History of Steuben County, New York

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OF-

I K I

STEUBEN COUNTY, UI k.

NE^W YORK,

m

-^=^WITH^=^_J

d lif

SOME OF

ITS

PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS,

kl

By

Prof.

W. W. CLAYTON

* PHILADELPHIA:

1879. ^ 'i

ifi^iiiiQiC

,\illNllllllllillillllllllli\IIIINIIIIIIiTMlinillAIIIIIIIII

llllllllllllplllllllNllliAIIIIIIIIII

PRESS OF

J.

B.

LIPPINCOTT &

CO.,

PHILADELPHIA.

PEEF ACE. -

"

42/ 426-7

426^ 428 430

433

338, 359

WEST

360

facing

Hubbard and Wife Harry Godfrey and Wife Ira C. Williams and Wife Benjamin Cook and Wife

414^ 414/

((

WAYNE.

356

356, 357

408, 409

"

.

408

408, 409

between " .

Residence of Charles L. Bailey

349

''

''

Portraits of E. A.

Portraits of

facing

.

Benjamin Myrtle and Wife David Bailey and Wife

Portraits of Charles L. Bailey

between 356, 357

and Wife

396

401

.

339

facing

Portrait of Joseph G. Sturdevant

Portraits of

"

URBANA.

PRATTSBURGH. Waldo and Wife Lucius Waldo and Wife

392

facing

.

"

.

Portraits of

391

338

**-

Portraits of Charles

378

facing

facing

.

.

376

«

M. T. Babcock Portrait of John W. Taggart Residence of John W. Taggart

.

Portrait of Dr. Philo K. Stoddard

375'



Residence of Adsit Bailey

Woodbury and AVife Portraits of Allen Drake and Wife Portrait of Dr. Solomon Deck Portraits of Henry Stearns and Wife Portrait of Deacon Thomas Whiting

375s

a

James Carpenter

Portraits of

F.

374^

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I

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Spring Creek takes

its rise

the head-waters of

Mud

two miles north of Bath, while

Creek and Five-Mile Creek are in In the northern

Yates County, some twenty miles north.

part of the town of Prattsburgh Flint Creek rises, near the

head of Twelve-Mile Creek, and the waters of the Canaseraga rise far south of those of the Conhocton.

ELEVATIONS.

by actual surveys: Crooked Lake, 718 feet above Horvillage of Bath, 1090 Corning, 925 tide-water

pally

;

;

;

Mud

summit between

Arkport, 1194;

1150;

nellsville,

55

Erie Canal, afl'ording a direct and cheap transportation to the sea-board for all the products of the surrounding

The

country.

valley of

Lake Keuka drains the lands of

Urbana, partly of Wayne, and of Pulteney, in Steuben The hills on the west shore rise some three hunCounty. dred to four hundred feet above the waters, and on the east Bluif Point is shore two hundred to three hundred feet. a marked and picturesque promontory, standing between

following elevations have been determined princi-

The

YORK.

Lake and Bath, 1579 summit between Bath and Arksummit between Arkport and Angelica, 2062; port, 1840

the branches of the lake and showing itself conspicuously

above the surrounding scenery. abrupt and

its

elevation

Its

is

more

altitude considerably greater than the high-

lands on either side of the lake.

Lake Waneta,

Keuka some two hundred

elevated above

;

and distant but two and a half miles,

feet,

;

Troupsburgh

Wayne,

2500.

Hills,

is

town of

in the

the summit of a different grade, and the tribu-

An

tary of waters which flow south into the Chesapeake.

The

lakes are

cal features

marked

LAKES.

excavation of a few feet at the

characteristics of the topographi-

the water into Lake Keuka, and thence into

New

of Western and Central

The most

York.

of them discharge their waters into Lake Ontario through

The Canandaigua, the Crooked, Seneca,

the Oswego River.

Cayuga, Owasco, Skaneateles, Onondaga, and Oneida, havhead-waters far in the Southern Tier, drain

ing; their

All of them

intervening territory to the north. leys of excavation far

the

lie

forms

in val-

lie

soil,

— the Oneida through the gray sandstone which

its

bottom,

with

group,

lus

the

down through the rocks which underwith

covered

drift;

throudi more than three hundred

shores

all

Tully

the

Skaneateles

the

Hamilton

feet of the

outcropping

limestone

both

on

the Cayuga and Seneca Lakes through the Marcel-

;

shales

and the superincumbent Hamilton and Tully

limestones, the latter ranging from four hundred and twenty to six

hundred and

called

sheet of water, which extends from

Keuka)

is

Penn Yan,

a beautiful

in the county

of Yates, to Hammondsport, a distance of about twenty miles, with a branch to

This

Branchport seven miles.

lake exhibits an excavation of

more than three hundred

is

Hotel would pass

Lake Ontario. This lake

Conhocton.

the

nearly three miles long and about half a mile wide.

abounds

in fish,

such as pickerel, perch, white

ward

into

Mud

Lake, near

Wayne Four

Wayne

Hotel

;

It

and

fish,

Corners,

tributary being a small stream which enters

north at

is

It discharges its waters south-

trout of the finest quality.

otherwise

it

its

chief

from the

fed by springs.

it is

Lake, aside from the waters of Lake Waneta, is fed by the Tobahanna Creek, and the creek running from This lake is Pine Grove through Tyrone to the lake.

Mud

two miles long and half a mile wide, abounding The outlet is called Mud Creek, and excellent fish.

about in

In

enters the Conhocton at Savona.

small lakes, singularly deep, partly veo-etable

thirty feet in depth.

The Crooked Lake (now

Yet the natural drainage

Wayne

mould and

of Bath there

is

its

course are several

grown and

filled

up with

In the eastern part of the town

tufa.

a succession of them,

which

aff"ords

a

study for the geologist and natural philosopher, how they were excavated amidst the surrounding hills to- their ex-

treme depth,

how detached

each from the other, and yet

exhibiting a chain of causes and

efl'ects

identical through-

feet in

depth through the shales and grits of the Erie

out.

group.

The waters

In the southeast part of the town of Prattsburgh lies Duck Lake, now about half a mile long and a quarter of a

by the rain

falling

are fed by springs, supplied with water

on the surface of the surrounding country,

which, passing through the seams and fissures of the rocks,

No

rushes into the basin below the surface of the lake.

streams of any considerable magnitude flow into

except

it

Cold Spring brook at Hammondsport and Lazallier Creek at

Branchport.

and perch of

The

lake abounds with white fish, trout,

of which numbers are taken

fine quality,

annually to grace the tables of those to seek

them

in their

proper season.

months the transportation of

who

take the trouble

During the summer

agricultural products

and

ar-

many boats, aside from one or two beautiful steamboats, which make daily trips between Hammondsport and Penn Yan and intermediate places. Lake Keuka lies two hundred and seventy-one feet above ticles

of commerce employs

the waters of the Seneca;

its

and forty-four thousand and

outlet discharges one

hundred

sixty-five gallons of water per

minute, with a current of one hundred and thirty-two feet per minute.

The

outlet runs

a distance of seven miles.

from Penn Yan

to

Dresden,

Boats pass to and from Seneca

Lake by means of the Crooked Lake Canal, thence

to the

mile wide, but evidently in years gone by more than twice The marsh surrounding this lake has been that size.

encroaching upon

gradually

limits for years.

its

This

marsh extends more than half a mile eastward and southward, and is filling up gradually with decayed organic Duck Lake is filling up with drift and mould remains. ;

its

waters are

suspension

The

;

full

of decayed vegetable matter held in

they abound in

creeks running into

which

rises in

rises in

;

depth, six to ten feet.

Duck Lake

are the Scutt Creek,

the vicinity of Scuttville, passing westward

through the marsh into the

which

fish

lake,

and the Waldo Creek,

Pulteney and runs southwest, entering the

northern extremity of the lake through the lands of Charles

Waldo.

This lake discharges

its

waters through a narrow

and crooked outlet of some forty rods in length into FiveMile Creek. This lake and outlet have been declared by statute law a public highway, for the benefit of those

are disposed to use

it,

to float

who

lumber down the Five-Mile

Creek to saw-mills or to market below.

Loon Lake,

The

valley.

town of Wayland,

in the

outlet passes for

and then comes

to the surface

Mud

of

Lake, a

and swamp.

This lake

is

with the Canisteo and Tioga, forming the

is

about eighteen

name

dropped there

a beautiful

lies

hills,

The

Salubria.

little

lake,

waters pure and

its

gem was probably

little

breaking up of the great inland

in the

as a " tear-drop" to

remind one of by-gone days.*

a beautiful sheet of water, and

sea,

It

is

in all its phases the

fulfills

upon the name by which

characteristics pi'edicated

it is

In the northern part of the town of Howard are two

One

lakes.

of

them

the north of

is to

Howard

outlet of

which empties into

above

confluence with the Conhocton.

its

Howard termed ^ pond by the northeast of

cultivated

Neil's Creek,

Flats, the

this outlet

the

and surrounded by a

inhabitants^ ^'

Pond

fine

This

Settlement."

Along

and creek are developed some of the most

Ascending the creek

to

re-

and past the mills of

Alonzo Graves, we find rocks of shale and here thrown up in rounded the passage of the water.

Howard

hills,

The

grit in masses,

and there torn asunder by

valley of this stream through-

marked contrast with the

is in

alluvial character of the

in the Sus-

north

far

Co.,

Hemlock Lake,

inlet of

which empties north into Lake Ontario.

Thence

it

Erwin, and

through

Avoca,

where

assumes the name of Chemung.

it

gether with

Campbell,

Bath,

drains

tributaries,

its

enters

rafted

much

its

Corning,

This

river, to-

northern and

the

all

Upon

middle portions of the county.

waters have been

of the timber of the county, and formerly a

large quantity of grain

was floated upon

to

it

market in

The Conhocton was

Pennsylvania and Maryland.

is

Friends'

Lake, the outlet of which passes southward through the This outlet

the Canisteo.

is

in character

with

all

the streams which are precipitated from the hills into the valleys below.

In dry seasons

it

secretes

the debris of the shales scattered along

weather

it is

thing in

pathway

its

the "

mad mountain

course,

for its

its

declared

its

early as 1795, constructed an ark seventy-five feet long

hills

as a

hundred

forests of pine, lies in

forms the head of Goodhue Creek, which passes southeast

through the town, affording hydraulic power for several

a wild, picturesque stream in

all

below Addison. its

This

surroundings of

sometimes beautiful and quiet as

it

is

hill

winds along

tortuous course, sometimes impetuous, dashing and surghills

as it hastens

downward

to the

Can-

try's settlement.

The

Canisteo River takes

and Grove,

RIVERS.

Canisteo, Tioga,

and their several

in

Allegany County, and passes eastward through unites with the

it

Tioga, and thence the united waters of the latter and the

Conhocton flow into the Chemung. taries drain the

southwestern part of the county

rank with the most

County are the Conhoc-

denominated creeks.

Baltimore and Phila-

valley,

being the headquarters

and lumber, and

for fitting out arks laden with provisions

sending them down to the Chesapeake Bay.

(See Histories

of Hornellsville, Bath, Urbana, and Bradford.)

The Tioga River

rises in

Addison.

Pennsylvania, and enters Steu-

Near the Pennsylvania from that town

;

line

This creek has

Creek enters the Tioga.

it

the

Cowanesque the town

its rise in

passes into Pennsylvania,

and thence into the town of Lindley, entering the Tioga near the State

line.

some of the most

The

beautiful

The TusCARORA Creek

valley of this

and

fertile

rises in

creek

presents

lands in the State.

the town of Jasper, and

by a tortuous course through the southwest corner of Rathbone into Woodhull, thence to the Canisteo, at the passes

village of

Addison.

The

hills

on either side of this creek

are quite near in their approach, leaving a contracted valley

of fertile alluvium.

This creek drains the southeast part

of Jasper, the town of Woodhull, Southern Addison, and

These towns rank in

The

hills

fertility

and valleys of the Tuscarora and

of

soil

and graz-

its

The

tributary creeks

furnish some of the most favorable advantages for^ wool-

growing and dairy purposes

Stephen's Creek has * Goldsmith Denniston.

hills

avenue of commerce with

the lower Susquehanna, and with

upper

its flats

This river was also

lumber.

in the early days as an

its

;

and the surrounding

fertile lands,

furnish the most valuable

famous

This river and tribu-

ing adaptation with any portion of Steuben County.

Chemung, Cowanesque, Canaseraga,

tributaries,

the towns of Alfred

its rise in

Steuben to near Painted Post, where

Tuscarora.

isteo.

principal rivers of Steuben

Others frequently navigated

during the early period of the coun-

this river with arks

of Troupsburgh

area of about five

It enters the Canisteo

river with a cargo

north to the Canisteo, midway between Painted Post and

torrent," sweeping every-

and

down the

and

In wet

channel.

the extreme northwest corner of the town of Addison, and

ing against the

Blood's) to Painted Post, and Gen. McClure, as

ben County from the south, in the town of Lindley, running

tumbling waters.

and surrounded by

valley,

now

waters beneath

and excavating rock and gravel

Goodhue Lake, covering an

saw-mills.

ners,

delphia, Arkport, in

Flats above.

In the southern part of the town of Thurston

The

merged

it is

and north of the

hills,

of staves to near Harrisburg.

other lake,

Flats, is a beautiful sheet of water,

country called the

ben County.

ton,

among

The

markable characteristics of the geological features of Steu-

and

River,

the town of Springwater, Livingston

sixteen feet wide, and passed

past GofF's Mills, thence northeast to the Conhocton.

acres,

Chemung

head-waters of the Conhocton are found

some two miles

lake debouches to the south in a crooked outlet, which runs

hills to

until

unites

navigable from the " twenty -two mile tree' (Bivin's Cor-

known.

out

The

quehanna. in

cognomen

retains that

it

the northwest corner of the town of Cohocton, passing

amid the surrounding

its

long and three-

over a mile

East of the village of Bath

clear,

marsh

are

above tide-water.

feet

nestled

run south to

it,

extreme southeast part of the county, where

which

County

in Livingston

with a volume of water suf-

The summit here

quarters of a mile wide.

Conhocton stretches from the summit to the

distance south of

little

YORK.

some distance underground,

The surroundings of Loon Lake

Neil's Creek.

hundred

situated in a high

is

It runs northward, while the waters

ficient to drive a mill.

its

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

56

to

be found anywhere.

its rise

in Jasper, near the head-

waters of the Tuscarora, and runs north through the hills

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, of Canisteo, where

enters the river a

it

Throughout the course of

mouth of Bennett's Creek. creek the country

elevated into high

is

below the

little

hills,

this

with precipi-

an elevation of eight hundred

Here the

River.

hills are

feet

at

above the Canisteo

about two thousand

hundred

five

The highest source of Bennett's

above tide-water.

feet

town of West Union,

rises in the

south of the residence of J. McNeil

Creek

is

a

thence

it

runs north past Rexville, " Rough-and-ready,"

little

Greenw^ood, Canisteo, where

enters the Canisteo River in

it

a broad and beautiful delta of

poses

view some of the grits from which

to

quarried grindstones. district

This creek ex-

flat lands.

its

;

valley

Its

upper source

have been

in a fine

is

lumber

somewhat contracted by the approach of

through which are precipitated numerous small, roar-

hills,

ing, rattling

runs of water, whose beds are paved with

broken stone, and gravel.

shale,

PuRDY Creek

It rises in the

Creek.

Hartsville,

tributary of Bennett's

principal

a

is

southwest corner of the town of

and runs through a narrow valley northeasterly

to Bennett's Creek, near the residence of

H. Eason.

this creek is covered with the debris of rock

bed of

Crosby Creek

The Canaseraga

rises in

Neil's

Mud

out of east

Creek

rises in

the south part of the town

the high valley of Loon Lake,

Howard

;

thence

Five-Mile Creek, Ten-Mile Creek, and Twelve-

Mile Creek

severally rise in

the north part of Pratts-

burgh, and run southwesterly into the Conhocton

Creek

at

Kanona, Ten-Mile

Mile at Wallace's Station.

at Wallace's Mills,

Cold Spring Creek

;

Five-Mile

Wheeler and Prattsburgh.

rises partly in

Bath and Wheeler,

forms quite a stream at the old Henry A. Townsend place,

and thence runs through Pleasant Valley at

Hammondsport.

Mud Creek easterly

to

Lake Keuka,

from

Mud

Lake, and runs south-

through Bradford and the eastern part of Bath to

the Conhocton at Savona.

At

the outlet of

Mud

Lake,

Frederick Bartles located himself in 1793, and built flouring-

a

and saw-mill, making the place quite noted, and (See History of Brad-

prospectively/ quite a large town.

GEOLOGY.

of the

tion

rise to

feet.

most commonly fine-grained, the

is

constantly to the south, there being no anticlinal

than the slightly elevated one which has given This dipping of

the northern and southern waters.

the rocks to the south, though

height of the coal

Some of

thickness.

it

diminishes the geographical

correspondingly increases their

series,

the hills in the southern part of Steuben

County are capped with conglomerate, showing masses of red sandstone, together with fossils which border the coal series

;

but the strata of rocks dipping to the south at

Painted Post one hundred and thirty feet to the mile, at

and

five miles farther

feet,

the strata of rock

feet,

County would pass

thousand feet

six

below the coal beds of Pennsylvania.

The

rocks of this county, consisting of shale and sand-

stone of a greenish color, are evidently not of igneous

They abound

origin.

in

marine organic remains of

and zoophites, showing the presence of the

sea,

ries exhibiting vegetable, not

It diminishes

From

with the coal as you go north.

of which

all

The

rocks of the county exhibiting marine organic re-

mains were

It has

ocean. all

some period submerged by the waters of the

at

been suggested that an inland sea covered

the western portion of the State, and observations

tend to support the theory.

The

may

lake ridge of Ontario

shows marks of shores of water, which

at various periods

feet to the present level of the lake.

of ancient shores

When

Lake.

may be

Similar indications

head of Seneca

traced at the

the waters stood at the highest

mark

indicated,

the area of the inland sea must have been limited by the

Highlands and

New England

range on the east

of Lake Superior on the north ;

;

;

the shores

the Alleghanies on the

and the head-waters of the Mississippi on the west.

outlet of this sea

would be by the

St.

Lawrence, the

to

the

The sandstones

are

be traced

particles being often ce-

down the valleys of

these rivers in the large

The indications of

diluvial action are

everywhere perceived

strewed over the surface.

is

localities.

of a perishable nature.

from an inch

to a foot in

number

of bowlders deposited.

of the sandstone of Steuben County

8

is

the support of their mass.

in the accumulation of gravel, sand, pebbles,

in layers

it

evident that these rocks pass under the coal series, and form

from the disintegrating nature of the

The sandstones range

con-

glomerate or pebble rock occurs in this county only as a

to this cause,

much

coal se-

The

marine remains.

two being intermixed with each other.

shale, ihat so

shells

and not of

— the

shale, the

mented by

or inclina-

Hudson, the Connecticut, ^nd the Susquehanna. The deposition of drift which occurred at that time may

composed

of sandstones and shales

depth of nearly one thousand

It

is

line other

The

surface rocks of the county of Steuben are

Chemung group

The dip

the coal formations of Pennsylvania.

south

ford.)

The

are

stood from an elevation of seven hundred and sixty-two

(See History of Urbana.)

rises

They

yards in length.

to several

sometimes colored with bitumen and carbonate of iron. The rocks of Steuben County pass immediately under

and Twelve-

These several creeks form the

principal valleys of the towns of

from an inch

sizes

terminal rock, and in very partial masses.

and north into the Conhocton.

with

color,

In some places they form concretions, parallel with their layers, of carbonate of lime or of manganese, of

land favorable for plants the origin of coal,

Lake, and runs south into

some places

whole mass.

peculiar to Steuben

thence to the Genesee River.

;

shale in

the same tendency to decomposition which characterizes the

south one hundred and ninety-eight

of Dansville, and runs north into Dansville, in Livingston

County

The

and

at the village of Hornellsville.

and enters the Canisteo

quarry suitable for grindstones

has been opened and worked.

through the northwest corner of Hartsville into Hornellsville,

locality, a

Chimney Narrows one hundred

Allegany County, and runs

in

rises

they form suitable layers for

localities

The

broken and torn asunder by the precipitous waters.

shale,

In one

57

assumes a slaty structure, sometimes of a blue

tous valleys, presenting features broken, bold, picturesque.

Bennett's Creek

In some

thickness. flagging.

YOEK.

The

and bowlders

Diluvial hills are found in various

level portions of

Western

New York

are

of diluvial origin, the surface being strewed with bowlders

;

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

58

Many

of foreign parentage.

and

gneiss,

of them consist of granite

some of sandstone from below, others of lime-

stone from above.

Many

of the rocks bear evidences of

NEW

YORK.

and Cohocton they are chiefly derived from primary rocks, some of the crystalline formation, others of granite, gneiss, and feldspar combined. On the farm of Albert Seeley, in

the wearing action of water, running and carrying materials

the town of Pulteney,

which wore away, and

tion, the

face of the rocks.

in

some instances

polished, the

In some places the abrupt

offsets

sur-

from

one strata to another have been worn down to a gradual

The agency of running water

slope.

luvial deposits is very

obvious

;

in

producing our di-

and the formation of these

deposits shows not only the action of running water in one direction,

many

but also oP eddies and counter-currents.

places

we

In

find the coarser deposits on the south side

a large bowlder of this descrip-

is

parent bed of which cannot be nearer than the

primitive formations of the north of this continent* is

found scattered through almost

the county, and in the southern

the northern towns of

all it is

mingled with masses

In some instances, as

of conglomerate.

Granite

in

Urbana, Wayne,

Wheeler, and Bath, large blocks are accompanied by rolled pebbles of greenstone, sandstone,

sienite,

and limestone.

In the valleys of the Conhocton, Canisteo, Five- and Twelve-

PENCIL SKETCH OF THE RAVINE AT HAMMONDSPORT, EXPOSING TO VIEW 300 FEET OF SHALE AND SANDSTONE. of the

hills,

and their ascent more abrupt.

We

find also

Mile Creeks, limestone

is

found as a

drift rock in

rounded

granite bowlders in the same deposit with those of limestone,

pebbles of different

many

the line of deposit of these bowlders, nor can any course

of them worn and rounded as by the whirl of counter-

currents.

And many of our

hills

and valleys bear evidence

of such eddies and currents of water in their formation.

We

notice two kinds of materials that have been carried

and deposited by the agency of currents of water 1.

Bowlders,

or

large

blocks

scattered over the surface or 2.

Beds of sand,

fragments of

imbedded

in clay.

and gravel, composed of rounded

diff'erent sizes.

The bowlder ally

clay,

of stone, rounded, and

There

be traced with distinctness.

were grounded from

The

It

is

is

ice deposits or

not any uniformity in

uncertain whether they

by

glacial action.

ridges of gravel, sand, and clay appear to have been

formed by similar action of water: they seem lar character,

bowlders.

and from the same

There

is

scarcely

to

be of simi-

as

the larger

any uniformity of

drift over a

given space in any one town.

localities

In some places

it

assumes

the form of fine sand, in others of coarse gravel, and in

deposits are numerous, and scattered gener-

throughout the county.

sizes.

In

Prattsburgh, Pulteney,

others of loam in mass, or mingled with sand and gravel in other places the sand, gravel

and loam, and

clay, lie-in

;

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, upon each

distinct strata

posits of

Howard

drift

The depth of

other.

these de-

above forty feet to two

varies from

feet.

Flats present a depth of alluvial deposit singularly

Though

deep as well as unique.

slightly elevated above

John

At

Davis.

Neil's Creek, along

depth, and

Loon Lake, out of which

which the alluvium extends

deposits are not uniform

and

east,

cases,

some present

;

The

hill

their greatest slope

and their bluff end, or shoulder,

The

the south and west.

many

to a great

devoid of gravel or other strata.

is

to the north

valley runs

eastern slope

is

more abrupt,

hundred

feet

above tide-water, and the source of Bennett's Creek

feet

fifteen

about three hundred feet higher.

At La Grange been made by the

lies

above the Canisteo and

hundred

high valley forming an extended swamp, and surrounded by

which

this latter place the elevation is about

five

is

in

59

Towsley, and in Greenwood, near the residence of Mr.

the general surface, this section of the county presents a

hills

YORK.

A

the Indians.

a salt spring rises, from which salt has inhabitants, and

sulphur spring

miles southwest of

was previously made by

rises in

Hammondsport, and

Urban a, about two above the lake

also

Marl and tufa are found near

shore north of that place.

to

Cold Springs, also near Ark port, in Troupsburgh, on the

in

Canaseraga, south of Dansville, on the summit between

than the western, the result of the action of

the waters in scooping out the valleys in their course towards the ocean, or of the eddies and currents of the inland sea

this creek

and the Canisteo, and along the Five-Mile Creek,

in the north of Prattsburgh.

At

termed the Gulf,

is

Bath and Wheeler,

valley between

anterior to the drainage from their surface.

what

Mitchellville, in





a high

a bed of clay of

is

we

find in-

unusual depth and tenacity, in which was found the tooth

stances in the eastern part of the county, through

Wayne,

of a mastodon, about ten inches in length, also a large

Of

eddies and currents

the action of these

From Keuka Landing, on the Lake Keuka, to the Wayne Hotel, and

Bradford, and Bath. shore of

southward, there

and

agencies,

bone, which was crumbled by the action of the

thence

moulded thereby, and lakes excavated

the whole distance.

Aside from Waneta and lakes

along the valley of

lie

Mud Mud

CHAPTER

Lakes, a succession of Creek, some of them of

XIV.

STEUBEK COUNTY CIVIL

great depth and surrounded by ridges and hills of every

conceivable shape. to the valley of the

From

the south head of

Keuka Lake

water-courses,

Sink-holes are seen

along the valley of Five-Mile Creek, far above

present

its

abrupt and deep, and surrounded by

per,

of gravel, sand,

The same appearances mark

Woodhull, and Addison, Mead's,

In

hills

the envi-

Purdy and Bennett's Creeks, the Tuscarora,

Cowanesque,

in Lindley

in

in Jas-

Campbell, and the

found outcropping and exposed

At Hammonds-

to view.

port, in a ravine above the stone mill, about three

feet of rock is exposed, characterized

hundred

hy forcoides gi-aphica.

It consists of shale and sandstone, of thin layers below and

thick layers above, the edges being

more

or less covered

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS.

Representatives in Congress hold office two years. They must reside in the State they are chosen to represent and have attained the age of twenty -five

of the shale near this place emitting the odor of

induced a search for

coal,

without evidence of

Each new

years.

The

year.

preceding,

The

elections are generally held



in this State

during the even year

on the general election day.

constitution of the United States directs that a cen-

ending with a cipher

and

;

after each

apportions the representation

enumeration Congress

among the

States,

and the

Legislature divides the State into Congressional districts.

The

first

Congressional

District,

including

County, was formed by Act of March

was the Tenth

tricts

Steuben

1797.

23,

It

and was composed of Cayuga, On-

District,

The

dis-

including this county have been changed as follows

Act of March 30, 1802. Seventeenth District.

— Cayuga,

Genesee, Ontario, and Steuben,



success.

In the town of Pulteney, shore, similar features coal resulted in like

at

developed, where digging for

are

manner

Harmonyville, near the lake

;

though argillo-calcareous rock

of sufficient thickness for building purposes

of the village of Bath, and also between nellsville,

United States,

Congress commences on the 4th day of March every odd

bitumen, and developing fragments of vegetables and iron pyrites,

citizens of the

ondaga, Ontario, Tioga, and Steuben Counties.

with crystallized gypsum.

Some

—Ju-

sus be taken every ten years, which has been fixed at those

and Pennsylvania.

the deep ravines and water-courses the rocks are

all

Government

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.

must have been seven years

the towns of Prattsburgh and W^heeler.

In North Cohocton there are seen the same depressions,

rons of

— County

diciary.

extend from Pleasant Valley to the small

and alluvium.

Government

LIST.

Depressions and holes, as of former

lake eastward of the village of Bath.

level, in

—State

Conhocton the same features are ex-

of water throughout.

clay,

Federal Government

and marked evidences are presented of the action

hibited,

air.

a definable valley, the result of these

is

hills

eastern

in

the creek ravine.

and density suitable

is

found north

Howard and Hor-

Sandstones of thickness

for grindstones are

found in the town

Act of March 20, 1804. Cayuga, Genesee, Ontario, Allegany, and Steuben, Seventeenth District. Act of March 8, 1808. Cayuga, Seneca, Tioga, and Steuben, Four-



teenth District.



Act of Jane 10, 1812. Cayuga, Seneca, Tompkins, Tioga, and Steuben, Twentieth District. Act of April 17, 1822. Twenty-eighth District. Act of Jane

29, 1832.

—Allegany,

—Yates

Cattaraugus,

and

Steuben,

and Steuben, Twenty-seventh Dis-

trict.

of Canisteo, on the lands of

Mr. Carter,

in

Woodhull, on

the lands of Mr. Stroud, in Jasper, on the land of Mr.

Act of September trict.

6,

1842.

— Allegany

and Steuben, Thirtieth Dis-

:

:

:

:

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

60

Act of July

1851.— Livingston and Steuben, Twenty-eighth

19,

District.

Act of April

23, 1862.

— Chemung, Allegany, and Steuben, Twenty-

Under the

:

YORK.

constitution of 1821, this

county was in-

cluded in the Eighth Senatorial District, with Allegany,

Mon-

Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Livingston,

seventh District. roe,

following table gives the names, residences, and peri-

The

ods of service of the citizens of

Steuben County who have

been Representatives of this county in Congress

Bath Bath Bath

John Magee John Maoree

T.

C. C. B.

.

Wheeler Bath..., Bath...,

Andrews

Hubbell David Rumsey, Jr David Rumsey, Jr Robert B. Van Valkenburgh.. ...... Robert B. Van Valkenburgh

William

20 21 22 23 25 28 30 31 37 38 41 43

.

Bath,

Grattan H. Wheeler Edward Howell

John

.

S.

Bath....

Walker

Bath... Bath... Bath... Bath... Corninj

Corning

John N. Hungerford,

John D. Higgins, Nov.

5,

Perral C. Dininny, Nov. Alley, Nov.

until the act of April 13, 1857.

Chemung

The Senate elected each

3,

1840.

2,

1852.

William

J. Gilbert, 1851.t

Andrew

B. Dickinson, 1854-55.

George B. Bradley, 1874-76. George B. Bradley, 1876-78. Ira Davenport, 1878-80.

the same qualifications, and for the

same term,

is,

ex-officto,

as

President of the Senate, a

College, a

Regent of the University, and

a trustee of the Capitol and of the State Hall.

Steuben

MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY, 1798-1822. The Assembly has always been chosen consisted at

first

When

6,

Hull, of Bath, appointed April

Daniel C. Howell, of Bath, appointed Feb.

3,

Hon. Daniel Cruger, of Bath, elected Jan. 30, 1816. William B. Ruggles, Deputy Attorney-General, appointed January, 1878.

STATE SENATORS. Prior to the constitution of 1821, Steuben County was designated the Western Sena-

and was represented, among

others,

by the

Vincent Matthews, «- 1798-1804. Henry A. Townsend, 1811-15.

* Mr. Matthews lived to

Bath.

at

Elmira when

it

it

was

should

number reached one hundred and fifty. was twelve in 1808 and fourteen in 1815.

in the several counties

were elected on the general

and the Assembly selected from the Senators annuCouncil of Appointment. first districted

with Ontario, and

Her members of represented in the Legislature in 1798.J Assembly under the first constitution were as follows 1798. Charles Williamson.

1812. Jacob Teeple.

1799. Charles Williamson.

1813. Jacob Teeple.

1800. Charles Williamson.

1814. Daniel Cruger.

James Faulkner. 1805. John Wilson. 1806. John Wilson. 1807. John Wilson.

1815. Daniel Cruger.

1808. George Hornell.

1819.

1804.

1809. 1810. 1811.

following persons, residents of this county

removed

when

1870.

SPEAKER OF THE ASSEMBLY.

a part of the large district

eight,

num-

annually, until the

Steuben County was at

SUPERINTENDENT OF STATE BANKING DEPARTMENT.

members.

be increased after each septennial census, at the rate of two

ticket,

1855.

hundred

reduced to one hundred, with a provision that

ally the 5,

three

contained

had reached one hundred and

1866.

CANAL APPRAISER.

it

number

the constitution was amended, in 1801, the

Members

Hon. Stephen T. Hayt, of Corning, elected Nov.

It

of seventy members, with the power to

of electors until

This increase

CANAL COMMISSIONER.

annually.

increase one with every seventieth increase of the

ber

citizen elected to this office, viz.

Hon. Robert Campbell, of Bath, elected Nov. 2, 1858. Mr. Campbell was also Regent of the University, appointed Feb. 1846, vice Governor Dix, resigned.

torial District,

year.

G. T. narrower, 1872-73.

Commissioner of the Canal Fund and of the Land-Office, a member of the Canal Board, a trustee of the Idiot Asy-

Henry H.

are

of the senators from this county have been the

rest

the Governor, whose duty he discharges in case of a vacancy

2,

who

Stephen T. Hayt, 1864-66.

same manner, and

County has had one

odd

of thirty-two members,

John K. Hale, 1856-57. Samuel H. Hammond, 1860-61.

,

The Lieutenant-Governor has

lum and of Union

consists

William M. Hawley, 1848-49.

1844.

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNORS.

He

and have so remained.

following

STATE GOVERNMENT.

in that office.

Steuben, Schuyler, and

Counties then became the Twenty-seventh Sena-

torial District,

1864.

8,



elected in the

and Chemung

Counties constituted the Twenty-sixth Senatorial District,

1868. Horace Bemis, Nov. John McDougall, Nov. ~, 1876.

is

constitution of 1846, Steuben

Under the

1828, Allegany.

4,

Grattan H. Wheeler, Nov.

James

this period the senators

Grattan H. Wheeler, 1829-32. George Huntington, 1836-40.

The PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS. John Lloyd, Nov.

During

Sixth Senatorial District.

Years.

1817-19 1823-25 1827-29 1829-31 1831-33 1833-35 1837-39 1843-45 1847-49 1849-51 1861-63 1863-65 1873-75 1875-77

20 28 28 28 28 27 27 30 30 30 28 27 27 27

15 IS

.

April 18, 1826, Steuben County was transferred to the

from this county were the following

Cong. Dist.

Residence.

Names.

Daniel Cruger William Woods

Niagara and (after Nov. 12, 1824) Orleans Counties.

Henry A. Townsend. John Knox. John Knox.

1816. Daniel Cruger. 1817. William B. Rochester. 1818. William B. Rochester.

1820.

1821.

John Dow. John Dow. John Dow.

1822. Grattan H. Wheeler.

f Extra session. first elected,

but afterwards

Lindley, was a member of AsJ Eleazer Lindley, of the town of sembly for Ontario County in 1792. Col. Williamson represented the

same county

in 1796.

:

:

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

YORK. MEMBERS ELECTED.

MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY, 1822-1847. 1823. George McClure.

,1838.

William Woods. 1824. George McClure.

1839.

Grattan H. Wheeler. 1825.

John Kennedy. James McBurney.

1827. Paul C. Cook. 1841.

George McClure. 1828. Dugald Cameron. Wm, Woods.

Alex. H. Stephens 1849. Abm. J. Quackenboss... John G. Mersereau

Francis E. Erwin.

Ziba A. Leiand.

Wm. Hunter. Wm. Kernan.

Jeffrey Smith.

Wm.

1845.

Wm. Kernan.

Jacob Van Valkenburgh.

1835. Jeremiah Baker.

Andrew

1846.

G. Chatfield.

Oto F. Marshall.

Joshua Healy.

Wm.

Lemuel B. Searles. Henry Switzer. Henry G. Cotton. John I. Poppino.

C. Rogers.

Hiram Chapman.

1847.

Wm. Wm.

Hunter.

number apportioned

them of convenient and contiguous

territory,

sus, the Legislature is required to reapportion the

and

to direct the

and

as

After each State cen-

nearly equal population as possible.

members

time when the supervisors shall meet for

the purpose of redistricting.

Pursuant

1

2 3

3 1

2 3 1

2 3

every other county one or more.

Steuben County was

dis-

— Avoca,

Prattsburgh,

Pulteney,

1866.

Bath,

Bradford,

Monroe Brundage Samuel MitchelL 1870. James G. Bennett John Davis 187L Thomas M. Fowler James B. Murdock 1872. Thomas M. Fowler Stephen F. Gilbert

Tyrone, Urbana,

Prattsburgh,

Savona

1

2 3

1876.

2

constitutioa of

with the people,

1

1821 gradually grew

who demanded

new

a

provide for the election of nearly

ernor.

1

2 1

2 1

2 1

2 1

2 1

2

all

one,

into disfavor

which should

the officers by the

Gov-

Several other radical changes were also demanded,

after considerable agitation of the subject, a convention

and

for the purpose of adopting a

was ordered

The

was held Nov.

election

new

constitution.

1845, with the following

4,

result 313,257 33,860

^'For a Convention"

to this expression of the popular will,

an act

was passed April 22, 1846, calling the convention

at Al-

Agreeably

from

this

9,

The

1846.

delegates

county were the following: Benjamin S. Brun-

dage, Robert Campbell, Jr., William Kernan.*

The new 3,

constitution was submitted to the people

Nov.

1846, and adopted by the following vote

Amended Amended

— Addison, Campbell, Cameron, Caton, Corning, Erwin, Horn-

It

came

constitution, constitution,

"Yes"

221,528 92,436

"No"

into force on the first

day of January, 1847.

—Addison, Cameron, Campbell, Caton, Corning, Erwin, HornCONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF 1867.

by, Lindley, Rathbone, Thurston, Tuscarora (from Dec. 31, 1859),

Woodhull.

— Addison, Cameron,

Assembled Campbell, Canisteo, Caton, Corning, Er-

win, Greenwood, Hartsville, Hornby, Hornellsville, Jasper, Lindley,

at

Albany June

4,

1867; adjourned

President.

— William A. Wheeler, Malone, Franklin Co.

hull.

Secretary.

— Luther Caldwell, Elmira,

TJiird District.

1847.

— Avoca,

1854),

Canisteo,

Chemung

Co.

— Samuel C. Pierce, Rochester. Delegates from Steuben County. — Hon. David Rumsey, Bath; Sergeant-at-Arms.

Cohocton, Dansville, Fremont (from Nov.

Greenwood, Hartsville, Hornellsville, Howard,

sine die

Feb. 28; 1868.

Rathbone, Thurston, Troupsburgh, Tuscarora, West Union, Wood-

17,

1

2

people, instead of receiving their appointment from the

District.

by, Lindley, Orange, Thurston, Woodhull.

1866.

1

2

Wayland, Wayne, Wheeler.

Second

1857.

1

2

Lewis C. Pierson William B. Ruggles Jerry E. B. Santee William B. Ruggles Jerry E. B. Santee. Azariah C. Brundage... George R. Sutherland... Azariah C. Brundage... George R. Sutherland...

1875.

Henrv Sherwood

Urbana, Wayne, Wheeler.

— Avoca, Bath, Bradford, Cohocton, Dansville, Fremont, How-

ard, Prattsburgh, Pulteney,

1847.

1

2

1873. Stephen D. Shattuck... Charles F. Houghton... 1874. Stephen D. Shattuck...

on that day, and adjourned Oct.

Reading,

Cohocton,

30, 1859, to April 30, 1862),

(from Dec.

1

2

bany on the 1st of June following, which met accordingly

Wayne, Wheeler. 1857.

1

2

1869.

1878.

one member, and

First District.

— Bath,

1

2 3 1 2 3

Fulton

tricted as follows 1847.

1

2 3

Lyman Balcom

1877.

to this provision,

the boards met in June, 1857, and in June, 1866. elect

3

McKay

^^No Convention"

and Hamilton Counties together

1

2

1867. AV'illiam B. Boyd Christian Minier 1868. John F. Little

2 3

The

of January succeeding the adoption of the constitution, and

to

2 3

S.

3

DELEGATES TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION.

1846 required the Board of Supercounties to meet on the first Tuesday

divide the counties into districts of the

Amaziah

1

ASSI]MBLY, 1847-1879.

constitution of

visors of the several

1

DIST.

Frederick M. Kreidler..

R. Crocker... John T. Plato 1862. Daniel B. Bryan

ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS.

The

2 3

1

Wickham

Divin.

NAME Samuel M. Alley John W. Taggart Henry Sherwood Horace Bemis 1864. William E. Bonham Alexander Olcott J. Harvey Stephens 1865. William E. Bonham Alexander Olcott Horace Bemis 1866. William B. Boyd

DATE. 1862. 1863.

1

2

R.B. Van Valkenburgh George T. Spencer Solon 0. Thacher 1858. R.B. Van Valkenburgh Washington Barnes William B. Jones 1859. Abel Eveland

Benjamin Smead.

MEMBERS OF

1

2 3

1857.

Ansel C. Smith.

1

2 3 1

Harlo Hakes

C. Rogers.

3

2 3

1855. Seth B. Cole Sylvester Smith Peter C. Ward 1856. Goldsmith Deniston Albert C. Morgan

John Jamison. Asa McConnell.

1844.

1834. Joshua Healy.

1837.

Hubbell.

1843. Morris Brown.

Edward Hovvell. John McBurney.

2

1852. R.B. Van Valkenburgh Benajah P. Bailey Nathaniel M. Perry 1853. Dryden Henderson John McBurney Henry H. Bouton 1854. John F. Williams Benajah P. Bailey Obadiah Stephens

Ziba A. Leiand.

Josiah Dunlap.

1

Joel Carrington

Francis E. Erwin.

Henry Phoenix. Andrew B. Dickinson.

1831. Paul C. Cook.

1836.

S.

DIST.

John K. Hale 1850. Edwin F. Church Ferral C. Dininny James Alley 1851. Chas. G. Higby James M. Miles

Samuel A. Johnson. 1842. Aaron W. Beach.

Josiah Duulap.

1833.

Manning Kelly. Andrew G. Chatfield. Abram M. Lybolt.

Wm.

1829. Randall Graves.

1832.

NAME, DATE. 1848. Abel Kendall John G. Mersereau

Andrew G. Chatfield. Abram M. Lybolt. Andrew G. Chatfield.

Grattan H. Wheeler.

1830.

Samuel Griggs. David Hall.

Johnson N. Reynolds. 1840. Richard B rower.

1826. Daniel Cruger.

61

Jasper,

Hon-

George T. Spencer, Corning.

Troupsburgh, Wayland, West Union. 1857.

— Canisteo,

nellsville,

Dansville, Tremont, Greenwood, Hartsville, Hor-

Howard, Jasper^ Troupsburgh, Wayland, West Union.

•-••

General William Kernan, of Tyrone, then in this county, father

of Hon. Francis Kernan, U.- S. Senator, Utica, N. Y.

:

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

62

NEW

County treasurers

COUNTY CLERKS.

the

following are the names of those

John T. Allen, November, 1861. Peter Halsey, November, 1864. Peter Halsey, November, 1867. Peter Halsey, November, 1870. Theodore A. Silsbee, November, 1873. Sebastian G. Lewis, November, 1876.

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS.

By visors

an act passed April 17, 1843, the Boards of Superof the several counties were directed

county superintendents of abolished

March

common

During

13, 1847.

The

schools.

office

was

existence the fol-

its

Steuben County

officiated for

appoint

to

:

Ralph K. Finch, Bath.

SHERIFFS.

constitation they were appointed annually

held

county

office in this

lowing persons

the next succeeding term.

who have

Peter Halsey, November, 1858.

Lucius A. Waldo, November,. 1877.

SheriiFs are elected for a term of three

ap-

James R. Dudley, November, 1848. Perry S. Donahe, November, 1851. Alexander Hess, November, 1857.

Chas. W. Campbell, November, 1853. Samuel M, Alley, November, 1856. OrsoD Mosber, November, 1859. Oscar J. Averill, November, 1862, Allen A. Van Orsdale, November, 1865. Nirom M, Crane, November, 1868. Henry Faucett, November, 1871. Archibald E. Baxter, November, 1874.

years,

Alanson

and are

Under the

S. Phillips,

first

Bath.

SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS.

by the Council

of Appointment, and no person could hold the

office for

more than four successive years. The sheriiF could hold no other office, and must be a freeholder in the county for sheriffs of

The

ties.

Philo P. Hubbell, November, 1850.

The

They were formerly

pointed by the Boards of Supervisors in the several coun-

Paul C, Cook, November, 1844. Paul C. Cook, November, 1847,

which he was appointed.*

under the constitution of

are elected

1846, for a term of three years.

31, 1796.

Henry A. Townsend, Feb. 11, 1799. John Wilson, March 21, 1807. Henry A. Townsend, Feb. 8, 1808. Bugald Cameron, Feb. 10, 1810. John WilsoD, Feb. 13, 1815. Edward Howell, March 19, 1818. John Metcalfe, Feb. 19, 1821. John Metcalfe, November, 1822. David Rumsey, November, 1829. William H. Bull, November, 1832. William Hamilton, Nov lumber, 1838,

ineligible for

YORK. COUNTY TREASURERS.

COUNTY GOYEENMENT. George D, Cooper^ March

:

following have been the

Prior to 1857 school commissioners were appointed by

The

elected on a separate ballot.

The

election

first

under the

Laws of 1856) was

act creating the office (chapter 179,

held in November, 1859.

Steuben County

Since that year they have been

the Boards of Supervisors.

following shows the school

commissioners for this county and the districts for which William Dunn, March

John WilsoB, March

31, 1796.

they were respectively elected

:

3, 1800.

Dugald Cameron, February 22, 1804. Jacob Teeplo, February 16, 1808. Howell Bull, March 22, 1810. Corneliug- YouDglove, March 25, 1811.

Thomas McBurney, March

7,

1812.

Benjamin Wells, February 23, 1813. Lazarus Hammond, March 2, 1814. George McClure^ February 28, 1815. Henry Shrivur, March 2, 1819. JohEf Mag€«, February 19, 1821.t John Magee, November, 1822.

John Kennedy, November, 1825. Alva Ellas, November, 1828. George HuBtington, November, 1831. John T. Andrews, November, 1834. Henry Brother, November, 1837. Hiram Potter, November, 1840. Hugh Magee, November, 1843. Henry Brother, November, 1846. Oliver Allen, November, 1849. Gabriel T. Harrower, November, 1852. Lewis I>. Fay, November, 1855. Orange Seymour, November, 1858. Edwin B„ Kasson, November, 1861. William N. Smith, November, 1864. Willis E. Craig, November, 1867. William B. Boyd, November, 1870, Holland B. Williams, November, 1873. Franklin B. Sherwood, November, 1876.

Name. George McLean Stephen Vorhis Eli H. Brown

Name.

Dist.

1

1

George P. Avery John 0. Higby (2d)

1 1

1

Zenas L. Parker G. Horatio Guinup G. Horatio Guinup P. J. Farrington Noble H. Rising

D. Peckham

William M. Sherwood Jacob H. Westcott Reuben H. Williams Reuben H. Williams Reuben A. Williams

1

R. R. Calkins Joseph B. Westcott

Dist.

Edmund

1

W^illiam

P.Todd

1

William S. Hale Horatio Pattengell Rodney Dennis

2

Albert T. Parkhill

2

Edwin Whiting

1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3

JUDICIARY. JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT. Steuben County trict,

is

included in the Seventh Judicial Dis-

with Cayuga, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Seneca,

Wayne, and Yates

who have been Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon.

Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

The

Counties.

justices of this court

residents of this county are the following A. Johnson, Corning, April

7,

1847.

A. Johnson,

"

Nov.

6,

1849.

A. Johnson,

"

Nov.

3,

1857.

A. Johnson,

"

Nov.

7,

1865.

David Rumsey, Bath, Nov. 7, 1873.J David Rumsey, " Nov. 1873.^

J Appointed by Governor Dix to

fill

the vacancy caused by the

death of Hon. Thomas A. Johnson. ^^

Const. 1777, Art. 26; Act Feb. 19, 1787.

t Appointed, and then under new constitution elected in 1822.

§

Elected by the people for a term of fourteen years, which expires

Dec. 31, 1887,

:

:

:

:

:

NEW

HISTOEY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Under the ester,

Hon. William B. Roch-

constitution of 1821,

of Bath, was appointed Circuit Judge for the Eighth

Circuit on 21st April, 1823.

ASSISTANT ATTORNEY-GENERALS. This was the original designation of the

1818, the

office

:

YORK.

63

of assistant justice was abolished, and the

number of judges was limited to five, including the first Under the constitution of 1821, the judges were judge. Under the constiappointed by the Governor and Senate. tution of 1846, they are elected for a term of four years,

office

of district

and

by the Boards of Supervisors.

their salary fixed

County Court

under the present constitution, jurisdic-

The districts embraced several counties, and were The office was seven in number (Act Feb. 12, 1796). The filled by the Governor and Council during pleasure. attorney-general officiated personally in New York County.

jurisdiction as the Legislature

The

it.

attorney.

following were the persons appointed under this act for

The

has,

and covenant, in sums

tion in actions of debt, assumpsit,

not exceeding one thousand dollars, and such other original

from time to time

shall give

Legislature under this provision has conferred

The

for the fore-

Steuben County and the territory then constituting the

upon the County Court equity jurisdiction

Sixth District

closure of mortgages, the sale of the real estate of infants,

admeasurement of dower,

partition of lands,

William Stewart, appointed March Nathaniel

W.

Howell, "

Feb.

31, 1796.

9,

judgments wherever seventy-five

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS.

and the care and custody of lunatics

and habitual drunkards.

The office of district attorney was created April 4, 1801. At first the State was divided into seven districts, as before, The folbut subsequently several new ones were formed. lowing were district attorneys in the Seventh District, in-

constitution associates with the county judge two

The

justices of the peace, to be designated

William Stewart, appointed March

ture shall prescribe,

and perform such other duties

following have been the county judges

2,

1802.

9,

1810.

officiated in

March

William Stewart,

Feb. 12, 1811.

Charles Williamson,

Vincent Matthews,

"

March

Daniel Cruger,

"

April 17, 1815.

William Kersey, Jan. James Faulkner, Feb.

12, 1818.

the 21st of April, 1818, a law was passed

each county a separate ino; office

under

this

making

The names of those

district.

hold-

law are as follows

March

22,

Lazarus H. Read,

'"'

Andrew

7,

June 21, 1886. March 4, 1840.

''

Dec.

"

Morris Brown,

June

constitution of

2,

9,

1846 and the amended con-

SURROGATES. constitution, surrogates were appointed

first

for an unlimited period elected June, 1847.

Joseph Herron,

John Maynard, Chris. John McDowell, Harlow Hakes, John H. Butler,* appointed John H. Butler, elected '' John H. Butler, Alphonso H. Burrell,

"

Ellsworth D. Mills,

"

Ellsworth D. Mills,

"

1867.

have been elected as

Under the

Robert L. Brundage,

1838.

George T. Spencer, November, 1871. Guy H. McMaster, November, 1877.

20, 1846.

follows Alfred P. Ferris,

16, 1804,

Guy H. McMaster, November,

1845.

stitution of 1867, district attorneys

31, 1796.

29, 1803.

Jacob Larrowe, November, 1851. David McMaster, November, 1855. Washington Barnes, November, 1859, Guy 11. McMnster, November, 1863.

1829. 1834.

*'

a. Chatfield,

Under the

Feb.

who have

Jacob Larrowe, April 17, 1843. William M. Hawley, Jan. 30, 1846. David McMaster, June, 1847.

Daniel Cruger, appointed June 11, 1818. " John Cook, Feb. 19, 1821. " Henry Welles, Oct. 1824. *^

may

Samuel Baker, Jan. 18, 1813. Thomas McBurney, April 15, 1816, James Norton, Feb. 7, 1823. George C. Edwards, Jan. 13, 1826. Ziba A, Leland, Jan.

Edward Howell, B. W. Franklin, Edward Howell,

as

Steuben County

" "

On

to hold courts

of sessions, with such criminal jurisdiction as the Legisla-

The Lewis,

by law,

be required by law.

cluding Steuben County

W.

due on an un-

1797.

satisfied execution,

Daniel

dollars is

satisfaction of

November, November, January 7, November, November,

appeal lay from their 1850.

Under the second

of Probate of the State,

1853.

constitution,

surrogates were appointed by the Governor and Senate for

1856.

1859.

four years.

1862.

cellor.

1865.

November, November, November, November, November,

by the Council of Appointment. An decisions to the judge of the Court

The

Appeals lay from their decision to the chan-

1846 abolished the

constitution of

of

office

surrogate, except in counties where the population exceeds

1865.

forty

1868.

thousand, and

devolved

In counties exceeding

its

judge.

1874.

the Legislature

1877.

They are elected for a term of four York County, where the term is

COUNTY JUDGES.

the county

in population forty thousand,

1871.

may

duties on

authorize the election of surrogates.

years (except in three years), and

New are

allowed to take the acknowledgment of deeds and administer

During most of the time under the

number of judges and

assistant

first

justices

constitution the in

the various

counties differed widely, in some counties the as great as twelve of each.

Appointed

vice

By

an act

number being passed March 27,

Hqvyou, removed from the county.

oaths in the same

manner

as

county judges (ch. 175, Laws

of 1851).

The

duties of surrogate have been performed in this

county by the county judge since 1847. time the

office

was

filled

Prior to that

by the following-named persons

;

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

64

Stephen Ross. March

31, 1796.

Robert Campbell, Jaa.

David Rumsey,. Jan.

"

:



first

judge,

my

becomes

it

duty to address you.

you expect much of a charge, you it

be disappointed, as

will

be nothing but a squib.

will

If

among you many

I see

gentlemen who understand the duties of grand jurors better

1827.

I need only say, then, you

than I do.

31, 1835.

3,

man and of his opinions, is here given Gentlemen of the Grand Jury : In the absence of

'

the

24, 1840.

Ansel J. McCall, Feb.

charge, so

characteristic of the

Samuel Baker, Ap»ril 10, 1817. William Read, Mavch 20, 1821. James Brmidage, March 28, 1823. 8,

The substance of the

charge the grand jury.

Henry A. Townsend, March 24, 1800. George McClure, March 25, 1805. John Metcalfe, April 6, 1813. James Read, April 8, 1815.

William Wood's, Jan.

YORK.

The

go ahead and perform them.

1844.

his criminal calendar,

by which

Now, gentlemen,

duties,

me

handed

sheriff has

appears he has five poor

it

devils in jail for various offenses

horse-stealing.

know your

two of them are for

;

there are grades in crime,

and common sense would indicate that the punishment

CHAPTER

XY.

should be in proportion to the criminality of the offense,

suppose

The

establishment of a county and the location of a

due time a bench and

seat of justice bring in

had no lawyers

till

The

was George

arrival

first

The next

county.

the county was organized in 1796.

He

on the Hudson.

and Stewart, from

Steuben

bar.

J).

Cooper, from Rhinebeck,

was appointed the

clerk of the

first

were Messrs. Jones, Masterton,

arrivals

New York

These gentlemen of

City.

the legal profession were followed by William

Howe

Mr. Cuyler was a

elegant

of Albany.

fine, portly,

Cuyler,

young

man, of very fashionable and fascinating manners of the In 1812, Gen.

Chesterfieidian order.

him aide-de-camp, and while killed

by

a cannon-ball

Amos

Hall appointed

stationed at Black

Rock he was

Maj. Cuyler was

from Fort Erie.

a very active and intelligent officer, and his death was

He

lamented.

According

left

to

a

young wife and one

much

who came to Bath was Dominick Theophilus Blake, a young man from Ireland. He was well educated, but his dialect and manner of speech afforded much amusement for practice,

and remained

Samuel

S.

in

Mr. Blake had but

Bath but a short time.

He removed

from Elmira

acquired an extensive law practice.

Bath, where he

to

if it

not

is

ought

it

to

when

this,

that one of these scamps stole a slab-sided

be

I inform you

Yankee mare,

Two

while the other took a Virginia blood-horse.

others

mayhem. One of them for biting off a which I think exhibits a most depraved appe-

are indicted for

negro's nose, tite

;

the other for gouging out an Irishman's eye, a most

ungentlemanly way of fighting. to these fellows.

The

of whisky.

The

last is a

I

hope you

poor cuss

article is so plenty

will look well

who

be had by asking, anywhere, and stealing

it is

jug

stole a

and cheap that

it

may

the meanest

kind of offense, and deserves the severest punishment that the law will permit. it

The

great

men

at

Albany have made

our special duty to charge you in regard to private

What

teries.

is

lot-

the mighty crime involved in this business

when hustling and pitching coppers is tolerated suppose they know, and as the law makes it our duty,

but I

I charge you to look out for them. constables,

and march these men

Sheriff, select

off to their duties.'

two

"

HON. VINCENT MATTHEWS.

Hon. Daniel Cruger,

member of

this

county bar, was born in Orange Co., N. Y., on

At an

the 29th of June, 1766.

academy

at

early age

he was sent

Middletown, N. Y., and finished his

to

an

classical

education under the instruction of the great scholar and

Noah Webster.

In 1786 he commenced

William B. Rochester, and other eminent members of this

lexicographer,

bar, studied law in his office.

the study of law with Col. Robert Troup, of

Among

You

so.

Vincent Matthews, who was for several years a leading

Haight, Esq., prior to his removal to Angelica,

bar.

;

understand what I mean by

will

little

Allegany Co., was a prominent member of the Steuben

County

the law

is

I cannot see,

son.

Gen. McClure's account, the next lawyer

the other members of the bar.

That I

exhibited by the circumstances of each case.

as

BENCH AND BAR OF STEUBEN COUNTY.

New

York,

named Cuth-

and during his studies became intimate with Pendleton,

man

of good sense, and, whether drunk or sober, a good-natured,

Judge (afterwards Governor) Yates, Chief Justice Morris, Aaron Burr, and others whose names form a brilliant con-

clever fellow."

stellation in the history

The following amusing anecdote, which was contributed by a member of the Steuben County bar to the " Knickerbocker Magazine," is said to relate to Judge Helm, who

thus had rare opportunities,

the early lawyers was a Virginian,

bert Harrison,

whom

Gen. McClure describes as a

resided at an early time in

judges of the Court of '^

Among them was

''

Bath, and became one of the

Common

a jolly old Virginian,

Judge

H

,

known throughout the country

He had Common Pleas.

habits and generous hospitality. a judge of the Court of

for genial

been appointed

Though

little

versed in legal technicalities, he possessed a fund of genuine

common

sense,

On

which made him a good judge.

occasion, in the absence of the first judge,

it fell

to

one

him

to

New York it

He

jurisprudence.

being his privilege to see

how

was administered by Morris, Yates, Spencer, Kent,

and Savage, and how forensic questions were managed by such master minds as Hamilton and Burr.

Matthews was admitted

Pleas

a sportsman of the old school of buff breeches and fair top-boots, well

justice

of

to practice in the year

remained some time with Col. Troup. to Elmira.

1790, and

In 1793 he removed

In 1796 he represented the Western District

in the Senate of the State.

Soon

after

he retired from the

Senate he was appointed, with Hon. James Emott, a ber of the

Onondaga Commission

mem-

to settle the difficulties

growing out of conflicting claims and

litigations respecting

the Military Lands, a delicate and trying position, the duties

of which were discharged with signal ability and success.

NEW YORK.

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, In 1809, Mr. Matthews was elected to the Eleventh Con-

which

gress from the then Fourteenth Congressional District,

and Tioga Counties.

consisted of Cayuga, Seneca, Steuben,

He

served one year in Congress, and returned to the practice

In 1812 he was elected

of his profession.

for several of the western counties,

sphere of

and professional

official

office a little

district attorney

and representing a large After holding the

labor.

over two years, his increasing professional busi-

ness compelled

him

to resign,

and his place was In 1816,

Gen. Daniel Cruger, of Bath.

by

filled

at the solicitation

of numerous friends in Steuben County, Gen. Matthews

removed

Here his popularity continued

to Bath.

to increase,

and he soon became one of the most distinguished lawyers in

New

Western

In 1821 he removed

York.

where his reputation for the

Rochester,

had gone before him, and and lucrative practice, which

as a lawyer

where he entered upon a large he continued

to

remainder of his active

He

pointed district attorney for that county in 1831.

was

and profound man, and an able

He

lawyer, though never an active politician.

been

It has

officer.

ability.

He

was a man of extensive and profound informa-

thoroughly conversant with parliamentary

tion,

without any apparent reflection he could

debate;

them

to existing circumstances

In 1815, Mr. Cruger formed a partnership with Hon. William B. Rochester, of Bath, subsequently one of the judges of the State, an eminent and distinguished

circuit

lawyer of fine legal attainments, a judge of

politician, a

superior abilities, a gentleman

He

December, 1780.

22d of

learned the printer's trade in his

boyhood of a Mr. Webster, one of the

by

perhaps, to add that the combination of such talents in this

one of the most powerful and influen-

legal firm rendered it tial

Western

in

New

York.

the 7th of April, 1815, Gen. Cruger was appointed

On

Seventh

District, consisting of the

was

and

it

was while in the

office that

Through

he entered the

his health,

as a student,

with

to the bar in

whom

it

proving injurious to

law-office of

he continued

GenI

till

S. S.

Haight

Haight.

About

this

time he

was

married

to

Miss Hannah

Clement, a niece of Henry A. Townsend, Esq., a lady of great refinement, intellectual culture, and graceful accom-

plishments,

who subsequently was

as

much admired

in the

In the

fall

of 1816 he was elected to Congress from the

tives as a

made

His

ability as a lawyer soon exhibited itself,

and he

became, within a few years after the commencement of his practice,

one of the leading lawyers at the Steuben bar.

Mr. Cruger served with the rank of major during the

his talents

House of Representa-

of the committee on the judiciary, and

member

several speeches,

won

served in the

which attracted more than ordinary

him

for

a high degree of respect.

Clinton was removed from the office of

canal

commissioner, meetings were held throughout the

State,

denouncing the act in the strongest and most em-

When

phatic manner.

the intelligence reached Steuben

It was the County a large meeting convened at Bath. largest meeting which, up to that time, had ever assembled

Gen. Cruger was called to pre-

in this part of the State.

istic

cities.

He

When De Witt

her husband was esteemed and honored among the gifted

he associated in those

Here

conspicuous than they had before been in the

attention and

side.

whom

less

State Legislature.

polished and refined circles of Washington and Albany, as

statesmen and lawyers with

a series of

and Steuben almost unbounded.

he was admitted

1805, when he became a partner with Gen

dis-

years he wielded an influence in the counties of Allegany

were not

pursued his occupation in Bath, but

of

Gen. Cruger attained

Owego Democrat^ which he edited and published for a short time, when he sold his interest and came to Bath, his For a while he

office

time second only in importance

at that

his highest professional reputation.

earliest printers in

here.

The

counties of Steuben, Allegany, and Tioga.

then Twentieth Congressional District.

removed

It is needless,

bench, the bar, and the political arena.

Albany, and afterwards started a paper at Owego, called the

father having previously

and prac-

birth, intuition,

a scholar, ripe and thorough, and an ornament to the

charge of the duties of this

the

as a

presiding officer."

to that of attorney-general,

on

His

facility.

was exceedingly popular

partisan strife of that day, he

district attorney

was born

with perfect

apply

notwithstanding the bitter animosity which governed the

interruption excepting his official terms.

He

quick

courtesy and urbanity in the chair were proverbial, and,

district attorney for the

native of Sunbury, Pa.

rules,

of apprehension, and he perfectly understood the rules of

26th of September, 1846, in the eightieth year of his age, having practiced his profession fifty-five years without

Daniel Cruger, whose ancestors were Huguenots, was a

Perhaps few men ever

over a legislative body with more dignity and

died on the

GEN. DANIEL CRUGER.

''

said,

presided

tice,

life.

Gen. Matthews served in the Legislature, from Monroe County, in 1826, in the Senate in 1839, and was ap-

a sagacious, philosophical,

ing

65

On

taking the chair he made one of his character-

speeches,



a speech of great

power and

eff'ectiveness,

although entirely destitute of any attempt at oratorical It

display.

own deep

was the calm and dignified expression of his

feelings, rendering his plain

and enduring. citizens

Among

have rights

other things

as well

as duties.

words penetrating

he said

The

'' :

Private

Legislature

is

war of 1812, and did gallant service with Gomk McClure's In the fall of 1813 he was elected to brigade in Canada.

but a co-ordinate branch of government, instituted for one

In 1814 he was re-elected, and also in

perverted to other objects, to purposes of ambition or party

the Assembly.

1815, and during this latter session was chosen Speaker of the House.

It

was a memorable contest between the

Republican and Federal factions.

was the Federal candidate. factions in the

Van

Rensselaer

So nearly divided were the

House, that Mr. Cruger was elected by a

majority of only one vote.

9

Jacob R.

He was

a most efficient presid-

and a single end, the duty of making laws.

spirit,

we

are authorized,

sition as shall call

to

it

back

endeavor to render

nature will admit.

spirit,

are

bound

to

make such

it

is

oppo-

to a discharge of its proper duties,

as pure as the imperfections of our

Fellow-citizens, that the Legislature,

powers

to

party rancor and hate, will be admitted by

all

in the removal of

party

it

we

When

Mr. Clinton, has perverted

its

:



!

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

66

No

reasonable and thinking men. tells

prophetic inspiration

that the people of this great State will surely vindi-

I assert that they will do

cate him.

know something day

zens, the

so,

will

come when shame and confusion

to carry into execution

He he

In such cases sunshine and tem-

darkness or the elements.

day and night were

all

the same to him.

The

der, would, in times of war,

and victorious

follow-

comman-

"

under the large

he

Bath

left

term of the Allegany Oyer and Terminer

to attend a

at Angelica.

on horseback.

In those days Cruger was the owner

of a valuable horse which he called Jingle Foot.

He

was

a large bay animal, with a white star in his forehead, finely proportioned, and like his master, with favorite, capable of great endurance.

deer and docile as he was

New

all

the courts in West-

York, and was therefore almost as famous as the

On

steed of Alexander the Great.

Gen. Cruger,

that village some time in the afternoon of the

On

the circuit.

He reached first

day of

his arrival he found his Democratic friends

in a state of great vexation,

owing

to an

advantage which

who was

this time the

term of the clerk of Allegany County,

a Republican, was drawing to a close.

That officer

Going

Albany

to

!"

exclaimed several gentlemen at the

Going

"

Albany, Cruger

to

To prevent was the

this county

This council was

to

meet on Thursday of that week, but

as there

had been

some misunderstanding among the Democrats as to the proper person to recommend, no name had been sent to

mean time

the Federals had been on

Albany.

But

the

and taking advantage of the misunderstanding

alert,

in the

Why, good heavens

you

ment now." " Yes I can.

Cruger," said a gentleman present,

!

Albany

can't reach

in time to prevent that appoint-

Jingle Foot will land

between this and Thursday noon, or I

any

at

he and I

rate,

make

will

He

Foot was ready at the door.

to

remedy the

late

of things.

In a few

Cruger on learning of

this

state

moments

filled

with the leading Democrats

of the county.

room was

A Federal clerk

in the county of Allegany

Night and day, over

of the village.

hill

and

dale,

he pressed

forward, stopping just long enough for refreshments and a

Jingle Foot seemed imbued with the same deter-

little rest.

as

his master,

—seemed

Albany town-clock

as the old

"

up

his progress that just

hour of noon of

tolled the

in front of the City Hotel.

Take such care of that horse

;

to gather fresh strength

Such was

he sped on his course.

as

you never did of any

who came forward

and the noble animal was soon

he rode

as

safe in the comfortable

stables of the hotel.

At

the appointed time the Council of Appointment assem-

As Allegany County was

bled.

body was

in the act of

the

on the

first

list,

when Daniel

Cruger, to their great astonishment, stood before

He

to his satis-

After resting a day or two in Albany, he again

faction.

mounted Jingle Foot, returned

to Angelica,

and the Demo-

Allegany County rejoiced in the appointment of a

which healed

somewhat bearing.

it.

in relating the true situation of affairs in that

remote region, and matters were soon arranged

crats of

that

moving the person recommended

for clerk of that county,

by the Federalists

all

own

dissensions

thick-set,

He was

party, having learned a lesson

among them.

common

height,

but with a manly, genteel figure and

graceful and easy in his manners, and his

conversation was refined and cultivated.

Both himself and

Mrs. Cruger possessed that genial hospitality which always

house with intelligent and

But Such a thing was not to be thought of for a moment where was the remedy ? It was too late for any mail to For a reach Albany in time to prevent the appointment.

filled

time Mr. Cruger walked the room in a state of intense ex-

Ambrose Spencer,

!

just

going down as Mr. Cruger mounted his horse and rode out

In person. Gen. Cruger was below the

evil.

Nothing could exceed the chagrin and mortification of

his

The sun was

This was in the month of June.

clerk belonging to their

was now apparently too

overturn the nice

cerning his business, and in due time word came that Jingle

matter of considerable advantage, and of course this was a especially as it

trial to

next gave the general some further instruction con-

was not long

aff'air,

a

me safely in Albany am mistaken in him

plans of these infernal Federalists," said Cruger.

among their opponents, had forwarded the name of one of This their own party for the office of clerk to the council. fact had just come to the knowledge of the Democrats when Cruger arrived. The partisan contests of those days were The appointment of a clerk was a bitter in the extreme. serious

can you be going

reply.

other," said he to the hostler,

party in Allegany County could unite.

What

?

being disgraced by a Federal

(Republicans, as they were then called), and of course the leaders of that

rest,

going to Albany."

Thursday Cruger drew up

whom

during

put over what causes you can and try the

;

was then appointed by the Council of Appointment at Albany, which at that time was composed of Democrats

would appoint any person upon

my business

want you take charge of

mined energy as

the Federals had apparently gained over them.

About

"

this visit to Angelica,

as usual, rode his favorite horse.

am

clerk,"

Jingle Foot had for two

fleet.

or three years carried his master to

ern

whom he was a great He was as fleet as a

that gentleman appeared

Albany for?" asked Gen. Haight. "

At

that day lawyers as well as judges traveled from circuit to circuit

" to

district system,

attending court

same moment.

have rendered him formidable

in the field

term

for I

in the discharge of his duties as district attorney

While

When

who was

said,

this

ing incident illustrates this characteristic, and evinces a greatness of action which, had he been a military

then sent for Gen. Haight,

" General, I

was never delayed on account of

Foot well rubbed,

and bridled within an hour and a half"

fed, saddled

at Angelica at that time.

measure which became necessary for him personally

Any

his appearance.

" Bullock," said Cruger, " have Jingle

will fall

this outrage."

upon the heads of the perpetrators of

pest,

Fellow-citi-

length he sent for the landlord, and that

made

person soon

because I claim to

of the people of this State.

At

citement.

YORK.

their

During the

session of the courts at

guests.

Bath their house was

always the headquarters of the judges Yates, and

pleasing

who

Van Ness

presided.

There

rested from their

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, labors in the court-room

John

there too

;

C. Spencer, Elisha

Wood-

Williams, Samuel A. Talcott, John A. Collier, David

and other eminent lawyers of the day, forgetting the

cock,

collisions of the bar,

were entertained by Mr. Cruger and

many an

his accomplished lady, while

by enlivened by pleasing and It

was the custom

arrived at a county-seat, to receive

and when the hour for the session

;

by his

open arrived, the

sheriff,

a very extensive practice both in Steuben and the adjacent counties.

Among

the lawyers practicing at the Steuben bar

In the court-room

lady, of

W.

Wheeling,

his property,

and went

General Haight, and William Woods,

Soon

tinguish and adorn the bar.

Va.,

to reside

Early in June, 1843, while attending a meeting of the

Wheeling Bank, he was stricken down with apoplexy, and died within a few moments after the attack. directors of

removed

His father was Dr. Benjamin Welles, who was an

eminent surgeon in the Revolutionary army.

Henry

re-

Thus many formidable competitors were removed, leaving Mr. Welles a more open field of labor. Steuben County,

— an

plimentary to him as a lawyer. Cruger,

His predecessor was Daniel

distinguished throughout Western

who was

as a lawyer

and

writer,

eminent in Congress

His

domitable energy and power.

life

Soon

after

People

knowledge of

to the

rank of ensign.

tactics

and military

drill,

was promoted

His company was attached

to Col.

Hopkins' regiment of infantry, and, early in July, took the

field, at

In September, 1814, the American army took possession

constant

The

days, and, at the

congratulated himself that within a few short

suddenly moved from their works, their besiegers, and,

But

fell

like a thunder-clap

a short but

after

sanguinary

drove them from their works to the plains of Chip-

pewa, with a heavy

loss in killed,

wounded, and prisoners.

In that battle young Welles exhibited the cool intrepidity of a veteran.

As they were

entering the works of the

enemy, a British soldier discharged his musket

The

who

at

him.

and mortally wounded a young

bullet grazed his side

soldier

stood partly in the rear.

this

was pursuing his

Troup, of that

a

New York

while the

legal studies in the office of Col.

office

of Gen. Matthews three

he was admitted to the bar, in October, 1817, with

Hon. John B. Skinner, of with him, three years

was charged

Steuben County by the

The victim was found

wounded,

in a speechless

in a piece of

woods mor-

and dying condition.

Who

time unknown.

At

length suspicion pointed to Douglas

arrested, indicted,

The matters

and in January, 1825, brought

relied

upon

for convicting

him were

merely circumstantial, but they pointed to him as the guilty man. The prisoner had many friends and some means-

He

prepared for a vigorous and determined defense.

Hon.

Edward Howell, Ziba A. Leland, and Schuyler S. Strong, the prosecuEsqs., of Bath, were retained to defend him The tion being conducted by District Attorney Welles. ;

trial

occupied several days, and was exceedingly exciting.

Hon. William B. Rochester presided, assisted by Hon. James Norton, then First Judge of Steuben County. Every efi"ort was made to save Douglas which his eloquent and able

counsel could employ;

many

abstruse and difficult

questions of law arose and were discussed all

;

many

thrilling

of which Mr. Welles

exhibited ability and learning equal to the occasion.

accused was convicted

;

The

but, on the trial, a circumstance oc-

curred which set aside the verdict of the jury, and gave him a new hearing. While the trial was in progress, during one of

its recesses,

the jury visited a place where spirit-

uous liquors were sold and partook of refreshments, some

city.

After remaining in the years,

to

His father had made the acquaintance of

eminent lawyer in the city of

latter

tally

in that case

citizen of

circumstances were developed, in

About the middle of November, 1814, he returned Bath, and entered the office of Vincent Matthews as student-at-law.

cruelty.

to trial.

on the morning of the 17th of September the Americans

battle,

The defendant

of Ives, under circumstances of great atrocity and

same time, grad-

hours he would re-enter with his victorious columns.

upon

name

he was

ually approaching with their parallels, so that the officer in

command

Douglas.

vs.

his professional

all

was the well-known case of the

It

with having murdered a

up a

British besieged the fort, keeping

fire for several

intellectual powers.

district attorney,

the perpetrator of the foul crime was, remained for some

Black Rock.

of Fort Erie.

in-

appears in another

Mr. Welles was appointed

county of Steuben and commanded by Capt. John Ken-

for his

for his

part of this chapter.

and

after,

New

high order, and a politician of

In 1814 he enlisted in a military company recruited in the

was elected sergeant, and soon

district attorney of

appointment which was highly com-

a case occurred which called into action

He

Mr. Matthews

after,

ceived his early education at the Kinderhook Seminary.

nedy, of Bath.

dis-

Early in 1823, Mr. Rochester was

to Rochester.

legislative abilities of a

born in Kinderhook, N. Y., Oct. 13,

Cruger,

appointed a circuit judge, and Mr. Cruger was in Congress.

York

JUDGE WELLES. w^as

when

—names which

In October, 1824, he was appointed

Henry Welles

Applying himself

practice.

William B. Rochester, Edward Howell, Daniel

shortly after.

1794.

Bath and commenced

office in

Mr. Welles opened an

after his admission,

at his lodgings

In 1833 he married Mrs. Shep-

where the general invested

Immediately

upon him

In 1828, Gen. Cruger sustained an irreparable misfortune

widow

of the same causes.

trial

Mr. Welles commenced his career were Vincent Matthews,

everything was conducted in the same formal manner.

ard, a highly-respected

and were often associated in the

at the bar as opponents,

carrying their

to the court-house.

in the death of his wife.

Subsequently, they often met

to the degree of counselor.

assistants,

respective badges of ofiice, waited

and escorted him

when a presiding judge him with public honors

to

67

with untiring industry to his profession, he soon attained

refined conversation.

in those days,

in full uniform, attended

agreeable hour passed

YORK.

Buffiilo,

later,

who was

also in the class

when they were both admitted

of them drinking intoxicating liquors.

Douglas alleged this act as a ground of

was carried

to the general

The

counsel for

error.

The

case

term of the Supreme Court, and

on the 25th of February, 1825,

it

came on

for

argument

at

;

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

68

trial

In due time the new

trial

attorney until the year 1829,

him

Bath ten

tice at

years,

where he continued a lawyer

his increasing civil

Hon. Edward Howell

Mr. Welles continued

when he removed

to practice

to

to prac-

Penn Yan,

with success and distinction

At

pit the brains against the hearty

Grloss

misdeeds and

trifle

common

the

to conclusions, yet

he gave

He

onist.

in

which he presented his

he was always formidable

was hke a heavy piece of

changed about, but always well and

manner

is

well illustrated

was once engaged

in

after admission to the bar

case.

as

artillery,

an antag-

by the following anecdote

:

first

strip

him

and he could only say of him, as Junius did of the

him support his flight his plumage and you fix him to the earth," he should endeavor in a quiet way to take some

and that

feathers that adorn

of the gentleman's plumage from him, trusted, to

just enough, he

keep his good friend out of the clouds; and

he succeeded

first

judicial election

under the con-

In the Seventh Judicial District,

took place.

Thomas A. Johnson, of Corning, Henry

Welles, of

Penn

Yan, Samuel L. Seldon, of Rochester, and John Maynard,

Supreme Court.

of Auburn, were elected justices of the

These gentlemen were lawyers of the highest and purest As they had adorned the bar with professional character. their learning

and

they added lustre to the

talents, so also

bench, which since the adoption of the

had been the admiration of the

first

constitution

For over thirty

nation.

years the judges of the Seventh District have upheld the learning, dignity, and purity of the

New

State of

1839 became

residents of the village of Corning, build-

ing one of the best houses in the place at

ment, in which he resided

till

Supreme Court of the

the time of his death.

duties of a justice of the

Supreme Court nearly twenty-one

years.

He

the various business and social interests of the village.

Hammond &

Johnson, he was half-owner of the water-

mill property just east of Corning,

same

firm of Johnson, to the

The

legal reports

his

abihty and

and was

at the time of his death, as

&

Brough

in-

one of the

Until his elevation

Bostwick.

bench he was in the active and constant practice of

his profession. "

He

was a Whig, of Free-Soil

a Republican throughout his

proclivities,

life.

He

and afterwards

was one of the

first

trustees of the school district in the village of Corning,

and during his was, from

its

life

an earnest promoter of education.

opening

till

The town

the Elmira Female College.

The

to

He

his death, one of the trustees of

of Corning being

a full share of the town ofiices.

county, senatorial, and Congressional districts were

largely Democratic, yet he

had the courage

to

accept at

various times a nomination by his party for the Senate and

Congress, and stumped the district with great ability,

though without success

al-

in securing his election.

In 1847 he was elected by the Whigs to the

office

of

Supreme Court for the Seventh Judicial DisThis county wa.s trict under the then new constitution. included in the district by the active efforts of three men, who admired Mr. Johnson for his staunch advocacy of Whig principles, and were determined that Steuben County

justice of the

should be placed in a strong

Whig

district, so that

be elected justice of the Supreme Court.

York.

Judge Welles discharged the

commence-

its

always took an active interest in building up and fostering

Whig, he was chosen

to the admiration of all present.

In July, 1847, the stitution



moved

of Nunda, Livingston Co., N. Y., under the firm-name of

In his

the flights of oratory which the counsel opposed to

The him of

business

He

reply Mr. Welles simply remarked that he never attempted

king, "

As

His

the trial of an important cause, at

the plain speaking of his opponent.

to Centre-

In 1841 he was appointed land commissioner for the With Simeon Hammond, now Erie Railroad Company.

not easily

effectually aimed.

one of the

terested in the

;

he removed

the present town of Corning, which was then head-

exhibition of his eloquence, and, in his conceit, a sarcastic

did

soon

he was old enough, he spent his winters in teaching He studied law district school and in reading and study.

power and

to

As

N. Y.

Co.,

as

Waterloo, in which the counsel opposed to him made an

allusion

Broome

parents removed to Colesville,

eastward, he removed to Knoxville, and in

such was the perfect preparation which

his cases that

In his early boyhood his

schools afforded.

quarters for business in this region.

not a rapid thinker, and sometimes slow in coming

Though

father was a small

with great truths."

the bar he gained the attention of the court and jury

by the calm, candid manner

His

farmer, and his advantages for education were such only as

and soon

he was not one of those

Who

His paternal ancestry was

15, 1804.

English, and his maternal Irish.

ville, in

"

May

Hamp-

in Blanford,

with Hon. Robert Monell, at Greene, Chenango Co., N. Y.,

Supreme Court.

until elected a justice of the

As

when

to resign.

in his place.

was appointed

JOHNSON.

A.

Hon. Thomas A. Johnson was born den Co., Mass.,

to discharge the duties of dis-

Judse Welles continued business compelled

HON. THOMAS

took place, and the

prisoner was convicted and executed.

trict

YORK.

case is reported in the 4th of

This

granted the prisoner.

Cowen.

new

conviction was set aside, and a

The

Albany.

NEW

he could

These three were

Hon. William Divin, member of Assembly (a resident of Reading, then in Steuben County) Hon. Francis H. Rug;

his duties with great industry and directness of purpose,

Chautauqua County (subsequently a and Hon. Ira Harris, senator from resident of Corning) Mr. Johnson's personal friend, Mr. Divin, withAlbany.

Barbour's and

out his knowledge, enlisted the two senators in the project,

will find the traces of his judicial labor

which was carried through without regard to geographical fitness, as the county of Steuben jutted southward to the

of the

State

research.

It

bear is

ample testimony

said, "

and the student of the

Howard's Reports' to be quite as

He

to

entered upon the discharge of

earlier

volumes of

numerous and quite

'

as valuable as those of

any other member of the court."

Judge Welles died

at

Penn Yan, March

seventy-fourth year of his age.

gles, a

senator from

;

Pennsylvania 7,

1868, in the

line.

Judge Johnson was

re-elected

when

and twice afterwards, and thus held the

his term expired, office for

twenty-

'"^iy -Ta^nii^l Sarta^'^-



:

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

Supreme Court of the

justice of the

York.

he studied law, and after being admitted to the bar, commenced practice at Moscow, Livingston Co. Not long after he commenced practice, by the failure of a brother whose paper he

in the fourth department.

As

a judge,

man

no

had indorsed, he was stripped suddenly of all his earthly possessions He never again recovered his pecuniary and reduced to penury. standing. He remained at Moscow but a year or two after his misfortune, when he removed to Dansville, where, by his professional labors, he gained a fair practice and considerable notoriety for his witty sayings and humorous speeches. While at Dansville his practice gradually extended into the counties of Allegany, Livingston, and Steuben.

of the past or present generation has

been held in higher esteem for his integrity and judicial His talents and character, which made him promability.

him

inent and successful at the bar, also gave

He

and honor on the bench. of

LL.D. from Hobart

He was

member

a

distinction

received the honorary degree

College, Geneva.

His good-humor, his never-failing fund of anecdotes, joined to his acknowledged professional ability, made him a favorite with his legal

of the Episcopal Church, of the tenets

At

and service of which he was an ardent advocate.

many

time of his death, and for

fession rendered

years previous, he was a

among

Hence,

fying assurance of the confidence he had inspired. After his business relations with Judge Hawley were dissolved he continued to practice

sufi'ering.

at Hornellsville

he resided

misery and degradation resulting from habits of intemper-

A

ance, he became active in the cause, and was among the

till

public

life

the

to

he maintained a

during his long career of

strict

and consistent adherence

and practice of his

principles

earlier

manhood.

Energetic and faithful in business, benevolent of heart, conscientious in principle, and genial and courteous in ner,

he had but

He

lived a

to

form an acquaintance

void of

life

ofi'ense to his

of a lingering and painful

He

him.

departed this

illness,

life

to secure a friend.

fellow-men, and died

lamented by

Dec.

5,

man-

all

who knew

1872.

During

Their children were

1865.

Anna

B., born Oct.

;

March

Adelaide, born

21, 1835,

married Chas. H. Thomson, of Corning, Sept. 26, 1855

Mary

Louise, born Feb. 8, 1840, married

wick,

now

Hiram W.

of Franklin, Pa., Dec. 27, 1865

Sarah

his second

W.

;

;

Bost-

and Lizzie E.,

Mrs of Penn

wife he married, Dec. 26, 1866,

Henry Welles, They had one daughter,

Parker, daughter of Hon.

Yan, who

survives him.

still

Margaret Welles, born Aug. 22, 1867. are

still

All his children

JOHN BALDWIN. the following for

Bench and Bar of New York," gives sketch of John Baldwin, who practiced law

some time

" The

name

in his "

and

Ilis wit,

his humor, his withering sarcasm, have created a fund of anecdote almost inexhaustible. If sometimes his wit descended to vulgarity we can excuse him, if occasionally he wielded a tarnished weapon



that the native

mould

perverted use of his intellectual powers. the rubbish and classic

offixl

of his

mind was above such

His vulgarisms were like

which sometimes surround the polished and still the glory and grandeur of a cultivated

column, showing

was called upon

to try a

very important case before a magistrate in the town of Birdsall, Alle-

gany Co. The plaintiff in the suit was the great man of the place, and Baldwin very soon discovered that the magistrate was one of those truckling sycophants over whom wealth and station exert an almost unbounded influence; and being disgusted with his evident perversion of justice, he poured out upon him the bitterest anathemas. Probably never before or since has a magistrate been subjected to such a terriWe shall omit a part of the ble excoriation by a member of the bar. conversation, giving only enough to show the spirit of the encounter.

When

he had finished, the lawyer on the other side arose and informed it was his duty to immediately commit *Mr. Baldwin

for contempt,

'

for,'

said he,

as a magistrate will be at

ing to the magistrate

' ,•

'

you do

unless

this, all respect for

you

an end.' thundered Baldwin, point-

for that thing!'

why, he

more

acts

like a

magpie peeping into

a marrow-bone than a magistrate trying a lawsuit; the deeper he can get his head into a hole the better he

feels.'

This sealed the doom of the irate lawyer, and the magistrate informed him that he should commit him to the jail at Angelica for

twenty days for a contempt. ^' ' For a contempt upon whom

asked the lawyer.

?'

"'V(\ij, upon me,' said the justice. " ' K contempt upon you? The thing

temptible thing in the universe

You

is

is

impossible; the most con-

respectable

compared with you a burlesque upon

are the dirty catspaw of the plaintiff here,

justice



!'

"The

justice proceeded in earnest to

draw up the papers

In a moment

contents over the dreaded instrument. ling of an eye



to

have

— in the twink-

became a sheet of inky blackness, with every

it

He

letter

then mounted his horse, and started for home across

taken before he reached the point of safety by the constable and his In assistant with a new warrant which had been hastily made out. vain he urged his jaded steed; to be overtaken he saw was inevitable,

but his

fertile

mind soon devised another method

'•John Baldwin was born in Lebanon, Conn., and while very young

make

that place his permanent resi-

of escape.

ing his horse suddenly, he faced his approaching enemies. rode up he sternly

*^'You are

me

my

to Angelica,'

" ' Stand

off,'

and he attempted

said Baldwin,

'

or

to I'll

make

The polished

'and must go with

the arrest.

blow you through

!'

his pocket one of those old-fashioned

brass inkstand-cases used in those days, of the officer.

WheelAs they

demanded what they wanted.

prisoner,' replied the constable,

"At the same time he drew from

architecture.

settled at Gleneseo, intending to

pe-

the county line; but being on a poor and lame horse, he was overable lawyer will not soon be for-

gotten in the counties of Livingston, Allegany, and Steuben.

when we remember

some of the

man

his practice in Hornellsville he

obliterated.

at Hornellsville

of this eccentric

which place

Baldwin committed, and as they were approaching completion and opened upon the table to receive the signature of the court, Baldwin suddenly seized a large inkstand, nearly full of ink, and turned its

living.

Mr. Proctor,

at

'^

born Oct. 21, 1845.

For

Almond,

illustrate

very eccentric

"*Talk about respect 3,

1831, married John Maynard, of Corning, Dec. 4, 1856, (he died Aug. 17, 1865)

to

the court that

Judge Johnson married Polly H. Birdsall, of Grreene, Chenango Co., N. Y., June 7, 1830. She died March 11,

when he removed

his death, in 1843.''

culiarities of this '^

And

1842,

till

few anecdotes will serve to

earliest advocates of the total abstinence pledge as the basis

of temperance reforms.

the faculty for

him independent, but he did not possess

In 1835 he removed to Hornellsville and formed a partnership with the late Hon. William M. Hawley. This connection in business was attended by flattering circumstances, and gave Mr. Baldwin a grati-

an early day, being duly impressed with the

at

income from his pro-

'^

the foremost in enterprises

having for their object the amelioration of human

this time the

accumulation.

was, in an enlarged sense of the term, a friend of his

fellow-man, and was ever

At

brethren and with the people.

the

warden of Christ Church, Corning, and was the largest contributor to the erection of its present church edifice.

He

whom

kins, with

Supreme Court

designated to hold the general term of the

69

had, on attaining his majority, received a competence from Soon his father's estate, and the advantages of a good education. after settling at Geneseo he entered the office of Samuel Miles Hop-

he was one of the justices

latter part of his life,

During the

New

State of

YORK.

He

dence.

the time of his death he was the senior

At

five years.

!

and presented

it

to the breast

surface of the inkstand flashed in the

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

70 moonbeams like the bright barrel ous look. The constable and his

and had a most murderback appalled at

of a pistol,

assistants started

the hostile attitude of the lawyer, the former crying out,

point that this

"

^

way

it

;

Leave me, you

may

go

off;

villains, or,

some of you he gave the inkstand a shake which caused it ing of a pistol. " This was enough.

homeward

The next moment

And

!'

to click like the cock-

were galloping

his pursuers

them

as fast as their horses could carry

went quietly home, thinking,

send a

us, I'll

Leave, I say

!

and Baldwin

;

as he afterwards said, that his protect-

ing genius had assumed the shape of an inkstand. '^

Baldwin was afterwards indicted

in the county of

very bitter and, as was charged, libelous

The

magistrate.

writer of

was very lengthy, and written

letter

ner that portions of

it

brought before the court he was required '

Before entering

in such a

man-

district attorney attached

When

the letter itself as part of the instrument.

^'

for a

only could be read by any persons except the

In drawing the indictment the

it.

Allegany

concerning this same

letter,

my

pleas, I ask for the reading of the indict-

The

district attorney

usual or formal part of

read the letter

itself

it

he did very well, but when he attempted full stop

when he removed

the year 1816,

till

to

he removed

Auburn and became one of

to

the publishers

of the Cayuga Patriot^ with which he was connected for

At

several years.

the expiration of this time he returned

and on the 17th of April, 1828, issued the

to Bath,

first

number of the Steuhen Messenger^ which was published by him and his successors, Samuel M. Eddie, William P. Angel, and Charles Adams, till 1834, when its name was changed to The Constitutionalist^ and in 1844 to the Steuhen Democrat^ and

continued

publication

its

1852.

till

Sr., resided in

Bath

till

the time of his

which occurred on March 17, 1852. He was an public-spirited man, frequently serving his town,

death,

and school

village,

district in various responsible capacities,

it

While reading the

commenced.

he soon came to a

the town of Howard, in this county, where he

Bath and published the third newspaper issued in that village. The Farmers' Gazette. About a year afterwards

active,

In those days a prisoner could demand the reading of the whole

be read.

now

is

David Rumsey,

to plead to the charges.

indictment found against him, and in this case the court directed to

what

to

the offender was

ment,' said he. *'

In 1815 he removed with his family

tion of the State.

followed farming

by the heavens above

YORK.

Oh, don't

!'

take care

bullet through the very heart of

'

NEW

to

and four years as clerk of the county, to which

was elected

— studied awhile upon

and commenced again. After stumbling through a few sentences he was obliged to stop again. Turning to Baldwin, he asked if he would not have the politeness to waive the reading of the letter. The latter declined and the attorney made one more attempt to read, but soon came to another full stop. " Will you not read that horrid, ill-spelled, illiterate, and abusive letter, Mr. Baldwin ?' asked the attorney for the people.

Bath by

to

he

in the fall of 1829.

David Rumsey, the subject of

it,

office

this notice,

was brought

On

his parents at the age of six years.

removal to Auburn he was taken to reside in that

where he enjoyed excellent schools.

their city,

for several years the advantages of its

As

a boy, he possessed an active and

*

"'No,

the letter

sir;

is

very legible

people of Allegany County have seen

know enough

that don't

— very

fit

to read writing,

indeed.

If the good

to elect a district attorney

why, I

shall not help

him

along,' said the prisoner.

" The

official

then losing

all

patience, began in a strain of denunci-

atory eloquence to abuse Baldwin, and concluded by saying that

*

the

annals of crime did not present such an awful, willful, and terrible

defamer of

human

vigorous intellect; his faculties were of that order which led

him

gation,

Baldwin, with great

May

it

please the court, in

all

the records of the past which I

have been able to consult, I have never until this moment seen or heard of a wind-mill going hy water." " Peals and roars of laughter, even cheers, went up from all parts of the court-room, and for once the vulnerable and brazen-faced district attorney was silent, stricken through by the prisoner's reply to his speech. " After silence was restored, Baldwin again the indictment.

" Then, '

if

His opponent declared that

the court please, I ask that

it

demanded the reading of it

may

investi-

boyhood he enjoyed the labor of

sifting

mind, with a zest which has only been

heightened

in

the more abstruse and complex problems

which have engaged

He office

his professional attention.

began the study of law at the age of nineteen, in the of Hon.

Henry

Supreme

Welles, late justice of the

Court, then a resident of Bath, and was admitted to the

bar in the year 1831.

gravity, addressed the court as follows '' '

in

jects presented to his

character as John Baldwin, the prisoner at the

that was standing on the table before him.

and even

and careful

truth from falsehood, in the tangled and complicated sub-

bar.'

" As he closed this speech he took a drink ol water from a tumbler

early to acquire habits of close

a large

His practice

number of adjacent

in this village,

suits,

in

where his services

counties,

have been retained in important

and

has covered a period

of almost half a century, including his career during the past five years on the bench of the

Supreme Court.

In 1832 he formed a law partnership with Hon. William

Woods, of Bath, which

relation existed

till

the death of

could not be read.

Mr. Woods, on the 7th of August, 1837.

Mr. Rumsey

be quashed,' said the

then practiced by himself about four years.

In 1842 he

prisoner.

entered

" After a few moments' consultation, the court directed that

it

should

be quashed, and Baldwin walked from the prisoner's box into the bar

amid the congratulation of his friends. " Mr. Baldwin was a thoroughly honest man, and never would consent that a case in his hands should be carried by dishonesty or perOnce he turned a profitable client out of his office for saying that he could prove anything that Baldwin wished to establish on the trial of a certain cause which the latter was conducting for him."

partnership with

his

brother-in-law,

Hon.

Robert Van Valkenburgh, now one of the justices of the

Supreme Court of

Florida,

who

studied law in his

This partnership continued until Mr.

was appointed minister

jury.

to

Japan

office.

Van Valkenburgh

in 1865.

Prior to Judge Rumsey's career in Congress, he discharged for four years the duties of surrogate of to

HON. DAVID RUMSEY.

into

which

office

Steuben County,

he was appointed by Governor Seward, in

1840.

Hon. David Rumsey, who, at this writing, is one of the justices of the Supreme Court of New York, was born in

and discharged so acceptably the duties of a representative

Salem, Washington Co., N. Y., on the 25th of December,

that he was put in nomination again, and re-elected in 1848.

1810.

His

father,

David Eumsey,

1779, was a printer by

&

Sr.,

born April 17,

occupation, and, with Messrs.

Dodd

Stevenson, of Salem, established the Washington County

Fostj one of the earliest newspapers published in that sec-

In 1846 he was elected to Congress for the

He first

first

time,

served during the sessions of the Thirtieth and ThirtyCongresses, holding a responsible position as

the Committee on Private

member of

Fund Claims during both

sessions.

In 1867 he was elected a delegate to the Constitutional

'^''^^4ySam^^/

SarloiT^

>^^^^$^^

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Convention, and while in that body was a

member

of the

Committee on the Powers and Duties of the Legislature. In 1872 he was appointed by Governor Hoffman a member of the Commission to Propose

Amendments

to the Consti-

71

Mr. Howell added a wide range of information, and a conscientious fidelity in the discharge of his duties which

commanded

He

the respect and regard of

who knew him.

all

died Jan. 30, 1871, aged seventy-nine years.

tution of the State.

On

YORK.

WILLIAM HOWELL,

the 7th of January, 1873, he was appointed by Gov-

ESQ.

Supreme Court, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the late Hon. Thomas

William Howell, Esq., brother of Edward Howell, is still in the practice of his profession at Bath, where he has

Seventh Judicial District, embracing

continued the same since 1830, a period of forty-nine years.

ernor Dix one of the justices of the

in the

A. Johnson,

Cayuga, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Seneca, Wayne, Yates,

In November, 1873, he was elected

and Steuben Counties. by the people for a

to

fill

the same exalted and honorable position

But by reason of age

term of fourteen years.

his

and distinguished of the most

member

as a

of the bar, has had a long

He

practice.

has been engaged in

many

tried in the Su-

and laborious cases

difl&cult

is

now

preme Court and Court of Appeals, and has a reputation

acumen second

Many

this section of the State.

space for

Rumsey As a

to

have them inserted in a sketch for publication.

justice of the

Supreme Court,

his rulings

and de-

by eminent impartiality, and his

cisions are characterized

demeanor by that courtesy which always renders

his inter-

town of Bath.

and

solicitor in the

1841, Jane E., daughter of

in

Hon. Anthony Brown, of Ogdensburgh, N. Y., and has His only son, Col. William Rumsey, three children. served through the late war, and in a large

is

his father's successor

One

EDWARD HOWELL.

Edward Howell was born

in

bar, as well as an

Oct. 16, 1792, at which place and in the city of

Co.,

N. Y.,

New York

In his boyhood he made several

his early years were passed.

voyages to sea on board of a ship of which his father was

In 1808, he came

master.

was employed

at the age of seventeen

He came

dilla.

to the

and was employed chandise

till

to Sidney,

town of Bath

Delaware Co., and

as a teacher in

Una-

in the spring of 1811,

in farming, teaching school,

and mer-

1816, when he commenced the study of law

with Gen. Daniel Cruger, of Bath.

In 1818 he was ap-

pointed county clerk, and soon after postmaster of the lage of Bath.

vil-

In 1823 he was admitted as an attorney in

the Supreme Court and solicitor in Chancery, and three years later as counselor in these courts.

In 1829 he was

appointed district attorney, and was elected to the Assembly in

1832.

signed the

In 1833 he was elected to Congress, when he office

re-

of district attorney, to which he was re-

appointed in June, 1836.

He

was soon

after appointed a

Mr. Howell

for

many

years stood at the head of his pro-

fession in this section of the State.

was

in practice seventeen

During the time he

young men entered

his ofiice as

students-at-law, at difierent times within a period of about

Campbell, son of Robert Campbell,

his great abilities

and profound knowledge of the law

Sr.,

position

ofiicial

was Hon. Robert

who was one

of the

of Bath, and second to no other citizen in point

first settlers

An

of honor and integrity.

old acquaintance, speaking of

the senior Mr. Campbell, says, "



kind,

genial,

He

was one of Nature's

and true."

honest,

Robert, was born in Bath, in the

His

son,

month of May, 1808.

After a preparatory course of study, he spent some time at

Hobart College, Geneva, and in 1826 commenced the study of law in the office of Cruger & Howell, then the leading

He

or

was admitted

and immediately opened an

W.

office in

to practice

copartnership

Worden, Esq., at Auburn, N. Y. In a year two he returned to Bath and entered into practice with T.

Gen. Cruger, under the firm-name of Cruger

&

Campbell.

Subsequently he formed a partnership with Hon. Samuel

H. Hammond. He was

a scholarly, laborious, conscientious,

and successful lawyer, and attained a large and lucrative practice.

His devotion

to his profession

years to decline political preferment.

induced him for

many

In 1842 he refused

accept the nomination for senator, which was tendered

by the Democratic Senatorial Convention.

But

in

to

him

1844 he

was a member of the Democratic National Convention which nominated James K. Polk lature, in

for the Presidency.

The

Legis-

1846, elected him a member of the Board of

Regents of the State University, and he held the

office at

Also in 1846 he was elected a

the time of his death.

delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and did efficient

He was twice in succession New York, in 1858 and in

service in that important body. elected lieutenant-governor of

1860,

—and



presided over the deliberations of the Senate

Board, and indeed in

ability.

all

As

a

member of the Canal

his official relations, he discharged

his duty with singular fidelity

and conscientious devotion

to

the public welfare.

As tion.

twenty years.

To

incumbent of the second

with great dignity and

Supreme Court commissioner.

1827, and

members of the Steuben County

in the gift of the people of the State,

with

Newburg, Orange

to the village in

Court of Chancery in 1833.

of the distinguished

in 1829,

HON.

He came

^

law firm in Steuben County.

law practice at Bath.

mother moved with the

his

HON. ROBERT CAMPBELL.

noblemen,

men agreeable. Judge Rumsey married,

course with

His father died in

commenced the study of law in the ofiice of Gen. Daniel Cruger. In 1830 he was admitted to practice in the Court of Common Pleas, and as attorney in the Supreme Court

interesting and important

which he has participated might be cited had we them and did it comport with the wishes of Judge

cases in

was

family to the Conhocton Yalley, about a mile above Kanona,

no other lawyer in

to

1811

Unadilla, N. Y., and in

for integrity, fidelity to the interest of his clients, indefati-

gable labor, and legal

He

the oldest lawyer in Steuben County.

born in Newburg, N. Y., Oct. 3, 1804.

in the

time will expire Dec. 31, 1880.

Judge Rumsey,

He

member of the bar he attained an honorable posiThough he never had the reputation of an eloquent

a

advocate,

—a

gift

which

is

often the result of rhetorical

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

72

fluency more than of a knowledge of the law,

lawyer

who prepared

—he was

his briefs with great care,

a

and who

NEW

passage, and Mr. Rochester with a large

and cogency.

He

was very systematic and labo-

pas-

HON. DAVID MCMASTER. Mr. McMaster was born in Unadilla, Otsego, N.

rious in his business habits, and a gentleman of courteous

the 21st of April, 1804.

manners and a kindly and generous

College, in the class of 1826.

disposition.

number of

sengers was drowned.

could urge his arguments before a court or a jury with great clearness

YORK.

He

is

Y.',

on

a graduate of Hamilton

He

began the same year

the study of law at Norwich, Chenango Co., and in the

HON. WILLIAM WOODS.

Hon. William Woods was one of the

He

lawyers of Bath.

fall

early

was a native of Washington County,

and studied law with Hon. Samuel Nelson, the Supreme Court of the United States, niece.

He

men

of his time.

the Legislature in 1823 and 1828, a

to

late justice

who married

of

his

did a very large legal business, and was one of

the most popular

from 1823

and prominent

to

He

was a member of

member of Congress

1825, and surrogate of the county from 1827

1835.

ROCHESTER.

B.

1827.

His

Hon. William Woods, and was admitted first

practice

nership with Hon.

was

in

in Bath, in 1827, in part-

Henry W. Rogers,

ception of one year in Clyde,

Wayne

practiced continuously in this village

and, with the exCo. (1828-29), he

till

1847, a portion

of the time in partnership with Ziba A. Leland and L. H.

Read, both since deceased.

Under the new County, which

This distinguished member of the early bench and bar

He

of this county was a native of Maryland. office

studies with

constitution, in June, 1847,

Mr. Mc-

Master was elected county judge and surrogate of Steuben

HON. WILLIAM

the

of that year came to Bath, and continued his legal

read law in

of Gen. S. S. Haight, at Bath, where he practiced

some time, and liam Woods.

one time in partnership with Hon. Wil-

at

He was

elected a

member

of the Eighteenth

Congress in 1822, was a representative on the part of the United States in the Congress of the American States at

Panama, and

in

1823 was appointed one of the

circuit

offices

he

filled

himself and his constituents. to both offices for a

duties of the

manner creditable to In 1856 he was re-elected

term of four years, and discharged the

same with that care and

of him both as a lawyer and a judge. their professional or official duties,

He

riage he has two children living.

States in that city.

His health

either in

have gained or retained

was married, Feb. 13, 1828,

Marcellus, N. Y.,

of the United

Few men,

degree than has Judge McMaster.

many

Bank

fidelity characteristic

the esteem and confidence of their fellow-citizens in a higher

judges of this State for the Eighth Judicial Circuit. He subsequently removed to Buffalo, N. Y., where he was for years president of the Branch

in a

Humphreys, daughter of the

who

late

died Oct. 7,

to

Miss Adeline A.

Guy Humphreys, of By this mar1841.

On

a winter in Florida, for the benefit of that climate, on

February 22, 1843, he married, for his second wife, Mary, daughter of the late Hon. George C. Edwards, of

board the steamer Pulashi.

Bath.

failing,

The

vessel

he started

to

spend

was wrecked on

its

Of

the children by this marriage six are living.

HON. GEORGE Hon. Geo. T. Spenoer

a lineal descendant of the

is

sixth generation from Jared Spencer,

America about 1634, and Mass., then called

Mass.

;

settled

Newtown

;

afterwards at Hartford

who emigrated

first

at

to

Cambridge,

subsequently at Lynn, ;

and was

at

Haddam,

His son Thomas migrated to the town of Saybrook, Conn., about 1679, where the family remained, and where Judge George T. Spencer was born, Nov. 6, 1814. His father, George Spencer, was a manufacturer of

and was among the

etc.,

earliest

manufacturers in this country of that class of goods.

He

married Julia Pratt, of Saybrook,

who was

a de-

scendant of Rev. William Pratt, of Baldock, Hertfordshire,

England, through William Pratt, the emigrant of

who was among the early settlers of Saybrook in 1645, known as Lieutenant William Pratt. Of this 1633,

union were born two sous and three daughters, of

Judge Spencer was

whom

His father died at the age 1877. His mother died March,

eldest.

of ninety-one, July 24,

1845, at the age of fifty-nine.

Judge Spencer received the at

common

his preliminary education at

school, at Lees

Academy, Connecticut, and

Amherst Academy, Massachusetts.

In 1833 he entered Yale College, from which he was graduated in the class of 1837, with classmates William

M.

Morrison R. Waite,

Evarts, Secretary of State;

Chief Justice of the United States

;

and Edward Pierre-

pont, late Minister to the Court of St. James.

In 1839 he entered the law

Conn., in 1662, where he died in 1685.

ivory combs, piano-keys,

SPENCER.

T.

office

of Governor Ells-

worth, at Hartford, Conn., and subsequently was a stu-

dent with John G. Forbes, of Syracuse, N. Y., and was admitted to the bar in July, 1841.

In August of the same year he began the practice of the law in Corning, where he has remained continuously until the present time.

He

was formerly a Whig, but became a member of the Republican party upon its formation. In 1857 he was a member of the Legislature of the State, and served upon the committee on the judiciary. In 1867 he was a member of the Constitutional Convention, and from 1872 to 1876, inclusive, judge of Steuben County.

In the year 1842 he married Harriet, daughter of Ira Stacy, of Belchertown, Mass. Their children are George Spencer, of St, Cloud, Minn. Mrs. Horace N. Pond, of Boston, Mass. Mrs. Rev. Albert W. Hubbard, of Sivas, ;

;

Turkey

;

Betsey

;

Clarissa

;

and Hugh.

,

JUDGE WILLIAM With the eminent lawyer whose name stands at the head of this sketch is associated much of the history of Steuben County and Western New York, while the record of self-made men presents few higher triumphs of unassisted energy and exertion than is exhibited in his life, for he was in every sense the architect of his own fortune. It has been truthfully said that those who, in the commencement of life are compelled to struggle with difficulties, determined to overcome them, have the key to success in their hands. Judge Hawley entered the battle of life, compelled to contend with herculean difficulties,and when, like Antaeus, he was sometimes obliged to touch the earth, he sprang again to the contest with renewed energies, which at length gave him the victory. He was born in the county of Delaware, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1802. His father was one of the early settlers of that county, a farmer by occupation. His means were limited, and he could afford his children but few advantages for education. Young Hawley very early evinced a desire for knowledge, and the few advantages within his reach were eagerly seized by him and turned to best account. While very young a friend of his father lent him "Plutarch's Lives," which he read not only with avidity, but understandingly, and through his whole life that great biographer continued to be his favorite author among the ancient writers. So retentive was his memory, that once reading a work he could repeat verbatim large portions of its contents. His memory was truly remarkable. He early conceived the thought that he should one day become a lawyer, and this idea was the theme of his ambition, the controlling motive of his life. Upon reaching his majority, with no fortune except strong hands, a vigorous constitution, the mental acquirements which he jjossessed, and a determined purpose, he removed to Almond, Allegany Co., purchased a piece of uncultivated land on credit, and at once commenced the work of clearing it for tillage. His intelligence and business capacity were soon manifested, and he immediately took a respectable position among the people of Almond. In the spring of 1824 he was elected one of the constables of that town. At this time imprisonment for debt had not been abolished, and this relic of barbarism greatly euhauccd the duties and responsibilities of constables. In the discharge of his official duties he was often one of the attending constables at the various courts held in Angelica. Although Allegany County was remote from the more (mltiyated portions of the State, yet its courts were graced by the most learned and able judges and advocates of that day. Nothing occurred which escaped his notice; the legal contests of these gifted advocates were watched by Mr. Hawley with intense interest, and when the law was pronounced by those profound judges he heard and garnered up all that fell from their lips. During the first term of court which he attended at Angelica he entered his name as a law student in the office of the late George Miles, then a leading member of the Allegany bar. As his means did not admit of his devoting his entire time to the Thus he office, he pursued his studies at home when relieved from other duties. continued for two years. Declining the office of constable, he commenced practice in justices' courts, in the mean time continuing his legal studies. A distinguished lawyer, who in those days often met him in justices' courts, remarked that Hawley tried a case before a justice with ability sufficient to distinguish in any court. His causes were conducted with dignity, propriety, skill, and learning. In due time Mr. Hawley completed his law studies, and passed in a creditable manner a thorough examination, was admitted to the bar, and at once opened an office in Almond. Such had been his reputation before his admission that he Was soon in the midst of a practice of considerable importance. In the fall of 1837 he was induced to make Hornellsville his future residence, where he soon took a high position amongthe distinguished lawyers by whom he was surrounded, and controlled a large and lucrative practice. One of his earliest business relations was a partnership with the late John Baldwin, whose legal abilities and keen wit distinguished him through-

M.

HAWLEY.

New York. This partnership continued only about one year when it was dissolved. In January, 1846, he was appointed by Governor Silas Wright first judge of Steuben County. Many years previous Governor Wright had met him and formed his acquaintance, and regarding him as a high-minded, honorable, and able lawyer, he tendered him this position as a mark of his esteem and confidence. He held this office for a little over one year, when Hbn. David McMaster took his place by election, and he was elected to the Senate from the Twenty-fifth Senatorial District of the State, and was honored with the second position on the committee of ways and means, while his name appeared on other important Senate committees during his term. On the 19th of February, 1848, he delivered a speech in the Senate on certain resolutions instructing the senators and representatives in Congress from this State to vote for the prohibition of slavery in New Mexico, whose entrance into the Union was then anticipated. This speech added much to his reputation it was calm, direct, and statesmanlike. It was regarded as one of the ablest delivered in the Senate during out Western

;

that winter. .Judge Hawley was a delegate from this State to the Democratic National Convention which assembled at Baltimore on the 22d of May, 1848, at which two delegations from the State of New York presented themselves for admission ; one of which was known as the Free-Soil, Radical, or Barnburner delegation, under the guide of the late Samuel Young, and that of the Conservatives or Hunkers, who were under the lead of Daniel S. Dickinson. He identified himself with the former. This convention culminated in a National Convention held at Buffalo, Aug. 9, 1848 to which Judge Hawley was also a delegate, and entered ardently into all Its proceedings, anil in which Martin Van Buren was nominated for President, and Charles Fnincis Adams for Vice-President. He was one of the committee who introduced those resolutions whose essential elements were afterwards stdopted by the Republican party. On the introduction of those resolutions he delivered a speech, the very sentiments of which in after-years he reiterated in a Republican State Convention. After retiring from the Senate, Judge Hawley n^ver again songht for official positions, but confined himself exclusively to his profession, and although fortunate in his financial matters, he continued to practice until within a short period of his death, which occurred Feb. 9, 1869. As late as 1868, September, at the Steuben circuit held at Corning, he appeared and conducted a very important divorce case, and there appeared no diminution in his fine mental powers, and he stood at the bar, as he had for years, an able and powerful competitor, though his health had been for some time declining. Few lawyers were more perfect in their preparation of a case for trial or argument than he. His papers always exhibited a brief philosophic statement of legally deducted facts, what a correct system of pleading demands. As a friend he was sincere and undeviating ; unpretending and easy in his manners, with pleasant, even fine conversational powers, he was an attractive companion. There was a seeming humor in his manner that drew the young as well as the old to him, and which disguised his faults. As a speaker he was calm, temperate, and logical ; he knew how to enliven a dry theme with a proper play of the imagination, and thus give relief to the fatigue of close attention. In the argument of a purely legal question, at special or general term, he avoided all florid language, and sought perspicuity and preciSeness of expression. As a citizen he was public-spirited, sedulous to advance the interests of the community in which he lived, and reasonably active in all projects of public improvement. Some years previous to his decease he united with the Episcopal Church at Hornellsville. In his domestic relations he was a kind husband and indulgent and liberal father.

HISTOUY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, HON. JOSEPH

Hon. Joseph G. Masten was a son-in-law of Dugald Cameron, and a lawyer who attained to considerable disHe came to Bath about 1832, was admitted to tinction. Pleas, and practiced in partnership with

Common

the

Henry

About 1836 he and Rogers removed to Buffalo, where he afterwards became mayor of that city and justice

W.

Rogers.

He was

of the Superior Court.

He

Convention of 1867.

stitutional

member

also a

of the Con-

died in Buffalo about

1872.

to

taught school, read law with Hon. Henry Welles, and be-

came

a partner with

Hon. David McMaster, with

He

practiced for some considerable time.

whom

he

then formed a

partnership with Mr. Masten, and both practiced together

Mr. Rogers now resides

they removed to Buffalo.

till

Ann was

Arbor, Mich.

During

collector of that port,

Rathbun

ney, acting in the famous

at

Buffalo he

his residence in

and was

Hammond

Mr.

was

also prosecuting attorcase.

He

founder of Hammondsport.

He

Academy, Prattsburgh. Gen.

S. S.

of Cruger

of Lazarus

a son

Hammond,

was educated

&

the

Franklin

at

began the study of law with

Haight, at Angelica, and finished

He

Howell, at Bath.

the office

in

was admitted

in

1831.

After practicing for a time at Baldwinsville, N. Y., he returned to Bath, and, in 1836, formed a partnership with

Hon. Robert Campbell, which

lasted

The year

1842.

till

Albany, and was there

practice in

In 1853 he commenced editing

elected district attorney.

He

mementos of

his genius.

ESQ.,

Plains, N. Y., about 1827.

Bath from Sidney

73

best love to cherish as

following he opened

HENRY W. ROGERS, came

who knew him

those

HASTEN.

G.

NEW YORK.

the Albany Reguter^ and closed his connection with that

He

paper in 185G.

afterwards practiced law in

company

with Hon. William Irvine, of Corning, and in November,

1857, became a partner of A. P. Ferris, Esq., at Bath. 1859 he was elected to the Senate from this senatorial

In dis-

In 1864 he removed to Watertown, N. Y., where

trict.

he died

in

November, 1878.

[For biographical sketches of Hon. George B. Bradley, C. H. Thomson, Esq., E. D. Mills, and others, see History of Corning.]

VINCENT M. CORYELL. Vincent M. Coryell was admitted in

HON. WASHINGTON BARNES. law

to the practice of

Bath in 1822, and was for a short time a partner of

Judge Welles. He subsequently became a Methodist clergyman. Mr. Coryell was a son-in-law of Dugald Cameron.

Hon. Washington Barnes was county judge of Steuben County from 1860

SCHUYLER

five years in

N. Y.

man

In December, 1822, he formed a partnership

from

all

with Hon. William Woods, and in 1824 became associated

He

in practice with

Hon. Edward Howell.

part in the

of Robert Douglas for murder at Bath in

trial

Some

1825.

in

1843.

He

Anson Gibbs, in

He

1820 and 1821.

removed

to

EUicottville,

as an attorney.

and died

He

there.

men and

politicians of a different

emolument and

He

influence.

HON.

and conscien-

and entirely

free

G. H.

Bath

select schools of

York, in the

;

class of

elected county

and again

in

M^^MASTER. born in 1829

;

prepared

Academy, Prattsburgh, and

in the

graduated at Hamilton College,

1847; was admitted judge

He

1877.

stamp too often seek

died in Bath in 1868.

Guy Humphries McMaster was

1852;

followed Daniel Cruger

a very earnest

J.

the tricks and subterfuges by which professional

for college at Franklin

Esq., was also an attorney at Bath for

John Cook, years,

living at Bath.

Esq., was also a practicing attorney at

where he was prominent

many

is still

after-

company with Ansel

in all his deaUngs, strictly honest

111.,

was a son-in-law of Gen.

Daniel Cruger, and Mrs. Strong

Bath

took a leading

years later he removed to Springfield,

where he died

He was

McCall, Esq., of Bath. tious

to

early at

He

Corning, and was admitted to practice in 1836.

Steuben from Orange

came

S. Strong, Esq.,

Schuyler Co.,

S.

settled quite

Painted Post; studied law with Thomas A. Johnson, of

wards practiced law

STRONG, ESQ.

He

1864.

to

in

New

to the bar in

re-elected in 1867,

1863;

wrote the " History of the Settle-

ment of Steuben County"

in

1850, while a student-at-law.

as district attorney, being appointed Feb. 19, 1821.

ANSEL HON.

S.

HAMMOND.

H.

Hon. Samuel H. Hammond, who, for a time, was partner with Mr. Campbell, was a man of very different mould and temperament.

Though

gifted with rare powers he disliked

the routine and drudgery of a reference were his abhorrence.

law-office,

The

and books of

scenes of nature, the

wild solitudes of mountain and glen, the sports of hunting

and

fishing, were,

on the contrary, his delight, and he often

found them so tempting a pastime as

to

seriously interfere

with anything like systematic attention to professional duties.

He

was

at times, and,

it

may

be

said, generally,

eloquent as

He

an advocate, and was a graphic and rhetorical writer.

was from temperament and habit better adapted

to journal-

J.

McCALL, ESQ.

Ansel J. McCall, Esq., has been a member of the Steuben bar and in continuous practice at Bath since 1842.

He

was born

in the

town of Painted Post (now Corning)

After a preparatory course

Jan. 14, 1816.

at

Franklin

Academy, Prattsburgh, he entered Union College, and was He commenced the study graduated in the class of 1838. of law in company with Hon. David McMaster, at Bath, and completed his clerkship in the bell,

office

of

Hammond & Camp-

being admitted, and entering into partnership with

Washington Barnes, Esq.,

in

tinued to practice for a period of five

quently practiced Ferris,

In

Esq.

several

whom he conHe subseyears.

1842, with

years in

company with A. P.

1843 he was appointed by Governor

wrote

many

Bouck surrogate of Steuben County, and held the office till the new constitution came in force, Jan. 1, 1847.

beautiful and tender things both in prose and poetry,

which

Mr. McCall

ism than to the law, and in the former sphere he

known and 10

will,

be longest remembered.

He

is

best

is

a yeteran lawyer,

and

is

not only well in-

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

74

formed

but upon

in his profession,

and general

interest.

conversant with

its

Few raen in the county are more men or have preserved more of its

He

history than he.

the topics of local

all

and companionable

a very genial

is

who never seem

gentleman, and one of those persons

grow

to

NEW

YORK.

was member of Assembly from this county 1841, and in 1846, and

district

1839, 1840,

in

He

attorney in 1845.

subsequently removed to Minnesota, where he became a justice of the United States District Court,

died not long since

full

and where he

of honors.

old.

ALFRED

P.

FERRIS, ESQ.

F.

Alfred P. Ferris, Esq., was born in the town of Milo,

He

Yates Co., on the 29th of November, 1818.

to

Bath, Jan.

Hon. Z.

A.

Leland

At

and

studied law with

Hammond, and was

H.

S.

the special election under the

Hon.

Bath

in

new

F. R. E.

office till

Jan.

1,

CHARLES

He

justices of the

commenced the

also

removed

became attorney-general of the

practice of

Minnesota, where he

to

State,

and

is

now one of the

Supreme Court.

consti-

HON. HARLO HAKES.

1851.

F.

Cornell

law in Addison.

tution in June, 1847, he was elected district attorney, and

held the

Elmira, formerly

received

Mr. Ferris has practiced law

admitted in 1843. ever smce.

He

1840.

1,

a resident of

practiced law in Addison.

an academical education at Franklin Academy, Prattsburgh,

and came

DiNiNNY, now

C.

Harlo Hakes was born in Harpersfield, Delaware Co., N. Y., Sept. 23, 1823.

KINGSLEY, ESQ.

His

Lyman Hakes, was

father,

a

native of Berkshire Co., Mass., and settled in Harpersfield

Charles F. Kingsley was born in the town of Urbana, in this county,

on the 29th of September, 1835.

After

re-

ceiving a common-school education, he spent two years at

the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, at Lima, N. Y.

Studied

He

law and was admitted to practice in December, 1857.

commenced practice in Prattsburgh in 1858, and settled in Bath in 1860, where he has followed his profession ever since.

HON. WILLIAM

Nancy Dayton,

married soon after

He

a native of Connecticut.

was a man

without early opportunities for book knowledge but possessed that native talent to be found often

among

the earlier

settlers of the country.

In

after-life

he became a careful observer of the events

He

was by occu-

self-exertion

and reading

of his time, and a student of literature. pation a farmer, yet by his

BONHAM.

E.

He

about the age of twenty-two.

at

own

he acquired a prominent place in the better-informed

Hon. William E. Bonham, now of

Hornellsville,

was

Bead law with Hon. Washington Barnes, at Bath, with whom be practiced for some time in partnership. In 1864-65 he was a member of the Legis-

of society.

born at Painted Post.

lature, in

which he creditably represented the

He

of Steuben County. rity,

a good lawyer, a

L.

H.

party in politics, and

Delaware Co., N. Y., by the Hon. William H. Seward,

He

— early settlers

included in Urbana.

Edward and William Howell, and Hammondsport. About 1839 he re-

studied law with

began

practice

in

moved

to Bath,

and became a law partner of Hon. David

McMaster.

Whig

at

died at the age of eighty-five, in Harpersfield, in the

year 1873, leaving three sons, Lyman, Harlo, and Harry,

His grandparents were among the

now

with the

identified

that time Goveroor of the State.

READ,

of that part of the town of Bath

was

the year 1841 received the appointment of judge of

in

of integ-

formerly practiced in Bath, was a native of Steuben

County.

He

man

He

district

and a genial, courteous gentleman.

HON.

who

is

first

circles

In 1850, President Fillmore appointed him

the eldest, a lawyer of Wilkesbarre, Pa., from 1840 until

his decease in

1874

;

the younger, a part of his

ber of the medical profession, but

now

a

life

mem-

a practicing attorney

of Wilkesbarre, Pa., having associated with him in practice his

nephew,

Lyman H.

Bennett.

His daughters are Mrs. Phineas L. Bennett, of Harpersfield,

N. Y., and Mrs. Joseph G. McCall, of Michigan.

Mr. Harlo Hakes spent

his time until

about twenty-eight

Chief Justice of Utah, to which Territory he removed.

years of age on his father's farm, attending school winters

After performing the judicial functions for one year, he

until

resigned and returned to Bath, where he died in

1853

or

In the year 1851 he entered the

ofiice

of Bufus

New England, and was He came to Bath about

Ziba A. Leland was a native of educated at Williams College.

He

profession.

was eminently successful

in the practice of his

In 1838 he was appointed Judge of the old

Common

Judge Edwards, who died in November, 1837. Judge Leland removed from this county to Auburn, N. Y., where he became a law Court of

Pleas, as the successor of

partner of Hon. George Rathbun.

He

died at Mechanics-

then became a student with Judge Harris, of Albany, and after attending one course of lectures at the

Albany law

school was admitted to the bar, 1853, and in

May

same year mained

settled in Hornellsville,

G. CHATFIEI^D.

Hon. Andrew G. Chatfield was

Y.,

for quite a

where he has

years a practicing attorney at Addison, in this county.

He

re-

time.

In the year 1855, Mr. Hakes married Mary, youngest

daughter of J. D. Chandler, of Hornellsville.

to represent his

in the State Legislature for the year

number of

of the

in the practice of his profession until the present

Mr. Hakes was chosen

ANDREW

N.

dren are M. Evelyn, Hattie Y., and Carrie

Saratoga Co., about 1873,

HON.

He

law student, where he remained nearly two years.

HON. ZIBA A. LELAND.

ville,

a teacher.

for eight successive terms

King, of Davenport, Delaware Co. (now of Elmira), as a

1854.

1822.

he was seventeen, and was

Their chil-

M.

Assembly

district

1856, and served on

the judiciary committee during the term. elected district attorney of the county,

.In 1862 he was

which

office

he held

'^y

-^awjW SarioA^

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Daring the year 1865 he associated with

for three years.

him

man

James H. Stevens,

the law business

-in

of fine legal

ability.

Jr., a gentle-

still

continues.

Twenty-ninth Congressional

District,

comprising the counties of Allegany, Steuben, and Chemung,

which

he now holds.

office

in political circles,

He

has been somewhat active

and interested

in questions affecting

He

changes in our nation's history.

Whig

ber of the

party,

THOMAS for a time a

In the year 1867, Mr, Hakes was appointed registrar in for the

In 1856-57 he was a member of the State Senate, and shortly afterwards removed to the West.

This firm has enjoyed a very

the term of partnership, which

bankruptcy

75

1836.

nellsville in

and surrounding counties during

large law practice in this

YORK.

the

was originally a memto the

and was a delegate

Baltimore

of

REYNOLDS,

J.

ESQ.,

of the bar at Hornellsville, was one

member

most original minds, and a man of great native

its

He

although of quite limited education.

talents,

For a while he practiced

Hornellsville in 1819.

in part-

John K. Hale, and subsequently with

nership with Hon.

During the

Mr. Brundage.

settled at

engaged successfully

years of

later

he

his life

farming and lumbering, and died

in

quite wealthy in 1867.

Convention that nominated Bell and Everett for President

and Vice-President, since which time he has been a supporter of the Republican party, and its representative of the

New York

Twenty-ninth Congressional District of

;

was a

member of the Cincinnati Convention in the year 1876 that made Hon. Rutherford B. Hayes the Republican nominee for the presidency of the

In addition

and

official duties.

he has

been thoroughly identified with the growing interests of the village of Hornellsville,

in the State of

Vermont.

read law in that State, and came to Hornellsville in

He

In 1851 he was admitted to the bar, and has pracHe has taken a promiticed in Hornellsville ever since. In 1863 and 1865, he represented nent part in poUtics. 1850.

the Third Assembly District of this county in the Legis-

United States.

to his professional

Hon. Horace Bemis was born

and largely interested

and was chosen Presidential Elector on the Repub-

lature,

1868.

lican ticket in

Hon. Harlo Hakes (See biography and

in real estate.

portrait in

In 1873 he opened " Hakes Avenue," connecting Main and Genesee Streets, and donated it to the village, and since

history of Hornellsville).

that time has purchased and improved that portion of the

a native of the town of Dansville, and was born in 1827.

and opened and graded the

After finishing his academic education, he studied law at

village

known

as " Riverside,"

street called " Riverside Place," connecting

Street,

Main with Elm

where he has built several substantial and elegant

which are classed with the finest in the town. Mr. Hakes has shown rare taste and mature judgment in the prosecution of the enterprise at " Riverside," and within

dwellins>:s,

a short space of time " Riverside Place" has

become one

of the most delightful and attractive places for private

dences to be found anywhere.

Characteristic of Mr.

resi-

Hakes

are his unyielding support of the right, his constancy of

purpose to accomplish successfully his hands,



all

matters intrusted to

either professional or simply of a business nature.

Esq., a partner of Mr. Hakes,

James H. Stephens,

School, Ballston Spa, Saratoga Co., and

Law

the National

is

with William T. Odell, and was admitted at Ballston, Jan. 5,

He

1852.

settled in Hornellsville as a lawyer, in

and has had a successful

W. Near, Esq

I.

1835

was born

Hornellsville,

Piatt,

practice.

in Jeff"erson

studied law with Clarke

;

and was admitted

county at Kanona, in 1859, and nellsville,

&

He

1858.

in

Bonham, Near

of the firm of

,

1853,

Co.,

&

N. Y., in

Colvin, of Watertown,

began practice

in

1865 removed

in this to.

Hor-

where he has since practiced his profession.

Hon. William Irvine,

well

known

to the citizens

and

His keen perception, sound judgment, strict integrity and fair dealing have secured to him a large measure of success

bar of this county, began the practice of law in Corning,

and the confidence of the community.

served during the years 1857-59.

He

about 1849.

was elected member of Congress, and

regiment of cavalry during the R.

L.

BRUNDAGE,

ESQ.

adjutant- general in 1865.

R. L. Brundage, Esq., settled in Hornellsville, as an He was born in attorney and counselor-at-law, in 1846.

Joseph Herron was from 1847

to

1854, and held the

was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1846. Mr. Brundage commenced the study of law with Hon.

law

J., in

John K. Hale, of Hornellsville, in 1840, and in 1846 was In 1852 admitted to the Supreme Court and to Chancery. he was elected the

office

to the office of district attorney,

three years.

until 1866, since

and claim agent

He

continued in active practice

which he has been employed

for the Erie

and held

as attorney

Railway Company.

Nov.

7,

twenty years or more

at

at Addison, in this county,

the head of the

and came

and was appointed

He now

resides in California.

member

of the bar of Corning

was elected

two

district attorney in

years.

a son of the late

Judge Maynard, of

Corning about 1850, where he practiced

in

1865.

He

was elected

district attorney

1856.

Henry

G.

Cotton commenced

the practice of law at

town of Corning, and subsequently removed to the village, where he was a partner of Hon. Thomas A. Johnson, prior to 1841, at which date he reCentreville, in the

moved

to Illinois (see

Johnson

Hornellsville bar, was a native of the State of Maine. first settled

late war,

was colonel of a

biography of Hon. Thomas A. John-

son).

HON. JOHN K. HALE, for

to

he died,

till

John who was

ofiice

John Maynard, Auburn, came

He

1856.

His parents came to May, 1819. this county and settled in Bath in 1824, removing to Greenwood in 1830. His father, Benjamin S. Brundage,

Sussex Co., N.

a

He

to

He Hor-

P.

Shapley, Esq., succeeded Hon. Thomas A.

in the practice of law at Corning,

on the election

of the latter as justice of the Supreme Court, in 1847.

Mr. Shapley died about 1850.

Henry Sherwood,

Esq., was another

member

of the

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

76

county bar, residing in Corning from 1860

to

was a member of the Legislature

Died

Payne Sherwood &

Alvin of

firm

removed

New

to

1875.

in

was a partner of Mr. Sherwood,

F.

practice here in

1862.

in

He

1870.

He commenced

Payne, Corning.

1863, and remained

He

York.

was

1868, when he

till

member

a

of the Legis-

Long Island City in 1876. Charles H. Berry, Esq., commenced

lature from

Corning about 1850; remained

removed

till

practice

many

of our patrons complain of the badness of the print,

and that not without

Williamson that he and his associates had been " in-

Col.

dicted by the grand jury for not holding an election at the

The next newspaper

about 1855, when he

Williamson was

Col.

Waterman

N.

C.

practiced law in Corning from

He removed

to 1853.

to

Minnesota, and became a

judge of the Supreme Court of that

& Waterman.

was Berry

Isaac

Herridon

C.

The

State.

Mr. Berry died

in

firm here

He

belonged to the bar of Corning

In 1861 he was appointed secretary to Hon.

about 1855.

at

Newburgh,

sive journey,

and

to sell out

came himself with

On

his

his arrival he wrote to Col.

Albany that he had ended

at

who

Mr. Carey forwarded his

printing materials by water, and

household goods by land.

little later

induced Lucius Carey,

himself at Geneva.

Williamson

Minnesota.

1796, but a

also in the year

than the Bath Gazette.

establish

under the auspices of

established

had been publishing a paper

Hon.

Mr. Kersey was at

sufficient cause."

the time one of the judges of Steuben County, and informs

in

general.

1851

have some encouragement to pursue the business, but

Painted Post for a representative in Congress."

Minnesota, where he has since been attorney-

to

We

YOKK.

a long

and expen-

had arrived and found his house unfinished,

and no room provided

Says he, " I

for his office.

am now

Andrew B. Dickinson, United States minister to Nicaragua. He is now dead. Some of the other members of the bar who practiced in

want of a room

Corning were

parents hear that I must lay idle for the want of a house,

as follows

George N. Middlebrook, 1850 remained years now resides in New York. William K. Logie, 1860 enlisted in 1861

about two

;

;

;

killed in

head of 141st Regiment, of which he was

AzARiAH

LoNGWELL, 1864;

of

firm

Longwell

&

My

in.

had spoken so much

I

house was to be done in

a mortifying reflection

He

in the winter."

yet " with

George

11.

removed

Graves,

&

firm of Longwell

1860-

Graves,

;

removed

to

it

Utah

in

1874.

XVI.

Williamson was

sold,

when

New

and

its

name changed

They were designed

York.

to stretch

all

"

" Genesee

from

Northumberland,

Early

in

January, 1796, he procured

Sunbury, Pa., a second-hand

or

newspaper-office, and enlisted as

printers

William Kersey and James Eddie.

They

Gazette and Genesee Advertiser."

paper published in Western

New

and publishers

issued the "

This was the

first

Bath news-

presumed that Mr. Kersey may have had a connec-

with the paper, not as printer, but as one of Mr.

Williamson's agents at Bath.

appear from his

He

Western

was a Friend,

as

would

at the

same time asks

for

some new

type,

urging that the type they had brought from Pennsylvania

"old and worn out."

conclude

it is

;

ofiice,

be,

so that

we may do

new type

business in good

therefore, request that, in addition to the order

Capt. Coudry, thou

may

on considering the case,

best to have a sufficient quantity of

complete the

fashion

"We,

may

by

be pleased to send us as soon as

two hundred weight of small pica or bourgeois.

It

out over a wide

bring

directions.

regions of

in

Hence

patronage the names

Advertiser," local places

etc.,

so

where the

was a shrewd method of catering

of them were short-lived ventures, which failed in a

few months.

Where

at great sacrifice

they were sustained,

it

was generally

and long-continued struggles,

if not to

privations, on the part of the editors or publishers.

and

and

and

was a

the pioneer papers obtained but a very meagre support, and

new

settlers,

in

wide extent of country, but even then

for patronage to a

Williamson at Albany, he speaks of having located some

In one of them, written to Col.

section,

names of the

papers were published.

men who

letters.

Advertiser,"

often attached to the

many

York.

in those days

feature throughout the newly-settled

and advertisements from

and patronage.

the " Western Re-

Mr. Carey died

and long names of papers

The two spices

Canandaigua, and

in 1804.

and sparsely-populated

newspapers were established under his au-

to

to

Advertiser.'^

troduction of the printing-press into the Genesee country. first

by Mr. Williamson

it

was removed

it

and Genesee

large

common

directly connected with the in-

for

In April, 1797, he brought

dollars.

first

1802

The Col.

amount paid

printers

^^

Canandaigua

BATH.

to

was here

number of the Ontario Gazette and Genesee The paper was continued about a year and a Advertiser^

out the

pository

THE COUNTY PBESS.

is

since I

it

must have been than pioneer

usually enjoy, for the

in

CHAPTER

tion

and

praise of the town,

in

After a while his dwelling-house was finished, and

room."

half at Geneva,

is

my

have

to

says he almost repents of his bargain,

was over two thousand

Minnesota, where he died.

to

Jacob H. Wolcott, 1870

It

me

to

the loan of one hundred dollars, he thinks he

a far better one

Graves.

;

when

is

it

work

to

can get a paper out, and moving along, if he can get a

colonel.

70

July, and

long I shall I cannot say, only for the

been the means of a number coming to

;

battle at the

how

lying idle, and

Few

deserve more at the hands of the public than those toiled long

and arduously

to establish

good newspapers

printing-offices.

The

progress of these

Col. Williamson, in

"

say

The

first

papers was quite encouraging.

1798, said:

printer of the

Ontario Gazette dispenses weekly

not less than one thousand papers, and the printer of the

Batli Gazette from four to five hundred."

This was a good beginning, certainly, for papers not yet

two years

old,

and

in a

country just beginning

to

be settled.



:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEX COUNTY, THE STEUBEN AND ALLEGHANY PATRIOT.

*'

Farmers' Advocate, and was jamin Smead,

in the year

Mr. Smead

Gen. Cruger,

to

Steuben

present

the parent of the

established by Capt. Ben-

The

1816.

who had

following letters of

been a

member

House

of Assembly, will explain

was originally established

difficulties it

''

administration, which the counties of Steuben

Sir,

— My

Legislature enabled

me

Assembly, and in your county. stance as an apology from a stranger.

last session of

the

In addressing you upon a

subject in which I am deeply and immediately interested, I thought you would desire to learn who I am. I am a printer, and began at an early age with a family, which has so rapidly increased that every effort of enterprise and industry has failed to furnish more than an ordinary subsistence. Four years I printed and edited a republican

paper in Brattleboro', Vt. and five years, another republican paper in Bennington. It is not delicate for me to say more of these papers than that they were always approved by the republicans,- yet, even to

Windham and Bennington

this day, the stinted population of both

counties cannot give the encouragement an industrious printer re-

In March, 1812, I quitted the latter place on receiving an appointment in the army and continued in the service of my country, quires.

;

with the

command

of a

company

The army being disbanded, zen's

life,

without

much

I

in the 11th U. S. Inf'y,

then

left it

till

last July.

— and returning to the

marched through nearly the whole extent of the northern section of became attached to habits and manners of the people, and In conversations with my resolved to settle among them for life. friends, it has been stated that Watertown, Jefferson Co., and Bath, both

encouragements

offer liberal

to a printer.

my

eldest son,

who

is

am

I

a printer, I could edit

and print a respectable paper. To embark in such an enterprise, at such a distance, I want the loan of 5 or 600 dollars three years without interest, office-room one year free of rent, and six months' credit The stock comprises only paper and ink, and may amount of stock. to nearly

200

dolls, per

ann.

The money

required to furnish print-

is

ing materials, and defray expenses of removal. I have an excellent press, and the other materials shall be good: all these I will give over as security for the

money immediately on my

arrival,

which

will

be

as soon as possible after its receipt.

contemplate this subject favor-

you to write Judge Buel, editor of the Argus, Albany and to Mr. John A. Stevens, editor of the Messenger, Canandaigua, for any knowledge you may require of my moral and political charWith the former, I acter, and mechanical and editorial capacity. have assisted to complete the laws and Journals of the last Legislaably, I beg

ance

the latter have

— Mr. Stevens knows me

had about ten fully, in public

of these gentlemen, I presume, will give

that

if

I ask,

years' intimate acquaint-

and private

have not a copy of the

made

On

that

shall be forthwith applied

to,

"Albany, "

Dear



Sir,

I rec'd

life.

and

my

my

duced below

real

want

effect the objects

sum

New

all

literary characters of

following sizes

my acquaintance

and attended

to

Minion, roman and

8 lbs. 10 oz.

^

All entirely new.

}

Double Pica, German. j

72

lbs.

Double Pica, Roman and

Italic.

J

upon which only 600 pages have been printed, and of which the enclosed is a specimen. I say it is nearly as good as new. 10 lbs. Quotations, and about 8 lbs. of leads, with some Great Primer, Flowers, and other type, and six cases, all new. 320

K)s. Pica,



''

I enclose Mess. Websters' Bill.

"

From

&

the bills of the Mess. Binney

In addition to

180 dollars.

good

— and

ever,

and

work is

as is

me

The weight

I can execute

done

my

of all

upon

in the country.

I therefore receive

It

dolls.

[Old-fashioned wooden

I arrive at

Bath with the whole,

type

and

600 dollars.

Ramage

your advances,

180 dolls.

to

is

press

worth

— and the moment them at yourself and

sure you will estimate

make over

to be

to

refunded in 3 annual in-

You

say

be advanced.

Mess. Websters require you

by

it

I shall be able to

press],

stalments, if I rightly understand your proposition.

300 dolls.

My



(including transportation) the

am

All these I will immediately

friends, as security for

how-

as elegant

a good bargain.

is all

safe,

materials will be well worth, and I

If,

may easily be obtained is now about 700 lbs., well

nearly new, and as good as any I ever wrought with,

140

at

it

as great a variety

it

it

Long-Primer, very

lbs.

no smaller type.

to carry

hereafter require Brevier,

from N. York. assorted,

have 230

this, I

our friends urge

all

we may

Ronaldsons', of the above

and

type, Mess. Websters deduct 25 per cent.,

them for type, by yourself and Mr.

to secure to

note, payable in 3 months, given

McClure. 120 dolls.

remains a balance of the 300.

Sir, to

my

fit

family for

the journey, to procure some other necessary articles, for

expenses for them on the way,

I shall require 150 dolls.,

waggons, with ;

2

which

will

make

I wish you to send

offer.

me

3

good horses each, cheap as they can be

they to bear their

own

This expense I

expenses.

estimate on an uncertain foundation at dolls.

Smollets and Hume's Hist.

Any communication you

480

reply to this, will therefore be received

my

its

italic.

3 lbs. 2 line L. Primer.

your town and county can

post-office.

on the instant of

sure to be excused

2 line Q. Primer.

8 lbs. 5 oz.

150

am upon

re-

:

*'4 lbs. fluted 2 line

herein

find leisure to bestow.

make me in

am

much

Mess. AVebsters here, a good and sufficient supply of type, of the

hired

proper to

offered being so

the orders for typo, &g., upon my repeating to him the assurance I made yourself, of securing you with the types for your advances. The sum is so small for the object, I have sought for, and obtained of

330

may deem

proposition for establishing

sum

for that purpose, I

the aid which the influ-

quire a liberal extension of charity, and

England,

Sept. 25, 1816.

spending a few days in contemplating economical methods to carry I agree to your proposition, and a good office thither with 300 dolls, Mr. Buel has cheerfully delivered me all your papers relating to me,

Either

use the

writes again

for

only more than you

Eng. at Hosford's, adjoining the

my

your reply to

a republican paper in Bath; and the

150 ~30

" Since completing the Laws, I

Smead

as follows

Having spent most of my with the local policy of N. York legislation you will consider limited; I should therefore, in this arduous and responsible undertaking, reential

from Mr. Smead's second

infer,

the 25th of September, 1816, Capt.

and years in

republican and

Gen. Cruger in an-

for the publication of the proposed paper at Bath.

proposed. "

letter of

immediately answered and a proposition

w^as

it

you the necessary assurance,

yourself and friends will transmit or order for it

public character.

carry a sufficiency of Chases, Sticks, etc., very good,

''If you. Sir, shall feel disposed to

ture—and with

&

" Benjamin Smead."

most desirous to establish in Bath, and earnestly solicit your assistance. My pecuniary circumstances are low, but retaining much of the vigor of youth, with

in the

—and accept the sincere assurances of my high

respect for your personal

property, without a plan for settlement, and

this state, I

Co.,

my prospects

your opinion of

early, giving

proposed undertaking

citi-

with a wife and six lovely children, have ever since been obliged to work as a journeyman, for a pittance to support them. Having often

Steuben

me

" Please write

swer to the above, but we

28, 1816.

your character, and influence in the You will doubtless admit this circum-

to learn

& Allegany must duly

tribute to their political happiness.

letter,

during the

residence in this city

in-

:

Hox. Danikl Crugeii, ''

hand— and have

regard, would induce your most wealthy patriots to blend the relief of

We ^'Albany, July

support; yet I require a lifting

for

too

fortune, I

a large and virtuous family with an object so well calculated to con-

of the

the origin of this long-lived and successful newspaper, and

through what

beg

to

am

wayward

dulged the hope that the interest, the honor, the security of a wise

Legislature from Bath the two preceding years, and was that year Speaker of the

77

Altho' bandied about by the malice of

proud

This paper was

YORK.

arrival.

me

in the whole.

For this I presume

property as liberal security. 150

dolls.,

Now,

sir, if

all

of

you

will estimate

you immediately send

by mail or otherwise, with the security for the type, I





HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

78

will be

ready to march within one week after

its receipt and if the you can procure them, I will detain them certainly no longer than a day, and be with you as early as possible. I wish you to engage me a comfortable house and well-

teams

;

start hither as soon thereafter as

lighted

my

&c., before

The procuring

near to each other.

office,

would

arrival,

of stands, trough,

As you

facilitate the first publication.

have had one Prospectus in circulation, I leave it with you to decide whether another would be useful. As I am not tenacious of a title,

and am a

stranger to your local politics, habits, manners, &c.,

total

feel delicate in issuing

an address

to the public until

money immediately, and

Please send the

I

meet you.

I

I will be ready to go with

the teams so soon thereafter as they can be here.

"Very '"

have added them

B. Smead.

respectfully,

among

dolls,

worth of

joint note of yourself all

" I return

to

the fonts of type I purchased of

which are so very

leads,

amount, therefore,

to the purchase,- the

which

as per Mess. Websters' Bill,

—and

till next summer. The expenses of living here without property or employment, and the uncertainty of the weather of

the season, will account to as

you express

When

I enclose.

and Mr. McClure, they

brethren of the type assure

is

useful, I

188

dolls,

they receive the

will deliver

me

me

the

ma-

my

for

And

haste.

further, little fear

relative to the influence of the proposed federal paper,

the inteniei publisher has any cunning, he will secure

are distributed in your

own

accompanied with such

enclosures,

re-

my paper as you may (with your friends) feel disposed to advise on my arrival. And I repeat my former assurance on this subject, that altho' my own general political opinions marks respecting the tone of

always continue unmoved and independent, I shall require in this State further knowledge of your local politics, and adhere to the best

variety of

sizes,

make with

it

below

as

its

and

it

influential

know the value

the excellence of metal,

handsome work

as

men

of your county.

the expressed opinion of

is

of

my

the

type) that with this

and beauty of the cuts, I can

common

is

all

in the State



it is

100

All advise that I carry no smaller size

real value.

than Long-Primer. " Very respectfully, B. Smead.

"D. Cruger, Esq. " 3d Oct., nine o'clock at night.

and

given

— and

assured,

printers here (and they

dolls,

and

of the most intelligent

a great bargain.

it is

you the order on Mess. Bruce's, because I really believe I could not get so good a bargain of them for twice the sum as 12 cases, Gallies, some Long-primer, Gr.-Primer, and flowers are

me in the bargain. "I again beg you to send

you

among the changeable, unfixed portion of influential politicians, a support which we may not soon recover. The papers I enclose may do good, if they

if

judgment

since find,

Mess. Websters, 8

terials,

served for myself and son

"I am myself

—I

YORK.

will

D. Cruger, Esq.

" Sept. 27.

NEW

to-morrow box

shall

it

— Have rec'd my press from Binney, Have already

ready for transportation.

you could send a note of 20 dolls, to Judge Buel, he will sell me, very cheap, some elegant Blanks, some useful cuts, such as the U. S. and State arms, beautiful card borders, &c., with flowers, all are very useful, and cannot

contracted for Bules, Cuts, Chases, Sticks, Flowers, and other neces-

be obtained in the country. " The money I want immediately, and the teams as soon they can

cut off the blank paper at the foot of

150 dolls, cash,

if



The uncertainty

come.

— but

all

" Very respectfully,

"B. Smead. •'

— —but

N. B.

$300,

I

wish

as,

it

to

be understood that

on close calculation,

nestly solicit that you send

At

it.

I

do not reject your

want 150

I shall

"

moment

this

strict rules



to give

my

subscription papers

— and to

I

fill

to

go

to

The paper thus established continued the property of Mr. Smead, who was editor and publisher, till the office was In 1857, Mr. Rhodes sold to William C. Rhodes, in 1849. sold to Perry S. Donahe, Esq., who conducted the paper

olTer of

August, 1860, and sold

till

I could obtain,

very

had cash.

have given up engagements here,

I

powers

beg you to paste to them white paper, and urge your friends them immediately."

do ear-

in cash, I

cheap, some rules, cuts, U. S. arms. State arms, and other necessary additions, if I

^'The very

my



one four- horse (hcav^y) and one two-horse might be must be left to your convenience. Please write by the first return mail.

gons preferable, best, ^^

wag-

of the weather would render covered

will exert all

from you

and in a very short period, I you a respectable newspaper. of our new Postmaster have induced me to

saries in expectation of help

you with

all

speed.

possible

B. S."

After a few weeks' further reflection on the subject, Mr.

name of the paper was changed to the /ar77167'' s Advocate and Stenhen Adverttse7', in 1822. and under the management of Mr. Donahe it was changed to its present name The Steubex Farmer's Advocate. original

It is the oldest

Smead penned

his third

and

last letter in relation to

and pro-

Mr. A. L. Underbill.

prietor,

The

to the present editor

paper except two in the State of

New

the

York, having existed uninterruptedly for sixty-three years. paper. "

It

Dear

is

Sir,

as follows

— Since

my

:

last,

"Albany, Oct. 2, 1816. have more fully contemplated the

I

importance of having subscription papers in circulation, and have

my

therefore printed a concise sketch of of the title

J

objects.

I

am

The

facilities

of this

and management

office

good county newspaper are attested by the

for

making a

five

thousand

copies sent out weekly to subscribers.

not tenacious

but as you had given no hints of the desires of your

THE STEUBEN COURIER.

friends on this subject, I have intended to adopt one, short, expressive,

and

may

This

sufficiently local.

be altered,

if

consultation.

of the

" I transmit them to you in separate packets, because I understand I can frank only half an ounce,

— and

benefits, the public will not be defrauded,

as this pursuit

is

— and therefore (as members

reasons for urging the transmission of 150 dolls, might be

further explained.

Many

I told

real necessaries, for

pensable.

I also

you I was

my

want some

eras,

which

in low pecuniary circumstances.

family, for a long journey are indis-

Cuts,

Sticks, one or two chases, a few

Blanks

more

will be actually necessary,

for early sales.

flowers, with

Blank Cards,

a number of etcet-

but not attainable in the country.

I choose, however, to borrow as low a

sum

as will possibly

answer the

requirements of such an establishment, and have confined lations therefore to the narrowest limits.

placed in

me must

be reciprocated.

I

am

my

calcu-

The confidence you have therefore in full surety that

I shall be assisted to arrive in Bath with the utmost speed.

born

for thirty-three years editor

Steuben Courier, published weekly at Bath, was

at

Preble, Cortland

Co.,

N. Y., in the year 1816.

for public

of Congress have told me similar evasions are deemed and practiced by them as honorable) I consider it no fraud. If there be any tax, I will pay it to you.

"My

Henry H. Hull, founder and

thought best on

To meet

For

a

number of years he attended the Homer Academy,

then one of the noted institutions of learning in the State,

and there prepared lege

;

to enter

the junior year in

Union

but in 1839 he abandoned this idea, and went to

Corning, where he taught school for two years. this

time he studied law in the

son,

and

in

office

1843 he was admitted

his taste.

to the bar,

but did not

more congenial

to

In 1841 he bought the Corning and Blossburgh

Advocate of Charles Adams, and continued two years, when, finding

a call

During"

of Judge T. A. John-

follow this profession, finding journalism

for

Col-

from leading Whigs

at

it

its

unprofitable,

Bath,

publication

and receiving

who had been deprived

the arrangements, I have relinquished places here for labor; journey-

of an "organ" by the demise of the Constitutionalist three

men

weeks previously, he moved the material of the Advocate

out of business induced me, for this object, to give places I had re-

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, and associated with him

to the county-seat,

Whittemore.

F.

YORK.

Courier on the 20th of September, 1843.

It

was a

six-

79

CORNING.

as publisher

Under the firm-name of Hull & Whittemore they issued the first number of the Steuben

M.

NEW

The Corning Journal, was established

the oldest newspaper in the village,

May, 1847, by Thomas Messenger, who and proprietor till July, 1851, at which

in

remained editor

column paper, twenty-one by thirty-one inches, and was At the end of two the only Whig organ in the county.

date the establishment was purchased by A.

years Mr. Whittemore retired from the ofiice to his farm

April, 1853, purchased

in Jasper,

and the publication of the Courier was continued

by Mr. Hull alone

now

1856, when Charles

till

Fairman,

Gr.

Elmira Daily Advertiser, was associated

editor of the

At

with him for nine months.

Fairman returned

Elmira

to

the end of that time Mr.

resume an

to

editorial position

In 1854, upon the formation of the Republican

there.

party, the Courier became, as

of Republican

an exponent

to this day,

In 1864, Mr. Hull formed a

principles.

W.

partnership with Enos

it is

Barnes, and the firm of Hull

Barnes existed, with the exception of six months until July

1,

in

&

1868,

1875, when Mr. Barnes retired to become

His place on the

County Reporter.

editor of the Alleghany

Courier was taken by H. S. Hull, son of H. H. Hull, and the publication of the Courier was continued under the

& Son

firm-name of H. H. Hull

for nearly a year,

when

the partnership was terminated by the death of the senior

Since that time the

editor on the 8th of June, 1876.

Courier has been conducted by the junior partner.

been enlarged from time

and

to time,

is

It has

now an eight-column

and Dr. George

mained

W.

Nov. the-

1,

1874, when Mr.

offices

of canal appraiser and harbor-master of the port of

New York,

the duties of which positions he discharged with

signal ability

and

He

fidelity.

was, with perhaps one or

The Corning Democrat was

till

June

8,

when he

died.

For twenty years before his death he was the most promnent figure in Steuben County politics, and his influence extended through the Southern Tier, and was

He

of " great politics."

circle

an able and

irony.

He had

an inexhausti-

and humor, and was a master of sarcasm and as an editor,

His influence

sonal characteristics,

He

and, possessing

he had no superior on the country press as

eff"ective political editor.

ble fund of wit

affairs,

mind, and a clear and forcible

intellect, a logical

style as a writer,

the

was thoroughly informed

concerning national, State, and local

un acute

felt in

won

for

combined with

him the

his per-

position he occupied.

possessed a lofty independence and earnest and deep-

seated convictions, and was fearless in the defense of

considered right.

He

was a

what he

politician in the broadest

and

best sense of the term, but was not a slavish party retainer,

and hesitated no more

own

to

expose knavery in the ranks of his

party than he did in those of the opposition

his political enemies, ness, never

whom

;

and even

he invariably treated with

fair-

charged him with mean intrigue, with double-

dealing, with venality, or with

apt to beset those

who

any of the

sins

which are so

are actively engaged in politics.

and established

has been editor of

is

this time the oldest

at

first

issued April 15, 1857,

Mr. Brown has continued the proprietor since that time. During the political compaign of 1866, Rev. L. D. Ferguson was associate

editor,

and from Nov.

9,

1868, to Jan.

1,

1870, the paper was published under the proprietorship of

Mr. Brown, by D. E. De Voe & W. A. Rowland. It was started as a six-column paper, and in July, 1866, was enlarged

It

and is

to eight

columns,

its

present size, in

a weekly. Democratic in

politics,

conducted, and has a good, remunerative circulation. The Corning Independent was established in the

ably

of

fall

Some time during 1875, Hubert S. Edson became a partner with Mr. De Wolfe, and the paper was conducted by the firm of De Wolfe & Edson till May, 1877, when Dr. A. J. Ingersoll purchased it, and con1874, by T.

S.

De Wolfe.

about one year, changing

this year

with illusory hopes of recovery

till

Athens Gleaner, and Frank B. Brown, editors and propriIn November of the same year Mr. Huston retired. etors.

During

good health, he was stricken with paralysis, and lingered

Wolfe

from the printing-office which a few years previously had published the Southern Tier Farmer, C. T. Huston, of the

the State, having been in the editorial harness thirty-five

apparently

& De

editor in Steuben County.

it

the 19th of May, 1876, while in

when he

The paper was

retired,

Dr. Pratt

nearly twenty-eight years, and

ducted

On

re-

the Journal continuously since July, 1851, a period of

two exceptions, the senior editor of the country press in

years.

and in

and

interest,

W^olfe.

De Wolfe

Corning Independent.

July, 1871.

held at different times, by appointment of the Governor, the

De

editor,

July, 1869,

till

conducted under the firm-name of Pratt

H. H. Hull was married, in 1850, to Miss Clara Williston, daughter of the late Judge Horace Williston, of Athens, was once or twice elected supervisor of Bath, and

Mr. McDowell's

sold one-half interest to T. S.

to seven columns,

He

became

latter

and proprietor

sole editor

paper, twenty-seven by forty-one inches.

Pa.

The

Pratt.

W. McDowell

1878,

it

it

it

a semi-weekly.

to

In May,

was edited by Uri Mulford.

was purchased by George

W.

Cooper,

made

present editor and proprietor, and has

it,

who

is

the

during the

National Greenback

past campaign, an advocate of the party.

HORNELLSVILLB.

The Hornellsville Tribune 1851, by Edwin Hough.

was established Nov.

It continued

3,

under the manage-

ment of Mr. Hough till 1858, when it was published by The office was then E. Hough & Son till Feb. 1, 1869. transferred to D. R. Shafer, and in June following was sold to J.

Greenhow

&

Son, the present proprietors and pub-

lishers.

In the outset the paper was neutral in

politics.

It be-

came Republican under the management of E. Hough & Son, and under its present management has been Democratic.

The

publishers issue a daily and weekly, both of

which have a good

circulation,

and they have every

facility

for first-class job-printing.

The Hornellsville Herald 1872, under the name of

''

was started March

The Economist,"

as

8,

an adver-

medium, by M. A. Tuttle, of the dry-goods firm of In 1873 it passed into the hands of an Adsit & Tuttle. association, was enlarged to a six-column paper, and its name

tising

changed

to the Hornellsville

Herald.

It

was published

as

Graham

a temperance paper, Miles G. Graham, editor, and

&

way till Jan. 1, was purchased by E. H. Hough, the present

Dawson, publishers.

1876, when

it

It continued in this

enterprising editor and proprietor.

It

The Hornell Times

was established Jan.

Yidette" (Democrat)

'•

was conducted by Mr. Tuttle.

changed from a weekly changed

&

1867, as

1,

Tuttle,

who

In Septem-

office.

1877,

1,

to a semi-weekly,

Mr. Johnson Brigham became since

Jan.

popular cognomen.

to its present

1877, the paper was changed back

&

In July, 1865, Mr. Johnson enlarged the paper to seven

Johnson,

which

with the most flattering success.

The Times

is

October,

and

Feb-

in

from the Tribune

Adams, present

published

who

editor and proprietor,

from the McGuire Block.

it.

J.

two weeks

it

It then passed into the

office.

At

1868, the Advertiser was

17,

the time

has continued to

it

was enlarged

it

Mr. Johnson and Mr. Roberts

A

many

to

to the office, as

other valuable machines and improvements.

present editor and publisher, George H. Hollis, pur-

chased the tiser as

work

at

half-medium Gordon and an

eighth-medium Liberty press were added

The

donned a

and about the same time a power-press took the

the office complete.

well as

it

office

Jan. 30, 1873, and published the Adver-

an independent journal

Sam-

the nomination of

till

1876, when

uel J. Tilden for President in

publishes

Tilden and Hendricks, and has since been published as a

It has attained quite a circu-

it

supported

Democratic paper.

At the tmie Mr. Hollis purchased the paper he was well known to the inhabitants of Addison and adjoining towns,

ADDISON.

and, although not a practical printer, the Advertiser^ under

management, gained rapidly

his

ADDISON ADVERTISER.

many

attempts had been made to establish a newspaper at Addi-

had been

fifteen different publications

and influence.

in circulation

This acquaintance with the people in the south towns of

Prior to the publishing of the Addison Advertiser

Some

dress,

June

Roberts.

hands of

lation during the recent " soft money"- agitation.

son.

&

place of the old hand-press.

by J. D. Adams, was

He

Willett Smith, Jan. 19, 1878.

publication was continued under the firm-name of

its

the present time.

new

and Bates

Roberts purchased a half-interest,

make

Greenback movement by

started in the- interest of the

Amos

Sept. 4, 1867,

an enter-

well sustained.

R.

and proprietor.

sole editor

were both practical printers, and set themselves

is

W.

and

Dow

1866, both

1,

continued

also a well-furnished job-office connected with

The Greenback Champion,

J. D.

Mr. Tuttle,

still

is

Mr. Johnson

retired, leaving

and

Jan.

Bates.

enlarged to eight columns, which size

ruary, 1878, a daily was started,

and

Dow &

Sept. 1, 1877,

to a weekly,

prising paper, Bepublican in politics,

was

Dow

S.

Bates, as editors and proprietors, under the firm-name of

Johnson

Brigham.

is

it

the paper was

George H. HoUis, the present publisher.

and the name

a partfter with

which the firm has been Tuttle

There

when

Jan. 30, 1873,

first issue till

its

sold to

1875, Mr. Thacher retired, and for two years following

ber,

it

from

editor, or senior editor,

columns and associated with him H.

the " Canisteo Valley Times," by Thacher

purchased the

YORK.

The Hon. Edwin M. Johnson was

a well-conducted

is

weekly, with a good circulation.

it

NEW

HISTOKY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

80

issued, all

Steuben and the people of Cowanesque Valley, Pa., brought a large

now

number of

The paper may

subscribers and friends.

be considered as established on a firm and paying basis.

of which eked out a short and unprofitable existence.

URBANA.

In March, 1858, the Hon. Edwin M. Johnson, the present clerk of the Assembly at Albany, established the AddiIt

was

to a page,

and

son Advertiser.

columns

first

"

independent on

Henry Baldwin, of Addison, took

subjects."

its

as a partner, leaving Mr. office

was

first

Johnson

publication for sev-

II.

Manners

as a

bakery, nearly opposite the river bridge, on the north side

of Water Street. the time the paper was started the material used was in quantity.

used was a Washington hand-press. the poor

facilities

and never appeared with a patent

itself

''

its

But notwithstanding

outside, nor was

1,

1875, the half-interest

it

in the

a local

is

May

paper owned by Mrs. Ben-

was purchased by Mrs. Fairchild, the

charge of the paper until the

latter

having

it

ever

fall

of 1876,

when Mr.

L.

H.

Brown bought a half-interest. The partnership existed for one year, when the interest owned by Mrs. Fairchild was purchased by Mr. Brown, who still continues to edit and publish the paper.

COHOCTON.

The Cohocton Vallet Times village of Liberty.

Herald

in

It

is

published in the

was established as the Cohocton

1872, by H. B. Newell, and afterwards pur-

independent principle^ and an-

Tribune^ and in 1875 was bought by William A. Carpenter,

all

subjects."

all

subjects."

This,

we

Soon

how-

find the

and changed

to the

till

advocated the election of Horace Greeley, and till

It is a

weekly

politics.

after the

the presidential campaign of

remained a Liberal Republican paper

Cohocton Valley Times.

newspaper, independent in

obsolete papers.

paper espoused the cause of the Republican party, and con-

1872, when

It

chased by James C. Hewitt and changed to the Cohocton

ever, did not last long, for in January, 1859,

tinued a Republican paper

1874,

w^eekly paper, devoted to the interests of the locality.

only press

Before the close of

Democratic on

paper again "independent on

1,

its first

issued from stereotype plates.

nounced

The

the paper was entirely printed at home,

year the paper dropped

by Mrs. B. Bennett and Mrs. E. B. Fairchild.

nitt

located in the second story of the

mostly second-hand and small

May

as sole proprietor.

frame building then occupied by William

At

established

Col.

In the summer of 1858, Col. Baldwin retired

months.

The

The Hammondsport Herald was all

quite an interest in start-

ing the paper, and was a partner in eral

hammondsport herald.

issued as a four-paged paper, six

January, 1873.

The Farmer

s

Gazette was

commenced

in

Bath

in 1816,

by David Rumsey, and was published about one year. Tke Steuben

i¥esse;i^er

was started

at

Bath, April 17,

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

NEW

till

1834, when

Constitutionalist,

sively

and

and

its

name was changed

its

& Van

Yalkenburgh,

Richards, and by the last-named firm as The

Steuben Democrat, until 1844, when the paper was susIn 1848 it was renewed by L. J. Beach, and in pended.

1849 was

transferred to George

publication was continued

till

H. Bidewell, by whom

its

Gem

was published

Bath

at

in 1854,

by Misses Jenny and Caroline Rumsey. The Addison Record was published at Addison by Isaac D. Booth, from 1840 to 1842, and in 1849 by Dryden & Peck.

The Addison Advocate was published by H. D. Dyer

in

The Voice of the Nation was commenced hands of A. L. Underbill, by 1856, when

it

Addison by

at

In 1855 the paper passed into the

R. l)enton, in 1852.

was removed

to

whom

it

The

difficulties

which many of the early

on the

Pulteney and Hornby estates had to encounter in paying

by

While

the present generation.

its

to treat the settlers

and aim of the agents

equity, yet the policy adopted

with justice and

by them and acquiesced

by hundreds of land-purchasers proved to be of a very Thousands bought their lands on embarrassing nature. contract, agreeing to

pay

them

for

in installments, together

with a certain stipulated interest thereon, which accumulated from year to year, amounting in a few years to more

Many

had

all

of them were poor, and

they could do to gain a subsistence for themselves

and families on the new

lands,

which exhausted

all

their

of paying their installments and meeting the annual interest

when

it

If these sums were not paid they

became due.

were compounded or added to the principal, on which

The Canisteo Express was published

by Thomas Messenger. The Addison Journal was started to

at

Addison in 1850^

terest

1851 by R. Denton,

in-

was again charged, involving them more hopelessly

than ever in pecuniary embarrassment. in

in

name changed

publication continued

its

was evidently the desire

it

energies and resources to clear and improve, to say nothing

May, 1867.

and was removed

settlers

till

was published

Bath and

The Steuben American, and

until

tions to his Sub-Agent.

than the lands were worth.

1848-49.

to

with the Land-Office— Meeting of Settlers—The Protesting Convention— Memorial to Col. Robert Troup— Col. Troup's Instruc-

Difficulties

for their lands can be little understood or appreciated

1852.

The Steuben Whig was published at Bath during the political campaign of 1828, by William M. Swain.

The Temperance

THE LAND CONTROVERSY.

publication was continued succes-

by R. L. Underbill, Whitemore

Dow &

The

to

81

CHAPTER XVIL

1828, by David Rumsey, and was published by him, Samuel M. Eddie, William P. xingel, and Charles Adams, successively,

YORK.

worse

state of things continued, the

it

The

longer this

The agents

became.

could not go on forever accepting promises to pay, and the

Allegany County in 1852.

only prospect

left

for

many

of the settlers was that the

The Addison Democrat was commenced by Charles L. Phelps in 1853, and was merged in the Voice of the Na-

lands on which they had toiled so long to gain a meagre

tion in 1854.

subsistence would be sold from under

at

The Corning and Blossburg Advocate was commenced Corning in 1840, by Charles Adams. In 1841 it passed

into the in

hands of Henry H. Hull, by

whom

it

was merged,

roy and P. C.

came the

Van

started in

Gelder.

1853 by M. M. Pome-

publisher, and changed the

name

to

This matter became so serious that in Allegany and Steuben Counties began

to arouse themselves to the perils of their situation,

We

remedy could be adopted.

and

give below the report of

A CONVENTION OF SETTLERS

The Elmira

held at the court-house in Bath, in the county of Steuben,

Corning in

on the nineteenth day of January, 1830, " to take into consideration the condition of the settlers on the Pulteney

The Painted Post Gazette was started by Mr. Fairchild

and Hornby estates" in the counties of Steuben and AlleHenry A. Townsend, Esq., was called to the chair, gany.

1856. at

the spring of 1856.

1846, and continued a few months.

The Painted Post Herald was published by Ransom Bennett and B. M. Hawley, from May, 1848, for about one

and Edward Howell and George C. Edwards, Esqs., apThe following delegates appeared, and pointed secretaries. took their seats

Addison.

year.

in

who

it

The United States Farmer was published

in

settlers in

In 1854, Rev. Ira Brown be-

Southern Tier Farmer and Corning Sun, and continued till

1830 the

to those

hold public meetings for the purpose of considering what

1843, in the Steuben Courier, at Bath.

The Corning Sun was

could pay for them.

them

The National American was established at Hornellsville In November, 1858, it was 1856, by C. M. Harmon.

sold to Charles A. isteo Valley

Kinney, and

its

name changed

Journal.

The Painted Post Times was begun C. Bronson,

baugh.

was discontinued some time

The Saturday News was W. Barnes, in the early part Republican

in politics.

But

when Mr. Barnes returned

October, 1870,

in

S.

H. Feren-

of the year 1868.

Enos

It

was

eleven numbers were issued,

to the 1,

Steuben Courier 1868.

—William Wombough, Lemuel B.

Shumway, Eber

vid

Scofield,

Searles,

Da-

and Daniel Burdick.

—William Woods,

James Warden, John Corbitt, Peter Hunter, Melvin Schenck, Caleb P. Fulton, and Elisha Hawks. Bath.

Cameron. tee,

— Jacob Thayer,

Joseph Loughry, Isaac San-

Sheldon Porter, and Hiram Averill.

Cohocto7i.—¥'du\ C. Cook, David Weld, Elnathan Wing,

1877.

established at Bath, by

from which he had retired Jan. 11

in

H. C. Higman, and

by William It

Can-

to

:

office,

Peter Haight, and Alfred Shattuck.

— Henry D. miah Baker, George —Thomas M. Canisteo.

Millard, William Stephens, Jere-

Santee, and

Dansville.

Newcomb, Leeds

Moses

Hallett.

Bowen, Peter Covert, Annis

Allen, and Martin Smith.

:

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

82

JJrwin.

— John

Samuel Erwin, and John

Evans,

E.

Greenwood.

—Levi

Thomas Johnson, Anson Cook,

Davis,

William J. Strong, and Randall Pease.

— Isaac

Iloniellsville.

Goodsell,

Samuel

— Oliver

Oldfield, Josiah

productive only of general distress, em-

John

Wheat,

Call, Oliver Petti-

J. Sharp.

— — Jasper. — William Hunter, Benjamin Smith, Uzal M'Mynderse, and Hinckley Spencer. Fainted — Robert H. Hoyt, Joseph Charles William Webster, and Henry D. Smith. Wolcott, Gamaliel Loomis, JoPrattsburgh. — Stephen

Howard. Daniel N. Bennett, Byram L. Harlow, William GofF, John D. Collyer, and Jacob G. Winne. Abraham M. Lybolt, Gilbert Reed, Caleb WolJersey. cott, Peter Houck, and Henry Switzer. Heliker, Ira

Post.

Gillett,

Jr.,

Prentiss,

siah AUis, Ira C. Clark, and

PuJteney.

Joseph Potter.

— David Hobart, William Sagar, Barnet Retan,

Daniel Bennett, and Seth Weed. S.

Child.

Slayter, Jesse

Wilden, and Nathan

— Henry

John Powers,

A.

S.

Hayes.

Townsend, John

Sanford,

Jr.,

Ketchum, and Dyer Cranmer. Jonathan Barney, Nathan Rose (2d), Abram Elias

— Overhizer. Quackenbush, David Barney, and John John H. Sherwood, and ThornWayne. — Latham Curry. ton Wood/mil. — Caleb Smith, Samuel Stroud, Asher JohnJeffrey Smith, and Martin Harder. Alfred— Edward Green, Daniel Babcock, Spencer Sweet, Richard and Clark Barns. — Stephen Mundy, Nathaniel Bennett, and JoseWheeler.

"

By

management

of the said estates

:

the disposal of their lands at prices above their value

and

beyond the power of the settlers to meet^ " By the practice adopted by the agency of compounding the interest annually on demands due, until by its accumulation it has, in most cases, increased the original demand to a sum beyond the value of the land

"

By

and the improvements thereon

and

;

threatening to enforce a course of rigid punctuality on

many

same time legal restraints are imposed entirely hopeless for them to attempt the payment of

of the settlers, while at the

which render it any considerable portion of their debts. "

And

ple at

whereas,

all

it is

not only the privilege but the duty of the peo-

times to assemble in a constitutional manner, with a view

to the correction of a state of things evidently prejudicial to the wel-

members. "Resolved, therefore. That a committee of one from each town represented in this convention, together with the chairman and secretaries and William Woods, Esq., be appointed a committee to draft a memorial to the principal agents of the Pulteney and Hornby estates on fare of the

community of which they

are

the subject of existing grievances.

"Resolved, That the following persons, together with those above

— Henry Williams, Henry L. Arnold, John Sobering, Samuel L. Bigelow, and Daniel Troupshurgh. — Samuel Cady, Samuel Griggs, Joshua Tyrone.

" Whei^eas, In the opinion of this meeting, the true cause of the present embarrassment and depression may be traced to an ill-judged

entirely

Coon, Othniel

bone, Jabez Lamphere, and

C.

J.

Fitch,

F.

son,

mentioned, constitute the said committee, to wit

:

Lemuel B.

Searles,

James Warden, Hiram Averill, David Weld, Jeremiah Baker, Thomas M. Brown, John E. Evans, Levi Davis, Isaac Goodsell, Oliver Pettibone, William Goff, Henry Switzer, Hinckley Spencer, Robert H. Hoyt, Gamaliel Loomis, David Hobart, Henry S. Williams, Samuel Grigges, John Powers, John H. Sherwood, Asher Johnson, Clark Crandall, Josephus Miller, David Crandall, Asa S. Allen, Alva Wood, and James Fox. " Resolved, That this convention adjourn till nine o'clock this evening to hear the report of the committee appointed in the preceding resolutions.

the convention adjourned, and again assembled at the

"Whereupon

and the committee reported a memorial, which having been read, it was " Resolved, That the same be adopted and be signed by the delegates

hour above

specified,

composing the said convention."

Crandall.

Hall,

phus

its affairs

policy in the direction and

Francis Northway, and Levi Nash.

Urhana.

administration of

YORK.

barrassment, and poverty.

Cooper, Jr.

Hornby.

NEW

The convention then adjourned

till

nine o'clock next

morning. Miller.

— David George Lockhart, Joseph Baldwin, James McHenry, and Jasper White. Hiram HarAndover. — Philip Wardner, Asa Purrington, and Stephen mon, Independence. — Alva Wood, William W. Reynolds, and Almond — James Fox.

The convention met on the 20th of January, pursuant to adjournment, when the following resolutions were adopted

Haight, Edward Howell, and George C. Ed-

that they report the result of such correspondence to this meeting at

Almond.

Crandall,

S. Allen,

Potts.

Elias

Crandall.

Italy.

Samuel

S.

wards, at the request of the convention, took their seats as

members

thereof.

The court-house being

insufficient to ac-

" Resolved, That Stephen Prentiss, William Woods, Clark Crandall, Ira C. Clark, and George -McClure, together with the chairman and secretaries, be a committee to forward the memorial to Col. Robert

Troup and to John Gregge, Esq., on behalf of the inhabitants of said counties, and to correspond and confer with them on the subject of such memorial, as well as any other matter relating thereto; and a future day.

"Resolved, That this convention, when

spectators, the conven-

tion adjourned to the Presbyterian meeting-house.

The convention having reassembled

at

may

adjourns, will adjourn to

time and place as the chairman and secretaries appoint, and that notice be published by them of such subse-

meet again

commodate the convention and the

it

at such

quent meeting.

the meeting-

house, and the objects of the meeting having been discussed, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously

adopted

" Resolved, That the

members

of this convention continue to hold

their places until the objects of the convention shall be obtained, or until others shall be appointed in their stead.

" Resolved, That

be recommended to those towns interested in the objects of this meeting, and who are not fully represented in this it

convention, to choose delegates to at least the ^'

Whereas, The unusual and alarming embarrassment of a great

portion of the settlers on what are usually termed the Pulteney and

Hornby

estates, in the counties of

Steuben and Allegany,

call loudly

some power to interpose between them and a state of pecuniary depression which threatens eventually to terminate in consequences disastrous to the welfare and prosperity of this

for the interference of

section of the State,

" Whereas, In the opinion of this meeting, the propriet^ors of any estate

cannot be benefited by th^ existence of a state of things in the

number

of five, to rep-

them in all future meetings. " Resolved, That the delegation in this convention from each town

resent

be a committee to be denominated the Committee of Grievances, whose duty it shall be to collect all information on the subject of existing evils and report the

meeting.

And

same

to this

convention at some future

that said committee be also authorized to collect funds

to defray the expenses attending the carrying into effect the object

of this meeting,

appointed.

and

to

pay over the same

to the treasurer hereinafter

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Resolved, That George C.

^^

Edwards be and

treasurer, for the purpose of receiving

all

hereby appointed

is

funds that

over for the purpose aforesaid, and whose duty

it

may

shall

be paid

be to dis-

burse the same at his discretion, with the advice of the chairman and secretaries, in aid of the object

" Resolved, That the chairman and secretaries be authorized

to cor-

respond with such non-resident land-holders in the said counties as they may deem proper, and which in their opinion may be produc-

YORK.

83

" A general peace had succeeded the commotions and distractions of war trade and all the arts of life had settled down into their natural and ordinary channels. A stagnation had succeeded as profound as the excitement and activity which had preceded it was general, and ;

property of

contemplated by this meeting.

NEW

kinds underwent a diminution of more than one-half

all

The productions of the

in value.

soil,

no longer required abroad, hand for the want of pur-

glutted our markets at home, remaining on chasers, or selling at prices

better than nominal.

little

now

In the mean

swelled by the continual accumula-

tive of

time the debt of the

by the laws of the land, to effect the removal of the evils under which the people of this vicinity labor, we pledge ourselves to each other and to the public steadily to pursue the object for which this

tion of interest, was augmented to a sum beyond his ability or his hope of payment. Add to this that the construction of the great Erie Canal, while it conferred the greatest advantages upon the country through which it passed, operated in the same ratio against this by

good to the settlers on such lands. " Resolved, That while we will use such measures only as are justi-

fied

convention

is

assembled, until a sense of justice on the part of the

land-holders and their agents shall induce them to adopt measures calculated to alleviate existing embarrassments

among

the settlers on

said estates.

That the proceedings of this convention be signed by the chairman and secretaries and published in the several public journals of the counties of Steuben, Allegany, and Yates, and that ^'Resolved,

one thousand copies of such proceedings be published in the form of a handbill for circulation. '^H. A. TowNSEND, CAfuV/rmH.

"

Edward Howell,

"George

C.

Edwards,

| (

Secretaries,'*

MEMORIAL.

arresting the tide of emigration from to the great regions of the

" Respectfully Sheweth,

the cotmties

canal,

upon

the

said

of Steuben and Allegany,



numerous navigable streams penetrating the count}^ of Steuben, and affording means for the cheap and easy transportation of the products of the soil to a market upon our Atlantic coast, were considered as conferring important advantages over the more fertile country through which the canal now passes, and produced a consequent advancement in the valuation of the land. That at that period of time the commotions of the French Revolution had involved the whole civilized world, our own country excepted, in a general and sanguinary war. The armies of the several powers of Europe, augmented to the utmost possible extent, had withdrawn from the cultivation of the soil such immense numbers of people that the productions of those countries were found entirely inadequate to the support of their inhabitants, and the whole of Europe, threatened with a general dearth and famine, were compelled to procure their bread from the granaries of this country. The productions of our farms were advanced to a price unprecedented; money was abundant, enterprise high, a spirit of emulation had gone abroad in the community, which impelled thousands to leave the older settled parts of the country and press on to the wilderness of the West, calculating upon the continuance of this prosperity

advantages of

;

and, estimating very extravagantly the local

this country, a large

number

time appeared prosperous and happy. to

command

Produce of

all

price,

and

themfor a

kinds continued

a high price in ready money, and a few of the

who had obtained

tlers,

of settlers located

an extravagant

selves here, contracted for lands at

draw

oflf

the settlers

different,

however,

first set-

the best lands, succeeded in paying for their

is

upon your agency. The lands were covered with a very large growth of timber, and the labor of clearing excessively great. The crops upon the

quality.

sale of lands here.

everywhere; the great reduction

of the relative value of lands in these counties, occasioned

by the

construction of the great canal; the reduction in the price of the gov-

ernment lands and the lands of the Holland Land Company; the diversion of the tide of emigration, capital, and enterprise to other channels the great amount of debt now due for lands which the whole ;

value of real estate

now

improvements made

in the

by them

;

hands of the the

their lands at their estimated value,

charge their debts, have produced a

utter

settlers,

including the

impossibility

of selling

and their utter inability

crisis in

to dis-

the affairs of the inhabi-

tants of a most momentous character, compelling them to appeal to you for relief from burdens and difficulties too great to be longer

borne.

" Impressed with the truth of these considerations, your memorialists, on the part of the whole community whom they represent, earnestly

recommend

the situation of this country to your consideration;

and fully that you have the power as well as the inclination to afford

them the

fullest relief,

they respectfully suggest the propriety of adopt-

ing, with regard to this agency, a policy similar to that lately taken

up by the Holland Land Company, which has had the happy

effect

and confidence, establishing prosperity and enterprise among the settlers, and effecting the collection of a larger sum of money for the proprietors than was ever before realized for their lands, and which will undoubtedly produce similar effects here. Should you adopt this course, gentlemen, we have no hesitation in saying, that while you most effectually promote the interest as well of the land-owners as of the settlers, you will cause your own names

there of restoring peace

handed down to posterity among those of the greatest benefactors of mankind. ^' Dated Jan. 20, 1830."

to be

COL. TROUP's INSTRUCTIONS.

the fate of a very large portion of the set-

tlers

first

channel

the great change which has within a few years taken place

sho-rt,

farms and establishing themselves in independence and competence.

Very

from us and prevent the

in the value of all kinds of property

" That previous to the construction of the great Erie Canal the

fictitious

its

and advantages of location upon the great

superior quality of the soil

the subscribers, delegates chosen by the settlers resident

of

by the course of

and expense of traveling and transportation, distance has, in effect, been diminished, and the lands of the United States, in the State of Ohio and Territory of Michigan, become accessible with less labor and expense than those on which we reside. The adoption of a new policy by the Government of the United States with regard to the national lands so introduced into the market, has also had a very seThe reduction of the price of those rious effect upon this country. lands to one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, and the facility of transporting their products to market by the lake and the Grand Canal, have induced many of our citizens who had the means of emigration thither to do so, and all are prevented from settling here who have the means of purchasing and paying for lands. '^ The Holland Land Company, impressed with a belief of the impe-

In

estates in the several towns

it

the great reduction in the labor

cording to the exigency of the times, and by their low prices and the

"THE MEMORIAL of

By

West.

rious necessity of the case, have reduced the price of their lands ac-

To Egbert Troup, Esquire, Chief Agent of the Pulteney Estate, and " To John Gregg, Esquire, Chief Agent of the Hornby Estate.

*'

^'

settler,

new lands were

About three months sented, Col.

small in quantity and inferior in

The occupants were poor;

estate, for a long time labored

and finally, when they had succeeded in making such improvements upon their farms as to enable them to raise some surplus beyond the most indispensable provision for themselves and their families, the fortunate period for drawing profit from the productions of the land had passed away.

above memorial was pre-

Robert Troup, chief agent of the Pulteney

issued the following letter of instruction to

under

the greatest difficulties in supporting themselves and their families;

after the

William

W. McCay,

management of the

sub-agent at Bath, in respect to the

estate in

Steuben and Allegany Counties ^^New York, March

"Dear estate, in

Sir,

—I

am

Hon.

informed that the

settlers

:

14, 1830.

on the Pulteney

Steuben and Allegany Counties, suppose the debts they owe

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

84:

the estate are so large, as, for the most part, to exceed their ability to

modate them and

YORK.

^'

am

I

also informed that, in consequence of their supposed inabil-

pay

ity to

that they

their debts, the settlers entertain serious apprehensions

may

ultimately lose their farms, and thus be involved in

ruin.

" I have uniformly cherished the kindest feelings towards the settlers, and therefore it is difficult for me to express my extreme regret at the apprehensions

which may agitate their minds.

^'As far as was compatible with a just regard for the interests of

who

principals,

act in the character of trustees

and

executors, I

promote the welfare of the

settlers in have uniformly endeavored to the course of policy I have pursued since my connection with the Accordingly, I have on all occasions endeavored to treat the estate. settlers with justice and liberality, and to show them every forbear-

ance and indulgence called for by the difficulties attending the settlement of a new country. I have moreover cheerfully made liberal contributions, from time to time, for promoting religion, opening roads, building bridges, and other public improvements. In so doing, I have also acted in perfect accordance with the wishes of

my

English

have entertained a belief that the debts due from the settlers in your department of the agency were generally I had therefore determined too large for their means of payment.

"For some time past

on what appeared

I

me

to

a proper plan for reducing the debts to a

My

reasonable and equitable amount.

objects in determining on this

plan were to animate the agricultural labors of the

settlers,

and

to

inspire them with confidence in their future prosperity and happiness,

by convincing them that I had no desire whatever to deprive them The plan had in view of the hard-earned fruits of their industry. the fair appraisement of the buildings and other improvements on every lot, together with the present value of the cleared land, and the present value of the land remaining in a state of nature.

value of each lot being thus ascertained, I proposed, by

The actual making an

abatement upon just and equitable principles, to reduce the contract debt to a sum below the appraised value, whenever the settler was to

make

a moderate

payment on account

of the balance.

sides such reduction of his debt, the settler was to be

Be-

accommodated

with a liberal enlargement of time for paying the balance, in easy

person,

it

would be plain

who became acquainted with

founded in equity, and afforded the

own

this plan, that

it

was deeply

every assurance that he

settler

This price, I

am

perIt

must nevertheless be remembered that the wheat to be received on contracts originally made payable in wheat must be taken at the price stipulated in the contracts.

"At

the time

when the

price of seventy-five cents per bushel is

given for wheat it may so happen that the settler who has money to pay may sustain an injury from making the payment in money and not in wheat. To prevent such injury, you are authorized to allow the settler a just abatement on his money payment, if he is willing to

make You

"

it.

"When

the settler comes to the

reduction of his debt, 1 think

demand debt,

and

will also receive cattle at fair

of

and

it

I desire

office to receive

the benefit of the

reasonable and just that you should of the balance of his

be expressly understood that, while the ap-

to

it

cash prices.

liberal

him a moderate payment on account

praisements are in progress, the settlers are expected to

ments

They may

as usual.

rest satisfied that the

make pay-

payments made in

impair their right to have a reduction of their debts, but shall be considered in lieu of so much paid at the time of reduction, and shall accordingly be applied towards extinguishing

mean time

shall not

the balances that may then be ascertained to be due. " It is my desire that no occupied or improved lots be advertised

have been favored with the opportunity of availing themselves of the benefits to arise from the reduction of their debts under the proposed appraisements. " Some time since I directed you to reduce for the future the selling

for sale until after the settlers

prices of vnsold lands in your agency to a

more moderate standard,

this direction you must continue to observe. " The details for carrying these instructions into

and

must neces-

effect

sarily be a matter of sound discretion with you, and I request you to

exercise that discretion in the

same

spirit of liberality that is

mani-

fested in this letter.

"You

will

be pleased to communicate

to the settlers in

due season,

through the medium of the newspapers printed at Bath and at Angelica, such part of the details as they ought to be made acquainted with.

" With great respect, I am, "

every considerate and unprejudiced

to

be received during the winter months

be fixed at seventy-five cents per bushel.

installments.

" I thought

is to

suaded, will secure to the settler a good living profit for his labor.

the

friends.

ready

is to

The

shall be found advantageous to the agency.

it

price at which the wheat

pay.

my

NEW

Dear

sir,

your humble servant, "

"Wm. W. M'Cay,

Robert Troup.

Esq."

pay for his farm. would finally be able, by " Soon after I had determined on the plan, I instructed you to put it forthwith in a train of execution, by employing one of the assistants in the land-office to make the necessary appraisement of the value of the lots. The plan was accordingly put in a train of execution but a good deal of time was necessary to a judicious and impartial appraisement of the lots, and it has consequently happened that the work has hitherto been performed only in some townships under

letter

your agency.

journed meeting of the convention held in Bath, April 14,

his

exertions, to

FURTHER ACTION OF THE SETTLERS. During the

interval of three

months between the above

of Col. Troup and another containing his modified

June 14, 1830, meetings were held by

instructions, dated

;

" It

is still

my

intention to continue the execution of

I have reason to believe that

nected with your agency lots,

he might be liable

is

it

may be imagined

employed

my

the settlers in

of the county, and a spirit of

calm but determined resistance manifested.

At an

ad-

But

plan.

that, if a person con-

1830,

being sufficiently impar-

it

was

" Resolved,

in appraising the value of the

to a suspicion of not

many towns

by

Col.

As the sense

Troup

of this meeting, that the instructions given

to his sub-agent in

Bath under date of March

14, 1830,

request you to lose no time in selecting, subject independent, judicious, and upright farmer some to my approbation, residing in Steuben or Allegany County, and no way connected with

will not afford the necessary and reasonable relief required by the

the estate, to appraise the lots under contract in the several towns in

recommend to said settlers that payments upon contracts upon the aforesaid lands

tial.

I therefore

now

your department.

As

expense, I request you

this will to

be a work of considerable time and

engage the person you may

select to

com-

mence with those townships that have not been already appraised by your assistant. so correct lots in

and

It fair,

is

possible that his appraisement

may prove

to be

on comparing them with the appraisements of the

other townships by the person you

may

select, as to lead

me

judge that the lots already appraised need not be appraised again. " The person to be intrusted with the business of appraisement must confirm the appraisement of the lots in every township by his oath,

to

and when the appraisement is returned to the land-office it must remain subject to my approbation. " The agency has heretofore gone to some extent into the practice of taking wheat and cattle in the payment of debts, and I now direct you to make the practice general, and to continue it as long as the settlers shall

appear faithfully

to

second

my

sincere desire to accom-

settlers

upon the lands embraced

in the agencies,

and that the con-

vention disapprove of the same. " Resolved, That the convention

they withhold

all

until the necessary relief

On

the 6th of

is

granted.'^

May

a large meeting of the settlers in

at

Hammondsport, of which James

Urbana was held

Brundage was chairman and William Hastings secretary. The action of the above convention was approved, and it was " Resolved, That

all

further payments be withheld until the asked-

for relief is granted.

" Resolved, That

our grievances are not redressed our delegates use their endeavors with the convention to memorialize the next Legislature, praying that propter and expedient laws be enacted for if

the relief of this oppressed community.'*

;

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Such was the spmt and purport of the meetings held

and honest farmer residing lot

the 14th of June, 1830, Col. Troup sent the follow-

M'Cay

ing instructions to Mr.

New

York, 14th June, 1830.

"But

—I

proposed plan for the relief of the settlers on the Pulteney Estate in Steuben and Allegany Counties, as exhibited in my letter of

my

instructions to

you

March

of the 14th

disagreeable to them

last, is

;

and especially that part of the plan which prescribes an appraisement of the present value of the improvements on every lot as one

that they have rejected

have resolved

am

sion, I

suspend

to

informed,

arbitrarily to cut

down

all

payments

It

seems

The suspen-

to the agency.

their contract debts, without

the cases of the

tion, in

settlers, to

my

consenting

any discrimina-

the present value of wild lands,

exclusive of the value of the improvements on their

them new contracts

further consenting to give

lots,

and

my

in

for the lots at the price

of wild lands.

Learning these necessary for

me

to be

the feelings and views of the settlers,

you with additional instructions

to furnish

it

is

your

for

much

perform

on mature reflection, and without

The

straight line of rectitude.

my

my principals and to my principals the

and, on the other liberality,

it

motive of personal interest to bend

of the estate intrusted to

between

plan of relief has proved so disagree-

I formed

least possible

ment from the

my

regret that

able to the settlers.

having the

side, to

and kindness.

charge places

It

me on middle ground

duties of diligence, justice, to

management

faithful

I have, on the one side, to

the settlers.

perform

my judg-

and

integrity;

the settlers the duties of justice,

was under a sense of these several

duties,

most deeply impressed both on my mind and heart, that the plan was formed. And, such being my duties, I was afterwards very happy to find that the plan received the full approbation of able, discreet,

whom

honest counsel, to

I submitted

for their consideration,

it

and but

particularly for their consideration of the legal exercise of the

more powers delegated to me as an agent. " It appeared to me that, as a discreet and faithful land-agent, I would not be justified in acceding to the plan of relief proposed by the settlers. I thought it was founded on arbitrary principles, which,

when

carried into practice, would prove unjust to the persons I repre-

and unequal towards the settlers themselves. " The reasons for this opinion are obvious. " The plan, by reducing debts differing widely from each other in age, amount, and character, would assume an arbitrary rule, subjecting the estate to a heavy and, in a great majority of the cases, un-

sent,

necessary loss on the debts in different proportions from twenty-five to seventy-five per cent.

themselves; for

settlers

ment on to

would not render equal justice to the the operation of an uniform rule of abateIt

debts, of various descriptions, could not

exceed what the actual situation of the

would often

It

farms for

{)lace

the settlers

the

in

had purchased

mean

in

many

cases,

profitably enjoyed their

and had paid

little

or nothing

time, on a footing of equality with those

their farms

footing than those

fail,

settlers in justice required.

who had

for ten, twenty, or thirty years,

them

who

but recently; and on a more favorable

who had made frequent payments,

tinguished their contract debts.

That

I

or

had quite ex-

have declined acceding

to a

plan possessing such A^ery objectionable qualities will not seem extraordinary to any

man who

regards what

and just

is

fair

sets

a due value on his property, and

in his business transactions.

wy plan would afford all the was proper to be granted by a discreet and This plan faithful land-agent, or that justice and equity demanded. was grounded on the fair value of every lot, which was to be ascertained by appraising, separately,'the present value of the improved land, and buildings, and the present value of the land remaining in a state of nature. That the appraisement might be perfectly impar'^

I supposed, on the contrary, that

relief to the settlers that

tial, it

was

was not

to take place in

favor of every settler indiscriminately, as there are settlers whose cases are so circumstanced as to render any relief to them neither

In this class of cases are those,

necessary nor proper. of second purchasers, settlers,

who

and paid them

among

others,

have lately bought contracts of the

for their

first

improvements, with express refer-

ence to the balances due on the contract debts. " The principles of justice and equity, to regulate the abatement proposed, would naturally embrace various considerations, such as the

the settler, his ability to pay, his hardships, losses, and misfortunes since he settled on the estate, and other circumstances furnishing just

In no instance, however, did I intend to charge, in the renewed contract, more than was due on the previous contract, though the value of the land should much exceed

and equitable claims

to liberality.

and not to inabatement, the that remembered But it should be injure him. stead of being designed by me as an act of mere benevolence, was to be made as a matter of business; and therefore I meant to bound my liberality by that honest and sound discretion which it was my duty the debt due on

it,

my

object being to benefit the settler,

managing the property of other persons. *'Such are the principles on which the tico jjlans proposed for the relief of the settlers are grounded; and I believe that when the arbi-

to observe in

government. " I very

this reduction of the contract debt

be reduced, by

to

sum considerably

of the property, the enterprise, industry, and general good conduct of

many

which, I have constantly understood, consists in

relief,

was

and, in consequence of their rejection,

value.

to continue until I agree to their plan of

is

its

several parts, the contract debt

of the settlers

its total

so disagreeable to

is

it,

its

greatness or smallness of the price originally agreed to be paid for the land, the accumulation of interest on the price, the present value

of the items to be taken into the account of

that this part of the plan

having been appraised, and

the value of

The

total value ascertained by uniting

an abatement on just and below the appraised value of the farm.

have received your letter of the 9th ultimo, with its inclosure. From them, and likewise from late proceedings of a public nature in Steuben County, I learn, with no little surprise, that Sir,

Steuben or Allegany County, and not

equitable principles, to a

"

'^Dear

in

85

subject to the influence either of the settlers or the land-office.

throughout the county.

On

YORK.

to

be made, under oath, by some independent, judicious,

trary and unjust principles of the plan of the settlers are contrasted with the rational and just principles of my plan, the contrast will

appear so glaring as to flash conviction on every reflecting and unprejudiced mind, that my conduct, far from meriting censure from the settlers, is well entitled to their grateful acknowledgments.

But my proposed jo^an for the relief of the settlers went still farther. reI granted them easy annual installments for paying the equitably means their facilitate to and contracts their duced balances due on of payment, as Steuben and Allegany Counties depend on the uncertain and hazardous navigation of the Susquehanna for a market for the sale of produce, I permitted them to make payments in wheat and cattle, taking wheat at seventy-five cents per bushel, and cattle "

;

at liberal cash prices.

It is matter of public notoriety that the price

of seventy-five cents per bushel for

price that has for

many

wheat

is

considerably above the

years past prevailed in Steuben and Allegany

admitted that seventy-five cents per bushel will yield the farmer a living profit, I readily agreed to allow that price. " Some of the contracts stipulate payments in wheat, but the greater Counties; and as

it is

portion of the contracts oblige the settlers to pay their purchasemoneys in cash. And yet I consented to take wheat and cattle in

though at the certainty of heavy The losses will the operation. from losses accruing to the agency to the arise from the expense and risk attending the transportation debts bad from and market, the of seaboard, from the fluctuations

payment on the cash

contracts,

which respects the agency has heretofore suff'ered severely. "I presume I hazard nothing in saying that the facilities thus pro-

in all

posed to be granted to the

settlers for the

payment

of the equitably

reduced balances of their contract debts rendered my plan of relief complete. I call it complete, for, by its natural effects, the debts of the the settlers obtaining relief would be reduced considerably below present worth of their farms, time would be gained for paying the at balances in easy installments, and a convenient and ready market, produce. Had liberal prices, would be provided for the sale of their

plan of relief to greater extent in essential particulars, important trust conI should have thought myself unworthy of the more equitable and what ask fided tome by my principals; but I what more liberal can the settlers reasonably desire of me? This I carried

my

question will be promptly and rightly answered by every settler who takes pride in performing his honest engagements. " The settlers voluntarily came and purchased their farms, without

commonly the practice of any imposition by the agency, at the prices asked by land-holders at the time, and after having explored the lots, and thereby qualified themselves to judge correctly of the situation, They have occupied the farms for nature, and value of the lands.



HISTOEY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

86 many

and supported their families with the productions of the soil; and they have been treated by the agency with scrupulous justice, and almost unexampled forbearance and kindness. " The settlers who have rejected the appraisement I had in view years,

NEW

Bath and Angelica newspapers; and in all your dealings with the settlers it is my wish that you treat them with the courtesy and kindness becoming your station and the character this letter published in the

of the agency.

" With great respect,

have unfortunately thus deprived me of the services of Mr. Grattan H. Wheeler in the prosecution of my plan of relief. Mr. Wheeler is

known

" I am, dear

as the proper person

member of our State Senate. to make the appraisement;

had

I

sir,

^^Your humble servant,

be an independent, judicious, and honest farmer in Steuben

to

County, and a respectable

him

YORK.

"Robert Troup.

selected

but, being

now

"Wm. W. M'Cay,

Esq."

deprived of the benefit of his services, I forbear to notice the qualifications that eminently fitted

a

manner

him

to execute the ofiice of appraiser in

satisfactory tc all parties.

" Since the appraisement of the

and

lots

many

is

particularly disagreeable to

in

having the appraisement made.

is

my *'

CHAPTER

by an independent, judicious, my plan of relief which

honest farmer appears to be a feature of

of the settlers, I shall not persist

With

will therefore be pleased

tt)

however,

this exception,

fixed purpose to carry the plan fairly into

You

efi'ect.

repeat your invitation to the set-

make payments on their making

and to inform them that, reasonable payments, you are authorized, in all cases where abatements are proper, to reduce the contract debts according to the equitable and liberal principles of my plan of relief; and also to allow them easy annual installments for the payment of the balances. The on the contract debts

;

applications for reducing the contract debts should claim your partic-

ular attention, and you are requested to favor the applicants with

every equitable and liberal relief their situation

may

your information

may

require,

With respect

qualify you to grant.

and

to applica-

Mr. Fowler has examined,

tions from settlers in the townships which

SOCIETIES.

it

the townships belonging to the estate, to

tlers, in all

XYIII.

I imagine you already have sufficient light to guide your judgment;

— Steuben

County Homoeopathic Medical Society Southern Tier Homoeopathic Medical AssociaHornellsville Academy of Medicine Steuben County Agrition

Steuben County Medical Society







cultural Society.

STEUBEN COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY. This

society

was organized prior

not showing the exact date.

1818, the records

to

It consists of the

major part

of physicians of the county, convened for the purpose of professional and social advancement.

Its first president, as

shown by the minutes, was Dr. Warren Patchin, who was

member

elected in the year 1818.

The

been examined,

James Faulkner, now of

Dansville, Livingston Co.

He

prudence

attended the

recorded meeting sixty-one years

ago.

as to applications from settlers in the townships

and

which have not

it is my desire that you grant them such relief as may recommenl under the limited information within your

reach.

"I have

heard, with

much

have been advised

settlers

gratification, that, notwithstanding the

number

to the contrary, a respectable

them have made payments, and taken new contracts I cannot help cherishing a hope that their prudent

of

abated prices.

at

and upright con-

duct will be followed by the other settlers in the several townships. *'

I shall wait a reasonable time on the settlers

who have

resolved to

suspend payments, with the expectation that, on their calmer tion,

reflec-

held since that date annual and semi-

society has

annual meetings at Bath, Dansville, Corning, Reading, and

Reading were

Hornellsville (Dansville and

ganization in Steuben County).

under some

difficulties,

separated location of

The

of or-

society has labored

chief of which has been the widely-

members.

its

has been useful to

It

giving opportunity for consulting concerning cases and com-

if

me

it

will

imperious duty, however

execution, to take leyal measures to enforce the per-

its

And,

entered into.

my

then become

formance of contracts which the

have

settlers

so willingly

and

fairly

in taking such measures, I do not entertain the

and its consame just and effectual protection principals which they have uniformly afforded to

smallest doubt but that the wholesome laws of the State, stituted authorities, will aff"ord the to the rights of

my

the rights of all other owners of real property in the State. " I have thus explained, and I hope with clearness, the course of policy which, after dispassionate and deep deliberation, I have adopted for the conduct of

my

The course

agency.

ment and approved by my conscience. and firm steps, without turning to the

my intention

to

be the

first

is

sanctioned by

I shall pursue

right or to the

land-agent in the State

it

with steady It is not

left.

to set

my judg-

the danger-

ous example of yielding to an attack on the rights of property; nor

my

men, be

intention to submit to the dictation of it

ever so numerous, that

direct path of duty in the

my

formed

is

management

me

to force

from the

of the great trust committed

many

greater prized, as at

districts

of

its

conceive to be a solemn obli-

members have been

a distance from professional

members were exposed

older

to

many

primitive forests paths.

;

the roads,

illy

me

with

its

confidence.

a solemn obligation which, as a

our State sustains of the laws State,

;

whom,

to represent;

citizen, I

owe

to the

likewise to be

high reputation

and energetic administration the owners of real property in the

a certain extent, on this occasion I

and

it

for its wise, impartial,

to the rights of all to

I conceive

may

be truly said

also to the welfare of every other class of

my

fellow-

whose prosperity and happiness are inseparably connected with the preservation of the rights of property, rights which constitute the main pillar that supports the fabric of our free and excellent citizens,

settlers, I

request you to have

hardships.

The Their

In the heat of the day and in the darkness of the

night, in sunshine

and

men have done an

in storm, these

arduous, important, and often unrequited duty to the inhabitants of the county

done

it

well.

Many

sickness, accident,

and, in

;

and death that

perusal of the following

body.

list

the

main, they have

are the associations of joy

list

It will be seen that to their rewards.

were members prior

to

will

and sorrow,

be recalled by the

of members of this honorable

many have finished their labors The first twenty names oh the 1820.

John D. Higgins,* Bath. Willis F. Clark.*

Warren Patchin,* Patchinsville. Samuel Gorton.* James Faulkner, Dansville. Enos Barnes, died at Geneva. John Warner.* James Warden, died at Mead's Creek. Andrew Kingsbury.*

government.

For the general information of the

brethren.

made, often mere bridle-

gation which, as an agent, I owe to the interests of the worthy family that has honored

in rural

patients were widely scattered in small openings in the

and gone to fulfill these intentions I

This organization has been the

paring modes of practice.

any combination of

charge.

" Faithfully

^'

at date

physicians of the county in a professional and social way,

painful to

to

Dr.

a reasonable time should elapse without receiving

But,

payments from them,

it

is

they will see the good sense of abandoning the ground they have

taken.

is

The

first

eldest living

* Deceased.

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

P.

Kenedy.*

Jacob Chatterton.*

Lyman N.

YORK.

Cook.*

Van Kuren, Hammondsport, admitted

Philo Andrews.*

E.

Walter Wolcott, died at Dundee. Thomas M. Bowen, Dansville died at Dansville.

J. B. Graves, Corning,

;

Noah

87

N. M. Perry, Troupsburgh, admitted 1845. Stephen Hagadorn,* Bath, admitted 1845. John H. Read,* Bath, admitted 1845. Christopher Patterson, Avoca, admitted 1845.

Daniel Gilbert,*

John

NEW

George W.

1845.

admitted 1846.

Pratt, Corning, admitted 1846

;

editor Corning Journal,

Peck, admitted 1847.

Niles,* Prattsburgh.

Monterey, admitted 1847.

Samnel Southworth.* Simeon H. Goss.*

Robert

Joel Luther.*

A. Robinson,* Hornellsville, admitted 1847. James Read,* Tyrone, admitted 1847.

T. Skinner,* admitted 1847; removed.

Robert F. Hoyt, Erwin, admitted 1820 died at Painted Post. Jonathan Lockwood,* Tyrone, admitted 1821. -,

Samuel

Scofield,

Bell,

admitted 1822.

Hibbard,* Reading, admitted 1823. James Cutler,* Painted Post, admitted 1823. George W. Turner,* admitted 1823. Gustavus A. Rogers, Bath, admitted 1823; died at Chicago. Silas B.

Andrew Blanck, admitted 1847

;

removed.

John B. Flemming,* admitted 1847. Samuel Mitchell, Hornellsville, admitted 1849. P. K. Stodard, Prattsburgh, admitted 1849. Joseph

S. Dolson, Bath,

admitted 1849.

Cameron Patchin, Wayland, admitted 1850.

Isaac L. Kidder, admitted 1824; removed.

E. Hall, admitted 1850; removed. A. T. Lyon, Savona, admitted 1851

Milo Hurd,* admitted 1824. Levi S. Goodrich,* Howard, admitted 1824.

May, Corning, admitted 1856. William Gilbert, North Cohocton, admitted 1856

David L. Wicks,* admitted 1824. Daniel H. Orcutt, admitted 1824. M. C. Kellogg, admitted 1826.

Ira P. Smith, Bath, admitted 1865.

Samuel B. Chidsey,* admitted 1823.

Henry

died in 1844.

;

Israel Chissom,* Italy Hill, admitted 1826.

Wixom, admitted

C.

Reuben F.

Harlow,* Bath, admitted 1865. Parkhill, Howard, admitted 1865.

E. S. Carpenter, Cohocton, admitted 1865.

Livermore, admitted 1827.

F. E. Bateman, Cohocton, admitted 1827.

James W. Black,* Bath, admitted

William Hunter,* Jasper, admitted 1828. Samuel Olin,* Hornellsville, admitted 1828.

Andrew Purdy, admitted 1866

;

1866;

now a Methodist

Ilochkiss, admitted 1828.

Sheffield,

;

Nathaniel Sheldon, admitted 1829.

John Mitchell, Addison, admitted 1866.

Manning

D.

Kelly, admitted 1829.

Zenas S. Jackson,* Prattsburgh, admitted 1829. Sampson Stodard, admitted 1829. Winthrop E. Booth, admitted 1829 died at Watkins. ;

Winslow, admitted 1834. Bissell,

Jr.,

1835.

admitted 1835; removed. admitted 1837

admitted 1837

;

F. Cridler, Hornellsville, admitted 1869.

;

died at Syracuse.

;

died at Norwich, Chenango

Daniel Seaver, admitted 1842; removed. ;

;

;

Wickham R. Crocker, Cameron, admitted 1843 died at Cameron. C. W. C. Howard, Avoca, admitted 1843; removed. ;

H. H. Hess,* Cohocton, admitted 1843. Rufus Talmadge, Pulteney, admitted 1843. Anson Andrews,* Reading, admitted 1843. removed. J. C. Morse,* Bath, admitted 1843 ;

Abbey, Reading, admitted 1843.

William Gulick,* Tyrone, admitted 1843. Thomas Shannon, Savona, admitted 1844. Marsena Terry, Savona, admitted 1844; removed. Brownell, Bath, admitted 1844 died at Paducah, Ky. N. M. Harrington, Corning, admitted 1845. L. K. House, admitted 1845.

* Deceased.

Pickett, Canisteo, admitted 1869.

Bennett, Bath, admitted 1869.

Lester B. Healey, Cohocton, admitted 1870.

W.

T. Green, Hornellsville, admitted 1870.

L. Goff, admitted 1870

:

removed.

W. W.

removed.

;

W.

C.

Walter S. Cheney, Prattsburgh, admitted 1842 died at Bath. Addison Niles, Bath, admitted 1842; died at Quincy, 111. P. D. H. Goff, admitted 1842 removed. Festus Demerest, admitted 1842 removed. Andrew D. Voorhees, Prattsburgh, admitted 1843; removed.

S.

Jameson, Hornellsville, admitted 1868.

H. Ward,* Hornellsville, admitted 1868. Joseph Robinson, Hornellsville, admitted 1868. R. P. Brown, Addison, admitted 1869. J. Van Dusen, Painted Post, admitted 1869; removed.

I.

J. S. Jones,

S.

Benjamin

Co.

Newman

C. S. Parkhill, Hornellsville, admitted 1867.

S.

Daniel H. Shipman, admitted 1835

Andrew Baker,

Plains, admitted 1867; removed.

C.

Abijah B. Case, Howard, admitted 1833.

William H.

John Cooper, Cooper's

,1.

A. L. Comstock, admitted 1832. IraL.Babcock, Bath, admitted 1833; removed to Norwalk, Ohio.

Myron A. Smith, admitted

Charles M. Graves,* Corning, admitted 1867.

J. A. Bennett, Prattsburgh, admitted 1868.

;

S.

Chittenden, Addison, admitted 1867; removed.

J.

P. Wylie, Bath, admitted 1867.

David Ward,* admitted 1830. Delevan Stebbins, admitted 1831 removed. Norman Truesdell, admitted 1831. J. R. Wagner, Addison, admitted 1831.

A.

minister.

admitted 1866 removed. H. A. Talmadge, Bradford, admitted 1866. F. M. Lockwood, Bradford, admitted 1866.

W. H.

Levi Fay, admitted 1828.

David

removed.

;

Samuel Ensign, Bath, admitted 1865 removed. Augustus F. Mills, Corning, admitted 1^5. Eli Allison, Wayne, admitted 1865. Dighton L. Case, Howard, admitted 1865. J. Straton

1827.

T. B. Gansevoort,* Bath, admitted 1827. J. L.

died at Savona.

;

E. R. Pulling, Bath, admitted 1826

Isaac

;

Smith, Avoca, admitted 1871. Moses T. Babcock, Hammondsport, admitted 1871. J. H. Trumbull, Hornellsville, admitted 1871. A. H. Cruttenden, Bath, admitted 1872.

A. D. Bobbins, Corning, admitted 1872. D. E. Graves, admitted 1872; removed.

H. R. Ainsworth, Addison, admitted 1872. E. Mullheron, Corning, admitted 1872 removed. ;

Ambrose Kasson, Bath, admitted 1873. S. H. Hall, Hammondsport, admitted 1873 J. B. Smith, Hornby, admitted 1874. Warren Stewart, Savona, admitted 1874.

;

removed.

G. S. Gallagher, Cohocton, admitted 1874.

M. D.

Ellison, Canisteo, admitted 1874.

John R. Selover, Bath, admitted 1874. L. N. Pinney, Painted Post, admitted 1875; removed. George F. Case,* Pulteney, admitted 1875. Frank Oulton, Savona, admitted 1876 ; removed. Mrs. Agnes Seeley, Bath, admitted 1876. E. A. Overhiser, Campbell, admitted 1877.

* Deceased,



:

;

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

88

Milton J. Baker, Hornellsville, admitted 1877.

York.

Dr. O. Groom, of Horseheads, was chair-

man, and Dr. E. M. White secretary of the meeting.

F. E. Cruttenden, Bath, admitted 1878.

Ephraim Winnie, Fremont, admitted

New

Tier,

J, B. Dudley, Painted Post, admitted 1877.

YORK.

Constitution and by-laws were adopted, and the follow-

1878.

ing

Total membership, one hundred and fifty-eight.

the ensuing year

officers elected for

W. L. Secretary and Treasurer, Dr. W. J.

Sayles, M.D., Elmira,

The

following

is

a

list

of presidents, together with the

year for which they were elected

1848. A. Niles.

Bryan, M.D., Ovid, N. Y.

1825. Robert H. Hoyt.

1866. Samuel Mitchell.

John D. Higgins.

The

1851. Stephen Hagadorn.

Henry

W.

1867.

1827. Isaac L. Kidder.

1868. Christopher Patterson.

1869.

1829. J. S. Livermore.

1832. David

1871. G. H.

Ward.

Van Dusen.

1872. J. B. Graves.

1873.

1834. T. E. Gansevoort.

1874. H. R. Ainsworth.

1835. Levi Goodrich.

1875.

H.

1837. Gustavus A. Rogers.

1876.

W. W. Smith. M. F. Babcock.

May.

C.

1842-43. Warren Patchin.

1877.

1844-46. A. B. Case.

1878. Ira P. Smith.

The following-named members of this surgeons di^ring the late war,

viz.

Ira P. Smith, F. Wylie, Bath

:

M.

Dr. Seely

;

Ham-

T. Babcock,

John

Dr.

;

now

is

Elmira;

in a prosperous condition, with hopes

25, 1867.

Vice- President

;

,

W.

;

H.

;

;

Secretary,

;

away, Hornellsville

Corning

;

Wolfe, Bath ;

;

W. S

Purdy,

B. F. Grrant, Bath

P. S. Hollett, Sonora

;

F.

W.

H. Purdy, Bath

D. Saxton, Liberty

H. A. Whitfield, Wayland

;

J. L. Gage,

Hammondsport Corning

;

Officers

burgh

;

W.

;

the

Bryan, Corning

W.

;

J.

;

W. E. HathE. W. Bryan,

;

;

Charles Brown,

Ham-

Hornellsville

;

C. E. Campbell,

E. A. Gorton, Corning

W.

;

S.

Purdy,

Big

"

Corning,

and

Society for

1879.

President,

M. Gamman, Corning A. M. Gamman, Corning

Secretary, A. ;

''

Cohocton,

"

Havana,

"

Elmira,

"

Corning,

"

N. Y. "

Flats,

January 19: President, WilVice-President, N. R. Seeley,

;

Treasurer,

W.

J.

Bryan, M.D.,

Officers for

1876, elected January 18

:

President,

W.

L.

Bath

Secretary

;

and

J.

Bryan, M.D.,

Censors, N. E. Seeley, M.D., Elmira; B. F. Grant,

;

E.

;

W. Bryan, M.D.,

M. Cadmus, M.D., Waverly, N. Y.

;

Ovid, N. Y.

;

James

William Gulick, M.D.,

Watkins, N. Y.

1876 were

Officers of

Athens, Pa.

N. Y.

heads,

At

re-elected on

;

January 15

January 16, 1877. :

President,

W.

Secretary smd Treasurer, A. P. Hollett, M.D.,

;

N. Y.

;

W.

Censors, E.

;

N. Y.

Bryan, M.D.,

Corning, ;

N.

K

0. Groom, M.D., Horse-

;

A. M. Gamman, M.D., Corning, N. Y.

the meeting on Jan. 15, 1878, Drs. E.

Gamman

W. Bryan

were appointed a committee to revise

At

the constitution and by-laws. ing,

S.

Vice-President, J. L. Corbin, M.D.,

William Gulick, M.D., Watkins, N. Y.

;

and A. M.

the meeting

heM

in Corn-

N. Y., on April 16, 1878, they reported, and the

fol-

lowing act of incorporation was executed and adopted in

E.

W. " AN ACT TO INCORPORATE

Censors, B.

;

;

W.

E. A.

" The Southern Tier Homoeopathic Medical Association of the State of New York. '^

This

States,

SOUTHERN TIER HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OP THE STATE OF NEW YORK. meeting was called and held

W.

Treasurer,

the place of the constitution

Gorton, Corning.

A

Athens, Pa.

"

T. Read,

Vice-President, B. F. Williamson, Pratts-

;

F. Grant, Bath

L. Corbin,

"

Havana, N. Y.

F. D. Purdy, Corning.

of

Bryan,

Binghamton,

;

mondsport; A. M. Gamman, Corning; B. F. Williamson, Prattsburgh

W.

"

Seeley, M.D., Elmira,



Bath,

E. D. Leonard,

Saxton,

Purdy, M.D., Corning

Bryan, Corning.

Regular Members,

"

W. D.

Officers for 1878, elected

Bath

S. Hollett, Sonora.

James M. Cadmus, Sonora

Benedict, Corning

S.

Wolfe,

Censors, B. F. Grant,

De

Charter Memhers.—K.

De

President, A.

Purdy, Addison

S.

James M. Cadmus, Sonora H. S. Benedict, Corning; P. Addison

'^

Elmira,

Corning.

Corning

THE STEUBEN COUNTY HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL SOCIETY Bath

Horseheads, N. Y.

" " "

Secretary

M.D., Bath

May

:

*'

^^

J.

association

Purdy, M.D., Corning; Vice-President, B. F. Grant, M.D.,

of continued and increasing usefulness.

was organized

W.

Watkins, "

L. L. Brown,

liam Gulick, M.D., Watkins

S.

Jameson, Hornellsville. This society

B. F. Grant,

"

Officers for 1875, elected

army

society were

Bath

Brownell,

"

John Burting,

mondsport; Dr. Henry C. May, Corning; Dr. P. K. Stodard, Prattsburgh

Corning,

N. R. Seeley,

1.

Drs. Joseph S. Dolson,

Dr.

;

"

L. Purdy,

W.

E.

Sayles, M.D., Elmira, N. Y.

A. P. Hollett,

Thomas Shannon.

1833. Gustavus A. Rogers.

members of the

first

Allison.

1870. A. B. Case.

Ebenezer B. Pulling.

18.30-31.

Bli^

Mitchell.

D.,

James M. Cadmus, M.D.,

;

William Gulick, " Orlando Groom, "

1826. Gustavus A. Rogers.

;

M.

William Gulick, M.D., Watkins, N. Y.

;

following were the

1856. A. B. Case.

John

B. F. Grant, M.D., Bath, N. Y.

;

Waverly, N. Y.

1850. Ira L. Babcock.

Vice-President, Dr.

;

Censors, Drs. N. R. Seeley,

;

Elmira, N. Y.

1849.

John D. Higgins.

;

1847. R. H. Hoyt.

1865. Joseph S. Dolson.

1828.

N. Y.

Bryan, Corning, N. Y.

Warren Patchin. 1819. Enos Barnes. 1820. John Warren. 1821. Noah Niles. 1822. James Warden. 182.3. Enos Barnes. 1824. Warren Patchin. 1818.

Purdy, Corning, N. Y.

Henry

President,

:

at the office of Dr.

E. D.

Leonard, in the city of Elmira, N. Y., on Jan. 20, 1874, for the purpose of organizing a medical society for Southern

is

to certify, that we, the

undersigned, citizens of the United

New

York, residing in the counties of

and of the State of

Steuben, Chemung, Schuyler, Seneca, Tioga, Broome, Yates, and Alle-

gany, in accordance with the requirements of an act of the Legislature of the State of

New

York, entitled

*

An

act for the incorporation of

benevolent, charitable, scientific, and missionary societies,' passed,

April 12, 1848, have associated ourselves together for the purpose of

known by the name of the ' SouthHomoeopathic Medical Association of the State of New

organizing a medical society to be ern Tier

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, York,' for the purpose of scientific investigation, the advancement of

Henry

our knowledge in the practice of medicine and surgery, to

W.

due examination,

certificates of

its

when they

year, in the village of Corning, Steuben Co., N. Y.,

T. L, Brown, M.D., Binghamton, N. Y.

and treasurer, who, together with five members of the association, who shall be elected at the same time, shall constitute a Board of Directors, and they shall continue in office one year or until their successors are elected and the following-named persons shall constitute the board of directors for the first year, or until the annual meeting in January, 1879: William S.

W. D. Saxton, M.D., Cohocton, N. Y. A. P. Hollett, M.D., Havana, N. Y. E. D. Leonard, M.D., Elmira, N, Y.

j

I.

W.

shall at its next meeting, on the third as a majority shall think

best to regulate the holding of meetings, admission of

may

the transaction of such other business as

members, and

all

New York

amendments thereto. "Dated Corning, N. Y., April

hereinafter referred to,

"

S.

Purdy,

Edward W. Bryan, Wm. E. a. Gorton,

" A. P. Hollett,

"B.F.Williamson, " A. M. Gamaian.-'

Nei:w York,

teuben. County of Ste

"On

N. Y.

Corning, N. Y.

W. Parkhurst, M.D., Elmira, N. Y.

Alex. V. Stobbs, M.D., Mecklenburgh, N. Y.

" N. R. Seeley,

State of

and

16, 1878.

*^

Flats,

Frank Tompkins, M.D., Penn Yan, N. Y. James M. Cadmus, M.D., Waverly, N. Y. L.

" W.

'^

W. Bryan, M.D.,

E.

be necessary to carry

out the objects of the association in accordance with the requirements of the statutes of the State of

Bryan, M.D. (dead), Corning, N. Y.

John Burling, M.D. (removed). Corning, N. Y. H. Hughes, M.D. (dead), Savona, N. Y. P. S. Hollett, M.D. (dead), Sonora, N. Y. I. B. Wescott, M.D. (West), Horseheads, N. Y. Mrs. H. E. Brown, M.D. (Brooklyn), Corning, N. Y. Charles Brown, M.D. (removed), Hammondsport, N. Y.

retary and Treasurer, N. R. Seeley, B. F. Grant, William Gulick, E.

Tuesday of July, 1878^ adopt such by-laws

J.

W. Read, M.D., Big

T.

L. Corbin, Vice-President; A. P. Hollett, Sec-

W. Bryan, 0. P. Barden. " And the said association

Sayles, M.D., Elmira, N. Y.

B. F. Grant, M.D., Bath, N. Y.

shall

elect a president, vice-president, secretary,

Purdy, President;

89

N. R. Seeley, M.D., Elmira, N. Y. I. L. Corbin, M.D., Athens, Pa.

and surgery. The association shall annual meeting on the third Tuesday of January of each

qualification to practice medicine

hold

YORK.

S. Purdy, M.D., Corning, N. Y. William Gulick, M.D., Watkins, N. Y. Orlando Groom, M.D., Horseheads, N. Y.

facilitate

the instruction of medical' students in the treatment of disease, and also for the purpose of granting, after

NEW

[l.s.]

C. E. Sayler, M.D., Elmira, N. Y.

[l.s.]

H.

C. Coon, M.D., Alfred, N. Y.

[l^s.]

B. F. Williamson, M.D., Prattsburgh, N. Y.

[l.s.]

A. M.

[l.s.]

0. S. Barden, M.D., Tioga, Pa.

[l.s.]

E.

[l.s.]

Wm.

Gamman, M.D.,

W. Rogers, M.D.,

Crystal Springs, N. Y.

E. A. Gorton, M.D., Corning, N. Y.

W.

F.

Corning, N. Y.

Adriance, M.D., Watkins, N. Y.

) r

88 *

J

HORNELLSVILLE ACADEMY OF MEDICINE.

the 16th day of April, a.d. 1878, before me, a Justice of the

Peace in and for said county, personally came W.

S.

Purdy, N. R.

Edward W. Bryan, Wm. E. A. Gorton, A. P. Hollett, B. F. Williamson, and A. M. Gamman, known to me to be the same persons described in and who executed the within instrument, and acknowlSeeley,

This association was organized Dec. 17, 1873, and holds its meetings on the first Wednesday evening in each month.

The

ofiicers

first

were as follows

:

Dr. J.

W.

Robinson,

Pre&ident; Dr. Samuel Mitchell, Vice-President ;

edged that they executed the same.

"George Hitchcock, ^'Justice

of

Gr.

Dr. C.

Hubbard, Secretary ; Dr. J. H. Trumbull, Treasurer.

the Peace.

membership. " I do hereby consent to and approve of the within " Dated April 16, 1878.

"James

L.

certificate.

Angle,

"Justice Siqyreme Court, " Seventh District.

" Filed April 22, 1878."

D. F. Cridler, S. E. Shattuck, C. G. Hubbard, C. S. Parkhill, S. F. Curry, J. H. Trumbull, J. W. Robinson, M. J. Baker, E. Beckwith, Hornellsville; D. L. Case, R. F. Parkhill,

Howard; R.

P.

Brown, John Mitchell, Addison ; C. E. Annabel, Cameron J. W. Burchard, Fremont; E. Winnie, Haskinville; Z. Deldine, Wm. H. Hagadorn, Almond; M. D. Ellison, Canisteo J. B. Graves, ;

;

"State of New York, Steuben County Clerk's Office Seal of

f

[

^

Steuben County.

J

"

[

88.

Arkport;

Lucius A. Waldo, Clerk of said County, and also Clerk of the County and Supreme I,

Courts therein. Courts of Record, having a

common

seal,

do hereby

have compared the foregoing copy of an article of incorporation with the original of the same, now remaining on file in my office, and that it is a correct transcript therefrom, and of the certify that I

whole of said original. scribed

ville

;

J.

W. W.

Officers

and affixed my official 22d day of April, 1878.

seal,

the seal of said courts,

" Thos. R. Rutherford, Dp.

is

members of the

association

have died, and

have been adopted.

proper in giving a history of this society to refer

Bryan, M.D., of Corning, N. Y. H. Hughes, M.D., of Savona, Steuben Co., N. Y.

from time

have

also

to time.

members of the

The meetings of the

the agricultural organizations which had

when

this

was established. first

one of which there are any authentic records

the society organized in 1841, although

many of the

remember the many county fairs, so called, which were held at Bath in the earlier times, under the auspices of Dugald Cameron, of Bath, Capt. Joel Pratt and Judge Robert Porter, of Prattsburgh, and

J.

tion

Treasurer.

older inhabitants can well

Sayles, M.D., of Elmira, N. Y.

following have been elected

The left is

P. S. Hollett, M.D., of Sonora, Steuben Co., N. Y.

The

Hubbard, Secretary ; J.

existed in this county prior to the year 1853, society

suitable resolutions of regret

W.

C. G.

Samuel

THE STEUBEN COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. It

corporation.

Henry

D. F. Cridler, President;

Clerk.''

By-laws were adopted in accordance with the act of in-

following



Mitchell, Vice-President ;

incidentally to

The

K. Richardson, Greenwood; L. V. Rathbun, RexCrandall, Andover.

for 1878.

H. Trumbull,

Alfred; J. E. Walker,

Li testimony whereof, I have hereunto sub-

my name

at Bath, this

Mark Sheppard,

Corning; H. P. Sanders,

associa-

association

been largely attended by physicians not members.

many

other leading

men of

the county.

In the early spripg of 1841, a meeting of the citizens of tihe couqty was called at t^he qourtrhouse, in Bath, to conr

;

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

90

YORE.

Early in 1854, the new board of

sider the practicability of organizing a county agricultural

officers elected

which meeting Ziba A. Leland was chairman, and Henry Brother and Robert B. Yan Valkenburgh were secretaries, and Z. A. Leland, 0. F. Marshal, Jacob Yan

into an agreement with the heirs of the late Dr.

R. Wood, Theron Loomis and Henry Brother a committee to draft a constitution and by-laws, and to report at an adjourned meeting to be held on the

Street,

society, of

Yalkenburgh,

years

duly elected

ofl&cers

dent, Otto F. Marshal; Yice-Presidents,

:

R. Wood, and Erastus Skinner; Secretaries, Wm. S. Hubbell and Ziba A. Leland Treasurer, Henry Brother.

month of October, close the members met

this year, in the

was held

Bath, and immediately after

its

society seems to

of nine hundred and sixty-six dollars and ninety-five cents

at

in

1854

so that,

;

by

skillful

and honest management, the

to

the members of the society began to

know

were

hundred and seventy

that the society then gave only one dollars in

some

gratuitous regard, in

and Henry Brother, Treasurer. For the year 1844, Israel R. Wood was chosen President David Smith, John J. Poppino, and Daniel N. Ben-

were made to secure voluntary do-

have been the

last

;

and yet the hard and

work done by Hon. David McMaster, in this 1863 and 1864, made the task all the easier for followed

him

in the effort, in

1867.

and accommodations was brought up at the annual meeting, and after some discussion laid upon the table.

Cook and Lay Noble, SecretaJohn Richardson, Treasurer. The fair of this year to

and during the years 1863

In 1866 the matter of new buildings and larger grounds

Wm.

;

who

those

;

seems

efforts

inferior,

improvements, but without success

Jr., Secretaries;

;

and too

that the buildings

feel

nations sufficient to warrant the society in attempting the

For the year 1843, Lazarus Hammond was re-elected President; Wm. Baker, Israel R. Wood, and Otto F. Marshal Yice-Presidents; James Shannon and Robert Campbell,

ries

insufficient

and 1864 several

premiums.

nett, Yice-Presidents

a contract for the purchase of said prem-

ises,

Theron Loomis and Ziba A. Leland; and Treasurer, Henry In comparison with the amount of premiums Brother. interest

make

two or three years,

and in 1862 they received a deed for the same, payimr therefor the sum of twelve hundred dollars. Almost immediately upon securing title to these lands,

Hammond; Yice-Presidents, 0. F. Wood, and Lyman Balcom; Secretaries,

President, Lazarus

may

sum

at

enabled to

it

in-

fifty-

eight dollars and six cents, they reached the then large

ensuing year

the society,

a term of

1853 were only two hundred and

society's officers were, in the course of

now awarded by

for

have had a prosperous career from

the court-house and elected the following officers for the

Marshal, Israel R.

on Washington

said lands of said heirs

lease

ceipts for the year

;

fair

— fronting

the time these grounds were taken, for while the total re-

Jr.,

Israel

A

Bath,

and the same year said grounds were properly

;

The

Presi-

John Cooper,

to

the portion of the society's

and the only exhibition building erected thereon that the society had until 1867, and on these grounds the society has since held all its annual festivals and fairs.

following.

were adopted, and the following



Ten Eyck

closed

the subsequent meeting a constitution and by-laws

At

who then owned

present fair-grounds in

Israel

June

1st day of

Gansevoort,

entered

At

one held by this society, and

the annual meeting of 1867 the matter was more

generally discussed, and

Warren W. Willson, Jonathan

immediately after the close of the fair, which was upon the river-flats in the village of Bath, southwest of the

Robie, Chas. N. Ackerson, Azariah C. Brundage, and Chas.

Pulteney Land-Office, the society disbanded; and from that time Steuben County was without a county agricultural

these improvements

H. Robie were appointed ;

a committee to solicit funds for

and they entered upon the work with

a will, and in a short time secured donations to the

amount

organization of

of three thousand dollars, from the citizens of Bath and

the present society was effected, under the provisions of

some of the other towns in the county. This movement, which resulted in the enlargement and improvement of the grounds, was directed by Robert B.

association until the year 1853,

when the

chapter 169 of laws of 1841.

On

the 18th day of

to Philo P. Hubbell,

May, 1853, upon

application

made

then clerk of the county, said clerk

gave public notice, as the statute required, that on Wednescourtday, June 22, 1853, a meeting would be held at the

house in Bath for the purpose of organizing a county agriThis meeting was largely attended by cultural society. the leading farmers of the county,— Hon. Goldsmith Denniston presiding and Robert B.

Yan Yalkenburgh

acting as

— and

an organization then completed, and the following officers elected President, Goldsmith Denniston Yice-Presidents, A. F. Marshall, J. B. Mitchell, A. B. secretary,

:

Dickinson,

;

Lyman Balcom, Redmond

S. Davis,

and John

George Edwards; Corresponding and Recording SecSecretary, R. B. Yan Yalkenburgh

Yan Wie;

Treasurer,

;

retary,

The

George first

S. Ellas.

annual

fair

of the society was held at Bath, on

the 12th and 13th of October, 1853, in the open field, on the larm of Robert Campbell, at the junction of Morris

and Steuben

Streets,

temporary str^ctures having been

erected for the purposes of the exhibition.

Wilkes,

and is

who had

just been elected the society's president

to his energy, sagacity,

and untiring labors the society

indebted more than to the efforts of any other

what was then done. A special law was procured

to

lature, enabling the society to

mortgage

man

for

be passed by the Legisits

real estate, for

the purpose of raising funds to buy additional lands in the the rear of the old grounds

;

and with the money thus

obtained, together with the voluntary donations received,

new

buildings and fences were erected at a cost of $4877.14,

lands purchased costing the society $3125.47, and a

new

driving-park laid out and finished at a cost of $1593.07. supervision and general direction of

The

provements was given

to

Ackerson, and Warren

W.

these im-

Robert B. Wilkes, Charles N. Willson by the executive com-

and the work well done.

mittee,

At

all

the end of the year 1867

the society

owed about

$4000, $2639 of which was secured by mortgage on the society's lands, and running for twenty years.

;

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

NEW

YORK.

91

Howell, 1861

In 1872 new grand and judges' stands were erected upon and at the annual the driving-park at a cost of $1085.18

1854-60 1862-63

;

Ambrose

;

Geo. S. Haverling, 1861-65

meeting of this year the constitution of the society was amended, so that an honorary life-membership could be

1866-74

;

Edwin

;

members of the

conferred upon such old

society,

in their support of the society, for the election of three such

honorary life-members at

than sixty years,

less

H. Robie, 1869 son,

In

1873, $1165.04: planting

grounds, cattle-,

and swine-pens and

sheep-,

permanent improvements

grading the

;

and

try-hall, constructed in

at

fairs

It has a large

among the

notice.

Among

ficial

its

upon which there

lage of Bath,

$200,

very valuable.

is

tasteful,

The

is

1863^ to incorporate "The

only an indebtedness of Gen. Winfield Scott. Gen. Geo. B. McClellan.

convenient,

following are the officers serving the society for the

Frank Aulls,

J.

Noble; Vice-Presidents,

M. Hopkins, Clarence Myotte, Thomas

Thomas Conover, Willard C. Morse, B. V. Lewis, and John L. Smith Secretary, Reuben E. Robie TreasGeneral Superintendent, Charles N. urer, Edwin C. Cook Hallett,

;

;

;

Ackerson.

The

following are the persons

of president,

positions

secretary,

who have occupied treasurer,

the

and general

superintendent of the society, and the years for which they

were elected Presidents.

— Goldsmith Denniston, 1853,

com, 1856; Lyman Balcom,

1857, 'Q^

;

'61

Uri Bal-

;

Daniel Gray, 1859

;

Grattan H. Wheeler, 1861;

John W. Taggart, 1860; Samuel Balcom, 1865; Robert B. Wilkes, 1867-68; Frank J. Marshal, 1869; Charles H. Robie, 1870-71; Azariah C. Brundage, Samuel E. Haskin, 1872-73 ;

1874-75

;

1877-78;

Nathaniel B. Stanton, 1876 J.

Secretaries.

;

Martin

W.

Noble,

M. Hopkins, 1879.

—Robert B. Yan Yalkenburgh, 1853

;

Geo.

M. Alexis H.

David McMaster, 1854-55

T.

1853-61 McCay, 1854-56 Robert M. Lyon, 1857-65 Cruttenden, 1862-64; Reuben E. Robie, 1866-78. 7^rm5?^?-

9

1,036

14 2

1 ...

...

2 8

...

1,488

33

316 246 259 348 212 198 186 342 253 247 174 126 149 187 405

4

33 2

36 1 1 6

3 ...

2 3

3 1

7

• ••

i

••

2

1 8 1 1

18 15 7 8

33 19 12 7 7

4 12 54

i

2 6

121

6 2 5

8

30 5

885

3,237

27

166 38 155 23 45 55 128 212 49 382 67 104 20

11

4

47

139 35 25 13 17 18 11 80 7 9

6 11

2

51

10

2 9 3 12 1

19 13 18 13 30 2

n

...

9

6

10

5

•«

2

29

4 16 81 18 11 4 30 17 13 16

9 9

7

15 75

1

3

10 14 4 134 11 11 5

11

22 10



1 1

14 6 3

4 ... ...

5

7

4

4 20

4

10

16 12 10

9 9 2 I

4 11

484 20

13 17

7 8 5

7

1



7

574 34

6

2 1 6

1

14

9

9

2 7

58 20 9 32 27 29

8

44 28 16

13

23

8 5 2 8 3

74

16

30

7

22 8

21

21 21 55 371

46 60 233 23 18 41 54 264 141 36 42 11 65 22 269

972 37 19 111 10 7

28 42 28 62 102 25 29 14 8

12

14 153 30 4 7

39 20 10 13 17 10 35 24 15 21 9

17

6,711

230 63 679 21 46 179 125 79 347 1,126

171 204 33 135 47 46

315 1824 11 8 4:i

3

4 12 5 8 30 5 5 5 2

1,403

69

138 34 80 140 55

7

130 46 66 87 189 496 19 240 16 41

4 14 19

I

I

lo 74

1,602 5

3,635

174

178

14 69

22 457 19 36 131 70 19 31 709 28 151

2 2

2 7

21 19 20 50 107 24 24

16 5

29 254 211 105 11 14

8 1

16 11 164 16 17 11

i

1

124

289 6

831 102 12 48 52 14 92 22 55 51 81 5

"5

1

44 29

1

23

5 2 5

7 3

4

22 17 4

65 465

10 12 3 9 1 12

5

4 2 7 7

4 22

4 7

3

5 7 3

6 6 3 3 23 6 12 2

21

i

2 19

4

1

13 3 1

46 3 1 1

3 2

31 3 1

"2

15 7 12 5 2 2 11 2

6

1 1 1

20

1

206

2

28

30

9 2 3

161 3

15

1

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

100

TABLE Showing hy Toivna

the

Civil Divisions.

Steuben County Addison Avoca Bath

Inhabited Houses.

Persons.

15,147

Bi-adford

991

Cameron

1,609 2,089 2,948 1,634 3,161 6,796 1,855 2,023 1,122 1,320

215 325 423

Canisteo Caton

,

,

Cohocton Corning

,

Bansvllle

Erwln Fremont Greenwood

.

...

Hartsville

Persons to a Family.

II.— POPULATION.

1,389

581 357 652 1,328

377 417 262 278 192 285

1,317

Persons to an Inhabited House.

Civil Divisions.

4.59 4.61 4.24 4.65 4.48 4.89 4.94 4.79 4.38 4.64 4.64 4.76 4.81 4.28 4.66 4.74 4.42

514 393

963

Hornby

YORK.

number of Persons, of Families, and of Inhabited Houses, and the average number of Persons to an Inhabited House, in Steuben County, from the State Census of 1875.

r3,838 2,593 1,776 6,704

Campbell

I

1

Persons.

Hornellsville

Howard

8,858 2,131 1,661 1,481 2,518 1,444 1,389 1,388 2,315 1,478 2,117 2,623

,

Jasper Llndley Prattsburgh..

,

Pulteney

Bathbone Thurston Troupsburgh Tuscaroia.

Families.

.. .,

Urbana. Way land

Wayne

a Family, and Persons

Houses

5.30 4.63 4.68 5.14 4.54 4.27 4.87 4.77 4.83 4.91 4.59 5.60 4.33

449

4.69 4.54 4.48 4.89 4.30 4.02 4.57 4.58 4.77 4.66 4.59 4.53 4.14 5.33 4.24 4.21

Sittings,

Membership, and

1,672

1,317 1,387 1,977

Persons to an Inhabited House.

Persons to a Family.

Inhabited

469 371 303 580 359 304 303 485 317 461 579 206 247 327 469

853

West Union., Wheeler Woodhull

to

460 355 288 555 338 285 291 479 3(11

461 468 197 239 321

5.51 4.32 4.40

TABLE IIL— CHURCHES. Showing the Different Religions Denominations in Steuben County, with the Number of Church Organizations, Edifices, Value of Church Property, from the State Census for 1875.

^

o s->

a O

1

o ^ &fi

i^ (V

o .a

o fcJD

>i

«»-(

00

Organizations.

S o

Sittings.

^3

^

03 !7 se

;-i

Ph

> African Methodist Episcopal Baptist Christian Connection Evangelical Association Evangelical Lutheran Free-Will Baptist Methodist Episcopal Methodist Protestant Presbyterian Pi'otestant Episcopal lioman Catholic

1

1

80

25

1600

26 4

26 4

8,400

2,217

,250

191 30

114,000 8,500 2,000 9,000 7,200 234,275

1 5

3

44

1

1

250

5 3 44

1,060

750

260 147

14,780

3,358

1

1

200

60

16

16

5,150 2,140 5,025

1,734 681 4,595

8

8

11

11

1

Second Adventist Seventh-Day Baptist, Union United Methodist United Presbyterian.

4

^ 2,000

3 3

950 200 900 800

34 100 273 70 50 80 90

136

43,885

13,995

1867,200

1

250 400 1,200

3

\ 3

1

1

Universalist

4

Wesleyan Methodist

3

137

1

1

3,000 14,000 5,500 1,175 8,000 4,700

,550

179,200 138,250 133,600

Total

TABLE IV.— AGRICULTURAL. Showing by Toicns

the

Area of Farm, Lands; Area or Land

the

in

Value of Farms, of Farm Buildings, of Live Stock, and of Implements; the Area of Crops, and the Amount of Agricultural Productions. Present Cash Value.

Farms.

Barley.

Grass Lands.

Unimproved. I.E

Civil Divfsions. > o u

i

Ma

33

ft

C

s

ia

eg

•73

o o

^

Bradford

Cameron Campbell Canisteo

Caton Cohocton Corning Dansville

Erwin Fremont Gieenwood Hartsville

Hornb}' Hornellsville..

Howard Jasper...

Lir)dley I'rattsburgh...

Pulteney

Eathbone Thurston Troupsburgh.. Tuscaroia

Urbana

,

Wayland

Wayne West Union Wheeler Woodhull

,

•73

^

O O

H

o

00 1—

p. I03

o

c

® p O

03

o

05 1

Steuben County.. Addison Avoca Bath

S o s

73

j

1,2 c

f*->

S-i

^

o

A crn8. J ores. A ores. Dollars. Dollars. Dollars. Dollars. Dollars. A ores. A eres. A cres. Tons. Bushels. 503,014 203,895 110,667 28,002,402 3,649,322 4.208,066 1,185,772 2,939,718 5,243 165,697 166,354 125,615 127,631 2,753 6,146 6,045 439,782 54,650 65,002 14,433 36,262 29 1,732 2,181 1,742 1,678 3,616 15,859 1,903 883,700 135,100 139,710 43,015 103,785 85 6.466 4,328 2,947 3,025 38.620 12,708 5,684 2,616,270 338,775 333,757 111,912 226,131 12;475 11,825 242 8,137 8,121 3,776 507 9,962 629,328 81,690 79,815 19,768 32,632 273 3,432 2,904 1,868 2,199 6,896 15,029 3,825 631,645 102,825 132,890 35,100 78,843 4,340 6,115 4,624 4,231 5,512 11,950 7,171 585,525 94,595 105,665 43,199 57,633 274 3,813 2,876 3,759 3,265 812 13,552 14,666 918,850 103,190 120,915 29,017 74,303 40 2,999 6,573 3,740 3,304 3,888 14,530 4,087 829,942 103,576 137,987 37,395 95,882 61 3,767 5,143 4,266 5,145 7,268 21,641 6,368 1,532,663 201,710 200,284 72,328 153,390 693 8,883 5,420 4,659 4,114 5,636 9,653 7,628 774,960 114,890 104,897 39,013 93,167 15 3,921 2,677 2,746 2,651 5,940 21,623 4,228 1,320,390 159,625 141,385 43,900 106,345 209 7,782 4,980 4,413 4,208 7,679 6,473 6,552 689,200 64,100 65,165 16,094 71960 89 1,967 1,930 1,721 1,356 4,939 12,816 843 546,465 74,986 93,202 30,208 68,706 335 4,426 3,480 2,763 2,901 2,303 13,427 7,072 473.625 52,560 110,465 16,024 66,896 29 3,137 6,966 3,549 3,950 6,745 11,284 3,681 527,512 53,550 95,917 29,206 69,646 110 2,610 5,083 3,462 3,338 4,932 15,239 3,701 694,520 97,975 121,788 30,403 93,618 179 3,829 5,184 4,878 5,661 14,186 5,883 2.126 1,278,875 96,330 123,485 36,025 90,770 134 4,263 5,648 3,904 3,740 24,196 9,486 1,867 1,071,406 139,606 182,516 49,688 130,421 309 8,425 6,930 5,799 5,724 8,515 18,769 2,369 764,710 107,590 147,465 40,065 94,215 153 4,335 7,259 6,447 6,403 6,851 10,480 415,715 57,489 63,150 17,858 30,018 56 1,656 2,390 2,484 1,917 27,410 7,578 650 1,576,455 209,610 225,825 62,449 170,937 10,566 237 6,926 5,768 5,533 16,213 3,480 417 1,142,625 166,780 132,472 40,867 127,181 636 6,171 3,553 2,811 3,156 10.854 4,876 6,034 601,525 95,160 104,421 25,680 55,540 71 3,163 4,610 2,718 2,591 3,437 9,895 8,268 513,816 75 970 94,146 26,647 55,777 122 3,264 2,680 2,717 2,557 158 25,171, 11,977 918,825 86,060 211,246 49,510 121,132 44 5,792 11,177 7,886 7,986 8,535 12,208 1,624 599,130 81 ,601 116,140 29,505 68,539 31 3,343 4,841 3,725 3,592 18,915 5,662 1,047 1,406,619 158,790 144,437 31,902 165,276 36 5,140 5,688 3,870 3,936 16,743 6,874 366 838,980 114,115 134,446 62,876 94,994 251 6,067 3,332 4,001 3,785 10,533 2,321 217 717,544 91,670 87,803 23,961 69,432 216 4,807 3,359 1,542 1,708 14,854 2,100 8,361 449,414 40,220 103,247 22,396 68,404 98 3,223 3,696 5,634 3,611 17,855 6,705 2,401 890,446 109,915 123,807 31,658 86,938 179 6,6331 6,103 3,584 3,899 20,657 6,729 6,055 823,940 84,830 164,525 34,782 111,956 17 5,31 8 8,960 6,168 6,2:^

Acres. 7,327 15

Acres. 10,458

239

60 441

1,339

1,573

354 115 112 100 47 472 66 486

459 145 197 169

27 62 6

33 19 30 196 79

69 625 109 932 51 124 2

49 38 131 2;»2

73

'892

1,193

437

725 96 247 160 30 895 401 654 21 396 101

65 167 111 7

803 244 421 23 253 107

BusJids. 134,301

307 4,399 21,191 4,593 3,035 1,906 2,116 1,133 9,711 1,606 11,491

602 853 100 757 385 765 3,607 1,426

18,249 7,667 1,598 3,452 2,691

102 11,727 5,912 5,768

510 4,^99 2,143

111

'

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

YORK.

101

TABLE v.— AGRICULTURAL. Farm Lands;

Shoicing hy Toious the Area of

Buckwheat.

1874.

Steuben County... Addison Avoca Bath

Acres.' A ores, 122,301 19,350 |

'

255

i

4()5

I

332 656

'

1,784

1,105

I

Bradford

786 965 381 481 907 742 543 666 229 681 621 331 866 320

Cameron Campbell Canisteo Catoii

Cohocton Corning Dansville

Erwin Fremont Greenwood Hartsville

Hornby Hornellsville..,

Howard... Jasper Lindley

]

,323

972 177

636 1,173 12

328 58 548 742 863 243 711 10 408 874 346 1,222 1,037

194

Prattsbnrgh..,.

1,168

1,260

Pnlteney llathbone Thurston Tronpsburgh... Tuscarora

530

84 771 768 929 44

Uibana Wayland...

,

Wayne West Union Wheeler

,

WoodhuU ..?.....!

1874.

1875.

651

529 1,035

583 821 502 555 473 694

700 748 425 753

1,'J65

1,365

5



the

Indian Corn.

Produced.

Area.

Civil Divisions.

Value of Farms, of Farm Buildings, of Live Stock and of Implements Amount of Agricultural Productions. (Continued.)

the

and

Crops,

Bushels 445,907 5,052 9,339 37,222 14,449 25,113 6,718 9,753 16,825 13,021 10,340 12,825 4,438 11,216 14,275 7,055 16,211 4,984 24,804 20,666 3,350 22.599 8^826 12,884 10,696 23,520 12,841 15,978 9,842 10,238 9,534 13,405 27,888

Produced.

Area.

1874.

1875.

1874.

Acres

Acres.

Bushels. 468.691 7,530 20,650 61,286 14,415 10,-50 15,405 11,992 9,476 22,618 22,734 20,370 16,102 7,231 2,835 3,544 6,083 15,979 14,390 2,284 13,091 18,565 20,114 9,028 11,289 10,243 12,161 16,024 19,160 25,965 2,363 13.259 12,255

12,798 15,524

232 537

309 590

1.759

2,081

'410

456 267 478 338 453 776 663 741 490 298

219 409 320 324 631 576 595 431 233 75 110 176 402 455 93 283 487 569 262 331 336 381 456 496 400 100 365 345

77

162 236 562 571 106 319 607 659 351 469 322 486 551 544 548 77 520 417

Area.

1874.

Showing hy Towns

the

Produced.

Area Sown.

1874.

1873.

1875.

Produced,

1875.

1874.

Bush.

A cres

Acres

71,173 11,473 47 29 377 5,601 1,021 6,439 337 2,321

7,946 16

386

195 132 146 165 800 96

10,146

1,038

248

28 321 94 126 106 306 814 145 69

30 395 304 238 10,368

1,451

164 317 910 912 2,231

49 65 4,226 263 438

246 732 216 148 106 129 135 451 108 509 90 193 70 110 83 198 665 147 33 501 302 73 103 301 184 657

1,041

389 102

1,063

91

686 171

299 210 842 982 173 153 634 206

2,199 16,594 1,170 116 2,302 441

!

661 162

113 278 226

1874.

1873.

Produced.

1874.

1874.

Bushels Acres Acres Bushels. 106,210 17,695 22,177 236,691 448 202 367 2,496 610 988 3,195 7,877 8,665 2,198 2,792 30,481 483 2,320 672 4,454 331 2,263 362 4,214 623 1,313 762 8,706 708 903 1,678 10,530 177 301 1,656 2,036 777 8,463 1,067 10,965 991 475 616 8,801 1,909 8,974 1,865 28,004 266 366 642 7,246 280 216 2,306 2,742 962 153 260 2,289 252 1,346 302 3,431 191 264 1,142 2,187 736 2,673 1,063 10,561 455 7,701 429 4,971 263 329 1,559 3,009 679 357 428 6,477 695 9,886 904 9,760 945 3,989 1,014 10,318 597 696 1,086 6,424 808 427 572 4,722 480 609 3,827 7,443 234 1,931 438 2,743 648 833 6,126 9,392 612 703 9,978 9,021 690 612 1,233 6,776 37 361 67 1,797 503 781 4,628 5,645 291 332 2,541 4,611

YL— AGRICULTURAL.



Apple Orchards.

Area of

Area Sown.

Area of Farm Lands ; the Value of Farms, of Farm Buildings, of Live Stock, and of Implements and the Amount of Ag)-icultural Productions. (Continued.) Potatoes.

the

Winter Wheat.

Produced,

Area.

1874.

1874.

Acres. Acres Bushels. Acres. Acres. 64,964 73,621 1,633,018 6,189 7,995 613 773 4 1 17,505 2,398 492 513 2,176 52,716 4,872 6,581 105,011 516 727 1,433 426 1,447 23,848 290 2,116 3 29 2,163 60,016 1,200 1,160 29,415 31 60 1,358 9 1,763 40,676 24 51 1,728 2,011 44,137 37 3,450 3,882 88,952 929 1,099 1,265 49 1,361 35,981 49 941 2,594 3,147 75,715 797 604 639 38 18,642 22 2,252 168 2,891 50,322 170 1,879 1,769 47,411 12 6 1,182 31 1,433 28 33,797 1,911 2,092 107 44,223 109 1,674 1,962 47,586 89 49 4,745 223 4,040 93,115 214 2,011 2,439 54,337 11 7 454 542 13,487 19 3 4,752 5,110 115,892 650 349 1,909 2,358 102 45,769 50 1,216 1,511 31,303 52 71 1,269 1,458 31,413 103 106 2,713 2,956 88 75,429 54 1,330 1,562 34,184 20 50 2,180 2,302 45,810 209 429 2,405 2,975 69,359 1,129 1,300 1,623 1,595 31,517 121 214 1,906 31 2,030 55,416 7 2,903 3,040 236 340 66,367 2,096 33 2,376 53,667 67

TABLE

Spring Wheat.

Rye.

Oats.

;

Grapes.

;

the

Area of

Horses on Farms. June 1, 1875.

Maple-Sugar.

Crops,

Poultry.

Honey col-

Civil Divisions.

Area.

Produced.

Fruit

pnTrees.

1874.

Steuben County Addison Avoca Bath

Acre>!

Acres

7,817

9,912 127

121 297 413 94 193 133 1(8 278 895 168 647

Bradford

Cameron Caujpbell Canisteo

Caton Cohocton Corning Dansville ErAvin

Greenwood....

57 307 178

Hartsville

120

Hornby..

2(t2

Hornellsville.

221 353 179 81 646

Fremont

Howard Jasper Lindley Prattsbnrgh. Pnlteney

.

144

West Union.... Wheeler

168 141 233 170 137 375 88 214 277

WoodhuU

25(»

Rittlibone

Thurston Tronpsburgh. Tuscarora

,

IJrbaiia

Wayland

Wayne

1875.

401 408 80 195 114 135 275 1,649

192 1,054

43 461 193 142 209 253 362 177 74 862 138 14.S

130 219 162 149 658 93 208 444 257

1874.

44,678 22,569 9,885 70,727

i

14,1131

19,510 16,341 28,893 23,518 14,826 45,987 8,854 33,912 36,330 38,270

duced. 1874.

Bushels. Number 1,003,836 481,979 17,233 7,363 39,883 17,168 51,184 37,942 9,494 7,656 18,485 13,029 15,136 11,900 16,401 9,230 31,066 23,613 119,117 32,713 21,172 13,987 89,424 16,036 ^

z

3J

s

fee

a.

3

W),c«

s

o

03

O

o

"-A

o 3

O Steuben County,

No

No.

5,3:36

8,100

132 106 652 68 96 253 143 236 247 123 188 109 157 126 101 159 118 319 183

139 180 634 118 156 257 209 279

Addison..

Avoca Bath Bradford

Cameron Campbell Canisteo

Caton Cohocton Corning Dansville

Erwin Fremont Greenwood Hartsville

Hornby Hornellsville..

Howard Jasper Lindley Prattsburgh. Pulteney Ilathbone Thurston Tronpsburgh.. Tuscarora

.

Urbana

Way land Wayne West

Union....

Wiieeler

WoodhuU

61

164 108 199 174 218 317 72 157 92 120 107 131

1874.

No.

No.

No.

10,123 5,609 5,804 150 169 63 91 254 48

706 148 195 236 283 334 357 186 298 128 205 375 244 309 250 509 439 234 341 191 345 224 892 355 19+ 327

314 168 279 104 118 298 204 250 166 332 370 174 239 208 250 207 622 318 148 335 116 387 169 352

12i!

422 233 615

317 120 85 185 204 146 218 85 128 109 132 216 109 252 56 176 240 76 261 75 141 141 411

302 112 347 41 278 84 391

471 107 45 406 105 102 183 56 218 273 80 106 142 223 284 91 165

No.

1875.

1874.

No.

34,882 445 1,310 2,740 425 1,134 800 1,143 1,015 1,142 699 957 328 885 1,356 1,943 994 839 2,224

No.

No.

6,214

7,371

761 680

785 901

1,244

"378

533

806

10 345

356

ioi

230

18 415 302 649

163 512 809

35,695

463 1,320 2,719

423

1

1,165

1

953 1,230

708 953 259 766 1,521 1,136 1,030

858

104

"53

1,482

1,259

476

667

1,676

2,101 1,812

89

553

557

256 149 143

1,180

1,166

703

181

718

739 887 736

660 168 210 106 82 246 98 248

2,527 1,144

2,683 1,174

767

809

1,005

1,000

1874.

1875.

1874.

1874.

1874.

1875.

1874.

1875.

1874.

1874.

Lhs. Gah. No. No. Lhs. Lbs. No. 54,598 157,898 84,897 80,617 404,282 393,020 14,348 10,000 215 199 955 943 224 400 2,948 2,303 13,205 10,818 495 17,610 12^820 10,056 9,763 48,960 52,758 1.407 2,354 1,897 10,736 8,465 308 111,590 1,359 1,601 6,704 8,468 329 700 150 96,347 915 1,023 4,575 3,905 348 50 45 98,786 1,727 1,695 7,347 7,291 389 110 124,736 1,879 1,045 7,694 4,085 393 139,385 900 3,405 4,170 3,361 20,667 16,347 705 79,173 15,450 605 539 2,467 2,215 331 88,730 7,600 4,794 5,027 24,338 25,745 592 45,650 21,500 502 378 2,211 1,778 131 660 57,995 1,498 1,608 6,836 6,980 330 120,415 984 1,333 3,943 5,279 245 80,355 70 13,700 896 851 4,366 4,317 259 831 130,997 2,550 1,622 1,5221 6,638 6,453 371 70,695 66,780 1,906 1,734 11,051) 8,563 264 119,851 15,980 1,082 2.304 2,358 10,858 11,053 761 202,098 400 2,371 2,120 11,059 9,375 398 73,710 328 420 1,240 1,651 203 956 174,129 630 9,547 10,284 48,418 53,147 681 84,655 974 100 3,970 1,174 20,456 6,266 483 104,930 1,022 1,038 383 4,565 4,909 93,110 4,000 998 1,088 5,185 319 4,989 360,640 720 1,816 2,020 8,094 9,233 638 153,^65 160 1,190 1,592 1,525 404 6,708 5,889 83,845 30 1,600 7,790 8,132 36,920 38,447 576 103,685 100 1,704 1,874 8,882 718 9,711 65,458 112 2,908 2,848 14,736 13,947 368 101,120 6,160 1,391 1,475 5,236 307 5,564 90,880 2,771 6,945 6,928 35,199 34,793 474 233,509 200 1,529 1,706 6,491 514 7,149

Lhs.

Lbs. 3,558,394 52,738 116,685 331,378 67,566 88,996 78,537 99,875 95,634 178,018 77,276 150,225 33,448

3,696,345 62,435 92,005 262,493 43,173

7l»,158

65,927 70,474 92,999 63,808 183,006 112,753 45,558 177,704 116,072 94,114 76,713 172,804

i

841

450

434

1,212

1,409

863

829

1,734

1,805

4:}

60

!

222 114

78

228 108 54

293 129 265

l(t8,715

128,055 183,720 86,555 77,597 109,101 143,188

TABLE VIIL— AGRICULTURAL. Sh owing

the

Number and

Size of

Farms

in Steuben County at the Census of 1875, by Towns.

r Number

of Farms.

Number of Farms.

o c

.

.

Civil Divisions.

Civil Divisions.

S-l

Si a>

C D

Bradford

Cameron Campbell

5

234 204 300 359 220 244

Canisteo

Caton Cohocton Corning Dansville

Erwin Fremont Greenwood Hartsville

Hornby

108

161 182 615 159 255

,

85 172 181 175 219

315 18

318 14

ie

47

35

7

7 3 8 1

3 6 9 3

11

10

20 17

14

1 2 3 2 1

3 c a

33

1

3

a 3

O

s5

7900

a;

c

c

S3

o Steuben County Addison Avoca Bath

(V 1-1

c n

22 3 2





(M

10

25

20 66 15 37 41 27 74 55

46 30 7

18 6 9

30

2807 53 63 198 66 99 94 73 132 128 75 73 14 72 53 52 79

»

c 3

C

c

C a

i

}-i

ft

s ^^

3245 46 98

Howard

...

61

...

81 97

1 ...

1

70 132

,

Jasper Lindley Prattsburgh., Pnlteney

,

Rathbone Thnrston Tronpsburgh. Tnscarora

Urbana

67

137 56 82 118 107 92

U Hornellsville

i

Wayland

2

Wayne

...

West

...

Wlieeier

Union...

Woodhull

172 358 282 178 389 266 199 193 388 246 259 305 163 214 228 295

1

C 3 13

T3

a

...

253 106

"cS

27 ...

'

0/

o o

,—

;-i

©

ui

'S

73 CO

3!

1—

0)

-a

o

1080

.

d lO



(N r->

T3

1

1 1

|3

3

TJ

T!

r^

C

c3

c

CO

1-1

(M

2 1

6

10 19 3 3

10 25 26 7

8 5 8

35 20 5

4

1

6

9 11 28 25 13 2 7 3

16 28 8

...

15 3 4

•.

2

a

cS

c3

10

9 2 6 9 1

rs

TS

f^

C8

2

...

"^

3 'a

.

29 36 30 30 53 46 18 27 55 39 32 75 20 17

30 37

^ 51 142 117 67 109 89 82 86 172 87 55 110 55 76 68 117

1—

10

4

86 159 122 49 147 82 84 75 146 82 112 80 51 113 118 136

1 1

4 1

2 2 1

2 1 ...

3 i

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

NEW

YORK.

103

TABLE IX.— WOOL. Showing hy Towns, for

the years 1855, 1864, 1865, 1874,

and 1875,

the

Number of Sheep Shorn,

Weight of

the Total

the Clip,

and

the

Average

Weight of the Fleeces.

Number

Average Weight or Fleece.

Total Clip.

of Fleeces.

Civil Divisions.

1 1

1864.

1855.

1865.

1876.

1874.

1864. 1865.

1874.

1865.

1864.

1855.

1874.

1

Steubrn County Addison Avoca Bath

101,484 1,863 3,067

226,695

233,823

84,897

80,617

483

326

215

199

8,713 21,628 5,920 5,541 5,506 6,742 3,810 10,126 2,109 16,573 1,740

10,089 21,349 6,058 5,625 6,614 6,786 4,166 11,057 2,023 6,686 1,348 7,328 5,901 5,405 4,841 6,863 15,427 8,281 2,119 19,179 10,006 2,781 2,868 8,113 3,951 16,763 6,434 5,617 3,197 13,390 6,642

2,948 10,056 2,354 1,369 1,023 1,727 1,879 4,170

2,303 9,763 1,897 1,601

11,7(!2

Bradford

2,178 1,616 1,219 1,888 1,514 4,044

Cameron Campbell Canisteo

Caton Cohocton Corning

527

Dansville

6,219

862

Erwin Fremont

2,129 1,390 2,449 1,993 1,977 5,346 3,666

Greenwood.... Hartsville

Hornby Hornellsville,

Howard Jasper Lindley Prattsburgh.. Pulteney

6,977 5,699

5,202 3,778 6,145 12,489 7,332 1,862 17,670 8,602 2,422 2,621 6,381 4,135 14,820 5,894 6,210 2,704 12,680 5,291

819 8,877 4,981

Bathbone

*'

Thurston Troupsbnrgh. Tuscarora

1,098 3,243

Urbana Waybind

io,*3i'8

Wayne

1,461 3,289

West Union.. Wheeler Woodhull

9,887 1,401

581

CHAPTER

915 1,695 1,045 3,361

639

606 4,794

5,027

502

378

1,498

1,608 1,333

984 896

861 1,522 1,734 2,304 2,120

1,622 1,906 2,368 2,371

328

420

9,547 3,970 1,022 1,088 1,816 1,692 7,790 1,704 2,908 1,391 6,945 1,629

10,284 1,174 1,038

XXII.

998 2,020 1,526 8,132 1,874 2,848 1,475 6,928 1,706

336,333 6,468 9,310 38,126 7,808 5,232 3.483 5,689 4,870 14,252 1,516 20,410 2,991 8,648 4,698 9,776 7,519 6,243 17,203 13,370 2,700 30,383 16,750 *

4,405 10,870 29,352 5,987 10,749 1,372 31,876 4,477

men on

896,066 2,082 38,448 84,968 24,293 20,077 13,063 22,227 13,418 40,297 7,508 74,140 7,256 28,099 20,074 20,787 13,180 26,330 48,790 28,078 4,307 74,088 36,616 8,139 8,768 22,754 14,088 57.278 25,590 22,898 8,035 61,487 19,302

Steuben in the

War

of 1812

Three companies of

militia

in

the

were

war of 1812.

were ordered out for three

6,708

36,920 8,882 14,736 6,236 36,199 6,491

943 10,818 52,758 8,465 8,468 3,9(5 7,291 4,085 16,347 2,215 25,745 1,778 6,980 5,279 4,317 6,463 11,050 11,053 9,375 1,661 53,147 6,266 4,909 4,989 9,233 6,889 38,447 9,711 13,947 5,564 34,793 7,149

The

He

appeared again on the

the

chiefly to the

town of

Wayne

James Sanford

companies, which belonged ;

town of Urbana, and mustered about fifty men, was commanded by Capt. Abraham Brundage. William White, first

lieutenant,

and Stephen Garner

These were organized with two

ensign.

5.07 5.15 4.47 4.77

4.46 4.21 4.74 5.21 5.07 3.76 6.07 4.25

batteries on the

rifle

companies

to seek a soldiers.

Lieut. Gillet and Ensign fire

of the British batteries

battle.

"

The command devolved upon

whether he would prove a brave of

all,

he

'

Gillet.

officer,

It

was doubted

but, to the surprise

rushed into the fight as if he had just found his

and

element,' whirled his sword, raised his powerful voice

cheered on his men.

After receiving a dangerous and

wound he continued

from Allegany County, and the battalion thus formed was

almost mortal

commanded by Maj. Asa Gaylord, of Urbana. Maj. Gaylord died upon the lines, and the command devolved upon

hat and brandishing his sword,

till

to fight,

he

finally

swinging his sank and

fell

from pain and exhaustion. "

Col. Dobbins.

men

with most of the men, crossed the river, and went into the

the other, which belonged

to the

of Pulteney, was his

4.60 4.66 3.78

the course of the forenoon, and complaining of illness re-

Kennedy remained under

rifle

4.87 4.56 4.93 4.47 4.25 4.09 4.96 4.08 6.08 4.41 4.66 4.01 4.87 4.09 4.49

4.88 4.74 4.70 6.41 4.46 5.29 4.27 4.30 3.91 4.86 4.11 5.12 4.70 4.34 3.96 5.07 4.24 6.37 4.80 4.42 3.93 6.17 5.34 4.73 5.00 4.67 3.86 4.73 5.18 4.90 3.77 5.02 4.19

of battle, over the river, in

field

independent companies of riflemen, and the third a com-

of the

4.22 4.26 3.36 3.35 3.57 3.41 3.86 4.34 4.40 3.19 4.85 3.65

4.76 4.44 4 48

3.95 2.45 3.86 3.97 3.86 3.85 2.25 2.16 2.06 4.18 3.62 6.77 4.28 3.82 3.47 4.08 3.97 3.91 3.86 3.80 3.92 4.22 3.88 3.73 3.70 3.14 3.43 4.97 4.07 4.13 3.25 4.62 3.56

exposed position, and disappeared with some

side.

commanded one

2.84 4.13 3.27 2.36 3.22 3.20

2..33

captain advised his

turned to the American

Capt.

4.01 3.35

3.96 4.31 4.41 3.93 4.10 3.62 2.37 3.30 3.52 3.98 3.56 4.47 4.17 4.03 3.52 4.00 3.49 4.12 3.91 3.83

upon by the British

—two were

months' service at the beginning of the war,

pany drafted from the regiment.

3.31 3.47 3.04 3.26 3.58 3.24 2.86 2.96 3.22 3.52 2.88 3.28 3.47 4.06 3.31 3.99 3.77 3.16 3.22 3.76 3.30 3.42 3.36

393,020

.

fired

rocks overhead.

— In the Mexican War.

active

38,978 84,727 23,384 21,266 12,416 14,061 8,663 46,269 7,315 44,678 6,773 28,010 20,469 22,038 19,221 26,819 69,585 31,440 8,305 80,928 38,852 10,387 10,585 26,492 13,535 78,366 26,208 23,213 10,400 60,587 19,734

404,282 955 13,205 48,900 10,736 6,704 4,575 7,347 7,694 20,667 2,467 24,338 2,211 6,836 3,943 4,366 6,638 8,663 10,858 11,069 1,240 48,448 20,456 4,665 6,185 8,094

opposite side, the grape-shot rattling furiously against the

less

Steuben County was

798

the shore of the Niagara, at the foot of a precipi-

tious bank,

MILITARY HISTORY.

922,892

Ensign Kennedy then took command, hastily forming

company was composed of every eighth man of the regiment, and was commanded by Capt. Jonas Samuel D. Wells, of Cohocton, Cleland, of Cohocton. and John Gillet were lieutenants, and John Kennedy

the scattering squad which had gathered on that side of

ensign.

among the who stood

The

drafted

" These companies reached the frontiers just at the time

Van Rensselaer, with an army of militia, was about to make an attack upon the works and forces of the British at Queenstown Heights. Capt. Cleland, with many

when

Col.

of his men, volunteered to cross the boundary.

.

.

.

The

the river into a company. fronted by the Indians,

At one time

whom

While exchanging an irregular trees,

they drove into a wood. fire

with

Kennedy, looking over a

thorough the head and mortally wounded.

battle,

these

enemies

Benjamin Welles, a young man from Bath,

beside

engagement of

they were con-

this

Kennedy and

fence,

was shot

At the

final

random, but often gallantly-fought his

men were

in

the line formed to

meet the British reinforcements which were just coming

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

104

Gen. Wadsworth, upon

up.

Yan

after the fall of

whom

the

Rensselaer, went through their lines

in a rough-and-ready style, with hat

ing to the inexperienced

brow of the

and coat

explain-

off,

To avoid

his plan.

officers

men were

of the British, the

fire

command devolved

the

ordered to retire below the

aim of

NEW

YORK.

at a wolf-hunt ]^

rifles

was a universal "

soldiers there

but to the dismay of the flash in the pan," not a

gun

The sergeant knew in an instant what was the cause of the failure. The muskets had been stacked out went

ofi*.

of doors during the night, and a

shower which

little

fell

upon which they were ranged and up which the enemy would march. When the British ap-

towards morning had thoroughly soaked the powder in them.

peared upon the top of the

cared

hill

The

from below.

the militia were to

hill,

slaughter would be great;

fire

they were

then to charge bayonets, and in the confusion might be suc-

though the decisiveness of

cessful,

a

against veterans by militia,

hill

never been under first

fire,

who

might well have been doubted.

destructive

mand by

hill

a fire

As

was delivered which was very

killed

was

fire

the militia sufi*ered considerable

;

back overpowered to the

them were made

Of

prisoners.

where most of

river,

the Steuben County men,

and three wounded."

Ensign Kennedy,

in this

At

resolute officer.

of Fort Erie he ordered his

men

to lie flat

the

upon the

Nothing could be done

disaster.

There were but two ball-screws and the

tain took one

A

The

before."

being an

officer it

would not do"

for

him

to lie

down. ''

drafted from the Steuben County militia, and sent to the

Niagara

frontier,

under the command of Capts. James

Reed, of Urbana, and Jonathan Rowley, of Dansville, ful

and

Capt.

reliable officers.

Reed

faith-

refused to go as a

and

Again the

I

A

heads.

company, John Short and John E. Mulholland were tenants,

and George Knouse and Timothy Goodrich

Of

ensigns.

the ground, and went through

Anthony Swarthout were and 0. Cook ensigns. months.

lieutenants,

All of the officers and most of the

teered to cross into Canada, and

men

sake

!"

he

them

"

were stationed at Fort

the terrible ceremonies

all

militia.

said.

to

The muzzles ;

man between British was now

dropped a

this time

smoke burst

The

him, when a bullet struck the unforthe eyes and killed him.

the

returned with

The

fire

of

Reinforcements

effect.

and the engagement became hot.

An

on horseback was very active in forming the enemy's

riding to and fro, giving loud orders, and

self extremely useful.

officer fell

by his men.

"

Mark

man.

his right-hand

The

sergeant had

and was handing the musket

tunate

field,

little

forth from them, and

dead and wounded.

fell

came upon the

was pale

over their heads," and instructing

fire

aim lower.

seven militia

He

man.

;

below the former range

to

full

Be quick, sergeant be quick, for God's They could hear the British officer saying

men, " you

to his

line,

volun-

bullets whistled over their

to fire, the sergeant stood beside the last

w^ere

These companies served about four

row of muzzles looked the

The moistened cartridges were time almost drawn, and while the enemy were about

this

officer

and Jabez Hopkins

British loaded their

of biting cartridges, drawing ramrods, and priming in

lieu-

Capt. Reed's company, George Teeples and

bullets whistled

third time the British brought their muskets to

to the private beside

Capt. Rowley's

The

The

and again two-score

commencement of the war as ready to march at the head of a company as a volunteer whenever he should be called upon. Both the companies were principally levied

Of

them

again they heard the alarming com-

militia in the face;

just finished his ill-timed job,

from the northern part of the county.

by the

as described

fired.

frightful

drafted officer, but reported himself to the general of the division at the

position for untried militia

over the heads of the militia.

and excited.

In the second year of the war two companies were

worked towards the

British brought their muskets with disagree-

able precision into position,

guns again.

cap-

and beoinnins:

sergeant, " looked strangely, as he had never seen

by

''

The

company.

in the

The men,

can hardly be imagined.

heads under a close and heavy

he thought

the charges were drawn.

till

ser«;eant the other,

more uncomfortable

view of the uneasy

from the British, because

the blame of the

fell

their labors in the middle of the rank,

ends.

muskets were

to it that the

and upon him afterwards

for,

ground, but he himself paced back and forwards by their fire

have seen

his business to

mand, j^re

and other engagements, gained

the reputation of a brave and sortie

the British

part of the line caused disorder; the

fell

two were

The

but a misapprehension of the word of com-

;

returned by the enemy

and

up

before that day had

part of the plan succeeded famously.

appeared above the

loss,

a charge of bayonets

was

It

making him-

that fellow," said the sergeant

Both

same

fired at the

from his horse, and was carried

They afterwards

and that one of his

legs

instant.

off the field

learned that he was a colonel,

was broken

George."

Judge McMaster, from whose vei^ interesting ^'

little

STEUBEN IN THE MEXICAN WAR.

work,

History of the Settlement of Steuben County," the facts

for this account

have been drawn,

says, "

We

have not suc-

ceeded in learning anything about the draft for the

last

year

of the war, if any was made, nor concerning the militia of this county

The County

who were engaged

following incident militia

is

at Fort Erie."

related

who was engaged

by one of the Steuben in one of the battles

the Canada line as sergeant of a company

was ordered

into action,

:

his

and before long found

fronted by a rank of British red-coats.

When

on

company itself con-

within a

During the Mexican war,

early in the

summer of 1846,

President Polk decided on sending a force of volunteers

by sea

to the Pacific coast.

then of

New York

powered

to raise a

known

be

for service

as the

City,

Col.

Jonathan D. Stevenson,

now of San

Francisco, was

regiment in the State of

7th Regiment of

on the Pacific coast and

New

New York to colonize

The regiment was to contain one hundred men each, rank and file. quest there.

em-

York, to

Volunteers,

our new con-

ten companies of

Steuben County was designated as the place for raising

distance of ten rods from their enemies, the militia halted

and were ordered

to fire.

Muskets came instantly

to the

shoulder, and were pointed at the British with the deadly

They had been familiar with wolf-hunts and Allegany. ••'"

in the

woods of Steuben

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, William E. Shannon, of Bath, at once

one company.

unteered to raise the

A

company.

time Shannon had enlisted the

son, of Bath,

vol-

105

Joseph Evans, of Newark, N.

M.

Elijah

J.,

Smith, of San Francisco, Calvin Hitt, of Minnesota, are the

In a very brief space of full

YORK.

now known

only ones from the vicinity of Bath that are

complement, and the

company was organized by the election of William E. Shannon, captain Henry Magee, first lieutenant, and Palmer V.

to

be living.

;

Hulett, second lieutenant

Van

J. C.

;

Loren,

sergeant,

first

H. D. Alden, second

sergeant. Nelson Boch, third,

E. Crandall, fourth

James Williams,

;

first

and J.

CHAPTER XXIIL

corporal, J. S.

Vincent, second corporal, S. H. Lamb, third, and Z. R.

MILITARY HISTORY— (Continued).

Lovelace fourth corporal. Privates.

— William H. Skinn, David

Peckham, Charles

Van

J.

Harmon, Henry

Steuben in the

Van Kuren, Bascom

Charles Whitehead,

Emery

The

Groit,

late

civil

suppressing the Rebellion.

Walter B. Mapes, Edgar M. Barum, Philander Paine, Cor-

acting

James Perrine, Martin S. Goit, Robert B. Given, David P. Graves, Matha Sharp, Elijah M. Smith, John C. Emerson, Erastus F.

the 23d

South was precipitated by an attack upon Fort Sumter on

On Monday

Sunday, April 14, 1861.

following,

Under this call Steuben County, promptly with Chemung, sent forth in June, 1861,

New York

Infantry, which was the

first

District.

Mapes, Denin D. Mur-

Early in the same summer, Capt. John Slocum, of Bath, raised

jamin Magee, Morris Coon, Finley M. Pawling, Henry Hopkins, Calvin Hitt, William M. Gibbs, James M. Vail, Sid

Battery

tered into the United States Service at P]lmira.

Abrun, Lyman Smith, D. H. Carpenter, John B. Lock,

New York

Van Aukee, Wm.

S.

Hodgman, H.

S. Biles,

J.

Brown,

W.

Magee, Lawrence Ackley, D.

On

New

warm

''

congratulations of

I,"

company

Bath,

left

citizens, for

its

York, where the regiment was

its arrival it

pany

Thompson.

the 1st day of August, 1846, the

with the of

J.

the city

to rendezvous.

of the 1st

New York

On

and sent

to the front in

Thus

with D, G,

and E, on the 26th of September, 1846, embarked on board the good ship Susan Drew, and sailed for their destination.

istence,

After a prosperous voyage of some six months, with brief

service.

Rio and Valparaiso, on the 20th of March, 1847, the ship entered the Golden Horn, and cast anchor in the

cipal

of that year.

Company

I,

On

last

the 1st day of April,

with D, E, and G, were taken on

Company

from

it

will

the 141st Infantry,

the 161st Infantry, sent

this county,

mustered from July,

be seen that from the beginning to the end

Steuben was constantly sending her sons into the

Most of them made

glorious records in the prin-

battles of the war, participated in the

great conflict with the Rebellion,

when

its

power was

broken in front of Richmond, in 1865, and rejoiced

in the surrender of

United States ship Lexington, and landed at Monterey on the 29th of the same month, and remained

some ten months.

partially

campaigns and

finally

board the

there

;

;

of the memorable four years' struggle for the national ex-

calls at

beautiful bay of San Francisco.

of 1861.

fall

1863, to August, 1864; the 188th and 189th Infantry,

The regiment I,

The

forward in October, 1862; the 179th Infantry, which was

mustered in October, 1864.

Company

the

mustered during the same month

were speedily supplied with new camp.

1861.

5,

Volunteers (Steuben Rangers) was organ-

made up

in

The 34th

Infantry, containing two companies from Steu-

While on the way and before sailing quite a number of the volunteers grew homesick and deserted, but their places was a number of weeks

Light Artillery, and mus-

regiment, mustered in August, 1862

was accepted and mustered into service as Comand went into camp on Governor's Island.

recruits.

as

The 50th Engineers, mustered Sept. 18, 1861, was partly made up of Steuben County men, and also the 104th New York Infantry, mustered during the winter of 1861-62. Then came the 107th New York Infantry, chiefly a Steuben

ized

Lamon Reno, John

Sloan,

E

New York

86th

Baker, J. Syke Baldwin, Caleb Hendy, Ira Johnson, Nathaniel Simonson, George

and commanded a company which was organized

ben County, was mustered at Elmira, June

Wm.

G. E. McAllister,

regiment

mustered into the service from the Seventh Congressional

phy, James A. Mapes, Horace Mapes, Joseph Craple, Ben-

Truesdale, Philander

Abraham

Lincoln called for seventy-five thousand volunteers to aid in

nelius Rosenkrantz, Elijah Witherell,

John E. Warren

New

war which had been threatened by the

Anthony D. Jones, Ezra Whitehead, Cyrus Wallace, Calvin Bennett, Henry M. Osgood, A. J. Ward, David W. Bunco, Hiram Chase, Josiah Wood, Peter Gary, Jesse S. Cooper, Oliver J. Coit,

W.

1st

to



Stickley,

Morris, Isaac Whittam, George

—Summary of Regiments sent

Field— The 23d New York Infantry— Battery E of the York Light Artillery 34th Regiment.

Loren, Henry Magee, Joseph Evans, Francis S. Schoc-

key. Comfort Bennett, Jeremiah

of the Rebellion

the

James Aldrich, William H.

S. Phillips,

War

Lee and Johnston, and the

final

triumph

of the Union cause.

We

I was then ordered

give in several following chapters the histories of the

regiments and parts of regiments, so far as

San Diego, and took passage on a coasting vessel for San Pedro, and from that place marched overland to the quaint to

able to obtain data,

and

at the

we have been

end of the respective town

histories the roster or military record of each town.

old town.

The company remained

THE TWENTY-THIRD NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.

there until mustered out of ser-

on the 25th day of September, 1848, just two years from its departure from New York City. Capt. Shannon

organized at Elmira, and on the 6th day of July, 1861,

died of cholera in Sacramento City, Nov. 3, 1850.

was mustered into the United States

The 23d Regiment New York

vice,

Hulett and Magee are now living in California. the privates of that

14

company

still

survive,

—John

Lieuts.

A

few of

C.

Emer-

first I

State Volunteers was

service.

This was the

regiment from the Twenty -seventh Congressional Dis-

trict.

;;

The regiment was Hoffman

officered as follows

master,

Archibald N. Devoe

Sergeant-Major,

;

master-Sergeant,

Hiram Smith

Quarter-

;

uated, and

— Captain,

tenant,

Theodore Schlick

Cornelius F. Mowers] Second Lieutenant, George

regiment remained in this pleasant camp were passed in

;

CoiDpavy

— Captain,

M. Loydon

Marshall

K. Bradley

;

C.



Wm.

Second Lieutenant,

Captain,

Samuel Barstow

;

First Lieu-

Second Lieutenant,

;

— —

;

;

Baldwin.

— Captain,

Melville C.

W.

William

Wilkinson

Dingledey

First

;

Second Lieutenant,

;

Cone

;

M. — Clark Lieutenant, A. D. Waters Second Lieutenant, B. B. xVndrews. Company — James D. Chapman Lieu-

Company

Captain,

li.

C.

;

First

Captain,

A. 0. Durland

;

;

First

Second Lieutenant, Samuel

W.

Cass.

Company K.



Captain,

Nathaniel

B.

Fowler

;

First

Second Lieutenant, Bodney

;

Steele.

homes

Army

of the Potomac.

March, orders were given for

length, on the 10th of

As

23d shared stole

the

army moved forward the

in the G;eneral cha2;rin in finding; that the formi-

enemy had

folded their tents and silently

away, leaving their pursuers in possession of the banks

of earthworks, over which protruded the ominous-looking

Quaker guns" of Manassas.

On

March the command of the briirade was from Gen. Wadsworth to Col. Bogers, of the

the 14th of

transferred 21st.

March 15 the regiment

started for Alexandria, for the

The roads

purpose of shipping on transports.

were

in

at this

Elmira, and upon arriving in

left

Wash-

ington encamped on Meridian Hill, two miles north of the

July 17

it

was reviewed by President Lincoln and

Secretary Seward, and a fine stand of colors presented by

The

the patriotic ladies of Elmira.

beautiful banner

was

presented by General A. S. Diven, and received by Colonel

Hoffman, who responded for the beautiful

time

an almost impassable condition, in consequence of

mud

gling one day in the

the regiment returned to

Here they remained two

camp.

days,

its

in a brief address,

testimonial of

fidence.

in this

camp

the

23d proceeded

to Fairfax,

and on to Bristoe.

distinctly heard the

camp of the 23d could be

ominous booming of cannon from the

disastrous battle-field of Bull

Bun.

During the day ru-

floating into the city that the

victorious, but night

Union arms were

brought the disheartening truth that

army was

falling

Bun had

been fought and

Heights, from which point

The enemy evacuated

the city on the 1st of May, and on

the 7th instant. Gen. Patrick, having been appointed mili-

This regiment raised for the

patrol.

banner

in this rebel

town.

July 23 the regiment crossed the Potomac into Virginia

23d

first

as

guard and

time the Union

The 23d remained here about

two weeks, when a general advance was made, and series of fatiguing

reaching Elk

On

marches

Bun June

the 27th of

it

after a

returned to Fredericksburg,

9.

June the regiment encamped

at "

Camp

Bufus King," on the Belle Plain road, about three miles from the Bappahannock Biver.

lost.

Manassas,

the city was subsequently bombarded.

back upon Washington, and

that the terrible battle of Bull

to

here

April 19 finds the regiment bivouacked

tary governor of the city, detailed the

the 31st of July, from the

From

bri2;ade.

and from thence

foot of Fredericksburg

at the

They

which time

until April 4, during

Gen. Patrick took command of the

thanking them

kindness and con-

their

remained

old

and moving one

mile farther on, encamped at Bailey's Cross-Boads.

The regiment

mors came

became a

the heavy rains that had recently fallen, and after strug-

Lieutenant, Florence Sullivan

the great

of the

the nation breathed freer.

;

I.

it

an advance, the grand, well-disciplined legion moved, and

First Lieuten-

Second Lieutenant, John Prentiss.

;

move

At

"

— Captain, Frank B. Doty

G.

was the sentence

!"

patience ceased to be a virtue, and the people clamored

dable host of the

Samuel N. Benedict.

Company

till

;

;

Lieutenant,

Potomac

stereotyped head-line for the press, read in Northern

for a

Company D. Captain. Luzern Todd First Lieutenant, Newton T. Colby Second Lieutenant, William H. Jones. Company E. Captain, George H. Powers First Lieutenant, John H. Pierce Second Lieutenant, Hugh J. F.

" All quiet on the

camp-life.

the ceaseless monotony of

to break

flashed along the wires day after day, until

Moses M. Van Benschoten

Company

Nothing occurred

First

;

Charles 0. Durland.

On

reviews, and picket.

drills,

Cole.

city.

to be stove-pipe

three months, December, January, and February, that the

Lieutenant, Lemuel

tenant,

be formidable

to

First Lieu-

Comjmmj B.

ant, Ira

what from a distance seemed

cannon proved

Terrill

E. Biles.

tenant,

camp-life.

mounted on wheels. On Upton's Hill, at a locality named by the men of the 23d Upton's Dale, the regiment went into winter quarters. The

Quarter-

Fife-Major, Julius C. Smead.

Companij A,

monotony of

to

September 28 a general advance of the army was ordered, and it moved to Upton's Hill only to find the place evac-

Churcbill

Drum-Major, Miles

;

relieve the

Chaplain, Ezra F.

;

YORK.

September 28, nothing of any importance happening

C.

Major,

;

W. Hajt;

Myron H. Mandeville; Surgeon, Seymour

Assistant Surgeon, William A. Madill

Crane

Henry

Nirom M. Crane

Lieutenant-Colonel,

;

Colonel,

:

William M. Gregg; Adjutant, William

W.

NEW

HISTOEY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

106

This camp was located on

August

owned by the wealthy planter King in the earlier days of the Old Dominion. While encamped on this beautiful

they moved to Arlington Heights, and on the 7th estab-

spot two interesting ceremonies took place, that of the pre-

and encamped

Fort Bunyon.

at

lished a picket line

from the road

On at

the 5th of

Hunter's Chapel to the

house of a Mr. Pearl, near Ball's Cross-Boads.

camp

at Arlington, the

35th

New York

James

S.

in

23d was brigaded with the 21st and

Volunteers, under

Wadsworth.

While

command

of General

The regiment remained here

until

lands

Hoffman by the non-commiscommand, and one to Lieut. -Col.

sentation of a sword to Col.

sioned officers of his

Crane by the privates of the regiment. a

handsome sword was presented

by the

officers

of the

line.

to

A

few days

later

Maj. William M. Gregg

NEW YORK.

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, July 24 the regiaient started on a reconnaissance towards Gordonsville, which, without entering into particulars,

may

be justly regarded as the most extraordinary reconnaissance

during the campaign.

reached during the afternoon, the

from want of

and cried

arrived at the foot of Cedar Mountain, and remained two

The

the 10th of

days on the

August 18 the wagon-trains were sent to the rear, and the regiment received orders to march at a moment's notice.

They proceeded engaged

A

Rappahannock

to

Station,

and were actively

of the regiment, speaking of this conflict,

member

to

Prepare to march

''

out,

was soon

them

You

company.

You

closed

Rogers, lead

!"

when Gen. Patrick adwords " My men, we return

line,

:

You

night.

last

fight well

;

up and prompt

to

old com-

obey orders.

Coi.

The regiment

par-

On

ticipated in the battle in the afternoon.

says,—

my

good

in

I've no fault to find.

by the right flank."

off"

fight

They're

follow the regulars.

panions-in-arms. well

in

in the following

the battle-ground of

Keep

fought August 21 and 22.

in that battle,

almost exhausted

and water.

sleep, food,

brio-ade

dressed

battle-field.

men

The regiment had scarcely stacked their arms for rest when Sykes' Brigade of regulars passed en route to the Bull Run battle-field, when Gen. Patrick rode rapidly up

August marching orders were received and regiment moved towards Culpepper, and on the 16th

On

107

the following

moved up the river opposite the first ford north of During the night the station, and encamped for the night. the enemy crossed with a force of artillery and cavalry, and The took position in a corn-field and wood near the ford.

morning opened what has gone down to history as the " second battle of Bull Run," one of the deadliest contests From the numbers of the enemy and of the Rebellion.

was opened about eight o'clock A.M. by Gen. Patrick's The enemy opened his battery from the cornbrigade.

that a fierce battle was imminent.

"

We

fight

but was soon driven from this position by Reynolds'

field,

As

battery and Battery B, 4th United States.

the sun

was sinkinir down the horizon we advanced to the river, under a raking fire of artillery and musketry, and took

bank of the

position near the

we were compelled

force

a rise of

river,

but owing to our small

The 23d

to retire.

ground raked by the enemy's

fell

artillery,

back over

column

eii

their close proximity,

required no prophetic eye to see

it

The 23d, then numbering only two hundred and twentywent into

five in line,

this battle

with Col. Crane in com-

mand.

The following Crane's

report

official

" This

description of the battle

taken from Col.

is

:

morning (xiugust 30),

after giving time to get

the brigade changed positions two or three times to

cofl'ee,

No enemy

different parts of the field.

in

force was dis-

masse, and in perfect order, while the shells burst fearfully

covered, notwithstanding our batteries kept throwing shell

above and around

into the

it."

Lieut.-Col. Crane in his official report of this battle says, *'

This was the

fire

of artillery.

the men.

men and

regiment had been under

was highly pleased with the conduct of

I

They were

cool

behaved

officers

my

time that

first

and prompt

to

like veterans

;

Both

obey orders. not a

man

flinched

the morning of the

artillery,

this

and

all

"

23d the

battle

opened with heavy

During the forenoon of

lasted several hours.

duy the regiment started for Warrenton, and

finally,

continued

having been defeated on the previous day. advanced, King's Division having the right and form-

to Gainesville, one of the

Next came the march

most

King having been

severe marches of the campaign, in consequence of the

oppressive heat and scarcity of water.

of

miles

the

town

When

regiment halted

the

for

After the scanty meal had been taken and

all

within six

but

it

was not

until

The

of Gainesville.

Brigade holding the on

the

battle lasted but

time

field,

shot was fired at the battle

Patrick's

In this engagement the 23d,

was not entirely engaged.

The

one hour and ten minutes, during which

Gibbon's Brigade

lost

eight

Patrick's Brigade, to which the

the field until the

hundred men.

o'clock A.M. started for

Gen.

23d was attached, held

wounded were cared

for,

Soon the

and

The enemy's

shell,

and

at three

Manassas Plains, which place was

"

fire.

aff'air

at Gainesville,

and

this,

We

as thick as

battle of Bull

opened upon us with shot

with their musketry, made a storm of in the rear of the woods, could give

battle raged for about one

until our front lines

lay in heaps.

around us

in earnest the final

artillery

Our artillery,

Thus the

of musketry.

terrific volleys

bullets flew

Now commenced

us no support.

attack was opened by Gen. Gibbon's

left.

on.

the extra

by Gen. Doubleday, Gen.

Brigade, supported

although

first

pushed

Run.

the

We

opened with

their

the sun began to sink below the

western horizon that the

lines

breakfast.

ammunition destroyed the command pressed on, and during the afternoon the advance division was fixed upon,

relieved for

now moved forward to a thick wood. skirmishers commenced firing, and soon the ad-

vanced

hail.

regiment was the third line

(Gen. Hatch was now in command. Gen.

of the division.

Here the

Springs, a spirited and lively contest.

My

ing four lines of battle.

the Sulphur Springs road.

White Sulphur

P.M. our division was placed under com-

retired,

on the 28th.)

participated in the battle of

silent.

was the prevailing opinion that the enemy

It

having come within one mile of the town, bivouacked on

The regiment

draw them out or bring forth a response,

of Fitz-John Porter, and with his corps ordered to

advance.

had

to

About two

mand

We

from his duty."

On

but

woods

and one-half hours,

were broken and the dead and wounded

The enemy

lay behind a railway

embank-

ment, and so well protected that our

men charged

upon them, sometimes upon the

and fought hand-to-

ditch,

Sykes' Brigade of regulars on our

hand.

left

in vain

was forced

back, our two front lines were decimated and broken, and

our (Patrick's) brigade badly cut to pieces. of the 20th

New York

left

the

" I

left

field

The

21st was used up,

wing of the 35th decimated. and

Pratt,

State Militia, was killed and the

regiment scattered and demoralized.

and the

Col.

These had

all

fallen back.

had heard no order

to

retire,

and remained

in the

:

woods some

little

and did so

rear),

my

time,

regiment being almost alone.

In this action I

but only a few

in as perfect order as

lost a

on battalion

number of men and

drill.

wounded,

officers

Providence has thus far seemed to

killed.

favor us.

On emerging from

"

and saw

met Gen. Patrick,

the woods I

was going against

at once that the battle

enemy had turned our

and the fighting was

left,

of musketry and artillery on that part of the

gade was got together (what was in rear of a battery,

"

We

bri-

and we took a position

left),

down.

to lie

lay in this position about half an hour, then were

enemy continued

the

but fortunately none of

came out upon the horse

terrific

Our

field.

and the men were ordered

ordered towards the rear and field

us, as

to

my

pike,

As we moved

left.

throw shot and

over the

shell at us,

regiment were hurt.

As we

Gen. McDowell rode up, his

covered with foam and dust, and he himself look-

all

ing nearly exhausted with fatigue and excitement, and or-

We

dered us towards Centreville.

to

Washington. "

We

tired that

AVe lay down upon the ground

we

the

mind the

did not

slept soundly

The

till

rain that

morning and wet

so completely

commenced, but

;

In speaking of

participated in the battle of Antietam. this battle. Col.

HoiFman,

my command who

and men of

officers

in his official report, says, "

The

went into the action

behaved most admirably, never deranging their alignment during the surgings backward and forward of the obeying with promptitude every order, and

all

lines,

the time

remaining firm, steady, and never moving until they had Their conduct was

received the full order.

We

wish.

had one

field,

one

staff,

that I could

all

thirteen

line officers,

and two hundred and twenty-three enlisted men. casualties

were four killed and

thirty-five

Our

wounded."

After various marches and skirmishes as well as changes

command and camps, November 25

of

finds the regiment

camp near Brooks' Station. Here the 23d remained until December 9, when it broke camp and moved forward. It went into the battle of Fred-

The army was

of the Potomac.

ericksburg, and, by

its

courage, perseverance, and soldierly

bearing, added fresh laurels to those already

to the skin."

following day was one of the deepest dejection to

Army

The 23d remained at Upton's Hill four days, and then commenced the march into Maryland and September 14 In this enfinds them in the battle of South Mountain. gagement both officers and men behaved splendidly, and received many encomiums of praise from their superior The regiment next officers for their bravery and coolness*.

in

arrived at Centreville about ten P.M., worn out and

exhausted.

campaign closing with the

disastrous

second battle of Bull Run.

continued the march,

and soon learned that the army were on the retreat

YORK.

Thus ended the

I

gave the order to retire (right of companies to the

finally

the

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

108

in full retreat,

won on many

a hard-contested field.

We

append

Col.

Hoffman's

official

report of this battle

:

surging back upon Washington, followed by the victorious

arms of the Confederacy within thirty miles of the

"Jan.

and confidence in the generals gone. says, " It

was about

when we received the news that Gen. McClellan was again in command of the Army of the Potomac. The nine A.M.

eflect

was wonderful and

upon cheer rent the along like a wave.

air,

For miles along the

thrilling.

lines of that battle-shattered

and disheartened army cheer

and the sound swelled and rolled

Officers sprang into their saddles with

Brigade, ii

giR^

sprang to their places in the ranks, and, at the order for-

moved as if invigorated with renewed life. We that we were again a host, and could and would save

all

all felt

our capital and country." Fairfax,

where

it

re-

mained overnight, and on the following morning proceeded on in the direction of Centreville,

meeting the balance

finally

of the brigade, and countermarched.

the

About

this time," says Col. Crane, "

Chantilly.

we

learned that

make an attack at a point near Our brigade was moved in that direction, and

enemy were about

to

the 35th, 21st, and 23d were placed in the old rebel pit to protect the right of

our line of

battle.

About

rifle-

sun-

down the enemy attacked our left, and the battle lasted The firing of musketry and artillery until about nine P.M. was incessant, and

this with the terrific

ning rendered the scene grand and

were repulsed with considerable until

march

the following afternoon, to

Upton's

Jlill.

1st Division, 1st

Army

Corps

:

my command

in the late action at Fredericksburg,

Decem-

ber 12, 13, 14, and 15, to be as follows the morning of the 11th of December

"On

brigade from our bivouac near White

we moved with the

Oak Church, on

the Belle Plain

RappahanWe marched but about one and a half miles when we were and remained all that day and night, owing to the difficulty

road, with the intention, as I supposed, of crossing the

nock.

and delay in laying the bridges. " That night (11th) the bridges were completed, and at early dawn we moved down to the northern bank of the river, at a point about one and a half miles below Fredericksburg, and near the lower bridges, where we remained while the rest of Gen. Franklin's left grand di-

The morning was very foggy until about noon, and we did not cross until about two p.m., we being about the

vision were crossing.

The regiment marched on towards

"

1863.

— In pursuance of orders, I have the honor to report the part

taken by

halted,

a bound, soldiers grasped their muskets with eagerness and

ward,

2,

" Lieut. H. P. Taylor, Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant-General 3d

Crane farther on in his report

Col.

" Headquarters 23d N. Y. Vols., Pratt's Point, Va.,

capital,

We

thunder and light-

terrific.

loss.

We

The enemy remained here

when we were ordered set

reached that place about midnight."

to

out immediately, and

Soon

last.

after the crossing

was

eifected

(which was without inter-

we were massed, with other troops of the 1st Division, near the residence of Mr. Burnard, when the enemy for the first time opened ruption)

upon us from a battery located on the hill opposite, the first shut striking and bursting in the ground in the flank of my regiment, wounding one man. " They threw about twelve or fifteen shot and shell with remarkably good range while in this position, which resulted in but trifling damage, owing to the fuses in their shell being cut either too short or too long.

soon moved, with the rest of the brigade and division, to a point directly in front of said Burnard's house, and deployed our line "

We

and stacked arms. " Gen. Smith's Corps (6th) was deployed on our right, his line running parallel to the river, and fronting southwardly and from the river.

The

lines of our corps (1st), after the

deployment, fronted

and down the river, the line running perpendicular to the river, the left resting upon it, and the right joining the left of Gen. Smith's line, and forming a right angle thereto. In this position we lay behind our stacked arms all night. easterly

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, " The morning of the 13th was also foggy, but the fog lifted early, and skirmishing commenced along the line, which grew into a general

and small-arms. " We were moved in close-massed columns down the river under a heavy artillery fire from the enemy's batteries, some one and a half

engagement with

miles,

artillery

when the enemy was found

our front, well posted in pine

in

woods, and protected by natural rifle-pits. " They were soon dislodged by our artillery, when we advanced with the rest of the division to within about one mile of Massaponix Creek.

This position we held

all

fire.

To-

artillery fire

upon

day, amid a most terrible artillery

wards evening the enemy concentrated a very hot

with the evident intention of turning our flank. " The position was maintained, however, although the brigade on our left, the commander of which misunderstood the order, fell back us,

with his command, skirmishers and all, just before dark, whereas his order directed that he should withdraw his brigade a short distance as soon as the darkness would cover his movement from the view of the

enemy, but to leave his skirmishers as they were as pickets. This movement being observed by the foe, and supposing they had accomplished their design, and that

we were

falling back, they

advanced

their line so far that their batteries were within thirty or forty rods

of our pickets,

over the plain,

and poured a perfect shower of grape promiscuously until about one hour after dark.

''They finally became convinced of their error, ceased firing, withdrew their lines, and all was quiet until morning, except an occasional shot between pickets.

"On

the 14th and 15th

we held the same

position without inter-

ruption, except an occasional round from their artillery and sharp picket firing, which was kept up most of the time, day and night,

with great briskness. " The picket lines were so close to our advanced position that

were placed on picket at dusk on the evening of the 15th, and by some misunderstanding or inadvertence on the part of the ofl&cer left in charge of the picket, were not informed to

B

proper time and with the

rest of

the

line,

and remained

about one hour after the rest had left, and at daylight they fell slowly back, keeping their deployment and stirring up many stragglers and sick, who had sought refuge and resting-place around the hospital buildings, barns, stacks, river-bank, etc., and finally were the last to cross the bridge,

it

being taken up immediately behind

them. " The steadiness and coolness of the officers and men of my command, with very few exceptions, were highly commendable through-

A

and F, who were on picket during the night of the 13tli, and Company I on the 14th, and Company J) on the night of 14th and during the day of the 15th. " Of the cool and deliberate bravery exhibited by the officers of the out, especially those of

Companies

two companies G and B, under the peculiarly perilous circumstances in which they found themselves, I cannot in justice speak but in terms of especial commendation. " In the action we had engaged one field officer, one acting staff officer (adjutant), fourteen line officers, and nine (9) companies, embracing 276 enlisted men.

Company C was

had three

We

detached.

took three (3) prisoners.

We

longed to go and help their noble comrades fight out the battle

which

(3) stragglers.

the 17th the 23d

moved down near the bank of

The term of enlistment arrangements were made the 11th of soil

May

of the

of Elmira." Marysville.

homeward

for the

the battle-scarred regiment

A

trip,

and on

the sacred

left

sad accident occurred while en route near Clark, of

Capt.

Company H, was

killed while in the act of climbing

bridge,

and he was knocked

His head struck the

the car, his body falling on

oft'

When

the rocks by the side of the track.

moments

was

after, life

found, a few

extinct.

the arrival of the regiment in Elmira

Upon

instantly

on the rear car just as

the train was passing under a bridge.

it

formed

in

Delevan House, and an address of wel-

line in front of the

come was delivered by Mayor Spaulding, which was briefly responded to by Col. Hoff'man, after which they marched to the old barracks of the 23d, where a bounteous repast was prepared by the

ladies of Elmira.

In the language of the Elmira Advertiser^ " It was a

men

Elmira, and gladdened the hearts of the

whom

made

the demonstration was

and war-gear and go home

to

;

but

throw

to their

it

gladdened far

their knapsacks

off"

own

honor

to

firesides, to

their

fathers and mothers, brothers, sisters, wives, and sweet-

Wednesday, the 13th of May, will be ever green the memory of the soldiers of the 23d and their friends."

hearts.

in

It was, indeed, a fitting reception of the battle-scarred

regiment of the Southern Tier, the

first

from the Twenty-

seventh Congressional District.

The

following

also of those

a

is

who

Jeremiah V. Bogart,

list

David Farron,

of the killed and missing, and

died from

wounds

or disease in the

killed in second battle of Bull

Eli Decker, died of fever, Dec.

3,

Run, Aug.

23d

:

30, 1862.

1861.

killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862.

William March, killed at Fredericksburg, Va., John M. Mowers, died of fever, Dec. 31, 1861.

May

25, 1862.

Shults, died of fever, Dec. 18, 1861.

Herkimer

Williams, killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. Christopher Brennan, died at Falmouth, July 4, 1862.

S.

Henry Brown, killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. Thomas Carroll, killed at Ball's Cross-Roads, Aug. Charles

W.

Tice, died

Aug.

1862, of

5,

17, 1861.

wounds received

at Antietam.

the

Harlow Arms, died March 24, 1863. David J. Perene, supposed to have been killed at Rappahannock Station, Aug. 21, 1862. Jerome Gorton, supposed to have been killed at Antietam, Sept. 17,

Henry E.

it

it

Plain and went into winter quarters. that

commenced

This march closed Court-

camp here during the winter April 20 the army moved, and the

The regiment remained

in

to the defenses of

George

Gilbert, died Dec.

C.

Ames, died

1,

1862.

Oct. 7, 1862, of

wounds received

at Antietam,

Sept. 17, 1862.

at Fairfax

10, and ended at Belle Plain, Dec. 20.

and spring of 1863.

23d having now expired,

within view of the " welcome spires and green shade-trees

receiving marching orders, and proceeded to Belle

when

the active campaign

in a great victory

of old Virginia, and on the evening of the 13th came

1862.

and went into camp, where

23d was assigned

were sanguine must result

to our arms."

remained until the 20th,

river,

House, March

all

Alexander J. Jaynes, died Dec. 15, 1861. " H. C. Hoffman, Colonel Commanding."

On

the sound of boom-

23d was aroused, and many

spirit of the

heard and seen, the

more when they were allowed

that we had retired. " Companies G and

At

of the regiment says, "

member

magnificent reception and worthy the patriotic people of

On the night of the 16th we were withdrawn to the north side of the Eappahannock about midnight, leaving two companies (G and B) on the picket lines not informed (except their commanding officers) *'

"

109

ing cannon and the blaze of battle, which could be distinctly

many

of their shots did execution in our ranks.

retire at the

A

YORK.

Aquia, and was there

in the fortifications during the battle of Chancellorsville.

Richard B. Hurd, killed at Fredericksburg, Dec. Thomas Van Horn, died Dec. 21, 1861. Israel Marquart, died Nov. 18, 1861.

James Pease, died Aug.

Edmund

13, 1862.

16, 1861.

Campbell, died in November, 1862, of wounds received at

Antietam, Sept.

17, 1862.

William Decker, died Dec.

16, 1861.

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTS,

110

Elias Dodge, died in January, 1863.

Hamilton Squires, died Dec.

Henry

4,

with three thousand five hundred.

lin

In this engagement

1861.

Averill killed, wounded, and captured

C. Cooper, died Dec. 4, 1861.

men

than there were

F. B. Tiffany, died Dec. 12, 1861.

A. M. Taylor, died Dec. 29, 1861.

Samuel W. Kelly, died Jan.

YORK.

wounds received

at Freder-

own command.

Rumsey was promoted by

Maj.

15, 1863, of

in his

be brevet

more of the enemy

President Johnson to

" distinguished

lieutenant-colonel for

services

icksburg, Dec. 13, 1862.

Bosworth, died Sept. 29, 1861. J. W. Parmatin, died Oct. 2, 1862, of wounds received at Antietam. R. W. Steele, died Dec. 7, 1861. J. F.

L. L. Bacon, died Sept.

6,

1861.

Maxson, died Feb.

J. E. B.

1,

1861.

wounds received from

17, 1862, of

acci-

dental discharge of a pistol.

James Simmons,

ARTILLERY.

organizations that went out from this county

New

Liglit Artillery, organized at Bath, in the

original officers of this battery

summer of were Capt. John

Slocum, First Lieuts. Charles C. Wheeler and William Rumsey, and Second Lieut. Robert H. Gansevoort. Capt.

Slocum resigned soon

after the battery reached

Washin,

— Captain,

Arthur

First Lieutenant,

was broken into detachments, and did guard duty

at

Georgetown, Capt.

S.

Daniel

Baker

;

Ells-

S.

Second Lieu-

at the

Long

at the

Company E^

Elmira.

First Lieutenant,

A. Packer

;

— Captain, Thomas

F. Shoemaker;

John G. Coply; Second Lieutenant, Geo.

and ninety-five non-commissioned

officers

and

privates.

Company F, ;

Lindley.

— Captain,

First Lieutenant,

Henry G. Harrower,

Samuel Maurice Morgan, Lind-

Second Lieutenant, Michael B. Stafford, Albany

;

and

field

officers did

During

district.

Company G,

Canisteo.

isteo; First Lieutenant,

this time

been commissioned by Governor E. D. Morgan

S.

Company

officers

II,

tenant in the 86th Regiment, Aug. 10, 1862, was appointed

quartermaster in his place.

First

;

Gen. Robinson.

Lieuts.

and

;

and eighty-four non-

— Captain,

William Ten-

Raymond

G.

;

Second

and ninety-five non-

;

Jackson A. W^oodward, Cooper's Plains; Second Lieuten-

and eighty non-commis-

sioned officers and privates.

First Lieutenant, Chas.

promoted

to

captain Nov.

;

— Captain, Seymour to

major Nov. 22,

H. Wombough, Addison;

22, 1861

John N. Warner, Woodhull sioned officers and privates.

Co.

promoted

;

Col.

Doster, provost-marshal

Capt. Bennett, of

Columbia.

G, died while on duty here.

Company

The regimental band was

also

mustered out of service here by orders from headquarters of the army.

The regiment remained in Washington until the 23d day of August, when it joined the Army of the Potomac, and moved

Alexandria the same day

It reached

under Gen. Pope.

to Cloud's Mills,

and was placed

afternoon of the 29th, where

in the brigade

;

Second Lieutenant,

and ninety-six non-commis-

Run

on the

was immediately formed

it

by Gen. McDowell

Bull

The regiment

in person.

made a gallant charge, led by Col. Bailey, losing many men and one officer. Lieut. Joseph H. Tull, of Company C, was badly

cal

wounded, and remained on the to

charged, and

ment's

first

is

now

He

living in that city.

experience in battle, and

for a fighting regiment

all

was

it

finally dis-

regi-

gave them a name

it

fell

back to Centreville, and

the skirmishing that took place on that

in

reserve on the march, and during the

It

battle of

Antietam under Gen. McClellan.

army

was

This was the

retreat.

the

days,

which they nobly sustained during

After the battle

participated in

field six

Washington, and was under medi-

treatment for over eight months.

the war.

Company K, Woodhull, Steuben G. Rhinevault, Woodhull

Washington by order of

when he was brought



;

S.

detailed for duty in the provost-marshal's office

Baker were

for a charge

privates.

Wood, Addison

John G. Copley and Arthur

of

battle-field of

Company /, Cooper's Plains, Steuben Co. Captain, Amos W. Sherwood, Cooper's Plains; First Lieutenant, ant, Foster P.

staff

F,

Gen. Pope, arriving on the

Wm.

Lieutenant,

officers

Company

Baker, Canisteo; Second

Lieutenant, James Carpenter, Jr.

commissioned

Lieut. Morgan, of

ing division, and from that

and privates.

Steuben County.

lieu-

first

James Bennett, Can-

Lieutenant, John Fulton, Canisteo

commissioned

who had

commandtime moved with the army of

— Captain,

Nathan

duty

of Brig. -Gen. A. Saunders Piatt, Gen. Sturges

ninety-one non-commissioned officers and privates.

;

company

there was a change in the line and staff of the regiment.

for the District of

18G1

with one company on

The

day for the

as officers of the

and

broeck

Wombough

Seventh Street wharf.

officers

;

Capt. Higgins with two companies

Bridge, and Lieut. Stafford with a detachment

at

privates.

and

in

Nineteenth Street, Capt. Sherwood with one company at

Lemi H. Crary; and eighty-nine non-commissioned

ley

:

March

Old Capitol prison, Capt. Lansing with three companies

tenant,

Lindley

1st of

was detached from his company and placed on the

sioned officers and privates.

;

About the

Quartermaster Spence resigned, and D. F. Brown,

privates.

worth

at

regiment

the Central Guard- House, Capt. Bennett with one

privates.

Company B, Addison.

Blanchard

L. Higgins

March, 1862.

until

Griffin, Ya., the

remained there about two weeks.

Rose.

— Captain, Benjamin

Camp

of the Potomac at

it

Syracuse.

most of the time

re-

that time having received orders to join the

Wright, Estes T. Sturtevant, Geo. J. Benjamin, Rankin B.

Company A.

The regiment

Md.

Hill^

after the retreating

enemy

It

moved with

until they reached

Manassas Junction, when, by orders of Gen. McClellan, Piatt's Brigade, consisting of the 86th and 124th New

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

112

York Volunteers and the 122d Pennsj^lvania Volunteers, were sent up and through Manassas Gap to support the

W. W.

cavalry under Gen.

YORK. They

on a secret expedition.

marching

rain, in light

day

in a

heavy

order, with five days' rations.

Major

started that

They met the enemy and drove them through Front Royal, joining the army

battle

after an

Ford, on the Rappahannock, on the evening of the 8th,

Clellan

ment

Averill.

absence of two days, and iSnding that Gen. Mc-

had been relieved by Gen. Burnside.

The

regi-

participated in the battle of Fredericksburg, and then

moved

to

Falmouth, on the opposite side of the

river,

Nothing transpired while

into winter quarters.

the exception of the Burnside

mud

Hooker's move on Chancellorsville.

now and had been connected with since the battle of Bull

going

here, with

incident to

Army

the old 3d

About

campaign.

New York

under Gen. A.

Corps

time

this

was commanded by

division

Gen. Whipple, and the corps by Gen. Sickles.

On

and the regiment bade adieu

ceived,

winter quarters, moving

when

night,

an easterly direction until mid-

men

heavy marching order, with eighty

in

rounds of ammunition.

and reached the United States Ford on

their old quarters,

the morning of

April 30 countermarched past

May

crossing the pontoons laid there for

1,

After crossing they soon struck the enemy.

that purpose.

Those acquainted with the history of the lorsville

know

that the

The 86th came

fighting.

in for their full share, as the list of casual-

enemy through and from the wood,

tion,

and then retired

The 86th

acting as support.

wounded

thirteen killed and

Many

been greater. a

The regiment expected

to

day

is

Sun-

one of the days ever to be remembered by those

who

now survive, and were with the regiment on that day. At first phiced in support of batteries, a short time after the whole division made a charge to the right of the Chancellor

House, the 86th on the

plank-road

— and such

a charge

!

— the 86th

third of their men, most of

whom

when

The

the regiment retired.

field;

Chapin was

Lieut.-Col.

large.

of the

left

were

loss

killed

line,

losing fully one-

left

of

wounded

in the hip

on the

officers

Capt. Angle, of Co. B, and

;

cers were carried into the Chancellor to

named

Army

until

the advance brigade of the

of the Potomac joined them on the 12th.

Whipple's Division having ceased to the terrible loss

muster-out of

others slightly.

work building

Co.

I,

was

fatally

offi-

;

Lieut.

wounded, and several

After the charge the regiment was put to rifle-pits

for

their

Lansing in command as senior

officer.

Whipple, division commander, was

Tuesday the regiment recrossed the their old quarters at Falmouth,

protection,

Capt.

On Monday

Gen.

wounded.

On

fatally river,

and were soon

and remained there

the 6th of June, 1863,

when an

86th and the 124th

accompany

to

own

at

until

order was received for the a large

body of cavalry

exist,

on account of

sustained at Chancellorsville, and the

it

immediately

regiments

several

86th and 124th

New York

after,

the

Volunteers, together with Ber-

dan's Sharpshooters, were attached to the brigade of Gen. J.

H. Hobart W^ard,

of the 3d

in Birney's Division

At this place Lieut.-Col. Higgins assumed command of the 86th Regiment. Corps.

On

Army

returned and

the morning of the 14th the 3d Corps started from

Bealton Station, hurrying back towards Washington, and

bivouacked for the night

Bristoe Station and

This was a terrible march, on account

Run

the old Bull

They moved

at Catlett's Station.

Very many were sun-struck.

of the heat.

battle-field

They reached

on the 16th, continued the

march on the 17th, and camped

Gum

at

Springs on the

This was a very dark night, so dark

night of the 19th.

that a person could not possibly see an object two feet from

him

and the only way

to get the different regiments into

position

was by sound.

They moved again on the 23d,

crossed

the

;

Potomac, on pontoons,

at

Edwards' Ferry,

reached Emmettsburg on the evening of the 30th, passing Poolesville, Middletown,

orders were received

Hooker had been

At this place command that Gen.

and Frederick City.

informing

relieved,

the 5th Corps, placed in

the

and Gen. George G. Meade, of

command

of the

Army

of the

Potomac.

On

House, and are sup-

have been burned with the building)

Woodward, of

was very

Acting Adj.

Capt. Ellsworth, of Co. D, killed (the last two

posed

field

and carried from the

Major Higgins was badly wounded;

Stafford

next the

among

lines,

but instead was placed on duty guarding the fords and

Manassas eJunction.

rout.

the extent of

be ordered back to Falmouth,

show.

and stayed the

Sta-

major and a lieutenant.

will

sent to their assistance,

to

within our

left

the next morning, passing through

3d was

Brandy

the infantry

fight,

suffered

given in the correspondence appended to this chapter

Saturday afternoon, when the 11th Corps broke, the

Late in the day

the enemy's loss must have

;

were

in

they occupied in the

This was mostly a cavalry

morning.

them

to the position

;

the latter charging

without success.

it

ties

On

men

They drove

ford.

the regiment advanced within eight miles of

battle of Chancel-

3d Corps did most of the

from the

a thick wood, a short distance

months'

to their four

bivouacked near Belle Plain, on the Rappa-

it

hannock, the

in

the water reaching the waists of the

Rappahannock Bridge,

the 28th of April, 1863, marching orders were re-

Early the next morning they

they were hurried forward, and soon struck the enemy

and the 122d Pennsylvania,

The

S. Piatt.

river,

several times to retake

Major Rhinevault resigned, and Capt. Higgins, of Company A, was commissioned major. The brigade consisted of the 86th and 124th

waded the

The regiment was

Run, and had been most of the

Run

and bivouacked for the night.

the

duty on account of age and the exposure

the Bull

in

march, until Gen.

time commanded by Lieut.-Col. Chapin, Col. Bailey being disqualified for

command, he having been promoted since the of Chancellorsville. The regiment arrived at Beverly

Lansing

the 1st of July

moved through Emmettsburg, march-

ing at quick time for Gettysburg direction,

and

ward was the night on

the

;

could hear firing in that

felt

sure the battle had commenced.

cry,

and on they pushed.

field,

with guns beside them.

morning Gen. Ward led his brigade it.

They

The 86th numbered about

slept that

The next

to the position assigned

three hundred rank and

and was placed on the right of the 124th, near

Round Top, its right.

in a piece of

file,

Little

wood, with the 20th Indiana on

Early in the afternoon the rebel

a furious cannonade

For-

upon our

lines,

artillery

opened

and about three o'clock

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, the infantry advanced to the attack.

Gen. Longstreet's

Corps was hurled against the old 3d Corps in four while the 3d had but one.

Ward's Brigade stood

man wounded

first

he was sent from the

command.

The

loss

Almost

86th was Col. Higgins, and

in the

field,

and

firm,

drove the enemy back, one line after the other. the

lines,

leaving Maj. Lansing again in

the regiment here was terrible.

to

John Warner, of Company K, fell, and several other officers were wounded and taken prisoners. Among the

YORK.

113

Bealton Station, and remained there until the 7th of No-

On

vember.

that day the

3d Corps moved

Ford, on the Rappahannock, in and, under a galling

full

obtained

fire,

to

Kelly's

sight of the enemy,

possession of the

full

number of prisoners. On the 8th Brandy Station, crossed the Rapidan

ford, capturing a large

advanced as

far as

on the 26th, at Jacob's Ford, and on the 27th (Ward's

Capt.

Brigade being in

latter

About sundown the 86th and 124th New York Volunteers were called upon, as the 17th Maine had just been driven. The two regiments sprang quickly for-

The

was Lieut. Seeley, of Company K, acting adjutant. rank and

to the

loss

dark when the

was severe.

file

It

was almost

reserve)

struck

the

rebels

about six

o'clock A.M.

orders were received for the 86th to retire.

ward and occupied the space vacated by the 17th Maine, and checked the enemy, although their batteries rained a

line of battle,

shower of

lilies

at the right

and

left

They did so in and were highly complimented by Gen. Ward,

in presence of the

whole division, for their gallant conduct on Gen. Sickles having been wounded, Gen.

that occasion.

Birney took command of the corps. Gen.

and

vision,

On

gave way, and

Col.

Ward

of the

di-

made

his

charge that day, but was not called on to do any work. it

That

front.

and on the morning of the 5th

in,

the regiment assisted in burying the dead.

The regiment moved forward on 7th.

It passed

army

the 6th, with the

On

and over South Mountain.

Mill, in line of battle.

On

the 14th

heard that the enemy had crossed the Potomac with

On

transportation and stores.

mac

Harper's Ferry, and

at

On

borough.

was now

command

in

his

all

the 17th crossed the Poto-

passed the night at Hills-

the 20th reached Upperville.

of the 3d

On

Corps.

the

22d

moved up the Gap, Ward's Brigade in advance. Struck the enemy near Front Royal, and, after severe fighting, sent them double-quick

reached Manassas Gap.

to the other side of the

the 23d

On

mountain.

the 24th retraced

our steps through the Gap, and on the 26th reached WarThis ended the campaign of Gettysburg.

renton.

It will be seen

Regiment

left

days', rations,

in light

marching order, with

five

expecting to return by that time, but, instead,

they were fifty-four days without a change of clothing except such as they had with them,



a thing not very con-

ducive to cleanliness or health.

Here

Higgins again took command, and Maj. Lan-

Col.

sing was ordered to Elmira, N. Y., with two officers and six sergeants,

On

on recruiting

moved

to

Sulphur Springs and pitched camp, doing picket duty and crossed the

15th day of September.

Rappahannock

On

17th camped near Culpepper.

whole division was to

in

line,

On

the 16th

On

Freedman's Ford.

at

its

way back

On

Centreville, reaching that place on the 14th.

Qn

'

15

' '

'

^

the

the 8th of October the

and soon was on

19th moved southward again.

the

Culpepper Mine

The army

Brandy

near

to

At

quarters.

and went into winter

Station,

point Lieut.-Col.

this

Lansing and party

again joined their regiment. loss

of the regiment up to this time had been very

company that had the same with them, and some of them none.

there was hardly a

;

that started

officers

Company Company

A had

Company B

Company C none; D one, on detached service Company E two, one of whom was detached Company F one Company G one Company H none Company I one Company K none;

one; ;

;

;

;

;

;

none.

In the

now

and

field

colonel, badly

mustered

out.

staff"

it

was the same.

wounded and

J.

B. L. Hi2:":ins

in the hospital.

H. Lansing was lieutenant-colonel

B. Staffbrd was major (formerly lieutenant of

F)

He was ;

M.

Company

James Cherry was adjutant (formerly sergeant of

;

Co. I)

D. F. Brown was quartermaster.

;

Company

was commanded by Capt. Jerry Ryan, promoted from

A the^

Company B, by Lieut. Booth, promoted from the ranks Company C, by Capt. Robert Barton, promoted from sergeant Company D, by Lieut. N. H. Vincent, promoted from sergeant; Company E, by Lieut. Geo. A. Packer, original Company F, by Capt. H. G. Harrower, original Company G, by Capt. N. S. Baker, promoted from lieutenant; Company H, by Lieut. Stone, promoted from private Company I, by Capt. Foster P. Wood, promoted from second lieutenant Company K, by Capt. John Finney, ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

promoted from the ranks.

service.

the last day of July, 1863, the brigade

drilling until the

at

Ford, being pressed hard by the rebel cavalry.

ranks

by this that on the 6th of June the 86th

Falmouth

On

retrace their steps,

to

which was done, crossing the Rapidan

Gen. French

On

field.

Mine Run, and found the enemy The picket line crossed the run during

They were then ordered

manded.

severe

Roxbury

from the

retired

near

to

heavily intrenched.

moved down the Hagerstown

the 10th reached Millport, and on the 11th rested for the night near

29th advanced

The

road, through Middletown,

among

the latter.

through Frederick City on the 8th, and on

the 9th changed direction and

of the 86th was severe, four

being killed and thirty-two wounded, Col. Higgins

moved

enemy, and reached Mechanicstown on the

in pursuit of the

loss

to

the night, and an assault was ordered, but finally counter-

was observed that the

enemy's vedettes had disappeared from our night a heavy rain set

The

That night the enemy

right in the lines, and near where Gen. Pickett

the morning of the 4th

them back.

drive

Berdan of the brigade.

the next morning the 86th was placed farther to the

On

upon them, and the infantry endeavored

shell

the

the

30th cauiped at "

The companies averaged from

ten to forty non-commis-

sioned officers and privates, the whole regiment numbering less

than three hundred for duty

were carried on the hospitals,

rolls,

;

although

many more

such as the sick and wounded i4

and those on detached

service.

During the month of December, 1863, an order was issued from Washington, that if those soldiers who had enlisted for three years

and whose term of service had about ex-

would

pired,

war

re-enlist for the

as veteran

volunteers,

they should receive their bounty and be permitted to re-

homes

turn to their

Nearly

days.

commissioned

and returned

body with

in a

a furlough of thirty

(two hundred and forty-five) of the non-

all

and privates of the 86th re-enlisted

officers

to Elmira,

N. Y., where they were furloughed

for thirty days.

At

the expiration of their furlough they joined their bri-

While

gade at Brandy Station. of Corning,

who had

at

Elmira, Capt. L. Todd,

New York

served two years in the 23d

Volunteers, was commissioned a captain in the 86th, as-

duty as captain of Company B, and returned with

}signed to

the reeriment to the officers

Several of the non-commissioned

field.

were also commissioned, but we are unable to give

The regiment remained

at

Brandy Station

1864, doing the usual picket duty,

until

4,

During the

3d Corps was broken up, and the

April, the old

divisions that Gen.

May

and making an

drilling,

occasional demonstration towards the enemy.

month of

possession of the

French brought into

it after

the battle

rebels,

but repulsed them without

command

made

of

all

the armies of the United States, and

headquarters

his

witli

Army

the

Potomac.

of the

May, 1864, the regiment was

the 1st and 2d days of

and

inspected, and on the 4th six days' rations

fifty

rounds

of ammunition were issued to each man, and Gen. George

At

this

ment numbered three hundred rank and

file,

G. Meade's address read to them.

At

turned from the hospitals.

time the regi-

some having

eleven o'clock p.m. the

moved towards the Rapidan, the 2d Corps

re-

army

crossing on pon-

toons at Ely's Ford, and bivouacking near the old battle-

of Chancellorsville,

field

moved

a.m. on the 5th.

at five

Ward's brigade reached Todd's Tavern about nine A.M.,

when they countermarched towards the Wilderness Tavern. The battle had commenced, and the 86th was soon in the hottest of

it,

— from about

two o'clock p.m. until darkness

The firing was terrible, The woods were so both from musketry and artillery. About thick that it was impossible to see the rebel lines. eight o'clock p.m. both armies ceased firing and lay down to put a stop to further manoeuvres.

take a few hours'

The 86th

rest.

suffered no loss

iii

killed,

with but

five o'clock the

motion, pushing the

fell

killed or

flying back towards the rear.

The men were

time.

wounded.

This was a fearful

so demoralized that

it

was utterly

impossible for the officers to rally them, until they reached

the

The

rifle-pits

that had been constructed during the morning.

corps w^as re-formed behind these works, and rested,

cooking

cofi'ee,

About three

for

the

first

time that day.

o'clock p.m. the Confederates advanced again.

The 86th were to retire

and eating,

the 10th re-crossed the Po,

Ward's Brigade was massed

in the front line of works,

with the rest to the second

line.

and were obliged

The

rebels took

in

of the bri-

left

After the formation news came to the regimental

commanders of the brigade, that they should see personally that every man's gun was uncapped and bayonets fixed in

command, and

their

that at a given signal they should ad-

There were eight

vance, double-quick, with a yell.

ments

in the brigade,

New York

and the formation was

Volunteers, 124th

141st

Pennsylvania,

New

and compact that the

regi-

as follows

:

York, 3d Maine,

20th

Pennsylvania,

110th Pennsylvania, and 40th

New York

Indiana,

Volunteers; and

field-officers

were obliged

to

At the signal The picket line

take position on the flanks of their commands.

given the brigade started at a rapid pace.

of the rebels was soon reached, they giving warning of the

Presently they came to the opening, and such

approach. a sight

In front a massive line of works, while between

!

that and the column the ground was strewn with timber.

The and

cry was forward, and the 86th,

reached the work.

shell,

and were unable

onet,

The

not reach them. that remained

went

to

moving on amidst shot

They had nothing but the bay-

remain long, as their support could

order for retreat was given, and those

to the

wood

for cover as quickly as pos-

The 86th went into that charge more than tw^o hunThey left in and around the works of the dred strong. enemy one hundred and sixteen men, besides several offi-

sible.

and

cers,

at roll-call

next morning but eighty-four answered

This was the heaviest

to their names.

loss that the regi-

They now numbered less than a company, for duty, and when paraded the companies numbered some two rank and file, with possibly one officer. The ment ever

sustained.

regiment returned to their position in the

lines,

there until late in the afternoon of the 11th,

ordered.

The rebels continued to give ground until about eleven a.m., when they turned and nearly overwhelmed the entire corps, it

On

little resistance.

were going into position on the right and

enemy slowly; but

was hot work,

trouble.

column of regiments, four paces apart, at the base of a Troops thickly-wooded hill, with the 86th on the right.

known

it

much

and crossed the Po River, meeting

hard day's work.

after a

next morning the army was again in

and quite a number of the 86th

and sent

to

Corps was moved to the right of the rebel

but several were wounded.

At

moved

the 9th

so close

with

They were attacked

by the

the 3d Corps badge.

Grant was made lieutenant-general,

Todd's Tavern, and there formed in

to

through the woods.

On

and about

cofi'ee,

battle

99th

S.

moved

all

About daylight on

line of

3d Corps proper was assigned to the 2d Corps, to be known as Birney's Division of the 2d Corps, retaining and wearing

march U.

and remained there

to the first line,

the 8th the 86th got their hard-tack and eight a.m.

fall

The

wounded behind them.

that night and part of the next day.

86th

in

but they were soon forced to

first line,

2d Corps returned

of Gettysburg were assigned to the 6th Corps, and the old

Early

YORK.

back, leaving their dead and

gade.

their names.

On

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

lU

two

the 86th being in the

to rest

five o'clock

tone.

Brown House.

The

when

The

first

;

without breaking their

the 2d

lines, to a place

silence

strictest

Arrived there about two o'clock a.m.

lines,

lowed

the

as

remaining

;

was

formed in

command was alformation. At about the

A.M. the order to advance was given in a low line

sprang forward, and moved as quickly as

the nature of the ground would admit.

who

the rebel pickets,

fired

and

fled,

They soon

struck

and were pursued so

many were captured before they could reach the The storming column went over the works, cap-

closely that

works.

turing Gen. Johnson, and nearly his whole division, with all

their artillery.

The

rebels

made

retake the works, but failed, with heavy

here was

ter^^ible

all

several attempts to loss.

The

fighting

the 12th and a part of the 13th, and



NEW

HISTOKY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, The 86th

the casualties were large.

Ward was

Gen.

this point

On

command

relieved from

brigade, and Col. Eagan, of the 40th colonel,

At

suffered severely.

New

of the

York, as senior

shooters,

new

to

enemy, who sent forward a small force

to

occupy the aban-

doned works, when the 86th and 124th were directed advance and drive them out.

Hastily forming, they dashed

command of

forward, under the

to

and speedily

Col. Lansing,

At this place, on the 18th, a shell from the rebels struck among the 86th, injuring four of its number; among them Capt. Todd of Company B, who was supposed to be mortally wounded and sent to the rear, but who recovered and joined his comdrove them out and recaptured the works.

Early on

pany, serving until the final muster-out. 19th, Eagan's Brigade

moved about

the

a mile to the rear, and

there rested until about five o'clock p.m.

;

was the

this

first

the 86th had been allowed since the opening of the

rest

campaign, having been under time heavy

was heard

firing

About

constantly.

fire

this

Fred-

in the direction of the

ericksburg road, and shortly a mounted orderly dashed up to

brigade headquarters, and the next

moment

the assembly

Leaving tents standing and knapsacks strewn

was sounded.

about, the brigade started double-quick for the scene of It

action. train,

proved

to be an attack of

Ewell on our wagon-

whom

they followed until

and continued

shovel,

at this

when they moved,

and on the morning of the 14th reached Wilcox's Landand were transferred by steamboats

ing,

On

of the James lliver.

to the south side

the morning of the 15th the

On

advance was resumed towards Petersburg.

Eagan's Brigade made an

Here

Col.

the 16tli

but were unsuccessful.

assault,

Eagan, commanding the brigade, was severely Col. Madill, of the 141st Pennsylvania, took

wounded, and

On

command.

the 18th a general assault was ordered, later in the day,

but for some reason deferred until

—but the

the assault was made,

when

troops were repulsed with

James the loss and men). That

considerable loss (since the crossing of the

of the 86th had been heavy, both

in officers

night was spent in throwing up works within short range the 20th the brigade was relieved, and

On

of the enemy.

on the 21st moved

and took position on the

to

On

Jerusalem Plank-lload.

here

addition to their

unteers, one

hundred and

they

;

thirty in

all,

number

From

this

Vol-

were transferred to

now numbered about two hundred and

forty

time until the 26th of July the regi-

ment was kept busy building one part of the works

On

of the

New York

the veterans of the 70th Begiment

;

left

the 22d had a skirmish with

The 86th had an

the rebels.

for duty.

after the flying rebels,

the 2d Corps started for Cold

labor most of the time until the 12th,

when Eagan's Brigade

and dashed

1,

work with the pick and

the 86th

reached the scene they moved quickly over Tyler's troops

to the

After operations were suspended, they were set

and a heavy fight on the part of Tyler to protect the same.

Tyler's troops were exhausted, and

many were added

place,

Harbor, and in the assault at that place the 86th were in reserve.

of works.

June

the night of

short distance to the rear, and line

and men, and although

off ofiicers

death-roll.

On

commenced throwing up a This movement was observed by the

who kept picking

115

no general engagement took

assumed command.

the 14th Birney's entire division was withdrawn a

YORK.

rifle-pits,

to another,

that day Hancock's

and moving from

almost constantly under

command was

ordered to pro-

darkness put an end to the chase.

fire.

traced their steps,

The brigade then rebringing with them a large number of

ceed to Deep Bottom as a diversion in favor of the Burn-

and the brigade bivouacked that night near where

side

prisoners,

they struck the enemy, and at daylight on the 20th turned to the place they had

22d moved forward, crossed the Mattapony, and

On

the night.

At

make an

;

moments

five o'clock p.m.

strongly

the order was given to

The 86th and 124th New York,

assault.

crossing the

flats,

leaving

enemy became

to the

bridge, were but a few

An 4

official

with heavy

states the killed,

hundred and twenty-six

at one

loss.

report of the losses of this brigade from

July 31, 1864,

to

five

in a failure,

morning of the 30th,

May

wounded, and missing

officers

and two thousand

hundred and forty-three men.

About the 1st of August, Col. Lansing returned and took command, and on the 12Lh Hancock's Corps moved to

Just before reaching

embarked on board steamboats, and remained until midnight, when at a signal they steamed up the James, reaching

satisfied that

number of

leaving quite a

The next morning

and ended

explosion took

City Point and bivouacked for the night, and on the 13th

they could not

hold them, hurried their guns over the bridge, and hastily fled,

place on the night of the 29th or the

near Peters-

of their number

many

dead and wounded along the route. the works the

enemy

here found the

of the road leading to the

left

rested for

the bridge they had two redoubts heavily

About

manned.

the

to the lines

The mine

burg on the night of the 28th.

23d reached the North Anna, near

the

the Chesterfield Bridge intrenched.

On

the day before.

left

re-

mine explosion, and returned

prisoners

in

our hands.

crossed the bridge under a heavy

fire.

Deep Bottom about four o'clock a.m., and disembarked. Gren. Mott was now in command of the division, and

De Trobriand

Gen.

of this brigade, almost

The 86th was ordered

immediately

to the front as

After crossing, the 86th and 124th were deployed as skir-

struck the enemy.

mishers, and advanced, driving the rebel skirmishers for

skirmishers, and remained on the line during the engage-

about one mile.

ment, which was severe

left

Col.

Lansing was badly wounded in the

fore-arm by a sharpshooter

Stafford, of the 86th,

and

left

assuming command.

the

field,

Maj.

That night the

regiments were withdrawn, and recrossed to the north side

On

On

;

the 18th Hancock's

the loss of the 86th was light.

command was

again on

way

The 86th

towards Petersburg, reaching there on the 19th.

was placed in the front

its

line of works, to the right of the

at Nel-

Jerusalem Plank-Boad, and remained there and in Forts

Ford and erected a line of works near the river, after which attacked the enemy and drove them into their main

Michael and Scott for about two weeks, constantly under

of the river.

the 28th crossed the

Pamunkey

son's

line.

The

up a deadly

picket lines were but a few rods apart, and kept fire.

More dreaded than

all

were the sharp-

fire,

when the regiment was moved

(called

into Fort

Sedgwick

by the boys Fort Hell), on the plank-road running

into Petersburg,

and

at a point

where the

lines

were but a

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

116

The

short distance apart.

picket line at one point in front

of the works was only fifteen paces from the rebel

Mahone) about twelve hundred

the rebel fort opposite (Fort

The

yards.

and

line,

was a very large inclosed work, containing

fort

beloved, honored, and respected by

ters,

no one dared to

;

remain within their bomb-proofs, as they would not

resist a

Returning

1865, doing the usual picket duty, and making thorough

generally occurring about twice in twenty -four hours, often

ceived orders to prepare for a march.

lasting

men

two or three hours

at a time,

sometimes calling the

out two or three times during the night

;

at such times

a person could count from ten to thirty shells in the air,

pointed for these works, and

all

was of daily occurrence

it

that from one to ten would be killed.

In these night

at-

tacks the pickets in front of the works would have a hard

ground as

time, and were obliged to lie as flat to the ble lets

if a

;

were

man fired

raised his at

be relieved after

head on either side a score of bul-

At

it.

this place the pickets could only

nightfiill,

and were frequently obliged

On

crawl back and forth on their hands and knees. last

possi-

to

the

moved to where they were set to work

of September the regiment was relieved, and

the extreme

left

of the

line,

cutting roads through a strip of woods and building a re-

doubt, returning after an absence of three days to their old quarters.

when

it

The regiment remained there until the 24th, moved with the corps, reaching the Weldon road

On

on the evening of the 26th. crossed Hatcher's

He

the morning of the 27th

Run, and soon struck the enemy.

now on the extreme

Trobriand's Brigade was

covering the front and flank of the brigade. line

was formed

where the 124th

The

day,

skirmish-

wood, excepting to the right,

New York

was posted.

the rebel pickets about one mile, but were brought to a halt

by the

On

movement on to

had

that even-

ing the regiment was again in

its

old (juarters.

on the skirmish-lines that day was three

the 9th was

moved about one. mile to the right, and assigned position in the new line remained here until the final advance, March 28, 1865, participating in all the engagements until the surrender of Gen. Lee, April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court- House. After the surrender started homeward bound. At Burkesville Junction, on the 14th, heard of the assassination of President Lincoln moved through Richmond ;

;

and Fredericksburg, reaching Washington about the middle of May, and camped near Fairfax Seminary

;

in the grand review in W^ashington

On

quarters xVrmy of the Potomac,

City.

participated

the 29th

made May

17, 1865.

After

the grand review the regiment prepared for the trip final

July

1865.

4,

home

muster-out, which occurred at Elmira, N. Y.,

and the

EXTRACTS FROM CORRESPONDENCE. The

following extracts from letters written by Lieut. D.

F. Brown, quartermaster of the 86th

New York

Regiment

ofiicers

the casualties as they took place in the regiment

The

''Fredericksburg^

loss

and about

'^

Dear

Sir,

"

Our

as lieutenant-colonel

commanding.

On

the

afternoon of the 29th orders were received to pack up and

be in readiness to move.

About sundown

a division of the

9th Corps came marching up to relieve the troops in the

The

rebels, seeing the

movement, opened

a

mortally wounded, dying within a few hours.

This was a

serious loss to the regiment, as he was a good soldier

and a

Starting with the regiment in 1861 as a

second lieutenant of

Company

F, and rising by merit to

of the regiment as lieutenant-colonel, he was

men

fell

7,

1863.

confusion of the past few

time or inclination

Chapin

May

to write.

.

.

.

-

about eleven o'clock a.m., while

in that fearful contest.

Capt.

W. W. Angle, Company

Capt. D. B, was mortally wounded, and has not since been heard of. S. Ellsworth, G|)mpany D, was killed instantly, a rifie-ball passing through his temples. Lieut. M. B. Stafford, Company F, and acting adjutant, was severely

Company

I,

wounded

in the thigh.

received a very severe

wound

Nathan H. Vincent, Company D, was places.

After the

fall

Lieut. A. J. AVoodward, in both

slightly

of Ellsworth, the

knees.

wounded

command

Lieut.

in several

company him covered

of the

Gen. Whipple rode up, and seeing

devolved on him.

with blood, requested him to go the rear, but he refused to leave his

company. furious cannonade, during which Lieut. -Col. Stafford was

little

brave Lieut. -Col.

leading his

The regiment remained here (Fort Sedgwick) until November 29. On the 13th of November Col. Lansing was discharged, on his own application, and Maj. Staff"ord was

— Amid the excitement and

days, I have had but

men.

command

On

permanently extended across the run.

had been

noon

the

the

line

time to time during the war, contain fuller statements of

marched

until

gallant officer.

That night learned that the new

was

Vaughan road, and there bivouacked next day, when the march was resumed, and

front line.

works for protection.

set to building

Volunteers, and published in the Corning Journal from

intended, the order to retire

back to the

in

of works.

a

The

S. Sharpshooters.

given, and about ten o'clock p.m. the brigade was

mustered

line

the part of the Union forces having failed

accomplish the purpose

thirty

behind their main

the 6th the brigade was relieved by a portion of the

5th Corps.

ade they advanced for a charge, but were repulsed by the

2d U.

rebels, posted

They were immediately

battery placed opposite this point, and after a furious cannon-

skirmish-line, assisted by the

pushing

line,

of the service by reason of General Order No. 26, Head-

all

rebels

brigade forded the run in battle

the

;

in a dense

The

the 5th they

and encountered the enemy near Hatcher's

to

The

Run.

that day re-

day of May, 1865, Lieut. D. F. Brown was mustered out

left

remaining there

marched

On On

Gen.

73d and 86th, with the 124th New York, were advanced as skirmishers about half a mile,

in

and remained there until the 4th day of February,

preparations for the spring campaign.

the firing was liable to be opened at any

;

— now

went into winter quar-

to near Petersburg,

moment,

shell

In



The

scenes here at times were terrific

command.

in the

command of Maj. Nathan A. Vincent, formerly a private of Company D, and on the 30th marched about six miles, and shortly after started on what is known as the Weldon raid.

batteries

all

the evening the regiment was quietly withdrawn,

— the 73d and 86th New York and the 99th Pennsylvania, — two of guns, and twelve mortars.

three regiments,

YORK.

Capt.

N.Warner and

Capt. J. H. Lansing, I

am happy

say, came out unhurt, though constantly exposed to the enemy's

to

fire.

behaved admirably, and the men followed their example Both officers and men received a flattering compliment from Gen. Whipple. Among the privates seven were killed and seventy-one wounded. I have not been able to get the names of Tiie officers

in

deeds of daring.

the killed and wounded.

Chapin.

We

deplore deeply the loss of Lieut. -Col.

His death has cast a gloom over the whole command.

The

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, of Capt. Angle and Capt. Ellsworth will be severely

loss

felt

by the

regiment.

command

"After the death of Col. Chapin, the

of the regiment

YORK.

dead; J. K. Fisk, since dead; Robert Laning, since dead; Stewart, A. Simpson. " The Union loss was

devolved upon Capt. J. H. Lansing, who discharged the duties of his new position with great coolness and bravery. On several occasions

enemy's.

with his men, he charged on the rebel batteries and drove them from their works. Tuesday the whole army fell back to the place

our nation's birthday.

occupied before the advance.

F.

I>.

"In the Field, Gettysburg, July

"Dear with you

Sir,

Brown." 4,

1863.

— Two months have elapsed since I have communicated

ered; in places they lay in ridges.

H. Lansing, he having assumed the command on the memorable

of Chancellorsville.

had not

Lieut.-Col. Iliggins

from the wounds received at Chancellorsville field,

to enable

him

to take the

but hearing that the army was in motion, he hastened to join his

command, which he accomplished two days after the battle. The engagement at the Ford was mostly between cavalry, and it was a sharp and severe contest. The loss in our regiment was about thirty in killed and wounded. The enemy was handsomely repulsed, and driven back about five miles. The officers and men of the 86th nobly sustained their well-earned reputation, and added another proof of

and their devotion

their courage

On

to the cause of

the 14th of June the whole

army was

our

common

country.

Our direction was northward. We passe i Manassas, Bull Run, and Centreville. Oh, what associations are connected with these names! How many homes have been darkened by the war-cloud that burst with such maddening fury on these memorable fields How many hearts have been wrung with anguish by the loss of fathers, brothers, sons, and friends, who poure 1 out their blood and laid down their lives upon '•

in motion.

!

.

the?3 huge, rosk-buiit altars of their country

mac on the

26th, at

!

We

Edwards' Ferry, and on the

crossed the Poto-

day of July our

1st

corps reached the battle-field of Gettysburg.

"On

the 2d instant the battle besarae general.

on our

left

The 3d Corps was enemy massed his forces, and made the purpose of breaking it. The contest was

wing, against which the

a desperate charge for

the most desperate and deadly of the war.

demonstrated his ability

to

Lieut.-Col. Higgins clearly

He

command.

wound in his The command

received a

and was taken from the field. who added another proof to his well-earned reputation for coolness and courage. I will here mention an incident. While the 86th and the 124th New York Volunteers were making a charg(3 upon the enemy, Gen. Ward sat on his horse watching the movement, and as they fell back in perfect order, after acfrom a

side

rifle-ball,

then devolved upon Maj. Lansing,

complishing their object, the general rode up to Maj. Lansing and remarked, I never saw men behave better. Major, your men have '

nobly won the red diamrjnd, the Kearney badge.'

The major replied, proud of the blue badge, but if you wish it we will adopt the red.' The blue badge was the one used by the 3d Division, which is broken up, but we still wore the badge. " Capt. J. N. Warner, Co. K, was killed instantly. He was a brave

'

We

feel

.

and able

Lieut.

officer.

Hammond,

.

.

Co. A, lost a leg

j

Lieut. Blanch-

was wounded in the hand Lieut. Packer, Co. E, wounded hand; Lieut. Seeley, Co. K, acting adjutant, was present during the engagement, but afterwards went on the field to look after the body of Capt. Warner, and he has not been heard from since. ard, Co. B,

;

in

The following tioned

a

is

list

of the killed

and wounded not heretofore men-

:

" Killed.— Co. A, Sergt.

J. Boies, John Hart; Co. B, L. Piatt, J. Taylor: Co. D, Calvin L. Stearns; Co. F, George Tremain, John Topple; Co. H, Jeremiah Everitt Co. I, A. C. Palmer, J. M. Black;

man "

;

Co. K,

Hyman

WoundecL—Co.

Hazeltine.

A,

Jeremiah

Rogers, Corp. R. Smith,

W.

Sergt. A. Shauger, Corp. A.

Root; Co. C, Co. E, R.

S.

Francis

Keller,

Gilbert

James W.

Cliafee;

Co. B,

Fisher,

Chafee,

Amidon,

J.

W.

Rose, C. L. Odell, L. R.

Beard; Co. D, J. Bovier, G. Powell, W. E. Stewart;

J.

Washburn;

Co. F, Allen W. Beeman, J. E. Brown, Sergt. Tremain; Co. G, E. E. Thompson, S. Hall, J. Hadley, Jr., L. Maddison, F. Gregory, W. Thomas, Corp. V. Allison; Co. H, Sergt. James Moidt, Corp. J. W. Ostrander, H. Dawley, W. S. Miller, P. Pierce, H. Cook Co. I, F. J. Horton, J. Smith, J. Carrigan, Sergt. A. J. Northrup: Co. K, Corp. W. Owen, Corp. N. W. Winship, since S.

;

Our victory

is

is

literally cov-

complete.

This

is

Thought travels back to the sanguinary fields of the Revolution, when liberty perched upon the banner of the triumphant free. Here the enemy of the same principle lies prostrate at her feet. This day is commemorated here by the warm blood of slaughtered thousands, it!

palpitating on the soil of our noble Keystone State.

"Yours

in the cause of liberty,

" D. F. Brown, Q.-M.''

"In the Field, Brandy Station, Va., Dec.

field

sufficiently recovered

E.

Oh, what hallowed memories cluster around

On the Oth of June last, our brigade broke camp at Falmouth, and moved up the river about twenty-three miles, to Beverly Ford, where, on the 11th, we encountered the enemy. Our regiment was at that time commanded by Maj. J.

W.

heavy, but nothing compared with the

His dead are unburied, and the ground

they have been eventful months.

:

117

"Dear



6,

1863.

have unavoidably delayed giving to the numerous friends of our regiment in old Steuben the result of the recent engagement beyond the Rapidan, as I have hardly had a moment to Sir,

I

devote to the matter.

"At

a late hour on the night of the 25th ultimo the bugle sounded

Every man was busy in his arrangemarch until the prompt command of Col. Higgins was given to fall in. The river was crossed on the 26th at Jacob's Mill. On the 27th an engagement took place. The 3d Corps became engaged about ten o'clock a.m. At two o'clock p.m. the 1st Division was ordered up to meet the enemy. Our brigade, commanded by Gen. Ward, was selected to make the charge, and the 86th and 124th New York Volunteers was selected as the storming-party. A short time previous to the charge Col. Higgins was borne from the field, a musket-ball having taken off a finger and passed through both thighs. Maj. Stafford then took command, and led the 86th in one of the most desperate conflicts that it ever experienced. Our regiment and the 124th alone regained the ground that had been lost by the 3d Division, and by sundown had driven the enemy sixty rods farther than any portion of our line had extended, and they held the ground during the entire night. You can form some idea of the severity of the engagement, when I assure you the two regiments engaged expended sixteen thousand rounds of cartridges. Maj. Stafford went back several times for ammunition. Capts. Harrower and Baker the interesting call to 'pack up.'

ments

for a

were appointed acting

field-officers

to

assist

Maj. Stafford during

the engagement, and Lieut. Packer was acting adjutant.

panies of the 86th were

commanded

as follows

A; Lieut. Booth, Co. B; Capt Robert Barton, Vincent, Co.

D

;

Lieut. J. G. Copley, Co.

E

;

:

The com-

Lieut. Holms, Co.

Co.

C; Capt. N. H.

Lieut.

Henry Thurber,

F; Lieut. A. B. Stanton, Co. G; Lieut. Stone, Co. H; Lieut. Wood, Co. I: Capt. Phinney, Co. K. " Gen. Ward paid a flattering compliment to the officers and men, and said he was proud of them. The general at first supposed that the regiment had been cut off and taken prisoners, and when he learned what they had accomplished he remarked to the major, in a playful manner, that he took his men out to find more comfortable Co.

lodo-inors

"The lor.

with Gen. Lee. killed in our

regiment in this engagement were Russel T.ay-

First Sergeant, Co.

Wright, Co. C

;

G; John Baxter, Sergeant,

Co. C; George

George H. W. Celover, Co. H.

"The wounded were

as follows: 1st Sergt. J.

Ryon, Corp. Nicholas

Longnot, Jacob Horb, James White, Lewis Hart, James Chaffee, David Hoyt, all of Co. A; 1st Sergt. F. D. Loomis, Daniel Alden, Nathan Phenix, of Co. B Lieut. Henry Thurber, George Babcock, George Murdock, of Co. F; Corp. A. Allen, Franklin Hallock, Asel Wilson, John Wallace, Lafayette Taylor, Foster Gregory, of Co. G Corp. Jesse Barton, D. L. Rowley, of Co. II; Wesley Simons, of Co. I; Corp. David Countruman, Corp. H. Hillrun, J. C. Sabin, Charles Wood, Thomas Fanand, Asa Cross, of Co. K. "Most of the wounds were slight. While inarching to the Rapidan, on the 26th, Albertus Russell, of Co. E, was killed, and W. S. Kelley, of Co. D, was wounded, by the accidental discharge of a gun. " The intelligence of the death of John Baxter will fall with oppressive weight upon his family and friends, but they can be assured ;

that he died while nobly battling in the defense of his country.

He He

none of his moral principles by his associations in the army. was regarded by his officers, and all who knew him, as a brave soldier. " To-day Lieut.-Col. Lansing arrived, and was heartily greeted by the whole regiment. The command will now devolve on him, and I lost

;

should judge from his looks that his absence has not diminished his ambition or courao^e. " I remain yours, etc., " D. F. Brown.'

"May Dear

Sir,

— May



" Company C, Corning. Henry Lanning, leg Charles Comfort, arm and abdomen; Sergt. W. Mcintosh, knee; Edwin Harridan, shoulder; Samuel Stevens, killed; Corp. Sam. Merring, killed Martin Mahr, killed Corp. F. E. Clark, hand Jacob Rarrick, both legs Cyrus A. Hurd, missing; Asa Car»ner, missing; Perry Washburn, ;

;

missing.

10, 1864.

morning, and was continued with great fury during the day.

;

;

"Company D,

the battle opened at an early hour in the

6,

YORK.

;

" In the Field, near Spottsylvania Court-House, Va., "

NEW

HISTORY OF. STEUBEN COUNTY,

118

The

Hornellsville.

— Capt. N. H. Vincent, arm

severe; Samuel Banta, shoulder, severe

Sergt.

;

arm and thigh; Chas. Hough,

L. Hazeltine,

and thigh, John Mcintosh, foot

slight; A. Silsbee, ab-

86th bore well their part in the engagement, making frequent charges on the enemy's works. Capt. J. G. Copely, Co. E, is wounded in the

domen, severe.

arm and

in the side;

leg; Thos. Weaver, finger; Jacob Hanick, thigh.

W. W. Card

"Company F, Lindley. Joshua Vankuran, arm; Lewis Clark, hand; Oscar Monroe, missing; Sergt. J. J. Talbot, missing.

Capt.

leg; Capt. Robert Barton, Co. C,

N". S.

Baker, Co. G,

wounded

is

is

wounded

in the thigh; Lieut.

others of the killed and

H.

wounded

wounded

is

in the face; Lieut.

C. Thurber, Co. F, in the foot;

in the regiment,

whose names

May

was engaged

all

are doing well

arm

:

I,

to the





"

arm

E.Baker, hip; Francis Hurlburt, foot; T.Campbell, thigh Henry O'Connor, thigh Peter Spencer, arm ;

;

leg; L. Duel,

Isaac Trow-

;

bridge, thigh.

Company £".— Sergt.

E. D.

Kemps,

leg; Corp.

H. H.

Cole, foot;

"

— L.

;

John

G.

Luther Mattison,

Cooper's Plains.

7,

William

— Color

Boughton, leg;

J.

J. C.

Sergt. Daniel Carson, knee,

Cobb, back J. D. Thompson, leg. " Company K, Woodhull. Charles Fisk, thigh

Charles

;



Capt. John Phinney, leg and

arm

Hugh

;

;

Ben. Miller, finger;

Clark, killed

;

Sergt.

James

Crowl, killed; Lieut. J. B. Spencer, wounded.

"The above others

are

all

sixteen in killed and

have been able

I

wounded on the

We

10th.

There are doubtless charge one hundred and

to find.

lost in the

wounded and missing.

Capt. Stone was inand Capt. Vincent severely wounded by the same shell. They were both excellent officers, and their loss, WMth that of Capt. Phinney, will be severely felt. Lieut. James Cherry, adjutant, was severely wounded in the thigh. stantly killed by a shell,

The men

are not hurt.

are in good spirits.

Wright,

Todd and Wood

All looks favorable.

"Yours, leg; C.

;

W.Stevens,

;

Corp. Clark Spicer, head;

Bettis, chest;

" Col. Lansing, Maj. Stafford, Capt. Harrower, Capt.

E. Warren, side; B. F. Alexander, hand; M.

— Sergt. Vallison,

F. Stone, killed

Cummings, arm; Alphonzo Rowley, arm

leg.

Company

;

Fletcher.

"Company

E. Cilley, head; H. Hewitt, shoulder; R. R. Sweet, hand.

Enchard,



severe;

;



Comptany F.

— Corp. G. Delat, slight

John Fulton, pelvis, severe. Company H, Troupsburg. Capt. Samuel ;

finger; Geo.

In addition

Adams, of Co. B, Henry Willick, H, and Charles Bailey, of Co. I, are



^'

W. H. Andrews,

none are considered dangerous.

:

W.

Sergt.

Fairbanks, finger; Sergt. Philip Bartle, face; Corp. Jerry Williams,

Henry Tenbrook, of Co. among the killed. The wounded are as follows '' Company A. Sergt. Gilbert Haynes, arm; Corp. John Feistner, arm; J. Smith, thigh; and Geo. Mazen, leg. " Company B. Sergt. Dennis Talbert, shoulder; Corp. John Amidon, face; John Hillion, William Batchee, shoulder. " Company C. Sergt. Geo. M. Clute, arm John Houghtaling, hand; Philip Svvick, abdomen; W. Dawley, arm. ''Company I). Sergt. A. C. Rogers, arm; Milo Tucker, hand; J.

''

;

commenced at an early hour, and our regiment day. The officers mentioned as wounded yesterday

above, H. Haliett, of Co. G, Calvin of Co.

" Company G, Canisteo.

fighting

7,

— Charles Hart, arm



I

have not yet learned. "

" Company E, Elmira.

etc.,

" D. F. Brow

N,

Q.-M."

foot. '^

Company H.

hand; E.

— Sergt.

W.

Bartle, shoulder; Corp.

arm; Jesse K. Barton, hand; John

Potter,

S.

Cook,

Bastle,

hand;

D.

"Dear

A. Slater, hand. '^

Company

I.

— W.

A. Crout, thigh; Thomas McTigue, arm;

Feredenburgh, back. " Comjmny A".— Sergt. G. Merring, leg; T. F. Ferrand, leg; Barber, head; W. Lanning, hand; L. Medbury, hand.

G.

ball

J.

W.

all the killed and wounded in the regiment at this Lansing was hit on the leg by a spent ball, and a passed through Major Stafford's hat, producing no injury to

Lieut.-Col.

either. '^

May

9,

the 86th was on skirmish-line, having been sent out the

They came in at twelve m. Capts. Todd, Harrower, Stone, Phinney, and Wood have been in command of their companies during this protracted battle, and are well. Lieut. Jerry Ryan comnight previous.

manded

Co. A.

"May house.

any

10,

sharp fighting

all

day

in

The 86th was engaged towards

casualties in our regiment.

the vicinity of the court-

was the heaviest

I ever heard.

Have not heard of made them. The musketry

night.

Just before dark a charge was

on the enemy's works, and our forces carried

" Yours, in our country's cause, F.



I

suppose you have heard through Maj. Stafford of

We

left

our lines at Cold Harbor, and on the

Brown, Q.-M."

Anna on 15th we

and on the 16th crossed the James at Wilcox Landing, near Powhatan. It was a mjignificent spectacle to witness the crossing of the James River by our army. A large number of steamboats, and numerous other water-craft, rendered the scene the gayest and liveliest of anything you can imagine, and as each boat moved from the shore laden with its living freight, cheer after cheer from thousands of brave hearts rang out upon the air, reminding one of a picnic on a grand scale. The constant booming of cannon, however, in the direction of Petersburg, broke the enchantment of the scene, and reminded us that we were making no pleasure trip, but would soon be grappling with the huge monster of secession on crossed the Chickahominy,

another bloody

field.

On

the afternoon of the 16th, while our divi-

massed behind one of the earthworks just taken from the enemy, Lieut. A. B. Stanton was hit by a piece of shell, and died a sion was

short time after.

Lieut. Stanton

came out with the regiment, and had

been in every engagement through which

All so far goes finely.

"D.

Sir,

27, 1864.

the casualties in the regiment since the battle of the North the 12th.

" The above are time.

"In the Field near Petersburg, Va., June

had passed. His last I must now die On the same day, G. Blackman, Co. E, was wounded in the

words were, for

it.'

'

I

have served

my

it

country faithfully.

Henry McFall, wounded in shoulder. "June 18, our regiment made if'charge, and after a sharp contest was repulsed. The loss was as follows Lieut. Charles S. Carr, Co.'I, wounded in w^rist; Sergt. Steven Chase, color-bearer, Co. H, head; Edward Schofield, Co. F, hand; E. Allington, Co. F, wounded in abdomen, since died; Oliver Campbell, Co. G, arm; Milo Tucker, Co. D, shoulder;

"In the Field, May

"Dear

— I wrote you on the 10th

12, 1864.

and gave you a list of casualties in the 86th up to that time. There was a severe engagement on the 10th, in which our regiment participated. The battle continued all day, and a little before dark a charge was made on the enemy's works. The 86th Regiment led the charge, having a hand-tohand fight. The following are the names of the killed and wounded, so far as I have been able to ascertain Sir,

inst.,

:

" Company A, Syracuse.



William Fuller, back; Sergt. Sam. Ingham, arm; George Lawson, shoulder; James White, thigh; Dan. Palmer, leg; John Brown. B, Addison. *' Company Charles B. Jordan, chest; Sergt. N.



Reynolds, thigh.

:

hand. "

June 22, 1864, the veterans of the 70th Regiment, N. Y. Vols., one hundred and thirty in all, were transferred to the 86th. The regiment now numbers two hundred and forty men present. "June 27, Maj. Stafford still unhurt, and is in command of the regiment. "

Yours

in the cause of liberty,

"D. F.Brown, Q.-M."

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, "In the Field before Petersburg, Va., "

Dear

Oct.

1864.

7,

that the time has arrived for us to discharge the sacred duty of voting.

We

YORK.

119

he raised a

to country so characteristic of his ancestors,

— Having received our ballots to-day, we are reminded

Sir,

NEW

company of volunteers, and in May following, as lieutenantcolonel of the 23d New York Volunteers (called the South-

are thankful that, through the liberal policy of our noble State,

the soldier

They say but

permitted to vote.

is

little

about

politics,

but they think and feel much. " Our regiment numbers now about three hundred present for duty.

ern Tier Rifles), hastened to the capital, reaching Arlington

Heights the next morning after the battle of Bull Run.

As lieutenant-colonel he commanded the regiment through

The men are in good health and spirits. Col. Lansing is in command, and although there is no forward movement since the affair at Deep Bottom, yet he has found enough to occupy his attention. Our

portant

regiment has been

(second), Chantilly, South Mountain, and Antietam.

in the rifle-pits in the

extreme front, within speak-

ing distance of the enemy, for several weeks past, exposed to the of the sharpshooters.

and

Pope's campaign, and led

fire

For two weeks past the 86th held Forts Michael

which constitute a portion of our front line of works. An attack was made several nights ago on our pickets, a little to our left, which resulted in a repulse of the enemy, with a loss of several killed and wounded, and about one hundred prisoners. Capt. Harrower was in command of the picket line on that occasion, and for his prudent and brave conduct received a flattering compliment, in a general order from our corps commander.

Rappahannock,

of

battles

of the 1st

stafi"

Army

of the Potomac,

Brown,

Q.-M.''

battle of

Fredericksburg, and on which he officiated

aide-de-camp

to

in general orders for gallantry

The family

of Crane

is

of

English descent, and the ancestor of the family, Henry

— born 1635, —came

as record

is

America about the year 1660,

to

staff"

home he New York at

John Crane, son of Henry Crane, who was born in 1664, and commanded a company in an expedition against hardship and exposure

in that

New

York, as the result of

campaign.

His grandfather, Daniel Crane,

of the

term

returned to his regiment as colonel of the 107th Volunteers, joined the regiment at Leesburg,

Va., then on the march to Gettysburg.

Gettysburg he had

command

Gen. Hooker, to join Sherman low his career

would be tions,

—born 1756, — was

a sol-

few men. sent, at

under command of

To

Chattanooga.

through " Sherman's

march

fol-

to the sea"

to give an outline sketch of the victories, priva-

marches,

pal of

In the battle of

of the regiment in the thick-

His corps (the 20th) was then

in

Army

until the expiration of his

Gen. Crane traces his descent from

1711, and died

by him.

provost-marshal-

of Gen. Hooker, in the

est of the fight, yet losing only a

Capt.

in

battle-field

assistant

found of his descent as son of John Crane, of

Norfolk, England.

Canada,

on the

of service of two years, when, after only two weeks' respite

Gen. Nirom M. Crane was born in Penn Yan, Yates

Crane,

as

Gen. Reynolds, and was complimented

Potomac, where he remained

N. Y., Dec. 13, 1828.

F.

Reynolds, where he remained until after the close of the

general on the

GEN. NIROM M. CRANE.

etc.,

of that renowned campaign, the princi-

whicb were Resaca,

Cassville, Dallas,

Peach-Tree

He, with others, being

Creek, and Atlanta, and the taking of Savannah, followed

church when the news of the battle of Concord came, at

by the march through the Carolinas, and the capture and

dier during the Revolutionary war.

once enlisted

surrender of Johnston's army.

in the service of his country.

About the year 1806 he removed from Connecticut with his family, and settled in Yates Co., N. Y., in what is now the town of Benton, then a wilderness. Hence he



was a pioneer of his

life as

in that county,

During the campaign

was a volunteer and ranked

as second lieutenant of a rifle

In the

fall

one term.

whom At

merchandise store in Wayne, this county, and continued as such, in that place and

Penn Yan, during the remainder of

In the year 1849 he established himself

in business as a

Wayne, which he continued successfully for and removed to Hornellsville, where he carried

at

three years,

on mercantile

business until

vice-president of the

Bank of

bank

until it

which he continues

office

he held

Home,

Bath, N. Y., Gen. Crane was appointed by Governor

Robinson

as one of the nine trustees,

and

also the treas-

is

urer of that institution.

Gen. Crane has been identified with the its

organization, although not in

Republican

any sense of

the term a professional politician.

In the year 1852, Oct. 19, he married

Marie Louise,

second daughter of Matthew MacDowell, of Wayne, Steu-

1856, when, being chosen

ben Co., a lady of rare culture, and descended from English

bank

ancestry on the maternal, and Scotch ancestry on the pater-

Hornellsville (the

first

established there), he remained in connection with the busi-

ness of that

Co.,

the organization of the Soldiers' and Sailors'

party since

his minority.

merchant

Upon at

the age of fifteen he became a clerk in a general

&

In 1869 he was chosen county clerk, which

maturity,

the subject of this notice was the youngest.

brigadier-general

of the same year he opened a private bank,

under the name of N. M. Crane

farmer, and died, at the age of sixty-one, in the year 1845,

who reached

and

1865, and returned home.

to carry on.

leaving two sons and five daughters

was brevetted

for gallant

Gen. Crane was mustered out of the service in June,

company in the war of 1812 was engaged in the battle of Queenstown Heights, Canada. He led a quiet life as a ;

South Carolina,

with rank from March, 1865.

and there spent the remainder

a farmer, dying at about the age of seventy.

in

conduct, he

meritorious

Gen. Crane's father, Nirom Crane, one of nine children,

of

Corps of the

commanded by Maj.-Gen. John

Subsequently he was assigned

etc.,

" D. F.

at

acting in-

Scott,

" Yours,

Co.,

as

Army

Run

Bull

Groveton,

was detailed

After the latter battle he spector-general on the

more im-

successively in the

it

was

closed, in

1859.

He

at

once started a private bank, the business of which he carried on until the breaking out of the

war of the Rebellion.

In April, 1861, inspired with that patriotism and loyalty

nal side.

Their children are Sidney H., Marion Louise, and

MacDowell.

Guy

NEW YORK.

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

120

CHAPTER XXV. HISTOIiy-(Continued).

War

Steuben in the

of the Rebellion

— (Continued).

Company

C.

— Captain, Fox

tenant, Charles J.

horrors stood out in awful vision be-

all its

The

fore the people of this country.

disastrous battles of

Company D.

Company E.



was during

when

this hour,

the pall of despondency seemed to be settling

down upon

the North, that President Lincoln issued a

July

call,

1,

for

three hundred thousand more men.

Gen. A.

Diven was

S.

from the Twenty-seventh sultry

summer night

District.

member

New

Congress from

ant,

Company

I.

— Captain,

Benjamin

tenant,

of Congress to do

so,

I

and thus

first

left

meeting with

rallied

to

Washington

much

Beecher that he

regiments by districts."

and on the

for Elmira.

fol-

Although

at

men soon Rev. Thomas K.

discouragement, able

support.

his

raise

to answer " yes,"

Gen. Diven was prompt lowing mofning

Van Yalkenburgh is mean to invite every member going.

is

going, and you must go.

regiment in

raise a

It

said of

is

Second Lieutenant, Lewis 0.

;

Newton

T. Colby

Company K.

— Captain, Allen N.

On

Sill

Second Lieutenant, Alonzo B. Howard.

;

the 15th the regiment arrived at Washington, and

by President Lincoln went into camp on Ar-

lington Heights, where,

August

19, they were

and on the following day the regiment moved

The 107th was brigaded

Massachusetts and two Pennsylvania

regiments, forming

of Whipple's Division, Reserve Corps,

the 5th Brigade

unteers

left

Elmira en route

and on the evening

N^w York

State Vol-

Maryland, and at seven p.m. they were in

glorious the

ized under the call for the three

of battle and heard the roar of dread

and received a banner from the State

in recognition of that

fact.

The

following were the

field

Robert B. Van Yalkenburgh der S. Diven

Fanton

;

;

Quartermaster,

Patrick

;

and

staff" officers

E.

Colonel,

Graves

P.

;

;

;

Hull

x\djutant,

Quartermaster-

Chaplain, Ezra F. Crane

;

H. Flood

:

Lieutenant-Colonel, Alexan-

Major, Gabriel L. Smith

Sergeant, L. B. Chidsay

geon,

to join the

from our camp

Assistant Surgeon,

;

Sur-

James D.

Hewitt; Sergeant- Major, John R. Lindsay; CommissarySergeant,

Henry Inscho

;

Hospital Steward, John

M.

Flood.

Five companies of this regiment were raised in the

army at

artillery, !

South Mountain

how

I

sharers in the strife that was in other regiments

long to wait. lay on their

and marked

we were soon to mingle how after a march we encamped at daybreak on the

with cautious march we advanced

rounded the 23d

!

Frederick City we saw the smoke

scene of an ensanguined battle of a day before

victors of

we broke

Washington

for the defense of

the strife in which

night of fatiguing

as

How

and with songs of triumph crossed the

at Arlington,

Potomac

How

march.

said, "

August moon looked down upon us

The regiment was mustered into the service from July 31 to August 31, 1862. It was the first regiment organhundred thousand men,

line of

In speaking of this movement Gen. Diven

camp

Washington.

to

Gen. McClellan's

army, moving northward to repel Gen. Lee's invasion of

company was mustered

of August 13 the 107th Regiment

Fort Lyon,

Sept. 1, 1862, with the 35th

6 orders were received to join

into the United States service in July,

to

received,

near Alexandria, Ya.

Sept.

first

bat-

first in

August 22 marching orders were

talion drill.

Gen. Diven traversed Schuyler, Chemung, Steuben, and

The

First Lieutenant,

;

Yan Yalkenburgh commanding.

Recruiting was rapid.

First Lieu-

;

E. Rutter.

Colonel

Allegany Counties, holding two meetings every day.

First

;

and with

aside his clerical duties,

laid

First

Wilson; Second Lieutenant, Nathaniel

C.

after a review

you go home and

;

C.

Henry D. Donnelly

abruptly, said, " Will

Pomeroy

J.

;

John M. Goodrich

to see

your district?

F.

Captain,

Sayler.

York, with the message that Secretary

First

;

him immediately. He immediately answered the summons, and the secretary, addressing him Seward wished

Second Lieutenant, Har-

;

;

ant, J.

Near midnight, on one

in

First Lieu-

;

Lieuten— Captain, James H Miles Knox. Milton Roe Second Lieutenant, John Lamon LieutenJohn Company G. — G. H. Brigham Second Lieutenant, Ezra Gleason. LieuErastus Clark Company H. —

tenant,

Washington by Gen. Van Yalkenburgh, of Steuben, and Mr. Pomeroy, of Auburn, both members of residence

Jr.

Morgan

Company F.

of Congress

he was called upon at his

in July,

Morgan,

Captain,

time

at that

Second Lieutenant, Odell D.

;

Captain, William L.

low Atwood.

already victorious

First Lieu-

;

Reynolds.

of the Potomac, had cast a gloom over the North, and

It

Lieu-

First

Second Lieutenant, Irving Bron-

;

Samuel A. Benedict

tenant,

tenant, William L.

arms of the Confederacy.

William F. Fox;

— Captain, Hector M. Stocum

1861, and the unsuccessful Peninsula campaign of the Array

served to add additional vigor to the

Second Lieutenant, George

son.

This regiment was organized during the dark hours of 1862, when the novelty of military life had ceased, and war with

;

First Lieu-

;

Swain.

THE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTH REGIMENT.

fierce

Lathrop Baldwin

Y. B. Bachman

tenant, Martin

MILITARY

— Captain,

Company B.

!"

!

in the track

eagerly

!

how

all

day

of the brave

we burned

making heroes of our

how we envied

Ah

!

to

be

friends

the glory that sur-

this gallant

regiment had not

The night of the 17th of September they arms, and ere the " gray-eyed morn smiled on

fol-

the frowning night" was heard the rattle of musketry, and

Company C at Painted Post, Company F at Addison, Company G at Bath, Company I at Corning, and Company K at Hornellsville. The

the ominous* booming of artillery, reverberated over the

army, told only too well that the battle of Antietam had

companies of the regiment were organized as follows

at the regimental association in

lowing towns of Steuben County

Company A.



:

:

Captain, Ezra F. Crane; First Lieutenant,

Melville C. Wilkinson

;

Second Lieutenant, John M. Losie.

opened.

member

As Gen. Diven remarked

in

an address delivered

1873, " Comrades, you

re-

the rest of that day."

Yes, the surviving members of the 107th will not soon

NEW

HISTOKY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, September day.

forget the horrors of that

was an

It

all-

Night

day's contest, and almost a hand-to-hand struggle.

men

put an end to the contest, and ninety of those brave

who marched

out to meet the enemy in the morning, at

night lay upon the

the lOTth's baptism of

and nobly did

fire,

This was

and wounded.

field, killed

pass through

it

Gordon,

and

He

bravery

its

The 107th New York

says, "

Van Valkenburgh,

Col.

bestowed

battle,

of praise upon this regiment for

soldierly bearing.

Kegiment,

of the

in his official report

many encomiums

I held in reserve, throw-

ing them into the edge of a piece of woods on the

advancing, must be held at

same

report,

he says,

'^

The

all

Again, in the

hazards."

advancing, I

rebel lines again

my

threw forward a portion of

brigade to support those

New York

nearly in front, while the 107th

support Capt. Cotheran's battery on the

was directed

under

ness to

its

though exposed

recalled,

and a

perilous position,

over

fire

adds, " I have no

and maintained

to a front fire

head from batteries

its

word but those of 4

field, in

moved with

fire,

its

to

This fine

left.

regiment, but just organized and brought into the this battle for the first time

left,

who met

which, I was informed by an aid of Gen. Hooker,

me

steadi-

ground

until

from the enemy,

in

He

rear."

its

praise for their con-

Capt. Cotheran, whose battery the regiment supported,

the following tribute in his

it

New York

107th Regiment,

Valkenburgh,

is

report:

official

"The

Yolunteers, Col. R. B.

entitled to great credit for both coolness

manner

courage, and the admirable

my

which

Van and

it

supported

first

time this

most cheeriully bear testimony

I

fire,

in

This being the

battery during the fight.

regiment was under

the excellent bearing of both officers and men, while

to

moved

occupying the uncomfortable position of being the ents of the enemy's

fire

recipi-

while they were unable to return

121

and on the 19th marchini>; orders were received,

and they started

in pursuit of the

Not one moment

elapsed, from

the beginning to the

close of this sanguinary struggle, that the

under

107th was not

The

following vivid

summary

of this battle, in which the

I07th took so conspicuous a position,

Gordon

From

"

:

given by Gen.

sunrise to sunset the waves of battle ebbed

Men

and flowed.

is

wrestled with each other in lines of regi-

camp, Septem-

into

While here the ranks were greatly decimated by which raged to such an extent that at the review by

fever,

President Lincoln, October

2,

The

camp

was indeed a sorrowful one, where men, who had passed the

men were

not three hundred

hospitals were filled with vic-

tims of the disease, and their

Maryland Heights

at

many of

so

the brave

of battle, sank before this

fire

destroyer, and were buried in the winding-sheet, for no

not even of the rudest manufacture, could at one

coffins,

The

time be obtained.

death in this camp was that

first

Company H, and he was buried made by Sergt. Abram White, q{^ old fence-

of Corp. Joseph Couse, of

rough box,

in a

hoards.

The 107th remained at Maryland Heights until late in Here they October, when they moved to Antietam Ford. remained a few weeks, and on the 10th of December moved into Virginia, passing through Harper's Ferry, thence across

down

the Shenandoah, and

the Leesburg Valley to Fairfax

halted here for a short time and

The regiment

Station.

then proceeded towards Fredericksburg; subsequently went

camp

into

Hope Landing, on Aquia

at a place called

about this time says,

The 107th remained

'^

Creek.

War Department

report forwarded to the

official

in

camp

at

Fairfax Station, Va., until the morning of the 19th of

January, when

it

broke camp and commenced marching

southward towards Stafford Court-House, together with the

Army

12th

Corps

W.

H.

(Maj.-Gen.

march was continued IVom day

day for

to

The

Slocum). five

days during

the worst possible storm imaginable, fording the swollen

way along seemingly impassable

streams and making our

The evening

roads.

of Friday arrived at Stafford Court-

Here the regiment was paid up

House.

27,

when we marched remained

;

in

Re-

Tuesday, January

until

Hope Landing, on

to

31st of

to the

pay received.

first

mained in bivouac near Stafford

Creek

fire.

They

foe.

ber 23.

October, 1862, which was the

it."

vanquished

Maryland Heights, and went

to

An

duct."

pays

field,

able to report for duty.

the deadly contest. Glen.

the

YORK.

the

Aquia

bivouac there for a few days, and then the creek and

commenced building

winter quarters for the fourth time.

February 13 finds

moved

to a

camp nearer

the regiment crease,

still

here.

Sickness

is

alarmingly on the in-

Only

and regimentally matters looked gloomy.

ments, brigades, and divisions, while regiments, brigades,

some four hundred men

and divisions faded away under a

ten hundred and nineteen of six months ago dead, wounded,

lines of

dead

to

terrible fire, leaving long

mark where stood the

Fields of

living.

corn were trampled into shreds, forests were battered and

left

for duty, the balance of the

or absent sick."

Camp

life

at

Hope Landing had been

scathed, huge limbs went crashing to earth, sent by shell

easy,

and round

shot.

winter, fatigue, and exposure, this

scream

this

in

throughout

it

Grape and canister mingled their hissing hellish

all,

carnival

thronged

yet within

all

this,

and

the patriots of the North wrestled with

hearts strong and unshaken that

;

;

wrestled with the rebel horde

and pressed upon

though sometimes halting

to

them, never yielding,

gather up their strength, then

with one mighty bound, throwing themselves upon their foes, to drive

We

them

into

their protecting

indeed at night slept upon the bloody

tory."

The regiment was

1st Division, of the

On

field

at this time in the

beyond.

of our vic-

3d Brigade,

for the sickness that prevailed, caused

with regret.

But not

|)he

reginient lay i;pon

so.

by the

camp might have been The regiment had been

greatly thinned by disease, and on April 27 they cheerfully

broke camp and marched, under the

command

of gallant,

The

fighting Joe Hooker, towards the Rappahannock.

order of march was gladly hailed, and Gen.

marked, " Never prisoner

left

a dungeon

Diven

re-

more eagerly

than we our camp when we marched forth under the

proud banner of the 12th

Army

The spring campaign was Not one week had elapsed

12th Corps.

the day following the battle

16

forests

left

and but

pleasant and duty

Landing

ere the

Corps."

active

as

it

was

after leaving the

107th participated

in

disastrous.

camp

at

Hope

the terrible battle



of Chancellorsville, adding fresh laurels to those already

won on

the hard-contested field of Antietam.

This regiment having fought gallantly at Antietam, and left

that sano:uinary field crowned with the laurels of vie-

harbored the thought of a possible defeat, and

tory, never

with the same coolness and determination their career there, did they

On

cellorsville.

move upon

enemy

the

marked

that

Chan-

at

the evening of the second day. believing

the 24th of

107th reached Gettysburg, Pa., and prepared

1 the

it

primed

afresh,

to

The advance soon became was

defeat.

Soon

a retreat, and, instead of victory,

regiment marched out they

after the

Corps, driven before

flying columns of the 11th

the fierce onslaught of Stonewall Jackson like chaff before

Right gallantly did the 107th attempt

the wind.

to stay

the flight of the fleeing and stop the pursuit of the pursuinht

unto pandemonium

came

the confusion was like

when

on,

During the night the regiment

itself.

aside,

guns were

and a few words of encouragement and

direc-

Then each man took that should summon them

colonel.

and awaited the order

the front, where the sanguinary battle of Gettysburg

was raging

in

its

all

regiment, however, was

The

fury.

not actively engaged, and the loss was small.

were ordered back to their position on double-quick, and

met the

men was thrown

by the gallant

tion given

conquered army

but they reckoned without their host.

Everything tend-

every indication of a terrible struggle.

ing to encumber the

for the

The morrow came, and with

deadly contest of the morrow.

his place

;

YOEK.

June the newly-appointed colonel, N. M. July Crane, joined the regiment and assumed command.

On

the foe was defeated, marched out to join in capturing a

it

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUiNTY,

122

July 5 the regiment and followed 14th,

the

Gettysburg

the

left

Lee, hard

escaped

pressed,

On

enemy.

in the pursuit of the retreating

Gen.

battle-field,

across

the

Potomac, closely followed by the Union army, under the

command

They continued their march reaching Kelley's Ford August 1, where

of Gen. Meade.

through Virginia,

they went into camp, and remained until September IG,

march was taken up

to Bealton Station,

again formed in line of battle, and until daybreak over their

when the

heads blazed the shrieking shot and

from whence the 107th was transported to Stevenson, Ala., From October, 1868, to reinforce the Army of the West.

At

consume the scanty prothat had been sent them, they entered the fight, and

early dawn, without time to

visions for

shell.

hours that passed like minutes struggled with the

foe, until

1864, the regiment

to April,

panies

line of

B

and K, which were sent to Shelbyville, Tenn. Wartrace, Bell Buckle, and Wartrace Bridge, doing

the last round of ammunition was exhausted, and then, with

lay at

fixed bayonets, stood, as they supposed, until reinforcements

guard and picket duty.

had come

rein-

107th received, by transfer from the disbanded 145th liegiment and by recruits, two hundred

and,

and

fifty

they formed a new line near the

the

first

to take their place.

Then

proud of their endurance, the regiment

orderly march,

in

The

retired.

forcements, however, outstripped them in the retreat

under a murderous

fire,

Chancellorsville House, only to be driven from

It

was fought and

by

desolate

by the

At

Many

a

home

least one-third of the

fight felt

participated in that day's

Every survivor who conscious of having

performed his duty, and thenceforward the regiment was

On

In a great cause.

who

They never fail The block may soak

may sodden

die their gore

Sherman hotly pursued the ston until

Adjutant Fanton, who resigned and returned

and on the following day,

to

now devolved

appearance,

as

moment's

notice,

at six o'clock, the forces

moved

orders had been received to

march

at a

to repel the invasion of Lee.

ginning of the Gettysburg campaign.

S.

following account of this battle Fitch, of Elmira,

two

who was

a

is

from the pen of

member

of the regi-

:

nable works.

here the regiment parted with their brave Col. Diven and

lively

lost nearly

attempt to force from their chosen position a large force of the enemy closely massed and defended by almost impreg-

camp and remained during the month of May. While

upon Lieut.-Col. Colby. June 12 the camp presented a

which the 107th

at Dallas,

This battle of Dallas, fought mainly by one division (the 1st) of the 20th Army Corps, was a desperate, earnest

Court-House, where they went

of the regiment

army

25, when, coming upon his

John-

''

the disastrous Chancellorsville battle-ground the

The command

retreating forces of

hundred men.

ment

in the sun: their limbs

They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overspread all others, and conduct The world at last to freedom."

to Stafibrd

May

a sharp contest ensued, in

A.

Elapse, and others share as dark a doom.

northward

field.

;

Be strung to city gates or castle walls; But still their spirits walk abroad, though years

their homes.

constant service since

the 20th of April,

The *'

eflicient

its

wounded.

counted veteran.

into

time from the fatigue of

entering the

Fearfully were the ranks of the

lOTth thinned, but not dishonored.

107th marched

to completely recuperate for

of Resaca, and the 107th lost two killed and seventeen

force engaged was lost.

From

men, and was enabled

Congressional District was rendered

for the 107th.

this day's carnage.

Their heads

this time the

in

battle of Chancellors-

lost.

was a bloody day

the Twenty-seventh

it

;

During

1864 (the regiment then six hundred strong), they broke camp, and then commenced SherMay 15 was fought the battle man's memorable march.

The

artillery of the victorious foe. ville

—with the exception of Com-

This was the be-

That

it failed

has been intimated.

was not by lack of valor or determined

eft'ort

That

it

on the part of

It was our soldiers, I trust I shall make apparent to all. and terrible for a long time considered by our men a rash

blunder on the part of our commanding generals.

Be

this

may, the honest and manly Sherman, as usual, shoulsimple anders the entire responsibility of the afi'air, by the nouncement, in that part of his official report which covers

as

it

this

engagement,

'

all this

was done hy

my

order:

was one of those unfortunate afi^airs, in which a great substantial sacrifice of precious life was made, yet nothing was accomplished. The fact that in one short hour this ''

It

que division

lost

pearly twelve hundred men, killed and

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN 'COUNTY, wounded, proves the magnitude of the

And

affair.

the entire army were brought to a halt, and after ten

too,

days of incessant fighting and manoeuvring had proved the

enemy's position

was resorted ^'

Two

to,

movement

almost impregnable, a flank

which alone compelled him

abandon

to

of the enemy attempted to assault and carry McPherson's

works and

It

was defended by

earth-

and the brave boys of McPherson

artillery,

re-

pulsed his every attempt, killing and wounding nearly three

This, in a measure,

'

squared' the

accounts and compensated for the disastrous result on the 25th, and months afterwards

we learned from

a captured

25th was

rebel officer that their loss in our front on the

very severe, particularly in their second

by the works, received the brunt of our

sheltered

less

terrible

which, being

line,

musketry

and suffered severely.

fire

which the

different road than that

a large force of rebel infantry

enemy being with severe

in

had taken, came upon

1st

a severe fight followed, the

;

new and formidable line of works,

driven into a

checking the advance of our troops

enemy were Gen. Hooker ordered the 1st and 3d

It thus being evident that the

loss.

in large force here.

Divisions back to the support of Geary, and by five o'clock

P.M. the entire corps were in line of battle, the 107th Regi-

ment occupying

thousand of his men, and driving him back shattered and routed to his works.

123

Shortly afterwards the 2d Division, which was on a

where they succeeded

it.

days after the repulse of our troops, a heavy force

position, farther to the right.

'^

here,

YORK.

*'

We

lay for

a position as before stated.

some time quietly waiting some response

the shells of our battery, and preparing for the shock that

seemed imminent and

Yet there was no

close at hand.

shrinking back or expression of dismay on the faces of the

Every one

veterans of the 107th.

work

to be done,

No

none thought

fiery experiences,

its

new hour of

falterino; in this

"

that there was hot

felt

but so often had they faced the whirlwind

of battle, and tasted of of

dan2:er.

The 107th Regiment lost a much larger number killed and wounded in this engagement than any other regiment

the bugle sounded an advance, and the long line

engaged, and far more than in any other of

down the

^'

hence

them did

to

years' service, it

it

operations

its

become the great event of

;

their three

and they richly deserve the right

to regard

"

The morning of was sounded

veille

reply being provoked by the shells of our battery,

across the ravine, and

hill,

beautiful precision

got under way.

the eventful 25th of

at 3.30 o'clock,

It

moved

and

May

Re-

came.

at 8.30 the

column

slowly forward until noon,

when

we moved out on a town of Dallas. The marching

they seemed

to

be making a precipitate

double-quick, sounded the shrill bugle

quick

!'

shouted the

officers

sprang our elated men.

by-road leading to the

entire brigade

little

and our

easy, the weather fine,

high

hoping soon

spirits,

and

the line of march

;

thing bid

work

fair to

to reach

men went

this objective point in

no enemy showed

as

for a ready

forward in

every-

itself,

accomplishment of that

object. '^

But suddenly

order

'

Had

'

march.''

Something was the matter

our advance struck that long expected

We

or was there trouble to the rear ? idly

back

for a mile or two,

struck across a

known by

field,

serious.

and

as

name of Pumpkin-Vine Creek,

to a thinly-wooded table-land,

and the infantry of

where

Greary's

Matters certainly looked

we went

woods

in

our front.

tradition that this

should soon meet.

The

front always

enemy

in front that

was formed on the

to

we

crest of a

the 1st Division taking the place where Geary's Division

The 2d Brigade,

had previously occupied. 107th belonged, held the

We

with his

now staff,

to

which the

at the double-quick

was an imposing

remarked that

line,

the line

;

terribly

were we mistaken

seemed

to slacken

not so the main

it

was as

moved

strict

as

an alignment

one man, eager to

But how

Still

line.

at the double-quick

down and over the wa-

The word to us was still /brwardj and on we went until we were in the very breath of the hell fire that was to sweep through our ranks. But now the pace slackens before us we hear the sharp crackvering line of skirmishers.



There goes a man

ling of musketry.

wounded

— there

fearful place

another; the line

embrasures of the batteries, frowned a bristling with force, lay the

could not retreat

We

enemy.

To

were

see the

massive earth-

fairly

of

to increase.

line

It

trapped

The ranks

flank.

Our men

escort,

pushed boldly ahead, and soon

leveled their

was ablaze with the discharge.

that dark covert leaped such a discharge

rebel cavalry.

the escort driving off the

A

sharp tight ensued,

enemy unaided.

Shot, shell, grape, canister

tearing through our ranks,

and destruction.

At

mowing

all

our

and minie came

a terrible swath of death

this first fire of the

half of those lost during the engagement. fearful.

to

The tire

experience.

The general, with his came upon a body of

—we

was some comfort

and held the

so near

and the whole

line of

a

the right of the 107th Regiment

us to

rifles

we can

stand our ground.

was the gallant old 3d Wisconsin.

know they were the enemy began

what

in

cannon, behind which, massed in

— we must

up bravely.

closed

and

halts,

Directly before us, so near

!

ground

fallen to the

came upon a

fled.

went

it

of death-dealing missiles as never before was met in

ing of Pumpkin- Vine Creek, which fired upon him and

line

advance, then come to a stand-still

its

learned that, early in the day. Gen. Hooker, rebel picket, posted at the cross-

The

sight.

Suddenly our skirmish

!

crashing forward, nearly running

Then out from

right.

Forward, double-

overtake what seemed to be a fleeing enemy.

heavy

left in

'

Gen. Williams, who rode close

drill.

on dress parade

The boys of our regiment

and trouble, and speedily came

line

as if

works,

marching back

difficulties

behind the

—and away

It

Forward,

retreat.



until

were sweeping rapidly forward with as true

a front as if on

began

into position one piece of our artillery

the conclusion that there was an

'*

were marched rap-

into a ravine, across a creek,

partially intrenched.

foreshadowed

hill,

snag,'

Orderlies were galloping to and fro giving orders,

shelling the

had a

down

artillery in position,

2d Division

'

then leaving the road the column

the euphonious

and up a steep ascent

we found

Then came the

was sounded.

a halt

about face and

surely.

our skirmishers coming

line swept,

a halt of an hour was made, after which

was

side with

a level, thinly-wooded section stretched

;

and forward the

before,

up the other

moved

up with, and rapidly driving back those of the enemy,

as such.

to

enemy It

fell full

one-

was sickening,

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

124

Company F occupied

"

road that led through the woods, and from

its

increased

exposure suiFered more than any other company.

Knox, who commanded

Capt.

waving

his

was

it,

sword and endeavoring

he was struck by a piece of In quick succession

fell

its

ahead of his men,

far

fell

volley

so along the line

men and

ment stood

fast,

God

But, praise

before the reaper.

and

fast,

its

pleted,

volley again

men were quickly

falling

fearfully de-

should surely have relief to fail,

and

this un-

But

passed, and no relief came, and

the contest went on.

line of the

still

hour

nearly an

regiment had become such a mere skeleton

men found

that the

operations being ordered, time and opportunity were given

dead, and the regiment was brought together and put in line to the rear of the field

behind the

a partial cover

" Twenty-four of the regiment's bravest and best fell

dead on the

trees,

and

"

Among

Company

flash of his

served them.

Col.

the message to hurry up the

have his men fix If the

off"

the

Crane now dispatched Adj.

relief, as

the brigade, with

his line

and nearlv out of ammunition.

was a mere

Back came the

command from the general, ^to bayonets^ and hold the ground at all hazenemy should make a sally and charge

adjutant with the

ards!'

cannon, to pick

who commanded

Benedict to Gen. Ruger,

skeleton,

upon the enemy's position,

upon our shattered

stern

nothing could save us from disas-

line,

trous overthrow, for there was no force within supporting

Fortunately, however, the enemy, either from

distance.

much

being too

crippled himself, or from an ignorance of

and

suff*ering.

the dead were the very flower of the regiment.

B

lost three

of

very best men, in the persons of

its

McGuire, Greves, and Yreeland,

among Corp. Mun-

shot dead, while

all

wounded was the tried and trusty son, well known to many friends here as a most exemplary and Christian young man. Company D, in the death of young William Yan Auken, lost a splendid soldier and a those fatally

stated,

men who

Beside these one hundred and thirty-two

to escape to a life of hopeless deformity

comrades, kept up a steady

by watching the

men

Twelve more of the wounded died

field.

during the night.

faithful

striving,

learned the actual loss during that fright-

work.

ful hour's

replenishing their cartridge-boxes from those of their fallen fire

now we

day, and

of operations of the previous

there to linger for a few days in agony worse than death, or

equal contest could not last long.

The

and no active

there was no confusion or

ammunition already began

soon, for

level,

crippled and mutilated forms found refuge in the hospitals,

We

remained unbroken.

The

step.

our front vomited out

by the survivors, and the ranks, though

filled

wonted

rose to their

its

hell in

The gaps caused by our

disorder.

And

falling like grain

broken I'anks close up, the line blazed forth

fiery discharges thick

men

cheerful influences the depressed

Parties were detailed to bring in and bury the

and went not backward a single

and again, and though the

of our

sky and

contest.

the gallant old regi-

1

spirits

its

clear

mortally wounded.

were

officers

bright sun, and under

dawned with a

about and ascertain the precise result of yesterday's

nearly one-half of the entire company.

fell

of the 26th

to look

on,

and second lieutenants,

first

The morning

when

them

to cheer

and

shell

Brave

the former severely wounded, the last dead, while at the first

"

a position directly across an open

YORK.

Capt.

Company

F, as has been

and mourned,

in the death of

and beloved comrade.

was

terribly cut up,

Knox and

Lieut. Hill, two as brave and accomplished

Company K lost another true and Christian young man, Sergt. Eugene Thacher. Company A lost its noble First Sergt. Hammond, and by the severe wounding of Capt. John M. Losie (who suffered the officers as

ever drew sword.

amputation of a leg) were deprived of a brave and

commander.

Two

efficient

Ben Force, of Company H, and Corp. Charles Newberry, of Company I. Both fell dead while bravely fighting men that could other fine soldiers were Sergt.

;

illy

be spared, their death caused a vacancy hard to be so

well filled again.

But among

so

many

gallant ones fallen

the cover of his works, and we were thus saved from com-

Each fallen one was a hero, and will be ever remembered as such by his surviving comrades, and a nation's gratitude will, we trust,

plete annihilation.

ever be accorded to them, as a part of that great host

the condition of

"

The gloom

in

aff"airs

from

his front, did not venture

of night began to gather around the devoted

regiment, and we could distinguish the enemy's position only by the flashes of his cannon and musketry.

Suddenly

a thrill of joy ran through every heart, as, looking back,

it is

useless to attempt a

for the next ordeal that the

came up,

of June he retreated.

where, for over an hour,

we had

stood and fought in the

face of a fire seldom if ever equaled in severity during the

men were

war.

Cautiously the scattered

slowly

moving back, lying down

shells of the at last got

enemy,

as

gathered

and

occasionally to escape the

he at times redoubled his

out of range, and were

in,

safe.

Soon

after, as

set in, the fire of the rebel battery slackened,

became a mere desultory skirmish

fire

fire,

and the

we

night fight

between the two

" It quickly

our

men

lay

grew dark, and, exhausted and heavy-hearted,

down

to rest.

the loss of some favorite

some comrade dearly

Not

member

loved.

a ;

company but mourned not a man but had lost

campaign might develop."

Fighting and skirmishing were continued on the following

enemy was intrenched, on the 5th Sherman lost no time, but followed

hard upon the retreating

foe.

He

crowded Johnston from

one position to another, and from June 6 to 14 was a series of marches, countermarches, and skirmishes. the

enemy opened an

On

Again there was a victorious

retreat

trmy of Sherman

battle of Gulp's

On went

the 15th

attack on our forces at Pine

and, after a hard fight, was repulsed with heavy

battle of

Knob,

loss.

by the enemy, and again the followed in hot pursuit.

Farm was fought on

27th followed the

lines.

who

down their lives that the nation might live. " The ranks of the regiment, though so fearfully depleted, were now fully reformed, and its gallant members were ready

day, and, although the

and fixed bayonets, and took their position

all.

laid

we saw the long-looked for relief. Never was relief more welcome or more needed. The long line of fresh troops halted,

mention of

The

the 22d, and on the

Kenesaw.

the flying foe before the intrepid Sherman.

Peach-Tree Creek battle was fought the 20th, and here the gallant Major Baldwin was mortally wounded, 22.

June

After hard fighting, Sherman secured a position in

:

:

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, and

front of Atlanta,

by the enemy September

evacuated

finally

107th Regiment was among the In this

the regiment

siege

the city, which was

laid siege to

and the

2,

to enter the

first

city.

about sixty killed and

lost

wounded.

The regiment remained

Atlanta some time performing

at

the 15th of

provost-guard duty, and on

September

left

Atlanta with Sherman on his memorable " March to the

On

Sea."

the 26th a skirmish was had at Sandersville,

and December

Redoubt No.

9,

8,

nine miles from Savannah,

was captured, and December 21 the

enemy and the campaign

the

This was one of the

closed.

greatest campaigns of the war, and

able to say, " I sea !"

It

may

Army

would prefer

make them

an honor to be

said, " I

surely

to the

107th during

this

won while known that

those already

laurels to

of the Potomac, and

1875 he

in

is

justly be written that the

Gen. Sherman held this regiment

and

it

marched with Sherman from Atlanta

campaign added fresh with the

was evacuated by

city

it is

in

well

tho Georgia side of the river, where they remained

the

army

for

the campaign through the Carol inas, and participated in the battle of Averysboro',

N. C, March

River,

N. C, March

19.

On

the

16,

ties



hundred

distance, five

24th

miles,

— the

of the campaign being about forty.

casual-

total

Left

camp





camp and

Peach-Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864. Siege of Atlanta, July 23 to Aug. 24, 1864. Sandersville, Ga.,

Redoubt No.

Nov. 26, 1864.

Savannah, Ga., Dec.

3,

1864.

9,

Argyle Island and siege of Savannah, Dec. 11-22, 1864.

C, March N. C March

Averysboro', N.

Black River,

16, 1865.

,

Roll of Honor.

— During

Fox and A.

Maj. Charles J.

with the muster-out

date, place,

who

those

lists

19, 1865.

month

the

of January, 1876,

S. Fitch, the efficient secretary

of the regiment, from which were

of the dead of the several companies, with

and cause of death.

This

list

comprises only

died before receiving their discharge from the

Many

service.

rolls

home, and died

sick

and wounded were discharged, came

none such are reported in

;

Field ami

this

list.

Staff.

Lieut. -Col. Lathrop Baldwin, died July 30, 1864, of at

Peach-Tree Creek, Ga., July

wounds received

20, 1864.

Com.-Sergt. Henry Inscho, died April

9,

1863.

Company A.

pass-

and on the 8th reached Elmira, on the 9th turned

over their

June 22, 1864. Kenesaw, Ga., June 27, 1864. Culp's Farm, Ga.,

at

Richmond and other places, the 25th finds the regiment in camp near Bladensburg, Md., preparing the muster-out rolls. June 6 they bade farewell to Southing through

soil,

Pine Knob, Ga., June 15, 1864.

they reached

Goldsboro' April 10, and, after a series of marches,

ern

May 15, 1864. Dallas, Ga., May 25, 186-1. Cassville, Ga., May 19, 1864. Resaca, Ga.,

and Black

Goldsboro' and went into camp, ending the march of sixtysix days,

Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3, 1863.

copied the

when they moved with

1-3, 1863.

cation at the office of the adjutant-general were furnished

justly proud."

until Jan. 17, 1865,

May

that I

After the evacuation of Savannah, the 107th went into

camp on

Chancellorsville, Va.,

125

of the 107th Association, visited Albany, and upon appli-

meet, whose services both East and West

to

YOEK.

:

the highest esteem

know no regiment

NEW

garrison equipage, on the 10th were

paid off and mustered out of service, and the 107th passed into history.

Hammond,

Cornelius

first

May

sergeant, killed at Dallas,

25, 1864.

Charles Bolton, sergeant, died at Chattanooga, Tenn., June 20, 1864, of wounds received at Dallas, May 25, 1864. John B. Arnot, died at Bolivar Heights, Oct. 23, 1862, Silas H. Betson, died at Hope Landing, Va., March 3, 1863.

Abram

Decatur, died at Bolivar Heights, Va., Oct. 13, 1862.

Augustus Demick, died at Fairfax Court-House, Va., Oct. 12, 1862. John M. French, died Sept. 19, 1862, from wounds received at Antietam.

William

Sammarij of

iMarches.

— The following

is

a

summary of

marches of the regiment Year.

Miles.

1862.— Before leaving Arlington Heights 1862. First campaign in Maryland..... 1862.— To Antietam Ford from Maryland Heights 1862. Winter campaign to Fairfax and Stafford CourtHouse 1863. Campaign to Chancellorsville 1863.— Second campaign in Maryland and Pennsyl-

20 175 10

— —

vania

— Marches on the Rappahannock and nessee 1864. — Campaign Atlanta and the sea 1865. — Campaign through Carolinas 1865. — Homeward march to Washington

William J. Graves, died at Atlanta, Oct. 24, 1864. Charles H. Luce, died at Washington, D. C, Jan 21, 1863. George McPherson, died at David's Island, N. Y., April 5, 1865. George Kamsey, died at Washington, D. C, July 25, 1863.

Henry Henry

P. Smith, died at Bolivar Heights, Va., Oct. 13, 1862.

Stevens, died at Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 19, 1864.

Company B. 150 75



1863.

Hill, died at Jeffersonville, Dec. 2, 1864.

350 in Ten-

300 600 500 400

to

Marcus M. Munson, corporal, died at Kingston, Ga., June from wounds received at Dallas.

Guy Rathbone,

John Bright, died

at

Washington, D. C, Jan.

in Nashville, Tenn.,

June

27,

wounds received

2580

in

the

Gamjyaigiis.

following

Virginia, Virginia, nessee,

—The

regiment campaigned

States: Pennsylvania, Maryland,

West

North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Ten-

and passed through Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky.

Summary of Battles.

— The regiment

following battles and skirmishes, viz.

Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

participated in the

20, 1863.

1864, of

wounds

received at Dallas.

Hay

Sununajy of

1864,

corporal, died in South Carolina, Jan. 25, 1865.

Jonathan H. Barlow, died

Harrison D. Cooper, died at Nashville, Tenn., July Total

4,

Griene, killed at the battle of Dallas,

May

W.

Jackson, died at Philadelphia, Oct.

Charles S.

1864, from

25, 1864.

Harvey Harrington, died at Antietam, Md., Sept. wounds received at the battle of Antietam. Henry C. Howland, died near Atlanta, Ga., July wounds received while on skirmish line. Jacob

7,

at Dallas.

8,

Keener, died at Kingston, Ga., July

18, 1862,

22,

from

1864, from

1862. 31, 1864, of

received at Dallas.

Martin McGuire, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. Stephen Rickey, died at Summit House, Md., Dec.

22,^

1862.

wounds

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

126

Oscar M. Root, died at Louisville, Ky., Aug. 24, 1864, from wounds

Frederick Lostensen, died at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 28, 1864, from accidental wounds. Gelder, died at Nashville, Tenn., July 29, 1864, from

wounds received

18, 1864.

B. Aldrich, Nov. 16, 1862.

H. Hatch, killed James B. Jones, June

at Chancellorsville, Va.,

James

G.

Jeremiah B. Wood, sergeant, Dallas, Ga., May 30, 1864. William R. Christler, corporal, killed at Averysboro', N. C, March 17, 1864.

John McCarrick, Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 11, 1864. David Able, Harper's Ferry, Oct. 29, 1862. Andrew Brockway, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864.

David B. Moranville, March 28, 1863. Samuel Miller, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. James D. Molson, wounded at Dallas; died May 7,

25, 1864.

1864.

Gilbert C. Sticklee, Oct.

George Compton, Hope Landing, Va., March 3, 1863. Michael Crampton, New York, March 19, 1864. Patrick Dore, killed at Atlanta, Aug. 11, 1864.

May 25, 1864. C, May 25, 1864, of wounds

killed at Dallas,

Louis Matthias, Newbern, N.

25, 1864.

James B. Nellis, Sept. 7, 1864, of wounds received Edwin M. Reynolds, Nov. 21, 1862.

Archilest Campbell, Atlanta, Oct. 25, 1864.

Clement Dreher,

May

Miller, Oct. 16, 1862.

Fred'k Mellen, Oct.

Oscar F. Bradley, Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 15, 1864.

received at

1863.

18, 1863.

Kelly, killed at Dallas,

Abraham

3,

wounds received at Dallas. 1864, of wounds received at Dallas.

1,

Theophilus Krumloff, Feb.

Company

May

1864, of

5,

Albert A. Johnson, June

at Dallas.

1862.

3,

Enos P. Barnes, Nov. 16, 1862. John Brewer, Feb. 6, 1863. Daniel Cummings, March 31, 1863.

Wm.

Louis N. Vreeland, killed at Dallas.

Van

Daniel F. Hathaway, Nov.

Henry

Stage, died at Harper's Ferry, Oct. 13, 1862.

Charles J. Terwilliger, died at Harper's Ferry, Va., Oct. 15, 1862.

Levi B.

YORK.

David Latonrette, Sept.

received at Dallas.

Van Buren

NEW

at Dallas.

1862.

1,

David Simonson, killed at Kenesaw, Ga., June 16, 1864. James B. Taft, wounded at Dallas; died June 9, 1864. Parley S. White, Nov. 2, 1862. Fred'k W. Wagner, June 10, 1863. A. D. Watson, March 5, 1863. Wm. H. Young, wounded at Dallas died May 26, 1864. ;

Averysboro'.

Clark Richardson, Aquia, Va.,

May

8,

1863, of

wounds received

Chancellorsville.

Samuel Kinney, sergeant, wounded

William Parks, Aquia Bay, March

17, 1863.

S. Steinbeck, killed at Dallas,

Francis

May

Horace Hotchkiss, sergeant, 8,

1864.

John

May

William E. Van Auken, sergeant, killed at Dallas,

May

25, 1864.

25, 1864.

T.

M. Aederman,

May

May

25,

Va., Oct. 28, 1862.

Isaac Slawson, Richmond, Va., Feb. 18, 1863, prisoner.

killed at Dallas,

Wm.

May

Com pa Hi/ E.

at Dallas,

May

30, 1864, of

wounds received

25, 1864.

Daniel B. Scott, corporal, mortally wounded on skirmish 17,

line,

Aug.

1864; died on the following day.

William Dickinson, corporal, killed at Rockingham, N. C, March

8,

1865.

Martin

Bloss, corporal, Louisville, Ky., Dec. 16, 1864, of

wounds

re-

Alonzo Johnson, killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. Wm. Jackson, died from wounds received at Dallas,

May

25, 1864.

18,

1864.

N. C, March 16, 1865. Eleazer J. Mowers, killed at Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 17, 1864. Nelson A. Robinson, Smoketown, Md., Dec. 13, 1862. Jesse E. Stevens, killed at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862. killed at Averysboro',

David B. Sanford, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. Jonathan E. Smith, Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 18, 1864. E. Taylor, Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 10, 1864. Francis Wheaton, Harper's Ferry, Oct. 10, 1862. James Wilcox, Chattanooga, Tenn., June 30, 1864.

John Morrell, Division Hospital, Aug.

19, 1864.

Company H.

Charles Willover, corporal. Harper's Ferry, Va., Oct. 26, 1862.

Benjamin Force, sergeant, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. Nathan F. Dykeman, sergeant, Washington, D. C, May killed by cars. Joseph Couse, Maryland Heights, Oct. 1, 1862.

Erastus Busking, date and place not given.

William Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug.

2,

1862.

William Cooper, Harper's Ferry, Va., April 11, 1864. Stephen Corwin, killed at Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 3, 1864. Joseph V. Hoyt, wounded at Atlanta, Ga. died July ;

Edwin W. Shaw, Hope Landing, Va., April 23, 1863. John R. Ackerly, Hope Landing, Va., Feb. 25, 1863. Anthony Boyce, killed at Culp's Farm, Va., June 22,

30, 1864.

Josiah Hand, Wilmington, Del., Nov. 7, 1862. John Lalor, Hope Landing, Va., Feb. 21, 1863.

William Ladow, Chattanooga, Tenn., Jan.

wounded

1863.

Nashville, Tenn., July 20, 1864.

ceived at Pine Knob.

Elias Raiker,

6,

L. Everitt, killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862.

John Morgan,

sergeant, killed on skirmish line, at Atlanta, Ga.,

Aug. 3, 1864. Peter C. Compton, sergeant, died June

1863.

25, 1864.

Fayette McCarty, Bell Buckle, Tenn., April

Adams,

1863.

Walter B. Long, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. Edmond Lewis, Tullahoma, Tenn., April 24, 1864. James McCullough, Hope Landing, Va., March 1, 1863.

Nathaniel Finch, Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 27, 1862. Isaac N. Lobdell, David's Island, N. Y., April 29, 1865.

C.

3,

3,

John Kallaher, killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. James W. Lovell, Hope Landing, Va., May 7, 1863,

in battle.

Guy

May

May

25, 1864.

Denniston, Washington, D. C, Feb.

Edward Dickinson,

1864, and died same day. Patrick Callahan, Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862, of wounds received

M. Dayton, Harper's Ferry,

Tomer, killed at Dallas,

Abram

J. Personius, sergeant, Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 5, 1864.

at the battle of Dallas,

killed at Chancellorsville,

Albert V. Borden, Harper's Ferry, Oct. 25, 1862. J. H. Greek, Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 17, 1865.

Beardsley, corporal, Fairfax Seminary, Va., Aug. 11, 1863.

Henry Armstrong, mortally wounded

died at Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 17,

B. Stratton, killed at Chancellorsville,

Adam

Co/njinuy D.

Ford, sergeant, killed at Dallas,

;

G.

1864. 25, 1864.

William Williams, killed at Rockingham, N. C, March

Beach William

Company

at

1,

at Averysboro'; died

Cyrus

1864.

March

J. Covin, killed at

Myron Geo. W.

Antietam, Sept.

17, 1862.

May

25, 1864.

Couch, killed at Dallas, Ga.,

19, 1865.

1865;

1864.

Hope Landing, Va., March 5, 1863. .Andrew Dewitt, Hope Landing, Va., April 5, 1863. M. S. Dawson, died at Frederick City, Md., Oct. 1, 1862,

Edward Sherman, Harper's Ferry, Va., Nov. 8, 1862. Andrew Van Camp, Harper's Ferry, Va., Nov. 3, 1862.

29,

Cutler,

of

wounds

received at Antietam.

Company F, Capt. John F. Knox, Kingston, Ga., in

Jason

May,

1864, of

ceived at Dallas. Lieut.

John D.

Sergt.

Amos

Hill, killed at Dallas,

May

25, 1864.

Rogers, Harper's Ferry, Va., Oct.

7,

1862.

wounds

re-

J.

Youmans, Nashville, Tenn., Aug.

8,

1864, of

wounds

re-

ceived at Dallas.

Stephen Edwards, Savannah, Ga., Feb. 15, 1865. John Griffith, Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug. 21, 1864, of wounds received at Atlanta.

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, L. Hawley, Kenesaw, Va., July

Hiram

1,

NEW

YORK.

127

CHAPTER XXVI.

1864.

Isaac Middleton, killed at Atlanta, July 22, 1864.

Johnson B. Margeson, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. Charles Mathews, Harper's Ferry, Va., Oct. 13, 1862. Hiram Paddock, Hope Landing, Va., March 2, 1863. Dewayne Patterson, Washington, D. C, Jan. 22, 1863.

MILITARY

HISTORY-(Continued).

The One Hundred and Forty-First

— The

One Hundred and Sixty-

First.

Daniel A. Stewart, Baltimore, Sept. 13, 1863. John D. M. Van Vleet, Chattanooga, Tenn., June 24, 1864, of wounds

THE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIRST.

received at Dallas.

Ethan Worden, Harper's Ferry,

The

Oct. 22, 1862.

New York

141st Regiment

Volunteers was organ-

At

ized at Elnaira during August, 1862. Compai^y

Nat E. Rutler, captain, Geo.

W. Bragg,

disasters of the Peninsula,

I,

killed at Chancellorsville,

May

1,

tional troops to beat

1863.

sergeant, killed at Atlanta, Ga., July 26, 1864.

who were

Gideon Belman, Harper's Ferry, Oct. 22, 1862. Calvin Burlinghame, Hope Landing, Va., Feb. 2, 1863. Daniel F. Corwin, killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. Levi Carpenter, killed at Dallas, John J. Decker, killed at Dallas,

John Dougherty,

May May

killed at Atlanta,

5,

Samuel Johnson, Harper's Ferry, Oct. Elias Newberry, killed at Dallas, May John Powell, New Albany, Ind., Aug.

be

25, 1864.

fluence to hasten

of

its colonel,

W. Marey,

Alman

sergeant, killed at Dallas,

25, 1864.

Chas. Alden, killed at Dallas,

May

5,

went into

it

Md., to do guard duty on the railroad

at Laurel,

to Miner's

warlike discipline and defense.

The was

roster of the officers of the regiment at that time

as follows

:

Colonel,

Samuel G. Hathaway,

James

C.

tenant-Colonel,

Dininny

H. Horton, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. William Harrison, Dalton, Ga., Feb. 18, 1864. C. L. Johnson, Annapolis, Md., March 12, 1865.

;

W.

Joseph

Beecher

M.

Robert

Adjutant,

Robinson

;

Jr.

John W.

Major,

McDowell

Lieu-

;

Surgeon,

;

Assistant Surgeons, 0. S. Green-

;

man, M. T. Babcock.

1862.

Lewis Knickerbocker, Aquia Bay, Va., March

Washington, D. C,

After reaching

Hill, Va.,

Wm.

9,

The maximum number

organization.

and joined Gen. Cowden's Brigade, of AberHere crombie's Division, in the defenses of Washington. it took its first lesson in picket duty, and perfected itself in

25, 1864.

R. Kelley, Harper's Ferry, Oct.

efficient in-

November 24 of the same year and ordered

1864.

Henry Brewer, Harper's Ferry, Oct. 16, 1864. Patrick Brauman, drowned near Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 6, 1864. E. J. Coleman, Wilmington, March 30, 1865. G. S. Cone, Aquia Bay, March 12, 1863. Philander Dowley, Murfreesboro', Tenn., March 14, 1864. James Fuller, Aquia Bay, Feb. 17, 1863. Simeon M. Goff, Chattanooga, Sept. 17, 1864. Eugene E. Howe, killed at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863.

Wm.

to

between Baltimore and Washington, and construct military It was relieved fortifications in the vicinity of Laurel.

Q. Thatcher, sergeant, killed at Dallas, May 25, 1864. W. Burrell, sergeant, Philadelphia, June 6, 1863.

Austin Lockwood, Nashville, Aug.

its

first

the regiment was not ordered to the front until Sept. 15,

1862.

May

the

recruited before the last day of August, but

men were

camp 0.

from the

selected

and he added his powerful and

30, 1862.

31, 1864.

The 107th was

district.

Hathaway was

Col. S. G.

suit.

Company K.

Eugene

regiments were raised in a short

full

perfect its organization, and the 141st soon followed

first to

1864.

Alfred S. Walters, Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 29, 1865.

upon a gen-

troops was so

The want of

time from this congressional

Albert N. Jaynes, Frederick, Md., Feb. 11, 1863.

to raise addi-

back the defiant legions of the South,

of the North.

imminent that two

25, 1864.

Aug.

became needful

it

bent, on account of their successes,

eral invasion

25, 1864.

the time, by the

Company A.

19, 1863.



Charles

Captain,

Clauharty

;

First

Second Lieutenant, John

Lieutenant, William P. Ross;

Theo. F. Morris, killed at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863. Jerome B. Newton, killed at Resaca, Ga., May 15, 1864.

W.

Strawbridge.

Adin Ormsby, Covington, Ky., May 18, 1864. John W. Ryan, Harper's Ferry, Va., Oct. 9, 1862. Henry H. Rasco, Aquia Bay, Va., May 12, 1863. Chas. H. Storms, Chattanooga, June 19, 1864. Martin Sage, Maryland Heights, Oct. 4, 1862. John Van Dyke, New York, Sept. 10, 1863, from wounds received

Company B.



Andrew D. Compton

Captain,

Lieutenant, Stephen F. Griffith

;

;

First

Second Lieutenant, Robert

F. Hedges.

C — Captain,

Company at

James McMillan

tenant,

Elisha G. Baldwin

;

;

First Lieu-

Second Lieutenant, Robert F.

Gettysburg.

Stewart.

Company D.

RECAPITULATION.



Captain, Charles A. Fuller; First Lieu-

tenant, William Merrill Field and Co. A ''

B

"

C

''

''

" " " " "

staff.

D E F

G

H 1

K Total

Died of wounds or killed *'

disease

2

14 18 16

William K. Logic — John A. Shultz Second Lieutenant, E. Andrew Company F. — John Barton Second Lieutenant, Wm. Daniel N. Aldrich Company G. —

Company E. tenant,

28 23 13 26

tenant,

Captain,

;

;

J. Rnssell

Captain,

Captain,

tenant,

;

First LieuJ. Belding.

First Lieu-

L. Collins.

;

John W. Hammond

;

;

First Lieu-

Second Lieutenant, John H.

Rowley.

Company H. 88 107

Second Lieutenant, Joseph Town-

send.

10 17 28

195

;



Captain,

William A.

Lieutenant, Stephen S. Roscoe

W.

;

Bronson;

First

Second Lieutenant, James

Smith.

Company R. A. Hall

;

I.



Captain, E. L. Patrick

;

First Lieutenant,

Second Lieutenant, George Tubbs.

;

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

128

Company K.

— Captain, Whiton

tenant, George E.

Wilbur F. Tuttle ;

;

First Lieu-

Second Lieutenant, Joseph A.

Frisbie.

A and B were organized in Schuyler County Companies C, I, and K in Chemung County; Companies D, E, F, G, and H in Steuben County. Feb. 12, 1863, the regiment

moved from Miner's At this time Col. Hathaway and

Arlington Heights.

Beecher resigned their respective Dininny was promoted to the colonelcy. Col.

ture

Maj.

positions.

Wm.

Capt.

K.

That

was soon relieved of the presence of the enemy, and the regiment was not engaged in any general vicinity

May

was ordered back, via Fortress Monroe, West Point, up York River, at the confluence of the 3

it

Mattapony and Pamunkey Rivers. Gen. Gordon now assumed command of the division, numbering eight thousand men, consisting of infantry, cavalry, and artillery. The regiment tarried three weeks, and engaged

in building rifle-pits

command was suddenly

and

fortifications until the

ordered back to Yorktown.

While

here Col. Dininny resigned his commission, and Lieut.-

Logic was promoted to the vacant place, Maj. Patrick

to the lieutenant-colonelcy,

Company A,

and Capt. Chas.

W.

Clauharty,

senior captain, whose just rights had been

hitherto ignored, was advanced to the majorship.

On

the

9th of June the regiment took up the march to Williamsburg. The weather on this march was exceedingly hot and dry, and the

and

men

suffered extremely from excessive heat

and

;

mud

and

The weather was

at night.

one day twenty-seven

in

watery

rain, to find a

so hot that the men's

Hun-

dreds went into Yorktown barefooted and feet blistering

Lieut.-

15 the division broke camp, and was sent to Suffolk, Ya., to the department then commanded by ex-Governor John A.

Col.

torrents for days

were scalded in their wet shoes and stockings.

feet

sore

Company E, was advanced to be lieutenant-colonel, and Capt. E. L. Patrick, Company I, to be major. April

to

141st than was subsequently experienced.

the

fell in

couch

Hill to

Logic,

battle.

Rain

YORK.

miles were gained through

Companies

Dix.

death in

NEW

but there could be no delay,

;

Lee

in

army made

to

laid out to cap-

the place by

left

Frederick City, Md.,

The same night

ariving there July 14. erate

was

it

The regiment

Maryland.

and proceeded direct

transport,



the whole Confed-

a safe retreat across the Potomac.

now disbanded and

don's Division was

Gor-

the troops trans-

and 12th Corps.

ferred to the 11th

The 141st was consigned to the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 11th Corps; Gen. Howard commanding the corps, Carl Schurz the division, and Col. Krzyzanowski the brigade.

The regiment joined the corps at days' march from Frederick City. Potomac, and arrived It

remained in this

at

Berlin,

Md

July 19

,

after three

it

crossed the

Warrington Junction the 25th.

locality for

some time, marching, coun-

termarching, changing camp, and drilling until September

The 11th and 12th Corps, under the command of Gens. Howard and Slocum, both under the command of Maj. -Gen. Joe Hooker, were 24,

when

came

the order

transferred to the

Army

move.

to

of the Cumberland, then in Ten-

The regiment arrived at Bridgeport, Ala., October and went into camp on the banks of the Tennessee River,

nessee. 2,

having traveled in eight days about fourteen hundred miles. Rosecrans was then shut up in Chattanooga on short rations,



transportation being fifty miles around

by wagons,

while by the railroad through Chattanooga Valley

only twenty-eight miles,

—the enemy holding

it

was

the road and

June 11 the march was resumed, reachino; Diascund Bridge June 13, where it remained, far in advance

threatening beleaguered Chattanooga from the heights of

of the rest "of the troops, in a low, marshy, and unhealthy

open this valley, which was accomplished

thirst.

locality,

At

this

and the duty was constant, onerous, and harassing. point the regiment had its first brush with the

The

Lookout Mountain.

gallant

the

berland

victim to the rebel bullets.

On June 26

the regiment resumed

its

march

to

White

House Landing, and joined Gen. Dix's whole command, numbering some thirty thousand, on an expedition towards Richmond, which should have been captured at that time,



while Gen. Lee and very nearly his entire armies were invading Maryland and Southern Pennsylvania. Gordon's

Wau-

This opened the

hatchie" on the night of October 28. railroad nearly to Chattanooga, ''

Army

and the

dubbed" Hooker's men

as "

men

Cum-

of the

Cracker Boys," as

had not seen but one cracker per day Hooker's

to

in just forty-eight

hours, ending with the famous moonlight " Battle of

enemy, David McCann (Capt. McDowell's company) being first

Hooker took the job

for a

month,

it

until

supplied their haversacks from their own.

The 141st took

part in the above action, which was fought

on our side entirely by Eastern troops.

Wauhatchie

is

about

five miles

base of Lookout Mountain.

from Chattanooga,

The regiment

at the

participated in

Division advanced as far as Bottom Bridge, only twelve or fifteen miles from Richmond, skirmishing frequently and

above the Clouds," where Hooker and the 11th and 12th

getting a healthy practical experience of shot and shell.

Corps won immortal glory.

Engagements were frequent between the

pickets, but

general battle took place until the 8th of July,

when

no

orders

were received to abandon the expedition, and the troops were transferred to the Army of the Potomac. For four or five

months the

bill

of fare served up partook of so

sameness that the regiment suffered extremely health.

Their staple

in general

diet, as well as luxuries, consisted

hard-tack, bacon, and coffee, served up

no ringing of the changes.

march

much

to Williamsburg.

July 8

The

campaign was now apparent

it

ad

of

infinitum^ with

took up the line of

severity of the Peninsular

in

the hard marches made,

which were the immediate causes of more sickness and

the glorious battle of Lookout Mountain, or the

In the mean time Gen. Grant had taken tanooga.

^'

Battle

command at Chat-

After the pursuit of the enemy for two days, the

11th and 15th Corps were headed for Knoxviile, where Longstreet was making a threatening siege

approach of Sherman and

Howard with

;

but upon the

their brave troops,

he beat a hasty retreat over the Virginia

line for safety.

This ended the march in that direction, and the regiment returned to

its

old

camp

at the base of

having in twenty-four days marched in three hundred miles.

Jan. 24, 1864,

It

when

Mound, twenty-two

Lookout Mountain,

mud and

rain about

remained in winter quarters until

the 2d Brigade was ordered to Shell

miles from Chattanooga and six from

;

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Bridgeport, Ala., where

it

duty, drilling,

the 2d day of May,

etc., until

remained doing the usual picket

the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 20th Corps,

when

— the

11th and

12th having been consolidated, forming the 20th,

command

the

—under

of Gen. Hooker, and immediately in conjunc-

Cumberland, Tennessee, and

tion with the armies of the

Ohio,

made

mand

of Joe Johnston.

for

Ringgold

The

and wounded.

Resaca followed that

battle of

lost ninety-five

in

Lieut. Barber, universally respected

as a Christian,

and a courteous and brave

stantly killed

and several

;

men

officer, fell

in-

were wounded, and a

officers

number of non-commissioned officers and privates were killed and wounded. The 141st also fought gallantly at latter

Mountain, and at

Pine

Dallas,

Peach-Tree Creek,

being the opening siege of Atlanta, where Col. Logie

and Lieuts. Warren and Babbitt were

the

December

Lieut. -Col.

killed.

A. J. McNett (who had been appointed in

— the

resigned) lost his right arm.

Maj. Clauharty, Adj. Hazard,

and Lieut. Shapper were severely wounded

;

Capt. Towns-

end and Lieut. Willor were slightly wounded.

who succeeded

fighting was at hand, and Atlanta

20th Corps, having previously hoochie, as a feint to the

Union army, was the

Hazard, captain previous,

fallen

enemy and

;

Corps, on his after

to

be colonel

;

;

Adjt.

and four months

M. McDowell was appointed by engineer of the 20th

staff.

Sherman's "march

to the sea"

was begun, and,

campaign, entered the city of Sa-

vannah, Dec. 21, 1864.

Jan. 17, 1865, leaving Savannah,

Carolinas

resistless legions

swept northward through the

towards Virginia, constantly

mishing with the enemy, but until, the

boro'

in

engaged

skir-

in

no general engagements

17th and 19th of March, the battles of Averys-

and Bentonville were fought.

Here, amid swamps

and under every discouragement, the noble old 141st gained last

its

glory in severe battles

marched over

five

hundred

;

and

campaign

in its last

miles, at the

most inclement

season of the year.

ward from Raleigh, N. C, and,

May

ton,

and soon

to

was mustered out of

The regiment reached home June met

at the depot

escorted

it

to the

Below we give the roster of officers. The regiment numbered three hundred and eighty men when mustered out.

From

first

to

the regiment had enlisted about

last

twelve hundred men. Lieutenant-Colonel, A. J. McNett, promoted to colonel, not mustered

mustered

not

lieutenant-colonel,

Assistant Surgeon, 0.

C.

Surgeon, G. S. Beaks;

;

Greenman

S.

First Lieutenant,

;

tenant, J. F. Carroll

Company

13,

1865.

It

was

by the committee of arrangements, who William Street Hospital, where, with the

of a corps of ladies,

.

train,

they

who had worked

assiduously

all

night

C — Captain,

E.

.

Baldwin, promoted to

G.

Jud Griswold

First Lieutenant,

;

.



Company D. Captain, W. Merrill First Lieutenant, Osmun Second Lieutenant, C. H. Freeman. Company E. Captain, Archie Baxter. Company F. Captain, A. J. Russell First Lieutenant, ;

;

— — M. V. Sherwood; Second Lieutenant, L. B. Company G. — Captain, P. Mitchell ;

;

M. G. Shappee Second Lieutenant, Company H. Captain, George Tubbs

ant,



ant, F. C. Willor

Company

First Lieuten-

I.

Rathbone

;

—^Captain,

J.

;

First Lieuten-

M.

R.

McDowell, bre vetted

First Lieutenant, J. B.

;

Second Lieutenant, William M. Ware.

— Captain, G.

Company K. M.

.

Second Lieutenant, A. Stewart.

;

Major United States Volunteers

ant,

Scott.

;

Hogarth

;

L.

Whiton

;

First Lieuten-

Second Lieutenant, George

After heartily discussing their meal, both regiments were

W.

Rogers;

Second Lieutenant, William H. Brown, not assigned.

The following is a list of the who died of disease or wounds, its

muster-out

rolls

killed,

in the

and

in the office of the

Company A.

James

C. Burtt, died of

wounds, July

26. 1864.

William W. Koons, died of wounds, Aug. Curtis J. Chamberlin, died Nov. 23, 1863.

Hiram H. Piatt, died May 9, 1864. Asa Bullard, killed July 20, 1864. Chester K. Chapman, died Dec. 6, 1863. Delos Dimick, died July

9,

1864.

Jackson Dickens, died June

Henry B.

Griffin, killed

14, 1863.

1,

May

also of those

141st Regiment,

tant-General at Albany

George Dalrymple, died Nov.

entertainment ready by the time of their arrival.

First Lieu-

;

Second Lieutenant,

;

major, not mustered

C.

Assistant Surgeon,

;

— Captain, W. P. Ross; E. Second Lieutenant, Company B. — Captain, W. H. Bradford Coryell

George E.

Adjutant,

Charles F. Babbit, died of wounds, July 21, 1864,

were furnished with a comfortable breakfast at the hands

17

Clauharty, promoted to

;

Gray; Quartermaster, E. Belding

Washing-

service.

137th Regiment, which arrived on the same

to get the

W.

Major, Charles

;

Alexandria and Washington,

24, participated in the great review in after

a distinguished

Park.

taken from

After Johnson's surrender the march was taken home-

re-

McDonald, in Wisner

Stephen

C.

after about a six weeks'

Sherman's

was delivered by Hon.

Maj.

;

welcome back the

to

reception and dinner, and a beautiful address of welcome

Second Lieutenant,

Capt. Baldwin, major

;

Gen. Hooker chief topographical

Soon

to cover the rear of the

by a host of friends

visited

The regiment was given

rious campaigns.

back to the Chatta-

Lieut. Grey, adjutant

Capt. Robert

2.

enter Atlanta.

first to

Clauharty, lieutenant-colonel

September

fell

McNett was promoted

Lieut. -Col.

More The

and every-

maining veterans, the heroes of desperate battles and victo-

Company A.

on their banners.

In a

ride.

and acquaintances who were eager

immediate command

and men,

tents were struck

During the day the 141st was

to the

perch

to

some marches and long

M. T. Babcock.

its officers

permission had been

thing was got in readiness for a good rest after their weari-

ground nobly under

of the regiment during the slaughter of

and victory continued

ment of the 19th Regiment,

its

regiment was disabled, but stood Capt. Baldwin,

Half the

Camp Chemung, where

short time after reaching the ground, back of the encamp-

to the position late

previous, in place of Lieut.- Col. Patrick,

to

129

previously obtained for them to pitch their tents.

enemy, under com-

to attack the

of Ringgold, in which the regiment killed

joined

it

marched

YORK.

1863.

15, 1864.

4,

1864.

Adju-

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

130

Oscar C, Griffin, killed

May

Company D.

25, 1864.

Franklin C. Grant, died of wounds, Nov.

John Hager, Horace W.

May

killed

10, 1863.

15, 1864.

Hart, died July 14, 1863.

David McClary, died Nov. 14, 1864. Stephen Mead, died of wounds, July

Henry

Daniel C. Norris, died June 6, 1863. Denet C. Prunnell, died Nov. 2, 1862.

27, 1864.

Elisha Booth, died of wounds, May 19, 1863. Alfred Countryman, died July 19, 1863.

Henry Coburn, died Sept. 18, 1864. Andrew Catsley, died Dec. 15, 1864. Lionell T. De Carr, killed June 22, 1864.

Francis L. Royce, died June 29, 1863. William W. Sutton, died July 2, 1863.

Van

Edwin Merrill, killed May 25, 1864. John Q. Adams, died of wounds, July William Cole, died March 17, 1865.

Charles A. Haradon, died Oct. 25, 1863. 30, 1864.

Miller, killed accidentally, Dec. 5, 1863.

Charles D.

YORK.

William Davis, died of wounds, Oct.

Vleit, died April 13, 1863.

Irvin Wetherell, died April 13, 1863.

1864.

8,

Israel Elliot, died Sept. 30, 1864.

Frederick Gluer, died April 13, 1864.

William F. Hubbard, died March 27, 1863.

Company B.

Minor

Sylvanus W. Millard, died April 10, 1865. Nicholas Revill, died Nov. 22, 1863.

George P. McCoy, died Oct. 13, 1862. James 0. Murray, died Jan. 25, 1863. Henry S. Wood, died Aug. 16, 1863. Andrew Archibald, died Aug. 5, 1863. Louis Clark, died Dec.

George E. Stevens, died July Denis M. Stevens, died Aug.

March 9, 1864. died March 3, 1861.

Isaiah Forrest, died Oct.

1

0,

Lorenzo D. Taylor, died Sept. (no date given), 1864. Henry Williams, died Aug. 16, 1863.

31, 1864.

William J. Wilson, died April

1864.

Artemus F. Green, died Dec. 11, 1863. Eaton Jones, died Dec. 29, 1864. John Looney, died Aug. 20, 1863. Jackson McDonald, died May 18, 1864.

Chester M. Wire, died Jan. 22, 1865.

Joseph M. Dunton, died March Andrew Benneway, killed July

Hez Fox, died Nov.

1863.

4,

Charles Dennison, killed

William

May

S.

Allen, died Nov.

John K. Austin, died May

Abram

29, 1864.

Benjamin G. Thompson,

C.

Elliott

M. Noyes,

killed

Judd Albertson, died

May May 15,

Albert F. Lynch, died Jan.

killed July 20, 1864.

May

5,

1864.

15, 1864.

of wounds, July 21, 1864.

20, 1864.

Amos

Gabriel N. Cooley, died July 13, 1863. Henry L. Cartwright, died Dec. 23, 1864.

Orin Conderman, killed

William Edwards, died Dec. 25, 1864. Horace G. Edwards, killed July 20, 1864.

James Elyea, died Dec. 23, 1863. Corydon M. Gillett, died Feb. 17, 1865. Shoemaker Hill, died of wounds, June 6, 1864. John C. Hanmer, died June 1, 1863. James D. Huff, died Dec. 10, 1864. Kennedy, died Nov.

25, 1863.

1864.

1,

D. Mason, died Dec. 24, 1863.

Alfred

Lorenzo D. Cartwright, died March 2, 1865. William H. Decker, died of wounds, July 21, 1864.

15, 1864.

1864.

Company F.

George H. Carnrike, killed May 15, 1864. Hiram G. Colson, died of wounds. May 16, 1864.

Eli

18, 1864.

Edwin Marcy, died March 2, 1863. John G. Prouty, died March 9, 1864. James E. Scares, died Dec. 8, 1863. Henry W. Squires, died Feb. 12, 1864. William C. Youmans, died of wounds, date not known.

William H. AUington, died of wounds, June 11, 1864. James F. Benjamin, died of wounds, June 14, 1864. William C. Carnrike, killed July

17, 1864.

killed

Milo Gorton, killed

2, 1863.

Isaac E. Bailey, died of wounds, Oct. Dwight Murphy, died April 4, 1864.

17, 1863.

Carpenter, died Feb. 21, 1863.

David Franklin, Wesley Breese, died Aug.

1863.

9,

Ira C. Dowd,. died Dec. 13, 1863. John W. Evans, died June 13, 1863.

25, 1864.

Com2^any

1864.

4,

Franklin P. Carpenter, died Jan. James Cook, died Dec. 16, 1863.

15, 1864.

Manley Van G elder, died April

20, 1864.

13, 1862.

Charles E, Hughes, died Aug.

George W. Scott, died April 20, 1864. Myron E. Triphagen, died Oct. 29, 1863. Wellington C. Hurd, died Oct. 19, 1863. Mark B. Wakeman, died July 27, 1863. Stephen Wilson, died July

22, 1865.

William F. Thomson, died June

Libolt, died Jan. 24, 1863.

Philetus Stoll, died Nov.

1864.

1,

Company E.

Henry B. Palmer, died March 13, 1863. William Powell, died March 19, 1864.

Edwin

24, 1863.

Henry Thorp, killed July 20, 1864.

Ira B. Cooper, died

Gideon Ellis, William Francisco, died Jan.

20, 1863.

Charles L. Satterlee, died Jan. 27, 1864.

1863.

5,

T. Millard, died Oct. 22, 1863.

John

W. Bush,

died Feb.

Corbett, died

1864.

3,



March

1864.

,

May

25, 1864.

Russell B. Carrington, died; no date given.

John Gray, died; no date given. Samuel D Lovelace, died Sept. Alexander Maynard, died Aug.

— 1864. — 1863.

George Owston, died Sept.

,

,

1864.

1,

Leander Partridge, died of wounds, Aug.

Thomas Robinson, died July



,

7, 1864.

1863.

Samuel B. Ryder, drowned June 16, 1862. 1863. Nelson B, Root, died Aug,



Lyman

,

Wellington, died Dec. 29, 1863.

Daniel O'Day, died Aug,



,

1863.

Charles A. Swarthout, killed July 20, 1864.

William Stevens, died of wounds, June

19, 1864.

Samuel A. Smith, died Jan. 3, 1865. Roswell H. Sleighton, died Jan. 15, 1865. Judson Scribner, died Jan. 16, 1865. Francis Van Wormer, died Nov. 25, 1863. Richard Weaver, died of wounds, Sept. 1, 1863. Elisha Wright, died Aug. 12, 1863. Edwin Weed, died Aug. 11, 1863. Daniel Watts, died April 26, 1865.

Company

G.

Capt. Daniel N. Aldrich, died Aug. 11, 1863. First Lieut. Alfred E. Barber, killed

May

McCrea, died Sept. 21, 1864. Andrew T. Grant, died of wounds, July Charles Kester, died July 2, 1864.

William

15, 1864.

S,

M. T. Aldrich, died Sept. 15, 1863. Henry Blackman, died Oct. 1, 1863.

21, 1864.

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

YORK.

Richard Gay, killed July

Edson L. Burr, died Jan.

6,

Jacob H. Cole, died June

16, 1864,

1864.

131

20, 1864.

Erastus E. Haskill, died June 19, 1864.

John W. Hapeman, died Aug.

Burrows Cole, died June 9, 1864. James V. Fairchild, died June 3, 1863. Henry W. Gernon, killed July 20, 1864. James H. Hurd, died June 3, 1863. Byron Hurd, died of wounds, June 2, 1864.

Andrew J. McCann, died (time and place not known). Ephraim Miller, died of wounds, Dec. 16, 1864. John Marsh, died of wounds, Dec. 7, 1864.

Ira Kinney, died Nov.

Michael McMann, died Feb.

6,

1863.

3,

Godfrey Lenhart, killed

1863.

May

1863.

2,

15, 1864.

1865.

Oscar R. Leonger, died of wounds, Aug. 12, 1864.

Daniel R. Olty, died Aug.

John R. Miller, died May 15, 1864. John L. Carnegie, died Jan. 25, 1865.

William Steinlein, killed

Martin

THE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIRST REGIMENT.

Amos

S. Prentice,

died Dec.

1863.

3,

The

1863.

7,

Wright, killed

May

summer

of 1862, and on the 15th of Oct. 25 the regi-

August, 1862, recruiting commenced. 20, 1864.

ment was reported

full,

and on the 27th of the same month

15, 1864.

was organized and mustered into the United States service Company H.

C.

May

Hamilton, killed

20, 1864.

15, 1864.

.John Campbell, died

May

,

following were

Stillwell;

Major, Charles Straun

Darling

1864.

officers:

;

Surgeon, Lewis

Joseph

S.

Dolson

Second Assistant Surgeon, Charles M. Pierce; Chaplain,

11, 1863.

Wooden

Sergeant-Major, Philip L. Beach

Jacob Gress, died July

Quartermaster-Sergeant, J. C.

15, 1863.

Benjamin F. Greeley, died March 19, 1865. Cassius M. Hadley, died Jan. 6, 1865. , 1864. Joseph Howland, died March



Oliver P. Jenks, died of wounds, Nov. 28, 1863.

wounds,

line

Adjutant, William B.

Surgeon,

Assistant

First

;

Thomas

Jeffers, died of

;

Kinsey; Quartermaster, Marcus E. Brown

Alfred Downs, died Aug. 30, 1863.

George W.

and

regimental

the

Harrower; Lieutenant-Colonel, Marvin D.

Colonel, G. T.

James W. Stewart, died Nov. 7, 1863. Henry Abbe, died Nov. 19, 1863. Albert E. Butler, died Aug. 6, 1864.



ment.

The

George P. Burnham, died Jan. 12, 1864. Samuel T. Stewart, died May 24, 1863.

Thomas Crusen, died April

N. Y., by Maj. A. T. Lee, as the 161st Regi-

at Elmira,

Theodore M. Warren, killed July

First Lieut.

Dewitt

was authorized by Grovernor

raising of this regiment

E. D. Morgan, in the

12, 1863.

Thomas Schoonover, killed July 20, 1864. Hiram J. Whitehead, died of wounds, July

Lyman

15, 1864.

known.

C. Stewart, died; date not

George Simons, died Nov. Henry Stewart, died June

7,

May

May

18, 1864.

Daniel Kelly, died Feb. 21, 1864.

geant,

J. 0.

Eufus

Alderman

S.

;

Commissary-Ser-

Hospital Steward, George

;

— Captain,

Company A. tenant,

John Gibson



;

B. F.

Van Tuyl

Second Lieutenant,

Captain, Horace B.

White

tenant, George R.



Beeman

M.

Beard.

Company B.

Palmer G. Linsay, died Aug. 21, 1864. Jacob Norton, killed July 20, 1864. William H. Olmsted, died Feb. , 1865.

;

First Lieu-

;

S. S. Fairchild.

Brown

First Lieu-

;

Second Lieutenant, William H.

;

Clark.

Company

Erastus L. Preston, died Feb. 28, 1864. Albert Pierce, died of wounds, July 24, 1864.

C.



Captain, Robert R. R.

Lieutenant, Orlando N. Smith

;

Dumars;

First

Second Lieutenant, D.

J).

Clark Stewart, died Nov. 29, 1863.

William Vaughan, died Dec.

Benjamin

S.

Kniffin.

14, 1864.

Welch, died Dec.

Company D.

10, 1864.

Company William T. Cary, died of wounds.

tenant,

May

31, 1864.

George Brees, killed July 20, 1864. Ezra G. Mallory, died Nov. 24, 1863. Levi G. Ellis, died Jan. 31, 1865. George W. Griffin, died March 16, 1865. George Haxton, died Sept. 27, 1864.

John

3,

1865.

J. Jenkiijs, died Dec. 29, 1863.

Daniel Luther, died of wounds, Aug. 19, 1864. Stephen Morris, died March 5, 1864.

David McCann, killed June 16, 1863. George Owens, died April 20, 1864. James E. Proctor, died May 15, 1864. Alfred

W.

George E. Biles

First Lieu-

;

James M. Cadmus; Second Lieutenant,

T. Scott

I.

Cornelius Doolittle, died Feb. 17, 1864.

George Hinches, died April

— Captain,

Phillips, died Feb. 21, 1865.

De Wolf Company E.

— Captain, Peter H. Durland

tenant, Robt. J.

Burnham

First Lieu-

;

Second Lieutenant, George 0.

;

Howell.

— — Worthing. John Company R, —

Company F. Captain, John Slocum First Lieutenant, John F. Little Second Lieutenant, James Faucett. Company G, Captain, Edmund Fitzpatrick First Lieu;

;

tenant,

;

P.

Captain, Willis

tenant, Nelson P.

Weldrick

E. Craig;

First

Lieu-

Second Lieutenant, Geo. B.

;

Herrick.



Company I. Captain, Samuel A. Walling First LieuSecond Lieutenant, Edwin A. tenant, Myron Powers ;

;

Thomas Simon,

killed

May

Theodore Vance, died April

15, 1864. 19, 1863.

James Wheeler, died Aug. 10, 1863. Joseph Wheat, died Aug. 2^, 1863.

Company K. First Lieut.

Eugene Egbert, died Dec. (no date given), 1864.

Edwin Branch, died Nov. 16, 1863. John L. Burt, killed June 22, 1864. Frank Bloss, killed July 20, 1864. Lemuel 0. Chamberlin, killed May 15, 1864. Hiram H. Cummings, killed May 15, 1864. John Fisher, killed May 25, 1864.

Draper.



Company K. Captain, Geo. M. Tillson First LieutenSecond Lieutenant, Henry ant, MatheW B. Luddington ;

;

0. Jewell.

Elmira November 17, and proceeded to New York, and encamped at Union Course, where they remained until December 4, when, having received orders

The regiment

left

to join the expedition of

Gen. Banks, the regiment, now

hundred and thirty-nine strong, embarked on the steamer Northern Light^ and, with the fleet, sailed under

five

A

NEW

HISTOKY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

132

New

Their destination proved to be

sealed orders.

July

Orleans,

YORK.

Vicksburg surrounded, and Gen. Gardner

4,

in

which place they landed December 17.

command

of Port Hudson, having defended the position

After bivouacking a few weeks on the banks of the Mis-

as long as

he deemed his duty required, on the 9th of July

at

above the

sissippi,

city,

moved

the regiment

to the rear of

the city, where the winter was passed.

the stronghold was surrendered and occupied by the Union forces.

December 31 the 161st was assio;ned to the 2d Bris^ade, Col. H. W. Birge, 1st Division, Brig.-Gen. Grover, and

river,

19th Corps.

on the 12th moved

From Port Hudson

down the

the regiment proceeded

and on the 9th disembarked

and

at Donaldsonville,

January 21, together with the 30th and 50th Massachusetts, 174th New York, and 2d Louisiana, it was

tant.

assigned to the 3d Brigade, Col. N. A..

and, after forming in line of battle, the Union forces, seeing

M. Dudley,

1st

Augur, and 19th Corps.

Division, Maj.-Gen.

respects one of the best disciplined regiments in the

At

Department of the Gulf was

in

command

being anxious

to

this time

of the marine forces at

run a portion of his

Army

fell

back

in

good order

enemy threatened an

enemy

a brisk

kept up some time, the 161st losing six

fire,

attack,

position

which was

killed, thirty-nine

New

The regiment remained at Donaldsonville until July 31, when they embarked for Baton Rouge and returned to

fleet past

Orleans, and the enemy's

tract the attention of the garrison, thereby affording the

After marching thirteen miles,

their "

Old Camp Ground."

August 15 the 161st was assigned

Army ment embarked for New 1st Division,

10th

to the

1st Brigade,

September

Corps.

Orleans,

the regi-

2,

and were ordered on

the order was countermanded and the main body sent to

Gen. Banks'

New

Orleans, while the 161st, together with three other

nies

were detailed as sharpshooters on the gunboats,

regiments, were shipped on transports and landed eighteen

and

B

miles up the river on the west bank.

the Sachem.

now made by Gen. Banks

Preparations were

May

towards Port Hudson, and on

enemy

march

to

12 the 3d Brigade

broke camp and commenced the onward march. the main forces came upon the

May

21,

at the Plain's Store

Boad, where a sharp engagement ensued, and the rebel were routed and driven towards Port Hudson.

forces

regiment moved forward, and.

May

dis-

numbers,

in

more advantageous

to a

The enemy opened

near the town.

miles

wounded, and nine missing.

Hudson, on the 12th of March ordered Corps up the east side of the river, to at-

water forces an advantage.

the following day the

plantation, six

Admiral Farragut

batteries at Port

the 19th

Cox's

that they were greatly inferior to the

During the winter the 161st had spent a great portion of the time in battalion and brigade drills, and become in all

On

to

24, the

The whole command

on the Arizona^

W.

of Capt.

attack the

with

expedition

E

Four compa-

Pass.

I,



D

on the Granite City^ and

Companies C, F, G, and

on

under command

E. Craig, were detailed as a storming-party to

enemy and

Capt. Fitch, of the 75th

General Banks.

regiments, were

New

Companies

Col. Kinsey, on the

These companies,

force a landing.

others of different

Upon

Sabine

to

commanded by

York, and on the steamer

H

and

K

were with Lieut.-

N. B. Thomas.

arriving near the Pass the gunboats opened

fire,

halted within one and a half miles of the centre of the

and soon one became disabled and another grounded.

enemy's works.

troops were not landed, the expedition proved a failure, and

became evident that a charge was the only efficient means of reaching the enemy's works, and on the 26th

the resz;iment returned to

It soon

May

of

a storming-party, consisting of thirty men, a cap-

and a lieutenant from each regiment of the 1st Diviswas called for. xlnd as an illustration of the material

tain,

ion,

of the 161st, so

many

perilous task that

committee

to

it

make

officers

and men volunteered

became necessary

the selections.

to

for this

appoint a special

All being in readiness,

May

27, the entire land force, the artillery brigade,

fleet

of gunboats upon the river opened a simultaneous

and the

attack.

The

contest was a terrible one

poured a flaming sheet of

fire

;

the artillery and

of shot and shell

forces fought with that bravery celled

:

;

flotilla

the land

and perseverance never ex-

while the assaulting column rushed into the very

jaws of death. his strongly-intrenched position poured

into those blue ranks a

and men

vester.

fell

like

Serg. George

Stratton and

murderous

fire

of grape and canis-

wheat before the

sickle of the har-

Bingham, of Company C, and Edward

Anson Betan, of Company A, were

instantly

After this attack the regiment continued to hold position in the ravines until

June

14,

attack was made, and again were the

its

old

D

Orleans.

In the action at

had two men wounded, ten scalded,

and Lieut. Lindsay with seventeen men were taken prisoners.

These were exchanged July 22, 1864.

The 161st were ordered

to join the expedition to the

Teche country, and September 15 they

camp.

left

a series of marches the regiment went into camp,

After

Novem-

Bayou Teche, where it remained until Jan. 7, 1864, when they broke camp and began the march towards Here the regiFranklin, which was reached on the 9th. ment went into camp, and the men enjoyed themselves ber 17, near

generally for eight weeks.

March 15 the

entire

army broke camp and began

march on the famous Red River expedition, and, series of fatiguing marches,

Here a

came upon the enemy

terrible battle

gallant 161st saved the whole defeat.

was fought,

army from

its

after a

at Pleas-

which the

in

a humiliating

It lost nine killed, forty-four wounded,,

and thirty-

nine missing.

At

the close of this battle Brig.-Gen. Dwight, on an

cial visit to

offi-

the 161st, addressed them as follows:

"Officers and

killed.

back.

Company

ant Grove.

The enemy from ter,

the Pass,

New

The

I appear before

men

you

to

of the 161st

thank you

New York

for

Volunteers:

your gallant conduct

when another grand

in the battles

Union

of Pleasant Grove you were ordered, upon your arrival, to

forces forced

through which you have just passed.

advance and hold the enemy

in

In that

check until the division

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Under

could form in line of battle.

By your

you accomplished your mission.

fire

Army

ing you saved the it

a hot and destructive

affords

me

valiant bear-

of the Gulf from destruction, and

the highest pleasure to convey to you the thanks

of the commanding general.

your movements by

marched with

'

column by company,' under

much

as

Again, at Pleasant Hill,

in

you

fire,

To your lieutenant-colonel much praise is due for the skillful manner in which he handled the regiOfficers and men of the 161st New York, I thank ment. you." A just tribute to as brave a body of men as ever marched

participated in

into

June

18,

an

all

the

movements of that

The 161st

Red River campaign.

disastrous and unwise

went

tendered by the patriotic citizens of that

The

city.

address

of welcome was delivered by Hon. Tracy Beadle, and Elmira, justly proud of the gallant sons of the

"Southern Tier,"

gave them a hearty welcome home. In the words of the chaplain, "Thus closed the military history of the 161st

New

York,

bullets,

its

regiment which had

by water and twelve hun-

traveled eleven thousand miles

dred by land, carrying

—a

by the enemy's

tattered flag, torn

over the burning plains of the South, into the

thickest of the fight, and into seven different States,

to battle.

The regiment

133

on the 6th of October, and Elmira on the 12th, where the battle-scarred 161st were the recipients of a grand ovation

order and precision as if you had

been upon review.

YOUK.

camp at Morganzia, where it remained until when it, having been selected to form a part of

eni2:ineer brii>;ade,

marched

to Vicksburs:, arriving in that

The regiment had hardly begun prepaengineer work when orders were received to

came home with not an its

and on

act to regret, with not a stain

banners, and with a history for endurance and heroism

untarnished and glorious."

The

following

is

a

of the killed and wounded as

list

compiled by the chaplain of the regiment in 1865

:

city on the 20th.

rations for

move, and on July 23 they embarked for White River,

Here the regiment remained

Ark.

turned to Vicksburg, where

it

a few days,

re-

was joined by Lieut. Lind-

who had been

say and seventeen others,

and

prisoners in Texas

KILLED.

— George N, Wright, Co. B. Port Hudson. — Anson Retan and Edward Strattou, Co. A: Baton

liotifje.

George G. Bingham, Co, C. Otis Walker, Co. C Cox's PlaRtdlion.



Hosea

— Anthony Compton and Orville C. Boorom, Co. D. — Charles L, Wheaton, Co. A; Lieut. L. Edgar

Sabine CrosH-Roadn.

3 the engineer brigade was abandoned, and the

Fitch, Co.

C

161st was attached to the 19th Corps, in the Department

Blunt, Co.

D

August

1

The regiment now commenced

of the Gulf

a series of

marches and skirmishes, changing position almost

August 14

left

it

day following to the

Vicksburg

New

for

their arrival returned,

17th Corps.

Orleans, where

Mobile Bay,

and Samuel Robinson and

;

Sibley, Co. H.

Sabine Pass.

eleven months.

and Sergt.

it

to

On

the 20th

daily.

and were transferred

New

again embarked for

for

of Fort Morgan,

On

capitulation.

the 25th

it

upon the day of

was sent across the bay

;

C.

WOUNDED. Port Hiuhon.

—Michael

Dougherty, Patrick Plynn, Co.

Beckwith, Co. B; Ezra M. Peters, Martin

A

Ilallet, Co.

;

William

C; Frank

McDonald and Eugene Bassett, Co, F; Alfred 0. Spaulding, Abram Cook and Lucius D. Cushman, Co. H.

G Cox's

arriving in front of that stronghold

E James Grimes and James

Co.

— Elihu Lockvvood, Co,

Orleans, and on the

the reduction

in

James Leonard,

;

O'Neill, Co. G. Pleo.H((nt Hill.

on the steamer Cahaicha

shipped

assist

it

Weller F. Smith, Henry E. Hewson, and Joseph

;

Co.

;

Plantation.

— Clinton

II.

Wilcox, Co.

A; Capt. William H.

its

Clark, Sergt. William Hibbard (mortally), Bartlett J. Beals, and

to

George A. Brown (mortally), Co. B Samuel A. Johnson, Joshua Kirk, Frank Letterman, Robert B. Murray, Joseph Seymour, Amasa Squiers, Co. C. Capt. James M. Cadmus, Sergt. Otis

Cedar Point, and September 2 embarked on the old block-

;

;

ade-runner Kate Dale^ en route to Morganzia, which place

was reached September

consumed

changing from place

in

was ordered

About

6.

to

weeks were now

six

The regiment

to place.

Paducah, Ky., and on the 26th marched

to

Columbus and encamped, where it remained until November 20, and then was ordered to Memphis. December 19 they bade farewell

Memphis, and embarked

to

January 11 the 161st landed above the

city,

New

to

New

Orleans.

at Kennerville, twelve miles

and went into camp.

Kennerville for

for

February 11

it left

Orleans, and from thence proceeded

Mobile Bay.

Smith, Dennis Losey

Bradford Sandford,

(mortally),

David G. Bryant, Alex. Carman, James Borden, George D; Henry R. Smith, Leroy Broderick, Co. E Stephen Read, Richard Harvey, William Davidson, Co. F; Sergt. Hugh Carney, Sergt. Thos. McCullough, Austin Amilie, Andrew Sullivan, Patrick E. Brown, Co. G; Franklin Phille}^

Blakeley, and Orville C. Boorom, Co. ;

Waight, Calvin Dibble, Roswell Miller. Sabine Pass.

— Abram Blakesley (mortally),

Garey Dodge (mortally), Adam H.

Patrick Hart (mortally), James M. Snyder (mortally),

Wilcox (mortally), George T. Gannan (mortally), Jos. Bartholomew, Thos. Sawyer, Ira Chubb, Isaac J. Lewis, Co. D. Sabine Cross-Roads. Lieut. John Gibson, Sergt. William Eggleston,



George Prentice, Elijah Sprague, Co. A George C. Coleman, Abner R. Page, Jas. Anderson, Ebenezer Boynton, Co. B; William Woodhouse, J. 0. Armstrong, G. H. Barrett, Thomas

Sergt.

The regiment

participated in

the capture of Spanish

Fort and Fort Blakely, and was present at the surrender

Here

of Mobile, April 12.

it

remained in camp

until

May

20,

when

from

its

brigade, with instructions to establish a military

orders were received detaching the 161st

While here the weather was

post at Apalachicola, Fla.

Luman

;

Clark, Co. C Capt. James M. CadAnthony Ayres, Theron F. Miller, Walter McCormick, Franklin Holmes, David G. Bryant, William Spencer, Lieut. R. L. Guion, Sergt. Henry Moore, George FohnsCo. D bee, Nathan P. Parker, James Murray, Byron Munn, Leartus Redner, Henry Weisner, George W. Edget, Co. E Jacob Swartwood, Lyman Tremain, Co. G; Samuel W. Jennings, William T. Norton, Co. II Capt. Samuel Walling, Co. I Capt. George M,

Smith, William Smith,

mus, Tunis

II. S.

;

J. Harford,

;

;

On

the 26th

of July an order was received to embark for the

Dry Tor-

intensely hot,

and much sickness prevailed.

New

tugas to relieve the 110th vice

York, whose term of

ser-

Marksville.

in this desolate

place until Sep-

tember 25, when, having been mustered out on the 20th, it

embarked

for

New

Tillson, Co.

York.

New York

City was reached



;

K.

—Wm.

A

John Henyon, Co, G, Capt. Edmund Fitzpatrick, Co. G; E. L. Dewitt, Co.

Pleasant Hill.

would soon expire.

The regiment remained

;

H. Garve}^, Co.

;

Spanish i^or^.— Christopher C. Such, Co. A.

C.

:;

CHAPTER XXYII.

with the

War

Steuben in the

of the Rebellion

—(Continued).

Company C

H

panies A, C, G, and

;

the remaining six companies were

raised in the counties of Allegany,

Of

Oneida.

the

from this county Quartermaster,

and

field :

J.

Oswego, Madison, and

staff officers

Brown,

Stocum, Company A, Bath

Corning

Hayt, Corning ;

John

Captain

ment was secured by Captain Rice,

Albany, and

at

it

was

afterwards connected with the 189th Regiment. Capt. Rice was born in Bath in 1829, and enlisted under

the

first calls

of the President for volunteers at the breaking

out of the war, as a private in the 1st

He

Ben-

First Lieutenant B. N.

;

by Lieuts. Robison and Warren.

assisted

Mustered and clothed by Sept. 13, it was at first assigned to the 175th New York, but a revocation of that assign-

the following were

W.

Colonel, William

L.

Com-

viz.,

of the 189th was enlisted in August, 1864,

Burrage Rice,

Four

in September, 1864.

companies were raised in Steuben County,

vil-

Wheeler, Bath, Kanona, Avoca, and Urbana, by Capt.

in

its

of only seven, and marched them into the

loss

lage square at Bath, where he bade them farewell.

THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-NINTH REGIMENT. This regiment was organized

YORK.

throw of the Rebellion, when he brought his company back

MILITARY HISTORY-(Contmued).

of

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

134

Vermont Regiment.

took an active part in the battle of Big Bethel, in

Company A, Second Lieutenant John W. Brown, Company A, Wheeler. Captain Burrage Rice, Company C, Bath First Lieutenant D wight Warren, Company C, Bath Second Lieutenant Mortimer W. Reed, Company C, Urbana. Captain William Washburn, Company G, Cohocton; First Lieutenant Edwin A. Draper, Company G, Cohocton. Captain Nathan Crosby, Company H, Bath First Lieutenant Hiram F. Scofield, Company H, Second Lieutenant L. G. Rutherford, Company

tion

U, Bath.

gade, to which the 189th belonged, a position he held with

nett,

;

;

captain of one of

of this regiment was raised in the town of

When

Bath, Steuben Co., by Capt. John Stocum. popular and well-tried

Pulteney Square,

The

result

" Single-handed

pany

shows.

it

and alone,

At

and mustered into the

the election of for

on the to him.

Stocum was born

came

at an early age

its

A

service.

officers,

the company unani-

Benjamin N. Bennett,

John W. Brown." and

By

his

a poor orphan boy.

good character he won a position of high

industry and

the urgent appeal of his family and friends, and

at

which he discharged

among his fellow-citizens. Such was the conyoung men had in him that, in 1861, when it

two years.

for over

spector on the staff of Brig.-Gen. Gregory, of the

great credit

ambushed

till

guerillas,

command.

his

who

attacked a foraging party under

His body was embalmed and sent

Capt. Silas

he lived

till

mondsport

W.

his seventeenth year,

to reside with his sister.

fense

and, with his Artillery),

command

was ordered

service Battery

E

full.

He

to sergeant,

and then

port and followed farming lieutenant of

till

Company

New York

After

to the front.

five

Light

months'

was divided up and put into other bat-

Returning home in 1862, when there was another

call

men, Capt. Stocum commenced recruiting Company

F

command among his

of the 161st Regiment, and was soon with his full at Elmira.

troops,

A

severe

numbers

died,

epidemic breaking out

and he was prostrated with fever

Meanwhile

three months.

his regiment having been or-

dered to the Department of the Gulf, ciently recovered

Baton Rouge, Port Hudson.

when he had

suffi-

he rejoined them, and rendezvoused

in time to participate in the

at

campaign against

Feeble health compelled him soon after to

resign and return home.

On

Lieut.

1831.

He in

D wight

When

the 3d of September, 1864, he

raising his

third and last company, for the war, with which he served,

— often

placed in higher commands,



till

the final over-

34th

faithfully,

first

New being

and discharged

to orderly,

to

Hammonds-

he entered the service again as

after Capt. Rice's promotion,

in his place

upon the death

officer.

Warren was born

in

Bath, March 21,

the war broke out he was engaged in farming.

and Aug. 19, 1862,

sold his farm,

Company F

New On

of the 161st

enlisted as a private

York.

He

was promoted

account of an attack of

typhoid fever, he was not able to join his regiment, which

had

sailed with

He served with and

after

Banks' expedition,

till

the 20th of February.

General Banks in the Louisiana campaigns,

one year was discharged on account of sickness,

and returned home.

In the

fall

of 1864 he assisted Capt.

Burrage Rice in raising Company C, of which he was elected second lieutenant,

was promoted

and on the death of the captain

to the first lieutenancy.

Second Lieutenant Mortimer W. Read was born

March

16, 1841,

in

Urbana,

and was brought up a farmer, which oc-

cupation he followed

commenced

Ham-

C, of the 189th Regiment, and

to orderly-sergeant Oct. 27.

teries.

for

of that accomplished

I,

He returned

with his regiment July, 1863.

first

to

was one of the

York, as a private, he served two years

was appointed captain,

(Battery E, 1st

He

Entering Company

Union.

of the

when he went

1861, shouldered the musket in the de-

volunteers who, in

and was commissioned captain

weeks his company was

Bath,

Robison was born in Hornellsville, where

fidence the

two

to

and buried with Masonic honors Jan. 19, 1865.

had command of the company

to raise a battery, in

2d Bri-

when he was shot dead by

Jan. 11, 1865,

respectability

was announced that he was about

W^hile captain of

the 189th, Nov. 4, 1864, he was promoted to brigade in-

promoted

in Pulteney, April 27, 1825,

Bath

to

com-

full

to find, as the military record

lieutenant

first

for second lieutenant,

Capt.

Hocked

he had a

in nine days

would be hard

mously chose and

in the village, volunteers

raised, equipped,

better one

officer erected his little tent

this

companies, but relinquished the posi-

its

accepted the office of under-sheriff in Bath, the duties of

thus stated in one of the village papers

is

term of service.

at the expiration of its

it

and was

Another regiment being immediately formed, he was chosen

;

A

mustered out with

itself for bravery,

;

;

Company

which his regiment distinguished

till

the war broke out,

unteered for two years in

Company A,

when he

of the 23d

vol-

New

York, served out his time, and was honorably discharged with his regiuient,

May

26, 1863.

He

enlisted again

under

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, Upon

Capt. Rice, Aug. 22, 1864.

the organization of the

in Bath, he

was chosen orderly-sergeant, and rose

to the lieutenancy in

due course upon the captaincy being

company

vacated by the death of Capt. Rice.

Company Gr was recruited in and Wayland, was the same

The

men.

In this section the feeling

in this county.

everywhere prevailed under the

as

large bounties, the

coming

of country urged the necessity of

maximum number

draft,

No.

The

the quota.

filling

of the company was raised by the per-

Elmira, orders to

1, at

and previous

These gentlemen accompanied the regiment shared

its

Mr. Draper,

and Mr. A. J. Alden, second lieutenant.

lieutenant,

first

;

to the field,

and

fortunes in the final campaign which successfully

crushed the great rebellion. Capt.

New York,

in

Cohocton, was

Hiram

and was

promoted

at once

New

the position of

He

York.

some time and

active

first

New York

Rochester, Corning, and

Companies.

1st Lieut.

Edwin A. Draper was

of Cohocton, where he always lived

He

first

years with General a private,

New

Banks

company, upon

its

real

designate

Com-

it

He was man, whom

perform

re-enlisted as

men promoted him by

enlisting twenty-seven

organization

military to

He

in Louisiana.

lieutenancy.

first

and a

always

entering the service.

York, and served faithfully two

Aug. 31, 1864, and

vote to the officer,

till

also a native

enlisted Oct. 1, 1862, as second lieutenant, in

pany I of the 161st

for his

and Erie Railroad

his

a neat

and

skillful

when he was

Second Lieutenant Andrew J. Alden, although not a

the

He

troops.

bar when he joined the 78th first

call for

disability interrupted

Company H,

of this regiment, was chiefly raised in the

town of Bath, Steuben Co.

In the

served in the Shenandoah Valley, under Gens.

in the

He

of 1864.

fall

fall

of 1864, after

reliable officer in all the vicissitudes of the service.

The companies of

Pond were

Capts. Bernan,

faith with his

On Monday,

proposed to Supervisor John L. Smith that authority be

panies arrived from Washington.

Corps,

The

Army

five

S. P.

Teachman,

this

On

and

fitting

command-

and while

there,

at

in comfortable

Hayt went down to City command of Capt. Stocum,

on the 12th of November, died suddenly of

congestion of the brain.

command

up the camp

the 5th, Col.

Point, leaving the regiment in

Warren

When

this sad

news reached

his

Station, the commissioned officers of

the regiment were convened by order of Lieut.-Col. Allen L. Burr.

men for home until

manding

company, who thereupon received furloughs

Division, 5th

following few days were mainly spent in building

days were mustered at

Elmira, on the 13th of September, over seventy

Griffin's (1st)

of the Potomac, Gen. Meade,

military style.

by Lieuts. H. F. Scofield and L. G. Rutherford,

movement of miles, Novem-

first

Arrived here, the regiment was placed in Gen. E.

The professor, for five years connected with the Sonora Academy, was designated, by his influence with the best class of young men, as the proper leader of another

he succeeded so well that in

The

1, Col.

tents, policing streets,

Duly authorized from Albany, and

Pond

Hayt having been ordered to report to Gen. Warren, commanding the 5th Corps, in front of Peters-

ber

obtained for Prof. N. Crosby to recruit a company of infantry.

Capt.

October 24, the remaining six com-

ing.

and Sergts. D. Crosby, R. McCann, and

encamped near

regiment and joined the engineer

Bryan, of Sonora, John

assisted

at City Point,

guard and drilling duty under Gen. Patrick.

Army

and others, of Bath,

and

Hill,

the depot of the United States Mail Railroad, and engaged

M. Gregory's (2d) Brigade,

recruiting campaign.

Washburn,

sent forward before the regimental organization

company of men, the quota of the town of Bath not yet being full for the call for five hundred thousand, Hon. D. B. Allen

to re-

the unanimous voice of his company, and was a brave and

burg.

a

him

was made second lieutenant by

Captains John Stocum and Burrage Rice had each raised

T..

three hundred thousand

consequence was to Warren Station, fifteen

considerably his duties with his company.

New York

and engaged in recruiting with great enthusiasm

enlisted

corps.

Company G, 189th New York, but

studied law with C. F.

turn home, where he partially regained his health, and re-

He in

He

Siegel and Banks, but severe illness compelled

had broke

he was made second lieutenant

in Bath,

1840, and received a good education at Pratts-

2,

Regiment, under the

Avoca,* where he established himself in business in 1846. ;

most

its

efficient officers.

New York

in

Aug. 22, 1864

and one of

after its oriranization,

Kingsley, Esq., of Bath, and was about being admitted at

native of Steuben County, married and became a resident of

enlisted

of the 189th

was acting quartermaster of the regiment

was completed, and, arriving

absent.

re-

called to

Second Lieutenant L. G. Rutherford was born

the adjutant would

duties

Company H,

lieutenant of

burgh and Sonora Academies.

the breaking out of the war, in the employ of the

He

mained but a short time, however, when he was

New

with

till,

and returned home.

and returned till

was

he was mustered out, on account of consoli-

officers,

N. Y., Jan.

Cohocton in 1851, and was subsequently,

He

to sergeant.

Orleans, and held the position

years he was engaged in teaching and farming in Wisconsin, to

also studied

F. Scofield enlisted in August,

dation, in the fall of 1863,

For a number of

a remarkably exemplary young man.

and had

subsequently made second lieutenant of a colored regiment

for

Washburn, born and brought up

years,

1862, in Capt. Biles' company, then organizing for the 161st

other

Mr. Washburn was chosen captain

had been principal

to entering the service

First Lieutenant

by Mr. E. A. Draper, and was mustered 1864.

to the front.

law with Hon. David Rumsey, at Bath.

organized at

September,

move

Academy over two

of the Sonora

severance and address of William Washburn, Esq., assisted in

H awaited in Barracks

Capt. Crosby was a graduate of the University of Mich-

last call for

and the love

135

mustered on the 19th, and Company

igan,

the towns of Cohocton, Avoca,

YORK.

Wm.

After mutual consultation, by request, the comofficer

appointed Capt. Burrage Rice, Chaplain

H. Rogers, and Capt.

Wm.

H. Withey a committee

the 26th.

Punctually they returned, and enough others

to draft resolutions expressive of the sentiments of the regi-

came

the company's complement, and about one hun-

ment.

to

fill

dred besides.

Capt. N. Crosby and his lieutenants were

These resolutions, embodying the regiment's high

appreciation of the character of Col.

Hoyt and

its

deep

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

136

NEW

YOUK.

sense of bereavement at his sudden death, will be found in

could reach the plank-road, and to the commanders whose

by the

unflinching troops had silenced the enemy, he said, with

the history of the 189th,

November 24

chaplain, page 74.

— Thanksgiving-Day— was

spent in camp,

the regiment partaking of the bountiful supply of baked poul-

December

from the North.

try, etc., sent

Weldon

celebrated raid on the

6,

commenced the

miles of the road, tearing up the track, burning the

and heating and bending the and

useless,

ties,

them

as to render

rails so

communica-

effectually cutting off the rebels'

with their supplies and reinforcements from

tion

camp

Carolina, the regiment returned and went into

two churches, erected voluntarily by the

They

The

obeyed.

fallen leader

by those around him, and promptly succeeded

to the train

by the captain next thoughtlessly

rank

in

but that was shamefully or

;

blame attached

and the

neglected,

The

of old Virgina.

for

benefit of

soldiers in a short

sion furnished the tent-roofs

and

Christian

to

the

been held responsible.

being chinked and smeared with the

poles, the crevices

should have been borne

before

Their bodies and gable ends were made of pine logs

soil

train !"

Instantly upon the assault being commenced, Capt. Rice,

with the coolness of a veteran, dispatched an orderly to

Gen. Gregory for reinforcements.

Here the brigade and regiment enjoyed the

save the

whole expedition instead of to those who ought to have

the rest of the winter.

reconsecrated

;

North

Gurley House, where the whole brigade rendezvoused

and

train.

the Jerusalem Plank-Road and the

Petersburg, between

time.

protect the

After destroying

Railroad.

Move forward your men to You cannot assist me. Move forward

great emphasis, "

Commis-

stoves, which, with

the

made them comfortable places in One called "The Brigade Church,"

the long

led his other eight

under command of Gen. Gregory,

nies,

Meeting to

camp of the 189th, and

the

in

Townsend quickly

Lieut.-Col.

it

was beating

roll

was not long before

It

at

our picket lines the

camp, and

all its

to

the

comparescue.

the general ordered

train,

guard to " About face!" and, with the

confront the foe, if necessary, and bring in Captain

rest,

The body was found

dark.

It

had

close-fitting panel-doors,

Rice's body.

which

been stripped naked and shot once through the waist and

to worship.

40 by 60 in size, was on the left of the brigade the other, called " The Church of the 189th," 30 by 40, stood on the right. The former was dedicated on Sunday, December 22, ;

by Bishop

Edmund K.

day, by Rev. J.

A

S.

Jones

the latter, the following Sun-

;

Tuttle, of Waterloo, N. Y.

at

City Point, and sent

home

the 13th

it

was embalmed

in charge of Lieut.

Dwight

Warren.

On

the 5th and 6th of February the regiment was en-

^facjed in

foraging expedition was sent out on the 11th of Jan-

On

twice through the head.

after

the battle of Hatcher's Run.

on the second day,

fight,

In the thick of the

Burr rode

liieut.-Col.

to

and

fro

uary, and visited a forsaken plantation at a considerable

along the line in front of his brigade, amidst a storm of

distance off the Jerusalem Plank-Road, about six miles out-

leaden hail, and rallied and strengthened his

the Union

side

lines

Capt. Rice was in loading,

and some eight miles from camp.

While the teamsters were

command.

he had stationed picket-guards

He

at a distance, to

was informed by a

be

Many

to give

way, but quickly reformed, and stayed the progress

of the

portions of the line were forced temporarily

enemy

They

killed

made their presence known by firing twice upon his command and retreating, so that when the reserve guard was sent forward they could not be discovered. The train was loaded, and as quickly as possible commenced to return. By order of Capt. Rice, Company H, under command of

On

band of

rebels.

soon

Lieut.

H. F.

had the advance both going and

Scofield,

coming, throwing out skirmishers on each side of the road,

About

a mile from the Jerusalem Plank-Road, in a dense

wood, a swamp

— swollen

the flankers on the to pass.

left

The enemy,

full

by the recent rains

— compelled

of the train to come into the road secreted in this

swamp

as near the

road as possible, fired upon the middle and rear of the passing train.

Rice ordered the

men

and eleven wounded

at six

hundred

dollars, in

February.

The presentation was made by

Capt. Crosby in

line of battle.

The

firing of

of Hatcher's

an eloquent and fitting speech, and feelingly and appropriately responded to

during the

final

by the

colonel.

participated in several hard engagements

brisk skirmishing deepened into a

panies line,

A

and

B

At Lewis' farm spirited conflict. Com-

campaign of the war. and a portion of

F composed

the skirmish

under Adjt. Roney, which, followed by the regiment

in line of battle,

advanced through bushy woods obliquely

stantly giving way.

in

token of the gallantry displayed

on the 6th of

field

forward as rapidly as possible, and ordered

and form

in this action.

Run

on the memorable

to the right, struggling

to halt

of the regiment were

sented by the regiment with a noble black horse, purchased

Instantly riding back from the front, Capt. it

Two

the 6th of March, 1865, Lieut.-Col. Burr was pre-

The regiment

under Lieut. J, G. Rutherford.

The 189th, under

in this part of the field.

Capt. Stocum, did gloriously.

resident of the near proximity of a

to stand

firm.

loyal

on the lookout for the enemy.

men

twelve wounded.

with the enemy, who were con-

Our regiment had none killed, but Company B took twenty-five prisoners,

A

the enemy, the hurry of the teams and wagons, produced

with three horses and their equipments.

such confusion that the two companies of the 189th were

engagement

the only ones that stood firmly and deliberately returned

the success of the 189th that their brave conduct was

the enemy's

complimented by their brigade, division, and corps com-

fire.

Here Capt. Rice

fell

from his horse mortally wounded.

and men gathered around him.

The

officers

the

enemy had

ceased.

With

The

rare presence of

manders."

at Gravelly

At

Run

says, "

report of the

So conspicuous was

four o'clock p.m. Major Withey, with three

supported by the

firing of

companies, was sent to the skirmish

mind

other seven companies of the regiment in line of battle.

in

such an extremity, Capt. Rice took this as an indication

Advancing on double-quick,

that the enemy's intention was to flank the train before

pressed the fleeing

it

enemy.

left

line,

wheel, the regiment closely

Thus they were completely

WILLIAM WOMBOUGH. The

personal history of William

Wombough

is

so intimateiy

connected with the settlement and growth of the Tuscarora Valley, where it

now

is

located the thrifty village of Addison, that

forms no unimportant part of the general history of this part

of the county of Steuben.

He

His parents

Being now

railroad car of the present day.

of eighty, he never after engaged in any

at the

new

advanced age

enterprises.

After

a brief illness of only four days he died from the effects of a paralytic stroke, at the ripe age of eighty -four, in the year 1853.

Monmouth Co., N. J., in were of German birth, and his

was born

hardships, are in striking contrast with the rapid transit of the

in

the year 1769.

came

father

to

It is impossible in a short space to do

He came

any more than give an

moving his boats up the Susquehanna, Chemung, and Canisteo

outline of his history.

into this valley,

America about the year 1765, settling in New Jersey. He had no opportunities for any education from books, and could neither

goods in

read nor write, but his very eventful and successful business

country when there was

career demonstrated that a practical education as often secures

labor

financial success.

mowing and other machinery, made a radical change in the mode of rapid transit of persons and goods, and in the time to accomplish a given amount

settled in

Delaware Co., N. Y., and

engaged in lumbering, rafting his lumber to Philadelphia. There

he remained eleven years, and in the year 1804 removed to the Tuscarora Valley, and settled in the almost wilderness and Indian country, where the

now

beautiful and cultivated fields vie

with the best in the State in point of agriculture.

He

purchased one hundred and eighty acres of land, where

at once

now

his

son William resides, built a saw -mill, and in 1806 erected a

on the Tuscarora Creek

second one, which

is still

where in 1830 he erected a

;

By this

standing.

to his original purchase, so that

acres of land.

time he had added

he owned some two thousand

In 1833 he removed to Woodhull, and purchased

of work.

any lead

until 1842,

when he returned

wards erected a

grist-mill (it

of the sash-factory

to

Addison, and a few years

being the

now owned by

In order to furnish his

There he remained

grist-mill.

fifth)

Messrs.

first grist-mill

after-

on the present

Mackay &

site

Hill.

with the proper ma-

a staunch

rough roads,

its

privations,

and necessary economy and

it

was always supposed by the but the

;

settlers that there

secret, if there

was one, was its location

member

strong in his political inclinations, and

of the

Whig

party.

In the war of 1812

he was drafted, but hired a substitute, paying therefor sixty

The progeny of

this

most remarkable business man

numerous in and about Addison, and makes up many

of the representative families of the village.

His wife was Elizabeth Towsley, who did her part well, and trained her children in all that makes true manhood and womanhood.

She died

at the age of seventy-nine.

His children were Henry, born 1800 (deceased) Mrs. Ruftis Mrs. Ira P. BenBaldwin, 1802 (deceased); William, 1811 ;

;

dock,

forests,

hence,

;

Wombough was

Mr.

lumber wagon, and returned with wagon loaded with weighty incidents connected with such a trip through

known to come to the and purchase powder, but never to make purchase of

discovered.

nett,

The

worthy of note here that the Indians were in

never disclosed by the natives, and no information of

chinery he was obliged tg go to Philadelphia, which he did in a

machinery.

is

was a lead mine near by

is quite

and erected a saw-mill and

It

settlement

now is, and there erected a grist-mill. In the year 1835 he removed to Troupsburgh, purchased some five hundred acres of land,

manual

the neighborhood, and that they were

dollars.

five

or no machinery to lessen

and about the time of his death the completion of the

;

hundrt^d acres of land where the village of Newville

some

little

Erie Railway, and the introduction of

While a young man he

grist-mill

Rivers, and lived during that period of the settlement of the

1813; Mrs. Peter

1818 (deceased);

(deceased)

;

Striker,

1815; Mrs. James B. Mui^

Mrs. Col.

George Farnham, 1823

Mrs. Gilbert B. Brewster, 1828

Wombough, 1831.

;

and Addison

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY, flanked.

Thereupon a charge was made

by which

six

nition,

thousand

rebels,

along our

all

line,

ammuFive Forks, the Key

with their arras and

were captured, and the battle of

of Petersburg, Richmond, and the downfall of the Rebellion

In this decisive

turned gloriously in favor of the Union. charge every

officer

and man was

in his place

followed closely by the 189th, being the leaped the enemy's fortifications, and his sword those his

who attempted

who

;

Gen. Gregory,

first

whose horse

struck

to raise their

down with

guns

to take

the 3d the news of the evacuation

On

of

Richmond

evoked the wildest cheers and enthusiasm. Passing through Mannsboro' and Dennisville, the regiment struck the DanRailroad at dark on the 4th, seven miles east of

ville

but surely repelling

expecting to break through

it,

Forming

and escape.

line of battle

in

ing briskly but giving way. Companies 189th, being

as brigade

deployed

morning of the 5th, planting

batteries, strengthening earth-

works, and manoeuvring forces indicated the proximity of the enemy.

and

assist

Soon the regiment was ordered

the cavalry in capturing a body of rebels

had not proceeded and jubilant troops tured battle-flags.

The

to ;

advance but they

when shouts of victory were heard, of cavalry came back bringing many capThe end approached. far

historian of this regiment thus describes the final

struggle before the surrender of

Lee

:

"

The

bugle-notes by

toils

Our

rebel batteries.

quick

double-

Rapidly the foe drew back, and

their support.

to

sented to

hosts,



who were now struggling with the advance of our The enemy, unconscious of the presence of ensnared foe.

18

and

infantry, cavalry,

verging,

'

awful

with

tread

artillery,

and

towards Lee's hostile and defiant brace annihilation if

the banners are

all

made

— were

down the battalions, moving

slopes

slow,'

On

to give battle.

floating

seen con-

to

em-

both sides

Generals and

on the breeze.

mounted aids and officers are hurrying to and fro, directing the movements which are to decide the issues of The double circle of skirmishers come four years of war.

their

into closer

"Our

and

closer conflict.

boys, with fixed and pallid features,

firing

!

and death and ruin that ever

Then

brigade

across the fields, at terrible skirmish-line,

came Lee's

bearing a flag of truce, and exclaiming,

Gen. Lee surrenders with

was riven, spell

fire

field.

through our

speed,

move onward,

every minute to participate in the most over-

orderly,

alry,

around Appomattox

not intercept the view. Grant's dread phalanx of embattled

Lee, completely surrounded, was engaging Sheridan, intent

captured the previous night by the cav-

hills

Here the grandest military view ever preWherever the woods did mortal sight appeared.

shook the martial

trains of supplies,

the right of our

we proceeded

hotly engaged with that of the rebels,

our marching, called us forth to the proudest deeds that Word was brought that ever shed lustre on human efl"ort.

way through. Marching towards Appoaattox Station, we met forty cannon, numerous wagon,rains, and army stores, and at the depot four railroad

off to

become

whelming outburst of

his

of the

infantry skirmish line having

memorable 9th day of April, we were summoned

upon cutting

F

the volleys of shell and solid shot poured upon us from the

expecting

renew

and

Coolly and steadily our columns advanced under

which, at six o'clock on the morning of Sunday, the everto

A

and took their position in the invincible circle whose now surrounded the greatest hope and army of the

Court-House.

the

field

corps,

Lee trying to elude Sheridan, who had intercepted him in his westward flight. Hastily erecting breastworks across the railroad, the 189th lay down

On

an open

in

skirmishers, advanced

and relieved the cavalry, who moved

our column rose to the brow of the

behind them for the night, no enemy appearing.

its lines

half a mile in the rear of our cavalry line, which was fight-

Burksville, and immediately were ranged in line of battle to encounter the forces of

*

137

the 5th Corps in support of Sheridan's cavalry, were slowly

Rebellion.

life.

YORK.

as if

all

his forces

!'

^

Cease

Instantly

by a thunder-bolt from Heaven, the iron

which had bound every man to his

fate in the ex-

pected conflict, and in an unrestricted confusion of shouts

and demonstrations of

joy, officers

and privates gave the

wildest vent to their feelings of gratitude and delight."

TOWNS AND VILLAGES OF

STEUBEN COUNTY. ADDISON. 4»»

The

GEOGRAPHICAL SITUATION.

Addison and

lies

situated in the southern part of the county,

is

upon both

sides of

bounded north by Thurston, carora,

and west by

Canisteo River.

the

It

is

by Erwin, south by Tus-

east

WoodhuU and

saw-mill was built by George

Wombough

William

1793.

and the year following a the

Goodhue about

also built a saw-mill in

1805,

Samuel Smith opened

grist-mill.

Stephen Rice, son of Samuel Rice, was the

first store.

first

Rathbone.

first

white child born

in the

town, and the

first

persons

married were Brown Gillespie and Miss Gilbert, daughter

The

Isaac Martin, was the surface of the town is chiefly a hilly upland, broken

one mile wide, and

cipal valley is

The

prin-

bordered by steep

hill-

its tributaries. is

and those

afi*airs, will

sides ranging

from three

hundred

to four

chief streams which intersect

it

feet in height.

Goodhue

Lake, in the northwest corner of the town, covers an area

The

of about 100 acres.

on the

;

it

is

clay,

mixed with the

debris of broken shale, and produces a fair yield of the

early

into the

In 1793 he cut a pine-

on the bank of the Canisteo, near

its

mouth, and from

the stump there sprouted up three other trees, which are

now

They measure about twenty-two inches in The old stump from which the tree was cut eighty-

standing.

diameter. five years

The

came

earliest settlers,

of the Tioga and Canisteo Rivers.

various kinds of grain, grass, and fruit.

EARLY SETTLEMENT.

among the

died

county with Col. Arthur Erwin, and settled at the junction

alluvial soil of the valleys is rich hills

who

be found in that part of our history copied from

Martin Young, one of the

tree

and productive

person

the early records, under the head of " Organization."

are the Canisteo River,

the Tuscarora, Elk Lick, and Goodhue Creek.

first

The names of many of the pioneers of the town, who took a leading part in its civil and industrial

settlers.

by the valley of the Canisteo and

The

James Martin, brother of John and

of Elisha Gilbert.

PHYSICAL FEATURES.

ago

the top of

is still

it is

plainly to be seen, although a portion of

somewhat decayed.

Mr. Young moved

to

made by

Minnesota about 1850, and hearing of the singular circum-

Reuben and Lemuel Searles, Oliver Miller, George Goodhue, John Martin, Jonathan Tracy, Abel White, James Benham, Asahel Stiles, Silas Morey,

stance of the growth of these trees requested his son, Fran-

first

settlement in the town of Addison was

Samuel Rice

in

179L

Elisha Gilbert, William

were among the

William

Wombough

He

still

a resident of the town.

Wom-

That sign

Henry

hundreds of curious

He was a prominent

interest at one time in

man,

Minne-

Minn.

John Helmer and John Martin

settled

a mile above the village on the river.

now

and

in the winter of

1875

fact of the

sprouting and growth of the three trees from the stump.

and owned a large milling

lies

trees,

on the road leading to Troups-

died some years ago at Addison.

apolis,

examine and measure the

to

cutting of the tree by his father in 1793, and of the

was the father of William and Henry

bough, the former

Mr. Francis E. Young proceeded

the facts in the case.

on a farm about two miles

settled

village,

E. Young, to investigate the matter and inform him of

had a sign put upon them setting forth the

first settlers.

southwest of the burgh.

Wombough, and Martin Young

cis

on farms about

None

of their fami-

Martin dision,

—a

is

still

Young cart

remaining there, and has been read by visitors.

drove the

first

wheeled vehicle into Ad-

drawn by a yoke of oxen.

Young, a son of Martin Young, was born 1812, and was one of a family of sixteen though sixty-six years of age he

is still

in

Francis E.

Addison

children.

in

Al-

hale and vigorous.

reside in town.

Samuel Colgrove was a surveyor, and at an early day.

He

Wombough's and

the village.

Arkport.

138

settled in the

resided on the road between William

He

ORGANIZATION.

town

afterwards removed to

This town was one of the original towns of the county,

and was known date

it

as

Middletown

was changed

to

till

April

6,

1808.

At

this

Addison, in honor of Joseph Addi-



J

TOWN OF The

son, the English author.

A

" Tuscarora."

early settlers called

also

it

part of Troupsburgh was taken from

Rathbone

part of

139

1817.

1805. Elisha Searles.f 0.

it

and Tuscarora in 1859.

in 1856,

ADDISON.

1805-1

1808, Cameron in 1822, part of Woodhull in 1828,

in

:

John Towsley.

1818-20. Martin Young.

Solomon Tracy.

1810. Elisha Searles.

1820. Isaac Santee.

1810-14. Jesse Rowley.

1821-24. Martin Young.

1814-17. David Dickinson.

1824-27. Jesse Rowley.

In the earliest record, entitled " Votes and Proceedings

Town

of a Town-Meeting held in and for the

town the

Tuesday

first

was elected Supervisor

Searles

George Goodhue, John sors

Lemuel

;

Asahel

Stiles,

1797," we find that Reuben

in April,

Searles,

Oliver Miller,

;

Wyman, and John Constable

Town

Clerk

;

Martin, Asses-

Jonathan Tracy and

;

Poormasters; John Martin, George Good-

hue, and Stephen Dolson, Commissioners of Highways;

Lemuel and

Searles, Collector

Oliver

Searles,

and

Abel White, Jonathan Tracy,

;

Reuben

Searles' barn-yard be a

town

between

Reuben Searles. 1800-3. Lemuel Searles. 1803. Reuben Searles, Jr. 1804-9. Lemuel Searles.

1815. Abel White.

1823-26. William Austin.

1809. William B. Jones.

1827. Alfred Nichols.

was probably

it

1810-18. Stephen Towsley.

1818-23.

During the same period the town

Abel White.

Oliver Miller.

William Wombough. 1817.

Reuben

Thomas

Searles.

1800.

Brown

Isaac Santee. 1820. William

Gillespie.

They probably

of the pioneers of Addison.

civilization

built the first school-house in the county of not,

was certainly one of the

it

first,

for

Steuben

;

if

erected as early as 1796, and at that period there were few if

any school-houses

At

this

Wyman,

town of Painted

The second town-meeting was held above appointed, on the

Reuben

first

Tuesday

1810,

till

by successive

1804.

In the

was elected supervisor.

Mr.

In 1806, office

Searles,

who

when David Dickinson was

held the office continuously

and continued

visor,

to be elected each year

till

1817, when

he was superseded by Samuel Colgrove, who was supervisor till

1821, and was succeeded by William B. Jones,

served

till

till

Brown

Wombough.

Gillespie.

1801. Abel White.

who

it

1827.

in construction,

where the bridge

is

to cross the

In 1799 "a tax of $20 for the support of the

" Middletown, the 9th day of April, 1801.

two slaves for Thomas Thissle

;

Recorded

the age of Luce fifteen

years old, the age of Will eleven years old."

The bridge

we

referred to above

was

in progress in

1803, as

learn from the following

"March, the 15th day, 1803. Jonathan Tracy, Town Clerk, received one hundred and fifty dollars for the use of building a bridge in

Middletown." " February, the 22d day, 1804.

ceived one hundred and

1802.

Harvey

Rice.

Jonathan Tracy, Town Clerk,

fifty dollars for

re-

the use of building a bridge

Middletown."

Payments were made on the work

be settled with the old town of Painted Post, from which

Middletown was

set

off.

as follows

:

1803-5. Jonathan Tracy. 1805. Alpheus Cheney.

* This town was included in Painted Post before the organization of Steuben County; hence when the county was organized and the new town of Middletown formed, there were accounts or other matto

H. Warner. Jeremiah Rowley. Jacob Cole, Jr.

was " voted that a sign-post be erected on the north

" April

4,

1803.

" April 27, 1803.

ters

1826. William

clerks during this period were

1797-1800. Oliver Miller. 1800.

Peleg J. Cole.

poor" was voted "to be paid in produce."

in

The town

Asahel Thomas.

David Dickinson.

river."

1823, when Samuel Colgrove was again elected,

and continuously thereafter

Samuel Colgrove.

side of the river, near

till

In this year William B. Jones was elected super-

1814.

and

each

chosen supervisor for one year, and was succeeded in 1811

by Timothy

Thomas Wheat. John Towsley.

In 1798 a bridge across the Canisteo was

in April, 1798.

George Martin was elected again, and held the till

1824.

Henry Tracy.

Searles was again elected to the office in 1805.

succeeding year

Elias Mason.

at the school-house,

Searles was re-elected supervisor, and

year George Martin

1822. Samuel Baker.

Reuben Searles. Harvey Kill. Timothy Searles.

Stephen Dolson.

Post."''^

elections continued to hold that office latter

Andrew Loughery. Thomas Wheat.

Searles. Searles, Jr.

1814. William

and John Martin were appointed a " committee

for settling with the

as

1813.

in the county.

meeting Reuben Searles, George Goodhue, John

Elijah Hallett. 1821. Boanerges Fluent.

1802. Elisha Searles.

must have been

it

Wombough.

Samuel Colgrove.

1801. Abel White.

Reuben Reuben

Wombough.

Samuel Colgrove.

Searles, Jr.

Elisha Searles.

This speaks well for the

Metealf.

1819. William

1799. Oliver Miller.

Reuben

Samuel Colgrove. William Wombough.

Oliver Miller.

John Vercampe. Searles to be fireman.

elected the following

Jonathan Tracy. 1798. Abel White.

Timothy

Searles was appointed to take care of that building, and

Reuben

Averill.

1816. William B. Jones.

Abel White.

at the school-house, as

Hiram

:

rails.

not stated at what house this town-meetins: was

held, but

1810-13. Lemuel Searles.

Searles.

1799.

for the year ensuing."

It is

Lemuel

1813-15. Lemuel Benham.

Voted,

said

:

1798. William Morey.

town pound.

and a half high and but

feet

1827 were

till

Searles,

That a ferry be kept near where the road crosses the river, and that threepence be charged for a man to cross. " Voted, That the next town-meeting be held at the school-house in ''

from the organization

1797. Abel White.

That a lawful fence be four

fiYQ inches

collectors

school commissioners

Reuben

Poundkeeper.

" Voted,

1797.

James Benham, Pathmasters; Elisha

Gilbert and Silas Morey, Fence-viewers

" Voted, That

as follows

Commissioners of Schools; Reuben

Miller,

Jr..

;

The town

of Middle-

Paid four dollars by order of the Commissioners."

Paid

fifty

dollars

by order

of the

Commis-

sioners."

f \

By virtue of a warrant From 1802 to 1813 no

in the records.

bearing date Oct. 29, 1805. election of school commissioners appears

:

:

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

140

"June "July

Paid

1803.

7,

15,

1803.

fifty dollars

Paid

by order of the Commissioners."

fifty-six dollars

by order of the Commis-

"

March

YORK.

1819.

3,

Voted, wolves no bounty, panthers

ditto."

sioners."

"March

2,

1804.

Paid one hundred and

fifty dollars

by order of

Higgins, of Bath, and Samuel Colgrove and Isaac Santee,

the Commissioners.

Jonathan Tracy, Town

The

In November, 1819, Vincent Matthews and John D.

following, with reference to the

Clerk.

first hotels, will

be

of Addison, school commissioners for their respective towns, laid

out school district No. 19,

partly in the town of Addison and partly in

of interest

1822 another bridge was " Be

Bonney's Settlement, lying

in

remembered, that we, the Commissioners of Excise for Middletown, in the county of Steuben, have resolved and licensed the it

At

son village. to take

built across the Canisteo at

the town-meeting in 1821

it

In

Bath.

Addi-

was " voted

one hundred dollars of the poor money, to be put

following persons to keep public inns or taverns in said Middletown for the year one thousand eight hundred and three, namely Elisha

with other money, for the purpose of building a bridge over

Searles, Elisha Gilbert, Robert Martin,

the Canisteo at this place."

:

Lemuel Benham; and have

taken as a duty of excise, for the use of said Middletown, five dollars from each and every person so licensed, as witness our hands this 4th day of May, 1803.

"John Knox, "Reuben Searles, "Abel White." In 1808 the name of the town was changed

This year " voted, that the bounty on wolves' scalps be ten dollars, and no person to be entitled to the bounty ex-

cept residents of the town."

LIST OF

This year a committee was appointed to select a convenient spot for a burying-ground, and

mittee

is to

it

was " voted, that the com-

get the burying-ground cleared and fenced, and

Edward

1829. William

the expense

is

to

be paid out of the money in the poor-

1831.

be presumed that there w^ere no poor at

1832.

that time to need the fund that had accumulated, and there-

1833.

It is to

office."

fore

was devoted

it

to another purpose.

In 1814 the school commissioners

laid

out four school

districts, as follows

to wit

composed of all that part of the town lying between the town of Painted Post and the new dwelling-house of John Martin, and from the Canisteo bridge, so as to include the dwelling:

First district to be

house of Henry Tracy of

Henry

the second district, from the dwelling-house Tracy to the dwelling-house of Jesse Rowley ; the third

including the dwelling-house of John Martin, to continue up the river so as to include the dwelling-house of Simeon Baker,- the fourth district to continue from thence up the river to the western

boundary of the town.

a

a

1835.

a

((

1836.

1839.

1842.

number

a

a ii

((

" a

a

a

i(

it

a

a

n

a

ii

u

Charles S. Sly.

a

a

William A. Baldwin a

a

1845. Fred'k R. Wagner.

a

a

1849.

James H. Miles.

1852.

U II.

Ross Jones. u l(

a

John Bailey. Thomas A. Henry S. Jones.

George W. Carr.

Geo. H. Wetherby. Rulef. S. Gile.

John N. Brown. Francis E. Young.

Abram Dudley.

S. Guile.

U

ii

Llewellyn A. Jones.

ii

ii

Llewel'n A. Jones, Jr

John

a

ii

S. Hill.

Stephen Lewis.

George Graham.

Martin Wilbur.

1857. 0. Seymour.

last year."

members of

re-

Loomis, 14 votes; John J. Pendergrast, 14 votes. For member of Congress, Oliver C. Comstock received 36 votes votes.

1858.

1860.

1861. 1862. 1863.

school district, extending on

from a small run of water called town," was

u

u

A.

Thomas Paxton. Henry Baldwin. Edwin J. Horn. ((

a

a

i(

S.

McKay.

Jacob V. Graham. it a Albert G. Crane. ii a

1864. F. C. Dininny.

a

1867.

a

1868.

i(

u

1869.

ii

a

ii

ii

1870.

a

u

ii

ii

1871.

u

a

John Carr. Henry S. Jones.

L.

M. Jones.

Charles a

W.

Gillet. ii

Alfred Kinne. ii

ii

E. Deville Root.

a

ii

ii

ii

W.

Lattimer.

a

ii

a

a

David K. Hickey.

ii

a

Daniel Allen.

1875.

a

(I

James H. Goodhue.

1876.

a

i(

F.

(I

((

1878. Albert G. Crane.

ii

ii

i(

1877.

a

a

Jacob V. Graham.

1874. S. V. Lattimer.

Simon McCullough.

ii

ii

a

ii

a

1866.

n

ii

a

a

it

Henry Baldwin.

ii

a

i(

1872.

ii

ii

(
-^^

Residence

or

THOMAS COTTON,

Avoca, Steuben CO..N.Y

TOWN OFAVOCA. He

Genesee Kiver. land-office,

and

was sent here

as the agent of

his large-hearted hospitality

the

was proverbial

among the early settlers. The year following his arrival he planted an orchard, which now shows the ravages of time, and like the early The orchard which William and settlers is passing away. Michael Buchanan set out on the Buchanan farm is now some of the

eighty-eight years old, and

trees therein are

Soon

155

young men

families and

Asa

Phillips,

Abram Towner, James Babcock,

Richard

Van

Buskirk,

Henry Smith, James

The

ference.

tree

is

about forty feet high, and from

may

present appearance

six feet in circum-

In this

another century.

stand

its

Jolm

Davis,

Buskirk, William Moody, Daniel McKenzie, Jonathan

Van

John Donahe, Eleazer Tucker, Allen Smith, Samuel

Tilton,

Burnham, Oliver those settlers

up measures

follow-

tained:

of this tree, about six feet from the ground, measures seven feet

The

settled in this town.

ing are the names of those settlers as far as can be ascer-

merly

and about ten

Steuben

County, and between 1801 and 1815 quite a number of

worthy of mention, one of which measures nine and a half One branch feet in circumference at or near the ground.

feet,

tide of emigration set towards

1801 a

after

taken from

1815 were

early

Wm.

Parkhill,

There were others

Henry Kennedy.

who came

settlers

between

settled

Baldwin, William

Israel

Timothy

Robords,

Charles

Howard who

into

for-

Among

of Bath, and set off to Avoca.

settlers

1801 and

These were, most of them,

Rice.

Allen,

and

Goff,

might

that

be

town between

this

orchard names were given to several of the trees, such as

called

" Grandfather

1816 and 1824: John B. Calkins, Jos. Mathewson, Gershom Salmon, James Silsbee, John Putnam, Hugh Briggs, Van Housen Hopkins, and a number of others unknown

Moody,"

etc.,

and other names.

This place, or the valley, at that time was known as

Buchanan's or the Eight-Mile Tree. (so

The Eight-Mile Tree

marked by Phelps and Gorham's surveyors) stood

little

a

north of the dwelling of Levi Kysor, about a quarter

The

of a mile south of the village of Avoca.

went

section

Abram Towner

to the writer.

new

and spent his

mill in 1808,

came

name of Podunk. But this name lasted only a short time, and when the little hamlet began to assume shape as a village it received a new name, which the inhabitants take pride in handing down to posThe name AvocA* was given by Sophia White terity. Having heard that the little vilwhile on her death-bed. lage was about to be christened with a new name, she sent a written request to the people to allow her to name the

of one of the descendants.

pleasant forest village.

in 1814, on a

writer gave

The

it

first

the euphonious

settlers after the

Buchanans were James and

Husfh McWhorter and James and Georo;e Moore.

McWhorters and one of settlers,

and

finally,

the Moores

after a

James McWhorter

Moores.

short

clearing,

became permanent

absence,

first settled

kin farm, erected a small log cabin, and

both of the

on the

I. J..

commenced

but did not remain on the farm long,

1800, Gershom Towner and

The

Has-

a small

before

as,

Finley McClure settled in

Gershom Towner purchasing the Haskin place and Finley McClure the farm now known as the Shaver farm. Gershom Towner, soon after his arrival, erected the first hotel or inn in what is now the town of Avoca it was on Avoca

;

life

oldest son

and resided there

The son died

of seventy-eight years.

during his long 8,

His

life there.

into possession of the homestead,

by the name of Buchanan's or the Eight-Mile Tree for a number of years, after which some one unknown to the

May

on a farm near the

settled

1876, and the farm yet remains in the possession

John Donahe settled on the creek leading to Howard, on what is now known as the Donahe place. Richard and John Van Buskirk settled on what is known as the Sam Haskin and Allen farm. Eleazer Tucker settled on what is known as the

Tucker farm, about a mile above Wallace Station,

where some of his descendants now

Henry Smith,

reside.

father of 0. S. Smith, settled in this

farm about one mile south of Avoca

town

village.

This farm was known to the early citizens as the Smith farm, but

now known

is

as

the farm on which William

Allen resides.

William

Moody

took up and settled the lands

now

occu-

pied by the village of Avoca.

While the

valley

was being

by earnest and worthy

settled

and uplands were receiving their sterling

citizens the hills

inhabitants, and in January, 1811, Israel Baldwin settled

on a farm now owned by his youngest son, Abraham H. This farm

Baldwin. tiful

inland lake

lies

known

south of and borders on a beau-

as the

Smith Pond, taking

from a worthy and noble Scot, who

settled

its

name

on the north

;

the Haskin farm, and stood on the present site of Mr.

Raskin's residence. tality,

for his hospi-

and no traveler was turned away hungry

rich or poor, his

commodious

hotel,

The second

Collin, in

;

whether

house was the home of the traveler in

then new country.

life.

Mr. Towner was noted

Although he did not have a

In the month of March, 1810, William

in 1810.

Allen settled on the farm

now occupied by Lyman, John,

and Alexander Shults, those two

and spent his

hotel in the

town was erected by Joel

way from the creek road leading

was primi-

then manufactured in town.

lumber

Finley McClure cut the road

through on the west side of the

river,

settled there, there

from Kanona

to his

having before that time

been a path or road cut through on the east side leading

through to Naples, Ontario Co.

being the only Israel

Baldwin, when he came into the county and on the farm

where he

It

settlers

ones in that neighborhood until the following year.

liberally the necessaries of

1808, at or near Wallace Station.

when he

large,

it

he supplied

tive in its construction, being built of logs, the only

place,

this

side of

sion.

settled

was the

life,

to

Howard

first to

cut his

to his posses-

William Allen preceded him, both taking upland

over which

no white

man had

ever

traveled

to

their

knowledge. Charles Robords settled on what

is

known

as Robords'

Hill in 1814.

Although the pioneers had a hard struggle to obtain subsistence, they did not forget that there was something to be looked to beyond the supply of their physical wants.

* From Thomas Moore's ''Sweet Vale of Avoca.'

As

early as

1796

or

1797 they employed one Anna Parker

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

156

to teach school

by going round from house

house through

to

the sparsely-settled country, imparting knowledge to

young

Her

as well as she could.

the

qualifications, except in

endowments and good moral character, would

physical this

day be deemed doubtful for that avocation, for in

life

she would often

after-

of her pioneer teaching and say

tell

that she could not write, and those

who could were regarded

But she followed teaching

as highly educated.

at

It

was

Anna

which was in 1818.

and stood on a plat of ground

built of logs

in

Mary McKenzie was She taught the summer

the

ing.

school.

employed

first

the

now

present village, and near where the railroad bridge stands.

the town of

Avoca

in

and

for a

^8 per month, a

now known

is

as

1812, and the greater part of them

After that time settlers came in

faster,

and

country

in

1824 fine,

were easily ob-

In 1809, Henry Kennedy erected a saw-mill at a place now

known as Goff"'s Mills, and it is said that the year following James Vaughn built a grist-mill at that point. The writer has made thorough investigation as to its truth, but is unable to afiirm the statement, the old settlers informing him Howard, which was

soon after he

1812, and until that event

in

the Taylor mill, in Wheeler, was the nearest point where

they could procure grinding.

Eleazer Tucker built the

first

Jon-

saw-mill on the river in 1825, near Wallace Station.

athan Tilton built the the village of Avoca.

first grist-mill

Soon

The

flouring-mill in the village.

Silsbee built the

was

Goff" mill

time before the Tilton or Silsbee the settlers great pleasure,

about a mile south of

James

after

built

some

These mills gave

mill.

until the building of the

for,

In those days

them

after they emigrated

to the

Therefore they had great cause for rejoicing over

stone.

the erection of these mills near at home.

The

first

store kept in

Avoca was by two

and very few

George

and Alonzo Simons, on the corner of the Oliver Zeilley lot. The whole stock of goods was brought here on two pack-

They were of such

horses.

a class only as constituted the

actual necessities of living in those plain days.

The Indians who frequented the settlements of the They would often come out of the whites were a lazy set. forest to

lands,

where the

and stand

or help, they

white

settlers

for hours

would

retort

were chopping and clearing their

and look and

on,

say, "

and

Ugh

man work; me no work; squaw

!

if

asked to aid

me

like to see

work."

At

the

Many

at most.

of the settlers having, no

teams of any kind, the ladies and gentlemen of those days

thought

no hardship to walk six or seven miles

it

for

visit

and return.

to

make

After a few years the farmers

any surplus found an excellent market in Bath the products of their farms, which were drawn on sleds raised

in the winter.

were accustomed

to

After disposing of their loads, they

start the

teams homeward alone, and

when they thought they had got about halfway home, they would follow and would overtake them, or get home as soon as the

teams did.

The death of Michael Buchanan was

He

town.

married

Anna Parker

the

first

in this

about the year 1800, the

marriage having been solemnized by Gen. George McClure. He lived with his wife only seven years, when he departed this

life,

when she to live

Anna Buchanan a widow, until 1811, married James McWhorter but she continued

leaving

;

on the Buchanan farm,

it

having been willed

to her

by her first husband prior to his death. The farm has been kept and owned by some one of the descendants of Anna Parker to this day. Hugh McWhorter (whose death was the second in town) died

marks his

o;reat size

to

March

6,

1812

was planted near

resting-place.

;

at the time

his head,

of

which

This tree has grown to the

of eiffht and a half feet in circumference.

There were but two places where schools were taught up one was in the village and the other near Sal1818,

mon



Waterbury's.

tricts,

brothers,

and

All the other teams were oxen,

and James McWhorter.

more primitive method of

using the mortar and pestle, made sometimes of wood and

this section,

There were only two teams of horses owned in this town before 1812, and they were owned by Michael Buchanan

still

such a distance, resorted

from

return to fish on that stream.

the Cold Spring mills in Urbana, and many, to save the

on their shoulders

running

said that the creek

it is

through the Towner farm and emptying into the river was their favorite stream for trout, and remained a favorite re-

his burial an apple-tree

grists

just below his house, and

dian kettle.

Taylor and Goff" mills, the people were obliged to resort to

arduous work of carrying their

there were from 50 to

a bullet-mould out of the remains of the In-

by oxen

tained.

settled in

mill

made many

who

first grist-mill

the

form desired, and a gentleman now living in Avoca has

were commenced that afterwards were enlarged to

that William Goff erected the

flat

At new

was of that kind that could be worked into any

it

;

an evening

life

on his farm near the

years after,

100 Indian lodges on the

there were about fifty families settled, and improvements

beautiful farms, and the comforts of

settled

number of

many would

took lands on the river, and but few ventured back on the hills.

Abram Towner

George Cameron was

what

hunting-ground of the Senecas.

time

sort to

price in those days considered high. in

This region

and worship have been found.

favorite

teacher in this build-

to teach the winter school, at

There were about 20 families

was a

of

stone being of a diff'erent character from any found in this

Parker and Susan Collier were the only teachers who taught built a school-house,

their ingenuity

relics

who was

log house and the dwellings of the inhabitants.

Avoca until they

50 Indian huts on the Haskin farm, where many

near that place have been found parts of a stone kettle, the

the second teacher, and taught school in part of her father's

in

into this town, there were about

came

first settlers

num-

for a

ber of years, and was succeeded by Susan Collier,

time the

YORK.

In 1843 there were eleven school

which number remains

to the present time.

are several fine school buildings in Avoca, one of

dis-

There

which

will

take rank with the union school buildings of any of the The number of pupils who attended school sister towns.

town during the school year of 1865 was 633 the amount of expenditures was $1365.37. In April, 1867,

in the

;

number of pupils in attendance was 583 expenditures, The population of Avoca is 1876 the village $1404.29. contains about 600 inhabitants, two hotels, two dry-goods

the

;

;

one clothing-store, two groceries, one cabinet-store, and several mechanics' shops, and other places of business.

stores,

The

inhabitants of the town and village are active, Indus-

Oscar

Smith was born in the town Bath), March 31, 1816.

S.

of

Avoca (then

in-

cluded in His paternal grandfather, Joseph Smith, was a native of Dutchess Co., N. Y., and settled with his family in Bradford he died Co., Pa., as one of the pioneers of that county, where

His father, Henry Smith, was about ten years old when the family settled in Pennsylvania was married to Anna Spalding, of Sheshequin, Bradford Co., Pa., and immediately thereafter came to Steuben County, settling in at

an advanced age.

;

town of Bath, in 1814, purchased a tract of land, built a saw-mill, and began clearing his land and manufacturing

the then

lumber. He spent the remainder of his

life

on

this farm, quietly

following agricultural pursuits was a man of correct habits, his ways. strict integrity of purpose, and unobtrusive in all He died about the close of the late Kebellion at the age of ;

eighty, having lived in this county to see the forest give place buildings to cultivated fields, and schools, churches, and public

take the place of the pioneer's rudely constructed log buildings. The wife and mother died at the age of fifty-seven, about the year 1850. She was a daughter of Maj. William Spald-

and granddaughter of Gen. Spalding, of Eevolutionary

ing,

fame.

Mrs. S. W. Park, of Athens, Pa. Maria; Eeuben O., of Clean, Cattaraugus Co. Erastus H., of Towanda, Pa. (deceased) Henry B., of Lyndon, Osage Their children are Oscar

S.

;

;

;

;

and Mrs. Franklin J. Marshal, of Wheeler, this county. Mr. Smith received his education from books in the common schools of his early days, which although of a limited amount formed a taste for reading and study, which he has His minority was spent at home, cultivated during his life. engaged with his father in farm and lumber business. At the age of twenty he began business for himself, and unassisted Co.,

Kan.

;

pecuniarily purchased one hundred acres of timbered land,

upon which he labored

for

some eleven

years, preparing the

land for farming.

In 1849, January 31, he married Elvira F., daughter of Capt. Jabez Fish, of Sheshequin, Bradford Co., Pa. She was born in 1824. In the year 1850 he settled in the village of Avoca, and opened a general merchandise store, which although of small beginning, he has gradually increased as the growing interests of the vicinity demanded, and continues at the present time. During the twenty-nine years he has been in business as a merchant in Avoca he has had associated with him at different times other men, with firm-names of ''Smith & Peek,"

and " Smith & Barney ;" the latter firm is now in business. Mr. Smith cast his first vote for President of the United Upon the States for Martin Van Buren as a Democrat. part, and an active formation of the Kepublican party he took was a delegate in the county convention upon the organization of that party here. He was a delegate to the State ConvenHe was tion in support of Abraham Lincoln for President. administration appointed postmaster at Avoca, first under the of President Pierce, second of Abraham Lincoln, and third, in the spring of 1868, of Gen. U. S. Grant, which office he now holds, making in all some twelve years he has been postmaster. Mr. Smith is a man of plain, unassuming ways, possessed of that native talent and sound sense, sharpened by contact with business through a series of years, not uncommon with men whose early life was regulated somewhat by the necessity of the times, and the privations which foster self-reliance. Promptness, integrity, and justice in his business are his

known

characteristics.

His children are O. Park, H. Wilmot, L. Dana, C. Howard, and R. O. Smith.

:

David L. Robords was born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., Oct. 24,

the town of 1799.

He

is

Amsterdam, eldest in a

family of eight sons and five daughters of Charles and Mary Robords, the former a native of New Jersey, and settled in Montgomery County prior to his marriage, where most of the

He removed to Steuben County, and Howard, now Avoca, in 1813, and took

children wore born.

town of up one hundred acres of timber land. At that time what is now Avoca was almost an unbroken wilderness. The remainder of his life was spent clearing off this land, together with He died in 1830, fifty acres more which he had purchased. aged fifty-one. His wife survived him some thirty years, and

settled in the

Yery many

of their

children settled in the town of Avoca, and are farmers.

Their

died at the age of eighty, in the year 1860.

Andrew, Ichabod, William, George, John, Barney, Mrs. Artemus Dunton, Mrs. Wm. Dunton, Mrs. Yestus Allen, Mrs. Edward Allen, and Mrs.

names are

as follows

:

David

L.,

John Nipher, of whom only four are living. Mr. Robords resided at home until he was twenty-two years of age, and being the eldest son assisted his father very much in clearing off the forest and preparing his land for never enjoyed the advantages of an educabut possessed of a large degree of native tion from books talent which, brought in contact with necessary privation and hardship in the early settlement of the town, is only

cultivation.

He

Robords entered upon the future with willing hands but no money. He is now in his eightieth year, and can trace his life back through some sixty-six years as a resident of the neighborhood where he now lives he remembers the continual warfare carried on with the wolf and other wild animals, in the ;

protection of domestic animals, in which, during his leisure hours, he had pleasant pastime with his

In 1821 he settled on one hundred acres of land for himIn 1822 he married Betsey, daughter of David Dunself. All of ton, of this town, and began lite in the log house. the incidents common to the pioneer were the lot of this couple yet with a will to accomplish whatever they under-

and make

their

beginning a success, Mr. and Mrs.

hand, and he

as eight wolves in

business life in 1878.

Mr. Robords has spent his life as a thrifty, enterprising farmer, and in the same vicinity where his father first settled.

and national matters, he has valued the right of suffrage as a boon of the American people, and has been connected with the Whig party, and is now a member of the Republican party. He is one of the old landmarks that point to the early days, and very few, if any, have been spared to live so long in the town as he, and contribute

Always

as

interested in local

members

He

is

known

of society to the general welfare of

its citizens.

for his sterling integrity in all business matters,

broad and comprehensive view of the various His wife died Oct. 4, 1866, beliefs held by men of the times. at the age of sixty-three. Their children are seven sons and six daughters, viz. Charles, Mrs. Lyman Perry, Helen (died young), John, Joshua, James, Mrs. Edward Allen, Racher (died young), Cyrus, Aaron, Mrs. Alvin Wood, Marvin, and Mrs. Harvey

and

;

took,

in

one day. A rehearsal of such thrilling incidents to the youth of today fires the young heart with a love for the early days and the pioneer life, in strange contrast with a beginning of a

relates the fact of killing as

;

increased.

many

gun

Fox.

for

his

;;

Nathaniel

Chase was born

B.

at Liberty Corners,

this county, Dec. 13,

town of Cohocton,

His

1814.

father,

which he carried on for some three years, and removed Avoca, purchased a

grist-mill

and saw-mill, and

to

after four

was a native of Berkshire Co Mass., and while a young man settled in Pompey, Onondaga Co.,

years engaged in business with those interests disposed of

N. Y., where he married Malinda, daughter of Nathaniel She was a native of Canterbury, Butts, of that place.

quite largely in

Conn., born in 1790, and with her parents removed

his son,

Thomas

C. Chase,

Massachusetts, and

,

first to

sixteen years of age the

when she was

family settled in Pompey.

Of

this

union were born

in

the town of

C. Chase, of Lima, Livingston

Co.,

N.

Pompey, Levi Y.

Mrs.

;

Dr.

them, since which time has been engaged in farming, and

with 1866, he was depot agent at Avoca, which position

Thomas C, has

became a supporter of active in politics, local

of Cohocton, Steuben Co., in 1812, and purchased a farm, a

never held

now forms

a part of the village of Liberty,

and through which the Rochester branch of the Erie RailNearly all of this farm was cleared by Mr. road runs. Chase, senior.

now Liberty

At

the time of his settlement at what

Village there was only a single log house, hence

the Chase family were

among the

pioneers of that part of the

In 1837 he sold his farm

county.

is

removed

at Liberty,

to

Chautauqua County, and died the same year, aged fifty-two. His wife survived him thirty-six years, and died at the residence of her son, in Avoca, in 1873, aged eighty-four. Their children born in the town of Cohocton were Nathaniel

B.,

infancy);

subject of this narrative

Mrs.

Franklin

Day

Dwight W., of Elcador, Iowa

;

(deceased), ;

(died

Aurilla

of

Amos W.

in

Bufi'alo

(deceased)

school only until he was ten years of age.

At

the age of

seventeen he went as an apprentice to learn the milling

several years.

year he worked

as

journeyman

In 1846 he purchased the Liberty

for

Mills,

principles.

its

He

has never been

but ever interested in questions affecting

In 1877-78 he represented his

legislation.

Board of Supervisors, besides which he has

in the

office,

desiring rather the quiet of business to

political preferment.

His

life

has been one of activity, and in his business

Unaided pe-

operations he has been generally successful. cuniarily

when young and beginning

a business career, he

economy and prudence self-reliant men, which formed

learned by necessity those lessons of

not

uncommon

to

our early

the basis of his business

daughter of

Amos

In 1834 he married Deborah, of Livingston Co., N. Y. She was

life.

Stiles,

Their children

born in Pompey, Onondaga Co., in 1818.

were Thomas C, of Avoca Ontario Co.

;

;

Mrs. Dr. D. S. Allen, of Seneca,

Ida Bell (died at the age of three years)

and an adopted daughter, Libbie Vrooman.

;

The mother

member

died Feb. 7, 1872, having been a devoted

of the

Methodist Episcopal Church for the past twenty years.

Born

Chase received the opportunities of the common

business; after one

and State

town

Josiah (died in infancy).

Mr.

since occupied.

Mr. Chase was originally a member of the Democratic party, but upon the formation of the Republican party

Washington Day (deceased), of Arcade, Wyoming Co. The family removed from Pompey and settled in the town portion of which

For nine years, beginning

real-estate.

in the county,

Mr. Chase has lived

of the Cohocton Valley give

way

to see the forest

to industry of the settlers

and agriculturists; the rude log school-houses and churches supplanted by fine architectural and costly edifices machinery ;

of

all

kinds take the place of manual labor

;

and a country

prepared for the third and coming generations to occupy.

:;

157

TOWN OF AVOCA. and

trious,

Prosperity and thrift are leaving their

frugal.

impress on every department of industry.

cemetery by the side of most of the early

village

settlers.

I. J.

James

Thomas

a

Cotton.

W.

a

Wm.

"

''

H. Hammond.

Alva Shunt. William T. Slattery.

J. Shults.

W. H. Wood.

1877. N. B. Chase.

G. Borden.

F. L. Shaver.

Tuel.

George

1876.

1878.

George H. Shults.

Ellis.

W. H. Wood.

Haskin.

1874. D. E. Hoadley. 1875.

Collectors,

Clerks,

Chester

1872. F. N. Barney.

1873.

The first child born in the town was William McWhorJohn Buchanan and Betsey McWhorter were the ter. They now lie buried in the pleasant next children born.

Town

Supervisors.

S.

B. Haskin.

Spencer Moore, Abigail Moore, and David Robords are probably the oldest living representatives of the of the town. erected by

it

Simeon Holmes.

who

there in a log cabin take special pride in keeping

preserved without change.

Herman

1844.

George A. Fox.

Rose.

S,

Herman

1864. Nathaniel S. Wheeler 1865. Peleg Gorton.

Leonard Wilson. 1867. G. W. Towner.

1866.

1868. Nathaniel S. Wheeler.

S. Rose.

1869. Peleg Gorton.

Salmon H. Palmer. 1850. John L. Robords.

1849.

was erected April 12, 1848, from the towns of

Avoca

The

Bath, Cohocton, Howard, and Wheeler.

town-

first

meeting appointed by law was held at the house of James Gr.

Barto, in the town of Avoca, on the

first

Monday

of May,

persons were duly elected

The following-named

ing year.

Henry A. Louck. Supervisor

Town

Jesse Louck,

;

the ensu-

officers for

Clerk

Oliver Bice, Simeon Holmes, Luther Tilton, Justices of

the Peace John Donahe, John L. Robords, Marcus Peck, James Gorton, John Collier, John T. Allen, Assessors Commissioners of Highways Allen Smith, John B. Ste-

John Conner, Commissioners of Schools

venson,

Charles

;

1852.

Herman S. Rose. Henry Goff'.

C.

Howard, Addison

Niles, School Inspectors

Perry

S.

Donahe, Collector; Perry

Almon

Devendorf,

S.

Caleb C. Allen. 1872. a.

W. Towner.

M. A. Peck. 1873. F. H. Williams.

Marcus Peck. 1855. Lawson R. Hood.

1874.

1856. Peleg Gorton.

Salmon H. Palmer. John Allen.

1857. N. S. Wheeler.

1875. G.

F. H. Guiwits.

G.

W. Coolbaugh. W. Towner.

Ward. Salmon H. Palmer. M. B. Walker.

1876. Alexander R.

1858. Ithiel C. Nichoson.

1877.

Peleg Gorton. 1859. Sylvester D. Lewis.

J. B.

Lawson R. Hood.

Hamlin.

Matthew

;

Fox, Joseph Matthewson, Salmon Waterbury, Inspectors of Election; Jonathan Clisbee, Abram Towner, Poormasters;

Silsbee.

1854. Ira Tucker.

1860.

W.

Leonard Wilson.

1851.

;

W. Coolbaugh.

1871. Forest H. Williams.

James

;

;

1870. G.

Allen Smith.

1853.

1843, for the purpose of electing town

Smith Tucker.

1863. Sylvester D. Lewis.

1845. John L. Robords. Henry H. Bouton. 1846. John L. Robords. 1847. Henry H. Bouton. 1848.

ORGANIZATION.

1862.

;

Luther Tilton.

It is still

standing, and the descendants of the worthy couple life

1861. Peleg Gorton.

1843. Oliver llice.

The first frame dwelling in the town was James McWhorter on the Buchanan farm. began

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

first settlers

Donahe, Josiah

Begel, Cornelius Vader, Oscar Smith,

CHURCHES. religious sentiment of the early time

The

Christian denomination,

who

was of the

held their religious worship in

Buchanan farm, and continued

the barn on the

to

hold

in the log school-house until 1827,

when

Constables. services there

TOWN

LIST OF

the

OFFICERS.

1843.

Henry A. Loucks.

1844. George

W. Burnhair

1845.

i(

u

1846.

i(

K

1847.

((

i(

1848.

ii

U

1849.

.

a

ii

a

Henry H. Bouton.

a

George P. Fox.

1851.

Joseph G. Sprague.

1852.

a

u

Dexter Straight.

1855. 1856.

1857.

Burnham Peleg .

1859. 1860. 1861.

a

u

Joseph Guiwits.

Henry A. Loucks. A. M. Waterbury. i(

1863.

1866.

U

ii

ii

ii

J.

a

Daniel A. Fox.

a

a

William a

1869.

ii

L

J.

a

1870. S. E. Haskin.

1871

I.

J.

Haskin.

ii

Henry Robertson. ii

Haskin.

a

John E. Storms. J.

S.

Wesley Calkins.

Overhiser i(

Horace A.

Wesley Calkins. a a

to

Silsbee.

Alexander Patten. a

a

preach here

Christian denomination continued

represent the predominant faith, but

to die out gradually,

At

it

and to-day but few remain

present the Baptists, Lutherans, and

and town.

The

village of

Joseph a

Ellis.

Henry

Foults.

a

Luther G. Clark.

W. G. Borden.

Avoca has three churches,

Lutheran, and Methodist, vices,



in

— the

Baptist,

which are held regular

ser-

and with which are connected prosperous Sunday-

schools.

THE BAPTIST CHURCH. The

a

1867. Joel Carrington. ii

George P. Fox. Oliver Zeilly.

a

some time

a

ii

a

Salmon H. Palmer.

1865.

1868.

a

ii

James Hees.

((

The

to

Methodists are the leading denominations of the village

John B. Payne. a

who commenced

called the "star-gazer,"

of that order.

ii

a

a

a

1862. J. H. Nichoson.

1864.

a

ii a Erastus Olmstead. Henry H. Bouton. Bauter. Andrew Simeon Wagner. Henry Goff. Salmon Waterbury. Francis H. Guiwits. Z. J. Calkins. (( a George W. Towner. Simeon Wagner.

1858. Joel Carrington.

first

commenced

Cornelius Vader.

Gorton.

Elders Buzzel and Elisha Brownson were the

ministers of the gospel, but there was another minister,

for

Andrew Bauter. Dexter Straight.

East

about that time.

Gideon Smith. a a

a

1854.

Larkin.

Peleg Gorton. a a

a

I.

Donahe.

Darius Silsbee.

((

1853. Joseph

S.

Jesse Devendorf.

i(

1850.

Perry

Amos

Bernard Fox.

at

Collectors.

Clerks.

Jesse Loucks.

Methodist Episcopal Church was organized

first

Hill.

Town

Supervisors.

and

Baptist Church was organized Jan. 13, 1847, by

adopting the Declaration of Faith and Church Covenant published by the

New Hampshire

Baptist State Convention.

Twelve male and twenty-one female members constituted Kev. Horace -Spencer the church, as originally organized.

was the

On

first

pastor,

and James Van Deuzer

first

deacon.

the 13th of August, 1847, the cliurcb was received into

the Steuben Baptist Association, with which

it

is

still

in

communion.

The

earliest

meetings of the church were held in the

:

;

NEW

HISTORY OF STEUBEN COUNTY,

158

YORK.

school-house and at private residences, and continued to be

and have

at present

1852, when the present church

Western

New

held

so

till

was

edifice

Since

its

had the following

organization this church has

Rev. Horace Spencer, Rev. James Halstead, Rev.

:

W.

A.

Sunderland, Rev. Henry Robertson,

Rev.

The Sunday-

Adelbert Chapman, the present minister.

numbers about 75

Cotton, S. is

and discipline of

constitution, declaration,

The church

the Franciscan Evangelical Lutheran Synod.

pastor,

and continued

to

James Shults was

its first

preach to them two and a half years.

The church called Joseph Strough as their second pastor, who settled with them in 1844, and preached about one which

year, after

and supplied

their first pastor returned

the church as a missionary for about one and a half years.

After

this,

Their

preaching. lier

about

for

and Isaac Dillenbeck

Benjamin Waggoner. sisted of

were

first ofiicers

Prior to the taxing of the towns to raise bounties for .

enlistments to

The church

12 communicants besides

:

is

at its organization con-

communion.

in

was incorporated July 26, 1868, and the church

The

dedicated in January, 1870.

property

The

It

edifice

value of the church

$3000.

is

first

pastor under the present organization was Rev.

The

N. Clock.

following were the

officers

first

Hiram Stattson, H. A. Wall, and Daniel Fox, Trustees

raised

into the field tion

1872

rence, from

:

time

till

Nov.

6,

Dillenbeck,

James

Stattson,

Shults, P. A.

ton Felch, Luther

Gr.

organization

its

1

It

a

fine

last call

her quota of 53

123 men sent

in all

into the

impossible to give a complete

The

following

list,

of the soldiers

list

as complete as can be

now

Byron March, Hezekiah Fox, R. McNeill, J. B. Newton, Zina James Voorhees, Eugene Tucker, Isaac House, Henry Squires, Morris Loucks, Wesley Davis, William Fraley, John Doud, Ira Doud, Leroy Tucker, L. McCarthy, F. Tucker, E. Avery, William Avery, Silas Vrooman, Fred Graves, George Brownrigg, Marcus Walker, George A. Collier, M. C. White, Solomon Smith, Abram Miller, Isaac Armstrong, H. H. Tobias, John N. Gillett, S. H. Houston, Henry Waifle, William J. Allen, 0. W.Ormsby, William E. Haskin, Asa Demandvilla, Christopher Fox, Abner Robords, W. L. Allen, William Waterbury, B, Cooley, Fred Collier, Henry Hees, W^hit Treat, J. B. Newton.

LIST OF THOSE

WHO WENT OUT WITH THE

189TH REGIMENT.

John Watson, J. C. Dunton, J. H. Kinkade, George A. Peck, Alonzo Vunck, Josiah Guiwitts, M. L. Deyo, F. N. Barney, J. W. Johnson, J. S. Fowler, Ira L. Golf, Joel Beagle, H. E. Butler, S. D. Briggs, J. Billinger, A. Carey, L. L. Ferris, George W. Gunsalas, J. E. Griswold, William B. Golden, A. Hooper, R. Hooper, D. Herrington, B. Herrington, Samuel Olds, W. W. Oxx, J. A. Palmanteer, Lorenzo

;

members

Trustees,

J.

;

Deacons,

H. Wagner, Sut-

Wm.

Robords, Riley Rasey, Frank Randall, Robert Swart, Thomas Sherwood, Seth Tubbs, Joseph Tucker, Oscar Tucker, B. Tobias, William B. Tobias,

P. Bellinger,

Luke H. Voorhees,

Clerk, George J. Shults.

;

edifice

in

the

village, the

his-

church

They maintain a prosperous Sunday-school, and have kept up regular services since

property being valued at $5000.

F.

Van Wormer,

R.

Woodmancy.

AND THOSE WHO DIED BY REASON OF WOUNDS RECEIVED IN THE SERVICE.

William March, killed at Fredericksburg, May 25, 1862. William Saltsman, wounded at Cedar Creek, died from wound, Dec. Robertson, killed at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Oscar Marcy, mortally wounded at the battle of Dallas, Ga.

;

22, 1864.

buried in Tennessee.

Albert Piatt, wounded at Gettysburg, died. Willis Sager (color-bearer of 188th), mortally

wounded

at Five

fearlessly carrying his colors at the head of his regiment

their organization.

;

Forks while

died April 29,

1865.

Jacob Shuman, killed at Hatcher's Run. Newton, killed at Dallas, Ga.

MASONIC.

The

and under the

more than her propor-

Calkins, William B. Overhiser,

W. Law-

church no data has been furnished us for a has

sons,

and their residences not being put on the muster-

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

tory.

500,000 men, Avoca had put

account of quite a number going out of the county

LIST OF KILLED

this

to

Piatt,

Present Elders, Isaac

and James Olmstead

A. A. Wall, George Bellinger

Of

Up

Lieut. A. J. Alden, Squire Wessels,

Yan Yalkenburgh, Clark

were

Sager, Willis Sager, B. Stanton, Fred Chase, David Palmanteer, Albert

1874.

at present are 62.

Hiram

for soldiers' bounties

James Hammond, Truman Head, S. 0. Allen, John March, Ezra Beagle, Luke Beagle, William March, Herkimer Shults, Arie Van Wie, Josiah Shaver, Jeremiah Shaver, Jesse Rich, Samuel Banta, Levi Randall, Artemus Dunton, Jos. W. DuntoUjGeo. E.Robords, Lyman Robords, Stillman Robords, J. W. Robords, Addison Robords, W. L. French, Jos. Jenks, James Cook, Horace Hammond, Thaddeus Ward, Jacob Sattsman, Wm. Sattsman, Wm. Martin, John Griswold,R. H.Collier, Joel Towner, Oliver Towner, Edwin Towner, Deloss Parkhill, Oscar Marcy, Thomas Raplee, Lyman McNeill, U. Marlatt, W. F. Kelsey, Alexander Van Pelt, M. Fitzmaurice, William H. Vunck, William Cox, George Curtis, L. Alden, Alfred Olds, Frank

R. Y. Whitbeck,

third pastor was Rev. D.

This church numbered at

communicants

call for

making

filled,

of this town.

;

present pastor, was called.

its

$2000

70 of her hardy

to that time,

rolls, it is

James

The pulpit was vacant from that 1877, when Rev. Wm. E. Churchill, the

to

In

service.

Rev. J. H. Webber succeeded Rev. N. Clock as pastor,

The

up

was promptly

Clerk.

July 13, 1870.

payment of bounties and other

by tax on the taxable property of the town.

the time of the last

;

;

to the

addition to these sums,

John Kinkade, and George Fox, Deacons James Shults,

Olmstead and Isaac Dillenbeck, Elders

These

obtained, has been sent us to be inserted in this place

its pastor.

still

About $600 were con-

expenses connected with the enlistment of soldiers.

to enlist,

the constitution and formula of the Franciscan Evangelical it

the several quotas, or up to December,

sums were applied

Elders, Richard Col-

This church was reorganized July 30, 1867, adopting

Lutheran Synod, with which

fill

of $3000 to aid enlistments.

On

Deacons, John Kinkade and

;

present Master

MILITARY RECORD.

they had no stated

years,

fifteen

The

Cooper, H. E. Butler.

tributed by the Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Association.

This church was organized the ninth day of April, 1842,

at that time.

W.

1863, the town of Avoca raised by her contributions the

pupils.

THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH.

had no property

Gr.

W. H. Wood, Thomas

N. Moore,

J.

are Rev.

M. B. Walker.

sum

by adopting the

W.

T.

S.

Dean, Rev. J. J. White, Rev. R. S. Stowell, and Rev.

school

The Past Masters

York.

Coolbaugh (deceased),

erected.

pastors

one of the most flourishing lodges in

J. B.

lodge was organized with about 20 charter members,

Rev. George M. Coolbaugh being the lodge they have been from the

first

first

Master.

As

a

uniformly prosperous,

LIST OF THOSE

WHO DIED FROM

DISEASES CONTRACTED IN

THE SERVICE. Byron March, served three years and Ranson McNeil, died in Washington,

re-enlisted; died at

D.

C, Dec.

15, 1863.

home, Feb.

29, 1865.

Christopher Patterson, M.D., was born umberland

His land

;

Co.,

father,

married

North-

in

England, on the river Tyne, Nov. 22, 1819.

Ann

Eng-

also a native of

Boger Patterson, was

Pegg, and with his family of six

—Joseph, Edward, John, Mrs. Mrs. Norris Markham — emigrated dren

chil-

Clute, Christopher,

America

to

in 1825,

life

farmer, which he followed until his death, which occurred

eighty-ninth

he followed in

uary, 1866. after his marriage. Dr. Patterson settled in

as a practicing physcian,

Avoca

and has remained here continuously

in practice, with little exception, until the present time.

As

early as 1845, before his graduation. Dr. Patterson

Censors of the Steuben County Medical Society, and since

the oldest resident of the town, and in her

which time he has been a member of that society, being its president for one year, and one of the examining board for

year.

One

son,

first settled

in

Eoger, was born

in

this

two years.

Dr. Patterson received during his minority a good edu-

At

died at the age of sixty-seven, Jan-

Dans-

still

country, and died at the age of nineteen.

cation.

on coming to

died, Jan. 18, 1858, aged sixty-

and where he

Her mother

nine.

first settled

received a license to practice medicine from the Board of

and resides on the farm where they

now

and

survives,

His wife

1852, at the age of eighty-four.

being

father

Kanona, and hence were among the pioneers of that part She was born in the town of Bath in 1820, of the county.

Soon Patterson, senior, followed the

Her

181