History of the Counties of Dauphin and Lebanon in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania: Biographical and Genealogical

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HISTORY COUNTIES OF

DAUPHIN AND LEBANON COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. BY

WILLIAM HENRY EGLE,

M.D., M.A.,

AUTHOR OF " HISTORV OF PENNSYLVANIA."

PHILADELPHIA: & PECK.

EVERTS

188

3.

w

^ [Copyright, 1883,

Wm.

H. Egle.]

[The foregoing copyright includes not only the General and Local Histories, but the Family Genealogies and Biographical Sketches;

special

protection

being desired therein.]

press OF J.

B.

LIPPINCOTT &

CO.,

PHILADELPHIA.

X

PREFATORY. It

is

becoming and proper that the author should make a few statements prefatory

following History of the Counties of Dauphin and Lebanon. history of

We

any

and our labor

locality,

have endeavored

Dauphin and Lebanon more important

to the

as the limits of a

what

voluminous

war

details of the

may

commission there

author does not hold himself responsible

Many

Much

and what

has been omitted because

come

to

our hands, and

to lay aside for future reference.

families.

For whatever

and complete.

full

size of the

over nine hundred pages,

to

Dauphin County

found pretty

light one.

be in this direction, or in any of the local details, the

—those who

could have furnished the information are.

communications or personal applications remain unanswered to this day.

We

have endeavored

to be correct

in

fear that through the fault of those

errors,

volume has not been a

and biography of the counties of

by the publishers,

will be

it

to the

to prepare

Union, which has increased the

for the

as promised

to the biographical department,

errors of omission or

will allow.

no easy task

is

large mass of material has

are reluctantly compelled to omit the record of

As

we

A

to preserve in these pages,

volume from eight hundred pages,

we

volume

have been recorded.

facts

the difficulty has been

Owing

in the preparation of this

to preserve as full a record of the history

It

detail as to

whose duty

names and dates

it

and we therefore throw the responsibility where

The names original,

of early warrantees of land and

and also the early township

officers.

was

in local matters,

to furnish such

and vet

data there

may

be

belongs.

it

all assessment-lists

The orthography

is

we have

varied,

it is

printed as in the true,

but we did

not feel authorized to correct any, since even to-day members of the same family write their

names

differently.

In the records of the war for the Union we have faithfully endeavored within our province, and hence have received the aid of a

number of

to preserve all comino;

There

soldiers of that war.

were instances where companies or parts of comjjanies were raised or drafted within the counties, but officered by

meu from

other localities;

the survivors are yet living,

it

Republic would take immediate steps portions of

commands

better keep green the

As views of

more

memory

men and

so,

failed to distinguish

if the different posts

to preserve in

them.

While many of

of the Grand

permanent form records of

or individuals from the counties of

previously stated,

others can be

we have

would be well

all

Army

of the

commands

Dauphin and Lebanon.

or

They cannot

of their departed and valiant comrades.

we have endeavored

to

they have the opportunity.

measures, and what

we have

prove faithful to the trust reposed in

We said,

have been candid

in

us.

have abundant authority therefor.

desiring to appear in the role of an historical iconoclast,

If

our opinions, in our

we have been compelled

to

Xot

give facts

PREFATORY. even though they

may have

We

toppled over tradition and current history.

have not forced

any opinion of our own without good and conclusive evidence.

Had

it

not been for the great energy of the publishers of this volume,

comprehensive a work would ever have seen the light of day. the agreement

made with

commensurate with that

Our thanks their power.

the public, and

spirit

are due to

To one

A. Boyd Hamilton,

we

They have

it is

regret that their encouragement

especially

of

and success was not

appreciative friends

who gave

must we make due acknowledgments his information as if

—our it

us every assistance in friend

and

co- laborer

was our own.

WILLIAM 24, 1883.

if so

of enterprise they have exhibited throughout the undertaking.

many kind and

— frequently making use of

Harrisburg, Julv

doubtful

fulfilled their part

H. EGLE.

HISTORY

COUNTY OF DAUPHIN COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA:

BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL. BY

WILLIAM IIENKY EGLE,

M.D., M.A..

AUTHOR OF " HISTORY OF PENNSYLVANIA."

Cfjf

iHrmorg OF

IBE^TEIE^L^"

WAUG-H EGLE,

THIS RECORD OP THE

HOME OF

HIS

ANCESTORS

IS

AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED.





CONTENTS OF HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY. CHAPTER

CHAPTER

I.

The Aborigines — Susquehannas — Shawanese — Customs and Char-

—Stone

The War

— Who were the Scotch-Irish —Their Shute, of Massachusetts — Penn'a Proposed

Pennsylvania Articles of Association

PAGE of

Hanover— Resolves of The

— Capt.



Matthew Smith's

of Paxtang

78

CHAPTER The War 13

CHAPTER

XIII.

—Resolves

Liberty Association of Londonderry

?

Settlement on the Susquehanna III.

XIV.

Independence (continued)— Capt. John Brisban's

for

Company— Capt. John Murray's Company— Capt. John Marshall's Company— Col. James Burd's Battalion, with Bolls of Capts. Cowden'B, Sherer's, Murray's, Bell's, Manning's, Fridley's,

White Settler— The Assessment-List of 171S Prices of Land, and Early Warrantees for Paxtang, Derry, Hanover, Londonderry, and Upper Paxtang Townships

John Harris, the

— The

II.

Proprietary's Concessions

Letter to Governor

3

Independence

for

Middletown

Company

CHAPTER The

PAGE



Implements William Penn'a Account of the Indians—Geographical NameB acter

Reed's, aud Deibler's

First

Companies

84



CHAPTER The French and Indian

War— Petition

CHAPTER XV.

19

Tho War

for Independence (continued)— Col. Timothy Green's Battalion— Rolls of Capts. Koppenheffer's, McQllown's, Brown's,

IV.

of the Inhabitants for Pro-

Rogers', McCallen's, and Rutherford's Companies

tection — Braddock's Expedition — The Atrocities of the Savages — Correspondence of John Harris and others relating to the

CHAPTER 39

Frontiers

CHAPTER

V.

The French and Indian War (continued)— Treaty at Harris' Ferry —Fort Halifax— Fort McKee— Fort Manady— Fort at Harris' Ferry— Fort Hunter

The War

for Independence (continued)— Names of Persons who took the Oath of Allegiance in Paxtang, Londonderry, and Han-

over Townships— Assessments of Non-Associators, 1777

CHAPTER

45

The War

CHAPTER

VI.

for

Independence (continued)— Roll of Capt. John Mar-

Weaver's Companies— The Close of the

CHAPTER

51

— Act

VII.

(continued)

—Gen. Forbes' Victory

CHAPTER

Military Organization in 1786-1790— Union Canal— The Whiskey Insurrection ; DeWees' Journal of— Scott's Description of Dau-

phin County in 1805

CHAPTER XX.

59

IX.

tains

Letter

of

Declaration of the Frontier Inhabitants

CHAPTER

of

1812— General Officers— Rolls of the Companies of CapElder, Fetterhoff, Graham, Todd— Peace-

Carothers, Crain, Dietrick,

Henry, Knight, McElhenny, Moorhead, Smith,

—Excitement in Parson Elder— The

Insurrection" (continued)

— Chantcteristic

Association of the Soldiers of the 63

X.

The Buckshot

—The

Approach of

tion of the

Legislature

Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued)

tropolis—The Conduct of the Quakers and Dr. Franklin—The Pamphleteers

CHAPTER

CHAPTER

Causes which Led to It— The Proclama-

Governor— The

Call to

Arms— Proceedings

in the

130

XXII.

Guards

134

CHAPTER

XII.





The* Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued) Appendix Names of Indians Killed— Bad Character of the Indians— The Paxtang Boys " The Apology of the Paxtang Volunteers" Affidavits of the Pioneers— Pamphlets Printed



119

69

Affair

1

of 1812

The War with Mexico— Organization of the Cameron Guards— Their Services in Mexico— Who raised the first American Flag in the Citadel of the City of Mexico— Roll of the Cameron

XI.

Paxtang Boys' Insurrection" (continued) Lazarus Stewart His Eloquent Declaration



War— The

CHAPTER

66

— Reward for Capt. — A Summary of the

"

War

CHAPTER XXI.

the Delegates to Philadelphia— The Fears of the Quaker Me-

The

114

— Destruction The War

CHAPTER

"

109

VIII.

of the Indians at Conestoga and Lancaster

The

Dauphin — Remonstrances Against of—The County in 1789— Opposition to the

of the County of

for Erection

CHAPTER XIX.

Insecurity of the Frontiers from their Maraudings

the Province

102

XVIII.

Federal Constitution

The French and Indian War (continued) — The so-called " Paxtang Boys' Insurrection"— The Manor of Conestoga— The Conduct of the Provincial Assembly— The Perfidy of the Friendly Indians

The

War— Continental

57

Conspiracy of Pontiac

" Paxtang Boys'

of Slavery

Register of Slaves— Rolls of Capts. McAllister's, Walker's, and

The Formation

CHAPTER The French and Indian War

95

XVII.

Company — Indian Incursions — Abolition

shall's

The French and Indian War (continued)— Second Treaty at Harris' Ferry— The Indian Barbarities— Letters from Adam ReedJournal of Rev. Charles Beatty in 1756— Officers and Men from Dauphin in the Provincial Service

91

XVI.

XXIII.

The War

for the Union— War Meeting at Harrisburg— Arbitrary Arrests— First Korthern Invasion by the Army of Lee— The Get-



tysburg 72

Campaign— The

Close of the Rebellion— The Assassina* 13

tion of President Lincoln

vii





CONTENTS OF HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY. PAGE

CHAPTER XXIV.

CHAPTER

i

Union (continued)— Officers from Dauphin County in other Pennsylvania Regiments— Dauphin County in the Three Months' Service— The First, Second, Tenth, Fifteenth, and

The War

Twenty-fifth Regiments

CHAPTER XXV. and other for the Union (continued)— The Reserves FortyThree-Year Organizations: The Thirty-fifth, Forty-first, Regiments fourth, Forty-sixth, Fifty-fourth, and Fifty-fifth

CHAPTER

The War

Prosperity of Harrisburg Visit of the Prince of

154

— Additions— Incorporated

Wales— The War

Service: Sevfor the Union (continued)— One Year's Regienty-seventh, Eighty-third, and One Hundred and First Years' Service: Eightieth, Eighty-fourth, Eighty-

1V2

copal

— Protestant

Episcopal

gelical—Church of

CHAPTER The Newspaper

The Industries

213

of

Harrisburg— The Location of the City and

CHAPTER The

Fire

Department— How they formerly extinguished



245

casterian

359

Charitable Institutions

291

298

East Halifax

III.

Sickness at Harrisburg— Laudis' Mill-Dam the Source of Trouble —Meeting of the Citizens— F.fforts to Purchase— Removal of Ihe

de Rochefoucauld at

in

305

IV. Harrisburg— Aggressions of the

CHAPTER

V.

Harrisburg— Act estabRemoval lishing the same — Laying of the Comer-stone of the Capitol

Government

to

VI.

Harrisburg in 1818— Visit of Gen. Lafayette— Reception at the Capitol— Extension of Borough Limits in 1838— The Ha 'American Notes" Nominating Convi

Reed

"

Wayne

"

391

393

400 406 408 409

416 419 421 422 428 429

"

429

"

432 433 435

436 436 •

440 441

"

453

"

455

Washington" Williams

I

445

446 448

452

458

"

Biographical History, 316

437

Upper Paxtang Township mlllersburg borough Middle Paxtang Township Lykens Valley Lykens Township Mifflin Wiconisco

Occupation of the Capitol— Cost of Construction

CHAPTER

"

374

" Jackson Jefferson "

1807— Erection of the Harrisburg Bridge

of the Seat of

368

Borough Rush Township

French Directory— Address of the Citizens of Harrisburg to President Adams, and his Reply— Cuming's Account of Harrisburg

of the Stateand Postmasters— Census

"

CHAPTER The Duke

—Post-Oflfices

MlDDLETOWN BOROUGH Lowr.n Swataua Township Swatara Township Stf.elton Borough Lower Paxtano Township " Susquehanna " Derry Hummelstown Borough Londonderry Township " Conewago " Hanover " South Hanover " " West



-Mill-Dam Taxes

365

Returns, etc

II.

CHAPTER

Academy— The Lan-

System— The Public Schools

Banks and Banking Institutions— Public Buildings

259

Harrisburg in 1787— In 1788— The Federal Seat of Government— Harrisburg erected into a Borough First Assessment of the Borough— Whiskey Insurrection— Address of the Burgesses to President Washington, and his Reply



CHAPTER XV.

I.

CHAPTER

Fires in

XIV.

Early Educational Efforts— The Harrisburg

CITY OF HARRISBURG.







CHAPTER

286

The Proprietary Grants— Manor of Paxtang— The Ferry Grant— The Harris Mansion— Proposals to lay out a Town— Conveyances Town to the Public by John Harris— Early Reminiscences of the Louisburgh— " Pumpkin Flood"— Taxables for 1787

355

XIII.

Mount Pleasant

CHAPTER XXXI.

CHAPTER

its

Harri6burg— The First Fire Company— Friendship— Hope— Cit—Washington Mount Vernon Paxton Good Will

227

CHAPTER XXX.

Paxtang Township

349

XII.

Great Natural and Acquired Advantages

The War for the Union (continued)— The Militia of 1862— First Regiment— Sixth Regiment— Independent Companies— Twenty-

The Early Courts— Where First Held— The Bar in 1789— The Court-IIouseB— The President Judges of the County— Reminiscences of the Bar, and Roll of Members

329

XI.

CHAPTER

izen

and Thirty-seventh Regiments

Epis-

— Baptist — Evan-

Press of Harrisburg, and of the County

CHAPTER XXIX.

Sixth, Thirty-sixth,

Catholic

Union

201

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The War for the Union (continued)— Two Hundredth, Two Hunand dred and First, Two Hundred and Fifth, Two Hundred Eighth, and One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Regiments

— Roman

God— Wesley

326

X.

Churches— Reformed— Lutheran— Presbyterian— Methodist

for the

The War for the Union (continued)— Oue Hundred and Sixty-third, Oue Hundred and Seventy-seventh, One Hundred and Seventh, One Hundred and Thirteenth, One Hundred and Thirtieth, and One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiments

Rail-

IX.

CHAPTER

CHAPTER XXVII. Union (continued)-One Hundred and First Regiment-Nine Months' Service: History of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh, or Dauphin County Regiment

as a City

Union— The

Water Supply : Early Efforts to Supply the Town with Water— The Water- Works of 1840— Shinplasters— The New Water- Works

ment—Three

The War

for the

322

CHAPTER

The War

319

VIII.

road Riots of 1877

CHAPTER XXVI.

seventh, Ninety-second, and Ninety-sixth Regiments

VII.

Improving the Navigation of the Susquehanna— Steamboats thereon—Internal Improvement— Pack-horse Teams and Conestoga Wagons The Pennsylvania Canal— Harrisburg and Lancaster Railroad— The Cumberland Valley— The Pennsylvania Railroad

for the

460 I

461

ILLUSTRATIONS TO HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY. PAGE

PAGE

Hamilton American Tube and Iron Company Ayres, William

559

Alricks,

Locust Grove

Farm

lacing

007

333

560

Lutheran Church, First Lutheran Church, Second Lutheran Church, Third

348

Maclay, William, Residence

561

Matheson, George

562

Matter,

470

Methodist Episcopal Church, Grace

393

Miller, J.

facing

472

Miller,

"

566

Myers, H.

Calder, William

"

473

Neagley, John

Calder, William, Residence of the late

"

320

Oak Lane Farm

564

Old Coilrt-House

261

325

Old Paxtang Church

394

566

Olth, E.

L

Bailey, Charles

between 388, 389 463 facing

Bethel Church, First

Bent, L. S

facing

M

Brubaker, George

Bucher, John C Bnrd, Col. James, Residence

facing of,

1764

Burke, Michael Calder,

James

Can

Camp

Sin

,

Cnrtin Hospital

R

Carl, J.

Chesapeake Kail-Works au.l Central Iron-Works Dauphin and Lebanon Counties, Outline Map of.

Deny Deny

between

358, 359 1

Du^A. J., Residence of Dunkel.J. A Durbin. Joseph James

Fager,

J.

D

591

Public School, Steelton

facing

Fortenbaugh, Abraham

W M

524

Pennsylvania Steel-Works, Geueral View

556

John

Geary, John

L

Presbyterian Church, Market Square

Fleming, James

facing

400

"

403 402

"

"

.

between

339 340

527

Rutherford, Abner

487

Rutherford, J.

4S9

St.

338

404

.«.

696

B

596

Church Schofield.E. Lane

345

Patrick's

491

Shinplasters, 1S3S

492

Shiuplaster Harrisburg

57:i

Shinplaster

494

Shoch, Samuel

498

Shunk,

598 facing

Bank Middletown Bank

387 facing

R

J.

Hamiltou,

Hugh

500

Simonton, A.

G

facing

Hanover Church

430

Simonton,

W

"

Harris Mansion, 1850

294

Snod^rass, James

293

Snyder, J.

facing

356

Stato Capitol, the

"

296

Susquehanna Indians Susquehanna Iron-Works Susquehanna River in 1701 Thome, C. V Thompson, A. F Weir, James Wenrich, Francis

Harris'

Log House, 1720

Harrisburg Car Manufacturing Company Harrisburg,Original Plat Harris, Robert

Hensel, J.

502

M

576

T

Hildrup, William

W. T., Residence of HofTman, William Hursh, George R Indian Relics Indian Purchases, Map of. Hildrup,

facing

679

"

408 578 579

facing

Jordan, Francis

ancaster County,

1730,

Map

of

Wolf, George

582

Wyeth, Francis Wyeth, John Young, James

"

32

601

602

facing

Wilhelm, Artemas, Residence

390 IS

M

511

609

4 facing

facing

Winebrenner, John

facing

Frontispiece.

W

580

513

599

600

"

H

Keystone Farm

J.

538

542

D

12

F

Kepner, William

Wiestling,

J.

597

537

"

Kelker, Frederick Kelker, R.

6

F.

328 368

Haldeman,

facing

401

404, 405

R

571

574

608, 609

Pearson, John J

568

Findlay, William

Forster,

590

Porter, D.

faciug

521

589

between

569

H

Fleming,

K

312

F

Etter, B.

facing

"

W

Elder,

H

4SI

479

342 588

William

"

414

R

586 587

F

480

Church, Interior View

366

G.F

facing

413

Dock, George Dougherty, Philip

335 faciug

Bessemer Mill and Open Hearth Furnace Frog Department and Rail-Mill Interior Bessemer Mill Superintendent's Residence Pino Street Presbyterian Church Pine Street Church (Presbyterian)

Church, Old

DeWitt. William

334

1701

of,

546

603

of.

between

549

398, 399

facing

551

552 facing

605'

"

554

"

606

ix

w

y

A





GENERAL HISTORY. CHAPTER

them

I.

offer





The Aborigines— Susquehannas Sbawanese Customs and Character Stone Implements William Penn's Account of the Indians— Geographical Names.



We wish

it

was possible

lucid account of the

first

an accurate and

to give

inhabitants of this locality.





much very much of the history of the aborigines is made up from the details of unreliable parties, and yet among the meagre data thus Unfortunately

given,

some few

wholly in the dark. supply, and

we

pended upon

gleaned which leave us not Tradition is the main source of

facts are

all

know how

for verity.

little

of that can be de-

Fortunately the members

of the Society of Jesus, the banner of the cross in their hands, during the seventeenth century, preserved not only a record of their

own

labors in the

cause of their divine Master, but somewhat concerning the history of a race for whose spiritual salvation they braved death itself. From their Relations we glean a few facts important to us as to the earliest of the aborigines

now

who

lorded

it

over this section

we

claim as our domain.

Prior to 1600, but

how long

before

is

not known,

the Susquehannas were seated upon the river of that

name. viously

By the Relations we find that they had precome into collision with the Mohawks, then

value, for the

little

put into the riors,

common enemy. Nor was the Susquehannas could one thousand three hundred war-

aid against the

one of

field

trained to the use of fire-arms

modes of war by three Swedish had obtained to instruct them.

and European

soldiers,

whom

they

Before interposing,

however, they began a negotiation, and sent an emOnondaga to urge the cantons to peace. The Iroquois refused, and the Hurons, sunk in apathy,

bassy to

took no active steps to secure the aid of the friendly Susquehannas. That tribe, however, maintained its its European neighbors, and Sawahegeh, and other sachems, in presence of a Swedish deputy, ceded to Maryland all the territory from the Patuxent River to Palmer's Island, and from the Choptauk to the northeast branch north of Elk River. Four years later, the Iroquois, grown insolent by

friendly intercourse with

in 1652,

their success in

almost annihilating their kindred

and south of Lake Erie, provoked a war with the Susquehannas, plundering their hunters on Lake Ontario. During that year the smallpox, that terrible scourge of the aborigines, broke out in their town, sweeping off many, and seriously enfeebling the War had now begun in earnest with the Five nation. Nations, and though the Susquehannas had some of tribes north

their people killed near their town, they in turn pressed

the most eastern of the Iroquois, by which in a war

the Cayugas so hard that some of them retreated across

that lasted for ten years the former nearly exter-

Lake Ontario

According to Capt. John Smith, who explored the Chesapeake and its tributaries, the Susquehannas were then, in 1608, still at war with the tribe referred to. In 1633 they were at war with the Algonquin tribes on the Delaware, maintaining their supremacy by butchery. They were friendly to the Dutch, and when the Swedes arrived on the Delaware, in 1638, they renewed the friendly intercourse begun by the former. According to Hazard, they purchased lands of the ruling tribe, and thus secured their friendship. Southward, also, they carried the terror of their arms, and from 1634 to 1644 they waged war on the Yaomacoes, the Piscataways, and Patuxents, and were so troublesome that in 1642 Governor Calvert, by proclamation, de-

in

minated their enemy.

clared

them public enemies. the Hurons, in Upper Canada,

When gan

in 1647, be-

under the fearful blows dealt by the Five Nations, the Susquehannas sent an embassy to offer to sink

to

Canada.

They

also kept the Senecas

such alarm that they no longer ventured to carry their peltries to New York, except in caravans escorted

by six hundred men, who even took a most circuitous route. A law of Maryland, passed May 1, 1661, authorized the Governor of that province to aid the Susquehannas. Egle's History of Pennsylvania. Smarting under constant defeat, the Five Nations solicited French aid, but in April, 1663, the Western cantons raised an army of eight hundred men to inThis vest and storm the fort of the Susquehannas. fort was located about fifty miles from the mouth of embarked on river. The enemy Lake Ontario, the according to the French account, and then went overland to the Susquehanna. On reaching the fort, however, they found it well defended on the river side, and on the land side with two bastions in European style, with cannon mounted and connected by a double curtain of large trees. After some trifling skirmishes the Iroquois had recourse to stratagem. 3

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY. They

sent in a party of twenty-five

peace, and ask provisions to enable

men

to treat of

them

to return.

The Susquehannas admitted them, but immediately burned them trymen.

before the eyes of their coun-

all alive

The

force of the Iroquois consisted of one

thousand six hundred warriors, while that of the Susquehannas only one hundred. On the retreat of the Iroquois, the Susquehannas pursued them with considerable slaughter.

After this the war was carried on in small and Susquehanna prisoners were from time

parties, to

time

at the stake,

and a famous medicine man of Oneida

appeared after death to order his body to be taken up and interred on the trail leading to the Susquehannas, as the only means of saving that canton from ruin. Towards the summer of 1672 a body of forty Cayugas descended the Susquehanna in canoes, and twenty Senecas went by land to attack the enemy in their fields but a band of sixty Andaste, or Susquehanna boys, the oldest not over sixteen, attacked the Senecas and routed them, killing one brave and taking another. Flushed with victory, they pushed on to attack the Cayugas, and defeated them also, killing eight, and wounding with arrow, knife, and ;

hatchet fifteen

sixteen

or

fifteen or sixteen

more, losing, however, At this time

of their gallant band.

the Susquehannas were so reduced by. war and pestilence that they could muster only

three hundred

warriors.

In 1675, according to the Relations Inedites and

Golden, the tribe was completely overthrown, but unfortunately forces

which

we have no effected

it

details

whatever as

or the time or

to

the

manner of

The remnant,

too proud to yield they had long contended as equals, and by holding the land of their fathers by sufferance to acknowledge themselves subdued, yet their utter defeat.

to

too

whom

those with

weak

to withstand the victorious Iroquois, for-

sook the river bearing their name, taking up a position on the western borders of

Piscataways.

murder of some Senecas.

Maryland, near the

Shortly after they were accused of the

They

settlers,

apparently slain by the

sent five of their chiefs to the

Mary-

land and Virginia troops, under Col. John Washing-

Gen. George Washington, and Maj. Thomas Truman, who went out in pursuit. Although coming as deputies, and showing the Baltimore medal and certificate of friendship, these chiefs were cruelly put to death. The enraged Susquehannas then began a terrible border war. which was kept up until their utter destruction. When the founder of Pennsylvania came to this country there was not one of the Susquehannas dwelling in their ancient seat; all had disappeared. Some few vagabond families of the Iroquois remained, occupying the deserted towns of their conquered and expelled enemies. These were the inditon, great-grandfather of

STJSQTJ

EHANNA INDIAN.

burned at Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, and Cayuga. In the fall of 1669, the Susquehannas, after defeating the Cayugas, offered peace, but the Cayugas put their ambassador and his nephew to death, after retaining him five or six months, the Oneidas having taken nine Susquehannas, and sent some to Cayuga, with



forty

At

wampum

belts to maintain the war.

this time the great

nas was one styled

war chief of the Susquehan-

Hochitagete, or Barefoot, and

women and crafty medicine men deluded the Iroquois with promises of his capture and execution

raving



viduals representing themselves as Conestogas, not by blood, but simply by occupation, a fact to which we shall again refer. They were Cayugas and Senecas. Whether by persuasion we know not, but certainly

by permission of the Iroquois came the Shawanese to Pennsylvania. Their origin was Southern. They probably belonged to the Algonquins, as they spoke

From the most authentic information it appears that the basin of the Cumberland River was the residence of the Shawanese before the settlement of the Europeans on the continent, and that they connected the different sections of the Algonquin families. the same language.

GENERAL HISTORY. At the

Bhawanese were a party and they must have been considered a very prominent band from the fact of their having treaty of 1683 the

to that covenant,

preserved the treaty in their

we

ing, as

many

own

possession or keep-

are informed that at a conference held

years after, that nation produced this treaty on

parohment

to the

Governor of the Province.

the custom with the Indian tribes treaty with the whites to

who made

It

was

a joint

commit the preservation of

the papers containing the treaty,

etc., to sucli

of the

were considered most to be trusted. From the best authority, it appears that as" early as 1673

bands

as

upwards of seventy families of that nation removed from the Carolinas and occupied some of the deserted Others of the tribe soon

posts of the Susquehannas.

followed.

Iu the year 169S, some Shawanese applied to the proprietary government of Pennsylvania for permis-

on the Conestoga and Pequea Creeks, under Opessah, their principal chief. Here they remained a quarter of a century, when, with other families settled on the Swatara, Paxtang, and the Susquehanna streams on the east, they branched off to the westward. As early as 1728 we find the Shawanese as far west as the Ohio, and by the middle of the eighteenth century the entire tribe had settled on the branches of that river. In the year 1732 the number of fighting braves of that nation iu Pennsylvania amounted to seven hundred. The Shawanese, says Colden, were the most restless of all the Indian tribes. In 1745, he says, one tribe of them had gone to New Spain. This band of four hundred and fifty, who located themselves on the head-waters of the Mo-

sion to settle

bile River, probabl)' never returned to Pennsylvania.

The

latter

hanna by

were merely residents on the Susque-

sufferance, not only of the whites, but the

Five Nations of New York, and yet they became the most perfidious, and to them their savage brutality, their fiendish atrocity are we indebted for most all





the bloody transactions of a later period.

In complexion, our uncivilized predecessors were of

tawny color, inclining to red, which, differing from the complexion of every other portion of the human family, seems peculiar to most, if not

all,

the aborig-

Their cheek-bones were high and prominent; their eyes widely separated their noses usually broad, even when curved in outline and the ordinary cast ines.

;

;

of their features was coarse and often inexpressive.

The men were

generally

tall,

straight, well-propor-

and hardly ever corpulent or in any manner The women were too apt to be short and clumsy their features were seldom delicate or handsome and what feminine graces they had were soon obliterated by hard bodily labor combined with mental and moral degradation. The beautiful Indian maiden was only a myth or the dream of the poet. The mode of life of the men, and perchance their natural constitution, gave them a power of enduring fatigue and privation such as no European could rival. When tioned,

deformed. ;

;

5

necessary they would hunt for days together while from hunger, or perforin long journeys

suffering

through the forests with no other refreshment than little parched corn and water.

a

For subsistence, the Indian depended much less upon agriculture than upon either fishing or hunting.

They confined themselves beans, corn, and tobacco. cultivated by

women and

chiefly to the raising of

The

corn and beans were

children, the tobacco alone

was thought worthy of the labor and attention of the men. The women of an ordinary family would commonly raise in a single season two or three heaps of corn, each containing twelve, fifteen, or twenty bushels.

The corn was spread day

after day in the sun, carefrom the rain or dew, and when in this way sufficiently prepared was buried in the earth, and fully shielded

thus preserved for the winter's subsistence.

Hunting and fishing were perchance the chief dependence for food. The forests were filled with animals, some of them beasts of prey, others suitable for food, others valuable on account of their furs. Flocks of wild turkeys roamed through the woods, partridges and pheasants abounded, both in the woods and open country, and at certain times of the vear the pigeons collected in such numbers that their flight seemed to obscure the light of the sun. The ponds, creeks, and rivers swarmed with water-fowl. The river Susquehanna was alive with fish, and every spring great numbers of shad, rock-fish, salmon, and perch ascended the stream, furnishing a seasonable supply to the natives when their provisions were exhausted by a long and severe winter. The clothing of the natives was composed of skins cured so as to be soft and pliable, and sometimes ornamented with paint and beads manufactured from shells. It may be stated in this connection that verv little is known of the process used by the Indians to prepare bear- and deer-skins for shoes and clothing. Loskiel says, " Their shoes are of deer-skin, without heels, some being very neatly made by the women. Their skins are tanned with the brains of deer, which make them very soft; some leave the fur upon the skin, and such fur shoes are remarkably light and easy." The buffalo robes sold by our furriers as tanned by the Indians are softer than those that are tanned by civilized people. Occasionally the women decked themselves in mantles made of feathers overlapping each other, as on the back of the fowl, and presenting an appearance of fantastic gayety which no doubt prodigiously delighted the wearers. Their dress consisted usually of two articles, a leather shirt, or under-garment, ornamented with fringe, and a skirt of the same material fastened around the waist with a belt and reaching nearly to the feet. Their hair they dressed in a thick, heavy plait, which fell down upon the neck and they sometimes ornamented their heads with bands of wampum or with a small cap. The men went bareheaded, with their hair fantastically trimmed each according to his own fancv. One ;

;

HISTOBY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY. warrior would have it shaved on one side of the head and long on the other. Another might be seen with his scalp completely bare, except a strip two or three inches in width running from the forehead over to the nape of the neck. This was kept short, and so thoroughly stiffened with paint and bear's grease as to stand up straight, after the fashion of a cock's

comb

or the crest of a warrior's helmet.

The

legs

were covered with leggins of dressed deer-skin, and the lower part of the body was protected by the breech-cloth, usually called by the early settlers Indian breeches.

Moccasins, that

dressed leather, were

other portions of the fully

common attire,

to

is,

light shoes of soft-

both sexes, and, like

many

were

times taste-

ornamented with embroidery of wampum.

men often dispensed with summer; while in winter

The

much

that

we

is

and the existence of the soul after death. Their sordid and supremely selfish natures could not raise their thoughts so high, for had such been the case there would be some redeeming qualities in the moral of the Indian.

life

We

shall close our account of the aborigines with such reference to the weapons of war and domestic implements employed by them as may be of value and in-

No

terest.

field presents to

the ethnologist a greater

and

they protected themselves

the illustrations herewith given and described were

inherent in the savage nature of the

shall refrain from referring.

Although marriage was

among

held the doctrines imparted to them of a Great Spirit,

variety of material than that of the Susquehanna,

mantle of skins. The male children ran about until they were ten or twelve years old in a state of nature the girls were provided with an apron, although of very economical dimensions. As to their houses and furniture, their food and its preparation, amusements, courtship and marriage, we There are certain peculiarities charshall not refer. acteristic of the Indian which are interesting to dwell upon, but these must be left to another occasion. A few remarks, however, upon their moral life may explain their future conduct towards the white settlers. The Indian of to-day, however, is a fair type of those savages who lived in our locality two centuries ago. We dislike to picture vice in all its horrid details, and aborigine

Their ideas of religion were crude and indefinite. With the advent of the pious Moravian and faithful Jesuit, new conceptions of a divinity crept into their obtuse minds, but it is doubtful if they ever had or

their leggins, especially in

against the bleak air by adding to their garments a

so

they had any, were lost in the multitude of vices.

not

their rites, unfaithfulness

always

found within the present limits of the county of Dauphin. The abundance of these relics of the Stone Age scattered upon the shores of the rivers, its islands, and for many miles inward, show unmistakable eviall

dences of this section of country being in possession

many

for

centuries of a powerful nation.

The number of stone implements were than

many

persons would suppose.

far larger

Prior to the

coming of the white man, with the exception of potand pipes, both made of clay, and wooden bowls

tery

made

of the knots of trees, all articles for domestic ornament, and for war, were formed of stone. Some are quite ingenious, and with all the improved machinery of the present day, we doubt if as fine specimens of arrowheads could be produced as those in our possession made by Indian arrowhead-makers use,

of the centuries ago.

recognized

was looked upon

as

a crime, and even death was frequently inflicted for

Hammer

stones

were possibly the

first

stone imple-

ments.

in the tribe.

Arrowheads are the most abundant of all stone implements to be found in this section. Few fields there are whose upturned sod does not reveal arrowheads either entire or fragmentary, and especially along the bottoms of the creeks are these specimens of the Indian arrow-maker to be found. They vary

bestiality

in size

by the irate husband. Licentiousness was common, and the man who looked upon the waywardness of his wife, visiting her with blows and wounds, may have been the most debauched creature this

offense

No female ever ventured alone, for was the besetting sin of the race. Uncleanness was in all their manners. Impatient of bodily labor, and indisposed to thought, they naturally turned for pleasure to those coarse gratifications

They were when not strongly incited to exertion they were gluttonous when supplied with an abundance of food, and they became intemperate as soon as the means of intemperance were placed within their reach. They were revengeful by nature custom had made vengeance with them a matter of duty and honor. They had little idea of truth; they were natural-born liars, and as a result were the meanest of robbers. As for murder and arson they had no comof the senses which were within reach. indolent

;

;

punctions of conscience ings in their nature.

;

there were no refined feel-

Selfish in the extreme, they

never realized what was ennobling.

Their virtues,

if

from one-half an inch

to four inches in length,

composed of quartz, flint, limestone, chalcedony, and other hard yet fragile minerals. Few are perfectly formed, being varied to suit ideas of the makers as to their form and shape. With the exception of two or first range of the Kittatinny Mountains, and among the bowlders along the Conewago, we have not been able to discover the workshop of the arrow-maker. Limestone is abundant in the county, and jutted out everywhere, while the pebbles of the Susquehanna furnished red and yellow

three points on the

jasper,

which seem

to

have been selected as much for The art of arrow-

their beauty as for their utility.

making had been reduced

to a perfect system,

and

were shaped in accordance with the taste and fancy of the maker. As Professor Brunner aptly says, "It was as easy for them to chip a large arrowhead down

10

11

1.

2.

1

Female Ornament.

5.

Chisel.

Axe.

6.

7.

Hammer. Earthen

8.

Last.

3.

Pestle.

4.

"Biscay Axe."

Paint Cup.

13.

10.

Quoit.

14.

Borer.

I.

Spear.

15.

Sceptre.

Scraper.

16.

Carved Head.

9.

Jar.:

I

12. (All stone

implements except 4 and

7."

Ornament.

GENERAL HISTORY. to a small

one without breaking

casian to whittle a stick

first

and by

density, chips.

way

discover which

trial

the stone

Flints do not chip equally well in all direc-

The second

tions.

it is

step

The

chips off a rock."

mer,

as it is for a Caua tooth-pick." As

it

to

manufacture, the authority just quoted says, step was to select a solid stone of uniform

to their

"The

down

true, bore a

is

flaking or breaking large

stone

celt for

chisel

and ham-

conspicuous part in the instru-

forming the larger implements of war,

ments used

in

agriculture,

and those employed

in the preparation of

along the banks of the Susquehanna and Swatara and adjoining fields which resemble in shape those just to, and may be properly called bark-knives, and used no doubt in barking trees and making canoes, as a large percentage of canoes were made of that material. They were also employed in " digging out" It may also the knots used for bowls and buckets. be stated that some of the knives were stemmed and

alluded

They were

fastened to a handle.

frequently used for

"sticking beasts" or stabbing. Line-Sinkers,

or Pendants,

abundant on the

are

namely, mortars and pestles, and to a certain extent in shaping the arrowhead and articles above mentioned. Yet, says a good authority, 1 in the examination of a collection of hundreds of chips and flakes, there was not found the first one bearing the

islands in the Susquehanna, notably at the head of

showing that

well polished, having light notches on two edges in

food,

marks of the

celt

upon the

face or edge,

Conewago

Falls, at

Juniata, or farther up, at Clemson's Island, noted fishing-grounds, until the past

the sinkers are

the application of instruments of bone and wood, com-

which

bined with friction, were the means by which they were dressed into shape. This method has been experimented upon very successfully by Professor Brunner with a block of chalcedony and a hard, dry piece of hickory. "For the large and even middle-sized chipped implements the Indians must have tied a

to three or four

bone on a heavy wise

it

is

stick

difficult to

and used

it

how

conceive

as a lever, other-

they could have

obtained a sufficient amount of pressure cal force

To undertake to is

describe a collection of these points

not in our province, nor would

As

— direct physi-

would have been inadequate."

previously stated, they were

it

repay the reader.

made

of different de-

arrowhead-maker suggested. to the end of reed shafts or split hickory, about two feet in length, by means of a cord, and sprung from a bow in such a manner that made them a most formidable instrument of warfare. They were used in the chase, and so expert were the aborigines that it was rarely they missed their object. The arrowheads of larger size were attached to sticks and used for spearing fish. Loskiel says, " Little boys are even frequently seen wading in shallow brooks, shooting small fishes with their bows and arrows." Knives includes diverse forms, some of which become allied to the arrowheads produced by chipping, and thus used as a savingof labor and material. Upon a close comparison these maybe readily distinguished from the arrowheads, the former being beveled on one side to form a sharp-cutting edge and point, while the latter, unfinished, is full in the centre and beveled both ways, both being flat on the lower side. The leafshaped knife presents the finest appearance, vary little in thickness, and are from two to five and six inches in length. Those found in this section are made of limestone or slate, although quartzite and jasper are not uncommon. There is a much larger class found signs, such as the fancy of the

The heads were attached

1

Mr. F. G. Galbraith, of Bainbridge,

ligations for certain details.

to

whom

the author

is

under ob-

Duncan's Island, mouth of the

made

fifty

years.

Some

of

square, with rounded corners,

to attach the cord.

They

are usually from one

inches square, by one-fourth to

five-

eighthsof an inch thick, composed principally of limestone and slate, and others with deeper grooves in the

common

river pebble.

The

latter stone, with frag-

ments of pot-stone vessels used

for the

same purpose,

are generally perforated either in the end or one side.

These sinkers were used in connection with long lines, to which the hooks were attached by shorter ones on the same principle of our present manner of out-line fishing, by being attached certain distances apart, and cast from the shore with heavier sinkers or anchorstone at the outer end of the line, the whole being drawn back at certain intervals by the angler. That their fish-hooks were made of bone we have no doubt, and in a collection of implements gathered and sent to England thirty years ago were two rude fish-hooks made of the bone of some animal. Borers or drills are generally lanceolate and very delicate, and it is surprising so many are found in so perfect a condition. The material of which they are

made

is

usually limestone.

It

is

astonishing with

what neatness and accuracy these small and

made

delicately-

perforators do the work, even in the hardest

kind of stone. That they, too, were used by experienced workers of stone, there is no doubt, as we

have many instances where the slightest carelessness on the part of the mechanic would have spoiled the design, especially where they appear in scepters, as some of them present but an eighth of an inch of stone between the hole and the face of implements, which is one reason, no doubt, so many are found broken in use. The borers were fastened to a stick like arrowheads and whirled around with the hand, The perforating no doubt comor a bow and string. pleted the specimen, no matter to what class it belonged, as there are specimens of every class of implements to be found in this section perfect in every respect except to the perforated part. These also appear in different stages of completion, from a slight depression made by the point of the borer to a distance almost completing the work.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

8

Of

the implements none are equal in beauty of

all

design and workmanship to the stone scepter, or drilled ceremonial implement, which are seldom found whole; half scepters are frequently found. These are invariably broken through the eye, or perforated part of the stone, done most likely in use, as they are as a general thing delicately made. One of the finest we have seen is ovoid in shape, and truncate at base and The sides are beveled to form a very accurate top. edge the groove is through the long diameter of the implement, and shows concentric slight grooves made by the boring implement. One of the raised edges which runs parallel with the groove is acute, the other truncate. The greatest length of this implement is four inches, and its greatest breadth three and a half inches diameter of groove five-eighths of an inch. The material has not been determined. It was customary among all aboriginal tribes to record the most memorable events by notches in wood or stone, designating the importance of it by the size of the notch, thus the record of victory by one deeper and more durable than those recording time and the less important events. These calendars are frequently met with, and often appear upon ornaments of bone, wood, and stone, of which we have several in our ;

;

collection.

Their axes were generally made of a hard rock, such as diabase, sandstone, etc., by taking any fragment of rock obtained by striking one rock upon another,

when

trimming

after

shape, ground

down

all

it

down

to a desirable

the irregularities by some

This they could have done by rubbing the stone to be polished on a sandstone, or by using sand as abrasive material upon any hard stone. When it is considered how slow a process this must have been, some idea may be formed of the unprocess of abrasion.

bounded patience

it

must have required

to grind the

larger axes into shape.

The question ner, with

often asked, says Professor Brun-

is

a great deal of emphasis,

Indians cut wood with

these axes?

how did the The Indian

could not use his stone axe for the same purpose for

which we use the

Loskiel says, " Their

steel axe.

hatchets [or axes] were wedges

made of hard

stone,

six or eight inches long, sharpened at the edge

and

They were not used to them or to kill their ene-

fastened to a wooden handle. fell trees,

mies." fell

but only

to peel

is how did they Loskiel answers again, " Formerly,

The next question

their trees'?

that arises

when they had no axes but

those

made

of stone as

above mentioned, they used to kindle a fire around large trees and burn them so long till they fell then by applying fire to different parts of the stem and ;

branches, they divided them into smaller pieces for " Formerly they kindled a fire by turning or

use."

twisting a dry stick with great swiftness upon a dry board, using both hands." They kept their fires

constantly burning in their wigwams. to

It

is difficult

imagine how happy the Indians must have been

when they

first obtained axes from the traders or setwith which they were enabled to manipulate their wood and erect their wigwams more expediThe axes were used also tiously and satisfactorily.

tlers,

to girdle

the trees and take off the bark which they

In making their canoes

used to cover their huts.

they would cover the sides of the log with ground or other material which was constantly kept wet, and

would burn out the middle. The axes are supposed to have been employed to remove the charcoal in this operation. These are the purposes for which it is generally conceded that the stone axes were adapted, but the variety of their implements was comparatively small, and they might have used their axes for various other objects. The size of the axes varied. The one from which our illustration was made is

nearly eleven inches in length by three and a half inches in width, while others scarcely one-third the

length have been preserved.

The

was used in the grinding of corn, and are shown being about eighteen inches in length, formed of hard, uncrystallized rock, perfectly smooth and cylindrical, each end nicely tapering. Implements of this character were not used especially for pounding in a mortar, but for rubbing soaked or green corn on a flat stone into a pulp, which was then moulded and baked Other pestles there were which were in the ashes. used for pounding, the blunt ends denoting this. The tomahawk of the aborigine was simply a smallsized axe finely polished, to which a handle was pestle

of varied lengths, the original of the one

firmly tied,

and carried by

its

owner

in his belt.

That

implement, which we associate with the atrocity of the red man, was not a stone instrument but one of

from the trader or early settler in exIn this connection we must refer to the hatchets found in many localities frequented by the savages and known in the Indian trade as " Biscay Axes." They were of several sizes, the largest about eight inches long by three inches across the face, weighed about three pounds; the smaller, about six inches long by three inches across the face, weighed one and a half pounds. The largest size was iron, secured

change

for skins.

the squaw axe, used in gathering firewood, the smaller was the tomahawk of the warrior, and carried habitually

when

traveling or

when on

the war-path.

In battle they were used at close quarters, and surprising stories are told of the accuracy with which they could be thrown at distances of several yards.

In certain

localities

destroyed by

fire

where Indian towns have been

great numbers are found. So plenty the country was new, that the pio-

were they when who were fortunate enough to have a town site of this character on their farms had iron sufficient to shoe their oxen and horses and to supply other necessary wants for several years. As late as 1879 there were found no less than six in one farm scrap heap neers

on the hanna.

site

of a Shawanese town along the Susque-

They

are generally of the model

shown

in

GENERAL HISTORY. our engraving, and almost invariably have the three cross trade-marks on each side. Specimens of these there is good reason for believing have been buried two hundred years, somewhat corroded, but just as serviceable as

when new.

Many have

not a particle

and never had others are well steeled and So far as we are able to judge there was no difference in model or finish, whether furnished by the Dutch, English, or French traders. Henry Fleet, an English trader on the Potomac in 1632, met some Indians from the direction of Lake Erie, called Herechkeenes. He says, " There came

of

steel,

;

finely tempered.

from another place seven lusty men with strange they had red fringe, and two of them had beaver coats, which they gave me. Their language was haughty, and they seemed to ask me what I did attire

;

and demanded to see my truck, which upon view they scorned. They had two axes such as Capt. Kirk traded in Cannida, which he bought at Whits of Wapping, and there I bought mine, and think I had as good as he." Within the brief compass ot a local history it is impossible to allude at length to all the implements used by the natives. They had mortars, barking tools, there,

polishing-stones, scalping-knives, digging tools with-

out numbers, and relics have been discovered the use

of which

is

unknown.

Bowls, pots, and kettles were

as essential in the Indian

white man.

them make them

traders or took

obliged to

crockery

is

household

as in that of the

Before they purchased these from the

fragile,

in

payment

in their

and

own

for

land they were

peculiar way.

All

for this reason only small

pieces of Indian earthenware can be

found.

The

most notable collection is that in possession of the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society at WilkesBarre, and concerning which Dr. Harrison Wright has recently given a description. We have had pieces sufficient, if

make

properly placed together at the time, to

a large pot holding two quarts of water.

tions of vessels

made

Por-

of soapstone are to be found, but

discovered or known of one entire to be found in this region. The Indians had their games, the principal of which was quoits, and we give an illustration of one secured on Duncan's Island. At one time these were quite numerous, but no notice being taken of them they

we have never

seem

to

have disappeared altogether.

They

are cir-

cular or of disc shape, with a cavity on the upper side for the

thumb, the lower side round, and thus hand for throwing.

well fitted to the

Bock

carvings, although to be found, are not nu-

On

. 60 p'.J thence S. 35 D». E«. S04 p«. then S. 24 D». E'. 112 ps. then S. 50 p>. to William Reuick's.riin then S. 64 D». E'. 190 p«. then S. 49 D". E'. 40 p" p".,

Forsters Fence

time began to look to their and they determined

rights as well as their interests,

;

The

influence of

and

S.

and serious disturbance at the was the " turbulent Irish" of the land historians, and the Proprietaries, to

polls.

course,

New Eng-

it

dem-

agogues who controlled the law-making power of the 3

p>.

;

55 D>. E'. 102

then

;

50 D". East 240

p".;

then

S.

p«.

;

then

S. 45

86

p>.

D» S.

S.

;

then

50 D». E'. 46

thence

;

70 D».

p>.

;

E'.

;

then

;

55 D". E«. 18

p«.

S.

'

D'. E'. 46 p>.

;

D>. E'. 80 p«.

;

46

D\ E1

|

then '

S.

House

;

.

84

then

p».

;

S.

then

;

40 D>. E'. 20

p».

;

S.

then

53

D

then

S.

81 D». E'. 52 p>

47 D'. E'. 28 p».

;

a .

E'. 79 p».

then

thence South forty-five

;

S.

.

S.

l

.

ps.

5S

;

then

42 D». E«. 72

p>.

p".

;

then

;

p>.

55 E'. 16

S.

then

;

40 D>.

then

Ds E

through William 83 D». E>. 100 p«. thence 40

35 D». E>. 52

S.

then

80

then

Suatarro Creek

p'. to

E'. 52 p».

S.

;

S. 64 D'. Et.

20 p> then S. then S. 66 D'l E>. 90 p>.

S.

p".

p».

60 D». E'. 120

thence

;

Bratteu's Fence

thence

;

|

settle the

matter, or rather to take sides with the political

S.

Craig's Field

Of

bles arose

64 D«. E'. 246

thence

S.

Adam

corner of

to the

as a

j

;

;

was beginning to be felt, consequence feared by the Assembly. The other class of Germans who were allied to the Quakers were not in sympathy with the Lutheran, Reformed, and Roman Catholic Germans. Hence troutheir Scotch-Irish neighbors

.

;

;

to maintain these with firmness.

of

Beginning at a Locust Tree by the Side of the said River near the said Harrises House thence South eighty-three degrees Easterly 106 p a to Paxtang Creek; thence North 73 D>. E. E. 60

S. 60 D'. E'. 44

p'.,

to

:

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

34

where these deponents had intelligence the corpse had been thrown; and there they met the rest of the white men aud Indians, who were in company, and there consulted to go further down the creek in quest of the corpse, and these deponents further say, they ordered the Indians to go down the creek on the other side hut they all followed these deponents at a small distance, except one Indian who crossed the creek again; and soon after these deponents seeing some Bald eagles and other fowls, suspected the corpse to be thereabouts; and then lost sight of the Indians, and immediately found one of the corpse, which these deponents say was the corpse of James Smith, one of said Armstrong's men and directly upon finding the corpse these deponents heard three shots of guns, which they had great reason to think were the Indians, their compauiuns, who had deserted from them; and in order to let them know that they had found the corpse these deponents fired three guns, hut to no purpose, for they never saw the Indians any more. And about a quarter of a mile further down the creek, they saw more Bald eagles, whereupon they made down towards the place, where they found another corpse (being the corpse of Woodworth Arnold, the other servant of said Armstrong) lying on a rock, and then went to the former sleeping-place, where they had appointed to meet the Indians, but saw no Indians, only that the Indians had been there and cooked some victuals for themselves, and had gone off. " And that night, the deponents further Bay, they had great reason to suspect that the Indians were then thereabouts, and intended to do them some damage; for a dog these deponents had with them barked that night, which was remarkable, for the said dog had not barked all the time they were out till that night, nor ever since, which occasioned these deponents to stand upon their guard behind the trees, with their guns cocked that night. Next morning these deponents went back to the corpses, which they found to be barbarously and inhumanly murdered by very gashed, deep cuts on their hands with a tomahawk or such like weapon, which bad sunk into their skulls and brains; and in one of the corpses there appeared a hole in his skull near the cut, which was supposed to be with a tomahawk, which hole, these deponents do

thence South fifty-seven degrees Easterly forty-four perches then south forty degrees Easterly nine perches, across Conewaago Creek; thence South twenty-four degrees Easterly thirty-four perches; thence South fifty-five degrees Easterly one hundred and six perches; percheB

then

;

;

81 D«. E*. 28

S.

p»., S°.

63 D*. E*. 32

p'., S°.

22 E'. 20

p«.,

S u 39 D*. E*.

;

.

thence S°. 76 D*. E'. 50 p*. then S». 67 D*. then S°. 87 D a FA 16 p 3 then N. 84 D 3 E'. 50 p«. then N. 86 74 p 9 then S. 75 E*. 58 p 9 then S. 46 D*. Et. 42 p». then S. 49 D»- E*. 40 p 9 then S. 77 D". E l 62 pa. to Thomas Harris's house thence S. E'. 40 p 9 8 p*. to the turn of the Hill E

Captain Company H.

Lieutenant-Colonels.

June

3,

One Hundred and Thirteenth Regiment. Colston, Aug. 19, 1862.

J. B. Beshler,

B.

April

lieut.

Assistant Surgeon.

1st lieut. Sept. 15, 1864.

Assistant Surgeons. J. P.

appointed brev. capt.

One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment.

Surgeon. S.

19, 18C4;

15, 1864.

ElGHTY-FIEST REGIMENT. H.

March

F.

Oscar Templeton, from 1st

Frederick H. Geety, Nov. Captain Company M.

Daniel

Company D.

Huff, from 2d lieut.

Company

must, out with consolidated regt. as

20, 1861.

Captain Company L. col.

Elmer

F. Jenning,

from

1st lieut. Sept. 7, 1862.

29, 1865.

One Hundred and Thirty-first Regiment.

Adjutant.

Edmund Mather, First Lieutenant

Jan. 18, 1863.

Colonel.

Peter H. Allabach, Aug. 16, 1862.

Company H.

Alexander Ramsey Nininger, from 2d

lieut.

Aug.

6,

1862.

One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment. Adjutant.

Second Lieutenant Company K.

John W. Taylor,

John E. Carsons, Aug. June 31, 1864.

Sept. 14, 1861.

29, 1S62;

appointed capt. and

asst. adjt.-geu.

Eighty-seventh Regiment.

One Hundred and Fifty-second Regiment.

Adjutant.

William K. Parker, June

Company C. James B. King, from

15, 1865.

Captain

Ninety-second Regiment.

Edward Thomas 1865

;

1st lieut. April 13, 1S64.

One Hundred and Fifty-ninth Regiment.

Colonels.

C.

Williams, Oct. 20, 1861.

J.

Jordan, Jan. 13, 1863; appointed brev. brig.-geu. Feb. 25,

Assistant Surgeon.

John

P. Seller,

March

25, 1865.

must, out with regiment July 18, 1S65.

One Hundred and Sixtieth Regiment, Litutenant-Colonel.

Edward

Assistant Surgeon.

G. Savage, from maj. Feb. 13, 1863.

George F. Mish, Oct.

2,

1862.

Majors.

John John

S.

One Hundred and Sixty-third Regiment.

Detweiler, Feb. 13, 1863.

F. Miller,

May

11, 1865.

Lieutenant- Colo nel.

James Gowan, March

Quartermaster.

28, 1862.

William D. Earnest (no date).

One Hundred and Sixty-seventh Regiment. Chaplain. .

Ed.

McKenney, Nov.

Assistant Surgeon.

20, 1861.

William B. Henderson, Nov.

Company G. William Keiser, June 16, 1S65.

First Lieutenant

Colonel.

Captain Company H.

Thomas W. Jordan, from

1st. lieut.

June

George B. Wiestling, Nov.

16, 1865.

Jacob F. Bassler, April

John G. Wiestling, Dec.

22, 1863.

Jacob Mish, Nov.

Joseph B. Garber, Nov.

31, 1864.

o*f

Company L. Henry Lebo, from 2d lieut. Feb.

First Lieutenant

Lebanon County.)

Surgeon.

E. R. Umberger, Oct. 14, 1863 ; must, out with regiment

Ninety-fifth Regiment.

Company O. lieut. Feb. 11, 1S65.

22, 1862.

One Hundred and Eighty-first Regiment.

Ninety-third Regiment.

John Williams, from 2d

1862.

29, 1S62.

Second Lieutenant Co77ipany F.

Second Lieutenant Company L.

(See History

1,

Quartermaster.

Company E. Douglass Edwards, Nov. 24, 1861.

First Lieutenant

John W. Wyetts, May

20, 1S62.

Adjutant.

Second Lieutenant Company L.

First Lieutenant

19, 1862.

One Hundred and Seventy-seventh Regiment.

June

27, 1S65.

Forks, Va., April

25, 1S65

;

killed in action at Five

1, 1S65.

One Hundred and Eighty-fourth Regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel.

Charles Klechner, Oct.

13,

I864

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

150

Second Lieutenant Company M.

Second Lieutenant Company C.

Thomas M.

Jeremiah W. Keener, July

Ditty, April 14, 1865.

Second Lieutenant Company D.

May

Joseph H. Bryan,

22, 1864.

Independent Mounted Infantry.

12, 1864.

Second Lieutenant.

One Hundred and Eighty-seventh Regiment.

J.

W.

Ellinger, Nov. 3, 1864.

Colonel

John

from

E. Parsons,

lieut.-col.

May

1,

FIRST REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.

1865.

One Hundred and Ninety-first Regiment. Adjutant.

William Hamilton, Sept.

On

the 20th of April the First Pennsylvania Regi-

ment

of volunteer militia for the service of the na-

1864.

5,

government was organized. Previous to the marching orders the men were furnished with muskets and muslin haversacks, and provided with hard-tack and bacon and about twelve round of ball-cartridge, which, for want of cartridge-boxes, were tional

One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Regiment. Quartermaster.

H.

Demming, July

C.

21, 1864.

Captain Company F.

William R. Jones, July

20, 1S64.

One Hundred and Ninety-fifth Regiment.

George C. Wynkoop,

W. Backhus,

On

the night of the 20th of

command

of Brig.-Gen.

Harrisburg and proceeded to a point near Cockeysville, on the Northern CenThis movement was made with the tral Railroad.

Daniel K. Kepner, Feb. 25, 1865.

C.

carried in their pockets.

April the regiment, under the

Company B.

First Lieutenant

receipt of

left

Sept. 30, 1864.

design of protecting the bridges on this road and

Two Hundred and Fifth Regiment. Captain Company G. E. D. Wilt, Sept.

Two Hundred and Tenth Regiment. Edward

L.

Witman, from

lieut.-col.

April 12, 1866.

Major. capt. Co.

A

April

12, I860.

Quailermaster.

Oct.

6,

May

16, 1866.

lieut. April 2, 1866.

Reg

Fif

George F. Mish, Sept.

PrNNsYI

Mil

13, 1862.

Sixth Regiheht Pennsylvania Militia. Major.

Auchmntz,

Sept. 15, 1862.

Twenty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Militia. Colonel.

George B. Wiestliug, Sept.

21, 1862.

Thirty-sixth Regiment (Ninety Dats). Colonel.

Henry

C.

Alleman, July

4, 1863.

Quartermaster.

Clement

B. Carr,

July

1863.

4,

Assistant Surgeon.

Peter G. Roebuck, July

4, 1863.

Chaplain.

James Robertson, July

7,

1863.

Thirty-ninth Regiment (Ninety Days). Surgeon.

George T. Wiseman, July

7,

1863.

Forty-seventh Regiment (Ninety Days). Surgeon.

William H. Egle, July

11, 1863.

First Battalion (One

Company W. Woodburn, July

First Lieutenant

command

II.

22, 1864.

retired to

Camp

Hundred

Days).

to

Monday

Scott, near the

The regiment remained

there, drill-

May, when

field,

guard the Northern Central Railroad from the Pennsylvania line to Druid Park, near Baltimore. On the 25th of May, having been relieved by the Twelfth Pennsylvania Regiment, Col. Campbell, it was ordered to move to Catonsville, Maryland, to guard the roads leading to Frederick City and HarTents and camp equipage were here per's Ferry. supplied, which had hitherto been wanting, all efforts On the 29th to obtain them having proved fruitless. it was ordered to advance about five miles to the village of Franklintown, where it was posted, and remained guarding the same avenues as before. On the 3d of June the regiment was ordered to until the 14th of

Company K.

Alonzo A. Carr, from 2d

repre-

ing in anticipation of immediate service in the

Second Lieutenant Company H. Philip Wentz,

upon the

of Maryland that a

time might precipitate a collision and lead

town of York.

1864.

Company H. William P. Miller, Sept. 20, 1864. George W. Garber, May 16, 1866.

First Lieutenant

But,

men

the secession of the State, the authorities ordered a

evening the

First Lieutenants

J.

had been broken.

retrograde movement, and on the following

Charles F. Kuhnle, Sept. 20, 1864.

Second Lieutenant Company B.

James Jenks,

Wash-

military occupation and a resort to violent measures at this

Solomon B. Bowerman, from

P.

setts troops,

sentation of leading public

Colonel.

S.

eventually of opening communication with

ington, which, since the passage of the Massachu-

1864.

2,

it

was detailed

to

Chambersburg to join the forces there concentrating. It was placed in camp, remaining several days, engaged in drill and field discipline. It was assigned to the Second Brigade, Second Division of Gen. Patterson's army. The brigade was soon after ordered to Hagerstown, and advanced to and encamped near the village of Funkstown. While at this place upon one occasion the whole encampment was aroused at midnight in anticipation of the enemy and hurriedly marched to Williamsport, on the Potomac, which was reached at day-break. Remaining until the following evening, no enemy being discovered, it was ordered to return to camp, reaching it about midnight. The regiment was here supplied with new uniforms. Previous to this time the men

GENERAL HISTORY. had suffered for the want of adequate clothiug, though the destitution had been greatly relieved by a partial supply sent by kind friends at Easton. A few days later, on the 21st of June, orders were received from the commanding general to prepare three days' cooked rations, and, taking transportation and ten days' rations, to move with all possible dispatch and occupy Frederick, Maryland. In obe-

151

KOLL OF COMPANY

E,

SERVICE). Recruited at Harrisburg and mustered in April 18, 1861.

Captain.

Jacob M. Eyster. First Lieutenant.

George W.

remained here about two weeks, constantly improving in field exercises and military discipline. It was next ordered to Martinsburg, Virginia. Returning through Boonsborough, it encamped the same night on Kennedy's farm, and on the following day arrived at Williamsport. Fording the Potomac, it advanced to Falling Waters. Next day, resuming the march, it arrived at Martinsburg, meeting the whole division commanded by Gen. Patterson. When, on the 14th of July, the division under Gen. Patterson moved towards Bunker Hill, the First Regimeut, in obedience to this order, remained at Martinsburg, which had now become the base of supply. Two days later the regiment was ordered to Charlestown, where it again met and rejoined the division. Here, on the 17th of July, an order was received to have the men prepared with ten days' cooked rations in haversacks, and be ready to move without baggage. On this day it had been arranged that a battle should be fought by the army under McDowell, but was delayed till four days later. The plan of campaign, as disclosed by the orders of the general-in-chief, contemplated that the army under Patterson should keep in front of the enemy and prevent his advance into Maryland or Pennsylvania, and make demonstrations in favor of the army operating under McDowell in front of Washington, with a conditional purpose of striking the enemy a

damaging blow, if a favorable opportunity offered. These demonstrations were continued till it was supposed that the contemplated battle before Washington had been fought. Gen. Scott had given notice to Gen. Patterson that the movement would commence on the 16th, again that it had been commenced on the 17th, and finally that the decisive battle would be fought on the 18th. On the 21st, the, regiment, was ordered to move to Harper's Ferry, from whence, on the 23d, it marched to Sandy Hook, and on the same evening took the train for Harrisburg, where the men were honorably discharged and mustered out. During the time that the regiment was in service, it did not participate in any battles but its timely arrival in the field accomplished much good by checking any rash movement on the part of rebels in arms along our borders. The duties it was called upon to perform were faithfully done, and its good conduct, under all circumstances, was appreciated and acknowledged by its superior officers. ;

P. Davis.

Second Lieutenant. J.

dience to this order the regiment struck tents the

same evening, and on the 22d arrived at Frederick and reported to Governor Hicks. The regiment

FIRST REGIMENT (THREE MONTHS'

Wesley Awl. Sergeants.

1.

Isaac R. Dunkleberger.

3.

Samuel Eberly.

2.

Charles A. Stoner.

4.

Valentine R.

Hummel.

Corporals. 1.

George W. McAllister.

3.

Levi Weaver, Jr.

2.

James A. Carman.

4.

Daniel Barr.

David Hummel. Privates.

Black,

Thomas

Ltldwig, Peter.

J.

Boughter, John.

McComus, John.

Brady, John

Miller, Conrad.

Bell,

C.

McConnell, Henry 0. Mager, Allen C.

Robert F.

Carman, Franklin H. Draker, John.

McCollum, John. Mish, Henry A.

Dimmers, John K.

Miles, Harrison

Eck, Ellis L.

Grier, Robert D.

McCoy, William F. McCallen, Thomas. McClune, Thomas. Nellie, Thomas. Parkhill, William A. Pennirman, Robert. Pinner, Henry.

Gardner, Thomas A.

Roat, John.

Child, Sullivan S.

Ehrman, Robert F. Embick, Elijah S. Grey, William Henry. Geety, William Galbraith,

W.

John

F.

W.

Raymond, Jacob H.

Heikel, Henry.

Hicks, Josiah B.

Rutherford, Samuel.

Hummel, W. H. H.

Kingler, William A.

Hass, Jerome.

Rapp, William R.

Hooper, Penbrooke.

Reynolds, George.

Hynicka, Johu M. Housechilt, Henry.

Roth, John E. L. Suydam, Charles A. Sullivan, John H.

Hoppy, Emanuel.

Hummel,

Jacob.

Sbeffer,

Knepley, Edward

0.

Kune, James B.

Theodore K.

Swaitz, Henry A.

M.

Edwin T. Weirman, Samuel

F.

Tunis,

Kuhn, Amos R.

Waterhouse, Harper Weichel, Jacob S.

Kirkpatiick, William.

Longnecker, Andrew J Longnecker, William.

Wilt. Jacob.

Letb, Sobieski.

Winters, Amos.

C

SECOND REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS. The Second Regiment was formed from companies hastily recruited in obedience to the call for volun-

Recruiting commenced on the loth of April,

teers.

1861,

and

as fast as

companies and squads were ac-

cepted they reported at

On

Camp

Curtin, Harrisburg.

the 21st of April, the officers of ten companies

were ordered officers

to

hold an election at York for

field

of a regiment, at which the following were

chosen and duly commissioned Frederick S. Stumbaugh, of Chambersburg, colonel Thomas Welsh, of Columbia, lieutenant-colonel James Given, from :

;

;

captain of

Company G,

of

West Chester, major.

Isaac S. Waterbury was appointed adjutant.

On the evening of Saturday, April 20th, the same day on which the regiment was organized, it left Har-

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

152

risburg by rail for Washington, but halted at Cockeysville, Md., at daylight on Sunday morning, the railroad bridge at that point having been destroyed.

After remaining in bivouac and under arms for about forty-eight hours, the regiment was ordered back to

where it remained in camp of instruction day of June, when the command was ordered to Chambersburg. In the army organization which here ensued, the Second Regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade of the Second DivisYork, till

Pa.,

the

first

ion.

Gen. Robert Patterson had been assigned by Governor Curtin on the 16th of April to the command of Pennsylvania troops, and a few days thereafter, while busily engaged in organizing and sending

them

to points threatened,

of Columbia,

The quota

with

headquarters at

Philadelphia.

of Pennsylvania troops, with an excess of

having been organized and placed and all the lines of communication leading to Washington having been opened and securely guarded, Gen. Patterson proceeded, on the 2d of June, to Chambersburg, where a camp had been formed under Maj.-Gen. William H. Keim, and assumed command, with the design of operating against the rebel army in the Shenandoah Valley, which was now threatening the contiguous parts of Maryland and Pennsylvania. As early as the 20th of June, Gen. Scott had requested Gen. Patterson to propose to him a plan of

some

ten regiments,

in the field,

operations.

On

force, driving the line.

On

enemy's pickets in upon his main

the 17th of June, Gen. Patterson

trans-

whole command by a rapid movement to Charlestown. The term of service of the Second Regiment having already expired, it moved on the 23d of July from Charlestown, and marching to Harper's Ferry, was taken by rail to Harrisburg, where, on the 26th of July, it was mustered out of service. ferred his

for-

he was, by the order of Lieut. -Gen. Scott, placed in command of the " Department of Washington," embracing the States of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and the District

ward

guard his supplies, Gen. Patterson marched with the remainder of his force to Bunker Hill, driving Johnston's advanced guard from the place, and on the 16th of July, the day on which, according to the telegrams of Gen. Scott, Beauregard was to be attacked at Manassas, he made a demonstration in

the 21st the latter submitted one,

which in substance proposed to occupy Maryland Heights with a brigade, and to fortify and arm with heavy artillery to make Frederick. Md., the base of supply, with a guard which should act as a sustaining force to the command on Maryland Heights to send all other available force, horse, foot, and artillery, across the Potomac to unite with Col. Stone at Leesburg, to operate from that point as circumstances should demand. This plan was not approved by Gen. Scott, and on the 25th of June he gave peremptory orders to Gen. Patterson to keep in front of the enemy while he remained in force between Winchester and the Potomac. The army having been ordered to move to Williamsport, the Second Regiment broke camp at Chambersburg on the 16th of June, and moving by rail to Hagerstown, went into camp at the village of Funkstown. Remaining here until the 23d, it was ordered forward towards the Potomac and encamped about four miles from the Crossing the Potomac with Geu. Patterson's river. combined army on the 2d of July, it advanced to Martinsburg. The enemy, having been pushed back from point to point, had finally established himself in an intrenched camp at Winchester. On the 15th of July, leaving two regiments at Martinsburg to ;

;

ROLL OF COMPANY

I,

SECOND REGIMENT (THREE MONTHS' SERVICE).

Recruited at Harrisburg, and mustered in April 20, 1S61

GENERAL HISTORY. ROLL OF COMPANY

F,

TENTH REGIMENT (THREE MONTHS' SERVICE).

Recruited «l Lyltms, and muttered in April 26, 1861. Captain.

Edward G. Savage.

153

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

154

on the following 8th of August, when they were paid This company lost three of its men by off in gold. Lieut. Lyne resigned just previous to the regiment crossing the Potomac, and was succeeded by First Sergt. Samuel Wolfe, who was afterwards, as a

death.

lieutenant of the Forty-sixth Regiment, killed at the

head of his command.

During the

last

two months

of their term of service Capt. Nevin and Lieut. Alleman acted upon a general court-martial in conjunc-

Alleman being With scarcely an exreturned company ception all of the survivors of this to the field, and while many of them became distinguished for gallantry, nearly all of them were promoted during the war to the grades of line-officers, while some of them reached the highest rank of field-officers. The Verbeke Rifles did their full duty, and its memtion with their

company

duties, Lieut.

the judge-advocate of the court.

bers acquitted themselves in subsequent organizations

with credit to themselves, and honor to the good old

county of Dauphin.

ROLL OF COMPANY E, FIFTEENTH KEGIMENT (THREE MONTHS' SERVICE). Recruited at

Hamsbury, and mattered

ia

May

1,

1S61.

Sbindle, Isaac.

Tearney, John.

Snyder, Simon.

Thomas, Lorenzo. Weaver, George.

Stahler,

John R.

Swineford, Oscar.

Winters, Joseph.

Stechley, William

Wills, William C.

Stine,

John N.

Wyant, Jeremiah.

.

;;

;

..

GENERAL HISTORY. 186'.!,

and Wilderness May, 1864; must, out with company June

Eichelburger, George, April

11,

3'.,

1864.

Etter,

First Lii'utenant.

March

brev. capt.

13, 1865

1861

2'l,

;

trans, to 191st Regl. P. V.

May

1864; veteran.

John C, April

18, 1861

disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 11, 1863.

;

Eichelberger, H., Feb. 22, 1864

pro. from 2d to 1st lieut. April 3, 1863 must, out with company June 11, 1864.

B. F. Ashent'elter, April 18, 1861

155

killed at Bethesda

;

May

Church

30, 1864.

;

;

Elliott,

Reuben, July

15, 1861.

Fish, Lewis, July 15, 1861

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

May

31, 1864;

Second Lieutenants. Fisher, Peter H., April 28, 1861.

John Yentzer, April 18, 1861 res. Nov. 15, 1861. John McWilliams, April 18, 1861 pro. from 1st sergt. 3, 1863; must, out with company June 11, 1864. ;

to

;

2d

lieut.

Giverren, Patrick,

April

James

Gosline,

D.,

May

1,

July

22, 1861

1861

disch.

;

Aug.

as 2d lieut. 6th U. S. Inf. George W. Horn, July 24,1861; killed in Wilderness burial-ground.

5, 1861, to

Garrigan, James, April 23, 1861

accept promotion

May

W. Johnson, July

out with

1861

1,

Goss, George W., Sept.

8,1864; buried

Sergeants.

Wall.

1,

1,

1862

must.

Feb.

S.,

May

31, 1864

L-,

Hain, Robert, April

April 22, 1861

22, 1861

Houser, Frederick M., July

Corporals. 22, 1861

Anna May 23,

at North

Jury, Adam, Jan. 16, 1864

1864

Kough, Henry

absent at muster out. 19, 1861

20, 1861

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

;

trans, to 191st Regt. P.

;

V "May 31, May

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

31,

1864

May

May

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

31, 1864;

4,

May

19, 1861

22, 1861

disch.

;

on

surg. certif. July 2, 1862.

1864; trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

1,

1861

1,

1S61

May

must, out with company June

:

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

31, 1864.

11, 1864.

May

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

31, 1864

May

31, 1S64;

veteran

Jacob Shapley, Jan. 1, 1864 Samuel Sides, Dec. 22, 1863

not on muster-out roll

;

not on muster-out

;

1864

pro. to sergt.-maj. April 11, 1863.

;

killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.

;

re-

31, 1864.

May

Leggore, William, Sept. 13, 1861; trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

veteran.

William Fitting, April

31,

veteran

Lemon, John, May ;

May

wounds

died Dec. 14, 1862, of

;

veteran. 18, 1861

11,

11; 1864.

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

;

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

A., April 22, 1861

Kohler, Charles, Feb.

Lockard, John, ;

10, 1861

22, 1861

Linn, Jacob, April 18, 1861

1864

veteran. 18, 1861

company June

ceived in action.

wounded

;

must, out with

;

must, out with company June

;

1864; veteran.

Henderson, Martin, April

Thomas H. Abbott, April

;

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Fob. 10, 1863.

1,

1864.

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

;

;

Lorenzo Horn, April

1862.

8,

;

Hemperly, George

11, 1864.

1S64; veteran.

John D. Books, April

on surg. certif Oct.

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

James, May 1, 1861 died at Alexandria Jan. 24, 1863; grave 700. Hughes, Christian, April 20,1861; must, out with company June 11,

must, out with

;

John A. Bonner, April 18, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. March 23, 1863. James H. Stanley, April 18, 1861; trans, to 191st Regt. P. V. May 31,

George W. Cole, April

;

disch. on surg. certif. June, 1862.

;

disch.

;

1861

Geist,

Aug.

22, 1861; pro. to sergt. April 11, 1863;

company June

Joseph A. Peters, April

31, 1864

1864.

B. R. Hayhurst, April 22, 1861

George W. Gray, April

11, 1864-

May

veteran.

pro. to sergt.

;

May

Gibbons, Jacob, in action

Gould, James

John R. Stoner, June 5, 1861 company June 11, 1864.

company June

absent, in hospital, at muster out.

;

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

veteran.

First Sergeants.

Joseph B. Rife, April 22, 1861

must, out with

;

Graybill, Jacob, April 22, 1861

roll

;

veteran.

;

veteran.

Calvin McClung, Dec. 22, 1863; not on muster-out roll

;

31,

veteran.

;

Lloyd, John, March

7,

1864

Montgomery, John, April

;

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

20, 1861

;

May

31, 1S64.

May

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

31,

1864; veteran.

Montgomery, William, April

veteran.

20, 1S61

trans, to 19lst Regt. P. V.

;

May

31,1864; veteran. Privates.

Alleman, Benjamin

Manly, Amos, April

F., April 18, 1861; disch.

on surg.

certif. Oct. 29,

May

Baskins, George W.,

1S61

3,

must, out with company June 11,

;

1864.

May

1861

3,

Berst, Levi, July 15, 1861

must, out with company June

;

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

;

Breckbill, Pierce, April 18, 1861

Henry

11, 1864.

A., April 18, 1861

;

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

May

31, 1864;

;

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

May

31, 1864

;

veteran.

31,

1S64

May

Regt. P. V.

;

31,

1S61

disch.

;

on 6urg.

certif.,

date un-

gunboat service Feb. 19, 1862. killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1S62.

trans, to

;

;

Orth, William H. H., April 19, 1861.

Cyrus H., April 19, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1S64. Peirce, George W., April 19,1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Peters, Johu W., April IS, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Powell, James, April 18, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. May 16, 1S63. Peters, John M., July 1, 1861 killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862. Penneman, Robert, Sept. 1, 1S61 killed at Gettysburg July 3, 1863. ;

;

;

Bomberger, Michael, Sept.

1861

5,

;

May

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

31,

1864; veteran.

Burg, William,

;

;

May

1,

1861; died at Tenallytown Aug. 5, 1861.

Antietam Sept.

Bailey, Joseph, April 18, 1861

;

Curry, William M., July

1861; must, out with

15,

killed at

;

Quinsler, William,

17, 1862.

company June

11,

May

3, 1861

1864. 18, 1861;

must out with company June

Cole, Alonzo, April 18, 1861; trans,

11, 1864.

from Vet. Res. Corps; must, out

with company June 11, 1864.

Camp, Simon C, April Conroy, William, April

18, 1861; must, out with company June 11, 1864. 18,

1861

Cain, William, April 19, 1S61

;

;

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

disch.

on surg.

Church, George H., April 18,1361; disch. March

20, 1863, for

wounds

received in action.

Cover, John, July

15,

;

1861; disch. Feb. 15, 1S63, for

wounds received

in

House May

May

F.,

April 18, 1861

;

Specht, absent, in hospital, at muster out

Dewalt, John, April 20, 1861; trans,

to 191st

Regt. P. V.

May

1S64

;

wounded

;

12, 1864; absent, in hospital, at

Aaron

at Spottsylvania Court-

absent, in hospital, at muster out.

G., April 24, 1861

;

at Spottsylvania

Court-House

muster out.

disch. Feb. 20, 1863, for

Jonas

F.,

Henry

July

D.,

22, 1S61

;

disch.

on surg.

Nov. 28,1861; trans,

certif.

to 191st

April

wounds

re-

3, 1S62.

Rogt. P. V.

May

31,

1S64; veteran.

31, 1864;

veteran.

Simmers, Charles, Sept. 13, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 10, 1S63. Stehman, Henry C, April 20, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. March 23, ;

;

Dailey, Patrick, April 25, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Aug.

Embick, Jacob A., April

13,

ceived in action. Stores,

Cornwall, Charles, April 22, 1861.

wounded

Sullivan, Cornelius, April 18, 1861;

Strauss,

action.

May 31, 1S64;

on surg. certif. May 13, 1862. 18, 1861 Reichenbach, Peter, Oct. 14, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 27, 1862. Roburm, James, March 8, 1864 died May 9, 1S64; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery. disch.

;

Snavely, John D., July 15, 1S61

certif Dec. 27, 1861.

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

veteran.

Rouse, Franklin, April

Chub, John, April

Depue, James

trans, to 191st

;

veteran.

;

Andrew B., April 20, known. Mushon Francis, April 19, 1S61 Murphy, Bernard, Aug. 29, 1862 Peirce,

Barnes, Simon, April 18, 1861

1864.

1864

,

veteran.

May

trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

;

G., April 19, 1861

Marquit,

Bishop, Jacob,

Bear,

18, 1861

veteran.

Martin, Jacob

1862.

20, 1861;

2,

1863.

1861.

must, out with company June

11,

Strickland, William, Feb. 1864.

2,

1864; trans, to 191st Regt. P. V.

May

31,

;

;;;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

156

Clunghart, John, June 22, 1801

Smith, Edgar, May 1, 1801 died May 16, 1803. Spencer, Lewis, May 10, 1861 killed at Spottsylvania Court-House buried in burial-ground at Wilderness. 12, 1864 ;

May

;

;

May

Smith, Daniel, Feb. 22, 1804; killed at Spottsylvania Court-House 12, 1864; buried in burial-ground at Wilderness.

May

29, 1801

TownBend, W. Ford, May

1801

1,

com. 2d

;

lieut.

Dec.

4,

1801

;

not must.

;

must, out with company June

Carroll,

Frank. June

22, 1801

;

absent at muster out.

May

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

11, 1864.

11, J864.

31,

1864

Waborn, Frank

disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 24, 1862.

K., April 20, 1801

disch.

;

;

on surg.

died Dec. 14, 1S62, of

certif. Oct. 4, 1862.

wounds received

at

Fredericksburg.

May

31,

1864; veteran. Curtis, James, Feb. 15, 1864

11, 1864.

;

22, 1861

Carpenter, David H., June 22, 1861; trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

roll.

must, out with company June Vincent, Robert W., April 20, 1861 Weist, Daniel, April 20, 1861

Frank, June

veteran.

not on muster-out

;

must, out with company June

;

Collins,

Conner, Thomas, June 22, 1861

Swigart, Aaron, April 19, 1861.

Swords, John,

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

;

Campbell, Daniel, June 22, 1861

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

May

31, 1864.

Carter, George, June 22, 1861; disch. on surg. certif., date unknown. Donahue, John, July 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Dugan, Samuel, June 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. DeWolf, John A., June 22, 1801 trans, to 190th Regt. P. V. May 31, ;

;

;

1864; veteran.

Wilson, Daniel, April 20, 1861.

June

22, 1861

;

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

May

31

Fraukhouser, C, June

22, 1861

;

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

May

31, 1864

Detrick, Charles, D, FORTY-FIRST REGIMENT (TWELFTH RESERVE, THREE YEARS' SERVICE).

BOLL OF COMPANY

,

1864

veteran.

veteran. Recruited in Dauphin County.

Fulton, William, June 22, 1861

Captains.

Fetterman, George, June

Samuel Wilt, June 22, 1S61 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 5, 1861. Thomas D. Horn, June 22, 1861 pro. to capt. Nov. 5, 1861 disch. on ;

;

;

surg. certif. Feb. 10, 1863.

William H. Weaver, June

May

13, 1864.

;

;

22, 1861

pro.

;

company June

1863; must, out with

died of wounds received

;

22, 1861.

Edward, June 22, 1861. Garman, George, June 22, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 28, 1862. Garman, Heury, June 22, 1801 disch. by order of War Department, Fuller,

from 1st

lieut. to capt.

Feb. 10,

Oct. 24, 1862. ;

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

May

31, 1864;

1864

;

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

May

31, 1864.

22, 1861

;

killed at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862.

Garner, Adam, June 22, 1861

11, 1864.

veteran. First Lieutenants.

Gurtler, George, Feb.

Henry Mather, June 22, 1861 disch. Nov. 5, 1861. Edward B. Snyder, June 22, 1861 pro. from 2d to 1st lieut. Feb. 10, 1863 brev. capt. March 13, I860; must, out with company June 11, 1S64. ;

;

First Sergeants.

Garst, Samuel,

June

1,

May

Gurtner, John, Feb. 26, 1864; died

May

6,

11, 1S64, of

wounds received

1864.

Hawck, William, July 22, 1861; must, out with company June 11, 1864. Hughes, Richard, June 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1804. Holt, John, July 20, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Heusler, Peter, June 22, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. July 18, 1802. Hicks, John, June 22, 1801; trans, to 190th Regt. P. V. May 31, 1864; ;

Robert Neidig, June

22, 1861

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

May

31,

1864

;

veteran.

;

Benjamin

Brightbill,

June

22, 1861

;

must, out with company June

11,

May

31,

1864. J. R.

veteran.

Baughmau, June

1801

22,

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

1864; veteran.

Hudgeon, John, June

22, 1861; trans, to

U.

S.

Signal Corps Aug. 29,

1861.

Sergeant.

Thomas, June 22, 1861. Hilbert, James, June 22, 1861. Hall, Robert, June 22, 1861. Haines, Charles, June 22, 1861. Jones, John, June 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Karnes, John, June 22, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Sept. 1, 1863. Krouse, Nicholas, June 22, 1861 trans, to artillery July 18, 1S62. Kraft, Henry, May 15, 1S61 pro. to com. sergt., date unknown. ' Kelley, Isaac, July 6, 1861; died at Georgetown, D. C, Dec. 10, 1801. Kuglen, George, July 6, 1861. with June 1864. Lepley, Samuel, June 25, 1861 must, out company 11, Lewis, Henry G., June 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Long, Joseph W., June 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Leiby, Alexander, July 29, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1864. Lyons, Edward, June 22, 1861; disch. by order of War Department Hall,

William R. Peacock, June 22, 1S01 com. 2d lieut. Feb. 10, 1803 not mastered; trans, to Company E, 190th Regt. P. V., May 31, 1864; ;

;

veteran. Corporals.

;

Monroe

B.

Wenger, June

22, 1801

must, out with company June

;

11,

1S64.

;

;

John A. Walker, June 22, 1861 must, out with company June 11, 1S64. John Reimert, June 22, 1861 trans, to 190th Regt. P. V. May 31, 1864; ;

;

veteran.

Richard Fleming, June 22, 1801 di6ch. on surg. certif. Dec. 15, 1862. John Irlam, June 22, 1S61 disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 27, 1S62. John Good, June 22, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 5, 1862. James M. Allen, June 22, 1861; drowned in Pamunkey River, June ;

;

;

;

;

;

4,

1864.

Aaron L. Burke, June 22, 1861 killed at Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862. Henry H. Hopple, June 22, 1861; killed at South Mountain Sept.

14,

1862.

Musician. 11, 1S64.

26, 1862.

McLain, George, Juno

22, 1S61

;

must, out with company June

1 1,

McLaster, John, July

11, 1861

;

must, out with company June

11, 1864.

Mills,

must, out with company June

;

;

Nov.

;

Charles Spickler, June 22, 1861

;

James, June

Maurer, Charles, June Miller, George,

Privates.

Austin, William P., June 22, 1861

;

;

22, 1S61

22, 1861

;

must, out with company June

;

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

Mann, Francis

must, out with company June 11,

Murphy, John, June 22, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. May McCabe, Harrison, Aug. 29, 1861 trans, to 190th Regt.

1864.

;

Bird, James,

June

22, 1861

must, out with

;

company June

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

May

F.,

June

22, 1861

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

May

11, 1864.

31,

1864;

June 22, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 5, 1S63. June 22, 1801 disch. on surg. certif. July 21, 1863. Barnes, William H., June 22, 1861 disch. Feb. 20, 1804, by sentence of Isaac,

Black, George

;

F.,

;

;

G. C.

M.

Bates, John,

May

31,

23, 1862.

P. V.

May

31,

1864.

McDaniels, Samuel, June

22, 1861; trans, to artillery,

Aug.

1,

1862.

Marthin, John, June 22, 1861; captured at Gettysburg July

Bumbaugh,

11, 1864.

31, 1864

veteran.

;

Brewster, Alex., June 22, 1861

1804.

must, out with company June 11, 1864.

must, out with company June 11,

1864 22, 1S61

June

;

veteran.

1864.

Anderson, William, June

22, 1861

3,

1863

disch. June 11, 1864. McCoy, Hugh, June 22, 1861 killed at White Oak Swamp, Va., June 30, 1862. McCord, Thomas, June 22, 1861 died at Alexandria, Va., Sept. 18, 1861 ;

;

June 22, 1861

disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 22, 1862.

;

Beatty, John, July 22, 1861

;

killed at

Babb, John, June 22, 1861. Brubaker, Samuel, June 22, 1801. Boston, Lewis, June 22, 1861.

Bryan, John, June

22, 1801.

White Oak Swamp June

30, 1802.

grave 293. McFarland, William, June

22, 1861; killed at

South Mountain Sept. 14

1862.

Moorehead, Christian, June 22, 1861 killed by accident Sept. 26, 1861. Miller, Edward, June 22, 1861 died Nov. 1, 1861 buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, D. C. ;

;

;

;;

GENERAL HISTORY. Quiun, John, June

22, 1861

June

Quen/.ler, Valentine,

unknown.

trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date

;

22, 1861

trans, to 190th Regt. P. V.

;

May

31,

157

John W. Taylor, Aug. 28, Va., June 24, 1864.

1861

George W. Cyphers, Aug.

1864; veteran.

Redfern, Samuel, July

11, 1SG1

must, out with company June

;

11, 1864.

missing

;

28, 1801

in action at

St Mar;

must, out with compain

;

1864.

Ray, Thomas, Feb. 11, 1864; trans, to 190th Regt. P. V. May 31, 1864. Reichart, Samuel, Feb. 29, 1864; trans, to 190th Regt. P. V. May 31, 1864. Stevens, Edward, June 22, 1861 trans, to U. S. Signal Corps, Aug. 29,

R. G. Howerter, Sept.

1861 ; must, out with company June 11, 1864. Spaulding, Theodore S., June 22, 1861; disch. on Surg,

John

1,

1861

must, out with company Sept.

;

9, 1864.

Corporate.

;

Feb. 17,

certif.

1863.

;

;

Shoemaker, George, June 22, 1861 Adam, June 22, 1861

Strauser,

disch. on surg. certif. Dec.

;

disch.

;

by order of

3,

1862.

War Department

Oct. 24, 1862.

Segar, Henry,

June

22, 1861

missing in action at Bristoe Station, Va.,

;

Oct. 14, 1863.

Simpson, Robert, June

James, July

Shaffer,

S. Stubbs, Aug. 28, 1S61 disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 1, 1881. George W. Briggs, Aug. 28, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. March, 1862. Horace Failes, Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864 must, out as

22, 1861; killed at Gaines' Mill

June

27, 1S62.

6, 1861.

;

sergt. Co. F June 20, 1805 veteran. John D. Richards, Aug. 28, 1861 wounded and prisoner June 24, 1864; died at Andersonville Aug. 17, 1864; grave 5940; veteran. Henry C. Portner, Aug. 28, 1861 died June 22, 1864, of wounds received at White House, Va., June 21, 1864; veteran. Philip Seiferts, Aug. 2S, 1801; must, out with company Sept. 9, 1804. Jerome Eisbbaum, Aug. 28, 1861 captured June 9, 1863 wounded May 28, 1864; must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Isaac Kennedy, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Samuel W. Reese, Aug. 28, 1861 absent, sick, at muster out. Adam Downs, Aug. 2S, 1871 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. ;

;

;

;

Skidmore, Thomas, June 22, 1861. Michael L., June 22, 1861 killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13,1862. Walker, George W., June 22,1861 wounded at Bull Run Aug. 30,1862; Tell,

:

;

must, out with company June

11, 1864.

;

;

;

;

Winters, Jeremiah, June 22, 1861; must, out with company June 11, Buglers.

1864.

Woodall, Charles, June 22, 1S61

John H. Lantz, Aug.

disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 22, 1862.

;

Weaver, Philip, June 22, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 14, 1862. Weaver, Peter, June 22, 1S61 trans, to 190th Regt. P. V. May 31, 1864

28, 1861; trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864; veteran.

Milton Ruch, Aug. 28, 1S61

must, out with company Sept.

;

;

1864.

9,

;

Privates.

veteran.

Woodall, James

T.,

July

6*

1861

;

pro. to q.m.-sergt., date

Woodall, William H., June 22, 1861

;

unknown.

trans, to U. S. Signal Corps

Yohn, George, July

1861

6,

trans, to U. S.

;

Army

Nov.

Adams, George, Aug. 2S, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Adams, James M., Aug. 28, 1861 pro. to 2d lieut. in Corps d'Afrbjue June 8, 1864. ;

Aug.

29,1861.

;

Boyer, Jacob, Aug.

25, 1862.

28, 1861

Boyer, William, Aug. 28, 1861

Aug.

Bailets, Russell,

ROLL OF COMPANY G, FORTY-FOURTH REGIMENT (FIRST CAVALRY, THREE YEARS' SERVICE).

28, 1861; pro. to lieut.-col. Aug. 18, 1861. David Gardner, Sept. 27,1861; pro. from 1st lieut. to capt.; to major Nov. 23, 1862. Henry C. Beamer, August, 1861; pro. from sergt.-maj. to 1st lieut. Jul)'

1862; pro. from private to com. sergt. Octo-

ber, 1861; to 2d lieut. Sept. 1, 1S62; to 1st lieut.

Nov. 25, 1862; with company Sept. 9, 1864.

to

:

S.

Thomas,

1862

;

Sept. 27, 1861

to capt. Co.

M May

25, 1862;

;

;

14,

1S64

;

1,

from 2d to

1st lieut.

September,

1st sergt. to 2d lieut.

Nov.

25,

killed at St. Mary's Church, Va.,

pro. to 1st sergt.

;

to

2d

lieut.

Aug.

1864; must, out by consolidation

14,

1864

June

20,

staff

George

Aug.

7,

pro. to capt.

;

and A. A. G. on Gen. Bayard's

1862.

12,1863; pro. from sergt. maj. April 12, 1863;

Thomas McGinley, Aug.

;

28, 1861; trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1S64; veteran.

John W. Rhorback, Aug. 2S, 1861 trans, to batt. out as sergt. Co. F June 20, 1865 veteran. ;

Campbell, William

S.,

Aug.

Cory, George A., Aug.

F May

Sept. 1, 1S64;

must,

S.

Signal Corps March

9,

1862; trans, to batt. Sept.

Aug.

P.,

1861

2S,

1,

1804; must, out in

must, out with company Sept 9

;

1S64.

Ells,

William, Aug.

trans, to Veteran Corps

;

2S, 1861

;

Farnwalt, Isaac, Aug. 2S,1S61

Nov.

6,

1863.

must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. must, out with company Sept. 9, 1S04. ;

Fisher, George W.,

;

disch.

March

1,

1862, for -wounds re-

Aug. 2S, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. September, 1862. Fritz, William D., Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1S64; veteran. Greaves, Francis M., Aug. 28, 1S61 must, out with company Sept. 9, ;

;

John, Aug.

;

;

,

;

;

;

;

Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1S64 veteran. Samuel Kilpatrick, Aug. 28, 1861; trans, to Co. F. batt. Sept. 1, 1S64; to Co. A. Nov. 1, 1864; pro. to 1st sergt.; com. 2d lieut. March 4, ;

28, 1861

Grey, Mercer, Aug. 28, 1861 Gates, David H.,

Aug.

must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864, must, out with company Sept. 9, I86t

;

;

2S, 1S61

Guilder, Joseph, Aug. 28, 1861 Gilliland,

William Strickland, Aug. 2S, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 1, 1861. James McCahan, Aug. 28, 1861 disch on surg. certif. Feb. 1 1862. John W. Bruner, Aug. 28, 1861 pris. June 9, 1863 trans, to U. S. Signal Corps March 1, 1864; veteran. John 0. Clark, Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1S64 veteran.

;

TJ.

pro. to hospital steward October, 1861.

;

27, 1865.

Delaucy, William

in Co.

not must.

trans, to

;

1S64; veteran.

;

;

Sept. 9, 1864.

28, 1861

disch. August, 1862. tor

;

wounds received

in action.

SergeantB.

1865

company

1S63; must, out with

Griffin,

Commissary Sergeant.

Speigle,

27,

1S64.

Quartermaster Sergeant.

S.

F May

;

J. Geiser, April

disch. Feb. 17, 1864.

Francis

June

Station, Va.,

ceived in action.

Second Lieutenants. C. Weir, Oct. 10, 1S61

Brandy

;

Fullertou, George, Aug. 28, 1S61

1865.

Henry

at

must, out in Co.

;

Ely, William, Aug. 28, 1S61

trans, to batt. Sept.

;

Abraham, Aug. 28, 1861 wounded at Bull Run Aug. 30, 1862, and Malvern Hill July 28, 1S64; absent, in hospital, at muster out. Campbell, Daniel, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1S64. Cory, Warren R., Aug. 28, 1861 wounded at Culpeper, Va., Sept. 13, Corl,

Co.

from

to 1st lieut. April 12, 1SG3

June 24, 1864. Hiram Piatt, Aug.

pro.

1862.

1,

pro.

1864

;

Conzler, Ernest, Aug. 28, 1861

First Lieutenants.

1861

wounded 1,

Benninghoff, James, Aug. 28, 1861 wounded and prisoner at Mine Run, Va., from Nov. 27, 1863, to Nov. 20, 1S64 must, out March 6, 1865.

1,

Hampton

1863; trans, to batt. Sept.

;

17, 1862; to capt. Dec. 11, 1862; res. April 12, 1863.

Alonzo Reed, Nov.

certif. July 8, 1862. Veteran Reserve Corps Sept.

1865.

Jacob Higgins, Aug.

capt. April 12, 1863; must, out

June, 1863.

certif.

on surg.

trans, to

23, 1863.

9,

Captains.

1,

disch.

;

28, 1861;

Bently, Abraham, Aug. 14, 1862;

Recruited at Harrisburg.

Francis P. Confer, Sept.

on surg.

disch.

;

;

must, out by consolidation June 20, 1S65.

Samuel, Aug.

F May

disch.

;

on surg.

certif.

March, 1862.

14, 1862; trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1804;

must, out

27, 1865.

Gray, William, Aug. 28, 1S61 ; died at Brooks' Station, Va., Dec. 87 1868 Gardner, Charles, Oct. 20, 1862; pro. to hospital steward Oct. 23. 1862.

Hall, Wilmer C, Sept. 1, 1861 Hull, Robert P., Aug. 28, 1S71

must, out with

;

company

Sept. 9, 1S64.

captured at Sulphur Springs, Va, Au-

;

gust, 1S62 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Hessner, Michael, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1S64. 28, 1S61 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Harper, Jonathan, Aug. 2S, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. March ;

;

Hughey, Samuel, Aug.

;

14, 1S62.

Hutchison, Charles H., Aug. Hatch, Arthur, Feb. 22, 1S64

14, 1S62 ;

disch.

;

disch.

on surg.

on surg. certif.

certif. June', 1S63.

July

17. 1864.'

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

158 Higby, Charles, Aug.

F May

in Co.

1862

14,

trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864

;

must, out

;

27, 1865.

Hartsock, Thomas, Feb. 22, 1864

trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1S64.

;

Adam, Aug. 28, 1861; trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864 veteran. Hoffman, William, Aug. 28, 1861 ; diBch. on surg. certif. Oct. 1, 1862. Hawn, Samuel K. -wounded at St. Mary's Church, Va., June 24, 1864 supposed to have died. Kritzer, James C, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Hiler,

C, lieutenant-colonel

Arnold C. Lewis, major.

;

On

the 22d of September, Maj. Lewis, while attempting to enforce discipline in a case of insubordination, was

;

;

;

shot and instantly killed by a private of Company I, who afterwards suffered the extreme penalty of the

law

for his offense.

Capt. J. A. Matthews, of

Com-

;

Lewis, John, Aug. 28, 1861

disch. Sept. 1, 1861, for -wounds received in

;

action.

Lloyd, William

1861

P., Sept. 1,

McDonald, James W., Aug. died, date

pro. to hospital steward Dec. 18, 1862.

;

28, 1861

sick in hospital since July

;

1,

1863;

unknown.

McCullough, John C, Aug.

28, 1861

trans, to

;

Veteran Reserve Corps

Sept. 20, 1863.

McCahan, John, Aug.

28, 1861

McFarland, Daniel, Aug. Sept. 1, 1864

;

Munch, William. Aug.

May

com.

sergt. Feb. 28, 1S62.

captured Aug.

;

1,

1862

trans, to batt.

;

veteran.

Mulliu, Patrick, Aug. 28, 1861

Bend,

pro. to

;

28, 1861

trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864

;

28, 1861

veteran.

;

drowned in James River, near Turkey

;

16, 1864.

Myers, Israel, Aug. 28, 1861. Newman, David W., Aug. 28, 1861

must, out with company Sept.

;

9,

1864.

Palsgrove, Samuel D., Aug. 28, 1861

Pugh, Evan, Aug.

May

at

1864; pro. to com. sergt.; must, out

1,

27, 1865.

May

21,

1864; veteran.

Reed, John M., Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Rhoades, Adam, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. disch. on surg. certif. April, 1863. Rittle, Daniel, Aug. 28, 1861 Ruggles, Albert, Aug. 28, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. 1862. ;

;

;

;

Renibaugh, Horatio, Aug. 28, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 1, 1862. Box, Joseph, Aug. 28, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. October, 1862. Reese, William H., Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864 must, out ;

;

F June

;

20, 1865; veteran.

Boseuberger, Cyrus, Aug.

28, 1861

died at BrookB' Station, Va., Jan.

;

27, 1863.

Rhoads, William, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Stoner, Leonard, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Shawley, Henry, Aug. 28, 1861; must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. Swoap, Peter W„ Aug. 28, 1861 ; disch. on surg. certif. March, 1862. ;

;

Seabolt, John,

Aug.

Stewart, C. E., Aug.

28, 1861 9,

1862

disch.

;

on surg.

certif.

March

trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864

;

;

1,

1862.

must, out in

Company F May 27, 1865. Speigle, Martin J., March 29, 1864; trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864. Snell, Aaron, Aug. 28, 1861 wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1S63; must, out as Corp. Co. F June 20, 1865 trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864 ;

;

veterau.

Uhler, John, Aug. 28, 1861; disch. on surg.

certif. March, 1862. Wike, William, Aug. 28, 1861; must, out with company Sept. 9, 1864. disch. on surg. certif. June 8, 1863. Welty, Zachariah, Aug. 28, 1861 ;

Wiggins, Daniei, February, 1862 Williams, John, February, 1862.

Ziukaud, William, Feb.

;

trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864.

22, 1864; trans, to batt. Sept. 1, 1864.

FORTY-SIXTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.

Company

D of this

regiment, recruited in

Dauphin

County, had been in the three months' service. The other companies, as a general thing, served in the in Allegheny, first campaigD, and were recruited Berks, Potter, Luzerne, and Northumberland Counties.

Rendezvousing

at

Camp

Curtin, the regiment was

organized on the 1st of September, 1861, by the selection of the following field-officers: Joseph F.Knipe,

Dauphin County, who had served during the three months' campaign on the staff of Gen. E. C. Williams, colonel James L. Selfridge, from captain of Company

of

;

Upon the resignation of Gen. Patterson from the command of the Army of the Shenandoah, Gen. Banks was appointed to succeed him. His forces were posted on the Upper Potomac, along the Maryland shore, in the neighborhood of Harper's Ferry. Soon after its organization, the Forty-sixth was ordered to Gen. Banks' command. Upon its arrival it was assigned to the First Brigade (under Gen, S. W. Crawford) of the Second Division of his corps. Little of interest, save the usual drill and camp duty and an occasional skirmish with the enemy, occurred until the opening of the spring campaign. In January, 1862, Stonewall Jackson, with a well-appointed force of all arms, having for some time occupied the Shenandoah Val-

had pushed out as far west as Hancock, where he was met and driven back by Gen. Lander. Lander pursued but soon after died, and was succeeded in command by Gen. Shields, who continued the pursuit On the 24th of February, Gen. Banks to Winchester. commenced crossing the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, and occupied, in turn, Leesburg, Charlestown, Martinsburg, and Winchester. Shields continued the pursuit of Jackson as far as New Market, whence he returned to Winchester. In the mean time Banks had dispatched one division of his corps to Centreville, and had himself departed for Washington. Considering himself superior to the Union force remaining, Jackson turned upon Shields, and a severe engagement ensued in the neighborhood of Kernstown. Three companies of the Forty-sixth, under command of Maj. Matthews, arrived upon the field Jackson was in time to participate in the conflict. beaten, and Banks returning gave chase, which was continued to Woodstock. In this pursuit the Fortysixth was conspicuous, Col. Knipe manifesting his usual enterprise and daring. Jackson, who was fearful of a union of the forces of Fremont and Banks, marched hastily across the mountain to McDowell, where he encountered the head of Fremont's column, under Milroy and Schenck, and defeated it, inflicting considerable loss. Returning with his characteristic celerity of movement, and masking his progress by his cavalry, he fell suddenly upon Col. Kenley, occupying an outpost at Front Royal, and, routing his small force, was making for the rear of Banks' army, before the latter was aware of an enemy's presence in his front. Turning his trains towards the Potomac, and dispersing the rebel cavalry which appeared upon his rear, Banks commenced his retreat down the valley. Finding that he must make a stand to save his trains, he drew up ley,

Page, Henry W., Aug. 28, 1861; killed at Milford Station, Va.,

as corp. Co.

to major.

disch.

;

wounded

14, 1862;

1863; trans, to batt. Sept.

on surg. certif. April, 1863. Brandy Station, Va., June 9,

pany A, was promoted

his

little

army

in line of battle in front of Winchester,

GENERAL HISTORY.

159

The

was thirty wounded, and six prisoners. Among the killed were Lieuts. Robert Wilson. S. H. Jones, and William P. Caldwell, and among the wounded Col. Knipe, Maj. Matthews, Capts. Lukenbaugh, Brooks, and Foulke, and Lieuts. Selheimer, Caldwell, Craig, and Matthews. In the battle of Antietam, Banks' corps was commanded by Gen. Mansfield, and early in the day of September 17th was led to the support of Hooker, battling with a heavy force of the enemy on the extreme right of the line, across Antietam Creek. Crawford's brigade was sent to the support of Ricketts' division, and advanced carrying the woods to the right of and beyond the cornfield, and maintained its position until relieved by Sedgwick's division of Sumner's The Forty-sixth was here led by Col. Knipe, corps. although suffering from the effects of his wounds. The loss was six killed and three severely wounded. Capt. George A. Brooks, of Harrisburg, was among the killed. Soon after the battle of Antietam, Col. Knipe was promoted to brigadier-general, and as-

force of only about seven thousand meet Jackson with not less than twenty thousand. For five hours the unequal contest was maintained, the Forty-sixth holding its ground with unexampled coolness and bravery. At length, finding himself outflanked and likely to be overpowered, he withdrew and made his way to the Potomac, where his trains had already arrived and crossed in safety. In this engagement the Fortysixth lost four killed, ten wounded, and three taken prisoners. The loss to the Union force in withdrawing through the streets of the town was considerable, the inhabitants, both male and female, vying with each other in pouring forth insults and deadly missiles. "My retreating column," says Gen. Banks in

in the Forty-sixth

and with an entire

skeleton."

men prepared

killed, thirty-four severely

to

his official report, " suffered serious loss in the streets

of Winchester, males and females vied with each

number of their victims by from the houses, throwing hand grenades, hot

other in increasing the firing

water, and missiles of every description."

Upon the appointment of Gen. Pope to mand of the Army of Northern Virginia,

the com-

the scat-

command

upon the Rappahannock, the Shenandoah, and in West Virginia were concentrated and

signed to the

were organized in three corps, commanded respecby Sigel (formerly Fremont), Banks, and McDowell. On the 7th of August, 1862, Crawford's brigade was stationed at Culpeper Court-House. The divisions of Ewell and Stonewall Jackson, followed by that of Hill, a force twenty-five thousand strong, had already arrived upon the Rapidan, and

to colonel of the

tered forces

cavalry.

On

crossing,

driving back the

of the brigade

Selfridge was promoted to colonel

gade

;

was assigned

Lieut.-Col.

Knipe's bri-

Company

B, to

and Capt. Cyrus Strouse, of Com-

lieutenant-colonel,

Upon

to major.

the inauguration of the at Fairfax,

which was or-

dered forward, but did not arrive upon the

field in

Fredericksburg campaign, the

was then lying with the division

Union

to

Capt. William L. Foulke, of

pany K,

;

Maj. Matthews

;

One Hundred and Twenty-eighth

Pennsylvania, which

tively

had commenced

loss

Forty-sixth,

time to be engaged. In the reorganization of the army, which was made upon the accession of Gen. Joseph Hooker to the chief

the 8th, Crawford was ordered forward

towards Cedar Mountain, and on the following morning Banks followed with the rest of his corps, conJackson, having columns with celerity, had taken position with his artillery on Cedar Mountain, at an elevation of two hundred feet above the surrounding plain, but had kept his infantry masked under the shadow of the forests. Four guns had been advanced farther to the front and lower down the side of the mountain. These, with the more elevated ones, opened on Crawford's brigade, and at five o'clock p.m. the Union forces in two columns advanced to the attack.

command, Knipe's brigade became the Second of the

The

rious opposition.

sisting

of seven thousand men.

pushed forward

position

his

of the

Forty-sixth

fell

opposite the

enemy's advanced pieces, and upon these the men charged with desperate valor. But before reaching them they had to pass an open field, now covered with shocks of full-ripened wheat. Here they were fearfully exposed, and the enemy's artillery, and his strong lines of infantry concealed from view, poured Three times in a merciless storm of shot and shell.

was

it

Col.

Knipe

led to the charge across that fatal plain, fell

when

severely wounded, and the regiment

was withdrawn. Had victory been possible," says The best Greeley, "they would have won it. blood of the Union was poured out like water. Gen. Crawford's brigade came out of the fight a mere "

.

.

.

.

.

.

First Division of the Twelfth Corps, the division being

commanded by Gen.

A. S. Williams, and the corps

by Gen. Slocum.

On

the 27th of

April, 1863, the

Eleventh and

Twelfth Corps, which had been lying near Falmouth during the winter, marched north to Kelly's Ford, where they crossed the Rappahannock, thence to

Germania Ford, where they crossed the Rapidan, and arrived at Chancellorsville without encountering se-

Here

it

was joined by the Fifth There

Corps, and on the 30th by the Third Corps.

were three roads centring at Chancellorsville, the main direction of each being eastward. Upon each of these Hooker ordered an advance on the morning of the 1st of May, Meade upon the left, Sykes commanding a division of regulars belonging to the Fifth Corps in the centre, and Howard upon the right. At two o'clock p.m., the movement commenced, and after proceeding some three miles the central column encountered

the

enemy

in

considerable force, and

support, where it was whereupon Hooker ordered a retrograde movement and a concentration

Knipe's brigade was sent to

engaged, and

lost

some men

its

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

160

Rapidan. Here the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps were detached from the Army of the Potomac and ordered to the support of Rosecrans in Tennessee and Marching to Washington, the Northern Georgia. regiment proceeded by rail to Nashville. Here the First Division was detailed to guard the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad from Tullahoma to Bridgeport. The country through which the road passes

upon the line of the previous night with the Chancellor House as headquarters, Meade on the left, Slocum in the centre, and Howard somewhat in the air on the right. Desultory fighting continued during the day of the 2d of May, when, at near nightfall, Stonewall Jackson, with twenty-five thousand men, burst like an avalanche upon Howard's corps, resting unsuspicious of danger, and drove it in rout and confusion in upon the centre. This brought the enemy upon Slocum's right, and during the early part of the

was infested with guerrillas and rebel cavalry, ever watchful for an opportunity to destroy the road and to wreck the trains. It was vital to the existence of the army that this line should be kept open and that it should be operated to its utmost capacity. The vigilance and fidelity with which this service was performed on the part of the Forty-sixth elicited the

night a sharp conflict was kept up, wherein Knipe's

brigade was engaged, losing wounded, and a considerable

many

in

number

killed

and

of prisoners.

body riddled with bullets, Here while attempting to escape when called on to surAt midnight a countercharge was made by render. Birney's division, and a part of the guns lost by Howard, and his abandoned rifle-pits, were regained, and the enemy thrown into some confusion. On the morning of the 3d, Williams' brigade was sent to the support of Birney, and here the battle raged with great fury, the enemy losing heavily, and being fell Maj. Strouse, his

broken and driven in great confusion. Upon the Hooker to the north bank of the Rappahannock the regiment occupied its old camp, where it remained until the advance of the army into return of

Pennsylvania.

The

loss

in

the

Chancellorsville

campaign was four killed, a considerable number wounded, two severely, and two taken prisoners. Maj. Strouse and Lieut. 0. R. Priestly were among the killed.

Early in June, Lee commenced a movement north, marching down the Shenandoah Valley, and crossing the Potomac at Williamsport. On the 1st of July he met the Union army at Gettysburg. On the evening of the same day the Twelfth Corps arrived upon the field, and was posted on the right of the line holding the summits of Culp's Hill, where a formidable breastwork was thrown up. On the afternoon of the 2d the First and Second Divisions were ordered to the support of the left, leaving their works unoccupied, save by a thin line of Green's brigade, of the Second Division.

During

their ab-

sence the enemy attacked and carried the left of the works, and, upon their return at evening, they found the rebels in possession.

Dispositions were promptly

dawn of the 3d a heavy fire of infantry and artillery was opened upon the enemy, and after an obstinate resistance of several hours he was driven back at the point of the bayonet. The Forty-sixth held the extreme right of the line, and after the reoccupation of the breastworks, was pushed across an open space beyond Spangler's Spring, and held a piece of wood fringing Rock Creek. The loss, owing to the sheltered position which the regiment occupied, was inconsiderable. Upon the withdrawal of Lee into Virginia, the Union army followed up his line of retreat, at the same time covering Washington until it reached the made

to

retake them.

Before

warm

approval of its superior officers. Early in Januaiy, 1864, a large proportion of the

officers

and men of the regiment having

re-enlisted

a second term of three years, insuring its continuance as an organization, they were given a veteran for

[

furlough and proceeded to Pennsylvania. 1

ranks were rapidly recruited, and upon

its

Here

its

return the

division rejoined the corps in winter-quarters in

and

about Chattanooga.

On the 6th qf May Sherman's army, seventy thousand strong, with one hundred and fifty guns, broke up winter-quarters and moved on the ever memorable Atlanta campaign. At Dalton, where Johnston, who commanded the rebel army, was first met, the enemy was turned out of a position strong by nature and well fortified by a flank movement through Snake Creek Gap, which had already been captured by Geary's division.

Following up the retreating enemy, Sherman found well intrenched at Resaca, prepared to dispute Here Sherman again attempted a movement by the right flank but Johnston, taking advantage of his antagonist's weakened lines in front, delivered a heavy and well-sustained attack, falling upon the divisions of Hooker and Schofield. He found Hooker not unprepared for the encounter, and after a bloody conflict Johnston was driven, with a loss of four guns and many prisoners. In this en-

him

his further progress.

;

gagement the Forty-sixth participated, losing three killed and five wounded. Pushing the enemy steadily back, on the 25th of May the regiment was again engaged at Pumpkinvine Creek and at New Hope Church. The country is 1 " Yobthful Veterans.— The claim of Missouri to have the youngest veteran soldier is disputed by the Keystone State. We are informed

Henry Weideusaul in his fourteenth year entered the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Infantry, participated in thehattles of Winchester, Cedar that

Mountain, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw, and Peach Tree Creek was wounded for the first time in the last-named ;

fight,

and

He was

re-enlisted last winter with the greater part of his regiment.

seventeen years of age on the

1st of

July last."— LouisvilU Jour-

nal.

Henry Wr eulensaul, named above, was first sergeaut of Capt. Brooks' company. He was first wounded at Cedar Mountain in August, 1862, where he was taken prisoner and was confined in Libby Prison for nearly five weeks. He was again wounded at Atlanta.

;;

GENERAL HISTORY. enemy was

here broken and the

well intrenched, his

off the

lfil

and invest the

railroads

on the south,

city

Mountains, from Dallas to Marietta, presenting an unbroken front. From the 25th of May until near

when Hood, detecting the movement, again fell upon the Union lines only partially formed. The attack was made with the rebel leader's characteristic im-

the middle of June, Sherman, always fruitful in re-

petuosity, but

sources, operated against the enemy's lines, compell-

waves of the sea against the immovable cliff. The regiment lost here six killed and a considerable number wounded. On the 1st of September Atlanta surrendered and Sherman's victorious columns entered the city in triumph. The hard fighting of the regiment was now ended. Gen. Knipe was here transferred to the command of cavalry and Col. Selfridge to the brigade, leaving Major Patrick Griffith in command of the regiment. On the 11th of November Sherman commenced his march to the sea. On the 21st of December he reached Savannah, and after a brief conflict at Fort McAllister took possession of the city. With but a brief respite he faced his columns to the north, and on the 17th of February Columbia, the capital of South Carolina, was taken without resistance, and a month later he reached Goldsborough, the end of his hostile wayfaring. Johnston surrendered on the 26th of April, and the army immediately commenced its homeward march. On the 16th of July, 1865, the Forty-sixth Regiment, after nearly four years of faithful service, was mustered out near Alexandria, Va.

lines

stretching

across

Lost,

Pine, and

Kenesaw

ing him, by constant battering and picket firing and

by frequent assaults gradually to give ground, taking first Pine Knob, then Lost Mountain, and at length the long line of breastworks connecting the latter with Kenesaw. Finally, on the 22d of June, the enemy, finding himself slowly but surely pushed from his strong position, suddenly assumed the offensive and made a furious attack upon Hooker's near the Gulp House. It fell upon Knipe's brigade and was led by Hood, but signally failed. Hood was repulsed with " Williams' heavy loss, including some prisoners. corps,

in

position

principally

Thomas

division," says Gen. "

skirmished

itself

into

in his official report,

position

on the right of

Geary's division, the right of Williams resting at Gulp's house, on the Powder Spring and Marietta

About 4

enemy

in heavy force atadvanced position before his men had time to throw up any works, and persisted in the assault until sundown, when they withdrew, their ranks hopelessly broken, each assault having been repelled with heavy loss." In the various engagements at Dallas, Pine Knob, Kenesaw Mountain, and Marietta, in all of which the Fortysixth participated, the loss was fourteen killed and about thirty wounded. Capt. D. H. Chesebro and Lieut. J. W. Phillips were among the killed. On the 16th of July Sherman crossed the Chattahoochee River, and sweeping around to the left, began closing in upon Atlanta, McPherson reaching out to strike the Augusta Railroad. While these movements were in full progress and the army only partially across Peach Tree Creek, a considerable stream running in a westerly direction in front of Atlanta, Hood again attacked, leading a heavy force and yrecipitating it with great violence upon the Union columns, falling principally upon Newton's The Forty-sixth was and upon Hooker's corps. much exposed and suffered severely but with ranks undismayed, led by Col. Selfridge, who was in the thickest of the fight, conspicuous by his white, flowing locks, encouraging and steadying his men, they hurled back the rebel hordes at the point of the With columns sadly decimated, Hood bayonet. retreated from the field, leaving five hundred dead, one thousand severely wounded, and many prisoners in the hands of the victors. The loss in the regiment was ten killed and twenty-two wounded. Capt. S. T. Ketrer, Lieuts. H. J. Davis, Samuel Wolf, and David C. Selheimer, and Adj. Luther R. Whitman were

road.

p.m. the

tacked Knipe's brigade in

its

;

among

Army

of the Tennessee from the

extreme

right,

Sherman was preparing

11

George A. Brooks, Sept.

Edward col.

left

1861

2,

L. Witnian, Sept.

Antietam Sept. 17, 1S62. from 1st lieut. to capt.; to lieut.-

killed at

;

1861

2,

'

Dauphin County.

in

;

pro.

210th Regt. P. V. Sept. 26, 1864.

T. J. Novinger, Sept.

1861

2,

pro. to corp. Oct. 1, 1861

;

to sergt.

;

Nov.

26,1862; to 1st sergt. Nov. 18,1863; to 1st lieut. March 20, 1864: prisoner from August 9th to October, 1862 must, out with company July 16, 1S65 veteran. to capt. Dec. IS, 1864

;

;

First Lieutenants.

John W.

Geiger, Sept.

2,

Jacob H. Shepler, Sept. 26, 1862

;

1861

dismissed July

;

1861

2,

to 1st sergt.

out with

March

company July

6,

pro. to corp. Oct.

;

20, 1S64

1st lieut. Dec. 18, 1864; prisoner 16, 1S65

from ;

1863.

1861

1,

;

Nov.

to sergt.

to 2d lieut. Sept. 29, 1SG4

;

May

3 to

May

16, 1863

;

;

to

must,

veterau.

Second Lieutenants.

March 1, 1862; resigned June 5, 1863. Samuel Wolf, Sept. 2, 1861; pro. from 1st sergt. to 2d lieut. Aug. 4, 1863 killed at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864, John L. Long, Sept. 2, 1S61 pro. from Corp. to sergt. March 21, 1S64; to Oliver B. Simmons,

;

1st sergt. Sept. 29, 1864

company July

;

2d

to

lieut.

Dec. 18, 1S64

;

must, out with

16, 1S65.

First Sergeants.

H. A. Weidensaul, Sept. 1862; pro. to corp.

2,

May

1861; captured at Cedar Mountain Aug. 9, IS, 1863; to sergt, Oct. 1, 1864; to 1st sergt.

July 1, 1865 com. 2d lieut. Co. F, July 15, 1S65 out with company July 16, 1865 veteran. ;

;

not must. ; must.

;

Samuel Bernheisel, Sept. 2, 1861 died at Alexandria, Va., Sept. of wounds received at Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862. ;

26, 1862,

Sergeants.

Edward D. Wells, Dec.

29, 1S63 ; pro. to Corp. Jan. 19, 1864 ; to sergt. Jan. 1865; must, out with company July 16, 1865; veteran.

Edward Rhoades, Jan.

to cut

FORTY-SIXTH REGIMENT (THREE

D,

YEARS' SERVICE). Recruited

1,

the killed.

Shifting the to the

ROLL OF COMPANY

mad

like the beating of the

fell

it

5,

1864

company July 16,1865;

prisoner from

;

pro. to corp. April 19, 1864

;

May

2 to

to sergt. April 1, 1865;

veteran.

May

15,

1S63;

must, out with

;

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

162

pro. to Corp. Sept. 1, 1864

to drafted ; must, out with company July 16, 1865. Not. to sergt. Nov. 26, 1862; William Marts, Jan. 13, 1864; pro. to corp. 18,1863; wounded at Dallas, Ga., May 25, 1864; absent, in hospital,

William Walker, July

14, 1S63

sergt. July 1, 1S65

;

;

;

Clawson, William, July 13, 1863; drafted; missing in action at Culp'B

Farm, Ga., June 22, 1864. Cummiugs, Eli, Sept. 2, 1861. Deafenbaugh,

S. A.,

Jan. 13, 1864

must, out with company July 16, 1865

;

veteran.

at muster out veteran. Samuel B. Fottsiger, Sept. 2, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 10, 1862. John Care, Sept. 2, 1S61 pro. to 1st lieut. Co. I, March 14, 1862. George Durrell, Sept. 2, 1861 killed at Cedar Mountain Aug. 9, 1862. Henry C. Knipe, Sept. 2, 1861 died at Annapolis, Md., April 23, 1865. ;

Donley, William, Sept.

;

1861

2,

must, out Nov.

;

1864, at exp. of

8,

term.

;

Dennis, Daniel, Sept.

;

Douney, Benjamin,

;

1861

2,

died at Harrisonburg, Va., April 30, 1862.

;

Mountain, Va., Aug.

Sept. 2, 1861, killed at Cedar

9,

1862.

Early, Claudius, Feb. 27, 1864; mustered out with

Corporals.

William Mease, Jan. 13, 1864; prisoner from May 2 to May 15, 1863 pro. to Corp. Nov. 18, 1864 must, out with company July 16, 1865

;

;

;

Alexander E. James,

Jan. 13, 1864; pro. to corp. Sept. 18, 1864

company July

out with

16, 1865

must.

;

veteran.

;

William Reimert, Jan. 13, 1S64; pro. to corp. Oct. 1, 1864; must, out with company July 16, 1865; veteran. John H. Hoke, Jan. 13, 1864; captured at Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862; pro. to corp. May 1, 1865 must, out with company July 16,

16,

1865.

Early, Joseph, Sept. 2, 1861

John C, Jan.

Ebersole,

veteran.

company July

20, 1864

must, out Nov.

;

1S64

13,

18, 1864, at exp. of

term.

Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July

killed at

;

veteran.

;

Early, Elias, Jan. 13, 1864; died at Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 17, 1864; veteran. Ensinger, William, Sept. 2, 1861 missing in action at Cedar Mountain, ;

Aug.

Va.,

9, 1862.

Frantz, David, Jan. 13, 1864; prisoner from May 2 to must, out with company July 16, 1865; veteran.

May

1865

;

16, 1865

;

15,

;

1865

veteran.

;

Edward King, Jan. to corp.

May

company July

Frantz. Henry, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with 13, 1864

1,

1865

prisoner from

;

May 2

to

May

must, out with company July

;

15, 1863 16,

pro

;

1865

.

vet-

;

veteran.

wounded at Culp's Farm, Ga., June company July 16, 1865 veteran.

1863

John Houser, Jan. 13. 1864 prisoner from May 2 to May 15, 1863 wounded at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864; pro. to Corp. June must, out with company July 16, 1865 veteran. 1, 1865

May

Flickner, Peter, Jan. 13, 1864; prisoner from ;

22,

June, must, out with

24, 1862, to

1864

;

;

;

;

company July

July

pro. to Corp.

;

1865

1,

;

must, out with

1864

13,

pro. to corp.

;

Nov. 18, 1864 wounded ;

5,

Elder, Sept.

2,

1862

pro. to Corp. Oct. 1, 1864

;

2,

1861

detected as being a female

;

disch., date

;

;

Faith, Francis, July 13,1863; drafted; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 21, 1864.

in action; absent, in hospital, at muster out; veteran.

must, out June

Foster, Francis A., Aug. 31, 1861; trans, to 42d Regt. P. V. September, 1861.

1865.

Jacob Killinger, Sept.

James

16,

1865.

Fuller, Charles D., Sept.

unknown.

16, 1865; veteran.

William H. Bachman, Jan. J.

company July

;

Elias Boyer, Jan. 13, 1864

Thomas

Frautz, Alexander G., Feb. 26, 1864; must, out with

Fought, James

1861; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 18, 1862. 2, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Aug. 22, 1862.

2,

Alexander Rhoades, Sept.

2,

1861

;

disch.

on surg.

certif.

Feb.

company July 16,1865;

veteran.

1863.

5,

E., Sept. 2, 1861.

Geiger, Peter, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with

F. O'Donnell, Sept.

John Yeager, Sept. 2, 1861 must, out Sept. 18, 1864, expiration of term. Matthew C. Taylor, Sept. 2, 1861; must, out Sept. 18, 1864, expiration of

Geiger, Frederick, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with

company July 16,1865;

;

Frederick Sarber, Sept. 20,

Samuel

veteran.

Gord, Jacob, Sept.

term.

1864

;

2,

1861

killed at

;

Peach Tree Creek,

Ga.,

July

0. Nace, Sept. 2, 1861

missing at Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug.

;

9,

27, 1865

;

John Lang, Jan.

13, 1S64;

not on muster-out

roll

;

veteran.

Geiger, Joseph, Sept.

Griffin,

must, out with company July 16,

;

term.

in action with loss of leg; disch.

2,

1861

;

died July 31, 1864, of

wounds received

at

Ga., July 20,1864; buried at Chattanooga, Tenn.,

grave 247.

Musicians.

Charles H. Renhard, Jan. 13, 1864

wounded

12, 1864, at exp. of

veteran.

Peach Tree Creek,

1862.

must, out Oct.

;

Geiger, Jacob, Jan. 13, 1864;

May

veteran.

1861

2,

1865 ; veteran. Charles H. Spade, Feb. 29, 1864; must, out with company July 16, 1865.

Archibald

B., Sept. 2,

1865; veteran. Hamilton, William H., Jan.

1861; mnst. out by special order July 5,

13,

1864

must, out with company July 16,

;

1865; veteran. Helinerick, Anthony, Jan. 13, 1S64

;

prisoner from Feb. 27 to

March

30,

1865 must, out with company July 16, 1865; veteran. Hiney, Samuel, March 7, 1864; captured near Bentonville, N. C, March ;

Albright, John A., Feb. 24, 1864; must, out with Albert, Joseph, Sept.

Jan.

4,

2,

1861

wounded

;

company July

16, 1865.

in action, with loss of leg

;

di6ch.

8,

1865

;

must, out with company July

Hammaker, Samuel,

1864.

Allison, John, Sept. 2, 1862; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 30, 1863.

Bedillion, William, July 14,1863; drafted; must, out with

company July

16, 1865.

Hammaker, Henry,

company July

16,

Feb. 19, 1864; must, out with

company July

16,

1865.

Head, Smith, Oct. 17, 1864 must, out with company July 16, 1865. Hancock, Andrew, July 14, 1863; drafted; must, out with company ;

Brunner, Urias, July

14, 1863

drafted

;

;

must, out with company July

July

16, 1865.

Brunner, William, July

14,

1863; drafted; muBt. out with

company July

16, 1865.

Beddleyoung, William, Sept.

2,

1861

;

disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 10, 1862.

Brumbaugh, James A., Sept. 2, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. July 3, 1862. Blowers, John Q., July 14, 1863 drafted disch. on surg. certif. April 20, ;

;

;

16, 1865.

Henderson, Elijah, July July 16,1865.

14, 1863

1864; prisoner from Feb. 28 to

13,

Koppenhafer, Samuel, Feb.

Kreiser, Peter, Feb. 19, 1864

;

;

disch.

;

May

25, 1862, to

March,

;

;

;

Chisholm, John W., Jan. 13, 1864; wounded at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864 absent, in hospital, at must, out; veteran. ;

John

;

disch.

by G. O. June

March

7,

2,

H., Sept. 2, 1861

Oct. 22, 1862.

March

30,

1865; veteran.

1864; must, out with

company July

23, 1864; absent, in arrest, at

;

must, out July

16, 1865.

muster out;

;

trans, to Battery F, 4th Regt. U. S. Art.,

10, 1865.

Kraft, George, July 14, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Kocher, John, Sept.

2,

1861

;

disch.

on surg.

Kelley, Orth N., July 13, 1864; drafted;

16, 1865.

Cassel,

1805

Knouff, Henry, veteran.

prisoner from

13, 1864;

must, out with company July 16, 1865 veteran. Jonathan, July 14, 1863 drafted; must, out with company July

1863

must, out with company

;

July 16, 1865.

July 20, 1864. Chubb, Philip, Jan.

;

drafted

drafted

;

by G. O. June 5, 1S65. Bousman, George, Aug. 6, 1864; disch. by G. O. June 8, 1865. Barr, Alexander, July 14, 1863 drafted killed at Peach Tree Creek, Ga.,

Bedillion, John, July 14, 1863

;

Hoke, Cornelius, Sept. 2, 1861 must, out Sept. 18, 1864, at exp. of term. Hancock, William, July 14, 1863; drafted; must, out with company Johnson, William, Jan.

1865.

Craft,

16, 1865.

Feb. 24, 1864; must, out with

1865.

April

2,

1865; disch.

June

Koppenhafer, Daniel, Jan.

certif.

Dec. 12, 1862.

prisoner from

March 14

to

2, 1865.

Aug. 26, 1864, of wounds reJuly 20, 1864; buried at Chatta-

13, 1864; died

ceived at Peach Tree Creek, Ga.,

nooga, Terra,, grave 503; veteran.

;

GENERAL HISTORY. Kreiser, John, Sept,

May

2,

1861

2,

missing in

;

fiction at Chancellorsville, Va.,

163

Snoddy, John, Aug.

5,

1864

disch.

;

Shellenberger, Jeremiah, Aug.

1863.

must, out with company July

Licldick, Cyrus, Jan. 13, 1SG4;

16,

1865;

Aug.

Stouffer, William,

Lenhart, Samuel H., Feb. 29,1864; must, out with company July 16,

Aug.

Saul, Levi,

6,

1864

6,

Stager, William H., Aug.

veteran.

6,

June

1864

;

disch.

;

1865,

8,

by G. 0.

disch. June 8, 1865, by G. 0. June 8, 1865, by G. 0. June 8, 1863, by G. 0.

1864; disch.

6,

1864; disch. June

8,

1865, by G. 0.

Stoutseberger, G. E., Feb. 19, 1864; died Feb. 27, 1865, of

I860.

Lehman, George, Aug.

by G. 0. June 8, 1865. disch. by order of War Department

1864; disch.

6,

Leibrick .George T., Sept.

1861

2,

;

Swayer, William, Sept.

2,

re-

1S61.

Spotts, Aaron, Feb. 19, 1864; must, out July 16, 1865.

Sept. 2, 1862.

Long, Leonard, Sept. 2, 1861 trans, to Vet. Res. Corps Feb. 15, 1864. Lyne, Thomas, Sept. 2, 1861 died Aug. 12, 1862, of wounds received at Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862. Laudcrabbe, Aug., July 25, 1863; drafted; died March 7, 1864; buried ;

;

at Stone River

;

1863

25,

drafted; died Sept.

;

2,

1864, of

wounds

received at Peacli Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864; buried at Chatta-

nooga, Tenn.

grave 638.

;

Maeder, Henry, Aug.

Townsend, Thomas, March 2, 1864; not on muster-out roll. Tromble, Solomon, Jan. 13, 1864 prisoner from Aug. 9 to October, 1862 must, out with company July 16, 1865 veteran. ;

25, 1863; drafted;

must, out with company July

Sept. 2,1861; killed at Winchester, Va.,

May 25,1862;

March 11,1864; wounded and missing at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1S64. Weaver, George, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with company July 16,1865; Vanscoter, William,

veteran.

Wambach, Jacob

16, 1S65.

Aug.

;

;

Thoman, Samuel,

buried in National Cemetery, lot 18.

grave 144.

Luce, William, July

Miller, William,

wounds

ceived at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864.

25, 1863; drafted;

must, out with company July

T.,

Murton, Alfred, Aug. 25, 1863 drafted must, out June 28, 1865. Mouutz, John, Sept. 2, 1861 ; disch. on surg. certif. Oct, 24, 1862. Martin, Frauk, Sept. 2, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 21, 1862. Major, John C, July 2, 1862 disch. by G. 0. June 7, 1S65. Muman, Christopher. Aug. 6, 1864; disch. by G. 0. June 8, 1865. Mease, Christopher, Feb. 17, 1864 killed at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July ;

;

;

;

;

20, 1864.

Feb. 23, 1864; must, out with

company July

16,

1865.

White, James, Aug.

16, 1865.

25, 1.8G3

;

drafted

;

must, out with company July 16,

1865.

Waltermire, Wesley, Aug.

6,

1864

;

disch.

June

Wenrich, Amos M., Sept. 2.1861; drowned

at

8,

1865,

by

G. 0.

dam No. 6, Maryland, Jan.

31, 1862.

Wenrich, John J., Sept. 2, 1861 killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863. Wanisher, Samuel, Sept. 2, 1861 killed in action June 19, 1S64. Zeiger, Cyrus, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with company July 16,1865 ;

;

;

Miller, David, Sept.

Miller, Alexander, Sept.

McFarland, Charles

veteran.

1861.

2,

Zeigler,

1861.

2,

E., Jan. 13,

1864

;

James M., Feb.

29,

1864

company July,

16,

1863

;

drafted

;

must, out with company

July 16, 1865. McDevitt, John, Feb.

1864 ; killed at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20,

23,

roll.

FIFTY-FOURTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.

1865. 14,

not on muster-out

must, out with company July 16,

1865; veteran.

Mclutire, William, Feb. 22, 1864; must, out with

McCurdy, Archibald, July

;

1S64.

Mclntire, James, July 13, 1863; drafted. McCanal, Hugh, not must, into United States service. Ney, Daniel, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with company July

This regiment, recruited principally

in the counties

of Cambria, Somerset, Dauphin, Northampton, and

Lehigh, in 1861, rendezvoused at Camp Curtin, and was organized by the selection of the following fieldofficers Jacob M. Campbell, of Cambria County, colonel Barnabas McDermit, of Cambria County, lieuteuant-colonel John P. Linton, of Cambria County, major. Col. Campbell and many of the officers and men had served during the three months' campaign, and Lieut.-Col. McDermit possessed military experience acquired in the Mexican war. The men were drilled by squads and companies while in camp, and Company F, Capt. Davis, for some time performed guard duty at the State arsenal. On the 27th of February, 1862, the regiment was ordered to Washington, and upon its arrival went into camp near Bladensburg Cemetery. Here the altered flint-lock muskets furnished by the State were exchanged for :

16,

1865; vet-

;

eran.

Nooinan, John, Sept.

1861

2,

disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 24, 1862.

;

;

Ney, Levi, Jan. 13, 1864 died July, 1864, of wounds received at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864 veteran. Noriuger, Samuel, Sept. 2, 1861. ;

;

Orth, Alexander M., Sept,

1861

2,

;

must, out Nov.

4, 1864,

at exp. of

term. Powley, Joseph, Jan. 31, 1S64 prisoner from Feb. 27 to March 30,,1S65 must, out with company July 16, 1865 veteran. ;

;

Price, John, Sept. 2, 1861

disch.

;

Paulus, Jonathan, Sept;

2,

Powley, Simon, Sept.

1861

2,

1861

;

on surg. certif. Dec. 18, 1863. on surg. certif. June 14,

disch.

1862.

must, out October, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

Parsons, Peter, Feb. 29, 1864; died at Decherd, Tenn., April 19, 1864. Reigle, Mitchell, Jan. 13, 1864

must, out with company July

;

16, 1865

veteran. Reigle, William, Jan. 13, 1864

must, out with company July 16, 1865

;

veteran.

Reese, James, Jan. 13, 1864; must, out with

company July

16,

1865

the Belgian

June 8, 1865, by G. O. Seigfried, William, Jan. 13, 1864; wounded and prisoner at Cedar Mounvettain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company July 16, 1865 ;

On

rifles.

ment was ordered

veteran. Roottiger, Charles, July 25, 1864; disch.

to

report to Col. Miles.

was directed

to

make

the 29th of

March the

regi-

proceed to Harper's Ferry, and

Upon

his arrival Col.

Campbell

a disposition of his force along

;

the line of the Baltimore and_ Ohio Railroad, and company July

Spotts, John, Feb. 19, 1864; must, out with

Creek, Ga., July 20,

16, 1865.

Peach Tree vet1S64; absent, in hospital, at muster out

wounded, with

Shelly, John, Jan. 13, 1834;

loss of leg, at

;

eran. Sheets, Joseph

J.,

July

Sowers, Israel, Sept.

Smith, Joseph

J.,

2,

30, 1864

1861

;

Sullenberger, Joseph, Sept.

;

prisoner

;

absent, sick, at certif.

muster out.

Dec. 19, 1862.

disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 19, 1862.

1861

2,

;

on surg.

disch.

Sept. 2, 1861

;

disch. on surg. certif.

May

25, 1863.

Shannon, James, Sept. 2, 1861 must, out Sept. 18, 1S64, at exp. of term. Shepler, John, Sept. 2, 1861 must, out Sept. 18, 1864, at exp. of term. Stingle, James, Aug. 30, 1802 disch. June 8, 1865, by G. O. Smith, John, July 14, 1863 drafted; disch. June 5, 1865, by G. O. Snoddy, William, Aug. 5, 1864; disch. June 8, 1865, by G. 0. ;

;

;

;

Company

F, Capt, G. W. P. Davis, was stationed at Sleepy Creek Bridge, seventeen miles west of Martinsburg. The country through which that portion

of the railroad runs, which the regiment was required

was considered by the rebels as their own and the majority of the population in the vicinity was rebel at heart. Numerous guerrilla bands, led by daring and reckless chieftains, roved the country, pillaging and burning the property of Union inhabitants, and watchful for an opportunity to burn to guard,

territory,

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

164

the railroad bridges, cut the wires of the telegraph, and destroy the road. To guard this great thoroughfare, of vital importance to the government, to suppress guerrilla warfare, to afford protection to the harassed and helpless people, was the duty which the

regiment was assigned to perform. Col. Campbell at once assumed the offensive, and hunted them instead of waiting to let them hunt him. Almost daily, from some part of the line, squads were sent out to engage and capture these roving bands led by such partisans as Edwards, White, Imboden, and McNeil, and mauy were brought

in.

the 25th of May, 1862, all the locomotives on the railroad west of Harper's Ferry •were hurried through to Cumberland, the engineers

On Sunday morning,

bringing the

first

intelligence of the retreat of

Banks

and the approach of Stonewall Jackson to Martinsburg. At nine o'clock that night Col. Campbell received the following dispatch from Col. Miles: "Concentrate your regiment at South Branch. Gen. Banks Expect defeated and driven through Martinsburg.

Soon afterwards the regiment was attached

command

to the

of Gen. Morrell, left for the defense of the

Upper Potomac, and subsequently, upon the organEighth Army Corps, it was assigned Third Brigade of the Second Division, commanded by Gen. Kelly. On the 29th of January, 1863, the Fifty-fourth was attached to the Fourth Brigade of the First Division, department 6f West Virginia, Col. Campbell in command of the brigade, and Lieut.-Col. Linton of the regiment. On the 3d of April, the enemy having attacked a forage train above Burlington, the Fifty-fourth, with a battalion At Purgitsville the of cavalry, was sent in pursuit. rebel cavalry was encountered and driven, and some prisoners taken. The regiment continued here, scouting the country and capturing guerrillas who infested the region, until the 30th of June, when it moved to New Creek in anticipation of an attack upon Grafton. On the 6th of July, Gen. Kelly moved his comization of the

to the

mand, by forced marches, of the Potomac,

now

to co-operate

with the

Army

enemy from the came upon the

driving the

On

the 10th he

an attack here hourly. Mean to fight." The success of Jackson, and the consequent withdrawal from the road, had inspired the roving bands with new life, and they became more troublesome than ever, wandering

field

up and down the country, pillaging indiscriminately The several companies were from friend and foe. kept constantly on the alert, and with an energy and

he learned through a scout that the enemy in force was moving on his rear and immediately retreated into Maryland, leaving the Fifty-fourth alone upon the Virginia shore. The enemy approached and

enterprise rarely equaled, the territory was scoured, of the squads penetrating the interior twenty

of Gettysburg.

and upon the withdrawal of the rebel up the retreat, and on the 19th was heavily engaged. During the night rebel pickets,

army

into Virginia he followed

many

threw a few shells into

and dispersing the guerrillas, restoring stolen property, and successfully protecting and preserving the road. The rebel army having defeated McClellan upon the Peninsula, and Pope at Bull Run, was now advancing into Maryland on the Antietam campaign. On the 11th of September his advance guard reached Back Creek. Communication with Col. Miles was severed, and soon after Harper's Ferry was invested by Jackson, the post, garrison, and immense military Col. stores falling into the hands of the enemy. Campbell telegraphed to Gen. Kelly, in command in West Virginia, for orders. Kelly declined to give any, but advised the withdrawal from the road. This the colonel decided not to follow and clung to his position, which had now become perilous, his little band of nine hundred men, without artillery or cav-

the 6th of

and

thirty miles, capturing

alry,

being the only Union forces at that time in the

hostile territory of Virginia.

After the battle^of" Antietam, Gen. McClellan, un-

aware of the presence of any Union troops south of the Potomac, sent a cavalry force to picket the Maryland shore.

Seeing soldiers in blue across the river they

regarded Col. Campbell's men as rebels in disguise, and it was with difficulty that they could be undeUpon the surrender of Miles the brigade to ceived.

which the regiment belonged had disappeared.

A

report to the general-in-chief soon brought an order attaching it to Gen. Franklin's command.

field,

November

its lines,

but soon retired.

the brigade

moved

to

On

Spring-

where a reorganization of the command took

place, the Fifty-fourth being assigned to the First

Brigade of the Second Division, Col. Campbell in

command.

On the 4th of January, 1864, Gen. Kelly apprehending an attack upon Cumberland, Col. Campbell, with part of his command, was ordered to its defense. A month later Company F, while guarding the railroad bridge at Patterson's Creek, was attacked by a party of the enemy under the notorious Harry Gilmor

in the

garb of Union soldiers.

By

this decep-

tion the rebels reached the picket line unsuspected,

when they dashed into the camp, and after a short struggle compelled its surrender. Three of the company were killed and several wounded. After the surrender, Gilmor, with his own hand, shot and instantly killed Corporal Gibbs, an act which should stamp its perpetrator with infamy. Col. Campbell, at his own request, was relieved from the command of his brigade and assumed charge of his regiment. About this time Gen. Sigel relieved Gen. Kelly, and immediately commenced preparations for a campaign in the Shenandoah Valley. On the 15th of May, while pushing his columns up the valley, Sigel struck a force of the enemy, unexpectedly large, under Gen. Breckinridge, near New Market, prepared to offer battle. Confident of his ability to drive the opposing force, Sigel disposed his troops

for battle.

At the

GENERAL HISTORY. opening of the battle, the cavalry in passing to the rear threw the infantry into some confusion, breaking through its lines. Steadily the enemy moved forward to the attack, his long lines overlapping both flanks of Sigel's force. The artillery was plied with excellent effect, but could not stay the rebel columns. Arriving within easy musket range, the infantry of both sides opened simultaneously a heavy and mutually destructive Are. For some time the battle raged with great fury, but the enemy's superiority of

length prevailed, and the

Union

lines

numbers

at

were forced

back, the Fifty-fourth retiring in good order, return-

enemy

he ceased to pursue. where he threw up defensive works. The loss of the regiment in this engagement was one hundred and seventy-four killed, wounded, and missing. During the remaining summer months the regiment participated in the marches and counter-marches of the command, the exact object of which was probably best known to its leader. .Upon the assumption of the chief command by Gen. Sheridan, the army was reorganized and prepared for an active campaign. The Fifty-fourth marched with the command to Cedar Creek, participating in a series of heavy skirmishes, and with it fell back to Halltowu. Here it remained until August 28th, when the enemy having disappeared from its front the whole force marched to Charlestown, and on the 3d of September to Berryville. On the day of its arrival a severe engagement occurred, lasting far into the night and ending in the complete repulse of the enemy. For four days the Army of West Virginia, now known as the Eighth Corps, bivouacked near Berryville, and was then transferred from the extreme left of the infantry line to the extreme right, at Summit Point. Here the Fifty-fourth remained until the 19th, repairing, as far as possible, the ravages of the campaign, distributing ing the

fire

of the

until

Sigel retreated to Cedar Creek,

supplies,

and assigning

recruits, convalescents,

and

veterans returned from furlough.

On

December the main body of Sheridan's army marched from the valley to join Grant in front of Petersburg. The Fifty-fourth moved to Washington and thence to City Point, arriving on the 23d, and encamped on Chapin's farm. It was the 19th of

assigned to duty in the

Upon

Army

of the James.

the muster out of service of the Third and

Fourth Reserve Regiments in May, 1S64, the veterans and recruits were at first organized into an independent battalion, which was subsequently united to the Fifty-fourth.

On

the 7th of February, 1865, the

term of original enlistments having expired, an order from the War Department directed that the two organizations should be consolidated under the name of the Fifty-fourth Regiment. This was effected, and it was assigned to the Second Brigade, Independent Division of the Army of the James, commanded by Gen. Ord. On the morning of the 2d of April the regiment

was ordered

105 forward

to join in the general

movement

and proceeding with the brigade crossed the rebel works near the Boydton Plank Road, now abandoned, and approached Fort Gregg. Here a spirited resistance was offered, and it was not until a hot fire of infantry and artillery had been brought to bear upon the enemy that he yielded. In this brief engagement the regiment lost twenty killed and wounded. The rebel army having been routed from its works about Petersburg, was retreating rapidly towards the North Carolina border. On the 5th of April two regiments, the Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania and the One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio, Col. Kellogg, with two companies of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, Col. Washburn, were ordered to make a forced march to High Bridge and effect its destruction for the purpose of cutting the enemy's way of Arrived at Rice's retreat and delaying his columns. Station, Gen. Read, of Ord's staff, took command, and when within sight of the bridge made his dispoBefore the column could be sitions for the attack. formed, word was brought that the vedettes at Rice's had been driven nothing daunted, the little force promptly attacked. But the enemy had taken ample precautions for the safety of this their main avenue of escape, and after a desperate struggle, in which Gen. Read was killed, Cols. Kellogg and Washburn wounded and taken prisoners, and a large proportion of the command killed or prisoners, surrounded on all sides by the main columns of the enemy's infantry and cavalry, it was forced to surrender. The loss of the Fifty-fourth was twenty-one killed and wounded. The captives were taken back to Rice's, where, to of the army,

;

their astonishment, they beheld Longstreet's

intrenched, having

corps

come up but a few moments

after

Read's column had passed in the morning.

The

attack,

though failing in its immediate purmain end; for Lee's columns were

pose, subserved the

thereby delayed several hours, enabling Sheridan to sweep around the enemy's rear and complete the destruction and capture of that once proud and defiant army. For four days, without rations, the captives marched with the retreating rebel army, when to their great joy they were released from their captivity and their starving condition by Grant's victorious columns. From Appomattox Court-House the regiment was sent to Camp Parole, at Annapolis, Md., and on the 15th of July was mustered out of service at Harrisburg.

ROLL OF COMPANY

F,

FIFTY-FOURTH REGIMENT iTUREE

YEARS' SERVICE). Recruited at Harrisburg. Captains.

George

W.

P. Davis, Oct. S, IS61

;

res.

March

16, 1863,

on surg.

certif. of

disability.

Johu W.

from 1st lieut. July 11, 1S63 Andersonville, Ga., Aug. 14, 1S64; grave 1298.

Hibler, Dec. 20, 1861

tured

;

died at

;

pro.

;

cap-

First Lieutenants.

William H. Miller, Nov. 1, 1861 pro. from sergt. to 2d lieut. July 4, 1S64 to 1st lieut. Nov. 30, 1864; trans, to Co. G Dec. 14, 1864. ;

;

;

.

;

.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

166 Lewis Rehr, Oct.

22, 1861

B

1864; to capt. Co.

from eergt.-maj.

pro.

;

Nov.

March

to lBt lieut.

Blank, William H., Feb.

27,

30, 1864; veteran.

'

must, out April

Second Lieutenants.

Robert Hanrersley, Dec.

2,

1861

pro.

;

1862

25,

25, 1862

res. Sept.

;

prisoner from Feb. 2 to Dec. 16, 1864

;

Camerer, Aloysius, March 14, 1864

4, 1863.

;

company July 15, 1865. must, out with company July 15, 1865

1862; must, out with

9,

Clush, William, April 22, 1864

from Corp. Feb.

;

exp. of term.

13, 1865, at

Colley, Richard, Oct.

May

by G. 0.

disch.

;

31,

1865

veteran. Sept. 2, 1862; pro. from sergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. 14,

John W. Burgien,

unknown.

1864; trans, to Co. B, date

Aug.

Carbitt, Peter,

May

1864; disch. by G. 0.

1,

31, 1865.

May 31, 1865; May 31, 1865. May 31, 1865. 0. May 31, 1865.

Conley, George, March 17, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

Cowen, William,

First Sergeants.

veteran.

by G. 0.

Oct. 27, 1862; disch.

Crowers, Samuel, Jan. 26, 1864; discb. by G. 0.

Barclay Cane, March

1864

14,

May

disch. by G. 0.

Henry Roat, Dec.

com. 1st

;

lieut. April 3,

1865

not must.

;

|

1865; veteran.

31,

1861

2,

j

roll.

Christner, Samuel, Crider, Daniel H.,

Sergeants.

Hummel, March

Joseph R. must.

;

by G.

disch.

14, 1864;

May

0.

com. 2d

lieut. April 3, 1865

;

;

1861

2,

captured

;

;

;

Copple, Franklin, Dec.

June

;

1864

not

;

31, 1865; veteran.

Henry Wolford, Mareh 14, 1S64 disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865 John G. Strayer, March 14, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1S65 William Holmes, March 14, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865 John Roat, Dec.

disch. by G. 7, 1864 unknown. March 17, 1864; trans, to Co. C, date unknown. March 14, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Crowers, John G., Oct.

Cassady, James, Oct. 20, 1862 ; trans, to Co. H, date

not on muster-out

;

1861; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga.,

2,

grave 2695.

30, 1864;

Chore, Michael, Jan.

1862; prisoner from Feb. 2 to Dec.

2,

;

veteran. veteran.

must, out Feb. 13, 1865, at exp. of term.

;

veteran.

Cliuk, Henry, Feb. 17, 1862; not on muster-out

;

June

Deihl, Jacob G., Feb. 24, 1865; must, out with

died at Audersonville, Ga.,

28,

Depher, John, March

grave 2602.

company July

15, 1865.

must, out with company July

14, 1864;

1864;

10,

roll.

15,

1865

;

veteran.

Benjamin Dilley, Dec. 2, 1861 trans, to Co. B, date unknown. Henry K. Algert, Dec. 2, 1861 captured died at Audersonville, ;

May

9,

Ga.,

;

;

Dougherty, Patrick, March

Thomas McClure, March

must, out with company July

14, 1864;

March

F.,

15,

DeHaven, George, Dec. Deily, Elwin, Jan.

13, 1864;

muBt. out with company July 15,

1S65; veteran.

23, 1862.

Diffenderfer, Robert, Dec.

Joseph Shoap, Feb.

must, out with company July 15,1865;

22, 1864;

must, out Feb.

Samuel D. Hummel, March

14, 1864;j disch

May 31,

1865

veteran.

;

by G. 0. May

31,

Euritt, Christian,

1865;

veteran.

May

14, 1864; pro. to corp.

March

1,

1865

;

disch.

31, 1865; veteran.

;

;

date

unknown

veteran.

;

Rinehard, Dec.

1861; captured; died at Audersonville, Ga.,

2,

Alonzo Hannis, Dec.

;

veteran.

Musicians.

Fry, Tilghman, Jan.

1862

2,

not on muster-out

;

roll.

1862; not on muster-out

2,

trans, to Co.

;

roll

H, date unknowu; veteran.

Ferrel, Jacob, Feb. 17, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Farlan, Joseph, Feb. 25, 1862

captured

;

;

died at Andersonville, Ga.,

June

veteran.

W.

P.,

disch.

;

by G. 0.

May

31, 1865

Feb. 26, 18C4; not on muster-out

j

veteran.

roll.

unknown.

P., Feb. 26, 1864; not on muster-out roll. trans, to Co. H, date unknown. 3, 1862 Gramling, A. S., Nov. 3, 1862 trans, to Co. H, date unknowu. National Gibbs, Mason, Dec. 2, 1861 died, date unknown buried i Cemetery, Autietam, Md., Sec. 26, lot F, grave 597. Griffey, Jeremiah, Dec. 2, 1861; captured; died at Auderst

Gindlesperger,

May

Gindlesperger, M., Nov.

31, 1865.

;

;

;

;

;

Anthony, Isaac, Feb. 12, 1863 trans, to Co. E, date unknown. Abel, Jerome, Feb. 25, 1862; captured; died at Andersonville,

Sept.

;

;

1S65

8,

Geisinger, John, Feb. 16, 1865; trans, to Co. G, date

William Ehler, Dec. 2, 1861 not on muster-out roll. Robert McDonald, Dec. 2, 1S61 not on muster-out roll.

1864

;

March

Finkley, George W., Jan.

Gearhart, J.

2, 1861.

Christopher C. Bennett, Dec. 10, 1863; disch. by G. 0.

29,

Matthew, Nov. 3, 1862; trans, to Co. C, date unknown. not on muster-out roll. R., March 17, 1864

Gore, John A., March 14, 1864

1861; not on muster-out roll

2,

disch.

;

1861.

2,

Gahman, William, Aug. 17. 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865. Goughenour, David, March 14, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865;

April 4, 1864; grave 355.

Amos

by G. 0. May 31, 1865. by G. 0. May 31, 1865.

disch.

;

30, 1863

18,1864; grave 2155.

William H. Craig, Dec. 2, 1801. David B. McDonald, Dec. 2, 1861. Francis Carman, Dec.

May

Folckhomer,

Francis, John,

John H. Kaufmian, March 14, 1864; pro. to corp. March 1, 1865; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865; veteran. Reese Davis, March 31, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865. Archibald Rex, Dec. 2, 1861 trans, to Co. B, and reduced to the ranks,

1864

1,

Eichelherger, H., Dec. Filer,

W. Young, March

by G. 0.

1861; prisoner from Feb. 2 to Nov.30, 1864;

2,

1865, at exp. of term.

6,

Ehrett, Charles, Aug.

Allen L. Boyle, March 31, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

1864; not on muster-out roll; veterau.

22,

2, 1861.

1862; not on muster-out roll.

2,

Dobbs, James, Jan.

unknown.

1864; trans, to Co. E, date

6,

Dayspring, George, Feb.

veterau.

Samuel Dunham, March

Daniel

1865;

;

Day, James

;

31,

veteran.

1864 grave 975. Corporals.

1865

May

1864; disch. by G. 0.

6,

Ga.,

July

grave 2648.

1,

;

1864; grave 7527.

captured died at Andersc uville, Ga March 23, 1864 grave 131. Hummell, Benjamin F., March 14, 1S64; must, out with company July

Geiss, Christian, Jan. 23, 1862

;

;

;

Bagnnl, John, Oct.

company July 15, 1865. must, out with company July

1861; must, out with

4,

Bennett, Wesley, March

3,

1864;

15,

1865.

15, 1865

veteran.

;

March 17, 1S64 must, out with company July 15, 1865. company July 15, 1865. Hammers, Martin, Feb. 26, 1864 must, out with company July 15, 1865. Henshew, Joseph, April 4, 1864 disch. by G. 0. June 6, 1865. Hert, George,

Bennett, Robert, March

1864

14,

;

must, out with compauy July 15, 1865

;

veteran.

;

Haines, William, Feb. 29, 1864; must, out with ;

Bennett, William, March 14, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

May

31, 1865; vet-

;

Hoffman, Milton, Feb. Beltou, Daniel, Feb. 5, 1863; disch. by G. 0.

Berkeybill, George, Oct. 27, 1862 Bidler, Samuel, Bell,

Richard

March

17,

1864

;

L., April 14, 1864;

;

May

31, 1865.

J,,

Dec.

2,

2,

;

captured

;

died at Andersonville, Ga.,

April 22,1864; grave 673.

1862; not on muster-out

Baney, Moses. Jan.

2,

1862; not on muster-out roll

1862

;

not on muster-out

BrookeB, George W., Jan. 23, 1862.

disch.

roll.

roll.

23,

1862

not on muster-out

;

March 25,1864; prisoner fh

March

by G. 0.

Jones, Lewis

2,

2,

roll

;

veteran.

m

;

May

veteran.

roll.

July

24, 1864, to Feb. 21,

n May

15 to Nov. 27, 18641

1865; disch. by G. 0. June 27, 1865. Inglert, John,

Bast, William, Jan.

Boyer, John, Jau.

on muster-out

captured; died at Andersonville, Ga.,

Hoffman, Jones, Jan.

roll.

1861.

1861

;

killed near Petersburg April 2, 1865;

1864; not on muster-out

Bannister, Thomas, Dec.

1861

14,1864; grave 1080. Hodes, William, Jan. 2, 1862; not on muster-out roll Hull, Godfried,

5,

2,

by G. O. May 31, 1S65. disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865. disch.

veteran.

Brindle, John, April Barr, Augustus

Huff, Arthur, Dec.

22, 1864; not

J.,

14,

May

March

1864

prisoner

;

31, 1865 14,

1864

;

;

frc

veteran.

must, out

i

itli

company July

15, 1865

veteran ;

veteran.

by G. 0. May 31, 1865 veteran. Kramer, Gottleib, Feb. 29, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865. Kiper, George S., Aug. 25, 1862 not on muster-out roll. Jordan, John, March

31,

1864

;

disch.

;

;

;

GENERAL HISTORY. Knowlden, John, March 5, 1863 not on mustcr-ont roll. Keech, Henry, Dec. 2, 1861 not on muster-out roll. Kreigber, George, Dec. 2, 1861 captured; died at Richmond,

Va., Feb.

Kercher, David, Dec.

2,

1861

:

not on muster-out

Kreiger, Simon, Jan.

2,

1862

;

must, out Jan.

Kreiger, Martin, Jan.

Kidman, John, Feb. Litz,

William

Lynn,

June

4,

1862; not on muster-out

2,

20, 1862

term.

1864

May

Andrew, Feb.

13, 1864

Thomas. Peter, Feb.

31, 1865.

June

14, 1865, to date

Ulrich, Jacob,

26, 4862; not

March

unknown.

1861

2,

must, out Jan.

;

1861

2,

Ludgate, John, Dec.

;

1861

2,

not on muster-out

roll

not on muster-out

roll.

;

Weiss, Francis

;

by G. 0. July

disch.

;

16,

20, 1S65.

by G. O.May 31, 1865; veteran. Murphy, John H., Sept. 26, 1862 disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865. Miller, Thomas, Feb. 28, 1862 disch. by G. O. May 31, 1865 veteran. 27, 1862; disch. ;

;

;

killed at Petersburg April

Morris, George, April 14, 1864;

27,

May

1864

roll.

company July

2,

1865;

;

31, 1865

disch.

14, 1864

;

;

15, 1865.

veteran.

by G. 0. June 29, 1865. not on muster-out roll

Dec. 23, 1861; trans, to Co. B, date

S.,

Weiss, James, Dec. 2,1861

;

;

1865

on muster-out

1865; must, out with

1861.

Wolford, Valentine, March

Lynch, Charles, Dec. 2, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 30, 1862. Long, Isaac, Jan. 2, 1862; not on muster-out roll. Miller, Owen, Feb. 22, 1864 must, out July 15, 1865 veteran. Mover, Lewis, March 16, 1864 prisoner from May 15, 1864, to March Minnich, Joseph, Jan.

roll.

died at Andersonville, Ga.,

Weaver, John B., Feb. 24, 1865 must, out with company July 15, 1865. Weddler, Henry, March 14, 1864; prisoner from May 15 to Dec. 6,

Warn, Wesley, Feb.

veteran.

;

;

;

;

1865, to date exp. of

6,

10, 2,

1864; disch. by G. 0. Lorhle, Simon, Dec.

captured

25, 1S62;

grave 1058.

;

Tonhoff, Philip, Dec.

Leonard, Charles, Dec.

not on muster-out

;

Teeters, Nathaniel, Feb. 17, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

May

24, 1865.

Felix, Jan. 7, 1864; trans, to Co. H., date

captured; died at Andersonville, Ga.,

grave 1620.

;

Stephenson, Frank.

roll.

not on muster-out roll.

;

1864; disch. by G. 0.

1,

Spitzfaden,

roll.

11, 1865, at exp. of

Feb. 12, 1863; disch. by G. O.

J.,

Andrew W., March

May

not on muster-out roll; veteran.

;

Sletler, Jacob, Jan. 23, 1862

23. 1864.

Little,

1861

2,

Schiffert, Jacob, Jan. 23, 1862;

;

;

167

Sexton, John, Dec.

;

;

trans, to Co. B, date

;

veteran.

unknown

unknown;

;

vet-

veteran.

White, Robert, Dec. 2, 1861 not on muster-out roll. West, Christian, Jan. 23, 1862; must, out Jan. 24, 1S65, at exp. of tejm. Werner, Aaron, Feb. 25, 1862; di*nh. on surg. certif. Aug. 16, 1S62. Wetherhold, Charles, Feb. 25, 1862; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., Ang. 7, 1864 grave 4966. ;

;

Wald, John, Jan.

2,

1862.

veteran.

March S, 1864; not on muster-out roll; veteran. Midenaught, Michael, Jan. 21, 1862 prisoner from Oct. 19, 1864, to Feb. 28, 1865; disch. by G. 0. June 20, 1865, to date May 22, 1865. Maine, John, Dec. 2, 1861 not on muster-out roll. Menges, Israel, Dec. 2, 1861; prisoner from Feb. 2 to Nov. 18, 1S64; Miller, Tobia6,

;

;

June

disch.

1865, to date exp. of term.

9,

May, Francis, Dec. 2,1861; not on muster-out roll. disch. by G. 0. May 31,1865 veteran. 6, 1804

McClellan, Charles, March

;

;

McLane, William, Oct. 4, 1861 prisoner from April disch. June 5, 1865, to date May 15, 1865. Nicholson, Silas, March 12, 1864; not on muster-out

6 to April 9, 1865;

;

Nine, Joseph, Jan.

1S62

2,

roll; veteran.

captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., April

;

14,1864; grave 538.

Owens, Noah, March

14, 1864; disch.

Oberly, Joseph, Feb.

by G.

May

0.

May

disch. by G. 0.

;

31, 1865; veteran.

unkuown.

1862; trans, to Co. K. date

3,

O'Neal, William, Feb. 22, 1864

2,

April 12, 1S64

1861.

2,

Patterson, John, Jan. 23, 1862

Powers, Pierce, Dec. must, out Jan.

disch. Jan. 27, 1865, at exp. of term.

;

prisoner from Feb. 2 to Nov. 19| 1864;

1861;

2,

1865, to date exp. of term.

9,

Prosser, Alexander. Jan. 30, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Rogers, Joseph, March 14, 1864 disch.

May

by G. 0.

Rust, Albert, Nov.

;

Rehrig, George, Feb.

May

prisoner from

15 to Dec.

7,

1864

31, 1865; veteran.

May

1863; disch. by G. 0.

5,

31, 1865; veteran.

1864; disch. by G. O. Aug. 22, 1865, to date July

9,

15. 1865.

Rhinesbith, David, March 15, 1864 Ries, Philip,

March

IS,

;

not on muster-out

1864; disch. by G.O.

May

roll.

26, 1865; veteran.

Rosenberger, Martin. March IS, 1864; not on muster-out

Row, Henry, Dec.

2,

Rush, Stephen

Dec.

L.,

1861

trans, to Co. B, date

;

1861

2,

unknown

roll. ;

veteran.

died at Annapolis, Md., April

;

Rake, James D., Jan. 2, 1862 not on muster-out Reod, Adam H., Feb. 17, 1862. ;

2,

1S64.

roll.

Henry

S.,

Aug. 17,

1865

;

from June 19

to

must, out with company July

Stull, Joseph, Feb. 9, 1864; must, out

Nov.

30,

with company July

15, 1865.

15, 1865.

Smith, David, Jan. 14, 1S65; absent at muster out. Sims, John W., Aug. 21, 1862

;

by G. 0.

disch.

May

31, 1865.

17, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1S65. July 19, 1862; not on muster-out roll. Sourbrine, Lewis, Feb. 15, 1862 not on muster-out roll veteran. Steedman, William C, Dec. 2, 1861 captured died at Andersonville,

StefTen,

Sims,

John, Feb.

Andrew

J.,

;

;

;

Ga., Sept. 17, 1864

;

Steedman, Marvin, Dec. 10, 1864.

under au-

White, during the summer and autumn of 1861, of G was raised in Dauphin County.

at Camp Curtin, where an organization was effected by the choice of fieldThree of the companies, B, E, and G, were officers. for a time stationed at Camp Cameron, near Harris-

The regiment rendezvoused

burg, under the

command

of Col.

Thomas A.

the 22d of

Zeigle,

officers.

November the regiment,

thirty-eight

and seven hundred and fifty-seven men, left Camp Curtin and proceeded to Fortress Monroe. Drill and discipline, which had been commenced at Camp Curtin, was here resumed, and the command was brought to a good degree of efficiency. On the 8th of December, in company with the Forty-fifth, Seventy-sixth, and Ninety-seventh Regiments, it embarked for South Carolina, arriving at Port Royal on the 12th. The Fifty-fifth was immediately sent out to guard the small islands and approaches to the west of Hilton Head, where it remained until the 25th of February, 1862, when it was transferred to Edisto Island. While on duty here a series of attacks were made by the enemy in large force upon the comthe Union outstretched lines upon the coast.

17, 1861; prisoner

1864; disch. by G. 0. April 27, 1865.

Smith, John H., Feb.

recruited,

panies, scattered as they necessarily were in holding

Ross, James, Feb. 24, 1S64.

Roberts,

Regiment was

officers 1861; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga.,

2,

grave 500.

;

Painter, Michael, Dec.

Fifty-fifth

which Company

On

1861.

Petreskey, Herman, Dec.

The

thority granted by Governor Curtin to Col. Richard

and were instructed by regular army

26, 1865.

O'Conner, John, Feb. 20, 1862. Pyle, James, Dec.

FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.

;

grave 9012. 2,

1861; captured

;

died at Richmond, Va., April

The

most determined of these was made on the 29th of March, when Companies E, F, and G, posted at the head of the island, nearly twelve miles from the headquarters of the regiment, were attacked by a force of the enemy estimated at two thousand. The action which ensued was severe, but the rebels were signally repulsed, with a loss to the three companies of about twenty killed and wounded. Gen. Evans, who was in command of the enemy, afterwards reported to the rebel government that he had made a

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

168

reconnoiaance upon Edisto Island, and had found the

Ames

enemy

Petersburg as far as Swift Creek, where he met the enemy well posted, aud immediately attacked, the

thousand strong. During the summer the only troops upon the island were those of the Fifty-fifth, and the duty, performed beneath a Southern sun, was very severe. On the 21st of October the regiment accompanied Gen. Brannau on an expedition, consisting of about four thousand troops, up Broad River. The command landed, under cover of gunboats, at Mackey's Point, and immediately advanced on Poeotaligo Bridge, the object of the movement being to destroy the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. At eight o'clock on the morning of the 22d the enemy was met at Caston, but were soon driven. At Frampton he made another stand, and after a sharp engagement was again driven, and retreated across the Poeotaligo River, burning the bridge as he withdrew. Here he took a strong position, and being largely reinforced from Charleston, held his ground during six hours, in which the battle fiercely raged. Unable to gain an advantage, the ammunition being nearly exhausted, the Union forces withdrew under cover of night and returned to Hilton Head. The Fifty-fifth lost in this engagement twenty-nine killed and wounded. Near the close of the action, while bravely leading his men against a masked battery, Capt. Horace C. Bennett was killed. The regiment was now stationed at Beaufort, S. C, where it remained for more than a year, performing picket duty at Port Royal Ferry, ten miles from the town, and also serving in the capacity of heavy artillery

six

upon the

fortifications.

On the 1st of January, 1864, the men re-enlisted for a second term of on the 22d departed

On

contest continuing until evening.

lowing morning

Ames

turnpike

towards

Early on the

fol-

learned that Terry's division,

had been attacked. Facing his columns about and advancing, he soon encountered the rebel in his rear,

forces, and drove them as far as Drury's Bluff, near Richmond. On the 13th the Union forces were again pushed forward towards Richmond, but found the enemy strongly intrenched in a double line of works behind Proctor's Creek. The outer line was carried, and Gillmore's troops continued the contest during the 14th and loth, flanking the rebel position. But he had now been reinforced by troops from Charleston, and Gen. Beauregard was in command. Seeing that the Union lines were greatly extended, and in

many

parts

thereby greatly weakened,

the

rebel

moved out of his intrenchments at night, and morning of the 16th, under cover of a dense fog, fell upon the left flank with sudden and overpowering force. The Fifty-fifth occupied a leader

early on the

left, and felt the full force Again and again he advanced

position near the extreme of the enemy's blows. to the charge.

Portions of the line gave way.

The

by side with the Fourth

New

Fifty-fifth stood side

Hampshire and gallantly held

its

flanked and nearly surrounded,

it

ground, until, out-

was

in

danger of

being captured. Col. White, as a last resort, selected three companies, C, D, and E, of his own regiment, and charged full upon the head of the advancing column. But it could not be broken, and the line

The loss

engagement was

was forced

very severe, being in killed, wounded, and prisoners, including those from May 9th, when the fighting

where, upon

March the veterans and

South Carolina, where the

re-

regi-

ment, now numbering twelve hundred and fifty effective men, remained for three weeks engaged in .drill and guard duty. On the 12th of April it embarked for Virginia, and landed at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown.

the

majority of the

for Harrisburg,

the 23d of

cruits returned to

upon

three years, and

their arrival, they were dismissed for a veteran fur-

lough.

then marched

Here the regiment was assigned to the Third Brigade (Col. Richard White), Third Division, Tenth Corps, Army of the James. Gen. Butler was here organizing his forces, consisting of about forty thousand men, to operate against Richmond by the right bank of the James. Embarking upon transports, the Tenth Corps moved up the river and landed at Bermuda Hundred, with the design of seizing and fortifying the peninsula between the Appomattox and the James as a base of operations. Advancing ten miles west, encountering little opposition, the troops were set to work throwing up intrenchments across the head of the peninsula, and soon had the neck of the " bottle" closed. On the 9th of May, Ames' division moved out of the works and destroyed the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad for a distance of two miles. Gen.

to yield.

in this

commenced, fifteen commissioned officers and three The colonel, lieutenanthundred enlisted men. colonel, and adjutant were among the prisoners, and Lieut. John H. Barnhart was among the killed. The command of the regiment devolved upon Capt. John C. Shearer.

The army now fell back to its intrenched Bermuda Hundred, and the regiment was

line at

quently engaged in several minor skirmishes.

On

subse-

the

morning of the 20th of May the enemy attacked the picket line on Forster's plantation at daylight. Onehalf of the Fifty-fifth was in position and made a stern resistance, holding its ground until the yielding of the forces on right and left made it necessary back to save itself from capture. having completed his preparations, was upon the point of moving upon the enemy's lines about Petersburg, when he received orders from Grant to detach a heavy force under Gen. " Baldy" Smith for it to fall

Butler,

and send

it

The

to the

support of the

Army

of the Poto-

was one of the regiments selected for this purpose, and was assigned to the First Brigade (Gen. Stannard), Second Division (Gen. mac.

Fifty-fifth

Martindale), Eighteenth Corps.

Moving

in transports

a

GENERAL HISTORY. down

James and up the York debarked at West Point, and marched via White House to Cold Harbor, where, on the 1st of June, it met the enemy, who was engaging the Sixth Corps. The line of battle was immediately formed and charged the enemy's works, capturing a line of riflepits and taking a large number of prisoners. The contest was continued during the 1st and 2d, but the principal charge was made on the morning of the 3d. Stannard's brigade was selected for the attack, and was formed in columns of regiments, in which the Fifty-fifth was the third. As it swept forward to the desperate work the intense fire of the enemy caused the front lines to waver, and finally to fall back in confusion upon the third, which was also momen-

Rivers, the corps

the

Capt. Shearer, in command, was wounded, and scarcely had the next in rank, Capt. Nesbitt, assumed it when he also was stricken down, and it devolved upon Capt. Hill, who soon restored order and held his position, now in the front line. During the night breastworks were thrown up, which tarily deranged.

were occupied until the night of the 12th, when the army withdrew. The loss in killed and wounded was four commissioned officers and one hundred and thirty-four enlisted men. In conducting this withdrawal from the enemy's front the Fiftyfifth was deployed in the front line of works, while entire

the regiments successively the night until

all

had

fell

back in the

stillness of

retired without casualties or

disturbance.

Marching back to White House, the corps again embarked on transports, and moved, via the Pamunkey, York, and James Rivers, to Point of Rocks, on the Appomattox, where it debarked, and early on the morning of the loth advanced on the enemy's works in Tront of Petersburg, capturing eighteen guns and four hundred prisoners. On the following morning Gen. Stannard ordered Capt. Hill to go forward with his regiment as skirmishers. He promptly advanced in the face of a hot fire and gained a position close up to the enemy's lines, but not without serious loss. On the 18th, Stannard's brigade, occupying the extreme right of the line, resting on the Appomattox, was again deployed for a charge. In front was an open field, commanded by the enemy's infantry and artillery, across which it must pass. Never faltering, the Fifty-fifth, which faced the ground most exposed, pushed forward obedient to command, and in less than ten minutes, while crossing this open field, it lost three

men,

commissioned officers and eighty enlisted than half of its effective strength,

— more



large proportion killed.

On

the evening of the 29th the corps

moved

to the

by the Ninth Corps, and upon the explosion of the mine, on the morning of the 30th, it was held in readiness to support the assaulting column; but the attack failed, and without rear of the position held

being called into action,

on the Appomattox.

it

returned to

its

old position

For two months the regiment

was engaged

1G9 in duties incident to a siege, being con-

fire of artillery, and the muskand sharpshooters, scarcely a day passing without some loss. During the night of September 28th the regiment crossed the James, and marched to participate in the attack about to be made by the Army of the James upon Chapin's Bluff. The capture of Fort Harrison was effected on the morning of the following day, but

stantly exposed to the etry of the pickets

the Fifty-fifth being held in support of the attacking troops, did not

become engaged.

was determined

to

In the afternoon

it

carry the works beyond, and at

four o'clock, Col. Jourdan, in

command

ade, ordered the Fifty-fifth to charge,

of the brig-

and take a

re-

doubt in the enemy's second line. The One Hundred and Fifty-eighth New York was deployed to support it, by advancing through the woods on the left, and the One Hundred and Forty-eighth New York to act as skirmishers on the right. The Fifty-fifth advanced over the open ground in front, a quarter of a mile, under a concentrated fire from three redoubts, supported by a heavy body of infantry. Bravely stemming a torrent of shot and deadly minie-balls, it moved steadily on, and reached a point within twenty yards of the work, when its rauks almost annihilated, and supports failing to come up, it was forced to fall back, leaving the dead and most of the wounded upon the field to fall into the hands of the enemy. Of five commissioned officers and one hundred and fifty enlisted men who marched at the word of command, three officers and seventy-eight men were Lieut. Blaney either killed, wounded, or missing. Adair was among the killed, and Capt. John O'Niel mortally wounded. On the following day the rebels made three attacks on Fort Harrison, but in each they were repulsed with terrible slaughter. In November, the colors which had been originally presented to the regiment by the Governor before leaving the State, carried in all its campaignings, and latterly almost constantly enshrouded in the smoke and fire of battle, having become badly tattered, application was made for a new stand, which was promptly forwarded. The staff and the few remaining shreds of the old one were deposited in the capitol.

In December the white troops of the Tenth and Eighteenth Corps were consolidated, and formed the Twenty-fourth Corps. The Fifty-fifth was assigned

Fourth Brigade of the First Division, and was henceforward engaged in performing picket and guard duty on the left bank of the James. On the 10th of December, while stationed at the redoubt on Signal Hill, near the extreme right of our lines, it was attacked by a portiou of Longstreet's corps. The demonstrations were feebly made, and were easily repulsed. On the 21st of December, upon the muster to the

out of service of Lieut.-Col. Bennett, at the expiration of his term, Maj. Filler was promoted to succeed

him, and Capt. James Metzger was major.

promoted

to

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

170

On

the 27th of March, 1865, the First and Second

and Amelia Court-House,

via Farmville, Burksville,

The regiment encamped on

Divisions of the Twenty-fourth Corps, and one divis-

arriving on the 25th.

ion of the Twenty-fifth Corps, under command of Gen. Ord, broke camp, and crossing the James and

the outskirts of the city, and performed fatigue and

the Appomattox, proceeded by the rear of the

army

to Hatcher's Run, and on the morning of the 29th relieved the Second Corps, which moved out still

During the 30th and 31st a part of the regiment was on the picket-line near the run, and in the general advance which was made, skirmished with the enemy, losing two men killed, and one commissioned officer and seventeen enlisted men wounded. On the morning of April 2d, in breaking through the enemy's lines, the Fourth Brigade, to which the regiment belonged, commanded by Gen. Fairchild, with the balance of the division, charged Forts Gregg and Baldwin, which, after a strong resistance, were carried, the Fifty-fifth being the first to occupy the latter. The loss here was one commissioned officer killed, and one commissioned officer and four enlisted men wounded. On the morning of April 3d, having ascertained that the rebels had evacuated farther to the

left.

Petersburg during the previous night, Gen. Ord's column was pushed forward to cut off their line of re-

By

Burksville Junction.

treat at

a forced

march

along the South Side Railroad, Ord reached the Junction on the evening of the 5th, a distance of about

Resuming the march on the following hastened forward, seven miles farther, to Rice's Station, the Fifty-fifth leading the column as skirmishers, and losing nine men wounded. At the

guard duty until the latter part of July, when it was ordered to report to Maj.-Gen. Hartsuff, at Petersburg. It

was stationed

ROLL OF COMPANY

it

Station

Ord held

way of

retreat to Danville,

umn

and forcing the rebel At daylight on the

col-

7th,

inarch, with the design of again

cutting the rebel line of retreat.

He

reached Appo-

mattox Court-House, a distance of forty-two miles, early on the morning of the 9th, in advance of Lee's columns, and with Sheridan's cavalry held firmly the only avenue of escape. " Sheridan," says Greeley, " was with his cavalry near the court-house, when the

Army

made its last charge. By his order who were in line of battle, dismounted,

of Virginia

his troops,

gave ground gradually, while showing a steady front, so as to allow our weary infantry time to form and take position. This effected, the horsemen moved swiftly to the right and dismounted, revealing lines of solid infantry in battle array, before whose wall of

gleaming bayonets the astonished enemy recoiled in blank despair, as Sheridan and his troopers, passing briskly around the rebel left, prepared to charge the confused,

reeling

masses.

A

white flag was

now

waved by the enemy, before Gen. Custer, who held our cavalry advance, with the information that they had concluded to surrender."

The

First

and Second Divisions of the TwentyAppomattox Court-House

fourth Corps remained at

S.

Waterbury, Aug.

28, 1861

;

Bermuda Hundred,

died at

the 17th,

when they proceeded

to

Richmond

Va.,

May

8, 1864.

Levi A. Weaver, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. from 2d to 1st lieut. May 26, 1863 to capt. July 1, 1864; must, out Nov. 23, 1864, at exp. of term. George H. Miller, Aug. 28, 1861; pro. from sergt. to 1st sergt. Jan. 1, 1864; to 2d lieut. Aug. 1, 1864; to 1st lieut. Jan. 25, 1865; to capt. April 20, 1865 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865 veteran. ;

;

;

;

First Lieutenants.

John Gotshall, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. to adjt. Aug. 3, 1863. William H. Shorb, Aug. 28, 1861; pro. from sergt. to 1st ;

1862; to sergt.-major Oct. 23, 1862; to 2d lieut. Nov.

sergt. Jan. 10, 4,

1863; to 1st

Aug. 1, 1864 must, out Dec. 25, 1864, at exp. of term. Daniel Bohanan, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. from corp. to sergt. Jan. 5, 1864 to 1st sergt. Aug. 1, 1864 to 2d lieut. Feb. 15, 1865 to 1st lieut. April 20, 1865 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865 veteran. lieut.

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Second Lieutenants.

Henry A.

Eiseubise, Sept. 18, 1863

1864; to 1st sergt.

May

with company Aug.

1,

pro.

;

from private

1865; to 2d lieut. July

to sergt.

2,

July

1,

1865; must, out

30, 1865.

First Sergeant.

Henry Scrimminger, March 28,1861; 1865

;

to 1st sergt. July 1, 1865

;

pro. to Corp.; to sergt. Feb. 15,

must, out with company Aug. 30,

1865; veteran. Sergeants.

David Black, Aug.

28, 1861; pro. to Corp.; to sergt.

June

5,

1864

;

must.

out with company Aug. 30, 1865; veteran.

Thomas 1,

J.

Howe, Aug.

28, 1861

pro. to Corp. Jan.

;

1,

1864

;

to sergt. Sept.

company Aug. 30,1865; veteran. June 6, 1864 to sergt. must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865; veteran.

1864; must, out with

George Loy, Feb.

15, 1864; pro. to Corp.

;

Oct. 9,

1864 Charles Long, Aug. 28, 1S61 pro. to Corp. Jan. 1, 1864 to sergt. July 1, 1865 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865 veteran. William Shorts, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. from Corp. killed at Cold Harbor ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

June 3,1864; veteran. Frederick Vogle, Aug. 28, 1861

June

pro.

;

from Corp.; killed at Petersburg

18, 1S64; veteran.

Corporals.

James M. Lyne, Aug. 28, 1861; pro. to Corp. Sept. 1, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1S65; veteran. James E. Ropley, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. to Corp. Sept. 1, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865 veteran. Edward Looker, Feb. 15, 1864 pro. to corp. Sept. 1, 1864 must, out with company Aug. 30,1865; veteran. ;

;

;

;

Alexander Timothy, Feb. 10, 1864 pro. to corp. Sept. 1, 1864 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. William H. Wennel, Feb. 6, 1864 pro. to corp. March 1, 1865; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Abraham Boak, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. to Corp. May 1,1865; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865; veteran. William Kromer, Aug. 28, 1861 pro. to Corp. May 1, 1865 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865; veteran. George Fisher, Aug. 28, 1861; pro. to corp. July 1, 1865 must, out with ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

until

(THREE

Captains.

Isaac

his position, cutting off the direct

towards Lynchburg.

Ord resumed the

G, FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT YEARS' SERVICE).

Recruited at Harrisburg.

sixty miles.

morning,

detachments

at different points, in

Buckingham, Cumberland, Powhattan, and Amelia Counties, acting under orders from the Freedmen's Bureau. On the 30th of August the regiment was mustered out of service at Petersburg, whence it proceeded to Harrisburg, where it was paid and finally disbanded. in Chesterfield,

company Aug.

30,

1865; veteran.

;

;

GENERAL HISTORY. William Boon, Aug. 1862, of

28, 1861

Not.

12, 1862, burial record

Nov.

(lied

;

wounds received

C,

at Pocotaligo, S.

2,

Oct. 22, 1862; buried

killed near Petersburg

;

June

18,

1SG4;

muster out.

Henry, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out Sept. 9, 1864, at exp. of term. Thomas, Sept. 4, 1861; must, out Sept. B, 1861, at exp of term. Fisher, Adam, Aug. 30, 1861 disch. Dec. 11, 1864, for wounds received Fetter,

;

:

veteran. in action Fry, John, Oct. 19, 1863; drafted; trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. Gruher, Isaac, Feb. 4. 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Grishaber, William, Feb. 5, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 18, ;

veteran. C.

Fields, Charles B., Feb. 2, 1864; absent, sick, at

Fit7.,

at Hilton Head, S C. Jobn H. Grubb, Aug. 28,1861

John

171

Lane, Aug.

28, 1861

died Nov. 17, 1864, of

;

Ohapiu's Farm, Va., Sept. 29, 1864 veteran. Jobn Brenizer, Aug. 28, 1861; not on muster-out

wounds received

at

;

roll

veteran.

;

1864.

John

Fox, Aug.

C.

28, 1861

Hogantogler, George, Aug.

Musicians.

\

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865

;

28, 1861

must, out with company Aug. 30,

;

1865; veteran.

Hughs, John, Aug. 28, 1861 absent, in hospital, at muster out veteran. Hooper, Pembroke, Aug. 28, 1861 disch. on surg certif. Nov. 8, 1862. Hooper, Alfred, Aug. 29, 1861 must, out Sept. 9, 1864, at exp. of term. Hatz, William, Aug. 29, 1861 must, out Sept. 9, 1864, at exp. of term. Hendrickson, E. S., Aug. 28, 1861 must, out Sept. 9, 1864, at exp. of ;

;

veteran.

Talbot Wagoner, Feb. 10, 1864

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865.

;

;

;

Privates.

Abbott, Joseph, Aug. 28, 1861

;

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865;

;

;

term.

veteran.

1865; drafted; disch. by G 0. June 12, 1865. Hull, Stitt, Sept. 23, 1863; drafted; trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. died at Beaufort, S. C, Oct. 17, 1862. Hat?., Henry, Aug. 29, 1861

Akens. Alexander, March 2, 1865 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Adams, George W., Aug. 28, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. June 2, 1863. Allison, John E., Aug. 28. 1861 must, out Sept. 9, 1864, exp. of term.

Hollabaugh, John, Jan.

Aumit, Henry, July 21, 1S63; drafted trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. Anderson, George, Sept. 24, 1S63 drafted trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. Ayres, Charles, Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to Co. I Jan. 1, 1864 veteran.

Hurshberger,

;

;

;

;

;

;

Anderson, John H., Feb.

killed at Drury's Bluff, Va.,

;

May

16,

must, out with company Aug. 30,1866;

;

Bryant, Daniel, Aug. 28, 1861

Brown, William W., March

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865;

;

2,

1864

;

must, out with company Aug. 30,

1861

;

must, out with

1865.

Brown, William

Aug.

N.,

28,

company Aug.

30,

15,

1S64

absent, sick, at muster out.

;

Birch, James, Feb. 2, 1864; must, out with company, Aug. 30, 1865.

Breckenridge, John, Feb. 20, 1864 Black, John D., Aug. 28, 1861

;

Brooks, Henry, Aug. 28, 1861

;

Boyle, Daniel, Aug. 28, 1861

must, out Sept. must, out Sept.

must, out Sept.

;

Boyer, George D., Aug. 28, 1861

Brooks, William, Sept. 18, 1861

May

16,

must, out with company Aug. 30,

;

1865; veteran.

Aug.

28, 1861

disch.

;

Jackson, Cyrus B., Aug. 28, 1861

on surg.

certif.

must, out with

;

Aug.

19, 1862.

company Aug.

;

9,

1864, at exp. of term.

9,

1864, at exp. of term.

9, 1864,

on surg.

disch.

;

at exp. of term.

certificate

trans, to Battery

June

2, 1862.

M,lst Kegt. U.

20, 1863; drafted; trans, to Co.

Bodicher, Daniel, Daniel, Aug. 28, 1861; trans, to Co.

E

April

S. Art.,

B

Jan.

1,

1,

1864.

1864;

veteran.

Beak, William, Aug. Byers, Charles, Feb.

28, 1861 9,

drowned

;

at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 21, 1861.

New York

1864; died at

Berkmjer, Lewis, Aug.

July

29, 1864.

1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., Aug. 14,

28,

1864; veteran.

1S64

5,

captured

;

;

June

died at Petersburg

4,

30,

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865

;

5,

1864

captured

;

Carpenter, E. B., June

Edward, Feb.

Timothy, Feb.

1,

died at Andersonville, Ga., Aug.

;

not on muster-out

;

roll.

1863; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865.

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865.

15, 1864:

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865.

10, 1864;

Carichner, Frederick, Feb.

9,

1864

;

Lough, David, Feb. 15. 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Leonard, Joseph L., Feb. 9, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Lichty, Moses. Feb. 15, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Lundy, Benjamin F., Dec. 25, 1861 ; disch. Dec. 21, 1864, for wounds received at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864. Lawyer, Joseph, Aug. 28. 1861 ; must, out Sept. 9, 1S64, at exp. of term.

Lane, Samuel, Oct.

1861

8,

must, out Oct. 8, 1S64, at exp. of term. must, out Oct. 22, 1864, to date Oct. S t

;

Lukins, Charles, Oct. 8, 1861 1864, at exp. of term.

Loucy, Daniel, Aug.

28, 1861

Lodge, Daniel, Sept.

23,

;

trans, to 42d Kegt. P. V.

;

1863; drafted; trans, to Co. pro. to hosp. steward

Lightner, Peter, Jan. 25, 1865

Jerome

P.,

Aug.

;

28, 1861

;

must, out with company Aug. 30,

1865.

Nov.

16, 1861.

E April 21. 1S64. May 1, 1S65.

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865;

;

veteran. ;

absent, on detached duty, at muster

out; veteran.

Minich, Henry, Feb.

20,1864; grave 6229. Buckson, William, Feb. 5, 1864

;

;

Minich, Jeremiah, Aug. 28, lSbl

1864.

3,

1864; must, out with

company Aug.

30, 1S65;

veteran. Messinger, Lewis, Feb. 15, 1S64; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. McCollum, Malcolm, Feb. 20, 1861 ; absent, sick, at muster .nit.

Millhouse, August, Aug. 2S, 1861

must, out with company Aug. 30,

;

1865; veteran.

McClintock, John, Feb. 22, 1S64 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Matter, William H., Jan. 19, 1865 must, out with company Aug. 30, ;

Cochran, Patrick, Feb.

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865.

10, 1864;

Coffrat, William, Jan. 25, 1865; absent

Cain, Samuel, Aug.

2S, 1861;

on detached duty at muster out.

must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865;

veteran.

;

1865.

Mott, Joseph, Aug. 28, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. June 2, 1S63. Macker, James E., Aug. 28, 1861 must, out Sept. 9. IS64, at exp. of term. McCabe, Samuel, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out Sept. 9, 1S64, at exp. of term. ;

Carichner, Godfrey, Aug. 28, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 8, 1863. Christman, Parker, Nov. 10,1861; disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 14, 1862.

Connor, Patrick, Aug.

28, 1861

Campbell, Patrick, March

7,

at Drury's Bluff, Va.,

;

June 18, 1864. wounds received Hampton, Va.

killed at Petersburg, Va.,

1S64

;

May

died

June

16, 1864;

17, 1864, of

buried at

veteran. Carr, Joseph, Aug. 30, 1861; captured;

died at Andersonville, Ga.,

August, 1864.

;

McAdams, John

F.,

Aug.

2S, 1861

must, out Sept.

;

19, 1S64, at exp.

of

term. Mercer, Abner, Feb. 15, 1S64 disch. on surg. certif. July IS, 1S65. Moral!, Richard, Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to Battery M, 1st Regt. U. S. Art., ;

;

Feb. 22, 1S62. Myers, George, Aug. 28, 1861 trans, to Vet. Res. Corps July 1, 1863. Morgan, Charles, Sept. 25, 1863 drafted; trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. Miles, John, July 22, 1863 drafted trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. ;

;

Crum, Benedict, Nov.

8,

1861.

Enger, Joseph, Feb.

3,

1864

;

disch.

;

;

Deitrick, Elias, Jan. 19, 1865; must, out with

James, Feb.

28, 1861

veteran. Jones, John, Oct. 15, 1863; drafted: trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864. Kichieshong, A., Aug. 28, 1861 ; must, out Sept. 9, 1864, at exp. of term. Kise, George W., July 21, 1863 drafted ; trans, to Co. E April 1, 1864.

Miller,

Badger, Thomas, Feb. Bear, Samuel, Feb.

Johnson, John, Aug.

;

18, 1863.

Brown, Samuel C. July

Ellet,

killed at Drury's Bluff. Va.,

;

must, out with company Aug. 30,

;

1865.

Cole,

28, 1861

King, Jerome, Feb. 9, 1864; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps May 15, 1865. Keffer, Henry, Jan. 29, 1864; not on muster-out roll. Lawyer, Jacob, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1S65

1865; veteran.

Brown, Charles, Feb.

Colder,

Aug.

1865; veteran.

veteran.

July

S.,

veteran.

Irvin, William J.,

1864.

Bechler, William, Aug. 28, 1861



;

Ironspoon, Harmon, Aug. 28, 1861

;

1864

9,

;

1864

;

24,

on surg.

15, 1864; killed at

company Aug.

certif. Sept. 16,

30, 1865.

1864

;

veteran.

Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.

Feig, George, Feb. 19. 1864; must, out with

company Aug.

30, 1865.

Mack, John, Aug. 2S, 1861 died at Beaufort, S. C, Aug. 6, 1862. Norris, Jesse K., Aug. 2S. 1861 absent, sick, at muster out veteran. Nole, Johnson B., Feb. 13, 1864 wounded at Drury's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864; absent at muster out. ;

;

;

;

;

172

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

Nelly, Thomas, Aug. 2S, 1861; captured at Drury'a Bluff, Va.,

May

Wilders, Joseph, Aug. 28, 1861; missing at Chapin's Farm, 1864; veteran.

16,

1864 escaped March 19, 1865 must, out May 4, 1S65, to date March 24, 1865, at exp. of term. Oswald, Stephen, Aug. 28,1861; captured; died June 20, 1864; burial record at Andersonville, Ga., June 28, 1864; grave 2589; veteran. Poist, Alexander, Aug. 28, 1861 must, out Sept. 19, 1864, at exp. of term. ;

;

Zorger, Jacob, Aug. 28, 1861 1864; veteran.

killed at

;

Va,

Sept. 29

Bermuda Hundred, Va May

19

;

Posey, Mordecai, Aug. 28, 1861 ; must, out Sept. 19, 1864. at exp. of term. Pafftey, Charles, Aug. 28, 1861 ; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864 veteran. Frederick, Aug. 28, 1861 captured died Aug. 19, 1864, of wounds received in action; buried at Richmond, Ya.; veteran. Rush, Christian, Aug. 28, 1861 ; absent, sick, at muster out; veteran. Raudebaugh, Isaac, Feb. 5, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Pfieffer,

;

Roush, Daniel

S.,

Jan

11, 1865

;

must, out with company Aug.

;

3oj 1865.

Ritner, Willi:, m, Sept. :i, 1861; must, out Sept. 9, 1864, at exp. of term. Ruggles, Alexander, Feb. 9, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 24, 1865. Reed, James G., Aug. 28, 1S61 captured died at Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 1, 1S64; grave 10.174. Swartz, John, Aug. 28, 1861 absent, sick, at muster out; veteran. ;

;

CHAPTER XXVI. The War

Union (continued)-One Year's Service-SeventyOne Hundred and First Regiment— Three Service— Eightieth, Eighty-fourth, Eighty-seventh, Ninetysecond, and Ninety-sixth Regiments. the

for

seveuth, Eighty-third, aud

Years'

ROLL OF COMPANY I, SEVENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS (ONE YEAR'S SERVICE). Recruited at Harrisbnrg— Assigned March, 1865, to Seientij-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

;

Stees,

John, Feb.

Captain.

1864; must, out with

company Aug. 30, 1865. company Aug. 30, 1865. 2, 1804; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Svveger, James, Feb. 19, 1S64; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Sants, Martin, Feb. 6, 1864; must, out with company Aug, 30, 1865. Snoddy, Calvin S, Feb. 20, 1864 must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Sullivan, John H., Aug. 28, 1S01 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 17, 1863. 3,

Sheets, Charles P., Feb.

1864; must, out with

2,

John

Bell, Feb. 21, 1865; must, out

with company Dec.

6, 1865.

Steiner, Peter, Feb.

Henry

C.

Deniming, Feb.

;

must, out Feb.

17, 1865;

21, 1S66.

Second Lieutenant.

;

Shaner, Jacob V., Aug. 28, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 21, 1863. Shiftier, John, Feb. 15, 1864; disch. June 1, 1865, for wounds received at Cbapin's Farm, Va., Sept. 29, 1864 veteran.

Lieutenant.

.Firs*

Joseph E. Rhoads, March

7,

1865

must, out with company Dec.

;

6,

1865.

;

;

First Sergeant

Samuel Eberly, Feb.

1865; must, out with company Dec.

27,

John H., March 2, 1862; must, out April 22, 1865, at exp. of term. Shorts, Henry, Feb. 13, 1864; prisoner from Sept. 29, 1864, to March Sagle,

1865.

6,

Sergeants.

4,

1865 disch. by G. O. June 12, 1865. Smith, Andrew, Feb. 27,1864; prisoner from

Louis P. Chester, Feb.

;

May 16, 1864, to April 17, 1865; disch. by G. 0. June 20, 1S65, to date June 9, 1865. Stewart, Alexander, Feb. 10, 1864; disch. by G. 0. July 22, 1865. Smith, John, Oct. 19, 1863; drafted; trans, to Co. E April 1, 1S65. Stephens, Roswell, Sept. 25, 1863 ; drafted trans, to Co. E April 1, 1865 Strong, Henry, July 22, 1S63 ; drafted'; trans, to Co. E April 1, 1865. Steiner, Jacob, Feb. 1, 1864; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date unknown. Sanno, George, Aug. 28, 1801; died at Beaufort, S. Aug. ;

0, 11, 1862. Saline, Leonard, Feb. 15, 1S64; killed at Petersburg, Va., July 18, 1S64 Shaffer, Martin, Oct. 15, 1S63; drafted; died June 23, 1864, of wounds received at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864. Shaner, Jacob V., Feb. 4. 1864 died at Hampton, Va., Jan. 21, 1865. Shane, Robert, Feb. 15, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va, June IS 1864 Smith, William H, Oct. S, 1861 ; died Oct. 22, 1864, of wounds received at Chapin's Farm, Va,Sept. 29, 1864; buried in U. S. General Hospital Cemetery, Aunapolis, Md. ;

Steiner, John, Aug. 28, 1861. Sweeney, Edward, March 7, 1865: not on muster-out roll. Taylor, David, Feb. 10, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865 Toomy, James, Feb. 5, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 30, 1865. Taylor, Samuel B, Aug. 28, 1S01 disch. on surg. certif. July 26, 1862. Tunis, Edwin F, Aug. 28, 1861 disch. by G. O. June 29, 1S65 'veteran Troxal, Arthur, Oct. 15, 1863; drafted; trans, to Co. E April ;

;

;

1S04

15,

died

June

wounds reVa, June 16, 1864; buried at Hampton, Va. Van Horn, Charles H, Aug. 28, 1S61 must, out with company Aug. 30, ;

;

Van

;

McGowen, Feb.

28, 1865

27, 1865;

must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. must out with company Dec. 6, 1865. ;

Corporals.

Robert B. Valentine, March

1865; must, out with

2,

company Dec.

6,

1865. S.

Cameron Wilson, Feb.

27, 1865; absent,

on detached duty, at muster

out.

George

W.

Heller, Feb. 27, 1865; absent, on detached duty, at muster

out.

Cornelius K. Dumars, Feb. 23, 1S65; absent, on furlough, at muster out.

Benjamin

F. Scheffer, Feb. 2S, 1S65; absent,

on detached duty, at muster

out.

Michael

J.

Maloney, Feb.

21, 1865; absent,

on detached duty,

muster

at

Edward H. Clay, Feb. 27, 1865 pro. to Corp. May 7, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. John L. Schuler, Feb. 27, 1865; absent on detached duty, at muster out. ;

;

Musicians.

John

C.

Wheeler, March

Albert H. Buehler, Feb.

1865

6,

;

1865

21,



;

must, out with company Dec.

6,

1865.

must, out with company Dec.

6,

1865.

Privates.

18, 1864, of

ceived at Petersburg,

1865

S.

Joseph L. Shearer, Feb.

1865

1,

Thompson, Thomas, Feb.

28, 1865 ; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Charles A. Suydatn, Feb. 28, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865.

George

veteran.

Amey, William A, Feb. 28, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Armstrong, William, March 9, 1865 not on muster-out roll. Boot, John, March 3, 1S65 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. ;

;

;

Riper, Christopli

Dec. 27, 1861

,

;

surg

disch.

May

tif.

8,

1863.

Blair, John, Feb. 21, 1865

;

must, out with company Dec.

6,

1865.

Bucher, Christian, Feb. 28, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Buehler, William, Feb. 27, 1S65; must, out with company Dec. 6,1865. Bodden, John C, Feb. 27, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. ;

Waterbnry, Edwin L, Aug. 1865

;

;

;

must, out

Jinpany Aug. 30,

veteran.

Weitzel, George

1865

28, 1861

W,

Feb. 13, 1864; must, out

mpany Aug.

30,

veteran.

Boyd, James A, March 1, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Brenner, Martin/Feb. 27, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Baldwi n, Thomas, Feb. 25, 1865 died Nov. 25, 1865 buried at Railroad ;

Wright, George, Aug. Wilson, John T, term.

Jr.,

28, 1861

Aug.

;

must, out Sept.

28, 1861;

9,

1864, at exp. of

must, out Sept.

9, 1S64, at

term

exp. of

;

;

Depot, Victoria, Texas.

Bremsholts, H. M, March 2, 1865 miiBt. out with company Dec. Black, Hugh, Feb. 28, 1865; disch. by G. O. June 20, 1S65. ;

Wolf, William, Feb. 20, 1S64; disch. on surg.

certif.

Winteis, Ephraim A, Jan. 24, 1865; disch. by G. 0. Woodall, A. C, Feb. 3, 1864 ; disch. by G. 0. June

7,

Samuel, Sept. Nov. 1, 1862.

Willis,

4,

Warden, Samuel, Sept. Waters, William, Aug.

1861

trans, to Batt.

;

M,

Jan. 24, 1865; vet-

May

30, 1865

1865.

1st

Regt

S Art

'

Cellers,

1861

;

28, 1861.

trans, to Vet. Res. Corps

1865.

;

U

'

4,

6,

Balmer, John F, March 10, 1S55; disch. by G. 0. Aug. 23, 1865. Burnside, George W, Feb. 27, 1865. Cramp, Edward A, Feb. 28, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Case, David, Feb. 27, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865.

July

1, 1863.

John, March

4,

Camp, John C, March Cox, Daniel

W,

1865

;

must, out with company Dec.

6,

1, 1865; must, out with company Dec. Feb. 28, 1865; disch. by G. O. Oct. 21, 1865.

1865.

6,

1865.

GENERAL HISTORY. Closkey, Bernard, April

1865

6,

disch.

;

by G. 0. June

2,

1865.

H„ March 9, 1865; not"on muster-out roll. Henry G., Feb. 23, 1865 must, out with coninauy Dec. 6, 1865. Howard W., March 2, 1865; absent, sick, at muster out. Dean, Joseph F., Feb. 27, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Dorsey, Philip B., Feb. 27, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Desch, Calvin, Feb. 28, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Doyle, John, March 3, 1865 not on muster-out roll. Everhart, Richard, March 4, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Eckle, Edward, March 9, 1865; not on muster-out roll. Faley, Thomas, Feb. 28, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Fitzpatrick, Patrick, Feb. 28,1865; must, out with company Dec. 6,1865. Fertenbaugh, William, March 4, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, Coleman, William Dehuff,

;

Davis,

;

;

;

;

;

1865.

March

Fullertou, William K.,

1865; must, out with

6,

company Dec.

6,

1865.

Fervis, William K., Feb. 28, 1865.

173

Thomas, George, Feb. 24, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 9, Tulay, Franklin, March 4, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Trostie, William,

March

1865

;

must, out with company Dec.

6,

1865.

4, 1865; disch. by G. 0. Sept. 14, 1865. Tompkins, Edwin, March 4, 1865. Thomas, Henry, March 9, 1865; not on muster-out roll. Valentine, George W., March 2, 1865; must, out with company Dec.

6,

1865.

James A., Feb. 24, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Wennel, George, Feb. 28, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Weaver, Fphraim W., March 3, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, Willis,

;

1865.

Walburn, John C, Feb. 2, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Wagner, Jesse, March 2, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Wagner, Reuben, March 2, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6,1865. Weaver, William L., March 6, 1865; died Dec. 4, 1865; buried at Railroad Depot, Victoria, Texas.

Gohn, Daniel A., Feb. 24, 1S65 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Gleason, James, March 3, 1865 disch. by G. 0. Sept. 30, 1865. Gotta, Solomon D., March 1, 1865; died at Nashville, Tenn., May 15, ;

;

Weaver, Casper, March 25, 1865; not accounted York, John, Feb. 2, 1865.

for.

EIGHTIETH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUN-

1S65.

TEERS.

Gardner, James, Feb. 28, 1S65; died at Green Lake, Texas, July 27, 1865. Griffin,

8,

Thornton, Preston, March

William, March

9,

1S65

not on muster-out

;

The

roll.

J., March 2, 1865; absent, on furlough, at muster out. Homer, John W., March 3, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865 Hoover, John J., Feb. 21, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1S65. Henry, Robert F., March 5, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Hartman, Jacob H., March 6, 1865 disch. by G. 0. Sept. 18, 1865. Haas, Christian, March 13, 1865; disch. by G. 0. May 23, 1865. Humphreysville, J., March 9, 1865 disch. by G. 0. May 23, 1865.

Harris, Smiley

;

;

authority to raise this regiment was given on the 27th of August, 1861, to William B. Sipes, then

of Harrisburg, by the Secretary of War. The companies were recruited, for the most part, by their offi-

;

;

;

Hussey, James, Feb. 27, 1865. G., Feb. 21, 1865; absent, on detached duty, at muster

Ingram, Johu out.

Jones, John B., March

4,

1S65

must, out with company Dec.

;

6,

1865.

March 3, 1S65; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Kennedy, Joseph, March 3, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Kcerper, Samuel F., Feb. 27, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Kiser, Josiah C, March 6, 1865 disch. by G. 0. June 30, 1S65. Keiser, Samuel, March 20. 1S65; disch. by G. 0. May 23, 1865. Kirby, Thomas, March 9, 1865; not on muster-out roll. Kipple, Peter,

;

;

Lucas, David A.,

Lyons, Eobert

J.,

March

1,

1865; must, out with

Feb. 23, 1865

Depot, Victoria, Texas. Leighton, Augustus, March

Manger, William H., Feb.

company Dec.

died Oct. 31, 1865

;

;

6,

1865.

buried at Kailroad

27, 1865

;

;

not on muster-out

roll.

must, out with company Dec.

6,

1865.

Henry W., Feb. 27, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Thomas D., Feb. 27, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. March 6, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Milliken, Thomas, March 3, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1S65. Montgomery, T. P., March 1, 1865 disch. by G. 0. July 14, 1865. Mahaney, William J., Feb. 24, 1S65; died in New Orleans, La., Aug. 28, Miller,

;

;

Millhouse, Owen,

;

;

1865.

McKinsey, Thomas, Feb. 22, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. McCord, John, Feb. 28, 1S65; absent, sick, at muster out. Nunemacher, A., Feb. 28, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Owens, William H., March 1, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. ;

;

must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. March 9, 1865 not on muster-out roll. O'Brien, John, March 9, 1S65 not on muster-out roll. Pierce, Joseph, March 3, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Potteiger, John H., Feb. 27, 1865 disch. by G. 0. Sept. 30, 1865. Reed, James K., Feb. 23, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Ronrour, Charles, March 7, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Rickebaugh, J. C, Feb. 28, 1S65; disch. by G. 0. Sept. 14, 1S65. Raezer, Henry, March 20, 1865; not on muster-out roll. not on muster-out roll. Reiliy, William H., March 9, 1865 Slentz, Jacob J., Feb. 27, 1865; most, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. Stimmel, Joseph W., March 2, 1865; must, out with company Dec, 6,

Andrew

R., Feb. 2S, lstio

;

O'Neal, William H.,

;

;

;

;

;

1865. 2, 1S65: must, nut with company Dec. 6, 1865. 2, 1S65; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1865. March S, 1865 must, out with company Dec. 6, 1S65. Sload, Lemon, March 6, 1865 disch. by G. 0. Sept. 14, 1865. Sands, George W., March 8, 1865; disch. by G. 0. Sept. 14, 1S65. Talley, George W., Feb. 27, 1865; must, out with company Dec. 6, 1S65.

Smith, Calvin, March

Snyder, William, March Sload, John,

and

at their expense, the grade of their

;

;

upon

commis-

their success

men.

Their military experience was in general limited to the three months' service. The companies rendezvoused at Camp Cameron, near Harrisin securing

burg, where a regimental organization was effected,

and George C. Wynkoop, of Pottsville, was commisClothing was promptly issued to the men upon entering camp, and the regiment was regularly exercised in dismounted drill. Side arms were received while at Camp Cameron, and horses were sioned colonel.

supplied, but not issued until after leaving

the 18th of

1865

6,

Martin,

Over,

cers

sions depending, as a general rule,

December the

it.

On

colors were presented

by Governor Curtin from the steps of the State capitol, and on the following day, in pursuance of orders from the Secretary of War, the regiment started for Louisville, Ky., where, upon its arrival, it reported to General Buell, in command of the Department of the Cumberland, and was placed in camp of instruction at Jeffersonville, Ind. Towards the close of January, 1862, the regiment broke camp, and, moving leisurely southward, through Kentucky, arrived at Nashville, Tenn., soon after its occupation by Union forces. Here the three battalions were separated, the first, under Major Wynkoop, in which was Capt. Davis' company, being assigned to Gen. Negley's brigade, and sent with him to Columbia the second, under Col. Wynkoop, to the command of Gen. Dumont, garrisoning Nashville and the third, under Maj. Given, to Col. Duffield's command, two companies being stationed at Murfreesborough, and two at Lebanon. The duty imposed at this time consisted in scouting in Western and Middle Tennessee, and as ;

;

far east as the

Cumberland Mountains.

was kept actively employed

The cavalry

defending the flanks of the army against the irregular bauds of the enemy's horse that were prowling on every hand. On the 1st of July the First Battalion, under command of Maj. in

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY

174

hrigade, occu-

nessee skirmishers, and then attacked the Seventh

the following day, Capt. C. C.

Pennsylvania with great fury, but met with a determined resistance. I went forward to the line of dismounted skirmishers, and endeavored to move it to the right to strengthen the Seventh Pennsylvania, but the moment the right of the line showed itself from behind the fence where it was posted, the whole of the enemy's fire was directed on it, turning it com-

Wynkoop, moving with Gen. Smith's

On Company I,

pied Manchester.

with nine men, was captured while on the picket line, but shortly after exchanged. When Buell, in September, made his retrograde movement through Kentucky, and subsequently his

Davis, of

advance, the First Battalion, under Maj. Wynkoop, accompanied him, participating in the battle of Perryville, losing four men wounded and three taken prisoners.

The Second and Third

Battalions re-

at Nashville, and was atThey were Gen. Negley's command. employed in scouting and foraging, and in assisting to defend the city. Early in November, 1862, Gen. Rosecrans, who had

mained with the garrison tached

to

superseded Gen. Buell the Cumberland,

in

command

made a complete

of the

Army

of

reorganization.

Up

to this time the cavalry had not been formed in brigades and divisions, but had been scattered over Tennessee, Kentucky, and a portion of Alabama,

doing very hard duty but accomplishing very little. Gen. D. S. Stanley was now assigned to the command of the cavalry, and made a thorough organization of it for efficient service, the Seventh being assigned to the First Brigade of the Second Division. Little of importance transpired to break the monotony of the picket and outpost duty until the 26th of December,

when the army advanced on the enemy at Murfreesborough. The First Brigade led the centre on the Nashville and Murfreesborough Pike, the regiments alternating daily, which brought the Seventh at the head of the column on the 27th. The entire march from Nashville to Stone River was a continuous Upon battle between the cavalry of the two armies. the arrival of the division at Stone River, on the 29th, the resistance was found too strong for the cavalry to move, and it was withdrawn to the right flank and rear. On the 30th a battalion of the Seventh Pennsylvania and one of the Third Kentucky formed a chain of vedettes in rear of the line of battle, with orders to drive up all stragglers. On the same day,

Wheeler captured the Brigade, on

train of the

the Jefferson

Twenty-eighth

Pike, between

Stewart's

Creek and Lavergne. Taking a battalion of the Seventh and the Fourth Michigan, Col. Minty moved " I met the enemy," says Col. Minty in to its relief. his report, " who were chiefly dressed in our uniforms. The Seventh Pennsylvania drove them until after dark." On the 31st the brigade, now reduced to about nine hundred and fifty men, took position, after crossing Overall's Creek, about three-quarters of a mile from the Murfreesborough and Nashville Pike, Capt. Jenning's battalion being posted in the woods near the " The enemy," says right of the Fourth Michigan. Col. Minty, " advanced rapidly with two thousand five hundred cavalry, mounted and dismounted, and three pieces of artillery, all under command of Gens. Wheeler, Wharton, and Buford. They drove back the Fourth Michigan to the line of the First Ten-

At this moment the Fifteenth Pennway and retreated rapidly, leaving the battalion of the Seventh Pennsylvania and the dismounted men entirely unsupported, and leaving them no alternative but to retreat." When, on this day, the right wing of the army was driven back in confupletely around.

sylvania gave

sion,

many

of the

men

of the battalion, on the line

enemy while endeavoring to drive forward the straggling infantry. After the battle was over, and the enemy was making the best of his way from the field, the cavalry was

of the vedettes, were captured by the

"

sent in pursuit.

enemy

in

force

;

About

six miles out they met the sharp skirmish ensued. The

a

Fourth Cavalry, First Tennessee Infantry, and the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry having to bear the brunt of the fight on our side. The enemy was driven from the field with heavy loss, and we returned to within a mile and a half of Murfreesborough and went The loss of the regiment in this entire into camp." battle was two killed, nine wounded, and fifty missing. On the 31st of January, the First Brigade was ordered to proceed to Rover and break up a rebel outpost. Arriving near the place, his pickets were encountered and driven in by the Fourth Michigan, when the Seventh Pennsylvania was ordered to draw sabre and charge, which was executed with a cheer, breaking the rebel line and utterly routing his entire command. The pursuit was maintained for ten miles, causing a loss of half his force.

After scouting in-

two weeks, inflicting considerable damage upon the enemy, the brigade returned to

side the rebel lines for

camp at Murfreesborough. Shortly afterward learning that the enemy had reoccupied Rover in force, and had strengthened

by an intrenched infantry and town five miles from Rover, and sixteen from Shelbyville, where a large part of the rebel army was in camp, Gen. Sheridan was ordered to move with his division to Eagleville,

artillery

camp

it

at Unionville, a

three miles west of Rover, for a diversion in favor of the cavalry.

When,

therefore, at sunrise

the First Brigade attacked the surprise was complete.

pickets were driven to

in,

enemy

on the

4th,

at Rover, the

After a sharp skirmish the

and the Seventh was ordered It was made in column,

charge with the sabre.

half platoon front, and received the concentrated

of over two thousand

fire

but without faltering, being supported by the Fourth United States on the right, and the Fourth Michigan on the left as carbineers, it dashed forward, broke the centre of the rebel line, and drove it in confusion towards Unionville. Not satisfied with his success, Col. Minty threw the rifles

;

GENERAL HISTORY.

175

flanking regiments into columns, on roads parallel

and, nerved by their success, pushed on after the

with the pike on which the Seventh was moving, and,

ing

sounding the charge along the whole

hemmed

upon

line, burst

foe.

A

fly-

mile from town a rebel regiment was

in in

an open

field and captured, offering As the troops advanced towards the

the astonished rebels at Unionville, entering their

little resistance.

camp on

town they were suddenly checked by the rapid fire from a battery of six pieces, posted in the publicsquare. Col. Minty at once brought up two pieces of artillery, and, directing the Fourth United States and the Fourth Michigan to take a parallel street to the right, Col. Jordan, with the Ninth Pennsylvania Cav-

But

the heels of the flying fugitives from Rover.

little

resistance was offered, only one regiment of

infantry attempting to form line, the artillery having

been moved the day before to resist the threatened advance of Sheridan. The Seventh charged through the camp, and then gave chase to the rebel cavalry retreating towards Shelbyville.

The

alry, of the First Division, the

loss of the Sev-

On

the 4th of March, 1863, Maj. Charles C. Davis

was

in

command of the Seventh Cavalry when the made on the Fourth Alabama, Col. Rus-

attack was

nine hundred men, the Seventh numbering one hundred and ninety-two. The latter charged with the sabre, captured their camp and all their personal effects, pursued them seven miles, captured their wagon-train of seventeen, six of which were mule teams. One hundred and six of the Confederates were killed, wounded, and taken prisoners, twenty of the latter within one hundred yards of Gen. Hood's camp. From Unionville the command marched the same day to Eagleville, where it joined Sheridan, and with him proceeded to Franklin, then to Columbia, skirmishing with Van Dorn and Forrest at Spring Hill and Rutherford Creek. The Seventh afterwards returned to Murfreesborough via Franklin, reaching camp on the 15th of March. The command was engaged with Morgan at Snow Hill, near Liberty, on the 3d of April, with a loss of one killed and one wounded; fought Duke's brigade on the 20th assisted in the sell,

May

6th

;

charge of cavalry.

After the loss of his artillery, a panic seemed to seize the enemy, and he fled in con-

bank of Duck River, a mile away, where he attempted to form a line to cover the passage of his trains. But it was a vain attempt. Charge after charge was delivered with an impetuosity insternation to the

spired of success, and, finally Shelbyville, with all its military stores, fell into Union hands, and a powerful

repelled a rebel

demonstration on Murfreesborough on the 14th

;

and

impetus was given to the retreat of the entire rebel army. Wheeler's boasted cavalry was broken, and never afterwards recovered from the blow.

fought Morgan at Alexandria on the 3d of June, in of which the Union forces were victorious except

all

the

street to the left,

;

;

capture of McMinnville,

first

and three companies of the Seventh, under Capt. Davis, to take the centre, the signal to charge was given. The Seventh was obliged to move in the face of the rebel guns, which were trained frill upon it, and were served with great rapidity, at first dealing shot and shell, and then double-shotted canister. But, unmindful of the storm, Davis dashed up the narrow street, filling it from curb to curb, the shouts of the men ringing above the noise of battle. As they came near, they were saluted by a shower of bullets from the rifles and pistols of the enemy. A short run brought the column hand to hand with the hostile force, and a brief struggle ensued over the guns but the slash of the sabre and the rapid rounds from pistols and carbines proved too much for rebel valor. He was driven in confusion, and the powerful battery was captured, as few have been, by a direct

enth was two killed and seven wounded.

last.

the 24th, Gen. Rosecrans commenced his advance on Tullahoma and Shelbyville. The cavalry,

On the 3d of July the regiment was engaged in a skirmish at Elk River, on the 17th of August at

under Gen. Stanley, moved on the right flank of the army. On the morning of the 27th, Col. Minty was ordered to charge and carry Guy's Gap, on the Murfreesborough Pike. With the Fourth Michigan Cavalry leading the advance, and the First Division supporting the flanks, he moved rapidly on through the gap, driving the rebels towards Shelbyville, and making captures on every hand. Arrived within five miles of the town, the enemy opened with artillery from his intrenchments. Col. Minty promptly deployed the Fourth Michigan and Fourth United States, as skirmishers, mounted, and held the Seventh in column. The advance was sounded, when from some

Sparta, and early in September

On

cause the

men commenced cheering,

moved with

the

army

on the Chickamauga campaign. The march was wearisome to man and beast, obliged to move with rapidity and to cross rugged mountains. From the 18th to the 22d, in the preliminary operations, and during the progress of the battle the regiment was in constant motion, and performed important service.

On

the 1st of August it marched with the cavalry in pursuit of Wheeler, passing through East and Middle

Tennessee into Alabama. This march lasted eighteen consecutive days and nights, with little rest and frequent running fights. Early in the year 1864, while stationed at Huntsville, Ala., a large part of the regiment re-enlisted

the skirmish line

Upon

and was

num-

charged, and Col. Minty, taking advantage of the

given a veteran furlough.

favorable moment, ordered the Seventh to

bers having been swelled by recruits to about eighteen

charge

Dashing ments were stormed and taken with many prisoners,

also.

forward with wild shouts, the intrench-

!

!

returning, the

hundred, rank and file, it was stationed at Columbia^ where it was ordered to drill and make preparation

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

176

While for the opening of the spring campaign. upon furlough, Col. Sipes, who had succeeded to the command, drew Spencer carbines, improved sabres, and horse equipments for the entire regiment, and when freshly mounted, as it was at Nashville, it was

On

well prepared for active service.

the 30th of

April the regiment, under his command, broke camp and, joining Garrard's division, set forward with Sherman towards Atlanta. On the 15th of May it

was engaged at Rome, and on the 27th at Dallas and Villa Rica Road, at the latter place having a sharp skirmish, losing three killed, six wounded, and one takeD prisoner; at Big Shanty, on June 9th, with one killed,

two wounded, and two prisoners

;

at

McAfee

Cross-Roads, on the 11th, with two killed and four prisoners at Monday Creek, on the 20th, with one ;

wounded, and six prisoners at Kenesaw Mountain, on the 27th in a raid on the Augusta and Atlanta Railroad, on the 18th of July in a raid on Covington and the destruction of the railroad, on the 21st at Flat Rock, on the 28th, with a loss of two wounded and on the 1st of August entered the killed, ten

;

Cyrus L. Conner, Feb. 1864

to capt.

;

pro.

25, 1864;

June

1S65

9,

from

sergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. 17,

to maj. 137th Regt. U. S. Colored Troops.

;

First Lieutenants.

John

C. Fields,

Dec. 21, 1861

1862

:

George W. Starry, Sept. Feb. 28, 1865 Isaac

1863; di6ch. Dec. 31, 1S64.

1,

1861; pro. from 1st sergt. Dec. 18, 1864; reB.

3,

veteran.

;

Keith, Sept.

S.

1861; pro. from sergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. 11,

3,

March

to 1st lieut.

Jan. 23, 1863.

res.

;

George W. McAllister, Sept.

June

1861; pro. from sergt.

3,

9,

1865; must, out

with company Aug. 23, 1865; veteran. Second Lieutenants.

Henry H. Lutz,

Sept. 3, 1861

Frederick H. Geety, Sept.

died at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 29, 1862.

;

1861

6,

;

wounded

at Nolinsville Pike, Tenn.,

Dec. 11, 1862; pro. from sergt. March 1, 1863; com. capt. Co. Nov. 15, 1864; not. must.; disch. Jan. 12, 1865.

James

T. Mitchell, Nov. 26,1861; pro. from com.-sergt.

must, out with company Aug.

K

June 9,1865;

23, 1865; veteran.

First Sergeants.

James A. Crinnian, Nov. 28, 1861 pro. from sergt. June 9, 1865; must. out with company Aug. 23, 1865; veteran. George W. Heebner, Sept. 3, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 26, 1863. ;

;

;

Isaac

Hall, Sept.

S.

3,

1861

veteran.

;

;

;

Quartermaster-Sergeant.

John H. Meredith, Feb.

26, 1864; pro. to Corp.

sergt. Jan. 22, 1S65: must, out with

;

trenches in front of Atlanta.

On

the 17th

it

moved

with Kilpatrick on his raid, on the 19th had a skirmish at Fairburn and Jonesboro', and on the 20th a sharp engagement at Lovejoy Station, in which Capt.

Chauncey C. Hemans were among the killed. The loss in this raid was five killed, twenty-four wounded, and fifteen missing. On the 12th of October it was engaged in the battle at Rome, and on the following day made a charge with the sabre on infantry, routing them and capturing two pieces of artillery, losing one killed and four wounded. Two weeks later it was engaged at Lead's Cross-Roads, which closed the campaign.

James G. Taylor and

The regiment having

Lieut.

suffered severely in

Dec. 18,1864; to q.m.-

company Aug.

23, 1S65.

Commissary-Sergeant.

James

Flattery, Nov. 29,1861; pro. to Corp. Sept. 26, 1864; to com.-

sergt.

June

1865

5.

must, out with company Aug.

;

23, 1865

Louis H. Bickle, Sept.

3,

1861

out with company Aug.

John

P. Pootzler, Sept.

3,

pro. from private Jan. 22, 1865

;

1861

;

pro. from corp

May 8,

1S65

;

at must, out; veteran.

Andrew

Dufford, Sept. 28, 1861; pro. to corp. Sept. 17, 1864; to sergt.

May

15, 1865

muBt. out with company Aug. 23, 1865

;

;

veteran.

Joseph West, Sept. 28, 1861; pro. to Corp. Dec. 18, 1864; to sergt. June must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865 veteran. 9, 1 865 ;

James

;

C. Davis, Sept. 26, 1861

Thomas

must, out at exp. of term.

;

B. Stewart, Sept. 16, 1861; must, out at exp. of term.

Casper Sherman, Sept. 3,1861; disch. on surg.

certif.

April 25,1865;

men, horses,

James Brown,

;

had expired, were mustered out. the 22d of March, 1865, the Seventh was

On

Daniel Edson, Sept.

Frederick

S.

3,

1861; veteran.

Hibbish, March 14, 1864; veteran.

David J Lewis, Sept. 3, 1861 disch. Dec. 4, 1865, to date May William P. Coulter, Sept. 19, 1861 not on muster-out roll. ;

and on the following day arrived in front of Selma, in the assault upon the works of which it participated. On the 16th of April it was in the engagement near Columbus, and on the 20th it arrived at Macon, Ga., where, the war having substantially closed, it remained until the 13th of August, when it was mustered out of service.

SEVENTH CAVALRY (THREE YEARS' SERV ICEV Counties.

Captains. 1,

1861

;

captured July 27, 1862 pro. to maj. July ;

1,1863. S. Thompson, Oct. 22, 1861; pro. from 1st lieut. Co. F July 1, 1863; captured at Lovejoy Station, Ga., Aug. 20, 1864; res. Jan. 18, 1865.

Heber

30, 1863.

;

in the battle of Plantersville, Ala.,

Charles C. Davis, Sept.

June

Sept. 3, 1861.

or-

dered on the expedition from Eastport, Miss., across the Gulf States. On the 1st of April it was engaged

Lyoommg

Ga.,

11, 1864; veteran.

.

Recruited in Dawphin and

must.

absent, Bick,

ordered to Louisville, Ky., to be remounted, equipped, and prepared again for active duty. While here many of the officers, whose three years' term of ser-

I,

;

23, 1865; veteran.

Thomas Coovert, Sept. 3, 1861; died at Bardstown, Ky., 1862. James Fleming, Sept. 3, 1861 killed at McAfee's Cross-Roads,

BOLL OF COMPANY

veteran.

Patrick Muuney, Sept. 3,1861; pro. from private Dec. 18,1864; must. out with company Aug. 23, 1865; veteran.

and equipments during a campaign rarely equaled for severity, was no longer fit for the field, and was

vice

;

Corporals.

Isaac Marks, Sept. 3, 1861; pro. to Corp. June 9, 1865; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1S65; veteran. Jacob W. Deckart, Sept. 3, 1861 pro. to corp. July 1, 1865; must, out with company Aug. 23. 1865; veteran. ;

Thomas

G. Allen, Feb. 28, 1S64; pro. to Corp. Jan. 22, 1865; must, out

with company

Thomas

Aug 23, 1865.

A. Simpson, Feb.

witli

Anthony

company Aug.

1S64 ; pro. to Corp. Jan. 22, 1865

2,

with company Aug. 23, 1865. Michael McSbay, Feb. 15, 1864; pro. at muster out. Patrick Boyle, Feb.

15,

to Corp.

1864; pro. to Corp.

company Aug. 23, 1865. John Kuntz, Feb. 27, 1864 company Aug. 23, 1865. James Adams, Sept. 3, 1861 Morgan Davis, Sept. 3, 1861

Owen

;

must, out

23, 1865.

WitthieB, Feb. 26, 1864; pro. to Corp. April 22, 1865

;

pro. to Corp.

;

disch. ;

P. Kehoe, Sept. 3, 1861

May

;

must.out

10, 1S65; absent, sick,

May 17,

1805; must, out with

June

1865

on surg.

9,

certif.

;

June

must, out with 27, 1863.

must, out at exp. of term. ;

disch. on surg. certif. April 30, 1865

;

vet-

;

;

;

GENERAL HISTORY. Edward Sparks, Sept. 3, 1861 disch. on siirg. certif., date unknown. John Smith, March 14, 1864; prisoner from Oct. 12, 1864, to April

May

1865; disch.

James Walters,

May

30, to date

Sept. 28, 1861

English, William, Feb. 27,1864; must, out with company Aug. 23,1866. English, George, Feb. 27, 1S64

L. Breckenridge, Feb. 22, 1864; died at Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 27,

1864; burial record, Aug. 26, 1864; grave 313. Henry Fry, Dec. 10, 1861 killed at Stone River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862. ;

Early, Daniel, Sept.

Farsamau, Moses

E., Feb. 25, 1864

must, out with company Aug.

;

23,

Flanery, Michael, Feb. 26, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23,1865.

Louis C. Crosland, Feb. 24, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23,1865. John S. Cole, Sept. 3, 1861 pro. to chief bugler May 1, 1863. Henry Messner, Nov. 28, 1S63 prisoner from Oct. 1, 1864, to April 21, 1865 disch. June 19, to date May 19, 1865 veteran. ;

;

;

2, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. 8, 1864; disch. by G. 0. July 3, 1865. Aug. 18, 1863; prisoner from Oct. 1, 1864, to May 20, June 27, 1865.

Fagerty, James, March Fisher, Daniel, Sept. Foster,

Osmond

1865

;

F.,

disch.

;

Fisher, John, Sept. Saddler. 18, 1861

on

disch.

;

rtif,

date

unknown.

3,

1861

1861

3,

;

23,

March

1865; veteran.

19, 1865.

company Aug.

23, 1865.

abBent, sick, at muster out.

;

1861; died at Nashville, Tenn.,

S., Sept. 28,

March

24,

1862.

Blacksmiths.

company Aug.

Sept. 10,1861; must, out with

23, 1865;

Gi bson, James, Nov. 27, 1861

not on muster-out

;

Gallagher, Frederick, Nov. 27, 1861

Hummel, Abraham,

out at exp. of te

t.

June

1864; must, out with

2,

Gradwell, Thomas, Feb. 22, 1864

Grubbs, John

24, 1S61

0.

absent, in Confinement, at muster out

veteran.

must, out with company Aug.

;

byG.

1864; disch.

2,

Gibson, William L., Sept.

Gulling, Philip,

William Montgomery, Sept.

John Partridge, Sept.

i.ut.

1865. Buglers.

John Hilbert,

absent, sick, at muster

;

1861; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps 1864; must, out at

3,

exp. of term.

Alfred Crider, Feb. 25, 1864

Eichard Davis, Dec.

must, out with company Aug. 23,

19, 1864;

1865.

21,

1805; veteran.

16,

must, out at exp. of term.

;

177

Eckteruach, Henry, Feb.

;

Sept. 3, 1861

;

roll.

not on muster-out

;

roll.

must, out with company Aug. 23,

1865; veteran. Privates.

Heatheriugton, James, Feb.

Andrews, Joshua, Feb. 10, 1S64; absent, sick, at muster out. Adams, Joseph, Feb. 25, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Awney, Henry, Sept. 2, 1864; disch. by G. O. June 23, 1865. Brubaker, George, Feb. 20, 1864 must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. ;

Boden, William, March 3, 1864 captured Oct. 1, 1864. Boettcher, Frederick, Jan. 29, 1864 absent, on detached service, at mus;

;

must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Howarth, Wm., Feb. 26, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Hageu, John C, July 23, 1864; disch. by G. 0. June 27, 1865. Holmes, Daniel, May 1, 1863; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865.

25, 1863

must, out with company Aug. 23,

;

1865.

Bowsman, Henry, Nov. Baker, Gemmil, Feb. ;

Burch, Jackson

29, 1861

disch. on surg. certif.

;

19, 1S64; prisoner

June

disch.

May

19, to date

A., Sept. 28, 1S61

Berts, Nathan, Sept. 3, 1S61

1,

Aug.

20, 1862.

1864, to April 21,

;

4, 1862.

died at Louisville, Ky., Jan. 1864.

1S62; died on Louisville and Nashville Rail-

4,

Wm.

1864

Jones,

John

0., Sept. 3,

1861

prisoner from July 24 to Oct. 17, 1864

by G. 0. July 12, 1865. Barry, William J., Sept. 3, 1861 not on muster-out roll. not on muster-out roll. Belford, John, Nov. 20, 1S61 Corcoran, Edward, Sept. 3, 1861; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865; ;

;

veteran.

Campbell, Bernard, Feb. 23, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out. Casey, Patrick, Feb. 24, 1864 must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Cross, Noah B., March 3, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. ;

May

Cross,

Noah

B.,

May

1863

1,

Crangle, Elijah, Sept.

must, out with company Aug.

May

23, 1865.

18, 1865.

1864.

3,

Chambers, John, Aug.

;

1864; died at Mobile, Ala.,

6,

on muster-out

Derr, William, Sept. 3, 1861; must, out with

Silas, Feb. 22,

23, 1865;

1864; disch. by G. 0. July 27, 1865.

Devlin, Patrick, Oct. 24, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1S65.

Dermott, James, Sept.

Day, Samuel, Sept.

3,

7,

1864; disch. by G. 0. July 3, 1865. trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, 1863. ;

1861

3,

;

not on muster-out

9, to

date

May

June

May

19, 1865.

26, 1864; disch.

on surg.

16, to date

Dougher, James, Feb.

1, 1864, to

April 21,

certif.

July

9,

1865.

Samuel S., Sept. 19, 1861: disch. on surg. certif., date unknown. Durham, John, Sept. 3, 1861 died at Tullahoma, Tenn., 1862; burial record, Stone River, March 21, 1863, grave 351. ;

Davis, William, Sept.

Eck, Emanuel, Feb.

12

3,

3,

15,

must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865;

;

1861.

Koons, Lewis, Sept.

3, 1861.

Kearns, John, Feb.

19, 1S64.

Lewis, Henry B., Feb.

must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865.

;

company Aug.

23, 1865.

company Aug.

23, 1865.

must, out with company Aug.

23, 1865.

1S64; must, out with

2,

Ludwig, James, Feb.

28, 1864;

Labar, Peter, Sept.

1861; killed at Columbus, Ohio, August, 1S62.

3,

Levy, Abraham, Sept.

Lehman, Amos Moi

rissey,

G.,

1861

3,

not on muster-out

;

Jan. 29, 1864

John, Sept.

1861

3,

;

roll.

not on muster-out

roll.

must, out with company Aug.

;

23, 1865;

veteran.

Joshua, Jan.

29,

1864

absent, sick, at muster out.

;

1865.

Mason, Samuel, Jan. 28, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1S65. Moore, John A., March 2, 1S64: disch. by G. 0. Aug. 2S, 1865. Murray, Michael, Feb. 23, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1S65. Messner, Michael, Jan. 31, 1S64 disch. by G. O. Aug. 3, 1S65. Miller, Socrates, Aug. 29, 1S64; disch. by G. O. July 7, 1865. Mayers, Euphratus, Aug. 2, 1864; disch. by G. 0. June 27, 1SG5. 1861

3,

disch.

;

surg. certif. April 1, 1S63.

Mason, William, Feb. 19, 1864; disch. urg. certif., date unknown. Moser, William H., Sept. 3, 1861 not i uster-out roll. McClune, Samuel, Sept. 3, 1861; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865; veteran.

McNeil, Honry, Jan.

company Aug.

23, 1865.

25, 1862.

McAfee, John, Aug. 12,1862; disch. by G. 0. June McGiuley. Edward L., Sept. 3, 1861.

Newman, John,

1861.

1864; must, out with

1S64

;

Davis,

Dorson, Michael, Sept.

7,

Kelly, Bernard, Feb. 29, 1S64; must, out with

Messner, Michael, Sept.

19, 1865.

Dixon, Milton, March 1,1864; prisoner from Oct. 1865; disch.

unknown.

roll.

roll.

;

1S61

Davis, David T., Feb. 25, 1864; prisoner from Aug. 30,1864, to April 21,

1865; disch. June

31, 1864.

Marshall, William G., Feb. 20, 1864; must out with company Ang. 23,

roll.

company Aug.

veteran.

Dobson,

unknown.

Keller, Charles, Feb. 24, 1864.

fifehaffer,

16, 1S63; not

date

veteran.

disch.

Cooper, Willis,

1864, to April 21,

disch. on surg. certif, date

;

Jones, John R., Oct. 31, 1861; not on muster-out

Kearns, Patrick, March ;

1,

certif.,

Jones, Joseph R., Oct. 31, 1861.

Kramer, Samuel, Nov. 27, 1861

1864

on surg.

Hotel!, John, Sept. 24, 1861; died at Louisville, Ky., Jan. 29, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, section A, range 9, grave 15.) Hughes, James C, Sept. 28, 1861 not on muster-out roll. Jones, David R., Feb. 22, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865.

Blain, John. S,

from Oct.

19, 1865.

disch.

;

Hale, Hiram, Aug. 13, 1862; died at Nashville, Tenn., March Heck, John, Sept. 3, 1861. Hunter, Alfred, Sept. 3, 1861.

Baney, John, Feb. 17, 1864; veteran. Barrett, John, Feb. 25, 1864.

March

May

to date

9,

H., Dec. 16, 1861

James, Peter, Sept.

road, Jan. 1864; veteran.

Butler, George 0.,

;

;

died at Jeffersonville, Ind., Jan. 1862.

;

died at Tullahoma, Tenn., Aug.

;

Brightbill, Jeremiah, Dec. 4, 1861

Brightbill, Joun, Dec.

from Oct.

19, 1865.

Hoover,

25,

13, 1864; prisoner

1865; disch. June

Bohanan, Thomas, Aug.

1865

Feb.

B.,

Hunter, John, Feb.

ter out.

Billman, Reuben R., Sept. 17, 1864; disch. by G. O. July 3, 1865. Brown, Charles, Aug. 29, 1864; disch. by G. 0. July 3, 1865.

1864; must, out with company Aug. 23,

16,

1865; veteran.

Hoffman, David

Feb. 22, 1864; must, out with

Overton, Samuel, Sept.

3,

1S61

;

23, IS65.

company Aug.

must, out at exp. of term.

23, 1865.

.

.

;

.

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY. O'Neil, Henry, Sept.

First Lientenant.

1861.

3,

Lewis F. Mason, Dec.

Oweus, Noah, Sept. 3, 1861. Ottz, William H., Sept. 3, 1861. Price,

March

V.,

2,

pro. from private Co. H, 56th Regt. P. must, out with company June 28, 1S65; veteran.

22, 1861

1865

;

James H., Sept. 3, 1S61 absent, sick, at muster out; veteran. Thompson, Sept. 3, 1861 disch. on surg. certif., date unknown.

;

;

Price,

Second Lieutenant.

;

Purcell, William, Sept. 3, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. 1862. Powell, Samuel, Aug. 16, 1863. Kimple, John D., Sept. 3, '1861 ; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865

Abraham Fraueuthal, March

company June

28,

First Sergeant.

John

veteran.

1865; must, out with

1,

1865.

S.

Campbell, Feb. 23, 1865

must, out with company June

;

28, 1865.

Keynolds, Thomas, Aug. 14, 1863; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865.

Readifer, Samuel, Feb. 28, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

William H. McConuell, Feb.

must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Bodgers, Thomas, March Is, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23,

Alexander Backenstoss, March

Raab, John, Feb.

27, 1864;

15, 1865; absent,

on furlough, at muster

out.

1865; must, out with

1,

company June

28, 1865.

1865.

Philip P.

Rigel, Henry, Feb. 13, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Kedabaugh, George, Feb. 19, 1864; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps April

7,

De Haven, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June

Benjamin K. Taylor, Feb.

23, 1865; absent, sick, at

1865.

muster

28, 1865.

out.

Corporals.

Rheam, Anthony, March 1,1864; prisoner from 1865 disch. June 19, to date May 19, 1865.

Oct. 1, 1864, to April 21,

;

William H. Pritchard, Feb. Cliauncey M. Shull, March

captured Aug. 20, 1864; veteran.

;

1865; must, out with

1,

company June

2S,

1865.

Robinson, Tliomas, Sept. 3, 1861. Rimple, William, Nov. 16. 1861. Sibert, Levi, Sept. 3, 1861

William H. Saltsman, March

company Aug.

Shillinger, Frederick, Feb. 27, 1864; must, out with

absent, on furlough, at muster out.

16,

1865

1,

1865; must, out with

:

company June

28,

1S65. 23,

1865.

Stackhouse, William H., Feb. 20, 1864; must, out with company Aug.

John A. Mattis, Feb. S, 1865; must, out with company June 2S, 1865. George W. Burd, Feb. 16, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. David D. Burross, Feb. 16, 1865 must, out with company June 2S, 1865. John Stoonier, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Francis Alexander, March 1, 1S65; must, out with company Juue 28, ;

23, 1865.

company Aug. 23, 1865. Strouse, John, Feb. 2, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. company Aug. 23, 1865. out with Schloss, Isaac, Feb. 9, 1864; must, Schreaniscer, William, Jan. 29, 1864; must, out with company Aug. Silly,

William, Feb.

5,

1864; must, out with

1S65. Privates. 23,

1865.

Shaudelmier, Frederick, Feb.

must, out with company Aug.

19, 1864;

8,

Alwiu, Hiram, Feb.

1865

8,

23, 1865. 26, 1864; must, out witli company Aug. 23, 1865. Salmon, Michael, Feb. 24, 1864 must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Sands, Albert W., March 27, 1864 disch. by G. 0. June 10, 1865. Seesholtz, George. Aug. IS, 1864; disch. by G. 0. July 14, 1865. ;

;

Swaitz, George W., Sept. 21, 1861

;

disch.

on surg.

certif.,

date

unknown.

John, Sept. 28, 1861 ; died at Tullahoma, Tenn., 1862. Sheridan, Peter, March 22, 1864; died at Nashville, Tenn., July 20, 1865. Smoke, Christopher, Sept. 3, 1S61 Slater,

;

28, 1865.

28, 1865.

Black, James, Feb.

1865: must, out with

8,

1865.

8,

/

Stevenson, Levi E., Sept. 3, 1861; not on muster-out roll. Tibbons, George, March 1, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23,1865. Taylor, Charles, Feb. 28, 1864; disch. by G. O. Taylor, James, Sept.

Thomar, William,

June

1,

1865.

M.,

March

7,

1865

must, out with company June

;

1865; must, out with

8,

Callahan, John, Feb.

8,

28, 1865.

company June

28,

company June 28, 1865. 1865; must, out with company Juue 2S, 1865.

1865; must, out with

Demar, Benjamin, Feb. 8, Densmore, Richard, Feb. 25, 1865. Evans, William A., Feb. 8, 1865 must, out with company June Echilberger, Joseph, Feb. 23, 1865; must, out with

Sept. 3, 1861.

1864; pro. to adjt.

May

Freeborn, Barger, March

;

1,

1S65; must, out with

company June

28,

28, 1865.

disch. by G. 0. May 30, 1865. 15, 1865 John C.,Feb. 23, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. John C, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Gibson, Charles, Feb. 16, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Gardner, James F., March 1, 1865; must, out with company June 28,

Fink, John, Feb.

;

Gantt, Geltz,

15, 1865.

Woods, Patrick D., Sept. 3, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. July Wining, Hiram, Sept. 10, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. 1862. Walker, Lazarus, Sept. 3, 1861 Willet, John. Warner, Frederick.

28, 1865.

company June

1865.

Tagg, Michael, Sept. 4, 1861. Wagle, John, Feb. 22, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. West, John, March 19, 1864; must, out with company Aug. 23, 1865. Winters, Benjamin F., Aug. 21, 1864; disch. by G. O. July 10, 1865.

Wm.

8,

Conover, William W., Feb.

;

1861.

3,

Campbell, Henry, Feb. 1865.

Stokes, Robert, Nov. 20, 1861.

Watts,

company June

must, out with company June

company Juue 28, 1865. Book, Fidel, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Brandon, John, Feb. 8, 1S65; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Bechtol, John, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out-with company June 28, 1866. Berger, Levi, Feb. 15, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Brown, James, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865.

Boyer, Samuel, Feb.

Simmers, Henry, Feb.

1S65; must, out with

Anderson, John, Feb.

;

30, 1862.

;

Watts, William, Sept.

White, Thomas,

3,

1865.

Andrew, Feb. 8, 1865 must, put with company June 28, 1865. must, out with company Juue 28, 1865. S., March 1,1865 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Herring, William, Feb. 8, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Hilbert, Solomon, Feb. 8, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Hasson, Charles, Feb. 8, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Hay, Thomas C, Feb. 23, 1865; disch. by G. O. June 2, 1865. Hantz, Henry, Feb. 10, 1865.

Graft,

Huss,

1861

;

;

Sept. 3, 1861.

Wilking, Peter, Nov. 23, 1861. Williams, Thomas, Sept. 3, 1861; not on muster-out roll. Young, Robert, Feb. 28, 1864; must, out with company Aug. Zubler, David, Feb. 27, 1864 must, out with company Aug. ;

Zimmerman, Augustus,

;

Abraham

Holtry, John, Feb.

Sept. 23, 1861

;

;

;

23, 1865. 23, 1865.

must, out Dec. 30, 1864, at exp.

Hethringtou, George, Feb.

8,

1865.

Harvey, John, Feb. 10, 1865.

of term.

Zindle, Charles, Feb. 26, 1864; prisoner from Oct. 1S65; disch. June 19, to date May 19, 1865.

1,

1864, to April 21,

Irvine, Jesse, Feb.

1865

8,

Knapp, Michael, Feb.

ROLL OF COMPANY I, EIGHTY-THIRD REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS (ONE YEAR'S SERVICE).

;

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

16, 1S65;

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

Kain, Charles, Feb. 16, 1S65; must, out with company Juue 28, 1865. Kroninger, Charles, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Lorah, Harrison, Feb. 15, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. must, out with company Juue 28, Lorah, Alexander, Feb. 15, 1865 ;

Recruited at Harrisburg

and Reading, assigned

to

Eighty-third Regiment

Pennsylvania Volunteers March, 1865.

Robert W. McCartney, March 1,1865; must, out with company June 1865.

1865.

Myers, Alouzo, Feb.

28,

8,

1865; must, out with

company Juue

28, 1865.

Marks, Oliver D., Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Marks, Henry, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Martin, James K.

P.,

Feb.

S,

1865; disch. by G. O.

June

27, 1865.

GENERAL HISTORY. Baughmau,

McCarty, William, Feb. 22,1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. McCurdy, John, Feb. 8, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. ;

William

Neff,

16, 1865

company June 28, 1865. company June 28, 1865. company June 28, 1865. Smaltz, Daniel, Feb. 8, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865 Shell, Henry, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Seidell, Jacob, March 1, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Sayler, George S'., Feb. 9, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Stah I, George W., March 1, 1S65 must, out with company June 28, 18G5; must, out with

8,

March

Brink, Bradford, March

Richards, John, Feb.

Baker, R. M., March

1865; must, out with ;

;

;

Charles, Ira,

March

Swartzwelder, N., Feb. 10, 1865 Slaughter, Taylor, Feb.

disch.

;

company June

by G. 0. June

3,

March

28, 1865.

roll.

company June

28, 1865.

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

;

company June

28,

March 7,1865; must, out with company June

28,

company June

28,

March 3, 1865; uot on muster-out roll. Dudley, John C, March 3, 1865 must, out with company June

28,

1865; must, out with

3,

1865. E.,

Carver, Augustus,

May

1865

7,

company June

absent, sick, at muster out.

;

1865; uot un muster-out

1865.

28, 1865.

1865.

1865; died at Alexandria, Va.,

S,

3,

1865; must, out with

3,

Crook, Samuel, March Carpenter, John H.,

1865; must, out with

3,

1865

3,

Brink, William, March

Cumbler, Jesse

1865.

Shade, Reuben, Feb. 10, 1865; must, out with

28,

1865.

Ruelius, Anthony, Feb. 15, 1865; must, out with 8,

company June

1865; moat, out with

3,

;

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

D., Feb. 8, 1865;

Phillips, William, Feb.

S.,

Benner, Henry, March 3, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Blymire, Bonjamin, March 9,1865; must, out with company June 28,

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

;

P.

1865.

;

Nigh, Amos, Feb.

179

30, 1865

March

1865; must, out with

9,

1865. ;

Clase, Daniel W.,

grave 3185. Shoop, David, Feb. 23, 1865.

;

Twerd, John W., March 1, 1S65; must, out with company June 28,1865. Town, Edward, Feb. 8, 1865. Woods, Samuel, Feb. 23, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Woods, John, Feb. 23, 1S65 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Weirich, Michael, Feb. 23, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Wysard, Lewis, Feb. 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Witman, Thomas, Feb. 15, 1S65; must, out with company Juue 28,1865. Wertz, Anthony, Feb. 8, 1S65; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Youugblood, Gilbert, Feb. 15, 1SG5; must, out with company Juue 28, ;

;

1865.

March 3, 1865 disch. on surg. certif. June 15, 1865. Funk, James, March 7, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Glaza, Samuel, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Grant, George W., March 7,1865; must, out with company June 28,

Deitrick, Jacob R.,

;

1S65.

Holman, Jacob, March 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Hayes, David M., March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865.

March

Hefelfinger, William L.,

1865.

Ziemer, William, Feb.

company June

1865; must, out with

8,

28, 1865.

1865

3,

;

must, out with company June

28, 1865.

Hamilton, Levi W., March

1865; must, out with

3,

company June

28,

1865.

ROLL OF COMPANY K (ONE YEAR'S SERVICE).

Hunter, Isaiah, March 7, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Hetrick, William, March 7, 1865 must, out with company June 28, ;

Recruited in Dauphin County, assigned M-trch, 186"),

Eighty-Tltird Regi-

to

;

ment Pennsylvania

Volunteers.

1865.

Heckand, Frederick, March S, 1S65 absent, sick, at muster out. Imhoff, Benjamin H., March 3, 1865 must, out with company Juue

Captain.

G.

W.

Huff,

March

9,

;

company June

1865; must, out with

28, 1865.

;

28,

1865. First Lieutenant.

John

Deitrick,

March

9,

1S65; must, out with

March 3, 1S65; must, out with company June 2S, 1865. Samuel S., March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 2S,

Jones, John C,

company June

28, 1865.

Kritzer, 1865.

Second Lieutenant.

March

Keiser, Jacob,

Benjamin M. Frank, March

11, 1S65

;

pro. to adjt.

May

5, 1865.

Kline, Jonas,

First Sergeant.

David C. Ritter, March 7, 1865; com. 2d lieut. June tered; must, out with company June 28, 1865.

23, 1865

;

not mus-

Sponenberger, March

3,

March

must, out with company June 28, 1865. must, out with company June 28, 1865.

;

1865

3,

3,

;

1S65; must, out with

Lebkichler, Joseph, March

1S65

7,

;

company June

2S, 1865.

must, out with company June 28,

1865.

Lebkichler, George W., March

Sergeants. J. J.

1865

3,

Knight, Cyrus, March

7,

1S65; must, out with

company June

28, 1865.

1865; must, out with company June 2S,

Lehman, William, March

1865; must, out with

3,

company June

2S,

1865.

1865.

Michael W. Bowers, March

1865; must, out with

company June

28,

1865; must, out with

company June

28,

8,

Lucas, Joshua, March

3,

1865

Levingston, Christian, March

1865.

M. D. Barndollar, March

3,

Henry Derr, March 7, 1865; pro. to company June 28, 1865. Cor's R. Buffington, March 7, 1865;

sergt.

June

2,

1865; must, out with

June

2,

1865.

1865

;

1865; must, out with

3,

compauy June

28,

1S65.

March

company June 2S, 1865. Livingston, Benjamin, March 3,1865; must, out with company June Lidick, David,

disch. on surg. certif.

9,

1865.

Levingston, Samuel, March

1865.

company June 2S, 1865. must, out with Company June 28,

must, out with

;

3,

1865; must, out with

28, 1865.

Corporals.

Long, William, March

company June 28, 1865. John Ditty, March 7, 1865: must, out with company June 28, 1865. J. W. Eshleman, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Benjamin F. Krouse, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 2S, Peter Derr, March

8,

1865; must, out with

March

7,

3,

1865; must, out with

1865

Henry, March

;

company June

must, out with compauy June

28, 1865.

2S, 1S65.

company Juue 28, 1S65. Joseph, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. George W., March 3,1865; must, out with company Juue 28,

Miller, Miller, Miller,

9,

1865; must, out with

1865.

1865.

William Baskin, March 7, 1S65 must, out with company June 28, 1865. John J. Nagle, March 8, 1S65 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Henry J. Michael, March 9, 1865; wounded; disch. by G. 0. June 17, ;

;

Meek, Morris, March 3, 1S65; must, out with company June 28, 1S65. Meek, Nelson, March 8, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1S65. McKelvy, Thomas, March 3,1865; must, out with company June 28, ;

1865.

1865.

Musicians.

Adam

Lutz, Isaac,

Everich,

John H. Keini,

March March

3,

1865; must, out with

3,

1865; must, out with

company June 28, 1865. company June 2S, 1865.

McGlaughlin, C, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 38, 1S65. Newberry, Lewis, March 3, 1865 disch. by G. 0. July 10, 1865. O'Neil, Jeremiah, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28, ;

1865. Privates,

Anderson, Thompson, March

3,

1865; must, out with

Prior,

company June

2S,

Beigh, John

R March ,

3,

Bowers, John H., March 1865.

John W., March 7, 1S65; must, out with company June 28, 1S65. B., March 7, 1S65 must, out with company Juue 88,

Parson, Napoleon

;

1865.

1865.

1865 3,

;

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

1865; must, out with

company June

28,

Potter,

William H., March

9,

1865; must, out with

company June

28,

1865.

Roush, Daniel, March

7,

1S65

;

must, out with company June 28, 1S65.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

130 Rush, Nathaniel, March Reifsnyder, Lewis C,

1865

7,

March

must, out with compauy June 2S, 1865.

;

1865; must, out with

3,

company June

28,

1865.

Eoush, Simon, March 8, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Bitter, William R., March 8, 1S65; must, out with company June' 28, 1865.

Rupp, George, March 3, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1865. Shure, Henry, March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28, 1865. Snyder, Charles C, March 3, 1865; must, out with compauy June 28, ;

1865.

Sponeuberger, Foster, March

1865

3,

;

must, out with company June 28,

1865.

Sponeuberger,

March 7,1865; must, out with company June

F.,

28,

Muhlenberg,

Upon

enemy.

his

was

posted,

arrival

Col.

confronting

the

Murray assumed

of the entire force, and at four o'clock on the morning of the 4th advanced to the eminence beyond the town and deployed in line of battle. He

command

soon learned that Stonewall Jackson, with a well-appointed force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, greatly superior to his own, was in his front. At eight o'clock Jackson began to press upon him, driving in his skirmishers. By skillful manoeuvring, preserving a bold

he kept the enemy at bay until near nightfall, fell back to Hancock, with the loss of but one man, drowned in crossing the stream. During the night Gen. Lander arrived and assumed command, and Jackson, who had approached and was shelling the town, sent Col. Ashby, on the morning front,

1865.

Spicher, Samuel

L, March

company June

28,

must, out with company June

28,

1865; must, out with

3,

1865.

Shuman, Michael, March

1865

3,

;

1S65.

March 3, 1865 must, out with company June 28, 1S65. Henry H., March 3, 1865; must, out with company June 28,

Sheesley, George, Segrist,

Lieut.

;

when he

1865.

Snoke, John N., March Trimmer, John, March

disch.

on surg.

3,

1865

3,

1865; must, out with

Williamson, Cyrus, March

;

1865

7,

June 15, 1865. company June 28, 1865.

certif.

must, out with company June

;

28,

1S65. 7,

1865

;

must, out with company June 28,

3,

1865

,

must, out with company June 28,

Williamson, Ramsey, March 1865.

Weiser, David R. P., March 1865.

Walt, Joshua, March

3,

1865

Weirick, Henry H., March

must, out with company June 28, 1865.

;

1865; must, out with

3,

company June

28,

1865.

March

Zaring, John W., Zeigler, Alfred

3,

C, March

1865

;

must, out with company June

1865

7,

;

Lander defiantly

its

imme-

refused,

Lander, as scion as he discovered his antagonist's purpose, hastened away to secure its evacuation, which he did, bringing his forces into Cumberland. The Eightyfourth

made

a forced

march

to the latter place, ar-

Jackson having been foiled in his expedition to Eomney by the rapid movement of Lander, returned to Winchester, and the Eightyfourth was posted successively during the winter at the North Branch Bridge, at the South Branch Bridge, and at Paw Paw, points along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On the 2d of March Gen. Lander died, the command devolving on Col. Kimball, and soon after the regiment moved on to Winchester. Here Gen. Shields took command of the division, and about the middle of the month drove the enemy up the valley, four miles beyond Strasburg, skirmishing with his

riving on the 12th.

Hart, James, March 22, 1864 not on muster-out roll. Henton, Lert, Oct. 29, 1864 not on muster-out roll. Jenkins, William D., March 28, 1864; not on muster-out roll. Kinter, John, Feb. 25, 1864; died April 8, 1864; buried in Allegheny ;

;

Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa. Keiff,

demand

and having been reinforced with Parrott guns, a spirited cannonade ensued, which was kept up during the entire day But this demonstration on the part of' following. Jackson was to cover his movement upon Romney,and diate surrender.

28, 1865.

must, out with company June 28,

1865.

James,

McMurdy,

of the 5th, with a flag of truce, to

May

Isaac,

9,

1864; not on muster-out

March

31, 1864;

Nichols, Francis, Oct. 29, 1864

;

roll.

not on muster-out

not on muster-out

roll.

roll.

Nicholson, John, March 28, 1864; not on muster-out Newton, John E., March 7, 1864; not on muster-out

roll. roll.

O'Brien, John Patrick, Feb. 24, 1864; not on muster-out Rice, John,

March

Summerville, C. E., May 13, Scranton, George W., March

Van Wart, James

on muster-out roll. 1864; not on muster-out

roll.

29, 1864; not

9,

1864; not on muster-out

A., Feb. 23, 1864; not

Wright, Lewis, Feb.

27, 1864; not

Woritschit, H. A., Feb. 22, 1864

roll.

;

on muster-out

roll.

roll.

rear-guard,

on muster-out roll. not on muster-out roll.

way

EIGHTY-FOURTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS. The Eighty-fourth Regiment was

recruited under

as

who

he went.

destroyed bridges and obstructed the

As Shields returned

to

Winchester,

Jackson, reinforced, followed closely on his track, the Eighty-fourth marching on the 20th from its camp

near Strasburg, without a halt, to Winchester. At P.M. on the 22d it returned at double-quick

five

the direction of William G. Murray, in the counties

through the town, and moved

of Blair, Lycoming, Clearfield, Dauphin, Columbia,

Union cavalry, posted at the west end, which the enemy was engaged in shelling. Soon after the regiment arrived upon the ground Gen. Shields was struck by a fragment of shell and disabled, the command again devolving on Col. Kimball. The Eighty-fourth

Cameron, and Westmoreland. The men rendezvoused at

Camp

Crossman, near Huntingdon, and subse-

quently at Camp Curtin. Recruiting commenced early in August, and towards the close of October an organization was effected by the choice of the following field-officers William G. Murray, colonel Thomas C. Macdowell, lieutenant-colonel; Walter Barrett, :

;

major.

On

the 31st of December the regiment was ordered Hancock, Md., arriving Jan. 2, 1862. Here it received arms, Belgian muskets, and crossing the Potomac, proceeded rapidly to Bath, where a portion of to

the Thirty-ninth Illinois, with a section of artillery,

to the

support of the

was ordered

to fix bayonets in anticipation of a charge, but the enemy soon after retreated, and was driven about two miles in the direction of Kernstown, where the regiment bivouacked for the night. On the fol-

lowing morning it was engaged in laying out the ground for a camp, when the enemy, at eleven a.m., attacked, and it was immediately ordered into line in support of artillery. Under cover of a wooded eminence on the right the enemy advanced, and with

GENERAL HISTORY. artillery gained a foothold upon the behind rocks and a stone wall, where he seri-

infantry and flank,

ously threatened the integrity of the

This

position

the

Eighty-fourth was

Union

line.

ordered

to

in such numbers as to make a n-i-tance out of the question, and the general gave the order to fall back. Now commenced a running fight.

coming down

He

followed us for several miles, and kept his bat-

teries at

Murray's range, was horse was struck, when he dismounted and advanced on foot. A moment later, while at the head of his men, and leading them on for the capture of the guns, he was himself struck in the forehead by a minie-ball and instantly killed. At this juncture, being without a field-officer, with two of its captains fallen, the regiment fell into some confusion, and a part of it fell

andria,

it

fearfully

decimated.

Col.

back under the shelter of the crest. The remainder, led by Lieut. George Zinn, taking shelter behind At this juncture the trees, kept up a steady fire. Fifth Ohio came up on the right, and, with other troops, forced the enemy from his position. A general advance was ordered along the entire line, and the foe was driven in utter rout. Three hundred prisoners, two guns, four caissons, and a thousand stand of small-arms were taken. Out of two hundred and sixty of the Eighty-fourth who went into battle twenty-three were killed and sixty-seven wounded. Col. Murray, Capt. Patrick Gallagher, and Lieut. Charles Reem were killed. After the battle the Eighty-fourth, under command of Maj. Barrett, was assigned to provost duty in the town of Berryville, where it remained until the 2d of May. It then joined in the general advance up the valley, and passing through Strasburg and Front Royal, proceeded to Fredericksburg. Scarcely had it reached its destination, when it was ordered back On to Front Royal, where it arrived on the 30th. the following day a smart skirmish was had on the Winchester road, after which thebrigade, the Fourth of Shields' division, commanded by Col. Carroll, moved on towards Port Republic, arriving on the 8th of June. "We charged," says an officer of the Eighty-fourth, " what we took to be a wagon-train, but soon found that it consisted of about thirty pieces of artillery with wagon covers, which gave us a warm reception. The next day, June 9th, the enemy came out in large numbers, and advanced to the attack. He came up in fine style, and fought hard to turn our While right flank, but was repulsed with great loss. we were following up our advantage, however, his came in on our forces outflanked us on the left, and rear. We then faced about, and the Third Brigade of our division coming up, we had them between two fires, and they soon fled to the mountains. He had by this time reformed his lines in front, and was





manner

that showed that he was His cavalry made repeated charges, but was repulsed by the steady fire of our infantry. We finally came upon the First and Second Brigades, drawn up in line, with Gen. Shields in command, when the enemy gave over the pursuit and

Forming upon the high ground near the Kcrnstown road, it moved gallantly through an open valley and up towards tlje wooded eminence, where were the guns. As it gained the crest the rebel infantry rose up from behind rocks and the fence where they had been concealed, and poured upon it withering volleys. The fire was returned with good effect; but, standing without shelter and at close charge.

181

work

in a

familiar with the route.

rapidly retired."

From Port Republic whence the

the division marched to Alex-

First

and Second Brigades pro-

ceeded to the Peninsula, and the Third and Fourth went into camp near the town. The campaign had

been a severe one, the marches long and difficult, the men poorly clad, and much of the time subsisting on scanty rations. On the 25th of June, Samuel M. Bowman, of Columbia County, late a major in the

Fourth Illinois Cavalry, who had seen service under Grant and Sherman in the Western army, was commissioned colonel, Maj. Barrett was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and Adjt. Thomas H. Craig to major. In July the regiment broke camp and marched out Carroll's brigade was here atto join Pope's army. tached to Ricketts' division of McDowell's corps. In the battle of Cedar Mountain, which occurred on the 9th of August, the regiment was not under fire until after dark, when a few of the enemy's shots and shells reached

its

ranks.

On

the 14th

it

joined in pursuit

of the enemy, following him up to the Rapidan, occupying the line of the river until the 19th, when it

Rappahannock. Here for a week the were held at bay, the fighting being general along the entire line, for the most part with the artillery. As soon as it was ascertained that the enemy had turned Pope's right flank, Ricketts' division was sent to Thoroughfare Gap, to check the progress of Longstreet's corps on its way to join Jackson, already at Manassas Junction, in Pope's rear. In the engagement which ensued the regiment took little part. On the 29th it moved into position on the right flank of the army, near Groveton, and on the morning of the 30th was warmly engaged. It remained upon the field until after dark, and for several hours after the mass of the army had crossed Bull Run. It was finally charged by a force of the enemy which approached under cover of darkness. Uncertain whether it was friend or foe advancing, Lieut. Alban H. Nixon volunteered to go out and ascertain his true character. He passed the outer pickets without discovery, and soon found himself in the very midst of Gen. Pender's South Carolina troops, who were moving upon the flank of the brigade, and only waiting the signal that its retreat was cut off to move upon and capture it retired to the

rebels

entire.

At the

peril of his life

are the enemy, boys dered,

!"

when

Nixon shouted,

"

They

a timely retreat was'or-

and the greater part of the brigade was snatched Enraged at

from the clutches of Pender's troops.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

182

having their well-laid plans thus suddenly frustrated, they threatened Nixon with instant death, and were only prevented from executing it by a fellow-prisoner, who seized him by the arm and exclaimed, " You will not shoot an unarmed man?" He was spared, and with other officers and men found upon the skirmish When the line was marched away to Richmond. regiment arrived within the defenses of Washington it had scarcely seventy men in its ranks fit for duty. In consequence of its severe losses it was ordered to light duty at Arlington Heights, in the command of Gen. Whipple, where it remained during the Antietam campaign. In the mean time, through the exertions of patriotic citizens of Pennsylvania,

whom

some of

accepted commissions, headed by Col. Bow-

were added to its ranks, which, with the return of men from hospitals and from furlough, brought its numbers up to the full standard of a regiment. About the middle of October it proceeded to rejoin the army, near Berlin, and marched with it to the neighborhood of Fredericksburg. In the campaign which followed it continued in Gen. Whipple's independent division. On the second day of the battle of Fredericksburg, Gen. Griffin called on Gen. Whipple for Carroll's brigade. It was promptly ordered forward, and moved up through the town under an incessant shower of shot and shell. Taking temporary refuge in a cut of the Fredericksburg and Richmond Railroad, the officers dismounted. At the word of command, climbing the steep aclivity at doublequick, the entire brigade rushed on and soon reached the front. Such was the spirit and daring of the movement that two companies of the Eighty-fourth reached a point considerably in advance of the line of battle, whence they had to be recalled. During the following night the enemy approached stealthily under cover of darkness, with the expectation of sur-

man, about four hundred

recruits

prising and forcing the part of the line where lay the

One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylhandsomely repulsed. At the close of the action the regiment retired with the army, and went into winter-quarters. Gen. Carroll, in his official report, says, " Where all did so well it seems invidious to particularize but I cannot forbear mentioning Col. S. M. Bowman and Maj. Milton Opp, of the Eighty-fourth, and Lieut.-Col. Crowther, of the One Hundred and Tenth, whose coolness, judgment, and unsparing bravery were conspicuous." Under Gen. Hooker the army was reorganized, and the Eighty-fourth and One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania and Twelfth New Hampshire constituted the Second Brigade of the Third Division (Whipple's) of the Third Corps, and Col. Bowman was assigned to its command. During the winter the principal duty consisted in guard and picket, in which the regiment shared, frequently meeting parties of the enemy, who made their appearance on the north bank of the river.

,Eighty-fourth and vania, but was

;

By

close scrutiny Col.

Bowman

discovered that per-

what purported to be permits, from Union by the enemy to come within our lines. These irregularities were reported and effectually broken up. The part taken by the regiment in theChancellorsville campaign is clearly shown by the following exmits, or

authorities were used

tract

from Maj. Opp's

official

report: " After severe

marches, occupying a period of of April,

we were brought

five

days from the 28th

in contact with the

enemy

on the afternoon of the 2d of May. In a reconnoissauce made by two divisions of the Third Corps to the left of Chancellorsville,

and

in the vicinity of

an

old furnace, the regiment was ordered to advance in line,

with flanking companies thrown forward as

unmask the position of the enemy. Under the immediate supervision of Col. Bowman, commanding the brigade, the object was successfully

skirmishers, to

and handsomely attained, with the loss of only two men wounded. On the morning of the 3d, at daylight, we were judiciously and strongly posted to the left of the plank-road, and to the left of Chancellorsville, as

a reserve force.

The

attack of the

enemy

had continued but a short time, when one line to the Col. Bowman's orders to the front of us gave way. Eighty-fourth and the One Hundred and Tenth to advance and occupy the position just abandoned were promptly and gallantly executed. The old lines were regained, and held for about an hour and until all the regiments on the right and left of the Eightyfourth had retired, leaving us in an isolated and exIn the hope that reinforcements posed position. would arrive, I still held the men in place, maintaining a steady and effective fire to the front. It was discovered, however, that a large force of the enemy had succeeded, by making an extensive detour under cover of a dense wood, in gaining our rear, where he was supported by a vigorous enfilading fire from several guns planted on an eminence to our front and left. It became obvious that to remain was equivalent to capture in a body, while to retreat was perilous in the extreme. The latter alternative was adopted. The retreat was executed in good order, but not without heavy losses and severe fighting. In numerous instances the men clubbed their muskets in hand-tohand encounters. Parties who had been overpowered, seizing opportune moments, took up guns at hand, demanded and obtained the surrender of many of their captors.

Lieut.

Farley, of

Company

F,

who

had been captured in the strife, headed a number of our men, and succeeded in extricating himself, and in capturing one captain, two lieutenants, and twenty-five men. These, with five men captured before the retreat began, made an aggregate of thirtythree rebel prisoners taken by the regiment. Our own losses were necessarily heavy from the peculiarity of the situation. Of three hundred and ninetyone officers and men engaged, two hundred and nineCapt. Jacob teen were killed, wounded, and missing. Peterman was among the killed, and Capt. C. G.

GENERAL HISTORY.

183

Jackson, Lieuts. William Hayes, Albert Steinman,

Spottsylvania Court-House,

John R. Ross, George S. Good, and Asst.-Surg. John S. Waggoner severely wounded, most of whom

skirmish.

fell

into the

enemy's hands."

The regiment

participated in the operations of the

brigade on the new line taken up on the morning of the 4th,

but without further casualties.

Whipple was

killed in this

Gen.

engagement, and the losses it was broken up

brilliant charge of

Hancock's corps, carrying elab-

men and

guns.

making large captures of The following extract from a diary Sampson will convey some idea of the

of Capt. L. B.

arduous service of the regiment

and the regiments assigned to other commands. The Eighty-fourth became part of Gen. Carr's brigade of the Second Corps, and was separated from the One Hundred and Tenth, with which it had served from

"

On

entrance to duty.

man was

the 11th of June, Col. Bow-

ordered to special duty, and never afterward

In December previous, Maj. Opp had been promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and Capt. George Zinn to major. In the Gettysburg campaign, the regiment upon its arrival at Taneytown, Md., was detailed as guard to the corps train, and immediately proceeded with it to Westminster, where it was employed in forwarding supplies to the battle-field, a vitally important duty, but one devoid of heroic incident.

had a brisk

orate lines of works, and

of his division were so great that

its

K

Company

At Pamunkey River, on the 10th, the regiment was again engaged, driving the enemy across the stream. On the morning of the 12th it joined in the

May

moved

14th skirmished,

mished

all

the afternoon

;

in this to the

works

;

:

16th, lay in line all day;

17th, fought on the picket line, drove the his

campaign

right, skir-

18th, skirmished all

day

;

19th,

enemy into marched to

Spottsylvania Court-House; 20th, lay in line of battle all

21st, marched Bowling Green, thence

day, received a good shelling

;

to

rejoined the regiment.

Guiney

Milton

Mil ford Station on the Po River; 22d, rested day; 23d, marched to the North Anna, charged and carried

Upon

the return of the

ment was engaged

at

army

to Virginia, the regi-

Wapping Heights on

the 24th

of July, in the neighborhood of Thoroughfare

Gap

Station, thence to

bridge,

—a

the river under a heavy 27th,

marched

of the regiment re-en-

Eighty-fourth, resulting in the loss of

men.

Lieut.-Col.

ceived a

Opp, while leading

wound through

a mortal hurt.

He

many brave

in a charge, re-

the right lung which proved

was a brave man, and sincerely

mourned by his men. moved on towards the

On left,

the 7th the regiment

and on the

8th,

near

;

25th and 26th, rested crossed at

;

Han-

;

commanding, fought the first battle of Pleasant Hill June 1st, our regiment had a sharp skirmish at Pleasant Hill, we lost a good many men for a small ;



severely

number

fire

Pamunkey and

Blaisdell

November, at Jacob's Ford on November 27th, at Locust Grove on the 28th, and at Mine Run on the 30th, losing four men mortally wounded, five slightly wounded, five missing, and one officer, Lieut. Good, captured. At the conclusion of the campaign the regiment returned to the neighborhood of Brandy Station, where it went into winter-quarters. In January, and were given a veteran furlough. On the 6th of February the enemy crossed the Rapidan in some force, and the Eighty-fourth moved with the column sent against him. He was driven back and one hundred of his men were taken prisoners. Upon the opening of the Wilderness campaign the regiment moved with the corps by the Germania Ford, and while marching on south along the Fredericksburg road, on the afternoon of the 5th of May, the enemy was discovered moving down in heavy force upon its flank. Line of battle was immediately formed and advanced to meet him, the fighting becoming general along the whole line, extending for miles. On the following day the fighting was very severe, and proved particularly disastrous to the

to the

over City; 29th, skirmished and built works; 30th,31st, our brigade, Col. lay in the works all day

fight."

1864, a considerable

Company K volunteering to hold a warm time they had of it; 24th, crossed

the rebel works,

on the 10th of October, at Freeman's Ford in a sharp skirmish on the 13th, at Bristoe Station on the 14th and again on the 19th, at Kelly's Ford on the 7th of

listed,

to

all

who Run by

In this latter engagement, Lieut. Nixon,

had saved the regiment from capture

at Bull

his timely signal, even at the peril of his

wounded with the

life,

loss of his left

was again

arm.

Such was the general character of the service until James on the 14th of June, when it crossed and was at once engaged in the operAdvancing the ations of the siege of Petersburg. lines, building fortifications, and defending the ground gained, interspersed with occasional assaults, filled up the measure of its duty until the 27th of July, when it recrossed the James, and bad part in the engagement at Deep Bottom. Returning to the lines in front of Petersburg, it was again engaged in the varied duties of the siege until the 14th of August, when it again moved to Deep Bottom, and in the sharp engagement which ensued the enemy was driven out of his works at Charles City Cross-Roads and some pristhe regiment reached the

oners taken.

sumed

its

Returning again

place upon the works.

to Petersburg, it re-

On

the 1st of Octo-

with the corps to Yellow House, and thence marched to the extreme left of the lines. The first line of the enemy's works was charged and carried. The second line was charged, but the column was repulsed. Lieut.-Col. Zinn had command of the

ber

it

moved by

rail

assaulting party, and while urging on his

men

in the

charge was severely wounded. In October the men whose terms of service had expired were mustered out, and the veterans and re-

final

were organized in a battalion of four comwhich remained on duty until the 13th of January, 1865, when it was consolidated with the cruits

panies,

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY. Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania, and thenceforward until the end of the war formed part of that organiza-

The

tion.

battalion participated in the operations of

Weldon Railroad on

the corps upon the

the 27th of

October, and again on the 9th of December, in the latter destroying the road as far as Bellefield Station.

Upon

the consolidation of the battalion with the

Campbell, Henry D., Dec. 11, 1861; disch. at exp. of term. Corson, Milton, Dec. 11, 1861

discharged, date

;

Casey, James, died at Antietam, Md.

Fenstermacker,

May

W.

1861

11,

11, 1861

1863; disch. at exp. of term.

3,

mustered out of service on the 29th of June, 1865.

Gower,

Furgeson, George W., Dec.

May

1863

3,

disch. at exp. of term.

;

11, 1861

June

died

;

captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

;

1864; buried in National Cemetery, Ar-

12,

gton. Elias, Dec. 11, 1861

Thomas, Dec.

Glide-well,

Greensweight,

disch. Feb. 9, 1863.

;

11, 1861

Dec. 11, 1861

S.,

Givens, George, Dec. 11, 1861

Harp, Washington, 13. 1862

,

June

died

;

18, 1862.

disch. Dec. 16, 1862.

;

disch. Oct. 3, 1862.

;

1862; wounded at Fredericksburg. Va., Dec. unknown. wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 30, 1863;

discharged, date

;

Haas, James, Oct.

Recruited in Daupliin and Lycoming Counties.

unknown. unknown.

discharged, date

;

died, date

;

Dec. 11, 1861, captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

J.,

Fitch, Daniel H., Dec. 11, 1861

ROLL OF COMPANY B, EIGHTY-FOURTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS (THREE YEARS' SERVICE).

buried in National Cemetery, sec-

;

tion 26, lot F, grave 622.

Downing, Eugene, Dec. Edgar, Thomas, Dec.

became colonel, George W. Perkins lieutenant-colonel, and Capt. Samuel Bryan major. The Fifty-seventh was finally Zinn

Lieut.-Col.

Fifty-seventh,

unknown. unknown.

Craig, Alfred, Dec. II, 1861; discharged, date

1862

6,

;

trans, to Co. G, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13, 1865. Captains.

W.

Harrison

Miles, Aug. 16, 1861

Samuel Bryan,

Oct. 18, 1861

from 1st

1862

;

pro.

1864

;

not mustered

Haas, Jonathan, Sept. 15, 1862

ros. Oct. 15, 1862.

;

wounded

;

1862

lieut. to capt. Oct. 15,

;

March

23,

Hawlk,

May

10,

Jordan, Daniel, Dec. 11, 1861

com. maj.

trans, to 57th Regt. P. V. Jan. 13, 1865.

;

Charles, Dec. 11, 1863.

Reuben, Dec.

Killian,

Mather, Sept.

1862

,

Jan. 18, 1863

;

1861

to 1st lieut. Dec. 19,

;

22, 1864, at exp. of

pro. to 2d lieut. Oct. 4, 1862

;

May

com. capt.

;

;

veteran.

March 25th

1861; died

11,

wounds received

of

at

Winchester, Va., March 23, 1862; buried in National Cemetery,

pro. to 1st sergt.

Jan. 18, 1863.

to adjt.

;

Young,

Jesse B.

21, 1S61

A

trans, to Co.

;

Jordan. Samuel, disch. Sept. 30, 1862.

First Lieutenants.

Edmund

trans, to Co. G, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13,

;

1865.

at "Winchester, Va.,

not mustered

10, 1864:

;

;

lot 9.

to 1st lieut.

Kuntz, James, Dec. 11, 1861 Winchester, Va., March

disch. Dec.

Krigbuum, Orlando,

term.

March 29th

died

;

of

wounds received

at

23, 1862.

wounded and captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863 disch. by G. O. June 7, 1865. Lentz, Forrest M., Dec. 11, 1861 wounded and captured at ChancellorsOct. 15, 1862; ;

;

Second Lieutenants.

May

ville, Va.,

George Zinn, Oct.

1861

1,

;

1S63; com. 1st lieut.

D

pro. to capt. Co.

Albert Smith, Sept. 2!, 1861

pro.

;

May

from

Oct.

2,

1862.

1st Bergt. to

Lloyd, George,

2d lieut. Jan. 18,

mustered; disch. Dec.

10, 1864; not

1863; disch. at exp. of term.

3,

10,

1864, at exp. of term.

May

Va.,

1863

;

wounded and captured unknown.

1S62;

,

3,

at Chancellorsville,

discharged, date

Lawrence. Her'n H., Sept, 15, 1862 disch. Feb. 11, 1863. Lawrence, Abram B., Sept. 15, 1862 trans, to Co. G, 57th Regt. P. V., ;

;

Jan. 13, 1865.

First Sergeants.

Simpson Simmons, Dec. 11,1861;

pro.

tured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

May

Nov.

30, 1863

from sergt. Jan. 3,

1863;

died at Alexandria Dec.

;

William I.Warner, Dec.

11, 1861

from

pro.

;

wounded

1863

9,

Osman, David C, IS,

;

at

1863; cap-

Mine Run

grave 1445.

ceived at Winchester, Va.,

;

Quick, William C, Dec.

pro.

from private

;

disch. at exp.

of term.

Va.,

Samuel

May3,

J.

11

,

wounded and captured at Chancellorsville, unknown. discharged, date unknown. 1861

1861

;

1863; discharged, date

Wilber, Dec. 11,

;

Stokes, Dec. 11, 1861

must, out Dec.

wounded

;

20, 1864, at exp. of term.

Peter Sones, Dec. 11, 1861; wounded at Winchester, Va., died, date unknown.

March 23,1862;

;

1863; captured;

(lied at

;

1,

1862.

wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. C, Jan. 7, 1865.

30,

Salisbury, N.

Va May ,

3,

Bennett, Isaac, Dec.

Bush, Charles

E.,

M„

1863

;

;

3,

11, 1861

;

at Chancellors-

unknown.

died at Falmouth, Va., Feb. 26, 1863. ; discharged, date unknown.;

Sept. 13, 1862; trans, to Co. G, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan.

13, 1865.

;

Campbell,

wounded

18, 1863.

wounds received

Stauffer, Daniel, Dec. 11, 1861; died of

cellorsville, Va.,

May

1863

3,

;

wounded and captured

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

Chan-

27, 1862.

died at Cumberland, Md., Feb. 27, 1862.

;

Speary, Benjamin C, Dec. 11, 1861; captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

May 3.

1863

;

disch. at exp. of term. disch.

;

on surg.

certif.,

unknown.

date

captured at Culpeper Court-House,

;

Mine Run,

Taylor, C. W., captured at dersonville, Ga.,

Adam,

May

24, 1864

;

Va.,

grave

Nov.

30, 1863; died at

11, 1861

Voorhees, Addison, Dec.

unknown.

disch. at exp. of term.

;

11, 1861.

Weaver, Jacob, Dec. 11, 1861 died at Cumberland, Md., March 12, 1862. Warn, Alexander, Dec. 11, 1861 wounded at Winchester, Va., March ;

;

23, 1862

;

trans, to Vet. Res. Corps.

Warn, James, Dec. T.,

1861

11,

;

disch. Sept. 22, 1862.

Dec. 11, 1861

;

disch.

on surg.

certif.

Wm.

Watson, Mark,

Falmouth, Va., Dec. 19, 1863.

An-

47.

Sept. 15, 1862; disch. on surg. certif., date

Williams, John, Dec. 13, 1861; trans, to Co. A veteran. Walker, James, Dec. 11, 1801 disch. Oct. 8, 1862.

R., Dec. 11, 1801; died at

at

Speary, John, Dec. 11, 1861; disch. at exp. of term.

trans, to Co. G, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13, 1865.

;

May

at Fredericks-

disch. at exp. of term.

;

Sulzberger, John, Dec. 11, 1861. Stevenson, George N., Dec. 11, 1861; disch. Oct.

Williams, Jacob

Bastian, Jacob, Sept. 27, 1862

at Chancellors-

disch. Feb. 21, 1863.

;

A; veteran.

1863; trans, to Co.

Unger, Daniel, Dec.

wounded and captured

trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date

Dec. 11, 1861

;

Saxon, Mark A., Dec. 11,1861; captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

Ulrich,

Ashley, John L., Dec. 11, 1801

8, 1862.

Va.

Privates.

1862

1863

Terry, Ebenezer N., Dec. 11, 1861

disch. Dec.

;

Philip L. Stevenson, Dec. 11, 1861

Bryan, David

3,

Shissler, John, Dec. 11, 1861

Mnsilims.

ville,

May

Robbins, Arthur, Sept. 15, 1862

Soars, John, Dec. 11, 1861

;

B. Poust, Dec. 11, 1861

Aug.

wounded and captured discharged, date unknown. ;

Simmons, Thomas

at Bull Bun, Va., Aug. 30, 1862;

Jackson Hollenback, Dec. 11, 1S61 disch. Juno 12, for wounds received at Winchester, Va., March 23, 1862. John A. Snadden, Dec. 11, 1861 trans, to Co. A; veteran.

Wash.

disch.

burg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. S., Dec. 14, 1861

Corporals.

Edward

;

23, 1862.

11, 1861

Rouse, Alonzo, disch. Feb.

George Smith, Dec.

A; veteran.

March

Parker. Charles, Dec. 11, 1861. ville. Va.,

11, 1861

trans, to Co.

:

Pinkerton, Joseph, Dec. 11, 1861; disch. Dec. 18, 1862, for wounds rePonst, William, Dec. 11, 1861

sergt.; disch. at exp. of

Sergeants.

William Everingham, Dec.

Oct. 24, 1861

;

;

,

1861

;

disch. Feb. 5, 1863.

June

18, 1863.

.;

.

GENERAL HISTORY. BOLL OF COMPANY H, EIGHTY-FOUBTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS (THREE YEARS' SERVICE). Recruited in Dauphin and

CUarJUU

Va.,

May

accounted for. 7, 1882; 1862; wounded ami captured at Chancellors-

6,

>i"t

3, 1863.

Hiney, George, killed at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1803. Jordan, James M., Sept. 10, 1862; not accounted for.

Captains.

William M. Bahan, Sept. 24, 1862 ; disch. June 8, 1863'. Clarence G. Jackson, Ang. 2, 1862 pro. from 2d to 1st lieut. Jan. 18, 1863; to capt. July 1, 1863 wounded and captured at. Chaucellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13, ;

;

James, Salisbury H., not accounted for. Kline, George A., Aug. 6, 1862; captured at Ohancelloroville, Va, May trans, to Co. H., 57th Eeginient P. V., Jan. 13, 1S65. 3, 1863 Lewis, Frank, June 5, 1862; trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13, ;

1865.

1865.

Lindemuth, Joseph, June

First Lieutenants.

May

Lewis, James M.,

Alexander R. Nininger, Aug.

1862; pro. from 2d lieut;

6,

discli.

Jan. 17,

1863.

James

July

F.,

Harrington, John, Aug. ville,

Comities.

185

Hughes, Benjamin

18, 1863

May

;

to 1st lieut.

1863

3,

17, 1862

July

1863

1,

;

1st sergt. to

2d

Jan.

lieut.

captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

H, 57th Regt. P.

trans, to Co.

;

from

pro.

;

Low, Thomas

V., Jan. 13, 1865.

not accounted

;

March

Wash-

Lane, William H., Sept.

1864.

8,

1862

5,

tra

;

to Co.

H, 57th Regt.

P. V.,

Jan

13, 1865.

Lias, Francis A., Sept. 13, 1R62 ; not Maguire, George, June 5, 1862 ; not

Second Lieutenants.

for.

K.

B., Aug. 21, 1862; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps; died at

ington, D. C,

March

Mitchell,

S.

1862

5,

17, 1862; trans, to Co.

tinted for.

Merchant, Thomas E., June 25, 1862 trans, to Co. F. Millard, Oscar B., Aug. 6, 1862; not accounted for. Miller, Thomas B., Aug. 21, 1862 not accounted for. ;

William A. Wilson, May 2S, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May pro. from private July 1, 1863 trans, to Co. H, 57th Eegt. 3, 1863 ;

;

;

P. V., Jan. 13, 1865.

Arthur C. Gilbert, June 5, 1S62 pro. to 1st lieut. Co. I Oct. 1, 1862. William F. Cox, June 5, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May D. Seely, Aug.

;

,

;

3,

Nolan, Garrett, June

for.

6,

3,

;

McE

;

1863; not accounted

May

captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

;

trans, to Co. H, 57th Rear. P. V„ Jan. 13, 1865. William H., June 5, 1862 not accounted for. McGowan, James, Aug. 5, 1862 not accounted for.

1863

Andrew

11, 1862

Manes, Henry, Sept.

1862; trans, to Co. H, 57lh Regt. P. V., Jan. 13,

Nevil, Jacob, Oct.

1862

5,

1862

3,

not accounted

;

trans, to Co.

;

for.

H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan.

13,

1865.

1865.

Oberly, Daniel, Sept. 17, 1862

trans, to Co. I, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13,

;

Privates.

1865.

Burk, James, June

1862; died Oct. 24, 1864; buried in National

5,

Cem-

etery, Arlington, Va. Bassett, James, June

trans, to Co.

;

H, 57th Eegt.

P. V., Jan. 13,

1865.

3,

1862; captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

6,

1863.

Briner,

James

not accounted for.

;

Sept. 23, 1862

J.,

Bryan, David M., Sept. Crawford, Charles

E.,

1862

15,

June

not accounted

;

not accounted

;

1S62

5,

for.

trans, to Co.

;

1862; not accounted

7,

Cosgrove, Martin, July 18, 1862

Campbell, John, July

for.

;

not accounted

;

for.

May

;

An

.

6,

1862; trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13,

Reams, Alle

,

Aug.

30, 1862

;

trans, to Co.

K, 57th Eegt. P.

V., Jan.

13. 1865.

William H., June 5, Schneiber, John, July 7, 1862 Schaffer,

ted for.

186! to Vet.

tri

:

:es.

Corps Sept.

26,

1863

disch. July 6, 1865.

Chase, Isaac, Sept. 13, 1862

not accounted

;

Conklin, Frederick, Sept. 11, 1862 8,

;

J.,

1S65.

1862; captured at Chancellorsville, Va.,

31,

trans, to Co.

;

13,

Eehr, George, June 5, 1862 not accounted for. Euch, William H., Aug. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. H, 57th Eegt. P. V., Jan.

Ruch, James

for.

13, 1865.

;

for.

captured

Stifer,

died at Salisbury, N.

;

0.,

1S64.

1862

5,

May

not accounted

;

for.

6,

1862 5,

;

not accounted

1862

;

for.

not accounted

for.

Sherman, Joshua P., Aug. 6, 1862 not accounted for. not accounted for. Solt, Alonzo, Aug. 21, 1862 Sollery, Andrew J., Sept. 12, 1862 trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. P. ;

1864; trans, to Co. H,.57th Regt. P. V.,

20,

Jan. 13, 1865.

Dewalt, William

John, Aug.

Stoner, Jacob, Sept.

;

Dunlap, James, July Dibert, Washington,

3,

,

;

H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan.

H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13, 1S65. Cook, Frank, Aug. 13, 1862; not accounted for. Chamberlain, James, Aug. 25, 1862 trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan.

Nov.

Sept. 13, 1862 not accounted for. Peterman, Benjamin F., Sept. 17, 1862 not accounted for. Quick, Daniel. Aug. 6, 1862; trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan.

13, 1865.

Curry, James, July

1863

B

1865.

13, 1865.

3,

6,

Pearce, Augustus

;

Beach, William, Sept. 13, 1862

'

May

5, 1862; not accounted for. 1862; trans, to Co. H, 57th Eegt. P. V., Jan. 13, 1865.

Perry, Hiram, June

Pea, John, Aug.

Barton, C. Frank, Aug.

trans, to Co. I, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan. 13,

;

1865.

1862

5,

Ostrander, Levi, Sept. 30, 1862

V., Jan.

;

13, 1S65.

June 5, 1S62 captured

L.,

;

at Chancellorsville, Va.,

May

1863.

Thompson, George, June 5, 1862 not accounted for. Torsey, Timothy, July 18, 1862 not accounted for. ;

;

1862; not accounted

Despies, Felix, July

7,

Duryea, William

Aug.

J.,

1862

8,

;

for.

;

trans, to Co. H., 57th Regt. P. V.,

Jan

13, 1865.

Dailey, Thomas, Aug. 11, 1862

;

trans, to Co.

H, 57th Regt. P. V., Jan.

13,1865.

Eisman, Nicholas, July

31, 1862; trans, to Co.

H, 57th Regt. P.

V., Jan.

13,1865. Estep, David, Sept. 23, 1862

;

Wright, Thomas, June 5, 1S62 not accounted for. Whitnight, Amos, Aug. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

trans, to Co. E.

Welsh, Abner, Aug. 6, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., 1863; not accounted for. Warner, Joseph P., Aug. 21, 1862; not accounted for.

May

3.

Wilhelm, Daniel, Ang. 11, 1S62 not accounted for. Young, William, Aug. 5, 1S62; not accounted for. Young, Rudolph L., Aug. 30, 1862 trans, to Co. K, 57th Eegt. P. V., Jan ;

;

Edgar, Uriah M., Sept. 23, 1863; not accounted for. Fink, Frederick, July 31. 1S62 not accounted for. Frees, Charles H., Aug. 25, 1862 wounded and captured at Chancellors-

13, 1865.

;

;

ville, Va.,

May

Fowler, Samuel

S.,

3,

1863.

Aug.

25, 1862; not

accounted

EIGHTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.

for.

Grew, Nelson, June 5, 1862 uot accounted for. Glasgow, Joseph, June 5, 1862 not accounted for. Garrigan, John, June 5, 1862; not accounted for. Griffith, Joseph, July 7, 1862; trans, to Co. H, 57th Regt. ;

;

1865.

Gearhart, William C, Aug. 6,1862; not accounted for. Gelnett, Edward, Sept. 13, 1862

Hughes, Joseph

L.,

July

7,

;

1862

not accounted for. ;

not accouuted

for.

P. V.,

Jan. 13,

This was virtually a York County regiment, but company was recruited in the

as a portion of one

county of Dauphin, we can only refer to the history of the regiment in the third volume of the " History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-65."

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

186

KOLL OF COMPANY B, EIGHTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS (THREE YEARS' SERVICE). Recruited in Daupliin and York Counties.

;

Captains.

Daniel

Jacob Detwiler, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. July 21, 1S63. Lewis Maish, Sept. 14, 1S61 pro. from 2il to let lieut. May 26, 1863;

;

Keiter, Sept. 14, 1861

vet-

killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19,

;

buried in National Cemetery, lot 18; veteran.

to

;

to capt. Jan. 24, 1865; to brevet maj. April 2, 1S65;

company June

W.

1864

;

;

captured June 23, 1864; disch. March 23, 1865. Zeph. E. Hersh,Sept. 12,1861; pro. from sergt.to 2d lieut. Jan. 20,1865 capt. Oct. 25, 1S63

John Snyder, Aug. 1, 1862; disch. by G. O. May 19, 1865. William Lefever, Jan. 3, 1862; disch. Jan. 3, 1865, at exp. of term. George Toomey, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. May 16, 1865;

29, 1S65

;

William

Barringer, Sept. 14, 1861; disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of

C.

must, out with

veteran.

;

John Walzer,

Sept. 14, 1861

on Burg,

disch.

;

certif. Sept. 29, 1861.

First Lieutenants.

John

Crull, Sept. 14, 1861

George

C.

Stroman, Sept.

26, 1863

;

14. 1861

26, 1863.

pro.

;

to 1st lieut. Oct. 25, 1863

James Tearney, to 1st lieut.

Edward

May

res.

;

Sept. 14, 1861

Aug.

;

from

July

1864.

9,

A

;

not mustered

Ball,

Andrew

M.,

June

on surg.

disch.

;

certif.

May

2,

;

1863.

May

1864; drafted; disch. by G. O.

4,

Bare, Samuel, Sept. 14, 1861

disch. Nov. 25, to date Oct. 13, 1864.

;

;

veteran.

Arnold, John, Sept. 14, 1861

Dec. 13, 1864; veteran.

F, Coe, Sept. 12, 1861; trans, from Co. I; com. capt. Oct. 29,

1864

Atrogge, Bernard, Oct. 31, 1861 absent, sick, at muster out. Ayers, Edward T., Sept. 14, 1861 must, out with company June 29, 1865 ;

sergt. to 1st sergt. Oct. 1, 1863

1865; to capt. Co.

9,

May

1st sergt. to 2d lieut.

to adjt.

from

pro.

;

26, 1865.

must, out with company June 29,1865;

;

veteran.

Second Lieutenant.

Bartholomew, Charles, Jan.

Robert K. Slagle, Sept. 12, 1861 trans, from Co. I; com. 1st not mustered disch. Jan. 13, 1865 veteran. 29, 1864

lieut. Oct.

;

;

Yeager, Sept.

J.

12, 1861; pro.

from sergt.

May

to 1st sergt.

Boyd, Robert 16,

1865; com. 1st lieut. June 15,1865; not mustered; must, out with

company June Samuel

29,

1865

F. Keller, Sept. 14, 1861

Henry Epley, Sept. disch.

on Burg,

14, 1801

David N. Thomas, Sept. mustered must, out ;

com.

;

May

certif.

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

1st lieut.

May

10, 1865

;

Bluste,

Adam,

Bollsh,

Montgomery,

company June

drafted

;

;

absent at muster out.

;

14, 1864; substitute; absent, sick, at

Sept. 14, 1861

muster out.

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

Sept. 14, 1861

;

March

disch. on surg. certif.

Byere, William R., Sept. 14, 1861

17,

on writ of habeas corpus, date

disch.

;

unknown.

1861; com. 2d lieut. June 15, 1865; not

12,

witli

1863

,

1863.

not mustered

1865; veteran.

16,

J.,

Burns, Thomas, July

veteran.

;

must, out with company June 29, 1866

;

veteran.

First Sergeants.

Milton

must, out with company June 29,

17, 1865;

1865.

Blouse, Daniel, Sept. 14, 1861

;

;

Baukart, Ephraim, Jan.

3,

Burge, Robert, June

1864

19,

1862; disch.

Jan 3,1865, at exp. of term. disch. on surg. certif. May 16,

substitute

;

;

1865.

29, 1865; veteran.

William K. Parker, Sept. 14, 1861 pro. from private Oct. 23, 1864 must. out with company June 29, 1865; veteran. George W. Schriver, Sept. 12, 1861 pro. from corp. Jan. 20, 1865; must. out with company June 29, 1865 veteran.

Barnitz, Jonathan, Sept. 14, 1861

James

Connelly, William, July

New

died at

;

Creek,

W.

Va.,

Aug.

1,

;

;

1862.

Bentley, John, Sept. 14, 1861

died Oct. 29, 1861.

;

;

Callan, John, July

9,

1864

substitute; captured Sept.

;

8,

1864.

;

Grimes, Sept.

S.

1861

14,

out with company June

Theo. A. Gardner, Sept.

Edward

T.

Rudy,

Oct.

29, 1865

14, 1861

1,

pro.

;

1861

;

from

corp.

16, 1865

;

must.

Cotton, William, July

Cook, Harris

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

captured June

;

May

veteran.

23.

1864; died at Ander-

William Drabeustadt, Sept.

14, 1861

;

from corp. June

pro.

1,

1864

;

disch.

Robert D. Greer, Sept.

;

on surg. certif. April 7, 1863. killed near Winchester, Va., June

;

1864

1S64

2,

15,

wounds received

substitute

;

;

;

absent, sick, at inUBter out.

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

on surg. certif. Jan. 12, 1862. on surg. certif. April 9, 1863.

disch.

;

14, 1861; died at Philadelphia, Pa.,

May

at Wilderness, Va.,

May

on surg.

31, of

certif.

Clarendon, David, July

died Dec.

;

Corporals.

29, 1864; drafted;

dropped from the

Henry

Drabenstadt, Frank, Sept. 14, 1861

;

C. Shatzler, Sept. 14, 1861; pro. to corp. Oct. 23, 1864; prisoner 2,

1865; disch.

June

17, 1865; veteran.

Jacob Harman, Sept. 12,1801; pro. to Corp. Jan. 6, 1S65; absent, with leave, at must, out; veteran. Thomas Malone, Sept. 14, 1861 pro. to Corp. Jan. 20, 1865; must, out ;

with company June 29, 1865; veteran.

John

G. Hotter, Sept. 12, 1861

;

pro. to Corp.

21, 1865;

must, out

;

of term. A. Mathias.Sept. 14, 1861 14, 1861

;

;

23, 1864;

abBent at exp. of

term.

William H. Zorger, Sept.

drafted

;

disch. by G. 0.

1861;

wounded Nov. 27,1863; absent

Johu A. Hiney, Sept. 14, 1861 abBent, sick, at exp. of term. Samuel Madlam, Sept. 14, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 12,

27,

;

died at Alexandria, Va., April

1,

1864; grave

1715.

Epler, Bcnneville C, Sept. 14, 1861; diBch.Oct. 13, 1861, at exp. of term. Epler, Jacob D., Sept. 14, 1861 4,

1864

disch. Oct. 13, 1S64, at exp. of term.

;

disch.

;

on surg.

certif.

March, 1863.

drafted.

;

James A., Sept. 12, 1861 absent, sick, at muster out veteran. Fisher, Silas, June 3, 1864 drafted; must, out with company June 29, Fellers,

;

;

;

1865.

at

18, 1S65.

Griffith,

William, Jan.

Gauntz, Daniel, Sept.

;

1862.

;

1865;

Gastrock, Levi, Sept. 14, 1861

;

rolls.

must, out with cumpany Juue 29, 1865.

17, 1865;

14, 1861

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

Glazier, Frederick, Sept. 14, 1861

;

John Smith, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. March 28, 1863. John Lees, Oct. 31, 1861; prisoner from July 9, 1864, to Feb. 22,

July

captured Juue 23, 1864.

Fainter, Robert, July 29, 1864; substitute; dropped from the 14,

exp. of term.

disch. April 27, 1865.

;

Foor, Jeremiah, June 3, 1864; drafted; disch. by G. O. June 9, 1865. Fecher, George, July 6, 1864; drafted; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps March

disch. Oct. 13, 1S64, at exp. of term.

wounded June

;

Diehl, Lewis H., Dec. 26, 1861; disch. Dec. 26, 1864, at exp. of term. Diehl, Eli, Sept. 14, 1861

Evans, Wilson, June

Frank M. Peters, Sept. 12,1861 pro. to corp. May 16, 1865; must, out with company June 29, 1865; veteran. Joseph M. Funk, Sept. 14, 1861; wounded May 6, 1S64; absent at exp.

Lucas Shurer, Sept.

25, 1864

1865.

Eicholtz, William, Sept. 14, 1861

March

with company June 29, 1865; veteran.

John

rolls.

company June

29, 1865.

Drake, Christopher, June

,

May

16, 1865;

4, 1862.

Carter, Charles H., July 30, 1864; substitute; dropped from the rolls.

7, 1864.

Aug. Winegardner, Sept. 14, 1861; pro. to corp. June 23, 1864; prisoner from June 23, 1864, to April 28, 1865 disch. June 16, 1S65 veteran. 23, 1864, to

May

veteran.

Dorfurt, John, July 3, 1864; substitute; must, out with

from June

8, 1864.

absent, sick, at muster out.

absent, sick, at muster out.

;

E., Sept. 14, 1861

Clune. John, Sept. 14, 1861

Coble, Moses, Sept. 14, 1861

1863

William Walters, Sept.

substitute

;

Carrol, William, Sept. 14, 1861; disch.

disch.

14, 1S61

James

1864; substitute; captured Sept.

7,

Crist, Addison, Sept. 14, 1861; disch.

Oct. 13, 1S64, at exp. of term.

Sobieski Leib, Sept. 14, 1861

July

Crone, Richard, Corl,

sonville, Ga., Oct. 10, 1864; grave 10,622.

J.,

7,

;

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

disch. Oct. 13, 1864; at exp. of term.

Gallagher, John, Sept. 14, 1861 ; diBch. on surg. certif. Jan. 26, 1864. Hanks, Benson, June 3, 1864 ; drafted must, out with company June ;

29, 1866.

;

GENERAL HISTORY. Hoover, William, June 29, 1864; substitute; must, out with company June 29, 1866. Houck, John A., Jan. 29, 1864; must, out with company June 29, 1865. Hummel, Joseph, Sept. 14, 1861 captured June 23, 1864 died at Ander;

;

sonville, Ga.,

March

Hursh, Samuel, July

absent, sick, at muster out.

;

Hull, Matthias, Sept. 14, 1861; prisoner Irom

1865

;

disch.

July

May

23, 1864, to

Hurley, John, Sept. 14, 1861

F., Sept. 14, 1861

Herrold, John, Sept. 14. 1861

Hann, Joseph C, June

3,

June

23, 1864, to

16,

May

2,

drafted

;

14, 1801; died at

died Oct. 27. of

;

Sept. 14, 1861

;

Henderson, David, Aug.

Va.,

June

3,

1863.

15, 1863.

Richardson, James, Sept. veteran.

;

company June

29,

Roush, Adam, June

1864; substitute; disch. by S. 0., date un-

Roush, Jacob, June

1865.

company June

1864; drafted; must, out with

9,

14, 1861

disch.

;

Reidhinger, Frederick, Oct. 31, 1861

1864; substitute; dropped from the rolls.

1,

1864; drafted; must, out with

1,

May

disch. on surg. certif.

;

29, 1865.

Quinn, Richard, Sept.

Hann, George, July 28, 1864; substitute; dropped from the rolls. Hays, James, July 29, 1864; substitute; dropped from the rolls. Henderson, George, July 30, 1864 substitute dropped from the rolls.

;

on surg.

certif.

May

16, 1865

vet-

;

absent, sick, at muster out.

1861; absent with leave at muster out

14,

company June

drafted; must, out with

10, 1864;

29, 1865.

Jones, William B., July

6,

known.

1864; drafted

4,

;

must, out with company June 29,

1865.

Johnson, Jacob, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Sept. 23, 1863. Kueller, Charles, July 25, 1864; substitute; must, out with company ;

June 29, 1865. Kinsman, Jacob, Jan.

by G. 0. Aug.

Sept. 14, 1861

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

1861

14,

must, out with company June 29, 1865;

12, 1861;

veteran. absent, sick, at muster out.

;

1865.

1864; substitute; died at Winchester, Va.,

3,

Roozell, John, July 29, 1S04 2,

substitute; dropped from the rolls.

;

1804; substitute; must, out with

31, 1861

disch.

;

Nov.

Sept. 12,1861; disch.

13, 18.64, at exp. of

on surg.

term.

May

certif.

16, 1865;

veteran.

Thomas W.,

June 29, 1865. Simmons, John C, Sept. Spayd, William F., Sept.

;

14, 1861

;

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

14, 1861

;

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

Smith, Bernard, Sept. 14, 1861; disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term. Spangler, Levi, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 12, 1802. ;

Feb. 22, 1864; substitute; disch. by G. 0.

June

6,

1865.

Moore, David, July

company June

Shrom. John C, Oct. 28, 1862; must, out with company June 29, 1865. Snyder, Augustus, July 28, 1864 drafted must, out with company ;

Lewis, Jacob, Sept. 14, 1861 ; disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term. Lenhart, Henry H., Sept. 14, 1861 ; disch. on surg. certif. March 17, 1863.

Luckenbaugh, W.,

An-

29, 1865.

Lonkart, Abraham, Jan. 21, 1805; must, out with company June 29,

Long, James A., Oct.

died at

4, 1864.

Snow, Elisha, July substitute

;

;

;

Richard, Henry H., June

Nov.

in action.

Lewis, Edward, July 14, 1861

23, 1864

;

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

23, 1804.

grave 10,803.

;

Rupp, John K., Sept. 14, 1861 disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term. Renninger, Adam, June 20, 1804; drafted disch. by G. O. May 19, 1865.

exp. of term.

Karstetler, Jacob, July 30, 1864; substitute; disch. Nov. 13, 1864, for

Logan, James, Sept.

Abraham,

dersouville, Ga., Oct. 13, 1864

23, 1865.

14, 1861; disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at

Kipple, Cyrus W., Sept.

wounds received

Roat,

Rouch, George W., Sept. 14, 1861; captured June Ramsey, William, Sept. 14, 1861 captured June ;

12, 1864; disch.

Kendrick, James, Sept.

Lucas,

Thomas,

Quickel, Gideon, June

grave

14, 1864;

2671.

Jones, Edward, June

company June

29, 1865.

Plain, John, July 30, 1864; substitute; dropped from the rolls.

wounds received

Alexandria Sept.

1865, for

6,

Powers, John, July 21, 1864; substitute; dropped from the rolls. Powell, Ackiuson, Sept. 14, 1861; missing in action near Winchester,

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.

Hanig, Lewis, Sept.

substitute; disch. Feb.

1864;

3,

29, 1805.

Price,

disch. on surg. certif. April 7, 1863.

;

1864

Oxenrider, John; June

Peston, Jay E., July 26, 1864; substitute; must, out with prisoner from

;

absent, sick, at exp. of term.

;

;

Payler, Samuel,

19, 1865.

Heiman, Michael, Sept. 14, 1861 1865; disch. June 21, 1865. Hunter, John

June

Nauss, Alexander, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term. Oren, James, Sept. 14, 1861; prisoner from June 23, 1804, to April 19, 1865; disch. June 9, 1865.

wounds received at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. June 3, 1864; drafted; must, out with company June

1865; grave 12,719; veteran.

2,

13, 1864; drafted

187

1864; substitute; must, out with

9,

company June

Smith,

Thomas

S.,

Sept. 14, 1861 3,

Schmuck, John, Feb.

19, 1864; disch.

1S62; disch. Jan.

Sheets, John, Sept. 14, 1861

29, 1865.

Morrison, James, July

14,

1864

Miller, William, Sept. 14, 1861

Mansberger, Levi, Sept. disch. July 8, 1865 ;

substitute; absent, sick, at muster out.

;

;

14, 1861

prisoner from Sept. 24, 1864, to

;

March

;

prisoner from Sept. 24, 1864, to Feb.

27, 1865; disch. April 11, 1865.

1,

Watson, William W., June pany June 19, 1S65.

Weaver, William, June

absent, sick, at exp. of term.

;

3,

Williams, Thomas, July

Mummert, Andrew, Jan.

Woaldeu, Henry W., July

;

3, 1862; disch. Jan. Mort, Jefferson, June 28, 1864; drafted.

McDonald, Rannell, June June 29, 1865. McElroy, Joseph, Sept.

substitute

;

3,

3,

1S65, at exp. of term.

12, 1862.

1865.

;

disch. Oct. 13, 1S64, at exp. of term.

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

1S64; substitute; killed at Fisher's Hill,

28, 1864; substitute;

must, out with com-

compauy June

29, 1865. 7,

1864; substitute; absent, sick, at muster out. 1S64; substitute; absent, sick, at muster

3,

out.

dropped from the

;

Welker, Henry C, Sept.

rolls.

company

1864; drafted; must, out with

must, out with company June

12, 1861;

3,

1864; drafted; must, out with

Myers, John, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. Oct. 13, 1S64, at exp. of term. Meisenhelter, W., Sept. 14, 1861; disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

Myers, Peter, July 12, 1864

Jan

1865, at exp. of term.

died Jan. 17, 1863.

;

14, 1861

14, 1861

Veoman, Nathaniel, Aug.

3,

by G. 0. June

Va., Sept. 22, 1804.

27, 1865.

Millikeu, Franklin, Sept. 14, 1S01

Mattis, Silas, Sept. 14, 1801

Updegrove, Thomas, Sept. Voglesong, John, Sept.

disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term.

disch. on surg. certif.

;

Sayers, Thomas, Jan.

29, 1865;

14,

1861

captured June 23, 1864

;

;

died at

An-

dersonville, Ga., Jan. 20, 1865 grave 12,493. Wise, Augustus, Sept. 14, 1861; disch. Oct. 13, 1864, at exp. of term. Wilhelm, Henry, Sept. 14, 1861; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July ;

9,

1S64; absent at exp. of term.

McCoy, Jacob, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. Oct. 13, 1S64, at exp. of term. McClane, William, Sept. 14, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Sept. 11, 1802. ;

;

Mcllvain, Thomas

J.,

Sept. 12,1861; disch. on surg. certif.

May

16, 1865;

6,

1804; substitute; must, out with

company June

29, 1865.

Newell, Oriel G., July 22, 1864; substitute; must, out with company

June

;

3,

1865.

Watts, Thomas, Sept. 14, 1861; died Aug. 23, 1863; buried in United

veteran.

Nagle, David, July

Wertz, Gottlieb, Sept. 14, 1S61 disch. on surg. certif., date unknown. Williams, Andrew B., June 9, 1864; drafted; disch. by G. O. June

29, 1865.

Nicholas, George, June 10, 1864

;

drafted

;

must, out with company June

Wilson. James, Jan.

6,

1865

;

;

wounded Aug.

16, 1864

;

absent at exp.

of term. ;

disch. on surg. certif.

May

16,

1865

;

vet-

not on muster-out

roll.

York, Francis M., June

28,

1804; substitute; absent, sick, at muster out.

Zartman, Samuel, Sept.

14,

1S61

Zorger, George, Sept. 14, 1861

29, 1865.

Nichols, Urias R., Sept. 14, 1861

Noel, John A., Sept. 12, 1861

States General Hospital Cemetery, Annapolis, Md. Webster, Thomas, July 5, 1S64; substitute.

captured June 23, 1864.

captured Juue 21, 1864.

;

Zorger, Peter F., Sept. 14, 1861

:

;

prisoner from Sept 24, 1864, to Feb. 28,

1865; disch. April 27, 1865. Zook, David, Sept. 14, 1861 ; disch. on surg. Zorger, Isaac U., Oct. 31, 1S61

;

disch.

Nov.

certif.

Dec. 23, 1862.

13, 1S64, at exp. of

term.

HISTOKY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

188

NINETY-SECOND REGIMENT (NINTH CAVALRY). The Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Ninety-second of the line, at first known as the Lochiel Cavalry, was organized on the 29th of August, 1861, in compliance with an order of the Hon. Simon Cameron, Secretary of

War, with Edward

colonel,

Thomas

C. Williams, of Harrisburg, as

C. James, of Philadelphia, as lieu-

Thomas J. Jordan, of Harrisburg, Under this authority the officers above named appointed the necessary line-officers, and directed them to proceed at once to recruit men for their respective companies. The place of rendezvous was at Camp Cameron, near Harrisburg. The regiment was composed of twelve companies, principally tenant-colonel, and as major.

Dauphin, Luzerne, LanCumberland, Mifflin, Blair, Wayne, Chester, Lehigh, Susquehanna, and in the city and county of Philadelphia. The field and many of the iine-officers and privates had served for the short term in 1861, and Col. Williams had served in the militia as early as 1832 had served with Gen. Scott in Mexico from the capture of Vera Cruz to the raised in the counties of caster,

Huntingdon,

Perry,

;

wound at commanded,

surrender of the capital, receiving a

first

the storming of Chapultepec, and had

with the rank of brigadier-general, the brigade as the Scott

Legion of Philadelphia

in

known

the three

months' service.

By

the 1st of October the companies were

the men, by

On

drill

and

full,

and

discipline, fitted for the field.

the 20th of November, by order of the Secretary

moved by rail to Pittsburgh, and thence by boat to Louisville, Ky., where upon its arrival it was reported to Gen. Buell, in command of the Department of the Cumberland, and placed in of War, the regiment

camp at Jeflersonville, Ind., opposite to Louisville. Mounted drill was at once commenced, a school for and by the 10th of January, 1862, by constant hard work and strict discipline, the regiment had acquired such proficiency that it was or.lered to the front, the enemy occupying the line of Green River. On the advance of Gens. Buell and Mitchell, in the early part of February, upon Gen. A. Sidney Johnston's position at Bowling Green, in compliance with an urgent request made by citizens and the Legislature of Kentucky, the regiment was ordered to remain for the protection of the State, and was posted, the First Battalion, under command of Col. Williams, at Grayson Springs, the Second, under Lieut.-Col. James, at Calhoun, in Western Kentucky, and the Third, under Maj. Jordan, at Bacon Creek, on the line of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. On the 5th of March the regiment was ordered

hundred and ninety-three of men, with Lieut.-Col. Wood, Morgan's second in command, Morgan himself narrowly escaping capture by the fleetness of his celebrated steed to the Cumberland River, which he swam, leaving the animal a prize to the regiment. On the 14th of May the Third Battalion marched from Lebanon to Livingston, in Overton County, after Morgan, who was again in the field, and at Spring Creek came upon his rear-guard, where after a spirited action the guard was captured, with the quartermaster of Morgan's brigade. Pushing on after Morgan, who declined fighting, he was forced to the Cumberland Mountains at Sparta, where his command scattered upon the various roads leading to Chattanooga. On the 3d of June the Third Battalion marched from Lebanon, Tenn., to Tompkinsville, Ky., and on the 6th, Capt. Hugh McCullough was warmly engaged at Moore's Hill, defeating Col. Hamilton, who had a largely supartisan, capturing two his

McCuland ten badly wounded. Capt. McCullough, a brave and competent officer, was shot through the stomach while leading his men to the charge. On the 9th of July, 1862, Morgau, with a force of over two thousand men, advanced against Tompkinsville. To meet this force Maj. Jordan, who was in command of the post, had but two hundred and thirty, and after maintaining an unequal contest for two hours, finding himself being surrounded, he retired to Burksville, Ky. In this engagement fifty- seven of the enemy were killed and one hundred and forty wounded, while the loss in the battalion was only ten killed, fourteen wounded, and nineteen taken prisoners. Among the latter was Maj. Jordan, who had his horse killed in the action. Lieut. Aaron Sullivan was among the killed. perior force, with a loss of the leader, Capt.

lough, and four

officers established,

In the

men

mean time

Springfield, and the

that the

killed

the First Battalion remained at

Second

at Clarksville.

enemy was penetrating Kentucky

Finding in large

regiment was again united under Col. Williams, at Lebanon, Ky., early in August, and was employed in keeping the State clear of Morgan and his bands and in watching the advance of Kirby force, the

Smith.

After the disastrous battle of Richmond,

Ky., on the 30th, in connection with the Ninth Ken-

tucky Cavalry,

it

covered the retreat of Gen. Nelson

the enemy's advance under Jenkins and Col. Scott, of the First Louisiana

to

Louisville, fighting daily

who displayed great activity, attacking at every favorable point. At Shelbyville it had a sharp encounter, defeating Jenkins, killing twenty-seven of Cavalry,

men and

After reaching guarding the roads in the direction of Tennessee, on which Gen. Buell was marching for the relief of Kentucky. Upon Gen. Buell's arrival, in conjunction with the Second Michigan, it took the advance to Perryville, and by its boldness in pushing the enemy's rear brought on the his

capturing forty-four.

into Tennessee, the First Battalion to Springfield,

Louisville

the Second to Clarksville, and the Third to Nashville. Soon after reaching Nashville the Third Battalion was moved to Gallatin, and on the 4th of May it first met the enemy under Morgan at Lebanon, where, with the Seventh Pennsylvania and the Third Kentucky Cavalry, it most signally defeated that daring

sanguinary battle fought there, sustaining the

it

was employed

in

fire

of

GENERAL HISTORY.

189

his infantry until relieved

command being

then formed on the right of the

tion of Sergt.

by McCook's corps. It line, and by its steadiness foiled every attempt of the enemy's cavalry to turn its flank. In this action it had ten killed and twenty-seven wounded. In general orders issued after the action Gen. Buell says, " The Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry behaved most bravely, being at one time compelled to stand for three-quarters of an hour under the concentrated fire of three batteries of the enemy's artillery, and only retiring when ordered to do so." By hard service the regiment had by this time become much weakened, and about one-half of the men were dismounted. It was accordingly ordered to Louisville for fresh horses and equipments. After receiving these, in company with the Second Michigan,

it

marched

to Nicholasville to prepare for a raid

into East Tennessee

upon the

railroads

communi-

cating with the rebel capital, by which succor should

be prevented from reaching Gen. Bragg before the advance of Rosecrans to Stone River. On the 22d of

December the

expedition, under

command

of Gen.

Carter, left Nicholasville, and on reaching Big Hill all the commissary stores and one hundred rounds of ammunition per man were distributed, roads and civilization were left behind, and the command took to the deer-paths of Pine, Cumberland, and Clinch

Mountains. To one unacquainted with the way it is difficult to form any adequate conception of the hardships which the troops encountered on this march.

These mountains, cheerless and dark, and savage as when Boone first saw them, are at this point one hundred miles wide, and can only be crossed by following the paths worn by the deer and the Indian ages before. Over these paths, in single file, marched the regiments, traveling day and night, swimming the Cumberland and Clinch Rivers, and fording the numerous creeks on the route, until the 1st of January, 1863, when it reached the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad at the bridge spanning the Watauga. This was defended by a company of about one hundred strong from the command of Gen. Humphrey Marshall, well intrenched. As time was all important, the cavalry was dismounted, the place carried by assault, and the bridge, a structure of two long spans, was burned. As it was deemed unwise to cumber the column with prisoners, the captured party was at once paroled, and the command moved down the railroad ten or twelve miles to the point where it The bridge here was crosses the Holston River. defended by a force of two hundred and fifty men, and intrenchments skillfully conhaving stockades structed for its defense. Without delay these were stormed, and the entire rebel force taken prisoners. In this action the Ninth lost six killed and twentyAmong the latter was Sergt. Ellis T. five wounded. Hamersly, who was shot through the thigh, the missile inflicting a painful and dangerous wound. All the badly wounded were left with the paroled enemy, the

without ambulances, with tin- excepHamersly, who resolutely refused to remain, and succeeded in keeping his horse and moving

with the column until it reached Kentucky. leaving the Holston bridge, and destroying a

After trestle-

work of nearly a mile across a swamp, the command faced for Kentucky, and by skillful strategy, joined with signal enterprise and rapidity of movement, succeeded in eluding the enemy, eight thousand strong, under Marshall, and recrossed the Cumberland Mountains, returning by the same paths by which it advanced. The success of this raid, in the face of a greatly superior force of the

enemy, was the much chagrin to the rebel chieftains, that Marshall, the commander, was relieved and never cause of so

afterwards restored to his

command.

The regiment reached

Nicholasville from this raid on the night of the 13th of January, with two-thirds its men dismounted, the animals for more than one hundred miles while crossing the mountains being

of

without food.

In the mean time, Col. Williams, for

some cause of difficulty involving a question of rank, had resigned, and Lieut.-Col. James on the 13th of January died. Maj. Jordan was accordingly promoted to colonel. After a few days' rest, the regiment marched to Louisville, where it was remounted, and rail to Nashville. On the 8th of February, two days after its arrival, it proceeded, by order of Gen. Rosecrans, to Franklin, where, after a sharp skirmish, Gen. Forrest's brigade of the enemy was driven from the town. Col. Jordan's command here formed the right wing of the Army of the Cumberland, which was now confronting the enemy at Liberty on the left, Shelbyville and Tullahoma in the centre, and Triune and Franklin on its extreme right. At Spring Hill, fourteen miles in front of Franklin, was the extreme of the left wing of the enemy, commanded by Gen. Van Dorn, Wheeler and Forrest commanding divisions under him, with a force of twelve thousand cavalry. The advance brigade of this force was at Thompson's Station, nine miles out on the Columbia pike, the Eighth Mississippi doing picket duty three miles nearer Franklin, and the Fourth Mississippi performing the same duty five miles to the right, on the Carter's Creek pike. For eighteen days the Ninth, aided by three hundred men from the Second Michigan Cavalry, without other support,

thence by

confronted this strong rebel force, and daily, to demade strong attacks upon his advance positions. This bold strategy was entirely suc-

ceive the enemy,

and the weakness of the post was not disVan Dorn until the morning of the 4th when he advanced in force to storm the place; but a division of infantry, under Col. John

cessful,

covered by of March,

Coburn, of Indiana, having reached Franklin duriug the night of the 3d, the whole command marched out on the morning of the 4th, and four miles from Franklin met the enemy. After a hotly-contested engagement, which lasted from nine in the morning

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

190

until three in the afternoon, the

enemy

jvas finally

der of the battle.

driven back to his position at Thompson's Station.

encounter

In this action the regiment suffered severely, having twelve killed and fifty-one wounded. On the follow-

mentary

who had assumed compursue and drive the enemy

ing morning, Col. Coburn,

mand, determined

to

from the station, his chosen ground. Immediately after daylight, Col. Jordan was ordered to advance with his regiment and drive the

enemy

into position.

As Jordan moved out skirmishing opened, and every moment became heavier. At the hills in front of the station the enemy made a determined stand, but the First Battalion,

under Lieut.-Col. Savage, and the

Second, under Maj. Detweiler, by a most gallant charge, drove him from his position and held the

ground

until the infantry

had formed and advanced

This action proved disastrous to the Union arms, and Col. Coburn, with three thousand eight hundred infantry, was captured. Col. Jordan,

to their relief.

with the cavalry, fought his way back to Franklin, bringing off two hundred and twenty prisoners, together with the entire artillery and baggage-train of

army and

all the wounded that the ambulances For the heroic part borne by the regiment in this action it was mentioned honorably in special orders by Gen. Rosecrans. In the campaign against Bragg in Tennessee, which culminated in the battle of Chickamauga, the regiment took part, and with the First Brigade, First Division of the cavalry, under Gen. Stanley, led the advance of our army. In the initial movements it fought in the battles of Rover, Middletown, and Shelbyville, and at the latter place charged the left flank of the enemy, while the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry charged the centre, and in a most stubborn hand-to-hand encounter succeeded in capturing nearly a thousand prisoners, with the enemy's battery, breaking up entirely his cavalry organization, and driving the few who escaped as mere fugitives upon the main force at Tullahoma. Among the killed was

the

could bear.

Capt. Gilbert Waters.

It

also participated

in

the

action at Elk River, and by passing the stream above

the enemy and boldly attacking him, forced him from his position at the fords in front

the right flank of

of Gen. Turchin, enabling his

command

to pass the

and follow the retreating columns.

At Cowan, Cumberland Mountains, the regiment captured two hundred of the rear-guard of Bragg as he was passing. A few days previous to the battle of Chickamauga it pene'trated to a point near Lafayette, Ga., and captured river

a few days later, near the foot of the

by a gallant charge a part of the advance guard of Gen. Longstreet, then marching from the army of Lee in Virginia to reinforce Bragg, and was thus enabled to give Rosecrans the

first

positive informa-

At Chickamauga the our line, and after the

tion of Longstreet's presence.

regiment held the right of

McCook's corps closed on the right of Gen. Thomas, and defended his flank during the remaindefeat of

it

For

its

conduct in

this desperate

Thomas a compliJordan was commended for

received from Gen.

notice,

and

his gallantry in the

Col.

most

flattering terms.

During the winter of 1863 and spring of 1864 it was in East Tennessee, and fought in the battles of Dandridge, New Market, Mossy Creek, and Fair Garden, capturing at the latter place the artillery of the

enemy.

The regiment having

re-enlisted

was given

a furlough of thirty days, and returned to Pennsyl-

vania early in April.

was again

By

the latter part of

May

it

having recruited its thinned ranks in the mean time to twelve hundred men. While at Louisville receiving arms and horses, Gen. John H. Morgan made his last raid into Kentucky, and was pushing for Frankfort, at which place he designed crossing the Kentucky River, and then by overpowering the detachments scattered along the Louisville and Nashville Railroad as guard, breaking up the track and burning the bridges, cut off Sherman, who was then far on his march to Atlanta, from his base of supplies, and compel him to fall back to Chattanooga. Col. Jordan at once volunteered to defend Frankfort, and seizing all the horses necessary to mount his command, and arming his men with common muskets, he marched by night to the capital, fifty-four miles, and successfully held the place, compelling Morgan to abandon his welllaid scheme, and fall back towards Pound Gap, near which place he was badly defeated by General Burbridge, who had a division of cavalry in his rear. The regiment soon after marched to Nashville, and thence to Chattanooga, arriving on the 2d of September. Here it was ascertained that the rebel Gen. Wheeler was crossing the mountains into Middle Tennessee, with all his cavalry. By order of Gen. J. B. Steedman, then in command at Chattanooga, the regiment at once started in pursuit, crossing the mountains direct to McMinnville, thence to Murfreesborough, where it arrived on the 5th. On the morning of the 6th it marched out twelve miles on the Woodbury and McMinnville Road to Readyville, wdiere it attacked and utterly defeated Gen. Dibberell's brigade of Wheeler's command, taking two hundred and ninety-four prisoners, a large proportion of whom were wounded with sabre cuts. The charge in this action was led by Maj. D. H. Kimmel, in a most gallant manner. The next day by order received by telegraph from Gen. Thomas, Col. Jordan was placed in command of all the cavalry in Tennessee, and directed to pursue the retreating enemy. He marched the same afternoon, and at Woodbury, just at dusk, met and defeated a part of the rebel Gen. Williams' division, under Col. Anderson. On the following morning he continued the pursuit to McMinnville, and the day following to Sparta, Gen. Williams constantly avoiding an action, though he had more than double the force under Col. tfordan. At Sparta the enemy took to the mountains and passed into East in the field at Louisville,

GENERAL HISTORY. Tennessee. For his conduct in refusing to

Gen. Williams was placed under arrest by Gen. Wheeler, from which he was not released until the end of the war. In acknowledgment of the good conduct of Col. Jordan and the troops under his command, of which the Ninth Pennsylvania constituted two-thirds, complimentary orders were issued by Gen. Van Cleve, at Murfreesborough, Gen. Milroy, at Tullahoma, and Gen. Steedman, at Chattanooga. The regiment then marched to join Gen. Sherman at Marietta, Ga., and on the 14th of November started on its march with that great chieftain to the sea. Previous to moving it was assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division of Cavalry, the whole under command of Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, and was assigned to the right wing of the army under Gen. Howard, leading his advance to Macon and Milledgeville. On the 16th, the first day out from Atlanta, it encountered Gen. Wheeler, who with his cavalry occupied the old works of the enemy at Lovejoy Station, on the Macon Railroad. The position was a formidable one, having been well intrenched by Gen. Hood. As the brigade moved to the attack the enemy opened a galling fire from four guns, but after a short and sharp encounter, by a most gallant charge, the regiment gained a lodgment in the works, driving the enemy from his guns and capturing them with more than three hundred prisoners. The guns were at once manned by the regiment, and were retained by it until the end of the war. They were the same guns that had been surrendered to the superior forces of the enemy near Macon by Gen. Stoneman some fight,

months previous. Early in December, while marching on Macon, it skirmished heavily with the enemy, and with the brigade pushed the cavalry of Wheeler within the defenses of the city. On the day following, in conjunction with Walcott's brigade of Wood's division, Fifteenth Corps,

it

fought in the battle of Bear Creek

or Griswoldville, defeating Wheeler, but not without

having ninety-five men killed and wounded. to the left flank of our army, it demonstrated in the direction of Augusta, and after crossing the Ogeechee at the falls turned southeast towards Milieu, one of the prison-pens for Union soldiers. When within one day's march of Way nesbo rough, Wheeler made a sudden night attack, but was defeated, though he followed up the command closely to Waynesborough, where he again made a fruitless night attack. On the day following, it having been discovered that the Union prisoners had been removed from Millen, and the necessity for prosevere

loss,

Moving through Milledgeville

1!M

the column already across the stream. By a bold charge the enemy was beaten off, and the regimen!

was enabled

now

to join the

in line of battle

remainder of the command, and awaiting attack. It had

its position when the enemy advanced, but was met with such a galling fire that he was compelled to draw off, and the brigade marched

scarcely gained

on unmolested to Louisville. In all these engagements Wheeler's cavalry outnumbered that opposed to him.

Two

days

later,

the infantry having

come up,

it

again moved on Waynesborough. Gen. DibberePs division of Wheeler's cavalry was found in line of battle

Buckhead Church and defeated. Pushing forward from its camp at Waynesborough, where it remained one day, the command on the following morning again attacked Wheeler, who had barricaded himself within cannon-shot of our front. The Ninth Pennsylvania at

had the centre, while the Ninth Ohio was on the right and the Fifth Ohio on the left, with the Third and Fifth Kentucky and Eighth Indiana in reserve. In this order the command moved over a beautifully undulating plain, and in twenty minutes the barricades were stormed and Wheeler was in

full retreat.

At Waynesborough he again made a stand, and

after a severe action he was driven from the town, and retreated across Brier Creek, on the road leading to

On the same day the command faced towards Savannah, where it arrived with the whole army on the 21st of December. After a month's delay the regiment again took the field, and entering South Carolina at Sister's Ferry marched through Robertsville and Barnwell to Blackville, on the Charleston and Augusta Railroad, where it encountered and defeated a portion of Wheeler's command, and following the railroad towards Augusta, two days later, developed the strength and Augusta.

position of the

enemy

at Polecat Ponds, near Aiken,

where he had been reinforced by Hampton's division. On the day following Wheeler and Hampton attacked with their whole force, but were signally defeated. Without pausing, the brigade moved towards Columbia, the capital of the State, and after taking Lexington and capturing a portion of Wheeler's rearguard,

moved

in the direction of Charlotte, N. C, Black Stake's Station, on the Columbia and Charlotte Railroad, where it met and defeated a force of the enemy. Crossing the Catawba at Rocky Mount, and marching thence by Lancaster and Chesterfield Court-House, it entered North Carolina, crossas

far

as

ceeding farther in this direction obviated, the com-

ing the Great Pedee River near the southern line of the State, and occupied Rockingham. On the morning of the 11 th of March the command reached Favette-

mand

ville,

turned toward Louisville, Ga., to form a junc-

which would cross the Ogeechee at that point. During the day Wheeler followed closely, and at Buckhead Creek made a heavy attack upon the Ninth, which was in the rear, in the hope of cutting it off from the rest of

tion with Gen. Baird's division of infantry,

the

enemy

few days of rest

retiring, it

skirmishing slightly. After a

moved towards Goldsborough, and

on the 16th, at Averyborough. was engaged in a most determined action, lasting from six in the morning until

rebel

two in the afternoon, against a division of the army led by McLaws, which resulted in the

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

192

capture of a large number of prisoners, with Gen. Rhett of the First Brigade South Carolina Heavy Artillery.

Ninth

In this action Capt. E. A. Hancock of the and Capt. John Boal was killed, and

lost a leg,

brigade every twelfth man was killed or The infantry coming up took up the wounded. fighting and carried the rebel breastworks, capturing In the artillery and a large number of prisoners. February Col. Jordan was promoted to brigadiergeneral, the command of the regiment still resting with Lieut.-Col. Kimmel, who had been promoted to

in the

render, was furnished by this regiment, Maj.

Porter being in command.

command moved through

On

the 17th the

tions of

life.

ROLL OF COMPANY

NINTH CAVALRY (THREE YEARS'

B,

SERVICE). JRecruilcd in iKcujiliin Courtly.

Captains.

command marched toward Benton-

of the Twentieth Corps, and with it participated in the battle which ensued on the 19th, the cavalry assisting materially in securing a

on the

left flank

triumph on that hotly-contested field. After refitting and resting near Goldsborough, the cavalry on the 9th of April again took the field, and while the infantry

moved directly on Johnston's position at Smithfield, it moved by a more circuitous route by the old battlefield of Bentonville, to reach the rear of the

enemy

and capture Raleigh. To accomplish this purpose required constant marching day and night. On the morning of the second day the cavalry struck the head of the enemy's retreating columns, and after a fierce and sanguinary conflict compelled the enemy to march by the flank, between Raleigh and Neuce

Edward

G. Savage, Oct.

Surg.

1861; pro. to maj.

7,

borough, N. C, March

H May 23,

wounded at Averysmust, out with company July 18,

16, 1865

;

1865. First Lieutenants.

Lewis A. Gratz, Oct.

1861

7,

pro. to maj. 6th Regt.

;

Ky. Cay. Aug.

10,

1862.

Romeo R. Bacon, Aug. John O'Grady,

1,

1862

Oct. 23, 1861

res.

;

pro.

;

Feb. 11, 1863.

from 2d

lieut. Co.

K May

1863;

23,

res. Sept. 1, 1863.

William H. liaugher, Oct. Co.

B May

26, 1861

31, 1863;

company July

;

pro. from sergt. Co. I to 2d lieut.

to 1st lieut.

May

30, 186*

must, out with

;

18, 1865.

Second Lieutenants. J.

Frank Miller, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. to 1st lieut. Co. C Aug. 4, 1862. MacKnight, Oct. 19, 1861 pro. from sergt. Co. F Aug. 7, 1862; ;

0. B.

;

1st lieut. Co.

M May 22,

George W. Leamy, Oct.

In this action Asst.in the left lung

while gallantly assisting by his presence in urging on

19, 1863.

lieut. Co.

1863; com. maj. Jan. 11,1865; not mustered;

by

S.

0.

June

1865

2,

to

1863.

17, 1861

James Moore was wounded

the men.

March

Elisha A. Hancock, Oct. 29, 1861; pro. from 1st

disch.

River, towards Hillsborough.

Greenville to Lexington,

where it remained until the 18th of July, when it was mustered out of service. Returning to Harrisburg, it was finally disbanded, and the war-worn veterans retired to their homes and the peaceful avoca-

that rank in September previous.

ville,

JohnM.

After the surrender the

pro.

;

from private Co. E

May

30,

1864

veteran.

;

First Sergeants.

Cyrus S. Spangler, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. from sergt. Aug. 31, 1864 must, out with company July 18, 1865; veteran. Thomas D. Griffith, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. to 2d lieut. Co. A May 22, 1863. ;

;

;

On the morning of the 13th the First Brigade, under Gen. Jordan, entered Raleigh, the city having been surrendered promptly by the civil authorities on Passing through the city the enemy his approach. under Wheeler and Hampton was found in position on the Hillsborough road, and was immediately attacked. In the engagement which ensued the Ninth bore the brunt of the action. The enemy fell back, hotly pursued by the cavalry for ten miles, to Morrisville, where he again made a stand. The line was quickly formed, the charge sounded, and the position carried, the enemy retreating in the wildest confusion over

Quartermaster-Sergeants.

Frederick Pick, Oct. Jan.

Henry

1,

1864

;

Deitrich, Oct.

muster-out

31, 1861

pro. to Corp. Sept. 1, 1862; to q.m.-sergt.

;

must, out with company July 1861

7,

pro.

;

1S65

18,

from private Oct.

;

veteran.

10, 1861

;

not .on

roll.

Romanus Behhey, Oct. 7, 1861; pro. from with company July 18, 1865 veteran.

corp. Jan.

1,

1864; must, out

1,

1864; must, out

;

Samuel

S.

Harper, Oct.

7,

with company July Sylvester Erb, Oct.

company July

7,

1861

pro. from private Jan.

;

IS, 1865

1861

pro.

;

18, 1865

;

veteran.

from corp. Jan.

1,

1864; must, out with

veteran.

;

George Shultz, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. from private Jan. 1, 1864 must, out with company July 18, 1865 veteran. Thomas E. Deitrich, Oct. 7, 1861; pro. from corp. Aug. 31,1864; must. ;

;

;

the plain, broken into fragments by the plunging fire of the artillery from the heights overlooking the valley.

The columns being again formed, started in pursuit, when a flag of truce was discovered approaching. It was received by the Ninth, under which was delivered the letter of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, directed to Gen. Sherman, asking for a meeting to determine the terms of surrender of the army under his command. This was the last fighting done, and the last guns fired in Sherman's command were from the battery of the Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. From Morrisville the command marched to Durham, and the escort to Gen. Sherman when he proceeded to the Burnett House to meet Gen. Johnston, and again

out with company July

Jacob F. Bassler, Oct. Co. I

May

7,

18,

to the

terms of sur-

1,

1862; to 2d lieut.

William Keiser, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. from musician, date unknown to 2d lieut. Co. G Aug. 23, 1864; veteran. Richard F. Martz, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. to regt. com.-sergt. May 20, 1865 ;

;

;

;

veteran. Corporals.

James Witman, Oct. 7, 1861; pro. to Corp. Jan, 1, 1864; must, company July 18, 1865; veteran. John L. Matter, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. to corp. Jan. 1, 1864 must, company July 18, 1865; veteran. Heury N. McCuitin, Nov. 16, 1861 pro. to corp. Jan. 1, 1864; with company July 18, 1865; veteran. Emanuel Klinger, Oct. 31, 1861; pro. to Corp. Jan. 1, 1864; with company July 18, 1865; veteran. ;

;

;

William Kreiger, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. to Corp. Jan. company July 18, 1865; veteran. ;

upon the occasion of agreeing

1865; veteran.

1861; pro. from Corp. Sept.

22, 1863.

1,

out with out with must, out

must, out

1864; must, out with

;;;

GENERAL HISTORY. William Thomas, Oct. 7. 1801 pro. to cor)). Jan. 1, 1804; must, out with company July 18,1866; veteran. Louis Goudy, Oct. 7, 18C1 pro. to corp. Feb. 15, 1866 must, out with company July 18, 1S65: veteran.

Grimm, Henry

;

March

Elias R. Tobias, Oct. 7, 1861; pro. to corp.

with company July

Aaron

Dec.

9,

29, 1865.

near Raleigh, H.O., April 13,1865; 18, 1863.

;

1,

1862

Hoehm, John,

disch. on surg.

;

Oct. 7, 1861

company July 18, 1865. must, out with company July Is, I860; vet-

;

1862.

Andrew M. Clark, June 1, 1863; Henry H. Hoffmau, Oct. 7, 1861 John Keretetter,

31, 1861; killed

May

Hicks, Thomas, Feb. 29, 1804; must, out with

pro to Corp. Sept.

;

disch. by G. O.

veteran.

1865; must, out

1,

;

Ganther, Barnabas, Oct. 7, 1861 died at Bridgeport, Ala., Oct. Geiger, George, disch., date unknown.

1865; veteran.

1,

Bressler, Oct. 7, 1861

certif.

Goudy, Samuel, Dec.

;

;

193

R., Sept. 22, 1861

Oct. 7, 1861

William H. Weist, Oct.

pro. to 2d lieut. Co.

M Aug. 23, 1864.

disch. on surg. certif.

;

Aug.

7,

J

Buglers. ;

Daniel Hoober, Oct.

1861

7,

1,

Hoffman, Jonathan

1S64; must, out

Hoke, Hiram

Aug.

E.,

disch.

;

by G.

0.

disch. by G. 0.

;

0. May 29, May 29, 1865. May 29, 1865.

by G.

24, 1864; disch.

1864

G., Sept. 23,

Hoober, George, Oct.

Saddlers.

1865.

disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 5, 1862. 7, 1861 Hartman, John G., Oct. 7, 1861 trans, to Co. K, date unknown. Hoke, Jonathan, Oct. 7, 1861 ; died at Jeffersonville, Ind., June 2, ;

;

pro. to saddler Feb.

;

1865;

;

1864; must, out

with company July 18, 1865;

Elias Dilfield, Feb. 22, 1864

18,

Heincy, Elias, Feb. 26, 1864; must, out with company July 18, 1865. Hoffman, John H., Feb. 19, 1864; must, out with company July Is, lsr,5. Hoffman, Philip, Feb. 16, 1864 must, out with company July 18, 1865. Hinkle, George, Aug. 29, 1864

from private Jan.

pro.

;

1,

company July

o

;

10,1865; veteran.

Henry Feindt, Oct. 7, 1861 pro. from private Jan. with company July 18, 1865; veteran.

must,

;

Henn, William, June 9, 1804; must, out with company July 18, 1865. Heuninger, Ephraim, June 9, 1864 disch. by G. O. July 15, 1865.

1864.

Solemn Grove, N. C, March

31, 1861; killed at

1801

7,

veteran.

28, 1862.

diea at Cleveland, Tenn., April

;

Hess, John W., Oct.

1,

1865

;

must, out with

I

Harinan, Philip, Oct.

company July IS, 1865; veteran. Henry Messner, Oct. 7, 1S61 pro. to regt. saddler Jan. 13, 1865 veteran. Isaac Messner, Oct. 7, 1861 drowned in Ohio River Nov. 29, 1861.

1861

7,

1862.

died at Stevenson, Ala., Sept. 17, 1863.

;

Harris, Henry, Nov. 21, 1861.

;

;

Henry, Jacob, Oct. 7, 1861. Holmes, John C, Oct. 7, 1861.

;

Heine, John, Oct. 7, 1861 not on muster-out roll. Junk, William A., Oct. 7, 1861 trans, to Co. K, date unknown. Kreiger, Reuben, Oct. 7, 1861 must, out with company July ;

Jacob

Weaver,

L.

Oct. 7, 1861

with company July

Jan.

pro. to far

;

1S65

18,

;

1,

1S64; must, out

veteran.

;

j

King, James, Aug.

Jacob Zarber, Oct.

1861

7,

March

pro. to blacksmith

;

1,

1865

must, out

;

I

with company July 18, 1865; veteran.

George W., April

.Allison,

11, 1864:

Klinger, Jonas, Feb. 10,

Kuntzelman, Amos,

Sept. 6, 1864; disch. 7,

1861

7,

1861

Lehman, Nathaniel, Feb.

James W., Feb.

1S64

17,

Armstrong, George, Jan.

;

absent, in hospital, at muster out.

25, 1S04

;

must, out with company July

Lebo, Philip

must, out with company July 18, 1865

;

veteran. 1S61

7,

;

must, out with company July

18,

with company July

tt

;

Oct. 7, 1861

May

by G. 0.

IS,

29, 1865.

disch. Feb. 29, 1864, to accept

;

commission

of 1st lieut. Miller,

Bitterman, William, Oct.

29, 1865.

;

1S64

22,

L., Sept. 23, 1864; disch.

Lehman, Joseph, 1861

7,

by G. O. May

trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date unknown. must, out with company July IS, 1865 vet-

;

;

1865. IS,

1865.

Burkle, George, Oct.

;

must, out with company July 18,

1865. Allison,

must, out with company July IS, 1865. 1S64; must, out with company July 18, 1865.

24, 1864

Keeper, Henry, Oct. Lengle, Henry, Oct.

Privates.

18, 1865;

;

John

N., Oct. 7, 1861

must, out with compauy July

;

18, 1865

;

1S65;

veteran.

Martz, Edward, Oct.

Bailey, Edward, Feb. IS, 1864; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

Matter, John, Oct.

1861

7,

7,

1861

;

must, out Aug.

;

2,

1865

;

veteran.

must, out with company July

18, 1865; vet-

Bailey, William, Oct. 7, 1861; disch. Oct. 26, 1864, to date exp. of term.

May 29, 1865. Bellow, Frederick, Aug. 27, 1864; disch. by G. O. May 29, 1865. Boner, Michael, Aug. 18, 1S64; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Bailey, George E., Feb. 16, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 31, 1865. Bricker, John, Aug. 29, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

Blesson, Patrick, Oct.

Matter, Michael, Oct.

1865; disch. by G. 0.

June

1, to

Bassler, Albert H., Oct. 7, 1861 Botts, Moses, Oct. 7, 1861

;

date

disch.

May

June unknown. certif.

6,

1862.

1861

7,

trans, to Co.

;

Adam,

by G.

O.

May

29, 1S65.

6, 1864; wounded at Averysborough, N. C, March 16, 1865; disch. on surg. certif. May 17, 1865. Duncan, Alfred, Feb. 29, 1864; absent, on furlough, at muster out. Dechant, Theodore C, Oct. 7, 1861 trans, to Co. K, date unknown. ;

Farber, George, Oct.

;

1861

7,

must, out with company July 18, 1865. must, out with company July

;

IS, 1865

veteran.

Foy, Thomas, Oct. 23, 1861 Feidt, Daniel

S.,

disch. Oct. 26, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

Oct. 7, 1861

Feindt, Francis, Oct.

7,

1861

Fetterholf, Samuel, Oct.

Folk, Josiah, Oct.

7,

;

trans, to Co.

K, date unknown.

trans, to Co. L, date

;

1861

7,

;

trans, to Co.

7,

1861

;

by G.

0.

1864; disch. by G.

Oct. 7, 1861

IS, 1865.

May 29, 1865. O. May 29, 1865.

pro. to sergt.-maj. July 1, 1864.

;

7,

Metzger, Frederick, Oct. 7, 1861; killed accidentally June 1, 1862. McClain, William P., Feb. 21, 1S64; must, out with company July IS, 1865.

McConley, George W., Feb. 1S65

;

1S64

26,

died at Newberne, N.

;

buried in National Cemetery, lot

McCoy, Jeremiah, Feb.

26, 1864; must, out

7,

C.,

April 19,

grave 136.

with company July

18, 1S65.

McCurtin, John, Oct. 7, 1861. Pell, Henry, Oct. 7, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. June 6, 1862. Russell, Joseph, Oct. 7, 1S61 must, out with company July 18,1865; ;

must, out with company July 18, 1865

1864

2,

;

must, out with company July 18,

1S65.

Rumberger, Simon, Feb.

22, 1S64;

must, out with company July

IS,

1865.

Gautz, Noah, Feb. Gratzer, Benjamin.

13

18,

company July

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

29, 1S64; disch.

Messner, William, Aug. S.,

;

veteran.

veteran.

J.,

Muckler, John, Aug.

Rhoads, William H., June

Green, Charles H., Jan. 25, 1864; must, out with company July 18, 1865.

Gee, John

Israel, Oct. 7, 1861

;

unknown.

K, date unknown.

1861; died at Cleveland, Tenn., April 26, 1S64.

Grimes, Thomas, Oct.

18,

1861; killed accidentally Aug. 31, 1S62; buried in National Cem., Lexington, Ky., circle 8, grave S4.

Cash, Franklin, Oct.

Evitts, Aaron, April 11, 1864

must, out with company July

;

;

Macbamer,

Messner, Philip, Oct.

Oct. 7, 1861.

Colyer, John, Aug. 29, 1864; disch.

1S64

27,

;

Marks, Cyrus

13, 1865.

Bokle,

May

Morgan, George, June 9, 1S64 disch. by G. O. July 25, 1865. Maurer, Henry, Jan. 25, 1864; must, out with compauy July 18, 1865. Miller, Benjamin, Feb. 19, 1864 must, out with company July 18, 1S65. Miller, David, Feb. 22, 1864; must, out with

K, date unknown. Bitterman, David, Oct. 7, 1861; died at Litchfield, Ky., March, 1862. Bitterman, Thomas H., Jan. 25, 1S64; killed near Raleigh, N. C, April Brubaker, John, Oct.

must, out with company July IS, 1865;

;

1865.

IS, 1865.

on surg.

trans, to Co. L, date

;

1S61

veteran.

Martz, Cornelius C,

1S64; prisoner from Nov. 21. 1864, to April 28,

4,

7,

May

17,

1864

May 3,

;

must, out with company July 18, 1865.

29,1864; must, out with

1864

;

company July

never joined company.

18, 1S65.

Riekert, Samuel, Feb. 25, 1S64

must, out with company July IS, 1S65. Ressler, Andrew, Feb. 22, 1S64; must, out with compauy July IS, 1865. Ressler, Henry, Feb. 22, 1S64; must, out with company July IS, 1865.

Roehm, William,

Oct. 7, 1861

;

;

disch.

on surg.

certif,

Dec. 12, 1802.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

194 Robinson, Andrew, Oct. las

Aug.

4,

John C,

Ralston,

1861

7,

killed near Louisville, Ky., by guerril-

;

George W. Sipe, Oct.

10, 1862; trans, to Co. L, date

Sept.

1864

8,

Snooks, Martin, Oct. 31, 1861

11, 1861

not on muster-out

;

18,

pro. to Corp. Oct. 12, 1861

;

to sergt.; to

must, out with company July

20, 1865;

1865; veteran. First Sergeants.

roll.

company July

must, out with

;

unknown.

;

May

1st sergt.; to 2d lieut.

1864; veteran.

Reed, William, Aug.

18, 1865.

Snyder, Joshua, Oct. 31,1861; must, out with company July IS, 1865; veteran.

James H. Harvey, Oct. 11, 1S61; pro. from sergt. May 20, 1865; must. out with company July 18, 1865 veteran. Samuel E. Spohn, Oct. 11, 1861 pro. to corp. Oct. 12, 1861 to sergt. June 6, 1S63 must, out with company July 18, 1865 veteran. ;

;

;

Smith, Emanuel, Oct.

18G1

7,

must, out with company July

;

1S65;

18,

veteran.

Jacob Wolfley, Oct.

Smith, Abraham, Feb.

must, out with company July 18, 1865.

16, 1864;

company July

11, 1861

18,

1865

must, out with company July 18, 1865. 1864; must, out with company July 18, 1865.

Snyder, John, Feb.

pro. to sergt. Jan. 1, 1864

;

must, out with

;

veteran.

;

16, 1864;

June 2, Stillwagen, William, June 2,1864; must, out with company July Stilhvagen, Ed. B.,

18,

1865.

Steever,

;

;

John W., Feb.

1864

26,

must, out with company July

;

18, 1865.

Quartermaster-Sergeants.

Jeremiah W. Weihley, Oct. 23, 1861 pro. fro out witii company July 18, 1S65; Vetera Thomas W. Jordan, Oct. 11, 1861 disch. on

rp. Jan. 1,1864; must,

;

certif. Sept. 3, 1862.

s

;

Shultzbach, Jeremiah, Feb. 26, 1864; must, out with company July 18,

Commissary Sergeant.

1865.

May

Scott, John,

unknown.

1864; tranB. to Co. L, date

5,

Stoneroad, Emanuel, Aug. 24, 1864

Schroyer, Jacob, Aug.

Snyder, Israel, Feb.

disch.

;

1864; disch. by G. 0.

16,

Samuel

May 29, 1865. May 29, 1865. May 22, to date May

by G. 0.

P. Gutshall, Oct. 11, 1861

disch.

;

on surg.

certif.

June

16, 1865

;

veteran.

1864; disch. by G. O.

17,

Sergeants. 15,

1865.

Charles M. Armstrong, Oct. 23, 1861; pro. from private Sept. 1,1864; must, out with company July IS, 1865 veteran. Jacob B. Shaeffer, Oct. 11,1861; pro. from corp. Dec. 25, 1864 must, out with company July 18, 1865 veteran. A. L. Corman, Oct. 11, 1861 captured near Raleigh, N. C, April 12, ;

on surg. certif. Aug. 21, 1862. disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 18, 1861.

Shreffler, George, Oct. 7, 1861

Shearer, Joseph, Oct.

1861

7,

disch.

;

;

;

;

Samuel, George, Oct.

7,

1861

Spotts, Isaac, Oct. 7, 1861

Sweitzer, Philip, Oct.

Stroup, Joseph, Oct.

7,

7,

Benjamin, Oct.

Shreffler,

on surg.

disch.

;

Dec. 18, 1862.

Aug.

certif.

21, 1862.

1865; pro. to corp.

unknown. unknown.

trans, to Co. L, date

;

trans, to Co. L, date

;

1861

7,

certif.

;

1861

1861

on surg.

disch.

;

1865

Samuel

died at Knoxville, Teun., Jan. 18,1864.

;

;

May

20,

865

1

must, out with company July

;

18,

veteran.

VV. Fickes, Oct. 11, 1861

pro.

;

from Corp. June

out with company July 18, 1865 veteran. Edward Smith, Oct. 11, 1861; pro. to corp. Oct.

16, 1865

;

must.

;

Tallman, John, Aug.

27, 1864

Updegrove, Daniel, Aug.

by G. 0. May 29, 1865. by G. 0. June 12, 1865.

disch.

;

1S64

16,

D.

disch.

;

TJmberger, Azariah, Aug. 29, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

May

on surg. certif. December, 1863. Abraham Hartman, Oct. 11, 1861 disch. Dec.

29, 1865.

;

Updegrove, Solomon, Feb. 16, 1864; killed at Waynesborough, Ga., Dec. 4, 1864.

Thomas 2d

Weaver, John, Nov.

16, 1861

must, out with company July

;

D. Culbertson, Oct. 11, 1861

lieut. Co.

G May

pro.

from private Oct.

term.

12, 1861

;

to

Corporals.

31, 1862; captured April 8, 1865; must, out with company July 18, 1865. Walborn, Daniel, Feb. 26, 1864 must, out with company July 18, 1865. Witmer, Isaac, Oct. 7, 1S61 disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term. ;

;

Wolf, Elias, Oct.

7,

1861

White, Charles, Aug.

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

18,

1864

Wachtle, George, Oct.

James M.,

1861

7,

7,

1S61

Weaver, Henry, Nov. 11, 1861 Zirgar, Emanuel, Oct. 7, 1861

died at Jefferson, Ind.,

;

trans, to Co. L, date

;

June

2,

unknown.

Captains. ;

;

to capt. Jan.

to maj. Dec. 17, 1864.

Oct. 28, 1861

;

must, out with

;

must, out with

1865; veteran.

18, 1865

pro. to corp.

May

8,1865; must, out

veteran.

;

May

must, out with company July 18, 1865. Jeremiah T. Walker, Oct. 11,1861; pro. to Corp. Jan. 21, 1865; must, out with company July IS, 1S65; veteran. William Reed, Oct. 11, 1861; pro. to corp. July 1, 1865 must, out with company July 18, 1865; veteran. Henry Kunkle, Oct. 11, 1861; wounded at Tompkinsville, Ky., July 9, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Sept. 5, 1863. William M. Houser, Oct. 11, 1861 trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date unpro. to Corp.

20, 1865;

;

;

William H. Harris, Oct. 22, 1861 res. Aug. 7, 1862. John M. Porter, Nov. 22, 1861 pro. from adjt. to 1st lieut;

Nathan W. Horton,

18,

Augustus Myers, May 9,1864;

1862.

Recruited at Harrisburg.

pro.

;

;

with company July

SERVICE).

;

must, out

;

with company July

NINTH CAVALRY (THREE YEARS'

C,

pro. to Corp. Jan. 1, 1864;

;

;

Augustus Melt, March 18,1862;

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

Zeigler, Benjamin, Oct. 30, 1S61

ROLL OF COMPANY

on surg. certif. Nov. 18, 1861. on surg. certif. Dec. 9, 1862. on surg. certif. April 7, 1864.

disch.

;

disch.

;

1861

11,

Cornelius Baker, Oct. 11, 1861; pro. to Corp. Jan. 17, 1865; must, out

disch.

;

Oct. 29, 1861

Ward, Michael, Oct.

Jacob K. Waidley, Oct.

with company July 18, 1865 veteran. James P. Cree, Oct. 11, 1861 pro. to corp. Nov. 1, 1864 company July 18, 1865 veteran. Henry Baker, Oct. 11, 1S61 pro. to corp. Dec. 25, 1S64 company July 18, 1865; veteran. ;

captured at Rockingham, N. C, March

;

1865; disch. by G. 0. June 29, 1865.

28, 1863

;

22, 1863.

veteran.

Weist,

to sergt.;

;

24, 1864, at exp. of

18, 1865;

Witmer, Peter, Oct.

7,

12, 1861

disch.

from sergt.-maj.

to 2d

lieut.

May

22,1863; to 1st lieut. June 20, 1863; to capt. May 20, 1865 captured at Raleigh, N. C, April 12, 1865 must, out with company July 18,

known. George S. Albright, Oct. 11, 1861 pro. to Corp. Oct. 12, 1861 died at Louisville, Ky., June 10,1862; buried in National Cemetery, section A, range 24, grave 13. John R. Boyd, Oct. 11, 1861; killed at Triune, Tenn., June 11, 1863. ;

;

;

;

1865.

Elijah Richards, March 16, 1864; promoted to bugler June 1, 1865; must, out with company July 18, 1865. John M. Dougherty, Oct. 11, 1861 captured at Tompkinsville, Ky., and

First Lieutenants.

George Fisher, J.

Frank

Oct. ft. 1861

Miller, Oct. 7, 1861

capt. Co.

K May

res.

;

;

May

pro.

from 2d

lieut. Co.

B Aug.

;

4,

1862; to

22, 1863.

Lawrence A. Crinnian, Oct. 17, 1861 June 20, 1863; to 1st lieut. May July

22, 1862.

;

E to 2d lieut. must, out with company

pro. from sergt. Co. 20, 1865;

paroled July

9,

company July

1862; pro. to bugler Jau.

James Buckwalter,

Oct. 11, 1861

1864; must, out with

pro. to bugler Oct. 12, 1861

;

died at

Jeffersonville, Ind., January, 1862.

Saddler.

William K. Campbell, Oct. 22, 1861 res. Aug. 7, 1862. Charles Coglizer, Nov. 14, 1861 pro. from sergt.-maj. Aug.

Leopold Miller, Oct.

;

;

8,

1862

;

res.

11, 1861

with company July

18,

;

pro. to saddler Jau.

1865

;

1,

1864

;

must, out

1,

1864

;

must, out

veteran.

6, 1863.

George A. Shuman, Oct. 1861

;

18, 1865.

Second Lieutenants.

Feb.

1,

IS, 1865; veteran.

;

to 1st Bergt.

22 1863.

;

11, 1861

;

pro.

from private

to 2d lieut. Feb. 6, 1863

;

to sergt. Oct. 12,

to 1st lieut. Co.

H May

John W. Walker, Oct. 11, 1861 pro. to farrier Jan. with company July 18, 1S65 veteran. ;

;

;

GENERAL HISTORY. Fernando F. Trankler, Oct. Jacob C. Ford, Oct. 23, 1861

1861

11,

;

Harman, E. M.,

died at Gallatin, Tenn.,May, 1862.

died at Nashville, Tenn.,

;

195

June 6,1863.

Oct. 11, 1861; disch. Oct. 26, 1864, to date exp. of term.

Hickernelt, William, Sept.

1864

6,

May

29, 1865, to date

June

21, 1865, to date

disch. by G. 0.

;

Oct. 26, 1864.

Blacksmiths.

Hopple, William, Sept.

George Simon, Oct. 11, 1861 pro. to blacksmith Jan. 1, 1864; must, out with company July 18, 1865 veteran. George L. Dentler, Oct. 11, 1861; died at Nashville, Tenn., April 18,

1864; disch. by G. 0.

2,

Oct. 26, 1864.

;

Holtzapple, Isaiah, Oct. 11, 1861; captured at Tompkinsville, Ky., and

;

paroled July

1X62.

1864

9,

;

May

disch. by G. 0.

29, 1865, to date Oct. 26,

1864. 1'rinile*.

Anderson, James

A., Oct. 11, 1861

Hickernell, Robert, Aug.

mus

;

company July

itb

10,

Huston, John W., Sept.

Henry H., Aug. 30, 1864 disch. by G. O.'May 29, 1865. Adams, Malan'n G., Sept. 7, 1863 died Dec. 25, 1863, of wounds received

by G.O. May

1,

G.O.June

1864; disch. by

9,

29, 1865, to

date

1865, to date Oct.

26, 1864.

;

Harris, OBcar R.

;

Tenn.

at Dandridge,

disch.

;

Oct. 26, 1864.

1865; veteran. Attig,

1864

8,

Irwin, John, Oct. 11, 1861

must, out with company July

;

18, 1865; vet-

Arnoldy, William. Arnoldy, Edward. Alber, John,

Irwin, John A., Oct. 11, 1861; disch. on surg.

May

Blain, Winfield

5,

S.,

1864; never joined company.

Oct. 11, 1861

Irwin, Henry, Oct. 23, 1861

must, out with company July

;

18,

1865;

Jones, Lawrence, Aug. 29, 1864.

veteran.

Jones, Albert T., Sept.

Berrier, John, Oct. 11,1861; captured at Tompkinsville, Ky.,

and paroled

9,

1864

16, 1865; absent, in

must, out with company July

;

18, 1865.

at

certif.

Lightner, TliomaB

E., Oct. 11,

Lightner, John

Oct. 11, 1861

S.,

1861 ;

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

Aug. 30, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Aug. 31, 1864; disch. by G. O. May 29, 1865. Long, Andrew, Aug. 29, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Laughman, Daniel, Aug. 30, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Linn, John J., Sept. 24, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Loyer, Joseph T., May 26, 1864; never joined company. Miller, Henry C, Oct. 11, 1861 must, out with company July 18, 1865;

Oct. 11, 1861; disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

Linn, William

November,

Lehr, Jerome

1861.

S.,

;

B.,

;

Barnet, Augustus N., Aug. Bretz, William H.,

Bates, John, Sept.

May 8,

May 29, 1865. May 29, 1865.

1864; disch. by G. 0.

9,

1864; disch. by G. 0.

9,

1864; disch. by G. 0.

May

;

;

29, 1865.

Bnchanan, George A., Sept. 6, 1S64 disch. by G. O. May 29, 1865. Bobbs, David G., Oct. 11, 1861; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date unknown. ;

;

veteran.

Books, Jacob R., Oct. 11,1861; killed accidentally at Louisville, Ky., 12, 1S64;

Raleigh, N. C, April

Thomas

died April 13, of

wounds received

disch.

;

on surg.

certif.

August, 1862.

1S61; captured at Tompkinsville, Ky., and

11,

1861

W.

D., Sept. 24, 1864

disch. by G. 0.

by G.

disch.

;

O.

Neeter, John, Sept. 10, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

;

May 29, 1865. May 29, 1S65.

May May

29, 1865. 29, 1865.

John, Aug. 10, 1864; must, out with company July 18, 1865. Powell, David, Sept. 8, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Penrod, Samuel, Oct. 11, 1861 disch. Dec. 24, 1S64, at exp. of term. Ott,

;

;

Plumber, Abraham, Oct.

;

by G. 0. June 20, 1865. Coalhuuse, John, Oct. 11, 1861; captured at Tompkinsville, Ky., and paroled July 9, 1862; died at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 14, 1861. Coover, John H. L., Oct. 11, 1861 captured died, date unknown. Coates, Charles P., May 31, 1S64 never joined company. Duncan, Samuel, Oct. 11, 1861; must, out with company July 18, 1865;

Raffensberger,

disch.

J.,

11, 1861; died at Nashville,

Oct, 11, 1861

died at Lebanon, Ky., Nov. never joined company.

Ricedorf, Daniel, Oct. 11, 1861

;

Renuer,

Paxil,

May

Rambo, Walter

veteran.

7,

1864

;

B., Sept. 15,

;

1862.

9,

1S64; disch. by G. 0. July 20, to date July

15, 1865.

Deibler, George,

Dunkleberger,

Aug.

J.

by G. 0. May 29, 1865. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. 1864; died April 13, of wounds received

13, 1864; disch.

W., Aug.

31, 1864

T., Sept. 24,

;

Sheffy, John, Oct. 11, 1S61; must, out with

at

Scott,

Walter

A., Oct. 11, 1861

Aug.

May

12,

1864; disch. by G. 0.

May

May

3,

1864; must, out with

company July

18,

A., Oct. 11, 1S61

Aug.

May 5, Daniel, May

Gheistwhite, Robert, Oct. 11,1861; disch. on surg.

certif.

Jan.

3,

18, 1S65;

1865; veteran.

must, out with company July IS,

;

Seaberts, Jacob,

1S64; must, out with

Speelman,

25, 1864;

company July

5,

1865;

IS, 1S65.

must. out with company July

Sheaffer, David L., Sept. 1, 1S64; must, out with

1865.

IS, 1S65.

company July

1865.

Sheaffer, Hamilton, absent, in hospital, at

veteran.

Gorden, David, Oct. 29, 1861 captured at Mossy Creek, Tenn., Dec. 1863; disch. Feb. 6, 1865, to date Nov. 25, 1S64, at exp. of term. ;

Gutsball, George, Aug.

John

1S65; vet-

1S65; veteran.

29, 1865.

12, 1864.

Gheistwhite, Daniel,

IS,

must, out \rtth compauy July

Snieigh, Oliver H., Oct. 11, 1861; disch. by G. 0.

Stump, William Fisher, David N.,

;

veterau.

must, out with company July 18, 1865; vet-

;

company July

disch.

Raleigh, N. C, April 12, 1865. Epler. Jacob, Oct. 11, 1861

S.,

Aug.

9,

29,

by G. 0. May 29, 1865. 1864; disch. by G.O. May 29, 1865.

1864; disch.

13,

;

buried in National Cemetery, sec. B, range S, grave 6. May 7, 1864; must, out with company July 18, 1865.

;

Heltzel, Alfred,

Houser, Jacob R., Aug. Harnish, John L., Nov.

muster out. must, out with compauy July IS, 1865

;

12, 1864; absent, in hospital, at 8,

1861

;

muster out. Sheaffer, Charles H., Aug. 31, 1S64; disch. by G. O. May 29, 1S65. Snyder, John H., Aug. 12, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1S65. Snyder, Samuel, Aug. 9, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Saylor, Allen, Aug. 30, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Stipe, Andrew J., Aug. 9, 1S64; disch. by G. O. May 29,1S65. Stone, Simon, Aug. 30, 1S64 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1S65. Stumbaugb, William, Sept. 27, 1S64 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. ;

I

Gheistwhite, John, Oct. 11, 1861; died at Louisville, Ky., Dec. 17, 1862;

veteran.

Teun., April, 1S62.

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

Reuben H., Sept. 8, 1S64; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Risewick, John C, Sept. 8, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Reaser,

;

Fisher, John,

;

;

Noll, Samuel, Sept. 24, 1864

;

;

must, out with company July 18, 1865. disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

,

paroled July 9, 1862 disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term. Chestnut, Joseph A., Oct. 11, 1S61 captured at Tompkinsville, Ky., and paroled July 9, 1862; disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term. Conrad, Samuel, Oct. 11, 1861 disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term. Campbell, James, Aug. 31, 1864; disch. by G. 0. June 20, 1865. Cree, Alfred, May 10, 1864 prisoner from Nov. 22, 1864, to Feb. 27, 1865

Dumb, David

Moore, Thomas, Oct.

;

Morah, Michael, May 25, 1863; never joined company. McKinley, Jacob, Aug. 12, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. McBride, William E., Sept. 8, 1864; disch. by G. O. May 29, 1865. McGuire, Milton F Sept. 17, 1864 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865.

buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery. P., Oct. 29,

1S64

Messimer,

1861; died at York, Pa., Oct. 11, 1864;

Crooks, John W., Oct. 11, 1861

Campbell, James

30,

Misenhelter, M., Aug. 16, 1864; disch. by G. 0.

at

12, 1865.

B., Oct. 11,

May

Matthias, John,

Sept. 9, 1862.

Baker, Samuel, Sept.

Gutshall,

at exp. of

term.

Averysborough, N. C, March hospital, at muster out.

wouuded

Bringer, George W., Oct. 11, 1861; disch. on surg.

Border,

;

;

May

Bruizer, A. F., Aug. 12, 1864;

Henry C,

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. 9, 1864 Korhn, Henry, May 7, 1864; never joined company. Lightner, William H., Oct. 11, 1861 disch. Dec. 24, 1864,

1865; veteran.

Brestle,

1864; never joined company.

Kline, William, Aug.

;

Burns, Theodore,

1,

Keller, Jacob, Oct. 11, 1861

July 9, 1862 must, out with company July 18, 1865 veterau. Bobbs, William H., Oct. 11, 1861; must, out with company July 18, ;

New

died at

;

August, 1862. Haven, Ky., February, 1862. certif.

Shearer, William, Sept. 29, 1S64; disch. by G. 0.

Shipman, Leonard

; '

R., Sept. S, 1S64

Shuler, Philip, Sept. 24, 1S64

;

;

disch.

May

29, 1S65.

by G. 0. May 29, 1S65. by G. 0. May 29, 1S65.

disch.

IS,

;

.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

196

Stoltz, Alfred A., Sept. 6, 1864; disch.

by G. 0. May 29, 1865. by G. 0. May 29, I860.

Lawr'e A. Crinnian, Oct. 17, 1861 pro. to 2d lieut. Co. C June C. A. Hungerford. Aug. 25, 1862; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865.

Spohn, John

by G. 0. June

Charles A.

Snively, Charles H., Sept.

P.,

Aug.

1S64

6,

discb.

;

30, 1864; discb.

Savery, Samuel F., Sept.

1864

8,

discb. by G. 0.

;

;

13, 1865.

June

June

13, to date

Lyman,

Oct. 17, 1S61

3,

20, 1863.

killed at Lafayette, Ga., Sept. 13, 1863.

;

Corporals.

1865. Sheaffer, Jonathan, Oct. 11, 1861

paroled July

9,

1862

John A. Beck, Oct. 17, 1861 pro. to Corp. Jan. company July 18, 1S65; veteran.

captured at Tompkinsville, Ky., and

;

;

disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term.

;

Sheibley, Jeremiah T., Oct. 11, 1861; disch. Dec. 24,1864, at exp. of

1S64; must, out with

1864

;

must, out

pro. to corp. Jan. 1, 1864

;

must, out

1,

;

;

term. Saulpier, Napoleon, Nov. 23, 1861

pro. to hospital steward, date

;

Marshall D. Clark, Oct.

un-

1861

17,

;

with company July 18, 1865 veteran. Benjamin Dillman, Oct' 17, 1861; pro. to corp. Oct. ;

known. Snyder, Samuel, Oct. 5,

1,

Jacob W. Bowers, Oct. 17, 1861 pro. to Corp. Jan. with company July 18, 1865 veteran.

1864, of

11, 1861

March

died

;

wounds received

5,

1863

Thompson's

at

;

March

burial record

Station,

Tenn. buried ;

Griswoldville, Ga., Nov. 22,

in

1865

National Cemetery, Stone River, grave 50.

Charles

Stype, George W., Oct. 23, 1861.

wounded at 1864; must, out with company July 18,

;

4,

1S64

;

veteran.

S.

Fargo, Oct. 29, 1861

pro. to Corp. Oct. 4, 1864

;

must, out

;

.

with company July

Thompson, S. L., Nov. 24, 1861 disch. Dec. 24, 1864, at exp. of term. Trump, George W., Oct. 11, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 4, 1862. Terrell, Almanzo R., Oct. 11, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 2, 1863. Thomas, John F., June 30, 1862 disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date unTressler, Henry D., Oct. 11, 1861 known. Turbett, George W., Oct. 11, 1861.

1865

18,

veteran.

;

;

Charles H. Bayletts, Oct.

1861

17,

pro. to corp.

;

June

1,

1865; must, out

;

with company July 18, 1865 veteran. William R. Firtig, Aug. 0, 1863 pro. to corp. May 20, 1865'; must, out with company July IS, 1865. Llewellyn Musser, Oct. 17, 1S61 pro. to corp. May 1, 1865 must, out with company July IS, 1865; veteran. Albert H. Phillips, Oct. 17, 1861 disch. 1862. ;

;

;

;

;

8, 1864; disch. by G. 0. May 29, 1865. Watson, John, Oct. 14, 1864; never joined company. Reuben, July 11, 1864 discb. on surg. certif. June

;

Nathan

;

ROLL OF COMPANY in

Luupiiin

S.

Detweiler, Oct. 17, 1861

May

David L. Moouey,

March

;

M. Fargo,

John Hailey,

19, 1863.

;

certif.

May

from 2d

pro.

;

company July

1864; must, out with

2V.

25, 1S64

May

22, 1863

May

20, 1865;

Oct. 17, 1861

Oct. 17, 1861

IS,

must, out with company July 18,

;

on surg. certif. Jan. 19, 1862. on surg. certif. Nov. IS, 1862.

disch.

;

disch.

;

Saddler.

;

Samuel H. Hamilton, Oct. 17, 1861 pro. to saddler out with company July 18, 1S65 veteran. ;

Sept. 23, 1S64; must,

;

Furriers.

First Lieutenants.

on surg.

12,

1865.

Elisha

pro. from 1st lieut. William H. Eckels, Oct. 17, 1861 disch. Nov. 25,1864, at exp. of term. Lewis A. Hoke, Oct. 26, 1861 pro. from 1st lieut. Co. F must, out with company July 18, 1865.

Isaac Lloyd, Jan. 10, 1862

C, April

1865.

pro. to maj.

;

killed near Raleigh, N.

;

Buglers.

W. Mumnia, May

Jacob

Captains.

John

Oct. 17, 1861

;

*uslianna Counties.

Albert,

;

1S62

9,

Reinhart, Ephraim, Aug.

Privates.

Albright, Henry, Aug. 13, 1S62; must, out with

29, 1863.

company May 29, 1863. Matter, Peter, Aug. 2, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Martz, Henry A., Aug. 2, 1862; must, out with company May 29,1863. McCarroll, Charles, Aug. 9, 1S62 must, out with company May 29, 1863. McFadden, John, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Poist, George W., Aug. 9, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Polm, Michael, Aug. 9, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Poticher, John, Aug. 9, 1S62 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Patterson, John R., Aug. 9, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Potiger, Jonathan, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Potiger, Daniel, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

Messuer, David, Aug.

Aug.

13, 1862; pro.

with company

May

to

musician Sept.

;

13, 1862;

;

;

;

;

;

1863. 29, 1S62;

mu6t. out

must, out with company

McNight,

Philip,

Aug.

13,

1S62; must, out with company

May

29, 1863.

Patschke, Charles F., Aug. 13, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va.,

29, 1863.

Philip L. Straw, Aug. 13, 1862

Kleemau, John, Aug.

May

29, 1863.

Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with

company May

29, 1863.

;

GENERAL HISTORY. Aug.

Peffly, Jacob,

13,

Peters, Samuel, Jr.,

company May

1862; must, out with

Aug.

wounded

13, 1862;

Musicians.

29, 1863.

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

muster out. 1862; must, out with company

13, 1862; absent, in hospital, at

Reinoebl, David C, Aug. 13,

209

must, out with company May 29, 1863. S. Boas, Aug. 4, 1862 William A. Krause, July 31, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 17, 1662.

Irvine

;

;

May

29,

Privates.

1863.

Redman, Henry, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Kise, Jacob L., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Robeson, Augustus, Aug. 15, 1862 must, out with company May 29,

Able, Jacob, July 31, 1862

must, out with company

;

;

Albright, John, July 31, 1862

must, out with

;

Alberson, George W., July 31, 1862

May

29, 1863.

company May

29, 1863.

May

must, out with company

;

29,

;

1863.

1863. Rise,

George D., Aug. 13, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 1862; disch. on snrg. certif. April 9, 1863.

13,

company May 29, 1863. wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May -29, 1863. Shank, Samuel, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Sherer, Justus, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Sherk, C. Penrose, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Shepps, Nicholas A., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29,

Schuler, Jacob T., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with

John

Seltzer,

K.,

Aug.

13, 1862;

wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. must, out with company May 29, 1863. 13, 1862 Armstrong, James G., Aug. 5, 1862; must, out witli company May 29,

Antes,

Emery

Aug.

J.,

1862;

5,

;

1863.

Able, William, Aug.

5,

1862

;

disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 12, 1862.

Buchanan, Porter, July 31, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Bingamon, Abner, July 31, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Bowsman, George W., July* 31, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., ;

;

:

company May

Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with

29, 1863.

Burke, David, July 31, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Brown, William, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. ;

1S63.

Shirk, Samuel

S.,

Aug.

must, out with company

;

May 29, 1863. May 29, 1863.

must, out with compauy

13, 1862;

Sugar, Baltzar, Aug. 13, 1862

Aug. 13, 1862; mu6t. out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, Spangler, John B., Aug. 13, 1862 Smith, Jacob

F.,

;

1863. Strickler, Peter G.,

Aug.

13, 1862

must, out with company

;

May

Bettleyoun, Emanuel, July 31, 1862

;

killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

13, 1862.

Brown, George, July 31, 1862. Carpenter, Jacob, Aug. 1, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Colyer, John W, Aug. 2, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. must, out with company May 29, 1863. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, Conklin, George H., Aug. 5, 1862 ;

29,

;

1863.

Smith, John, Aug.

Thome, Charles

13, 1862

Aug.

V.,

must, out with company

;

13, 1862

May

must, out with company

;

;

29, 1863.

May

29,

1863.

George V., Aug. 5, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Crandill, Edwin, Aug. 4, 1862 died Dec. 23, of wouudB received at FredCorl,

1863.

Uhler, John C, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with compauy May 29, 1863. Umberger, John P., Aug. 13, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

;

;

ericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

;

13, 1862

;

must, out with company

Zimmerman, Joseph, Aug.

1862

13,

;

May

Cummiugs, John

29, 1863.

died Jan.

1863, of

8,

wounds received

H.,

Aug.

2, 1862.

Dean, George H., Aug. 5, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1S63. DeHaven, John, Aug. 5, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Donahower, John F., July 31, 1862 must, out with company May 29, ;

;

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

;

1863.

Donnelly, John A., July 31, 1862

must, out with

;

company May

29,

May

29,

1863.

William W. Jennings, Aug. 6, 1862 pro. to col. Aug. 16, 1862. W. H. H. Hummel, Aug. 6, 1S62; pro. from 1st lieut. Aug. 19, 1862; must,

Dunlap, Samuel R., July

31, 1862;

must, out with company

;

out with company

May

1803.

Dunlap, James

29, 1863.

James

Elliott,

First Lieutenant.

John

Morgan, Aug.

T.

1S62

6,

May

out with company

pro.

;

from 2d

G.,

A.,

Fanning, Robert lieut.

Aug.

19, 1862

must,

;

Aug. July

5,

1862

31,

1862

Aug.

G.,

1863.

Thomas, Aug. 2, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Aug. 16, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Floyd, James B., Aug. 6, 1862; disch. Feb. 13, 1863, for wounds received Forster,

29, 1863.

;

Forster, James,

Second Lieutenant.

Thomas

G. Sample,

Aug.

6,

1862 ; pro. from 1st sergt. Aug.

May

out with company

must, out

;

1862; must,

1,

May 29, 1863. with company May 29, 1S63. out with company May 29,

must, out with company

;

1862

19,

;

must,

29, 1863.

First Sergeant.

;

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. Gilman, Jacob P., Aug. 4, 1862; muBt. out with company May 29, 1863. Gross, John, Aug. 2, 1S62; muBt. out with company May 29, 1S63. Hebeison, Jacob, Aug. 1, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. ;

Andrew

Santo, Aug.

with company

4,

1862

May

pro.

;

from

Aug.

sergt.

19, 1862

;

must, out

29, 1863.

Hebeison, John, Aug.

5,

1862

must, out with company

;

May

29, 1863.

Heck, William M., Aug.'4, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Heck, Andrew J., Aug. 4, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Henry, William H., July 31, 1862 must, out with company May 29, ;

John McWilliams, July 31, 1S62 pro. from private Aug. out with company May 29, 1863.

6,

;

Thomas

G. Smith, Aug.

with company May

must, out with company J.

mu6t.

;

;

Maglauchlin, Aug.

5,

31, 1862; pro.

May

1S62

company May 29, William W. Reed, Aug. 2, 1862 out with

1863. Hill,

29, 1863.

Alexander McCormick, July

W.

1802

1862; pro. from corp. Aug. 14, 1862; must, out

5,

;

from Corp. Dec.

1S62

14,

from corp. Aug.

must.

19, 1S62,

1863. pro. to 1st lieut. Co. I Dec. 14, 1862.

;

T., July 31,1862;

Hogau, James, Aug.

must, out with company

May

29,1863.

1S62; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va,, Dec. 13,

1,

company May

1862; must, out with

29, 1863.

pro.

Alexander

Houser, William, Aug.

4,

29, 1863.

1S62; must, out with

company May

29, 1863.

Hnghes, Matthew, Aug. 1, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Hunter, John D., Aug. 2, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Hoover, Benjamin, Aug. 5, 1862 died of wounds received at Fredericks;

;

Corporals. P. A.

Campbell, Aug.

James

1862; must, out with

2,

L. Shanklin, Aug.

2,

1862

;

with company

May

4,

29, 1863.

July

31, 1862

William C. Knighton, July out with company

14

must, out

May

;

31,

Henry, Aug. 2, 1862; died at Harrisburg, Pa., Aug. 11, 1S62. Irvine, James B., July 31, 1S62; must, out with compauy May 29.1S63. Hillyer,

Jones, Richard, July 31, 1S62

9,

1862

;

1863.

must.. out

Jones, Horace B., Aug.

Kline, Jacob, Aug.

2,

2,

1S62

Kelley, James F. P., Aug.

1862; must, out with

31, 1862

May

Ellis D. Powell,

;

May 29,

out with company

1862; pro. to corp. Sept.

Shamberger, July

with company

29, 1863.

29, 1863.

Isaac McCounell, Aug. 0. F.

5,

company May

pro. to corp. Dec. 24, 1862

;

with company May 29, 1863. Abram Rupply, July 31, 1862 must, Daniel E. Martin, Aug.

burg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

;

company May

pro. to corp. Oct. 9, 1862

29, 1863.

must, out

;

29, 1863.

pro. to corp.

March

May

29, 1863.

14, 1863

;

must.

;

1S62

5,

;

May

29, 1S63.

company May

must, out with company

May

29, 1S63.

29, 1863.

disch. Jan. 27, 1863.

Lloyd, Garrett, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Lucker, Edward, Aug. 1, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1S63.

Martin, William H., Aug.

muBt. out with company 1862

;

must, out with company

;

1862; must, out with

Maglaughlin, Jacob

J.,

5,

1862; must, out with

Aug.

company May 29, 1863. compauy May 29,

1S62; must, out with

5,

1863.

Meyer, Frantz, July

31, 1862

;

must, out with company

May

29, 1863.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

210 Miley, John H., July 31, 1862

must, out with company

;

May

Bechtel, William, Aug. 13, 1862 Brightbill, David

Aug.

J.,

Manikowaki, W. V., July 31, 1862; disch. on Surg, certif. Dec. 27, 1862. McGowan, Henry, Jr., Aug. 5, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

July

July

31, 1862

May 29, 1863. with company May 29, 1863. out with company May 29, 1863.

must, out with company

;

must, out

31, 1862;

Rohrer, Abner, July 31, 1862; must, Rowland, Robert B., Aug. 2, 1862; must out with company May29,lS63. Rutter, Jacob, Aug. 5, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Swartz, Martin, July 31, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

company May 29, 1863. John D., July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. July Sanders, Emanuel R., 31,1862; must, out with company May 29, 1862; must, out with

Santo,

1863.

Warren J., Aug. 5, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, 1863. James W., July 31,1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Stephens, Dennis, July 31, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 15,1862; must out with company May 29, 1863. Swartz, Andrew, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1868. Small, Charles H., July 31, 1862; pro. sergeant-major Aug. 18, 1862. Sheafer,

;

Sloan, David, July 31, 1862

;

Sollers,

;

;

29, 1863.

must, out with company

May

May

29,

29, 1863.

;

Carson, Franklin, Aug. 13, 1862

S-,

;

;

;

March 28, 1863. Dehuff, Henry G., Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Fink, Simon C, Aug. 9, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Gable, Charles H. A., Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, teers

;

;

1863.

Edward

Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863 Goldsmith, Henry, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29,1863. Gibbs, Edward, Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Graves, John, Aug. 9, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, Grant,

0.,

;

;

company May

Company Recruited

in

G.

Aug.

Va., Dec. 13,

must, out with company

10, 1862;

May

29, 1863.

Second Lieutenant.

wounded at Fredericksburg, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1862.

Hudson Denny, Aug.

10, 1862;

Va., Dec.

Aug.

1862; must, out with

9,

1862

;

May 29, 1863. May 29, 1863. May 29, 1863. with company May 29, 1863.

must, out with company

must, out with company

;

Jones, JameB, Aug.

9,

1862; must, out

Kerr, James, Aug.

9,

1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

;

must, out with company

Abraham

1862

9,

E.,

;

Aug.

May

1862

9,

;

13,

29, 1863.

must, out with company

May

29, 1863.

must, out with company

May

29,

1863.

Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863Kenney, William A., Aug. 9, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 20, 1862. Lovell, Melvin N., Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Morris, William, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. P.,

Mannas, Michael, Aug. 9, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Michael, William, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Morton, John B., Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Mulverhill, Michael, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

First Sergeant. Elierly,

1862

13, 9,

Jones, Enoch B., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company

Kelsey, Melvin

First Lieutenant.

George Hynicka, Aug.

3, 1863.

1863.

Irvine, James, Aug.

Kingport,

wounded at Fredericksburg, company May 29, 1863.

10, 1862;

April

;

Kerr, William, Aug.

Captain. J. Ball,

1862; must, out with

certif.

George N., Aug. 9. 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Hoffman, David R., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29,

1862

Dauphin County.

29, 1863.

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 24, 1863.

9,

1862; disch. on surg.

9,

Hill,

Herman, John, Aug.

;

29,

Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Cotteral, John, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Connelly, James, Aug. 9, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. March 14, 1863. Cushman, Henry, Aug. 9, 1862 trans, to Fourth Regiment Ohio Volun-

Samuel

Gardner, Charles R., Aug.

1863.

29, 1863.

1863. Cole,

Gilmore, Robert, Aug.

Touse, Henry, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Zarker, John B., Aug. 4, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863.

May

must, out with company

;

John S., Aug. 4, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Weber, Henry, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Wells, Samuel, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Winebrenner, M. H., Aug. 4, 1862; must, out with company May 29, Utzs,

;

Cole, Timothy, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Chambers, Joseph P., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May

Shafer, Henry, July 31, 1862.

Samuel

May

must, out with company

Burns, Samuel, Aug. 9, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 31, 1863. Benard, Aaron A., Aug. 9, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 19, 1863. 13, 1862

1862; must, out with

Schroder, Frantz, July 31, 1862.

13,

must, out with company

;

Foist, Jacob,

John

;

13, 1862;

1863.

Boyer, George H., Aug. 13, 1862

1863.

Piatt, Levi,

Privates.

29, 1863.

Minich, Henry, July 31, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Mitchell, Joseph J., Aug. 4,1862; must, out with company May 29,1863. Montgomery, J., Sr., Aug. 2, 1862; must, out with company May 29,

company May

must, out with company May 29, 1863. 9, 1862 Moughan, Michael, Aug. 9, 1862; muBt. out with company May 29, 1863. McDermott, John, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. McKee, Andrew J., Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. McGinnett, John W., Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29,

Morse, John W., Aug.

29, 1863.

;

;

W.Kimball, Aug. 9, 1S62; must, out with company May 29,1863. Thomas J. White, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Henry Davis, Aug. 9, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, Clifton

company May

1862; must, out with

Jacob

J.

Hiukle, Aug.

9,

Pearson, William Lyle, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with

29, 1863.

1862; must out with

;

1863.

company May

29, 1863.

Corporals.

John

B. Walter,

13, 1862;

Aug.

13, 1862

wounded

;

must, out with company

29, 1863.

wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. George Siuinger, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Henry Swartz, Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. William H. Cain, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Andrew M. Kerr, Aug. 9, 1862 pro. to Corp. January 12,1863; must. out with company May 29, 1863. John J. Humphries, Aug. 9, 1862; pro. to corp. Oct. 16, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. James H. Campbell, Aug. 9, 1862 pro. to corp. April 30, 1S63 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Johu Gulp, Aug.

9,

1862

;

;

;

;

;

Benjamin

13,

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

May

;

company May

29, 1863.

Pritz,

wounded 1862; must, out with company May B.,

Aug.

Page, Daniel A., Aug.

9.

Pugh, William, Aug.

9,

9,

1862:

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 29, 1863.

1862; must, out with

company May

29, 1863.

1862; trans. Aug. 15, 1862, organization un-

known. Redifer, Samuel,

Aug.

1862; must, out with

13,

Rotherick, Henry, Aug.

Snyder, Marcus, Aug.

9,

9,

1862

company May

must, out witll company

;

1862; must, out with

May

company May

29, 1863. 29, 1863.

29, 1863.

wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Styer, James, Aug. 9, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Sgahr, Levi, Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Stemberger, Daniel, Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Sanders, John W., Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Sergeut, Charles W., Aug. 9, 1862 must, out with company May 29, Seidle,

Samuel, Aug.

9,

1862;

;

;

;

;

;

1863.

Musicians.

William Bush, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. James A. Drain, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. J.

Snyder, William, Aug. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Snavely, Martin W., Aug. 9, 1862 ; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

GENERAL HISTORY. Southwick, James W., Aug.

wouuded at Fredericksburg, company May 29, 1863.

Simmers, Robert, Aug.

9,

1862

9,

James C, Aug.

1862

disch.

;

on surg.

certif.

April 25, 1863.

9, 1862.

Weitzel, Columbus, Aug.

;

1862

9,

Wingert, Salmon M., Aug.

;

;

died at Washington, D. C, Sept. 28, 1862.

;

Brown, Andrew, Aug. 12, 1862 muBt. out with company May 29, 1863. Bear, John, Aug. 13, 1802 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Burns, John, Aug. 12, 1802; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Banzhoff, Henry, Aug. 12, 1862 mint out with company May 29, 1803. Brandt, Benjamin, Aug. 13,1862; must, out with company May 29, 1803. Beachler, Jacob, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Brown, Henry J., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Brinzer, John, Aug. 12, 1862; disch. on surg. cerlif. Jan. 22, 1863. Bretz, Daniel, Aug. 13, 1802 died Dec. 31, 1862. Campbell, Alexander, Aug. 12, 1802; must, out with company May 29, ;

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 23, 1863.

9,

Seber, Bernard, Aug. Sehrt,

Va.,

1862;

9,

Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with Shartzer, John, Aug.

211

must, out with company

;

1862; must, out with

9,

May

29, 1863.

company May

29,

1863.

;

company May 29, 1863. 9, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Walter, Thomas, Aug. 9, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Worley, Philip B., Aug. Wallower, Daniel, Aug.

9,

1862; must, out with

;

1863.

Cramer, John, Aug.

captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

12, 1862;

1862; must, out with company Coble, Solomon, Aug. 12, 1862

Company H. Captains.

Jeremiah Kohrer, Aug. 14, 1862; pro. to major Aug. 19, 1862. John K. Shott, Aug. 14, 1862; pro. from 1st lieut. Aug. 19, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

May

29, 1863.

must, out with

;

company May

29, 1863.

Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Campbell, David, Aug. 12, 1862; pro. to q.m.-sergt. Dec. 1, 1862. Davis, Jacob. Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. David, Theophilus, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Detwiler, Jacob, Aug. 12, 1862; died at Washington, D. 0, Nov. 16, 1862. Epler, Richard, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Fratz, William, Aug. 12, 1802; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Fitzpatrick, Thomas, Aug. 13, 1862 captnred at Fredericksburg, Va., Crick, Frank,

;

;

;

;

First Lieutenant.

Isaiah Willis, Aug. 14, 1862; pro. from 2d lieut. Aug. 19, 1862

with company

May

must, out

;

;

Dec. 11, 1862

29, 1863.

;

must, out with compauy

Hoover, Isaac W., Aug.

Second Lieutenants.

Hickernell, Robert, Aug. 12, 1862

James R. Schreiner, Aug. 14, 1862; pro. from private Aug. 19, 1862 res. March 7, 1863. Jacob R. Kinsley, Aug. 12, 1862; pro. from 1st sergt. March 7, 1863; died May 15, of wounds received at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, ;

1863.

11,

1862

;

29, 1863.

May

29, 1863.

captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

must, out with company

;

May

must, out with company

13, 1862;

May

29, 1863.

Hickernell, David L., Aug, 13, 1862; must, out with

company May

29,

1863.

Aug. 12, 1862; must, out with company May 29,1863. Herold, Leonard, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with compauy May 29, 1803. Irely, Samuel, Aug. 12, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Irely, John, Aug. 12, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. James, David, Aug. 12,1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Jenkins, Henry S., Aug. 12, 1862; captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. Houser, Jacob

R.,

;

Firtt Sergeant.

David Hyde, Aug. 12, 1862 pro. from with company May 29, 1863.

sergt.

;

March

must, out

7, 1863;

11, 1862; niuBt.

Solomon Cover, Aug.

13, 1862

captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

;

11,

company May 29, 1863. Francis J. Rinehart, Aug. 12, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 11, 1862 pro. from private March 7, 1863 must, out with company May 29, 1863. William E. Shaffer, Aug. 12, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 11, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. 1862

;

must, out with

;

;

;

Caleb H. Roe, Aug.

from private Jan. 1,1863; must, out

12, 1862; pro.

out with company

May

29, 1863.

Jones, James, Aug. 12, 1862; must, out with

company May

29, 1863.

Koehler, Charles, Aug. 12, 1862; must out with company May 29, 1863. Keyser, Jacob, Aug. 12, 1802; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Lutz, William, Aug. 12, 1862; captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 11,

1862; must, out with

Laughman,

company May

29, 1863.

Daniel, Aug. 12, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 30, 1862.

Miller, James, Sept. 16, 1802

must, out with compauy

;

May

29, 1863.

Murphy, Robert, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Mauybeck, Amos, Aug. 12, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 16, 1862. Miller, John, Aug. 12, 1862. McBarron, William, Aug. 12, 1862; must, out with company May 29, ;

with company

May

29, 1863.

Corporals.

Leander Sandere, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. John P. Kleis, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Henry Willis, Aug. 12, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, ;

;

;

1862

;

John W. Klineline, Aug. 12, 1862 with company May 29, 1863.

Abraham

May

must, out with company

F. Brinser,

with company

Aug.

May

David Fisher, Aug.

;

pro. to Corp.

pro. to corp.

;

Nov.

1863.

McNeal, George, Aug. 12, 1S02 must, out with company May 29, 1S63. McBarron, John, Aug. 12, 1862; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, ;

1862.

Nov.

1,

1862

;

must, out

Nov.

1,

1862

;

must, out

Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Aug. 12, 1862 died April 6, 1863. Aug.12, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863, Buhl, Wi'lhelm, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Rehrer, Nicholas, Aug. 12, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. must, out with company May 29, 1863. 11, 1802 Null, Jacob

29, 1863.

1802

12,

pro. to corp.

;

12, 1862

29, 1863.

S.,

Osman, John

;

B.,

;

Phillips, William,

;

1,

1862

;

must, out with

company May 29, 1863. C. Lowman, Aug. 12, 1862; pro. to corp. Nov. 1, 1S62 muBt. out with company May 29, 1863. James G. Davis, Aug. 12, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 6, 1863. Frank A. Shott, Aug. 12, 1862; died Nov. 10, 1862. Robert

;

;

Rittersback, Jacob, Aug. 12, 1802; must, out with

company May

29,

1803.

;

Ramsey, Charles

J.,

Aug.

12, 1802;

must, out with company

May

29

1863.

Musicians.

Henry Hippie, Aug.

12,

Valentine Ruth, Aug.

1862

12, 1862

must, out with

;

Reed, John, Aug.12, 1862; killed at Fredericksburg, Va Dec. 13, 1862, Henry J., Aug. 12, 1802; must, out with company May 29, ,

May 29, 1863. company May 29, 1863.

must, out with company

;

Schreiner, 1863. Stipe,

Privates. ;

;

Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Bancus, Henry, Aug. 12, 1862 captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 11, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

Beck, William V., Aug.

;

;

Bretz, Elias Jacob, Aug. 12, 1862 11, 1862;

Bretz,

;

captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

must, out with compauy

Benjamin

F.,

Aug.

13, 1862;

May

Andrew

11, 1862

Ackerman, Ansil, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Airgood, Paul, Aug. 13, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Atherton, Alonzo, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Arnold, Jonas S., Aug. 12, 1862; died Dec. 22, of wounds received at

29, 1863.

must, out with company

;

J.,

Aug.

29,

May

29, 1863.

company May

29, 1863.

May

29, 1863.

Andrew, Aug.

12, 1802;

must, out with

Stipe,

Jackson, Aug.

12, 1862

must, out with company

;

company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Shaffer, Isaac H., Aug. 12, 1S62 Snyder, Joseph H., Aug. 12,1862; must, out with company May 29,1863. Snyder, Samuel, Aug. 12, 1S02; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Siple, William, Aug.12, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Suavely. John W., Aug. 12, 1802 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Swords, William, Aug. 12, 1S62; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va. t Dec. muBt. out with company May 29, 1863. 13, 1862 Singer, Philip, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1803. Sebolt, John, Aug. 12, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Shectz,

Johu

H.,

Aug.

12,

1S62; must, out with ;

;

;

May

captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

12, 1862;

must, out with company

Stipe,

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

212 Stipe,

William, Aug.

wounded

12, 1862;

1862; disch. on Burg,

April

certif.

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

company May 29, 1863. Ulrich, Solomon, Aug. 12. 1S63 must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Wentling, John, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Whisler, John L., Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Winters, Daniel, Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Young, Hiram, Aug. 12, 1662 must, out with company May 29, 1863. ;

;

;

;

;

Company

I.

Counties.

Captains.

1862; must, out with

company May

Shoemaker, Aug.

S.

W.

29, 1863.

May

29, 1863.

;

Loser, Jacob, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with

1863

Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

13, 1862; killed at

;

May

must, out with company

Lessley, John, Aug. 13, 1862

Aug.

Lillienstine, Charles,

company May

company May

29,

29, 1863.

29, 1863.

must, out with company

;

13,

1862; disch. on surg.

May

29, 1863.

certif. Oct. 4, 1862.

Lentz, Eli, Aug. 13, 1862; died Feb. 16, 1863.

Menear, Edward

J.,

Aug.

13,

1862

must, out with company

;

May

29,

;

;

1863.

29, 1863.

William W. Reed, Aug. 2, 1862; pro. from sergt. Co. must, out with company May 29, 1863.

F

Dec. 14,1862;

pro.

;

from sergt. Sept. 5, 1862 wounded must, out with company May ;

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862

S.,

;

First Sergeant.

Charles G. Miller, Aug. 13, 1862

Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Mumper, Levi, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Miller, Johu H., Aug. 13, 1862 must out. with company May 29, 1863. Mark, John G., Aug. 13, 1862; muBt. out with company May 29,1863. Miller, Daniel, Aug. 16, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Meyer, Henry, Aug. 13, 1862 muBt. out with company May 29, 1863. Moneghan, John, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Mondorff, David, Aug. 13, 1862 missing in action at Fredericksburg, Myers, Daniel

Second Lieutenant.

;

29, 1863.

;

;

;

Sergeants.

Augustus A. Welsh, Aug.

13, 1862; pro.

Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

from private Oct.

1,

1862

;

must.

out with company May 29, 1863. David Early, Aug. 13, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Samuel G. Sheaffer, Aug. 13, 1862 pro. from Corp. Sept. 8, 1862 wounded ;

;

;

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

May

May

Hanson, Christian, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Jones, Michael, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Kindt, Anthony, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Livingston, William, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29,

Lentz, Alfred, Aug. 13, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

Henry, Aug. 13, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va.,Dec. pro. from 2d lieut. Dec. 14, 1862 must, out with company

13, 1862

13, 1862.

Heikes, John E., Aug. 16, 1862; must, out with company

1863. Oct. 13,

13,1862.

Jerome

Gardner, Theodore F., Aug.

Livingston, James W., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with

C

First Lieutenants.

James

29,

must, out with'company

13, 1S62;

certif. Oct. 6, 1862.

1862; pro. from 1st lieut. Co.

9,

Adam, Aug.

1863.

Ira R. Shipley, Aug. 13, 1862; disch. on surg. Christian A. Nissley. Aug.

May

must, out with company

;

May 29, 1863. Fidell, Francis, Aug. 13. 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Gelvin, John, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Frantz,

;

Adams

Recruited in Lebanon and

Fickle, Thaddeus, Aug. 13, 1862 1863.

1863.

1,

Ulrich, Martin, Aug. 12, 1862; must, out with

1862

;

must, out with company

29, 1863.

John M. Segner, Aug.

1S62; pro. from Corp. March

13,

out with company

May

1,

1863; must.

29, 1863.

Myers, Jacob H., Aug. 16,1862; died at Washington, D. C, December, 1862.

company May 29, 1863. Joseph, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Norman, Edward, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Osborne, John H., Aug. 13, 1862; absent, sick, at mUBter out. Packham, Bradd, Aug. 13, 1862. Rupp, Henry, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Robb, John A., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Rankin, William, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Nipple, Jeremiah, Aug. 13, 1S62; must, out with

Neiff,

;

;

;

Corporals.

George A. Wolf, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Reuben K. Newhard, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

Rhodes, Henry, Aug. 13, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 31, 1862. Stough, Joseph, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, SheatTer, John W., Aug. 13, 1862 ;

1863.

Michael Baker, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Shade G. Stevens, Aug. 18, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862

;

must, out with company

Jacob Stambaugh, Aug. 13,1862

Joseph Early, Aug.

company May

May

29, 1863.

Nov.

6,

1862

;

May

29, 1863.

must, out with

29, 1863.

Aug.

13, 1862;

must, out with company

May

29,

1863.

May 29, 1863. May 29, 1863. company May 29, 1863.

must, out with company 1862 must, out with company ;

S., Aug. 13, Johu H., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with John A., Aug. 13, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Shaeffer, Jacob, Aug. 13, 1862; disch. April 6, 1863, for wounds received

Sheaner. Jacob

;

Shutt,

Schultz,

William S. Myers, Aug. 16, 1862 absent, sick, at muster out. William A. Forney, Aug. 13,1862; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. ;

13, 1862.

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

Musicians.

Simon Wheeler, Aug.

13,

Edward

Aug.

F. A. Clark,

S.,

Stevens, Edward, Aug. 13, 1862

must, out with company

;

13, 1862; pro. to Corp.

Sheaffer, Philip

Trimmer, Andrew, Aug.

company May 29, 1863. 1862; must, out with company May 29,

1862; must, out with 13,

1863. Privates. ;

1863.

Auge, Valentine, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. BlasBer, Andrew, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Baker, Daniel L., Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Black, Jacob, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29/1863. Becker, Martin, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Bachman, Peter, Aug. 13,1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Black, Daniel, Aug. 13, 1862 disch. for wounds Feb. 27, 1863. Bupp, Joseph T., Aug. 13, 1862. Cilley, John, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Day, George, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. DaviB, James M-, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, Druckenmiller, A., Aug. 13, 1862 ;

;

;

;

must, out with company

May

29,

must, out with company May 29, 1863. Welsh, George W.,Aug. 13, 1S62; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. Vornosdale, Uriah, Aug. 13, 1862

;

must, out with company May 29, 1863. Wendling, Adam, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company Weltmer, Martin, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company 13, 1862

Arnold, Eli, Aug. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Alexander, Franci6, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29,

13, 1802;

1863.

;

;

May 29, May 29,

1863. 1863.

Walborn, Elijah, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Weirman, Joseph E., Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

Wilhelm, Lewis, Aug. 13, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Feb. 26, 1863. Young, James, Aug. 13, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Yanu, John, Aug. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. ;

;

Company K. Recruited in Lebanon

;

;

1863.

Schuylkill Counties.

William Fox, Aug.

14, 1862

;

killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 11,

1862.

1863.

Early, Benjamin W., Aug.

and

Captains,

14,

1862; must, out with company

May

29,

Joseph W. Dougherty, Aug. must, out with company

14, 1862

May

;

pro.

29, 1863.

from l6t

lieut. Dec. 12, 1862;

GENERAL HISTORY. Johnson, Joseph, Sept.

First Lieutenant.

Duvid

Long, Aug.

S.

14, 1862

May

out with company

from 2d

pro.

;

lieut.

Dec. 12, 1862; must,

to 2d lieut. Jan. 19, 1863

pro.

from private

to sorgt. Oct. 1, 1862

May

must, out with company

;

First

;

29, 1863.

Henry

14, 1862

29, 1863.

May

must, out with company

;

29, 1863.

Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Euston, Aug. 14, 1862 pro. from Corp. March 1, 1863; must.

J. Light, J.

must.

;

disch.

u surg. certif. Feb. 28, 1863

Mayberry, Charles, Aug. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Miuning, Charles, Aug. 15, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va.. Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Moyer, Reuben, Aug. 14, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862;

must, out with company

Moyer, Peter, Aug.

1862

15,

May

29, 1863.

must, out with company

;

;

May

29, 1863.

Theodore H. Bechtel, Aug.

14, 1862

out with company

McCree, James, Aug. ;

29, 1863.

May 29, 1863. May 28 ut with company May 29, 1863. ut. with company May 29, 1863. ut with company May 29, 1863. with company

it

;

May

Sergeants.

Adam

mm

must.

;

company May

must, out with company

;

Lessig, Reuben, Aug. 14, 1862; must.

Lehman, Amos, Aug. 18, 1862; Leidy, Daniel, Aug. 14, 1862.

Sergeant

Daniel Downey, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company

Kichard Bertolet, Aug.

1862; must, out with

15, 1862;

Lash, James L., Sept. 14, 1862 Lengel, George. Aug. 15, 1862

Second Lieutenant. ;

2,

Keller, Frederick, Aug. 15, 1862

Klarke, Franklin, Aug.

29, 1863.

"William J. Barr, Aug. 14, 1862

213

must, out with company

May

29,

McLaughliu, Cyrus, Aug.

May 29, 1863. May 29, 1863.

must, out with company

14, 1862;

1862; must, out with

14,

company May

29,

1863.

1863. Corporals.

William Bicher, Aug.

company May

14, 1862; pro. to Corp. Oct.l, 1862;

must, out with

29, 1863.

Win. H. Ramsey, Aug. 14, 1S62 mUBt. out. with company May 29, 1863. William A. Klock, Aog. 14, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. must, out with company May 29, 1863. 13, 1862

Pierman, Isaac, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Raber, Lewis B., Aug. 14, 1862 captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Ramsey, Rufus, Aug. 15, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. ;

;

;

Ringle, F. E., Aug. 15, 1863; must, out with

company May

;

Rupp, John,

Jr.,

Aug.

14, 1862

must, out with company

;

29, 1863.

May

29, 1863.

;

Henry

Schram, Sept.

L.

with company

May

Benjamin Bugle, Aug. with company

2,

1S62; pro. to Corp.

March

29, 1863.

14, 1S62

May

pro. to corp.

;

March

1863

1,

;

must, out

29, 1863.

company May

May

29,

1863.

Charles F. Kanton, Aug. 14,1862; pro. to corp.

out with

1863; must, out

1,

Reinoehl, Jacob B., Aug. 15, 1862; must, out with company

March

1,

1863; must.

Springer, Charles, Aug. 14, 1862;

May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, 1863. must, out with company May 29, 1S63. must, out with company May 29, 1863.

Stoner, Andrew, Aug. 14, 1862;

wounded

Raber, George W., Aug.

14,

Smith, Arthur

16, 1862

Schreckengast,

29, 1863.

Samuel Martry, Aug. 14, 1862; pro. to Corp. March 1, 1863; must, out with company May 29, 1863. John L. Freck, Sept. 14, 1S62; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Jacob Hummel, Aug. 14, 1S62 pro. to corp. Oct. 1, 1862 disch. on surg.

F.,

Aug.

Snavely, William, Aug. S.,

14,

1862

;

;

1862;

Sept. 14, 1862

;

Snyder, Jeremiah, Aug. 14, 1862

13, 1862;

;

must, out with company

must, out with company

at

May

Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

29, 1863.

;

;

;

company May 29, 1863. Strauser, William, Aug. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Thomas, Joseph R., Aug. 15, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, Strauch, John, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with ;

certif.

Feb. 14, 1863.

James Warbrooke, Aug. Robert

J.

on surg. certif. Feb. died at Washington, D.

15, 1862; disch.

Luckenbill, Aug. 14, 1862

;

24, 1863. 0.,

Dec. 16,

1863.

Upchurch, Theo.

1862.

Thomas Winters, Aug.

company May 29, 1863. 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

14, 1862; must, out with

Zachariah Reidel, Aug. 14,

Privates.

Auman, Henry,

Sept. 14, 1S62; must, out with

company May

29, 1863.

Bankes, Paul, Aug. 15, 1S62; wounded at Fredericksburg. Va., Dec. 15, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Berkheiser, Henry, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with

company May

29, 1S63.

J., Aug. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Bumberger, Samuel, Sept. 14, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Bergal, Franklin, Aug. IS, 1862 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec.

Brumensteifer,

F.,

Aug.

14, 1862;

must, out with company

May

29,

1863.

Musicians.

;

;

Weber, Solomon, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Weik, Henry, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Weik, David, Aug. 15, 1S62; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Whittle, John, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Williams, Milton, Aug. 14, 1S62 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Warbrook, William, Aug. 15, 1862; must, out with company May 29, ,

1863.

Warf, Frederick, Aug. 14, 1S62

;

disch. Jan. 20,"1S63, for

wounds

re-

ceived at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

Yocum, Franklin, Aug. Yost, Lewis M.,

Aug.

14, 1S62

14, 1862;

;

May 29, 1863. with company May 29, 1S63.

must, out with company

must, out

;

15, 1862; disch.

Brown, George.

on surg.

Sept. 14, 1862

certif.

1862; disch.

March

Feb. 24, 1863.

wounded

;

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13,

13, 1863.

wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Eckert, Benedict, Aug. 14, 1S62; must, out with company May 29,1863. Fessler, Ellis, Aug. 14, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Feger, Henry, Aug. 15, 1862; must. out. with company May 29, 1863. Geiger, Charles, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Gerbill, Benjamin, Aug. 16, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1S63. Heverling, Cyrus, Aug. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Harpett, Charles, Sept. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Hutton, William L., Aug. 14, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Heisey, Daniel P., Aug. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Hoffman, Jacob, Aug. 14, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863. Hay, Christian, Aug. 14, 1S62 wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862: must, out with company May 29, 1863. Heckman, Edward A., Aug. 14, 1862; captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 15, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Hobbs, John A., Sept. 14, 1862 must, out with company May 29, 1863. Hautz, Elias, Aug. 15, 1862; disch. April 4, 1S63, for wounds received at Dougherty, Samuel, Aug.

CHAPTER XXVIII.

14, 1862;

The War for the Union (continued) — One Hundred and Sixty-third, One Hundred and Seventy-seventh, One Hundred and Seventh, One Hundred and Thirteenth, One Hundred and Thirtieth, aud One Hun-

;

;

;

dred and Thirty-sixth Regiments.

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-THIRD REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS (EIGHTEENTH CAVALRY), THREE YEARS' SERVICE. Company

;

Recruited

;

;

;

;

Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. Iba, Frederick R., Sept. 2, 1S62; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must, out with company May 29, 1863.

in

E.

Dauphin County.

Captains.

James Gowen, Sept. 18, 1862 pro. to lieut.-col. Nov. 2S, 1862. Thaddeus S. Freeland, Oct. 13, 1862; pro. from 1st lieut. Dec. 8, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 22. 1862. S. H. Tresonthick, Sept. 17, 1S62; pro. from 1st sergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. S, 1862; to capt. May 1, 1864; died July 26, of wounds received at St. Mary's Church, Va., June 15, 1S64. George W. Nieman, Oct. 13, 1S62; pro. from 2d to 1st lieut. Dec. 8, 1S62; ;

to capt. Dec. 2, 1864 31, 1865.

;

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Prov. Cav., Oct.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

214

Boyer, Solomon, March

First Lieutenants.

John R. Winters,

May

2,

1864

Sept. 17, 1862

com.

;

from

pro.

;

July

let lieut.

2,

2d lieut.

regt'l. q.m.-sergt. to

1864

not mustered

;

killed at

;

Kauffman's Hill, Va., Oct. 9, 1864. Theodore Jackman, Sept. 16, 1862 pro. from com.-sergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. 3, 1864; to 1st lieut. Jan. 1, 1865; must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt.

1865

2,

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro.

;

Cav., Oct. 31, 1865.

March

Bagt, Anton,

1865

6,

absent at muster out.

;

Bailey, Edward, Sept. 17, 1862.

Bayler, William B., Feb. 29, 1864; prisoner from .May 5 to Dec.

7,

1864;

;

P. Seal, Sept. 17,

with company June

1862

pro.

;

1865

2,

;

must, out

Burns, John

company June

1862; must, out with

14,

1865.

8,

1865.

Sept. 17, 1862

F.,

G.O.June

14,

1862

2,

trans, to U. S.

;

14,

Henry C,

Sergeants.

Jos. S. Morrison, Sept. 30, 1862

must, out with company June 14,1865. must, out with com pany June 14, 1865.

;

;

George W. Hocli, Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with company June Depew Gilbert, Nov. 12. 1862; disch. by G. 0. July 21, 1865. G.

W.

P. Freeland, Sept. 17, 1862

Frederick Griuer, Sept. 17, 1862

James Gray,

William D. A. Naugle, Sept.

James H. Daddow,

July

W. H.

1,

1864

8,

March

certif.

2,

Va Aug. ,

30, of

March

C, Dec. 9,

1862. in

action

June

11, 1864;

action Sept. 28, 1864;

;

Oct. 31, 1865.

1865

5,

;

must, out

with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav.,

Oct. 31, 1865.

Draper, George W., Sept. 27, 1864; killed at Cold Harbor, Va,, June 11, 1864.

22, 1864.

Dailes, George W., Sept. 30, 1862.

Esworthy, George

grave 2723.

Poffeuberger, Nov. 12, 1862; must, out with Co. E,3d Regt. Pro.

Cav., Oct. 31, 1865.

Feb. 27, 1864

5,

1865

;

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro.

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt.

;

Pro. Cav.,

Oct. 31, 1865.

exp. of term.

12, 1865, at

D.,

Cav., Oct. 31,1865.

Engler, John, April

'

;

wounded in unknown. wounded in

11, 1864;

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav., Oct. 31, 1865. must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav.,

captured; died at Andersonville, Ga.,

Absalom A. Wilt, Oct. 2, 1862 disch. Oct. Solomon S. Updegrove.Oct. 2, 1862; disch.

;

Chronister, Dixon O., Sept. 29, 1862;

Dittys, Dallas D., Feb. 23, 1864

1863.

wounds received

14, 1865.

;

trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, date

2d lieut. Co. I Dec.

compaDy June

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro.

;

trans, to U. S. army October, 1862. Clemens, Richard, Sept. 17,1862; trans, to U. S. army October, 1862. Cooper, James, Sept. 17, 1862 trans, to U. S. army October, 1862. Clark, Dennis, Sept. 30, 1862; trans, to U. S. army October, 1862.

Davis, David, April

Aug.

by

Cav., Oct. 31, 1865.

Davis, George W.,

1865.

17, 1862; pro. to

Sept. 17, 1862; ;

on surg.

Sept. 17, 1862; died

action near Charlestown,

John H. Boult,

14, 1S65.

on surg. certif. April, 1863. on surg. certif. Jan. 16, 1864.

trans, to Co. C, 11th Regt. V. K.

;

1864; disch. by G. 0. July

2,

disch.

;

Sept. 17, 1862; disch.

Charles P. Sheaf, Sept. 17, 1862

disch.

;

13, 1865; disch.

1862; must, out with company June 14,

17,

Sept. 10,1864; must, out with

Cooper, James B., Sept. 17, 1862

1865.

Peter F. Dunkle, Sept. 17, 1862

March

29, 1865.

Campbell, John, April 13, 1865 must, out with company June

C. Etzweiler, Sept. 17, 1862;

December, 1862.

S. army October, 1862'. army October, 1862. army October, 1862.

1865.

Copley,

Aaron

certif.

prisoner from Sept. 26, 1864, to

Carbaugh, Daniel, Sept.

must, out with company June

;

on surg.

Sept. 30, 1862; trans, to U. S.

Bright, William, Sept. 14, 1864; not accounted for.

Quartermaster Sergeant.

Wingard,

July

Boyer, Frederick, Sept. 13, 1862.

Bierman, 17,

H„

Barsto, Henry, Oct.

First Sergeant.

F.

O.

Bradford, Ephraim, Sept. 17, 1862; trans, to U.

from sergt. Jan.

14, 1865.

Jacob Greenawalt, Sept.

by G.

Balso, Jacob, Sept. 30, 1862; disch.

Second Lieutenant.

William

disch.

Brant, John M., Sept. 30, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. March, 1863.

Pro. Cav., Oct. 31, 1S65.

Oct. 12, 1865, at exp. of term.

Eastman, Edward, Sept.

22, 1864

;

absent, on detached service, at muster

out. Corporals.

Erb, Christian B., Sept. 30, 1862; captured; died at Harrisburg, Pa.,

Wdj. Stephens, Sept. 30, 1862; must, out with company June 14, 1865. John A. Berry, Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with company June 14, 1865. Sawara S. Snyder, Sept. 17, 1862 must, out with company June 14, 1865. Edward Brown, Oct. 2, 1862 disch. by G. O. July 10, 1865. ;

;

John Hoffacker,

Sept. 30, 1862; killed at

William Fulkison, Sept.

Andrew

Hanover,

July

Pa.,

;

;

Oct. 31, 1865.

Hiram C

,

by G.

Sept. 17, 1862; disch.

O.

June

12, 1865.

Ferguson, Frank, Sept. 17, 1862 trans, to TJ. S. army October, 1862. Fackler, Jacob C, Sept. 17, 1862; died at Fairfax Court-HouBe, Va., June ;

6,1863.

Cav., Oct. 31, 1865. Bugler. 30, 1862

1865; must, out with

;

Ferguson, James

prisoner from

company June

May

1864, to

5,

March

5,

T.,

Nov.

12, 1862.

Garrison, George, Sept. 30, 1862

;

must, out with company June 14,

1865.

14, 1865.

Isaac N. Williamson, Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with

company June

14,

Garrett,

John

Feb. 27, 1864; must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro.

T.,

Cav., Oct. 31, 1865.

1865.

John

Emanhiser, John W., Sept. 17, 1862 not on muster-out roll. Fine, James, April 5, 1865 must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav., Frailey,

3, 1863.

30, 1862.

B. Pines, Feb. 29, 1864; must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro.

Wilber Shepherd, Sept.

1864.

Bell, April 1, 1865.

Gibson, Johu, May 16, 1864 absent, on detached service, at muster out. Giugerbach, John, March 6, 1865; absent at muster out. Gruber, Barnhard, Sept. 17, 1862 captured at Germania Ford, Va., Nov. ;

Farrier.

William F. Polm, Sept.

17, 1862;

James H. Tresonthick,

Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with

must, out with company June

14, 1865.

company June

;

18,1863. 14,

1865.

Garnian, Benjamin, Sept. 17, 1862; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga.,

May

Saddler.

9,1864; grave 968.

Guire, Edward, Nov. 29, 1862.

William

J. L.

Ettiuger, Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with

company June

14, 1865.

Hoover, John H., Sept. Hess, William

Privates.

Aim, Jesse, Feb. 25, 1864; wounded at St. Mary's Church, Va., June 15, 1864; must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav., Oct. 31, 1865. Anderson, George, Oct. 2, 1862; captured at Germania Ford, Va., Nov. 18, 1803. 17,

1862

;

disch. on surg. certif. April 22, 1863.

Beller, Jacob, Sept. 17, 1S62; captured; must, out with

company June

14,1865. 14, 1865.

1862

;

must.

nt with

1862

;

must.

at

Herman, John, Aug. 5, 1864 Henderson, John, March 6, 1865; ;

with company June 14, 1865. ut with company June 14, 1865. t

disch. by G. O.

June

21, 1865.

HarriB, William F., April 13,1865; disch. by G. O. Aug.

Howard, Charles,

Ansbach, Henry H., Sept.

company June

with company June

17,

P., Sept. 17,

Hurling, Adam, Sept. 30, 1862; must, o

Sept. 22, 1864

;

8,

1865.

absent, on detached service, at muster

out.

Howard, James,

Sept. 22, 1864; absent,

on detached

14, 1865.

Bayler,

Wm.

company June 14, 1864. 1804; must, out with company June 14,

A., Sept. 30, 1862; must, out with

Baucherich, George, Sept.

24,

1865.

July

Henry C, March 26, 1864 Asylum Cemetery, D. C.

Bradford, tary

Howard, Daniel, Sept. 30, 1862 Hoover, John D., Sept. 17, 1862

;

died

May

1,

1864

;

buried in Mili-

29,

trans, to U. S.

;

;

captured

;

army

October, 1862.

died at Andersonville, Ga.,

1864; grave 4222.

Hager, Charles E., Sept. 30, 1862; died at Fairfax Court House, Va., April 20, 1863.

GENERAL HISTORY. Hollingsworth, C.

F., Sept. 30, 1862;

Hunter, Napoleon

B., Sept. 14,

Winchester, Va.,

not on muster-out

1864; died

;

roll.

11, 1864;

Hall, Frederick. Oct. 15,1864

not accounted

;

witll Co. E,

wounded

;

company June

14, 1865.

in action Oct. 8, 1864; must, out

3d Eegt. Pro. Cav., Oct. 31, 1865. 17, 1862; captured at Germania Ford, Va., Nov.

Kurtz, Adam, Sept.

18,

1863.

King, JohD, March

29, 1864; trans, to Co. I, 6th U. S.

Cavalry, Dec.

2,

witll Co. E,

;

;

;

;

;

out.

John

L., Sept. 17, 1862

I.ehn, Josiah, Sept. 17, 1862

Old Church June

captured at Ely's Ford, Va., Jan.

;

wounded

;

at Wilderness, Va.,

June

1864.

31, 1866.

;

Oct. 31, 1865.

Waters, Charles, Feb. 27,1864; wounded in action June 11 and Aug. 22, 1864; must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav., Oct. 31, 1865. 1865

6,

;

absent at muster out.

Williams, Aaron, Feb. 27, 1865; disch., date unknown. White, Benjamin B., Sept. 29, 1862; absent, on detached service, at

muster out. Wilson, John, Sept.

Woodside, William Ga.,

June

9,

17, 1862; trans, to U. S. J., Sept. 30,

army

October, 1862.

1762; captured; died at Andersonville,

1864; grave 1749.

Wager, Joseph, Sept. 17, 1862 died at Harrisburg, Pa., Sert. 30, 1862. Warner, John, Sept. 17, 1862. Wilhelm, Andrew B., Sept. 30, 1862. Ward, Thomas, Sept. 17, 1862; not on muster-out roll. Young, Robert J., Feb. 26, 1864; disch. by G. O. July 8, 1865. ;

May 8, and at

24th Regt. Vet. Res.

11, 1864; trans, to Co. F,

Corps, Feb. IS, 1863; disch. by G. 0.

Mooherman,

5,

3d Regt. Pro. Cav., Oct.

B., March 6, 1865 absent at muster out. Thompson, Samuel, Sept. 30, 1862; disch. by G. 0. June 16, 1865. Thomas, Joseph, March 31, 1864; wounded in action Aug. 25, 1864; absent, in hospital, at muster out. Watson, John, Feb. 25, 1864; must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt Pro. Cav.,

Waxharu, James, Marcli

1864.

Kawel, Joseph H., Sept. 17, 1862; captured died at Andersonville, Ga., Aug. 9, 1864 grave 5145. Kitzelman, Richard, Sept. 17, 1862. Lowe, Robert \V., Sept. 17, 1862 must, out with company June 14, 1865. Lyons, James, Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with company June 14, 1865. Long, Jerome B., Oct. 2, 1862; disch. by G. 0. July 13, 1865. Lilly, Caleb, Feb. 27, 1864; absent at muster out. Laiug, John, March 6, 1865 absent at muster out. Lambert, Henry, Sept. 22, 1864 absent, on detached service, at muster linking,

must, out

Tanner, Morgan

for.

Jones, John, Sept. 22, 1864; absent, on detched service, at muster out. Kies, John, Feb. 26, 1864

Trawits, Henry, Sept. 30, 1862 must, out with company Juno 14, 1866. Turner, Thomas M., Feb. 27, 1864; wounded at Old Church, Va„ June ;

buried in National Cemetery,

lot 26.

Jones, Enoch B., Aug. 26, 1864; must, out with

215

28, 1865.

C. D., Sept. 17, 1862; must, out with

company June

14,

ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT (NINE MONTHS' SERVICE), DRAFTED MILITIA.

1865.

Miller,

Samuel

It.,

Sept. 27, 1864; must, out

Miller, Jacob, Feb. 27, 1865

Meads, Franklin, Sept.

1862

17,

by

disch.

;

Company

with company June 14,1865.

From Dauphin

G. 0. July 13, 1865.

captured at Germania Ford, Va., Nov.

;

Oiplain.

John

18, 1863.

Moohennan, William,

Oct.

1862

2,

died April

;

2,

1864, of

wounds

F. Peck,

Nov.

21, 1862

Washington, D. C, June, 1863;

Sept. 17, 1862; died at

May, Jan.

2,

1863; buried in Military

Cemetery. Murray, John, Sept. 30, 1862. Martin, Henry C, Oct. 2, 1862. McCreary, Isaac, Sept, 28, 1862 must. McGrath, Patrick, Sept. 30, 1862; must. ;

McDonald, John, Feb.

26, 1S64;

absent

Asylum

Jacob Misli, Nov.

21, 1862

wounds received

;

out with company Aug.

1862; must-

3,

1863.

Second Lieutenant.

ut

company June with company June

>n

detached service, at muster

lit

with

14, 1865. 14, 1865.

Joshua R. Elder, Nov. 2, 1862 pro. from with company Aug. 5, 1863. ;

sergt. Dec. 3, 1862

must, out

;

First Sergeant.

1802; must, out with

2,

company Aug.

5,

1863.

died at Stevensburg, Va., April

Cemetery, Culpeper Court-House, block

1,

section A,

row

7,

grave

217.

;

died of

;

0. Mumma, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out witli company Aug. 5, 1863. Moses Lyter, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Peter Frantz, Nov. 3, 1862 pro. from corp. Dec. 20, 1S62 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Adam Hoffman, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

Joseph

;

;

;

;

died at

Richmond,

Va., Nov. 22,

1863.

Nuble, Amos, Sept. 29,1862

wounds received

at

Opeqnan, Va.,

Sept. 19, 1864.

Corporals.

March

6,

by G. 0. July 3, 1865. 1S62; disch, by G. 0. June 16, 1865.

1865

Polm, John H., Sept. 17, Pilkingtou, James, Sept.

Henry C,

pro.

;

5,

in action Feb. 27, 1864; buried in National

McCool, William C, Sept. 17, 1862. Neff, Henry, Sept. 17, 1862 captured

Painter,

Nov. 29, 1862. from 2d lieut. Dec.

pro. to q.m.

;

Philip D. Felty, Nov. 21, 1862

Nathan Posey, Nov. McCarroll, William W., Sept. 17, 1862

Orr, William,

1863.

5,

First Lieut&ittnts.

burial record, David

13, of

must, out with company Aug.

;

re-

ceived in action.

May, Daniel,

C. Count!/.

disch.

;

Thomas Forney, Nov.

1862

2,

must, out with company Aug.

;

5, 1863.

William B. Reed, Nov. 2, 1862; pro. to corp. April 26, 1863; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Daniel Fisher, Nov. 2, 1S62 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1S63. John McCord, Nov. 2, 1S62 must, out with company Aug. 5. 1863.

17, 1862.

Sept. 17, 1862.

;

Reed, George, Feb. 27, 1864

;

absent at muster out.

;

Roberts, James, Feb. 25, 1864

must, out with Co. E, 3d Regt. Pro. Cav.,

;

Oct. 31, 1865.

Ritzston, Samuel, Sept. 17, 1S62; captured at

Germania Ford,

Va., Nov.

18, 1863.

Samuel T., Sept. 17, 1862 trans, to U. S. army October, 1862. Reed, Samuel, Sept 17, 1S62. Streminger, Philip, Sept. 30, 1862; wounded at Opequau, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; must, out with company June 14, 1865. Ritz.

Adam

company Aug. 5, 1863. Christian C. Good, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out witll company Aug. 5, 1863. Samuel S. Keim, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1S63. John H. Sheesly, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1S63. Cover, Nov.

3,

1862; must, out with

;

Springer, George B., Sept. 17, 1862

;

must, out with company June 14,

Musicians.

Samuel B. Kauffmau, Nov.

2,

1862; must, out with

company Aug.

5,

1863.

Christian Reitzel, Nov.

2,

1S62

must, out with company Aug.

;

5,

1S63.

1865.

Sullivan, Timothy,

March

29,

absent, on furlough, at muster out. Aug. 12, 1865; buried in National Ceme-

1864

Stout, Peter, April 12, 1S65; died

Sbafer, Frederick,

March

Snow, Adam, March

6,

1865

;

Privates.

;

tery, Antietam, Md., section 26, lot F, grave 600.

absent at muster out.

absent at muster out. 6, 1865 Smith, Walter, Sept. 22, 1864; absent, on detached service, at muster ;

out.

Snyder, Oliver, Sept. 29, 1862. Spayd, Christian K., Sept. 17, 1862. Stack, Dennis, Sept. 30, 1862.

Alleman, Adam, Nov. 2, 1862 died at Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 5, 1862. Bishoff, Christ. C, Nov. 2, 1862 most, out witli company Aug. 5, 1S63. Brown, John H., Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1S63. Boliuger, Jacob, Nov. 2. 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. ;

;

Boll, Philip A., Nov. 3, 1S62; must, out witll

Biever, Jacob, Nov.

2,

1S62

;

Core, Frederick, Nov. 3, 1862

;

5,

must, out with company Aug.

George W., Nov.

2,

1862

;

Carpenter, Henry, Nov.

2.

1862

;

Cassel,

company Aug.

1S63.

disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 5, 1862. 5, 1863.

must, out with Company Aug. must, out with company Aug.

5,

1863.

5,

1863.

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

216 Cockley, David, Nov. Caley, Samuel, Nov.

1862

2,

2,

Caley, Benjamin, Nov.

1862 2,

must, out with company Aug.

;

5,

Company

1863.

must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

;

1862

From

F.

Lancaster, Bariphiu, and adjoining comities.

.

;

company Aug. 5, 1863. 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

Clark, David, Nov. 10, 1862; must, out with

Dengler, Samuel, Nov.

2,

Duncan, John

3,

S.,

Nov.

Decker, Elias, Nov.

6,

1862

trans, to Co.

;

B Nov.

Isaac S. Filbert, Nov. 23, 1862

2,

2,

6,

1863.

Daniel T. Smouse, June 20, 1861 pro. from sergt. Co. F, 40th Regt. P. V., Dec. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

company Aug. 5, 1863. company Aug. 5, 1863. Farling, Obadiab, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Fishburn, Reuben, Nov. 13, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Gerheart, Cornelius, Nov. 3, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Eisenhour, John, Nov.

Foltz, Elias, Nov.

must, out with company Aug.

;

First Lieutenant.

6, 1862.

1S62; must, out with

;

1862; must, out with

Second Lieutenant.

Joseph B. Garber, Nov.

must, out with company Aug.

22, 1862;

5,

1863,

;

Gingerich, Daniel, Nov.

First Sergeant.

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 18, 1862.

2,

Henry, Felix, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Herman, George, Nov. 3, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Hoover, John, Nov. 3, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Hoover, David, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863. Houser, William, Nov. 2, 1862; absent, sick, at muster out. Hoffard, Jacob, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Hoover, Samuel, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Hikes, Washington, Nov. 5, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Hetrick, William, Nov. 2,1862; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 16, 1862. Judy, John, Nov. 10, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Killinger, Levi, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Kinley, Benedict, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Lime, Adam, Nov. 3, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 17, 1862. Lingle, Andrew, Nov. 2, 1862. Mathias, Peter, Nov. 3, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Martin, Philip, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Metzgar, Daniel, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1S63. Meek, Lewis S., Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Miller, Charles, Nov. 10, 1862; must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863. Miller, Andrew, Nov. 10, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Mapes, George W., Nov. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. B Nov. 6. 1862. Miller, Douglass S., Nov. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1862. McNamara, E. D., Nov. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1862. Noaker, John, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Patrick, Peter, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Patrick, William, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Page, Elias, Nov. 20, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5,1863. Page, John, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Plouch, Israel, Nov. 2, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. April 16, 1863. Payne, Charles M., Nov. 6, 1862; trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1862. Payne, Franklin W., Nov. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1862. Roland, Abraham, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Eeed, Adam, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Keigel, Daniel, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Reichard, John, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Rutt, Michael M., Nov. 2, 1862 disch Nov. 18, 1862. Reese, John R., Nov. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1862. Shaffer, John, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Shallahammer, A., Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Saddler, Henry, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Seibert, David, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863. Shartzer, Joseph J., Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Shutter, William, Nov. 3, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Strohm, Henry, Nov. 3, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Seiders, Jacob, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

Harry H. Hippie, Nov.

1862; must, out with

6,

company Aug.

5, 1863.

;

;

James R. Campbell, Nov. 5, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. William Wentz, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. John T. Sheibley, Nov. 10, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. John F. G. Long, Nov. 6, 1862; absent at muster out. ;

:

Corporals.

Henry Wentz, Nov.

1862

2,

must, out with company Aug.

;

5,

1863.

Samuel A. Kern, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Jacob Snyder, Nov. 5, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. S. L. Hollenbaugh, Nov. 5, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Samuel Barcley, Nov. 5, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. ;

;

;

John Hawthorn, Nov. 12, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Henry Alton, Nov. 11, 1862; must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863. John Mack, Nov. 11, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

;

;

;

;

Musicians.

;

Cyrus Miller, Nov.

Benjamin

1862; must, out with

6,

F. Barnhart, Dec. 3, 1862

;

company Aug.

1863.

5,

must, out with company Aug.

5,

1863.

;

;

Billman, Isaac, Nov.

;

Briner, Jacob, Nov.

Baker, Michael Bistline,

Cless, Jacob,

A.,

Taylor, John, Nov.

Tingley,

Edwin

Nov. 6,

2,

1862

1862 ;

;

B Nov.

6,

5,

;

;

5,

1863.

6,

1862.

;

Nov. 6, 1862 trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1862. Walmer, Henry, Nov. 6, 1862. Yenlzer, John H., Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5,1863. Zartman, John H., Nov. 6, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Zimmerman, Daniel, Nov. 13, 1862 must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863.

Nov.

Holloway, James, Nov.

;

;

company Aug.

1862.

Heim, George, Nov. 11, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Heinbaugh, C. B., Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 6, 1863. Humes, William D., Nov. 5, 1862.

1S62.

1863.

;

8,

1862; must, out with

;

Groff, Jacob,

R.,

F.,

4,

;

5,

Wade, Martin, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Welker, Henry B., Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Wade, Lewis, Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. West, William

1863.

5,

company Aug. 5, 1863. Gutshall, Philip, Nov. 0, 1S62 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Garland, William, Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Greenblade, John, Nov. 11, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Gutshall, Abraham, Nov. 2, 1862.

16, 1862.

Nov. 6, 1862. Unger, Benjamin W., Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug.

1862; must, out with

6,

Esbleman, Samuel, Nov. Fry, Joseph, Nov.

died at Suffolk, Va., Jan. 30, 1863.

trans, to Co.

company Aug.

1862; died at Suffolk, Va., Jan. 22, 1863.

5,

;

1863.

Shallahammer,

1862; must, out with

;

;

Henry W., Nov. 2, 1862; disch. by special order Nov Smith, James C, Nov. 6, 1862; trans, to Co. B Nov. 6, 1S62.

Nov.

Eslinger, Jacob, Nov.

;

Shearer,

1S62.

8,

2,

Nov. 2, 1862. Conrad, Jacob, Nov. 10, 1862. Crider, Joseph R., Nov. 8, 1862. Dean, George, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Duck, Solomon, Nov. 11, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Dehiser, James W., Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Emery, George, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

;

company Aug.

;

1862.

Crull, John,

;

must, out with

1S62

Berntheiser, Joseph, Nov. 11, 1862.

;

;

1862;

5,

6,

8,

Cook. William, Nov.

.

1S62

Nov.

Bucher, Samuel, Nov.

;

2,

F.,

Solomon, Nov.

Bowman, John, Nov.

;

Seitzinger, Alexander, Nov.

1862; must, out with

Berrier, William H., Nov. 6, 1862.

;

;

company Aug. 5. 1863. company Aug. 5, 1863. company Aug. 5, 1863. must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863.

1862; must, out with

2,

2,

Berrier, William, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with

I

4, 1862.

Kuhn, John C, Nov. 5, 1S62; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Kuhn, Andrew L., Nov. 6, 1862; absent at muster out. Kesler, David, Nov. 5, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Kochenderfer, Peter, Nov. 5, 1862; must, out with company Aug.

5,

1863.

Kern, Simon, Nov.

5,

Kitner, Abraham, Nov.

Kebler, Lewis, Nov.

company Aug. 5, 1863. must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

1862; must, out with

6,

5,

1862;

1862.

Kenny, William, Nov. 4, 1862. Kaylor, Abraham, Nov. 6, 1862. Lay, William A., Nov.

Lay, Samuel, Nov.

5,

6,

1862; must, out with

1862.

company Aug.

5,

1863.

GENERAL HISTORY. Miller, Samuel, Nov.

1862

2,

Mover. Joseph, Nov. Miller, Isaac, Nov.

must, out with company Aug.

;

Bellon, John, Nov. Betz,

1862.

Miller, Isaac T., Nov.

McConnel, Samuel, Nov. McCardel, William, Nov.

O'Donnel, Samuel, Nov.

11, 1862

;

company Aug.

must, out with company Aug.

1862; must, out with

2,

1862

2,

1863. 1863.

Brubaker, Samuel H., Nov.

Kico, George C, Nov.

1863.

5,

1863.

5, 1863.

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Nov.

2,

5,

Henry C, Nov.

Frantz, Uriah, Nov.

1862

5,

1862

2,

Feidt, George, Nov. 2, 1862

1862; must, out with

company Aug.

5,

Furkel, Philip, Nov.

;

;

:

Shearer, John, Nov. 10, 1862.

Andrew, Nov.

Sweigart, Peter, Nov. Shelpfer, John, Nov.

8,

8,

8,

;

2,

1862.

company Aug.

5,

1863.

4,

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 14, 1862.

4,

1862

disch.

;

on surg.

4, 1862. 5,

1863.

5.

1863.

2,

1862; must, out with 1862

2,

Nov.

company Aug.

1862

;

certif.

must, out with company Aug.

2,

Haines, Frederick A., Nov.

disch. on surg. certif.

;

Nov.

2.

1862.

company Aug. 5, 1863. company Aug. 5, 1863. Klinger, Philip, Nov. 2, 1862; must, ont with company Aug. 5, 1863. Klinger, Joseph, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Kissinger, Jorias. N must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. 2, 1862 Kocher, William, N 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Koppenheffer, H. S Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, Klinger, Peter, Nov.

1862; must, out with

2,

Klinger, Samuel, Nov.

2,

1862; must, out with

;

Jr.,

2,

.

Lubold, Martin, Nov.

1863.

John

R.,

2,

Mencle, Daniel, Nov.

5,

1863.

1862

company Aug.

5,

disch.

;

1862

1863.

5, 1863.

t

i

certif.

1862; disch.

n surg.

i

certif.

1S62

;

1,

;

2,

2,

1862.

1862.

1862.

disch. on surg. certif.

1862

2,

Nov.

surg. certif. Nov.

;

1,

1862.

2,

urg. certif. Nov. 2, 1862.

c

McCurtin, Daniel, Nov. 2, 1862. Ossman, George, Nov. 2, 1862; disch. Nov. 19, 1862. Ohle, Eli, Nov. 1, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. Reedy, William H., Nov.

Nov.

surg. certif. Nov. 2, 1862.

disch on surg. certif. Nov. 2, 1862.

;

disch. on

;

surg

o:

disch.

;

1862; disch.

2,

1862 2,

Parker, Joseph C, Nov.

First Lieutenant.

P. S. Bergstresser, Nov. 25, 1S62; must, out with

company Aug.

surg. certif. Nov. 2, 1862.

i

2, 1862.

2,

Nov.

Miller, Jacob, Nov.

I.

County.

must, out with company Aug.

disch

;

1862.

Miller, Jeremiah, Nov. 2, 1862

Captain. ;

2,

2,

Miller, Samuel, Nov.

Miller,

25, 1862

1S62; must, out with

1862

2,

Nov.

Metz, Michael, Nov.

company Aug. 5, must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. 1S62; must, out with

6,

COMPANT

Nov.

1863.

5,

1862; disch. on surg. certif. Nov.

John W., Nov.

Hoffman, John, Nov. Hoover, Alfred, Nov.

Lebo, Joseph, Nov.

From Dauphin

J. Evitts,

must, out with company Aug.

;

1863.

Gingles, Thomas, Nov.

Gaiton,

Lentz, John,

1862.

Abraham, Nov. 10, 1862. Trupe, Abraham, Nov. 8, 1862. Zigler, John, Nov. 2, 1862

2,

1862; must, out with

5,

5, 1863.

1863.

5, 5,

;

Trostle,

Waggoner, Christian, Nov.

Nov.

Lubold, George, Not

1862.

1862.

Shreader, William, Nov.

L.,

must, out with company Aug.

1863.

1862.

8,

Showalter, Elias, Nov.

1862.

2,

out with company Aug.

.

1862.

8,

Good, John

niUBt.

;

'.

1862.

2,

1863.

5,

must, out with company Aug.

;

;

1862

2,

Fisher, Jeremiah, Nov.

1863.

Sensenig, George, Nov.

company Aug.

1862; must, out with

2.

Daniel, Benneville, Nov. 2, 1862.

Stambaugh, John, Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Stump, John, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Stum, George, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Sbeibly, George, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Seager, Jacob, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Stambaugh, Eli, Nov. 10, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Snyder, John G., Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Shull, Frederick, Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Shannon, Jesse, Nov. 2, 1862; died at Suffolk, Va., March 4, 1863. Shearer, Henry, Nov. 2, 1862; died at Suffolk, Va., April 20, 1863.

Benjamin

Charles, Nov.

Deitz, Joseph, Nov.

Evitts,

1863. 5,

5,

;

Drum,

I., Nov. 2, 1862. Rutb, John, Nov. 8, 1862. Robison, William, Nov. 8, 1862. Stambaugh, William, Nov. 2, 1S62; must, out with company Aug.

Sberiff,

;

;

Rice, George

Shoemaker, William, Nov.

5,

Bubb, Jonas, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Carle, Daniel, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Coleman, Charles, Nov. 2, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 2, 1862. Coleman, Jacob. Nov. 2, 1862. Deitz, Jacob, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Deibler, John N., Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Dillman, Barnhart, Nov. 25, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 1863.

1862.

2,

company Aug.

1862; must, out with

2,

1863. 5,

company Aug.

must, out with company Aug.

;

5, 1863.

5,

1862; must, out with

2,

1863.

5,

company Aug.

5,

company Aug. 5, 1863. Rhea, James D., Nov. 6, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Butter, William, Nov. 11, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Rule, Henry A., Nov. 2, 1862. Peck, James W., Nov.

must, out with company Aug.

;

1862; must, out with

2,

;

1862; must, out with

6,

1862

5,

Anthony, Nov.

Bordner, Jonathan, Nov. 25, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Brown, David, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

1862.

5,

McClure, James K., Nov. 5, 1862. Noal, Alexander, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. Ney, Samuel, Nov. 2, 1862. Peck, James, Nov.

Privates.

1863.

5,

1862.

8,

8,

217

Nov.

1,

1862.

must, out with company Aug. 5

1863.

Srcond Lieutenant.

Joseph D. Gise, Nov.

25,

1862

Reed, Israel, Nov.

must, out with company Aug.

;

5,

1863.

Jonathan Tobias, Nov.

2,

Abraham

2,

H., Nov.

1862; must, out with 5,

1S62; must, out with

Ritzman, Jacob, Nov. 2, 1862 Romberger, J. B., Nov. 2, 1862 absent, sick, at muster out. Ritzman, Baltbazer, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with compauy Aug. ;

1862; must, out with

2,

company Aug.

5,

1863.

company Aug. 5, 1863. company Aug. 5, 1863. company Aug. 5, 1863 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1S63.

1862; must, ont with

Reed, Joseph H., Nov. Reed,

First Sergrant.

;

Sergeants.

Edward Mencel, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with compauy Aug. 5, 1863. Henry Bordner, Nov. 2, 1862 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Henry Witnier, Nov. 2, 1S62 must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863. Martin P. Shaffner, Nov. 2, 1862; must, out with company Aug. 5, 1863.

5,

1863.

;

;

;

Romberger, Jonas, Nov. 2, 1862; disch. Nov. 18, 1862. Reigle, Obed J., Nov. 2, 1862; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 2. 1S62. Ryeo, John, Nov. 11, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 11, 1S62. Reichard, Elias, Nov. 1, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 1, 1862. Robins, Abraham T„ Nov. 1, 1862 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 1, 1862. Romberger, George, Nov. 2, 1862 disch. Nov. 18, 1862. Rul

(d.

Oct.

Obed

26,

C. Bucher.... Aug. William Dock March John C. Bucher(re-

Dec. 4, 1798) Oct. Dec.

Edward

1827

Innis August, 1839).... Jan. Feb. Fred Hummel

John

Samuel Moore 1813)

1827

12,

20, 18:17). Green (d.

John Kean Aug. Thomas Former

James Cowden

23,

Nov.

March

Feb. 20, 1792) Aug. Joshua Elder (res. April 18, 1792.... Aug. James Clunie (d. Sept. 18, 1798).... Feb.

October, 1827)... Aug. Innis Green (res. elected to Con-

Isaac

Momma

Mumma

23, 1S61

Nov. Nov. Nov.

(re-

elected)

Aug. 10 1818 (Under the Constitution of 1873,

Hauer sent

for the president

sion of his guilt aB an accessory before the fact, but denied that

McKin-

(res. ney, Jr. Oct. 1832) Val. Hummel (res.

Aug.

1817)

David Harris

But on the trial aud Judge Gloninger and made a confeshe was present at the comniissiou of the murder, which he alleged had been committed by McManus aud Peter McDonough, and that the rest of the prisoners were accessory before the fact. It appearing probable that McManus was present at the murder and was the person who shot the deceased, he was not examined as a witness on the trial of Hauer. The jury was discharged from giving a verdict as to Hauer and the cases were continued until the next term. Iu this proceeding the counsel of Hauer declined to interfere as they had nut been consulted by Hauer as to his confession, and they considered that he had by that act taken his case out of their hands. At the next term a bill was found against McManus as the person who committed the murder with a pistol or axe, and one against Hauer and others for procuring and abetting it. " McManus was tried and convicted on his own confession, " When the case of Hauer and others was called up, it was objected by Duncan, Fisher, and Clymer that Hauer was in law discharged, as the jury in his case at the former term had been discharged without his consent, and it was alleged that he could not be put in jeopardy of life twice for the same offense. Able and learned arguments were made by them, and by Mr. Hall and Smith on the part of the Commonwealth. It was contended by them that the proceeding which should bar a second trial must be an actual acquittal by verdict on the general issue (p. 35) and further that there must have been a verdict of not guilty on an indictment free from legal error, and that in this case of Hauer the first indictment was defective, it not having been alleged- in it that Francis Sheetz died of the ivounds received. Judge Henry held that such omission was fatal to the indictment and was conclusive in the matter; and that it was therefore unnecessary to decide the other question. As Hauer therefore could not have been legally convicted on the first indictment, his case and that of Donegan aud Cox was called up. On being called on to plead, Hauer stood mute. The court, considering that he stood mute from obstinacy, directed the plea of not guilty to be entered for while he held their horses at the end of the lane.

Com John Gloninger. ... Aug. John Carson (d.

gress)

office abolished.)

;

THE PRESIDENT JUDGES OF DAUPHIN COUNTY. [As before noted, the following interesting incidents are from the pen of the late George Washing-

be perceived that he does not first president judge the law, William Augustus Atlee.]

ton Harris.

It will

refer in this

connection to the

learned in

"Judge Henry was, I understand, a native of Lancaster County. He was a large man, perhaps above six feet in height, and he was lame from a rheumatic affection, contracted probably when in the military service. He had been in the Revolutionary army, and was in the Quebec expedition in 1775,

which

now

is

and subsequently wrote a narrative of that expedition,

a scarce book.

I

do not distinctly recollect of ever seeing

him. I know nothing personally of his ability as a judge, but never heard it questioned. He presided, in the year 1798, at the trial of Hauer and McManus for the murder of Francis Sheetz, and from the report of that case

I

would judge quite favorably of

He

died

He also wrote Emaus Orphau-House.

his capacity.

the will of George Frey for the foundation of the

when

in Lancaster, Lancaster County forming a part of his juHis family lived in Harrisbnrg after his death for sevand several of his daughters were zealous, active members of

dicial district.

eral years,

the Methodist Church.

"The

case of Hauer and McManus, as I have iutimuted, was reported. was one of the most interesting murder trials which ever took place It was devised by Hauer for the destruction of the lives of Francis and Peter Sheetz, his brothers-in-law, by whose death he It

in the State.

come into possession of a considerable estate. Mcyoung Irishman, who, when executed, was not twenty-one

desired his wife to

Manus was

a

He had led rather an irregular life in his own country, and was seduced into this outrage through Patrick Donagan, who lived for a time with John Hauer. Donagitn and others were also indicted

years of age.

for the

"

murder, but none were convicted but Hauer and McManus.

A

him.

"Donegan and Cox

objected to being tried with Hauer, but the court

decided that the matter was within the discretion of the prosecuting

and they were accordingly tried together. The confession of Hauer was used against him, and testimony given as to Donegan and Cox. Hauer was convicted and Donegan ami Cox acquitted. A bill was found against the wife of Hauer and Hugh McDonough, but no evidence was given on the part of the Commonwealth and they were acquitted.

officer,

would appear to me probable that if Hauer had not made confession would not have been convicted, as the persons present room where Francis Sheetz was killed (he was first shot with a pistpl and then struck with an axe) could not identify the murderers, they having their faces concealed, and the candle in the room being extinguished by accident. "The case was another illustration of the saying that 'murder will out. As observed by Webster in the Crowningsshield case, the secret Hauer, in this is often too deep for concealment and must be confessed. case, confessed and acknowledged his written confession on being arraigned on the first indictment, but when arraigned on the second indictment he did not speak and never spoke publicly afterwards, and was eventually hanged without publicly speaking a word. However, it is worthy of remark that when the jury were ready to deliver their verdict, and the clerk proclaimed, 'John Hauer, hold up your baud,' he It

of his guilt he in the

1

held

it

up.

"McManus made

a confession subsequently, which was published.

degree of ability was displayed by the counsel in this case which has seldom been equaled at any criminal trial in the interior of this

In this he persisted that he was not present at the house

Charles Smith, of Lancaster, Charles Hall, of Sunbury, and Matthew Henry, who, I understand, was a brother of Judge Henry,

He

State.

were concerned on the part of the Commonwealth. Thomas Duncan, of, Carlisle, afterward Judge Duncan of our Supreme Court, James Hopkins, William Montgomery, of Lancaster, George Clymer, of Reading, who had been a member of the convention which formed the Constitution of the United States, and Messrs. Fisher, Elder, and Laird, of Ilarrisburg, were concerned for various of the prisoners. Blessrs.

Capitol Hill in July, 1798.

"Judge Henry was followed in the judicial office by Walter Franklin, who was commissioned on the 18th of January, 1811. He when appointed by Governor Snyder, aud was a man

Donough as principals, and against Patrick Donegan, Francis Cox, Hugh McDonough, and Elizabeth Hauer, who was the wife of John

satisfactory to the bar in Lancaster County,

the murder had been committed by

Hauer and Peter McDonough

mur-

of Lancaster,

lived in Lancaster

Hauer, as accessories before the fact. " Hauer was put upon trial. It was intended on his trial to use Mcas a witness on the part of the Commonwealth, as he alleged that

the

when Hauer and himself were confined in the same apartment in the jail, Hauer declared that he would behave in such a manner as to induce a belief that he was insane. "A report of the trial was published by Mr. Wyeth, from which I have made up this statement. Hauer and McManus were executed on also declared that

Duncan, Fisher, Elder, Laird, and Clymer were concerned for Hauer. " A bill had been at first found against John Hauer and Peter Mc-

Manus

when

der was committed, but that he hold the horse at the end of the laue.

His judicial administration was not where he afterwards preand when acting as judge in that county at least two attempts were made before the Legislature to effect his removal, either by address or impeachment. On oue of those occasions he was defended by James Hopkins, a veteran attorney of Lancaster. During the proceeding one of the managers of the House concluded his address late in the afterof very gentlemanly appearance.

sided,

GENERAL HISTORY. Mr. Hopkins rose and asked that the House adjourn til) the next day to afford him an opportunity for more special preparation. The Honee, however, was fatigued with the length of the proceeding and refused to adjourn, and Mr. Hopkins, heing obliged to proceed, rose and stated that he would divide his proposed argumont into a considerable noon.

number of heads, and the first head of his argument into various parts. A member immediately rose and moved that the House adjourn in order to afford to the counsel

an opportunity

to condense,

and the House ac-

"Ou came

the

first

proceeding before the Legislature in hia case the judge

off successfully,

but on a second or third proceeding

that he had written on both sides of

was considered

some

it

political question

;

was said and tins

grave an offense, that, fearing a more unfavor-

to be so

able result, the judge resigned.

"In one

and was, after the lapse of some years, a candidate for the Vice Presidency, on the ticket with the celebrated William Wirt. He died in November, 1861. " Mr. Ellmaker was succeeded as judge by David Scott, who was appointed by Governor Snyder,and was commissioned in December, L816. He was a native of New England, but was settled in Bradford County at

He is said to have been a good lawyer. He have been pugnacious in his temper. I have heard it obhe had been in military life he would most probably have been distinguished. I have no recollection of ever seeing him on the bench, but saw him after he had left Harrisburg as his place of residence, and when I saw him he was somewhat deaf. He resigned his position as judge of this district, having been appointed to another disthe time of his appointment. is

also said to

served that

cordingly adjourned,

if

the northern part of the State "Knowing little of Judge Scott, I addressed Judge Woodward, late of our Supreme Court, for information as to him. " Judge Woodward states that Judge Scott was a native of Connecticut, and that he settled in Bradford County. When Judge Scott was appointed to this judicial district, Judge Gibson was the president judge trict in

Judge Franklin, one of the manHouse was Andrew Stewart, of Fayette County,

of the proceedings against

agers on the part of the

263

who was a candidate for Congress in 1870, against Mr. Foster, the former member, and Mr. Stewart was then the last survivor of the Legislature to which I have referred. On one of the same proceedings, perhaps the same one, against Judge Franklin, my old friend Richard Coulter, afterwards a judge in the Supreme Court, was also a manager on the part of the House. He was frequontly poetic in speech and in

waving the sword of justice to and fro, to keep corruption from its base. "As I was on quite friendly terms with Judge Coulter during my ap-

Bradford District, to which he had been appointed by Governor A vacancy happening on the Supreme Bench, Judge Gibson was appointed by Governor Snyder as a supreme judge, aud Judge Burnside was appointed to the Bradford district, then consisting of the counties of Luzerne, Pike, Wayne, Susquehanna, and Bradford. Judge Burnside, after presiding in that district for above a year, resigned, and JudgeScott was appointed, the district having been reduced to the counties of Luzerne, Pike, and Wayne. Judge Woodward states that Judge

pointment as reporter,

Scott presided in that district with great ability until the year 1838,

I recollect

writing.

one of his figures on the occasion referred

to.

He

said substantially that the judiciary of Pennsylvania .should be like the

guardian angel of

to

old,

standing on the battlements of the Constitution,

I desire to be excused for referring in this place another eloquent passage from one of his judicial opinions. It is in

his opinion, in the case of Supplee

An

vs.

Hanscll, reported in 5 Harris Re-

in the

Snyder.

when

in

consequence of increasing deafness he resigned

in favor of Nabut Governor Ritner appointed Judge Jessup instead Judge Scott lived several years afterwards, and died at Judge Woodward states that Judge Scott while on the

thaniel B. Eldred

;

individual granted a piece of ground for the erection

of Mr. Eldred.

of a church and for the use of a burial-ground, reserving the right to

Wilkes-Barre.

him and

bench also acted as canal commissioner for several years, but without compensation; aud Judge Woodward further writes tliat Judge Scott was a man of great clearness and force of intellect. He had not been thoroughly educated either in literature or law, but he supplied his de-

ports, 388-9.

his wife to build a vault or vaults in

Some

in repair.

it,

and

to

keep the same

of the grandchildren had another vault made, appro-

priating four burial-lots on the ground. trustees of the church,

This was objected to by the

and the decision of the Supreme Court was ad-

verse to the claim of the defendants in the case.

often linger about the grave), they can enjoy that preference by being

buried as most other people are buried, and like other members of the

church, in the bosom of mother earth, with the green sod over them.' " The successor of Judge Franklin was Amos Ellmaker. He was born in Earl township, Lancaster Co.,

on the 2d of February, 17S7. After graduating at Princeton, he studied law for one year with James Hop-

kins, of Lancaster, then a year at the Litchfield

cluded his studies with married.

Thomas

He was admitted

Law

School,

and con-

Elder, of this place, whose daughter he

to the

bar at December term 1808.

He was

elected to Congress, but declined to serve, and twice refused a tender of

a commission as a judge of the Supreme Court.

He continued

in the

practice of the law at Harrisburg until his removal to Lancaster, in

June, 1821.

He went

to Baltimore in the year 1814 as

an aid to Gen. Forster. He was commissioned as judge in July, 1815, and occupied the bench till December, 1816. He was reputed to be a good lawyer. His addresses to the jury, when at the bar, were clear, distiuet, and argu-

He left the bench in December, what reason I do not know. He held an elevated position was appointed attorney-general by Governor Findlay. He, however, contracted the odium of the Governor's friends by refusing to defend him before the Legislature, when unjustly assailed by a Philadelphia faction, headed by the celebrated John Binns. This refusal may have been owing to the fact that Mr. Thomas Elder, his father-inlaw, was one of those who urged the prosecution. "The Governor was defended by George M. Dallas, of Philadelphia. The chairman of the committee of the House was William Wilkins, of Pittsburgh, who made a report favorable to Governor Findlay. Mr. Wilkins was afterwards rewarded for bis action by appointment as a

mentative, but by no means oratorical 1816, for

here, and

judge in the Pittsburgh district, to fill a vacancy, opportunely for him, happening through the death of Judge Roberts, a few days, perhaps within two days, before the termination of Governor Findlay's official term. He was appointed on the 18th of December, 1820, Mr. Findlay having been inaugurated on the lGth of December, 1817, his executive term being "

by application and force of character. He was an honest, uplittle overbearing sometimes, and always of irascible temand on the whole an excellent officer both as judge and canal commissioner. He was the founder of the Episcopal Church in WilkesBarre, aud instituted in his office there the first Sunday-school that was

ficiencies

"Judge Coulter, who delivered the opinion in the case, observed 'there is room yet in the family sepulchre; but if the grandchildren do not like the cold and lonely dampness of that place, but prefer that their narrow house should be visited by the glimpses of the sun and moon, and be fanned by the breezes (and the thoughts and feelings of this life

for three years.

Mr. Ellmaker, as before observed, afterwards removed

to

Lancaster,

right judge, a

per;

organized in northeastern Pennsylvania. " Judge Scott was succeeded in this district by Judge Franks, who was commissioned by Governor Findlay in 1818. " Samuel D Franks and George B. Porter, the first of Reading, aud the latter of Lancaster, bad beeu in the military service, having gone to Baltimore in 1S14, when it was threatened by the British forces. They were not engaged in any battle, but when the Legislature met, after the Pennsylvania forces, volunteers and militia, had returned

home, the two came to Harrisburg, and both clerks of the House, as I think, not having gone into the military service, they were elected clerk and assistant clerk of the House of Representatives They were efficient officers, and Franks was an excellent reader. He was useful to the members and was quite popular. It was unfortunate for him that he did not continue in that position but after the election of Mr. Findlay as Governor he applied for appointment as judge, that being at that time an appointment during good behavior. He was possessed of erton Casper Shrom Bigler Henry Martyn Hoyt, Jr

Mr. Harris,

W. Simonton.. W. Siniontou.. & Jordan

Hall

Charles Spyker Wolfe Daniel Pastorius Brllner

Note.

Cumberland County..

Fred. K. Boas

James Stewart

F.

S.

Cert. ..

J. J.

William Bueliler Lamberton.... Nov. Marlin E. Olmsted May Casper Dull Aug. John Simon Alleman Jan. Daniel Coyle Herr

Benjamin

John

Detweiler

..

Henry M. Zug H. M. Hanna Theodore K. Long

Harman

March, 1883.

Lamberton

Philadelphia

Morton P. Hejiry David Frank Eyster George Kunkel John Porter

any

Cumb. Co

Carlislo

12, 1875 29, 1875 10, 1875 22, 1875

** " 31, 1875 Feb. 18, 1870 April 24, 1876 May 5, 1876 Dec. 11.-1S70 Jan. J7, 1-77 Jan. 17, 1877

Georpe R. Kaercher Charles Penrose Biddle Nicholas V. Mervine iNola William H. Jessup William Pearson

as

At Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

.

May May

A.N. Brice Thomas S. Hargest John Trainor King S. M. Woodcock John L. McKeehan George W. Heck

Henry

McAlarney

R. A. Lamberton Dec. 20, 1873... Jan. 27, 1874.., Feb. 5, 1874 .... April 27, 1874 April 28, 1874.

Louis Pfeiffer Frank E. Beltzhoover J. S. Arnold J. Mver Light

J. P.

Whon

L. N. Ott

Frederick Milnor Ott Charles Wesley McAlarney.. Henry L. Lark John Dalzell

Ehrmau Burkinan

Motion of

till

June term,

1793, inclusive.

At September and December

terms of 1793 he was not present, and the court was held before associate judges, who were Judges Gloninger, Carson, and John Keanatthe September term, and at the December term Thomas Forster appeared as an additional associate judge. "

At March term, 1794, John Joseph Henry appeared as president district. Judge Henry had been engaged in the

judge of this judicial

invasion of Cauada in the year 1775, and has published a narrative of the expedition.

GENERAL HISTORY. "

The members who have been admitted

to the bar of this

county since

the organization of the county exceed three hundred.

"On

the

first

own behalf, he was admitted an attorney of the court; and next, on his motion, were admitted as attorneys, John Wilkes Kittera, John Clark, Joseph Hubley, John Andre Hanna, James Riddle, John Joseph Henry, Peter Huffuagle, and Jacob Hubley. "On the same day, it is stated, that on motion of Stephen Chambers, James Biddle and GoUinson Read were admitted. " Next, on motion of John Joseph Henry, George Ross was admitted then, on motion of John Wilkes Kittera, John Reiiy was admitted. On motion of Stephen Chambers a rule was adopted that the admission of attorneys in this court shall be regulated by the same rules as have ;

county of Lancaster. This ended the list of attorneys admitted on that day but subsequently were admitted James Smith, of York; Thomas Duncan, of Carlisle; Jasper Teates, Charles Smith, and William Montgomery, of Lancaster; William R. Atlee, of Lancaster or Philadelphia; Messrs. Hamilton and David Watts, of Carlisle; Mr. Hartley, of York; and Messrs. Fisher, Elder, Patterson, Laird, and Wallace, of Harrisburg, and afterwards numerous others.

James Smith was admitted August,

of the Declaration of Independence.

1786.

He

wj

s

to

deRochcfoucault, who

have been an obliging, estimable man.

He was one of the signers also a member of several

I

think, justly, in Him narrative of the

He was the brother-in-law of my father, Robert and was one of the executors of the will of John Harris, the John Hanna Briggs, lately deceased, one of his grandsons, was named after him. The name of Mr. Hanna i« marked general of the militia.' Harris,

founder of Harrisburg.

on the dockets of the court as counsel as late, at least, as the fall of 1795. How much longer I have not specially examined. He was elected to CoDgress from this

district,

aud served from 1797

till

1*05, in

which year

he died.

"Of James Riddle

I

know nothing

certain.

He may have been

"John Joseph Henry, Peter Huffuagle, and Jacob Hubley, were from Lancaster. James Biddle, I suppose John Marks Biddle, was from Reading; and so was Collinson Read, who was the compiler of Read's Precedents,' a book formerly much in use. '

" Mr. Biddle was a man of very gentlemanly appearance, of courtly manners, aud was afterwards, if not at the head, a leading member of the Reading bar. George Ross was from Lancaster. John Riley was from Lebanon County, then a part of Dauphin County, and was the

remembered physician of this place. "Other attorneys, heretofore named, were Thomas Duncan, of Carafterwards a judge of the Supreme Court. Jasper Yeates, of Lancaster, who was also afterwards a judge of our Supreme Court, and was the compiler of Yeates' Reports.' Charles Smith was from Lancaster, and was afterwards the first judge of our District Court. Mr. Atlee and Mr. Montgomery were from Lancaster. Mr. Hamilton, afterwards Judge Hamilton, and Mr. Watts, were from Carlisle; and Mr. Hartley was from York. "Col. Thomas Hartley was a native of Berks County, born in September, 1748. He studied law in York aud commenced practice there. He entered the army at the opening of the Revolution, and soon became distinguished. He commanded a corps in the Wyoming and Susquehanua Valleys after the descent of Butler and the Indians. He was a member of Congress in 1788, and continued to hold the office duriDg twelve years, and held several distinguisbed offices iu this Commonwealth. He died 2lst December, 1800, aged fifty-two years. This notice is from Day's 'Historical Collections of Pennsylvania.' "Mr. Galbraith Patterson resided in Harrisburg. He was a son of father of Dr. Luther Riley, the well

lisle,

ance, which, taken in conjunction with his eccentric ideas, produced au

Yeates, of Lancaster, afterwards, as before stated, a judge of our

effect irresistibly comical,

Court.

'

though, on an analysis,

it

would be

difficult

to decide whether the man or the saying most constituted the jest. The most trivial incident from his mouth was stamped with his originality; and in relating one evening bow he had been disturbed in his office by

a cow, he gave inconceivable ze6t to his narrative by his telling how she thrust her nose into the door and roared like a Numidian lion.'

" Mr. Graydon further remarks that there was then at York a certain judge who resided in Philadelphia. He was a Scotchman was a man of erudition, and was fond of displaying his historical knowledge; but that Mr. Smith used to set him raving by some monstrous anachronism, ;

Don't you remember that terrible, bloody battle which Alexander the Great fought with the Prussians, near the straits of Babemandel ?' What, sir,' said the judge, repeating with the most in-

as, for instance,

'

'

effable contempt,

sians?

you

which Alexander the Great fought with the Prusdid you get your chronology?' Said Smith, 'That

Where now

will find

is

recorded in Thucydides or Herodotus.'

"Mr. Graydon adds one

at the table

that after oue of these exhibitions, while every

was holding

his sides at the

expense of the judge, he, on

his part, had no doubt that

of his disdain.

Smith was the object of laughter, as he was Thus everything was as it should -be, all parties were

pleased.

"Stephen Chambers was from Lancaster, and, as I understand, was a brother-in-law of John Joseph Henry, who was appointed president judge of this county in December, 1793.

John Wilkes Kittera was from Philahad settled at Lancaster. John Clark was from York, and had been an officer in the Revolutionary army. He died at York in the present century. He is mentioned in Day's Historical Collections.' Joseph Hubley was from Lancaster. John Andre Hanna was a native delphia, but

'

New Jersey. He settled in Harrisburg about the time of the organization of the county and laying out of Harrisburg. I saw him once, but do not recollect his personal appearance. From information as to him,

of

sub-

sequently of Chambersburg.

and died at York 11th July, 1806, at the .ge of about ninety-three years. The above is from Day's Recollectio is.* In a note to Graydon's Memoirs,' it is said that he was educated at the college of Phihulelphia, and after he was admitted to the bar there, he removed to the vicinity of Sbippensburg, Pa., and there established himself as a lawyer and surveyor. From this he removed to York, in this State, where he continued to reside during the remainder of his life. In 1775 he was elected to Congress, and retained his Beat in that body until November, 177S, when he resumed his professional business, from which he withdrew in 1800, and died in 1806. In Sanderson's 'Lives of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence'' is a more extended notice of him. "Mr.Alexander Graydon was for a short time in York when a young man. He says that 'there was in that place at that time an oddity; this was Mr. James Smith, the lawyer, then in considerable practice. He was probably between forty and fifty years of age, and was possessed of an original spark of drollery. This, as may perhaps be said of all persons in this way, consisted more in the manner than the matter, for which reason it is scarcely possible to convey a just notion of it to the reader. In him it much depended on an uncouthness of gesture, a certain ludicrous cast of countenance, and a drawling mode of utter'

i

visiti'd

important State conventions, held a high i ink at the bar, and was a man of great wit and good humor. He cam from Ireland very young, i

if-

Duke

Harrisburg in the year 1790, and the DOtli of him has been lately republished here. He nays that Gen. Hanna wan then 'about thirty-six or thirty-eight years of age, and was brigadier-

in this respect in the

;

"

me

noticed favorably, and, as

day of the holding of the court in May, 1785, on motion

of Stephen Chambers, Esq., on his

been adopted

he would seem to

271

*

Col.

William Patterson, perhaps of Lancaster, a gallant officer of the He was well educated and

Revolution and iu Indian ware preceding.

prepared for the study of law, which he pursued in the

How

office of

long Mr. Patterson remained in Harrisburg

is

Jasper

Supreme known;

not

but perhaps about 1799 or 1800 he removed to the west branch of the Susquehanna near to Williamsport, where he had a considerable tract

and he died not long afterwards. Mr. Patterson was in legal practice there were few published Supreme Court and from the commonplace which Mr. Patterson left, which was prepared with neatness and book care, it would appear that he was extensively read. It is said that he was quite a handsome man and of agreeable address. He was a contemporary of Mr. Fisher aud Mr. Elder, of Harrisburg, and John Marks Biddle and Charles Evans, of Reading, who, I have been informed, spoke of him with respect and esteem. He was the father of the wife of Judge Hayes, of Lancaster, and of the late Dr. Edmund B. Patterson, of Lewistown, who was exceedingly popular as a man, and was distinguisbed as a physician; and of whose geniality of temper, liberality and friendliness of disposition, it affords me pleasure, from a familiar acquaintance, Galbraith Patterson contributed to the improvement of Harto speak. risburg by building the brick house on the Market Square, the second house below the Jones House. " The late William Graydon, of Harrisburg, was one of the early members of our bar. He was the compiler of the book of legal forms, which was formerly in extensive use. He was a man ot medium height, of

of land,

"When

reports of decisions of our

;

very gentlemanly manners, of dark lively eyes, neat, if not precise in dress, and of an intelligent countenance. He was rather too diffident

and seldom, or perhaps never, was engaged in the trial of causes. He was for many years a justice of the peace. He was an honest Christian man, aud was long au elder in the Presbyterian Church. His portrait, painted by Francis, is in existence, and is an excellent representation. He wore a cue, tied with a ribbon, and bad his hair powdered. He died iu October, 1840, aged nearly eightytwo. He was a brother of Alexander Graydon, who was the first pro-

to eucounter the asperities of the bar,

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

272

thonotary of this county, be having been appointed to the

office, in

the

year 1785, by the Supreme Executive Council of the State, of which

John Dickinson was then the president. Mr. Alexander Graydon was the author of Graydon's 'Memoirs,' which is quite an interesting book.

On pages

334-35 of the edition by Littell, is an account of his election. Mr. Alexander Graydon was a gentleman of very respectable appear-

" Mr. Watts once, at the Carlisle bar, quoted from Teague O'Regan.' Judge Hamilton asked, What book is that you read from V " Modern Chivalry," your Honor.' It is not a proper book to read from in court,' said the judge. I wish,' said Mr. Watts, that your honor could write such a book ;' and he proceeded with the argument. " There was a case which was, at the time, the occasion of much mer'

'

ance, of sprightly agreeable manners, very polite, and, as his book shows,

riment

a ready and intelligent writer.

office in relation to

"Our

courts were attended occasionally by Mr.

James Hopkins, of

have often seen and heard at the bar and in He was of medium height, and someconsidered to be an excellent lawyer, but was so deliberate ill expression and, perhaps, it may be said, inanimate in manner, as to become rather tiresome in his discussions in court. He could, apparently without much exertion, speak for half a day or a day on a point of evidence in order, in endeavoring to enlighten the court, or to consume time till a witness was brought into court, or until some other unprepared-for event was accomplished. He was, in his practice at the bar, the very opposite of Thaddeus Stevens, who finally settled in Lancaster, who never occupied the time of the court when he had nothing to say that was material to the matter in hand, and who seldom occupied more time than was useful to it. I have heard that Mr. Elder considered Mr. Hopkins one of the few lawyers in this part of the State who were especially conversant with the law and practice relative to the Orphans Court. It never appeared to me, however, that there was special intricacy as to such learning; but Mr. Elder had a great deal of such practice, and put a high estimate upon the knowledge Lancaster.

Mr. Hopkins

I

the House of Representatives.

what robust

in form.

He was

1

necessary to understanding it. " Charles Hall, of Sunbury, aho occasionally practiced here.

He was

'

*

terial.

at the

'

A man

expense of Mr. Watts.

and woman were in his

some legal matter in which their marriage was maThey had been cohabiting together, and Mr. Watts inquired

whether they had been married. Not being assured of it, he directed them to stand up. He asked the man whether he took the woman to To which he answered in the affirmative. To the question to the woman whether she took the man as her lawful husbaud, or in words to that effect, she replied, To be sure, he is my husband good enough.' The reporter of the case states that Mr. Watts adbe his lawful wife.

'

them

go before a magistrate and repeat the ceremony, but thiB was not done. The Supreme Court; decided that though marriage is a civil contract, requiring no religious ceremonial, yet that it must be entered into in words implying a present agreement to contract it; that vised

to

in this case the

womau

referred only to a past cohabitation, and this

insufficient for the purpose.

The

case

that of

is

Hantz

vs.

Sealy,

waB and

reported in 6th Binney Reports.

"Mr. Watts was an impassioned,

forcible,

and fluent speaker, and was

to be an able lawyer. There was a striking contrast in the appearance of Mr. Watts and Mr. Duncan. Mr. Watts was apparently a strong powerful man, Mr. Duncan was a small man. Their voices were

conceded

very dissimilar, that of Mr. Watts was strong and rather rough, that of Mr. Duncan was weak, and sometimes quite shrill when excited in pleading.

concerned with Charles Smith, afterwards the judge of our District Court when first established, on the part of the Commonwealth, on the

'' Mr. Duncan was appointed a justice of the Supreme Court by Governor Snyder in 1817, in the place of Judge Yeates, deceased. Judge

He was rather above the com-

Tilghman, a man of very gentlemanly manners and a model judge, was then the chief justice, and Judge Gibson was the other associate. Judge Duncan eventually removed to Philadelphia, and resided there till his death, in November, 1827. A further notice of him exists in Day's His-

Hauer and

others, in 1797 or 1798.

trial

of

mon

height, stout in person, of ruddy complexion, smooth,

face, of

character, and of considerable ability in his profession. is

handsome

gentlemanly appearance and manner, of a highly respectable

My

impression

that he was a ready and agreeable speaker. I think that in the latter life be did not seek practice, and that his family, having an

part of his

ample estate, he probably retired from professional business. He died about 1824 or 1825, aged, perhaps, above sixty. " When I was a boy going to school, Mr. Laird, Mr. FiBher, and Mr. Elder were the prominent members of the bar residing in Harrisburg. Mr. David Watts and Mr. Thomas Duncan, of Carlisle, the latter afterward on the bench of the Supreme Court, occasionally attended here.

"Mr. Watts was of rough exterior, careless of his dress, and by no means choice in his language. He seemed generally to be not at all reluctant to say what he thought, without regard to the feelings of the object of his remarks. Mr. Duncan, on the contrary, was a man of polished manner, neat and careful in dress, and never rude or wantonly disrespectful to others. They were the rival practitioners at Carlisle. I heve heard of an anecdote which somewhat illustrates their respective characters. On one occasion in court, when Mr. Watts was annoyed by a remark of Mr. Duncan, he said, You little' (using some offensive ex'

Then,' said Mr. Duncan, I could put you in my pocket.' 'you would have more law in your pocket thau ever you had in your pression),

'

'

head.'

'

page 265. "Since writing the above notice of Mr. Watts and Duncan, I have perceived the following in Brackenridge's Recollections of Places and Persons in the West,' the time referred to being in or about 1807. He says that he attended court at Carlisle, where there were two very able lawyers, Messrs. Watts and Duncan. 'The former was possessed of a powerful mind, and was the most vehement speaker I ever heard. He torical Collections,'

'

seized his subject with an Herculean grasp, at the

same time throwing Herculean body and limbs into attitudes which would have deHe was a singular instance of the union of great strength of mind with bodily powers equally wonderful. " Mr. Duncan was one of the best lawyers and advocates I have ever his

lighted a painter or sculptor.

'

seen at any bar, and he was, perhaps, the ablest judge that ever sat on

He was a very small man, with a large There never was a lover more devoted to his to the study of the law. He perused Coke upon Littleton as a recreation, and read more books of reports than a young lady reads new novels. His education had not been very good, and his general reading was not remarkable. I was informed that he read frequently the plays of Shakespeare and from that source derived that uncommon richness and variety of diction by which be was enabled to embellish the most abstruse subjects, although his language was occasionally marked by inaccuracies, even violation of common grammar rules. Mr. Duncan reasoned with admirable clearness and method on all legal subjects, and at the same time displayed great knowledge of human nature in examination of witnesses and in his addresses to the jury. Mr. Watts selected merely the strong points of his case, and labored them with an earnestness and zeal approaching to fury; and perhaps his forcible manner sometimes produced a more certain effect than that of the subtle and wily advocate opposed to the Supreme Bench of the State.

but well-formed head. mistress than Mr.

Duncan was

;

"I was present at the trial in this place of an indictment in which Mr. Watts was counsel for the defendant. It was an indictment for perjury in qualifying to the return of property by a debtor on his application for the benefit of the insolvent laws. The act of Assembly required the applicant tu make return of bis property. He submitted a schedule, to which he had been qualified, which he declared was a schedule of his property. It was alleged, on the part of the Commonwealth, that there were fraudulent omissions, and that the deponent

had thus sworn falsely. But Mr. Watts made the point that the applicant in Bwearing that the exhibit was a statement of bis property was not to be understood as declaring that it was a schedule of nil of his property, and therefore that be was not guilty of perjury. The court, Judge Franks being on the bench, instructed the jury to that effect, and the defendant was acquitted. It may be said this instruction was more In other in accordance with the dictates of humanity than of law. words, that it was not common sense, and common law is said to be the common sense. There is a reason or of caricature perfection of of law in an old English play which represented an entertainment of servants

him "Mr. Bracken ridge further remarks Among the younger members of the bar, John Bannister Gibson, now chief justice of the State, was the '

'

:

in the absence of the master of the house.

most conspicuous. He, even then, had a high reputation for the clearness and soundness of his judgment and the superiority of his taste.' As to this latter remark I add, that Judge Gibson had a nice musical taste, and was a superior performer on the violin. "Judge John Bannister Gibson, whose subsequent distinction as a jurist and in other respects has been so eloquently portrayed by Chief

law.

Justice Black in his biographical notice, printed iu the preface to 7th

The conversation turned on One of the party 6aid that a position spoken of as law was not 'Oh, 1 said the other, 'it may be nonit was mere nonsense.

law, that

sense, but

still it

may

be very good law for all that.'

Harris' Reports, was, in clined.

his

younger days, rather democratically

In the celebrated case of Eakin

vs.

in-

Raub, reported in 12th Ser-



GENERAL HISTORY.

273

geant A Rawle's Reports, Judge Gibson dissented from the opinion of Chief Justice Tilghman.and in a lengthy opinion contended that though

this place.

the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania had the power to declare at act of

others in different parts of the State.

our Legislature to be unconstitutional where it conflicted with the Constitution of the United States, yet it had not such power when it conflicted

office,

merely with the Constitution of the State. But Judge Duncan, in an elaborate opinion in the case, demolished such a distinction and Judge

of the banks established under

;

Gibson afterwards acknowledged the correctness of the decision of the majority of the court in the case of Eakin vs. Raub, in two Opinions, one in the case of Menges vs. Wertnien, reported in 1st Barr, 223, and the other the case of De Chastellux

"Judge Duncan

vs.

Fairchild, reported in 3d

Hums.

also delivered an able opinion in another case

on au

important question iu practice. It had been a question whether the decree of the Orphans' Court, on the account of an executor or administrator,

was subject

to

re-examination in a suit in the

I recollect of a case

which had been

tried before

Common

Pleas; and

Judge Gibson, holding

a circuit in Lebanon County, in which items of an account were held liable to be overhauled. But iu the case of McPherson vs. Cunliff, re-

was decided that the decree of the Orphans' Court on a question clearly within its jurisdiction was conclusive as to the parties to it, except only on appeal to the Supreme Court. The case had been argued before the Supreme Court by very distinguished counsel, Mr. Parker Campbell, of Washington, Pa., and Mr. Biddle, of Pittsburgh, on the one side, and Mr. Baldwin and Mr. James Ross, of Pittsburgh, on the other. No sketch of the arguments of counsel is given in the report of the case, but the opinion of Judge Duncan is learned and elaborate. " When I knew Mr. Samuel Laird, which was about the time of the war of 1812-15, he seemed to be decliniog in business and in health. He was a till, guod-looking man, of a mild, gentle disposition, very gentlemanly and kind in manner, and was considered to be a good lawyer. ported in 11 Sergeant

& Rawle,

it

In the year lsll he erected the three adjoining three-story brick buildings on Second Street, in one of which

I live,

aud which were then con-

sidered to be quite creditable to the place. He died about 1S15. " Two gentlemen read law under the direction of Mr. Laird towards

mean Mr. John ML Forster and Mr. Jacob B. them was a member of the bar for twenty or thirty

the close of his life,— I

Weidman.

Each

of

Weidman at Lebanon, from which county he had come. "Mr. Forster never had an extensive practice, but was for a number of years the counsel of the Branch Bank of Pennsylvania at this place, years, Mr. Forster settling at Harrisburg,and Mr.

He conducted with ability the prosewho was tried in April, 1*27, for the murder of He was not a ready lawyer or speaker, but was possessed of good legal judgment when he had time for preparation. His ability lay in another direction. He had a taste for the military profession, and in that line of life might have been distinguished. He was of medium size and was well formed. He was an excellent penman, au accomplishment in which many of the bar are deficient. " Mr. Weidman was a lawyer of great industry, and had for many years an extensive aud the leading practice in Lebanon County. He was rather above the common size, stout in body, of florid countenance, of which Mr. Lesley was cashier.

cution of McElhenny,

Sophia German.

and seemed to enjoy excellent health. He was not a fluent speaker, but was pertinacious in the conduct of his causes, and was slow to compromise, having confidence in his management of them. He understood the German language, which was of great advantage to him iu Lebanon County, where that was then the of genial

and

jovial manners,

Before the banking act of lsl4 was passed there was no bank of issue in

That act provided

and he vetoed the

bill;

were so numerous that the

for

one at

this place and for nearly forty Governor Snyder was (hen in

but the banks provided for

in the

bill

was passed over his veto. Perhaps most it were put into operation, but in many cases, being improvidently managed, and not being required by the business of the community, they produced great injury in their respecbill

tive neighborhoods.

"The city of Reading had one or more under that bill. Their mode management was not generally understood by the community ; and I have learned that on one occasion a man, unsophisticated in banking of

matters,

was

came

told that

to the bank with his own note and applied for a loan. He he must have an indorser. He innocently asked where the supposing that there was a class nf men designated by

indorsers lived,

law to indorse notes. " Another

man

Berks County, supposing that he could make money

in

out of the operation, gave out that he would indorse notes for ten per

was unfavorable to him, as his liabecame greater than his receipts. "Harrisburg was an advantageous location at that time for a bank from its being on the river and under the influence of the lumber trade, which gave it the advantage of a large and extensive circulation and the Harrisburg bank was a success. It has always maintained a fair reputation, aud is considered as one of the soundest of such institutions in the State. The present cashier, Mr. James W. Weir, has for many years been connected with it in that capacity, and enjoys, in a high degree, the respect and confidence of the community. " From the establishment of the bank until near the time of his death Mr. Wallace was its president, and it may be inferred that his course in relation to it was judicious. " I was too young, and was then too much absent from home at college, to know him otherwise than by sight. He was one of the examiners of Col. Roberts, when on examination for admission to the bar, and he expressed himself as much gratified at the gentlemanly conduct of Mr. Wallace on that occasion, he interfering when a question of practice was put, a point with which, in his opinion, Mr. Roberts was not cent, of the proceeds; but the result bilities

;

The acquaintance continued, and Mr. Roberts entertained towards him much respect as a lawyer aud a He does not seem to have been extensively engaged in the practice of law here, yet the respectability of his character rendered him a credit to the bar of this county. His wife was a daughter of William Maclay, who was a senator with Robert Morris, from Pennsylvania, iu the First Congress. Mr. Wallace was the father of the widow of the late Rev. William R. DeWitt, late of this place, and of the Rev. Benjamin J. Wallace, of Philadelphia. He died in this place in May, 1S16, in the forty-sixth year of his age. The Rev. Benjamin Wallace was the author reasonably supposed to he acquainted.

gentleman.

of an interesting article relative to the early settlements of this State,

containing remarks relative to the killing of the Indians at Couestoga and Lancaster, and a eulogy of the Susquehanna, which has a place in the history of this society. " It may be remarked that establishing the strength of a republican system of government and its adaptation to a wide expanse of country, aud the extendiug of 'liberty throughout the laud and to all the in-

habitants thereof,' were not the only beneficial results of the late parriand fiendish war. Another highly beneficial result was realized:

cidal

common

the furnishing a currency of general circulation throughout the Union, supported by the government, instead of that existing during a great

in

part of this century, viz., uotes entirely,

language, half or more of the witnesses in court then testifying German. He enjoyed the confidence of the people of that county in Mr. Forster was his inhis judgment and integrity to a great degree. timate friend, aud frequently took part with him in the trial of his causes.

I add that even at this time perhaps half of the witnesses at the

Lebanon County Court

testify iu

the

ligious societies exist in that county in

German language, and whose charters the use

others,

if

not utterly, worthless; and

though sound, yet of such varied description as to plates

as to

require critical and judicious examination to distinguish the genuine from the spurious; and even as to notes issued in the same State, from

that re-

the multiplicity of banks aud the variety of uotes, calling for a degree

in their

of

knowledge and

skill as to

the condition of the banks and genuineness

meetings of any other language than the German is expressly forbidden, and schools exist in that county in which the English language is not taught. Judge Pearson has wisely refused to approve of the charter of any religious society with such a prohibition, as being against public

of their issue which was difficult of attainment.

and the best interests of the people themselves. ''There was another member of the Harrisburg bar who was well known in his day. This was William Wallace. "Mr. Wallace was a native of this county. I understand that he studied law under the direction of Mr. Kittera, perhaps either in Lancaster or Philadelphia. He was admitted to the bar of this county in June, 1792. He removed to Erie, Pa., where he continued to reside till Ifell, when he returned to this place; and when the Harrisburg Bank was established under the bank act of 1814 he was elected its president.

"Mr. George Fisher was possessed of mild, gentlemanly manners, and was kind in his intercourse with the young members of the bar. He had a ruddy complexion, a fine face, aud handsome head. He was a large man in bis youth was probably quite strong, and was quite fleshy toward the end of his professional career. He was remarkable for the musical character of his voice aud the distinctness of his utterance. When staudtug at his office-door on the southwest corner of the market square, where the Presbyterian Church is now erected, he could be

policy

18

"From

1S10

till

Elder were in their

some time afterwards, Mr. Fisher and Mr. prime. They were men of very different character-

1S30, or

istics.

:

heard, with considerable distinctness,

fifty

yards

off.

He had

also re-

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

274

markably strong eyes. I have seen him reading in court, with a candle (we bad then no gas) held in one hand and a book or paper in the other, and the candle held so far forward that he seemed to look almost through it. "He seemed to have been extensively engaged in litigation in ejectment cases depending on original title, which were then a fertile subject of dispute in our courts and in those of the neighboring counties. He occasionally, and perhaps for a number of years, attended the Sunbury court.

In

my

time at the bar he was frequently, so far as respected the though when he got them fully out

facts of his case, not ready for trial,

he would often manage them well. of the law,

He Beemed

and had a considerable law

to be fond of the

study

When Judge Franks

library.

resigned, Calvin Blythe, then, I think, Secretary of the

Commonwealth,

was spoken of as his successor. Mr. Fisher also desired the appointment, and said that e.cperience at the bar was necessary for that position, and that Calvin Blythe had not had a sufficiency of it. Judge Blythe was, however, appointed. It happened, after a while, that a suit was on trial before him in which Mr. Fisher was the defendant, and it was one of considerable magnitude. Judge Blythe charged in favor of Mr. Fisher. This effected a revolution of opinion concerning the judge in the

mind

of Mr. Fisher,

and he said that he began

think that the fellow

to

Several years before his death he retired

would make a pretty good judge.

from practice at the bar aud resided on his farm below Middletown. "Mr. Thomas Elder led the bar here in amount of business for perHe was remarkably industrious, being gen-

haps twenty or more years.

eral ly in his office late at night.

When

in court

and not engaged

in the

a cause, or with business in the Orphans' Court, of which he had a very large share, be usually was engaged, not in conversation like trial of

He was

other members of the bar, but in writing. for the trial

of his case.

when with

nearly always ready

of his cause, aud was usually quite familiar with the facts It

was not common

for

him

to

considerable

down

number

:

down

Mr. Elder put

for trial.

He was

concerned in nearly every About twenty verdicts were

list.

case tried duriug the two weeks court. taken in that time, and Mr. Elder succeeded in obtaining verdicts, if not in all but one of the cases he tried, in all but one, two, or three. Charles Smith was a superior lawyer, and as a judge very ready and decided. "Neither Mr. Elder or Mr. Fisher contributed to the improvement of 1

Harrisburg by the erection of any substantial building; the houses which they occupied had been built by others. " Amos Ellmaker was admitted to the bar in this place at the December term, 180S, but removed to Lancaster in 1821. He is mentioned in

my article

Dauphin County. He was and pleasant

relative to the president judges of

possessed of fine conversational powers, aud was accessible in intercourse.

" From 1810 till 1825 or 1830 there were no other lawyers here, except perhaps Mr. Ellmaker, who had anything near the extent of practice enjoyed by Mr. Fisher and Mr. Elder. There was, however, a member of the bar

He was

who was widely celebrated. Adams County, in

a native of

This was Mr. Moses McClean. this State,

and was admitted

to

the bar in 1807.

"Mr. Maclean was possessed of decided literary tastes; but he was not deficient in his argument on legal points when he took the trouble to understand them.

and

pressed

His addresses to juries were generally briefly ex-

to the proper points.

not strive to obtain business.

He was exceedingly indolent, and did He had a fine poetic vein, and some of

his productions in that line are highly creditable.

Scriptural passage (see

know

not what they

His verses on the

xxii. 24), 'Father, forgive

them, for they

are exceeding beautiful, and deserve to be

I quote as follows:

" Come,

mourning

'

but Mr.

Luke

do,'

extensively circulated.

ask a continuance of a case

reasonable vigilance he could have been r^ady

of causes were set

quite a number, and being one of the oldest practitioners, his

cases were at the head of the

souls, rejoice, be glad,

Drive every fear away;

Fisher was frequently in a condition to render a continuance desirable.

Come listen Aud hear

Mr. Elder was merely a lawyer and man of business. He had little imagination and his reading, except of law, appeared to have been very limited. He had an extensive acquaintance throughout the county; and when he had important cases on hand looked well to the connection between parties and jurors. He seldom indulged in recreation; his time

to the

dying God,

the Saviour pray.

;

was pretty much occupied by attention to his profession and to the care of his property, of which he had a large share. He was for many years the president of the Hairisburg Bank, which fact probably contributed He had also a large professional busito the extension of his business. ness in Lebanon County; but I never knew of his attending court in any other county. He was possessed of strong prejudices, aud it is probable that it would have been difficult for him to forgive any one who had offended him in any material matter. But he was not without generous impulses. When he took a fancy to a person he would sometimes be social and liberal, not merely in words, but in a pecuniary way; but when he entertained a dislike, he was rather unrelenting. He read law with Gen. Hanna. "When Mr. Fisher and Mr. Elder were pitted against each other in the trial of a case, it seemed to be as much a personal conflict between them as professional zeal in behalf of their respective clients. Mr. Elder was frequently personally offensive; Mr. Fisher was without malice, but, like a trained boxer, stood up to the fight as long as his opponent carried on the personal contest. Mr. Elder was about six feet in height, and was large in proportion, though not fleshy. His countenance was without color, not pleasant, but his person was remarkably Btraight and was impressive. In his young days he was exceedingly agile. I have beard that when he was studying law a raftsman from up the river mude a banter to jump with any one in the town. Mr. Elder was called on at the office of Gen. Hanna, and was persuaded to engage in the contest. The river man in a running jump leaped nine-

"

'

Legions of angels were hie own, Obedient to His word;

With zeal the immortal warriors burned To vindicate their Lord. "' Michael, of heaven's

own army prince, Thou didst no succor bring, Nor grasped thy spear, hell's terror once, To save thy suffering King.

" '

To earth no thunders dared

No

to roll,

lightnings flamed abroad,

For meek-eyed love their vengeance chained Fast to the throne of God. "

'

Father, forgive them, Jesus cried,

Let vengeance not pursue; Father, forgive them, was his prayer,

They know not what they "'Come, mourning

souls,

Cause.every doubt to

Thy Saviour for his And he will pray

do.

again rejoice, flee,

murderers prayed, for thee.

"'Should persecution's eager 'shaft Pursue us while we live, Jesus, benevolent, divine,

Oh, teach us to forgive.'

son of Parson Elder, of the Paxton and Derry Churches.

is now remembered, though some may be found one or more newspapers of the day. I recollect a couple of verses, ia a different strain from the preceding, which were written by him as a New Year's Address for a carrier of one of our newspapers. He ad-

"Mr. Fisher was not so tall as Mr. Elder, but heavier in person. He was the son of George Fisher, the founder of Middletown. Both had

dressed in these verses persons of various occupations, and those to the innkeepers and storekeepers were substantially to this effect:

teen feet, but Mr. Elder leaped four inches farther.

or more years before his death.

He

left

left

a large real estate.

superior constitutions and enjoyed excellent health

of their respective deaths.

He

the bar ten

He was

a

near the period Mr. Fisher died in February, 1853, aged till

" Little of his poetry

in

'"

eighty-aeven, and Mr. Elder died in April, 1853, aged above eighty-six.

They were born within six mouths of each other, aud within six miles of each other, and in the same township in this county. Mr. Fisher was admitted to the bar in November, 1787; Mr. Elder was admitted in August, 1791. "Mr. Elder waB a very successful lawyer. When our district court was established in this county, Mr. Charles Smith being the judtje, a

Ye innkeepers, who furnish us brandy and wine, Nice roast beef and turkey on which we may dine,

When

you spread out your table give the traveler his fill,— Let him think of his belly and not of his bill.

" '

Ye

storekeepers, who sell us good coffee and tea, Don't charge us two dollars for stinking Bohea

;

When you If

it slip,

handle the yardstick, keep your thumb to the spot

slip it forward, or else slip it not.'

GENEKAL HISTORY. " Hewiis a Federalist in politics, but during the governorship of

Simon

and left a considerable estate. He was a native of was a graduate at Cannonsburg, and died hi August, 1852. time one of the representatives of thin county in the House

cessful in business,

Snyder he conceived the idea of being appointed judge. He gave at 'Simon Snyder: he distinguishes merit, and rewards it. 1 Some one aBked him when he became a Democrat. 'Why,' he said, 'he helped to carry the lantern.' But this was after the

this county,

Borne celebration a toast,

He was at one

election.

years.

"

He was

incltued to humor.

He once

entered a dark room with a

275

of Representatives.

"Judge David Krause was a member of of

this bar f.»r fifr»*^n or more He was a native of Lebanon County, and read law in the office Judge Walker, who was United States judge, residing in Pittsburgh.

gentleman who immediately opened a window. Mr. McClean then observed that a philosophical idea hud just occured to him. Well, what was it?' Why, when you opened the window, did the light come in or the darkness go out?' The reply was expressive but not complimentary. "He had a bald head. He said of it that the soil over gold-mines was always barren. He was occasionally called on for toasts at public celebrations, and he was sometimes quite happy in expression, One I recollect was, 'Our Country a Hercules in its infancy, what will it be in its manhood?' On one occasion a man from Philadelphia was dilating here on the advantages in Philadelphia over those in Harrisburg. 'Why,' says he, here you have trouble to get milk; in Philadelphia it is brought to our doors.' Oh,' says Mr. McClean, 'that is the reason you have so many calves in Philadelphia.' It is to be regretted that his life had uot been more carefully conducted, and that he had not devoted more of his time to study and literary pursuits. He might have left an elevated reputation. He was rather above the common height,

Robert J. Walker, afterwards senator and Secretary of the Treasury, was a student in the same office at the same time. Mr. Krause settled fur a while at Lebanon, but about the year 1825 came to Harrisburg to act

inclined to fatness, of large head, not unpleasant countenance, of genial,

settled at

manners, and was exceedingly careless in his dress. He went to Huntingdon, in this State, where he died. He married a daughter of John Hamilton, formerly of Harrisburg, and at one time

a fine

'

'

i

'

'

social

reside at

extensively engaged herein mercantile operations. " Francis R. Shnnk, afterwards Governor of the State, was admitted to this bar in September, 1810.

He

did not enjoy

profession here, his other avocations

— as clerk

much

of the

practice in the

House of Repre-

sentatives and to the board of canal commissioners, etc.

most of

his time.

He was

a superior

penman and an

—occupying

excellent reader.

He was a social, kind-hearted man, a very cheerful, pleasant companion, fond of and abounding in anecdote, and not given to evil speaking of others.

He was

very popular in this place.

Pittsburgh, where he was tions,

somewhat engaged

in

He removed

to

professional avoca-

and was residing there when elected as Governor. He was rehaving discharged with characteristic

elected, but resigned in July, 1848,

probity the duties of the executive office. " Mr. Shunk was very tall, being two or three inches over six feet in He was at the head being the tallest of the military company in which he marched as a private soldier to Baltimore in 1814. His frame was large, but not fleshy. His appearance was rather ungainly, but his address was so frank and genial that the defects of his form were little considered by those in his company. He was nearly in extremis when he resigned, and he died a few hours afterwards. "Mr. Abiathar Hopkins was for several years a member of the Harrisburg bar. He was from one of the New England States, and for several years taught a female seminary in Harrisburg. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar, and practiced with credit for several years. After an absence from home for a number of years he went on a visit to his family in New England, and about the time he reached home he took sick and died. He possessed an excellent character, gentlemanly manners, and was much respected here. " Mr. Samuel Douglas came here from Pittsburgh. He was a member of the Legislature, and it being supposed that there was an opening here for a lawyer of the Democratic side of politics, he removed here. He was appointed attorney-general by Governor Wolf in his first term. He was possessed of ready and animated elocution, and was decided and positive in bis expression of opinion and argument. He was considered to be a good criminal lawyer, but was uot considered by the profession as distinguished in other departments of the law. He was an Irishman by birth, as was indicated by his speech. He was about six feet in height, thin in person, of plain appearance, and rather awkward in manner. He was a man of fair reputation, and was a member in communion of the Presbyterian Church in this place. He died in this place above twenty years ago. "Another member of the bar who practiced with considerable success, and with whom I was on specially friendly relations, was William McGinn. Though not possessed of the graces of oratory, he had a legal mind of a high order. His judgment on questions oflaw was excellent. His memory, too, was reI had great faith in his professional opinion. markable. He kept no docket, but seemed to have but little difficulty to trace up the history of bis cases. He was fond of reading, and was possessed of considerable information outside of the law. He was suc-

height.





as private secretary to G\

•nor Shulze.

interest in the Intelligence,

lewspaper, printed at Harrisburg, and was

connected therein with Ge

Cameron.

est in the paper,

and was

a

practice here about 1828

He afterwards purchased an He subsequently

sold his inter-

nitted to the bar of this place, 1829.

He was

commencing

from this county in the House of Representatives for one term. In 1815 he was appointed by Governor Porter judge in the Norristown district and rea representative

moved

to Norristown, where he remained till his death. He was a fluent speaker, and possessed of considerable ability both as a writer and He was of medium height, slight in form, dark hair, of a

speaker.

bright, intelligent countenance, of agreeable manners, and of kind disposition. He died about a year ago, aged about seventy-three.

"Archibald Findlay read law in the office of Mr. Ellmaker, and was admitted to the bar in this county iu December, 1820. He subsequently

Chambersburg, and died not many years afterwards. He had intellect, and was possessed of refined literary taste. Had he lived he might have become distinguished. He was a son of Governor Findlay and a brother of Judge Findlay,of Philadelphia. He had a remarkably fine person, a highly intellectual countenance, and had bushy red hair. He and I started for college together. We read law in the same

and were admitted to the bar at the same time. "Samuel Shoch read law at the same time in the office of Mr. Ellmaker, and was admitted in March, 1820. He is a native of Harrisburg. He was a member of one of the military companies, viz., that of Capt. Crane, which marched from this place to Baltimore in 1814, and which office,

much glory in the expedition, as there was no there to combat whilst they were in the service. In one of the viz., that of Capt. Walker, were Charles and R. Ferdi-

acquired credit without

enemy

other companies,

nand Durang, the latter of whom adapted for 'The Star Spangled Banner,' which had just been written, the tune to which it is now sung. The two brothers, after it was sung in camp, sung it on the stage of the Holliday Street Theatre, in Baltimore. (See an account of it in Harper's Magazine of July, 1871.) C. aud F. Durang had been members of a thecompany which had on several occasions visited Harrisburg, and

atrical

which belonged the celebrated comedian Blissett and the elder Jefferwho was quite distinguished as a comic actor. Jefferson subse-

to

son,

quently died in Harrisburg, and over his remains a stone was put by the direction of Chief Justice Gibson and Judge Rogers.

"Mr. Shoch was for years the collecting attorney of the Harrisburg Bank. I was concerned with him in the proceeding in the Frey estate. at Middletown.as to which application was made in or about May, 1S29, to the Supreme Court at Lancaster, under the act of 1818, relative to charitable trusts. George Frey was a native of Germany. He had long been engaged at Middletown in merchandising and milling. He had no children, and he desired to devote his large estate, consisting of above eight hundred acres of land, with a valuable water-power on the Swa-

He determined to found an Institn maintenance and educaorphan children, who as a part of their education were to be instructed in the tenets of the Lutheran Church. He did not seek to tara Creek, to charitable purposes.

tion not merely for the education, but for the

tion of

perpetuate his own name in the title of the institution, but gave it one commemorative of an interesting scene in the life on earth of the Saviour after his crucifixion by calling it The Emails Orphan House.' His will was dated in 1806, and was written by John Joseph Henry, president judge of the courts of Dauphin County. It was an elaborate '

minute and special directions. It is reported in the and Spayd, in 3d Watts' Reports. The estate after was mismanaged, and the orphan house became decayed and no school was kept. The Lutheran clergyman at Harrisburg, the venerable Mr. Lochman, considering that the children to be maintained and educated in the institution were to be instructed in the doctrines of the Lutheran Church, felt interested in the subject, and applied to Mr. Shoch, whose family belonged to his church, to endeavor to have some action taken on the subject. one, and contained

case ex-parte Cassel his death

"As

the will contained a provision for settlement of accounts of the

trust in the Courts of Quarter Sessions of

was made

to that court, of

Dauphiu County, application which Judge Franks was then president-

:

H1ST0KY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

276 Mouths elapsing applied to

me

as

any decision, Mr. Shoch was concluded to make application under the act of

after the application witliout

an

assistant^

Supreme Court

to the

and

it

at their session at Lancaster,

In the course of the proceeding a question might he raised as to obtaining a status in court, inasmuch as no school and consequently no children were in it who were interested But the will provided for the education of orin its maintenance. pha As an orphan was sometimes defined to be a child who had 181S, before referred to.

existed,

i

Charle

parent,

we concluded

to

make

F. Mueticb, of Harrisburg, as

name

application in the

the guardian of certain

of

i

Also that the Supreme Court had no jurisdiction of the matter; that the act of ISIS had provided only for cases

where no other redress ex-

and that in this case the will provided for action in the court of Dauphin County. He ridiculed certain provisions of the will, alleged that no orphan had applied for admission, and that this was the case with regard to the wards of the petitioner. "After the close of Mr. Buchanan's argument, Mr. Hopkins made some remarks, one of which was that 'if the court will read the will, they will see that it is the will of a foolish man.' To which Judge Huston said, We are not going to read the will now, nor is it necessary isted,

'

that

we

should.'

The court sustained

the application and directed an

account before auditors of their appointment. " It

proper to remark that on the will being offered for probate in

is

or about the year

181)6,

which the jury found

the court directed an issue of devi&avtt in favor of the will.

The character

vel

non, in

of the will,

as well as the sanity of the testator, were of course examinable on the

that issue.

trial of

" Also

was scarcely competent for the principal, holding office under the will and enjoying advantages under it, to objectto its validity. And, further, that if there were provisions in the will of an absurd, unreasonable, or impracticable character, they should scarcely have been permitted to nullify the reasonable, practicable, and meritorious provisions it

same uses

which

as those for

it

has been devised or conveyed.

It is

whose life cannot in the course upon property of which he or they happened to be puss^sst'd a character, either as to sale or partition, which shall bind the public in all time and under all circumstances and conditions. The earth is for the living and not for the dead, and though wills of decedents and agreements of individuals are entitled to and should

more

persons,

respect, yet to such considerations the public in-

receive reasonable terests are

paramount.

vs. Clymer, 2 Barr, George Frey

See Norris

" In conclusion as to the will of

minor

whose deceased father (the mother, however, 6urviving the We did so by father) had been a member of the Lutheran Church. petition directed against the former principal, who had resigned, and also against the principal then in charge of the estate, and also against certain of the trustees provided for in the will. This was in May, 1829. "At the time appointed there appeared against us Mr. Buchanan, a distinguished member of the Lancaster bar and afterwards President of the United .States, and Mr. Hopkins, a veteran lawyer of the same bar. "Mr. Buchanan contended that application having been made to the court of Dauphin County, an election of that forum had been made. childrc

the

not reasonable that one or

of nature long endure, shall impress

277.

"

The application to the Supreme Court on the part of members of the Lutheran Church not being successful, an act of Assembly was obtained in 1846 for the

appointment of the trustees on the nomination of the ttco east and nest of the Susquehanna, The case arising

Lutheran Synods lying

to the Supreme Court, who in the case of Brown reported in 6th Barr, decided that the act was unconstituand that the trustees in office could not be removed without a hearing at law. Now, it was sought by the act of 1846 to obtain a change of trustees in the interests of the Lutheran Church and not on account of misconduct on their part, aud therefore a trial at law would

under the act was taken

Hummel,

vs.

tional,

not have effected the object, but the act of 1846

may have been

objection-

able as limiting the choice of trustees to those of a particular church, whereas the will of the founder provided that 'members in good stand-

ing of any of the Protestant Churches' should be eligible.

"The judge who

delivered the opinion of the court iu the case of

vs. Hummel declared that the charter or act of incorporation of the institution was « contract between the government and individuals,

Brown

and the case of the Dartmouth College vs. Woodward, reported in 4th Wheaton, was referred to in support of the position. Now it may be somewhat difficult to see how the act of incorporation of a public charity is o contract, aud not merely an act of ordinary legislation liable to alteration by the Legislature which enacted it or by a subsequent one, especially where no money is paid to the Commonwealth or required by the act to be expended, which might not, under the terms of the will, be expended without the act. But such it has been declared to be in the case of

Brown

Hummel,

vs.

before referred

to.

"It may not be improper to add that if the obligations of a contract upon the Commonwealth as to every act of incorporation of a charitable, literary, or bauking institution, horse or other railroad, or act of incorporation forauy other purpose, and if any evil provision cannot be rest

repaired except something be done beyond the terms of the act of incorporation, and even then not directly by the enacting power, acting

own

by-

riously

it may choose (but always the requirements of justice), but necessarily through a. proceeding in court, then the law-making power ought to be especially care-

dissatisfied

ful as to the privileges

its

"In

the course of the proceedings before the auditors Mr. Shoch labo-

examined the books of accounts and made abstracts. Being with the auditors' report, we filed exceptions to it, and after argument before the Supreme Court a decree was made which terminated in large charges against the two principals who had charge of the estate.

"Application was then made by us for a change of management, and on the hearing of this proceeding Mr. Stevens appeared and claimed an appointment of the principal on nomination by the Lutheran Synods.

In objection to this an animated and impressive address was made by Mr. Shoch. Our nominee was appointed, a substantial building has been erected, an act of incorporation has been obtained, aud a school established, which is now in operation, and in which the English as well as the

"On

the

German language is taught. argument in the Supreme Court on

under the

and contended that he should not be held accountable, alleging that he was under the supervision of and subject to removal by the trustees. The Supreme Court, however, decided differently. "Mr. Shoch subsequently was lor some time the clerk of the House of Representatives of this State; was afterwards secretary of the Constitutional Convention of 1838, and is now the respectable, intelligent, and successful cashier of the National Bank of Columbia. "There is one provision in the will of George Frey which I do not consider to be authoritative, viz.. the provision that no part of the real estate devised slmlt ever be sold. I conceive that the law-making power first

principal

mill

may

to

granted or contained in them. The legislative otherwise turn out provisions which may be unpalatable to

the public taste or injurious to the health of the body politic.

"The Constitution of the United States was not framed till 1787. It contains the brief provision that no State shall pass any law ''impairing It does not explain whether the contracts of contracts. meant are simply contracts between individuals, or also contracts between individuals aud the government. The Dartmouth College case the obliyation

'

did not refer to a charter granted in this country and since the adoption of the Constitution of the United States, but to one granted to the trustees'

of

Dartmouth College

iu 1769 by the British crown,

and

was

it

to this

Supreme Court of the United applied the inhibition to the States to pass any law impairing the

literary institution, thus formed, that the

the exceptions filed, Mr.

Fisher and Mr. Elder were for parties in the case, and Mr. Herman Alricks, then a young man and now a highly respectable member of the

Harrisburg bar, appeared for the

force or by such instrumentality as

according

will

the landed property within the limits of the State,

States

obligation of contracts,

the decision in

and

Brown

vs.

this antique case

was referred

to in

support of

Hummel.

not time that the Dartmouth College case aud other kindred decisions, no matter by what authority supported,,— and they are sup-

"Is

it

names,— be repudiated, but not limiting the negation to charters of literary or charitable institutions, but giving a wider scope, and the power of the Legislature to control them be

ported by the authority of great

it

acknowledged? " It has been argued and alleged that where Coogress, reasoning, a State Legislature acts within

its

or,

constitutional

by parity of

power

in re-

pealing or changing the terms of an act of incorporation, the justice which should certainly atteud such proceeding should legally be meas-

ured by a proceeding

at law.

But

if

Congress or the Legislature of a

be directed, the proceeds, in cases of trust, to be applied to the same

power of repeal or alteration, why should not the proper measure of justice be administered in such mauuer or by such instrumentality as the legislative power shall direct? And is it not

uses as declared in the trust. A conversion is not a diversion. It must Bouietiuies, if not frequently, be a great public iuconvenience or a posi-

worthy of consideration whether the prohibition to the States as to interfering with contracts refers simply to contracts between individuals,

has control over

all

and that where the public interests imperatively require

may

tive evil that real estate

remain

in the

its sale, its

sale

same condition and subject

to

State possess the

and not

to coutracts

between individuals and the government

itself?

It

GENERAL HISTORY. is a

legal principle, in the construction of Statutes, that the

not included unless expressly named.

Why should

in the Constitution of the

"The Supreme Court the State of

tary of the

See Broom's Legal Maxims, 73.

not this principle be applied to the provision as to contracts

New

vs.

WilBon

(see

1

Kent's Com. 414-15) that the

power of taxation could be permanently surrendered. Now the taxing power is an incident of sovereignty, an essential part of every independent government. (Black, C. J., in the case of the Bank of Pennsylvania os. the Commonwealth, 7th Harris, 15*2.) How, then, can it be surrendered by a temporary legislature? 'Taxation to be just must be equal, and to be equal must be universal.' 'To exempt some would be '

1

to increase the

burdens of

others.'

(Idem.)

Why,

then, should the

property of institutions, not for burial or religious objects or for purposes of general charity, be relieved of a burden to which that of the

poor

subjected?

is

"The which

I

occasion to which I have referred was not the only one on have heard Mr. Buchanan. I heard him frequently in our State when he was a young man, and I then much admired him.

Legislature

His voice was agreeable, very clear, with his enunciation

though

ringing sound, and loud; was exceedingly distinct; he was fluent in speech, i

deliberate, but not unpleasantly st

;

manner usually

his

ani-

mated, and his lauguage unexceptionable. I also heard him in the Senate at Washington, just previous to tht inauguration of Gen. Harrison.

He

tions.

An

spoke in opposition to an impracticable, absurd resolution, introduced by Mr. Crittenden, soon to be one of the new cabinet, prohibiting officers of the general government from interfering iu elecearnest discussion took place, the Senate being addressed by

Mr. Crittenden, Mr. Clay, Mr. Mangun and perhaps by Mr. Calhoun, and i was not surpassed by any one on that speaker, and very able and impressive to be timid

and

irresolute

,

Mr. Wright, Robert J. Walker, my estimation Mr. Buchanan He was an agreeable

iccasion. a

when required

debate; but he was considered to assui

occasions of extraordinary importance to himself

i

e responsibilities

on

to the public inter-

ests. When secession was threatened or actually begun, had he posand intrepidity which, at such a crisis, should have been displayed by the head of the government, the South would not have been in doubt whether secession would be met by mere

sessed the resolution

protestation, acquiescence or entreaty, or fought to the bitter end.

But

Mr. Buchanan appears to have been fitted for action in quiet times, rather than the stormy scenes of politics or revolution. " Mr. Buchanan was tall in person, his form large and well developed. His head, however, from some diseased condition, or from malformation

hung to one side. He dressed carefully, and his appearance was gentlemanly and impressive. " Two young men read law in the office of Mr. Shunk when he was in practice here, viz., William M. Hall and .lames Findlay, and they were admitted to the bar in November, 1822. " Mr. Hall was a native of Harrisburg. His mother was a daughter of William Maclay, and she resided at the time of her death in the stone bouse on the corner of Front and South Streets, in this place, which had been built about the year 1794 by her father, and which was the second stone house built within the present limits of Harrisburg, the one erected in 1766, near the lower end of Front Street, by the second John Harris,

in his neck,

subsequently the founder of Harrisburg, being the

first.

"Mr. Hall settled at Lewistown, in the county of Mifflin, where he soon got into practice; and had he continued at the bar, from his marked ability and great industry, would probably have attained a high rank in the profession. But his mind becoming religiously impressed, he abandoned the practice of law, studied divinity, and became a clergyman in the Presbyterian Church, and was widely known throughout the State. His health becamo impaired, and he died in middle age at Bedford, in August, 1851. His mind was too active and energetic for the frail tenement in which it was lodged. His bodily strength was uot sufficient for attaining a knowledge of two professions. His eyes were prominent aud he was near-sighted, but he did not discover the imperfection till he was well grown, when, hearing some boys speak of seeing something on the island opposite, he at first disbelieved that the island could be seen distinctly from the town, and it was then hediscovered his defect of vision. Mr. Hall was a very honest, upright man, reliable in his friendships, and a sincere Christian. One of his sons is now a member of this bar.

"James Findlay was a son

of Governor Findlay, four of

whose

five

He settled in Greensburg, Westmoreland Co., where be had beeu appointed the prosecutiug officer, and from which county he was afterwards elected to the Legislature, where sons were admitted to the bar.

he soon became distinguished.

Commonwealth by Governor

to Pittsburgh,

where he was joined

Ho eventually removed by Mr. Shunk a He there year 1844. James Findlay

Wolf.

iu the prof--Hhion

short time before his nomination for the office of Governor,

middle age, about the and his elder brother, Archibald, hereinbefore mentioued, were men of gentlemanly instincts and manners, and were each of rather superior ability and of fair reputation. "I here take occasion to mention that Governor William Findlay, fur whose memory I entertain a youthful respect, has been confounded with William Findley, of Westmoreland County. See Graydon's Memoirs,' edited by Littell, pages :156 and 373. " Mr. McCormick was known to most of the present members of the bar. He was a superior lawyer, and from his unexcitable temperament might have been well fitted for the bench. When actively engaged in liis profession he had a more extensive practice than any other of those who came into practice with him. His opinions on matters of law were generally reliable, and he was extensively called on for counsel after, from lose of sight, he ceased to be able to try causes in court. He was an effective speaker, and when he lost a cause it might generally be considered that he had the wrong side of it. He was of medium size, and of intellectual countenance. It would seem that after arriving at manhood he nev< njoyed good health. He was sedentary in his habits, taking but little cise either in walking or otherwise. He was rather -Be, but seemed to enjoy the company of his friends ,vheu in his office His eyesight, perhaps owing to his sedentary life, md perhaps exces: e and incautious use of his eyes, became impaired, and he became blind. The affection, however, did not seem to affect his spirits, aud in his office he seemed much as usual. Though sorely afflicted for many years, he bore his affliction, at least publicly, with little murmur or complaint. He died in January, 1870, aged sixty-nine.' " John C. Kunkel was of quite prepossessing appearance. He was of medium height, slight, but well forn pf had a ruddy countenance and very clear complexion. He bad a pleasant voice, was a highly agreeable speaker, and more accomplished in that respect than any other member of the bar of this place ice the organization of the county, Though distinguished as a speake he was not considered by the leading members of the bar here to be st s a lawyer. To attain eminence in knowledge of law requires close d attentive study,aswell as large practice, and he had uot industry resolution sufficient to effect that result. He was tw elected to Congress, but his busin at home interfered much with his representative di not distinguished as a member of Congress. He was unusually successful in the acquisition of fortune, a portion of which he left to purdied, unmarried, iu

United States?

of the United States also decided, in the case of

Jersey

277

He was subsequently appoiuted

Secre-

*

(

1

,

:

poses of charity.

He

died in October, 1870.

"There was another member of the bar who died some years ago who was considerably distinguished for bis knowledge of law and for industry in his profession. This was John A. Fisher. He came to the bar in December, 1820, when his father. Mr. George Fisher, heretofore spoken of, was still in considerable practice, and thus was enabled the more readily to get into business. He was the most laborious lawyer I have here. He was generally ready for the of 1 iy practh i

rial of his causes when by reai enable diligence it could be effected. to endeavor to write down nearly His usage in the trial of a cause w all of the oral testimony delivered, not trusting to his memory for it. This contributed to lengthen trials in which he was engaged, and was often complained of by the court and the adverse counsel, but he was pertinacious. When his turn came he gave the cause a thorough examination. In the preparation of bis paper-books for the Supreme >

Court he was elaborate, and it was not his fault if his side of the case was not understood. He pursued the profession for about forty years, and had an extensive and lucrative practice in this and Lebanon County. He was generally concerned in the few ejectment cases which depended on original title which were tried here after the older lawyers, who had large experience in that line, had died or bad retired from the bar. These cases related to timber lands or mountain lands in the coal region, which

had become an object of special attention. He also drafted the act of March, I860, for the incorporation of the city of Harrisburg, which extensive act is evidence of his ability and is a specimen of his industry. He died in July, 1S64, aged sixty-six. He was a large man, of remarkably vigorous consti tut iou, and of great strength and power of endurance. " Charles C. Rawn was a member of this bar for fifteen or twenty years. He was from one of the eastern counties of this State, perhaps from Chester. He was possessed^of considerable ability, of great euergy of character, aud was indefatigable in attention to his professional business. He was fluent in speech, and in controversy was the last to yield. He was a relative of Governor Shuuk, which conneciion most prol«ably iuduced his settlement here. He had been of the Democratic school of



HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

278 politi
Henry..

Pooman, Michael

Hutchison, Jos Hutchison, Sam Huston, Andrew Huffman. Jos

Montgomry, Hugh

150 160 250 90 280 100 90

Wilson, Jn", Jun' Wilson, Jno Wilsou, Jn", Sen' Wilson, Alexander Wilson, Joseph, Sen' Wilson, Jos. Jun' While, Hugh Whitely, Widow

Win.igle, .Mathias

Wickeraham, Abuer.. Wolfly. Conrad Fre^, Geo

100

Gilchrist, Rohert

Lerue, Francis Landis. Jacob Mire, Jacob

Acres.

206 40

1+4^

Loydon, Jn"

Name. Wallace, James

Wyly, Samuel

Williams, Geo

Wrav, Hugh Wvlev, Robert Wiggene, James

Gibbous, William.. Grimes, Jn° Gilchrist, Jn» Grimes, Gustavus

Kitzmiller,

430

Vance, Moses

250 90 140 150 100

Nobb, Widow

J n«

Haddon,

Acres.

Name.

AcreB.

Name.

Acres.

Name. Fockler, Geo

Shoemaker, j

.In"

Share, Peter Smith, Michael Smith, Peter Smith, Mary & Jos

Thompson. .In" Taylor, James Thompson, Sam' Tanner, Chris' Toot, David

144 180 100 104 124 211 170 232

230 200 ...

18

304 150

Porter, Jn".

Bates, Jno.

Wm

Curry, James.

Vance,

Miller, Jn".

Cogly, Rob'.

Smith, Geo.

M

100 160

Simpson, Nathan1 Gross, Michael.

c

.

Conuald, Richard.

Oberlander, Fred*.

Jno, Row Mury, Thomas.

Witner, William.

Miller, Jno.

,

.

Martin, Fritz.

Randolph, Nathan'.

Shaw, David. Gilchrist, Matthew.

Felty, Michael.

Keas, Robert.

Martin, Sam'.

Page, Jn".

Cochran, Jn".

Winogle, Fredrick.

Burleigh, Francis.

Canible, Archibald.

100

Clark, Robert.

Little, Jacob.

150

Morrow, William.

Ryle, Thomas.

200

Toot, Geo

Umbergcr, Henry

Comprey, Alex'.

Long, Paul.

Elder, Robert.

Lowry, W».

180 405 150 100 150

c

Youtz, Francis.

Strahen, Thomas.

150 80 100 106 217 13 120

Sen'.

Leek, Courad.

M

Henry. Ju" Derby Sen'. Jn° Boyd. Pitners,

,

125

M"Guire, Richard.

Brown, Sam'.

Siders, Jacob.

Stewart, W"°.

Foot, David.

Fridley, Barnet.

Parks, Jn".

Attlee, Conrad.

-..

;;

CITY OF HARRISBURG. Huffman, Dan

M-Knight, Jn°.

1 .

ated; followed by Swatara in 1799; and Susquehanna in 1815, leaving only that portion of the township

Jun r Richman, Robert.

GroSB, ChriB n .

Harris, Jn°,

Consort, Jn".

291

.

now known as Lower Paxtang, although never erected To distinguish it from the northern portion of the county, which was set off as Upper Paxtang

As previously stated, the first division of Paxtang was when Hanover township was erected then, in 1791, when the borough of Harrisburg was incorpor-

as such.

;

in 1767,

it

was thus termed by general usage merelv.

CITY OF HARRISBURG. CHAPTER

I.

'

i

1

The Proprietary Grants— Manor Harris Mansion

of

Paxtang— The Ferry Grant— The

— Proposals to lay out a Town — Conveyances to the — Early Reminiscences of the Town — Louis-

Of

17S7.

Harris' Ferry, the site of the flourishing

and

prosperous city of Harrisburg, and of the individual

who gave

it

name, we have alluded

in the general

history of the county.

On

the 17th of December, 1733, the Proprietaries

of Pennsylvania granted to

John Harris, by

patent,

three hundred acres and allowance of land, extending

from what

is

now Herr

Street, formerly the

upper

boundary of the old borough of Harrisburg, down the river to a black-oak somewhere near the termination of Walnut Street with Front Street, and thence back by a line continuous with Mulberry and Tenth Street

now the line of Sixsame day, Dec. 19, 1733, a patent was granted to Joseph Turner for five hundred acres and allowance, adjoining the above and extending down the river from the aforesaid black-oak to what is now the division line between the lands of the late John Mahan and Mrs. Hanna, deceased, extending back from the river, and embracing the James Harris tract, now the property of A. B. Hamilton. This was taken up by John Harris in the name of Joseph Turner, no doubt, to comply with certain usages of the landoffice, for on the next day (December 18th) Joseph Turner conveyed to Edward Shippeu, who on the next day (December 19th) conveyed to John Harris. North of now Herr Street was the manor of PaxIt was one of the Proprietary reservations of tang. land, and one of the smallest manors in the ProvIt is described as ince, but its soil was unequaled. bounded on the northwest corner by land of John Harris, the elder; that in 1732 was at a beech-tree, on the top of the bank of the Susquehanna River, near where the present Front and Herr Streets intersect. It included about twelve hundred acres; the river line six hundred eighty-nine perches and three east of the canal to the rear line, teenth.

On

the

made by

The land

is

Isaac Taylor,

June 4, 1733, "for Thomas Penn, Esquire;" "Commencing at a water-beech thence east-northeast two hundred and fifty-two perches to Paxtang Creek thence north one hundred and twenty perches; thence north by east two hundred and eighty perches to a black-oak; thence northwest one hundred perches; thence west by north three hundred and eighty perches to a black-oak on the bank of the Susquehanna River thence down said river six hundred and eighty ;

Public by John Harris

burgh— "Pumpkin Flood"— Taxables for

hundred yards, being over two miles. thus described in a survey

I

perches."

Taylor notes that when he passed the Harris line Paxtang Creek was all vacant land on the remaining sides of the manor. These bounds would seem to include from the river to (east of the canal), west of

the present " Miller's school-house," on the high ridge above the hospital, the grounds of which are within the survey. Its north line was the south one of the " John Reel farm." This comprises some of the most fertile land of the river valley. The Penus, however, were too poor to preserve it intact, and began to sell portions of it about the time of Braddock's defeat,

disposing of the last of

it about ten years before the Revolutionary war. In conveying this land we find no mention of quit-rent, the instrument being for the fee; an important distinction between this and the manors of Conestoga, Springett, Maske, and Lowther.

Taylor's survey was sent to the land-office at Philaand very carefully criticised there, being

delphia,

deemed of such importance Penn to visit Harris' Ferry in

as to induce

Thomas

1736. While here he obtained personal knowledge of its value. We hear of it next in an application of James Galbraith, of Lancaster County, for two hundred acres, includiug a

The warrant was granted Jan. the survey was returned the follow-

piece of this manor. 9,

When

1749.

ing was indorsed upon general

it

— Mr. Scull

being surveyor-

:

" Me. Scull,— One James Mitcheltree improved this land before the Thomas Penn, came into the country, by express permission of Mr. Logan, and a part of his improvement was run into the manor of Paxtang, but with no intent to deprive him of a grant of land on the

prop'r,

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

292 common money

terms, &c, &c, whenever a patent

is to

award from

is

applied for; the purchase

be at £15.10 per 100, and J4d quit rent per acre, ent. 1st

March,

&

This shows that the next tract above Harris, on the

Susquehanna,

was " improved"

before

family of Mitcheltree had land in what

is

The 1732. now Susque-

hanna township. Galbraith's tract proved to contain two hundred and forty-five acres with allowance, and was that part of the manor east of " Pasting Creek," "the south line commencing just south of Dead Horse Brook thence northeast one hundred perches to lands of James Alcorn thence north and ;

;

west by sundry corners to lands of Thomas Armstrong; thence west and northwest one hundred and fifty-eight perches along lands of Arthur Forster thence west one hundred perches to the creek thence ;

;

down Pasting Creek two hundred and sjxty-six perches." The date of the survey Sept. 5, 1750. The part owned by Galbraith within the manor was found by subsequent survey to be one hundred and twentyfive acres.

The next survey was that of Bertram Galbraith, 12, 1759, when "Mister Penn's eleven hundred

May and

forty acres without allowance"

is

thus described.

one hundred and the north line of twenty-five acres " John Harris' land, at a birch-tree on the bank of the Susquehanna;" thence north sixty-five east two hundred and fifty-two perches to Paxtang Creek at an " elm ;" thence north and north by east two hundred and twenty perches ninety-four perches northwest

It

excludes James :

Galbraith's

Commencing on

;

thence north eighty west three hundred and thirtyeight perches to a Spanish-oak on the bank of the

Susquehanna; "thence down said river six hundred and eighty-nine perches," making the western front

— now

row of buildings on the west

that

of Front Street which so

much

side

disfigures the locality

of that fine thoroughfare.

The adjoining owners on the survey

of 1759 appear

in the boundaries of this portion of the

manor, with

names of " Keverand John Hersha, Thomas and William Gaullaugher," whose lands were the additional

along Paxtang.

John Hamilton purchased all of the one hundred and twenty-five acres, together with one hundred and fifty-five acres of the manor running out to the river. About the same time other parties made purchases, the whole amounting to nearly eight hundred acres; so that it had all passed out of the ownership of Penn 1789, Capt.

Galbraith tract within the manor,





before Harrisburg was five years old.

The next considerable transaction was in 1810, when Abraham Huy (corrupted into Huey, always, however, written by its owner Huy) conveyed one hundred and fifty acres to Christian Kunkel. This was sold by George Kunkel aud David Hummel to Luther Keily, John Whitehill, and Adam Henry Orth. Then a number of owners of parts of the manor began to appear, and as we write more than five hun-

own

dred persons

parts of " Mister Penn's

manor of

Paxta'ng."

The conveyance

of any part of this land to " the

low-water mark of the Susquehanna"

is

without right.

Penn claimed only to the bank of the Susquehanna. The low-water mark bound of modern deeds is an assertion of a right which did not originally pertain to the land within this manor.

The land

in the lower portion of the city, including

The

the First and Second Wards, and portions of the

lands are James Alcorn, northeast of James Galbraith, Archibald Forster, James

Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Wards, were of different

nine perches in excess of the survey of 1733.

adjoining

Harris

;

Potts,

Widow (Thomas) Armstrong; on

surveys and not in John Harris' warrants.

John Harris'

the river,

James Chambers.

dated Dec. 24, 1760, and devises to his two sons,

habitation was on the lower bank

the, river,

A well, dug by exists about one hundred feet east of was covered over about thirty years site is easily distinguished by a small cir-

seen by some of our oldest citizens.

Thomas and Michael,

Mr. Harris,

acres, share

his grave.

three hundred and eighty-six and share alike. In 1778, Adam Eckart, who at one time was owner of a large body of land in and about Harrisburg, purchased two hundred and two acres of the Simpsons, and subsequently nearly

first

about one hundred and fifty or two hundred feet below the spot where now repose his remains. The foundation walls of this house have been of

In 1760, Thomas Simpson was owner of four hundred acres of the south part of this manor. His will is

years as Pottstown, "

names

" R. Peters."

It was known for many Hard Scrabble," and other fancy

Street to south side of Reily.

1732.

ago, but

cular

still

It

its

mound

of earth.

In connection with his man-

sion-house he erected a large range of sheds, which

The next above Simpson was Thomas Forster, " Esquire," who held four hundred acres. North of him was Thomas McKee, who held " about four hundred acres." The transactions in this laud took place after

were sometimes literally filled with skins and furs, obtained by him in traffic with the Indians, or stored there by Indian traders, who brought them from the western country. These skins were carried, at an early day, on pack-horses to Philadelphia for sale.

the survey of 1759.

A

all

of that land.

Adam

In 1786,

Eckart, joiner, and Catharine his

conveyed to Joshua Cooper, tanner, and they to Abraham Huy, six lots of ground comprising the town of "New Philadelphia." This town-plot was three acres a narrow strip along the river from Herr wife,

;

representation of this log house, the original of

which

is

in possession of

Gen. Simon Cameron,

is

herewith given.

The second John Harris

inherited that portion of

upon which the borough of Harrisburg was subsequently laid out. For three-fourths of his father's estate

CITY OF HARRISBURG. a century the ferry right

site

was known as Harris' Ferry.

was not granted

tiirieB

The

until the year 1753, as

the following copy of the original document: "Thomas Penn and Richard Penn, Esqrs., true and absolute

by

proprie-

and Governors-in-chief of the Province of Pennsylvania and New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware. To all unto

counties of

whom

these presents shall come, greeting:

Whereas,

It hath

been rep-

resented to us that the frequent passing and repassing of people over

our river Susquehanna hath made it necessary that ferries should be erected and established at proper places for the ready carrying over our said river all travelers and other persons whose business and affairs may call

them

into these parts of our said province.

known tons

And

it

being made

that the plantation and tract of land belonging to

Harris, of the county of Lancaster,

yeoman, lying on the

John

east side of

the said river Susquehanna, in the township of Paxtang and county aforesaid, b}r

means

of the convenient situation thereof,

is

a proper

place for erecting and keeping a ferry for that part of our said prov-

and

203

such reasonable

reward as hath heretofore been accustomed, or Bhall be hereafter settled f Bucks, Geo Bucks, Peter Beaver, Geo Bucks, John Bayers, Casimor Byers, Jo" Blessley, Blessley,

Anthony John

Berine, Dan' Blair,

John

Chambers. James Coss, Jacob Cobongh, Abram Gander, Joseph Caufman, Ji Cain, Jn«..

Cough, Mathias Toss. Geo Gamble, Moses

200 150 212 50 200

50 2*1 100 40 150

25 120 200

Mills,

Henry

Ettor.

Acres.

40 25 80 100

W>° McG.e, Henry Mitchel, David Myers, Jo" Monigh, Vandle Mills,

McKee, Sain

Espy,

Henry Thomas

Elliot,

15 150

200

Dan'

Fiver. And" Fifer.Jn" Fuutz, Conrad Felix, Stephan

Fontz, Biirnard Fleck, Alex' Fritz,

Henry

Grossman, Nicholas Galoway, Jos Grimes, Hector Gingrey, Jn"

100 100

130

1

Jn° MeCiunis, James

McKee, Rob' McKee, Esther

Roiles, Miuh Rife, Jacob

Rouse, Martin

75 50 85 140 60

John

250

Roadrock, Peter

Henry

It.it/el,

114

Rife, Jos hi>

Join

,

40

Martin

Richart, Philip Smith, Jacob.. .III Shi SI,:,

Bail.;

.

.

100

Sellars, Fred' Shaffner, Fred' Shoop, Margret

100

Spidle, Spidle,

Mack Mack,

132

Stephanuon, Geo Scott, W'" (James Gold) Singer, Jacob SinJn°

Stoufer, Chris Shellv, Dan' Shreidly, And"

DenniB

Stall,

Striokler, Jacob Striokler. Abram

100

Scott,

,

>,

—John

Overseers of Roads.

174 Tetweiler, David Tetweiler, Jacob Tilts,

Fred*

Taylor,

100 100 100

230 250 100

.In"

Taner, Mich' Wolf. Geo Wagner, Fred k ... Wliitmer,.ln° White, \V« Wilson, Mosses Williams. William

Sherer,

Landis, Jacob

Wickersham, Aimer

263

Hurst, Charles Yeates, Anthony Yeates, Peter

Henry

John Kauffoian.

In the Derry return for 1780, which is herewith given, we find that mills were possessed by Michael (2), Adam Hamaker (2), Barbara Sharer, and William Scott. Stills were operated by Martin Brand (2), James Laird (2), and David Mitchell (2). Negroes were owned by Joseph Candor, George Cass, and William White (2).

Haun

Ann Arbuckle

Jacob Quhard. Jacob Derrey. And" Gamble.

Geo. Lower.

Adam Deam.

Richard Hall.

W». Whigand.

John

Lodwig Emrich. Suseanah Wetherholt.

Fred' Humel.

Gall.

Chrlstoph Bowe James Donally.

'in

150 150 400

Servine. Stephan

Long, Johu Kain.

—John

274

He Adam.

1784. Constable.— Henry Etter. Overseers of Poor.

90

SJmerman, Nich' James Shaffner, Jacob

Laferty, Patrick Landis, Peter

Wm

150

Fred'

100

Hood, Geo

Laird,

115

Adam Spidle, Jacob

W

Landis,

inn 100

J'

Spalsbacb, Geo

Still,

Long, Jn«

100

Jn»

Shote. Fredt Sellars, Philip

50 100

Kile, James Lightic, Nicholas

100

1

251

Jackson, Jn" Johnston, Thomas Johnston, David Johnston, Sam' Jackson, Edward Jamison, William

350

James

Rnsel,

Hall, Hugh Ilunsbei ger, Jacob

Haun, Mich' Hamacher, Adam, Jn r Hanna, Sam'. Hindman, John Hindman, Saml

240

Prim, Jos Patlon, James Persht, Peter, Jun r Peosht, Peter

259

Hess, Fred" Hock, Philip

1 lott.

McFarland, Jn» Nissley, Jacob Nupher, Henry Nupher, Christian Oagel, Tho>

Giugrey. Abram Grape, W"> Hershey, And"

Hume!, Valen" Henry, Adam m Hindoiali, Hamacher, Chris" Hamacher, Adam Hamacher, David

150 400

Mitzger. Jacob

?,

150 150

16U 240

Ma

i,

Darr, Conrad

221 100 25 3

Myers, Jus Jun< Mveis, .!„

Conns, Geo Etter,

James

Laird,

Ridley,

Fox, Jn

1773. Constable— William Bredin.

ItiriTKN,

Acres. Alison, Davi.l Alison, Geo Alison, Rob' •,

1764. Constable.— John Tanner.

1765.

411 17"".

Peter Spade.

Jos. Furey.

Mich' Spade.

Adam Cram.

Martin Fredley.

66

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

412 Lewis Meyer

Peter Fredley.

Mary

James GInng.

Adam

Heroof.

Haverliug.

Sam' Glark. Jacob Bricker.

Philip Blessly.

James Cnims. Ban Banm. Henry Cooper.

Jn° Shoop.

Hirmau

1

Birnard.

Fred' Sellais.

Jn" Landis.

Jn° McLaughlin.

Chris" Landis.

W" Gray.

Henry

James M. Glester. Rub Henderson.

Jacob Qnhard.

Miller.

Jn» Camble.

1

Dani Robinson.

Edward Bulges

Jacob Shearer.

Geo. Minet.

Geo. Crabner.

Jacob Axnoe.

DERRY TOWNSHIP,

1S2R.

Derry township as now constituted is bounded on the north and west by the Swatara Creek, which separates it from the townships of Lower Swatara, Swatara, South Hanover, and East Hanover, on the east by the Lebanon County line, and on the south by the townships of Conewago and Londonderry. It is one of the richest townships in the county. The following is the only complete list of supervisors we have been able to obtain of any of the townships :

SUPERVISORS OF DERRY TOWNSHIP. 1785. J. Sherer.

1810.

A. Strickler. 1786. A. Blessing.

Joseph Rife. 17S7. J. Brenser.

Peter Geib.

1813.

C. Stauffer.

1792.

1814. J. Nissley.

1793. J. Candor.

Jacob Heister.

Humme

1816.

J. Hoffer.

1795. George Bower.

1817.

Philip Fishburn. 1796. D. Brandt. P.

1797.

George Loner. Funck.

F.

C.

1820.

M. Brandt.

J.

1802. C.

Boughman.

C. Landis.

1824.

Joseph Rife.

Banm.

J.

1804. C.

W.

John Minnick. 1827. Christian Stoner.

D. Shoop. 1808. H. Shaffner. J.

1809.

1828.

Henry Landis. John Fishburn.

1829.

John Landis.

Laird.

1807. J. Herahey.

Greenawalt.

Abram Hoober. John Moses.

Hawk.

John Detweiler.

D. Detwciler. 1806. A. Hocker.

Roadrock.

1826. A. Henry.

J. Gingrich.

1805. P. Beinhauer.

II.

T. Smith. 1825. H.

Martin.

Kouffman.

Lime. David Metzler.

J.

1823.

Mumma.

1803. D.

John Nissley. George McCanu.

1822. J. Beiuhower.

A. McCleary. 1801. C. Baer.

John Hoffer. M. Nissley. Daniel Seiler.

1821.

J. Bricker.

M. Walford.

Wagner.

Brennaman.

1819. H. Strickler.

J.

1799. Christian Earnest.

M. Hoover. Henry Booser. Abram Brandt.

1818. G. Hoover.

Roadrock.

1798. J. Graff.

1800.

Hummel.

Henry Goss. James Wilson. John McKee. John Landis. Henry Horst.

1815. Christian Apple.

J. Nissley.

1794. Frederick

Berst.

Jacob Books.

1812. Frederick

J. Risser.

1789. J. Kinjiiich.

John

Jacob Merisler. 1811.

Peter Berst.

Jonas Miller. 1830. Jacob Coble. Christian Nissley. 1831. Christian Stoner. B. Fishburn.

1832

DERRY TOWNSHIP. miles north of Lebanon, in 1851, the bridges were swept from their piers from that point all along the Swatara (save the one at Laudermilch's Ferry) to its mouth at Middletown. The bridge at Hummelstown was rebuilt in less than a year after its destruction by the original owners. Joseph Sherer died March, 1824,

and

his interest fell to his wife,

who

disposed of

Mr. Hefflefinger prior to her removal

John Earnest,

1838.

Sr., also

dead, his

to the

it

to

West

in

widow held the

41 Z

The dedicatory services were conducted by ExBishop Erb, Revs. J. F. Smith, Lewis Peters, Ezekiel Light, and G. W. Miles Rigor (presiding elder). The building is thirty by forty feet, and is neatly furnished. A cemetery adjoins the church, in which a monument twenty-two feet in height bears the following inscription in raised letters " At Rest, Edward Stover, died July 31, 1870, aged 21 years, 10 1872.

:

months, and 3 days."

homestead was sold to Samuel Mr. Klopp afterwards purchased Mr. Heffle-

half-interest until the

Klopp.

finger's interest,

and held the

bridge until he disposed of

Dauphin County

known

it

is

to the

commissioners of

which time it has been The Swatara River at

in 1855, since

as a " free bridge."

this point

entire control of the

from twelve to fourteen

best portion of the year.

The

first

feet in

depth the

bridge was built

The bridge built twenty-five or Hammaker's Mill Ferry by the county was always a free bridge. The old Red Bridge, leading from Centre Square through Water Street, Hummelstown, to the Hanover townships, was built

about the year 1818. thirty years later at

by a stock company, but was also purchased by the county twenty-five years or more ago, and is free for Below Landis' Dam, one-eighth of a mile travelers. north of Hummelstown, and visible from the railroad depot, is another ferry or fording-place, which is still used by the farmers of Lower Paxtang and West Hanover, between their homes, the mill, and the

OLD DERRY CHURCH. It

is

known

almost certainly established

that

what

is

Derry Presbyterian Church, in Dauphin its first services near the head of a confluent of Spring Creek, in that portion of Chester County from which Lancaster was taken, and subsequently Dauphin, about one and a half miles from the site upon which its first church building (that of 1729) was erected. This building was nearly square, twenty-three by twenty-five feet, of logs and clapboards. The first services we have account of were as

County, held

held at the close of the month of April, in 1724. The small congregation must have been gathered from

all

the frontier within a radius often miles, and without

exception was of the Scotch-Irish immigration.

Its

canopy was the primeval forest. It was addressed by the Revs. George Gillespie, David Evans, and Robert

railroad depot.

Derry Village

is

situated thirteen

and a half

miles east of Harrisburg, and is named for Old Derry Church. It is a post-town, located in the midst of a beautiful and productive farming region.

The United

Brethren have a church here, a brick structure, rebuilt in 1881, of which Rev. David Longnecker is the pasOne mile west of Derry is Swatara Station, tor. and, like the former, situated on the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. Mechanicsburg lies east of Derry, is really an extension of Palmyra, Lebanon Co. Spring Creek was the name formerly given to the west-

and

it is now genknown by the latter name. Dunkard Meeting-house is located about half a

ern part of the village of Derry, but erally

A

mile south of Derry Station. It is a neat brick building, erected nearly half a century ago. South of Hummelstown about two miles is the Hill

Church of the Evangelical Lutheran congregation. It was the oldest German church in the township, the old log church having been built in the year 1756. It was rebuilt in 1875. The ministers are supplied by the Hummelstown charge. There are several other churches in the township, concerning which we endeavored to secure information, but failed it.

to receive

Memorial United Brethren Church. —This and a half miles south of Hum-

beautiful church, one

melstown, was erected by Edward Stover as a memorial and child, and was dedicated on Aug. 4,

to his only son

OLD DERRY CHURCH. Cross.

served Clark,

Some names of those present have been preRowland Chambers, Thomas and William James Galbraith, Patrick and Robert Camp-

:

John Mitchell, William McBey, James Quigley, William Hay, Robert Moody, Malcolm Kar (Kerr), Thomas and Hugh Black, James Harris, William McCord, Morgan Jones, David McClure, James MacFarlane, Alexander Hutchinson, John and Benjamin Boyd, James Hamilton, John McCosh and sister. These men were all engaged making themselves bell,

homes on the

frontier,

" over

Conoy" and along the

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY.

414 Susquehanna, much those

who managed

to the

mind of Penn family. their way to pre-

distraction of

land affairs for the

Every obstruction was thrown in However, they were not vent permanent location. to be deterred by the frowns of the governing powers as at Philadelphia, but took what land they needed ;

was thoroughly repaired at a cost of five hunIt stood without further repair until May, 1883, when it came to be so much decayed that It was taken down and a it was thought dangerous.

when

it

dred dollars.

new one of stone is at present in course of construction The early records of nearly the same dimensions.

sought religious consolation from

of the congregation seem to be lost; most likely have

ministers of the Presbyterian faith, erected a church, and complied with the Provincial laws, in an uneasy,

great migrations that have so frequently almost depop-

they

felt settled,

antagonistic fashion,

"on the barrens of Derry."

one can speak with entire certainty of cation. first

A

public road

now occupies

graveyard used by the early

its

exact

ulated this early settlement.

lo-

following interesting particulars

on a farm

owned by Mr. Samuel Wingert, on a commanding and by tradition, it is the place where the was held and the original church built. The confused relics of a building supposed to have elevation,

first

We

No

a part of the

settlers,

been carried " West" in the luggage of the very

service

know, however, the The Rev. Adam Boyd " preached to the westward of Octorara and Donegal, over Conoy," in 1723. The Rev. James Anderson preached in Donegal in 1724, and became pastor there in 1726, giving one-fifth of his time "over Conewago," the present Derry. The Rev. William Bertram was called

in

:

1732 " to Derry," upon the so-

INTERIOR VIEW OP OLD DERRY CHURCH. been the church were there sixty years ago. Therefore it is just possible that a small church was there, until one was erected on the present site, in 1732, the year the land-office was opened. One thing is known, that the remains of Patrick Campbell, who died in 1735, were removed from the abandoned burial-place at Wingert's to the present cemetery, and is the oldBe all this as it may, it is cerest date found there. tain that a congregation was formally gathered in 1730, and soon afterwards worshiped at the present Derry, now an historically prominent feature in early frontier occupation, and their descendants have held

of Rowland Chambers, William Wilson, John Sloan, John Wilson, Hugh Black, Robert Campbell, James Quigley, William McCord. The congregation paid him sixty pounds a year in hemp, linen, corn, yarn, and cloth, and gave him the use of

divine service there ever since.

Presbytery, but was not increasing. Soon after the peace of 1763 it began to diminish the tendency to go West was not to be resisted among these sons of the frontier, and its effect upon the church was especially disastrous. Mr. Elder was a most efficient shepherd of his extensive charges, and held this pas-

So rapidly did the settlement increase that the first house was in a few years found to be too small. It underwent some enlargement, when in 1769 a new church of logs, thirty-eight by thirty-nine feet, was erected. It was used by the congregation up to 1831,

licitation

Mr. Bertram served Derry until which occurred on the 2d of May, 1746.

a farm.

his death,

In 1742 the exact record is missing; Rev. John Elder, then in charge of the Paxtang congregation, after some debate about salary and " the time" to be given to Derry, was installed pastor. The congregation was then a large one, perhaps the largest in the

;

:

DERRY TOWNSHIP. torate with the presidency of the board of trustees

from 1742

when he was succeeded

to April, 1791,

in

Mr. Elder died July,

the latter by Col. Robert Clark. 1792.

Rev. Nathaniel R. Snowden was called March, He was pastor of Derry, Paxtang, and Harris-

1793.

Mr. Snowden

In 1795 he resigned.

burg.

died in

1850.

Rev. Joshua Williams was called August, 1798, with a salary of one hundred and eighty pounds in In June, 1802, Mr. Williams resigned. time it was the custom to elect the pastor

cash.

Up

to this

president of the corporation consisting of thirteen

After Mr. Williams' pastorate this ceased

trustees.

and laymen were chosen.

An

inscription in the graveyard has the following

" In

memory of James Adair, preacher who departed this life September 20,

of the Gospel,

1803, aged 32 Mr. Adair came to Derry as a " supply" during the vacancy in the pastorate, preaching occasionally from Sept. 20, 1802, until April 7, 1803, when " Paid this appears on the books of the congregation Reverend James Snodgrass for moderating a call for Mr. Adair, £1.10." He does not appear to have accepted this call. He, however, preached seven Sun-

years."

:

days as a supply, when to

Mr. Snodgrass

for

this appears: "

By cash paid

a funeral sermon at Mr. James

Adair's Burial, £1.10.0."

June, 1805, the congregation came together to call fifteen voted for Rev. James Snodgrass, and twenty-six for others. No choice was made. In September another meeting was held. Rev. John Hutchinson was called, twenty-one for, nineteen against. a pastor

;



Mr. Hutchinson declined the

September, 1806, all the members of the congregation united in a call to Rev. James R. Sharon, who had previously been settled at Paxtang. He continued pastor of both concall.

gregations to the time of his death, in 1843. 1843, the following

is

recorded

:

"

By

May

31,

cash paid Mrs.

Sharon, a donation from Derry congregation for the purpose of erecting a tombstone over the remains of the Rev. J. R. Sharon, our late pastor, $100."

April

2,

1844, this entry

:

"

By

Then,

cash paid Mrs. Sha-

ron, being a donation granted by the congregation to Mrs. Sharon, which will appear by reference to the minutes as entered April 24, 1843, $100."

Rev. April

J.

1,

M. Boggs was called March 9, 1844, until when a church dispute between Derry

1847,

and her daughter " over Swatara, on lands of Dr. William Simonton," caused so much feeling that Mr. Boggs was refused compensation, and Presbytery dissolved his relation to Derry June 12, 1849.

415

Rev. Andrew D. Mitchell was chosen pastor by a vote Aug. 11, 1849, the congregation agreeing to pay him two hundred dollars a year for one-fourth of his time. He served as pastor until

unanimous

Aug.

the date of his last receipt for salary.

19, 1874,

The minutes

are missing from 1857 to 1883.

Mr.

Mitchell died in 1882, at Middletown, Dauphin Co.

Thus this congregation has had in one hundred and fifty-four years the following pastors Mr. Bertram, four years; Mr. Elder, fifty years; Mr. Snow:

don, two years

;

Mr. Williams, four years Mr. ShaMr. Boggs, five years; Mr. ;

ron, thirty-seven years;

twenty-five

Mitchell,

years

;

vacancies,

seventeen

years.

Under the charter of March 28, 1787, an organiJohn Elder as president; Robert McCallen, treasurer; Thomas Laird, Jr., secretary; John Rodgers, William Laird, and Robert

zation took place, with Rev.

Clark, trustees.

There

is

no

earlier record

than

this,

except a note "that William Laird, James Wilson,

and Thomas McCallen were appointed to settle accounts with former trustees, John Rodgers, Robert

Jr.,

Clark, and

James Wilson,

been the security

Sr.,"

who

appears to have

for the treasurer of the

previous

organization.

In 1842 the graveyard was carefully and substaninclosed, memorials of sorrow or affection to departed friends " set up and cleaned," iron gates provided, and every mark of respect paid to the retially

mains of the fathers and mothers of a noted race. The wall and yard are to-day in excellent order. The cost to the congregation was six hundred and seventyeight dollars, a very liberal expenditure for a congre-

gation whose income was not five hundred dollars a year.

Aug. 1, 1845, it was agreed that a chapel " for the members beyond the Swatara Creek" should be erected on " land of Dr. William Simonton, on the line of Dr. Simonton and

John

Berst, facing the road

from weatherboarded and plastered. John B. Moorhead and Dr. William Simonton are to superintend, and Mr. Boggs is to give one-sixth of his time" after the building is ready. The chapel was soon finished, and cost four hundred and twenty-five dollars and twenty-nine cents. It was sold about 1860 for three hundred and ten dollars. As has been stated, this " daughter of Derry" was the cause of many disputes before the necessity of the mother church required it to be disposed of. It was not until about 1800 that the exact dimensions of the Penn gift of 1741 were determined. Since that time the glebe has dwindled to less than a dozen of acres.

Swatara

to Corbett's Mill," to be

" Capt.

HUMMELSTOWN BOROUGH. In the year 1738 there was warranted to Valentine Gloninger one hundred and fifty acres of land on the Swatara. In 1761 this right was purchased by John settlers in that region,

Campbell, one of the earliest

who the year following sold to Frederick Hummel. The same year the latter laid out the tract into town The lots sold lots, naming the place Fredericktown. freely, and one of the earliest purchasers was Anthony Doebler, of Lebanon, who bought a lot on Market Street in January, 1763, within a month after the lots were for sale. That lot is described as being along " another lot taken up by Adam Hurshey." Doebler agreed to pay a yearly rent for the fee of ten shillings sterling (about two dollars and a half of our present money), "one shilling sterling of which sum was to be paid yearly forever for the use of a German Lutheran Church intended to be erected," the purchaser further binding himself to erect a substantial house eighteen by twenty feet " at least" on the premises. No time for the fulfillment of this condition is fixed. It

may be

here stated that

founder's death

that

it

the

was not

name

changed from Fredericktown

of

until after the

the town was

to that

bears.

From

in 1771,

and that of Hummelstown,

which

it

now

the assessment-list of Fredericktown, in 1779,

it

will be

seen that in the eight years supervening there was no increase in the number of inhabitants. Whether this

was due to the war which was then going on, and which will account for the absence of either " freemen" or " single men," we cannot say. The absence of the

name Hummel

in the last list

contrast with recent returns.

is

in striking

The Hummels then

re-

sided on the adjoining farm to the town, and are in-

cluded in the other portions of Derry tax-lists. In 1779 it is well known that there were a large number of gunsmiths at

Hummelstown making arms

for the

Continental army. They perchance are also included in the Derry assessment proper.

FREDERICKTOWN, DERRY TOWNSHIP, Peter Shat.

1771.

HUMMELSTOWN, DERRY TOWNSHIP,

1779.

;

HUMMELSTOWN BOROUGH. In some houses the effects were more than in others. The knockers on some of the doors rapped as though they were moved by hands, and in the dwelling of Philip Leebrick a set of china was shaken from a table and broken to pieces. The fright caused many of the people to rise from their The second shock took place five minutes after beds.

Feb.

.

John

F. Probst; 1857-61, A. S. Link;

forty seconds.

to

visible

1861-67, Eli Huber; 1867-73, P. Rizer; July

and

five o'clock,

lasted

about half a minute.

felt in

In both instances a rumbling noise ac-

every house.

earth. Such was the number of them im-

companied the trembling of the fear of the people that a large

mediately

was

It

not as severe as the former, but was sensibly

repaired

meeting-house,

the

to

where

prayers were offered for the preservation of the inhabitants.

The

history, growth,

and prosperity of the town

is

so intimately connected not only with that of the

county but with its local institutions that reference Humto them will be found of value and interest. melstown was incorporated as a borough Aug. 26, 1874, since which period the following have been the chief municipal officers:

BURGESSES. John

1874-76.

Z.

1879-80. George F. Gree

Grove.

1876-78. C. A. Nissley.

W.

1878-79.

j

E. Hendricks.

I

1880-81. Dr. J. B. Crist. 1881. Dr.

H. B. Rupp.

TOWN CLERKS. 1874-81. Franklin Smith.

|

Zion's Evangelical

John

1881.

edifice, a log structure,

The church

16, 1766.

ing-house and

Bolton.

Lutheran Church. —This

congregation was organized in

church

J.

1765, and the was completed

first

May

receipts for building the meet-

1,

1857,

to 1877, P. S.

Mack

417

;

July

1,

1877, J.

1,

1873,

H. Leeser, the

present incumbent.

From 1795 to 1804 the congregation had no minister. Reformed Church. — As heretofore stated, when the town was laid out in 1762 by Frederick Hummel, Reformed congregation, on church is now erected. The first church edifice was a log structure, built by the Lutheran and Reformed congregations jointly, and which was burned in December, 1817. Before 1808 there are no records to show who the pastors or church officials were. Rev. Philip Gloninger, of Harrisburg, served the congregation from 1808 to 1824. Under his pastoral care the elders were Peter Heffelfinger, Sr., and Henry Seig Deacons, Jacob Duey, Sr., and Samuel Brightbill. His successor was Rev. Joseph La Ross, who married here Miss Elizabeth Earnest, and after several years' faithful ministry removed to Bloomsburg, Columbia Co. He was followed by Rev. Samuel Seibert, who continued some years, and resigned in favor of Rev. Daniel Bossier, who preached for some seventeen years every four weeks in German. He was succeeded in 1853 by Rev. D. G. Heisler, who continued until 1856. The" religious services up to 1853 were conducted in the German language only, but after that, under Rev. Mr. Heisler, were alternately in English and German. Up to 1855 the congregation worshiped in the Lutheran Church, first in the log edifice burned in 1817, and afterwards he

set apart a lot to the

wlfich

its

;

in the stone building erected in 1815-16.

In 1855,

the Lutherans having decided to remodel their church

other purposes from 1765 to 1768

edifice,

the Reformed congregation was compelled to

and the expenditures £127 2s. 4d. The original building stood some twenty or thirty feet edifice, and was destroyed by fire in present from the December, 1817. David Eckstein was the parochial schoolmaster from 1792 to 1805, and kept school in the old log church. The present stone church was erected in 1815 and 1816 and remodeled in 1855, making it now one of the most attractive church All that can be learned from edifices in the county.

vacate,

and removed temporarily to what was then as the Middle school-house. On the 8th of

were £140

18s.

all 6rf.,

the few fragments

left

of

its

early history

is

that Maj.

Frederick Hummel was the chief member of the building committee, and that Rev. Michael Enterline served the church as pastor until 1780, and during

administration baptized seventy-one children, confirmed eighteen catechumens, and administered the communion to one hundred and forty-eight per-

his

sons.

The

terline

;

April

pastors have been

:

1771-81, Michael En-

1781-95, William Kurtz

April 15, 1804, to 1807, John Frederick Ernst; April 5, 1807,

5,

June June 23,

to

23,

1811,

;

John Paul Ferdinand Kramer; John Henry Vanhof Rudolph Denime;

1811, to June, 1819,

June, 1819, to Oct. 6, 1822, Charles

Oct. 6, 1822, to Dec. 5, 1830, Peter Scheurer; Dec. 5, 1830, to Oct. 27, 1854, 1854, to

Nov.

27

1,

Henry G. Stecher;

1856, George Haines;

Nov.

Oct. 27, 1,

1856,

known

January, 1855,

resolved to erect a church edifice,

it

the corner-stone of which was laid in the following

May by

Rev. Mr. Leinbach, Rev. Messrs. Gans, Kremer, and Huster participating in the ceremonies. The dedication occurred Dec. 23, 24, 25, 1855, the officiating ministers being Revs. H. Harbaugh, J. W. Nevin, Daniel Bossier, and others. The original cost of the church was five thousand two hundred

and twenty-one

Rev. D. G. Heisler conpastor, Rev. M. A. Smith, came in December, 1857, and continued until At this time the charge consisted of congre1866. dollars.

tinued until 1857.

The next

known as Shoop's, Wenrich's, Union Deposit, and Hummelstown, with preaching here every two

gations

weeks.

The next pastor, Rev. Samuel Kuhn, came in the spring of 1847, and continued until 1S77, when he resigned. No pastor for some time, preaching being supplied

by

the

of Franklin College. church was made a separate charge, and in May, 1877, Rev. A. R. Bartholomew was installed pastor, who remained until the fall of 1878, when he accepted a call to the Jonestown

During

students

this year the

;;

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY.

418

Church, in Lebanon County. The congregation was then supplied with preaching every two weeks by Rev. J. H. Pennypacker, of Elizabethtown charge, In 1882, Rev. A. S. Stauffer took until Aug. 1, 1879.

belonging to the church were kept was then and subsequently the school was moved from

articles

used,

began

one private house to another until 1820, when a brick house on Front Street was built in a more modern At this period the schools were managed by a style. board of trustees appointed by the commissioners, and this plan was continued until the free schools

1840, the services being held at the residences of dif-

were established

charge.



United Brethren Church. This denomination to have preaching at Hummelstown as early as

members. In 1842 a congregation was formed, Conrad Smith (now deceased) being one of the first and leading members. In 1843 a stone church edifice was erected on the site of the present one, which was built in 1857, the first not being large enough to accommodate the increased membership. Since 1865 the pastors have been: 1865, Rev. Miller (who died) 1865-67, J. M. Kephart; 1867-69, D. 0. Farrell; 1869, Israel Carpenter; 1869-71, Rev. Stehrwalt; 1871-73, John F. Smith 1873-74, Jacob F. Smith 1874-77, C. C. Meily 1877-79, G. A. Loose 1879-81, ;

;

;

E. Light; 1881-82, Thomas Garland. Methodist Episcopal Church. Hummelstown



Station was formed out of

Dauphin

Circuit in 1857.

Since then the pastors have been 1857, William B. Gregg; 1858, C. L. Stineman 1859, Gideon J. Barr; :

;

John C. Gregg 1861-63, Jacob Slichter 1863, Sypherd 1864-66, M. Barnhill 1866-69, F. M. Brady 1869-72, L. Hubbs 1872, E. Potts 1873-76, 1876-79, Richard Raines 1879, J. T. J. M. Gable Gray 1880-82, Jonathan Dungan. In 1852 the congregation was organized as the Dauphin and Hummelstown Mission. The church edifice was built in 1S52 and 1853, and is a neat one-

1860,

;

J. O.

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;



Church of God (Bethel). This congregation was organized in 1874, and for nearly two years serThe church vices were held at the Engine Hall. edifice, a brick structure, was erected in 1876 on South been 1875-77, Railroad Street. The pastors have 1877-79, James McDonald; 1879S. P. Stoneseifer 81, A. Snyder; 1881-82, F. L. Nicodemus. Mr. Nicodemus lives at Palmyra, and preaches there and at :

;

Hummelstown. The first school-house of the town and vicinity was built on Hanover Street about 1764. The ground was donated by Frederick Hummel, the founder of

A one-story house the town, for school purposes. was erected, and a school supported voluntarily by the citizens.

square miles.

The district composed an area of The furniture consisted of desks,

fifty

con-

oak or pine boards, fastened to the walls around the room. Benches were made of rough logs hewn on the one side, and supported by blocks. The building was in use until 1790. It was then sold and converted into a dwelling-house. In the same year the Lutheran Church was selected for school purposes (the school being then taught by Allison Piney), and was occupied as such until it was destroyed by fire in 1819. A small house in which

structed of rough

Press was the

news-

first

paper established in the town, and its first number was issued July 14, 1870. It was a four-page sheet of twenty-four columns, and was published at one dollar per year. Its publisher, Mr. Kersey, was also a surveyor and engineer. Its publication was continued

March 30, 1871, when it was discontinued for want of support. The Hummelstown Sun, a weekly paper, was established and its first number issued Dec. 1, 1871, by W. R. Hendricks and J. W. Stofer, the latter of the

until

Mr. Stofer having the Journal and publish, retired from the Sun, and Mr. Hendricks became its editor and publisher until Middletown Journal.

to edit

April

1,

1875,

when he purchased Mr.

Stofer's inter-

and has continued from that to the present time Its size was its sole editor, publisher, and proprietor. originally four pages and twenty-four columns, changed during the past year to twenty-eight columns. est,

The Hummelstoavn Bank,

;

story frame structure.

in 1837.

The Hummelstown Weekly

ferent

owned by

individuals,

Hummel was

a private institution,

was organized

in 1868.

George

when he was succeeded by the present incumbent, Abner RutherJohn J. Nissley has been the cashier from its ford. formation. The first board of directors was composed of George T. Hummel, Jacob Eberly, John M. Shenk, Abner Rutherford, John H. Balsbaugh, Joseph FarnsT.

ler,

president until 1875,

Dr. Jacob Shope, Christian Landis, Martin Early.

directors in 1882 were Abner Rutherford, Dr. Jacob Shope, John M. Shenk, John Balsbaugh, Joseph Hershey, Judge Isaac Mumma, John H. Balsbaugh, Joseph Louch. The teller was Levi H. Nissley. Citizens' Fire Company, No. 1. The Hummelstown Fire Company was organized Jan. 12, 1819, and remained as such until 1882, when the name was changed to Citizens' Fire Company, No. 1. In January, 1819, the company bought an old engine built in Philadelphia about forty years prior, and which it

The



uses to this date.

Niobe Fire Company, No.

2,

was organized as

early as 1837, but. there are no records, save a bill

found showing it to have been in existence that year. It was Its second engine was brought here in 1850. reorganized first in 1865 and again in 1872, when

John M. Hummel was

elected president.

It

was

in-

corporated July 19, 1879.

Vigilant Fire Company, No. 3, was organized as a stock company in the fall of 1881. It bought an engine of Rumsey & Co., of Seneca Falls, N. Y.

:

:

LONDONDERRY TOWNSHIP. At

the February sessions, 1768, the court taking

into consideration a petition

preferred to

1780. Constable.— James Kelly. Overseers of Poor.

them by

the inhabitants of Derry township setting forth that

Overseer of

the bounds of the said township were very extensive

and the inhabitants thereof labored under several inconveniences by reason thereof, and praying and

large,

Overseers of

boundary

line agreed

upon by

1783. Constable.— George Bell.

Overseers of Overseers of

Along a certain road leading from Conewago thence to Felix Landis, creek, by the widow Hall's senior, at Swatara creek, which said road is to fall into the east part of the said township, and that the said part be known by the name of Londonderry, and that the west part of said township retain the name of Derry. It is considered and ordered by the

Poor.— William Sawers, Mark Worst. Roads.— John Myers, David Foster.

1784. Constable.— Robert McCallen. Overseers of Poor.

;

court that the said township be divided agreeable to

— David Hays.

—Thomas Mitchell, Patrick Hays. Overseers of Roads. — Philip Fishbourn, James Kelly. Overseers of Poor.

the said inhabitants, to wit "

Poor.—William Hunter, John McCallan.

Overseer of Roads.

1782. Constable.— John McCallen.

the said court to divide the said township into two parts, according to a

— Samuel Brodly, Robert Hays.

Roads.— James Sullivan.

1781. Constable.— Dewald Grim.

— Hugh Hamilton, Dewalt Grim. —Chriatly Stoner, David McQueen.

Overseers of Roads.

1785. Constable—James Kelly.

Overseers of Poor.

— John Morrison, Walter Clark. —Jacob Reichard, Robert McCleary.

Overseers of Roads.

The Londonderry returns for 1780 give us the following additional information from that herewith given Mills were in the possession of William Moor, Sr. (2), Christian Snyder (2), and John Tanner. :

the prayer of said petition

;

and that the said part

to

known by the name of Londonderry, and end be known by the name of Derry, which

the east be the west

hereby confirmed to be and remain firm and stable forever, and as such to be entered

said division line

is

of record."

The

reasons for adopting the Quitopahilla Creek,

etc., as

the eastern boundary are stated under the head

Stills

were operated by Jacob Cook

LONDONDERRY TOWNSHIP RETURNS FOR

Acres.

—John Campbell, John Chesnit. Overseers of Roads. — John Sayers, James Forster. Constable. — Christian Stoner. Overseers of Roods. — Christian Taner, David Wray.

Bahn, Jn»., Jim' Balm. W" Be;il, Ludwig, no return

100

Eliot, Archibald Erdv, Jn«, Sen' Erdv, Jn»., J' Erdv, is.'le. John Fliger, Ludwig Fliger, Jn4 188

100 100

James

200 100 392 248

Far lev, Jn«

Mich' Franz, Mich> Faulket, Jos

142 200

W-

100 198 320 145 50

Fl>a. get.

Foster,

Hay, Pavid Hay, W»., Jun' Hay. Patrick Hay, .lames Hay, Matthew Herchbarger, Dan Hunter, W» Hay, W=, Sen' Hunter, Rob' Hunter, David HorsoD, Jn° Hamilton, Hugh Henry, Geo., no return Hemperly, Anthony Hershey, Benj n 1

Hetzler. Balsor Hoarst, Jacob Hess, Sanil

419

50 50 100 100 100 366 200 50 100 100 100

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

420

Acres.

Acres.

Huber, Ludwig Humble, Jn"

200

Hay, Rob' Grove, Jacob

ISO

GO

100

Gran, Cornelius Garret, Jn" Grim, Dewalt Jordan, Geo Johnston, Charles Johnston, Jn" m Johnston, Kernaghan, Jn°

50 70 100 84 80

W

Eman

Kllpatrick,

'.

Prats, Nicholas

Penogle, Martin Peters.

Geo

80

ISO

1

James

Kenishy, Jacob Heaphard, Geo LiDch, Patrick Linnin, Jacob Longenecker, Jacob, no turn Longenecker, Dan ., no turn Longenecker, Abram.no turn Landis, Felix, no return Landis, Jn"., no return Lineweaver, Peter Long, Alex' Logan, .In" Long, Martin, no return McGlaughlin, Barnet 1

15 90 140 re-

Rowan, Widow Reamer, Philip Rhay, David Rhay, Rob' Rhay,Jn°

170 110 60 195 127

Riesor, Peter

127 100 200

Conrad Jacob Rowland, Henry

80 100 40

Riesor,Jn° Riet, Kist,

Shenck, Dewalt Snyder, Cliris"

re-

Shira, Jacob, Sen' Shire, Jacob, J r

re-

McClintock, Joseph Mitchel, David Mitchel. Thomas Moor, William, Sen' Mo.u, William, Jr Mickley, Jacob, Mickley, Jn"

Mrflmiv, Rob' McOallon, Rob' McCallou, Thomas McCallon.Jn" Morrel, Fetrich, no return

Myer.John Archibald McDonald. David Morisun, James Morison, .In" Mc(';. lister,

177

200

141 90

156 30

200 150 100 90 90 135 210 162 144

Shenck, Stophel Stopher, Jacob Stoner, Chris" Shultz, Detrich Sulivan, James Sawers, Benj™ Sawers, Jn" Shirtz,

Mitchel, Abram Nafshoe, Jacob, no return Nafshoe, Jos

25

300 600

Mich

Stwick, Chris

Cordwino Shaw, W" Simouton, W"> Stwick, Jn°, no return

Sick. Paul

Stickley, JnSborckly, Jn", no return

Schenck, Mich

64

50

re-

black-oak-tree on the eastern bank of the Swatara

Creek, at the

mouth of Stickler's Run

;

thence a

due east course seven miles and one hundred and twenty perches to the Lebanon County line, at the farm of Jacob Longnecker." The court confirmed this report on the 21st of January, 1826, and gave to the northern section the name of Derry, and to the southern division the name of Londonderry. (See Road Docket A, page 13.) Since that period the township has been limited in its dimensions by the erection of the township of Conewago. The township is bounded on the east by Conewago township on the south by Conewago Creek, which separates it from Lancaster County; on the west by the Susquehanna River and the Swatara Creek, which separates it from Lower Swatara township and on the north by Derry township. It covers an extensive area, but there are few villages of any ;

importance,

— Port .Royal, noticed

in

the history of

Middletown, being the most prominent. About 1811 or 1812, Gainsburg, and also called Franklin, was laid out by Conrad Grim, John Fulweiler, and John C. Kramer. It was a venture of the speculative era in our State history,

was a mania

no return Tavlor, Francis, no return 1

for

building

when there

turnpikes and erecting

.,

towns every four or

Teets, Philip

Tanner, Chris", no return Tanner. Jn" Wolf, Mich Walker. Archibald Wiltmore, Ulry, no return Worst, Mark Wolf, Conrad

Wishan. Conrad Wear, Sam White, Jn« Fox, James Kernaghan, James 1

140

44 25

107

1

1

300 253 100 100

200 100

Wm

Sawers,

who made

;

Riterbach, Peter, no return

McQueen, Josiah McQueen, Rob' McQueen, David

Nigh, Adam Nigh, Nicholas, no return

Poorman. Peter Pennal, James

quire into the propriety of a division,

port in favor of a division by a line " Beginning at a 100 100 250 200 150

Plough, Jacob, no return Painter, Jn"

Eillinger, Geo., no return Keatrin, Fettigh, no return. ... Kelly, James 250 Kelly, Patrick 30 Kennedy, .In" 47

Kenrigb,

Wm, no return Null, Geo Null, Chris" Over, John Over, Peter O'Neal, Jn» Painter, Ilanliu Nigh,

five miles

along their route, the

farmers selling their broad acres and investing their 100 180

hard cash in town lots. This was well calculated to overdo the town business and hurry on a financial

130 104 150 300

only houses

Gainsburg did not survive its fledgeling, the now in the locality having been erected

crash.

by the present generation.

The Conewago Presbyterian Church located a earliest

Freemen.

little

was was one of the Scotch-Irish neighborhood.

east of Gainsburg.

churches of this

It

Christopher Keatly.

Ludwig Fishborn.

A

Jos. Faruey.

Fred'. Buck.

Jacob Longenecker. Martin Miller.

year the Rev. Samuel Black was their regular min-

Ane". Wallus.

Anthony

ister.

Henry Stafford. Dan Plough.

Geo. Gega.

log building was erected prior to 1741, for in that

The land

W». Hunter.

Jn". Fraua.

is contiguous or rather inclosed by a two hundred and two and five-eighths acres, which James Clark held by a warrant from the landoffice dated Aug. 1, 1743. Samuel Clark conveyed it by an indenture Feb. 23, 1775, to William Braden, of Derry township. The land was afterwards patented to Robert Spear by patent deed Nov. 8, 1785, and was called " Spear's Choice," and called for 202| acres and the usual allowance. The patent was enrolled in rolls-office, in Patent Book No. 4, page 99,

John Weary. Wendle Henry.

Jn". Leach.

etc.

1

.

Abrani Stickley.

Tera.

Jn". Smith.

Thompson.

Robert M. Cleary.

Jn°.

And". Foster. James Donnal.

Geo. Henry.

James Kennady.

Rob'. Allen.

Jos. Brosh.

Jn°. Gibb.

Jn". Farmer.

Mich Keatrin. James Hughey.

Jn°. Shoemaker.

W»,

Everhart Keatrin.

As

tract of

Jn». Nigh.

1

.

Hall.

Jn». Link.

Jn».

Hay.

previously stated, between the year 1813,

The

draft, will

when

the erection of Lebanon County cut off a large portion of Londonderry township, and the year 1825, some proceedings were had in the Quarter Sessions to remodel the townships of Derry and Londonderry, none of which, however, seemed to have received the At November term, final sanction of the court.

1825, the court appointed three commissioners to in-

"

following

explain

Resurveyed

for

memorandum, accompanying

Robert Spear, August

of land, containing two

a

itself; 18, 1785,

the above tract

hundred and two acres and five-eighths and

allowances, situate in Derry townBhip, Dauphin County, late Lancaster,

by warrant granted to James Clark 28tb of July, 1743.

"Signed

"N.B.

The above square pieco

Bertram Galbraith.

of nineteen by twenty perches

is

a

Presbyterian meeting-house and burying-grounds.

"To John Lukens,

S. G.

"Returned into the Land-Office the third November, 1785, for John Edward Lynch." S. G.

Lukens, Esq.,

;

CONEWAGO TOWNSHIP. Robert Spear assigned his patent to Robert ColeSept. 21, 1784, William Braden conveyed it to Robert Spear; and John Spear, Nov. 5, 1804, transferred it to Robert Coleman, the asssignee of Robert Spear of the patent. Robert Coleman sold it, June 15, 1818, to Robert Dempsey, whose administrator, Jacob Redsecker, on April 13, 1831, conveyed it to John Conrad. The latter's administrator, Henry Fisher, sold it, June 16, 1841;, to John Fisher, who, March 11, 1842, conveyed it to George Hess. John B. Coleman, Feb. 24, 1830, conveyed his interest in it to Samuel Hoffer, who in turn transferred to George Hess April 8, 1842, making the latter the owner in fee. George Hess conveyed it, April 4, 1868, to

man

;

Abraham

who

Rutt,

in

April,

Olwine, the present owner.

1875, sold to

John

church lot is in the midst of a farm, repeatedly sold and transferred as land. The title, however, to the old graveyard is by law vested in the Presbytery of Carlisle, who should take charge of it and have it properly inclosed. What has been supposed to have been a church foundation is a dilapidated wall, inclosing the burial-place of some important families. There is no inscriptive stone to tell what it really was. It is about ten by twelve feet. Clearly there is no mark of a church at this spot. What is very remarkable, So, this old

there

is

421

not a tombstone, or part of one, with any

inscription in the mass of fragments of such

The

memo-

which surround the family inclosure spoken

rials

of.

stones are of the red sandstone of the neighbor-



ing hills, many of them free from all evidence of manual adornment, weatherbeaten as well as rough. Islands in the Susquehanna. Several very important islands in the Susquehanna are included In the days when the in Londonderry township. shad fisheries of the Susquehanna were productive and valuable, these islands were considered the





The

choicest fishing-rights on the river.

principal

ones are Shelly's, nearest the York County shore

and Hill Island north, nearly opHill Island posite the mouth of the Swatara Creek. Elliott's, east

is

of

it;

noted for being the place whence, during the Milexcitement of 1844, a score of firm believers

lerite

assembled, expecting from thence to be translated After enduring the severe weather of

heavenward.

that lonely night on Hill Island, the

morning dawn

not bringing the expected millennium, the converts

way home, wiser than before. and the adjoining island have recently become favorite tobacco ground, the richness and peculiarity of the soil admirably adapting them for tobacco wended

their

Shelly's

culture.

CONEWAGO TOWNSHIP. This township was organized by an bly approved April

and

2,

1850,

act of Assemwhich enacted "that from

after the passage of this act all that part of the

one-fourth miles in length by three and one-half miles in width, and in population one of the smallest

The southern

in the county.

townships of Derry and Londonderry lying within the following boundaries, to wit Beginning at the

ewago Creek

Conewago Creek, the line of the counties of Dauphin and Lancaster, at the place where Brill's Run empties into said creek and from thence by a straight line

towards the creek.

:

;

running parallel with the line dividing the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon to a point that by running a straight line from said point at a right angle with the aforesaid parallel said straight line will intersect

Dauphin and Lebanon more than one-half of a mile north of the Mennonite meeting-house at or near said county line and from thence along the line of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon to the line of the county of Lancaster; and from thence down said line to place the said line of the counties of at a point not

;

of beginning, shall hereafter form a separate election district and township, and shall be called Conewago," etc.

its

portion along the Con-

a beautiful plain, which gradually northern margin, the granite ridge,

It has good pasture meadows and There are sections of the township, however, much broken by rocky elevations, but even here and there between these are often rich fields and fine farms.

farms.

In the northwestern part are the sand-hills,

which culminate in a few prominent spurs belonging to that system of which the Round Top in Londonderry is the most striking. Beautiful springs gush out of these hillsides, and as the early settlers built near running water, some of the oldest farms are in this locality.



Indian implements are frequently found, tomahawks, axes, and arrow-heads. Two hominy-stones, capable of holding a peck, are in existence, having been preserved, one in the possession of Cyrus G. Shenk, who has it in use at his barn another on the adjoining farm. A curious stone of this C shape has been found. In this locality traces are to be seen of a



;

The township was forms

slopes from

is

its

so

named

for the creek

entire southern boundary.

which and

It is four

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

422

Shortly after Templeton came another

high fence surrounding a plot of ground, erected by the Indians for entrapping deer. Among the early settlers in the neighborhood were

small room.

Christopher Shoop, John Buchs, Leonard Wallers,

were generally kept at private Abraham Snyder and others of the earlier days, and those of Rev. Speck, Samuel Hoffer, Joseph Clark,

Rev. John Roan, Robert Carothers, and David JohnThe tract of land which Moses Potts had surson. veyed to him March 29, 1755, he sold to Michael Shenk in 1770. The Hoffers came about 1800. Other families about the same period, if not earlier, were in the locality, the Longeneckers, Rissers, Grubbs,



Lehmans,

etc.

In 1799, Goss' mill, which has also

connected with it a saw-mill, was erected. On the farms of John Risser and Benjamin Longenecker were distilleries about the year 1780. Risser's mill

was built in 1770, and Redsecker's in 1776. There are three churches within the township limits. The Meuuonite meeting-house, near the Derry line, on the northeast, was built about 1780; the Brethren's Church in 1S54, and the Union meeting-house in 1869.

The

first

under large

schools were taught by the church minister trees during favorable

weather and at such

other places as opportunity afforded.

In 1790 there

German. About 1795 an English school was organized where Henry Shenk now resides. It was taught by Stephen Templeton. The one-story log school-house, twelve by sixteen feet, in which Templeton taught

were only

five schools in that section, principally



comprised three rooms, a bed-room, kitchen, and a On each side a portion of a log was left out for a row of window-panes, and it is presumed va-

school-room.

grants did not push up the sash for ingress to lodge,

nor was the teacher troubled to close and open the Some sixty pupils were crowded in this shutters.

school established by a Mr.

McMullen.

These things

when the schools houses. The names of

existed until about the year 1S00,

and the Techtmyers of

later times are intimately con-

For Mennonite

nected with the schools of the neighborhood.

many

years school was taught in the old

meeting-house,

down

to the

adoption of the present

system of education. The township has two villages. Bachmansville, a post-town, is situated in the northeastern part, and

was named

for the

Bachmans, who erected the

buildings of any importance.

first

Its population is less

Mount Harrison, or Foltz's than a hundred. Store, near the centre of the township, is a hamlet of some six or eight houses. It was named Mount Harrison by the Kreiters, who kept store there during the Harrison campaign of 1840. It is beautifully situated on an eminence between Middletown and Colebrook. There are three grist-mills in the township, Red-



secker's,

the southwestern

in

part,

built

in

1776

and

Risser's, in the

southeastern corner, erected in 1769.

In early times

Goss', near the centre, in 1799

they hauled

all their

;

grain to Philadelphia over poor

no accommodation " for man or The teams at night halted by some stream of water, the feeding-trough was fixed upon the wagon-tongue, and there the horses ate and slept, no matter how inclement the weather, the drivers stowing themselves snugly under the wagoncover in the " fuhrmons bet." Four, five, and freroads,

and

little

or

beast" by the way.

quently six horses constituted the team.

HANOVER TOWNSHIP. At February

sessions, 1736-37, a petition

was pre-

sented to the court of Lancaster County stating that

many

of the inhabitants of Derry township, living on Swatara Creek, labored under

the northwest side of the

inconveniences by reason of the largeness of the township, and asking to be divided from the other part thereof, and that their bounds might be as fol" To be divided on the west from Peshtank by Beaver Creek, from its mouth to the mountain from Lebanon on the east and Derry on the south, by Swatara Creek from Beaver Creek mouth to the forks, and thence by the north branch thereof to the mountain which was allowed by the court and ordered to be recorded, and that the said towuship be called Hanover." The boundaries of this township (so

lows

:

;

;

named

for the

House of Hanover)

as originally laid

and therefore cannot easily be mistaken, but there is an evident mistake in stating the petitioners to be inhabitants of Derry township, residing northwest of the Swatara Creek, and that their prayer was for a division of Derry township. A glance at the boundaries of Derry will show that there was no part of that township on the northwest side of Swatara Creek, and the division lines asked for and granted did not touch upon the territory at all. The mistake is not of any practical importance, but seems evident that the petition was from inhabitants of Peshtank, and for a division of that township. Hanover, as thus laid off, embraced parts of what was before Peshtank and Lebanon townships.

out are

all

natural,

:

HANOVER TOWNSHIP. During the years 1768

made

1775 frequent efforts were township of Hanover, those

to

for a division of the

end favoring a division, those in the west The war of the Revolution opening, the question was not mooted until the efforts were being made for the erection of the new county of Dauphin. The matter was brought to the attention of the court at Lancaster at the February sessions, 1785, from which we take the following record in the east

end

in opposition.

"The

court, taking into consideration the limits of

the township of

Hanover and great

difficulties

of the

several officers therein in discharging their respective

on due consideration and advisement, do diby a small stream of water running through the same, which is called the West Branch of Priest's Run, and rises on the lands of Philip Rank, and from thence by the said stream or run of water until it empties itself into Swatara Creek at Michael Brown's mill and do further denominate that division which is next to Jonestown by the name of East Hanover, and the other division thereof by the name of West Hanover." The stream of water called Priest's Run in the foregoing record is not found by that name on Thomas Smith's map, nor is any one now living in that section of the county who knows of a stream by that name; but from the best information which has been obtained, that marked on Smith's map, and now generally known as Raccoon Creek, was the dividing line between East and West Hanover townships down to the year 1813, when Lebanon County was taken from Dauphin, the northwest line of which runs in the neighborhood of Raccoon Creek, and, indeed, the head of that creek is made one of the points of that line, and the running of that line so near the dividing line of East and West Hanover townships made it of hut little practical importance where the separating line of the two townships was it may, however, be assumed with reasonable certainty that Raccoon Creek was the line. There is another question which it seems proper duties,

rect a division thereof

;

;

and

in place here to refer to, it is as to the true boundary on the north of East and West Hanover townships. In point of what may be called practice, it seems those townships were held to extend to the

Second Mountain

from an early day. If the records are consulted it by no means is certain that the practice was in accordance with them, or that there was any authority, until a later day, for supposing those townships extended beyond the First Mountain, other than long usage. When the township of Paxtang was erected, in 1729, it extended from Swatara Creek to Kohtohtoning Hill, above Peter Allen's where Peter Allen's was, or whether the First Mountain of the range was the only one known by the name of Kohtohtoning, it is now impossible to know. The probability is that start from below and running up the river, if it liad been intended to pass the First Mountain and adopt the ;

at least

423

it would have been so stated this, however, is but conjecture. The next matter of record bearing on the question occurs when Hanover township was erected in 1737. Beaver Creek, from its mouth to the mountain, was made the dividing line between Han-

Second,

;

over and Peshtank.

Beaver Creek had

its

source at

the southern base of the First Mountain, and the diIt should have been stated before, when referring to the boundaries of Peshtank, that when the Kohtohtoning Hill was reached, the line ran eastward by the south side of said hill to the meridian of the mouth of Quitopa-

vision line was extended no farther.

Again, in the year 1767, the court or-

hilla Creek.

Lower mouth of

dered the division line between Upper and

Paxtang townships Fishing Creek Mountain, next

to

be

made from

" the

thence along the top of Kittatinia

;

Lower Paxtamj, to Beaver Creek." Hanover township was divided into east and west in the year 1785 the dividing line was a run, having its to

;

source on the south side of the First Mountain.

In

Peshtank and extending beyond

this case, like that of the division of

Hanover, the record provides no

The

the First Mountain.

line

practice of treating the ter-

between the First and Second Mountains as

ritory

within the Hanovers probably originated soon after the organization of

The

Dauphin County,

in the year 1785.

question whether East Hanover township ex-

tended beyond the First Mountain in the year 1796 trial of the case of Gloninger vs. God-

occurred in the dard, in the

which

is

Common

Pleas of Lebanon County, and

reported in 5th Watts, 221.

The under-

standing and practice before mentioned was fully proved on that trial in the Supreme Court, however, ;

although it was not thought necessary to the question, the judge who delivered the opinion of the court clearly intimated that the records showed the First Mountain to be the true boundary. This question and these matters relating to it are here merely referred to as a part of the history of township boundaries, and not to be understood as suggesting any existing culty

;

incidentally the Second

the record line of

diffi-

Mountain has become

West Hanover,

as

may

be seen on

reference to the records establishing the township of

Rush

in 1820,

and the division of West Hanover town-

Dauphin County. The assessment lists up to the formation of the county of Dauphin were designated as East and West End of Hanover. Those for the East End we have

ship in 1842, both in

given with the history of Lebanon County, the whole of which probably

fell

into that county

upon

its

erec-

tion in 1813.

Hanover township suffered severely in the French and Indian war, and many are the incidents of pioneer life which have come down to us. In the " Barnetts of Hanover" reference is made to Joseph Barnett and his son, William, giving the statement as it came to us from the late Samuel Barnett, of Springfield. Ohio. The following detail, however, differs somewhat from that there given.

;

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

424

The Barnetts and

their

immediate neighbors erected

a savage people, exposed to cold and hunger, and subwanton cruelty? who can tell of their

a block-house in proximity to Col. Green's mill, on

ject to their

the Manada, for the better safety of their wives and

through weary months and years their fervent prayers, their bitter tears, and enfeebled health? The prospect of a treaty with the Indians, with the return of prisoners, at length brought a gleam of joy

children, while they cultivated their farms in groups,

one or two standing as sentinels. In the year 1757 there was at work on the farm of Mr. Barnett a small group, one of which was an estimable man named Mackey. News came with flying speed that their wives and children were all murdered at the blockhouse by the Indians. Preparation was made immeWhile Mr. diately to repair to the scene of horror. Barnett with all possible haste was getting ready his horse, he requested Mackey to examine his rifle to Everything right they all see that it was in order. mounted their horses, the rifle in hand, and galloped taking a near way to the block-house. A party of Indians lying in ambush rose and fired at Mr. Barnett, who was foremost, and broke his right arm. His off,

rifle

dropped; an Indian snatched

Mackey through

the heart.

it

He fell

up and shot Mr.

dead at their

feet,

and one secured his scalp. Mr. Barnett's father, who was in the rear of his company, turned back, but was pursued by the Indians, and narrowly escaped with his life. In the mean time Mr. Barnett's noble and highspirited horse, which the Indians greatly wished to poscarried him swiftly out of the enemy's reach, but becoming weak and faint from the loss of blood, he fell to the ground and lay for a considerable time unable to rise. At length by a great effort he crept to a buckwheat-field, where he concealed himself until the Indians had retired from the immediate vicinity, and then raising a signal he was soon perceived by a neighbor, who, after hesitating for some time for fear of the Indians, came to his relief. Surgical aid was procured, and his broken arm was bound up, but the anxiety of his mind respecting his family was a heavy burden which agonized his soul, and not until the next day did he hear that they were safe, with the sess,

exception of his eldest son, then eight or nine years whom the Indians had taken prisoner, together

of age,

with a son of Mackey's about the same age.

sleepless nights, the anxious days, prolonged

long,

'?

to the stricken hearts of these parents.

Mr. Barnett Col.

left his

Croghan and a body of

who were

Accordingly,

family behind and set off with five

hundred

" regulars"

destined to Fort Pitt for that purpose.

Their baggage and provisions conveyed on packhorses, they made their way over the mountains with the greatest difficulty. When they arrived at their place of destination, Col. Croghan

made

quiry concerning the fate of the

captives.

little

strict in-

After

much fruitless search, he was informed that a squaw who had lost a son had adopted the son of Mr. Barnett

and was very unwilling

to part

with him, and he,

believing his father had been killed by the Indians,

had become reconciled

to his fate,

and was much

at-

tached to his Indian mother. Mr. Barnett remained with the troops for some

time without obtaining or even seeing his son. Fears began to be entertained at Fort Pitt of starvation.

Surrounded by multitudes of savages, there seemed little prospect of relief, and to add to their despondency a scouting party returned with the distressing news that the expected provisions which were on the way to their relief was taken by the Indians. They almost despaired, five hundred men in a picket fort on the wild banks of the Allegheny Eiver without provisions The thought was dreadful. They became reduced to one milch cow each day for five days The killed and divided among the five hundred. To their great three following days they had nothing joy, on the evening of the third, provisions arrived every sunken, pale, despairing countenance gathered brightness, but owing to its imprudent use, which



!

.'

the officers could not prevent,

many died. many were

The

While the

savages on learning that one of their captives was a son of Mackey whom they had just killed, compelled

the Indians,

him

water from Grant's Spring (this spring is near Grant Street, in the city of Pittsburgh, known to most of the older inhabitants); he took his "camp-kettle" and proceeded a few steps, when he suddenly thought the adventure might cost him his life and turned back

to stretch his father's scalp,

and

this heartrend-

he was obliged to perform in mangled body of his father. The Indians escaped with the two boys westward, and for a time Mackey's son carried his father's scalp, which he would often stroke with his little hand and

ing, soul-sickening office

sight of the

say, "

My

father's pretty hair."

Mr. Barnett lay languishing on a sick-bed, his case doubtful for a length of time, but having a strong constitution he at last, through the blessing of God, revived, losing about four inches of a bone near the elbow of his right arm. But who can tell the intense feeling of bitterness which filled the mind and absorbed the thoughts of him and his tender, sensitive companion, their beloved child traversing the wilderness, a prisoner with

the

fort.

treaty was pending

who One day Mr. Barnett wished

killed

by

were continually prowling around a drink of

;

immediately he heard the report of a rifle, and looking towards the spring he saw the smoke of the same, the unerring aim of an Indian had deprived a sol-



life. They bore away his scalp, and his body was deposited on the bank of the Allegheny. The treaty was concluded and ratified by the parties nevertheless great caution was necessary on the

dier of

;

part of the whites, knowing the treachery of

many

of

their foes.

Mr. Barnett was most unhappy. His hopes concerning his child had not been realized, and he had

HANOVER TOWNSHIP. been absent from his family already too long. Soon guard with the pack-horses started to cross the mountains, and he after the conclusion of the treaty a

gladly embraced the opportunity of a safe return.

After injunctions laid upon Col. Croghan to purchase,

he bade him and his associates in and after a toilsome journey reached home and embraced once more his family, who were joyful at his return. But the vacancy ocif possible, his son,

hardships

farewell,

its members still them that William was alive, grief* wiped away the tears from the wife, and expressed a prayerful hope

casioned by the absence of one of

remained.

He

soothed their

cheeks of his

told

that through the interposition of a kind Providence

he would eventually be restored to them. Faithful to his promise, Col. Croghan used every

endeavor

to obtain

At

him.

length, through the in-

He was brought to Fort Pitt, and for want of an opportunity to send him to his father was retained under strict guard, so great was his inclination to return to savage life. On one occasion he sprang down the bank of the Allegheny River, jumped into a canoe, and was midway in the stream before he was observed. He was quickly pursued, but reached the opposite shore, raised the Indian whoop,'and hid himself among the bushes. After several hours' pursuit he was retaken and brought back to the fort. Soon after, an opportunity offering, he was sent to Carlisle. His father, having business at that place, arrived after dark on the same day, and without knowing took lodgings at the same public-house where his son was, and who had been some time in bed. As soon as he was aware of the fact he asked eagerly to see him. The landlord entreated him to let the boy rest until morning, as he was much wearied by traveling. To this the father could not assent, replying, " If a son of yours had been absent for three years could you rest under the same roof without seeing him '?" The hardy host felt the appeal and led the way to the chamber. The sleeping boy was awakened and told that his father stood by his bed. He replied in broken English, strumentality of traders, he was successful.

"

No my

At

father."

saying, "William, father."

On

my

this

moment

son, look at

his father spoke,

me:

I

am your

hearing his voice and seeing his face he

sprang from the bed, clasped him in his arms, and shouted, "

My

father

!

My father

is still

alive !"

All

the spectators shed tears, the father wept like a child,

while from his lips flowed thankful expressions of gratitude to the Almighty disposer of all events that

was again restored. Early the next day the father and son were on the road homewards, where they arrived on the second day in the dusk of the evening. The rattling of the his long-lost child

wheels announced their approach all

the children

came

forth.

;

the mother and

She, whose frequent

425

him led by his father and presented to her, the partner of her sorrows. She caught him to her bosom and held him long in her embrace, while tears of joy flowed. His brothers and sisters clustered eagerly around and welcomed him with a kiss of affection. It was a scene of deep feeling not to be described, and known only to those who have been in similar circumstances. The happy family, all once more beneath the parental roof, knelt down and united in thanksgiving to Almighty God for all His mercies to them in protecting and restoring to their arms a beloved and long-absent child. The children scrutinized him with curiosity and amazement. Dressed in Indian costume, composed of a breech-cloth around the waist, with moccasins and leggins, his hair about three inches long and standing erect, he presented a strange appearance.

By degrees he

laid aside the dress of the wilderness,

which he greatly preferred, forgot the Indian language, and became reconciled to his native home. But the rude treatment which he received from the Indians impaired his constitution. They frequently broke holes in the ice on rivers and creeks and dipped him in order to make him hardy, which his feeble system could not endure without injury. Respecting the son of Mackey, he was given by "the

Indians to the French, and passed into the hands of the English, and was taken to England,

came

as a time of the Revolutionary war. He procured a furlough from his officers and sought out his widowed mother,

soldier in the British

who was

to

America

at the

living, and who had long mourned him She could not recognize him after the lapse

still

as dead.

of so

army

many

years.

He stood

before her, a robust, fine-

looking man, in whom she could see no familiar traces of her lost boy. He called her " mother," and told her he was her son, which she did not believe.

!

'

;

He

prayers had heretofore been addressed to the Throne

shall separate us but death."

of Divine Grace for the safety and return of her son,

the British army, but remained with his

now trembled and was almost overcome

contributed to her support in her declining years.

as she beheld

" If

you are my son," said she, " you have a mark upon your knee that I will know." His knee was exposed to her view, and she instantly exclaimed, "My son indeed !" Half frantic with joy, she threw her arms around his neck, and was clasped in those of her son. " Oh, my son," said she, " I thought you were dead, but God has preserved you and given me this happiness. Thanks, thanks to his name Through long years 1 have mourned that sorrowful day which bereft me of my husband and child. I have wept in secret till grief has nearly consumed me, till my heart grew sick and my poor brain almost crazed by the remembrance. I have become old more through sorrow than years, but I have endeavored to kiss the rod' which chastised me. My afflictions have not been sent in vain, they have had their subduing and purifying effect heaven became more attractive as earth became dark and desolate. But I now feel that I shall yet see earthly happiness. Nothing in this world, my son, never returned

to

mother and

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

426

There was another interesting meeting, that of the son of Mr. Barnett. They recapitulated the scenes of hardship through which they passed while together with the Indians, which were

1774. Constable.

upon the memory of both.

indelibly impressed

presented a great contrast in appearance,

They

— Barnett a

man, and Mackey the reverse. The former sank into an early grave, leaving a wife and daughter. The daughter married a Mr. Franks, who subsequently removed to the city of New York. Mr. Barnett, the elder, after experiencing a great sorrow in the loss of his wife, removed to Allegheny County, spending his remaining days with a widowed daughter. He died in November, 1808, aged eightytwo years, trusting in the merits of a Divine Providence. His eventful and checkered life was a life of always praying for the sanctified use of his His dust reposes in the trials, which were many. little churchyard of Lebanon, Mifflin township, Al-

legheny Co. In 1768 a movement was put on foot to divide the township, and again the year following. Prior to

1775. Constable.

From

Roads.— Daniel Musser, William Kithcart.

Overseers of

1776. Constables.— Edward Tute, Joseph Overseers

of Poor.

Wright, John Winter.

1777. Constable.— Edward Tate.

1778. Constable.— James McMillan.

—Josiah Espy, James Willson. — Joseph Crane, Francis Alberdele. —James Stewart. Overseers of Poor. — Richard Dearmond, Abraham Latcha. Overseers of Roads. — James Porter, James Young. Constable. — James Porter. Overseers of Poor. —James Robertson, Kilian Long. Overseers of Roads. — John Hooper, Henry Shuey.

Overseers of Poor.

Overseers of Roads.

1779. Constable.

1780.

1781. Constable.— Robert Caldwell.

Poor.— Josiah Parks, William Robinson. John French, Josiah Espy. Thompson. Overseers of Poor. John Rodgers, Daniel Bradley. Overseers of Roads. Richard Dearmond, Abraham Latcha. 1783. Constable.—James Wilson. Overseers of Poor. Robert Hill, James Young. Overseers of Roads— William Young, John Cooper. 1784. Constable— John Winter, Sr. Overseers of

Overseers of Roads.



1782. Constable.— John

— — —

Overseers of Poor.

that period until the erection of the

Overseers of

— Robert Sturgeon, ThomaB Hunn.

Roads.— Thomas McCord, William Stewart.

1785. Constable— John Winter, Jr.

county in 1785 we have gathered the following:

Overseer of Poor. 1769.

McGuire.

—John Graham, Abraham Hooblor.

Roads— William

Overseers of

1759 no records have been found giving the township officers.

Poor.— Peter Walmer, William McClure.

— Thomas Robinson, David Priest. — James Low. Overseers of Poor. — George Tittle, Joseph Hutchason. Overseers of Roads.

pale, delicate

faith,

— John Youard.

Overseers of

Mackey with

Constable— Samuel Sterret.

Overseer of



—James Young.

Roads— George

Tittle.

of Roads. Robert Snodgrass, William Thompson. 1760. Constable.—John Brown. Overseers

Overseers of Poor.

— Walter McFarling.

The only complete

Hugh Rippy.

1761. Constable.— Robert Snodgrass.

that for 1781.

— Anthony McCreight, James Willsou. Overseers of Roads. —William Allen, Jacob Toops.

Overseers of Poor.

Overseers of Poor.

ship of East and fore referable to

Walnian.

1762. Constable.— Peter

—John Andrew,

Overseers of floods.

—James Young. Overseers of Poor. — John Gilliland, James McClelihan. Overseers of Roads. — John Dixon, William Young. —John Young, John

Roads.—James Willson, George Tittle. McClure. Overseers of Poor. John Hill, John Forster. Overseers of Roads. Joseph Allen, Walter McFarland.

— —

there-

Brandon,



Brown, Sam Allen

(West End). 1768. Constable— John Hill.

— Jacob Stover, Joseph Barnett. Overseers of Roads. — Peter Walmer, Joseph Hutchison. Overseers of Poor.

1

Beaker, Jn°

Brown, And" Brown, William Brown, Jn»., Jun* Bell, Samuel Bachmau, Michl Bumgardner, Philip

Brunner.

Hume.

Bradly, Dan'

135%

Bumgarner, Baltzor Brown, Jn°

Poor.— Arnold Sherts, Thomas Robinson. Overseers of Roads— William Robinson, James Todd. 1771. Constable.— William Cooper. Overseers of Poor.— John Toups, William Cincarte. Overseers of Roads.— James Wilson, John Tibbin, Jr. 1772. Omalaoh.—William Brown. Overseers of Poor.— Joseph Crean, Thomas Hume. Overseers of Roads.— Peter Eversole, Adam Harper. Overseers of

60 150 130 130 62 160 176 125 260 100 300 220 100 200 100

1773. Constable.— Joseph McQnire.

of Poor.— Benjamin Wallace, Andrew Carverock. Roads.— Matthias Poor, James Robinson.

Brightbill, Jn« Brightbill, Peter Bell,

Boge,

Robert

Andrew

Crain, Jos Crain, W"Crafford, Elizabeth Cathcart, Crain, Geo Caldwell, David Caldwell, James



Calboun, James Cooper, Andrew Cooper, Jn» Oraford, Richard

111% 212

187

Cimmeruian,Jn° Cunningham, John Crain, Ambrose fallible, John Clark, Benjamin Countrim, John

150 210 100 208 318 150 120 200 232 200 102 100 135 212



Dearmond, Richard

8

Bumgarner, Jn°

Boal, Robert

1769. Constable.— Benjamin Clark.

166 300

Caldwell, Rob'

Carpenter, Carvery, And"

200 140 140 150 150 100 100 136 120 242 100

Acres.

Cook, Jacob, Esq'

Craige, Jn°

80

Barnet, Jos

—William Brown, Adam Harper. — William Stuart (East End), Samuel

Overseers of Roads.

Overseers of

150 240 150

Beal, Peter

1767. Constable.—John Dixon.

Overseers

160%

Brand, Philip Beard, James Brown, Michael

Andrew, James

Overseers of

1770. Constable.— Robert

Brown, William

Allen, William

Hill.

—John Kough. —Thomas McMullen, John

Abertdal, Nicholas Abeitdal, Francis

Andrew, Jn«

1766. Constable.— William

Overseers of Roads.

it is

Names.

Acres.

300 285 170 200 370 150 150

Allen, Job

1765. Constable.—James McClure.

Overseer of Poor.

West End, and much of Lebanon County.

HANOVER TOWNSHIP RETURN FOR 1781. Names. Auger, George

1764. Constable.

Overseers of Poor.

is

Ferguson.

—James Rippetts, James Young. Roads. — John Dickson, William Young.

Overseers of Poor.

Overseers of Poor.

Hanover

however, the entire town-

William Allen.

— Lazarus Steward, David

1763. Constable.— James Stewart.

Overseers of

assessment-list of

It includes,

Dixson, Sinkey Dixon, James Dixson, Geo Dixson, Richard Espy, Geo Endworth, Jm> Espy, Josias Ewi'ng, Robert Ebersole. Peter Freeman, Caspar Fenleer, Michael Finny, Thomas In trust Furguson, Sam French, Jn" Furguson, Jn° Finly, Richard Firebach, Adam Finney, Sam 1

I

136 133

100 150 130 160 135 175 150 170 120 44 180

1

Faneeler,

Henry

Fox, Anthony Frank, Christian Green, Timothy, Esq' Grahams, Jn° Glenn, Hugh Greenlee, Robert

Graham, Henry Graham, James, Jun* Graham, James, Sen r Grahams, W»

150 135 200

337% 200 100 200 180 100 181 100

HANOVER TOWNSHIP. Goodman, Adam Hugey,Jn» Hooke, Geo Hu Jn«.. Hutchison,

Jos.,

Jun p

.

Abram

150

Hutchison, Jos., Jun' Horner, And" Humbarger, Leonard Hoover, John Hill, Robert Hill,

104'iJ

W"

Hamaker, Adam Hammel, James Hedrick, Geo Tho Hu Hedrick, W» Hedrick, Peter Harper, Adam

Helm, Conrad Hess, Henry Henry.Jacob Johnston, James

.

Johnston, Jn» Innis,

Mary

Johnston, Richard Kennady, Rob' Karr, Andrew

Andrew

Killinger,

Kennady, Thomas Kingry, Peter KlecU, Ludwig

Abram

Latchar,

Low, James Lowmiller, Henry Loss, Jacob Lidigh, Jn"., D'

Matthew, Lind .McCormac, Jn° McGuive, David McMullin, James Moody, Robert Mclnare, Thomas McClure, James McClure, Francis McCormac, Elez"' McCreight, James, Capt Mevers, Conrad

Menough, Geo

McQuown, Jn" In Trust McNutt, Barnard Mislemings, W» McOreght, Anthony McCord, Jn» McCollough, W» Michael,



McCord, Thomas McKlhenev. Tho 9 McClngh, W» Meuoch, Simon Miller, Dan" Myer, Michael

Pesore, Geo Pesore, Mathias Pesore, Fredrick

Proner,John

James

Pergue, Joseph Pesore,

Henry

Portlemey, Viutle Philipi, Michael Porter,

James

Parks, Jos Porterfleld,

Robert

Prooner, Jacob

Ramsey, Geo

Jun

Stewart, James,

Stewart,

Sam

|

80 168 150 180 150 160 150 200 200 170 100 80 148 147 147 140 125 100 100 177 120 230 200 173 200 28

40

15

Saint,

1

Jacob

Sprecher, Jacob S|ict/,lach, Peter ;

|

Acres.

180 73 144 102 100 147 100 100 300 40 160 300 130 100 73 100 100 120

Swan, Samuel Shuv, Jn"

150

Robert Frahelton. Alexander McGee

Jn" Stopher.

Jos h Briggs.

James Johnston.

Alexan' Ridd. Jn" Dunlap.

Jn" Rlppitb.

Jos. Wilson.

Philip Wallhower.

James Rippith. Patrick Gallant.

Edward

Israel

Low.

Valen" Spelsbach. Jn° Young. Jacob Creamer.

Eva Huftnagle.

W m Donalson.

Jn" Sibert. Jos. McClure.

Geo. Mury.

Isaac Hannah. Neal Colgan.

Philip Frank.

W™ Jones.

Jn° Lose.

David McCracken

Jn° Petrey.

Rob' Strain. Jn" Herkenreider

Sam

Fredi Pickel.

Jn° Stone. Tho 9 McCullough.

Lazarus Stewart.

1

Kirsley.

Chris Pirky.

Jn° Dups.

Henry Stewart, James

Ja 9 Breadon. W» McEnally.

Segler,

100 147

Patrick Flin.

Jn" Walmore.

Slone, Archibald

179

Jn" Martin.

Henry Pruner.



Jacob Greatt.

Snodgrass, Jn" Sturgeon, Sam'

140

Sil-or, Michael Sliultz, Jn»

„ 150 130

Stone, Adam Stewart, Widow Seidenstricker, Philip

250

Steely, Jn°

121

Serung, Ludwig Straw, Michael

300 280 300 200 230 300 95 137 150 100 130 200 189 137 79 100 200 200 153 200 199

In trust Stnilev, Jn" Slone, William Shuey, Henry Stone, Peter

Seaman, Jn° Stone, Abram Slone, Alexander Stewart, James Tittle,

Geo

Toner, Danl Toops, Jn" lippins, Jn» Tippins, Jacob Tittler,

Adam

lempleton, Robert



Trdusdle, Todd, James Todd, David

Iodd,Jn°

100 200

391



n\\i

WilHugh.. Walker, Thomas

Wonderly.Dan Wilson, James Wolf, Geo

1

177 150 80

360 154 147

203

Wright, W»>

225

Ward, Geo

200 300 150 200 130 243 170 130 160 20 170 195 100 200 211 200 100 443 200 284

Wilson, James, Cap' Wilson, James, Ex' Wallace, Robert Wise, Adam Wallace, Thomas Weaver, Jn"

Wingart, Abram Weaver, Dam Wolf, Jacob Wingart, Chris Wilt, Geo Wilt, Jacob Walmore, Peter

Winter, John

Walmore, Peter, Jun' Winlin, Dewalt Young, W-, Se' Young, W»„ Jun' Young, James

1

.

And" Young. Peter Weirup.

Valeo e Salla. Conrad Road.

Adam Mark.

Miller.

Barnet.

Ju° Young. Jacob Dupes. Nicholas Titlow.

Jacob Rasor.

Jn" Barnet.

Alexander Young.

Jn° Martin.

Jacob Muser.

Jn" Paterson.

Jn° Pruner. Nicholas Pruner.

Tho 9 McMillin.

M

12414 12o 130 100 130 145 135 228 100 100 130

Wallace, And" Willson, James, Sen'

Jn" Tebhins.

Morris.

Jos. Barnet.

200 125 80



Hugh

W"

Wallmore.Geo

Thorn, Tagart, James

Isaac Harison.

Ja 9 Pinkerton. Rob' Lewk.

65

1

Sam' McCull gh. Jn" Hoover. David Kinuy. Isaac Hodge. Neal Meidon.

Dan

167%

Thompson, Jn" Twoeys, Kman

Cloky.

Francis Ferguson

Wallace,

195 177 225 120 133 100

Jn° Elder.

Jn" Murry. Ja a Wilson.

180 192 150 120 160 80

211

711

Brown. Math 9 Crowser.

David Hase.

W» Stewart.

130 196 80 150 240 100



Christ'

W

Rob' Lewis. Ja 8 Johnston.

175

Sneider,Jn« Snoddy, W» SnodgrasB, Stream, David

W'° Wilkison. m Evens.

Robert Dulton. Charles Mulroy.

120 200

•Stewart, Jn"

100 140 240

177



W"

Ramsey, David Robinson, James Rank, Philip Rough, Barnet

221 150 310

150 100 178 200 232 144 197 100 200 126

Ramage,

Robinson,

70 100 50 178

Righard, Jn"

Rippit, W°> Rippet, James

Rainbo, Peter River, Peter

Sharp, Isaac Sturgeon, Rob' Sarkerry, Ulry

Ram, Milher Ram, Jacob Rodger, James Rodgers, Jn"., col" Robinson, Jn" Rodger, And" Rodger, W»

Rumberger, Geo

190 130 180 160 118

100 150 160 300

1

Abram

Sterrot, Jii«

Mowrey, Widow Musser, Dan Meese, Geo McFarland, Walter Nigh, Philip Poltz, Michael Poore, Mathias Pickel, Ju»

lieaguel,

100

200 174 142

Miley, Martin

Ramsey, Hugh

179 300 150 120 181 20 150 130 200 80 150 219 130

Myers, Jacob Myers, Henry Markellion McBride, Jn"

Petierue,

Robinson, James Rodger, Jeremiah Robinson, Sam' Kigart, Jacob Robinson, Widow Ramsey, William

216 160

i,

Horst,

Names. Rough, Jn»., Rev

100

427

Jn" Millers.

W» McFarland.

Hugh

Geo. Hains.

Reppith.

Thomas Hardon. Robert Warnoch. Duncan Sinclair. James Wallace.

Jn" Carvery. Peter Felty. Peter Simon.

Jacob Stone.

Philip Boil.

Benjamin Clark. W» Young. Adam Weaver.

Duncan Camble. Jn" Ramage.

Jn° Sups.

Robert Hervey.

Jn" Philip Debaar

Henry Sherp.

Josuah Mathew.

Mathias Becker. Jn" Carter. Martin Miller. Jn" McCully.

Peter Uncher.

W»Glen.

W™ r

Cunningham.

George Pruner.

Caspar Grosser. Chris" Fox.

Dan McBride. 1

Stophel Syder.

Elizabeth Moyer.

Jn" Snody.

Peter Fox.

Adam

James Duncan.

Conrad Shrith. David Petierue.

Jn° Morison.

Geo. Syder.



Abram

Harbison.

Hume.

Jn° Tully. Alex' McElheney.

Eallis.

Jn" Carvery. Peter Fleeting.

Jacob Lose.

Archibald McCullough.

Robert Young.

Adam

Poore.



HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

428

Hanover was West Hanover, and thus continued until 1813, when Lebanon was formed, when the entire East Hanover, with a portion of West HanWest Hanover, were included in the new county. over in Dauphin continued as such until the year 1842, when by the sixty-fourth section of an act of Assembly, passed on the 4th of March that year, it provided " that the township of West Hanover, in the

Upon

the formation of the county,

divided into East and

county of Dauphin,

shall, as

then divided into three

separate election districts, thereafter form three separate townships, the south district to be called South

Conrad Waggoner perches

— whole

and 20

distance, 2 miles

— course bearing south 82 degrees west

;

thence

from J. B. Morehead's through other land of said Morehead, Doc. William Simonton, Samuel McCord, William McCord, Jacob Keiffer, Samuel Shellenberger, George Bashore, William Bomgardner, and Christian Walters, to Beaver Creek to a hickory, leaving all the houses on said farms north, except J. B. Morehead's present residence, one of Doc. William Simonton's tenant-houses, now occupied by John Farling, Samuel McCord's and AVilliam McCord's these five are south course bearing the same, viz.,



Hanover, the east district to be called East Hanover, and the west district West Hanover, and that the then supervisors should file in the office of the clerk of the

south 82 degrees west, distance 2f miles. Then beginning at the house of J. B. Morehead (present resi-

Court of Quarter Sessions of Dauphin County, as the dividing lines of said townships, the survey and draft thereto annexed of the election lines run of said

near land of Daniel Keim, through land of Doc. Wil-

West Hanover township, pursuant

to

law,

by M.

Robeson, on the 17th day of September, 1838." On the 14th of March, 1842, the survey and draft of

M. Robeson was filed as above Road Docket A, page

recorded in

directed,

and was

253, as follows, to

wit:

"Beginning

at the

of the intersection of

Swatara Creek, half a mile south

Bow Run

with said creek, at a

oak on the land of John Fox; thence through land of Conrad Waggoner, Philip Stine, Abraham Hoover, Jacob Leasure, and John B. Morehead, to the present residence of J. B. Morehead, leaving the houses on all said farms north, except chestnut

dence)

;

thence through land of said Morehead, and

liam Simonton, Alexander McFadden, Daniel Keiffer, Samuel Zimmerman, John Snodgrass, Simon Stout, Samuel Fleming, Mary McCreight, Joseph Shoop, Benjamin Snodgrass, Emanuel Cassel, junior (near Daniel and William Gross), Joseph Allen, William Crum (near Daniel Aungst), E. and C. B. Grubb, George Rhoads, John Rhoads, and E. and C. B. Grubb, to the top of the second mountain the present boundary of West Hanover township leaving

— —

all

the houses on said farms west, except Daniel

Keim, Simon Stout, Benjamin Snodgrass, Daniel and William Gross, Emanuel Cassel, junior, Daniel Aungst, E. and C. B. Grubb, George Rhoads, and John Rhoads; course bearing north 14J degrees west, distance 8 miles."

SOUTH HANOVER TOWNSHIP. This township lies south of the other Hanovers, with the Swatara and Beaver Creeks on its entire eastern, southern,

and western border.

watered, and there

is little

It

is

well

poor or untillable land in

the township.

Union Deposit was

laid out by Philip Wolfersand called Unionville. The survey was made by Samuel Hoffer, and the platting done by Jacob R. Hoffer. It comprised twenty-three lots. In the same year Isaac Hershey laid out some lots adjoining. The place, however, always went by the name of Union Deposit, from the fact of its being

berger, July 30, 1845,

a deposit of

all

preparatory to Wolfersberger,

kept the

the grain produce, its

of this region,

several boats.

He

also

Dr. D. C. Keller came in 1848, resident physician. The first house

first store.

and was the

first

built on the hill

The

etc.,

shipment on the canal by Mr.

who owned

post-office

was the one in which he resides. was established in 1857, and David

McCormick's Furnace was erected about 1857, and a few years ago a railroad built from it to Swatara Station, on the Lebanon Valley Railroad, a distance of a mile. It manufactures pig metal, and employs in the furnace and quarries some forty hands. Most of the ore is obtained from Sand Hill, three and a half miles distant, the rest from Cornwall and other banks. The churches are the Lutheran and Reformed, a one-story brick edifice, erected in 1847, and the United Brethren, a similar structure, built in 1848. The former is supplied by the Hummelstown pastors. Its trustees are George Hocker, Sr., Lutheran, and Jacob Walmer, Reformed. Rev. David S. Longnecker, of Derry, is the United Brethren pastor. The village is on Swatara Creek and the Union Canal, one mile from Swatara Railroad Station. Wolfersberger appointed postmaster.

Hoeenerstown is situated in the southwestern part Hum-

of the township, one and a half miles north of

WEST HANOVER AND EAST HANOVER TOWNSHIPS. melstown.

It takes its

and whose descendants are very numerous in The place has a store, post-office, and this vicinity. the usual number of small shops. The United Brethren Church is at the east end of the village, and the region,

German

Manada ville

name from John Hoerner, born

in 1782, of one of the earliest families that settled in this

Baptist at the west.

lies in

429

the extreme eastern part of

Manada with

the township, at the junction of the

It contains a saw- and grist-mill,

Swatara Creek.

school-house, cabinet-shop, store, and several other shops.

The

first settlers

in the place

were

J.

Ream,

G. F. Yengst, D. Houck, John Gordon, Dr. Samuel Eby, H. Styles, J. Dougherty, D. Ritter, and S. Rose.

WEST HANOVER TOWNSHIP. Adjoining East Hanover township on the west is To the

the extreme portion of the Hanover of 1737.

The

wise be of interest here will be found elsewhere.

north and west

Barnett place, one of the earliest farms cleared within the township, is located one mile and a half east of

the south

Linglestown, recently owned

is Middle Paxtang township, while on South Hanover township, and southwest Lower Paxtang township. In the northern part of the township are the First and Second Mountains of the Kittochtinny range, between which lies Fishing Creek Valley, entered through a gap in the First or South Mountain, long known as Heckert's Gap. The township contains many fine, well-watered, and

lies

productive farms.

The

history of this locality

is

so

by George Runyen. Another landmark of the early settlement is the late Robert Stewart homestead on Beaver Creek.

Manada Hill and

Hanover shops.

line.

A

is

the only village in the township,

the southwest of the township near East

lies in

It

has a post-office, store, and several

mile and a half southwest

Church, a one-story frame structure.

intimately connected with not only the history of the

miles southeast

township proper and the county, especially during the most interesting epochs, that what might other-

a

little

northeast

is is

the

German

is

the Lutheran

Two and

a half

Baptist Church, and

the Zion Lutheran Church, a one-

story brick structure.

EAST HANOVER TOWNSHIP. East Hanover Township,

Manada Gap.

the northern part of the township are the three

Between the Second and Third Stony Creek, in the centre of Stony Creek Valley, appropriately named. Shellsyille, often called Earlysville from the large number of Earlys living in and near the village, and whose post-office is called " West Hanover," is

ranges of the Kittochtinny Mountains, the First, Sec-

situated a

as defined

by the

rec-

bounded on the north by Rush township, on the east by Lebanon County, on the south by South Hanover and Derry townships, and on the west by Middle Paxtang and West Hanover townships. In ord,

is

ond, and Third, and as a consequence the land

is

much

broken and the greater portion sterile. The and southern part of the township is well watered, central

highly cultivated, and productive.

On

the southern

border, separating the township from Derry, tara Creek.

Bow Creek

is

is

Swa-

in the eastern part of the

the

Mountain

is

little south of the centre of the township. name from Maj. John Shell, who was born Dec. 20, 1790, and died March 27, 1875. He laid out the town, and in 1821 opened the first hotel, in which he was succeeded by Henry Dick, John Adam Albert, and William Snyder. This tavern is the oldest build-

It takes its

ing in the village, being originally a log house built

township, while the Manada, another branch of the

in 1764, but has been remodeled

Swatara, courses through the entire western

to

side,

Lebanon County between the First and Second Mountain, finding its way through the former by rising in

it.

The

first

store

and additions put was opened by Maj. John

Shell and Jacob Early, as partners, in 1S22.

It

has

two churches, the Evangelical Association, of which

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY

430

S. Brown is pastor, and the joint Lutheran and Reformed Church. Rev. Mr. Gauker is pastor of the Lutheran congregation, while that of the Reformed is supplied by the minister of Hummelstown,

Rev. C.

Rev. A.

Grantville

is

The matter was At a

a thriving village, located a mile of Shellsville, near the

Manada Furnace is in ship.

It is

is

Oct.

and embraces was built in 1836, Near it is the site of

session of Presbytery held at the

1735, the affair of the people of

same place

Manada Creek

deavor

to acquaint himself with the brethren before our next meeting, and also endeavor to prepare some

heirs,

acres.

7,

was again deferred. " Mr. Richard Sankey, a theological student from Ireland, having produced his certificate at last meeting before the members of Presbytery and been taken under its care, the Presbytery ordered that he en-

the northwest of the town-

owned by the Grubb

some twenty-five hundred but

deferred until the next meeting of

Presbytery.

Lebanon It is a new place which sprang up since the war. It is a growing town, and has a large trade with the surrounding country. The United Brethren have a neat church edifice and beautiful cemetery. east

to to

defer granting said supplication until they be heard.

S. Stauffer.

and a half County line.

him them

congregation, reported that his people desired signify to the Presbytery that they desire

It

not now in operation. Manada," erected about 1755 for protection

preliminary extempore

trials against

our next meet-

old "Fort

ing."

against the Indians, and as a kind of block-house to which the early settlers fled on the advance of the

Octorara, Lancaster Co.,

red men.

Stewart appeared to prosecute a supplication of Man-

The German

At a

session of the Presbytery held

southeast end of the township, and the Methodist

Episcopal congregation are near the centre, just about the proposed South Mountain Railroad.

HANOVER CHURCH. Nearly eleven miles from Harrisburg, on Bow Creek, was located old Hanover Church, one of the landmarks in the history of the Scotch-Irish and of Presbyterianism in Pennsylvania. 1

HANOVER CHURCH. In 1735 the Presbytery of Donegal, then the only Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church in America west of Philadelphia, was in session at Nottingham,

This

Presbytery had been created by order of the Synod of Philadelphia in September, 1732. The original

members of

it were Rev. Messrs. James Anderson, Boyd, William Bertram, John Thomson, and Robert Orr. On the 3d of September, 1735, a supplication was presented from " A people on the borders of Suetara Congregation, desiring the countenance of Presbytery in building a new meetinghouse in order to have supplies," which being read, the Rev. William Bertram, the pastor of the Swatara

Middle Lazarus

empowered to promise towards Mr. Sankey's support among the people of Hanover as their orderly pastor the annual payment of sixty pounds, i.e., one-half in cloth and the other in particular commodities, as flax, hemp, linen, yarn, and cloth, together with several gratuities mentioned Said call was recommended to in said supplication. Mr. Sankey's consideration till the next meeting of Presbytery. He was appointed to supply Paxtang and Hanover alternately, and to open the next meeting of Presbytery with a sermon from Rom. vi. 21. On the 30th August, 1738, the Presbytery of Donegal met for the first time at Hanover. Richard Sankey was ordained and received as a member of the Presbytery of Donegal, and was installed as the first pastor of the Hanover Church. On June 6, 1759, we learn that Mr. Sankey, having received a call to a congregation in Virginia, and desaid commissioners are

month of September.

at

20th,

ada Creek for a new erection. The region along Manada Creek to the mountains was settled rapidly, and the people early began to feel the inconvenience of going so far as Derry to church, and moved for a new " erection or congregation." At that early day they were all Scotch-Irish, and were connected with the Presbyterian Church. The boundaries'of congregations and the location of meeting-houses were determined by the Presbytery with considerable authority. On the 10th November, 1736, Presbytery ordered James Gelston and Richard Sankey to supply Pequea and Manada by monthly turns alternately until the next meeting of Presbytery. On the 6th of April following, in pursuance of a supplication from the people of Manada, Mr. Bertram was ordered to supply that people on the last Sabbath of April, and to convene the people on some day of the following week in order to moderate a call to Mr. Sankey. On the 22d June, 1737, a supplication and a call to Mr. Sankey was presented to Presbytery by John Cunningham and Robert Grier, commissioners from the congregation of Hanover (Manada), by which

Baptists have a meeting-house in the

Chester Co., Pa., in the

November

Adam

!

j

EAST HANOVER TOWNSHIP.

431

signing to remove there, applied for and received cre-

peculiar calls in grain was the greatly depreciated

His relation to the Hanover Church as pastor seems to have been already dissolved. He removed to Virginia, accompanied by many of the Hanover congregation, about 1760. The main reason for going was to escape the incursions of the savages. He settled at Buffalo, joined the Hanover Presbytery of Virginia in 1760, and was appointed to preside at the opening of the Synod of Virginia in 1785. He lived to a good old age, respected by his people and his brethren in the ministry. Mr. Sankey served the Hanover Church for twenty-one years, and, though no further record is known of his ministry, it was evidently an acceptable one to the people, who kept him so long, and many of whom accompanied him when he left the place. After his dismissal, during the year 1759 the church was supplied occasionally by Rev. Messrs. John Steel and

value of the Continental currency.

dentials from the Presbytery.

John Elder. In November, 1762, a call was made for the Rev. Robert McMordie, which he accepted. During the year 1765 or 1766 the church of Hanover became

No

record of Mr. McMordie's resignation was doubtless caused by the dissensions in his church. After his withdrawal the church continued in a distracted and enfeebled state. In April, 1772, Mr. William Thom was appointed one of the supplies at Hanover. On the 21st of May a call for Mr. Thom was presented in Presbytery, with a copy of a subscription paper of over one hundred pounds. The call was put into his hands. In the mean time Mr. Thom received other calls from Big Spring, Sherman's Valley, and Alexandria, Va., and on Oct. 15, For the next seven years, 1772, accepted the latter. vacant. exists,

but

it

cepted the

call,

Mr. Woods acand was ordained and installed over

the Hanover congregation June 19, 1782. torate of Mr.

Woods was

his

to

memory

On the 16th of OcMr. James Snodgrass was received under the care of the Presbytery from the Philadelphia Presbytery, and having accepted a call from the Hanover congregation he was appointed to prepare a lecture on Rom. viii. 1-7, and a Presbyterial exercise on 1 Cor. the Presbytery of Philadelphia.

tober,

xv. 22, as parts of his trial for ordination.

On the 13th of May, 1788, the Presbytery of Carlisle met at Hanover, John Craighead, Robert Cooper, and Samuel Waugh, with James Johnston, elder. Upon the next day, May 14th, James Snodgrass was ordained and installed as pastor of the Hanover congregation. Rev. John Craighead presided and gave the charge, and the Rev. John Linn preached the



sermon.

During the first eight or ten years of his pastorate Mr. Snodgrass kept in a blank-book of the trustees of the church a record of the marriages, baptisms, and admissions to the church, but he seems to have become weary of it, and to have utterly abandoned it before the year 1800. There is no record of removals from the church by letter or by death. A list remains of the heads of families about the year 1788, and the

who

to the date of his death.

The times tried men's souls. Men were to war the people were poor.

also in existence.

On

the 20th of June, 1781, a call from

Hanover to which they

Rev. Matthew Woods was made out, in promise to pay him six hundred bushels of wheat, or a sum of hard money equivalent thereto, and also a gratuity of six

hundred bushels.

The cause

of these

pas-

Sept. 13,

in 1789.

lists

away

The

In 1787, Hanover was allowed to prosecute a call a probationer for the ministry under the care of

covering part of the period of the Revolutionary war, called

On

His remains 1784, the Rev. Matthew Woods died. were buried in the Hanover graveyard adjoining the church, and a tombstone erected by subscription to

the Hanover Church depended on occasional supplies.

;

a brief one.

of those

paid stipends are continued

down

Mr. Snodgrass' receipts for his salary and the records of the board of trustees are

The church was very weak at the time of his death, and never had another pastor. The building fell into decay, and was at length in 1875 or 1876 taken down. The care of the glebe funds and the cemetery grounds was placed in the hands of trustees.

:

HALIFAX TOWNSHIP. At December

sessions, 1803, the court

Matamoras

issued an

is

a village situated about two miles

order to certain commissioners to view and lay out a

south of Halifax.

new township out of parts of Upper and Middle Paxtang townships, who reported the following boundaries of the new township, to wit

Church of God, United Brethren, and Methodist Episcopal, the latter supplied by the Halifax pastor.

" Beginning on the west side of the Susquehanna

Mountain thence along the top of Peter's Mountain to the Berks and along said line to WiDauphin County line; thence thence along the top of said conisco Mountain mountain to the Susquehanna River, and across said river and thence to the place of beginning." This report was confirmed by the court at their March sessions, a.d. 1804, and it was ordered that the new township be called Halifax. The mountain called " Wiconisco" in the above report is the same Kiver, opposite the end of Peter's

;

;

usually called Berry's Mountain.

The history of the township centres about Fort Halifax and the town of Halifax, and is referred to elsewhere. There are certain facts, however, of local importance which

it is

well to consider in this con-

nection.

The township accepted the free school law in 1836, and the most active persons in urging the adoption of the system were Judge Landis and John Mutch. Opposite the town of Halifax is Clemson's Island, once the site of a Shawanese Indian village as late as A large mound on the island partially exam1701. ined shows it to be one of those burial-places of the aborigines which evidence some great sanguinary struggle or sudden calamity, where the large number of dead required their sepulture in one common grave. Various surmises and traditions have come down to us concerning this Indian mound, but whether the result of the famed " grasshopper war"

It

It

contains three churches, the

has several industrial establishments, a good school-

house and

stores.

The

post-office is called " Powell's

Southwest of the village is another United Brethren Church with graveyard, and a little north of the village is the Union meeting-house and cemetery. There is a fourth United Brethren Church in the northwest part of the township, just back from the Valley."

Susquehanna Biver. Lytle's Ferry.

— Joseph

Lytle

removed from

known as The property severally to John

Marietta to the spot which was afterwards " Lytle's Ferry" in the fall of 1773.

was obtained by warrants issued Kroker, Samuel Hunter, and Joseph Lytle, and* comprised about two hundred acres in all. Geographically, the location was about four miles north of Halifax, two miles south of Millersburg, and about a halfmile below Berry's Mountain, which was then a formidable barrier to journeying along the river. Here Joseph Lytle established a ferry, which became the most important crossing on the river between Harris' Ferry and Sunbury (Fort Augusta). The property was surveyed by Bartrem Galbraith and styled " Fairview," in December of 1773. Joseph Lytle continued occupation until his death, about 1790.

in this

The

was then purchased by his only son, and Michael Bauer. At the end of about sixteen years they sold the ferry to William Moorhead, father of the Moorhead brothers (J. Kennedy, ferry property

John

Lytle,

of Pittsburgh, J. Barlow, of Philadelphia,

known through Pennsylvania,

etc.),

in April, 1806.

well

Mr.

implements of the Stone Age have been exhumed. On one of the islands opposite the borough, prior to 1820, was a noted roosfing-place of bald eagles. A Lutheran and Reformed Church is located two

Moorhead came from Soudersburg, Lancaster Co., and after some time also tried to start a town. It was located on the old " Moorhead homestead," about two miles south of Millersburg, more recently known as the " Finney farm," and at present as the " Miller farm." The project never amounted to anything, and

miles northeast of Halifax.

no buildings were ever erected on the

of the Indians centuries ago

story brick structure.

we know

not.

Many

It is a substantial one-

It is better

known

as Fetter-

Church. The Mennonites have a church situated a few rods distant from the foregoing. 432 hoff's

With

all its

lots.

advertised attractions the project failed,

and the contemplated town and future county-seat forever remained a farm, on whose fertile fields several

generations have lived and labored.

HALIFAX BOROUGH. The town of Halifax, pleasantly located on the Susquehanna River seventeen miles above Harrisburg, was laid out July 18, 1784, by George Sheaffer and Peter Rise. The first deed given by white men in this vicinity was issued to Robert Armstrong by Thomas and John Penn, proprietaries. The warrant for the laud was dated April 17, 1764, and the deed given Feb. 8, 1775. As the valley and creek still bear his name, Armstrong was no doubt the first white settler here. The price stipulated was £51 18s. and Id., from sixty to seventy cents an acre. This,



.

however, did not include the rental of one halfpenny per acre which had to be paid to the agent of the

mond, and from north to south as indicated by the present length of Front Street from Boyer's to Singer's land.

When the town was laid out the lots were sold for twenty dollars each by means of a lottery, then the customary way of designating the public preference for lots.

John Downey made the survey

for the origiIn 1801 the houses were mostly on the river, and even in 1825 and 1826 all the old houses but five or six were along the Susquehanna.

nal proprietors.

The

original settlers

soon gave

way

this region.

were generally Scotch-Irish, who

to the

German

James Ferguson

tide that fast set in in in 1801

bought an old and a half log house (stone basement) on his arrival and there lived. Three tanneries were early established, George Leebrick's, John Shammo's, and Hassinger's (first built and started by Abraham

Penns at Lancaster City yearly in the month of May. The land included in this deed is now owned by the Boyers, Geiger, and Loomis families, beginning at the northern line of the borough and extending

story

along the river to Armstrong's Creek. It

Landis). Three-quarters of a century ago four cooper-shops flourished and four distilleries in or adjoining the town, and at a somewhat later period

is

described

having been bounded on the east by a barren ledge of hills, on the west by the Susquehanna River, south by vacant lands, and north by settlements in the right of Simon Girty. The house of Robert Armstrong is still standing on the bank of the river, three-fourths of a mile above the town, and is the oldest house in the neighborhood. This is also the site of old Fort Halifax, from which the town derives its name, reference to which has been made in the general history. There is nothing now to as

mark the place except

in a slight elevation of the

ground and a well known

to

have belonged to the

Isaac Jones started the

At an

point of trade, receiving

town was a flourishing

impetus from the " shad which were the largest and best-paying along the Susquehanna River. During the fishing season large quantities were packed, and often fifty its

and sixty teams were here from a distance to haul fish. In olden times the place was noted for horse-racing, and two men, Brubaker and Bower, were killed when running horses, but at times

away the

twenty years apart.

The land on which Halifax stands was deeded to James Aston, Sept. 29, 1773, and was called in popu-

river bottoms.

lar parlance " Flat

Bottom," and about the same time the tract adjoining perhaps the one now owned by George Singer and others was conveyed to Aston, and was known as " Scanderoon." From 1729 to 1785 Halifax was in Upper Paxtang township, Lancaster Co. From 1785 (at which time the county of Dauphin was formed) until 1803 it was in Upper

1875,

Paxtang township, Dauphin Co. As heretofore stated, the town of Halifax was laid out by George Sheaffer and Peter Rise in 1794, but we find that the deed was recorded by Philip Brindle and George Norton, attorneys for George Winters, on the 8th of May, 1794. The plot of the town extended from the river to

C. D.



hat manufactory.

fisheries,"

fort.



first

early period the

The

old track was along the

Halifax was incorporated into a borough May 29, its first burgess being Dr. H. W. Bischoff. The

election was held on June 29th following, of which the judge was T. J. Sawyer, and the inspectors were William B. Gray and J. B. Markley. The corporation officers have been Burgesses, 1875-79, H. first

:

W.

Bischoff; 1879, Isaac Lyter; 1880-82, Albert S. Loomis. Clerks, 1875-77, G. T. Leebrick 1877-SO, ;

the alley adjoining 28

the

property

of

Henry Sha-

Waldron

;

1880-82, Isaac Lyter.

The Halifax Bank was

organized Aug. 1, 1871. establishment the officers have been William Lodge, president; William Shammo, cashier, and J.

Since

its

E. Lighter, teller. The directors in 1881 were Andrew Bowerman, Joseph Fetterhoff, Leonard Clemson, William Taylor, J. B. Landis, James Hoffman, William Fitting, Charles W. Ryan, Conrad Bauer!

433

;; ;

:

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

434

Thomas

J.

Sawyer, Andrew Shepley.

one hundred thousand dollars. cupied the same building.is

The

"

Halifax Herald,"

Its capital stock

It

has always oc-

Anthony Wayne

was originally a four-page sheet of four columns each, and its terms were one dollar a year if paid in advance, one dollar and twenty-five cents if paid during the year, and Loouiis.

It

one dollar and fifty cents if paid at the close. Its motto was, " We aim to serve the people and to promote the greatest good of the greatest number." It was Democratic in politics, and warmly espoused in the campaign of 1844 the election of "Polk and Dallas."

Halifax Methodist Episcopal Church.



About 1799 and 1800 several Methodist families setThree members of tled in and around the town. them, James Ferguson, Robert Bowes, and Thomas Burrell,

who had emigrated from

the town.

Soon

after,

Ireland, located in

Philip Shephard established

himself three miles above town, and George Lemon four miles below town, both families coming from the

About the same time five or six more families of the Methodist Episcopal Church settled in Lykens Valley, and John and Daniel Miller settled near the mouth of Wiconisco Creek, where lower end of the State.

they laid out Millersburg. Two or three miles farther up the valley settled Daniel Stever, an old soldier of the Revolutionary war, and the

first

Methodist ex-

time John Motter, Philip Verner, John Deitrich, and Samuel Wells located ten miles farther up the valley. Just a few

horter in the county.

About

and Williamstown

into a station, with other

the various towns.

the only newspaper

ever published in the town, was established Feb. 22, 1844, by

cuit,

sub-divisions hereafter to be noted under the heads of

this

miles from the Dauphin County line, in Schuylkill County, lived Henry Kunzelman, who afterwards itinerant preacher of the Methodist faith, preaching in the German language. In the summer of 1801 the Philadelphia Conference sent out Rev. William Rose, an Irishman, as a missionary, who, after making several excursions through the upper

became an

end of Dauphin County with the view of establishing permanent appointments for preaching, organized several classes and preaching appointments, one in Halifax, one near where Millersburg is, and one near where Berrysburg is. Next year he was followed by the eccentric Rev. Jacob Gruber, who preached in The Dauphin Circuit both German and English. was then fully explored and organized, embracing Dauphin, Lebanon, and parts of Schuylkill County, making a six weeks' tour, day or night appointments, besides the Sunday labors. This territory now embraces twenty circuits and stations (or, as old Father Gruber called them, tobacco patches), supporting from one to two ministers each, with at least two In 1834, preaching appointments each Sabbath. Harrisburg was cut off as a station, aud in 1S37 the circuit was divided, making Peter's Mountain the Afterline, the upper end forming Halifax Circuit. wards Lykens and Wiconisco were made into a cir-

The

old log meeting-house in Halifax was prob-

Methodist edifice in the county, and The following is a list of all the itinerant and station preachers that have preached or ministered at Halifax ably the

first

was built

in 1806.

Dauphin

Circuit from 1801 to 1837 William Ross, missionary; 1802-3, Jacob Gruber; 1803, Henry Boehm 1804, Auning Owens, Henry Boehm 1805, Joseph Osborne, Joseph Stephens; 1806, William Hunter, Daniel Ireland; 1807, Thomas Burch, William Hoyer, George Harmer; :

1801,

;

;

1808, Thomas Burch, James Miller, J. Kitchell 1809, Thomas Boring, John Betchell 1810, Thomas Baring, John Farmon 1811, William Fox, D. Brown, John Van Shock; 1812, William Fox, James Mitchell, William W. Foultz; 1813, James Mitchell, William W. Foultz 1814, William W. Foultz, John Walker, Henry Kunzelman 1815, Henry Kunzelman, Lawrence Lawrenson 1816, John Goforth, Richard Mc;

;

;

;

;

;

1817, John Price, Phineas Price; 1818, William Leonard, William Able, Samuel Grace; 1819, William Quinn, Henry G. King; 1820, Henry G. King, Jacob Gruber (2d time) 1821, Jacob Gruber, Joseph Cary; 1822, John Woolson, W. W. Wallace; 1823, John Woolson, Matthew Soren 1824, John Goforth (2d time), William Allen; 1825, A. Ogden, Henry G. King (2d time) 1826, Henry G. King, Joseph McCool 1827, Francis Hodgson, Thomas Neal 1828, Thomas Neal, Francis Hodgson 1829, Eliphalet Reed, Jefferson Lewis 1830, Eliphalet Reed, J. B. Ayres, C. B. Ford 1831, David Best, J. B. Ayres, A. Z. Baring 1832, David Best, Allen John, Richard W. Thomas; 1833, Thomas Sovern, Allen John, Francis Hodgson (2d time) 1834, John Edwards, Robert E. Kemp 1835, Charles W. Jackson, Robert E. Kemp; 1836, Richard W. Thomas (2d

Callister;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

time), Charles

W. Jackson.

Halifax Circuit from 1837 1837, Jonas Bissey, Charles Schock 1838, Charles Schock 1839, Jacob Davidson 1840-43, Eliphalet :

;

;

;

Reed (2d time) 1843, John Edwards (2d time), William L. Gray 1844, Edwards and Gray 1845, Leeds K. Berridge, Thomas A. Fernley 1846, John Watson, John Hough; 1847, Eliphalet Reed (3d time), S. ;

;

;

;

R. Gillingham 1848, Valentine Gray, C. L. Stineman 1849, Valentine Gray, George W. McLaugh;

;

James E. Meredith, Frederick Illman John Cummins, C. R. Curry 1852, Cummins J. Childs; 1853, H. H. Hickman, Joseph S. Cook; 1854, Joseph S. Cook, Robert L. Colier 1855, Henry B. Mauger, J. Wheeler 1856, H. B. Mauger, G. W. Barr; 1857, H. H. Hobbs, R. J. Carson; 1858, William B. Gregg, Joseph Cook 1859, William B. Gregg, lin

;

1850,

1851,

;

;

;

;

Crouch 1860, S. W. Kurtz, Gearge Sheaffer and Sheaffer 1862, William H. Burrell, C. W. Ayres 1863, W. H. Burrell, John Stumger J. T.

;

1861, Kurtz

;

;

;

:

RUSH TOWNSHIP. 1864, G. S.

Kesler,

time) 1872,

F.

Conway,

1868, E. J.

;

J. E.

M. Brady;

M. Barnhill

;

Kesler; 1865-66, J. E.

1867, S.

R. Gillingham (2d

D. Pepper; 1869-71, Silas B. Best 1873,

Thomas Sumption

;

1874-76,

Joseph Aspril 1876, Richard Morley 1877-80, Jonathan Dungane 1880, Henry White. Some of the above was paid in work and labor, some in materials and hauling, and the remainder in cash. Some of the subscribers gave more than they originally promised, and only in two or three in;

;

;

stances did the subscribers scriptions good.

down

When

fail

to

make

their sub-

the old church was taken

the shingles were found as good as

when

first

put on.

The

old log church was replaced in 1850 by the

present substantial brick edifice, built in the centre of the town.

The

circuit

now embraces Matamoras,

Trinity Church in Powell's Valley, and preaching in

United Brethren Church near the Parks neighborhood.

The Lutheran Church,

a one-story log struc-

R U S'H On

was built about 1814, but from 1826

to 1838

was

used occasionally (nearly half of the time) by the

The Lutheran congregation gradudwindled down so that by 1838 it had no members, or at least no officials to take charge of it. Then the citizens held a meeting and sold its material to Anthony W. Loomis, who removed it to the village. The proceeds from its sale were used to inclose the graveyard lot, upon which it stood, with a substantial fence. It stood on the hill. United Brethren Church in Christ.— This congregation was organized about 1840, but the present church edifice was not built until 1868. Since 1868 the pastors have been Revs. J. W. Hunkle, A. F. Yeager, Joseph Young, John W. Geiger, Mr. List, William D. Knower, A. V. H. Gosweiler, Ezekiel L. Hughes, V. S. Riddle, W. D. Mower, and S. P. Funk, the present incumbent, who came in 1881. The Evangelical Association Church was until recently part of the Millersburg Circuit, but preaching here has been abandoned. village school. ally

TOWNSHIP.

the 23d of October, 1819, the Court of Quarter

Sessions issued an order to commissioners to inquire into the propriety of dividing the township of

ture,

435

Middle

of said petition, the line,

who made

report in favor of altering

and that they had run the

line as follows, to

wit: "

Paxtang.

The commissioners reported in favor of a division, and that they had run a dividing line as

Beginning at a chestnut-oak on the top of Peter's Mountain, the northwest corner of Rush township

follows, to wit

thence a southwesterly course along the summit of

;

Beginning on a stone heap on the Second Mounsummit of which separates West Hanover from Middle Paxtang township, at the distance of three and one-half miles from the northwest corner of West

said mountain, which separates Jackson and Halifax

tain, the

townships from Middle Paxtang and Rush, seven miles twenty-five perches to a marked hickory thence passing on the line between John Williams aud the

Hanover township, thence north ten degrees west

Widow Fortenbach

three miles one hundred and

and one hundred and eighty-five perches to a chestnut-oak on the summit of the Third Mountain thence

This report was confirmed by the court March 14, 1820, and it was ordered that the new township be called Rush township. (For record, see Sess. Doc.

tain seven miles, intersecting the west line of

"

fifty perches to a chestnut-oak tree on the top of Peter's Mountain and line of Halifax township."

The

above described continued to be the dividing line between Rush and Middle Paxtang townships from 1820 to 1832. Previous to the 22d of November, 1831, a petition had been presented to the court praying for an alteration of the dividing line between those two townships, and on that day the court issued an order to commission1815-23, page 282.)

line

ers to inquire into the propriety of

granting the prayer

;

south ten degrees east one mile

;

a northeasterly course along the top of the said

mounRush

township."

This report was confirmed by the court Nov. 19, (See Road Doc. A, page 74.) The township as thus organized, being exceedingly mountainous, contains fewer farms and the least num-

1832.

ber of inhabitants than any other in

Dauphin County.

Clark's Creek flows through the centre of the entire

township westward. Third or Sharp Mountain forms its southern, while Peter's Mountain its northern boundary.

JACKSON TOWNSHIP. On

Fisherville was laid out in 1854 by Adam Fisher, now deceased, then an extensive landholder. It is now a flourishing little village, containing a neat frame school building, stores, etc. The Methodist

the 23d of August, 1828, an order was issued by

the Court of Quarter Sessions to three commissioners to view and report upon the propriety of dividing the

township of Halifax according to the prayer of inhabitants of the east end of said township, asking for a division,

Episcopal Church edifice was erected in 1859, and

called Jackson, previously presented

The commissioners

is

Of the United Rev. Jacob Funk is pastor,

supplied by the Halifax Circuit.

and that the new township might be

Brethren congregation,

to said court.

those formerly being the same as at Jacob's Church

reported that in their opinions a

Wayne

was necessary and proper, and that they had run and marked a division line as

in

follows, to wit: " Beginning at a chestnut-oak

many

division of said township

ship.

township, and

St.

John's in Mifflin town-

The Evangelical Lutheran Church was

erected

a one-story brick building. Jacksonville was laid out about 1825 by George Enders and Joseph P. Lyter, most of the houses being

on the top of Peter's Mountain, in Winn's Gap, on the line dividing Halithence across fax and Middle Paxtang townships Powell's and Armstrong's Valleys, north 3S degrees west 6 miles and 280 perches to a hickory on the line between Upper Paxtang and Halifax townships, on Berry's Mountain, at a small curve in said mountain about three-quarters of a mile west of Woodside's

years ago.

It

is

on the lots owned by the former. It was named in honor of Ex-President Jackson. Joseph Bowman William Enders had the first built the first house. store. The first blacksmith was Joseph P. Lyter; the first physician was Dr. McGuire. The post-office was established under President Pierce's administra-

;

tion in 1854.

Gap." This report was confirmed by the court at Novem(See Road Docket A, page 37.) ber sessions, 1828. It was thus named for the then President of the United States, Gen. Andrew Jackson, and as thus established was diminished by the erection of Jefferson The early settlers in the township were the in 1842. Hoffmans, Enders, Fishers, Millers, Snyders, Fetterhoffs, Werts, Shotts, and others, many of whose descendants remain in the locality. Armstrong's Creek rises in this township, and flowing southwest, empties into the Susquehanna above Halifax.

The

present postmaster

is J.

F. Helt,

and the first one was William Enders, after whom the There are office was called " Enders Post-Office." two churches, the Lutheran and Reformed (Star of Bethlehem), a neat frame edifice erected in 1875, and the United Brethren built in 1873. Rev. Isaac Erhart is pastor of the former, and Rev. Jacob Funk of the latter.

East and northeast of Jacksonville are the following churches: Steam's, Miller's (Reformed, of which Rev. A. S. Stauffer is pastor), and the United Brethren, at Deitrich's.

JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. considered a division of the said township neces-

In the year 1842 inhabitants of Jackson township petitioned the Court of Quarter Sessions, asking for

a division of said township; whereupon the said court, on the 23d April, 1842, issued an order to three commissioners to inquire into the propriety of granting the said prayer, 436

who made

report that they

and had run a dividing line as follows, to wit: "Beginning at a white-oak on the summit of the dividing ridge, at the Halifax township line, and between the farms of Abraham Kinports and Lewis sary,

j

i

I

Culp; thence north 66 degrees east 250 perches

to a

:

;;

REED TOWNSHIP. post; thence north 42 degrees east 50 perches to a post; thence north 66 degrees east 340 perches to a post thence north 71 degrees east 160 perches to a post;

thence north 66 degrees east 80 perches to a post; thence north 69 degrees east 656 perches to a post

thence 18 degrees east 171 perches to a post; thence north 55 degrees east 28 perches to a post; thence north 39 degrees east 304 perches to a post thence along Broad Mountain north 13 degrees east 140 ;

437

This report was confirmed by the court Nov. 23, The township was named for President Jefferson, and as thus established continued until 1879, 1844.

when

the western portion was erected into a separate

township and called Wayne. The early settlers in the township were the Buffingtons, Bordners, Etzweilers, Hoffmans, Shoops, Pauls, Millers, Werts, Runks, Wolfangs, Enders, Deitrichs, Trawitzs, Lehrs,

Hawks, and others of German

descent, nearly all of

The

perches to a post; thence north 7 degrees west 520

whom have

perches to a pine in Deitrich's Gap, on the summit of Berry's Mountain, being in length 8 miles and 140

face of the township

perches."

Creek

This report was confirmed by the court on the 24th In the year 1844 the inhabitants of Jackson petitioned the court, complaining of part

ing into the Susquehanna above Clark's Station. There are several old churches in the township.

of November, 1842.

made in 1842, and praying Whereupon the court appointed

of the division line as for

an alteration.

other commissioners to view and report on the propriety of

making such

alteration.

These commisand that they

sioners reported in favor of alteration,

agreed upon and run the following line " Beginning at a pine on lands of John Shoop,

tains a

representatives in the valley.

number of

rises in

is

irregular

sur-

and abrupt, but conPowell's

fine productive farms.

the township, flows westward, empty-

James' Reformed Church has a large congregawhich the Rev. A. S. Stauffer is pastor. Of St. Jacob's Lutheran Church the present minister is the Rev. Joseph Hilpot, and for his predecessors see St. John's Church, Mifflin township, of which charge this church forms a part. Carsonville is the only village in the township, St.

tion, of

and contains a

store,

church, post-office,

Near

etc.

between said Jackson and Jefferson townships thence north 68 degrees east 13} miles to the Schuylkill County

the village are the remains of old Shawanese Indian camps and burying-grounds, the location being on

line."

limits of the county.

Sr.,

corner of former

partition

line ;

one of the Shamokin

trails,

which passed through the

REED TOWNSHIP. Reed Township was

erected by the act of

Assem-

bly of the 6th April, 1849, which directed " That portion of the qualified voters of Penn election district,

Dauphin County,

Paxtang township,

Middle Paxtang and Halifax. When the township was erected, the portion of Middle Paxtang reverted to the original township.

The

that reside in Middle

shall hereafter vote at the regular

history of this township centres chiefly around

the islands at the

mouth of the Juniata,

well

known

Duncan's Island, and shall be erected into a separate township and school district, to be called Reed town-

by the general designation of Duncan's Island*. The southern part of the township includes the Susquehanna portion of Peter's Mountain, and the land is much broken. There are several fine farms on Powell's Creek, while the lands on the large islands

ship," etc.

in

place of holding elections for said township, and the

balance of the voters of said Penn election district shall hold their election at the new school-house on

The township

bounded on the north and northeast by Halifax township, on the west by Juniata and Susquehanna Rivers, and on the south and southeast by Middle Paxtang township. It includes the large Duncan's islands on the western side of the river, and Haldeman"s. It is named for William Reed, who resided about half-way between Clark's Ferry and Halifax. Previous to being set off as Reed township it was Penn election district, formed of portions of is



the river are unsurpassed

for cultivation.

The

Wiconisco Canal, connecting with the Pennsylvania Canal at Clark's Ferry, and the Northern Central Railroad edge the river the entire length of the township.

Clark's Ferry, at the

crossing

to

the

and the Juniata (named by the Indians Queenashawakee), was for many years quite a noted place. Being hemmed in by the mountain and river, it has never increased beyond the usual country islands

tavern.



HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

438

hanna,

DUNCAN'S ISLAND.

preter,

Whether the Proprietor had heard of a letter which he and Sasto John Harris, to desire him to desist from making a plantation at the mouth of the Choniata, where Harris has huilt a honseaud commenced clearing fields. "

soonau sent

John Harris;

referred to

provement." may have

it

was not

bis

custom

afraid that the warriors of the Six Nations,

mouth

built a house for the

to bear

ill

when they

will

but he

;

which included

On

thereof,

is

is

pass that way,

Beyond this, on the same side of the Juniata, is a house marked " Cornelius Acheson, who had encroached upon Hulings' Improvement in the Onion

-

Bottom, settled there settled

upon the island

;

that

who

had granted him previous permission, he removed therefrom.

At

period

this

the

By what tribe we know not. It

inhabitants

mostly Shawanese.

it

been inhabited,

is

band of Susquehannas. whites there was a large

were

felt

had previously probable by a

the

upon which

Upon the advent of the mound on the island (Dun-

unequal

archaeologist of the future

have been found

all

Indian

whom we

discover

ants.

«

The

much

al-

might not have

relating to the primal inhabit-

to flee.

man came

arrived,

Mr. Hulings ventured

return alone to the house.

to

After carefully recon-

noitering he entered, and found, to his surprise, an first

notice

we have of the Shawanese on

these

from the journal of the Rev. David Brainerd in 1745, and which has been reprinted. From a " rough draught" of the islands at the islands

and were obliged

fled to the point of the island, Forgetting ready to cross over at the first alarm. something in the haste, and thinking the Indians

luded, will no doubt be able by research in that locality to

conflict,

a place of safety)

relics

have

for the

lingered too long, for the wily red

the near approach of the savages, hurriedly packed up a few valuables, and placing his wife and youngest child upon a large black horse (the other children having previously been removed to

over these islands, and we are of

the opinion that the antiquary, to

In the spring following Brad-

of

was

not consulted, and these remains of the aboriginal inhabitants were used as filling-material for one of the shoulders or bastions of the dam.

Opposite the

suddenly, and the tomahawk and scalping-knife were reeking with the life-blood of the hardy but unMr. Hulings on being apprised fortunate pioneers.

large trees

The

fallen in battle.

the terrible blow.

Some down

of the

construction

spring."

dock's defeat (1756) the savages had reached the Susquehanna, but the few scattered frontiersmen were

had grown. During Pennsylvania Canal this mound was dug into and found to contain the bones of hundreds of Indian warriors, who had no doubt can's),

last

bank of the Susquehanna, are and " narroughs." Prior to this the French and Indian war had desolated the Juniata Valley, and the islands at the mouth islands, on the east " Peter's Mountain"

is,

established a trading-post, being a large Indian village there, but at the request of the authorities,

Im-

James Baskin's" house, while " Hulings' house" (another improvement) is farther up, in what is named the "Onion Bottom."

to see

John Harris had

" Part of Hulings'

the south of the Juniata, below the " William Kerl's" house, opposite

the point of Duncan's Island "

a settlement made on lands which they had always desired to be kept free from any person settling upon. He was told in that care should be taken to give the necessary orders in it." it ill

A

is

convenience of his trade, yet he ought not to clear fields. To this it was answered that Harris had only cleared as much land as would be sufficient to raise corn for his horses. Shekallamy said that he had no ill

may take

James Reed's" house, while between the

" Francis Ellis's" house. circuitous line, denominated " Mr. Neave's line," crosses the straight line

"They were told that Harris had only built that bouse for carrying on his trade; that his plantation, on which he has houses, barns, etc., at Peixtan, is his place of dwelling, and it is not to be supposed he will remove from thence; tbat be has no warrant or order for making a

will to

"

tween the " Susquehannah River" and the " Juneadey River," near the bank of the latter stream, is " Hulings' house." Some distance from " the point" is a straight line running from river to river on which is written " this is the way I want my line," while beyond, on the West Branch of the Susquehanna, nearly opposite " James Keed's" house, is " Mr. Neave's" Farther up the river, opposite a small island, house.

on the 19th of June, Shikellamy, a chief of the Five Nation Indians, a man of much consequence among the savages, asked through Conrad Weiser, the inter-

settlement on Choniata. " Shekallamy said that though Harris

is

centre of the island and the western shore is a small triangular " Island," so marked. On " the point" be-

The first we hear of Duncan's Island was in 1733, when at a Provincial Council held at Philadelphia,

is

mouth of the Juniata, made by Marcus Hulings in 1762, three are noted. One, now known as Duncan's Island, is marked " Island," and house as " Widow Baskin's." The large island in the Susquehanna known as Haldeman's Island, containing three houses,

\

;

Indian up-stairs " coolly picking his flint." Stopping to parley with the savage, so that he might retreat without being shot at, the delay to his wife

some time

seemed unaccountable, and fearing he had been murdered, she whipped up her horse and swam the Susquehanna. The water was quite high, but nowise daunted, she succeeded in reaching the opposite shore Mr. Hulings soon appeared, and finding in safety. the animal with his wife and child had disappeared,

the one to the southern point " Francis Baskin," onethird farther up, on the Susquehanna side, " George

in turn

Clark," while about the centre that of " Francis Ellis." On the north point is the word " Island."

he himself, by means of a light canoe, was safe from pursuit. The fugitives succeeded in reaching Fort

Almost opposite, on the

Hunter, where the Baskins and others of their neigh-

east

bank of the Susque-

he became alarmed, but a signal from the

eastern shore of the stream relieved his anxiety, and

:

REED TOWNSHIP. bors had congregated, and the inhabitants of Paxtang

had

rallied for a defense.

In the summer following William Baskins, living on Duncan's Island proper, returned from Fort Hunter with a portion of his family to cut his grain, and while thus engaged they were suddenly startled by the yell of Indians

who were hard by; however,

dis-

alarms were

covering they were neighbors, their

439

party pursued him without firing, being particularly anxious to roast him before a slow fire or show him

some such warm

which anxiety would not They were sure of taking him, and he felt that his luck had deserted him at last. Utterly exhausted he treed, and as they advanced killed another redskin. To his astonishment the party immediately fled. Murphy afterwards be satisfied

if

hospitality,

they shot him dead.

him fire three times without him load once, they imagined he had a great medicine of a gun that would shoot forever. At the war's end Murphy became a farmer. It was

quieted, but, alas! they were deceived, for the bar-

ascertained that, seeing

barous savages, as soon as they were near enough, gave them distinctly to understand their object was their

seeing

At

scalps.

this

moment they

all fled in

consternation,

hotly pursued, towards the house, and

when

there

Mr. Baskins, in the act of getting his gun, was shot dead and scalped his wife, a daughter of about seven, and a son three years old were abducted. Mr. McClean, who was also in the field, plunged into the river and swam the Juniata at what is called " Sheep Island," and concealed himself in a cleft of rocks on the opposite side, and thus eluded the pursuit of the savages and saved his life. Mrs. Baskins effected her escape from the Indians somewhere near Carlisle; the daughter was taken to the Miami country west of the Ohio, then an unbroken wilderness, where she was detained for more than six years, when, in con;

formity with Bouquet's treaty

made with the

Indians,

she was delivered up and returned.

She subsequently married John Smith, the father of James Smith, of Newport. The lad who was captured at the same time was taken to Canada, subsequently christened

characteristic of this

man

to live for others,

and he

died from a disease contracted in saving the children of a neighbor from a winter's flood.

When peace was declared and our independence acknowledged, many of the Schoharie Indians had among a people whose houses and barns they had burned, and the assurance to return and settle again

whose friends and relatives they had killed. There was one Indian named Seths Henry, who had killed more Schoharie people than any other man. He would sometimes leave a war club upon the dead body of a victim, with a horrid row of notches thereon, each notch indicating a scalp taken.

An

energetic

savage, he once led a party from Fort Niagara in the

winter to capture certain Schoharie patriots, and he succeeded, traveling six hundred miles through the

snow

to

do

so.

back, but he was

He,

too,

to come One day he Timothy Murphy

had the audacity

much upon

his guard.

Timothy Murphy, and concerning whose history we

started from one house to another.

have the following account

was observed to go in the same direction shortly afterwards, and it is a curious coincidence that, as far as can be ascertained, Seths Henry never reached any

The

first

we hear of Murphy was

his being

one

of the chief riflemen of Morgan's celebrated sharp-

At

shooters.

the battle of Bemis' Heights,

selected a few of his best

them cial

to

make

mark.

A

Morgan

place in this world.

directed

After this there began to be mysterious disappear-

the British general, Fraser, their espe-

ances of Tories and Indians, and was to be noted that

Several of

when Murphy

marksmen and

fired

them

Fraser

fired

without

eflect,

but

fell.

short time after the battle of

coincident with a disappearance would be a bush-heap fire

Monmouth,

three

companies of Morgan's corps were sent into Schoharie, N. Y. Among these was Murphy, and before long the Tories set an extra price on Murphy's scalp, a price that was never paid, although many Indians lost their hair in trying to win the reward. Murphy was a stout, well-made man, with rather a large body and small limbs, handsome in face, with jet-black hair and eyes.

Murphy's hairbreadth escapes were many in numIn the nick of time something was certain to He had at one time a double-barreled rifle, a weapon unknown to the Indians in those days. He was chased by a party, and

in the vicinity in

last seen.

human

vermin.

Timothy Murphy was a capital stump-speaker, and was a political power in Schoharie County. He brought William C. Bouck into public life, which brought him into the gubernatorial chair of the Empire State.

turn up to help him out.

years.

managed to load the empty barrel. As they gained upon him still, he stopped and shot another. The

which the missing person was

be supposed that calcined

bones might have been found in the ashes of these bush-fires. The remaining renegades and savages took the hint and departed that land before they departed this life, so the country was cleared of the

ber.

although he could generally outrun them, on this occasion they gained upon him. So he turned and killed one. Then he ran on, and while sheltered from the view of his enemies by a clump of bushes

It is to

As

to the

He

died in 1818, at the age of seventy

widow of William Baskins, the

first settler

on Duncan's Island, she married her neighbor, Francis

Susquehanna during the Revolution, which he carried on many Ellis.

Ellis established a ferry across the

years.

As previously mentioned, Duncan's Island was noted in early times, and really until the construction of the great Pennsylvania Railroad, as an impor-

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY.

440

tant point on the line of travel northward

and up

the Juniata.

have not learned.

Duncan's Island

is

about two

miles in length, although quite narrow, at the eastern

In 1819 strenuous efforts were made by interested to annex Duncan's Island to Cumberland County. Upon the formation of Perry County in

can's Island proper was

end of which is the village and post-office of BenveHaldeman's Island (so named for the owner) lies to the north, and separated from the former by a narrow channel. Unlike Duncan's Island, it is not of alluvial origin, but is elevated far above the neighboring flat-lands. The farm-house on it commands a magnificent landscape, comprising many of the wonders both of nature and art. The river here is nearly a mile in width, and is crossed by a wooden bridge. A dam across the river, just below the bridge, creates a pool, upon which canal-boats cross by means of a double towing-path attached to the bridge. The canal continues up Duncan's Island, diverging at its upper end into the Juniata and Susquehanna divisions. The Juniata division then crosses the Juniata River on a splendid aqueduct with wooden superstructure, and continues up the right bank. There is

why

also a fine bridge across the

parties

1824, no doubt the opportunity

would have been

new

afforded the secessionists to be included in the

county, but that did not please them, and hence they

remain loyal

to the

they are allied by

In the until the

county of Dauphin, to which

many

interests.

and march of internal improvements which has latter part of the eighteenth century,

needlessly destroyed our fisheries, the islands at the

mouth of

the Juniata were noted for their catch of

shad, and these rights were in themselves considered

of great value there as elsewhere on the Susquehanna

and

its

At

branches.

the so

commencement of the present century Dunnamed Isle Benvenue, but designated, instead of Juniata Island, we

nue.

mouth of the Juniata.

WAYNE TOWNSHIP. This was the last created township in the county, and the first erected under the Constitution of 1874, which directed that in case a division of a township is desired, the whole question must be submitted to the popular vote of legal voters within the township. There were in favor of a division of the township of

Jackson one hundred and seventeen, and sixty-six

At the court in May, 1878, Honor Judge Pearson issued the following decree against a division.

his

" Beginning at a pine-stump on land of Jacob Miller (formerly John Shoop), and on the line between Jackson and Jefferson townships;

thence by land of said Jacob Miller south nine and a quarter degrees east forty-four perches to a pine-tree at forks of public roads; thence south thirty-eight degrees through woodland of Samuel Shoop and others east one hundred and twenty perches to a stone corner of lands of Christian

Hoffman and John Werner

;

thence south twenty and a

half degrees east through lands of Christian Hoffman fifty-four perches;

thence by the same bearing on what is termed the Old Bull or Sawyer line six hundred and ninety -four perches to a chestnut-oak-tree on the

summit of :

"It appearing to the court by the vote taken and the return of the election ordered and held for the purpose of determining the question of a division of Jefferson township, and the return of said electiou showing that a majority of the votes taken are in favor of the division of said Jefferson township as reported by the commissioners for that purpose,

ships

;

Peter's Mountain line between Rush and Jefferson townand that they consider the division of said township necessary

for the convenience of the inhabitants as regards assessments, roads,

"John K. McGann. "George W. Enders. " William H. Fitting."

elections, schools, etc.

The

early settlers were the Buffingtons, Hoffmans,

the court therefore order and decree that said township be, and the same is hereby divided according to the report of the commissioners

Lebos, Gross, Swigards, Millers, Sheets, Sheesleys,

and the lines marked out and returned by them, and the draft attached to and made a part of said report; and that the east end of said town" ship division shall continue to be named Jefferson, and the west end of said division shall be a new township, to bo named Wayne, and shall by

Enders, Etsweilers, Engles, Lautzs, Snoops, Zimmermans, Wises, Spouslers, Hoovers, Pauls, and Potti-

that

name

be

known for all corporate purposes Wayne shall hereafter be held at

said township of 2

(named Sawyer's), in

said

;

that the elections of

the Bchool-house, No.

township and the elections ;

for the said

Burlington and George Vf. Bowman inspectors for the said Jefferson until the next election for said officers: and the court appoint for the township of Wayne John P. Sweigert as judge, and George Becker and

James Lebo

inspectors until the next election for said officers. " By the court.

"John

J.

Pearson, President Judge"

The commissioners appointed to divide Jefferson township reported as follows:

Lenkers,

Bowermans, Lehrs,

gers.

Enterline Post-Office

town-

ship of Jefferson shall be held at the school-house in Carsonville, in said township; and the courts appoint Simon Smith judge, and Henry

Enterlines,

Breslers,

store

is

in the centre of the

Jonathan Enterline opened a here, and kept the same for fifteen years. He

township.

was the honor.

first

In

1855,

postmaster, the office being

The present

store

is

named

in his

kept by Abraham For-

tenbaugh,and the postmaster is Amos Sponsler. The Reformed Church here was erected about 1830, of which the present pastor is Rev. A. S. Stauffer. Jacobs' United Brethren Church is a onestory frame building located in the western part of

:

UPPER PAXTANG TOWNSHIP. the township, built in 1861.

Rev9. George Hoffman,

Its pastors

Amos

penter, Kunkle, Loose, Doner,

have been

!

Yeager, Israel Car-

Hoffman Church. —This

church edifice, just east no longer used for worship, an old graveyard, but with few tomb-

of Enterline post-office,

and Jacob Funk, the

present incumbent.

Attached I

441

to it is

is

stones standing.

UPPEK PAXTANG TOWNSHIP At

a Court of Quarter Sessions held at Lancaster was presented from in-

dorsed " Appeal Doblicate,

1778,

Hoffman, and the orthog-

Peter

in August, 1767, a petition

Upper Paxtang, Wikiniski

Lower Paxtang township, stating that "some time ago Upper Paxtang above the Narrows was a separate township from Lower Paxtang, and had their annual officers. James Murray and Wil-

raphy of the surnames given as in the original. It will be seen by the large number of " Located Lands" that much of the valley had been taken up by out-

habitants of

liam Clark served as constables in said Paxtang

above the Narrows, and they had their own inspectors, etc., and learning that the inhabitants of Upper Paxtang above the Narrows had petitioned the court for a road from the Narrows to James Reed's, and obtained an order for a view of the same as in Lower Paxtang, which alarmed the petitioners, and they therefore prayed the court to grant them relief by confirming a division line of said townships." Where-

upon the court ordered that the partition

line " be-

tween Upper and Lower Paxtang be made from the mouth of Fishing Creek, where it empties into Susquehanna, and from thence along the top of Kittatenia Mountain, next to Lower Paxtang, to Beaver Creek."

There does not appear

be any record of the

to

court previous to the date of the above establishing

any way recognizing the existence of Upper Paxtang township. The minutes of the Court of Quarter Sessions, which usually exhibit the townships and the names of the constables for each at the commencement of each session, does not notice either the name of Upper Paxtang township or any constable as from such township until after the date of or in

the order of 1767

;

that order

creating this township at

order no northern

is

all,

the only record found

and

limit assigned,

as it

it

has in that

may

be taken

Upper Paxtang embraced at least all the territory subsequently assigned to Dauphin County, from the lower mountain to the Mahan-

that from August, 1767,

tango Creek, subject, however, to a debatable question whether Hanover township extended northward by the second mountain, a question which is noticed

more

at large

under the head " East and West Han-

over."

The

first

assessment-list of

Upper Paxtang

is

that

Wiconisco District in 1778. It is the earliest record we have of the inhabitants of Lykens Valley, as separate from Upper Paxtang. The paper is infor the

District,"

side parties for speculation or as investments.

Aaron

Levy, Michael Miller, John Cline, and Henry Wails, from the amount of taxes assessed, seem to have been very large landowners. list

The

latter

refers to the age of persons

to military

duty

UPPER PAXTANG,

portion of the

who were

not liable

HISTORY OP DAUPHIN COUNTY.

442 John Cline. James Beehara. Stephen Martin.

Michael Groscolp. Simon Brand. Frederick Height.

Andrew Boggs.

Henry Wails.

Rev. Anderline.

Samuel Sleight. George Harris. Levy Simeons.

Nicholas Miller. Patrick Work. John Shock.

Located Unimproved Lands. Acres.

George Frey James Hicham Nicholas Millar

HenJ Wino Abram Reg And" Bogffs

Doctor Leight.

George Mucklam Philip Dehause. Martin Cryder. Arthur Niger.

100 100 200 100 100

Craford's Peter Isk

Teeker.

Land

Abram Regie Ju» Shough

John Didde.

Isaac Kellar

Christian Snyder

Tetrich Stonebreaker

Martin

Jacob Shot.

George Nigley.

William Rider. Jacoh Weaver.

Landis Winger

Arthur Tagerts

Work Caleb Way Pat'

Philip Glinger.

1

Fred' Shich Sneider Grove

'.

Aaron Levy

Upper Paxtang remained entire until after the formation of the county of Dauphin, when it was division following division, until all now left of the original township

what we

is

Bartrim Galbreath,' Dan Williams 1

Dan' Miller Felty Overlady

Jacob Wetmer W'» Poor

Mountain, the "Lower District" that portion lying south of Berry's Mountain and north of the First Mountain. In the Upper District there is no return

and but one

and that owned by Capt. Weaver. In the Lower District, Marcus Hulings and Joseph Lytle had each a ferry, while Christian Hetick is returned for a boat; David Ireland has one still,

Lower

Bozard, John Bufflngton, Benj

Ludwig

Bretz,

Bend, Stephen Barger, Charles Conway, Francis Cline,

Whl»

Cooper, Adam Clinger, Philip

John Develer, Mich Develer, Mathias Dido, John Cole,

1

Acres.

30 [

loo 50 100 50 300 50 200 150 50 50 150

j

I

I

200 50 50 200

Harmon, John Hufman, Peter Hufman, Nicholas Hufman, .InHarmon, Jacob Harmon, David Haynes, Henry

200 40 100 20 luo

Hakert, Peter Iurey, Abram Inrey, Sam'

300

Ingrim.W" King, Adam Lark, Stophel Lioman, Dan 1

M'Clain, James Metz, Jacob Miller, Jn" Mutter, John

Myers, .InMinich, George

Meeck,

Ni. h..las.

Michael, Michi Neibour, Abram

50

30 100 150 400 50 40 100 30 200 150

Ridle,

SO 30 50 50 50 150 100 50 100

Geo

Ronsculp, Philip I

I

Rush, David M™ Anderlin Snoop, Geo-

50 50

Stiver, Yosts Stiver, Dan'

Debendurf, Revd Free, Joel Frelick, Anthony Feight, Geo Grub's Land

Negley, Geo Omholtz, Henry Phillips, Joseph Peter, Richard Powel, Jn"-. Rider, W>" Rider, Jn°

'

1

Ayrs,



,

Alison, Richard Bell, George Brown, Peter Bell, William

Wid" Birney, James Blue, John

.

75 60

50 50 150 200

Sneider, Leonard

60 30 100 100

Abram

Suoke, Chris Shot, Ludwig, Sen'

1

Shot, Ludwig Shut, Michael

100

Bundle, Ju° Black, Thonias Black, James Black, Dan 1 Boyd, Rob* Beard, Thom 8

Boyd, Rob' Boan, Thomas Cochran, Geo

Chambers, Jn° Carbet, Peter

W» W»

Cochran, Sam Oolgon, Jos

Leo. Coffman.

Andrew Spangler. Henry 01st. District Return, 1780.

J'

300 100 100 100

Clark,

100 50 30 50 100 50

,

Werfel Henry Welfrey, Henry .'..

...

106

James

Huh.

100

Holn

Adam

Forster, Stephen Forster, W"»

Forster,

James



Fulks, Frey, Conrad Fulton, Alex' Finley, John Garber, Jim Galligher, Thomas Gartner, Adam

Anthony.

Hoai: ,

Joans, Isaac Joans, Isaiah

Himpson,

100 100

1



Irland, David Johnston, W"i. Cap 1 Kellar, Jos Kisler,

100 100

Ge

50 30

Wo

50 50 200 100 60

60

Kiuter, Jn"

200 50 100 100 100

50 100 50 100 100 100

Kearns, Thomas Krnnailay,

Wm

Kays, John Kesler, Dan' Leonard, James Little, Jos Lockert, Inopis Laferty, Patrick Leek, Henry

Meek, Mathias McCluskey, Henry Mooncy, Abram M'tiill, Rob' M'Elhar, Patrick Mutch, Jn" M'Clenahan, Ja> M'C'ord, Rob«

M

James Murray, James Murdock, Jn"

Jn°..

Eyeman, Jacob

Smith

Hal held, Jn Hal •111011, Mich'

30

Dougherty, Henry

Elder, Jn°

10

W-

Huling, Marcus Hetick, Chris"

Dice, Jn".

Dougblass, Alex'

100 20

Goudy, Robert

Cline, Cutlip Caseation, James

Dun

I

Garber, Mich 1 Gilmore, Jn° George, Alex r Givens, Alex'

Gownow,

1 1

I

60 30 200 100

Colegon, Jn°

Ekert,

Woodsides, James Weaver, Capt

Well, P.John Yeager, And"

Widow



Buckhanon, James Bell, James

Gamble,

Smith, Jacob Shut, Jacob Saladay, John

Wolf, Henry Weaver, Jacob Went/., Adam

Baskin,

Boan,

Clark, 50

Seal George Shirley, John Shirley, Jacob

Sneider,

Brongh, Felty

Clark, Geo

Salady, Michael Stonebreaker, Detrich St ^breaker, Detrich, Jun' Shadle, Michael Shirley, Stophel

50 100

Acres.

Armstrong, Rob' Armstrong, Rob

John, .Inn' Brown, Jn«

District Return, 1780.

Michael Walker Henry Merhler Jacob Shaver Jn° Haekert Jacob Covel And" Regla Chris" Coffman Geo. Redsecker Smith, Jacob

Philip Clinger.

Bell,

Acres.

Philip Qeel

Jn° Wert.

Bell,

Upper

1

George Shadle Chris" Sneyder

Anthony Wertz.

Brown, Joseph

UPPER PAXTANG.

1

Dan Moor

Jonathan Woodsides. Jn» Phillips. W» Armecot. Zachariah Shoningberg.

Bell, Jn°., Sen'

negro.

Sleigh

200 1500 100 200 300 100 50 300 800 100 100 150 200 100 200 200 100 200 100 50 150 100 300 200 100 100

Freemen.

northwest corner of the county. The full return for 1780 is herewith given, that comprising the " Upper District" included all that section north of Berry's

for a mill,

1

Geo. Trice Geo. Hake, Esq Blacher's Land Dan Wolf. Simon Sneider

200 150 150 200 700 400 200 400 150 600 1000 300 3000 300 200 100

extreme

find in the

Sam

Doctor Ledigh Jn° Clendenning

100

Lowman

Geo. Eckert Simon Sneider

John Gilman.

150

100 250 160

Levy Simons

D°..

Peter Huffman.

Martin Greider Michael Grossculp Simon Brand. Fred* Weight Henry Wails

100

Thomas Carmchael

John Coulman.

Philip Dehass

300

George Ferree.

Chrisley Snoak.

Jn°M^Land

Stephen Martin

John Clandining.

Richard Peter.

Geo. Frey Jn° Ciine

200

40 150 400 100 100 100 145 15

c

Caul,

M'Elrath.Jos Murray, Archibald Misbor, Wid" M«Comb, W» Murray, John M'Nainara, James Montgomery, Colo'

60 50

10

15Q

'

200 50

10 30

100

130 60 150

50 100 20

200 60

M'Millon, Ju"

M'Fa.Ming.Jn" M'Cleyre, Patrick

Newpecker, Martin Nickleson,

60 loo 60

Thomas

Oram, Thomas Ock, Sam' Plough, Sam'

100

90

.

:

UPPER PAXTANG TOWNSHIP. Powel, Maluchi Pecker, Aaron Peacock, James Richmond, Jn«

30 150

Simons, George Swmef'onl, Albright Tavlor. John Taylor, Sam' Taylor, Geo Tindurf, Jacob

Rinzling, .In" 60

Suffron, Patrick

Smith, W» Straw, Jos. & Geo Smith, Rob« Strieker, Jacob Sturgeon,

Thomas. Jn° Thompson, w™ Thompson, Tho" Venderback, Henry Weeks, Jessey Walker, Rob> Watt, James Winn, Josiah

300 SO 100 100 150

Shelman, Ludwig

Thomas

Shorts, Leonard

Swagerty, Peter Stiver,

100

Michael

30

Simpson, Jno Stevenson, Jn°

Overseers of Roads.

James

Stone,

Ryan, Jn°

— Peter Hoofman, Thomas Oram. —Stophel Lark, Malachia Powell. — Robert Armstrong. Overseers of Poor. — James McCall, George Migla. Overseers of Poor.

60

Spore, Alex'

I

20

1781. Constable

100

,

120

Ove

100 100

1782. Constable.

John Mutch.

1

1783. Constable.

—John Mutch.

of Roads.— William Ayres, Joseph Little.

o/ Poor.— William Clark, Abraham Neighbo Overseen of Roatl*. lohn Murray, Adam Wentz. Overseers

100



Abraham Jury.

1784. Constable.

50 100

if

Oversee/'

>/

Poor.— Patrick Laferty. Roads.— William Foster (Lower

District).

100

Ynnslet, Michael

15

443

Stophel Shesley.

1780. Constable

Acres.

Acres.

(

of Upper Paxtang, as now existing, bounded on the north by the Northumberland County line, on the east by Mifflin and Washington townships, on the south by Halifax and Jackson townships, and on the west by the Susquehanna

The township

Located Unimproved Tenets.

is Acr.

Jacob Rizet Peter Laudis Rubin Hains

MOInre's Land

100 100 600 500

Jn« Cline

Dennis Dougherty Jn°.

Joseph Little

600 120 200

Jn». Lida

Geo. Fry

Jacob Wagoner Colo n

300

Jn». Cline Isaiah Jones Bull's Land Peter Pilley Alex'. Bartrim

Ale

600 300 120 400 4000 150 160

Timothy Matlat John Flora Jn«. Mil Jn°. Harshal

100 150 100 150 200 250 100 50

Killixger's Post-office.

—This

point

Chris n Hetick Peter Sturgeon W». Shields .

Edward Waters Christ".

three miles from the former place and seven from the

Near by is the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church, an elegant two story-brick edifice erected in 1872. This church is supplied by the Millersburg

latter.

pastors.

David's Reformed Church

edifice, a two-story

brick structure, was built in 1866, and Jn°. Goldenherry.

Henry Taylor. James Diveny.

yards from Salem Lutheran Church.

George Simere.

Jn". Cochron.

tion of David's

Harmon

Richard Waid. Sam. Orom.

are found recorded as early as

Conrad Leek. Peter Sturgeon.

And w

Philip

Leek.

Newpecker

Jn°. Bell.

James Spear.

Elijah Chambers.

The township

officers

from 1769 to 1785 were

—John Cochran.

baptisms





finish

Sept. 22, 1804.

—Thomas Sturgeon, James Murray.

Roads— William

Clark.

Constable— John Bell.

—John Cochran, John Mutch. — Robert Armstrong, John Black. —John Murray. Overseers of Poor. — Samuel Cochran, John Taylor. Overseers of Roadjs. — Peter Corhit, John Colligan. Constable. — John Murray.

1771. Constable.

Poor.— Patrick Sufferin, Samuel Taylor. Marquis Hulins, John Bell, Jr. Murray. Overseers of Poor. Robert Armstrong, William Foulk. Overseers of Road*. John Cochran, James Buchanan. Constable— John Gillmore. Overseers of

Overseers of Roads.



1773. Constable.— John

— —

— Thomas Forster, Ludwick Shots. — Alexander Randies, James Woodside. —Joseph Little. Overseers of Poor. — John McMullan, John Reed. Overseers of Roads. — Robert Armstrong, Samuel Cochran.

Overseers of Poor.

Overseers of Roads.

1775. Constable.

Sr.,

1776. Constable.— William Cline.

— Ludwick Shutz, James Forster. Overseers of Roads. — John Mutch, John Colligan. Overseers of Poor.

Sr.,

1777. Constable— Henry Ginder. 1778. Constable.— Malachia Powell.

— —

James Buchanan, John Tice. John Taylor, Joseph Little. Comtable— Benjamin Bufflngton. Overseers of Poor William Airs, Abraham Jury. Overseers of Roads. John Bell, Jacob Scifley. Overseers of Poor.

Overseers of Roads.

1779.

to 1774, as

June 8th of that year. Rev. Samuel Dubenborn was the pastor, and labored from 1779 to 1789. After 1795 he returned and remained a while. On March 7, 1775, these two congregations Lutheran and Reformed had one hundred and sixty-one acres of land surveyed for them jointly, called " Good Intent," and received a deed therefor

Overseers of Roads.

Overseer of

1774.

only a few

Overseers of Poor.

Overseers of Poor.

1772.

was formed prior

is

The congrega-

According to an agreement between them, dated March 30, 1792, they made a division in 1808. In 1794 the old log church was built, and on Feb. 27, 1797, a contract was made with some one to

1769. Constable.

1770.

Fouler.

Alex'. Taylor.

Ayers.

Jn.

.

Jn°. Landis.

Philip Tindurf.

situ-

,

Hetick

Do

Ju°. Swagerty.

is

Millersburg to Berrysburg,

.Port

James M«Canl M'Grahan & M«Ke

600 50

River. ated on the road from

Marstaller

.

Geo. Cooper

Bartrim Galbreath Rob'. Neal

_

Widow Duncan Widow Scott Fredt. Humble

,

James Tilman

Metch

— —

it

for

one hundred and eight pounds.

The

build-

ing committee on the part of the Reformed congrega-

were Abraham Nachbar [Neighbour], Jacob It Meek, George Neagley, and Valentine Weker. stood at the lower end of the cemetery, and was a two-story log house, weatherboarded, plastered, and with galleries on three sides. The pulpit was ascended by stairs and surmounted by a sounding-board. It is not known whether it had regular pastors or not, but occasional preaching was had by Revs. William Hendel, of Tulpehocken, Geistweit, Anthony Hautz, of Lebanon, and Philip Gloninger, of Harrisburg. During the Revolutionary war, when Rev. William Hendel came, he was escorted by members of the congregation with muskets to protect him and them from the prowling Indians, and during the services guards stood with guns in hand near the church to protect the worshipers from skulking savages. Rev. Hendel had a catechism class of eighty-five, many of whom came ten or fifteen miles to attend class or service. tion

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

444

Eev. James Reily was pastor from 1812 to 1819, and (luring his time the parsonage was built opposite the

by the pastors of St. John's Church, near Berrysburg, and the Reformed congregation ("Zion's") by the

church (where the farm-house now is). Rev. Isaac Gerhart was pastor from 1819 to 1844. His successors have been: 1844-56, J. A. Ellis; 1856, Richard A. Fisher; 1857-65, Ephraim Kieffer 1865-68, F. J.

Millersburg pastors of that denomination.

;

Moore; 1868-75,

W. Lescher;

J.

1875 to present

In 1842,

Keefer, Sr., donated one-fourth acre of land

upon which

to build a

church

edifice.

The

corner-

stone was laid in 1843, and a neat structure built thereon.

The Evangelical Association Church,

time, J. B. Kerschner.

The old church

Andrew

edifice

was torn down

in 1865,

and

the corner-stone of the present structure laid Sept.

9,

The basement was dedicated Dec. 8, 1868, and the main audience-room May 24, 1868. Hoover's Chuech. This church edifice, lying in the southeast part of Upper Paxtang township, near 1866.



the Mifflin township line,

is

a joint church of the

theran and Reformed Churches.

Lu-

The Evangelical

Lutheran congregation (called "Zion's")

is

supplied

Riegel's,

a handsome

frame

edifice, is in

at

the ex-

treme eastern part of Upper Paxtang township, and only a few yards from the Mifflin township line. It is supplied with preaching by the pastor of the Ber-

rysburg church.

Paxton Post-Office

is

the

name

of a village in

the northwestern corner of the township, at the of the less

Mahantango Creek.

It contains a

mouth

population

than one hundred.

MILLERSBURG BOROUGH. Millersburg Borough quehanna River,

is

situated

on the SusWiconisco

at the confluence of the

Creek, twenty-three miles north

of Harrisburg, on

the Northern Central and Lykens Valley Railroads.

The

place was settled

some years prior

time it was laid out. It derived its name from Daniel Miller and John Miller, who emigrated from Lancaster County about 1790. They took up some four hundred acres of land and began a settlement. It was laid out by Daniel Miller into town lots in July, to the

and incorporated into a borough April 8, 1850, its progress has been rapid. Daniel Miller's first wife, Elizabeth, died in 1813, and he married for the second time Mary Wingert, July 8, 1817. They both died in October, 1828, leaving one child, Mary, who was born Nov. 25, 1820, married George W. Bowers, Feb. 11, 1838, and is still living in the town. Daniel Miller, who was born in 1750, had two children by his first wife, who removed at an early day to Ohio. 1807,

from which time

The

first settlers in

this region,

known

as "

Lykens

Valley,"

were French Huguenots and Germans. Francis Jacques or " Jacobs," commonly known as "French Jacob," Larue or La Roy, Shora, Sandoe, the Kleims, Werts, Steevers, Shutts, Ferrees, Millers,

Andrew Lycan, and John Rewalt are found among the earliest names of white men who settled in this section. About the time John and Daniel Miller settled here " French Jacob" built his grist-mill on the north bank of the Wiconisco Creek, just above the foot of Race Street, and near to which, some time before, he

had built his log cabin, then considered quite a pretentious structure, large and strongly put together, and well provided with loop-holes, a kind of fort to which the settlers might fly for safety in cases of attack from the Indians. Here was taught the first school, kept by Daniel Miller, the proprietor of the



town.

Neither cabin or mill are longer to be seen.

Domestic trouble had caused at an early date the owner (Jacobs) to remove forever from the spot. The property was at times unused and unoccupied. It fell under the ban of superstition, several of the settlers having seen about it divers strange and unearthly appearances, " shapes dire, dismal, and horrid." Time and the spoliations of man have done their work, and the almost obliterated channel of the old head-race alone

is

seen to

mark

the spot

where once was the forest-home of the old French Huguenot. Upon a part of this land Daniel Miller, the then sole proprietor, through Peter Williamson, his surveyor, laid

out the town-lots in July, 1807.

These lots sold very readily, being selected by lottery, and soon the place assumed the importance of a rapidly-growing and prosperous town. The town is regularly laid out, with spacious streets crossing each

other at right angles, and practical alleyways giving

passage to the rear of every building.

The Susque-

hanna River at this point is a mile in width, stretching away in lake-like form some three miles, from Berry's Mountain in the south to the Mahantango Mountain in the north, at which points, forcing its way through these mountains much diminished in its

;

MILLERSBURG BOROUGH. bed,

it

up for church services. Here Rev. Isaac Gerhart preached occasionally. The building was never dediIn 1856 cated, and no regular pastors were called. the Reformed and Lutheran congregations jointly

hurriedly tumbles over rocks and pebbles of

it

the passage, winding quickly out of sight. The first school was taught in a log cabin or fort

by Daniel Miller, the founder of the town, and he was succeeded by a Mrs. Miller. This fort was built about 1794, on the banks of the Wiconisco Creek, as a place of safety from the surrounding Indians. The next house was built about 1812 or 1813, on Union Street, and was taught by an educated German. This house was superseded by a poorly-constructed brick building, and that by a frame structure on the site where now stands the large and substantial building on Middle Street, which continued in use until

who

on the 30th of November following. The first conRev. Ephraim sistory was elected April 25, 1857. Kieffer was the first pastor, and the present incumbent is Rev. J. B. Kerschner for the others see David's Church, which with Zion's at Hoover's and this make one charge. In 1874 this congregation bought ;

out the interest of the Lutherans.

man

the free-school system was adopted, after

of scholastic abilities.

men

in the early history of the

Hemping preached

the year

occasionally

Lutherans here in the old school-house in the language. In 1832, Rev. S. D. Finckels, of Middletown, came here every four weeks and preached in both English and German. In 1842, Rev. W. G. Laitzell, one of the seven founders of the East Pennsylvania Synod, who had been called to his first charge in Armstrong's Valley, crossed Berry's Mountain and preached here and at Salem (Killinger's). From 1846, Rev. C.F.Stower, of Berry sburg charge, preached

German

being defeated twice, as the town and township were at that time one school district. The opposition from the township was very great, but persistent perseverance overcame all the opposing forces. The most active school

Lutheran Church. —About

to the

About 1844

a

Paul's

St.

1830 the Rev. J. N.

established a good

McGaw,

cor-

ner-stone was laid in June, and the building dedicated

educational sentiment, and was succeeded by Samuel or 1845

The

erected the brick church on Middle Street.

the citizens refused to send their children. In 1833 a select school was taught by Mrs. Susan Barringer, a

lady of considerable culture,

445

town

were Jacob Seal, Dr. Robert Auchmuty, David Link Simon Wert, Adam Light, John Ebery, Benjamin Musser, and Matthias Freck. The town has now two first-class school buildings and five graded schools. Its high school compares favorably with any in the

here for four years as often as convenient, and in 1852, Rev. Jacob Martin, of same charge, came occasion-

county.

the Reformed, and in 1856 built the church edifice on

charge, began holding services, and after one year's labors organized a congregation,

The

officers of

in 1850

the borough since

have been

its

it

Street.

The

1861, P. P.

Sell;

Fernsler the charge consisted of Berrysburg, Millersburg, Salem (Killinger's), and Lykens, but in 1871

incorporation

:

the latter was withdrawn. 1850.

Simon Wert.

1852. J. J.

1865.

Bowman.

1867. 1870.

1855. Jacob Ratbvon.

1872. J. S. Musser.

George M. Brubaker. 1858. J. L. Bomgardner.

1874.

H. Frank.

1876.

John

1857.

S.

.in

1879. B. G. Steever.

1862. George Slate.

18S0. J. L. Freck.

1851. B. G. Steever. 1853. Jesse

Auchmuty.

George Yeager. 1858. William A. Jodon. 1857.

Bowman. N.Bowman.

Reformed congregation

to the

March, 1873, and

laid the corner-stone in

Evangelical Association Church.

1864. S. S.

1S68.

con-

first church was built on the lot where the present parsonage stands, and was a log structure weatherboarded. The present church building, a commodious twostory brick structure, was built in 1860. Since 1862 (as early as any records are found) the pastors have

edifice

Bowman.

Benjamin Bowman. H. H. Mosser.

1871. E.

—This

gregation was organized about 1840. .The

1863. C. C. Freck.

1867.

for

new

June, 1874. The basement was dedicated in 1878, and the audience-room Nov. 14, 1880.

TOWN CLERKS. David Brindle.

Union Church

edifice in

1864. B. G. Steever.

1850.

the

fourteen hundred dollars, broke ground for a

Musse

1859. C. Penrose.

In 1871 the project of

withdrawing from the joint union building and erecting a new church was discussed. It sold its interest

Simon Wert. A. Douden. Simon Wert.

1853. Jacob Seal.

which united with

pastors have been: 1856-61, D. Lane; 1862, George P. Weaver; 1863-66, C. A. Fetzer; 1866-78, M. Fernsler; July Under Rev. M. 27, 1879, George Conrad Henry.

Middle

In 1846 there were in Millersburg about eighty and three churches.

dwellings, two stores, one mill,

In 1850 it had five hundred population, which doubled in 1860 and trebled in 1880.

In November, 1853, Rev. D. Sell, of same

ally.

W.

1860. B.

1878. Jesse

1862.

1880.

Steever.

Auchmuty.

William M. Hartman.

The Millersburg Literary Society was organ-

;

and is in successful operation, being patronized and actively participated in by many of the best and most prominent men of the town.

;

1864, Joseph

M. Sayler

1865-67, F. P. Lehr; 1867-69, A. A. Overholt; 1869-

ized in 1876,

Trinity Reformed Church.— About the year 1833 several members of the Reformed faith pur-

been: 1862-64, William Hain 71, L.

Snyder

;

Neitz; 1876-79, I

1881,

H. A.

1871-73, S. S.

Chubb

W.K. Wiand;

;

1873-76,

1879-81, S. S.

H. A.

Chubb

;

Neitz, present incumbent.

Berrysburg was the

first

seat of this

denomination

j

chased a frame building on Middle Street and

fitted

in this region,

and two years

after its organization

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

446

into a church this one was organized.

able church property, and

is

It

owns valu-

clear of debt.

The Methodist Episcopal Church. —Millersburg and Berrysburg Circuit was cut off of Halifax in 1866. Since then the pastors have been 1866-68, A. W. Wiggins 1868-70, Able Howard 1870, Thomas Kilpatrick; 1871-75, W., H. Fries; 1875-77, W. S. Pugh; 1877-79, J. M. Hinson 1879, William M. Gilbert; 1880-82, N. D. McComas. It was made a station. The large brick edifice was erected in 1858. The church has one hundred and seventy-five members, and a parsonage adjoining the church edifice. The Manufacturing Industries of the borough are the planing-, saw.-, and lumber-mills of John Neagley, C. F. Freck, and Alfred Douden and the Standard Axle Manufacturing Company, the latter of which has proved a successful enterprise. The Millersburg Herald was established by its present editor, proprietor, and publisher, J. B. Seal, on the first Friday in January, 1875. It is a weekly family journal, and specially devoted to local news. It is a four-page sheet of thirty-two columns, and en:

;

;

;

joys a large circulation.

equipped politics,

job-office.

With

it is

This paper

connected a wellindependent in

is

and occupies a position which gives

it

great

strength in moulding opinion in the north of the

county.

The First National Bank 12, 1867, as

was organized Feb.

the Lykens Valley Bank, and began busi-

March 6th following. It was a private company, composed of G. M. Brubaker, S. P. Auchmuty, Benjamin Reigel, Philip Moyer, Joseph F. Corbett, Henry ness

Walborn, George Gleim, Aaron Mattis, Jonathan Its capital was twentyReigel, and Daniel Good. five thousand dollars, which was shortly after increased to forty thousand dollars by the addition of the following new partners Tobias Bickel, A. Fortenbaugh, Jonathan Swab, Sept. 7, 1868, and Benjamin D. Reigel, George Deibler, and George Daniel in March, 1869. It was incorporated Feb. 29, 1872, and reorganized as a corporation. It was merged :

bank April 13, 1875, with its charter numbered 2252, and began business as such May 1st the following. G. M. Brubaker was president to January, 1875, and was then succeeded by Alfred Douden, the present incumbent. George Gleim was cashier until April 14, 1873, when Ferdinand H. Voss succeeded him. It has a capital stock of one hundred

into a national

thousand dollars, with a surplus of twelve thousand dollars. Its first banking-house was on Market Street. In 1869 it erected its present building, and occupied it in the fall of that year.

The Millersburg Bank was

organized in the

fall

an individual banking institution, composed of eighty to one hundred stockholders, mostly of the wealthiest farmers, and all individually liable. Its capital stock is thirty thousand dollars, with a surplus of ten thousand dollars. Its first president was S. Buck, succeeded in 1875 by the present incumbent, F. Wenrich. J. S. Gilbert has been cashier from its organization, and Isaac Miller vice-president of 1868.

It is

since the creation of that

ment

it

has occupied

its

office.

own

Since

its

establish-

building on Union

Street.

MIDDLE PAXTANG TOWNSHIP. At

a Court of Quarter Sessions, held in

County

month of August,

in the

Dauphin

1787, an order

was

issued to commissioners to take into consideration

the necessity and propriety of dividing

who

tang township,

Upper Pax"comthe mouth of a

reported a dividing line,

cluded the section of the county between the First and Peter's Mountains, embracing Fishing Creek, Stony Creek, and Clark's Valleys. As may be surmised, the face of the country is much broken, and save along the principal streams as they near the

mencing at the river Susquehanna, at run emptying into the said river, and running from Jacob Strickler's spring, and thence along the different courses of the said run to the place where the said spring extracts out of the earth, and from thence by a direct line to the dividing ridge thence along

Susquehanna and the valleys expand, the land is poor and unproductive. Nevertheless, there are some fine farms on Clark's Creek and along the

the said ridge to the extremity thereof, to the line of

and

;

Berks County."

The

court directed the township to be divided,

agreeably to this report, from the said line to the upper boundary of Lower Paxtang, to be called Middle Paxtang.

As thus constituted the township

in-

Susquehanna.

The history of the township is so intimately connected with that of the general record of the county, to which reference is made for a history of Fort Hunter, at the mouth of Fishing Creek, and other details relating to the Freuch and Indian war. The following incident, however, is of such a local char-

we give place thereto. Ludwig Minsker, an emigrant from

acter that

the Palatinate,

:

MIDDLE PAXTANG TOWNSHIP. located in Clark's Valley in 1750.

He

built his cabin

on a run near the place where the house of John Hocker, Jr., now stands. He was a man of great courage, and the Indians of the neighborhood fear-

dian referred

117

It

to.

appeared that some ill-disposed

whites had gone to the cabin of the Indian and wantonly shot him, but did not

kill

him.

With

his little

strength remaining the poor Indian crawled up and

ing him, never molested him or his family. It was subsequent to Braddock's defeat that hostile Indians crossed over the mountains and spread death

then down the side of the Fourth Mountain, across

and desolation on the frontiers. While out hunting during the spring of 1756, Ludwig observed the trail Knowing that if they of the marauding savages.

rock alluded to

discovered his cabin, his wife and child in his absence would be killed, he hastened home and quickly

of Stony Creek, nine miles north of Harrisburg.

devised means for their protection.

It

was too

late

below the mountains, for he would be overtaken. Having in his house a chest six feet long, he bored a sufficient number of holes in it to admit air; then taking it upon his shoulder, waded up the run some distance, placing it in a sequestered nook. Returning to his cabin he took his wife and child (the latter but to go

same way to the chest to conwhere the dense foliage covered their hiding-place. It was ten days before the hostiles had left the valley, and during all that time Mrs. Minsker and her child were safely secured in the huge chest, her husband in the mean time keeping guard in the neighborhood of their cabin, hunting and carrying

six

months

old) in the

ceal his trail,

provisions to the refugees.

One autumn, while Ludwig was

severed the lower part, exclaimed, " like

Hog meat

him," and scampered

very off to

the woods.

The

child

who was

concealed with his mother in

Ludwig the second. He married a daughter of Thomas Cairn, and built his cabin at a spring on the Third Mountain, on property now belonging to Harry Zeiders, who is a descendant of the the chest became

Ludwig.

first

It is

only a few years since that the

cabin was torn down. Prior to the Revolution a friendly Indian had his cabin on the north side of Peter's Mountain, near the spring which supplies the water-trough on the pike.

One evening in lived for years unmolested. of the year Mrs. Minsker, while standing in the door-way, heard a loud moan, resembling that of some one in extreme agony. She told her husband, Here he the

fall

who

replied that

it

was the cry of a panther.

Still

found by direction of the sound that the person was going up the mountain, but Ludwig to quiet her said she must be mistaken, it was only the cry of the panther. The ensuing summer the cows remained out beyond the usual time, and the children were sent in search of them. Going up the mountain they came to what was then called and still known as the "King's Stool," when they found a skeleton lying under it. Informing their father of the fact, Ludwig examined the remains, and found by the hunting-shirt, which was intact, that it was the In-

listening, she

is

a huge bowlder heaved on the top

of another, and as high as the tallest trees.

Dauphin first

is

mouth The point was by Samuel

a prosperous town located at the

made at who removed

settlement

Sturgeon,

that

thither

shortly

after

the

French and Indian war. A mill was built there in 1770, and the place went by the name of Green's mill. The town was laid out in 1826 by Innis Green for the Dauphin and Schuylkill Coal Company, and by him named Port Lyon. It was afterwards and for many years called Greensburg, until it was made a posttown, when the name was changed to Dauphin, for the county, and when the borough was incorporated, 31st of March, 1845, the post-office name was adopted. Corporation Officers. The borough was in-



corporated

have been 1845.

carrying towards

his cabin half of a good-sized hog he had butchered, an Indian stealthily came up behind him, quickly

good meat, Indian

Clark's Valley; thence up theThird Mountain to the " King's Stool," where he died from exhaustion. The

March

31, 1845.

Its officers

since then



; ; ;

HISTOKY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

448 Irish Presbyterians removing,

and the church

passed into the hands of the Lutherans and

edifice

German

Reformed, or was jointly owned by them and the remaining Presbyterians. It burned down in 1855, but for some five or six years previous had not been used for religious services. A Presbyterian Congregation was organized April

6,

1850,

when twenty-three members entered

into solemn articles of covenant

and

faith.

There

is

no record before that, although previous to that time Rev. Dr. DeWitt, of Harrisburg. preached occasionally in the school -house and at the old " Hill Church." Rev. George R. Moore came June 21, 1848, to officiate at the old " Hill Church," and was ordained Oct. 18, Under his auspices .the congregation was 1848. formed as previously stated. He preached mainly in the school-house. The new church was dedicated May 12, 1850. The bell was a donation from John W. Patton, Esq., of Philadelphia. Miss Monroe and other ladies, of Wilmington, Del., donated the communion service. Rev. George R. Moore continued Rev. John W. Davis, from as pastor to June, 1856 March, 1857, to August, 1860; Rev. Alexander D. Moore, from Sept. 8, 1860, to Sept. 8, 1868 Rev. David C. Menker, from Dec. 1, 1868, to April 25, 1880 and the present incumbent, Rev. Robert F. McClean, from Sept. 1, 1880. Methodist Episcopal Church. Dauphin Circuit was cut off of Halifax Circuit in 1838, since which time the pastors have been 1838, D. Sheets 1839, V. Gray, William McCombs 1840, H. E. Gilroy, William McCombs 1841-13, William Cooper, T. W. Arthur 1843, R. M. Greenbank, J. M. Wyeth 1844, R. M. Greenbank, T. A. Fernley 1845, William 1846, Eliphalet Reed L. Gray, George D. Brown ;

;

;



:

;

;

;

;

;

John C. Thomas; 1848-50, C. R. Brooks; 1850Henry Sutton 1852, H. Sanderson, C. R. Curry

1847, 52,

;

H. Sanderson, J. J. Lane; 1854, S. R. Gilliugham, H. H. Hickman 1855-57, Valentine Gray, E. J. Pepper; 1857-59, William Dalrymple; 1859-61, George G. Rakestraw 1861-63, Abel Howard 18631865-67, G. T. Hurlock 1867, 65, S. L. Kemble Gideon Barr; 1868-70, T. Montgomery; 1870-72, 1853,

;

;

;

;

;

1872, J. Robison 1874-76, Frederick Illman 1876-79, Ephraim Potts 1879 to the present time, R. C. Wood. The church edifice, a commodious frame structure, was erected in 1837. The circuit embraces Dauphin, Rockville, Coxestown, and Paxtang, a preaching appointment four miles from Harrisburg and near the residence of Judge Hies-

John Stringer

;

;

;

;

ter.



Zion's Lutheran Church. This congregation had worshiped in the old " Hill Church," but on September 5th of that year it resolved to erect a new church edifice in the town. The joint building committee then appointed were Daniel Poffenberger, Elias Fertig, H. C. Sponsler, George Kinter, George W. Urbin, Nelson C. Hyde. It was built on a lot of Mrs. Gross by the Lutheran and Reformed before 1849

The corner-stone was laid and the building dedicated Feb. 2, 1851, with a dedicatory sermon by Rev. A. H. Lochman. The pastors have been: 1851, Rev. C. F. congregations jointly.

Aug.

1850,

10,

1852-56, Rev. C. Nittenhauer 1856-68, Rev. George J. Martz 1868-70, Rev. Kurtz 1870-80, Rev. D. P. Rosenmiller, who died in 1880, and since then the congregation have had no regular pastor. Evangelical Association Church.—This congregation was organized prior to 1872, when the church building was built. Before then services were

Stoever;

;

;

;

occasionally held in the school-house.

have been Leslie;

:

1872-75, Rev. J. A. Fager

1877-78, Rev. A. Markley;

;

The

pastors

1875-77, Rev. 1878-80, Rev.

John Hoover; 1880, the present incumbent, Rev. H. M. Copp. This circuit embraces two other churches, Zion's, some two miles from town, and which was organized in 1862, and the one at Fishing Creek, organized in 1831. The Halifax Church was an offshoot of Zion's, and was instituted to accommodate the town members.

Berry's Mountain Mills, near Berry's MounMiddle Paxtang township, were built in 1797, the large saw-mill by Mr. Barr. They were afterwards operated by Mr. Rutter, and later by Loomis & Kingsbury. In 1834 and 1835 they transacted a large business. Shurr's mill was a short distance above. tain, in

LYKENS VALLEY. The

Wiconisco or Lykens Valley includes that Upper End" of the county of Dauphin that is watered by the Wiconisco Creek and its branches, save where local names have been given to certain portions, such as Williams Valley, etc. As much of the history of the townships is so closely allied, we purpose to give such facts relating thereto section of the "

as do not specially belong to the townships proper.

may be here stated that locally Lykens Valley is but a small part of Wiconisco Valley, and yet we are compelled to designate the " Upper End" by that It

general

The

title.

early history of the Wiconisco Valley

of interest, inasmuch as the individual for

is

whom

one the

LYKENS VALLEY.

449

takes its name was among the first Andrew Lycans (not Lycan) settled

out early to fodder their cattle, when two guns were fired at them. Neither being harmed, they ran into

on the Swatara Creek, where he took up two hundred and fifty acres of land, adjoining lands of Rohert

the house and prepared themselves for defense in case of an attack. The Indians then got under cover of a

Young and Lazarus

hog-house near the dwelling-house, when John Lycans, a son of Andrew, John Rewalt, and Ludwig

entire valley

now

In 1732,

settlers.

Stewart, and which was surveyed

About 1740 he out and removed, with a number

Shott, a neighbor, crept out of the house in order to

of others, to the west side of the Susquehanna, where

get a shot at them, but were fired upon by the savages,

him on the 4th of

to

seems

he

to

have sold

settled arid

April, 1737.

made some improvements on a

and all wounded, the latter (Shott) in the abdomen. At this moment Andrew Lycans saw one of the Indians over the hog-house, and also two white men running out of the same and get a little distance therefrom. Upon this Lycans and his party attempted to escape, but were pursued by the Indians to the number of sixteen or upwards. John Lycans and Rewalt being badly wounded and not able to do anything, with a negro who was with them, made off, leaving Andrew Lycans, Shott, and a boy engaged with the Indians. The savages pursued them so closely that one of them, coming up to the boy, was

tract of

land between Sherman's Creek and the Juniata, in then Cumberland County. This not being included in the last Indian purchase, the Shawanese,

who had

a few scattered villages on the Juniata, complained of the encroachments of these»settlers and demanded

To

their removal.

authorities

sent,

pacify the Indians the Provincial

in

1748,

the sheriff of Lancaster

County, with three magistrates, accompanied by Conrad Weiser, to warn the people to leave at once. But, notwithstanding all this, the settlers remained, deter-

mined not

On

to be driven

the 22d of

May,

away, at

by threats. more decisive meas-

least

1750, after

going to strike his tomahawk into him, when Ludwig Shott turned and shot him dead, while Lycans killed two more and wounded several in addition. At last,

ures had been decided upon by the Provincial gov-

ernment, a number of high dignitaries who had been appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor held a conference at the house of George Croghan, in Pennsborough Subsequently, accomtownship, Cumberland Co. panied by the under-sheriff of that county, they went

being exhausted and wounded, they sat down on a log to rest themselves; but the Indians were somewhat

and stood some distance from them, and consequently returned to look after their own wounded. cautious,

released by order of the Governor of the Province, when Andrew Lycans re-

Lycans and all his party managed to get over the mountains into Hanover township, where they were properly cared for. Here Andrew Lycans died, leaving a wife, Jane Lycans, and children, John, Susanna, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Mary, and Margaret. It

moved with his family to the east side of the Susquehanna beyond the Kittochtinny Mountains, and by per-

settlers,

to the place

where Lycans and others

lived,

and

after

taking the settlers into custody burned their cabins to

number of five or six. 1 They were subsequently

the



is

mission of the authorities " settled on a tract of about

on the northerly side of Whiconescong Creek." Here he made " considerable improvements," which we learn from a document in our possession. Until the spring of 1756 these pioneers on the Wiconisco were not disturbed in their homes, but following the defeat of Braddock, everywhere along the frontier the savages began their work of devastation and death. Their implacable cruelty was stimulated by the promise of reward for scalps on the part of the French, beside the further one of being put into possession of their lands. On the morning of the 7th of March, 1756, Andrew Lycans and John Rewalt went two hundred

acres, situated

We

have before us the "account of Andrew Work, sheriff of Lanremoval of trespassers at Juniata," which is as follows: "Dr. Province of Pennsylvania to Andrew Work, Sheriff of the

1

caster, for

County of Lancaster and Cumberland. "To ten days attendance on the Secretary Magistrates of the County of Cumberland, by his Hoo's, the Governor's command to remove sundry persons settled to the Northward of the Kichitania Mountains "To paid the Messenger sent from Lancaster my own Expenses, :

3: 7:

"To

the Under-sheriff's Attendance on the like Service, eight days:

"To

his Expenses in taking

ter other

down Andrew Lycan

Expenses on the Journey, 2: 10:

" Augt., 1750.

29

to Prison to Lancas-

0.

And. Work, Sher."

not

known when Lycans'

family, with the other

returned to their homes in the Wiconisco

all danger was over; and although ou a number of occasions they were obliged to leave all and flee before the marauding savages, yet the one alluded to was the only occasion where they so narrowly escaped with their lives. Besides,

Valley, but not until !

Shamokin (Sunbury), and Armstrong's (Halifax), and at McKee's, at the foot

the erection of the forts at at

of Berry's Mountain, was perchance ample protection from the annual marauds of the Indians, which up to

',

the year 1764 kept the frontier inhabitants in a terrible state of apprehension and fear.

John Lycans, son of Andrew, became an officer of the Provincial service, commissioned July 12, 1762. In Juue, 1764, he was stationed at Manada Gap. It is probable he removed from the valley prior to the Revolution. His mother, Jane Lycans, in February, 1765,

had a patent issued to her for the land on which her husband had located. The Lycans' cabin stood until about twenty years ago ou McClure's farm, owned at present by H. L. Lark. Ludwig Shott died about 1790, and left a large family some of his descendants remain in the valley. Rewalt subsequently removed ;

now thickly-settled portion of the Province. Andrew Lycans has given his name to the beautiful

to the

valley of the Wiconisco,

owing perchance

to the ter-

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

450

him for a time, subsequently by Peter MinThis cabin stood near the old house on Walfarm, and was in later years occupied by

encounter with the Indians as narrated. The orthography has been changed within the last fifty years, but we have not learned the reason therefor. Whether Lykens or Lycans, we trust that no attempt

pied by

may ever be made to deprive the first pioneer of the name which has been appropriately given to it. After Andrew Lycans' the first house built at Oak-

house on the premises. The first election held in the valley, or in Lykens township, was probably in Gratz, about the year 1815.

rible

Dale Forge was erected by Henry

Shoffstall for Joel

Ferree, of Lancaster County, then owner of the LyIts location was cans' tract, about the year 1771.

about seventy-five yards northwest of where the present bridge crosses the Wiconisco Creek. The property was purchased by Mr. Ferree from Jane Lycans, the widow of the old pioneer. On the death of the it became the property of Isaac Ferree, of Lancaster County, whose son, Isaac, Jr., moved into

former it

in 1800.

At the period when Andrew Lycans

lived

on the Forge property there was an Indian village on the land now owned by Henry Bohner, and the spring at his house is the head of the run which empties into the head of the Forge dam and called the " Indian This Indian town property, when it was abandoned by the Indians, was taken up by Joel Ferree, first named. AVhen the house was built by Mr. Shoffstall, there were few settlers in the neighborhood. There were, however, Shott (now Kottka), George Buffington, near Bufiington's Church, John Nicholas Hoffman, and Philip Umholtz, near Gratz. In Williams Valley the nearest person was Conrad Updegraff, at (now) Williamstown, and next Daniel Williams, who had a grist-mill there, at or on the property now owned by Martin Blum, east of Williamstown. Another person about this time, by the name of Daniel Hain, built a saw-mill where the Summit Branch Railroad crosses

Town Run."

the creek at Lykens, taking the water from Rattling

Creek by a race to Wiconisco Creek. Oak-Dale Forge was built about the year 1828, by James Buchanan, who at the same time, or the year following, built six or seven houses for his workmen. The houses were located on the south side of the creek, and were occupied by John Ginter, Thomas Nutt, George Conner, Samuel Boon, Joseph Dunlap, and others. Mr. Buchanan came from Harrisburg. He subsequently removed to Baltimore, where he died. He kept a store at the Forge, and also the post-office, which latter was established about 1830, the mail being carried by pack-horse. Previous to that time the post-office was at Millersburg, each neighbor taking his turn to bring the mail from there

nich. lace's

Solomon

who

Shoffstall,

erected the present old log

Hoffman's Church was the

place of religious

first

worship.

The importance of Lykens Valley may be dated from the year 1825. In that year coal was discovered by Jacob Burd, Sr., and Peter Kimes, then living near the lower end of the Short Mountain, in what was then Lykens township. They had gone out one Sunday morning to take a walk, and reaching the top of the mountain they paused, one of them having a stick in his hand, carefully dug into the earth, when This gave rise to the opinion it revealed black dirt. that there must be coal in the mountain. A short time afterwards a wagon road was made, and men commenced to dig. This was the first beginning of the coal operations which gave rise to the Lykens Valley, Short Mountain, and Franklin Coal Companies. This was in the same year that anthracite coal was first burned successfully in Philadelphia, and its advocates, after having undergone the usual derision that men of new and progressive ideas have No to contend with, began to reap their reward. doubt this combination of circumstances determined the action of the shrewd Simon Gratz. He at once bought the land in and east of the Gap from one Frey,

its

owner up

to that time.

Professor Sheafer, of Pottsville,

the

"Upper End,"

who was

a native of

furnishes us the subsequent his-

tory of this enterprise.

The Wiconisco Coal Com1831, composed of six mem-

pany was organized in Simon Gratz, Samuel Richards, George H. bers, Thompson, Charles Rockland Thompson, all of Philadelphia, and Henry Schreiner and Henry Sheafer, both of Dauphin County. They began work at opening their mines by drifts in the gap at Bear Creek, a tributary of Wiconisco Creek, and sold coal in the vicinity in 1832. The first miners were three Englishmen, James Todoff, John Brown, and William Hall, who came in from



Schuylkill County.

The Lykens Valley

Railroad, the fourth railroad in

the United States to carry anthracite coal, and the

lo-

Dauphin County, was located by Mr. Ashwin, an English civil engineer, and extended from the mines in Bear Gap, sixteen miles, to the Susquehanna River, along the north foot of Berry's Mountain. This road was constructed under the direction of John

now of Henry Bohner, and then occupied by Joel Ferree, the younger, who died at Baltimore, in the War of 1812. The second house

and Simon Ballade, director. The road was completed and began transporting coal in 1834, by horse-power,

weekly.

From

1795 to 1800 there were only three houses

built between the

Forge and Lykens.

One was

cated on the property

was built by George Setzler on the property now of Isaac Seebolt. The third on property now owned by John Wallace, erected by Peter Shoffstall and occu-

first in

Paul, civil engineer,

on a

flat strap-rail.

Henry

A

Sheafer, superintendent,

number

of ark-loads of coal

were shipped from Millersburg in March and April, Then the coal-cars were boated across the Sus1834.

:

LYKENS VALLEY. quehanna from the terminus of the lersburg to

Mount

ance of the public, who want a rail connection between the two counties, joining the two rivers, the Schuylkill on the east and the Susquehanna on the west. This mountain is again tapped at Bear Gap,

railroad at Mil-

Patrick, on the opposite side of the

Perry County. This site was formerly owned by Peter Ritner, brother of Governor Ritner. Here Company had a set of chutes on the Pennsylvania Canal, where they shipped their coal to market. The first boat-load of Lykens Valley coal was sent on Saturday, April 19, 1834, by boat "76," forty-three tons, Capt. C. Faunce, consigned to Thomas Borbridge, Columbia, Pa. Shipments continued in this manner until 1845, when the railroad was worn out and abandoned until 1848. Then a portion of the railroad was regraded, and all laid with a new T-rail. The Wiconisco Canal, connecting the Pennsylvania Canal at Clark's Ferry with Millersburg, was built and shipments resumed in 184S, and have continued ever since. Up to and including 1858 the total shipment of coal from the Lykens Valley mines, from the beginning, amounted to eight hundred and forty-eight thousand seven hundred and eighty-one tons, and the grand total shipments on the Susquehanna were three millions two hundred and thirty-four thousand seven hundred and eighty-one tons, which included shipments of coal by the Union Canal and other avenues as follows The Shamokin Railroad was opened in 1839, the Dauphin and Susquehanna in 1854, the Trevorton Railroad in 1855. At that early day of the coal trade this portion of the country was wild and seemed far removed in the woods. Lykens Valley is the -broad expanse, three to five miles in width, of fertile, red-shale soil between Mahantango Mountain on the north and Berry's Mountain on the south, with the Susquehanna River as its boundary on the west. Its eastern portion is a distance of twelve miles from the river, and is subdivided into two smaller valleys, the main or northern one extending some ten miles east to the valley of the river, in

the Lykens Valley

the original mines above referred

tion

now

pierced at

district,'

here.

The lands

in the vicinity of the old

cipal owner.

Adjoining said lands on the east was the coal ter& Haldeman, both prominent residents and landowners of Harrisburg. These three bodies of land are now in the ownership of the Summit Branch Coal Company, controlled by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. ritory of Messrs. Elder

The popularity of

this coal, first

opened by Henry

Sheafer, led to the opening of the Short

Mountain

Coal Company's mines in 1854, after the sale of the Elder & Haldeman lands to the Summit Branch com-

They extended a branch road eastward from the town of Lykens, where they penetrated the south side of the mountain by a tunnel, cutting coal in pany.

side of the basin, or north dip, It is

known

mines were controlled by the following ownership The western portion, by Thomas P. Cope, a wellknown merchant of Philadelphia; afterwards it became the lands of the Short Mountain Coal Company, controlled by Job R. Tyson, the son-in-law of Mr. Cope, a well-known attorney of Philadelphia. J. Edgar Thomson, the famous president of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, took an interest in said company, and had their first breaker built under the direction of Professor Sheafer, whose education in coal began at the old Lykens Valley mines. The lands covering Bear Gap and North Mountain were owned by the Wiconisco, afterwards the Lykens Valley, Coal Company, of which Simon Gratz, a prominent merchant of Philadelphia, was the president and prin-

Moun-

Tower

where it is extensively worked by the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, and again at Williamstown, by the Summit Branch Coal Company, the lands of which two companies adjoin at the county line between Schuylkill and Dauphin, where a willful wall of the Pennsylvania Company and the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company prevents a junction, much to the annoy-

hardly

the anthracites.

on the south, to a point where it coalesces with Clark's Valley, the two headed off by Broad Mountain, beyond Tower City. This Short, or Coal Mountain, is a prong of the southern anthracite coal-field, forming a narrow basin, hardly more than a mile

The southern

productive here, one being farther east, the great mammoth

These two lower inter-conglomerates, one eight and the other four feet thick, are dissimilar from other anthracite coals in their lustreless appearance, and their cubic fracture shows its western approach to the semi-bituminous coals farther west. It is a free-burning, red-ash coal, but free from impurities, ready of ignition, and the most popular coal (especially for domestic purposes) of all is

tain

the only one worked.

that only two beds, the very lowest in the

bed, the great productive bed of the eastern

This valley, hardly a mile in width, extends east from its junction with Lykens Valley ten miles, with

is

The North

too small for working, while

The south portion is named after its early settler, Williams, who built a grist-mill near Williamstown, also named after him.

wide.

is

series, are

Creek.

the Short Mountain on the north and Berry's

to.

Mountain was penetrated by a tunnel directly north of the gap, but thus far has not been very productive of coal. In fact, what seems singular in this connec-

:

Mahanoy

451

great perfection, and where they have mined, prepared, and shipped one thousand tons of coal per diem for several years in succession. The same large

City,

shipments are now being made just east of the Summit Branch mines, at the Brookside colliery of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company.

I

The same beds of Lykens Valley coal, and the same coal in all its peculiarities, is now mined in Stony Mountain, at the Kalmia colliery of Phillips &

HISTORY OF DAUPHIN COUNTY.

452 Sheafer, south of

Tower

liamstown, Wiconisco, Lykens Borough, and some two or three small villages, with a population num-

All the above col-

City.

except Kalmia, have sunk deep slopes under The future of the Lykens Valley diswater-level. trict must, ere many years, be transferred to the south

lieries,

on the north side of the mountain, where the lies intact for twelve miles, more or less, mostly below water-level. Before another century begins, the active shipments of coal must come from that side, through the old works in the South Mountain, or from independent collieries along the north dip,

same bed

.

I

North Mountain, where railroads must one leading west to the Susquehanna, and

foot of the

"be built,

I

another east to the Schuylkill, through Klinger's Gap, where the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company have a large body of lands, and a site

grand colliery above water-level. There are four collieries open and in working conBig Run, by James Fendition in Upper Dauphin, nel (it is a land-sale colliery, shipping none by rail) the other collieries are known as Short Mountain, Lykens Valley, and Summit Branch or Williamsfor a



;

town.

Big Lick colliery

Dependent on these

is

not

now

in operation.

collieries are the

towns of Wil-

and ten thousand persons. Eighty per cent, of the dwellings in this once prosperous valley are the property of working-men, the result of hard toil, self-denial, and privation. One familiar with the picture of Bear Gap and its wild surroundings in 1832, all forest, its lofty mountains and rushing streams, no work of the hands of man apparent, no sound but the roaring of the creeks, the streets of the town of Wiconisco, as located by Henry Sheafer, and those of Lykens, by Isaac Ferree, Sr. (an intelligent emigrant from Lancaster County), Fifty years can appreciate the great development. bering between eight

1

of earnest labor has sent millions of tons of coal

from

its

long-sealed

tomb

to

land and sea, build-

ing towns, railroads, canals, churches, and schools,

and lighting and warming

all

the people with

its

But few of the original parties who enterprise remain among us. It but

cheerful glow.

began this remains for us to make this brief record of their work, that our citizens may know somewhat of the enterprise of the early pioneers.

LYKENS TOWNSHIP. Upon the petition of inhabitants of Upper Paxtang township asking for a division of said township, the court issued an order at their January sessions, 1810, to three commissioners to inquire into the propriety of granting said prayer, draft of the township, etc.

and

to

make

a plot or

The commissioners

re-

ported in favor of a division of the township by the following line, to wit: " Beginning at a pine-tree in the Halifax township

on the summit of Berry's Mountain at Peter Gap thence north ten degrees east along and near a public road which leads from Halifax to Sunbury through Hains' Gap, four hundred and sixty perches to a post on the north side of Wiconisco line

Richert's

;

Creek near the said road thence north eighty perches to a pine; thence running along the public road aforesaid north five degrees west four hundred and seventy perches to Buffington's Church, leaving the said church on the westward thence a course north ten degrees west, leaving the dwelling of John Hopple westward

of what was then

Upper Paxtang township.

This

report was confirmed by the court on the 3d of Sep-

tember, 1810, and division be called

it was ordered that the eastern Lykens township. Lykens town-

ship was reduced in 1819 by the formation of Mifflin

township from Upper Paxtang and further in 1840

when

Lykens, and

that portion south of the north

Thick Mountain was erected into Wiconisco township. This township and the valley is named for Andrew Lycans, one of the earliest pioneers of this section, and to whom full reference has been made in the sketch of Lykens Valley proper.

side of Coal or

GRATZ BOROUGH.

;

;

eleven hundred and

Creek,"

fifty

perches to Mahantaugo

etc.

The report then follows the lines around the two divisions of Upper Paxtang as they were after taking off

Halifax township (running the lines across the It is therefore unnecessary to follow them

river).

further here, as the line given above shows the division

Gratz was laid out in 1805 by Simon Gratz. It is situated on the road leading from Millersburg to Reading, thirty miles from Harrisburg. It was incorporated into a borough April 3, 1852. In 1838, Mrs. Frey kept the tavern and Solomon Shindle a store.

The

oldest resident of the place

is

Squire

George Hoffman, who was born two miles east of the borough March 13, 1798. He was the son of John Nicholas and Margaret (Harman) Hoffman, one of the earliest settlers in the valley, and a prominent family. Squire Hoffman has been magistrate for the past thirty-five years. When he came to Gratz

;

:

MIFFLIN TOWNSHIP. 1819 there were only five houses in the place; one was the oldest house, built here by Ludwig Umholtz. Shoffstall, now owned by Edward L. The