 Burgess was sent on a course at CFS, Upavon, returning in mid-March to Llandow. Burgess joined 66 Squadron at Ibsley on August 6 1942 but three weeks later he sailed in the MV Leinster to Gibraltar, where he was put in charge of a defence flight of six Spitfires and six Hurricanes. He was posted to Luqa, Malta on October 26 1942, as a Flight Commander with 1435 Squadron. On November 5 he damaged a Bf 109. On a sweep across Sicily on the 25th, to attack Comiso aerodrome, Burgess was attacked by FW 190s. His Spitfire caught fire and he crashed into the sea, just offshore from the beach at Gela and he was captured. After being entertained by the pilots of JG 2 at Santa Pietra, Burgess was handed over to the Italians and imprisoned at Chieti. He was later in Stalag Luft 3 (PoW No 2588). After repatriation to Britain in May 1945, Burgess was released from the RAF on November 23 1945. He returned to insurance but moved to a successful career in banking. He retired in 1980. Burgess died on August 10 1988. PO 27.5.41 FO 16.1.42 FL 16.1.43

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ERIC BURGOYNE 42796 PO Pilot British

Called up on October 16, he went to CFS, on No 61 instructor’s course, after which he went to 7 FTS, Peterborough, to instruct. Burnell-Phillips joined 607 Squadron at Croydon, soon after its return from France on May 22 1940. He made his first flight with the squadron on May 28. He claimed two He 111s destroyed on August 15 and he shot down a Do 17 on September 9. In the latter engagement, his engine seized and he made a forced-landing near Knockholt, in Hurricane P 2912. Burnell-Phillips was slightly wounded by a bullet in the ankle. On September 26 he forced a Do 17 to crash into the sea by making mock attacks, his ammunition having been exhausted. He also claimed a Bf 110 destroyed on September 30 and shared a He 111 on October 4. Burnell-Phillips was awarded the DFM (1.11.40), credited with at least five victories. He was commissioned in November and was killed in a flying accident on February 9 1941 at Haddington, East Lothian, aged 24. He is buried in Dirleton Cemetery, Peebleshire. Burnell-Phillips’ portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde in February 1941.

19 Squadron

Burgoyne joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his flying training on May 18 1939, as a pupil pilot. Training completed, he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford in mid-May 1940. S of Chichester on August 31, Burgoyne shared in the destruction of a Bf 110 and on September 5 he probably destroyed a Do 17. He was shot down and killed in combat with Bf 109s over Canterbury on September 27 1940. His Spitfire, X 4352, crashed at Coldred, Kent. Burgoyne was 25. He is buried in St Mary’s churchyard, Burghfield, Berkshire.

APO 18.5.36 PO 9.3.37 PO 14.11.40

NORMAN WHITMORE BURNETT 70101 FO Pilot British 266 and 46 Squadrons

APO 23.10.39 PO 18.5.40

PETER SLATER BURLEY 551809 Sgt Radar Operator

British

Burnett was commissioned in the RAFO, in Class AA (section ii), in August 1934. He transferred to the RAFVR in January 1938. Called up on September 7 1939, he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge from 5 FTS, Sealand on December 16 1939.

600 Squadron

Burley joined the RAF as a Boy Entrant in 1937. He must have volunteered for flying duties and then susequently done a radar course, probably at RAF Yatesbury.

On August 1 1940 Burnett was posted to 46 Squadron at Digby. On that day he was made ‘B’ Flight Commander, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. He crashed at Hollingbourne on September 8, following a combat over Sheppey. He was admitted to hospital, wounded. His Hurricane, V 6631, was a write-off. He did not resume operational flying until November 1 1940, although he continued to command ‘B’ Flight on the ground. On November 7 Burnett damaged a Bf 110, on the 11th he probably destroyed a CR 42 and on the 13th he destroyed a Bf 109. On May 20 1941, 46 Squadron sailed for the Middle East in the aircraft carrier HMS Argus. At Gibraltar pilots and aircraft were transferred to the carriers HMS Ark Royal and Furious. On June 6 they flew off to Hal Far, Malta. Five days later Burnett was flying one of seven Hurricanes that were scrambled to meet a heavily-escorted Italian reconnaissance aircraft. In the ensuing combat, Burnett was shot down. A search to within sight of the coast of Sicily failed to find any trace of him. Burnett is remembered on the Malta Memorial, Panel 1, Column 1. Burnett’s younger brother, Pilot Officer W H Burnett, a pilot, failed to return from an operation to Nuremburg on March 31 1944. He was serving with 166 Squadron, operating in Lancasters from Kirmington in Lincolnshire. He is buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery.

He was with 600 Squadron at Manston by June 28 1940, as an Aircraftsman. Burley flew seven operational sorties during the Battle of Britain. He was promoted to Sergeant in early October. He was still with 600 Squadron in November 1940. No other service details traced.

FRED PERCY BURNARD 45461 F/Sgt Pilot British

616 and 74 Squadrons

Burnard was born on March 9 1915 in Scarborough. He went to the Friarhoe Senior Boys’ School in the town. He joined the RAF in January 1930 as an Aircraft Apprentice (564553). He passed out in December 1932, as a Metal Rigger. He served in Iraq and Egypt. He later applied for pilot training and was selected. With training completed, he passed out as a Sergeant-Pilot. He was with 616 Squadron at Leconfield in June 1940. On July 3 he shared in destroying a Do 17 and on September 1 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another. Burnard joined 74 Squadron on October 27 1940. Surprised by Bf 109s over Dover on November 1, he returned to base damaged, in Spitfire P 7501. He was posted to 85 Squadron on November 15. Commissioned in March 1941, Burnard went to 54 OTU, Church Fenton from 85 Squadron on November 24 1941, as an instructor. Burnard served in India and was released from the RAF in 1947, as a Squadron Leader. He trained as a teacher and worked in the East Riding of Yorkshire, becoming deputy head teacher at Hilderthorpe Junior School. He died on April 27 2007 in Newtonmore in the Scottish Highlands, having lived at Laggan in retirement. He was buried in Laggan churchyard.

PO (RAFO) 13.8.34 FO (RAFO) 13.2.36 FO (RAFVR) 1.1.38 FO 7.9.39 FL 16.12.40

OWEN VALENTINE BURNS 146278 Sgt Wop/AG British

235 Squadron

Burns was born in Birkenhead on November 20 1915 and was educated at St Francis Xavier’s College, Liverpool. He joined the RAFVR at 3 RAF Depot, Padgate on October 3 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (969385). With his training completed, Burns joined 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton in June 1940.

PO 5.3.41 FO 5.3.42 FL 5.3.43

PETER ANTHONY BURNELL-PHILLIPS 88212 Sgt Pilot British 607 Squadron

The squadron mainly carried out aerodrome protection duties and escorted aircraft that were attacking the French ports and German shipping. On an offensive sweep on November 18 he shot down a Do 18 flying boat. Returning from a dusk patrol over the North Sea on February 14 1941, Burns’ Blenheim hit a tree as it was about to land at Langham, when the flarepath lights were put out because of enemy aircraft in the vicinity. The observer was killed, the pilot was seriously injured and Burns escaped with a broken collarbone. After a spell of Aerodrome Control duties, Burns joined 279 (ASR) Squadron in December 1941, flying Hudsons carrying the 24 feet long airborne lifeboat. Commissioned in February 1943, Burns was posted to 5(C) OTU in December, for instructor duties. In 1944 he did specialised gunnery courses and in December went to 16 Group in Edinburgh, where he was one of a small team, re-writing gunnery instructions for all aircrew. Burns was appointed Gunnery Officer at 19 Group, Plymouth in January 1945 and in February he became PA to the AOC, AVM C B S Spackman.

Born in Richmond, Surrey, Burnell-Phillips was educated at St George’s School, Weybridge. He joined the RAF on a short service commission (37848). He began his ab initio training on March 9 1936, as a pupil pilot at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty. On June 5 he moved to 11 FTS, Wittering. Training completed, Burnell-Phillips was posted to 54 Squadron at Hornchurch on January 10 1937, later moving to 65 Squadron, also at Hornchurch. Burnell-Phillips was obliged to resign his commission on February 1 1939 for infringement of flying discipline, when, for a bet, he flew at rooftop height along the main thoroughfare of Crowborough, Sussex. He joined the RAFVR on April 20 1939 (745892) and he began a flying instructors’ course on the 25th. In June 1939 he was posted to 32 E&RFTS, West Hartlepool.

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With training completed, Burtenshaw went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 7 and after converting to Spitftres, he joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on the 29th. He was shot down and killed on March 12 1941, still with 54 Squadron, aged 21. Burtenshaw is buried in Snodland Cemetery, Kent.

When a new AOC arrived in November 1947, Burns was posted to RAF West Kirby as OC SHQ Unit. He left the RAF in March 1948. PO 19.2.43 FO 19.8.43 FL 19.2.45 FL 19.8.46

WILLIAM RICHARD BURNS NZ 40202 Sgt Air Gunner New Zealander

CYRIL GEORGE BURTON 45730 F/Sgt Pilot British 23 Squadron 236 Sqdn Burton went to Paston School, Norfolk. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (565499), in September 1931 and passed out on August 16 1934 as a Metal Rigger. He later successfully applied for pilot training.

Born in Devonport, England on June 10 1912, Burns went to New Zealand in 1929 and worked on sheep and dairy farms. He joined the RNZAF in January 1940 and after training at Weraroa and Ohakea, he sailed in the SS Akaroa on March 23, arriving at Tilbury on May 9.

He was with 23 Squadron at Collyweston as a Flight Sergeant pilot in June 1940 and served with it throughout the Battle of Britain and was still with the squadron in November 1940. Commissioned in May 1941, he was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

After gunnery instruction at 5 OTU, Aston Down, he was posted to 236 Squadron at Thorney Island on July 6 1940. He moved to 282 Squadron on November 14 and then went to 221 Squadron in mid-December. Burns came off operations on March 26 1941, to operate and maintain the searchlight on the first Wellington to be equipped with the Leigh Light for anti-submarine work. On July 10 1941 Burns went to the Coastal Command Development Unit, to instruct on the Light. In late January 1942 he joined a searchlight development unit, 1417 Flight, which became 172 Squadron on March 8 and by June was fully operational. Burns was posted to 210 Squadron on January 15 1943, later moving to 59 Squadron and 279 Squadron. Commissioned in December 1943, Burns was with 279 until November 1944, when he went to 5 (Coastal) OTU at Turnberry. He was repatriated to New Zealand in September 1946 and released in December, as a Flight Lieutenant. Burns died on May 23 1949.

PO 8.5.41 FO 8.5.42 FL 8.5.43

DOUGLAS LAWRENCE BURTON NZ 40187 Sgt Observer New Zealander

248 Sqdrn

Born in Opunake on December 14 1916, Burton was working as a salesman in Sydney at the outbreak of war. He returned to New Zealand and joined the RNZAF as a trainee Observer on January 15 1940. With ground training at Weraroa and flying at the Air Observers’ School at Ohakea completed, Burton sailed for the UK in the RMS Rangitata on June 7 1940. On July 30 he was posted to 17 OTU, Upwood and he joined 106 Squadron at Finningley on October 2. He was then posted to Sumburgh in the Shetlands, where he joined 248 Squadron on October 19 1940. On October 20 Burton was a member of a Blenheim crew, captained by Pilot Officer G M Baird, on a flight off the south-west coast of Norway. After engaging and shooting down a Do 215, they were themselves shot down by Bf 109s. Baird and Burton were captured. Burton was wounded and he was sent to hospital in Stavanger. He was later a prisoner in Stalag Luft 1 and Stalag Luft 3 (PoW No 423), where he worked in the Red Cross Store. He was promoted to Warrant Officer in May 1943. Burton arrived back in New Zealand in January 1946, spent some time in hospital and went on to the reserve in December. He became a partner in a sports-outfitting business in Wanganui. He died there on November 20 1974.

PO 5.12.43 FO 5.6.44 FL 5.12.45

ALFRED DENMARK BURT 49994 Sgt Pilot British 611 and 603 Squadrons Born on July 27 1916, Burt was educated at Brockenhurst County School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (566159), at Halton on September 7 1932, to train as a Fitter II (Airframes and Aero Engines). He passed out on July 26 1935 and was posted to 4 (AC) Squadron, as an LAC. Burt applied for pilot training and on January 18 1938 he began flying at 2 E&RFTS, Filton, moving on to 10 FTS, Ternhill on March 27. With training completed, he was posted to No 1 Electrical and Wireless School, Cranwell on October 30 1938, as a staff pilot. At the outbreak of war, Burt joined 46 Squadron at Kenley but on September 16 1939 he moved to 611 Squadron at Digby. On August 21 1940 he shared in shooting down two Do 17s off the Lincolnshire coast and on September 11 he probably destroyed a He 111. Burt was posted to 603 Squadron at Hornchurch on October 4 and he was slightly wounded in action on November 14. On December 17 he was sent to CFS, Upavon for an instructors’ course, after which he went to 15 FTS, Kidlington. Burt was posted overseas on October 22 1941, going to 24 Air School, Nigel, South Africa, as an instructor. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in August 1942. In September 1944 Burt returned to the UK and joined No 1 ADU, Redhill, as a ferry pilot. On February 28 1945 Burt was posted to 512 Squadron at Broadwell. He was awarded the AFC (14.6.45). A year later he went to 271 Squadron, also at Broadwell, as a pilot and Squadron Training Officer. 271 was disbanded on December 1 1946 and re-numbered 77 Squadron. Burt went to 241 OCU, North Luffenham on January 27 1948 and later took part in the Berlin Air Lift. He was awarded a Bar to the AFC (1.1.55). Burt held a number of staff appointments prior to his retirement on July 27 1958 as a Squadron Leader. He died on March 17 1980.

HOWARD FRIZELLE BURTON 33227 FL Pilot British 66 and 616 Squadrons Burton was born in Letchworth in 1916 and educated at Bedford School. He entered RAF College, Cranwell, as a Flight Cadet, in January 1935. He was awarded the Sword of Honour at his graduation in December 1936 and granted a Permanent Commission. On December 19 he joined 46 Squadron at Digby. On March 2 1939 Burton was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and perhaps also appointed a Flight Commander. Burton was posted away to HQ 12 Group on June 26 1939, for Ops duties. He joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on September 7, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. On May 12 1940 he shared a He 111, on June 2 he got a probable He 111 over Dunkirk, on the 19th Burton damaged a Ju 88 and on July 29 he shared in the destruction of a He 111. Promoted to Acting Squadron Leader on September 3, he was given command of 616 Squadron at Kenley. Burton had no further victories until June 21 1941, when he shared a Bf 109. On July 21 he shared another and on the 23rd he damaged one. Awarded the DFC (19.9.41), Burton was posted away in September for a rest from operations. In early 1942 Burton was posted to the Middle East and later became Wing Leader of 239 (Kittyhawk) Wing. On January 18 1943 he destroyed a Bf 109 and shot down another on February 26. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (23.2.43) and at the end of his tour he got the DSO (6.4.43). He also held the C de G. At the conclusion of the Tunisian campaign, Burton and other unit commanders were

PO 24.8.42 FO 24.2.43 FL 24.8.44 SL 1.1.51

ALLAN ANTHONY BURTENSHAW 745616 Sgt Pilot British 54 Squadron Burtenshaw was born in Windsor on February 23 1920. The family went to live in Snodland, Kent where he played cricket for a local team. He was awarded a choral scholarship to Eton. He joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and after completing his elementary flying training at 23 EFTS, Rochester, he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on June 16 1940, on No 49 Course.

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On September 7 Bush made a forced-landing at Eastchurch, after a cannon shell went through his cockpit hood and petrol tank during a combat over the Thames Estuary with Bf 109s. On September 12 he destroyed a Bf 110, on the 17th a Bf 109 and on the 30th he damaged a He 111. On this day Bush was shot down, in an action over the South-West coast and crash-landed near Yeovil. Both incidents were in Hurricane P 3021. Commissioned in July 1941, Bush went with ‘A’ Flight of 504 when it was formed into 81 Squadron and posted to Leconfield. The personnel were kitted out for an unknown overseas destination.They flew to Abbotsinch in Harrows and embarked for Russia on the aircraft carrier HMS Argus, which carried crated Hurricanes. On September 1 1941 the squadron flew off in sixes for Vaenga airfield, near Murmansk. The squadron began operations, including bomber escorts, and carried on until midNovember, when 81’s pilots started converting Russian pilots to Hurricanes. They left Russia on November 29, leaving all equipment behind, and returned in HMS Kenya, landing at Rosyth on December 7. After return to the UK, Bush spent a period instructing Army glider pilots. He then converted to Mosquitos and joined 139 Squadron at Upwood. He was later with a Spitfire Flight, training Lancaster crews to cope with attacking fighters. Bush was awarded the DFC (23.3.45), serving with 128 Squadron in 8 (Pathfinder) Group, Bomber Command, in Mosquitos. Bush was released from the RAF in late 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 2002.

flown home to England in May 1943, on leave. On June 3 they took off in a Hudson of 117 Squadron, to return to North Africa. Over the Bay of Biscay the aircraft was intercepted by a Ju 88 and shot down. Burton was among those lost. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 118. PO 19.12.36 FO 19.6.38 FL 19.6.40 SL 1.9.41

LESLIE GILBERT BURTON 78081 PO Observer British

236 Squadron

Burton joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer (755058). He was called up on September 1 and on completion of his training, he was commissioned in March 1940. He joined 236 Squadron at North Coates on March 11 1940. After a period away from the squadron, probably at No 1 (C) OTU, Silloth, Burton rejoined it on July 19. He was the first observer to fly on operations with the squadron, on July 21 1940. Burton was posted away to 431 Flight at Bircham Newton on October 26 1940. He was killed on December 24 1940, aged 26. He is buried in St Peter’s churchyard, Harborne, Birmingham. PO 10.3.40

PERCIVAL ROSS-FRAMES BURTON 74348 FO Pilot South African 249 Squadron Burton was born in 1917 in Cape Province. He joined the South African Coast Garrison and Citizen Forces in 1935.

PO 12.7 41 FO 12.7.42 FL 12.7.43

He later went to Britain, to Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. In 1938 he was reserve cox for the Oxford crew in the University Boat Race on the River Thames. Burton learned to fly with the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR on September 26 1939. Called up in October, he completed his training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell. He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on June 22 1940, to convert to Hurricanes, and he joined 249 Squadron at Church Fenton on July 21. On September 2 Burton probably destroyed a Do 17 and on the 26th he damaged another. On the morning of September 27 the squadron engaged a formation of Bf 110s of V/LG 1. The Hurricanes broke the Germans’ defensive circles and the enemy aircraft went south at low level, heading for the Channel. Burton pursued one of the Bf 110s for about forty miles, often at little more than treetop height, but the German pilot, the Gruppe Kommandeur of V/LG 1, Hauptmann Horst Liensberger, was unable to shake him off. Just N of Hailsham, Burton’s guns stopped firing and the two aircraft skimmed over the rooftops. The Hurricane, V 6883, was above and behind the Bf 110. Burton suddenly banked and made what appeared to be an attack. Both machines lurched and an object spun away. The tail unit of the Bf 110 dropped into a field, followed by the rest of the aircraft. The falling object was the wingtip of Burton’s Hurricane. His aircraft crashed into a huge oak tree on New Barn Farm, throwing its dead pilot clear and burning itself out in a field. The German crew were buried in Hailsham Cemetery but were exhumed after the war and buried elsewhere. Burton is buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, Tangmere. Eye-witness reports indicate strongly that he deliberately rammed the Bf 110. A letter from Fighter Command to the Hailsham ARP Chief said that Burton was to be recommended for a posthumous gallantry award. This could only have been the VC but in fact he only received a Mention in Despatches. In 1980 a road on a housing estate near to the site of the crash site was named ‘Burton Walk’ in his memory. Burton’s elder brother, Flight Lieutenant W W Burton, a pilot, died on August 20 1941. He did not return from an operation to Kiel, in a Wellington of 104 Squadron, based at Driffield. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial.

CHARLES ROY BUSH 42691 PO Pilot New Zealander

Born in Wellington on February 7 1918, Bush was educated at Wellington College and then went to work for an insurance company. Early in 1939 he applied for an RAF short service commission and he was provisionally accepted. He left New Zealand on June 15 1939 and on July 27 he began his ab initio training at 8 E&RFTS, Woodley. Bush went on to 3 ITW at Hastings and moved to 10 FTS, Dumfries on October 9 1939, on No 15 Course. Bush arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on April 20 1940, where he converted to Gladiators and then Spitfires. On May 14 he joined 615 Squadron at Abbeville and flew Gladiators on aerodrome defence until the 21st, when 615’s remaining aircraft were withdrawn to Kenley. On June 6 Bush joined 242 Squadron at Biggin Hill. Two days later he flew back to France with the squadron, to provide cover for the Army, falling back on St Nazaire. After several days patrolling the port, 242 was withdrawn to Coltishall on the 18th. On September 7 Bush damaged a He 111 and a Bf 110, on the 9th he destroyed a Bf 110, on the 18th he got a probable Ju 88 and on the 27th he destroyed a Bf 109. Bush joined 258 Squadron at Drem on December 5 1940. On June 16 1941 he claimed a probable Bf 109. He was posted to 610 Squadron at Tangmere on July 19 but moved on a month later to 41 Squadron at Merston, as a Flight Commander. He destroyed a Bf 109 on August 22, shared a Hs 126 on September 18 and damaged a Bf 109 on the 21st. He was awarded the DFC (30.9.41). Posted to 58 OTU, Grangemouth on October 22, Bush was there until March 1942, when he was detached for special duties with the RNZAF. He arrived back in New Zealand on July 13 and was posted to the newly-formed 11 (Fighter) OTU at Ohakea. He joined 15 (Kittyhawk) Squadron in late October 1943 and went with it to New Georgia on December 16, as a Flight Commander. Bush returned to New Zealand on February 16 1944 and on May 1 he was given command of 21 Squadron, about to be formed at Ardmore with Corsairs.The squadron pilots flew in a transport to Santos on June 19 and got their Corsairs next day. Tour-expired, Bush returned to Whenuapai on September 20 and after a rest, went to Guadalcanal for a second tour with 21 Squadron, which he finished in February 1945. Bush returned to the UK in July and was attached to No 1 AFDU at Andrews Field, Essex. He took part in the first Battle of Britain flypast over London on September 15 1945. In late March 1946 Bush transferred to the RNZAF and arrived back in New Zealand in early November. He was given command of the Communications Flight at Ohakea. On November 30 1948 Bush was carrying out a photographic reconnaissance of the Gisborne area, in an Oxford. He landed at Napier, took off again for Ohakea but never arrived. The crashed aircraft was finally located in the Ruahine Range. It is believed to have broken up in the air. Bush and his crew of two were all killed.

PO 26.9.39 FO 26.9.40

BASIL MARTIN BUSH 101038 Sgt Pilot British

242 Squadron

504 Squadron

Bush joined the RAFVR in Cambridge in July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758076). He had carried out some flying training at 22 E&RFTS there, before being called to fulltime service on September 1. He completed his training at 8 FTS, Montrose and after he had converted to Hurricanes at 7 OTU, he joined 504 Squadron at Castletown in early July 1940.

APO 18.9.39 PO 20.4.40 FO 24.4.41 FL 24.4.42

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GORDON DOWNS BUSHELL 745584 Sgt Pilot British 213 Squadron

On July 17 1940 3 Squadron was notified that one flight was to move to Sumburgh, to form 232 Squadron. On the 21st Butterick flew there with ‘B’ Flight of 3 Squadron from their base at Wick to Sumburgh. The eight Hurricanes were redesignated as 232 Squadron. On the 23rd he ditched off the Shetlands, in Hurricane P 3861, after his engine failed. In early October 1940 Butterick was posted to PDC Uxbridge for a move overseas. After embarkation leave, he was one of a group of pilots assembled at Uxbridge on October 19 for service in Malta. When the proposed posting had not materialised by November 11, Butterick was recalled to 232 Squadron. He went to Egypt in early 1941 and was posted to 33 Squadron in Greece on April 18. He was shot in the knee in hand-to hand fighting with German paratroops on Crete in May 1941 and captured. He was flown to Athens, as a PoW, where his leg was amputated. Commissioned in September 1945, Butterick stayed on in the RAF for a while after the war and was released as a Flying Officer.

Bushell, of Fenny Stratford, joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on September 1, he completed his training at 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 44 Course, which ran from November 6 1939 to May 18 1940. He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on the 18th and after converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to 213 Squadron on the 25th. On August 12 he claimed two Bf 110s destroyed, on the 13th he probably destroyed a Bf 109, and on the 15th he claimed another Bf 110 destroyed. He damaged a Bf 109 on October 15 and probably destroyed one on the 17th. He was killed on December 31 1940, when he crashed in a snowstorm at Risby Park, Suffolk, in Hurricane P 3267. Bushell was 24 years old. He is buried in Bletchley Cemetery, Buckinghamshire.

PO 5.9.45 FO 5.3.46 FO 5.9.46

SAMUEL LESLIE BUTTERFIELD 563441 Sgt Pilot British 213 Squadron

KENNETH BUTTERWORTH 1050688 AC 2 Radar Operator

Born in Leeds in 1913, Butterfield went to Watford Boys’ Grammar School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in September 1929 and passed out on August 19 1932, as a Metal Rigger. He later applied for pilot training and was selected.

Butterworth joined the RAFVR in June 1940 at 3 RAF Depot, Padgate, as an Aircrafthand. After a short radar course at RAF Yatesbury, he joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston and served with it in the Battle of Britain. He was still with the squadron in November 1940. No further service details traced.

Butterfield was with 213 Squadron at Wittering at the outbreak of war. On May 17 1940 he went with ‘B’ Flight to France. The pilots flew their Hurricanes and the ground crews flew over in an Ensign and a Bombay. The flight was attached to 79 Squadron at Merville and carried out defensive patrols, bomber escorts and army support operations from there. Over two days, May 19 and 20, Butterfield shared in the destruction of two Hs 126s. The squadron was withdrawn to Wittering on the 21st but it continued to operate over France daily, from Biggin Hill. On May 28, over Dunkirk, 213 engaged a large force of German aircraft. Butterfield shot down two Bf 109s and a Ju 88. He was then attacked by a Bf 110, which he destroyed, but he himself then suffered hits from attacking Bf 109s, which set his Hurricane on fire. He baled out and was picked up by the passing paddle steamer Sundown, which landed him at Margate. On the 31st Butterfield destroyed a Bf 109 and probably another. He was awarded the DFM (14.6.40). He failed to return from a combat over Portland on August 11 1940. His body was washed up on the French coast and he is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery. Butterfield was 27. His Hurricane, P 3789, was subsequently found on the seabed two miles off Lulworth, Dorset.

PERCY BYNG-HALL 79224 PO Air Gunner

British

Canadian

23 Squadron

29 Squadron

Byng-Hall was born in England but went to Canada as a child. In late 1939 he went to England with the West Nova Scotia Regiment. He transferred to the RAF in May 1940 as an Air Gunner. He went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 18 and joined 29 Squadron at Digby on July 7 and served with it until November 18 1940, when he was posted to 218 Squadron, to fly in Wellingtons. He transferred to the Administrative Branch in July 1942 and was released from the RAF in early 1946. Byng-Hall is believed to have died in Halifax, Nova Scotia on May 21 1948. APO 18.5.40 PO 15.6.40 FO 15.6.41 FL 15.6.42

EDWARD LAWRENCE BYRNE 621878 Sgt Radar Operator British

ALEC FRANK BUTTERICK 202121 Sgt Pilot British 3 and 232 Squadrons

FIU

Byrne, of Portsmouth, joined the RAF on October 4 1938, for nine years, as an Aircrafthand. He trained as a Wireless Operator and was one of the original radar operators in FIU from April/May 1940.

Butterick joined the RAFVR in April 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741431). He was one of fifty VR pilots, who were given the opportunity of having six months’ continuous training with the regular RAF.

At that time there was no official role for them and most were LACs. The CO arranged for them to be trained as air gunners, so that they could become Sergeants and draw flying pay. On September 13 1940 Byrne was in a Blenheim which failed to return from a night patrol. He, Flight Lieutenant R G Ker-Ramsey, pilot, and Sergeant G Dixon, observer, baled out and were captured. The Blenheim, Z 5721, crashed into the Channel, off Calais. At some time Byrne was held in Stalag Luft 3 at Sagan (PoW No 266). He was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Warrant Officer.

He joined 3 Squadron at Kenley on April 4 1939, on attachment. On August 29 Butterick crashed in Hurricane L 1928, landing at night at Biggin Hill, unhurt. Still with the squadron at the outbreak of war, he was later taken on to the strength, when his attachment was completed. On September 10 1939 he crashed his Hurricane, L 1939, returning from Manston to Croydon in bad visibility. He was admitted to Faversham Cottage Hospital, with a broken ankle and some injuries to the spine.

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C ANTHONY RICHARD CAIN 755057

Sgt

Wop/AG

British

THOMAS MORROW CALDERWOOD 235 Squadron

106757

Cain, of Harpenden, Hertfordshire, joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. He was called up on September 1 and after completing his training, he joined 235 Squadron.

Pilot

British

British

85 Squadron

Commissioned in July 1941, Calderwood was released from the RAF in 1946. He died on September 28 1957. PO 26.7.41 FO 26.7.42 FL 26.7.43

JAMES RUSSELL CAISTER PO

Pilot

In June 1939 Calderwood joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754372). Called up on September 1, he completed his training at 8 FTS, Montrose, on No 20 Course, which ran from June 10 to August 31 1940. He converted to Hurricanes at 6 OTU and then joined 85 Squadron at Church Fenton on September 23.

He served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain and was still with 235 when he was killed on June 15 1941, aged 21. Cain is buried in Kriberg Cemetery, Gothenburg, Sweden.

44826

Sgt

603 Squadron

FRANCIS WALTER CALE Born on October 19 1906, Caister joined the RAF, as an Aircrafthand (358860), about January 1925. He later applied for pilot-training and was selected. He served in Palestine in the 1930s, as a Sergeant-Pilot.

42104

PO

Pilot

Australian

266 Squadron

Cale, from Western Australia, was educated at Guilford Grammar School, Perth.

Caister joined 603 Squadron at Turnhouse on October 29 1939. On January 19 1940 he damaged a He 111 off Aberdeen, on March 7 he shared in the destruction of a He 111 70 miles E of Aberdeen and on April 16 he shared a Do 17. Caister shared a Ju 88 on July 3, shared a Do 17 on the 6th, shared a He 111 on the 12th and attacked a Ju 88 10 miles off Aberdeen in the late evening of the 19th, which crashed at Aalborg, in Denmark. Commissioned in August, Caister claimed a He 111 destroyed on the 30th and a Bf 109 on

He was provisionally accepted by an RAAF Board for an RAF short service commission. Cale sailed for England on February 2 1939 and began his training on March 13 1939. With training completed, Cale joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on November 6 1939. On June 2 1940 Cale probably destroyed a Bf 109 over Dunkirk. On August 15 he was shot down by Bf 109s over Maidstone. He baled out and landed in the River Medway. His body was recovered from the river the following day. His Spitfire, N 3168, crashed in flames on the bank of the Medway, at Teston. Cale was 25. He is buried in the Westminster City

September 3. Three days later he was shot down over the Channel off Manston. He landed his damaged Spitfire, X 4260, in France and was captured. He had only been married for one week and did not see his wife again until May 1945. Caister was awarded the DFM (13.9.40). At some time he was in Stalag Luft 3 (PoW No 242). He was released from captivity in early May 1945 and left the RAF on June 8 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. Caister died in 1994.

Cemetery, Ealing. APO 13.5.39 PO 6.11.39

WILLIAM PERCIVAL CAMBRIDGE PO 24.8.40 FO 21.8.41 FL 21.8.42

37791

PO

Pilot

British

Pilot

British

253 Squadron Cambridge was born in India in 1912, the son of a civil servant.

GEORGE DOUGLAS CALDERHEAD 86333

FL

54 Squadron He was educated at Bromsgrove School and then returned to India, where he worked in the sugar industry. He joined the RAF in February 1936, as a candidate for a short service commission. He began his ab initio course on March 9 1936, as a pupil pilot. Cambridge was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill on May 16 and with training completed, he joined 29 Squadron at Debden on December 25 1936. At the end of 1938 he was ‘B’ Flight Commander. He was detached to HQ 11 Group on June 28 1939, on Air Intelligence duties. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on

Calderhead, from Glasgow, joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748842). He was called up on September 1 and after completing his training at RAF College FTS, Cranwell on September 6 1940, he was commissioned. He arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 7, converted to Spitfires and joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on the 28th. Calderhead was posted away to 3 School of General Reconnaissance on December 12 1940. He was with 31 (General Reconnaissance) Squadron in Newfoundland, when he was killed in a flying accident on January 12 1942, aged 23. He is buried in Sherwood Cemetery, Newfoundland.

September 6 1939. Cambridge was posted from 11 Group on May 24 1940 to 253 Squadron, then re-

PO 7.9.40 FO 7.9.41

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September 6 flew off to Vaenga airfield. Some operations were flown in Russia and Cameron got a probable Ju 88 and damaged another on October 6 1941 but the main task was to convert and train Russian pilots on Hurricanes. The squadron left Russia on November 28 and reached Rosyth on December 6. It was given Spitfires and sent to Eglinton, Northern Ireland. In April 1942 134 sailed for the Middle East, arriving at Tewfik on June 6. In early July the CO and the most experienced pilots were attached to 213 Squadron in the Western Desert, while the remainder of the squadron went to Palestine. Cameron joined 213 on August 28. He destroyed a SM 79 on November 14 1942. He was posted to 335 (Hellenic) Squadron at Mersa Matruh on April 3 1943, for advisory and training duties. He received a Mention in Despatches (2.6.43). On October 5 Cameron went to 224 Group, Burma, as a Staff Officer, and on February 1 1944 he was given command of 258 Squadron. He was awarded the DFC (21.11.44) and on February 11 1945 he shared in the destruction of a Tony over Rangoon. Cameron left the Squadron on August 8 1945, returned to the UK and was awarded the DSO (2.10.45). He was granted a Permanent Commission on September 1 1945. Cameron went on to a most distinguished career in the RAF, despite losing his full flying capacity through illness soon after the war. Amongst other appointments, Cameron instructed at the Staff College, commanded the London University Air Squadron, was Personal Staff Officer to the Chief of the Air Staff, commanded RAF Abingdon, was Deputy Commandant at Cranwell and Air Member Personnel. He became Chief of the Air Staff in 1976, but, in the following year, on the death of Sir Andrew Humphrey (q.v.) he was appointed Chief of the Defence Staff, holding the appointment until 1979. He was created a life peer, Baron Cameron of Balhousie, on January 1 1983. Cameron died on January 30 1985 in the Middlesex Hospital. At the time of his death, he was Principal of King’s College, London. He is buried in St Michael’s churchyard, Halton, Buckinghamshire. In addition to his gallantry awards, Cameron was created CBE (1967), CB (1971), KCB (1975), GCB (1976) and KT (1983).

equipping at Kirton-in-Lindsey, after being in the heavy fighting in France. He was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander. He was detached to the AFDU at RAF Northolt on June 4, for a ten-day course on Air Fighting. On August 30 1940 he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed. The next day, after Squadron Leaders Starr and Gleave were killed and badly burned respectivly, Cambridge, as Senior Flight Commander, assumed command of 253 Squadron. On September 1 he damaged two Bf 110s and on the 4th he destroyed another. During a routine squadron patrol on September 6 1940, Cambridge’s aircraft gave trouble. He baled out but was killed. The Hurricane, P 3032, crashed at Kingsnorth. Cambridge is buried in Henley Road Cemetery, Reading, Berkshire. APO 4.5.36 PO 9.3.37 FO 9.9.38 FL 3.9.40

JAMES DOUGLAS CAMERON 747925

Sgt

Wop/AG

British

604 Squadron

Cameron, of Edinburgh, joined the RAFVR around April 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. He was called up on September 1 and after completing his training, he was posted to 604 Squadron and served with it during the Battle of Britain. Later posted to Bomber Command, Cameron was killed on May 9 1942, serving as a Flight-Sergeant with 9 Squadron at Honnington, Suffolk. His crew failed to return from a raid on WarnemŸnde, in Wellington X 3369. Cameron was 23. He is buried in the 1939-1945 War Cemetery in Berlin.

MATTHEW CAMERON 45540

F/Sgt

Pilot

British

66 Squadron

Cameron joined the RAF around July 1934, as an Aircrafthand (517583). He later applied for, and was selected for pilot training.

APO 31.7.41 FO 4.3.42 FL 4.3.43 FL 1.9.45 SL 1.1.50 WC 1.1.56 AC 1.7.64 AVM 1.7.68 AM 1.7.74 ACM 1.11.75 MRAF 31.7.77

In January 1940 he was a pilot with 66 Squadron at Duxford and on the 11th he shared in destroying a He 111 off Cromer. In May 1940 the squadron flew covering patrols over Dunkirk and on the 13th Cameron probably destroyed a Ju 88 E of Rotterdam. On August 19 he shared in a probable He 111, on the 20th shared in destroying a Bf 110 and probably a second, on September 9 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another and on the 15th he damaged a He 111. On September 27 Cameron destroyed a Ju 88, on October 13 probably a Bf 109 and on the 21st he was promoted to Flight Sergeant. On November 14 he probably destroyed a Ju 87 and damaged another. On December 17 he was posted away to CFS, Upavon, for an instructors’ course. Commissioned in March 1941, Cameron was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He must have been re-commissioned as the London Gazette shows him resigning his commission as a Flying Officer on September 20 1969. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde.

ALAN CAMPBELL 391857

Pilot

British

Air Gunner

New Zealander

264 Squadron

He volunteered for the RNZAF in November 1939 and reported to the Ground Training School at Weraroa on December 18. After completing a gunnery course at the Air Observers’ School, Ohakea, he left for the UK at the end of March 1940 in the SS Akaroa, arriving on May 9. Campbell was posted to 264 Squadron at Duxford, and in the course of continuing his training he flew two operational sorties, as an LAC and without his Air Gunner’s badge. He was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 27, where he qualified and received his brevet. After rejoining 264 on September 17 he was promoted to Sergeant. In early November 1940 he was posted to 75 Squadron at Feltwell. He made thirty operational flights in Wellingtons and at the end of his tour he went to 23 OTU, Pershore, as an instructor. He returned to operations at the end of April 1942 and joined the recently-reformed 156 Squadron at Alconbury. At his own request, he went back to 75 Squadron on May 19, to do his second tour. Campbell was front gunner in a Wellington, which failed to return from a raid on Hamburg on the night of July 28/29 1942. German evidence revealed that it had received a direct hit from ground guns at 2.10 am on the 29th and crashed at Stade. It was Campbell’s fifty-second operation. Campbell was 22. He was buried in Stade Cemetery but was later re-interred in Soltau Military Cemetery.

NEIL CAMERON Sgt

Sgt

Campbell was born in Nelson, Lancashire on January 23 1920 and he was taken to New Zealand as a baby.

PO 26.3.41 FO 26.3.42 FL 26.3.43

102585

GC 1.7.60

1 and 17 Squadrons

Cameron was born in Perth, Scotland on July 8 1920. He was educated at Perth Academy and after leaving, he went to work as a clerk for the Royal Bank of Scotland. He joined the RAFVR on May 13 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748176) and learned to fly at 11 E&RFTS, Perth. Called up at the outbreak of war, Cameron went to 3 ITW, Hastings on October 1 and on March 26 1940 to 15 EFTS, Redhill. On June 8 he was posted to 8 FTS, Montrose and after completing the course, he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on August 31, to convert to Hurricanes. He joined No 1 Squadron at Wittering on September 26 1940. Cameron joined 17 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on October 15. He destroyed a Ju 87, shared another and probably shared in the destruction of a third on November 8 1940 and claimed a Bf 110 destroyed on the 17th. He was one of the 17 Squadron personnel, who were transferred to 134 Squadron, formed at Leconfield on July 31 1941 for service in Russia. Cameron was commissioned at this time. The squadron sailed on August 19 in the carrier HMS Argus from Abbotsinch and on

ALAN ROBERTS McLEOD CAMPBELL 42393

PO

Pilot

Canadian

54 Squadron

Campbell, of Sorrento, British Columbia, was a candidate for an RAF short service commission when he began his flying training with the RAF on June 2 1939, as a pupil pilot. He was posted to 3 FTS, South Cerney on September 25, on No 29 Course, which ended on April 13 1940. With training completed, Campbell joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch. He was detached to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 27. After converting to Spitfires, he

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DONALD CAIRNIE OGILVIE CAMPBELL

was posted to PDC Uxbridge on May 15, for allocation to a squadron in France. Instead, he rejoined 54 Squadron on May 25. On July 7 he made a forced-landing at Deal, slightly wounded, after an attack by Bf 109s. He claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and a Do 17 damaged on August 18. On the 24th he was slightly wounded, in Spitfire X 4019. He did not fly again until September 11, when he made a non-operational flight of 40 minutes. Campbell shot down a Bf 109 on March 3 1941, which crashed at Brenzett. In May 1941 Campbell was with the MSFU at Speke. He sailed for Halifax, Nova Scotia on June 10 in the Empire Moon, the second ship to sail, which was equipped with a

741676

Sgt

Pilot

British

66 Squadron

In June 1938 Campbell joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939 and after completing his flying training he was serving with 66 Squadron at Coltishall by June 8 1940. Campbell was posted to RAF Biggin Hill on September 20 1940, as non-effective sick. He was admitted to Station Sick Quarters with a throat infection. He did not rejoin 66 Squadron until November 24 1940. No further service details traced.

GILLIAN LORNE CAMPBELL

catapult Hurricane. Campbell later served with 80, 123 and 234 Squadrons. He was released from the RAF on October 30 1945, joined the RCAF in August 1951, retired in 1964 and died in September 1979.

81680

PO

Pilot

British

236 Squadron

Campbell, of Bromley, Kent, joined the RAFVR in July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754786). He was called up on September 1 and on completion of his training he was commissioned on July 13 1940. He went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on that day.

APO 5.8.39 PO 6.4.40 FO 6.4.41 FL 6.4.42 After converting to Blenheims, Campbell joined 236 Squadron on August 5. 236 was a Coastal Command unit, seconded to Fighter Command for the Battle of Britain. On August 20 1940 Campbell’s Blenheim was damaged by anti-aircraft fire over Pembroke Dock but he returned safely to St Eval. On November 19 1940 Campbell was posted with his flight to Aldergrove, where it combined with a flight from 235 Squadron, to reform 272 Squadron. He flew his first operational sortie with 272 on the 21st. In May 1941 272 Squadron was posted to the Middle East The first six Beaufighters flew out from RAF Chivenor on the 24th, reaching Abu Sueir, Egypt on the 28th. 272 was operational the next day, providing fighter cover for the evacuation of Crete. Campbell damaged a Ju 88 on June 1, S of Crete. On July 24 he claimed two Ju 87s destroyed over a convoy E of Malta and on the 30th he damaged a four-engined transport between Sardinia and Malta and damaged three SM 79s on the ground at Elmas airfield, Sardinia. On November 19 1941 Campbell destroyed a Ju 87 on the ground at Timini airfield, Libya, on the 23rd shared in the destruction of four SM 79s on the ground at Barce airfield and on the 26th he shared in destroying a Caproni 311 and damaging a Fiat CR 42 on Jedaby airfield. On December 6 1941, again strafing Timini airfield, Campbell’s aircraft was hit by flak and he had to make a forced-landing 40 miles S of the airfield. A fellow pilot, Flying Officer D H Hammond, landed alongside, picked up Campbell and his navigator and took off again. Before leaving, Hammond destroyed Campbell’s aircraft with cannon fire. Campbell was awarded the DFC (30.1.42). He was still with 272, when it went to Malta on November 6 1942. He was killed on December 23 1942, flying a Spitfire in a test. He was 23, a son of Sir Edward Campbell Bt, and is buried in Durrington Cemetery, Wiltshire.

ALEXANDER MIDDLETON CAMPBELL 34932

FL

Pilot

British

29 Squadron

Born on October 16 1917, Campbell joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on November 16 1936, as a pupil pilot. He was posted to 2 FTS, Digby on February 6 1937 and with training completed, he joined 29 Squadron at Debden on January 8 1938. On May 21 1940 was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander. Campbell was posted away on December 1 1940 and he joined 258 Squadron, recently reformed at Leconfield, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. He stayed in the RAF after the war and retired on October 17 1956, as a Wing Commander. Campbell died in 1979. APO 31.1.37 PO 8.1.38 FO 8.1O.39 FL 9.10.40 SL 1.12.41 SL 1.9.45 WC 1.1.52

DAVID BAILLIE CAMPBELL NZ 40604

Sgt

Air Gunner

New Zealander

23 Squadron

Campbell was born at Te Kopuru on June 8 1920, educated at Dargaville High School and after leaving he became a postman. He joined the Territorial Army in 1936 and in January 1940 was serving on Home Defence at Fort Takapuna, Auckland, in the 15th North Auckland Regiment.

PO 13.7.40 FO 4.7.41

NORMAN NEIL CAMPBELL

He volunteered for the RNZAF and began training as an air gunner at Weraroa on February 13 1940. He gained air experience and had gunnery training at the Air Observers’ School at Ohakea, after which he sailed for the UK in the RMS Rangitiki on April 24 and arrived there on June 8. Campbell was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 17 and he joined 23 Squadron at Ford on September 28. He remained with the squadron, carrying out night intruder operations, until March 1942, when he went to 116 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Hooton Park. In May 1942 Campbell moved to 1653 Conversion Unit at Polebrook, to crew up and convert to Liberators. On June 24 1942 Campbell’s crew flew a Liberator of 159 Squadron, en route for India, via the Middle East. They were retained in the Middle East for operations and were initially based at St Jean, Palestine, from where they carried out long-distance day and night raids against targets in Crete and Tobruk. The squadron moved to Aqir on August 12 and made attacks on enemy convoys and targets along the South Mediterranean coast, as far away as Benghazi. 159 was merged with 160 Squadron in September 1942 and went to Shandur, in Egypt. Campbell’s tour finished in March 1943 and he returned to the UK, where he was awarded the DFM in April. At the end of May 1943 Campbell left for New Zealand, via America and Australia. After arriving on August 1 he spent a short while at No 1 OTU, Ohakea and then went to ITW at Rotorua, as an instructor. In mid-January 1944 Campbell was posted back to flying, joining 3 (General Reconnaissance) Squadron at Ohakea but he was found to be medically unfit for aircrew duties and took his discharge on April 8 1944, as a Warrant Officer. Campbell had a number of businesses in the postwar years and was working for the Ministry of Works in Whangarei, when he retired in 1980. He died in June 1984.

41824

PO

Pilot

Canadian

242 Squadron

Campbell was born in St Thomas, Ontario, son of Isabel and Alex Campbell. The latter worked for the Michigan Central Railroad. N N Campbell went to Myrtle Street Public School and later the Arthur Voaden Technical School. After graduation he went on to St Thomas Collegiate School. His first job was driving cars from the factory at Windsor to the St Thomas showrooms of Disbrowe Motor Sales. In 1938 Campbell began flying at the London, Ontario Flying Club and obtained his civil pilot’s license. He applied for a short service commission in the RAF in late 1938. After provisional acceptance, he sailed for England on January 14 1939 in the Duchess of Athol. Campbell began his ab initio course on January 23 1939, as a pupil pilot. He went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on April 1, for a two week induction course, after which he was posted to 11 FTS, Shawbury. With training completed, Campbell arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 5 1940, converted to Hurricanes and went to PDC Uxbridge on May 15 1940, for allocation to a squadron in France. It is not clear whether Campbell ever got to France but he joined 32 Squadron at Wittering on May 24. On June 3 he moved to 242 Squadron at Biggin Hill. Five days later he flew to France with the squadron, to help cover the rearguard actions being fought by the British Army as it retreated to the Atlantic coast. Campbell flew back on June 18. With no maps, he ran out of fuel and made a forced-landing on a beach near Minehead. By mid-July 242 was operational again and on September 15 Campbell damaged a Do 17 and on the 18th he claimed two Ju 88s destroyed, shared in shooting down another and damaged a fourth.

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Cannon was one of those who flew operationally, without rank or brevet, receiving three shillings per day, which included one shilling flying pay. When other Radar Operators were posted away as surplus in December 1940, Cannon was flying with the CO, Squadron Leader M F Anderson, and was retained on the squadron. In March 1941 Cannon was teamed up with Flying Officer K I Geddes. During the night of the 12/13th they shot down a Ju 88, engaged in a raid on Portsmouth, on the 14/15th a He 111 was destroyed and on the 16/17th they damaged a He 111. In the early hours of June 5 1941 Cannon and Geddes shot down another He 111, into the sea off Ventnor, Isle of Wight. Soon after midnight on the 15th another He 111 was destroyed. The team’s final victory came during the night of July 8/9 1941, when a Ju 88 was shot down over Dorset. Cannon was awarded the DFM (24.6.41). He was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Warrant Officer. Cannon died on September 17 1983.

On October 17 1940 Campbell was in Hurricane V 6575, which crashed into the sea after, presumably, after being hit by return fire from a Do 17 engaged off Yarmouth. His body was later recovered and he was buried on October 31 in Scottow Cemetery, Norfolk. Campbell was 27. APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39

ERNEST WILLIAM CAMPBELL-COLQUHOUN 39301

FL

Pilot

British

66 and 264 Squadrons Joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on October 12 1936, as a pupil pilot. CampbellColquhoun was posted to 10 FTS, Ternhill on January 16 1937 and with training completed, he joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on August 7.

BERNARD CAPEL 902479

On May 12 1940 he shared in the destruction of a He 111 3 miles E of The Hague, on June 2 he probably destroyed a Bf 109, on July 29 he destroyed a He 111 and on August 2 he damaged a Bf 109. On August 21 he was posted to 264 Squadron at Kirtonin-Lindsey, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. On the 26th CampbellColquhoun damaged a Do 17. He was posted away from the squadron on November 14 1940. He went to 145 Squadron on October 24 1941, to 4 Delivery Flight on April 6 1942 and later he was with 165 Squadron at Gravesend. He shared in destroying a Do 217 and probably a FW 190 during the Dieppe operation on August 19 1942. Campbell-Colquhoun was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Squadron Leader. He died on February 16 1989.

Air Gunner

British

25 Squadron

Candy was commissioned in May 1940 as a direct-entry Air Gunner. After completing his gunnery training, he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 18, for training on the Blenheim. He joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on July 6. He flew only one operational sortie with 25, on July 12.

42741

British

Pilot

British

257 Squadron

In July 1937 he went to work at Bobby’s, Eastbourne to learn the retail trade. Weekends were spent flying with the Civil Air Guard. In 1939 Capon applied for a short service commission in the RAF and he was provisionally accepted. He began his ab initio course at 19 E&RFTS, Gatwick on August 8 1939. He went to 11 FTS, Shawbury on October 21 and with training completed, Capon joined 257 Squadron, when it was reformed at Hendon on May 17 1940. He claimed a He 111 destroyed on August 12 and shared a Ju 88 the next day. On October 12 he was shot down in combat with Bf 109s over Dungeness and baled out, slightly wounded. His Hurricane, V 7298, crashed at High House Farm, Stone. Squadron Leader R R S Tuck took command of 257 in September 1940. Capon always flew as his No 2. On January 1 1941, after flying a night patrol, Capon was killed, landing in a blizzard at Coltishall. He was 20 years old and is buried in Marsh Lane Cemetery, Surbiton. Capon’s sister, Yvonne, died on April 5 1942, serving in the Wrens as a writer. She was 19 years old and is also buried in Surbiton Cemetery.

ARTHUR WILLIAM CANHAM Air Gunner

PO

Capon was born in Surbiton, Surrey on August 1 1920. He was educated at Arundel House Preparatory School, Surbiton and Kingston Grammar School.

APO 18.5.40 PO 15.6.40 FO 15.6.41 FL 15.6.42

Sgt

23 Squadron

CARDALE FREDERICK ALEXANDER CAPON

On the 15th Candy was posted to 98 Squadron at Gatwick. The squadron, equipped with Battles, was preparing to move to Iceland. On July 27 the squadron moved to Newton and the ground personnel left for Iceland next day. The aircraft took off from Wick for Kaldadarnes on August 27 1940. Candy was posted away in October 1940 and left Iceland for the UK on October 26 on the SS Antonia. He was at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge by November 8 1940. He was posted to 264 Squadron on December 10 1940 and later served with 12 Squadron. He was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant.

939269

British

After a spell at RAF North Coates, Capel remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. On December 30 he was posted to a gunnery course at 5 B&GS, Jurby. With his training completed, Capel was posted to 235 Squadron at North Coates on March 27 1940. He joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston on May 29 and served with the squadron in the Battle of Britain. With the advent of the Beaufighter and airborne radar many Air Gunners were posted to Bomber Command. Capel was serving with 7 Squadron at Oakington in 1941 when he was awarded the DFM (15.8.41). The citation stated that he was rear gunner of an aircraft attacking the German battleship Scharnhorst at La Pallice. His Stirling was engaged by six enemy fighters. With accurate and well-controlled fire, he shot down the first two that attempted to attack and the others flew away. He was decorated by the King at Buckingham Palace on December 2 1941. Capel did not fly again after September 1941. He later retrained as a photographic technician. He was serving in Germany prior to his release from the RAF on January 14 1946. He died in Wales on March 17 1976.

ROBERT JOHN CANDY PO

Air Gunner

Capel was born on March 15 1919 at Crewkerne. After leaving school, he worked for an insurance company. He joined the RAFVR on September 8 1939, as an Aircrafthand, and reported to RAF Uxbridge.

APO 21.12.36 PO 12.10.37 FO 12.7.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.7.44

79229

Sgt

600 Squadron

Canham enlisted in the RAFVR on October 25 1939, as an Aircrafthand. He later applied for aircrew duties and remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. After a gunnery course at 5 B&GS, Jurby, he joined 600 Squadron at Manston in May 1940 and served with it in the Battle of Britain. With the advent of the Beaufighter and airborne radar, the Air Gunners were posted away from the squadron in January 1941. Canham was sent to 11 OTU, Bassingbourn and afterwards joined 9 Squadron at Honington, flying as a rear gunner in Wellingtons. In August 1942 the squadron converted to Lancasters. Canham was discharged from the RAF on February 9 1943, following an operation at RAF Hospital, Ely, for the removal of splintered bone from his head and a badly-perforated ear drum. After the war Canham emigrated to New Zealand. He died there in 1990.

APO 9.10.39 PO 11.5.40

HERBERT CAPSTICK 79176

PO

Observer

Jamaican

236 Squadron

BERNARD CANNON 1052310

AC 2

Radar Operator

British

604 Squadron

Capstick was born on November 19 1920. His father was a senior Civil Servant. Capstick attended Cressbrook School, Kirkby Lonsdale and Sedbergh School, where he was a house prefect in Evans House, leaving in 1937. He joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer (751809). He was called to full-time service on September 1 and was sent to 4 ITW. He was posted to No 11 Air Observer Navigation School, Hamble on November 20 1939, on No 1 Air Observer Course, as an LAC.

Born in Bolton in 1915, Cannon joined the RAFVR in June 1940, as an Aircrafthand. He volunteered for flying duties and at the end of June he was at RAF Yatesbury for an airborne radar course and on July 20 he joined 604 Squadron at Gravesend, never having flown.

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With the course completed on March 9 1940 Capstick went to 9 B&GS, Penrhos for gunnery training. Commissioned in May 1940, he joined 236 Squadron at Thorney Island on July 15. Capstick served with the squadron in the Battle of Britain. On November 19 1940 he was posted with his flight to RAF Aldergrove, where it combined with a flight of 235 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. Capstick flew his first operational sortie with 272 on the 23rd. On April 12 1941 he was posted to 254 Squadron at Sumburgh. A posting as an instructor in September 1941 was almost immediately cancelled. On November 11 1941 he went to 228 Squadron, operating Sunderlands from Stranraer. He was attached to 202 Squadron at Gibraltar between January 11 and February 11 1942, before returning to 228 Squadron. From mid-April to early May he was at No 1 AAS, Manby on No 37 bombing leaders’ course. On May 21 he was a member of the crew of a Sunderland that attacked a U-boat in the Atlantic, probably causing damage. In late May Capstick was posted to Canada to a specialist navigation course at Port Albert. Other postings in Canada followed. He was released from the RAF on December 27 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant with 1068 flying hours. He qualified as a solicitor in London in 1947, becoming a solicitor in Hong Kong in 1948. He returned to Jamaica in 1951 and was admitted as a solicitor there. It is believed that Capstick died before 1961.

After converting to Spitfires, he joined 263 Squadron at Drem on June 23. He went to 603 Squadron at Turnhouse on July 3 and he joined ‘B’ Flight, which was then detached to Montrose, for aerodrome defence and convoy protection duties. The squadron went south to Hornchurch on August 27 1940. On September 11 Cardell damaged a He 111. On September 27 he was in combat with Bf 109s over the Channel. He destroyed one but it is believed that he was wounded in the engagement. He attempted to get back to the English coast but had to bale out at 500 feet a quarter of a mile off Folkestone. His parachute failed to open but he surfaced again very quickly. His friend, Pilot Officer P G Dexter, who had been flying with him, kept making low passes over Folkestone Harbour, trying to attract people’s attention to Cardell’s plight. When he failed to do so, he made a forced-landing on Folkestone beach. Hastily casting off his flying gear, he ran to where a group of men were trying to launch two boats. He helped launch the first and jumped into the second. Cardell was still afloat, but dead, when they reached him. His death certificate stated ‘Died from multiple injuries received due to war service’, probably caused by hitting the sea after such a long fall. Cardell was 23. He is buried in Holy Trinity churchyard, Great Paxton.

PO 5.5.40 FO 5.5.41 FL 5.5.42

PO 10.6.40

BRIAN JOHN GEORGE CARBURY

CHARLES FREDERICK CARDNELL

40288 FO

80807

Pilot

New Zealander

603 Squadron

The son of a veterinary surgeon, Carbury was born in Wellington on February 27 1918. He was educated at New Lynn and King’s College, Auckland and was a fine athlete.

PO

British

23 Squadron

PO 2.6.40

FRANK REGINALD CAREY 43132

PO

Pilot

British

43 Squadron

Born in Brixton, South London on May 7 1912, Carey was educated at Belvedere School, Haywards Heath. He joined the RAF in September 1927, as an Aircraft Apprentice (561516), at Halton and passed out in August 1930, as a Metal Rigger. Carey went to 43 Squadron at Tangmere as an AC1. In 1933 he returned to Halton for a conversion course, to be a Fitter II (Airframes). In 1934 he was posted to Worthy Down, as an LAC, and served there with 7 and 58 Squadrons. He had applied for pilot training and was selected in 1935. He passed out as a Sergeant-Pilot from 6 FTS, Netheravon and joined 43 Squadron in September 1936. He was still with the squadron at the outbreak of war and on January 30 1940 he shared in destroying a He 111, which was attempting to bomb fishing boats. On February 3 Carey shared in the destruction of a He 111 and on the 12th he shared another. He was awarded the DFM (1.3.40) and promoted to Flight Sergeant. On March 28 Carey shared in the destruction of a He 111 E of Wick. He was commissioned on April 1 1940. On the 10th he was posted to 3 Squadron at Kenley. Carey’s section was sent to France on May 10. On that day he claimed four He 111s destroyed and another shared, on the 11th another He 111 destroyed and on the 12th he shot down a He 111 and a Ju 87 and probably a second Ju 87. On the 13th Carey claimed one Do 17 destroyed, a He 111 shared and possibly a Bf 110. On the 14th he claimed a Do 17 shot down S of Louvain. His Hurricane, L 1932, was hit by return fire and he made a crash-landing SE of Brussels. After being picked up by a Belgian patrol, Carey was admitted to hospital, with a leg wound. He was eventually evacuated to England in early June, only to learn that, officially, he was ‘Missing, believed killed’. Carey was awarded the DFC and Bar, both being gazetted on the same day (31.5.40). He rejoined 43 Squadron at Tangmere on June 24. On July 9 he destroyed a Bf 110 and shared two others, on the 19th he shot down a Bf 109 and damaged two others. On this day Flight Lieutenant J W C Simpson was wounded and Carey was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander, with the rank of Acting Flight Lieutenant.

PO 27.9.38 FO 27.4.40 FL 27.4.41

Pilot

British

Flying a night patrol on August 8, Cardnell’s Blenheim crashed near Peterborough, from an unknown cause but it was believed to be from a temporary loss of control. He and his gunner, Sergeant C Stephens, were both killed. Cardnell was 22. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery, London.

PHILIP MELVILLE CARDELL 80818

Pilot

Cardnell joined the RAFVR in November 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742645). He was called up on September 1 1939 and with flying training completed, he was commissioned and went to 5 OTU on June 10 1940, for conversion to Blenheims. He joined 23 Squadron at Collyweston on the 23rd.

Tiring of working as a footwear salesman, he went to England in 1937 and applied successfully for an RAF short service commission. He began his ab initio training on September 27, as a pupil pilot. After completing his flying training in June 1938, he joined 41 Squadron at Catterick. On September 1 1939 Carbury was attached to RAF Turnhouse, as Ops Officer ‘B’ in the Sector Operations Room. On October 6 he was detached from RAF Turnhouse to 603 Squadron, which was based there. This attachment ceased and became a posting to 603 on October 24 1939. Carbury damaged a He 111 N of Arbroath on December 17 and on March 7 1940 he shared in the destruction of another He 111 70 miles E of Aberdeen. On July 3 1940 Carbury shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. 603 Squadron flew south to Hornchurch on August 27 and on the 28th he damaged a Bf 109 and in the three days from the 29th to the 31st he claimed seven Bf 109s destroyed. On the 31st he was slightly wounded. On September 2 he shot down a Bf 109, on the 7th two more and probably a third, on the 11th a probable He 111 and on the 14th another Bf 109. On October 2 Carbury destroyed a Bf 109, on the 5th he damaged another, on the 7th he shot one down, on the 10th two more and on the 14th he damaged a Ju 88. Carbury’s tally during the Battle of Britain of 15 enemy aircraft destroyed, 2 probables, 1 shared and 3 damaged placed him among the five top-scoring pilots of Fighter Command in the Battle. He is one of the few pilots who were awarded the DFC (24.9.40) and Bar (25.10.40) during the Battle. On November 29 he shared in the destruction of a Do 17 with eight other pilots, in an engagement 8 miles E of Ramsgate. 603 returned to Scotland in December and on the 25th, flying from Drem, Carbury damaged a Ju 88 N of St Abb’s Head. On December 30 1940 he was posted to 58 OTU, Grangemouth, as an instructor. He did not fly operationally again. On October 1 1941, having been convicted of fraud, he was dismissed the service by General Court Martial. Carbury remained in England after the war and died there in July 1962. APO 28.11.37

PO

603 Squadron

Cardell was born in 1917 in Great Paxton, Huntingdonshire. He joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748036). He was called up on September 1 and was posted to 15 FTS, Lossiemouth on December 29 1939, on No 6 Course, which ended on June 10 1940. He was then commissioned and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down.

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WILLIAM FLEMING CARNABY

On August 8 he damaged a Bf 109, on the 12th probably destroyed a Ju 88, on the 13th he probably destroyed a Ju 88 and damaged two others, on the 15th shot down another Ju 88, on the 16th destroyed two Ju 87s and damaged two more and on the 18th destroyed another Ju 87. On the 18th Carey was himself shot down and he crashed at Holme Street Farm, Pulborough, in Hurricane R 4109, wounded in the right knee. He was sent to the Royal West Sussex Hospital, Chichester and did not return to the squadron until October 5, with the rank of Pilot Officer. In November 1940 Carey was posted to 52 OTU, as an instructor, but returned to operations in February 1941, as a Flight Commander with 245 Squadron at Aldergrove. He was back at 52 OTU not long afterwards and was posted away on July 25 1941. Carey went to Baginton on August 15, to form and command 135 Squadron. It sailed on December 6 for the Far East and arrived at Rangoon on January 19 1942. Ten days later he destroyed a Nakajima Ki 27 over the city and damaged another. Carey was promoted on February 12 1942 and became Wing Commander Flying of 267 Wing. On the 23rd he destroyed a Ki 51, on the 24th a Ki 27 and a transport aircraft and on the 26th three Ki 27s. He was awarded a second Bar to the DFC (24.3.42). His final victory was on October 25, when he got a possible Oscar. Later in the year he was appointed to command RAF Alipore and at the end of 1942 Carey was posted to Air HQ Bengal. In February 1943 he was given command of the Air Fighting Training Unit, Amarda Road. Carey was posted to 73 OTU, Abu Sueir in November 1944 to command, as a Group Captain. For his work in India he was awarded the AFC (1.1.45). He returned to England in July 1945 and was granted a Permanent Commission. Carey held various staff appointments until finally; in 1958 he was made Air Adviser to the British High Commission in Australia. He retired on June 2 1960, as a Group Captain, and was made a CBE (11.6.60). Carey was also awarded the Silver Star (US). Carey went to work at the Rolls Royce Aero Division in Australia and returned to live in the UK on retirement. He died on December 6 2004. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde.

90157

FO

Pilot

British

264 and 85 Squadrons

Born at Dulwich, London on November 21 1914, Carnaby was educated at Uppingham School and Christ’s College, Cambridge, reading Economics and Law. Carnaby learned to fly with the University Air Squadron. After leaving Cambridge, he went to London to study for a Chartered Surveyor qualification, with a view to joining his father’s firm, Marten and Carnaby. He joined 601 Squadron, AAF at Hendon in late 1935 and he was commissioned in January 1936. Carnaby relinquished this commission on March 1 1938 for a four-year commission in the AAFRO. He was called to full-time service on August 31 1939 and later rejoined 601 Squadron. Carnaby joined 264 Squadron on May 19 1940. His engine failed on June 7 and he baled out of Defiant L 7004, injured. Admitted to Duxford Station Sick Quarters, he was later transferred to Littleport Hospital. He took part in the squadron’s last spell of day-fighting, from Hornchurch in late August. On the 28th Carnaby returned to base, having destroyed a He 111 over Dover, and then had his Defiant severely damaged by return fire. On October 22 1940 he joined 85 Squadron at Castle Camps, as it went over to night-fighting. On February 5 1943 Carnaby was killed, as a Flight Lieutenant with 25 Squadron. His Mosquito, HJ 918, broke up in cloud near Church Fenton. His navigator, Flying Officer J H L Kemp, was also killed. Carnaby is buried in Newmarket Cemetery, Suffolk. PO (AAF) 3.1.36 PO (AAFRO) 1.3.38 PO 31.8.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41

RALPH CARNALL PO 1.4.40 FO 1.4.41 FL 23.11.41 SL 6.5.43 WC 6.5.45 WC 1.7.47 GC 1.7.56

48169

Sgt

Pilot

British

Born on August 23 1913, Carnall went to Longton School in the Potteries. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (563058), in January 1929 and passed out in December 1931, as a Fitter.

SYDNEY CARLIN 81942

PO

Air Gunner

British

111 Squadron

264 Squadron

Carlin was born on March 24 1889. He was at St Bede’s School, Hornsea from 1901 to 1906, when he went to Kingston College of Engineering from 1907 to 1909. He enlisted in the 18th Hussars in Autumn 1909 but bought himself out on December 3 of that year.

He applied for pilot training, was selected in 1935 and began flying in 1936. With the course completed at 9 FTS, Hullavington, he was posted to 111 Squadron at Northolt on February 22 1937. Carnall was still with the squadron in 1940 and was in action over Dunkirk. On July 10 he crashed on landing at Hawkinge, after his port wing was damaged during a combat off Folkestone, in which he damaged a Do 17. On the 25th Carnall damaged a Bf 109 and on the 31st he shared a Ju 88. On August 16 he was shot down over Kent and crashed in Hurricane P 3029 at Palmers Green Farm, Brenchley, badly burned. He spent a year in hospital, during which time he underwent plastic surgery by Archie McIndoe at East Grinstead and became a Guinea Pig. After rehabilitation, Carnall went on a flying instructor’s course, qualifying in February 1942. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in March, he spent two years instructing on Tiger Moths. In Spring 1944 Carnall did a conversion course on to PR Mosquitos. He and his navigator were posted to 684 Squadron in Calcutta. They picked up a reinforcement Mosquito in the UK and flew eastwards. The flight was an eventful one, fraught with many difficulties, and ended with Carnall making a crash-landing in the jungle. 684 Squadron remained in Calcutta until October 1945. It then moved to Tan Son Nhut airfield, near Saigon. Shortly after its arrival there was a special parade, on which a number of Japanese officers were required to formally surrender their swords to selected British officers. Carnall received a sword from a Lieutenant Sato. This sword is now held by the RAF Museum. Carnall stayed on in the RAF, in the Fighter Control Branch. He retired on August 24 1963 as a Squadron Leader and died in 1984.

Before the Great War he was farming near Hull. On August 8 1914 he rejoined the 18th Hussars, understating his age and not declaring his previous service with the Regiment. He went to France on August 28. He was promoted to Lance Corporal on May 17 1915 and was awarded the DCM (6.8.15). He was commissioned in the Royal Engineers on September 15 1915, as a 2nd Lieutenant. Promoted to Lieutenant on May 21 1916, he received wounds on July 18, which resulted in his losing a leg. For this action he was awarded the MC (20.10.16). On July 1 1917, Carlin known ever after as ‘Timbertoes’ because of his wooden leg, managed to transfer to the RFC. After completing his flying training, he was posted to CFS as an instructor. Carlin joined 74 Squadron in France on May 26 1918, claimed his first victory on June 13 and in July he was a Flight Commander. Before being shot down and captured on September 21 1918, Carlin had destroyed four German aircraft, probably a fifth and had also destroyed five enemy balloons. He was awarded the DFC (2.11.18). In 1922 Carlin went to Kenya and took up farming. In the early thirties he was managing a farm there for a German baron. Carlin was an expert rider and organised a polo team. He was a Staff Officer in the Kenya Defence Force from 1930 to 1935. Back in England, Carlin was commissioned in the Army Officers’ Emergency Reserve on August 30 1939, as a Captain. In February 1940 he was in the 7th Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery in Malta, when he was accepted for transfer to the RAF VR, for training as an Air Gunner. Carlin returned to England and on July 6 he was posted to No 1 AAS, Manby, on No 10 Air Gunnery Course. He completed his training there on No 11 Course on July 27, was commissioned and joined 264 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey. He was detached to CGS, Warmwell on September 8 1940 for a course, He retuned to 264 on October 8. Carlin went to 151 Squadron on January 5 1941. On May 9, running to his Defiant turret, to fire at German aircraft attacking the aerodrome, he was killed by their machine-gun fire. He was cremated at Hull Crematorium. Carlin was almost certainly the oldest holder of the Battle of Britain clasp and one of the very few men entitled to wear RFC pilot’s wings and an RAF air gunner’s brevet.

PO 16.3.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 16.3.44 FL 16.9.45 SL 1.1.57

JACK CONWAY CARPENTER Sub-Lieutenant (FAA)

Pilot

Canadian

229 and 46 Sqdns

Carpenter was born at Bexhill, Sussex on March 6 1919, son of Noel and Ida Carpenter, formerly of Toronto. The family returned to Canada later in 1919 and resettled in Toronto. J C Carpenter was educated at Upper Canada College and in 1938 he was Cadet Captain in the College Corps. The family returned to the United Kingdom in June 1938. From their new home in Anglesey, Wales, Carpenter applied for admission to Greenwich Naval College. Being six

2nd Lt (RE) 15.9.15 Lt (RE) 21.5.16 PO 27.7.40

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WILLIAM JOSEPH CARR

months too old for normal entry as a Midshipman, he joined the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on July 1 1939, rated as Midshipman (A). He did his elementary flying training at 14 EFTS, Elmdon and moved on to 7 FTS, Peterborough on December 11 1939, on No 7 (FAA) Course, which ended on May 27 1940. In response to Churchill’s request to the Admiralty for pilots, Carpenter was one of those attached to the RAF on June 15 1940. He was seconded from HMS Daedalus. He arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on June 17, on No 1 Course. After converting to Hurricanes, Carpenter joined 229 Squadron at Wittering on July 1 and moved to 46 Squadron at Digby on the 23rd. Carpenter destroyed a Bf 110 near North Weald on September 3 and two days later he shot down a Bf 109 in the

36127

FL

Pilot

British

235 Squadron

Carr went to Morning Lane LCC Elementary School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice (563438), on August 27 1929 and passed out on August 19 1931, as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He later applied for pilot training and was a Sergeant-Pilot when he was granted a Permanent Commission on February 24 1938. Four days later Carr was posted to the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Martlesham Heath. He was posted to 235 Squadron at Detling on June 2 1940 and damaged a Do 17 on July 1. He was posted back to the A&AEE on July 21 1940, as a staff pilot. He was awarded the AFC (1.7.41). Carr remained with the A&AEE and was involved in five major aircraft accidents before the one in which he lost his life on August 26 1942. He was one of four men killed when Warwick BV 214 crashed 2 miles SW of Shrewton, Wiltshire, after fabric detached from the port mainplane. Carr was 29. He is buried in St Paul’s churchyard, Mill Hill, Middlesex.

Southend area. On September 8 he was shot down, during an attack on enemy aircraft over Sheppey. He baled out but fell dead. His Hurricane, P 3201, crashed at Bearsted, near Maidstone. Carpenter’s body was taken to the Royal Navy Dockyard at Chatham, from whence it was returned to his family at Llanfaethlu, Anglesey. He was buried at sea, off Borthwen Beach, on September 16 1940. He was 21 years old.

PO 24.2.38 FO 24.8.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41

ROBERT ALBERT CARR-LEWTY Midshipman (A) 1.7.39 Acting Sub-Lt 14.3.40 Sub-Lt 5.7.40

46026

Sgt

Pilot British

Born at Bradford, Yorkshire on July 6 1911, Carr-Lewty was educated at Carlton Grammar School, Bradford and Edinburgh University. In January 1936 he joined the RAF on a direct-entry pilot scheme (580095).

JOHN MICHAEL VOWLES CARPENTER 42191

PO

Pilot

British

41 Squadron

222 Squadron

Carpenter was born on April 9 1921 in Rhos-on-Sea. He was educated at Clifton College and on leaving there he joined the RAF on a short service commission.

He began his flying training at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell on January 6 1936 and, after completing his ab initio course, he was enlisted in the RAF on March 2 1936. He completed his training at 4 FTS, Abu Sueir, Egypt. He passed out as a Sergeant-Pilot/ Navigator in August 1936 and was then posted to 107 Squadron at Andover in December. He moved to 41 Squadron at Catterick in October 1937. During Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain Carr-Lewty flew over 100 operational sorties, claiming a Bf 109 destroyed and a Ju 87 damaged on July 29 and probably destroyed another on September 5. In December 1940 he was posted to 15 EFTS, Kingstown, as an instructor, commissioned in June 1941 and in December he went to the staff at 5 FIS, Scone, moving to 10 FIS, Woodley in August 1942. Carr-Lewty was recategorised A1 on all types in November 1943. He was offered the post of CFI to the Royal Turkish Air Force in 1944 and CFI of the Free French Flying Instructors’ School in 1946 but he declined both. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.45) and left the RAF in 1946. He became Principal of the Teeside Flying Club and later owned a bakery in Hull. He sold this enterprise to finance his studies as a doctor. In 1958 Carr-Lewty went to Edinburgh University Medical School. He qualified as MB, Ch B in July 1964. He was a GP in Scarborough, where he was the doctor on call for the Grand Hotel. He acted as Medical Officer for RAF Topcliffe and RAF Fylingdales. He died on March 4 1994. Carr-Lewty was an avid birdwatcher and wrote magazine articles on the subject of birds.

He began his ab initio course at 15 E&RFTS, Redhill on May 1 1939, as a pupil pilot. After a short induction course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, Carpenter went to 10 FTS, Ternhill on July 10, on No 12 Course, which ended on December 9 1939. Carpenter arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on December 28, converted to Gladiators and joined 263 Squadron at Filton on January 25 1940. On April 21 the squadron embarked on HMS Furious for Norway, flying off three days later, to land on frozen Lake Lesjaskog. By the 26th all Gladiators were either destroyed or unserviceable, so 263 returned to the UK in the carrier. In May 1940 the squadron was involved again in Norway. From the 21st, when it landed at Bardufoss, until it re-embarked on HMS Glorious on June 6, 263, it gave a good account of itself, covering the evacuation of the Army and flying offensive patrols. The carrier was sunk by enemy action soon after sailing and nearly all 263’s pilots were lost. Carpenter did not fly on to the carrier and returned to the UK in the MV Arandora Star. He joined 222 Squadron in late June 1940 and flew his first sortie on July 2. On August 31 he claimed a probable Bf 109, on September 1 he destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 3rd a Bf 110. On September 4 Carpenter destroyed a Bf 109 over Maidstone. His Spitfire, P 9378, was then hit, possibly by anti-aircraft fire. He baled out, wounded and the aircraft crashed at Boughton, Kent. He rejoined the squadron on October 24 1940 and on the 30th he damaged a Bf 109. Carpenter stayed with 222 until April 22 1941, when he was posted to 46 Squadron at Sherburn-in-Elmet. The squadron was preparing to leave for the Middle East. On May 20 it embarked on HMS Argus. At Gibraltar pilots and aircraft were transferred to the carriers HMS Ark Royal and Furious. On June 6 they flew off to Hal Far, Malta. 46 was kept in Malta and re-numbered 126 Squadron. On June 30 Carpenter shot down a Mc 200, on September 4 he claimed another, on November 8 a Mc 202, on the 12th another Mc 202 and on the 22nd he damaged another. On December 27 he shot a Ju 88 down into the sea. Carpenter, who had been a Flight Commander since early October 1941, was awarded the DFC (2.1.42). He damaged a Ju 88 on January 14 1942 and was soon afterwards posted to 112 Squadron in the Western Desert. In May 1942 he went to 92 Squadron at Heliopolis. Carpenter completed his tour and was posted to South Africa, where he instructed at 66 and 42 Air Schools. In June 1943 he returned to the Middle East, where he was briefly with 417 Squadron, before rejoining 92 Squadron in Italy, as a Flight Commander. In November 1943 Carpenter was with 145 Squadron in Italy and in January 1944 he was given command of 72 Squadron at Lago. On April 11 he was posted away, received a Bar to the DFC (7.7.44) and returned to the UK. He went to Hawker’s as a production test pilot. Carpenter was granted a Permanent Commission in September 1945 and he retired on December 31 1959, as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. Carpenter died in Devon on February 11 2005.

PO 26.6.41 FO 26.6.42 FL 26.6.43

JOHN CHARLES CARRIERE 41825

FO

Pilot

Canadian

219 Squadron

Born in Quebec in 1915, Carriere joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on January 23 1939, as a pupil pilot. With flying training completed, he was posted to 219 Squadron when it was reformed at Catterick on October 4 1939. He went to 229 Squadron at Digby on October 23 and rejoined 219 Squadron, then at Redhill, on December 9 1939. Carriere was on a searchlight co-operation flight in a Blenheim on August 6 1940, when he collided with high tension cables and crashed into a river. The aircraft was written off but Carriere and his gunner, Sergeant C Beveridge, survived. Beveridge was treated for facial injuries and returned to duty but Carriere was admitted to hospital with facial injuries and was non effective sick for a month. He did not fly again until September 12. In January 1944 Carriere transferred to the RCAF and he was released in Canada on November 28 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant.

APO 1.5.39 PO 27.12 39 FO 27.12.40 FL 23.12.41 FL 1.9.45

APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39 FO 23.10.40

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MALCOLM KEITH CARSWELL 39780

FL

Pilot

New Zealander

He went to 43 Squadron, also at Tangmere, on August 24 1939. He was later with 605 Squadron at Wick. On April 10 1940 he shared in destroying a He 111 over the North Sea. Carter was posted to France on May 16. He joined 73 Squadron at Gaye on the 21st. On the 24th he destroyed a Bf 110 SW of Cambrai. 73 was withdrawn to Church Fenton on June 18. Carter was posted to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on July 13, for posting abroad. He arrived there to find the posting was cancelled and that he was temporarily attached to RAF Uxbridge for Special Duties. He rejoined 73 Squadron on July 23 and on August 15 1940 he claimed two Ju 88s destroyed and probably another, off Flamborough Head. Carter was attached to 302 (Polish) Squadron at Leconfield on August 24, as a Section Leader. He went to Duxford with a 302 detachment on September 18, to operate from there with the Bader Big Wing. The attachment ceased on the 25th and they returned to Leconfield. Carter was with a squadron patrol on October 18 1940. It became lost over the Surrey hills because of fog. The leader caught a glimpse of Kempton Park racecourse and ordered his pilots to make forced-landings. Carter was one of four pilots killed in the attempt, when he tried to bale out at 50 feet. His Hurricane, P 3931, crashed on the racecourse. Flying Officer J Borowski was killed nearby, attempting a forced-landing on the racecourse. Pilot Officers S Wapniarek and A Zukowski were also killed, crashing in other places. Carter was 21 and is buried in Queen’s Road Cemetery, Croydon. The squadron was represented at his funeral by Flight Lieutenant J A Thomson and Flight Lieutenant J N W Farmer.

43 Squadron

Carswell was born in Invercargill on July 25 1915 and educated at Southland Boys’ High School. He was apprenticed to a chemist and began a course in pharmacy. In 1936 he began having flying lessons at the Invercargill Flying Club and in June his instructor arranged for an interview for an RNZAF short service commission. At that time there were no immediate vacancies so Carswell made his own way to the UK in early 1937. He applied on arrival and was provisionally accepted. On March 30 he began his ab initio training at 12 E&RFTS, Prestwick and in June was posted to 6 FTS, Netheravon. After completing the course, he joined 43 Squadron at Tangmere in January 1938. On February 3 1940 Carswell damaged a He 111 near the Farne Islands. On the 9th he was one of a section chasing a He 111, that was attacking a cargo ship off the coast between Acklington and Rosyth. His engine suddenly failed and, being too low to bale out, he decided to ditch the Hurricane close to the ship. The aircraft went straight down but Carswell managed to extricate himself. He could not inflate his life jacket and tried to swim through the freezing choppy sea to the ship, about a mile away. He passed out and came to in the ship, now docked at Rosyth. His life had been saved by the crew giving him artificial respiration. Carswell was off flying for three months but arrived back just in time to fly south to Tangmere on May 31. The next day he was shot down in flames over Dunkirk and baled out. He landed very near the front line and, after convincing French soldiers that he was an ally, he was taken to an emergency hospital in Dunkirk. He boarded a destroyer under Stuka attack and finally reached England, where he was taken to hospital, arriving there in the evening of the same day he had taken off from Tangmere. Carswell returned to 43 on August 24. On September 2, in a combat over Ashford, his Hurricane was hit and caught fire. He baled out, burned on legs, arms, hands and face and with cannon shell splinters in chest and thigh. After leaving hospital, Carswell was grounded for medical reasons and took up control duties. In October 1940 he went to Exeter as a Fighter Controller, moving in November to Orkney on Defence of Scapa Flow. In March 1941 he went to Peterhead as Chief Fighter Controller and in May 1942 moved to Biggin Hill. He had several Controller postings over the next three years. Carswell transferred to the RNZAF in January 1944. He regained his flying category in April 1945 and went to 17 SFTS for a combined refresher and twin-engined conversion course for night fighters. Towards the end of the year Carswell applied for discharge in the UK and was released on January 26 1946. After a long working life in Italy, he retired to Australia. Carswell died in Sydney in 2005.

APO 14.12.38 PO 3.9.39 FO 3.9.40

VICTOR ARTHUR CARTER 84966

Pilot

British

British

615 and 607 Squadrons

He went to 10 FTS, Ternhill, on No 21 Course, which ran from June 10 to September 6 1940. Carter was commissioned on the 7th and went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge, to convert to Hurricanes. He joined 615 Squadron at Prestwick on September 30 and to 607 Squadron at Tangmere on October 9. He was posted away to 258 Squadron at Drem on December 6 1940. In 1942 Carter transferred to the Administrative Branch and was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant. He is remembered on a plaque at Dulwich College, which was unveiled on March 14 2002.

LESLIE RAYMOND CARTER Sgt

Pilot

Carter was born in 1917 and educated at Dulwich College. He joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745884). Called up on September 1, he did his elementary flying training at No 1 EFTS, Hatfield.

APO 30.5.37 PO 5.4.38 FO 5.10.39 FL 5.10.40 SL 1.12.41

754236

PO

74, 66, 610 and 41 Squadrons PO 7.9.40 FO 7.9.41 FL 7.9.42

Carter, from Hertfordshire, joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on September 1, he completed his training at 14 FTS, Cranfield, on No 7 Course, which ran from April 28 to August 3 1940. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 10 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 74 Squadron at Kirton-inLindsey on the 26th. Three days later he joined 66Squadron at Coltishall. When the squadron moved to Kenley that day, Carter remained behind for further training. He rejoined 66 at Kenley on September 7. The stay was again short and Carter was posted to 610 Squadron at Acklington on the 10th. He moved on again on October 1 1940, joining 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. On the 11th Carter, whilst climbing to engage Bf 109s, collided with Flying Officer D H O’Neill. Both pilots baled out but O’Neill’s parachute failed to open and he was killed. Carter’s Spitfire, X 4554, crashed and burned out at South Ash Manor, West Kingsdown. His last sortie with 41 Squadron was made on October 22 but he remained with the squadron. In early 1941 Carter rejoined 74 Squadron at Manston. He was reported ‘Missing’ on July 6 1941. Carter was 21 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 35.

GERALD CHARLES TREWALLA CARTHEW 42484

PO

Pilot British

Pilot Canadian

53, 85 and 145 Squadrons

Carthew was born on April 16 1921 at Mountain Park, Alberta, where his father was working as a surveyor in mines. Carthew’s mother returned to the UK when he was very young. Carthew and his sister accompanied her. Carthew attended Southdown College, Eastbourne and Hastings Grammar School. He never went back to Canada but retained Canadian citizenship throughout his life. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training on June 26 1939. With training completed, he arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 5 1940, converted to Hurricanes and then joined 17 Squadron at Hawkinge on May 12. He moved briefly to 213 Squadron at Biggin Hill, then joined 229 Squadron on May 20, went to 85 Squadron at Debden on the 25th and finally to 253 Squadron at Kirton-inLindsey on June 6. Carthew shared in the destruction of a Do 17 on September 11. He returned to 85 Squadron at Castle Camps on the 24th, for further training. He went to 145 Squadron at Tangmere on October 14. He flew his last sortie with the squadron on October 16. There is no further mention of Carthew in the 145 Squadron ORB. Transferred to the Administrative Branch in 1942, Carthew was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. He worked as an accountant. Carthew died in July 2013. An uncle, Lieitenant William Morden Carthew, was killed on June 3 1916, serving with the 49th Battalion, Canadian Infantry and is buried at La Brique Military Cemetery No 2. Mount Carthew near Pincher Creek, Alberta was named after W M Carthew.

PETER EDWARD GEORGE CARTER 41375

PO

73 and 302 Squadrons

Carter joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his flying training on October 6 1938, as a pupil pilot. He completed his training and joined No 1 Squadron at Tangmere in mid-1939.

APO 19.8.39 PO 28.2.40 FO 28.2.41 FL 28.2.42

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JOHN CHAMPION CARVER 72396

FO

Pilot

British

Malta convoys with Hurricanes from HMS Victorious. He was awarded the DSC (10.11.42) for his services, during which he shot down at least two Ju 88s. In 1945 he was Air Group Commander in the 21st Aircraft Carrier Squadron in the Indian Ocean and received a Mention in Despatches for an air strike on Sumatra from HMS Khedive on June 30. He was made a CBE (13.6.59) and was at that time on loan to the Government of India. Carver was ADC to the Queen in the late 1950s. He retired on March 1 1966, as a Captain. Carver died on December 23 1983.

87 Squadron

Born on January 30 1916, Carver was educated at Winchester College and later Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Chemistry. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and he joined and was commissioned in the RAFVR in August 1938.

Midshipman 1.5.34 Acting Sub-Lt 1.9.36 FO (RAF) 12.9.37 Lt 1.9.38 Lt-Cdr 1.12.45 Cdr 31.12.49 Capt 30.6.56

He worked at ICI Singapore before the war and did some flying with the VR in Malaya in 1939. Carver was called up at the outbreak of war. With training completed, he went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge from the Air Ministry on September 11 1940. He joined 87 Squadron at Church Fenton from 6 OTU on September 30 and was still serving with the squadron in November 1940. He was a Flight Commander in 247 Squadron at Portreath in June 1941 and on July 31 he shared in the destruction of a Do 17. In September Carver was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and posted to HQ 10 Group. He returned to operations in January 1942, when he was given command of 118 Squadron at Predannack. Carver took part in the attack on the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau on February 12. On March 13 he baled out after his Spitfire was hit by return fire from a Ju 88. As he left the aircraft he struck his face against the hood and was stunned. His parachute opened and he came to in the sea. After some difficulty in disentangling himself from the shrouds, he inflated his dinghy and set out to paddle the seventy miles to the English coast. After 57 hours, in wintry conditions, Carver was within seven miles of his objective, when he was picked up by a Royal Navy vessel, the attention of which he attracted by blowing his whistle. Carver was awarded the DFC (10.4.42). He was reported ‘Missing’ on June 6 1942, in action over Cherbourg. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 65.

HERBERT ROBERT CASE 83272

Pilot

British

29 and 229 Squadrons

Carver joined the RAFVR about September 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742080), and did his pre-war training at 7 E&RFTS, Desford. Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training at 10 FTS, Ternhill, on No 17 Course, which ran from December 9 1939 to May 25 1940.

ERNEST CASSIDY 40507

Pilot

British

25 and 249 Squadrons

On the night of July 19/20 1940 Cassidy probably destroyed a He 115 12 miles E of Walton soon after midnight. On September 3 Cassidy’s Blenheim was attacked in error by a Hurricane of 46 Squadron, flown by Flight Lieutenant A C Rabagliati. Cassidy made a forced-landing at Hatfield Heath,

RODNEY HAROLD POWER CARVER British

FO

Born on October 25 1916, Cassidy joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training at 10 E&RFTS, Yatesbury on November 29 1937, as a pupil pilot. After a short induction course at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge from February 19 1938, he was posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough on March 5. With training completed, he then joined 25 Squadron at Hawkinge on September 17 1938.

PO 26.5.40 FO 26.5.41 FL 26.5.42

Pilot

64 and 72 Squadrons

PO 10.8.40

He was commissioned on the 26th and went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 27th. After converting to Blenheims, he joined 29 Squadron at Digby on June 16. Carver was attached to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on July 16, to convert to Hurricanes. The attachment ceased on the 18th and he was posted to 229 Squadron at Wittering. In an engagement over Maidstone on September 11, Carver damaged two He 111s. His Hurricane, N 2466, was set alight. He baled out and landed near Flimwell, wounded and burned. The aircraft crashed in Goudhurst Road, Horsmonden. He spent four weeks at Rumwood Court Hospital, near Maidstone and was then moved to RAF Hospital, Wendover. Carver rejoined 229 and was with the squadron in 1941. He was with 605 Squadron in 1944 and was awarded the DFC (21.11.44). Released from the RAF in 1946, as a Squadron Leader, he died in 1996.

Lieutenant (FAA)

British

Case was commissioned and he went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 10 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 64 Squadron at Leconfield on the 28th. He flew his first operational sortie on September 3 and his last on the 14th. He moved to 72 Squadron at Biggin Hill about September 15. Case was killed on October 12, when he fell out of formation and crashed in a field off Winehouse Lane at Capel-le-Ferne, near Folkestone, in Spitfire P 9338. He was buried in St Nicholas’ churchyard, near his home in Withycombe, where a small display in the church now commemorates him. Case was 24 years old. An Army officer’s wife wrote to Case’s mother saying that she had witnessed his aircraft being attacked by Bf 109s immediately before he crashed. Other witnesses gave similar accounts.

KENNETH MALTBY CARVER PO

Pilot

Case, the son of a farmer at Withycombe, Somerset, was educated locally and became an apprentice with Metropolitan Vickers in Manchester. He enlisted in the class ‘F’ Reserve, as an Airman u/t Pilot, about June 1936 (700690). He was called to full-time service on September 1 1939 and completed his flying training at 2 FTS, Brize Norton, on No 47 Course, which ran from Aprl 28 to August 3 1940.

PO (RAFVR) 16.8.38 PO 7.9.39 FO 16.2.40 FL 16.2.41

79730

PO

crew unhurt. Cassidy was posted to 249 Squadron at North Weald on October 21 1940. In May 1941 the squadron was ordered to the Middle East. It sailed in the carrier HMS Furious on the 12th. At Gibraltar the Hurricanes were transferred to HMS Ark Royal, which then sailed into the Mediterranean. On May 21 249 flew off to Malta and, once there, it was told that it would be staying. On July 9 Cassidy shot a SM 79 down into the sea. At the end of the month he was posted, as a Flight Commander, to the Malta Night Fighter Unit, then about to be formed. On the night of August 5/6 he destroyed a Fiat BR 20, on the 26th he shared in damaging two more and on November 9 he damaged another. Cassidy was awarded the DFC (2.1.42) and returned to the UK, becoming a Flight Commander at 61 OTU, Rednal. He was at Rednal until September 1942, when he was posted to 56 OTU, Tealing. In May 1943 Cassidy went to 64 Squadron at Ayr as a supernumerary Squadron Leader. In June he was attached to 16 Squadron at Middle Wallop, as a Fighter Tactics instructor. In July 1943 Cassidy went to 222 Squadron at Hornchurch, again as a supernumerary. After a short spell at the Fighter Leaders’ School at Aston Down in August, he returned to 222 Squadron, as CO. On September 5 he shared in probably destroying a FW 190. Cassidy was posted away in November 1943, to take command of 64 Squadron at Coltishall. On November 23 he shared in the destruction of a Bf 109. In April 1944 he was posted to HQ 13 Group. In November 1944 Cassidy went to HQ RAF Middle East, remaining there until April

804 Squadron

Born on June 8 1916, Carver joined the Navy in 1935 and entered the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth. In the 1930s the RAF supplied pilots for the Fleet Air Arm and occasionally trained Naval pilots. Carver was granted a temporary RAF commission on September 12 1937, as a Flying Officer. He relinquished this commission on July 26 1939. Carver joined 804 Squadron at Hatston on November 30 1939 and was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander on March 29 1940. He embarked on the carrier HMS Glorious with a detachment of 804 Squadron Gladiators on April 22 and they transferred to HMS Furious on May 9. The pilots of the detachment ferried 263 Squadron Gladiators from Prestwick to Furious on May 12. The detachment flew off Furious on May 23 and returned to Hatston, where 804 reassembled and was put under Fighter Command control. The Gladiators operated from Hatston on dockyard defence. On September 5 1940 ‘A’ Flight of 804 embarked by air on to Furious, disembarked three days later and returned to Hatston. Carver again embarked on Furious, with one section of ‘A’ Flight, on October 11 1940, for operations against Tromso, Norway. Bad weather prevented flying and the section returned to Hatston on the 19th. On June 29 1942 Carver was given command of 885 Squadron, operating in defence of

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On January 16 1937 he was posted to 8 FTS, Montrose and after completing his training, he joined 25 Squadron at Hawkinge on August 7 1937. Cave was still with the squadron in August 1939 and was then ‘B’ Flight Commander. On August 30 he took command of a flight of four experimental AI Blenheim IVs, on attachment to 25 Squadron. He resumed command of ‘B’ Flight on September 4. On January 31 1940 Cave was posted to RAF Halton, as non-effective sick and admitted to hospital there. He joined 600 Squadron at Manston on March 29 1940. He was posted to 242 Squadron at Coltishall on August 11 but flew no operations with it before being posted away on October 3 1940. Late in the war, Cave went into Aircraft Control and when he died in 1962 he was the senior Squadron Leader in the Aircraft Control Branch.

1945, when he was briefly with 92 Squadron in Italy, as a supernumerary, before taking command of 72 Squadron in Austria. After holding a wide range of flying and non-flying appointments, Cassidy retired on June 1 1958, as a Squadron Leader, retaining the rank of Wing Commander. He was awarded the AFC (5.6.52). He died in 1995. APO 19.2.38 PO 29.11.38

FO 29.8.40 FL 29.8.41

SL 1.7.43 SL 1.9.45

LIONEL HARWOOD CASSON 91000

PO

Pilot

British

616 Squadron APO 21.12.36 PO 12.10.37 FO 12.5.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.9.42 FL 1.3.45 SL 1.8.47

Born in Sheffield on January 6 1915, Casson was educated at Birkdale School and the King’s School, Ely. He went to work in the steel industry.

FREDERICK NORMAN CAWSE 80543

He joined 616 Squadron AAF at Doncaster on April 6 1939. He was called for full-time service on August 24, posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 7 and after training he rejoined 616 Squadron at Leconfield on April 6 1940. Casson was sent to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 28, after which he went to PDC Uxbridge on May 15, from where he was posted to 501 Squadron in France. On his way to Arras, the train was bombed at Amiens and the next day he lost all his kit, when the train was heavily bombed at St Roche junction. He walked to the outskirts of Rouen and met an RAF vehicle going to Cherbourg. From there he got a ship to Southampton. On May 27 Casson joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill but managed to get back to 616 at Leconfield on July 7. On August 15 he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. On the 25th Casson, Pilot Officer T Murray and Pilot Officer J Brewster were loaned to 615 Squadron. On August 30 Casson probably destroyed a He 111 and damaged another and on September 1 he claimed the destruction of a Do 17. The squadron was withdrawn to Kirton-in-Lindsey on the 4th. Casson was scrambled on February 26 1941, with Flying Officer R Marples. They attacked a Ju 88, killing the rear gunner. Casson’s engine began to overheat and the cockpit filled with glycol fumes. He headed for Tangmere but crossing the coast at 1200 feet he feared the aircraft was on fire, so he baled out. The Spitfire, P 7753, crashed at Priors Leas, N of Littlehampton. On May 5 he attacked a Ju 88 at dusk, was hit by return fire and he baled out over Littlehampton. Casson shared in destroying a Bf 109 on June 22, damaged another on the 24th, destroyed a Bf 109 on the 26, probably destroyed another on July 19 and destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged another on the 23rd. On this day he was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander. On a sweep over France on August 9 1941 Casson was attacked by a Bf 109 and shot down. He was captured. Wing Commander D R S Bader (qv) was also captured as a result of this engagement and there has been unproven post-war speculation that he was accidentally hit by fire fron Casson’s aircraft. Soon afterwards Casson was awarded the DFC (16.9.41). At some time Casson was held in Stalag Luft 3 at Sagan (PoW No 3725). Released from captivity, Casson was demobilised in the UK on November 12 1945. He went back to work in the steel industry. He rejoined 616 Squadron on May 10 1946, when it was reformed at RAF Finningley, as part of the AAF. He rejoined as a Flying Officer. On October 2 1950 Casson was promoted and took command of 616. He was awarded the AFC (1.6.53) and was released again in November 1954. He died on October 8 2003.

PO Pilot

British

238 Squadron Cawse joined the RAFVR around March 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745188). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training at 11 FTS, Shawbury, on No 17 Course, which ran from November 20 1939 to June 1 1940.

He was commissioned on June 8 1940 and arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge, to convert to Hurricanes. Cawse joined 238 Squadron at Middle Wallop on July 7. He probably destroyed a Bf 109 on August 8 1940. He was killed on August 11, when he was shot down by a Bf 109 in a combat off Weymouth. His aircraft, Hurricane P3222, crashed into the sea. It was reported in the 238 ORB on December 13 that Cawse’s body had been washed up on the French coast. He was 25 years old and is buried in the Cayeux-sur-Mer Communal Cemetery, France. PO 8.6.40

ARSEN CEBRZYNSKI P 1416

FO

Pilot

Polish

303 Squadron

Born on March 2 1912, Cebrzynski was in the PAF before the war. In September 1939 he was with III/1 Dyon. On the 3rd he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on the 6th he shared in the destruction of a Ju 87 and a Bf 110. After the fall of Poland he escaped to France and he joined l’Armée de l’Air. In May 1940 he commanded a flight of three Polish pilots in Groupe de Chasse II/6 at Chateauroux, with Bloch MB 152s. On June 5 Cebrzynski destroyed a He 111 and shared another and on the 15th he shared a Hs 126. Cebrzynski arrived in England on July 7 1940 and went to the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool, to await a posting. From there, he joined 303 Squadron at Northolt on August 21. He probably shot down a Do 17 on September 11 but was himself shot down in combat S of London. His Hurricane, V 6665, crashed at Hitchens Farm, Pembury. Cebrzynski was severely injured and died on the 19th. He was buried in Northwood Cemetery, Middlesex. He was awarded the KW & Bar (23.12.40) and a second Bar (31.10.47).

APO (AAF) 23.7.39 APO 24.8.39 PO 6.4.40 FO 3.12.40 FL 3.12.41 FO (AAF) 31.1.47 SL (RAAF) 2.10.50

COLIN EWART PATRICK CASTLE 966825

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

FRANTISEK CHABERA

219 Squadron

115117 Castle joined the RAFVR in September 1939. He remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner and after completing his gunnery course, he was on 235 Squadron by March 31 1940, as an AC 2 Air Gunner.

Pilot

British

Czechoslovakian

312 Squadron

In 1930 he was admitted to the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov. Following graduation in 1932 he was assigned for pilot training on twin-engined aircraft and also to a night fighter course. On completion of this training he was posted, as a pilot, to the 2nd Air Regiment at Olomouc (1932 – 1934) and then to the 4th Air Regiment at Hradec Kralovelove (1934 – 1935). He was then posted to the Military Aviation Academy at Letnany. When the Germans took over Czechoslovakia on March 15 1939, the Czech Air Force was disbanded and Chabera was demobilized. He escaped to Poland, in June 1939, and, with other escaped Czechoslovak airmen sailed from Gdynia to France where he joined l’Armée de l’ Air.

JOHN GEOFFREY CAVE FL

Pilot

Chabera was born on January 5 1912 in Lansberg, Germany.

He was with 219 Squadron at Catterick in June 1940 and served with it in the Battle of Britain. On November 13 1940 Castle and his pilot, Pilot Officer T Birkett, were killed when their Beaufighter crashed in daylight near Edenbridge, cause unknown. At that time Castle was still an Air Gunner. He is buried in Cathcart Cemetery, Renfrewshire.

39271

Sgt

600 and 242 Squadrons

Born in Britain, Cave was educated in Calgary from 1927 to 1932 and worked there in 1934/35. In October 1936 he joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on the 12th, as a pupil pilot.

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on No 31 Course, which ran from November 20 1939 to May 19 1940, on which day he was commissioned. Chaffe joined 245 Squadron at Drem on May 21 1940. He was posted to 43 Squadron at Usworth on September 18 but returned to 245 Squadron, then at Aldergrove, on December 20 1940. In late 1941 Chaffe was in Malta, serving with 1435 Flight. He took command of 185 Squadron at Hal Far in February 1942. He was killed on March 22 1942, aged 27. Chaffe is remembered on the Malta Memorial, Panel 2, Column 1.

On September 11 1939 he was posted to CIC Chartres for retraining on French equipment. On December 2, in the rank of Caporel Chef, he was posted as an operational pilot to GC II/5, equipped with Curtiss H-75 aircraft. During the Battle of France, on May 11, he destroyed a He 111 and shared another, on the 14th he shared a Bf 110, on the 24th shared a Bf 109, on June 5 shared another and on the 8th claimed another Bf 109 destroyed and also a Hs 126. His unit, now at Perpignan, moved to Algiers on June 20 and then to Oran. With other Czechoslovak airmen in his unit, he was released from l’Armée de l’Air service on July 2 1940 and he went to Casablanca where he sailed on the Royal Scotsman to Gibraltar. There, he transferred to the David Livingstone and sailed to Britain, arriving in Cardiff on August 4 1940. On arrival he was accepted into the RAFVR (787698). He was at the RAF Czechoslovak Depot, Cosford, when he was posted to 312 Squadron at Duxford on September 5 1940. He was still with the squadron on November 1 1940. He volunteered for night fighters on March 24 1941 and was posted to 96 Squadron equipped with Hurricanes and Defiants. On September 20 he was posted to the Czechoslovak Flight at 68 Squadron, who were equipped with Beaufighters. His next posting was on May 26 1942, to the Czechoslovak Inspectorate General where he remained until August 1 1942 after which he returned to 312 Squadron, now equipped with Spitfires, where he remained until February 1 1944. He was commissioned in the RAFVR in December 1941. In the autumn of 1943 Chabera had volunteered for service in Russia. With 20 other Czechoslovak RAF pilots, he left Britain on February 21 1944, aboard the Riena del Pacifico and sailed via the Mediterranean to Russia. On arrival he flew to the Ivanovo airbase NE of Moscow, for retraining on La-5FN aircraft. On May 3 1944 he was assigned to the 128 Czechoslovak Independent Fighter Squadron, based at Kubinka airbase. Following reorganisation the unit was renamed the 1st Czechoslovak Air Regiment and on October 28 1944 Chabera was appointed its Commander. During his service in Russia, Chabera achieved a Ju88 ‘probable’ on October 18 1944 and destroyed nine trucks, two cars and one tank. At the end of the war Chabera was released from the RAFVR as a Flight Lieutenant and returned to Czechoslovakia. He was posted to Letnany airbase with the rank of Captain and was later promoted to Lieutenant-Major. Following the communist takeover of Czechoslovakia, in February 1948, Chabera was arrested, with two former RAF colleagues, on April 6 1948 at Prague Ruzyne, accused of starting an aircraft in an attempt to escape to Germany. He was sentenced to five years hard labour, the time being served in Bory (1949 – 1950) and Pribram high security prisons and then in the uranium camps of Bytiz, Vojna and Jachymov. He was released in December 1953 and until September 1954 was only permitted to do menial work. In September he found work as an electrician at an electrical plant at Bystfany where he remained until his retirement. Chabera died on October 21 1999 at Litomeric, Czech Republic.

PO 19.5.40 FO 19.5.41

HARRY HUTCHINSON CHALDER 43691

PO

Pilot

British

266 and 41 Squadrons

Chalder joined the RAF on August 26 1935, as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot (580049). His service after the completion of his training is not known but he was with 66 Squadron at Duxford on April 1 1940, when he was commissioned. Chalder was posted to 266 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on April 15 1940. On August 12 the squadron moved temporarily to Eastchurch to carry out possible anti-shipping operations. Early the next morning the Germans attacked Eastchurch, using thirty Do 17s. Severe damage to buildings and hangars was inflicted and six aircraft were destroyed on the ground. Five Do 17s were destroyed. Chalder was injured in the foot by a bomb. On September 15 he went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. On the 17th his Spitfire, N 3266, was badly damaged by a Bf 109 off Dover. Chalder was shot down in a combat over Charing on September 28 1940 and baled out, seriously wounded, landing near Garlinge Green. His Spitfire, X 4409, was possibly that which exploded over East Stour Farm, Chilham He was admitted to Chartham Hospital and died there on November 10, aged 25. Chalder is buried in St Nicholas’ Cemetery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. PO 1.4.40

STANISLAW JOZEF CHALUPA P 1300

PO

Pilot

Polish

302 Squadron

Born in 1915 in Zaraz, in the Kracow region, Chalupa went to the Artillery Reserve Cadet Officers’ School after leaving school.

Sgt 1940 PO 19.12.41 FO 1943

DENNIS FREDERICK CHADWICK 101519

Sgt

Pilot

British

64 Squadron

In January 1936 he moved to the Air Force Flying School at Deblin and was commissioned in 1938. He was with 123 Eskadra of the Pursuit Brigade in September 1939 and on the 3rd he shared in destroying a Bf 110. After the fall of Poland, Chalupa escaped to France, via Romania, and joined l’Armée de l’Air. In May 1940 he was a member of Groupe de Chasse I/2. On the 11th he shared in the probable destruction of two Ju 88s, on June 2 he destroyed a He 111 and on the 8th he destroyed a Ju 87 and shared a second Ju 87 and a Bf 109. After the French collapse, Chalupa escaped to England. He joined 302 Squadron at Leconfield on July 23. He claimed the probable destruction of a Ju 88 and the later damaging of another on August 21. After the latter engagement, Chalupa’s engine began to malfunction and started smoking. He throttled back and began a gliding descent towards base but just failed to reach it. He made a wheels-up landing outside the Leconfield boundary. The aircraft, Hurricane P 3934, was repairable and he was unhurt. Chalupa went to Duxford on September 13 1940, with a 302 Squadron detachment, which flew operationally as part of the Bader Big Wing. On the 15th he claimed a Do 17 destroyed and another probably destroyed. The attachment ceased on the 25th and the detachment rejoined 302. In November 1940 Chalupa was still with 302, then based at Northolt. On the 10th he was posted to RAF Northolt, as non-effective sick. On recovery, he rejoined 302. He was awarded the VM (5th Class) (1.2.41). Rested from operations on July 30 1942, Chalupa was posted to the Operations Room of 302, remaining there until June 24 1944, when he went to 16 SFTS, Newton for an instructor’s course on Masters, after which he became an instructor there. On January 30 1945 Chalupa was posted to 3 (O) AFU for No 1 Pilot Navigation Course and he returned to Newton, as a Navigation Instructor.

Chadwick joined the RAFVR in May 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740294). He was called up on September 1 1939 and with training completed, he was posted to 5 B&GS, Jurby on February 10 1940, as a staff pilot. On May 18 Chadwick was attached to 4 (C) Ferry Pilot Pool from 5 B&GS. The attachment ceased on the 20th and he returned to 5 B&GS. He was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 2. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 64 Squadron at Leconfield on the 17th. He flew his first sortie on the 19th. On November 11 1940 Chadwick damaged a Bf 109 and on December 5 he made a forced-landing at Faversham, after being attacked by a Bf 109. Commissioned in July 1941, he transferred to the Administrative Branch in 1943 and was released in 1945, as a Squadron Leader. Chadwick died in 1973. PO 17.7.41 FO 17.7.42 FL 17.7.43

RONALD IVOR CHAFFE 79528

PO

Pilot

British

245 and 43 Squadrons

Chaffe, from Bristol, joined the RAFVR in January 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742850), and did his pre-war flying training at 2 E&RFTS, Filton. He was called up on September 1 and completed his training at 3 FTS, South Cerney,

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Course, which ended on March 23 1940. On leaving 2 FTS, he probably rejoined 610 for a short spell before going to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 28. After he had converted to Hurricanes, he went to PDC Uxbridge on May 15, for allocation to a squadron in France. It would seem that Chandler joined 501 Squadron at Anglure. The squadron was withdrawn from France on June 18 1940, operated from Jersey on the 19th, covering the withdrawal of the BEF, and then re-assembled at Croydon on the 21st. Chandler was posted back to 610 Squadron, then at Gravesend, on June 30. On July 24 Chandler shot down two aircraft S of Dover, a Bf 109 and a Blackburn Skua of the Fleet Air Arm, attacked in error. On July 25 he destroyed a Bf 109, on August 12 he damaged a Bf 109, on the 14th shot down a Bf 109. On the 18th he destroyed a Do 17 and damaged another. On the 29th he damaged another Do 17 and on the 30th he shot down a Bf 109 and probably destroyed a Bf 110. Chandler was awarded the DFM (22.10.40). He was detached from 610 to RAF Acklington on December 14 1940, when the squadron moved from Acklington to Westhampnett, until December 30, when Chandler was posted to 2 CFS, Cranwell. Commissioned in June 1941, he later served with 65 and 615 Squadrons. Chandler was awarded the AFC (2.4.43). He was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant, and recommissioned as a Pilot Officer in the RAFVR Training Branch in June 1946.

On September 25 1946 he was posted away to a Holding Unit, went to 6 RU on November 9 and was released from the PAF on December 30 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. He was awarded the KW (31.10.47). Chalupa settled in Canada but later returned to Poland. PO -.7.40 FO 1.3.41 FL 1.9.42

GEORGE PHILIP CHAMBERLAIN 16168

WC

Pilot

British

FIU

Born on August 18 1905, Chamberlain was educated at Denstone College. He entered RAF College, Cranwell in September 1923 and on graduating, he joined 25 Squadron at Hawkinge on July 30 1925. On April 14 1927 Chamberlain went to India, joining 5 (Army Co-operation) Squadron at Risalpur, flying Bristol Fighters. He returned to the UK in August 1930 and went to the Electrical and Wireless School at Cranwell, for a course. Chamberlain went to Upavon on July 21 1931 as Station Signals Officer, moving on September 26 1932 to the staff of HQ ADGB and a year later to the SHQ Staff at RAF Netheravon. It was back to flying in 1934, with a posting to 17 Squadron at Kenley on March 14, as a Flight Commander. In January 1936 Chamberlain went to RAF Staff College, Andover and a year later was appointed to the Signals Staff at HQ 16 Group, Coastal Command at Lee-on-Solent. He moved to 18 Group, Donibristle, as Officer i/c Signals, on November 7th 1938. In April 1940 Chamberlain was serving on the Night Interception Committee at Air Ministry, which acceded to Dowding’s request for a night unit. Chamberlain was given the job and he formed the Fighter Interception Unit at Tangmere, with Blenheims. He was posted to HQ Coastal Command on July 17 1941, made an OBE (24.9.41), posted on January 4th 1943 to No 1 Radio School, Cranwell and in August 1943 he went on a year’s attachment to the RAAF in Melbourne. Chamberlain retired from the RAF on September 25 1960, as an Air Vice-Marshal CB OBE. He died in November 1995. PO 30.7.25 FO 30.1.27 FL 5.11.30 AVM 1.7.55

SL 1.2.37

PO 26.6.41 FO 26.6.42 FL 26.6.43 PO (RAFVR) 1.6.46

VICTOR RONALD CHAPMAN 754146

PO Pilot

British

ALAN KINGSLEY CHAPPELL 80808

Pilot

Pilot

British

236 Squadron

In December 1937 Chappell joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741187), and began his weekend flying at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham. He was called to full-time service on September 1 1939 and was posted to No 1 ITW, Cambridge on November 10. Chappell moved to 12 FTS, Grantham on December 30 and on completion of the course he went to No 1 (C) OTU at Silloth, to convert to Blenheims. He joined 236 Squadron at St Eval on August 15 1940, a Coastal Command squadron, operating with Fighter Command on long-range fighter and reconnaissance sorties, in Blenheim Mk IVs. Chappell was posted to 413 Squadron at Stranraer on July 7 1941 but he left on August 5. He joined the AACU at Gibraltar on September 14 1941 and was with it until August 28 1942, when he returned to England. On September 12 Chappell joined the staff at 3 School of General Reconnaissance at Squires Gate. He did a Beam Approach course at No 1 BATS, Watchfield in late October and returned to Squires Gate. He was there until June 13 1943, when, in preparation for his second tour of operations, he was posted to 3 (Coastal) OTU at Haverfordwest, to convert to Wellington Mk XIVs. Chappell joined 612 Squadron at Chivenor, to carry out night anti-submarine and antishipping operations. With his tour completed, he left the squadron on February 27 1944 to take a staff job at the Directorate of Accident Prevention at the Air Ministry. Chappell was released from the RAF in November 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1993.

FL 11.7.42

British

PO

Chappell was born on May 23 1914 at Ainsdale, near Southport, Lancashire. He was educated at Marlborough College and pre-war worked for a London advertising agency, doing market research.

HORATIO HERBERT CHANDLER Sgt

264 Squadron

235 Squadron

With training completed, Chamberlain went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 13, to convert to Blenheims, and on August 5 1940 he joined 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton and served with it in the Battle of Britain. Returning from a dusk patrol over the North Sea on February 14 1941, Chamberlain prepared to land at Bircham Newton. Suddenly the lights were put out because of enemy aircraft. He flew on to the satellite at Langham, 15 miles away, and as he was about to touch down, the lights there went out. The aircraft hit a tree. The navigator was killed and the air gunner slightly injured. Chamberlain was seriously injured and spent the next eight months receiving treatment at Ely and Torquay. In October 1941 he went to a ground job at RAF Langham. On May 11 1942 he was attached to 2 Armament Practice Camp at Thorney Island, on flying duties. He was posted on administrative duties at the Air Ministry on May 1 1943 and remained there until his release from the RAF in 1946. Chamberlain died on September 21 2011.

106245

British

After completing his gunnery training, Chapman joined 264 Squadron in July 1940. On August 28 he was gunner in Defiant L 6957 which had its petrol tank holed during an attack on a He 111 over Folkestone. Chapman and his pilot, Sergeant A J Lauder, returned safely to Hornchurch. Chapman was still with 264 Squadron in November 1940. No further service details traced.

WC 1.3.40 GC 1.3.42 AC 1.7.50

Chamberlain joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754042). He began his flying training at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell. He was called up at the outbreak of war and on October 23 went to No 1 EFTS, Hatfield, remaining there until March 18 1940, when he was posted to 6 FTS, Little Rissington.

PO 13.7.40 FO 11.7.41

Air Gunner

Chapman joined the RAFVR in July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on September 1, he later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner.

JOSEPH THOMAS RONALD CHAMBERLAIN 81677

Sgt

610 Squadron

Chandler, born in 1917 in Bexhill on-Sea, joined 610 Squadron, AAF on March 10 1936, as an Aircrafthand (810021). In April 1939 he went into a new NCO pilot-training scheme and had already carried out some flying training before being called up on August 24 1939.

PO 2.6.40 FO 2.6.41 FL 2.6.42

Chandler was posted from 610 on October 7 1939 to 2 FTS, Brize Norton, on No 42

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CHARLES GORDON CHAPPELL 40672

FO

Pilot

British

destroyed five Bf 109s, probably six others and shared in the probable destruction of two more. He was awarded the DFC (15.7.41) and he was posted away from 54 Squadron in early October to CFS, for an instructors course, after which he instructed at 9 FTS, 9(P) AFU and 5(P) AFU. In December 1942 Charles went on a refresher course to 52 OTU and in January 1943 he joined 64 Squadron. On March 12 he damaged a FW 190. He moved to 611 Squadron on March 27 1943, as a Flight Commander and on April 22 he was given command of the squadron. On May 4 he damaged a FW 190 and on the 7th he damaged a Bf 109. On the 14th he destroyed a FW 190 and the next day two more. Commandant Mouchotte of 341 Squadron shot down a FW 190 simultaneously with Charles’ second one. Thus the two pilots shared the honour of shooting down Biggin Hill’s 1000th victim and a prize, each getting £90. Charles claimed a FW 190 destroyed on May 17 and another on June 23. On this day his own aircraft was damaged and, after gliding down from 10,000 to 1000 feet, he baled out into the sea and was picked up by an ASR launch. On July 5 Charles damaged a FW 190 and on the 25th he shot down another and damaged a Bf 109. On August 9 1943 Charles was promoted to lead the Middle Wallop Wing. He claimed a FW 190 on August 31, was posted to Portreath on September 16, to command the Wing there, and on the 24th he claimed his final victory, a Bf 110. Charles was awarded a Bar to the DFC (16.7.43), the US Silver Star (20.7.43) and the DSO (29.10.43). He went to staff duties at HQ 10 Group and in April 1944 he transferred to the RCAF. After a lecture tour of Canada, Charles was on the staff of HQ Allied Expeditionary Air Forces. After the war he was repatriated to Canada and stayed in the RCAF. He had a mental breakdown in 1949 and was diagnosed with acute schizophrenia, probably caused by wartime stress. He appeared to have recovered but after suffering a relapse, he was pronounced incurable. He was released from the RCAF in 1951 and spent the rest of his life in the Shaughnessy Veterans’ Hospital in Vancouver. Charles died there on November 5 1986.

65 and 609 Squadrons

Chappell joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on March 7 1938, as a pupil pilot. After completing his training, he went to 2 AOS, Acklington on December 17 1938, as a staff pilot. On September 1 1939 he joined 52 Squadron at Alconbury, equipped with Fairey Battles. On the night of November 3 he took off from Benson on a night training exercise and crashed through some trees, injuring himself and the other crew member. Chappell probably volunteered for Fighter Command in August 1940 and on the 5th he went to 5 OTU, Aston Down. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 65 Squadron at Turnhouse on the 19th. He carried out four operational sorties with the squadron, on September 4, 12 and 14 and October 7. It is believed that he moved to 609 Squadron at Middle Wallop on October 9 1940 but there is no mention in the squadron ORB. Chappell was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Squadron Leader. He died on January 25 2006. APO 7.5.38 PO 7.3.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.1.44

DOUGLAS WILLIAM ERNEST CHAPPLE 902225

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

236 Squadron

Chapple, of Plymouth, enlisted in the RAFVR in September 1939. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. After completing his training, he joined 236 Squadron on July 19 1940. He was still with the squadron in November 1940. He was with 7 Squadron at Oakington in 1941. Chapple was killed on a daylight operation to Bremen on June 28. His Stirling, N 6007, was shot down into the North Sea, after a running fight with Bf 109s. Chapple was a Flight Sergeant at the time of his death. He was 24. Chapple is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 35.

PO 15.5.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41

GERARD CHARNOCK 1002641

AC2

Radar Operator

British

25 Squadron

WILFRED THOMAS CHARD 746805

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

Charnock joined the RAFVR about June 1940 to train as a Wireless Operator. He probably had done a course in radar before joining 25 Squadron at North Weald in late September.

141 Squadron

Chard joined the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Aircrew. Called up on September 1, he completed his gunnery training and had joined 141 Squadron at Turnhouse by June 1940.

In the early hours of June 5 1941 Charnock, then a Sergeant, was in a Beaufighter of 25 Squadron, flown by Sergeant H Gigney. They shot down a He 111 over the Wash. It crashed at South Reston, Alford, Lincolnshire. No further service details traced.

Flying with Sergeant G Laurence, he shot down a Ju 88 at night on September 17 1940. It crashed at St Andrews Close, Maidstone. Chard flew sixteen operational sorties during the Battle of Britain. In July 1943 Chard, then a Warrant Officer Radar Operator, was with 219 Squadron in North Africa. He was again crewed with his 1940 pilot, George Laurence (qv), by then a Flight Lieutenant. On the night of July 5/6 1943 they destroyed a Ju 88 over Bizerta, Tunisia, in Beaufighter V 8875. On January 7 1944 they took off from Bizerta on a test flight, with a trainee radar operator aboard. Turning over the airfield boundary, the aircraft’s port wingtip clipped a car and the Beaufighter somersaulted and crashed. Chard and the trainee were thrown clear but Laurence was killed. Chard was released from the RAF, as a Warrant Officer. He died on May 17 1947 and is buried in Sutton Road Cemetery, Southend-on-Sea.

HARRY WALPOLE CHARNOCK 147902

FO

Pilot

Canadian

Pilot

British

64 and 19 Squadrons

Born in 1905, Charnock was educated at Harrow. He entered RAF College, Cranwell in January 1924 and was commissioned in December 1925, joining 32 Squadron at Kenley on the 16th. He was posted to No 1 Squadron at Tangmere on August 18 1930. Charnock was cashiered by order of General Court Martial on December 12 1930 for a low-flying offence. On September 5 1939 he rejoined the RAF. With training completed, he went to 64 Squadron at Church Fenton, as a Sergeant-Pilot (901005). On September 6 1940, on his first operational sortie with the squadron, he crashed in Spitfire K 9903 during a routine patrol. Although the aircraft was written off, he was unhurt. On the 12th Charnock was posted to 19 Squadron at Fowlmere. He scored his first victory on November 5 1940, when he claimed a Bf 109. He claimed Bf 109s destroyed on July 21 and August 7 1941. At the end of his tour with 19 Squadron, he was awarded the DFM (7.4.42). Charnock was posted to 72 Squadron in early August 1942. In November 72 moved to Gibraltar and on the 16th it flew to Algiers and began patrols the next day. Between November 25 and December 18 he claimed a FW 190, four Bf 109s and another Bf 109 probably destroyed. On December 18 he was himself shot down and landed in enemy territory. Charnock bribed an Arab to lead him to the British lines. Once there, he went to a base hospital. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in January 1943, he was awarded the DFC (26.2.43) and rejoined the squadron on March 17 1943. Posted away, Charnock returned to the UK and was posted to 57 OTU, Eshott in November 1943. He was later at 61 OTU, Rednal and he went to AFDU, Wittering in January 1944. He joined 222 Squadron at Funtington in July 1944. Two days after joining the squadron, he was injured in a car accident and did not return to operations until early 1945, when he was posted to 41 Squadron at Volkel, as a Flight Commander.Charnock was released from the RAF on November 24 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant. He was awarded the Croix de Guerre and was created a Chevalier of the Order of Leopold II avec Palme by the Belgians. He died on May 24 1974.

EDWARD FRANCIS JOHN CHARLES 36198

Sgt

54 Squadron

The son of an RFC pilot, Charles was born in Coventry, England on February 6 1919. He was taken to Canada as a child and lived in Lashburn, Saskatchewan. In June 1937 he joined a territorial unit, the 16th/22nd Saskatchewan Horse. Charles joined the RCAF, as an Officer Cadet, on January 3 1938 and transferred to the RAF in May 1939. On December 20 he was posted to 81 (Communications) Squadron. When it was disbanded on June 15 1940, Charles joined 2 (Army Cooperation) Squadron. In August Charles volunteered for Fighter Command and on the 21st he was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden, to convert to Spitfires, after which he joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch on September 3. On October 24 1940 Charles baled out of Spitfire P 9558, when the engine malfunctioned. The resultant clouds of black smoke gave him the mistaken impression that the aircraft was on fire. Charles claimed no victories until April 7 1941, when he shot down a Bf 110 E of Manston. In sweeps over France between June 17 and the end of September 1941, Charles

PO 16.12.25 FO 16.6.27 PO 12.1.43 FO 12.7.43 FL 12.1.45

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GEORGE FREDERICK CHATER 34230

SL

Pilot

South African

Airfield (Northolt) and on August 31 he took command of 317 Squadron at Plumetot in France. On January 1 1945 he destroyed a FW 190. At the end of his tour he went back to HQ 131 Airfield and was awarded the VM (5th Class) (25.6.45). Chelmecki was posted on November 9 1945 to the Ferry Pool of the Enemy Aircraft Salvage and Service Unit at Hamburg-Fühlsbuttel, for flying duties. He was released on August 8 1946, returned to Poland in 1948 and died there on March 28 1988.

247 and 3 Squadrons

Chater joined the RAF on a short service commission in September 1934. He completed his flying training at 3 FTS, Grantham and joined 23 Squadron on September 16 1935.

PO 3.5.40 PO 6.8.40 FO 1.3.41 FL 1.9.42

Chater was posted overseas on February 21 1936, to 100 (Torpedo bomber) Squadron at Seletar, Straits Settlements. In late 1939 Chater was a flying instructor at Cranwell. On January 5 1940 a detached section of 152 Squadron Gladiators at Sumburgh was designated ‘Fighter Flight, RAF Sumburgh’. Chater joined it on January 9, as CO. Three days later the Flight was transferred from Fighter Command to 18 Group, Coastal Command. Chater was still commanding, when the Flight rejoined Fighter Command on July 21 1940. On July 28 the unit moved south to Roborough and on August 1 he reformed 247 Squadron from the Gladiators of the Sumburgh Fighter Flight, for the defence of the Plymouth dockyards. Chater was awarded the DFC (13.9.40) and on September 23 he took command of 3 Squadron at Turnhouse. He was posted away to RAF Castletown on November 12 1940, as non-effective sick. He commanded 30 Squadron in Ceylon from February to May 1942 and a Hurricane Wing in Burma in 1944. Chater was released from the RAF in 1949, as a Group Captain. APO 14.9.34 PO 8.3.35 FO 8.11.36

FL 8.11.38

PETER CHESTERS 84960

Sgt

Pilot

British

Pilot

British

74 Squadron

Chesters, of Thorpe Bay, Essex, was born on April 29 1919 and was at Haileybury College from 1933 to 1935. He represented the College in shooting at Bisley in 1935. After leaving he joined his father in the silk trade in the City of London. He spoke German and he visited Germany on business. Chesters became interested in flying and he joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot, around June 1939 (754228). Called up on September 1, he did his elementary training at 5 EFTS, Hanworth. He moved on to 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 49 Course, which ran from June 16 to September 6 1940. Chesters was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 7 and, after converting to Spitfires, he joined 74 Squadron at Coltishall on September 28 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on October 2. He shot down a Bf 109 on October 27, which made a forced-landing at Penshurst Aerodrome, Kent. Chesters landed there, supervised the capture of the pilot and then took off with trophies he had acquired from the 109. On November 27 Chesters’ aircraft was damaged in combat over Chatham and he baled out, wounded in the leg. He stayed at the controls long enough to steer his stricken aircraft away from a village. Chesters was admitted to Orpington Hospital. His Spitfire, P 7306, crashed at Blacketts Marshes, near Sittingbourne. On February 5 1941 Chesters shared in the destruction of a Do 215 near Dover. He shot down a Bf 109 of JG 51 over Kent on April 10. So delighted was he with his success, that he attempted a victory roll over 74’s base at Manston, misjudged his height and crashed on the parade ground. Chesters was killed instantly. He is buried in Sutton Road Cemetery, Southend-on-Sea.

SL 1.9.40 WC 1.12.41

JOHN COWPER CHEETHAM 46208

PO

23 Squadron

Cheetham, of Dunbar, East Lothian, joined the RAF as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot (580031) on August 26 1935. He was with 23 Squadron at Wittering on January 1 1940 but there is no record of him making any flights until April 5, when he was pilot on an anti-aircraft co-operation flight. Cheetham’s next recorded flight was an operational sortie on July 24 1940, on which he acted as Air Gunner, with 23’s CO, Squadron Leader L C Bicknell flying the Blenheim. After this sortie there is no further mention of Cheetham in the squadron ORB. He was with 9 Ferry Pilot Pool in late 1940 and on December 29 made a forced-landing at Squires Gate in poor visibility, in Spitfire L 1045. Commissioned in July 1941, Cheetham was killed on July 15 1944, as a Flight Lieutenant, aged 35. His unit at the time of his death is not known. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 201.

PO 7.9.40

CHARLES ARTHUR COPELAND CHETHAM 82946

PO

Pilot

British

1 Squadron

PO 26.7.41 FO 26.7.42 FL 26.7.43 Chetham, from Newton Abbot, joined the RAFVR in September 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot (742089) and did his pre-war training at 7 E&RFTS, Desford. Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training at 10 FTS, Ternhill, on No 17 Course, which ran from December 9 1939 to May 25 1940.

MARIAN CHELMECKI 76690

PO

Pilot

Polish

56 and 17 Squadrons

Born on August 2 1916, Chelmecki was in the PAF before the war. He graduated from the Air Force Flying School, Deblin and was posted to 122 Fighter Eskadra of the 2nd Air Regiment. In 1939 he was transferred to Deblin, as an instructor.

Chetham was commissioned on May 26 and went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on the 27th. After converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to RAF Hendon for onward posting to France. Chetham probably joined No 1 Squadron in France before it was withdrawn to Northolt on June 18 and damaged another the next day. Chetham went on leave on December 11 1940, pending a posting from No 1 Squadron to overseas. In early 1941 Chetham was with 33 Squadron in Greece. He was killed there on April 15, aged 21. He is buried in Phaleron War Cemetery, Athens.

After Poland collapsed, he escaped to Romania, then to France and arrived in England in early 1940. He was commissioned in the RAFVR on May 3 and transferred to the Polish Air Force on August 6. In mid-July 1940 Chelmecki was posted from the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool to 15 EFTS, Carlisle. On August 6 1940 he went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 56 Squadron at North Weald on the 31st, moving to 17 Squadron at Debden on September 11. Chelmecki was detached to 257 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on the 17th and rejoined 17 on September 24. He destroyed a Ju 87 on November 8, shared in damaging a Do 17 on the 9th and destroyed a Bf 109 on the 11th. Chelmecki was posted from 17 to RAF Debden on November 27, as non-effective sick. He was awarded the KW (1.2.41) and a Bar (1.4.41). He went to 55 OTU, Annan on March 20 1941 and for the next eight months instructed at 55, 56 and 61 OTUs. On November 5 1941 Chelmecki joined 308 Squadron at Northolt and moved to 302 at Heston on June 13 1942, as a Flight Commander. Chelmecki was appointed Deputy Squadron Commander on January 14 1943. From May 17 to September 21 1943, he served on the staff of 2 Polish Wing at Hutton Cranswick, after which he joined 317 Squadron at Northolt.He was awarded a second Bar to the KW (7.7.43). In January 1944 Chelmecki was posted to HQ 18 Sector, on July 12 he went to HQ 131

PO 26.5.40

JOSEPH ARMAND JACQUES CHEVRIER C 856

PO

Pilot

Canadian

1 and 1 (RCAF) Squadrons

Born in St Lambert, Province of Quebec on October 7 1917, Chevrier joined the RCAF on July 4 1938. He was with 110 (RCAF) Squadron when it arrived in England from Canada on February 25 1940. Chevrier was posted to No 1(RCAF) Squadron at Northolt on September 14 1940 and went on attachment to 5 OTU, Aston Down on the same day. He converted to Hurricanes and was then attached to No 1 Squadron, RAF, at Wittering on October 3, making his first flight next day.

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the carrier HMS Illustrious and he commanded 1843 Squadron on the escort carrier HMS Arbiter in the Far East. In late 1945 Chilton commanded the School of Naval Air Warfare and 748 Squadron at St Merryn. He became senior naval test pilot in the UK and spent two years on test duties with the US Navy. He commanded 806 Squadron, became CFI at the Fighter School at Lossiemouth, commanded the Flying Wing at Bedford and was Commandant of the Empire Test Pilots’ School at Boscombe Down from 1968 until he retired on April 5 1971, as a Captain. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.59). Chilton died in September 1995.

He rejoined No 1(RCAF) Squadron at Prestwick on October 24 1940. Chevrier was repatriated to Canada on January 9 1941. He was appointed ADC to His Excellency the Governor-General, the Earl of Athlone on August 8 and served in that capacity until March 31 1942. Posted to 130 (RCAF) Squadron, Chevrier was reported ‘Missing, presumed Killed’ in a flying accident on July 6 1942, as a Squadron Leader, aged 25. He is remembered on the Ottawa Memorial, Panel 1, Column 4.

CLIFFORD ARCHIBALD CHEW 116439

Sgt

Pilot

British

17 Squadron Midshipman 13.3.39 Acting Sub-Lt 13.7.40 Sub-Lt 15.2.42 Lt 13.1.43 Lt-Cdr 13.1.51 Cdr 30.6.56 Capt 31.12.65

From Eton Wick, Berkshire, Chew joined the RAFVR in June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748557). He was called up on September 1 and completed his flying training. He arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 1 1940, converted to Hurricanes and then joined 17 Squadron at Debden on July 15. On August 21 he claimed a share in the destruction of a Ju 88 and on September 5 shared in destroying a He 111, with Flying Officer M B Czernin of 17. Chew was posted away to CFS, Upavon on September 22 1940, for an instructors’ course. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in January 1942. One day in June 1944 Chew was captain of an aircraft on an instructional flight, making night landings. On the fifth one the starboard engine began to give trouble. Chew took over the controls and managed to climb to 800 feet, a very difficult feat on one engine. Excessive vibration made it impossible to maintain height. As the aircraft came down, the starboard engine caught fire and the propellor flew off. The undercarriage mechanism did not work. Chew decided to land on the runway, to avoid crashing into other aircraft. He brought the crippled and burning aircraft down. The whole fuselage was blazing by this time and only Chew’s promptitude and presence of mind enabled the pupils to jump clear without injury. For this action he was awarded the AFC (25.8.44). Chew was killed on March 24 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant with 512 Squadron, a Dakota unit. He is buried in Hotton War Cemetery, Belgium.

DOUGLAS JAMES CHIPPING

PO 2.1.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 2.1.44

RODERICK AENEAS CHISHOLM

67603

Pilot

British

Pilot

British

604 Squadron

He joined 604 Squadron, AAF in 1930 and was commissioned in March 1931.Whilst on his final ‘Wings’ test on July 28 1931, with the AOC, Air Commodore McNeece Foster, as his passenger, Chisholm was involved in a landing accident at Tangmere, in Wapiti K1379. The aircraft was wrecked but both men escaped serious injury. In January 1935 Chisholm went on to the Reserve and in 1936 he went to Persia, to work in the oilfields there. At the outbreak of war Chisholm was passed as fit for flying at HQ RAF Iraq. He left Teheran in January 1940 and on February 23 was posted to 3 FTS, South Cerney for a refresher course and for conversion to twins. Chisholm rejoined 604 Squadron at Northolt on June 22. On the 30th he was detached to 11 Group, Uxbridge for short R/T procedure and elementary attacks courses. He returned to 604 on July 4 and served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. In 1941, with Sergeant W G Ripley as his Radar Operator, he had a run of success. On March 13 they destroyed two He 111s at night, on April 9 another two and Chisholm was awarded the DFC (11.4.41). On the night of April 11 they shot down a He 111 and a probable Ju 88, on the 29th a He 111 and on July 8 destroyed a He 111 and damaged another. At the end of his tour in January 1942, Chisholm was posted as a controller to Middle Wallop and was awarded a Bar to the DFC (10.2.42). He had been a Flight Commander in 604 since August 1941. Chisholm went to HQ 81 Group in March 1942, to organise the training of night fighter crews at OTUs but in June he was posted to RAF Ford, to command the Fighter Interception Unit. During the night of July 2/3 1943 Chisholm destroyed a Ju 88 over the Channel S of Bognor. Over Mannheim on the night of November 18/19 1943 he shot down a Bf 110. In late 1943 Chisholm went to a staff job at 100 Group Bomber Command, to develop radio counter-measures and fighter support for the bombers raiding Germany by night. He was awarded the DSO (14.1.44), credited with nine enemy aircraft destroyed. Chisholm was stationed in Germany immediately after the war, with an RAF interrogation team, to investigate German radio and radar measures taken against Allied bombers. He was made a CBE (1.1.46) and had received two Mentions in Despatches (1.1.45 and 14.6.45). He was released from the RAF on January 1 1946, as an Air Commodore. Chisholm returned to the oil industry. He retired in 1970 and took up carpentry and

PO 9.12.27 FO 9.6.29 FL 1.2.34 SL 1.12.37 WC 1.9.40

PATRICK CHARLES STUART CHILTON British

FO

Chisholm was born at Bridge of Allan, Scotland on November 23 1911 and educated at Ampleforth College and the Imperial College of Science and Technology.

145 Squadron

He was posted to 444 (Fleet Spotter-Reconnaissance) Squadron at Lee-on-Solent on January 29 1930, moving to the School of Naval Co-operation in March 1932. At the end of the year Chignell went to SHQ RAF Calshot. He was posted to RAF Seletar, in the Straits Settlements, on March 25 1937 and was put in charge of a detachment at Trincomalee. Chignell returned to Britain and went to SHQ Biggin Hill on July 10 1938. He commanded 32 Squadron there from October 30 1939 to May 6 1940. He arrived at Dyce on May 12, to take up the post of Fighter Sector Commander and Senior Controller in the Dyce Ops Room. Whilst at Dyce, Chignell flew two operational sorties with ‘B’ Flight of 145 Squadron, on September 2nd and 6th, thus qualifying him for the Battle of Britain clasp. On October 6, he was posted to HQ 14 Group. Posted to the Far East on December 26 1940, Chignell was killed at Kallang on February 14 1942, as a Wing Commander, aged 36. In recognition of gallant conduct in operations against the Japanese in early 1942, Chignell received a Mention in Despatches (1.10.46). His name is on the Singapore Memorial in Kranji War Cemetery.

Pilot

222 Squadron

PO 27.5.41 FO 27.5.42 FL 27.5.43

Chignell joined the RAF on a short service commission in December 1927. He went to 2 FTS, Digby on January 14 1928 and after completing his training, he joined 12 Squadron at Andover on December 15.

Sub-Lieutenant (FAA)

British

He flew his first operational sortie on July 2. Chipping probably destroyed a Bf 109 on September 4 and probably another on the 5th. On this day his aircraft was hit by antiaircraft fire over Dover and he baled out, wounded. His Spitfire, X 4057, crashed near Pineham. Chipping was commissioned in May 1941. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.46) and released from the RAF in 1946 as a Flight Lieutenant. Chipping later went to live in the USA and died there in 1985.

ROBERT ALEXANDER CHIGNELL WC

Pilot

Chipping joined the RAFVR in February 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742935). Called up on September 1, he completed his training and joined 222 Squadron at Hornchurch in late June 1940.

90233 24171

Sgt

804 Squadron

Born on February 15 1921, Chilton was educated at Blundell’s School. He joined the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on March 13 1939, rated as a Midshipman (A). He did his elementary flying at 20 E&RFTS and moved on to No 1 FTS, Leuchars, on No 5 Course, which ran from September 4 1939 to January 13 1940. Chilton joined 804 Squadron at Hatston from Fighter School on June 11, to fly Gladiators on dockyard defence. On October 19 1940 he was posted to 771 Squadron. Later Chilton served with 805 Squadron in the Western Desert, with 881 Squadron on

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Free French Air Force. On August 18 Choron moved to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge. He converted to Spitfires and joined 64 Squadron at Biggin Hill on September 11. Choron probably destroyed a He 115 on November 1 1940 and shared in destroying a Do 17 on December 21. In July 1941 Choron was posted to 609 Squadron at Gravesend, under the command of Squadron Leader M L Robinson. On August 7 he damaged a Bf 109 and on the 9th he probably destroyed a Bf 109. Flying as Robinson’s No 2 on August 27, Choron destroyed a Bf 109 off Dunkirk and on September 17 another. On October 21 1941, W of Boulogne, in Spitfire W 3236, Choron was attacked and damaged by Bf 109s of JG 26. He managed to cross the Channel and made a crash-landing at Rye. On October 27 he probably destroyed a FW 190 and damaged another. Then, at the end of his tour, Choron was awarded the C de G (Fr) and posted to 53 OTU, Heston, as an instructor. Choron returned to operations on April 8 1942, when he joined 340 (French) Squadron at Redhill. Two days later the squadron went on its first offensive sweep, as part of the Tangmere Wing. Wing Commander M L Robinson was leading the Wing at the head of 340 Squadron, with Choron as his No 2. The Wing was attacked by a large force of FW 190s. Neither Choron nor Robinson returned to base and both were reported ‘Missing’. A report on Paris radio said that Choron had been picked up dead in his dinghy but this was never confirmed. His rank at the time of his death was Lieutenant de Reserve. Choron was later appointed a Compagnon de la Liberation.

furniture-making. His book on his wartime experiences, Cover of Darkness, was published in 1953. He died on December 7 1994. PO (AAF0) 16.3.31 FO (AAF) 16.9.32 FO (AAFRO) 24.1.35 FO 23.2.40 Fl 22.6.41 SL 16.12.42 WC 3.6.44 GC 14.12.44

TADEUSZ PAWEL CHLOPIK 76691

FL

Pilot

Polish

302 Squadron Chlopik was born on June 18 1908 and served in the prewar PAF. He arrived in England in early 1940 and was commissioned into the RAFVR on May 3.

He went to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum from the Polish Wing at 3 S of TT, Blackpool on July 5 1940, for testing and grading. Chlopik moved on to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on the 14th and, after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 302 Squadron on August 3. He transferred to the Polish Air Force on August 6. On September 13 Chlopik went to Duxford with a 302 detachment, to operate with the Bader Big Wing. On the 15th he destroyed a Do 17 and then shared another but on this day he was shot down in a surprise attack by enemy aircraft over North Weald. He baled out but is believed to have injured himself doing so and he fell dead at Rawreth. His Hurricane, P 2954, crashed at Marks Farm, Woodham Road, Battlesbridge. Chlopik is buried in Sutton Road Cemetery, Southend-on-Sea. He was awarded the KW and Bar (1.2.41).

GEORGE PATTERSON CHRISTIE 40081

FO

Pilot

Canadian

242 and 66 Squadrons

Christie was born on October 1 1917 at Westmount, Quebec and joined the RAF on a short service commission in June 1937. He began his training at 4 E&RFTS, Brough on July 12 1937, as a pupil pilot.

PO 3.5.40 He went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on September 7 for a short induction course and moved on to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on the 20th. With the course completed on May 5 1938, he joined 43 Squadron at Henlow next day. On April 10 1940 he shared in the destruction of a He 111 over Scapa Flow, in Hurricane L 1608. Christie was posted away to 212 Squadron at Heston on April 20 1940, flying unarmed high-altitude Spitfires on photo-reconnaissance sorties. On June 13, although unarmed, he forced a Fiat BR 20 down into the Mediterranean, whilst on a photographic sortie over Southern France. The squadron was disbanded on June 18 and was absorbed by the Photographic Development Unit and he stayed with the PDU, which continued to operate from Heston. For his photographic work, Christie was awarded the DFC (21.8.40). He joined 242 Squadron at Coltishall on July 22, probably destroyed a He 111 on August 1 and shot down a Bf 110 on the 30th. Posted to 66 Squadron at Kenley on September 3, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant and ‘B’ Flight Commander, Christie destroyed a Bf 109 on the 4th and probably another. His Spitfire, X 4502, was damaged in the combat and he made a forced-landing near Canterbury, slightly wounded, with splinters in left arm and right leg. Next day Christie was shot down by Bf 109s, wounded, and was admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Gillingham. He was declared non-effective sick and posted to RAF Kenley. He rejoined 66 Squadron on November 12, as a Flying Officer. On the 14th he claimed a Ju 87 destroyed, another probably destroyed and a Bf 109 damaged. On the 26th and 27th he shot down Bf 109s and on December 20 he flew one of two Spitfires in an attack on the airfield at Le Touquet, one of the RAF’s first offensive actions. On the 29th Christie damaged a Do 17. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (14.1.41), being then credited with at least seven enemy aircraft destroyed. On January 3 1941 Christie was posted to Ferry Command. He returned to Canada and in March he joined Ferry Command at Dorval. He was killed near Pointe Claire, Quebec on July 5 1942, in a flying accident in a Hudson, as a Squadron Leader. Christie is buried in Lake View Memorial Garden, Pointe Claire.

JOHN ALLISON GEORGE CHOMLEY 84668

PO

Pilot

Rhodesian

257 Squadron

Chomley, who was born on June 6 1920 in Southern Rhodesia, entered RAF College, Cranwell on April 27 1939, as a flight cadet. As he had not completed his course at the outbreak of war, he was enlisted in the RAFVR on September 7 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (581693). For some reason, unknown, he was withdrawn from RAF College FTS, Cranwell in early 1940, before graduation. Chomley did complete his flying training and he was commissioned in the RAFVR on June 8 1940, instead of receiving a Permanent Commission. He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on June 8 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 257 Squadron at Northolt on July 7. He crashed on landing at Hendon on the 23rd, in Hurricane P 3641, but was unhurt. Chomley was reported ‘Missing’ after a combat with enemy aircraft off Portsmouth on August 12 1940. His Hurricane is believed to have crashed into the sea. He was 20 and his name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7. PO 8.6.40

MAURICE PHILIPE CESAR CHORON 30501

Adjudant

Pilot

French

64 Squadron

APO 5.9.37 PO 12.7.38 FO 12.2.40 FL 12.2.41 SL 1.3.42

Choron was born on November 7 1911 at Bethisy-St Pierre. He made his first flight at the new L’Oise Aero Club at Crepy-en-Valois and was the first pupil to be instructed there.

JOHN McBEAN CHRISTIE 741898 Sgt

After gaining his pilot’s licence, Choron did his military service with l’Armée de l’Air and was released to the Reserve as a trained pilot. He decided upon a career in aviation and became an instructor at several aero clubs in Eastern France and Corsica. As Chief Pilot of the club at Bastia, Choron met and became a friend of Michael Lister Robinson (qv), on leave from the RAF. They were to serve together in 1941. Choron was called up at the outbreak of war. After the French collapse he left France, from Port Vendres on June 24 1940, catching a passing British convoy and he embarked on the SS Apapa, bound for Britain. He landed on July 7 and after a stay at RAF St Athan, he was posted to No 1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum on July 29, for testing and grading. He moved to Odiham on August 10 and flew Tiger Moths and Hectors with No 1 Fighter Training Squadron of the

Pilot British

152 Squadron

Christie joined the RAFVR in July 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 1939 and did his elementary flying training at 12 EFTS, Wick. He moved on to 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 48 Course, which ran from May 27 to August 10 1940. Christie arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 10th and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 152 Squadron at Warmwell on August 22. On September 26 Christie was shot down by Bf 109s in combat over the Channel, off Swanage. His Spitfire, K 9882, crashed into the sea and he was picked up dead. Christie was 22 and is buried in Arkleston Cemetery, Renfrew.

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BEVERLEY EVANS CHRISTMAS C 925

FO

Pilot

Canadian

After a further operation, Chrystall was fitted with an artificial limb. He was awarded the DFC (15.1.45), transferred to the RNZAF on July 1 1945, returned to New Zealand in June 1946 and he was released on July 20. Chrystall became a successful farmer. On July 28 1961 he and a contractor were at the bottom of a ten feet deep hole when the sides caved in. Both men were killed.

1 (RCAF) Squadron

Christmas, of Rouville, Quebec, joined the RCAF on January 1 1939 and he was with No 1 (RCAF) Squadron, when it arrived in the UK on June 20 1940. Christmas was detached to RAF Uxbridge on July 5 for a short R/T procedure course. He claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on August 31, damaged a Do 17 on September 1, damaged a He 111 on the 11th, shared a Ju 88 on the 27th and claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on October 5. Christmas was posted away to 110 (RCAF) Squadron later in October. An Army Cooperation unit, 110 was renumbered 400 (RCAF) Squadron on March 1 1941. Some time later Christmas joined 403 (RCAF) Squadron, remaining with it until September 12 1941, when he was repatriated to Canada. Back in Canada, Christmas commanded 133 (RCAF) Squadron at Boundary Bay, flying Kittyhawks on West Coast defence. In March 1942 he was posted to the Middle East, where he briefly joined 14 (SAAF) Squadron, as a supernumerary Squadron Leader, before moving to 260 Squadron. Christmas did little flying and in August 1942 he returned to Canada, where he was appointed to the command of the Fighter Wing at Patricia Bay, British Columbia. In November 1942 Christmas went to RCAF Staff College in Toronto, where he remained until late June 1944. He commanded No 4 Wing (No 1 Air Division, Europe) from April 1955 to July 1957. He retired on January 1973, as a Colonel, and died on May 17 1988 at Victoria, British Columbia.

PO 3.8.41 FO 3.8.42 FL 3.8.43

EDWARD WALTER GILLES CHURCHES 39900

Wop/AG

New Zealander

New Zealander

74 Squadron

At the age of 15 Churches made his first application for an RNZAF short service commission. When he was finally successful, the scheme lapsed before he was called. He went to the Ground Training School at Weraroa on October 26 1939, moved on to 2 EFTS, Taieri in November and on January 16 1940 he was posted to 2 FTS, Woodbourne. Training completed, he was commissioned and then sailed for the UK in the RMS Rangitata on June 7. Churches first went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on arrival, then to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 4, to convert to Spitfires. He joined 74 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on August 21 1940. Churches collided with Sergeant W M Skinner on August 30. Skinner baled out and got down safely and Churches managed to land his aircraft. On September 11 he probably destroyed a He 111, on the 14th he damaged a Ju 88, on the 24th he damaged a Do 17, on October 29 he probably destroyed another He 111, on November 1 shot down a Bf 109 and on the 14th he destroyed another. Churches shared in the destruction of a Bf 109 on February 22 1941 and shot down a Bf 109 on March 18. He was shot down and killed on April 19 1941 by a Bf 109 of JG 53, in Spitfire P 7381. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 63.

COLIN CHRYSTALL Sgt

Pilot

One of the youngest participants in the Battle of Britain, Churches was born in Auckland on July 17 1921. Educated at Onehunga Primary and Auckland Grammar Schools, he went to work as a telegraph messenger and postman.

FO 26.10.39

46538

PO

235 Squadron

Chrystall was born at Foxton on November 21 1916 and educated at Foxton High School. Afterwards he went farming with his father. Unsuccessful in his attempts to obtain an RAF short service commission, Chrystall sailed for England in the RMS Rangitata on April 7 1938. In July he joined the RAF, as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator (614569), and passed out in April 1939. He remustered as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator (Air) on May 1.Training completed, he was posted to 23 Squadron at Wittering and flew his first operation on September 201939. Chrystall then remustered as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator /Air Gunner and went to No 1 Air Armament School, Manby, for a gunnery course, on October 7 and passed out with the rank of LAC. He returned to 23 Squadron and began North Sea patrols. On November 29 his Blenheim had engine failure and the crew baled out. The aircraft, L 1452, crashed at Owlet Plantation, East Stockwith, near Gainsborough. In March 1940 Chrystall applied for pilot training, had a selection board in May and was accepted for training at some future date. In late May he joined 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton and was promoted to Sergeant. The squadron flew patrols over Dunkirk and operated in support of Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain. When Chrystall was posted away for pilot training on May 10 1941, he had flown 133 operational sorties, involving 450 flying hours. After completing ITW, Chrystall went to 9 EFTS, Ansty, where he was commissioned in August and received a Mention in Despatches (24.9.41) for services with 235 Squadron. He was posted to 8 FTS, Montrose on November 1. Chrystall completed the course on April 15 1942 and then went to 59 OTU, Crosbyon-Eden, to convert to Spitfires. He joined 485 (NZ) Squadron in June 1942 and flew his first operational sortie, as a pilot, on July 3. He destroyed a FW 190 over Dieppe on August 19. In mid-September 1942 Chrystall was posted away for service in the Middle East, arriving at El Ballah for a course on Hurricanes on November 23, after which he joined 123 Squadron at Mehrabad, Persia. In April 1943 the squadron returned to Egypt. In July Chrystall went to 322 Wing Training Flight at Sorman and on August 10 he flew a Spitfire to Lentini, Sicily, to join 243 Squadron at Pachino. In February 1944 he was posted to 206 Group, as a test pilot, but soon rejoined 243, then in Egypt. In April 1944 it moved to Corsica and then to the Italian mainland. On June 6 1944 Chrystall was leading his section in a low-level attack on enemy transport E of Cencina. His propeller was damaged by flak and he made a forced-landing behind enemy lines. With the help of peasants, he avoided capture for two weeks. On his way to a pick-up point on the coast, Chrystall was skirting a German gun emplacement when he stepped on a mine and lost the lower half of his right leg. German soldiers treated him kindly and after hospital treatment, he was sent to Stalag XIIID in Germany. He was repatriated to the UK in September 1944.

PO 28.5.40

WALTER MYERS CHURCHILL 90241

SL

Pilot

British

605 Squadron Churchill was born in Amsterdam on November 24 1907 and was a Cambridge University BA. He joined 605 Squadron, AAF in 1931 and he was commissioned in January 1932.

He was granted an extension of service in the AAF on January 11 1937 and then transferred to Class ‘A’ of the AAF Reserve of Officers on January 11 1939. He was recalled to fulltime service with 605 on August 24 1939. Churchill was posted from 605 to 3 Squadron at Croydon on October 24 1939, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. On May 10 1940 the squadron was attached at short notice to 63 Wing in France and Churchill was given command of the squadron when the CO was killed. He shared in the destruction of a Hs 126 on May 12, shared a He 111 on the 13th, destroyed three Ju 87s and possibly a fourth on the 14th and shot down a Bf 109 and possibly a second on the 15th. After ten days of fighting, 3 Squadron was withdrawn to Kenley. Churchill was awarded the DSO and the DFC (31.5.40). On June 18 he rejoined 605 Squadron, then at Drem, as Commanding Officer. On September 11 1940 Churchill suffered a flesh wound in one arm and was nonoperational until the 25th. He was posted away on September 29 1940, to form 71 (Eagle) Squadron at Church Fenton. In late 1940 Churchill was suffering from sinus trouble. On January 23 1941 he handed over command of 71 Squadron and came off flying. He later commanded RAF Valley. By July 1942 Churchill was again fit for flying and he was posted to command RAF Ta Kali, Malta. He flew a Spitfire off the aircraft carrier HMS Furious on August 11 1942 and landed on Malta. He planned the first offensive sweeps over Sicily and led the first one on August 23 1942. Four days later, leading the second one, his Spitfire crashed in flames after being hit by flak and Churchill was killed, aged 35, as a Group Captain. He is buried in Syracuse War Cemetery. His portrait was done by Eric Kennington and Cuthbert Orde. PO (AAF) 11.1.32 FO (AAF) 11.7.33 FL 11.1.37 SL 1.6.40 WC 1.12.41

89

FL (AAFRO) 11.1.39

FL 24.8.39

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EVZEN CIZEK 85921

PO

Pilot

Czechoslovakian

He joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on August 22. On the 26th 219 formed a temporary Training Flight and Clandillon trained with it until it was disbanded on September 14. He was declared operational on that day. He attended an AI course at Debden and rejoined 219 on December 6 1940. In the evening of March 13 1941 Clandillon and his radar operator, Sergeant C W Dodge, were on patrol in a Beaufighter. They shot down a He 111 that was raiding Southampton. It crashed at Smokehall Farm, Shipley, Sussex. Clandillon was commissioned in March 1942 and was killed on February 18 1943, as a Flying Officer. The unit he was serving with at the time of his death is not known. He was 28 and is buried in Littlehampton Cemetery, Sussex.

1 Squadron

Cizek was born in Slexska on December 10 1904. Following graduation from High School he enlisted in the Czech Army in 1922 at the Army Academy at Hranice from where he graduated in 1924. He was then assigned to the Infantry School at Milovice. On graduation he served in several infantry regiments until, in 1928, he transferred to the newly formed Czechoslovak Air Force. Initially he flew as an observer but, in 1932, he was assigned to the Military Aviation School, at Prostejov, for fighter pilot training after which he was posted to the 1st Air Regiment at Prague-Kbely. In 1934 he was appointed Commander of the Regiment’s 43rd Fighter Squadron and, on March 31 1937, with the rank of Staff Captain, he was appointed Commander of the 44th Fighter Squadron, which was later redesignated the 32nd Fighter Squadron. When the Germans took over Czechoslovakia on March 15 1939, the Czech Air Force was disbanded and Cizek was demobilized. He escaped to Poland in June 1939. On July 31 1939, he boarded the Chroby at Gdynia which took him to France. Cizek was commissioned in l’Armée de l’Air as a Lieutenant and was posted to CIC at Chartres for retraining on to French equipment. On December 2 1939, he was posted to GCIII/3 as an operational pilot. At this time GCIII/3 was equipped with MS-406 aircraft but later re-equipped with Dewoitine D-520s. He destroyed a Bf 109 on the May 11 1940, shared in the destruction of a Do 17 on the 14th and a Do 17 and a Hs 126 on the 19th and on June 16 he destroyed another. Due to the imminent French capitulation, GCIII/3 evacuated to North Africa. L’Armee de l’Air released its Czechoslovak airmen so that they could be evacuated to England. As he was the senior Czechoslovak airman of the group, Cizek acted as their liaison officer in Casablanca during their evacuation, however, due to contracting pleurisy, his own departure was delayed until August 13, when he sailed on the Nereida, bound for Lisbon, Portugal. On arrival in Lisbon he boarded the last civilian flight to depart for England, landing at Hendon on August 17. Following recovery from his illness, Cizek was commissioned in the RAFVR on August 20 1940. He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge from the RAF Czechoslovak Depot, Cosford, on September 28, to convert to Hurricanes. On October 5 he crashed in Hurricane N2341, after engine failure. He was unhurt. This training was completed on October 14 1940 and Cizek joined No 1 Squadron at Wittering. On the 29th he crashed on landing after a combat with a Do 17. On December 12 1940 he was promoted to Squadron Leader and given command of 312 Squadron, at Speke, as joint CO with Squadron Leader F H Tyson. In April 1941 Tyson was posted away and Cizek took sole command. He was now aged 37 and still suffering from the effects of the pleurisy he had contracted in North Africa. He was posted to the Czechoslovak Inspectorate General, in London, on May 27 1941 for an administrative role. On November 26 1942, Cizek was serving as a Group Captain with the Inspectorate of the Czech Air Force when he was required to go, as Czechoslovak Liaison Officer for RAF Fighter Command, to Llanwit to attend the funeral of Sgt Frantisek Remes who had been killed in a training accident with 53 OTU. With Squadron Leader Josef Jaske (qv) at the controls the pair flew in a Foster-Wickner Warferry aircraft, ES947 in poor visibility. Over the port of Cardiff, the aircraft hit a barrage balloon cable and crashed into the harbour. Cizek was killed and Jaske suffered a broken spine. Cizek is buried in Grave 28 B1 in the Czechoslovak section at Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey.

PO 2.3.42 FO 1.10.42

COLIN ANTHONY GORDON CLARK 42192

Pilot

British

South African

FIU

With training completed, he joined 266 Squadron at Sutton Bridge on December 10. Clark was posted away to the Fighter Interception Unit at Tangmere on June 24 1940. On the 26th Clark was detached to 5 OTU, Aston Down, for Blenheim training. He returned to FIU next day. He was appointed Acting Flying Officer on September 8 1940. On October 13 Clark was flying Blenheim L 6805, operating as a target aircraft for an AI-equipped Boston. Due to an error in the use of the fuel cocks, he experienced engine failure and made a crashlanding near Lancing College. The aircraft was written off but he was unhurt. On January 16 1941 Clark attacked a He 111, without result. On May 16 he shot down a Ju 88. He was posted away from FIU on September 22 1941 and joined 263 Squadron at Charmy Down. Clark was killed on October 30 1941, as a Flight Lieutenant with 137 Squadron. Newlyformed and equipped with Whirlwinds, the squadron flew its first operational sortie on October 24. Clark was lost when he went into the sea whilst on an operational flight. He was 28. He is buried in St Michael’s churchyard, Geldeston, Norfolk. APO 24.6.39 PO 9.12.39 FO 9.12.40

DAVID de BRASSEY CLARK 90086

SL

Pilot

British

600 Squadron

Clark joined 600 Squadron, AAF in 1935 and was commissioned in May. On January 15 1939 he was made ‘A’ Flight Commander. He was embodied for full-time service on August 24 1939 and took command of the squadron on May 10 1940, when the CO, Squadron Leader Wells, was reported ‘Missing’. On that day Clark led ‘A’ Flight on a daylight attack on Middlekerck-Zeebrugge-Flushing, during which he shared in the destruction of a He 111 on the ground. Clark was posted from 600 in September 1940, after being hospitalised with broken foot-bones, following a fall into a trench on the 14th. He relinquished command of 600 Squadron two days later. He was made a CBE (1.1.45) and released from the RAF later in 1945, as a Group Captain.

DAVID LAURENCE CLACKSON FL

Pilot

Clark, from Johannesburg, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on May 1 1939. After successfully completing his ab initio course, he went to 8 FTS, Montrose, on No 12 Course, which ran from July 10 to December 9 1939.

PO 20.8.40 SL 12.12.40 WC 1941 GC 27.05.42

90087

PO

600 Squadron

Clackson joined 600 Squadron, AAF at Hendon in 1935 and was embodied for fulltime service on August 24 1939. By June 1940 he was an Acting Flight Lieutenant and ‘B’ Flight Commander in 600 Squadron.

PO (AAF) 27.5.35 WC 1.3.42

He served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain and was posted away on January 8 1941, to form and command 68 Squadron at Catterick, which became operational on April 7, as a night fighter unit. Made an MBE (14.6.45), Clackson was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Wing Commander. He died in 1989.

GODFREY PERCIVAL CLARK 144706

Pilot

British

British

FL 24.8.39

SL 1.9.40

604 Squadron

After the squadron went over to Beaufighters in the later months of 1940, Clark and other air gunners were posted to Bomber Command. Commissioned in March 1943, he was awarded the DFC (13.10.44), serving with 102 Squadron and flying in Halifaxs from Pocklington. Clark was released from the RAF in 1947, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1995.

JAMES ALBERT CLANDILLON Sgt

Air Gunner

FL (AAF) 15.1.39

Clark joined the RAFVR in November 1939 (906080). He volunteered for aircrew duties and trained as an Air Gunner. He joined 604 Squadron at Middle Wallop on August 16 1940.

PO (AAF) 10.7.35 FO (AAF) 10.1.37 FO 24.8.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41

117778

Sgt

FO (AAF) 27.11.36

219 Squadron

Clandillon, of Ilford, Essex, joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745726). He was called up on September 1 and after completing his training, he arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on August 3 1940, to convert to Blenheims.

PO 29.3.43 FO 29.9.43 FL 29.3.45

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HUGH DESMOND CLARK 33382

FO

Pilot

British

1940, which became 5 OTU on the 15th. He converted to Hurricanes and joined 504 Squadron on April 13. He was shot down on September 11, in combat over the Kent coast, in Hurricane P 3770, and reported ‘Missing’. Clarke is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7. However, an investigation of an aircraft which crashed and burned out S of Rookelands, near Newchurch on Romney Marsh, proved beyond any doubt that it was Hurricane P 3770. Items found confirmed the pilot’s identity as being Pilot Officer A W Clarke and also that he had not left the cockpit. Next-of-kin decided that his remains should be left undisturbed and that a memorial should be erected close to the crash site. This memorial was dedicated on September 11 1986.

213 Squadron

Born on March 30 1919, Clark was at Wellington College from 1933 to 1936 and entered RAF College, Cranwell, as a Flight Cadet, in January 1937 and later became a King’s Cadet. On graduation he was granted a Permanent Commission in December 1938. Clark joined 213 Squadron at Wittering in early 1939. He was detached to the School of Air Navigation at Manston on March 11 1939, for a short navigation course. He was posted from 213 to 85 Squadron in France on May 13 1940. Clark was shot down and wounded on the 16th and after recovery from his wounds, he rejoined 213 Squadron, then at Exeter, on August 19. Clark was wounded in combat over Portland on August 26 and he did not fly again until November 1 1940, when he made a local flight. No further service details have been traced. Clark retired from the RAF on October 1 1960, as a Wing Commander.

APO 19.8.39 PO 1.2.40

GORDON STUART CLARKE 747818

Sgt

Observer

British

248 Squadron

PO 17.12.38 FO 17.6.40 FL 17.6.41 SL 1.7.43 Clarke, of Bedford, joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer. He was called up on September 1, completed his training and joined 248 Squadron at Gosport in May 1940. On the 31st he was sent to No 1 (C) OTU, Silloth and he rejoined 248 on June 25.

WILLIAM TERENCE CLARK 126026

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

219 Squadron

On September 28 1940 Clarke was one of the crew of a Blenheim which engaged and damaged a Do 18 over the North Sea. His aircraft was hit by return fire and the pilot, Pilot Officer C C Bennett, and Clarke were slightly wounded. With fuel tanks damaged, Bennett headed rapidly for home. It was heard later that the Do 18 had to land on the sea and was abandoned by its crew before it sank. Clarke, Bennett and Sergeant G B Brash, Wop/AG, failed to return from a reconnaissance operation to the Norwegian coast on October 1. They were reported ‘Missing’. All three are remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 12.

Clark was born in Croydon on April 11 1919. He joined 615 Squadron, AAF at Kenley in March 1938, as an Aircrafthand (819004). He trained and flew as an Air Gunner in Hawker Hectors on Army co-operation duties. Called to full-time service on August 24 1939, Clark remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. He completed his training and joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on July 12 1940. With the advent of the Beaufighter and airborne radar some of the air gunners of 219 were trained on radar with the squadron as Radio Observers. Clark qualified in this category. On the night of April 16/17 1941 Clark flew with 219’s CO, Wing Commander T G Pike, when his own navigator was taken ill. They intercepted and destroyed a Ju 88 and a He 111, in the Guildford area. During the night the night of April 27/28, flying with Flying Officer D O Hobbis, his regular pilot, Clark assisted in the destruction of an unidentified enemy aircraft, on June 1/2 and on June 13/14 they shot down He 111s. Clark was awarded the DFM (8.7.41). In July 1941 he was posted to 1455 Flight, then forming at Tangmere with Turbinlite Havocs. In May 1942 he went to 1451 Flight at Hunsdon on the same duties, locating enemy aircraft by radar in the Havoc, for accompanying fighters to attack and destroy. The scheme was not a success and was eventually abandoned. Commissioned in May 1942 from Warrant Officer, Clark moved to 60 OTU in October 1942, as a Navigation/Radar Instructor. In May 1943 he was posted to 488 (NZ) Squadron at Ayr, as Navigator to the newly-arrived ‘A’ Flight Commander, Squadron Leader D O Hobbis, his original pilot from 219 Squadron and 1455 and 1451 Flights. On December 20 1943 Clark was flying with Pilot Officer D Robinson, when they destroyed a Me 410 over Sussex. At the end of his tour in March 1944, Clark went to North Weald Sector Operations, where he trained as a Controller. Whilst there, he was given leave to visit 488, then at Colerne. He went to dispersal to see Robinson, now a Flying Officer. His navigator was unfit to fly and Clark offered to take his place. On this sortie, a Beach-Head patrol on the night of July 28/29, they destroyed a Ju 188. Clark returned to North Weald next day. He rejoined 488 in August 1944 but two months later went to RAF Honiley Ground Approach School, after which he took No 1 GCA Unit to Prestwick, as second-in-command. Clark was released from the RAF in November 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant.

GORDON THOMAS CLARKE 748034

Sgt

Pilot

British

151 Squadronn

Clarke joined the RAFVR around April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and, after completing his training, he went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 1 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 151 Squadron at North Weald on July 15 1940. He was shot down by Bf 109s over Ramsgate on August 24. Clarke crashed in Hurricane P3273 at Plumford Farm, Ospringe, wounded, and was admitted to hospital. He returned to the squadron on October 6. He was posted away to CFS on December 30 1940. Awarded the AFC (7.9.45), as a Warrant Officer, Clarke was a Master Pilot in October 1949 and was commissioned in March 1953. He was killed on August 11 1953, when flying Harvard KF329 of No 107 Maintenance Unit, which he abandoned after being unable to recover from a spin near Geneifa, Egypt. He was too low and his parachute failed to open. Clarke is buried in Fayid Military Cemetery. SAC R Jackson was also killed in the accident and is buried in the same cemetery. PO 5.3.53

HENRY REGINALD CLARKE 102587

Sgt

Pilot

British

74, 66 and 610 Squadrons

Clarke joined the RAFVR in Belfast in May/June 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754383). He made his first solo at 24 E&RFTS in July. Called up on September 1, he went to 3 ITW, Hastings on October 1, moving on to 4 EFTS, Brough on December 18.

PO 18.5.42 FO 18.11.42 FL 18.5.44

ARTHUR WILLIAM CLARKE 42485

PO

Pilot

British

Clarke was posted to 14 FTS, Kinloss on April 10 1940. With his training completed, he went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 10, converted to Spitfires, and joined 74 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on the 26th. He moved on to 66 Squadron at Coltishall on the 28th. It was again a short stay and on September 11 Clarke joined 610 Squadron at Acklington. On September 30 1940 Clarke had an amazing escape from death. During a practice dog-fight he collided head-on with another Spitfire. Their wings hit and Clarke’s propeller probably struck the other aircraft’s wing. His engine became so rough, he throttled back immediately. He trimmed his nose down, opened the hood, undid his harness and let go. After leaving his cockpit, Clarke was probably struck by the tailplane. He passed out and when he came to he was hanging upside down, suspended by one strap, which was fastened, very insecurely, round one leg. Clarke managed to pull himself up and got hold of the rest of the harness but just before reaching the ground he fainted again.

504 Squadron

Clarke was born in Altrincham on December 26 1919. In January 1931 he and his sister went to Cheadle Hulme (Manchester Warehousemen and Clerks’ Orphan) School, their father having died. Clarke became a House Captain and then School Captain in 1937. He left in March 1938, having been awarded the ‘John Rylands’ Gold Watch, and took up a post in the Meteorological Department at the Air Ministry. He left to join the RAF on a short service commission in June 1939. Clarke began his ab initio course at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell on June 26 1939, moving on to 10 FTS, Ternhill on September 9, on No 14 Course. With training completed on January 27 1940, Clarke went to 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on March 8

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November 24 1939, Cleaver went to Merville in France on May 17 1940, with ‘A’ Flight of 601, to support 3 Squadron, but the stay was short. On the 18th he shared a Do 17 and on the 19th his Hurricane was struck by debris from a damaged He 111 and Cleaver made a crash-landing S of Lille. The flight returned to Tangmere on May 22. On the 27th, he destroyed two Bf 110s in the Dunkirk area, on July 11 Cleaver claimed a Ju 87 destroyed and a probable He 111and on July 26 a Bf 109 destroyed. On August 11 he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and a Bf 110 and on the 13th he probably destroyed a Bf 110, shared another probable and damaged a third. On the 15th Cleaver shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 in a combat over Winchester. He was then himself shot down in the same engagement. His hood was shattered by a cannon shell, Cleaver’s eyes were filled with perspex splinters. He managed to return to Tangmere and was rushed to hospital, where his sight was saved but his operational flying days were over. Cleaver was awarded the DFC (13.9.40). On May 27 1941 Cleaver transferred to the Administrative Branch. In early 1942 he was Ops III at HQ 10 Group. He was released from the RAF in late 1943, as a Squadron Leader. He died in 1994.

His only injury was a deep cut on the chin, caused by his helmet being wrenched off as he left the cockpit, and some bruises. His parachute pack must have caught on some part of the cockpit and been pulled off, breaking the harness straps, one of which pulled itself tight round one of Clarke’s legs when the buckle caught in the loop. The parachute must have pulled open when the pack was wrenched off. He did not remember pulling the rip-cord. The other plane went straight into the ground from 14,000 feet, possibly with Flying Officer C H Bacon at the controls. Clarke went to 602 Squadron at Prestwick on December 16 1940, moved to 266 Squadron at Wittering on the 22nd and finally joined 255 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on January 3 1941, initially flying Defiants and later Beaufighters. Commissioned in August 1941, he stayed with 255 until December 1942, finishing up in North Africa from mid-November. With his tour completed, Clarke returned to the UK. He became a test pilot and was posted to 23 MU, Aldergrove on April 18 1943, where he remained until released from the RAF on May 2 1947, as a Flight Lieutenant. Clarke died on July 26 2010. PO 2.8.41 FO 2.8.42 FL 2.8.43

RAYMOND WALKER CLARKE 70849

FO

Pilot

British

PO (AAF) 8.4.37 FO (AAF) 8.10.38 FO 24.11.39 FL 24.11.40

SL 1.3.42

79 and 238 Squadrons

IAN CHARLES COOPER CLENSHAW

Clarke began training with the RAFO on January 17 1938, as a pupil pilot and was granted an RAFO commission in March 1938. He relinquished this on being given an RAF short service commission in January 1939.

745067

Sgt

Pilot

British

253 Squadron

Joined the RAFVR in February 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot, and made his first flight in a Tiger Moth on February 19 at 34 E&RFTS, Rochford.

On completion of his training, he was posted to 226 Squadron at Harwell, equipped with Battles. The squadron flew to France at the outbreak of war, as part of the AASF. Clarke was posted back to the UK on September 14 1939, to go to HQ 6 Group. He returned to France on November 29 1939, this time joining 88 Squadron at Mourmelon. After suffering heavy losses, the squadron was withdrawn to Driffield on June 14 1940. In August Clarke volunteered for Fighter Command. Posted to 79 Squadron at Acklington on August 18, he moved on to 238 Squadron at Chilbolton on October 3. He was posted away on October 19, with instructions to report to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, for duty with 261 Squadron in Malta. In mid-November Clarke sailed in the aircraft carrier HMS Argus from Gibraltar, which was carrying Hurricanes for Malta. Clarke was one of six pilots who flew off on November 16 1940 in the second flight of Hurricanes, led by an FAA Skua. A series of mishaps saw the Hurricanes run out of fuel and fall, one by one, into the sea, with the loss of all six pilots. Clarke is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 5.

Called up on September 1 1939, Clenshaw went to 3 FTS, South Cerney on November 20 1939, on No 31 Course, which ended on May 25 1940. In early June 1940 Clenshaw was with 253 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey. On the 7th he crashed in Hurricane N 2436 and was slightly burned. On July 10, flying in bad visibility on a dawn patrol, he lost control and was killed when he crashed near the Humber coast, in Hurricane P 3359. Clenshaw was 22. He was the first Fighter Command aircrew casualty in the Battle of Britain. He is buried in St Mary’s churchyard extension, Kelvedon, Essex. A memorial plaque was unveiled on July 10 2000, the 60th anniversary of his death, at Clenshaw’s former home in Shaftesbury Avenue, Southend.

RUPERT FRANCIS HENRY CLERKE APO (RAFO) 26.3.38 PO 17.1.39 FO 3.9.40

36108

RONALD NEVILLE CLARKE

Clerke was born on April 13 1916 and educated at Eton. He went on to Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he read Mechanical Sciences. Whilst there, he was a member of the University Air Squadron.

29063

SL

Pilot

British

235 Squadron Clarke joined the RAF in April 1930 with a short service commission. He went to 3 FTS, Grantham on April 26. With his training completed, he joined the School of Naval Cooperation, at Lee-on-Solent on February 24 1933.

FO 13.10.31 FL 13.10.35

SL 1.10.38

GORDON NEIL SPENCER CLEAVER 90135

FO

Pilot

British

Pilot

British

32 and 79 Squadrons

In October 1937 Clerke was granted a Permanent Commission in the RAF, as a Univeristy Entrant. He was posted to 5 FTS Sealand on October 25 and with training completed, he joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill in June 1938. Clerke was posted to 79 Squadron at Acklington on July 25 1940, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. He shared in the destruction of a He 111 off Sunderland on August 9. He shared in the destruction of a probable Do 17 and a confirmed Bf 110 on the 15th, destroyed a He 59 and probably a Bf 109 on the 28th, probably destroyed a Ju 88 on September 6 and shared in shooting down one He 111 and probably another on the 27th. Clerke was posted to No 1 PRU at Heston on December 11 1940 and was still with it at Benson on July 13 1941, when the first Mosquito, W 4051, arrived. On September 17 he flew the first Mosquito operational sortie, to photograph Brest and the Spanish-French frontier. In October he demonstrated the Mosquito to the King and Queen at Watton, in mock combat with a Spitfire. On the 15th Clerke made a record-breaking flight from Wick to Benson in a Mosquito in 1hr 32 minutes and on November 4 he made one of the first Mosquito flights overseas, making the trip to Malta in 4 hrs 45 minutes, using a camera as he crossed Italy. In early 1942 Clerke was posted to 157 Squadron at Castle Camps, as a Flight Commander. On September 30 he had the first Mosquito day combat when he shot down a Ju 88 thirty miles off the Dutch coast. Clerke was given command of 125 Squadron at Fairwood Common in December 1942, as an Acting Wing Commander. He destroyed a Do 217 on February 17 1943 and a Ju 88 on June 13, both at night. Awarded the DFC (23.7.43), he was then credited with four enemy aircraft destroyed and three shared. Clerke was posted from 125 in October 1943. He commanded the Bomber Support Development Unit from its formation in April 1944. On July 4 he flew the unit’s first operational sortie, with Flight Lieutenant J R Wheldon. He commanded RAF Manston from September 1945 to October 1946 and he retired on August 9 1965, as a Group Captain. Clerke died in 1988.

Clarke joined 217 (General Reconnaissance) Squadron at Tangmere on March 28 1937. In May 1940 Clarke took command of 235 Squadron, with one flight at Thorney Island and the other at Bircham Newton. He led the squadron during its secondment to Fighter Command. Clarke was awarded the DFC (17.1.41). He changed his name to Neville-Clarke in early 1941. He was killed on March 4 1941, when a Hudson of 224 Squadron crashed at Loch Bradan, Ayrshire, on a flight to Aldergrove. Neville-Clarke was then a Wing Commander, aged 36. He is buried in St Peter’s churchyard, Little Aston, Warwickshire. His portrait was done by Sir William Rothenstein on January 11 1941. Neville-Clarke’s brother, Lieutenant S N Clarke, died on November 21 1940, aged 35. He was serving with the Royal Artillery and the circumstances of his death are unknown. He is remembered on the Dunkirk Memorial. PO 11.4.30

FL

601 Squadron

Cleaver, who was born in Stanmore, Middlesex, was educated at Harrow School. He became a noted skier and skied for Britain in the years before the war. In 1931 he won the Hahnenkame competition at Kitzbuhel, the only time it was ever won by a Briton.

PO 25.10.37 FO 25.4.38 FL 25.4.40 SL 1.3.41 WC 1.9.42 WC 1.1.49 GC 1.1.58

He joined 601 Squadron, AAF in 1937 and was commissioned in April. Mobilised on

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DOUGLAS GERALD CLIFT 41828

FO

Pilot

British

breaking long-distance flights. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.38) for his work at the RAE, testing the effects of barrage balloon cables on aircraft. Recalled to the RAF at the outbreak of war, Clouston was appointed to the Experimental Section at Farnborough to carry on with his testing work. The aircraft at RAE were unarmed and pilots took cover when the air raid sirens sounded. This irked Clouston, never more so than when his brother, Falcon, was killed over Dunkirk. Shortly after his death, Clouston chased a He 111, intending to chew into it with his propeller. The enemy aircraft escaped into cloud and although he flew above and below the cloud as far as the coast, Clouston lost him. His CO was angry and Clouston was grounded, although a few weeks later an order came through for RAE aircraft to be armed and the first pilots to reach aircraft after the warning sounded were to patrol the airfield. Clouston was generally one of the first off. Tiring of uneventful patrols, when the next siren went he took off, circled the airfield and headed for Guildford, where he could see shell-bursts in the sky. Some He 111s, with a Bf 110 escort, were returning from a raid on London. A Bf 110 dived , pulled out at low level and headed for the coast. Clouston gave chase and had almost caught up when a He 111 flew across his path. A long burst from Clouston sent it crashing into a field. He resumed his pursuit of the Bf 110, silenced the rear gunner and set the starboard engine on fire. More bursts exhausted Clouston’s ammunition and he veered away to let a Hurricane finish the job but he too must have been out of ammunition and the Bf 110 limped away across the Channel. Clouston returned to Farnborough and did two victory rolls. Again he was grounded by an irate CO. From October 18 1940 Clouston was attached, at his own request, to 219 Squadron at Redhill, flying Beaufighters at night but without success. He returned to Farnborough on November 17 and in early December he was posted to the Directorate of Armament Development, to work on airborne searchlight equipment. On May 12 1941 he was given command of 1422 Flight at Heston, to test the Helmore 40 KW Light. For this work he was awarded a Bar to the AFC (1.1.42). In late 1942 Clouston began pressing for a transfer to an operational squadron. He was given command of 224 Squadron at Beaulieu on March 19 1943. Equipped with Liberators, the Squadron was on anti submarine duties and for his part in their operations; Clouston was awarded the DFC (1.10.43). With his tour completed, he was posted in late February 1944 to RAF Langham to command and he was awarded the DSO (14.4.44). He received a Mention in Despatches (14.6.45). Granted a Permanent Commission in September 1945, Clouston was seconded for two years to the RNZAF in July 1947. He returned to the UK in 1949 and went for a Senior War Course at The Royal Naval College, Greenwich. In July 1950 Clouston was appointed Commandant of the Empire Test Pilots’ School. He retired from the RAF on April 7 1960, as an Air Commodore CB.

79 Squadron

Clift was born on March 15 1919 and joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio training at 5 E&RFTS on January 23 1939. He completed his training at 11 FTS, Shawbury and arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on October 24 1939. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 79 Squadron at Manston on November 17. On May 10 the squadron went to France. On the 16th Clift destroyed a Fw 189 over Wavre and on the 17th he shared a Do 17. The squadron returned to Biggin Hill on the 20th. Clift destroyed a Bf 110 over Dunkirk on May 27. On August 15 1940 he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed, on the 30th he shared in the destruction of a He 111 and on September 1 he probably destroyed a Bf 110. His final victory with 79 was on March 24 1941, when he probably destroyed a He 111. Clift was posted to CFS, Upavon in July 1941, for an instructors’ course. He later volunteered for the MSFU and served with it until October 1942. He remained on flying duties for the rest of the war, finishing up in South-East Asia with the RIAF. After the war Clift served with 34 Squadron until its disbandment in August 1947. He went later to Germany and Singapore, spent some years at the Royal Radar Establishment at Malvern and after a year spent as Adviser to the Imperial Iranian Air Force, his last posting was to West Drayton on the ‘Linesman’ project. Clift retired on July 2 1974, as a Squadron Leader. APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39 FO 23.10.40 FL 10.1.42 FL 10.7.45 FL 10.1.48

JOHN KENNETH GRAHAME CLIFTON 41902

PO

Pilot

British

253 Squadron

Clifton was born in Plymouth on October 20 1918. The family moved to Taunton in 1928 and he was educated at Taunton School. In 1939 Clifton joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course at 11 E&RFTS, Perth on February 6 1939, as a pupil pilot. He moved on to 2 FTS, Brize Norton in June and on completion of the course, he joined the newly-reformed 253 Squadron at Manston on November 6 1939. When ‘A’ Flight of the squadron went to France on May 17 1940, to support the fighter squadrons there, Clifton was with it. He destroyed a Do 17 on the 18th and probably a Bf 109 on the 19th. The flight withdrew to Kirton-in-Lindsey on May 24. On August 31 he claimed the destruction of a He 111. Clifton was shot down and killed the next day, in combat with Do 17s and Bf 110s over Dungeness. His Hurricane, P 5185, crashed into the road at Grave Lane, Staplehurst. Clifton is buried in St John’s churchyard, Staplegrove, Somerset.

APO 10.10.31 APO 10.10.30 PO 10.10.31 WC 1.9.44 GC 1.7.47 AC 1.7.54

39223

Pilot

New Zealander

SL 1.6.41

FO

Pilot

New Zealander

19 Squadron

Clouston was born in Auckland on January 15 1916 and learned to fly privately at Rongotai in 1935. After being provisionally accepted for a short service commission, he sailed for the UK in June 1936. He began his ab inito training on August 31 1936. Clouston was posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough in October and with training completed, he joined 19 Squadron at Duxford in June 1937. He became squadron adjutant in late 1938 and on October 1 1939 he was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander. On March 11 1939 Clouston was detached from 19 to Sutton Bridge, for an Air Firing Instructors’ course. He returned to his squadron a week later. On May 11 1940 Clouston shared in the destruction of a Ju 88, on the23rd he destroyed a Bf 109, on the 26th two Ju 87s, on the 27th a Do 17 and shared another probable and on June 1 a Bf 109 and another shared. He was awarded the DFC (24.6.40). As part of the Duxford Wing, 19 Squadron took an increasingly active role in August. On the 2nd Clouston damaged a He 111, on the 31st shared a Bf 110, on September 9 destroyed a Bf 109 and probably another, on the 15th destroyed two Bf 110s and a Do 17 and on the 18th a Ju 88. On November 19 1940 Clouston was given command of 258 Squadron, then reforming at Leconfield. On August 22 1941 he was appointed to command 488 Squadron, then being formed at Rongotai, New Zealand. He went out to Singapore, to prepare for the arrival of its pilots and ground staff. They arrived on October 10 and the inexperienced pilots were sent to an OTU at Kluang, to convert to Buffalos. The ground staff, based at Kallang, tried to make serviceable the twenty-one Buffalos left behind by 67 Squadron, which had moved up to Burma. Clouston’s orders were to get the squadron operational as soon as possible but lack of tools and spares, coupled with the aircraft’s poor performance, made 488 a weak opponent for the Japanese. Out-flown and out-manoeuvred, the squadron dwindled in numbers in spite of being strengthened by nine Hurricanes on January 24 1942. A week later its aircraft

ARTHUR EDMUND CLOUSTON SL

FL 3.9.39

WILFRID GREVILLE CLOUSTON

APO 15.4.39 PO 6.11.39

29162

FO 10.4.32

219 Squadron

Born on April 7 1908 at Motueka, Clouston had an early ambition to go to sea but found that he suffered from apparently incurable sea-sickness. He started a garage and secondhand car business in Westport, which flourished. Inspired by the famed flights of Kingford-Smith, Clouston learned to fly at the Marlborough Aero Club. He sold his business in 1930 and sailed for England. He applied for an RAF short service commission and in the meantime he took a job with the Fairey Aviation Company. After some blood pressure problems, Clouston was accepted by the RAF and began his ab initio flying in early September 1930 and in late October he moved to 3 FTS, South Cerney. With training completed, he joined 25 Squadron at Hawkinge on April 7 1931. Clouston was posted to 24(Communications) Squadron at Northolt in early 1934 and when his commission ended in September 1935, Clouston considered returning to New Zealand. However, the Air Ministry offered him an appointment, as a civilian test pilot, at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough in October 1935 and he accepted. Clouston made his mark in civil aviation in the years before the war in races and record-

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Clyde was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander on September 7 1940. He destroyed a Bf 110 on October 7. He was posted from 601 to HQ 10 Group on December 13 1940. He was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Group Captain, and returned to Mexico. His portrait was done by Cuthbert Orde.

evacuated to Sumatra and in mid-February those that remained were handed over to 605 Squadron and 488 ceased to exist. Clouston was posted to HQ RAF Singapore on January 23 and he was captured when the Japanese occupied the city. Freed in September 1945, he returned to the UK and was granted a Permanent Commission. He held a number of commands and appointments before retiring on March 20 1957, as a Wing Commander. After his return to New Zealand, Clouston took up farming in Hawke’s Bay. The privations he suffered as a prisoner of the Japanese almost certainly contributed to the deterioration of his health in the late 1970s. In May 1980 he was admitted to hospital in Waipukurau following a fall. He appeared to be making a good recovery but died suddenly on May 24. APO 31.8.36 PO 30.6.37 FO 30.1.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.6.44

PO (AAF) 30.7.35 FO (AAF) 14.4.37 SL 21.11.41 WC 1.1.44

PO

Pilot

British

FO 8.9.39

FL 8.9.40

JAMES PATRICK COATES Lieutenant (RN)

Pilot

British

808 Squadron

Joined the Royal Navy in 1931. Coates was commissioned in the Engineer Branch in 1934. He was attached to the Fleet Air Arm on October 9 1939.

WC 1.7.50

ARTHUR VICTOR CLOWES 44780

FO (AAFRO) 11.2.38

Coates did his elementary flying training at 24 EFTS, Sydenham. On December 11 1939 he moved to 7 FTS, Peterborough, on No 7 (FAA) Course, which ended on May 27 1940. He joined 808 Squadron at Castletown on July 11 1940, flying Fulmars on dockyard defence. Coates was killed on November 26 1940, serving with the carrier HMS Ark Royal in the Mediterranean. He undertook an air test in a Fulmar of 808 Squadron and stalled and crashed into the sea while landing-in. The aircraft sank in 35 seconds. Coates was reported missing, presumed drowned. His name appears on the Fleet Air Arm Memorial, Lee-onSolent, Bay 1.

1 Squadron

Clowes was born in New Sawley, Derbyshire and educated at Long Eaton Council Elementary School. He joined the RAF in January 1929, as an Aircraft Apprentice (563046), and passed out in December 1931, as a Metal Rigger. He later applied for pilot-training and was selected. He completed his training and passed out as a Sergeant-Pilot.

Midshipman 1.1.32(E) Sub-Lt 1.12.34 Lt 1.2.37 He was serving with No 1 Squadron at Tangmere at the outbreak of war. The squadron was immediately sent to France. On November 23 1939, whilst sharing in the destruction of a He 111, Clowes’ Hurricane was struck by a French Curtiss Hawk 75A, losing one of his elevators and most of the rudder. He managed to make a successful landing back at Vassincourt. He was promoted to Flight Sergeant on April 1 1940. On March 29 1940 Clowes destroyed two Bf 110s, on May 14 a Bf 109 and a Ju 87, on the 15th a Bf 110, on the 23rd he shared a He 111, on June 4 he destroyed a Bf 110 and on the 14th he shot down a He 111. The squadron was withdrawn to Tangmere on the 18th and was fully operational again by the end of July. Clowes received a Mention in Despatches (11.7.40). He claimed a He 111 and a Ju 88 destroyed on August 16, a Bf 110 and a He 111 damaged on the 30th, two Do 17s and a Bf 110 probably destroyed on the 31st, a Bf 110 shot down on September 7 and a Do 17 shared on October 24. Awarded the DFM (20.8.40) for his work in France, Clowes was commissioned in September. He was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant and given command of ‘A’ Flight on October 10. He led No 1’s first offensive sortie on January 1 1941, strafing German installations between Calais and Boulogne with two other pilots. Clowes was posted to 53 OTU, Heston on April 29 1941 and was awarded the DFC (13.5.41). He commanded 79 Squadron at Baginton from December 1941 to February 1942 and 601 Squadron in the Western Desert from August 21 to November 22 1942. In May 1943 Clowes did a short refresher course at No 1 METS at El Ballah before taking command of 94 Squadron at El Gamil. He relinquished his command in September 1943 after being accidentally blinded in one eye and taken off operational flying. Granted a Permanent Commission in the Secretarial Branch in September 1945, Clowes later went to RAF Staff College. He died of cancer of the liver on December 7 1949, whilst still serving. Clowes is buried in Brampton, Cambridgeshire.

DONALD GORDON COBDEN 41552

PO

Pilot

New Zealander

74 Squadron

Born in Christchurch on August 11 1914, Cobden was educated at Christchurch Boys’ High School from 1927 to 1931. He was a fine rugby player and played for the All Blacks against the Springboks in 1937. He went to England in late 1937 and in early 1938 he was playing for the Catford Bridge Club. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio training on August 29 1938. After two weeks at No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, he was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on January 28 1939. With training completed, Cobden joined 3 Squadron on September 2 1939, moved to 615 Squadron at Croydon on the 8th and on October 6 he was posted to 74 Squadron at Hornchurch. The squadron began patrols over France and Belgium on May 10 1940. On the 24th Cobden destroyed a Do 17, on the 26th shared a probable Hs 126 and on the 27th he probably destroyed a Do 17. Officially the first day of the Battle of Britain, July 10 saw 74 Squadron sent to protect a convoy in the Dover area. In the engagement which followed, Cobden got a probable Bf 109 and damaged a Do 17. On the 24th he shared in the destruction of a Do 17 off Dover. On August 11 74 took off to patrol convoy ‘Booty’, twelve miles E of Clacton. In the combat between the Spitfires and forty Bf 110s, Cobden was shot down and killed. It was his twenty-sixth birthday. His body was recovered by the Germans and he is buried in Ostende Community Cemetery, Belgium.

PO 25.9.40 FO 3.2.41 FL 10.12.41 SL 1.9.45

APO 13.1.39 PO 13.11.39

WILLIAM PANCOAST CLYDE

ARTHUR CHARLES COCHRANE

90154

42915

FL

Pilot

British

601 Squadron Clyde was born in Sevenoaks and went to Eton College and Oxford University. He was a stockbroker for a time, an assistant to the Governor of the Bahamas and worked for Johnson and Johnson. He skied for Britain. He joined 601 Squadron AAF in 1935 and went on to the Reserve of Officers in February 1938. He rejoined 601 Squadron in early September 1939.

PO

Pilot

Canadian

257 Squadron

Cochrane was born in Vernon, British Columbia on April 27 1919 and was educated at Vernon High School. He began an ab initio course at 3 E&RFTS, Hamble on May 1 1939, as a pupil pilot and a candidate for a short service commission. With training completed at 8 FTS, Montrose and 14 FTS, Kinloss, Cochrane joined 263 Squadron at Filton on April 13 1940. He did not go to Norway with the squadron on April 20. He was posted from RAF Filton on May 20 and joined 257 Squadron at Hendon on the 23rd, where it was being reformed after returning from France. The squadron became operational on July 1 and moved to Northolt. On August 8 Cochrane claimed a Bf 109 destroyed, on the 12th he damaged a He 111, on the 18th he probably destroyed a Do 17 and damaged another, on the 31st shot down a Bf 110, on September 7 he claimed a Do 17 destroyed and on the 15th he destroyed a Do 17 and shared a He 111.

Clyde went to France on May 17 1940, with ‘A’ Flight of 601, but the stay was a short one. On May 19 he destroyed a He 111. The flight returned to Tangmere on the 22nd. On the 27th Clyde claimed two Bf 110s destroyed in the Gravelines/Dunkirk area. He was awarded the DFC (31.5.40). On June 6 Clyde claimed a Do 17, on the 7th he destroyed a Bf 110, on July 7 he shared in the destruction of a Do 17, on August 13 he claimed three Bf 110s destroyed, a Ju 88 probably destroyed and a Bf 110 damaged, on the 15th a probable Ju 88 and another shared, on the 16th a Ju 87 destroyed and another damaged and on the 31st a Do 17 destroyed.

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The 804 detachment flew off Furious on May 23 to Hatston, where the squadron reassembled and was put under Fighter Command control. The squadron served on dockyard defence under RAF command for a time during the Battle of Britain. Cockburn was mainly engaged with testing the Brewster Buffalo, from its arrival on July 24 1940 until September 5, when he embarked by air on HMS Furious, with ‘A’ Flight of 804 Squadron. The flight disembarked on the 8th and returned to Hatston. On June 1 1941 Cockburn took command of 881 Squadron and in 1942 he was Commander (Flying) on HMS Argus. In 1943 he held the same appointment on HMS Stalker, which was part of Force V in the assault on Salerno. He led 26 Seafires of the Naval Fighter Wing to the airfield at Paestum on September 9 1943, to operate from there until the RAF squadrons arrived in Sicily. The Wing then moved to Asa to operate alongside 324 Wing of the RAF, which it did for six days before returning to its own ships. Cockburn was awarded the DSC (23.5.44) for his part in the action. From December 1944 Cockburn commanded the Royal Naval Air Station at Puttalam, Ceylon. In 1955 he was Naval Attaché, Rio and he retired in 1960, as a Captain.

On September 15 Cochrane was badly injured in a car accident and he was posted away to RAF Debden on the 16th, as non-effective sick. He spent some months in hospital. Cochrane joined 87 Squadron at Charmy Down in August 1942, as a Flight Commander. He went to North Africa with the squadron in November 1942. On January 22 1943 Cochrane was scrambled from Djidelli in the early morning. Although it was still dark, he found and shot down a SM 79 into the sea. Awarded the DFC (30.3.43), Cochrane failed to return from a patrol on March 31 1943 and was reported ‘Missing’. He was 24 years old and is remembered on the Malta Memorial, Panel 6, Column 1. APO 24.6.39 PO 10.4.40 FO 10.4.41 FL 10.4.42

JOHN REYNOLDS COCK 40674

FO

Pilot

Australian

87 Squadron

Midshipman 15.9.26 Sub-Lt 28.4.30 Lt 1.3.31 FO 18.1.31 FL 1.7.35 Lt-Cdr 1.3.39 Cdr 31.12.46 Cdr 31.12.50

Born in Renmark, South Australia on March 3 1918, Cock was educated at Renmark High School, Prince Alfred College, Adelaide and Roseworth Agricultural College. He learned to fly privately and went to England in early 1938 and joined the RAF on a short service commission in March.

RICHARD COCKBURN COCKBURN Lieutenant (FAA)

He began his ab initio flying on March 7 1938, as a pupil pilot. He completed his training at 6 FTS, Little Rissington, after which he joined 87 Squadron at Debden from 6 FTS on December 17 1938. Cock went to France with the squadron at the outbreak of war. On April 10 1940 Cock destroyed a He 111 off Le Touquet. On May 10 he shared a He 111 and damaged two Do 17s, on the 12th destroyed a He 111, on the 13th destroyed a Bf 109, on the 16th probably destroyed a Ju 88, on the 18th destroyed a Ju 87 and damaged another and on the 19th he shared a Hs 126. The squadron was withdrawn to Debden on the 24th, moving to Church Fenton a few days later, to refit. On July 5 1940, 87 Squadron moved to Exeter. Soon after midnight on the 26th Cock shot down a He 111, which crashed at Smeatharpe, near Honiton. On August 11 he shot down a Ju 88 and a Bf 109 and probably shot down a Bf 110 and another Ju 88. In this engagement Cock’s Hurricane, V 7233, was hit by a Bf 109 and he baled out, slightly wounded. He landed in the sea off Portland Bill, swam ashore at Chesil Beach and was admitted to hospital. Cock rejoined 87 on September 11 1940. On the 26th he claimed a Ju 88 destroyed and a Bf 109 damaged, on the 30th a Ju 88 destroyed and probably a Bf 109 and on October 10 he claimed another probable Bf 109. After his engine cut out on patrol on October 24, Cock was unable to avoid colliding with Pilot Officer D T Jay. Cock managed to make a forced-landing but Jay was killed, attempting to bale out. Cock suffered shock in this incident and was posted to RAF Exeter on November 24, (w.e.f. October 24), as non-effective sick. He rejoined 87 Squadron on December 3 1940. Awarded the DFC (25.10.40), Cock was posted away from 87 to 2 CFS on December 8, for an instructors’ course. In September 1941 he was instructing at 9 FTS, Hullavington. On July 15 1942 Cock was posted to 453 Sqaudron, recently reformed at Drem, as a Flight Commander. Cock left the squadron on August 30, for a course as a pilot gunnery instructor. After a short attachment to 222 Squadron at Ayr in November, he returned to Australia, where he was attached to the Spitfire Wing at Darwin, as a supernumerary. Cock later went to the Gunnery School at Mildura and lectured at various units. In April 1944 he returned to the UK and did a tour with 3 Squadron in France, flying Tempests, after which he went back to England. Cock was released from the RAF in February 1948, as a Squadron Leader. Later for a time he was the Secretary of what was then the Australian Division of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association He returned to the UK, to be present when the wreckage of Hurricane, V 7233, in which he had been shot down on August 11 1940, was salvaged from the sea on August 30 1983. For a time Cock organized an Australian branch of the Battle of Britain Fighter Association. He died in Australia on August 20 1988.

British

808 Squadron

Cockburn learned to fly at the Lympne Flying Club in 1937. He took part in air races and made his last flight as a civilian on August 28 1939. He volunteered for the RNVR on the day war was declared. After training he instructed at Lee-on-Solent until late August 1940. He joined 808 Squadron at Castletown on August 28 flying Fulmars on dockyard defence. On October 22 1940 he embarked with the squadron on HMS Ark Royal. He was awarded the DSO (25.11.41), for an action in which he was flying one of two aircraft from Ark Royal that forced twelve enemy aircraft to turn away from a Malta bound convoy. Two of the enemy machines were destroyed and others damaged. Both FAA aircraft were shot down. Cockburn was rescued from the sea by an Australian destroyer. On May 1 1942 Cockburn was appointed to HMS Daedalus and commanded 734 (Engine Handling Unit) Squadron at Worthy Down from February 14 1944 to December 5 1945. Cockburn was released from the Royal Navy in January 1946, as a Lieutenant Commander. He had flown 18 aircraft types but never flew again. Cockburn lived in Kent and died on December 8 2013, aged 99. He was a cousin of J C Cockburn (qv) and also of Wing Commander R A B Learoyd, VC. Sub-Lt 3.10.39 Lt 3.10.40

JOHN COGGINS 44458

PO

Pilot

British

235 Squadron

Coggins, of Nacton, Suffolk, went to Nacton Voluntary School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in September 1929 (563631) and passed out on August 19 1932 as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He later applied for pilot training and became a Sergeant-Pilot. Coggins served in Palestine in the 1930s and was awarded the DFM (22.11.38) and Bar (14.4.39) for gallant and distinguished services there. He joined 235 Squadron on June 2 1940 and was commissioned in August. In September an aircraft carrying a full load of bombs crashed among other aircraft and burst into flames. Coggins, Flying Officer J H Laughlin and another officer immediately ran to these aircraft, started the engines and taxied them away. During this time two of the bombs exploded. Three aircraft were taken to safety without damage and a fourth sustained only minor damage. The courage of Coggins and Laughlin was recognised with an MBE each (21.1.41). Coggins would never receive his. On December 16 1940 he was captain of Blenheim Z 5754, on a minesweeper escort operation. He and his crew, Pilot Officer N A Sadler, observer, and Sergeant P R Prosser, air gunner, were lost when the aircraft crashed into the sea, cause unknown. Coggins was 27 years old. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7.

JOHN CLAYTON COCKBURN Pilot

British

Cockburn was born on June 14 1914 and educated at Wellington College from 1928 to 1932. He then went to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and was commissioned in the Highland Light Infantry in February 1934. He subsequently took a course at the Small Arms School, Hythe. Cockburn did not find Army life congenial and resigned from the Army in 1936.

APO 7.4.38 PO 7.3.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.1.44 FL 1.12.42

Lieutenant-Commander (FAA)

Pilot

804 Squadron

Joined the Navy in 1926 and attached to the RAF in January 1931, when he received a temporary commission in the RAF, as a Flying Officer, on attachment. He became a Flight Lieutenant in July 1935 and relinquished his RAF commission on July 26 1939.

PO 12.8.40

JOHN HUNTER COGHLAN 37719

Cockburn commanded 718 (Catapult) Squadron from March 29 1939 until December 9 1939. He took command of 804 Squadron on December 16. On the 28th he collided with another aircraft whilst flying in Gladiator N5504. He baled out, unhurt. He embarked on the carrier HMS Glorious on April 22 1940, with a detachment of 804, which transferred to HMS Furious on May 9. From the 12th the 804 pilots were engaged in ferrying 263 Squadron’s Gladiators to Furious for service in Norway.

FO

Pilot British

56 Squadron

Coghlan, of Southsea, was born in Shanghai and joined the RAF in January 1936 on a short service commission and he began his elementary flying on February 3, as a pupil pilot. He went to 7 FTS, Peterborough on April 18 and with his training completed, he joined No 1 Squadron at Tangmere on October 25.

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Cole flew on his first operational sortie on the 6th. He was still with 236 in November 1940. No further service details traced.

When 72 Squadron was reformed at Church Fenton in 1937, Coghlan joined it but in March 1938 he returned to No 1. After the outbreak of war, he went to 56 Squadron at North Weald. In mid-May 1940 ‘A’ Flight of 56 was operating from Lille by day and returning to North Weald at night. Coghlan destroyed a Bf 109 and shared in the probable destruction of a He 111 on the 18th and damaged a He 111 on the 19th. On May 23 he took command of ‘A’ Flight, shared a He 111 on the 27th and damaged two Ju 88s on the 29th. The squadron withdrew to Digby on May 31 for a rest. Coghlan was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on June 1. The squadron returned to North Weald on June 5. He claimed a Do 17 destroyed on July 3, possibly destroyed a Bf 110 and damaged two Bf 109s on the 10th and probably destroyed a Ju 87 and a Bf 109 on the 13th. On this day his Hurricane, N2402, was damaged in an attack by Oberleutnant Fšzš of 4/JG 51, whilst engaging Ju 87s of II/StG 1 over the Channel, off Calais. Coghlan was slightly wounded. He was awarded the DFC (30.7.40) and posted to the Central Landing School, RAF on August 7, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant. He was lost in a Lysander of the Parachute Practice Unit during the night of August 17/18 1940. The aircraft, which had probably taken off from North Weald, was lost over the English Channel whilst on a sortie to land an agent in France. Coghlan’s body was washed up at Boulogne on September 23 1940 and buried next day in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery. He was 25 years old. Another version of the events of August 17/18 1940 is that Coghlan was on his first clandestine operation, detailed to land an agent in France. On landing, both men were captured and shot.

CHRISTOPHER COLEBROOK 86344

Pilot

British

British

54 Squadron

After converting to Spitfires, he joined 54 Squadron at Catterick on October 14. Colebrook was killed on April 20 1941, still serving with the squadron. He was shot down off Clacton in Spitfire P 7383 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 31. PO 21.9.40

EDWARD JACK COLEMAN 42800

PO

Pilot

British

54 Squadron

Coleman was born on October 9 1914 and was at Dulwich College from 1926 to 1933. After leaving, he went to work for Beese & Co, shipping agents, and he was later posted to their branch office in Aden. Coleman returned to England in April 1939 and joined the RAF on a short service commission. He began his ab initio flying course on August 14 1939. He was posted to 15 FTS, Lossiemouth on December 29 1939, on No 6 Course, which ended on June 10 1940. Coleman arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on the 10th and, after converting to Spitfires, he joined 54 Squadron at Rochford on June 24. On July 7 Coleman made a forced-landing near Deal after an attack by Bf 109s, slightly wounded. His next flight was made on July 14. He claimed two Bf 109s probably destroyed on the 24th. Coleman was posted to RAF Hornchurch on August 28, as non effective sick, with malaria. He rejoined the squadron on October 16. He was killed on February 17 1941, when he crashed whilst carrying out a weather test. Coleman was cremated at the South London Crematorium at Mitcham, Surrey. He is remembered on a memorial plaque at Dulwich College, unveiled on March 14 2002.

The Hon DAVID ARTHUR COKE FO

Pilot

Colebrook joined the RAFVR about July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754796). Called up in September, he completed his training, was commissioned on September 21 1940 and he arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on that day.

APO 30.3.36 PO 3.2.37 FO 3.9.38

73042

PO

257 Squadron

Son of the Fourth Earl of Leicester, Coke, of Holkham Hall, Norfolk, was born on December 4 1915. He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read Mechanical Sciences. He learned to fly with the University Air Squadron and transferred to the RAFVR in June 1939. Called up on September 1, Coke completed his training and arrived at 5 OTU, Aston Down on April 20 1940. He converted to Hurricanes and was posted on May 14 to 257 Squadron, then about to reform at Hendon. On August 12 Coke’s Hurricane, P 3776, was severely damaged in combat over Portsmouth. Slightly wounded, he made a crash-landing and was admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar, where one of his fingers was amputated. He remained with 257 Squadron, as non-effective sick. Coke was posted to RAF Debden on September 12, again as non-effective sick, and did not rejoin 257 until September 27. Coke destroyed a Bf 109 over the Channel on October 22, probably destroyed a Bf 109 over Cranbrook on the 25th and probably destroyed a Do 17 on December 8. He was detached from 257 to 46 Squadron at Digby on December 29 1940. In Spring 1941 Coke was posted to the Middle East and he joined 33 Squadron in Greece. On April 15 he destroyed a Bf 109 N of Athens. At the end of April the squadron’s last four Hurricanes covered Army convoys leaving Greece and joined up with the remnants of 80 Squadron, to put up a fighter defence. They then withdrew to Crete, operating from there until withdrawn to Egypt about May 20 1941. On June 1 80 Squadron reformed at Aqir in Palestine and Coke joined it, later becoming a Flight Commander. On June 14 1941 he damaged a Frernch MS 406 off the Syrian coast. The squadron returned to the Western Desert at LG 103 on October 22 and on November 24 Coke damaged a Bf 110 NW of Maddalena. On December 9 1941 Coke led a formation of Hurricanes to attack enemy transport on the El Adem-Acroma road. They were intercepted by Bf 109s and Coke and three others were shot down and killed. He is buried in Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Acroma, Libya. Coke was awarded the DFC (26.12.41) for an attack on enemy transport on the El Adem-Acroma road one day in November 1941. A large number of vehicles, tanks and mechanised transport were bombed and machine-gunned and the damage inflicted played a large part in blocking the road.

APO 23.10.39 PO 10.6.40

PETER COLLARD 90402

FO

Pilot

British 615 Squadron Born in London, Collard joined 615 Squadron, AAF at Kenley in late 1937. Called to full-time service on August 24 1939, he was detached from 615 to 11 Group Pool, St Athan on September 9, for a Hurricane conversion course. He rejoined 615 on September 12.

Collard flew with the squadron to Merville in France on November 15, in a Gladiator. 615 received its first Hurricanes in April 1940. On May 15 Collard damaged a Hs 126 and another unidentified enemy aircraft. The squadron was withdrawn to Kenley on the 21st. Collard claimed a He 111 probably destroyed on June 22, a Ju 87 destroyed on July 14 and he shared in the destruction of a He 59 over the Channel on the 27th. He failed to return from a combat off Dover on August 14 1940. His Hurricane, P 3109, crashed into the sea. Collard was 24 and he is buried in Oye-Plage Communal Cemetery, France. He was awarded the DFC (23.8.40), the citation crediting him with six enemy aircraft destroyed.

PO (RAFVR) 27.6.39 PO 1.9.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41

PO (AAF) 4.2.38 FO 24.8.39

CHARLES FREDERICK JOHN COLE

GEORGE RICHARD COLLETT

745971

745500

Sgt

Observer

British

236 Squadron

Cole joined the RAFVR about March 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer. He was called up on September 1 and after completing his training, he joined 236 Squadron at Bircham Newton on September 3 1940.

Sgt

Pilot

British

54 Squadron

Collett joined the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He was called up on September 1 and with training completed, he arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on July 1 1940.

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BASIL GORDON COLLYNS

After converting to Spitfires, he joined 54 Squadron at Rochford on July 15. He claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on the 24th. On that day he ran out of fuel pursuing an enemy aircraft and made a forcedlanding on the beach at Dunwich. Spifire N 3192 was a writeoff. Collett was killed in combat with enemy fighters on August 22 1940. His Spitfire, R 6078, crashed into the Channel off Deal. He was 24 years old and is buried in Bergen-op-Zoom War Cemetery, Netherlands.

391342

PO

Pilot

British

Pilot

New Zealander

238 Squadron

Collyns was born in Greymouth on February 24 1913 and educated at Nelson College from 1925 to 1930. He spent two years at Lincoln Agricultural College and then he went sheep farming at Kaikoura. In June 1939 Collyns joined the Civil Reserve of Pilots and began flying at the Marlborough Aero Club. Called for full-time service, he went to the Ground Training School at Weraroa on November 19 1939. Collyns did his elementary flying at No 1 EFTS, Taieri and 2 EFTS, New Plymouth, before going on to 2 FTS, Woodbourne. Collyns qualified as a pilot and was commissioned at the end of June 1940. He sailed in the RMS Rangitane on July 12 for the UK. He arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge from No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on September 10. After he had converted to Hurricanes, he joined 238 Squadron at Middle Wallop on September 30. He did not become operational until October 26. Collyns was detached from 238 to 601 Squadron at Exeter on November 6, for further training, after which he rejoined 238, then at Chilbolton, on the 27th. He was posted to No 1 Squadron at Redhill on May 3 1941. On June 21 he shot a Bf 109 down into the sea. At the end of his tour he was posted to 60 OTU, East Fortune on November 17, as an instructor. Collyns joined the newly-formed 243 Squadron at Ouston in late June 1942, moved on to 222 Squadron at Drem on September 2, became a Flight Commander in October and was posted to 485 Squadron at Kings Cliffe on November 11 1942. Four weeks later Collyns went, as a supernumerary Flight Lieutenant, to the AFDU at Duxford, remaining there until June 7 1943, when he went to 1493 Flight, Eastchurch, as a gunnery instructor. Collyns returned to operations on January 15 1944, with a posting to 65 Squadron at Gravesend, newly-equipped with Mustangs. He damaged a Ju 52 and a Bf 109 on the ground on April 19 and destroyed a Bf 109 in the air on June 10. Four days later Collyns was posted to 19 Squadron at Ford, as a Flight Commander. On June 20 he shot down a FW 190. On the 22nd he was attacking gun positions at low level when he was hit by flak. Collyns pulled up sharply to 3000 feet, hoping to reach the American lines but his engine began to spurt flames, so he baled out, was picked up by American troops and flew back to England, to rejoin his squadron. On August 9 1944 Collyns destroyed a FW 190 and shared another, on the 14th he got a probable Bf 109 and damaged two FW 190s, on the 20th he destroyed a Fw 190 but was then himself shot down. He crashed about one kilometre from Rouvres and was killed instantly, his body being thrown about twenty metres from his aircraft. Collyns’ body was taken to the Mayor’s house and he was buried on the 22nd in the presence of the entire village. There were so many flowers that the Germans protested. After the war his remains were re-interred in the Villeneuve St George Communal Cemetery. Collyns was awarded the DFC (16.10.44).

LEON WILLIAM COLLINGRIDGE 42196

PO

66 Squadron

Born on August 25 1920, Collingridge joined the de Havilland Aircraft Co, as an apprentice, in 1938. On May 1 1939 he went into the RAF as a candidate for a short service commission. After completing his elementary flying training at 6 E&RFTS, Sywell, he was posted to 8 FTS, Montrose on July 8 1939, on No 12 Course, which ended on December 9 1939. He went to 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on the 28th, converted to Spitfires, and joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on February 3 1940. The squadron moved to Coltishall on May 29 1940. On June 19 Collingridge shared in the probable destruction of a Ju 88 NE of Yarmouth. In combat with He 111s on July 29, he shared in destroying one before his Spitfire, N 3402, was hit by return fire, causing engine failure, and he crashed on the beach at Orfordness, sustaining injuries. He was admitted to Ipswich Hospital. Collingridge rejoined 66 Squadron on August 26. He was immediately posted to RAF Biggin Hill, as non-effective sick. Two days later he was transferred to the RAF Officers’ Hospital, Torquay. He finally rejoined 66, then at West Malling, on January 6 1941. On November 16 1941 Collingridge was posted to CFS, Upavon for an instructor’s course. He instructed on Masters and Tutors at 9 FTS, Hullavington from January 12 to March 22 1942 and then at 5 FTS, Ternhill until August 26 1943, when he was posted to Canada. Collingridge instructed at 41 SFTS, Weyburn; 37 SFTS, Calgary and 34 SFTS, Medicine Hat. In December 1944 he did a course at 2 FIS, Pearce and then instructed at 10 SFTS, Dauphin and 18 SFTS, Gimli. He returned to the UK in October 1945 and was posted to the staff of 17 Reserve Centre, Rattlesden, moving later to 16 RC, Sudbury. From June 1946 to April 1949 Collingridge was with 607 Squadron at Ouston. He served in a number of flying and instructional appointments before his retirement on August 25 1963, as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. Collingridge was made an MBE (2.6.62). He died in 1993.

PO 28.6.40 FO 28.6.41 FL 28.6.42

ERIC COMBES APO 24.6.39 PO 9.12.39 FO 9.12.40 FL 27.3.42 FL 1.9.45

808380

ANTHONY ROLAND COLLINS

Combes joined 608 Squadron, AAF at Thornaby in 1938, as an Aircrafthand, for four years.

29088 SL

Pilot

British

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

219 Squadron

72 and 46 Squadrons With his training completed, Coombes was posted to 219 Squadron at Catterick on August 1 1940. He was still with the squadron in November 1940. As a Flight Sergeant Combes was killed on November 20 1941, serving with 38 Squadron, when Wellington lC T 2991 crashed and exploded as it made a forced landing at El Imayid, Egypt, following a raid on the airfields at Derna and Bardia. Also lost were: Sergeant P Fenn, Sergeant J V Hamilton, Sergeant G H Hellyer, Sergeant F H Lewis, RAAF and Sergeant N J Sharpe. Combes was aged 23 and is remembered on the Alamein Memorial.

Collins was born on June 22 1908 and entered the RAF in late June 1930, on a short service commission. He did his flying training at 2 FTS, Digby, afterwards joining 3 Squadron at Upavon on June 23 1931. He was posted to 30 Squadron at Mosul, Iraq on February 28 1933. Back in the UK, Collins went to No 1 Armament Training Camp at Catfoss on February 28 1935 and on August 10 1936 he was appointed Personal Assistant to the AOC 25 (Armament) Group, Eastchurch. On January 2 1938 Collins was sent to the School of Photography, Farnborough, under instruction. On October 28 he was appointed Officer i/c Photography at Coastal Command, Lee-on-Solent. On June 18 1940 Collins went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge for a refresher course. He joined 72 Squadron at Acklington on July 19 and assumed command on the 25th. On September 2 1940 he was slightly wounded and his aircraft damaged in combat with Bf 110s over Herne Bay. In that engagement he probably destroyed a Bf 110 and a Do 17. Collins flew no sorties between September 2 and September 21, when he was posted to RAF Biggin Hill, as non-effective sick. He was given command of 46 Squadron at Stapleford Tawney on October 6 1940. He held the appointment for a very brief period, being posted to the Middle East on November 4. Collins retired from the RAF on June 22 1955, as a Wing Commander. He died on February 21 1976.

PETER WOODRUFF COMELY 41831

PO

Pilot

British

87 Squadron

Comely joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying on January 23 1939. He completed his training at 11 FTS, Shawbury, on No 12 Course, which ran from April 15 to October 23 1939. He joined 145 Squadron at Croydon from 11 FTS on the 23rd, two weeks after the squadron had been reformed. On May 16 1940 Comely was posted to RAF Hendon, for service in France. He and five other pilots delivered Hurricanes to 87 Squadron at Lille-Seclin. They stayed and flew operationally with 87. The last two survivors, Comely and Flying Officer D H Ward, had been placed on the squadron strength by May 19. The squadron was withdrawn from France to Debden on

PO 27.6.30 FO 27.2.32 FL 27.2.36 SL 1.12.38 WC 1.6.41 WC 1.10.46

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Unit, Connell joined 401 (RCAF) Squadron in 83 Group, 2nd TAF. On November 21 1944 he shared a FW 190, on December 25 he shared a Bf 109 and on January 23 1945 he shared in destroying an Ar 234. Connell was posted away from 401 on April 9 1945 and returned to Canada in May. He was released from the RCAF on June 16 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1994.

May 20. On that day Comely claimed two Ju 88s destroyed. From Debden, the squadron went to Church Fenton. At the end of July ‘B’ Flight of 87 went south to try night-fighting. During the night of August 7/8 Comely shot down a He 111 into the sea. He claimed a Ju 88 destroyed on August 11. He shot down a Bf 110 in a combat off Portland on the 15th but was himself shot down and killed, crashing into the sea in Hurricane P 2872. Comely was 19 years old and he is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 19. APO 1.4.39 PO 23.10.39

Aircraftman Connolly is recorded, without initials, in the logbook of Flight Sergeant Lingard of 25 Squadron as having flown patrols with him on September 5 and September 26 1940. No other information has been discovered.

HARRY ALFRED GEORGE COMERFORD 24051

FL

Pilot

British

312 Squadron

FRANCIS HEBBLETHWAITE POWELL CONNOR

Comerford joined the RAF on a short service commission in January 1927 and was posted to 2 FTS, Digby for flying training. Having qualified, he joined 16 Squadron at Old Sarum on December 19 1927, equipped with Bristol Fighters.

39857

FO

Pilot

British

Connor was born in 1917. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on May 10 1937. On July 17 he was posted to 9 FTS, Hullavington and, with training completed, he joined 22 (TorpedoBomber) Squadron at Thorney Island on June 12 1938.

On October 20 1928 Comerford was posted to 28 Squadron at Ambala, India. He served on the North-West Frontier in 1930/31. He moved to 31 Squadron at Quetta on March 18 1932 and became Adjutant. On December 20 1932 Comerford went to the UK on leave. He returned to India and was then posted back to the UK on November 22 1933. Comerford joined 40 Squadron at Abingdon on March 15 1934 and with his term of service completed he went on to the RAFO on October 7 1934. He was recalled on January 13 1940 and posted to 7 FTS, Peterborough, as a Flying Instructor and ‘C’ Flight Commander. He was remanded for Court Martial on July 5 1940, on a charge of becoming unfit for duty due to excessive consumption of alcohol. He was tried by General Court Martial on July 24 1940 and acquitted. Comerford was posted from 7 FTS to 6 EFTS, Sywell and it was from there that he joined 312 Squadron at Speke on October 1 1940, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. He flew a few operational sorties on the 11th, 12th and 13th. On the 13th Comerford, Squadron Leader Ambrus and Sergeant J Stehlik attacked and badly damaged a Blenheim of 29 Squadron, the crew of which fortunately survived. On the 15th Comerford, together with Squadron Leader J Ambrus and Pilot Officer T Vybiral, were flying as Yellow Section on a routine patrol. They lost their bearings and were soon low on fuel. Comerford, in Hurricane V 6542, made a forced-landing near Carnforth, writing off the aircraft. Ambrus crashed near Dalton-in-Furness and Vybiral baled out in the same area. Comerford was posted non-effective sick on October 20 and declared fit for light duty only on the 26th. He did not fly again operationally. On November 13 1940 Comerford was posted away to Air Ministry, for attachment to Vickers at Weybridge. He was awarded the AFC (30.9.41) and left the RAF when he resigned his commission on April 19 1943.

Connor went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 22 1940, converted to Spitfires and joined 234 Squadron at St Eval on July 6. He shared in the destruction of a Ju 88 on July 27 and was shot down on August 16 during a combat with Bf 109s off Portsmouth. He baled out and was rescued by a Royal Navy launch and taken to Haslar Naval Hospital, remaining there for two months. His Spitfire, X 4016, crashed into the sea. Connor did not fly operationally again. On November 3 1940 he was posted to CFS, Upavon for an instructor’s course. From May 14 1941 until the end of the war he was a flying instructor in the UK and Canada. Connor’s final posting was to the Air Staff at HQ 50 Group, Reading. He was released in July 1946, as a Squadron Leader. APO 5.7.37 PO 10.5.38 FO 10.12.39 FL 10.12.40 SL 1.9.42

STANLEY DUDLEY PIERCE CONNORS 40349

FO

Pilot

British

JOHN WILLIAM COMPTON AC

Radar Operator

British

25 Squadron He received a five-year commission in 500 Squadron, AAF in May 1936. He relinquished this on being granted an RAF short service commission in December 1937. He was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on the 20th and with training completed Connors joined 111 Squadron at Northolt on June 27 1938. The squadron began flying patrols over France on May 18 1940 and on that day Connors destroyed a Ju 88 and a Bf 109. On the 19th he claimed three He 111s and a Ju 88 destroyed and on the 31st he possibly shot down another Bf 109. He was appointed ‘B’ Flight Commander on May 25, with the rank of Acting Flight Lieutenant, and awarded the DFC (31.5.40). On June 2 Connors had an unconfirmed He 111 over Dunkirk and on the 7th he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed, on July 19 he claimed a Bf 109, on the 25th another damaged and on the 31st he shared in the probable destruction of a Ju 88. Connors destroyed a Bf 109 on August 11, destroyed a Ju 88 and a Bf 110 and damaged another of each on the 15th, damaged a Do17 on the 16th and probably shot down a Do 17 on the 18th. In this last engagement Connors was shot down by anti-aircraft fire whilst attacking Do 17s bombing Kenley. He was killed and his Hurricane, R 4187, is believed to be that which crashed at The Oaks, Wallington. Connors is buried in North Berwick Cemetery. After his death, the award of a Bar to the DFC was announced (6.9.40), the citation crediting him with twelve enemy aircraft destroyed.

Compton enlisted in the RAF for the duration of hostilities in June 1940, as an Aircrafthand. He went on a radar course at Yatesbury, after which he was posted to 25 Squadron at North Weald about October 10. He flew his first operational sortie on the 21st and been promoted to Sergeant by November 7 1940. No further service details traced.

WILLIAM CHARLES CONNELL C 1159

PO

Pilot

Canadian

111 Squadron

Connors was born on April 8 1912 and educated at St Paul’s School, Darjeeling, India. He was commissioned in the Special Reserve of the RAFR in March 1936. He resigned this commission when the Special Reserve was converted to the AAF.

PO 15.1.27 FO 30.8.28 FL 1.6.32 FL (RAFO) 7.10.34 FL 1.9.39

1157050

234 Squadron

32 Squadron

Born in Tisdale, Saskatoon on November 6 1917, Connell joined the RCAF on October 1 1939 and began his training at Vancouver Aero Club in November, continued at Trenton from February 1940 and at Camp Borden from March. He arrived in England and joined 112 (RCAF) Squadron, a holding unit, on September 8 1940. He went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on the 21st to convert to Hurricanes. Connell joined 32 Squadron at Acklington on October 6. He joined No 1 (RCAF) Squadron from 32 on December 1 1940. In February 1942 he was posted to Malta, flying there in a Sunderland on the 21st. He joined 126 Squadron at Ta Kali, as a Flight Commander. When the first Spitfires arrived on March 8, Connell joined 249 Squadron, also at Ta Kali. On the 11th he damaged a Bf 109, on the 15th he probably destroyed a Ju 88 and on the 26th he destroyed a Ju 88 and damaged another. On April 21 1942 Connell and six other pilots were flown to El Ballah, Egypt in a Wellington, to ferry back new Hurricanes for 229 Squadron. They arrived back in Malta on May 5. Connell damaged a Ju 88 on May 7 and on the 8th he was wounded by a Ju 87 gunner and was evacuated and repatriated to Canada. After serving with 135 (RCAF) and 133 (RCAF) Squadrons, he was posted back to the UK in May 1944. After a refresher course at 61 OTU, Rednal and further training at No 1 Tactical Exercise

PO (RAFR) 26.3.36 PO (AAF) 25.5.36 APO 20.12.37 PO 19.2.38 FO 19.8.39

BRIAN BERTRAM CONSIDINE 79728

PO

Pilot

Irish

238 Squadron

Considine joined the RAFVR in December 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (742748). He did his early flying at 20 E&RFTS, Gravesend. Called up on September 1 1939, he was posted to No 1 ITW at Selwyn College, Cambridge in October.

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Commander and given command of 604 Squadron. He was awarded the DFC (18.5.43). During the night of July 25/26 Constable Maxwell and Quinton damaged a Do 217 over Yorkshire and on August 23 they destroyed a Ju 88 in daylight over the North Sea. Their next victory, a Ju 188, did not come until March 21 1944. During the night of May 15/16 they destroyed another Ju 188, on July 2/3 a Ju 88 and, finally, during the night of July 8/9 a Ju 88 was shot down and a Do 217 probably destroyed. Constable Maxwell went to HQ 85 Group at Uxbridge on July 19 1944, was awarded the DSO (22.9.44) and posted back to 54 OTU, to command the Training Wing. With the war in Europe over, Constable Maxwell asked to be sent to the Far East. He was given command of 84 Squadron at Charra, Bengal but the Japanese surrendered before he led the squadron on operations. With the disbandment of 84 in December 1946, he took command of 60 Squadron in Singapore. Constable Maxwell was posted to England on December 8 1947. On arrival, he took four months of leave and on April 27 1948 he entered Ampleforth Monastery, as a novice, with a leave of absence from the RAF. He stayed at Ampleforth for four years and once having decided to leave, he rejoined the RAF in November 1952. In January 1953 he did a flying refresher course at 22 FTS, Syerston, moved to 209 AFS at Weston Zoyland in March, where he learned to fly Meteors. In July Constable Maxwell was posted to 228 OTU, Leeming, on Meteor NF 11s. After OTU, he was appointed OC Flying at Coltishall, remaining there until January 1956, when he did an instructors’ refresher course at CFS, South Cerney. In April he took command of the Oxford University Air Squadron. In March 1960 Constable Maxwell was given command of RAF Gan, in the Indian Ocean. At the end of the year he returned to the UK, to be Air Liaison Officer to the GOC, Chester, Western Command. In April 1962 Constable Maxwell was posted to Scottish Command, an appointment he held until he retired on June 3 1964, as a Wing Commander. Constable Maxwell died in August 2000. John Quinton left the RAF after the war as a Squadron Leader, but rejoined as a Flight Lieutenant in 1951. On August 13 that year he was a passenger in a Wellington on a training exercise when a mid-air collision occurred over Yorkshire. As the Wellington broke up Quinton clipped the only available parachute to a 16-year-old ATC cadet, Derek Coates and pushed him out of the aircraft. Coates was the only survivor from the two aircraft involved in the collision. Quinton was awarded a posthumous George Cross.

Considine went to 3 FTS, Grantham on November 20 1939, on No 31 Course, which ended on May 10 1940. He joined 238 Squadron direct from 3 FTS on May 14, as it was being reformed at Tangmere. On July 11 Considine shared a Bf 110, on the 13th he destroyed a Bf 110 and shared in the probable destruction of another and on the 21st he probably destroyed a Bf 110. On August 27 he shared a Do 17. He was himself shot down by Bf 109s over Bournemouth on November 5 1940. He baled out, wounded, and his Hurricane, V 6792, crashed at Crab Farm, Shapwick. Considine volunteered for service in Greece on December 6 and he rejoined 238 Squadron, after fully recovering from his wounds, on December 10. In May 1941 238 Squadron was posted to the Middle East. It flew off the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious on June 14 to Malta, refuelled and then flew on to LG 07 in Egypt the next day. Considine himself went by troopship from the UK to Takoradi and on arrival there he was detailed to ferry a Hurricane north, for squadron use in the Western Desert. In January 1942 Considine was posted to 73 OTU, Aden. He later returned to Egypt and then went to a Met Flight in Palestine, flying twice daily in Gladiators to record weather information. He joined 74 Squadron at Mehrabad on January 30 1943, as ‘B’ Flight Commander. He joined 111 Squadron in Malta in June 1943 and moved to Sicily after the invasion. He later joined 173 (Communications) Squadron at Cairo and was with it until December 1944, when he returned to the UK. Considine was posted to 48 Squadron and flew a Dakota, towing a glider, in the Rhine crossing. The squadron flew out to India on February 15 1945 and carried out supply drops in Burma. After his return to the UK in December 1945, Considine was released from the RAF. He flew with Aer Lingus for four years and later went into advertising. Considine died in 1996. PO 12.5.40 FO 12.5.41 FL 12.5.42

MICHAEL HUGH CONSTABLE MAXWELL 36219

FO

Pilot

British

56 Squadron

PO 7.10.39 FO 7.1 40 FL 7.1.41

Constable Maxwell was born at Beauly, Invernessshire on June 3 1917. He was educated at Ampleforth College, Yorkshire and went to Hertford College, Oxford, where he read Modern History.

SL 1.3.42

SL 10.11.46 WC 1.1.52

ALEXANDER NOEL CONSTANTINE 40893

He was a member of the University Air Squadron, as well as being a commissioned officer in the 4th Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders, a territorial unit. In the years preceding the war, Constable Maxwell attended both Army and OUAS camps. In March 1939 he had applied for a Permanent Commission in the RAF as a University Entrant. On August 28 he heard that he had been accepted. Called up at the outbreak of war, he spent a month as an Army Officer but then resigned his commission and reported to 9 FTS, Hullavington on October 10 1939. Constable Maxwell completed his training and was posted to 7 B&GS at Stormy Down in March 1940, for a gunnery course, after which he joined 56 Squadron at North Weald on April 20. On May 27 he shared in the destruction of a He 111 over Dunkirk and was then hit by Belgian anti-aircraft fire. He baled out, was taken to Ostend and returned to England in a trawler. Constable Maxwell was wounded in the leg and foot by cannon shell splinters on June 8, when he was jumped by Bf 109s whilst on a bomber-escort operation. A tyre burst on landing and the aircraft slewed round. He was admitted to Epping Hospital. He rejoined 56 Squadron on July 9. On August 28 1940 he claimed a probable Bf 109, on September 27 he shot down a Do 17 and shared a Bf 110 and on the 30th he made a crash-landing on Chesil Bank, after being in combat with Do 17s and Bf 110s over Portland. The Hurricane, L 1764, was a writeoff but Constable Maxwell was unhurt. On October 7 he probably destroyed a Bf 109. He was posted to 52 OTU, Debden on February 21 1941. In late March he went to CFS for an instructors’ course and then returned to Debden. At the end of July he moved to 60 OTU, East Fortune, to do more instructing but on October 8 he was posted to 604 Squadron at Middle Wallop. He was teamed with Sergeant J Quinton. In March 1942 Constable Maxwell was promoted to Squadron Leader and posted to command the AI Flight at 60 OTU, taking Quinton with him. They were to remain together for over four years. At the end of August 1942 they went to 54 OTU, Charter Hall, where Constable Maxwell was to command ‘B’ Squadron. A return to operations came on December 12 1942, with a posting to 264 Squadron at Colerne, as a Flight Commander. During the night of January 21/22 1943 Constable Maxwell, with Sergeant Quinton as his radar operator, damaged a Do 217 over Deelen airfield and on March 30 a He 111 was shot down in daylight. On April 23 Constable Maxwell was promoted to Acting Wing

FO

Pilot

Australian

141 Squadron

Constantine was born at Moama, New South Wales on December 13 1914. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying on May 16 1938, as a pupil pilot, at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty. He completed his training at 8 FTS, Montrose in March 1939 and was posted to No 1 Air Observers’ School at North Coates, as a staff pilot. He moved to 4 AOS, West Freugh in September, as a staff pilot. Constantine had a period in hospital in October/November 1939 and on recovery, he went to 10 B&GS, Warmwell, again as a staff pilot. He then joined the recently-reformed 141 Squadron at Grangemouth on December 11 1939. He served with 141 throughout the Battle of Britain and was posted away to 23 Squadron at Ford on April 28 1941, to fly Havocs. Constantine did a course at No 1 Blind Approach School at Watchfield in May, after which he was posted to 61 OTU, Heston, as an instructor. In October 1941 he joined 264 Squadron at West Malling, on Defiants. In November 1941 he went to 125 Squadron at Fairwood Common, again on Defiants and in December 1941 he joined 87 Squadron at Colerne, this time to fly Hurricanes. In January 1942 Constantine was posted to India, travelling by sea. He went to Air HQ, New Delhi on arrival, where he was given command of 273 Squadron in Ceylon, defending the ports there. In June 1943 he took command of 136 Squadron at Baigachi, India. On January 15 1944 Constantine destroyed a Mitsubishi A6M-3 and he damaged another, on the 20th destroyed a Nakajima Ki 43, on February 15 another A6M-3 and in March a Nakajima Ki 44. He was posted away soon afterwards to HQ ACSEA, as Wing Commander, Tactics. Constantine returned to the UK in June 1944, to attend the Fighter Leaders’ School at Milfield. He went back to HQ ACSEA in October. In June 1945 he returned to Australia and was briefly at HQ RAAF Airboard, Melbourne before returning to HQ ACSEA, Kandy on August 3 1945. Released from the RAF in December 1946, Constantine returned to Australia and began flying in the former Dutch East Indies area. He was killed on on July 29 1947, during the conflict between Indonesian nationalists and the Dutch colonial power. He was in a Dakota, purchased by supporters of the new Indonesian republic and carrying medicines from Singapore, which crashed on approach to Maguwo. The aircraft had been intercepted by a Dutch Kittyhawk, but the Dutch denied that the Dakota had been fired on and also denied claims that it was carrying Red Cross markings. There was one survivior. Constantine’s wife was amongst those killed. APO 9.7.38 PO 16.5.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.1.44

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ARTHUR WILLSON COOK 131140

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

Promoted to Warrant Officer in June, he returned to operations on October 26, when he joined 264 Squadron at Colerne as Radio Observer to 264’s CO, Wing Commander H M Kent. On May 6 1943 Cook went to Fairwood Common to be RO to the Station Commander, Group Captain Heber-Percy, who had full use of a Mosquito of 307 (Polish) Squadron, stationed there at that time. Cook was posted to 1692 Flight at Drem on October 1 1943, which moved later to Little Snoring.He was injured in an incident on February 15 1944, when his aircraft was shot at by British anti-aircraft guns, after entering a gun-defended area. In August 1944 Cook began training as an Airfield Controller. He was released from the RAF in June 1946, as a Warrant Officer. Cook went into Aircraft Control in civilian life and was on the staff at Heathrow Airport for many years. He retired on January 1 1981. He died in 2004.

604 Squadron

Cook enlisted in the RAFVR at Hartlepool in July 1939, as an Airman u/t Aircrew (758186) and was called up in December. Posted to 3 ITW, Hastings, he was there until April 1940. In June he went on a gunnery course at 5 B&GS, Jurby, Isle of Man, then to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 20, to convert to Blenheims, after which he joined 604 Squadron at Middle Wallop on August 20 1940. Cook remained with the squadron until February 20 1941, when he went to No 1 School of Army Co-operation, Old Sarum. He was posted to the Overseas Air Delivery Flight, Kemble on April 26 and from July 14 to September 12 1941 Cook served with 216 Squadron at Heliopolis and 223 Squadron at Shandur. After a short spell with 69 (General Reconnaissance) Squadron in Malta, he joined 1437 Strategical Reconnaissance Unit in Libya on November 30 1941, later serving with it in Sicily, Italy and Persia. Cook was awarded the DFM (2.6.42) for a sortie over Benghazi. His Baltimore was attacked by six enemy fighters. Although his gun was rendered useless by icing conditions and he was in grave danger from enemy fire, Cook gave cool and skilful instructions to his pilot and endeavoured to take photographs of the enemy aircraft. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in July 1942, Cook returned to the UK in November 1943 and after a Specialist Armament Course at Manby, he became an Armament Officer at Morpeth in May 1944. He was appointed Station Armament Officer at RAF Dalcross in January 1945. Cook was released from the RAF in December 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1990.

CHARLES ALFRED COOKE 43634

Pilot

British

British

66 Squadron

Cooke was posted to 3 FTS, South Cerney on August 22 1936 and with training completed, he joined 213 Squadron at Northolt on April 25 1937. He was commissioned on April 1 1940 and joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on the 8th. On May 13 1940 six Spitfires of the squadron, with six Defiants of 264 acting as rear cover, were to assist in the evacuation of Queen Wilhelmina from Rotterdam. After a dawn take-off, the Spitfires arrived at Rotterdam without incident, just as a force of Ju 87s, escorted by Bf 109s, began dive-bombing the city. The pre-arranged plan with the Defiants was quickly forgotten and the Spitfires went for the Ju 87s. Cooke shot one down in flames and damaged another. He pursued a third one down to ground level and it crashed into a haystack and blew up. Cooke climbed back up to 12000 feet and joined what he thought were two Spitfires but on discovering that they were Bf 109s, Cooke, low on fuel and out of ammunition, climbed into cloud and headed for base. As he broke cloud over the Thames Estuary, the anti-aircraft guns opened up on him, fortunately without result. On July 10 Cooke shared in destroying a Do17 and on August 20 he destroyed a Bf 110 and on the 21st he damaged a Do 17. On September 4 Cooke claimed to have probably destroyed three Bf 109s. On this day, in combat with a Bf 109 over Ashford, Cooke was shot down. He baled out at 20,000 feet, with burns to face and hands. His abandoned aircraft exploded almost immediately afterwards. Cooke made a delayed drop to 8000 feet, finally landing in the top of a poplar tree in a wood at Ham Street. The Spitfire, R 6689, crashed on the crossroads at Chequertree Farm, Aldington. After rejoining the squadron on September 21, Cooke assumed command of ‘B’ Flight on October 5 and was promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant on the 18th. On October 13 Cooke probably destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 27th he damaged two Bf 110s. He was posted away to 312 Squadron at Speke on November 30 1940 and took command of ‘A’ Flight. In December 1941 Cooke took command of 264 Squadron at Colerne. He destroyed a Ju 88 in the early hours of July 31 1942, which crashed at Malvern Wells, Worcestershire. At the end of his tour, he was awarded the DFC (13.10.42). After the war Cooke stayed in the RAF, in the Secretarial Branch. He was a graduate of the Staff College and retired on July 11 1958, as a Squadron Leader. He died on January 28 1985 in Douglas, Isle of Man and was cremated.

HARRY COOK Sgt

Pilot

Cooke was born on June 7 1912. He joined the RAF about May 1936, as a direct-entry Airman u/t Pilot (580219). He began his elementary training on June 8 1936, as a pupil pilot. He went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on August 4, where he was formally enlisted.

PO 16.7.42 FO 16.1.43 FL 16.7.44

126096

PO

266 and 66 Squadrons

In July 1939 Cook joined the RAFVR, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754199). He began his elementary flying training on August 6. Called up on September 1, he was posted to 3 ITW, Hastings in October, after which he continued his training at 3 EFTS, Hamble and 14 FTS, at Kinloss and Cranfield, on No 7 Course, which ran from April 28 to August 3 1940. Cook was awarded his flying badge on June 21 1940, completed the course and went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 4. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 266 Squadron at Wittering on August 26. He moved to 66 Squadron at Kenley on September 12. Cook shared a He 111 on the 15th, claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on the 24th, a Bf 110 destroyed and another damaged on the 27th, another Bf 109 on the 30th and a Bf 109 damaged on October 8. He made a crash-landing at Hornchurch on October 13, following a combat with Bf 109s over Maidstone. His Spitfire, X 4543, was written off but Cook was unhurt. On October 11 Cook damaged a Bf 109 and on November 26 he claimed another Bf 109 destroyed. In early 1941 Cook was posted to 7 OTU, as an instructor. Later in the year he was with 234 Squadron at Ibsley, served as a pilot with the MSFU in 1942 and in 1943 he was with 41 Squadron. On one early morning patrol, Cook surprised a German destroyer, which, after one burst of cannon fire, turned and ran on to rocks. Commissioned in June 1942, Cook had three confirmed victories, three probables and four damaged. He also destroyed a V1, a train, two armoured vehicles and twenty other types of vehicle. He was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. PO 18.6.42 FO 18.12.42 FL 18.6.44

PO 1.4.40 FO 5.1.41 FL 5.1.42 SL 1.8.47

ROBERT VINCENT COOK 755328

Sgt

Air Gunnerv British

HERBERT REGINALD COOKE

219 Squadron

161352 Cook was born on January 2 1921. He joined the RAFVR at Southend on March 10 1939, as an Airman u/t Air Gunner. He was called up at the outbreak of war and posted to RAF Jurby on November 13, for an air gunnery course.

Sgt Air Gunner

British

23 Squadron

Cooke joined 601 Squadron, AAF in October 1938, as an Aircrafthand (801516) for four years. He was called up on August 24 1939 and later remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner.

On May 20 1940 Cook joined 219 Squadron at Catterick and served with it throughout the Battle of Britain. When the squadron was re-equipped with Beaufighters, Cook retrained as a Radio Observer. On November 22 1941 his aircraft attacked and damaged a Do 217 in the late evening. Cook was posted away from 219 to the Telecom Flying Unit at Hurn/Defford on February 25 1942.

He was with 23 Squadron at Collyweston in June 1940 and served with the squadron in the Battle of Britain. Commissioned in March 1943, Cooke was awarded the DFC (10.12.43), as a Warrant Officer with 619 Squadron, operating in Lancasters, from Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire. The citation stated that he had taken part in a very large number of sorties. During an

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MEN OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

He was posted to 3 FTS, Grantham for flying training and with the course completed he joined 33 Squadron at Bicester on March 27 1932. In October 1933 he went to the School of Naval Co-operation. In April 1935 Coope was given a staff job at No 1 Air Defence Group, London. He became Assistant Air Attaché in Berlin on November 12 1935 and held the post until January 1939, when he went as a supernumerary to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge. Coope commanded 87 Squadron from April 4 1939 and took the squadron to France at the outbreak of war. On November 14 1939 Coope and Pilot Officer R L Glyde of 87, in two Hurricanes, made a forced-landing in Belgium and they were interned. They escaped on the 24th and, with the help of the British Consulate, made their way back to France in civilian clothes and rejoined 87 Squadron on the 27th. Coope was posted to 52 Wing in France on December 12 1939. He later returned to England and he joined A 13 of the Directorate of Intelligence at the Air Ministry on May 30 1940. He was a friend of 17 Squadron’s CO, Squadron Leader C W Williams, and he spent a week or so with the squadron from August 25 1940 ‘for some flying practice’. Between the 26th and 31st Coope flew thirteen operational sorties with the squadron. Williams had been killed in action on the afternoon of the 25th, the day Coope arrived at the squadron. Coope wrote a personal tribute to him that was published in The Times on October 8. In this he said how he and Williams had sat and chatted on that fateful day until 17 Squadron was scrambled. It seems that Coope took the decision to fly operationally only after Williams’ death. At no time, on any sortie, did he lead the squadron, a flight or a section. His motivation may have been to avenge his friend. In early 1941 Coope became Wing Commander Flying at Wittering. On a Channel patrol on April 15, he was shot down in Spitfire P 7901 by Adolf Galland of JG 26. Coope was killed on June 4 1941, leading 266 Squadron on a sweep. Ten miles SE of Dover his Spitfire, P 8034, suddenly broke away, turned on to its back and spun down. No parachute was seen and it was presumed that Coope had lost consciousness due to oxygen failure. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 28.

attack on Kassel Cooke saw an aircraft being attacked by a fighter. He informed his captain and they were able to shoot the enemy aircraft down. Cooke was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flying Officer, and he died in 1994. PO 29.3.43 FO 23.3.44

ROBERT JOHNSON COOMBS 60324

Sgt

Pilot

British

600 Squadron

Coombs was born at Brockley, London in 1912 and educated at the secondary school there. He went to work for Shell. He later worked for Armstrong-Whitworth and in 1939 he was a planning engineer with Folland Aircraft. In May 1932 Coombs joined 600 Squadron, AAF at Hendon, as a fitter-armourer (800278). He completed his four year term of service and he then joined the RAFVR on January 25 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740029). Coombs went for a two-month ab initio course at 12 E&RFTS at Prestwick, from January 25 to March 26 1937. He continued his training afterwards at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham from May 1 to August 4 1937 and when he moved to Southampton in August 1937 he did his flying at 3 E&RFTS, Hamble from August 5 to September 4 1937. Called up at the outbreak of war, Coombs was posted to 5 FTS, Sealand on October 8 1939 and after completing his training on January 26 1940 he rejoined his old Squadron, 600, at Manston on February 10. He was with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. Commissioned in January 1941, he was posted away on August 14, to be an instructor at 51 OTU, Cranfield. Coombs returned to operations on April 8 1943, when he joined 151 Squadron at Wittering, moving to 157 Squadron at Hunsdon on November 1 1943. With another Mosquito, Coombs carried out a patrol from Predannack to Cape Ortegal and Ferrol on February 19 1944. Over the Bay of Biscay they encountered a Ju 290 transport, which they attacked and shot down into the sea. Debris from the enemy aircraft hit Coombs’ port radiator and his engine seized, leaving him to return hundreds of miles across the sea on one engine, with both wings damaged by return fire. On March 12 1944 Coombs was posted to 487 Squadron at Hunsdon. On a night antirail sortie on August 5 to Nantes/La Roche/La Rochelle, his aircraft was hit in the starboard engine by flak. Unable to jettison his bombs and with his starboard engine overheating, he and his Navigator, Flying Officer W Judson, baled out at 8000 feet. Sheltered by local people and aided by the French Resistance, they eventually reached the American lines at Nantes on October 1 and returned to England on the 6th. His tour completed, Coombs joined No 1 Ferry Unit at Pershore on October 17 1944, engaged in ferrying four-engined aircraft. He remained with the unit until August 20 1945, was awarded the DFC (29.6.45) and was released from the RAF in 1947, as a Flight Lieutenant. Coombs rejoined the RAFVR, serving at 18 FTS, Fair Oaks from December 2 1947 to November 8 1952. He was Secretary of the 600 Squadron Association until his death in December 1957.

PO (RAFO) 21.3.30 PO 24.10.31 FO 24.4.32 FL 24.10.35 SL 1.10.38

CHARLES FREDERICK COOPER 1003497

Pilot

British

56 Squadron

Cooney was born in Warwick on April 10 1914 and educated at Birmingham Junior Technical School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in January 1930 and passed out in December 1932, as a Metal Rigger.

155877

Pilot

British

Sgt

Wop/AG

British

235 Squadron

Cooper was born in Hockley, Essex on July 28 1917 and educated at Hockley Council School. After leaving, he went to work as a butcher. In April 1939 he joined the Aircraft Crew Section of the RAFVR at Southend, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (747756). Called up on September 1, Cooper joined 235 Squadron at Manston in October. In February 1940 he was sent for further training to No 2 Electrical and Wireless School and he rejoined 235, then at Bircham Newton, on August 13. Cooper went to 272 Squadron on November 26 1940. When the squadron was re-equipped with Beaufighters, the air gunners were posted away and Cooper joined 240 Squadron at Stranraer on March 22 1941, a Catalina unit. On September 1 1942 he went to 205 Squadron, again on Catalinas, and completed his first tour. Commissioned in June 1943, Cooper returned to operations on May 9 1944, posted to 230 Squadron, equipped with Sunderland flying boats, as Signals Leader. He left the squadron on December 10 1945 and on May 6 1946 he went to 4 (Coastal) OTU, again as Signals Leader. Cooper later served with 206 and 99 Squadrons and when he retired from the RAF in

WILLIAM EDWIN COOPE SL

600 Squadron

DOUGLAS CLIFFORD COOPER

Cooney later successfully applied for pilot training and he passed out as a SergeantPilot. He was with 56 Squadron at North Weald by September 1 1939. On January 29 1940 Cooney made a forced-landing at Playford, Suffolk in Hurricane L 1984. He was admitted to East Suffolk and Ipswich Hospital, with injuries. The squadron operated for short periods from French airfields during the Battle of France. On May 22 1940 Cooney shared in the probable destruction of an Hs 126 over Hesdin, with Pilot Officer B J Wicks, and over Dunkirk on the 27th he claimed a probable Bf 110. On July 29 1940 Cooney was shot down and killed by a Bf 109. His Hurricane, P 3879, crashed and exploded in the Channel off Dover. He was 26 and his name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 10.

05201

British

He was a member of the crew of Blenheim L 4905, which had engine failure during a routine patrol in the early hours of October 3 1940. It crashed into trees on high ground at Broadstone Warren, Forest Row, Sussex in heavy rain. The pilot, Pilot Officer C A Hobson, Sergeant D E Hughes, gunner and Cooper were killed. Cooper is buried in Holy Trinity churchyard, Heath Town, Wolverhampton. He was 20 years old. He was one of a number of aircrew, who flew operationally in the Battle of Britain without rank or flying badge.

CECIL JOHN COONEY F/Sgt

Radar Operator

Cooper, of Wolverhampton, joined the RAF in June 1940, as an Aircrafthand. He volunteered for aircrew and after a short radar course he was posted to 600 Squadron at Redhill on September 26 1940.

PO 15.1.41 FO 15.1.42 FL 15.1.43 FO (RAFVR) 2.12.47

564567

AC2

17 Squadron

Coope was educated at Manchester Grammar School and went on to Oriel College, Oxford, where he read Modern Languages. He was a member of the University Air Squadron in 1930 and was commissioned in the RAFO in March 1930. Coope relinquished this when he was granted a Permanent Commission in thr RAF, as a University Entrant, on October 24 1931.

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1954 he was a Flight Lieutenant, Signals leader with 192 Squadron at Watton. Cooper settled in Western Australia. He died there on August 7 2006.

Commissioned from Warrant Officer in March 1945, Cooper was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flying Officer.

PO 9.6.43 FO 9.12.43 FL 9.6.45 FL 9.12.46

PO 3.3.45 FO 3.9.45

JOHN ENERTON COOPER

ASTON MAURICE COOPER-KEY

745777

40802

Sgt

Pilot

British

610 Squadron

PO

Pilot

British

46 Squadron

Cooper, of Luton, joined the RAFVR in April 1939 and did his weekend flying at 29 E&RFTS, Luton. Called to full-time service on September 1, he was posted to 4 ITW, Bexhill in November.

Cooper-Key went to Sherborne School and joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio course on April 4 1938, as a pupil pilot. He went to 5 FTS, Sealand on June 18, for No 37 Course.

On April 30 1940 Cooper went to 15 EFTS, Redhill. He moved to 15 FTS, Brize Norton on June 17 and then to 15 AFTS, Chipping Norton on August 11. On September 23 Cooper went to 7 OTU, Hawarden, to convert to Spitfires. On October 6 He joined 610 Squadron, Acklington. On October 27 Cooper became separated from his section on an evening flight and in failing light and bad conditions, he went down low to get his bearings. He lost R/T contact, climbed, then went into a spin. He baled out and landed unhurt. Cooper was posted from 610 to 602 Squadron at Westhampnett on December 14 1940 and joined it on the 16th. He was killed on September 9 1941, as a Sergeant with 91 Squadron. His Spitfire dived into the sea off Dungeness while escorting a Walrus on an ASR exercise. Cooper is buried in Luton Church Burial Ground.

With training completed on January 14 1939, he was posted to 23 Squadron at Wittering on January 14. He was detached to RAF Locking on October 22 1939 for a parachute course, rejoining his squadron on the 29th. Cooper-Key was posted away to 46 Squadron at Digby on June 20 1940. On July 24 he was on an AA co-operation flight over Derby. He was killed when he crashed on a railway embankment W of Peartree Station, attempting a forcedlanding in Hurricane P 2685. Cooper-Key was thrown clear and killed instantly. The aircraft burned out. He was 21 and he is buried in Scopwick Church Burial Ground, Lincolnshire. APO 4.6.38 PO 4.4.39

THOMAS PAUL MICHAEL COOPER-SLIPPER 41555

FO

Pilot

British

605 Squadron

ROY NORMAN COOPER 188171

Sgt

Pilot

British

610 and 65 Squadrons

Cooper-Slipper was born on January 11 1921 at Kinver, Staffordshire, grandson of the vicar. He was at King Edward VI School at Stourbridge and was a candidate for an RAF short service commission after leaving school in September 1938.

Cooper, of Portsmouth, joined the RAFVR in July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758092). Called up on September 1, he completed his flying training and arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 23 1940.

He began his ab initio course at 12 E&RFTS, Prestwick on October 31, as a pupil pilot. Cooper-Slipper went to No 1 RAF Depot; Uxbridge for a short disciplinary course on January 14 1939 and on the 28th was posted to 9 FTS, Hullavington. With training completed, he went to No 5 Armament Training Station, Penrhos on September 4 1939 and he joined 74 Squadron on the 7th. Cooper-Slipper was detached from 74 on September 19 to 11 Group Pool, St Athan, for further training. He rejoined 74 on October 24 1939. He was posted to 2 Ferry Pilot Pool, Filton on December 11 he was with it until March 9 1940, when he went to 605 Squadron, Wick. On May 21 1940 the squadron went south to Hawkinge. On the 22nd Cooper-Slipper shared a He 111, on the 25th he destroyed a Ju 87 and on the 26th a Ju 88. The squadron then went up to Drem and was there until September 7, when it moved to Croydon. On the 8th Cooper-Slipper destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged a Do 17, on the 11th he damaged a He 111, on the 12th shared a Do 17 and on the 15th he destroyed a Do 17 by ramming. His aircraft had been hit by return fire during the attack on German bombers. He lost control and collided amidships with the Do 17 over Marden, losing his own port wing. Cooper-Slipper baled out and was slightly injured landing at Church Farm, Marden. His Hurricane, L 2012, crashed at The Leas, Yalding. On September 27 he damaged a Bf 109. He was awarded the DFC (26.11.40). On November 13 1940 he was posted away to CFS, Upavon, for an instructor’s course. In February 1941 he was posted to a Naval Flying School, as an instructor, and in July he went to 60 OTU, East Fortune. In September 1941 Cooper-Slipper was posted to 96 Squadron at Cranage, as a Flight Commander. He moved to 74 Squadron at Acklington in October and in November joined 135 Squadron, then preparing to go to Burma. When the squadron reached Singapore, Cooper-Slipper and several other pilots were held back, to fly with 232 Squadron against the Japanese. On January 22 1942 he destroyed two G3M bombers. After a few days in hospital, he flew a number of sorties, during which he probably destroyed three more Japanese bombers. When Singapore fell Cooper-Slipper escaped via Palembang, was a prisoner of the Japanese for one day, eventually reached Batavia, where he was severely injured by a bomb. He went by hospital ship to Ceylon, then to Bombay. He spent six months in hospital in Poona and Pietermaritzburg. South Africa. Fit again, he was posted to the Middle East as Chief Test Pilot at 103 MU at RAF Aboukir and CO of the Special Performance Spitfire Flight. This entailed local development of the Spitfire for PR work, low-altitude high speed Tac R for 40 (SAAF) Squadron, high-altitude interception of Ju 88 photographic aircraft and latterly Ju 188s at high speed at 30,000 feet. Cooper-Slipper had two combats, at 44,100 feet and 30,000 feet, damaging a Ju 188. He returned to the UK at the end of 1944 and became Chief Test Pilot at RAF Lichfield.

After converting to Spitfires, he joined 610 Squadron at Acklington on October 6 1940. He moved to 65 Squadron at Turnhouse on the 12th. Commissioned from Warrant Officer in July 1944, Cooper was killed on October 28 1945, as a Flying Officer with the Anti-Locust Flight. He was 29 and is buried in the European Cemetery, Jinja Road, Kampala, Uganda. PO 18.7.44 FO 18.1.45

SYDNEY FREDERICK COOPER 174121

Sgt

Pilot

British

253 Squadron

Cooper was born on July 14 1916. He joined the RAFVR in July 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741840) and was fully-trained when called up on September 1 1939. With other VR pilots, Cooper was attached to the FAA at Donibristle, where he did a deck-landing course with Gladiators on HMS Furious. The pilots were offered the chance to transfer to the FAA but most declined and were posted back to the RAF, Cooper among them. He arrived at 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on October 30 1939, converted to Hurricanes and then joined 253 Squadron at Manston on December 12. Cooper was shot down in combat on August 30. His Hurricane, P 2631, crashed near Biddenden and was written off but he was unhurt. He damaged a Do 17 over Brooklands on December 3 1940. Commissioned from Warrant Officer on June 28 1943, Cooper stayed on in the RAF, was awarded the AFC (10.6.48) and retired on June 29 1958, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1994. PO 28.6.43

FO 28.12.43

FL 28.6.45 FL 28.12.46

THOMAS ARTHUR COOPER 196692

Sgt

Pilot

British

266 and 92 Squadrons

Cooper was born in 1920. He joined the RAFVR about May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748252). Called up on September 1, he carried out his elementary flying at 29 EFTS. He completed his training at 5 FTS, Sealand, on No 49 Course, which ran from June 16 to September 7 1940. Cooper arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on the 7th and, after converting to Spitfires, he joined 266 Squadron at Wittering on September 30. He was posted to 92 Squadron on October 13.

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PERCY COPELAND

He was released from the RAF in mid-1946, emigrated to Canada in 1947 and became a Test Pilot with Avro Canada in 1948. In 1949 Cooper-Slipper was Captain on development of the Avro Jet Liner, in 1950 Captain of the Orenda Lancaster and he started flying the Orenda-engined F86 Sabre, in 1951 he started flying the CF 100 fighter and in 1955 was made Chief Test Pilot of Orenda Engines. In 1957 Cooper-Slipper completed the USAF Commanders’ Course on B 47 aircraft and then did several hundred hours’ development flying of the Iroquois engine on a B 47 loaned to the RCAF. Cooper-Slipper finished his flying career in 1959. He died in Canada on February 23 2004. APO 14.1.39 PO 3.9.39

108956

Sgt

British

British

616, 66 and 73 Squadrons

Over Dunkirk on June 1 he damaged a He 111. On August 26 he was shot down in a surprise attack by a Bf 109. He made a forced-landing in Spitfire K 9827 and it burned out at Crundale House Farm, Wye. Copeland was wounded and admitted to Ashford Hospital. On September 27 he claimed a Bf 109 probably destroyed and two others damaged. On October 14 1940 he was posted to 66 Squadron at West Malling, moving ten days later to 73 Squadron at Castle Camps. Copeland joined 151 Squadron at Digby on November 7. On the 9th he and Flying Officer K H Blair intercepted a Do 17 on a pre-dawn sortie over the east coast, off Skegness. Although they claimed it as destroyed, it reached Gilze-Rijen, with two of the crew wounded. On the night of May 10/11 1941 Copeland destroyed a He 111, in a Defiant of 151. The enemy aircraft crashed at Upchurch, Kent. Commissioned in November 1941, Copeland was posted to the Middle East in early 1942 and he served with 250 Squadron from April 8 1942, as a Flight Commander. On May 15 Copeland’s aircraft was damaged by flak and he was obliged to make a forced-landing in the desert. He rejoined the squadron next day. On June 15 he destroyed two SM 79s 130 miles N of Gambut. They were attacking a convoy, en route to Malta. On June 26 he was flying one of three Kittyhawks of the squadron, as part of an escort for Bostons W of Matruh. The Kittyhawks were attacked by Mc 202s. Copeland failed to return from this operation. He was then a Flight Lieutenant. He was awarded the DFC (27.7.43). He was 25 and his name is on the Alamein Memorial, Column 247.

FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.7.44

Radar Operator

Pilot

Copeland joined the RAFVR about July 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740491). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training and joined 616 Squadron at Leconfield in early 1940.

LEONARD EDWARD MORGAN COOTE 138415

Sgt

600 Squadron

Coote, of Chiswick, joined the RAFVR in May/June 1940, as an Aircrafthand (1002930). He volunteered for aircrew duties and after a short radar course at Yatesbury, he joined 600 Squadron at Manston on July 18 1940, as an Aircraftsman. He was a Sergeant by October 28 1940. Commissioned in October 1942, he was killed on October 3 1943, as a Flying Officer with 46 Squadron, then operating in the Middle East. He was in a Beaufighter lost during an attack on a convoy off Kos. W A Cuddie (qv) was lost in the same aircraft. Coote is remembered on the Alamein Memorial, Column 267. At some time he had undergone plastic surgery at the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

PO 10.11.41

PO 13.10.42 FO 13.3.43

JACK HARRY HAMILTON COPEMAN 41257

RICHARD COPCUTT 581146

Sgt

Observer

British

PO

Pilot

248 Squadron

He damaged a Bf 109 on July 19 1940 and shared in destroying a Ju 88 on the 31st. Copeman was shot down and killed in a combat off Margate on August 11. His Hurricane, P 3105, crashed into the Channel. He was 27 and is buried in Middlekerke Cemetery, Belgium.

He was a member of the crew of Blenheim P 6952, detailed to carry out a reconnaissance off the South-West coast of Norway on October 20 1940. After engaging and shooting down a Do 215, the Blenheim was attacked by three Bf 109s. One engine was knocked out and the cockpit filled with smoke. The captain, Pilot Officer G M Baird, got down to low level, flying blind and skimming the sea, feeling for the surface, at a speed of 150 mph. The aircraft struck the sea and the silence was complete, as the fuselage filled with water. Baird freed himself and opened the hatch. He then managed to float out the unconscious Sergeant D L Burton but was unable to rescue Copcutt, also unconscious, before the aircraft sank. Copcutt was 20. His death was confirmed on November 4 1940. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 13.

APO 29.10.38 PO 29.8.39

GEORGE HENRY CORBETT 81366

PO

Wop/AG

British

Pilot

Canadian

66 Squadron

Corbett was born in Saskatchewan on November 4 1919. His parents emigrated from Britain in 1914. The family moved to British Columbia in 1929. Corbett graduated from High School in 1935 and soon afterwards went with his family to England.

NORMAN DOWNEY COPELAND Sgt

111 Squadron

Copeman joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying on August 29 1938, as a pupil pilot. With training completed, he was with 111 Squadron at Northolt at the outbreak of war.

Copcutt, of Whetstone, Middlesex, joined the RAF about March 1939, as a direct-entry Airman u/t Observer. He completed his training and joined 248 Squadron at North Coates, probably in mid-March 1940. He was posted to No 1 (C) OTU, Silloth on May 21 and after receiving further training, he rejoined 248, then at Dyce, on June 25.

54595

British

235 Squadron

Joined the RAF on March 16 1938, as an Aircrafthand (610168). After initial training, Copeland was posted to No 1 Electrical and Wireless School at Cranwell for a wireless operators’ course, after which he joined 23 Squadron at Wittering. He later remustered as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. Copeland was sent to RAF Manby for an air gunnery course and after qualifying, he returned to the squadron. On May 23 1940 Copeland was posted to 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton. He went with his flight to Aldergrove on November 19, where it combined with a flight from 236 Squadron to reform 272 Squadron. Copeland joined 404 (RCAF) Squadron at Thorney Island on May 25 1941. He was posted to Canada on April 7 1942, to be an instructor at 31 OTU, Wibert, Nova Scotia. He returned to the UK in late November 1943 and went to 12 AGS, Bishopscourt, Northern Ireland. Commissioned in December 1943, Copeland was posted to 13 AGS, Ballah, Egypt in late May 1944 but soon after arriving, he was sent to Quastina, Palestine. After the end of the war, he went to Pamanzi Island in the Comoro Islands group in the Indian Ocean. Copeland was repatriated from there in December 1945 and released in January 1946.

He was enrolled in the de Havilland Aircraft Construction School at Hatfield. Corbett joined the RAFVR about November 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740859). When war broke out he was in Canada on a two months’ visit, which he cut short and returned to England. He went to 9 FTS, Hullavington, for No 17 Course, which ran from March 7 to June 29 1940. Corbett went to 5 OTU, Aston Down on July 6 and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 66 Squadron at Coltishall on the 26th. After probably destroying a Bf 109 on September 9, Corbett was himself shot down by Bf 109s over East Grinstead. His Spitfire, N 3049, is believed to have crashed at Cowden after he baled out, slightly injured. He was sent on seven days sick leave next day. On September 27 Corbett claimed a Ju 88 destroyed. During the action, his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and he made a crash-landing near Orpington, unhurt. Corbett was killed on October 8 1940, shot down by Bf 109s. His Spitfire, R 6779, crashed and burned out on Bayford Marshes, Upchurch. He is buried in St Mary’s churchyard extension, Upchurch, Kent.

PO 29.12.43 FO 29.6.44 FL 29.12.45

PO 6.7.40

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VAUGHAN BOWERMAN CORBETT

HORACE ARTHUR CORDELL

C 299

100598

FL

Pilot

Canadian

1 (RCAF) Squadron

Sgt

Pilot

British

64 and 616 Squadrons

Born on March 24 1911 at Toronto, Corbett joined the RCAF Auxiliary on December 30 1935. He arrived in the UK with No 1 (RCAF) Squadron on June 20 1940. On July 5 he was detached to RAF Uxbridge for an R/T course. He rejoined the squadron on the 9th.

Cordell was born on March 23 1915 in London and worked in his father’s bakery business. He joined the RAFVR about July 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (758227) and flew at No 1 E&RFTS, Hatfield.

On August 26 he damaged a Do 17. Corbett was shot down in combat with Bf 109s over Cranbrook on August 31. He baled out, with burns, and landed near Wittersham level crossing. His Hurricane, P 3869, crashed and burned out at Biddenden. He was declared non-effective sick and posted to 112 (RCAF) Squadron, which served as a holding unit. He did not rejoin his own squadron until November 18 1940. On January 1 1941 Corbett was posted to 2 (RCAF) Squadron at Digby, as a Flight Commander. He took command of the unit in April 1941. It had been re-numbered as 402 (RCAF) Squadron on March 1 1941. On a Blenheim-escort to raid the power station at Mazingarbe on September 27 1941, Corbett shared in destroying a Bf 109. When his tour ended, he was awarded the DFC (13.2.42) and on July 16 1942 he was repatriated to Canada. Corbett was killed in a flying accident on February 20 1945, as a Group Captain. He is buried in St James’ Cemetery, Toronto.

Called up on September 1, Cordell continued his training at No 1 EFTS, Hatfield from March 29 1940, moved to 9 EFTS, Ansty on June 10 and then went to 8 FTS, Montrose on June 20. With training completed, he arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden on September 20 1940, to convert to Spitfires. He joined 64 Squadron at Leconfield on the 30th. Cordell moved to 616 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on October 13 and remained with it until November 18 1940, when he joined 602 Squadron at Westhampnett. Next day Cordell escaped injury, when his Spitfire overturned after landing on a muddy area of the airfield. On March 16 1941 he joined 54 Squadron at North Weald and on June 22 Cordell went to 74 Squadron at Gravesend. He was posted to 56 OTU on July 7, as an instructor, and was commissioned there. Cordell joined 91 Squadron at Lympne on December 9 1942 and then went to the MSFU at Speke on January 21 1943. He made no operational launchings during his time at sea. He was posted away to CGS, Sutton Bridge on August 8 1943, for a Pilot Gunnery Instructors’ course, after which he went to 10 Group Practice Camp on September 30. Cordell was posted to RAF Castletown on March 29 1944, as Sector Gunnery Officer. He was at 5 (P) AFU at Chetwynd and Ternhill from July 4 1944, as a Gunnery Instructor and was then attached to 11 (P) AFU at Wrexham from March 7 to April 7 1945. Cordell was released from the RAF in 1947, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died on July 24 1998 and is buried in South Petherton Cemetery, Somerset.

WILLIAM JAMES CORBIN 126536

Sgt

Pilot

British

74, 66 and 610 Squadrons

Corbin was born in Kent on August 5 1920 and was educated at St Michael’s School, Maidstone. He joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (754013) and did his weekend flying at 23 E&RFTS, Rochester. Called up on September 1, he completed his elementary training and then moved to 14 FTS, Kinloss, for No 7 Course, which ran from April 28 to August 3 1940. On the 10th Corbin arrived at 7 OTU, Hawarden, for conversion to Spitfires. He joined 74 Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey on the 26th but on the 29th moved to 66 Squadron at Coltishall. When the squadron went south to Kenley soon afterwards, Corbin remained behind, to complete his training. He rejoined 66 at Kenley on September 7 but three days later he was posted to 610 Squadron at Acklington. Six weeks later, on October 24, Corbin was posted back to 66 Squadron, then at Gravesend. He remained with 66 until September 21 1941, when he went to 53 OTU, Llandow, as an instructor in the Gunnery Flight. During his operational tour, Corbin probably destroyed a He 111, damaged two Bf 109s and damaged aircraft and installations on the ground during daylight sweeps over Northern France. Promoted to Warrant Officer in May 1942, Corbin was commissioned in June. He returned to operations in September 1942, joining 72 Squadron at Ayr. The squadron was about to go to North Africa. On November 8 it was at Gibraltar and on the 16th flew to Maison Blanche, Algiers. He was posted away on June 8 1943, the end of his second tour. Whilst with 72 he claimed two Bf 109s probably destroyed and two others and a FW 190 damaged in the air; two Bf 109s and two Mc 202s destroyed or damaged on the ground, 14 lorries destroyed or damaged and an MTB sunk in Tunis Bay and another two badly damaged. He was awarded the DFC (27.7.43). Corbin reached the UK in July 1943 and in August he was posted to the Gunnery Flight at 57 OTU, Eshott. In April 1944 he was appointed Chief Instructor at 11 Armament Practice Camp, Fairwood Common. Released from the RAF in December 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant, Corbin rejoined the RAFVR in March 1948 and served until 1952. Corbin was a teacher after the war and a prominent Freemason. The Corbin Business Park, Maidstone was named in his honour in 2008. He died on December 8 2012.

PO 19.6.41 FO 19.6.42 FL 19.6.43

DOUGLAS FREDERICK CORFE 810075

Air Gunner

British

British

73, 610 and 66 Squadrons

In 1936 Corfe joined the AAF (810075), to serve on the ground staff of the newly-formed 610 Squadron at Hooton Park. When the AAF introduced its own scheme to train NCO pilots in October 1938, Corfe remustered as an LAC Airman u/t Pilot with 610 Squadron. He was mobilised on August 24 1939 and posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on October 7, on No 42 Course, which ran from October 9 1939 to March 23 1940. Corfe completed his training and rejoined 610 Squadron, then at Wittering, as a Sergeant-Pilot. He was posted to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on April 28 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he went to PDC, Uxbridge on May 15, for allocation to a squadron in France. He joined 73 Squadron at Gaye. On July 25 he rejoined 610 Squadron, then based at Biggin Hill. Corfe claimed a Bf 109 damaged on August 14, he damaged another on the 15th and he was shot down in flames on the 22nd, during a combat with Bf 109s over Folkestone and baled out. His Spitfire, R 6995, crashed and burned out at Hawkinge. He was unhurt. Corfe was posted to 66 Squadron at Kenley on September 10. He destroyed a Bf 109 on the 14th. He was again shot down by Bf 109s on the 18th, this time over the Canterbury area, in Spitfire R 6603. Corfe baled out and was admitted to Chartham Hospital, with injuries. The aircraft crashed at Denge Wood, Petham. He was posted from 66 Squadron to RAF Biggin Hill on the 18th, as non-effective sick. He did not rejoin the squadron for several months. In April 1941 Corfe was with 229 Squadron at Speke. The squadron embarked on the carrier HMS Furious in May, en route for the Middle East. On the 21st six Hurricanes were flown to Malta, leaving for Mersa Matruh later the same day. The Furious could not dispatch the remaining Hurricanes of 229, having been too long in hostile waters. It returned to Gibraltar, sailed again in early June and 229 flew off to Malta on the 6th. The Hurricane IIs were left in Malta and the 229 pilots took Mark Is on to Mersa Matruh the next day. Pending the arrival of squadron ground crews, the 229 pilots were attached to 73, 6 and 208 Squadrons in the Western Desert for operations. On April 19 1942 Corfe flew one of six Hurricanes IIcs from Gambut the 720 miles across the sea to Malta, to join the nineteen other Hurricanes of 229, which had arrived in two groups, on March 27 and April 6. On April 25 1942 Corfe, with five other Hurricanes, was sent to intercept Ju 88s, Ju 87s and Bf 109s over St Paul’s Bay. He became separated from the other Hurricanes and was attacked by four Bf 109s. Corfe broke away and raced for cover between some hills. He was then hit by local ground fire, losing part of his wing. The Hurricane, BE 708, crashed into rocks and exploded on impact, killing Corfe. At the time of his death, Corfe was a Warrant Officer. He is buried in Capuccini Naval

HENRY CORCORAN Sgt

Pilot

Corfe, of Hoylake, Cheshire, was born on August 24 1918. From Rock Ferry Higher Grade School he went to Park High School, Birkenhead in September 1929. He gained his School Certificate in 1934 and left on April 4 1935, to begin work as a clerk with the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board in Liverpool, where his father was employed in a similar capacity.

PO 16.6.42 FO 16.12.42 FL 16.6.44 FO (RAFVR) 19.3.48

519958

Sgt

236 Squadron

Corcoran, of Higher Openshaw, Manchester, joined the RAF about May 1935, as an Aircrafthand. He later remustered as an Airman u/tAir Gunner and after completing his training, he joined 236 Squadron at Thorney Island on July 19 1940. The next day he was flying with Sergeant E E Lockton on an escort operation in Blenheim L 1300. They were shot down by Hauptmann Neumann of JG 27. Both men were reported ‘Missing’, after their aircraft crashed into the Channel off Cherbourg. Corcoran was 27. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 13.

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at Elgin. With his tour completed, Corkett went as an instructor to 53 OTU in October 1941, initially at Llandow but later at Roose, Glamorgan. In January 1943 he was posted to 64 Squadron at Hornchurch and in May was given command of 197 Squadron at Tangmere. In early July 1943 Corkett was shot down, taken prisoner and sent to Stalag Luft 3 (PoW No 1710). Repatriated to the UK, he went on to the RAFO on September 1 1945. Corkett rejoined the RAF in September 1952 and was posted to CFS, South Cerney, for an instructors’ course. In April 1953 he went to 2 FTS, then at Cluntoe, Northern Ireland but later at Hullavington and Syerston, as an instructor on Jet Provosts, until September 1958. Corkett had two non-flying staff jobs, firstly at RAF Pitreavie Castle and finally at RAF Scampton, prior to his retirement on January 15 1962, as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He died in 2003.

War Cemetery, in a collective grave with eight other airmen, all of whom died between April 21 and 26 1942.

RICHARD JOHN CORK Sub-Lieutenant (FAA)

Pilot

British

242 Squadron

Cork was born in London on April 4 1917 and educated at Slough Grammar School. In 1938 he successfully applied for a commission in the Royal Navy, with a view to joining the Fleet Air Arm. He entered the Air Branch of the Royal Navy on May 1 1939, as a Midshipman (A), and went to Greenwich Naval College for basic training, on Pilots’ Course No 6, from May 2. In late August 1939 he went to the RAF’s 14 E&RFTS, Elmdon and then to No 1 FTS, Leuchars, on No 6 Course, which began on November 6. Awarded his wings in March 1940, Cork went to HMS Raven at Southampton, for deck training with 759 and 760 Squadrons. After completing his training, Cork went into FAA service. On June 15 1940 he was attached to the RAF and posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden. He converted to Spitfires but on July 1 he joined a Hurricane squadron, 242, at Coltishall. On August 30 Cork destroyed a Bf 110 and shared a He 111 and on September 7 he destroyed a Do 17 and a Bf 110 and on this day he was slightly injured in action. On the 15th he destroyed two Do 17s and damaged three Bf 109s. Cork was recommended for the DFC and it was approved on the 24th but was replaced with the DSC by the Admiralty (18.10.40). On December 8 1940 Cork was posted to 252 Squadron, Coastal Command but on January 6 1941 he went to RNAS Yeovilton, for Fleet Air Arm duties. Cork joined 880 Squadron in HMS Indomitable in the Mediterranean. He served in the carrier until September 1941, when he joined another carrier, which went to the Indian Ocean. Its Hurricanes flew secretly to Ceylon and, operating from there, they surprised the Japanese and foiled the air attack intended as a prelude to invasion, which subsequently never took place. In early May 1942 Cork took part in the operations which neutralised the French fighters in Madagascar, clearing the way for British troops to occupy the island and prevent it falling to the Japanese. On May 5, in attacks on Diego Suarez airfield, Cork destroyed three Morane MS 406s and three Potez 63s on the ground. In early August 1942 Cork was back with 880 Squadron in HMS Indomitable, taking part in Operation Pedestal, re-supplying Malta. On August 11 he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. The following day, in three sorties, Cork destroyed a Ju 88 and shared another and destroyed a Bf 110 and two SM 79s. Cork was awarded the DSO (10.11.42). In early 1944 Cork was appointed Wing Leader of 15 Fighter Wing, made up of two Corsair squadrons operating from HMS Illustrious. On April 14 1944 Cork took off in a Corsair before dawn from the carrier, to investigate whether the poor weather would allow a planned exercise to take place. He radioed back that it would not and also said that he could not land back on the carrier because of aircraft taking off. Cork went to the airfield at China Bay, flew over to see if the runway was clear, as it would normally have been at that time of day. Seeing the flarepath lit, he landed but collided head-on with an unlit Corsair, just about to take off to join the Illustrious. Both pilots were killed and the aircraft burned out. Cork was a Lieutenant Commander at the time of his death. He is buried in the cemetery at Trincomalee.

APO 15.4.39 PO 6.11.39 FO 6.11.40 FL 6.11.41 FL 1.9.52

MALCOLM CHARLES CORNER 78746

Pilot

British

Canadian

264 Squadron

Corner joined 141 Squadron at Gatwick on October 2 but flew no operational sorties with it up to December 31 1940. He transferred to the Administrative and Special Duties Branch on June 5 1941 and died on April 23 1945 at Ambala, India, as a Squadron Leader. Corner is buried in Delhi War Cemetery. APO 12.4.40 PO 29.5.40 FO 29.8.41 FL 1.9.42

NOEL HENRY CORRY 80544

PO

Pilot

British

25 Squadron

Corry was born in December 1918. He joined the RAFVR on February 22 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745106), and did his elementary flying at 24 E&RFTS, Sydenham, Belfast. Called up after the outbreak of war, he was posted to ITW at Bexhill-on-Sea. Corry later went to 11 FTS, Shawbury, on No 17 Course, which started on November 20 1939. With his flying training completed, he was commissioned and posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 8 1940, to convert to Blenheims. Corry joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on June 26 1940 and was with it until January 29 1941, when he was posted away to the Special Duties Flight, 72 Group, initially at Northolt and later at Denham and Eastchurch. On February 19 1942 he joined 8 (P) AFU, training in precision night landings, then on to 2 FIS, Montrose on April 14 1942, for a flying instructors’ course, after which he was posted to 14(P) AFU, Banff, as a Flight Commander Flying Instructor, on Oxfords. On March 14 1944 Corry went to 30 OTU, Hixon, on Wellingtons, to prepare for operational flying in heavy bombers. He moved to 1656 Heavy Conversion Unit, Lindholme, where he joined a crew, who had lost their skipper. After two weeks at the No 1 Lancaster Finishing School at Hemswell, the crew then joined 12 Squadron at Wickenby, Corry as a Squadron Leader and ‘A’ Flight Commander. As he was on his second tour, Corry was required to do only 20 operations but his crew, on their first tour, had to complete 30. Keen to stay with them, Corry continued after his quota was up and he was posted away when it was discovered that he had done 24. He was awarded the DFC (8.12.44). He later went to HQ Bomber Command Air Staff, attached to HQ No 1 Group, Bawtry, as Air Crew Safety and Rescue Officer. His final posting was to No 1 Parachute School. Corry was released from the RAF on November 27 1945, as a Squadron Leader. He died on March 27 2006.

ALAN HENRY CORKETT PO

Air Gunner

Corner was born in 1907 at Westmount, Quebec. He volunteered for RAF aircrew and was commissioned in April 1940, as a direct-entry Air Gunner. After training, he was with 264 Squadron at Duxford in June 1940. He flew with the squadron in the Battle of Britain and his last operational sortie with it was made on August 24 1940.

Midshipman 1.5.39 Sub-Lt 14.3.40 Lt 1.11.41

41903

PO

253 Squadron

Born on August 9 1917 in Finchley, Middlesex, Corkett was educated at the City of London School. He was a stockbroker’s clerk before joining the RAF on a short service commission. He began his training on February 6 1939, as a pupil pilot, at 11 E&RFTS, Perth. In June he was posted to 2 FTS, Brize Norton. With training completed, he joined the newlyreformed 253 Squadron at Manston on November 6 1939. In mid-May 1940 the squadron, along with others, was alerted to fly to France. Gathered for an early morning takeoff, the Hurricanes were sent back to their bases, presumably as a result of Dowding’s letter to Churchill, requesting that ‘not one more fighter will be sent across the Channel, however urgent and insistent the appeals may be’. On September 4 1940 Corkett claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on October 5 he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. On the 19th Corkett was posted to RAF Kenley, as noneffective sick. He did not rejoin the squadron until December 4 1940. He remained with the squadron until August 1941, when he was posted to 17 Squadron

PO 8.6.40 FO 8.6.41 FL 8.6.42

GUY WEBSTER CORY 40677

FO

Pilot

British

41 Squadron

Cory was born on September 2 1916 and joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training on March 7 1938, as a pupil pilot. He continued his flying training at 11 FTS, Shawbury, on No 9 Course, which ran from May 19 to December 17 1938. With training completed, he joined 41 Squadron at Catterick in January 1939. He was still with it at the start of the Battle of Britain.

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On September 7 1940 Cory damaged a Bf 109 and a Do 17, on the 23rd he probably destroyed a Bf 109 and on October 25 he damaged two Bf 109s. In early 1941 Cory was posted to CFS, Upavon, for an instructors’ course, after which he joined the staff at 6 FTS, Little Rissington. He was awarded the AFC (1.1.43). After the war he went to Oxford, to read English. At some period he commanded the University Air Squadron there. In January 1952 Cory was Admin Officer at Kai Tak, Hong Kong. He retired from the RAF on July 24 1954, as a Wing Commander. Cory died on June 20 1981.

1946 he joined 98 Squadron, flying Mosquitos. Granted a Permanent Commission in August 1947, he had a long post-war career, holding various staff appointments and commands, including 151 Squadron and RAF Aldergrove, before retiring on August 19 1974, as a Wing Commander. He died in September 1994. Cosby’s portrait was drawn by Cuthbert Orde in the mess at Biggin Hill in October 1940. Younger brother of E T Cosby.

APO 7.5.38 PO 7.3.39 FO 3.9.40 FL 3.9.41 SL 1.1.44 SL 1.9.45 WC 1.7.53

DIGBY VAWDRE CARTMEL COTES-PREEDY

APO 8.7.39 PO 1.2.40 FO 1.2.41 FL 1.2.42 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.7.55

41987

PO

Pilot

British

ERIC THOMAS COSBY 157403

Sgt

Pilot

British

Cotes-Preedy joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his training on March 6

3 and 615 Squadrons

Born on November 1 1916, Cosby joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745834). He began his weekend flying at 8 E&RFTS, Reading, continuing later at 3 E&RFTS, Hamble.

1939, as a pupil pilot at 8 E&RFTS, Woodley. He went on to 14 FTS, Kinloss, on No 1 Course, which ran from April 13 to November 6 1939. With training completed, he joined 236 Squadron at Stradishall on November 8. Cotes-Preedy served with the squadron in the Battle of Britain. On August 21 1940 he was detached to Farnborough for a High Altitude Flying Course. Back with 236 Squadron on November 6 1940, he claimed a He 115 floatplane destroyed, which was actually a Breguet 11 of the Luftwaffe SNFIKdo, the German air-sea rescue service. On January 29 1941 Cotes-Preedy was pilot of an aircraft which crashed shortly after a pre-dawn take-off. The aircraft burst into flames on impact and the observer was thrown out. Cotes-Preedy forced his way out and found his observer lying in burning petrol. He dragged him clear, rolled him in the grass to extinguish his burning clothing and then returned to the aircraft, to look for the Air Gunner. Finding the gunner’s escape hatch jammed, he ripped the side of the fuselage and dragged the gunner out by his head. Although injured and suffering from burns himself, he had saved the life of the gunner and also probably the observer’s. Cotes-Preedy was awarded the George Medal (5.5.41). In June 1941 he was posted to 59 OTU, Crosby-on-Eden, as an instructor. He moved to 61 OTU, Heston in February, was briefly with 610 Squadron at Hutton Cranswick in March 1942, before joining 609 Squadron at Digby later in the month, as a Flight Commander. Posted away to the Air Ministry in September 1942, Cotes-Preedy served in the Directorate of Fighter Operations until November, when he went to the Gloster Aeroplane Company, as a production test pilot. In June 1943 he joined 193 Squadron at Harrowbeer, staying with it until November, when he was posted to 52 OTU, (Fighter Command School of Tactics) at Aston Down. In December he joined 263 Squadron at Ibsley but then rejoined 193 Squadron five weeks later. When his third operational tour ended in February 1944, Cotes-Preedy went to the Napier Aero Engine Company, Luton, as a test pilot. He joined 56 Squadron at Newchurch in June 1944. On July 3 and 12 he destroyed two V 1 flying bombs. Cotes-Preedy took command of the squadron at Grimbergen, Belgium in September and on the 29th he destroyed a FW 190 in the Emmerich area. He was awarded the DFC (3.11.44) and was posted away to 83 Group Control Centre in the Netherlands in February 1945. From early June Cotes-Preedy was with 616 Squadron at Lübeck, until he was sent to the BAFO School of Offensive Air Support in August 1945. He returned to the UK in October and was briefly at HQ Fighter Command before going to the Central Fighter Establishment at West Raynham. He was released from the RAF on January 28 1946, as a Squadron Leader, and returned to work for the Gloster Aeroplane Company as a test pilot. Cotes-Preedy died in 1972.

Called to full-time service at the outbreak of war, Cosby was posted to 3 ITW, Hastings on November 20 1939, moved on to 10 FTS, Ternhill on March 6 1940 and finished his course there on June 14. Cosby then went to 5 OTU, Aston Down, converted to Hurricanes and joined 3 Squadron at Wick on July 31. He moved to 615 Squadron at Northolt on October 14. He destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged a Ju 88 on the 29th. Cosby was posted away to CFS, Upavon on December 29 1940 for an instructors’ course. He went to RAF Hamilton, Ontario on July 2 1941, remaining there until November 21 1942, when he was posted back to the UK. From January 28 1942 Cosby instructed at 3(P) AFU, Lulsgate Bottom, 62 OTU and 12(P) AFU, Grantham. On August 3 1943 he went to 60 OTU, High Ercall for conversion to night intruder Mosquitos. Commissioned in September, Cosby joined 605 Squadron at Bradwell Bay on November 2. He flew with the squadron until July 14 1944, returning then to 60 OTU, as an instructor, moving on September 4 to 54 OTU, Charter Hall. Cosby was released from the RAF on October 28 1945. He rejoined in September 1949 and retired on March 3 1967, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died on April 26 1978. Elder brother of I H Cosby. PO 5.9.43 FO 5.3.44 FO 13.5.48 FL 7.5.59

IVOR HENRY COSBY 42293

PO

Pilot

British

236 Squadron

610, 72 and 222 Squadrons

Cosby was born in London on August 19 1919 and educated at Bournemouth School. He learned to fly in 1938 at Air Service Training Ltd at Hamble and joined the RAFVR as an Airman u/t Pilot. He went into the RAF on a short service commission in May 1939. With flying training completed, he joined 13 (Army Co-operation) Squadron in France in April 1940. After the heavy fighting from May 10, the depleted squadron withdrew by road in late May to Cherbourg, to England by sea, then to Hooton Park to reform. In August 1940 Cosby volunteered for Fighter Command. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden on August 23 and, after converting to Spitfires, he joined 610 Squadron on September 3. On the 20th Cosby moved to 72 Squadron, also at Biggin Hill. On the 23rd he shared in destroying a Bf 109. In October, when 72 went to Leconfield to reform, Cosby was posted to 222 Squadron at Hornchurch on November 4 1940. When the squadron went to Coltishall on November 11, he joined 602 Squadron at Westhampnett. On December 28 Cosby was posted to 141 Squadron and he joined it at Gravesend on January 6 1941. During the night of February 15/16 1942 he damaged a Do 217 and on August 25, with Pilot Officer L A Komaroff (q.v.) as radar operator, he destroyed a Ju 88 S of the Isle of Wight. Cosby remained with 141 until January 1943, when he went to 51 OTU, Cranfield, as an instructor. After an air gunnery course at CGS, Sutton Bridge, he went as Chief Gunnery Officer at 60 (Night Intruder) OTU at High Ercall in March 1943. A return to operations came in September 1943, with Cosby going as a Flight Commander to 264 Squadron at Fairwood Common. He had a run of night successes. On June 13/14 1944 he destroyed a He 177, on the 17/18th a FW 190, on July 3/4th a Ju 188, on the 11/ 12th a Do 217 damaged and on August 3/4 a Ju 88 destroyed. He was awarded the DFC (4.8.44), being then credited with four enemy aircraft destroyed. In 1945 Cosby was made OC Admin 6502 Air Disarmament Wing in Germany and in

APO 29.4.39 PO 6.11.39

FO 6.11.40

FL 6.11.41

SL 1.7.45

GERALD COTTAM 1050685

AC 2

Radar Operator

British

25 Squadron

Cottam joined the RAFVR in June 1940, as an Aircrafthand. He volunteered for flying duties and was sent to Yatesbury for a short radar course. He joined 25 Squadron at North Weald in early October 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on the 7th. No further service details traced.

HUBERT WEATHERBY COTTAM 77790

PO

Pilot

British

213 Squadron

Cottam, of Sunderland, joined 607 Squadron, AAF before the war, as an Aircrafthand (807327). He remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot, when the opportunity for pilot training was extended to non-commissioned members of the Auxiliary Air Force.

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HERBERT WILLIAM COUSSENS

Called up on August 24 1939, Cottam was posted from 607 to 7 FTS, Peterborough, on No 12 Course, which ran from October 9 1939 to March 6 1940. He was commissioned on March 7 and joined 610 Squadron on the 17th. Cottam was posted from 610 on May 8 1940 and arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on the 18th. After converting to Hurricanes, he was posted to 213 Squadron at Wittering on the 25th, and joined it on June 2. On August 12 1940 Cottam destroyed a Bf 110, on September 11 he damaged a Bf 110 and on the 15th he destroyed another Bf 110 and damaged a Do 17. He was killed on December 5 1941, whilst serving as a flying instructor at 23 SFTS in Southern Rhodesia. Cottam was 22 and he is buried in Bulawayo Cemetery, Zimbabwe.

120161

Sgt

Pilot

British

601 Squadron

He was born on May 18 1920 and joined the RAFVR in March 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot (745488). Called up on September 1, he completed his training at 9 FTS, Hullavington, on No 19 Course, which ran from May 13 to August 17 1940. Coussens arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on August 18, converted to Hurricanes and joined 601 Squadron at Exeter on September 11. He went to 73 Squadron in November 1940 and was with it when it moved from Debden to Birkenhead on the 9th, to embark for the Middle East. Commissioned in March 1942, Coussens was with 607 Squadron in Burma in June 1944. He was released from the RAF in 1946, rejoined the RAFVR in 1947 and went back into the RAF in 1949 in the Aircraft Control Branch. Coussens retired on May 18 1963, as a Flight Lieutenant.

PO 7.3.40 FO 7.3.41 PO 19.3.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 19.3.44

FO (RAFVR) 11.12.47 FL 21.11.49

JACK BURRALL COURTIS 391343

Sgt

Pilot

New Zealander

111 Squadron

GEORGE WALTER COUZENS 44823

PO

Pilot

Born at Bluff on October 1 1914, Courtis was educated at Waihopai School and Southland Boys’ High School. He worked as a clerk for the Vacuum Oil Co at Invercargill.

British

54 Squadron

Born on May 31 1909 in Attleborough, Norfolk, Couzens was as an apprentice carpenter after leaving school. He joined the RAF in 1927, as an Aircrafthand (507983) and trained as a Rigger.

In June 1939 Courtis joined the Civil Reserve of Pilots and began elementary flying training with the Southland Aero Club. He volunteered for the RNZAF at the outbreak of war and reported to the Ground Training School at Weraroa on November 19 1939. Courtis did his ab initio training at No 1 EFTS, Taieri and then went to No 1 FTS, Wigram on January 13 1940. Being injured in a forced-landing in April put him in hospital for four weeks. He completed the course and sailed for the UK in the RMS Rangitane, arriving at Liverpool on August 27. Courtis went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge and was posted from there to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on September 11 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 111 Squadron at Drem on the 29th. He was killed on December 5 1940, when his Hurricane crashed into a hill in bad weather in Scotland. Courtis is buried in Sleepyhillock Cemetery, Montrose.

He later became an Air Gunner and in the mid-1930s he applied for pilot training and was accepted and trained. As a Sergeant-Pilot, he served for two years on the aircraft carrier HMS Courageous before the war. Couzens joined 54 Squadron at Hornchurch from 80 Squadron on March 24 1938. He was a Flight Sergeant by September 1 1939. Commissioned in April 1940, Couzens served with 54 in the Battle of Britain. He was detached to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch for ten days from September 18 1940. Couzens was posted from 54 to 8 FTS, Montrose on October 1 1940, as a flying instructor. He instructed for the rest of the war and was awarded the AFC (14.6.45). He retired from the RAF on September 8 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He died in June 1978. PO 1.4.40 FO 1.4.41 FL 1.4.42

RONALD NOEL HAMILTON COURTNEY 70852

FO Pilot

British

151 Squadron

WILLIAM HUGH COVERLEY 70142

FO

Pilot

Courtney was born on December 25 1919 and joined the RAFO and began his elementary training on January 17 1938. He was granted a five-year commission on March 26 and carried out his flying training at 8 FTS, Montrose, on No 9 Course, which ran from April 9 to October 29 1938. With training completed, he joined 151 Squadron at North Weald. He relinquished his RAFO commission on being granted an RAF short service commission in January 1939.

PO 17.1.39

FO 3.9.40

FL 3.9.41

SL 1.1.41

602 Squadron

Coverley was born at Loudham, near Nottingham. He began his training in the RAFO on October 12 1936, as a pupil pilot. He was commissioned in December 1936 and was called to full-time service at the outbreak of war. He joined No 3 Air Observer School at Aldergrove from the Reserve on September 3 1939. He was posted away on November 27, to 602 Squadron at Drem. On January 13 1940 Coverley damaged a He 111 over the Firth of Forth. On July 7 he shared in destroying a Ju 88. He was shot down by enemy fighters over Dorchester on August 25 and baled out, unhurt. His Spitfire, P 9381, crashed and burned out on Galton Heath. On the 31st he probably destroyed a Bf 109. Coverley was shot down over the Biggin Hill area on September 7. He baled out, badly burned, but his descent was not seen and his body was not found until September 16. His Spitfire, N3198, crashed in flames at Fosters Farm, Haysden Lane, near Tonbridge. Coverley was 23. He is buried in Dean Road Cemetery, Scarborough. His father, Private T C Coverley, died in France on December 2 1917, serving in the 8th Battallion, Royal Fusiliers. He is remembered on the Cambrai Memorial.

Courtney was posted to France, via Manston, on May 13 1940 and was attached to 607 Squadron at Vitry-en-Artois. On the 14th he destroyed an unidentified enemy aircraft, on the 17th he destroyed two Ju 88s and on the 22nd he destroyed another Ju 88. He rejoined 151 Squadron at North Weald on May 27. On the 29th Courtney was attacked by Bf 109s over Dunkirk and baled out, wounded in the back of the neck and the right leg. He was picked up by the corvette HMS Shearwater and taken to Ramsgate Hospital. He returned to 151 on July 18 1940 but did not fly again until September 4. On December 13 1940 Courtney is believed to have been posted to the Middle East but no service details have been found. In February 1942 he was posted to 610 Squadron at Hutton Cranswick. On May 15 1942 he damaged a Do 17 and on June 4 he damaged a Ju 88. Courtney was later posted to the Far East. He was given command of 261 Squadron at Chittagong and later Chiringa from July to December 1943. He took command of 113 Squadron in January 1944 at Dimapur and later Tulihal and Palel, India. Courtney was awarded the DFC (8.9.44), the citation stating that he had taken a prominent part in the squadron’s operations in the Imphal Valley and had destroyed three enemy aircraft. He was posted away from 113 in September 1944. Courtney was awarded a Bar to the DFC (29.1.46). He commanded 130 Squadron at Odiham from July 1946 to January 1947, 72 Squadron, also at Odiham, from February1947 to February 1949 and 32 Squadron at Shallufa, Egypt from November 1951 to May 1952. Awarded the AFC (1.1.54), Courtney led the 1954 Battle of Britain flypast. A graduate of the Joint Services Staff College and the RAF College of Air Warfare, Courtney was made a CB (1.1.67) and retired from the RAF on January 6 1968, as a Group Captain. He died in 1986. APO (RAFO) 26.3.38 WC 1.1.53 GC 1.7.59

British

APO (RAFO) 21.12.36 PO (RAFO) 12.10.37 FO (RAFO) 12.4.39 FO 3.9.39

AUBREY RICHARD COVINGTON 42591

PO

Pilot

British

238 Squadron

Born on January 22 1921, Covington was granted an RAF short service commission and began his elementary training on July 10 1939, as a pupil pilot. He completed his training and was posted to 226 Squadron, flying Fairey Battle light bombers. He was still with the squadron on June 15 1940, when 226 embarked for the UK from France.

SL 1.8.47 Covington volunteered for Fighter Command and joined 238 Squadron at St Eval on

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Cowley had completed his flying training and was on 87 Squadron at Debden on January 1 1939, as a Sergeant-Pilot. He was still with the squadron at the start of the Battle of Britain. On August 15 Cowley made a forced-landing at Symondsbury, near Bridport, after a combat over Portland, in which he destroyed a Bf 110. His Hurricane, P 3465, was written off and Cowley went to Bridport Hospital, slightly wounded. He rejoined 87 Squadron on discharge from hospital but did not fly operationally with it again. On October 14 1940 Cowley was posted away to RAF Exeter. He was commissioned in July 1942 and released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant.

August 20 1940. He destroyed a Bf 110 on September 15. His Hurricane, P 3833, was damaged in this combat over Kenley and he made a forced-landing, out of fuel, at Gulledge Farm, Imberhorne, Sussex. On October 1 he destroyed two Bf 110s and damaged a Bf 109 but on this day he was himself shot down by Bf 109s W of Poole and is believed to have baled out at Sherborne. On the 7th he was shot down over Blandford. Covington baled out, slightly wounded, and was admitted to Blandford Hospital. His Hurricane, V 6777, crashed at Meriden Wood Down, Winterbourne Houghton. He was posted from 238 on October 12, as non-effective sick, and did not rejoin until December 2 1940. Covington volunteered for service in Greece on December 6. He was posted away on the 9th, to 307 (Polish) Squadron at Jurby. He joined it there on the 13th. On the 21st Covington was pilot of a Magister, with Pilot Officer Proctor, 307’s Engineer Officer, as passenger. He had to make a forced-landing in Ireland and he and Proctor were taken and interned at Curragh Camp, Dublin. In the early hours of June 29 1941, Covington was one of a group of ten internees, led by Flying Officer P F Mayhew (qv), who made a successful escape attempt. Four were later recaptured but Covington and the other five men reached Northern Ireland. Covington stayed on in the RAF after the war, latterly in the Fighter Control Branch. He retired on January 22 1964, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1994.

PO 2.7.42 FO 2.1.43 FL 2.7.44

JAMES ROY COWSILL 741936

Sgt Pilot British

56 Squadron

APO 2.9.39 PO 6.4.40 FO 6.4.41 FL 6.4.42 FL 1.9.45 Cowsill joined the RAFVR about August 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot. He carried out his pre-war training at 4 E&RFTS, Brough. Called up on September 1 1939, he was posted to 3 FTS, South Cerney on November 20 1939, for No 31 Course, which he completed on May 25 1940.

JAMES BAIRD COWARD 39412 FL

Pilot

British

19 Squadron Coward was born in Teddington, Middlesex on May 18 1915 and educated at Sutton High School. He joined the RAF as a candidate for a short service commission and began his ab initio course on November 16 1936, at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty.

After converting to Hurricanes, Cowsill joined 56 Squadron at North Weald in June. On July 13 he damaged a Ju 87, which crash-landed on the beach at Cap Griz Nez. Following this action, Cowsill was shot down off Calais by Feldwebel John of 4/JG 51. Cowsill’s aircraft, N 2432, came down into the Channel, about two miles from St Margaret’s Bay. An MTB immediately proceeded to the area, but found no trace of the pilot and only a small piece of wreckage bearing the aircraft number. Cowsill was never heard of again and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 13. He was 20 years old.

He did his intermediate and advanced flying training at 2 FTS, Digby from mid-February to September1937. With training completed, he joined 19 Squadron. On November 6 1939 Coward was posted to 266 Squadron, then reforming at Sutton Bridge, as ‘A’ Flight Commander. Over Dunkirk on June 2 1940 he probably destroyed a Bf 109. Coward rejoined 19 Squadron, then at Fowlmere, from hospital on June 27. He flew his first sortie on July 6. He fell ill soon afterwards and did not fly operationally again until August 28. On August 31 he was shot down during an attack on Do 17s ten miles E of Duxford. He baled out, badly wounded, and landed on the Royston-Newmarket Road. Coward was taken to Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, where his left leg was amputated below the knee. Fit again, Coward was posted to Mr Churchill’s personal staff, in charge of roof-spotting at Chequers and Chartwell. In early January 1942 he went on a three month refresher course at Hullavington, after which he was posted to 52 OTU, Aston Down, to command a squadron. In October 1942 Coward went as CFI to 55 OTU, Annan. On November 21 1943 he took command of No 1 ADU at Croydon. Coward was sent on a course at RAF Staff College on June 17 1944, following which he was posted to the Air Ministry, in charge of Fighter Operational Training. After the war he held a series of staff appointments and commands. Coward was awarded the AFC (1.1.54). He retired from the RAF on September 8 1969, as an Air Commodore. He died on July 25 2012

DAVID GEORGE SAMUEL RICHARDSON COX 101041

Radar Operator British

25 Squadron

Cowen joined the RAFVR about June 1940 as an Aircrafthand. It is possible that he was an Airman u/t Radio Operator who volunteered for flying duties and was sent to Yatesbury on a short radar course. He joined 25 Squadron at Martlesham Heath on August 25 1940. He flew his first operational sortie on September 1 and his last with 25 Squadron on October 29. No further service details traced.

JAMES COWLEY 49664

Sgt

Pilot

British

British

19 Squadron

Cox joined the RAFVR in April 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (745136), and began his flying training at 19 E&RFTS, Gatwick. Called up on September 1 1939, he was posted to 10 FTS, Tern Hill and was on No 16 Course, which ran from November 6 1939 to May 11 1940. He joined 19 Squadron at Duxford on May 23. On August 19 Cox shared in the destruction of a Bf 110, on the 31st he probably destroyed a Bf 110, on September 9 he shot down a Bf 109, on the 11th he got a probable Do 17 and on the 15th he destroyed another Bf 109. Cox was himself shot down on the 27th in an engagement over the Canterbury area, in Spitfire X 4237. The aircraft was written off after crashing at Wye Court Farm, Wye and Cox was wounded. He was admitted to hospital and was in there for three months. He claimed a Bf 109 destroyed on June 27 1941but in the engagement his Spitfire was badly damaged and he made a crash-landing at Dungeness. Cox probably got another Bf 109 on August 12. He was commissioned in July 1941 and posted away from 19 Squadron on September 12, to instruct at 57 OTU, Hawarden. He went to CFS, Upavon for two weeks in October, on an instructor’s course. In May 1942 Cox joined 72 Squadron at Biggin Hill. He damaged a FW 190 on July 26 W of Calais. The squadron was posted to North Africa in November 1942. On the 8th it was in Gibraltar and on the 16th it flew in to Maison Blanche airfield, Algeria. Cox got a probable Bf 109 on the 25th, shot one down on the 26th, probably got one on the 27th, destroyed a Ju 88 on the 29th, a He 111 on the ground on December 2 and shot down a Bf 109 on the 4th. On January 2 1943 Cox damaged a Bf 109. He was made a Flight Commander and awarded the DFC (16.2.43). He damaged a Bf 109 on March 26, shot one down and damaged another on April 3, probably destroyed a FW 190 on the 12th and damaged another on the 19th. Cox’s tour expired on April 26 1943 and he was posted back to the UK on May 15. From June 21 to August 3 1943 he gave talks at factories, after which he became a Tactics Liaison Officer, instructing American pilots. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (9.7.43). In early January 1944 Cox was briefly with 130 Squadron at Scorton but moved to 504 Squadron at Hornchurch on the 20th, as a Flight Commander. On March 12 1944 he went to 84 Group Support Unit, Aston Down, remaining there until June 5, when he was posted to command 222 Squadron at Selsey. Cox rejoined 84 GSU, then at Thruxton, on July 17 and stayed until October 2 1944,

WILLIAM COWEN AC

Pilot

Cox was born on April 18 1920 at Southsea, Hampshire and educated at Bournemouth Collegiate School. After leaving, he worked as a clerk in a solicitor’s office. After failing an RAF medical, he worked for some months at Billingsgate Market to build himself up.

APO 28.1.37 PO 16.11.37 FO 16.6.39 FL 3.9.40 SL 1.12.41 SL 1.8.47 WC 1.7.52 GC 1.7.58 AC 1.7.62

1050707

Sgt

87 Squadron

Cowley went to the Royal High School, Greenwich. He joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice in January 1931 (565084) and passed out in December 1933, as a Metal Rigger. He later applied for pilot training, was selected and he was remustered as an Airman u/t Pilot.

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His Spitfire, P 9511, hit a house at Stelling Minnis. Cox was 24. He was cremated at Birmingham Municipal Crematorium and his ashes were scattered at Old Castle Bromwich aerodrome.

when he was posted to No 1 Squadron at Detling. He received the C de G (Fr) in September. Cox was given command of No 1 Squadron on January 1 1945. He was posted away on April 5 to HQ 221 Group, Burma. He led 909 (Spitfire) Wing from May 21 to September 26 1945, when he went to HQ RAF Siam. He was released from the RAF on March 11 1946, when he resigned his Permanent Commission. Cox died on January 20 2004.

PO 6.7.40

PHILIP ANTHONY NEVILLE COX 33184

PO 17.7.41 FO 17.7.42 FL 17.7.43

FO

Pilot British

Cox, of Brighton went to Brighton, Hove and Sussex Grammar School. He joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice at No 1 S of TT, Halton in September 1932 (566096) and passed out in August 1935 as a Fitter.

GILBERT PARISH COX 580644

Sgt

Observer

British

236 Squadron

Cox joined the RAF in February 1939, as a direct-entry Airman u/t Observer. He was posted to 236 Squadron at St Eval on September 20 1940 and flew his first operational sortie on the 29th.

He won a place at RAF College, Cranwell and started there in September 1935, as a Flight Cadet. He was awarded the R M Groves Memorial Prize in 1937. After graduating in July 1937, with a Permanent Commission, Cox was posted to 43 Squadron at Tangmere. On January 17 1939 he went to 11 Group Pool, St Athan, as an instructor, and was made OC ‘C’ Flight on August 25. Cox was made an Acting Flight Lieutenant on September 24 1939. 11 Group Pool became 6 OTU on March 9 1940. Cox went to AFDU, Northolt on May 7, for instruction in air tactics. He was posted from 6 OTU to Hendon on June 6, for posting to France, where he joined 501 Squadron at Le Mans, as a Flight Commander. 501 withdrew on the 18th from Dinard. It operated on the 19th from Jersey, covering the BEF evacuation from Cherbourg, and re-assembled at Croydon on the 21st. Cox claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and shared in the destruction of another on July 20. In combat over Dover Harbour on the 27th, Cox was shot down in Hurricane P 3808 by Feldwebel Fernsebner of III/JG 52 and reported ‘Missing’. At the time Cox was thought to have been a victim of the Dover anti-aircraft guns. He was 25. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 5.

All sorties flown by Cox in October 1940 were with Pilot Officer A K Chappell as pilot and Sergeant H G Matthews as Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. No other service details traced.

GRAHAM JAMES COX 41668

FO

Pilot

British

501 Squadron

152 Squadron

Born in Sparkhill, Birmingham in 1919, Cox joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio training at 23 E&RFTS, Rochester on December 28 1938.

PO 31.7.37 FO 31.1.39 He was on No 11 Course at 10 FTS, Tern Hill, which ran from March 20 to October 14 1939. Cox probably joined 152 Squadron at Acklington directly from 10 FTS at the end of his course. On August 12 1940 he shared a Ju 88, on the 13th got a probable Bf 110, on the 18th shared a Bf 109 and on the 21st shared a Ju 88. Cox claimed a Bf 110 destroyed on September 27, one damaged on the 30th and Ju 88s damaged on October 7 and the 19th. He destroyed a He 111 on May 27 1941 and with his tour completed, he was posted away and awarded the DFC (17.10.41). Returning to operations in September 1942, Cox went to 501 Squadron at Middle Wallop, as a Flight Commander. In May 1943 he was posted to 43 Squadron at Mateur, Tunisia. The squadron moved to Malta on June 8. On a bomber-escort to Gerbini, Sicily on July 4, Cox destroyed a Bf 109. On the way back he decided to fly at low level and he and his No 2 attacked a train at Vizzini station and blew up the engine. On the 5th he was promoted and took command of 229 Squadron at Krendi. On July 10 he destroyed three Mc 200s. In October 1943 he was posted away for a rest. He returned to operations in February 1944, when he took command of 92 Squadron at Marcianise in Italy. Cox destroyed a FW 190 and damaged another on May 13 and destroyed a Ju 188 on July 21. Posted away in August 1944, Cox was awarded the DSO (10.10.44). In 1945 he served as a Forward Controller in Italy. He was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Squadron Leader. Cox is believed to have been killed in a civil flying accident. One source states that the Cessna, in which he was flying, crashed in Canada’s Northern Territory, after it became uncontrollable because of icing in bad weather conditions.

RALPH CYRIL RUPERT COX 747819

Sgt

Observer

He was posted from 248 to No 1 (C) OTU, Silloth on May 31, rejoining the squadron on June 25. On August 27 1940 Cox was a member of the crew of a Blenheim, which failed to return from a sortie to reconnoitre the Southern coast of Norway. The aircraft crashed into the sea, reason unknown. The pilot, Pilot Officer C J Arthur, and the gunner, Sergeant E A Ringwood, were reported ‘Missing’. Cox’s death was confirmed on September 28 1940, after his body was washed up on the Swedish coast. Cox was 30. He is buried in Kriberg Cemetery, Gothenburg.

WALTER EDWARD COX 747745

Sgt

Air Gunner

Pilot

British

British

264 Squadron

Cox joined the RAFVR about April 1939 in the Aircraft Crew Section, as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. Cox was called to full-time service on September 1, he completed gunnery training and he was with 264 Squadron at Duxford by May 12 1940. He rejoined the squadron on May 17 after being shot down. No details are known of this incident. Cox was killed on February 23 1953 flying in a Bristol Brigand of 238 OCU, which crashed on approach to Colerne. The pilot and two trainee navigators were also killed. Cox is buried at St John the Baptist, Colerne.

KENNETH HENRY COX PO

248 Squadron

Cox joined the RAFVR about April 1939 as an Airman u/t Observer. He was called up on September 1, completed his training and joined 248 Squadron in the Spring of 1940.

APO 4.3.39 PO 2.10.39 FO 2.10.40 FL 2.10 41

81367

British

610 Squadron

Cox joined the RAFVR about December 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot (741176). He was called up on September 1 1939 and completed his training on No 18 Course at 11 FTS, Shawbury, which ran from January 31 to June 29 1940.

JOHN HARRY COXON 749430

He was commissioned on July 6 and posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down. After converting to Spitfires, Cox joined 610 Squadron at Biggin Hill on the 27th. On August 12 he claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and another probably destroyed, on the 15th probably another and on the 18th another one destroyed and also probably a Do 17. On August 28 1940 Cox was shot down and killed in combat with Bf 109s over Dover.

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

141 Squadron

Coxon joined the RAFVR about May 1939 in the Aircraft Crew Section, as an Airman u/t Aircrew. He was called up on September 1, completed training as an Air Gunner and he joined 141 Squadron at Dyce on August 20 1940.

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JOHN TEASDALE CRAIG

He moved to 410 (RCAF) Squadron at Ayr from 141 on August 2 1941. In 1942 Coxon was with Bomber Command, flying with 103 Squadron from Elsham Wolds, Lincolnshire. He failed to return from a raid on Essen on June 6 1942, in Wellington DV 699. He was then a Flight Sergeant. Coxon was 33. He is buried in Reichswald War Cemetery, Germany.

564573

Sgt

Pilot

Sgt

Pilot

British

501 Squadron

Craig successfully applied for pilot training and he was a Sergeant-Pilot with 111 Squadron at Northolt by December 31 1938. On May 18 1940 Craig destroyed a Bf 110 over Douai. His Hurricane was badly damaged and he made a crash-landing N of Vimy. Over Dunkirk on the 24th he claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on the 31st a Bf 109. On July 10 Craig probably destroyed two Do 17s, on the 25th damaged a Bf 109, on August 13 claimed a Do 17 shot down, on August 15 a Bf 110 destroyed, three Ju 88s and a Do 17 probably destroyed and three Do 17s damaged. Craig shot down a Do 17 on the 16th, damaged another on the 18th and damaged a Bf 110 on the 30th. Craig was shot down in combat with Bf 110s over Felixstowe on August 31. He baled out, injured, and was admitted to Epping Hospital. He was awarded the DFM (6.9.40), being then credited with at least eight enemy aircraft destroyed. He was posted to 56 OTU, Sutton Bridge on January 21 1941, as an instructor. He was killed on June 2 1941, when his Hurricane, W 9114, was in a mid-air collision with a Hurricane flown by Flight Sergeant I K J Bidgood (qv). Craig was 27. He is buried in Wittonle-Wear Cemetery, Co Durham.

Crabtree, from Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire, joined the RAFVR about July 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740434). He was attached to 43 Squadron for training. Called up on September 1 1939, he joined 501 Squadron at Filton. The squadron flew to France on May 10 1940 but Crabtree followed next day with the rear party, in Bombay L 5813. As it prepared to land at Bétheniville, the aircraft’s nose went up. The pilot went round again. On the second approach the same thing happened, the pilot appeared to lose control and the Bombay went into a tail-slide and crashed. Three passengers were killed and six injured, including Crabtree. He was treated at the Casualty Clearing Station at Epernay and sent back to hospital in England. After recovering from his injuries, Crabtree next flew with 501 on September 24 1940, having previously acted briefly as a controller. He flew his one and only operational sortie on the 25th and made no further flights with 501 Squadron. He was declared non-effective sick on September 30. Crabtree was posted away to 57 OTU, Hawarden soon afterwards and made his first flight there on October 15 1940, as an instructor. In 1941 he was with 616 Squadron and on July 3 he was shot down over Lille, in Spitfire P 7980. He was captured by a German patrol, but escaped. He was sheltered by a French family and returt returned to England after several months, taking back with him detailed drawings of an arms factory, on cigarette papers. He received a Mention in Despatches. Crabtree was commissioned in June 1942 from Warrant Officer. He served with 600 Squadron (Beaufighters) and 216 Squadron (Dakotas). He was released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. Crabtree was killed in a civil flying accident on June 24 1950. He was the pilot of a Percival Proctor that crashed at Tosside, Yorkshire. The aircraft was on a flight from West Hartlepool to Blackpool when it landed in a field at Brockthorn Farm, Tosside in mist. Witnesses reported that the pilot said he had lost his bearings and had a faulty radio. While attempting to take off about an hour after landing the aircraft hit a dry stone wall and exploded. All three passengers were also killed. The inquest, held at Settle, recorded a verdict of misadventure. At the time Crabtree was manager and an instructor at Greatham Airport, West Hartlepool.

EDWARD WILLIAM CRANWELL 141532

Pilot

British

607 Squadron Born on September 13 1914, Craig was educated at Winchester College and Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he obtained a BA in Law in 1936 and an MA in 1940. Before the war he was practising as a solicitor.

He joined 607 Squadron, AAF at Usworth in 1937 and was commissioned in May. He was embodied on August 24 1939. Craig was one of a section of three Gladiators that sighted a Do 18 flying boat 25 miles out to sea on October 16 1939. Their attacks inflicted such damage as to cause it to crash 50 miles out from the coast. The crew were picked up by a trawler and made PoWs. On November 13 1939 607 Squadron flew from Acklington to Croydon, going two days later to Merville in France. Craig was attached to 13 Squadron, based at Mons-en-Chaussee with Lysanders, on January 2 1940. He rejoined 607 three days later. On May 11 1940 Craig shared in the destruction of a Ju 87. The squadron was withdrawn to England on May 20 and re-assembled at Croydon on the 22nd. Craig served with 607 Squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. On August 15 1940 he probably destroyed a He 111 and a Bf 110. He was posted to RAF Turnhouse on December 18 1940, as a supernumerary on Ops duties. He took command of the squadron in March 1941. Craig was shot down whilst making a low-level attack on Le Touquet airfield on November 4 1941 and captured. In 1942 he attempted to walk out of Stalag Luft 3, disguised as a German guard, but was unsuccessful. At Oflag XXIB Craig was one of thirty-six officers who tunnelled their way out. With a companion, he walked south towards Gneisen but was recaptured by military police after three days. After returning to England in May 1945, Craig was released from the RAF later in the year. He received a Mention in Despatches (28.12.45) and was made an MBE (26.7.46), for distinguished service whilst a PoW. Craig returned to his law practice, later becoming a partner. He rejoined the AAF in 1947, firstly in the Secretarial Branch but later in the Fighter Control Branch. He died in 1974. PO (AAF) 28.5.37 FL (RAAF) 6.2.50

FO (AAF) 28.11.38

FO 24.8.39

FL 3.9.40

Pilot

British

610 Squadron

He was called up in late 1939, went to 3 ITW, Hastings and then to 11 EFTS, Perth. On June 15 1940 Cranwell went to 15 FTS, Brize Norton on No 10 Course, which moved in August to Chipping Norton and ended on September 23. On the 24th he was posted to 7 OTU, Hawarden and after converting to Spitfires, he joined 610 Squadron at Acklington on October 6. Cranwell was detached from 610 to RAF Acklington on December 14 1940, when the squadron moved to Westhampnett. In early 1941 he was injured in a crash and spent several months in hospital, after which he was posted to No 1 AACU, initially at Weston Zoyland and later at Aberporth. In June 1942 Cranwell volunteered for Bomber Command and did some training on Oxfords at Little Rissington. In July he converted to Wellingtons at 15 OTU, Harwell and in October he joined 102 Squadron at Pocklington on Halifaxes. Cranwell was commissioned from Warrant Officer in February 1943, finished his tour in July and was awarded the DFC (13.8.43). From July 1943 until February 1944 he was at 82 OTU, Ossington, as a Flight Commander, on fighter affiliation. In March he moved to 26 OTU, Wing on similar duties. In February 1945 Cranwell went to 17 OTU, Turweston, to convert to Wellingtons. In May he went to 1652 Heavy Conversion Unit, Acaster Malbis, to convert to Halifaxs and in June to the Glider Towing Training Unit at Matching. From July to October 1945 he served with 190 Squadron at Great Dunmow, flying Halifaxes on general transport duties. Cranwell was released from the RAF in late 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1993.

GEORGE DUDLEY CRAIG FL

Sgt

Cranwell joined the RAFVR in August 1938 (741969) and did his weekend flying at 21 E&RFTS, Stapleford Abbots.

PO 4.6.42 FO 4.12.42 FL 4.6.44

90285

111 Squadron

Craig was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne. He went to Wolsingham Grammar School, joined the RAF, as an Aircraft Apprentice, in January 1930 and passed out in December 1932, as a Fitter, Aero Engines.

DOUGLAS BARKER CRABTREE 125730

British

PO 6.2.43 FO 1.8.43 FL 1.2.45

HECTOR HUGH CRAWFORD 39904

PO

Pilot

New Zealander

235 Squadron

Born at Hawera on August 25 1916, Crawford went to New Plymouth Boys’ High School and he afterwards worked as a clerk until joining the Customs in 1937. Crawford learned to fly privately in early 1938 and in May 1939 he joined the Civil Reserve of Pilots. He was called up for the RNZAF at the outbreak of war. On October 26 he went to the Ground Training School at Weraroa, was posted to 2 EFTS, New Plymouth in late November and on December 18 1939 he went to 2 FTS, Woodbourne. After gaining his flying badge and being promoted to Sergeant, Crawford completed the course and was commissioned in early May 1940. He sailed in the SS Mataroa

FO (AAF) 30.5.47

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On May 8/9 another He 111 was damaged and on July 7/8 a Ju 88 and a He 111 were destroyed. Crew was awarded the DFC (29.7.41). Guthrie was posted away from 604 but Crew continued to find enemy aircraft at night. During the night of April 2/3 1942 he destroyed a He 111, on the 26/27th damaged another and on May 3/4 and 4/5th he destroyed Do 217s. Crew, who was made ‘A’ Flight Commander in May 1942, was awarded a Bar to the DFC (16.6.42). In October 1942 Crew became OC of the Radio Development Flight, conducting radio and radar anti-jamming trials and training. In March 1943 he joined 85 Squadron at Hunsdon, as a Flight Commander, and during the night of April 23/24 he damaged a Do 217 and on May 21/22 he shot down a FW 190. Crew took command of 96 Squadron at Church Fenton in June 1943. On January 4/5 1944 he shot down a Me 410 and damaged another, on February 13/14 destroyed a Ju 188 and on April 18/19 another Me 410. Between June and early August 1944 Crew shot down 21 V1s at night. He was awarded the DSO (26.9.44), credited with 13 enemy aircraft destroyed. 96 Squadron was disbanded on December 12 1944 and Crew went to RAF Staff College in January 1945 and was later granted a Permanent Commission. Between July 1948 and February 1950 Crew led 45 Squadron in operations against the terrorists in Malaya. He was awarded a Bar to the DSO (10.3.50). He held a series of appointments and commands prior to his retirement on March 3 1973, as an Air Vice-Marshal. Crew was made a CB (1.1.73). He died in August 2002.

for the UK on the 24th. After arriving on July 10, he went to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge. From there he was posted to No1 (Coastal) OTU, Silloth, from where he was sent on detachment to Prestwick on July 23, on No 2 Blenheim Course. On August 17 Crawford, with the course completed, returned to Silloth and was posted to 235 Squadron at Bircham Newton next day. With ninety operational sorties carried out and a Do 18 shared on November 18 1940, Crawford was posted to 143 Squadron at Thornaby on July 14 1941. He moved to 272 Squadron at Kemble on August 19 and on the 30th took off in his Beaufighter from Portreath, bound for Gibraltar and then the Middle East, via Malta. After arriving at Edku in Egypt, Crawford was immediately attached to 252 Squadron and flew back to Malta to carry out operational sorties from Luqa against targets in Sicily and Sardinia. Crawford rejoined 272 Squadron in Egypt on October 8 1941 and began operations. On November 12 1941 he damaged a Ju 52, on the 16th damaged a Ju 87 and on the 18th he shared in the destruction of two Ju 52s. On December 19 he took off to strafe the Barce-Tocra road. His Beaufighter was damaged by ground fire and after coaxing it along, he finally made a crash-landing in the desert 50 miles northwest of El Mechili. Another pilot, whom Crawford had picked up in a similar plight, saw him and landed a mile away. After setting fire to their aircraft, Crawford and his navigator ran towards their would-be rescuer. As they came over a rise, they heard machine-gun fire. The Beaufighter took off and the two men were captured by a convoy of German armoured cars. They travelled for two days but at dawn on the third Crawford escaped after a sentry left him alone for a few minutes. The Germans chased him for half an hour but he eluded them by hiding next to a dead camel. Having injured his ankle, Crawford was soon unable to walk but he was found by some Bedouin tribesmen, who fed and cared for him. He met some British troops on the 27th and rejoined 272 Squadron four days later. On February 6 1942 Crawford was shot down by ground fire whilst making a low-level attack on enemy vehicles near Martuba. He attempted to land but crashed on uneven ground and the aircraft caught fire. Some time later his Navigator returned to the squadron. Although wounded, he had managed to get clear after the crash. He could see Crawford lying amongst the wreckage but because of his own wound, the intense heat and danger from exploding ammunition, he could not reach him. He was then unconscious or already dead. Crawford was reported by the Red Cross to have been buried in a military cemetery near Barce. After the war his remains were re-interred in Benghazi Military Cemetery.

PO 3.10.39 FO 3.10.40 FL 3.10.41 SL 29.9.43 SL 1.9.45 WC 1.7.52 GC 1.1.59 AC 1.7.65 AVM 1.7.69

JOHN LAWRENCE CRISP 112450

Air Gunner

British

141 Squadron

Cresswell, of Wollaton, Nottinghamshire, joined the RAFVR about June 1939, as an Airman u/t Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. He was called up on September 1 and after completing his gunnery course, he joined 141Squadron at Drem on September 10 1940. He was posted to 410(RCAF) Squadron at Ayr on July 13 1941and he was killed on August 30 1941, as a Flight Sergeant, operating in Defiants from Drem. Cresswell was 23. He was cremated at Nottingham Crematorium, West Bridgford.

EDWARD DIXON CREW 74700

FO

Pilot British

British

43 Squadron

On November 1 Crisp moved to 11 FTS, Wittering and completed his training at No 1 Armament Training Camp at Catfoss, from March 27 to April 28 1936. He then joined 18 Squadron at Upper Heyford. Crisp was posted to 49 Squadron at Bircham Newton on June 1 1936. He was dismissed from the RAF on June 8 1937 by sentence of a General Court Martial. Crisp joined the RAFVR at Portsmouth on May 28 1939, as an Airman u/t Pilot (748440). He was called up on September 1 and reported to 3 ITW, Hastings on October 3. He moved on to 9 FTS, Hullavington on January 1 1940 and with the course completed, he went to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on June 3. After converting to Hurricanes, Crisp joined 43 Squadron at Tangmere on July 6 1940 and made his first operational sortie three days later. During an action off Selsey on July 19 Crisp’s Hurricane, P 3468, was damaged in an attack by Feldwebel Blazytko of III/JG 27 but he returned to base, unhurt. Crisp damaged a Bf 110 on August 13. He was shot down by Bf 109s in an engagement off Bognor on August 16, in Hurricane L 1736. He baled out and broke his thigh in a heavy landing. He was posted to RAF Tangmere as non-effective sick. Crisp was sent to Princess Mary’s Hospital, Halton. on September 6 and was at No 1 Airmens’ Convalescent Depot, Blackpool from November 30 1940 to March 28 1941. He rejoined 43 Squadron, then at Drem, on May 22 1941. He was posted away to 122 Squadron at Ouston on July 21. Commissioned in November 1941, Crisp was killed with 122 on June 8 1942. He was 25 and his name is on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 68.

DENIS GEORGE CRESSWELL Sgt

Pilot

Crisp joined the RAF on a short service commission in August 1935 (37387). He went to 2 E&RFTS, Filton on August 25 and afterwards to No 1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge on October 17, for a short disciplinary course.

PO 4.5.40 FO 4.5.41

751880

Sgt

604 Squadron Crew was born on December 24 1917 at Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire. He was educated at Felsted School and he went on to Downing College, Cambridge, where he obtained an MA in Anthropology and English Literature. He was a member of the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in early October 1939.

APO 21.10.35

PO 26.8.36

PO 21.11.41

RONALD FREDERICK CROCKETT 79177

Crew was called to full-time service on November 8 1939. He was posted to 3 ITW, Hastings in November and moved on to RAF College FTS, Cranwell in January 1940. With training completed, he converted to Blenheims, firstly at Andover and later at 5 OTU, Aston Down, from June 22. Crew joined 604 Squadron at Gravesend on July 8 1940. He was detached to 11 Group from the 14th to the 19th for short R/T and elementary fighter attacks courses. By day on August 11 Crew shared in the destruction of a He 59 floatplane 30 miles from Cherbourg and on September 11 he shared in destroying a Do 18 flying boat, as it was being towed by an E-boat. In December 1940 Crew teamed up with Sergeant N H Guthrie, as his radar operator, and they had some success. During the night of April 4/5 1941 they destroyed a He 111, on the 8th damaged another, on the nights of the 24/25th and the 28/29th they shot down He 111s.

PO

Observer

British

236 Squadron

Crockett, of Acton, London, joined the RAFVR about July 1939, as an Airman u/t Observer (755291). He was called up on September 1 and began his training at 4 ITW. He was posted to No 11 Air Observer Navigation School, Hamble on November 20, as an LAC. Crockett was on No 1 Air Observer Course, which ended on March 9 1940, after which he went to a B&GS. With training, completed, he was commissioned on May 5 1940 and joined 236 Squadron at Thorney Island on July 15, probably from No 1 (C) OTU, Silloth. He was still with 236 in November 1940. Crockett was killed on September 7 1942, as a Flight Lieutenant with 230 Squadron, a flying boat unit based at Aboukir. He was 25 and is buried in Hadra War Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, Egypt. PO 5.5.40 FO 5.5.41 FL 5.5.42

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PETER GUERIN CROFTS 33381

FO

Pilot

British

He rejoined 609 Squadron, then at Drem, on May 5 1940. Crook tore a ligament in his left knee on May 12. He had an operation on the 16th at Peebles Hydro Military Hospital. He resumed flying on the 30th. On July 9 Crook shared in the destruction of two Ju 87s and probably destroyed another, on the 13th he damaged a Do 17, on August 11 destroyed a Bf 110, on the 12th he destroyed two Bf 109s and probably destroyed a Bf 110, on the 13th shot down a Bf 109, on the 14th shared a He 111 and a Do 17, on September 27 shared a Bf 110 and on the 30th destroyed two Bf 109s and probably another. He was awarded the DFC (1.11.40). On November 10 1940 Crook was posted to CFS, Upavon for an instructors’ course, after which he went to 15 EFTS, Carlisle on December 15 1940, remaining there until April 25 1944, when he moved to 21 AFU at Wheaton Aston. On July 5 1944 Crook was posted to 5 AFU, Tern Hill, on September 5 to 41 OTU, Hawarden and on December 1 to 8 (Coastal) OTU, Dyce. On December 18 1944 Crook took off in a Spitfire IX, EN 662, to fly a mid-morning high-level photographic sortie. At 10.52 am HQ 13 Group reported to Dyce that a Spitfire had been seen to dive into the sea near Aberdeen from 20,000 feet. A search of the area picked up some of Crook’s flying clothing but he was never found. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 202. Crook wrote of his experiences in Spitfire Pilot, published in 1942. His portrait was drawn by Cuthbert Orde in November 1940.

615 and 605 Squadrons

Crofts was born in St George’s Square, London on January 2 1918. He was educated in Sevenoaks and at Wellington College and entered RAF College, Cranwell in January 1937 as a Flight Cadet. He did not complete the course for some reason but was granted a short sevice commission in May 1938.He completed his flying training and joined the SHQ Staff at Gosport in September 1938. In mid-July 1940 Crofts was with 150 Squadron, flying Blenheims and he may have been in France when the squadron was with the AASF in France. Crofts probably volunteered for Fighter Command in August 1940. He went from 150 Squadron to 615 Squadron at Prestwick on September 3, then to 605 Squadron on the 18th. He was shot down by Bf 109s over Ticehurst on September 28. Crofts baled out but fell dead at Red Pale, a mile and a half from Dallington. He was probably machine-gunned as he floated down. His Hurricane, V 6699, crashed in a paddock at Earls Down and exploded. Crofts is buried in All Saints’ churchyard, Tilford, Surrey. There is a memorial cross on the spot where he fell, a few yards from Red Pale. APO 11.5.38 PO 17.9.38 FO 17.3.40

APO 25.8.39 PO 4.5.40 FO 9.12.40 FL 9.12.41

ERIC EUGENE CROKER 391826

Sgt

Pilot

New Zealander

HAROLD KAY CROOK

111 Squadron

63789

Sgt

Pilot

Born in Auckland on January 1 1917, Croker was educated at Henderson Valley Primary School and Mt Albert Grammar School. He went to work as an electrical apprentice with the Auckland Harbour Board.

He joined 219 Squadron at Catterick on June 17 and served with the squadron throughout the Battle of Britain. Commissioned in April 1941, Crook went on to the RAFO in August 1947, with the rank of Squadron Leader. He died on March 20 1988. PO 9.4.41 FO 9.4.42 FL 9.10.43 SL (RAFO) 1.8.47

VALTON WILLIAM JAMES CROOK NZ 40203

Air Gunner

British

141 Squadron

The squadron went south to West Malling on July 12 and Crombie was in one of nine Defiants attacked by Bf 109s of III/JG 51 off Dover on July 19. His aircraft, L 6974, was shot down into the Channel. The pilot, Pilot Officer J R Kemp, and Crombie were both reported ‘Missing’. Crombie was 29. With no known grave, he is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 13.

DAVID MOORE CROOK Pilot

British

Air Gunner

Australian

264 Squadron

After the outbreak of war, he volunteered for aircrew duties and began his ground training at Weraroa on January 15 1940. After a Lewis gunnery course at the Air Observers’ School, Ohakea, he sailed for the UK in the SS Akaroa on March 23, arriving on May 9. Crook was at Uxbridge for a month before being posted to 264 Squadron at Duxford for further training. On July 26 1940 he was sent to 5 OTU, Aston Down, where he was awarded his air gunner’s badge and promoted to Sergeant. He then rejoined 264 Squadron on September 15 1940. Posted away on March 20 1941, Crook went to 3 Group Training Flight at Stradishall, leaving there for the Middle East in early April. He joined 37 Squadron at Shallufa, Egypt, to fly in Wellingtons. In June Crook’s aircraft was shot down into the sea and he was not picked up for 38 hours. With his tour completed in early September 1941, Crook returned to the UK and went to HQ 25 Group at Stormy Down, as an instructor. He received a Mention in Despatches (1.1.42). After a course at CGS, Sutton Bridge, he was posted to 7 AGS, Manby, to instruct. In late June 1942 Crook went to 1653 Conversion Unit at Polebrook and after a month moved to the Aircrew Pool at Snaith. With his crew, he flew from Lyneham in a Liberator, to join 160 Squadron at Aqir, Palestine.The squadron later moved to Egypt and in January 1943 became part of 178 Squadron at Shandur. Crook completed his third tour in June 1943, returned to the UK and was repatriated to New Zealand in September. He was with No 1 (RNZAF) Squadron at Whenuapai in early 1944 but transferred to the RAAF and left for Melbourne in June. He was discharged in mid-February 1945, as a Warrant Officer, for medical reasons. On December 22 1950 he died through drowning at Hawkesbury River, New South Wales, aged 37.

Crombie, of Lightwater, Surrey, joined the RAF in September 1939, mustered as a u/t Air Gunner. He completed his training and then joined 141 Squadron at Turnhouse in 1940.

90478 PO

Sgt

Born in Orange, New South Wales on May 11 1913, Crook went to New Zealand in 1937, to take part in a Government Building Scheme.

ROBERT CROMBIE Sgt

219 Squadron

Crook joined the RAFVR about July 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741859). He was called up on September 1 1939, completed his training and was at 5 OTU in early June 1940.

In August 1938 he joined the Civil Reserve of Pilots. He was called up by the RNZAF at the outbreak of war and reported to the Ground Training School at Weraroa on December 18 1939. Croker went to No 1 EFTS, Taieri in mid-January 1940 and moved to No 1 FTS, Wigram on March 11. With his training completed, he sailed for the UK on July 12 in the RMS Rangitane, arriving on August 27. Croker arrived at 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge from No 1 RAF Depot; Uxbridge on September 11. He was unhurt when the undercarriage of his Hurricane, L 1789, collapsed on landing on September 24. He joined 111 Squadron at Drem on the 29th. He had flown fourteen operational sorties before being posted to 260 Squadron at Skitten on December 12 1940. Croker went to 41 Squadron at Catterick in May 1941. On a training flight on June 1, he crashed into the side of a hill and suffered severe head injuries. He was taken to Catterick Hospital. He died next day. Croker is buried in Catterick Cemetery, Yorkshire.

903506

British

609 Squadron

Crook, from Shrewsbury, was born in Huddersfield in 1914. He was at The Leys School, Cambridge and then Cambridge University. In July 1938 he joined 609 Squadron, AAF at Yeadon and made his first flight on August 2. He was called up on August 25 1939. Crook was posted to 6 FTS, Little Rissington on October 7 and was on No 15 Course, which began on the 9th. He arrived at 10 B&GS, Warmwell on April 24 1940 with the Advanced Training Squadron of 6 FTS, for the final stage of his course, which ended on April 27.

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MICHAEL ERNEST CROSKELL 124118

Sgt

Pilot

British

Later he was an assistant director at Elstree Film Studios. In 1935 Crossley joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio training on November 25, as a pupil pilot. On February 15 1936 he was posted to 11 FTS, Wittering and after completing the course he joined 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on August 24. Immediately preceding the war Crossley spent some time as ADC to the Governor of Aden. He rejoined 32 in 1939 and on August 31 he was appointed ‘A’ Flight Commander and made an Acting Flight Lieutenant on September 9 1939. From May 18 1940 the squadron used Abbeville as a forward base. On the 19th Crossley shot down a Bf 109, on the 22nd another, on the 23rd two more, on the 26th a Ju 88 and on June 8 he destroyed two He 111s on a patrol over France from Biggin Hill. Awarded the DFC (21.6.40), Crossley received it from the King at Biggin Hill. On July 20 1940 Crossley claimed a Bf 109 destroyed and shared a Bf 110, on the 25th he got a probable Bf 109, on August 12 two Bf 109s destroyed, on the 15th two Ju 88s, a Do 17 and another Do 17 shared, on the 16th a Bf 109, a Bf 110 and a Ju 88 destroyed, on the 18th a Bf 109 and a Ju 88 destroyed and a Do 17 damaged and on the 25th a Bf 109 and a Do 17 destroyed. Crossley was shot down twice in the Battle of Britain. On August 18 he baled out after being shot down by Bf 109s and landed at Gillingham. His Hurricane, N 2461, crashed at Wigmore. On August 24 he crashed at Lyminge after a combat over Folkestone. The Hurricane, P 3481, was written off but Crossley was unhurt. On August 16 1940 Crossley had been promoted to Acting Squadron Leader and given command of 32, when Squadron Leader J Worrall was posted away. He was awarded the DSO (20.8.40) and remained with the squadron until April 1941, when he was sent to America, as a test pilot with the British Air Commission. Back in the UK, Crossley led the Detling Wing in 1943. He contracted tuberculosis and was restricted to non-operational flying. Crossley was made an OBE (1.1.46) and released from the RAF in 1946, as a Wing Commander. He later went to South Africa, to manage a family business, growing trees to produce pit props. He died in his garden, suddenly, in December 1987 at White River, East Transvaal.

213 Squadron

Croskell joined the RAFVR in June 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741693). Awarded his flying badge in August 1939, he was called up on September 1. He went to 11 FTS, Shawbury on September 27 1939, for No 14 (RAFVR) Course, which ended on November 18. Croskell arrived at 12 Group Pool, Aston Down on December 31 1939, converted to Hurricanes and joined 213 Squadron at Wittering on February 3 1940. He was in ‘A’ Flight of the squadron. On May 17 1940 the flight flew down from Wittering to Biggin Hill and in the afternoon it escorted a Bombay transport of 271 Squadron across the Channel to Abbeville. Later in the afternoon the Hurricanes landed at Merville to refuel, taking off again at 17.45 hours to patrol Brussels and Verde-Brain. At 19.50 the flight returned to Biggin Hill, having seen no enemy aircraft all day. On May 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22 ‘A’ Flight flew to France from Biggin Hill each day, mounted patrols from Lille Marcq or Merville and returned to Biggin Hill each evening.The flight returned to Wittering on May 23. During this period ‘B’ Flight of 213 had been operating in France, attached to 79 Squadron at Merville. It also returned to Wittering on May 23. Over Dunkirk on May 29, Croskell probably destroyed a Ju 87. At the start of the Battle of Britain 213 Squadron was based at Exeter. On August 11 Croskell claimed the destruction of a Ju 88, a Bf 109 and probably a second Ju 88, on the 26th he damaged a Bf 110 and on September 11, flying from Tangmere, he destroyed a Bf 110. Croskell was shot down near Maidstone on September 15, in Hurricane P 3113, and baled out. This was the aircraft formerly used by 213’s CO, Squadron Leader D S MacDonald (qv), and carried the code letters AK-!!!. The three exclamation marks indicated enemy aircraft claimed by MacDonald. Croskell was posted to CFS Upavon for an instructors’ course in February 1941, after which he joined the instructing staff at 6 FTS, Little Rissington in April. In February 1942 he moved to No 1 Beam Approach School at Watchfield. Commissioned in May 1942, he remained there, instructing, until released from the RAF in March 1947. Croskell was commissioned in the RAFVR in December 1947 and instructed, as a civilian, until 1951, when he joined BEA, from which he retired in 1976. He died on January 15 2015. PO 27.5.42 FO 27.11.42

FL 27.5.44

APO 3.2.36 PO 25.11.36 FO 25.5.38 FL 25.5.40

JOHN DALLAS CROSSMAN

FO (RAFVR) 10.12.47

43282 PO

Pilot Australian

JAMES TERENCE CROSSEY 42805

PO

Pilot

British

In early 1939 Crossman unsuccessfully applied for a short service commission. A second attempt six months later went better and on August 12 1939 he sailed for Britain. Crossman arrived at 9 EFTS, Ansty on October 16 for his ab initio training, as a pupil pilot. He moved to RAF College FTS at Cranwell on April 10 1940. At the end of the course, he was posted direct to 32 Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 14. He was detached on the 19th to Uxbridge, for a short R/T course, rejoining the squadron on the 22nd. After monoplane flying experience in a Magister back at the Sector Training Flight at Biggin Hill, the CO decided to send Crossman to 5 OTU, Aston Down on August 3 for further training and conversion to Hurricanes. However, this was cancelled. Instead Crossman went on August 3 to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge, driving himself in a car he had bought that had belonged to Pilot Officer G I Cherrington, killed in the Battle of France. Crossman rejoined 32 Squadron on August 26. He went north with it to Acklington but on September 12 was posted to 46 Squadron at Stapleford Tawney. On the 15th he probably destroyed a Do 17, in an engagement SE of London. On September 30 46 Squadron was jumped by Bf 109s and Crossman was shot down and killed, crashing in flames at Tablehurst Farm, Forest Row. He is buried in Chalfont St Giles churchyard, Buckinghamshire.

After completing his training, he went to 7 B&GS, Porthcawl on April 29 1940 and on to 5 OTU, Aston Down on May 13. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 249 Squadron at Leconfield on June 10 and served with it in the Battle of Britain. On September 15 1940 he probably destroyed a Do 17. The squadron sailed in the carrier HMS Furious on May 10 1941. At Gibraltar they transferred on to HMS Ark Royal on the 18th and three days later flew off to Ta Kali, Malta. On November 22 1941 Crossey claimed a Mc 202 destroyed and on December 24 he shared a Ju 88. In February 1942 Crossey left 249 and went to Cairo, from where he was posted to South Africa, as an instructor. He served at various Air Schools until August 21 1944, when he was posted back to the UK. He joined the Aircraft Delivery Flight at Redhill on October 15 but three weeks later went to 105 OTU, Bramcote, to convert to Dakotas. Crossey was posted to 216 Squadron at Cairo West on February 17 1945 and served with 26 Squadron at Akyab from March 28 until August 1 1945, when he returned to 216, then at Almaza, Egypt. Crossey was released in 1946 and later went to live in Malta, where he was Manager of Malta Airlines.

APO 10.4.40 PO 14.7.40

RICHARD GEORGE CROSSMAN

APO 23.10.39 PO 18.5.40 FO 18.5.41 FL 18.5.42

746701

MICHAEL NICHOLSON CROSSLEY FL

Pilot

British

32 and 46 Squadrons

Crossman was born on March 20 1919 at Mossman, Queensland. He was educated at Cook’s Hill Primary School and Newcastle Boys’ High School in New South Wales.

249 Squadron

Born in Johannesburg on January 24 1918, Crossey joined the RAF on a short service commission and he began his elementary flying training at 5 E&RFTS, Hanworth on August 14 1939, as a pupil pilot. Crossey was posted to 3 ITW, Hastings on October 24 and went on to 9 FTS, Hullavington on November 6.

37554

SL 11.8.41 WC 1.9.42

Sgt

Wop/AG

British

25 Squadron

Crossman, of Watford, Hertfordshire, joined the RAFVR about March 1939 as an Airman u/t Wop/AG. He was called up on September 1, completed his training and joined 25 Squadron at Debden in early October 1940. He later trained as a Radar Operator.

32 Squadron

Crossley was born on May 29 1912 at Halford, Warwickshire. He was educated at Eton. Afterwards he studied at the College of Aeronautical Engineering at Chelsea. After graduating in 1933, he was employed by the Aero Club, Brooklands.

During the night of May 5/6 1941, flying with Sergeant K B Hollowell in Beaufighter R 2156, Crossman was involved in the destruction of an unidentified enemy aircraft and probably a second N of the Wash.

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a CBE (1.1.63), KCB (1973) and appointed Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod to the Order of the Bath in 1979. He died on December 1 1996.

Flying again with Hollowell on May 16/17 in R 2156, a He 111 was destroyed over the sea near Cromer and on June 4/5 they destroyed another He 111 over West Runton, in Beaufighter R 2154. Still with 25 Squadron, Crossman was killed on July 8 1941, as a Flight Sergeant, in Beaufighter R 2245. The pilot, Pilot Officer D W Thompson, was also killed. Crossman is buried in Watford Cemetery.

PO 11.4.40 FO 11.4.41 FL 11.4.42 AC 1.1.64 AVM 1.7.6 AM 1.1.73

SL 11.7.43

SL 1.8.47

WC 1.7.54

GC 1.7.59

IAN JAMES ALEXANDER CRUICKSHANKS HAROLD REGINALD CROWLEY 42971

PO

Air Gunner

British

80819

PO

Pilot British

Cruickshanks joined the RAFVR about September 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740646). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training at 15 FTS, Lossiemouth on No 6 Course, which ran from December 29 1939 to June 10 1940. He was commissioned and posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down. After converting to Spitfires, he joined 66 Squadron at Coltishall on June 23.

Born on June 19 1915, Crowley joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice in January 1931 (565409) and he passed out in December 1933. Crowley later remustered as an Air Gunner and was flying in Harts with 12 Squadron at Andover.

On August 20 Cruickshanks shared a Bf 110 and probably shared a second one and on September 9 he shared a He 111. Two days later he made a forced-landing NE of Ashford after being damaged in a combat and was slightly injured. He was posted away on September 29 1940 and joined 4 Ferry Pilot Pool on October 8. Cruikshanks was killed on June 8 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant, but the unit he was serving with is not known. He is is buried in Milverton Cemetery, Leamington Spa.

In September 1939 Crowley was with 64 Squadron at Church Fenton. When the squadron began to receive Spitfires in exchange for its Blenheims in April 1940, Crowley, then a Pilot Officer, moved to 219 Squadron at Catterick on May 22. With the advent of airborne radar and the Beaufighter, Crowley retrained as a Radar Operator. In early October 1940 he went on a short attachment to 600 Squadron at Redhill with a 219 Beaufighter, to test out the new radar equipment

PO 10.6.40 FO 10.6.41 FL 10.6.42

operationally. He later transferred to the Technical Branch, as a signals specialist. He stayed in the RAF after the war, holding responsible staff appointments in signals and communication. Crowley retired on July 1 1965, as a Wing Commander, retaining the rank of Group Captain. He died in 1984.

JOHN CRUTTENDEN 40895

PO

Pilot

British

With training completed, he was posted to No 1 AACU. He was on ‘Z’ Flight of the unit when it moved from Henlow to Watchet on May 1 1939. Cruttenden was posted from No 1 AACU to 6 OTU, Sutton Bridge on May 28 1940. After converting to Hurricanes, he joined 43 Squadron at Tangmere on June 9. On July 7 Cruttenden shared in the destruction of a Do 17. On this day he baled out after a glycol leak caused his engine to catch fire. He was shot down in combat with enemy aircraft ten miles S of the Isle of Wight on August 8 1940 and reported ‘Missing’. He was 20. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 7.

DENIS CROWLEY-MILLING PO

Pilot

British

43 Squadron

Cruttenden joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his elementary flying training on May 16 1938.

PO 17.1.40 FO 17.1.41 FL 1.12.41 SL 1.7.45 SL 1.9.45 WC 1.1.56

78274

66 Squadron

219 and 600 Squadrons

242 Squadron

Born at St Asaph, Flintshire on March 22 1919, CrowleyMilling was educated at Malvern College. He was an apprentice at Rolls Royce and he joined the RAFVR in November 1937, as an Airman u/t Pilot (740885). Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training, was commissioned in April 1940 and arrived at 5 OTU on the 20th. After converting to Gladiators and Spitfires, he was posted to 615 Squadron in France on May 14. After the squadron was withdrawn, Crowley-Milling was posted to 242 Squadron at Biggin Hill on June 6 1940. He went with it to France on June 8, to help cover the retreat of the Army to the Atlantic ports. The last of the 242 pilots left France on the 18th and went to their new base at Coltishall. On August 31 1940 Crowley-Milling claimed a He 111 destroyed and on September 7 a Bf 110. On this day his Hurricane, P 3715, was damaged in combat over the Thames Estuary and he made a forced-landing on an old aerodrome at Stow-St Maries. On September 15 Crowley-Milling destroyed a Bf 109 and on the 17th he shared in the destruction of a Ju 88. On February 8 1941 he shared a Do 17 off Clacton, on the 15th he damaged a Ju 88 and on April 1 he probably destroyed another. He was awarded the DFC (11.4.41). On June 13 1941 Crowley-Milling was posted to 610 Squadron at Westhampnett, as a Flight Commander. He was soon in action, sharing a Bf 109 on June 21 and probably destroying another four days later. On August 21 Crowley-Milling was shot down over France. With the help of the French underground, he evaded capture and eventually reached Spain, where he was interned for three months, during which time he contracted paratyphoid. After being released, he recovered in a Madrid hospital and arrived back in the UK in December 1941. Crowley-Milling returned to 610 and took over his old flight. Over Dieppe on August 19 1942, he destroyed a Bf 109 and damaged a Bf 109 and a FW 190. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC (22.9.42). On September 1 1942 Crowley-Milling was promoted and posted to Duxford, to form and command 181 Squadron, which he did until August 1943. He then briefly led 16 Typhoon Bomber Wing but came off operations in October to go to HQ USAAF at High Wycombe, to coordinate fighter operations with B 17 daylight attacks. He was awarded the DSO (24.12.43). When he came off operational flying, he had made 431 sorties. In June 1944 Crowley-Milling was posted to Air Ministry, Operational Requirements. He was granted a Permanent Commission in 1945 and took part in the first Battle of Britain flypast in that year. He commanded 6 Squadron from November 1947 to July 1950 and led the Odiham Meteor Wing in the 1953 Coronation flypast. Crowley-Milling retired from the RAF on July 29 1975, as an Air Marshal. He was made

APO 9.7.38 PO 16.5.39

LAWRENCE ELWOOD CRYDERMAN 41674

FO

Pilot

Canadian

242 Squadron

Cryderman, a school teacher from Islington, Ontario, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio flying course at 9 E&RFTS, Ansty on December 28 1938. He went to 10 FTS, Ternhill for No 11 Course, which ran from March 20 to October 14 1939. Cryderman joined 242 Squadron at Coltishall from No 2 School of Army Co-operation Andover on August 31 1940. Completely lacking in Hurricane experience, he was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on September 5, to get some. He rejoined 242 on the 26th and flew his first sortie on October 5 1940. Cryderman was scrambled on February 8 1941, with two other pilots, to search for an enemy aircraft E of Clacton. They found it and an attack was made, damaging one of its engines. Soon afterwards, Cryderman called up, saying he was returning to base, then that he was landing on the sea. Despite searches, he was not found. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 30. APO 4.3.39 PO 2.10.39 FO 2.10.40

WILLIAM ARTHUR CUDDIE 42806

PO

Pilot

British

141 Squadron

Cuddie, of Regina, Canada, joined the RAF on a short service commission and began his ab initio flying on August 3 1939. He completed his training at 6 FTS, Little Rissington, on No 19 Course, which ran from April 27 to August 3 1940.

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to Cooper. In 1959 he emigrated to New Zealand. Cukr (Cooper) died in Christchurch, New Zealand on October 24 1989.

He then went to 5 OTU, Aston Down and after converting to Defiants, he joined 141 Squadron at Turnhouse on August 19. He was killed on October 3 1943, as a Squadron Leader with 46 Squadron, then based in the Middle East. Cuddie was flying a Beaufighter in an attack on a convoy off Kos. L E M Coote (qv) was lost in the same aircraft. With no known grave, Cuddie is remembered on the Alamein Memorial, Column 267.

Sgt 6.8.40 PO 1940 F/L 1/7/42

REGINALD WALKER CULLEN APO 23.10.39 PO 3.8.30 FO 3.8.41 FL 3.8.42

752429

VACLAV ERIC CUKR

Cullen was born in Northampton on June 2 1919. He joined the RAFVR in May 1939, as an Aircrafthand. Called up on September 1 1939, he was sent to RAF Wittering, where he joined 23 Squadron.

107245

Sgt

Pilot

Czechoslovakian

310, 43 and 253 Sqdns

Cukr was born on October 16 1913 in Prague. On leaving school he trained as an electrician but on October 1 1932 joined the Military Aviation Academy at Prostejov. He graduated on June 15 1934 and was posted to the 2nd Squadron of the 1st Air Regiment, based at Prague-Kbely. On September 15 1935 he was assigned to the Military Aviation College, based at the same site. On July 1 1937 he was posted to 85 Bomber Squadron of the 6th Air Regiment, also based at the same airfield and also at Havlickuv Brod.

AC

Air Gunner

British

23 Squadron

He remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner and on September 4 Cullen began gunnery training with the squadron. In March 1940 embarkation orders came for the Middle East and then Finland but both were cancelled. In June 1940 the squadron moved to Ford and began flying night patrols from Tangmere. By November 1940 23 was intruding by night over the French airfields, often dropping anti-personnel bombs. Late in 1940 Cullen was posted to Bomber Command, as a Sergeant, and joined 35 Squadron at Linton-on-Ouse. On January 9 1941 he was captured by the Germans after baling out over Alderney in the Channel Islands. Cullen was sent to Dulag Luft for interrogation. Two weeks later he went to Stalag Luft 1. During his captivity he was confined in the PoW camps at Stalag Luft 1, 3, 4 and 6. (PoW No 425). The final four months of the war were spent on the road and the last camp was vacated ahead of the Russian advance. Cullen was liberated in early June 1945 by the 6th Airborne Division He was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Warrant Officer.

When the Germans took over Czechoslovakia on March 15 1939, the Czech Air Force was disbanded and Cizek was demobilized. With other former airmen, on the night of June 13 1939, he smuggled himself aboard a coal train near Kuncice, Ostrava, which took them over the border into Poland. There he reported to the Czechoslovak Consulate in Krakow which arranged for onward travel to France. He sailed, from F, on July 27 1939, aboard the Kastelholm. He was accepted into l’Armée de l’Air and on October 6 1939 was assigned to CIC Chartres for retraining on French equipment. On March 8 1940, after completing an airgunnery course, at Montpelier, he was posted as an operational pilot, with the rank of Caporel Chef, to GCII/3 which was equipped with MS-406 aircraft and later with Dewoitine D-520s. On May 20 Cukr claimed the probable destruction of a Do 17, on the 22nd a Ju 87 destroyed and a Hs 126 shared, on the 24th and 26th he shared in the destruction of two Do 17s and on June 4 he destroyed a Bf 109 and shared a He 111. On June 8, during an attack on a Ju 87B, he received a head wound which nearly blinded him. He had to abort the attack and make a belly-landing in a field near Vailly, an area already being overrun by advancing forward units of the German Wehrmacht. He managed to evade capture and crossed back into French held territory where he collapsed unconscious. He was found by French soldiers who took him to the hospital at Chateau-Thierry. After treatment he left to avoid capture by the advancing Germans. During the Battle of France Cukr was credited with the destruction of eight Luftwaffe aircraft, making him the 3rd most successful Czechoslovak pilot of that Battle. With the fall of France imminent, Cukr, with other Czechoslovak airmen, was released from l’Armée de l’Air service and made his way to Port Vendres from where he was evacuated by ship to North Africa on June 24. He then boarded a ship bound for Gibraltar where he transferred to the Neuralia which arrived in Liverpool on July 12 1940. He was accepted into the RAFVR on August 6 and on the following day he joined 310 Squadron at Duxford from the Czechoslovak Depot at Cosford. He was sent to 6 OTU on August 17, converted to Hurricanes and joined 43 Squadron at Usworth on September 12. During combat on September 23 his aircraft was badly damaged and he had to make an emergency landing at Biggin Hill. He went to 253 Squadron at Kenley on or about September 28. He made his first operational sortie on the 29th. Commissioned in early 1941, Cukr remained with 253 but the injuries he had received in France started to affect his flying. Following medical tests he had to cease operational flying and, on March 12 1941, he was posted to 52 OTU at Debden as an instructor. During 1942 Cukr was posted to the Test Unit at Kemble, where he went on a conversion course to become a test pilot on multi-engined aircraft and on January 15 1943 he was posted to 20 MU at Aston Down as a test pilot for the SOA technical unit. He also commanded a small flight which converted multi-engined pilots to singleengined fighters. O July 4 1943, during a test flight in a special Mustang I (AG489) Cukr was in collision with a Spitfire flown by a pupil from 52 OTU. He managed to bale out but was at low altitude and the parachute failed to fully deploy. He landed in some tree-tops but was seriously injured. He was admitted to the RAF Hospital at Wroughton and then spent the remainder of the war in the RAF Rehabilitation Unit at Loughborough. He was invalided out of the RAF on August 13 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant and returned to Czechoslovakia. Initially he remained in the Czechoslovak Air Force, with the rank of Major, but, because of his injuries he was, eventually, invalided out. In October 1945 he became Vice-Chairman of Svazu Lectu (the Airmen’s Association of Czechoslovakia). Following the communist takeover of Czechoslovakia in February 1948 Cukr was aware that he was going to be arrested because of his RAF service. Despite the difficulties caused by his injuries, he escaped, with the assistance of five former RAF colleagues, over the border into the American Zone of Germany in May 1948. In Germany Cukr joined the Czechoslovak Intelligence Office (CIO) which was a news organisation working against the communists. He remained with the CIO until 1957 when it was disbanded due to infiltration by communist agents. Cukr returned to England where he obtained British Nationality and changed his name

JAMES DOUGLAS CULMER 177211

Sgt Air

Gunner

British

25 Squadron

Culmer was born on March 15 1913. He joined 600 Squadron, AAF, as an Aircrafthand, about October 1938 (800632). Called to full-time service on August 24 1939, he remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner and completed his training. He was with 600 Squadron until May 1940, when he was posted to 25 Squadron at North Weald, serving with it throughout the Battle of Britain. On the night of November 15/16 1940, Culmer was gunner in a Blenheim, patrolling over Essex, with Sergeant S V Holloway, pilot, and AC F Fildes, radar operator. A He 111 was suddenly illuminated by a searchlight about 50 yards astern of Culmer’s aircraft. He opened fire, causing the Heinkel to break up. He was awarded the DFM (24.12.40). Culmer was with 25 Squadron until 1942. He was commissioned from Warrant Officer in August 1944 and stayed on in the RAF after the war, in the Aircraft Control Branch. He retired on March 15 1963, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1990. PO 24.8.44 FO 24.2.45 FO 24.8.46 FL 18.5.56

JOHN HENRY CULVERWELL 529270

Sgt Pilot

British

87 Squadron

Born in London on September 30 1914, Culverwell joined the RAF on February 18 1936, as an Aircrafthand. He was posted to 3 S of TT on May 8, went to 2 Wing, Henlow on July 3 and after passing out as a Flight Rigger, he returned to 3 S of TT and also qualified as a Metal Rigger. Culverwell was then posted, as an AC 1, to the School of Air Gunnery, on the maintenance staff. He applied for pilot training and was remustered as a Metal Rigger u/t Pilot on June 26 1939. His rank was then Corporal. He did his elementary flying training at 13 E&RFTS, White Waltham. On September 2 1939 he moved on to 10 FTS, Ternhill for No 14 Course for intermediate and advanced flying training. The course ended on January 27 1940 and Culverwell went to the 11 Group Pool, St Athan for further training and conversion to Hurricanes.He joined 87 Squadron in France on March 29 1940. The squadron was withdrawn to Debden on May 24. Culverwell was killed in a night-flying accident at RAF Exeter on July 25 1940. He took off and appeared to climb too steeply, stalled and crashed back into the ground, in

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Hurricane P 3596. He is buried in Cathays Cemetery, Cardiff. In 1988 his widow died and was buried in the same grave.

In January 1943 Cunningham was given command of 85 Squadron at Hunsdon and Rawnsley went with him, as Navigation Leader. During the night of June 13/14 1943 they shot down a FW 190 and on August 23/24 and September 8/9 two more. The team’s final successes came in early 1944, with an Me 410 destroyed during the night of January 2/3, a Ju 188 damaged on February 20/21 and a Ju 88 probably destroyed on the 23/24th. Cunningham was posted in March 1944 to 11 Group, Uxbridge as Group Captain Night Ops. He was awarded a second Bar to the DSO (3.3.44) and released from the RAF in 1945, as a Group Captain. In addition to his British awards, he received the Order of Patriotic War 1st Class (USSR) and the Silver Star (US) (14.6.46). Cunningham rejoined de Havilland and had a most distinguished career involving the development and testing of new aircraft, particularly the Comet. He rejoined the AAF and commanded 604 Squadron from July 1946 until 1948. His portrait was done by Eric Kennington in 1941. He was made an OBE in 1951 and a CBE in 1963. Cunningham died on July 21 2002. His name is on a memorial plaque at Whitgift School.

ALFRED BERNARD CUMBERS 118713

Sgt

Air Gunner

British

141 Squadron

Born in Southend in 1908, Cumbers joined the RAFVR in March 1939, as an Airman u/t Wop/AG (746780). He was called up on September 1 and with his training as an air gunner completed, he joined 141 Squadron at West Malling on July 14 1940. During the night of September 16 Cumbers was in Defiant N 1552 with Flying Officer J Waddingham. They destroyed a He 111 and probably shot down another into the sea. Cumbers was awarded the DFM (18.3.41). He later retrained as a Navigator Radar and was commissioned from Warrant Officer in March 1942. Cumbers was with 89 Squadron in 1942, in the Middle East, still flying with Waddingham. On the night of July 4/5 they destroyed a Ju 88 NE of Port Said, in Beaufighter X 7719. They were with an 89 Squadron detachment in Malta in September 1942. On the 26th they crashed in Beaufighter V 8268 because of engine failure. Both men were pulled from the burning aircraft but Waddingham died from his injuries next day. Cumbers was released from the RAF in 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant. He died on December 28 1985.

PO (AAF) 7.5.36 FO (AAF) 5.12.37 FO 24.8.39

JOHN LAURENCE GILCHRIST CUNNINGHAM 90194

FL

Pilot

British

603 Squadron

Cunningham was born at Burntisland, Fife in 1917. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and joined 603 Squadron, AAF in 1935. He was embodied on August 23 1939 and was detached from 603 to RAF Leuchars on November 4 1939, on experimental work.

PO 17.3.42 FO 1.10.42 FL 17.3.44

JAMES CUNNINGHAM 1052182

LAC

Radar Operator

British

29 Squadron

He returned to 603 on November 12 and he damaged a He 111 on December 7, when he was with a 603 detachment protecting Montrose airfield. Cunningham was detached from 603 to RAF Turnhouse in June 1940, for controller duties. He rejoined the squadron on July 15 and on the 20th he shared in shooting down a Do 17 into the sea thirty miles E of Aberdeen. He failed to return from a combat over Dover on August 28 1940 and was reported ‘Missing’. He was 23. Cunningham is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 4.

Cunningham joined the RAFVR in June 1940, as an Aircrafthand. It is probable that he volunteered for flying duties and was sent on a short radar course at RAF Yatesbury, after which he joined 29 Squadron at Digby on September 26, as an LAC Radar Operator. He is known to have flown two operational sorties, with Pilot Officer D J Anderson, pilot, and Pilot Officer P Byng-Hall, gunner, on September 28 1940 and with Flying Officer L G H Kells, pilot, and Sergeant R Lilley, gunner, on October 8 1940. No further service details traced.

PO (AAF) 6.5.35 FO (AAF) 6.11.36 FO 23.8.39 FL 12.3.40

WALLACE CUNNINGHAM JOHN CUNNINGHAM 90216 FL

Pilot

British

80545

PO

Pilot British

19 Squadron

604 Squadron Cunningham was born in Glasgow on December 4 1916. He joined the RAFVR in September 1938, as an Airman u/t Pilot (741899).

Cunningham was born at Addington on July 27 1917 and educated at Whitgift School, Croydon. In 1935 he became an apprentice at the de Havilland Aircraft Co.

Called up on September 1 1939, he completed his training at 11 FTS, Shawbury on No 17 Course, which ran from November 20 1939 to June 8 1940. He was posted to 5 OTU, Aston Down on June 10 and after sconverting to Spitfires, he joined 19 Squadron at Fowlmere on June 25. On August 16 Cunninhgam claimed a Bf 110 destroyed, on September 7 a He 111 destroyed and another damaged, on the 9th a Bf 109 destroyed, on the 15th a Bf 109 destroyed and a Bf 110 shared, on the 18th a Ju 88 shared and on November 15 a Bf 110 shared. He was awarded the DFC

He joined 604 Squadron AAF in November 1935 and after learning to fly, he was asked by de Havilland’s to test light aircraft. He was soon appointed to be a full-time assistant test pilot under Geoffrey de Havilland. On August 24 1939 he was mobilised and in September was made ‘B’ Flight Commander. He was detached from 604 to AFDU, Northolt on May 17 1940 and then to RAF Tangmere on the 20th and later to the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. These detachments appear to have been in connection with trials of a bomb, designed to be dropped on enemy bombers. Cunningham rejoined 604 on July 8