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Looking at Ourselves
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https://archive.org/details/lookingatourselvOOOOgyim

ooking at Ourselves

JOZSEF GYIMESI

BF PROMETHEUS BOOKS Buffalo, New York

.^5

/ / j

!

'^rry Mediterranean Reasoning When Pharaoh became god incarnate the union between nature and above­ nature became happily accomplished in the eyes of his people; and because they looked like him, the god, it was inevitable to conclude that man is made in the image of god; i.e., man is divine. This logic, however, wasn’t necessarily flawless, because god could have entered the human body without making man in his image. But theirs was a convenient inference, which in due time helped and confirmed our aspiration for immortality. Few or perhaps no other event in history can parallel the effects of Pharaoh— god—on the human psyche. His aftereffects, directly and indirectly, still influence us; and not only the West but through it also the greater part of the world. Man always hoped for eternal life, but since the pharoahs, this hope turned into certainty for many of us.

500

EPILOGUE

v. Rational, Irrational, and! Non-Rational Matter is eternal, and so is Sellem. Matter takes all kinds of shapes and forms, but keeps the tendency to revert back to its original state; and so does Sellem. Both matter and Sellem, however, will always be ready to return in a new identity from their original condition. All this seems to be rational, just as much as saying that lakes, brooks, rivers, rain, dew, moisture, and drops of water are substantially water from the ocean; they are not the ocean, but they are water, hence tend to go back to the ocean. Thus the cycle can start again and again. The believer’s certainty is that matter will return to matter, but that Sellem, once it becomes the Soul of man, remains our personality within eternity. But then how could it be our personality after death, when it was only a part of it while we were alive? We know that as far as identity or self is concerned, nothing is changeless in nature except change itself. So this kind of tenet sounds quite irrational. The third view is that our logic, besides being pedestrian, is also arbitrary, even on material levels. Hence, by its very nature it is quite unfit to be an arbiter in any kind of spiritual issue; the consequences of our logic, the socalled rational and its opposite, the irrational, pertain strictly to matter; within the non-material the only usable means is the non-rational, that most ancient and trustworthy source of our wisdom. The most obvious representative of this non-rational is our Soul (i.e., Sellem, or a sub-aspect of it), which is given to us by the Supreme Power from the above-nature, and as such after our physical death, will return to the realm of its origin. We don’t really know what the non-rational actually is, but we are aware of its existence and of its uncanny might. We cannot say, for instance, that telepathy is rational or that it is irrational; rather, it is non-rational, and it works. And so does clairvoyance, precognition and retrocognition, psychic healing, intuition, and many other non-material manifestations of reality. But none of them really proves personal eternal life. At its best our non-rational is a strong indication that something is inherently wrong with our rational.

vi. Is Non=Rational flue Universal Rational? However difficult it might be for some of us, the non-material should be taken very seriously. We have been led astray too long by our objective rational mode of thought. We can ill afford it. I started the essay in Book One, Part IV, Sellem-Humanizer by claiming that life is a chemico-physical reaction with a Mind. In the pages that followed, it was repeatedly stated that Mind, as an aspect of Sellem, is the programmer and programming of procedures of life. All in all, this means^that everything alive has a Mind. Do we have proof of this? Yes. It is becoming more and more evident that Mind is the primary perception in cell life; that Mind is a “divine" insight not only within artist and genius, but also within the ladder

EPILOGUE

501

of molecular organization. Primitive man somehow always knew this; he always tried to reason with everything seen and unseen, intelligible and unintelligible. But he was thought to be much too simple and superstitious to be taken seriously by the “objective and rational” learned man. In other words, Sellem and its aspects are non-material implements of life, and on a deeper level their activities may be considered non-rational, if compared to the arbitrary constructions man imposes on nature with the help of our so-called objective rational. From a holistic standpoint, however, the non-rational of Sellem may very well be the only universal rational. And once we become familiar with it, we will probably also understand the mechanism of all psychic abilities. But even then we will still remain within nature. It is quite megalomaniacal or masculine to dare to suppose or to claim that the Almighty from above-nature made us an exception. This supposition or claim sounds irrational only because it is non-rational and above the rational.

vii. Reincarnation or Metempsycikosis After he became aware of the relationship between cause and effect, primitive man did his best to explain it. Only lately have we started to realize that be­ sides being poetic, his endeavors also made sense. By identifying with nature and its changes, sooner or later he had to stumble upon the idea of reincarnation. With reincarnation and its positive and negative peculiarities at hand he eventual­ ly began to systematically interpret the mysteries of nature and of human life. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to give an account of these inter­ pretations or to follow the development of reincarnation or metempsychosis into its religious and social tenets. The far more important aspect of this idea is the fact that the great majority of mankind, one way or another, still shares the belief in reincarnation. And perhaps very wisely so, because among other things it explains the final fate of Sellem and also gives ingenious reasons for great individual and social injustices. It also explains the many qualitative and quantitative differences between us. Without a doubt many of its clarifications are more reassuring to the human heart than those materialistic ones. Does all this mean that primitive man was essentially right from this point of view, too? Not necessarily. Time and again it is claimed that during hypnosis mediums regress into previous lives, often far back in history. These regressions often seem to be genuine enough. When these occur, the most thought-provoking side of these events is that the medium always turns into a striking personality; slave or king, happy or miserable, good or evil; but this soul from the past is never an average individual, psychologically speaking. These people from bygone times may occasionally provide us with information previously unsuspected, or may speak in languages completely alien to mediums in their waking state. Isn’t this proof enough of the validity of reincarnation and of the personal immortality of Sellem? Definitely not. In fact, these regressions and their effects indicate the reality of ancestral memories, and also make evident the fact that our

502

EPILOGUE

most outstanding ancestors had the strongest and most lasting impact on us. And last but not least, they show that important ancestral memories carried in the genes of the medium made themselves manifest by the same or similar mechanism (even though in a different fashion) as the one evidenced during the phenomenon of deja vu. Naturally, the genes of this unusual ancestor may be present in innumerable descendents, among them potential or actual mediums. Hence, if during hypnosis many people claim to be Benjamin Franklin, for instance, these mediums aren’t necessarily frauds. And now a word of caution. Now and then one hears that psychosomatic disorders are related to something disastrous in one of our previous Eves. The key for the improvement or complete cure of this psychosomatic problem is always some convincing explanation regarding causative factors; and hypnosis can be of great help in this endeavor. Regressing to a former existence is a most ingenious way to find practical clues in order to help solve personal difficulties. The resulting solutions from it, however, don’t prove or disprove reincarnation; at their best they only confirm the scientific accessibility of ancestral memories through hypnosis. Don’t get me wrong. Personally I am not against reincarnation as such. On the contrary. All in all I find it the fairest prospect one could wish for. Thus I, too, can imagine the part of the self I call Sellem, representing the whole personality on a non-material level, being reincarnated again and again. However, while most ingenious and captivating, reincarnation or metempsy­ chosis is a belief system; that is to say, a system of no real proofs. On the other hand, ancestral memories, energy, and energy frequencies (like those of thought) are evident realities in us. Sellem is a non-material feature of life, but in the final analysis, Sellem is also energy, and as such it has its specific frequencies. Once Sellem is personified in any shape or form (which at times might be alien to us) eventually it will disincarnate, but it will exist forever in nonphysical reality. While on its way back to Cosmic Sellem, if it happens that we are on the same frequency with this disincarnate Sellem, we might become deeply connected with it as long as it is still close to us. And it is quite possible and probable that as our individual “Higher Power” it will influence, guide, or perhaps misguide us on our ways to Goodness, Beauty, and Truth. In practice all this means is that besides the special experiences of a (or some) particular ancestor(s) being present in the subconscious of innumerable direct and indirect descendents, many of us (or perhaps all of us) can have and will have affinities with one and the same Higher Power among the many possible ones. Heredity, ancestral memories, and especially in many cases the special energy frequency of a certain disincarnate Sellem (the Higher Power) may be the reason that so many complete strangers suddenly have the same exact idea(s), and that the same things are so often invented at the same time by different people unknown to each other. It also explains the reason that we tend to have “soul mates.” Furthermore, it seems certain that most or perhaps all parapsychological phe­

EPILOGUE

503

nomena are related to the similarities between the energy frequencies of a particular incarnate Sellem and those of a particular disincarnate one. But as there is no evidence, it seems unlikely that we are incarnated more than once.

vin. Sellem and the Rings on the Lake In its manifestations, Sellem uses matter and is closely connected to the evolutionary level of the organism; that is, the more evolved the organism, the more evolved its Sellem. This parallel shows that human Sellem neither originates in the above-nature nor survives as personality after death- the latter is simply wishful thinking. Witness the subservience of Sellem to the corporeal, its pitiful individual shortcomings, and its nonegalitarian manifestations among individuals. Not to take it as part of nature is a gross insult to the above­ nature as well as to our rational thought and intuition. There are some indications, provided by apparitions, hauntings, etc., that it takes longer for individualized Sellem to return to its original status—to be one with its source—than it takes for individual organisms to become one with matter. Do you still remember the pebble of the child? The stone reached the bottom of the lake in a short time, but the rings on its surface still went on and on. With regard to communications between the living and the dead, no evidence so far is really conclusive. But research should go on. Voices like those of Konstantine Raudive’s magnetic tapes—allegedly the voices of the dead—should be especially investigated. They seem to reveal far more than what meets the ears. I, too, did some experiments with these voices, but not enough to form a conclusion based strictly on my findings. So my views are built on Raudive, or rathei on reports of his endeavors. To begin with, Raudive recorded the tapes well beyond distances for music waves. Therefore no radio frequencies had intervened. Some of the voices, allegedly belonging to people from the recent past, appeared forceful; some sounded like people chatting nearby and then farther away. Other voices were less discernible, faint, and fading in desolate distances. Raudive seemingly managed to converse with some of these supposedly dead people. 1 did not. It is yet to be decided whether these voices are mis­ representations and thus eventually explainable by rational means, or whether they belong to those departed, to their Sellem returning to once again unite with their original source, the Cosmic Sellem. Do you still remember those fading rings on the face of the lake? They rise from water and set in water.

Appendix Animal (V ifalizer) Characteristics

Adaptability—

The quality of being capable of accommodating, adjusting, arranging,

suiting,

fitting

conforming,

immaterial

oneself

and/or

to

with

material

circumstances

or

in the best interests of one’s drive for life.

Earthiness—

The quality of resembling nature or some of the properties of earth,

such

as:

matter

no

must

life

what,

go

on;

being

mortal;

belonging

the

to

earth

as

opposed to the spiritual or heavenly; pertaining to the present state of existence; grossness,

dullness, and roguishness.

Emotionality—

The

state

of excitement

of the

as

feelings,

opposed

to

coolness

(deliberateness, self-possession) and logic. (Naturally the other two organic components, the

is

Nestbuilder and

first

of all

an

the

Explorer,

Animal

drive for life is a river.

are

not

characteristic.

To

better

idiosyncrasy,

understand

this,

but emotionality

imagine

that

our

flow would be the drive for pleasure; its aim

uninterrupted

Its

free of this

would be the “infinite” sea, the drive for the infinite. The wellspring of this river would have to be, of course, the Animal; consequently both our Nestbuilder and our Explorer have to depend on it, and in the long run, so does our Sellem.)

Gregariousness—

The disposition to associate, to live in a flock or herd.

Instinctivity—

The

state

determined

by

natural

impulse

or

propensity;

the

power

and disposition to be spontaneous; the quality of acting without reasoning, deliberation, instruction,

for

life.

or experience.

(Instincts

are

In

our

other words, the

oldest

innate

or

most conspicuous

inherited

tendencies.

feature

Hence

of the drive

even

though

they are Animal in their inherence, their “radiation” reaches all segments of our personality.

As a matter of fact, in their fusion with our other inherences they become the motivating power behind all life-oriented thought and action. So, if the “death instinct” were possible, it would have to equate with the cessation of all instincts, and therefore could no longer be an “instinct.”)

Feminine (Nesfbuilder) Characteristics Primary

Analysis—

The

process

of

resolving,

constituent elements or essential (as

opposed

to synthesis).

features;

dissolving,

or

separating

a

whole

the ability to consider anything in

Whenever supported

by Sellem, analysis

is a

into

its

its parts

most efficient

APPENDIX

506

feminine characteristic. of action

analysis

which used to be considered

In logic

the tracing of things

is

deduction. (It stands to reason, therefore, that any analytical method

and

investigation

scientific

will

among

require,

other

opposed

to

of philosophical

very

a

qualities,

masculine line

as

induction,

their source;

to

a strictly

well-situated

Nestbuilder within the personality of the philosopher or scientist.)

Changeability—

The

fickle,

unstable,

quality

uncertain,

of

mutable,

of modification, transition, and

seem

not

at

all

flattering, yet

subject

being

variable,

unsteady,

and

transformation,

remains

it

a

very

of being

alteration;

to

important

capable

whimsical;

wavering,

reversal.

inconsistent,

(This characteristic does

contributing factor in

the

development of that singularity of superior personalities which we term “flexibility.”)

Circumventiveness—

The

powerful

and

idiosyncrasy

possible

of the

process

usually

protector,

Nestbuilder.

To

or gaining

of imposing on,

all

by

(Perhaps

delusion.

it

appearances

advantage

the

only

over,

sycophantic

itself only

manifests

the

in

times

of predicaments; i.e., whenever circumstances prevent other feminine singularities from

creating conditions for the free flow of the drive for pleasure.)

Communication—

The act of imparting, revealing, divulging, delivering, or conferring

from one to another feelings, sentiments, opinions, and knowledge, or something generally

not tangible; emotional intercourse by words or body language.

(This peculiarity then

is the driving force for any gossip; but also—among other qualities—the

sine qua non

of a good teacher.)

Delicacy—

first

At

glance

A closer look, however,

fineness,

minuteness,

this

quality

reveals it to

fragility,

be an

criticalness

be

to

seems

synonymous

with

tenderness.

agreeableness to any of the senses: (i.e.,

exactness,

accuracy,

minute

nicety, care

in

examination); sensitivity to beauty, harmony, or their opposites; daintiness, refinement,

civility,

or

politeness; scrupulousness;

freedom

from grossness;

refined

discrimination;

critical fastidiousness; delightfulness and luxuriousness; i.e., the quality of being addicted to cultivated pleasures. (This is the feminine characteristic that prompts us to recognize

the Nestbuilder as the most culture-oriented part of our personality.)

Docility—

The state of being tractable, easily managed and instructed. Successful docility

presupposes the strong

presence

of the Animal with its adaptive ability. (Docility

is one

of the reasons that during our development and maturation those with a strong Nestbuilder are

the

better

or

best

students.

And

because

more

women

have

a

strong

Nestbuilder

in their personality than men, practically speaking, girls are better students than boys.)

Elusiveness—

The ability to escape, evade, or avoid

in

intentions

with

a

high

or

actual

situations

Nestbuilder

within

artifice,

by

stratagem,

personality

their

being seen, detected, discovered

are

or

never

dexterity.

an

“open

(Hence

people

book,” but

are

diplomats, actors, and liars also, if they so choose.)

Great Depth of Feeling— an

Of course,

acute emotional endowment

not

a

in

this

faculty

case

of the

by

“feeling”

senses.

I

mean

Although

Sensibility,

our emotional

sensation is present in the personality's Animal and Explorer parts, too, it never reaches such depths and subtlety as in the sentiments of the Nestbuilder. (Coupled with Sellem,

it manifests itself as intuition and impression, or as the intensifier of preception.)

APPENDIX

507

Inwardness—

The quality of belonging to the inner life (as opposed to outwardness,

the Explorer state of tending to the external life from within). While it enhances intimacy

and familiarity, the very nature of inwardness is disinclined to superficiality.

Passiveness—

A

present;

the

activity

latent

ability to

with

the

of subtle

attitude

always

responsiveness

receive sensations from external agents; the capacity to endure

suffering without resistance; calmness;

context, this quality also

Still, in the Nestbuilder

unresisting submission.

and resignation,

means lifelessness

but only in very negative

cases.

Patience— and

a

One of the finest Nestbuilder attributes. It equates with a calm disposition

self-possession

discontent,

of its

leniency,

murmuring,

without

endurance

essence;

forbearance;

retaliation;

or

own

perseverance.

In

other

fretfulness,

it

words

is

a

capacity for waiting a long time for the expected good or pleasure.

Placidity—

The state of inner calmness; serenity without disturbance or any passion;

benignity

and

moderation

graciousness;

and

reasonableness.

(It

without

goes

saying

that our main drive for pleasure emanates from the Nestbuilder part of the personality;

hence

healthy “moderation” and “reasonableness” will

in

be

accord

the strength

with

and naturalness of this drive.)

Subtlety—

The

quality

of

being

nice

and

fine;

discerning,

precise,

refined,

and

penetrative; of keen and delicate distinctions; acute; discriminative; sophistical; ingenious;

skillful; smooth. and the

slyness;

On the other hand, subtlety may also only mean craftiness, cunning,

wile,

Nestbuilder,

falsity,

and

deception;

benign

essentially

and

deceit,

honest,

and

treachery,

can

into

turn

delusion.

a

most

(No

wonder

malevolent

and

perfidious adversary.)

Tenderness—

In

all

likelihood

our

most

feminine

outstanding

mainly indicates the state of being frail and soft as opposed yet

at

the

same

time

extremely

sensitive

to

impressions

words, the readiest state of humaneness, easily affected

pain;

As

such

it

firm, and

hard;

unwilling to

cause

to tough,

and

pain to oneself or another; susceptible to love, compassion,

quality.

kindness, and pity.

In other

by the distresses of another and

solicitous of anothers'good; a benign quality marked by effeminate mildness and gentleness. Because

of its consequence,

though,

it

is

also

the

most

solid

basis

for

our emotional

existence; no development of healthy human life can be imagined without it.

Just as in the case of the other personality compenents, the Nestbuilder also has many

more

primary

characteristics

than

most salient and obvious ones.

those

mentioned.

1

have tried

to describe

only the

Among the secondary feminine characterics we cannot

ignore humility and shyness.

Secondary

Humility—

Freedom

from

pride

and

arrogance;

also

a

modest

estimate

of one's

own worth. (The very essence of this quality renders a small Nestbuilder even smaller,

but

perhaps

pleasant;

and

the great

true regarding personalities.)

one

much

greater,

plus enchanting.

This

is

also

APPENDIX

508

Shyness—

It is

a

or quality

state

chary;

not a

of being timid,

frightened;

readily

synonym of the Explorer characteristic called

be

to

but

bashful, shrinking, cautious, circumspect,

modest,

inclined

not

Reservation,

familiar;

retiring;

wary.

and

coy

and

Naturally,

as in the case of other feminine characteristics, the degree of shyness will differ with every Nestbuilder, yet it is always one of the main reasons for the conservative side of its nature.

Masculine (l Explorer Characteristics Because of its special role in creating impersonal societies, as well as its immense influence

on Western culture, careful attention should be given to some of the basic characteristics of the Explorer component.

Aggressiveness—

quality in a game called survival of the fittest,

most important

A

and a sport called quest for the infinite. Aggression lends balance to the intrinsic verve of the

Animal, gives

charm

to Explorer predispositions.

imparts spirit and

to the Nestbuilder traits, and

meaning

In sum, it contributes to a fullness of heart and the feeling

that man should inherit the earth and tomorrow.

Of course,

so

far

have

I

represented

only the

optimal

nature

or constructive

of

aggressiveness. It is, however, often identified with the act of hostility, and rightly so.

In

of the

personalities dominated Animal’s

seeking

of conscience;

lack

who

Nestbuilder

is

deprived

boring yet frightening arrogance

on

impetus to

gives

the aberrations

Explorer

of the pleasure­

and

satisfactions;

natural

of normal,

the

advantage

aggressiveness often takes

Explorer,

by the

itself as

well

as

bestows

a

its chief helper,

on

the dehumanized Sellem. Subhuman behavior (such as “might is right") or destruction and self-destruction are ready to follow.

Boastfulness—\

peculiarity that best reveals the Explorer's basic psychophysiological for

Ill-equipped

precariousness.

the

task,

the

Explorer

pushed

nevertheless

is

by

its

main drive toward the unknown, the infinite. And it has little or no choice. The Explorer's

ostentatious,

exultations

a frightened

child.

On

displays

the

other

in

are

reality

hand, just

a

like

kind a

of “whistling

child,

it

seeks

in

the

dark" by

recognition

that

it

has made it to the present, and assurance that it will make it to tomorrow.

Though often irritating, the Explorer's vaunting is one of its most human aspects; it

reveals—in

addition

to

its

anxiety—the

Explorer’s

disbelief

it

that

actually

is

accomplishing the improbable, the something it is not really fit for.

optimal

Under

conditions

this

boastfulness

will

add

pride

to

the

Animal's

zest,

a provocative shine to the Nestbuilder’s fragility, and humor to Sellem.

BoIdness— deficiency freedom

in

in

a

While

actually

boastfulness

masculine confidence,

limitless sense.

is consciously tied to

the distinctively

denotes

boldness

Boastfulness

is

indicates

side

of the

and

a

motivated,

while

preparedness for action.

masculine

fundamental

unconventional confidence

unconsciously

perception of danger and

adventurous

apprehension

profile.

But

it

can

and

boldness

It belongs to accommodate

the Animal’s needs with daring, the Nestbuilder's mysteriousness with preeminence, and

the coolness of Sellem with originality. If it exclusively

or even chiefly

reflects

the

Explorer, its

quite obvious: impudence, rudeness, impertinence, effrontery.

negative

aspects

will

be

APPENDIX

Bravery— of

spirit

In its favorable guise, one of the finest masculine traits, indicating firmness

coupled

adaptability

509

with

generosity

the

magnificent,

and

dignity

mind.

of

It

can

the

Nestbuilder's subtlety admirable,

Animal's

the

render

Explorer's courage

splendid, and Sellem’s perception acute.

negative

Its

manifestations

bullying,

intimidation,

include

indecency,

indiscretion,

and showiness.

Defiance— eliminates

or

this

Usually

to

reduces

Nestbuilder's depth

characteristic

the

dullness

of feeling;

is

in

destructive

common

Animal's

the

reduces

chiefly

its

sense;

Explorer's courage

effects.

it

Thus

the

enshallows

to injudicious

it

bragging;

and turns Sellem’s constructiveness into insolence. On the other hand, it can engender a contempt of danger, and can instill sufficient daring in the drive for life to give meaning to all other drives.

Determination— exact specifications masculine

Its

most salient

both

within and

its

characteristics,

aspect

is establishing directions,

without the psyche.

positive

or

and

Of course, just as with other

definiteness

negative

boundaries,

is

in

direct

relation

to

the position and particularity quotient of the Explorer in the hierarchical arrangement of the personality.

It

is,

as

a

rule,

an

admirable

trait.

tyranny,

imperiousness, capriciousness,

toriness,

and

many

similar

notions

Yet

one should

remember

that

arbitrariness,

despotism, inflexibility, immovability,

are

direct

or

indirect

peremp­

of this

descendents

same

idiosyncrasy.

Enthusiasm—

The original Greek meaning of the word was “possessed by a god."

Today it suggests the predominance of emotional over intellectual powers.

It may be as passing as a summer thunderstorm; or it may overwhelm like a forest fire, intermingling with the drives for life and the infinite; its ardor may lead our drive

for pleasure into ecstasy. If it is of significant magnitude it is a strong, gratifying emotion manifested by expressions of approval or avid interest in a cause, aim, or object believed to be worthy. Its ardent zeal is attendant on any worthwhile achievement.

On the other hand, it is a primary force in the shaping of the zealot, the visionary,

and the fanatic. It is also responsible for the ubiquitous human conceit of being divinely inspired, and for credulousness in matters that transcend human powers.

Expansiveness— Of course

it

can

also

bring

sorrow of the next fellow.

the basis of life and

misery is ascribable to this single masculine trail.

human

Untold

happiness,

In its

pleasure; it

but

an

expansive joy

is

usually

positive phases it can be magnanimous

built

and

unknown horizons, and

impels man toward

on

the

broaden helps the

intellect to express hope. It is one of the Explorer's more general effects—this tendency to

fill

in

the entire world

a

divine quality!

It

presents

only one problem:

too

many

people have it. This alone can render it quite negative.

Passion— hand

in

An

rousing

intense the

emotion,

overpowering Sellem

idiosyncrasies

of the

other

first

in

component(s)

order to gain

to

the

greatest

a free excess

possible.

it

may

at

limes

be

heartening,

yet

its

aspects

always

lend

to

be

inordinate,

so

that calmer souls deem it a plebeian inclination leading to madness. Actually its proclivity is toward the borderline between the natural and aberrated, as in the case ot the infatuated.

APPENDIX

510

the adorer, the fanatic, or the exalted. In the same individual it can on one side convey affection, love, devotion, longing, tender feelings, attachment, ardor, zeal, and rapture; and on the other side anger, fury,

indignation,

perturbation,

excitement,

wrath,

violence,

vehemence,

pathos,

subjection

to pain and distress, or even—in grave instances—insanity.

Possessiveness—

Expansiveness

holds.

possessiveness

conquers;

Expansiveness

suggests continuous action, whereas possessiveness implies permanence. Still, whenever

possible,

they

in

hand

walk

the

toward

hand

infinite.

And

in

an

such

association

possessiveness can evolve into a royal quality; i.e., a powerful cohesive force both within

and without the self.

Alone, however, possessiveness is always parochial, its effect smothering. Or it may degenerate into avarice, covetousness, parsimony, miserliness, niggardliness, and cupidity.

As a

result of such

vices

the center of the

individual's

balance

will shift from

within

the psyche toward exterior objects—animate or inanimate.

Naturally, possessiveness may have both positive and negative manifestations within the framework of the same personality.

Protectiveness—

More

preservation,

refuge, shelter,

It

when

is

exalted

and

coupled

synonymous

less

or

shield, the

with

it

is

the

with

most dignified

feelings

deep

notions

of the

guard,

defense,

of

of Explorer qualities.

and

Nestbuilder,

becomes

an august state when accompanied by positive feminine characteristics in the company of Sellem.

When acting single-handedly, however, it tends to resolve itself into inflexible laws much as the parochial, smothering carriage of possessiveness.

Reservation—

As opposed to the Nestbuilder’s communication, it reflects deep-seated

Explorer inferiority feelings initiated by its quest for the infinite.

It always denotes vulnerability, yet its effects may take on the attributes of wisdom. This

means

reservation

that

feelings

and

intentions

concealed,

are

kept

in

store

for

eventual use or disposal.

Reservation radiates icy coldness, though in essence of

mechanism

defense

The

predestinations.

masking

long-term

inadequacies

effect

of such

for

caution

it is only caution; i.e., a type

the is

of

fulfillment restraint

masculine

modesty,

and

and

thus the authority, status, and dignity such “virtues” merit.

Too the

least

reservation

much

is

the

road

to

cowardice

masculine of human characteristics, albeit

and

suspicion.

In

the curbing effect

all,

of its

it

seems

prudence

may render it the most mature one.

Restlessness— transforms

A

masculine curse

masculinity

into an

and,

Explorer.

for something very important to

happen.

perhaps,

A A

also

a

blessing.

state of disquiet,

quality

A

condition

uneasiness,

that

as if waiting

prerequisite to any discovery;

the

lust of wandering. Wherever present,

no rest, no satisfaction, no peace can reign. Ambition, anxiety,

agitation, unsettledness, and perpetual change disturb the spirit.

*

Synthesis—

This denotes the act or process of making a compound by joining together

its elements,

or by

or more things.

uniting simple compounds, or simply the putting together of two

APPENDIX

511

Translated into psychological terms it indicates:

The Explorer’s ability to force into conjunction small social

a.

the

family,

clan,

and

tribe,

or

so

in

doing

and

create

units, such as

maintain

societies

bigger than the tribal (i.e., impersonal, artificial ones);

Combination, or a direct method of reasoning—the reverse of the feminine

b.

style of analysis or resolution.

Both success

and

“ability”

“combination”

seem

be

to

responsible

as a species, as well as for many of his social

miseries

man’s

for

in

his

tremendous

and

new

as yet

unnatural setting.

There are many reasons for assuming that the development proper of these masculine characteristics

creature.

began

For an

man

in

overview

with

of the effect

to say that they are expressed

and yet

mutation

his

chiefly

from

of these

by the

vegetarian

a

to

a

carnivorous

Explorer peculiarities,

it

is

more than

natural

need for achievement, and that at their best they helped these

very same

aspects

drive

man

to

wasteful

sufficient

urge for competition

us to launch into space;

mismanagement

of resources and

thus to ecological suicide.

Sellem Characteristics The main characteristics of Sellem are: perception, consciousness, discernment, under­ standing,

coolness),

conceptualization,

and

hope.

anticipation, constructiveness,

Regarding their definitions,

we

unemotional

have

to

keep

in

objectivity (or

mind

that even

though per se Sellem is an independent phenomenon, it borrows fuel for its operations

from the drives of its organic partners. Therefore, the quantitative and qualitative features of To

its

characteristics

put

it

directly

are

another way,

Sellem

is

and

indirectly

the

related

nonmaterial

to

the

situations

factor of the cosmos

of its

and

peers.

life,

and

even in its most independent manifestations, it will as a component of personality evince the colors of its partners.

Anticipation preconception,

Presentiment, premonition, forefeeling, intuition, hunch, expectation,

forethought,

foresight,

forecast.

In

more

practical

terms:

visualization,

prophecy, estimation, or prediction of future events or states.

Conceptualization—

The process

of conceiving in the mind; that

is.

of imagining,

of formulating concepts, ideas, notions, thoughts.

Constructiveness—

The faculty of setting things in logical order; a mark of the creative,

generative, productive mind.

Discernment—

A skill in discriminating, acuity, shrewdness, penetration, perspicacity,

sagacity, subtlety.

Hope—

Trust, reliance, faith, or belief in fulfillment; optimistic in prospects, outlook,

and foretaste.

512

APPENDIX

Perception—

Sensation,

apprehensibility,

observation,

notice,

detection,

intuitive

awareness, consciousness, concept, acumen, cognition, cognizance, realization, insight.

Understanding—

for

Faculty

comprehension,

appreciation,

reason,

knowing,

judgment.

Unemotional Objectivity

for

Coolness)

—True

objectivity

is

not

within

the

realm

of mortals (who are intrinsically subjective in nature). Still, Sellem tends to be in everyday

parlance extrinsically cool or even coldly objective, fair, equitable, just, impartial, unbiased,

and dispassionate in its essence.

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32;

above-nature, 498

vorous.

Abraham and Isaac. 269

505;

Absolute

Man.

18,

21, 91. 250,

255,

299-302,

army, as

protector of.

the

32; carni­

15; chief characteristics of. 29

condemned

lo die.

79; drive for life.

251;

and

30.

death.

14; fit, misfit, unfit. 32

322; absence of, 379; and the Devil, 269;

33;

Egyptian type of. 259; Greek type of, 261.

principle. 451; quantitative and qualitative

the darkness of Europe. 326; still

features. 25; related to. 15; suicide. 31; "to

263; in

lingering on, 355;

Sumerian type of. 256;

woman type of, 486

and

freedom.

and

75;

227;

antagonism. 414 "am idiosyncrasies." 359

acceptance, 389

ami-Hellenistic features. 416

accommodation, personal. 130

anti-Semitism. 414 417

advertising, 62, 66,

Aphrodite, 314, 316. 331

121, 228; missionaries. 402;

suggestibility, 119-121

Aesop.

law,

kill" and "not to kill." 15; vegetarian. 15

absolutism, 198; spiritual. 335

Aeolian harp,

the

Apollo. 179.314; at Delphi. 316

147

apparitions, 503

Til

Aquinas, 239, 277. 327

Age of Enlightenment. 288. 290

Archimedes. 327

Age of Reason. 290

Aristotle. 15, 273. 274. 302, 316. 327

aggression. 396

armchair psychology, 172

agrarian, 420

art;

agriculture, 309. 420-422

abstract,

primitive.

356;

commercial,

dis­

sonant and artless. 355; Gothic. 343

Alexander the Great, 264; as divine, 317 -

Artemis, 314

alienation, 205

ascetic(ism), 495; attitudes. 291; and materialism.

"Almost Man," 366. 372, 373, 375-376. 377 378,

58; masculine peculiarities. 424

assembly line, 388

385

Assyria(n).

altruism, 230, 236

Amazon. 438,441

443.480.481; ants. 443; Space

309, 310;

kings,

See

god, 415; way of thinking about man. 405

astronomer, 154

Amenophis

Amenophis (Amenhotep) or Ikhnaton, 307,415;

monotheism of, 307

astronomy, 308 Athena. 314; Pallas, 316

308. 310

American Blacks, 108

Atomic Age, 484

American-Indian genius, 125

Aton.

first sole God. 308.

310.

439

anarchy, 198

Anaxagoras, 273

atrophization of territory. 386

Anaximander, 263, 273

Augustine, 239. 277, 327

Anaximenes, 273

auto-suggestion, 477, 478

ancestor(s), 472, 502

average citizen, 366

ancestral memories. 129. 239. 245. 254. 472. 501,

Aztec(s), 302. 432

502;

and

as sole living

astrologer. 154

Age. 445 Amenhotep.

270.

the

child

daydreams. 413;

and

prodigy.

deja vu,

414;

and

414; expe­

rience, 414; and social pyramid. 191

Babylon(ians), 310-311

Bacon, 278, 346

anger, as social device. 87

Balkan States, 125

Animal-Vilalizcr. 14; against best interest of. 31

Ball, John. 343

311.

312.

338,

INDEX

518

Bathory. Elizabeth, 406, 407

Carthage. 214

Bator, 409 411

Cassandra. 487

bees and termites, 185

Castellio, Sebastian. 339

chameleon, 424;

behavior(al):

key to

the

self,

Catherine the Great, 488 Catholic clergy, 163; monocracy, 369

91 Benedict of Nursia, 327

Cervantes, 283, 346, 445, 454

Bentham. 278

Chamberlain. 283

Berengar, 343

charlatans, 398

bigamy, 160

chastity, 190

“bigger and better,” 131

chauvinism. 214

bigot, 214; bigotry, 222

child(ren),

audacious,

178

179;

of the

genius,

Billy the Kid, 178

393; of the imagination, 224; neglected, 425;

birth and destiny, 392

open with mother, 218; prodigy. 414; raised

blueprint, 18; disrespect to personality's, 380

by mother,

Bodin, 302

spanking, 171

174; reserved with father. 218;

Bolyai, 278

chimpanzee, 22; in the driver's seat. 212

boredom and apathy, 387-388

China, 357

Borgia, Cesare, 487

Chinese: civilization. 356; culture. 486

Borgia, Lucrezia, 487

chosen, 206, 416

Bosch, 431

Christian: alter ego, 384; and Assiric aggressive­

boy girl, name of the game, 143

ness,

Brahe. Tyco, 346

righteousness.

brain, 15; feminine and masculine locations, 15n

to

Britannia. 124

capitalism, communism, fascism. 133-134;

Brueghel the Elder, 431

demonologists. 470; eternal life. 464; mar­

Buda, 328

tyrs,

462;

bum, 58

436;

philosophy. 323: pyramid,

Burr, Aaron. 422

universality, 294

Byzantium, 323, 327, 328, 486

chosenness,

Sinaic

die

for

323;

Christ.

mission.

Roman

self-

“brotherly love," 485; 270;

compassion

personality,

439;

367,

in

323, 370;

Christianity. 211. 318-322; and Absolute Man. 325; during the Caesars, 415; and surging

Caligula, 317

feminine colors, 336

Calvin, 336, 337-339; and the masculine woman.

Church and Army, 288

444; and the middle class, 341; Protestant

Churchill, 283

pope, 337

city states, 309, 313; Italian, 328, 343

civilization,

Canann(ites), 312

229,

308;

interrelated

Chinese,

cannibal, 42

Indian, Polynesian, Mayan. Western, 356;

canonization. 383

urban, 344

capital punishment, 133, 380 capitalism,

348,

349,

350,

clairvoyance, 500

352,

489;

and

free

enterprise, 354. 399; and unions, 350

classes: can be destroyed but they reappear. 361; “haves" and “have nots,” 349; social and

capriciousness. 151

economic, 305

car, “buy now. pay later," 156

climate and territorial laws, 73

carnivorous(ness), 15.42; and contemplation, 45;

codification of laws, first, 135

and

envy,

72, 86; gluttony,

86;

and jail,

63; and jealousy, 72; killer disposition, 43; killing

and

anger, 45;

and

opportunism,

66; and optimism, 67; and paranoia, 28; and

pessimism, 68; and

and

radicalness, 207; and table

43

cognition, 221 Colonna, Vittoria, 487 comfort-conscious

people,

156;

money

slavery, 156

66;

communism, 351, 490; and proletariat, 355

manners,

compulsion(s), 477; to be remembered, 405

propaganda,

and

Comte, 278

Carpathian mountains, 407

con artist, 151

Carpenter of Nazareth, 292

conditioning, over-, non-, improper-, common­

Cartesian, 346

sense-, 63

INDEX confession, 457, 459

dictatorship:

the

and

Explorer.

519

433 434;

to

conservative person, 158

establish and maintain. 372; in the name

Constantine the Great, 318, 321,341.440

of love, 80; and man-made societies,

Constantinople, fall of, 125. 486

of the proletariat rule, 399

contentment, 33-34

Dionysus, 426; and the Greek mind, 428

conversation pieces, 228

disobedient, 488

Copernicus, 274

disrespect:

copulation, 221

and

divine

right.

198;

individual.

202;

industrial, national, religious, 201

coquettish self, 154

doctrines about the hereafter, 405

Corday, Marie Anne, 192

domination: of component(s), 18; and domineer­

Corneille, 346

ing, 136-137; and submission, 146

Counter-Reformation,

339;

and

women,

444,

487

Don Quixote,

178, 445

Dostoevsky, 245, 289, 302

courage, 178, 192-194

Dracula, 404-407

courtesan, 425. 426, 487

dream, 48; and ancestral wishes and memories.

covetousness, 83-84

49;

created equal, 217

phetic, 48

creations,

122

and

babies,

drives: borrowed,

49;

prevented.

49;

pro­

17; inadequate or aberrated,

credit rating, 156

26; for infinite, 14. 21. 26. 404; for infinite

criminal, inveterate, 183; and the media, 183

and Truth,

critics, 203, 218, 225

and Goodness. 17; for pleasure, 14, 21. 26;

Cromwell. Oliver. 192

for pleasure and Beauty, 17; of single cell,

crook, 141, 247

17; for life,

14, 21. 26; for life

13. 21

cross, 330, 354; and Sword, 276, 330

331, 355

dualism:

and drive

for infinite. 405;

crowns in the barnyards, 455

and

culture. 228, 491; Christian, 430, 452; civilization

nomadic situations, 268

son,

267;

matter

and

of father

spirit,

405;

duelling bravo, 193

and humanness, 420; local pagan, 430

duels, 189

cynic(ism), 265, 488

dvnastv: builder. 58

59; head of. 231

Dante, 332. 454. 465, 467

Dark Ages, 451,486

Edison. 149

Darvula, 406

effeminate, 92

Darwin, 263; evolutionary theory of. 289

ego-fugal, 429

daydream. 408,411; and age. 413; and the young.

ego-petency. 429, 480 egotism, 230; collective. 490

414

dead, voices of the, 503

Egyptian(s), 260-261, 308, 464

death, 404, 497. 503

Einstein, 274

defector, 488, 489. 490

Elizabeth I, 290. 488

deja vu,

Elysian Fields, 465

414. 502

Demeter. 315

emotion(s) are the effects of our drives. 17

democracy and poor societies, 345

emotional(ism). destiny of man, 17

Democritus, 272. 327

Empedocles. 272 Enlightenment, 346; childish optimism of. 355;

depository of the species, 111

prior

Descartes. 239. 278, 290, 346. 452 453

pseudo-Absolute

Man

enterprises: indifferent, impersonal, imperialistic.

desperado, 178

132

d'Este, Isabella. 487 Devil, 331, 332. 466; existence or nonexistence

of. 246; and the feminine woman. 445; im­ a

369;

phenomenon, 348

deserter. 293, 488, 489

plicitly

to,

woman.

471;

and

Libuc.

333;

entrepreneurs. 181 environment(al):

dogmatize.

blueprint. 369;

masculine.

18;

indolent,

191;

and

inclined

88;

industrial.

personality.

mirror of Absolute Man. 269. 331; worship

447;

preceded God worship, 244

“right" and “wrong." 366; -trees. 381

Dickinson. Emily. 482

Epicurean! ism). 265. 302

to

18;

INDEX

520

epistemology, 263

Creator, 432; complement each other. 157;

Era of the Sponger, 378

and

Erasmus, 278. 336, 338, 487

exist because of each other, 467; the Judeo-

Erigena, John Scotus, 343

Christian. 437

cultures,

430;

erudition, 177

fibs and lies, 56

ethnological factors, 294, 295

Fichte, 278

Euclid. 327

film industry,

Eudoxus, 327

finite and infinite, 212

event(s): political, economic, social, 367

the

Eternal. 433 434;

151

fit, misfit, unfit, 31-33, 393

368

evolution of man. and logic. 17

flirter: jill-flirt, 152; motivation of. 152

exams and quizzes, 138

fornication. 38

ex-hunters: creators of nomadic societies, 421

foundation. 230

existence:

Franco-German War, 289

authoritarian

and

basic mechanism of.

regimented,

218;

autocratic,

199;

110; bureaucratic or

prolonging,

199;

social,

Franklin, Benjamin. 274 Frederick the Great, 486 freedom: over- and under-estimation of. 77

220

extortionist, bandit, parasite, 58

French: confusion. 452;

60

and German,

revenge

and counter-revenge, 220; “God's Image,"

extramuros, 361

450, 453 454; woman, 452-454

fair sex. an ornamental piece, 425

Freud. 278, 289

fairy(ies), 472; and ancestral memories. 472-473;

friendship. 494

and

birth of mythology, 473;

tales. 209.

496; and opposite sexes. 495

frugal, 207

fury, 46-47

473, 474

faithlessness, 293 fantasy, 413; about paradise, 450; paralyzed, 151;

Galileo, 274, 346 Gauss, 274

in the world of, 472

fascism. 490; and fatherland, 355

gene(s): manipulation of. 77. 396; -pool. 391

fast-food barns, 131

genetic, engineering and surgery, 396 397

fate, 497

genius:

father: and demands of society, 218; -Sun. 433;

-image inadequate, 229; and member(s) of society, 197; and stringency, 218;

393,

394. 479, 484, 488, 493,

endowments, 403; and ancestral memories,

414 gentleness, national. 99-100

Faust, 250

gestation, outside of uterus, 397

felaheen, 306

gibbon, 22 14;

Female-Nestbuilder,

and

500;

accommodating,

130;

Gilgamesh. 257

altruistic ways of. 90; characteristics of, 16,

give-and-take. 215, 230

505; the Christian, 435; condemned to die,

God(s):

Almighty,

498;

existence

or

non­

I5n, 435; and

existence of. 246. 447; “Our Father," 448;

and

and human colors. 448; idea of one, 415;

death. 79: and decline of civilization, 302;

man made in the image of. 394, 468; our

pleasure.

masculine, 419; messengers, 176; severe or

251; confused with vagina.

cruelty.

and

89;

drive

culture-oriented,

for

14;

303;

enchanted

stroller, 162; evolved from Animal, 26; and French

Revolution, 348; and

home.

107;

tolerant,

303;

ways and

will

“God-fearing businessman," 342

and modesty, immodesty, 100; and monis­

“God’s Image," 300, 325

405;

and

mysteriousness,

89; and “now." 302; scope of.

16; selfish,

127; and Sellem, 207; and sense of humor, 202; and sex, 84 feminine:

children,

171,

392;

we

have no. 355

and law. 227; medium of humanness, 89;

tic psychology,

of.

327, 363. 374-375.450

451.453-454 Goethe, 276, 351, 454

“good old days," 302

Goodness, Beauty, and Truth, 17, 238, 262. 299, 174; development

and

315. 492

final shape, 16; Gothic. 432; man. 146, 182;

gorilla, 22

parents, 171; students, 163

“Gray Eminence." 363, 454

feminine and masculine: and the Aztec Supreme

“Great Illuminated," 403

521

INDEX “Great Initiates,”403

oneness, 15

Great Mother, 318. 321, 324

humanness, material achievement built on, 188

Greek(s). and eternal life, 464

Hume, 278

gregariousness, 377, 482; denotes, 418

humor, 102; Explorer devoid of. 184

grotesqueness, 151

Hungarian(s), 14. 213

guilt: egocentric in intent. 455. 456; and feeling

hunter, 42, 266; bounty, 193

inferior, 456; social peculiarity, 456

hussars, 185

gullibility, 41

Huxley, Julian, 357 Huxley, Thomas, 304

Haeckel, Ernst, 305

hyperactive, 216

Hammer and Sickle, 276

hypnosis, 119-120. 501,502

Hammurabi, 311; Code of, 258, 308

hysteria. 477

Hanseatic League. 328

hysterical slates, 478

479

happiness, 33-34 harmony and disharmony,

140

Ibsen. 282

Haney, 346

Icarus, 179

hatred, 45

idealist, 488, 493

Hatshespsut or Hatasu, woman

pharaoh. 419.

485

ideas, feminine and

or masculine. I5n

Identity. Stimulus, and Security. 62

hauntings, 503

Ikhnaton.

See

Amenophis

healing profession, 173

I Hyes, Gyula, 348

Hegel, 263, 278, 349

imagine(ation). 411; of children. 412; immature.

Hellas, 247,

255,

264,

314.

315,

316;

and

the

215; and personal experience. 411; super­

cilious people, 216

Golden Mean, 314

Hellenism, 265

imperialism. 198

He-Man, 185

imperious soul, 109

Hera, 314, 427,428

Impressionism, 289

Heracles, 179

imprudence, 92 94

Heraclitus, 273, 327

Inca culture, 125

herd: consciousness, 457; owner, 266

independence, 180

hereditary-forest, 381

India. 312. 356. 357, 464

heredity, 17; and environment, 18

indifference, 388. 389

Hermes, 403

indignation. 46

hero,

205, 460, 473; as victor. 271; dead. 479;

image, 234; row,”

and

461;

individual:

the “now” and “tomor­

minority,

489;

and

social

and

181; and freedom. 385-386

age.

disrespect.

201;

immortal,

183.

413;

and 446;

consciousness.

family,

457;

388-390;

importance,

191;

consciousness, 461; tribes and. 461; unsung,

infinity. 26; life span of an. 412; and recog­

ordinary, 233

nition. 457; -society-species. 251

234; war, 193; worship, 233

industries: disrespect of. 202; infallible cure-all.

234

177; and the masses, 130

Herodotus, 260, 273 “Higher Power,” 502

Indus valley, 305

history, 452

infallibility, 176; in the name of love, 176

Hitler, 148, 270,417

inferiority and worthlessness, 456

hobo, 58

infidelity, 109, 113

Hobbes, Thomas, 278, 348

inflictions, 480

holidays, commercial aspects, 148

Inquisition, 340

Holy Ghost, 237, 248, 269, 276; and the dove,

instinct(ive), 241.412; the memory of the species, .

439

471

home, 155; hearth of the feminine. 438

instinctual or species-specific, 241

Homer, 327

integration. 19; artificial. 19. 214. 215, 218, 477,

during

Homo sapiens, individual and social. 22

478;

homosexual, 112

distorted,

human,

mimosa.

104:

omnivorousness. 27

28;

developmental

19, 477;

natural,

years. 19. 214.

138: 215,

216, 477.478; and non-integration. 19.214,

INDEX

522

215, 477; partial, 19, 477; threatened, 455 intellect, intelligence, 412, 481, 483; definitions

Koran. 464 Krishna, 403

of. 237 238, 471; from outer space, 22, 175 intellectual:

is

achievement

to

simplify,

172;

La Metlrie, 290

“rebellion," 148

leader:

interdependence, 180 intolerance,

language, 492

175; and obstinacy,

and

or

follower,

388,

217,

448;

inher­

ences, 452

199 200

intramuros, 361, 366

legislation, first, 135; in the West, 423

intuition, 254, 412, 413, 499. 500; ingredients of,

Leibniz, 346

Lemuria and Mu, 305

272

irrational, 497

leniency, 96

Iscariot, Judas, 292

Lenin, 270

Isis, 319. 322, 324, 436, 440-441, 444, 476; and

Leonardo da Vinci, 328, 351,487

Pax Humana,

L 'Homme Machine. L 'Homme Plante,

440

Islam, 312, 401.468

290

290

Liberty, Fraternity, Equality, 208, 289, 408. 416;

Italy, 217

and bygone tribal days, 348

life, after death. 193, 405, 407; in commune, 168;

James, W., 278

jan jinnis. or

per

473

se

democratic,

200;

egocentric.

170;

Jefferson, 368

eternal return of, 500; in the here and now,

Jesus, 320, 321,331,403, 436; falsified for Christ,

70; man as enemy of, 394; mechanism of incarnate,

320

Jew(s), 312, 415; and abstract abilities, 312; and annoyed Greek psyche, 440n; the “chosen

people," 415;

and

Christianity, 435;

and

Mind

395; “milk

as,

235;

Khazars, 416n; left “different," 440; eman­

Lincoln, 368

cipation of, 416; and eternal life, 464; for

Lindbergh, 233

plastic

271;

and

and

visual

Messiah.

arts,

312;

435;

and

urbanized

culture,

415;

nation,

415;

ways.

415;

394;

lingam. 195; and the Eternal Male, 402

Lipershey, 316

local greatness, 385

Locke, 278, 348; and present-day America. 348

woman. 436

jingoism, 222

logic, 498, 500

Judaism. 323, 465. 468

London, 328

Judeo-Christian

human,

Livia, wife of Augustus, 211

nomads, 440

Jewish:

of

monochromatic. 385

limbo-people, 211

Lord,

sanctity

wine" of. 428;

species, social, individual. 455; stereotypic,

crucifixion of Christ, 416; descendents of

the

and

system. 437;

conjecture. 468;

outlook, 483

loneliness, 34, 205

longanimity, 96

Julius Caesar. 283

lord: “of Glory," 320. 384, 440; and master, 391

Jung. 278; his Animus and Anima, 433

love, 34-35; beauty is made for. 195; and hate,

Justinian and Theodora. 327

247; is peace on earth,

195; is perishable,

176 kamikaze, 61, 193

“love-lay dolls," 470

Kant, 239

Loyola, 336, 337

Karman, Theodore von, 278

Ludwig II of Bavaria, 209

Kepler, 274, 346

Lugosi, Bela, 406

Khazars, 416n

lust: and history books, 85; for power, 85; and

Kierkegaard. 278 killer, hired, 193; non-killer gene pool, 246

kindness, 481; active, passive, reflexive features of, 481 -483

sex, 84

Luther, 328, 335

336, 338; “Ninety-Five Theses"

of, 339; shortsightedness of, 444 lycanthropy. 407

King, Martin Luther, Jr.. 108 king of kings, 225, 279

Machine, pluses and minuses, 131

Koestler, Arthur. 416

macho, 92

INDEX macrocosm and microcosm, 125

lem.

Madach, 282

ders familiar and lasting.

187; cornerstone.

feminine ren­

176;

Heaven or

164;

magic, 175; as a proto-science. 263

Hell, 465; masculine guides and

magician, 475; first, 135

164; masculine interest,

Magyars, 486

“Catholic" and “Protestant,” 328; charac­ teristics of.

168, 508; competitive run­

16,

marrying kind, the, 161

martyr, 461,462; Lawrence, 462; and tribes. 461 Marx. 270,

ner, 162; condemned to die, 251; and death.

84;

deranged.

or

destructive

self­

right,

be

hierarchy-conscious.

194;

house of,

tool

192;

85; and organized religion. 303; and the

penis. 15n; and principles, 189; related and in

with

contact

comer.

and

359;

God.

relative

167;

rise of civilization,

and

sarcasm. 202; and

189;

of himself.

118;

after his

16; efficiency, 285; 434; gender,

469;

392.

mass:

-convictions,

transgressor.

397;

287;

-illusions,

372;

materialism, 288; and metaphysical theory, 288;

orgy of. 342; positive and negative side of,

288

created equal, 219; and artificial mutations.

matriarchy, 303, 419

22;

matter and anti-matter, 497

471;

average, 371; aware of his own death. 405;

Maya culture. 125. 237

beyond our solar system, 192; as carnivor­

memory! ies):

and

vegetarian,

406;

“center

of

universe,"463. 474; combative. 194; cosmic

of,

importance

societies,

demasculinized,

420;

emotionalism.

creator of nomadic

175;

132;

and

16; eternal life of. 409-410;

imprudent, 395; and woman

and

significant

and

new, 371;

part

42;

more

soner.

man,

391;

spiritualized.

163, 381, 403;

425;

insignificant.

of nature.

primitiveness

16; masculine

logic,

masculine

118;

more 384;

predator, 405;

pri­

repository of social

129;

middle: -aged. 413; classes of Europe, 416 “might is right.” 399

Mill, 278

predator,

own

species.

Michelangelo, 346; his Pieta, 438

has

his

ancestral,

Messalina’s masculine syndrome. 182

military, 225

226;

personal,

personal experiences, 413; process, 412

feminine, 146,495; god-like destiny of. I 18; law,

-man,

material: and non-material. 497; group. 498

materialistic conception of history. 349

ous

227;

131,370,371,372

Mata Hari, 192

human­

anti-Nestbuilder,

182;

heart,

ization, 395; alien in super-societies. 22; all

anti-woman,

develop­

171;

woman, 146, 268, 441,442, 443

304;

and truth, 170; and uncertainty. 16. 169

afraid

supremacy.

masterpieces. 106

of, 16; and lime, 303; and “tomorrow," 304;

man;

of evolution.

late­

satire, 203; scope

child,

honesty. 188; parents. 171; and philosophy.

206; law-conscious. 226; and lust for power.

84

198;

ethics, 486; the Eternal. 433

176; intemperate.

188; infallible.

348. 368, 384; child

314,

ment and final shape,

from Animal. 26; has to

17; evolved

289,

masculine: certainty,

232; drive for infinite.

dramatization. 231

278.

of Enlightenment. 351

destructive, 173; devoid of humor. 184; and

14.

III;

164; market.

institution, 163

Male-Explorer, 14; Animal natural ally of, 197;

79;

protects.

monogamy, 160; polygamy. 160; unnatural

108

Malcolm X,

523

millionaire. 58 missionary. 214; Christian. 468 • mistrust: and deductive and inductive reasoning.

170; and thesis, antithesis, 170

Mithra(ism). 318

319.

321

322.

324.

330. 436.

444. 476

pyramid, 403; restless pioneer. 236; rights

moderation. 99

of, 367, 377; Super-, 394, 397, 473; super­

Mohammed, 465. 469

system known as, 404; slave of his pyramid,

molecular biology, 393. 394

374; tribal in nature, 22, 304; totally alone.

Moliere, 282. 346

490; ultimate destiny of, 232

money: age-old God-substitute. 163; and coun­

try and marriage. 163; -maker, 58

man's life partner, 403 404 Marcus Aurelius, 317

monism. 405

Marduk, 307,311,338

monogamy!ic).

bigamy,

160

59

162. 266. 392. 468; family.

392, 469, 470, 495. 496

Maria Theresa, 488 marriage:

395

160; Catholic, Judaic,

Mos­

monotheism,

307.

311,

468.

490;

a

nomadic

INDEX

524

old age, 413; homes, 135

sprout, 439 Monteverdi, 346

“old bull,” and young woman, 129

Moses, 415, 476

Ometecuhtli, 432

mother: and the child’s personal inherences, 197;

omnivorous, 27

carnivora, 28

-'s day, 451; defeminized, 451; -Earth, 310, 422. 433; the first magician,

135; -image,

195; intimates lenity, 218; -instinct, 241; and

promises

of

218;

self,

the

source

of

“Mother Church”: and art, 325; and castrated

always

323;

ontology, 263

opportunist, 42-45 oracles, 175 orders, monastic, 335

prejudice, 195

man.

28; overpowers vegetarian and

dictator,

a

325;

and

organic components, three, 14

organutan, 22 Ormazd and Ahriman, 434

woman, 323

Muses, 316

Orpheus, 264, 316. 403

music, Western. 432, 455

ostracism, 221

mysticism, 467-468

ova of the woman genius, 393

Napoleon.

148,

347,

350.

372,

416;

hailed

by

Paccioli, Luca, 341

Paganini, 139

the Amazons, 445 nation(s): and devotion. 313; disrespect of, 201;

paradise, 464, 465 paraplegics.

and the individual, 493 national: fame, 383; genius, 494; idealism. 493; personalities, 493; revivifications, 287

103

parasit(ism), 233; situation, 367

Parmenides, 273, 327

nationalism, 399, 493

particularity quotients of the self. 19-21

natural selection, 392

passion, 424

naturalism. 493

patriarchal: dualism, nomadic. 268; the essence

nature:

is

aristocratic,

367;

of Christianity is, 275;

of followers, 452;

prefers inequality, 219

Mind, 270; trinity,

269

near-death experiences, 212

patristic churches, 399

Nero, 149, 317

Paul

of Tarsus,

208,

319,

328,

nestbuilding, 140; process and its outcome, 155

inferiority complex, 331;

neurotic and psychotic problems. 379

humor,

never-never land. 150

convert, 320

newly rich, 156

and

and

lacked sense of

personality

the

his

of

a

Paulian theology, 292; Lord of Glory, 320, 384,

415, 440

Newton, 274, 290, 346

Pax: Assirica. Humana,

New York City, 154

Nietzsche, 278, 302

nihilism, 205. 357, 468

317.

310,

442;

Romana,

440;

Christiana,

331;

206. 317. 354.440,

442

nirvana, 464

nomad(ism),

469;

436;

peace: -peddler, 214; primeval, 254 309

310.

420 422;

genius, 421; motorized, 355

no mana no taboo,

252

and

military

Peirce, C. S., 274

penis, symbol of, 15n. 402 perceptual experience, 411

non-material, 497, 498

perfidious, 294

nonrational, 497, 500, 501

perpetuation, individual and species. 26

nunneries, 438

person.

nurse, 129

13; becoming a, 413-414; conservative.

157; evil. 465; odd,

151

nursing. 135

personal security, 494

nymphs, 316, 470. 473

personality, 13, 18; at will, 19,

objectivity, 171

139;

177; components:

elements,

14;

19; blueprint of, 18

four violin strings,

environment

obligingness, 131-132

Greek

obsession(s), 477; for glory, 405

integration

obsolescence, built-in. 156

137,

odd person, 151

monogamic, mothering,

and

Latin,

during

317;

and,

heredity,

developmental

18;

18;

years,

177; integration, non-integration, 162; neurotic,

19; 19;

INDEX or self, or quaternity, 26; Sumerian, 256;

pseudo-pessimism. 70

the tightrope dancer, 19; “tilted,” 139, 140;

psychic healing, 500

types of, 18, 299-300

psycho-historic-cultural marks. 491

perversity, 199

psychopaths, 456

Peter's Basilica, St., 335, 337

psychosomatic disorders, 121, 502

Pharaoh, 175-176; god incarnate, 259, 261,265,

Purgatory, 465, 466

306, 499; Hatshepsut the woman, 419

philosophy,

pyramid(s):

189, 432, 434, 452-453; Sumerian,

257

Christian,

452;

525

492

and

Egyptian

Mayan. 275; encourages inequality. 219

Pythagoras. 273, 316. 327, 403

phobias, 477

platitude(s), 397

quaternity, 26

Plato, 273, 274,316, 327, 403 play, 387; -work, 53

rage, 46 47

pleasure and gender, 423

Rama, 403

Poe, 282

rape: and legalized prostitution. 84; in tribal days,

poet(ic), 243; children and primitives, 242; lovers.

tribes are born, 429

222 rapist. 84. 222

politics, politicians, 177

rational,

polyandry(ic), 160, 266, 392. 496

497,

500,

501;

irrational.

500;

497,

nonrational, 500. 501; thought. 288

polygamy(ic), 160. 266, 392, 495

rationalism, impressive habit, 128

Pompadour, Madame de, 453, 488

“real politics,” 294

“possessed,” 479

Reanimative, 282- 284

possessiveness, 140. 388

red-yellow-blue, 114-116

power: bloody or bloodless. 173; essence of. 200;

reincarnation, 499. 501,502; or metampsychosis,

501. 502

striving for. 200-201; sublimated. 200 powerful, cosmic common denominator for the,

rejection, 388, 389

reiigion(s):

175

can

enrich

existence,

praise, need for. 390 391

votion.

precognition and retrocognition. 500

303; and peace of mind. 398

213;

organized

404;

and

and

de­

unorganized,

predator(y). 42 45

religious; revivals, 398; display. 499

predictions, 175

Renaissance. 328. 336. 337. 339. 430. 432. 451.

pride, personal, national, religious. 81

486; freedom, 355; essentially Italian. 452;

priestess(es), 135, 212

wasn't a mass-movement. 430; and witches,

primates, 14, 27

476

primitive man. 499; fittest, 110

Renascent, 282-284

primordial man. last, 88

resentment. 46

Prince of Peace. 331. 354

responsibility, 386

princes and princesses. 473

restaurants: automatized, 131; family, 131

prisoners. 103. 181.429; men more than women.

restrictions. 61 Resurgent, 282-284

205 prodigal. 228. 229

reticence, 114

professional ethnic. 214

revolutionist. 227

propaganda. 66. 121

Rhea, earth-goddess, 427

Protagoras, 272

Richards, 278

Protestant: ethic, 342; God. 341

“rights of the sponger," 367

Protestant Reformation. 328; guidance. 416

Robin Hood. 178

Protestant Reformators, 208

Roman:

Protestantism. 218; essentially German. 452; and

nationalism.

339

340;

Renaissance, 335 336 Providence, 128 pseudo-adults,

164

pseudo-optimism. 70

a

reaction

to

church.

336;

for

the

country,

271;

■ emperors as gods. 317; gods. 317

romanticism. 492 Rome. 214, 217. 486; the baptized Empire. 437 Rousseau.

131. 278;

348

Rozsa. Sandor. 178

The Social Contract.

347

INDEX

526

Rumanians. 213

sexual: injustices, 129; potency is hereditary, 423

Russell. Bertrand, 274

Sforza, Caterina, 487

Russia. 213

Shakespeare, 282, 346, 454

Russian aristocracy, 99

shelters, 135

showiness, 209 single cell,

sadomasochism, 26, 164, 205. 213. 323. 369 saints, presidents, and institutions: are made. 429 salvation:

dogma of,

160; equal rights to, 452;

13, 27, 31, 404. 499; and drives,

21; and the infinite (immortality),

13,

13, 463

Sinai, 335; overpowered Olympus, 339

sin(s): man is born in, 394; sense of, 309; seven

feminine in nature, 133

deadly, 80-88

Samos, 277 Sappho, 432

slave(s), 386, 435, 462; - work, 53

satirist. 203

social: order is imperative, 336; revolution, first.

Scaevola, Gaius Mucius,

110

192

social beingness, advantages and disadvantages

scavenger(s), 42-45

of, 79-80

Schelling, 278 schismatics, 217

social existence, origins of. 33

schizophrenic reactions, 220

social pyramid,

116, 217; and ancestral memo­

ries, 192; and the low-born, 191-192

Schubert, “Ave Maria,” 431

scientific knowledge, 289

Socrates, 264, 273

scientists, 290, 397

solar genius, 357

Scythians, 464

\

soldier, 167, 185; bloody and bellicose. 424; little,

186; professional, 214; “unknown,” 461

secessionism, 173 secret societies, 212

Solomon, 312

sectarian, 217

Sophocles, 327

self:

-importance, -knowledge,

integrated

210,

-made

233;

and

-indulgence,

216;

man, 19;

hope,

192;

97; non­

particularity

quotients of the. 19-21; or personality. 26;

-promotion,

or

209;

quarternity,

26;

14; aspects of.

Sellem-Humanizer,

14. 236-238,

499; borrowed drives, 17; characteristics of,

17, 511; and colors of its three personality 17,

contributions

511;

of,

17;

cosmic, 498, 499, 502, 503; cosmic occur­

popes,

kings, learned men, 475 soul, doctrine of the immortality of, 319

“soul mates,” 502

sovereign authority, 226

Spartacus, 462 spendthrift. 156

Spengler, 302 sperm banks, 393, 394 Spinoza. 278, 346

17; and Female-Nestbuild­

managerial, commoner, freeman. 281; man

intellectual

values

of,

17,

238;

if

as prisoner of, 243

spiritual pauperism, 397, 398

condemned to die, 251; lordly, managerial,

Slael, Germaine de, 488

commoner, 280 281; non-material essence

Stalin, 148, 270

universe,

and

spirit(s): and demons, 309; of the law, 424; lordly,

er, 207; freeman aspects of, 280 281; three

of

476;

17; essence

14; essence of cosmos,

of humanness,

great

astrologer,

Sparta, 315

selfishness, 231; and individuality, 236

rence,

as

474;

Space Age, 276, 452, 454, 484, 485

-respect, 189

partners,

sorcerer,

235;

non-material

or

non­

stoic(ism), 232, 266, 302

organ ic part of personality, 26; seven favor­

Stoker, Bram. 406

ite little words of, 264; short-circuited, 141

stubbornness, 199

separatists, 217

students: best and worst, 117; feminine, 163, 506

servile soul, 109

submissive, exams and quizzes,

seven inherences, the, 251

sex: and gender, 423;

and lust. 84; motivation

for, 112; and sociableness, 84 sex urge, 38

39, 470; and Devil's machinations,

332; and morality, 39; in women and men,

40

analyst, memory,

138;

observer,

136

success and failure, 108-109 suggestive or hypnotic powders, 474

suicide, 31, 245

Sumer(ians),

246, 385, 425, 457, 480

308-311,

language,

308;

culture,

309;

life after death.

463;

313,

and

463;

527

INDEX and Mesopotamia, 308

unassuming, 92

superiority complex, 456, 469

underworld, 225, 227

Superman, 394, 397. 473

universal rational, 500

superstag, 182

“Unknown God." 322; altar to the, 262, 313

superstition(s),

175;

and

feminine

readiness to

“Us” and “1,” 36-37, 274

attribute, masculine urge to acertain. 422. 468; and the avaricious, 230; of primitive

vagary, 151

tribes, 244

vagina, 402; symbol of. 15n

suppositions and presuppositions. 108

Vambery, Armin. 406

symbols: and idiosyncrasies of personality com­

vampire tales, 406

ponents,

4(X):

and

intellectual

shortcom­

ings, 399; uses and abuses of. 399 403

Szettem,

vampirism, 407 vandalism, 201, 227 Vatican. 455

14, 235

Vega, Lope de, 346

vegetarian. 15; envy. 73. 86; gluttony. 86

taboos, 289

Tantrism, 401

402

87; and

human behavior. 40 41; and jail. 63; and

teacher, 129,218

jealousy. 73; and mania of persecution, 28;

teenager fantasies, 151

and murder. 45; and opportunism. 65

Teilhard de Chardin. 356, 357

optimism, 67; pessimism. 69; worrier. 50

telepathy, 500

Vestals. 442

television: and the life of the whole world. 370;

Vico, 278, 302

potentials and dangers, 132

Villon. Francois, 430 431,432

termites and bees, 185

Virgin

Mother. 324.; cult of the. 438, 451. 452:

territorial imperative, 222, 463

Mary,

Thales, 273, 316

eliminated the, 484

and/or

feminine

465.

324,

484;

Protestant

zeal

virginity, 442 443

therapist, as an opportunist. 65

thought(s):

66;

masculine,

15;

Vitruvius, 278 Vlad the Impaler. 406 407

process, 453

Voltaire, 290. 417

Titans, 185.427,428

volte-face, populi.

Titian. 487

293

Titus, 312

vd.v

368

tolerance, 97 Tolstoy, 289, 302

Wallace, Alfred Russel. 304

To rd a, the Diet of, 340

welfare, 88, 135

traitor, 294. 488, 489

Wesleys, John, 342

Transylvania, 214. 340

whimsicality, 151

tribe, basic criterion of, 17, 301, 303-304

While

trinity: and agrarian situations, 268; Christian. 269, 439; Egyptian, 259; of the family. 256, 267; industry-technology-war, 289; Sumer­

Man. arrogance of. 469; masculine atti­

tudes of the, 358 wisdom: and ambition. 184; and meekness, 103:

and prudence, 92; road to, 30 wishful thinking, and age. 413

ian, 256-257

Trojan War, 316

witch-hunters. 471, 476

troubadours and minnesingers, 474

witches,

Truth.

17; essence of.

196; equals Materialism,

331. 471, 474. 475; and

wizard, 229

“Justice."

woman:

and

“real,” 355

l urks, 486

Male-Explorer,

170;

achievement of. 486;

392,

403;

centripetal

tycoon, 229

combative.

biological

agrarian

and

force,

195;

function

402;

of.

439;

centrum.

402;

defeminized.

132;

defen­

seless sex, III; depository of species, 110; envies man.

Udugs, seven. 257, 258

in

nomadic societies. 441; axis of human life.

TV dinner, 132

tyranny, 375

329:

and the cult of Isis, 476

355; grew to cosmic proportions, 354; and 381;

heretics.

nine

195; feminine man and femi­

woman. 425;

free in comparison

to

528

INDEX man. and

163, 403; Greek. 316; and the hearth

arrow,

ethics, 437;

442;

and

Hebraic-Christian

Hindu. 357;

and

the “King,”

495; masculine, 146.441.442.443-445,495;

and ,

the maturing

wise-,

priestess,

agriculture,

309.

genius, 404; 135. 481; 421;

as

medicine-

originator of

“Queen,”

495;

rights to, 311; repository of the species, 486;

soul

of.

449;

superior

position

of,

frame of reference, 312; iarities of, 312

Yankee, 270

“yes-man,” 480 “Yes” and “No,” 446 447

Yin and Yang, 432-433 yoni, 195; and the Eternal Female, 402

youth, aim of, 222

404;

Western, 441

zealot, 214; communist and anti-communist. 214

women's liberation movement. 151

Zeno, 272

work: and slavery, 54; and types of work. 53

Zeus, 314, 316, 427, 428

worrier, 50, 324, 485

Zoroaster, 403, 434

worship, 244

Zoroastrianism, 434

worth

or worthlessness, 429;

masculine pecul­

objective, subjec­

tive, 479-480

wrath, 46-47

Yahweh, 311, 328, 338; Aton and the Assyrian Kings, 311; children of, 312; and Christian

Zrinyi, Ilona, 488

Zwingli, 337

DEMCO