History of Berks County in Pennsylvania

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Y.?/

PBEFAGE.

The

history of Berks County, one

State of Penns3'l\ania, facts, relating' to

teentli

is

the earl}' politieal organizations in the

presented in this volume.

embraces the important

It

the several aflairs of the county, from the bejiinninji' of the eigh-

century until now, which the author collected during the past ten years;

and, up(m having arranged sult of

ot"

liis

them

in

a systematic narrative, he

sul)mits the re-

labors.

The author acknowledges with pleasure the thorough [)ublishers,

now

Messrs. Everts, Peck

&

Richards, in

its

production

he has been enabled to issue

enterprise and

liberalit}',

much beyond

his original intentions.

The

Rocke)' and Capt. Frank H. Cole,

it

in

co-operation of the ;

for,

through Vheir

a comprehensive plan

services of Mr. George R.

whom

Prowell,

they sent into the county for

Mr.

J. L.

tlie

purpose of aiding him in the completion of his enlarged undertaking, are worthy

of particular mention.

Many

persons in every district of the county, and

Pliiladel[)liia

and

lie

and Washington, encouraged the author

friends

at Harrisliurg,

in the course of his labors,

recognizes their kindly attentions to him.

M. Reading, May,

188(3.

L. xM.

TABLE OF CONTENTS. PAGB

IXTRODUC'TIOX

Chapter

1

French and Indian

Chapter

I.

General History of Pennsylvania

— Colonial

Forts

County by Indians Early Settlers

— Provincial

;

Dutch, Swedes, English, German,

and

Constitutional

Government

chases of Territoiy from the Indians

etc.

of Early

— Pur-

dered,

—Counties erected

Journal

— Numerous

Supplies,

— Invasion

of

Letters on Sufferings

Prisoners and Missing.

Chapter IX. Chapter

Revolution and Independence

II.

Revolution— Stamp

Physical Geography of Berks County

Spirit at

Reading

—Various Committees chosen— Battle at Lexington awakens County Companies from Berks County



Elevations.

War- Torj'

Conscientious Scruples against

County— English

Chapter

136

Duty— Patriotic

2()

— Minerals — Botany — Mountains— Valleys

Streams— Relative

111.

— Burd's

Inhabitants— Peace Declared— Persons Mur-

Taken

— Development,

Geolog>'

104

War- Officers,

Military Periods— Cause of etc.

•')

VIII.

War

III.

Feeling in

Readmg— Associators—

Prisoners at

Brigadier-General Elected'—Quota of County Exceeded

—Patriotism of Joseph Hiester— Battle of Long Island

56

linns

Camp SurDrowned— Militia Refuse to County— Army Supplies1777— Conway Cabal— Duel at

—Deserters-Hessian Prisoners— Hessian

— Delawares Tribes, Clans and Sachems — Five Nations— Manners and Custon Retreat of Indians — Present Locati< n— Villages-

Origin

prised—Hessian Officer

:

Ganawese dian

Names— Indian

March— Militia

Returns of

Reading in Reading — Independence

Affairs at

Relics.

Won

and Peace Declared

—Continental

Revolutionary Survivers

Chapter

IV.

Paper Money.

Chapter X. 04

Nationalities

Whiskey Insurrection of 1794

-English— WeUh-Irish—Hebr.

Swedes—Ge

— Negroes,

167

House Tax and Liberty Poles of 1799- Embargo of 1807— War of 1812-15 and Companies of County En-

Chapter V.

listed.

Erection of County

Chapter XI.

72

Mexican

General Situation of Territorj'-:— Petitions for County

—Districts— Names of Townships — Reductions of Territory, Northumberland

War

180

Act erecting County

Cause of the

and Towns

Mexico— Participation

County and Schuylkill County— New Counties Pro-

Return of

War -Readiiiji

Artillerists

in

Departure

Ariillcrislb

War— Battles

for

Engaged In—

—Brilliant Reception.

posed.

Chapter XII. Chapter VI.

Civil

Agriculture

84

General Condition and Progress

— County Society

Exhibitions— Farms, Production,

and

etc., of

and

County, 1870

War

186

— Patriotism of County — War Meetings and Appropriations — Ladies' Aid Society — Reading Hospital — Drafts and Quotas of Berks County — NorthIntroduction

Men in Service— Sumniary of Battles- Paper Money— List of Companies from Berks County in Civil War— President's Call for Troops— First Companies in ern

1880.

Chapter VII.

War— Ringgold Pearly

and General Industries

87

Early Furnaces and Forges of

1828-30- Industries 1850-7G— Memorial

—Comparative

in 1840

for National

of Present Furnaces, Forges

Tabic of

County

Statistics

Statement,

Foundry— Summary

and Mills— Comparative

— Production

for 1880

at three recent periods

Statistics of

County— Production,

— General

of Iron in

Industries-

Manufactures of County, 1870 and 1880.

Light Artillery the First

Statement of Captain Countj^

in

Service; Nine Months'

Company-

McKnight— Soldiers

Three Months' Service,

18(11;

of Berks

Three Years'

Service; Volunteer Militia of

1862; Drafted Militia of 18G2; Volunteer Militia of 1863;

One Hundred Days' vice 1864-65

Service of 1864

— Miscellaneous

;

One

Year's Ser-

Enlistments from Berks

Coimty- Soldier's Buried in Berks County— Grand Army PosU— Society ot Ex-Prisoner's of War.

——



I

TABLE OF CONTENTS. Chapter

Chapter XXII.

XIII. -WJ

Militia Provision

Legislative

County

— County

Census of Berks County Early Population of State

of 1783

Battalion

Militia proffer Services to President

Adams

— Military

—Taxables and Voters of County, — Property and Money Assessed, 1885.

County, 1850

and 1885

Companies Artillerists

Cadets.

Reading.

Religious Denominations

— Refon

Part

Town

Public Sale

— First

Excitement, Heidelberg and

Taxables, 1759— District of Reading Erected— Churches

Mails

—County

Chapter XV.

nal

374

— Charity

— County

Schools

Institute

— Public

at

of

Buildings

Improvements — Fuel, Light and Entertainments

— Indian Invasion— Revolution

Hunting and Fishing

— Common

— Pay

Site

— Markets and Fairs, Charter to Reading for Them — Citizens against Change of Government — Early Innkeepers— Early Occupations —Rainbow Fire Company — No Newspapers nor Inter—Schools

Bible So-

General Education School Education

to 1783

—Town laid out— Lots sold Patentees — Ground-Rent — List

Selection of

— Sunday

Early Encouragement

-Town from 1748

1.

Friends

Religious

Meetings

357

— Baptists — Dunkards Catholics— Amish — Other De-

-Roman

1876

Chapter XXIII.

Chai'ter XIV.

Lutherans

of Increase of Popu-

to 1880— Census 1880— Table of Houses, Farms, etc., in

of Villages,

1842— Battalion Day of 1843— County Militia in 1856— State National Guard— Reading

ing in

— Rate

lation—Census Table of County, 1790

in

1798— County Military Division— Encampment at Read-

Prominent

Schools

Men— Pound

Sterling— Old Style to

New

Style.

Comparative Table of Schools and Scholars.

Part 2.— Borough from

1783 to 1847

— Election Districts — News— Post-Office — Internal Improvements — Ferries

Charter of Incorporation

Chapter XVI.

papers

Language, Manners and Customs

— Fire Companies, Banks and Water Sup— Light— Public Buildings— Stages, Canals and — Manufactures—Traffic —Merchants of Reading in 1830 — Occupations in 1839 — Distinguished

386

and Bridges ply

Chapter XVII.

Railway

392

Nevvspaijers

-Me

-Str.

Se.

rial

Cll:i

-Early E.xhibitions

of

— Pn

Chapter XVIII. 424

Internal Improvements

Part3.—City

River- Bridges, Roads and TurnpikesCanals and Railways— Public County Build-

from 1847

Schuylliill

Review of Reading

Stages,

ment— Riot

ings— Post-Uffices— Telegraph and Telephone.

Chapter XIX. Politics

Legislation

— Political

Slate Conventions and List of Officials

Men— Offices by

Parties

— Political

Mass Meetings

at

Reading

— Biographical Sketches.

Reading, July. 1877.

692 744

pitals

Part

6.

Light—Halls— Private Market Houses— Hos-

— Private Parks^—Street Railways.

—Churches

767

Part 7.—Schools Parts.

Chapter XX.

798

—Associations

811

Part 9.— Officials

—Bench and Bar

J utlges

682

18SG

— Manufacturing Industries — Internal Improvements

Electric

Special

Festivals

in

to

1847— Incorporation—Dcvclop-

City Buildings, etc.— Post Office— Cemeteries— Oas and

Districts— Political Sentiment of County

Prominent Representative

Judiciary

Part

5.

474

and Civil List

Klection

Part

4.

in

— Attorney-at-Law — Biographical Sketches.

Part

10.

841

—Census Chapter

853

XX W

Chapter XXI. 855

Boroughs of C'ounty Me and do good to one the world,

kindly received and his authority was accordingly

Markham

In his

lay out a great city.

the Indians he addressed them as follows

with the two declarations. There

he exhibited to the Governor the King's declaration,

and it marked the division between the and slave States for a hundred years. In the fall of 1681 certain commissioners from Penn arrived, having been seut by him to line,"

to be

The education

provided for

be administered without delay be regulated in such a

manner

;

;

justice

his

his

of rich

was

to

prisons were to

as to lead to the

reformation of criminals; and the penalty of

death was to be abolished, except in the cases of

murder and

treason.

Several days after this

meeting the Assembly (which had been called

by his

Markham

to

meet for the purpose) adopted

frame of government, and from that time

onward the development of the province was wonderful. Philadelphia was then founded upon a plan which conteraj)lated the growth of

The

a magnificent city.

lands of the province

were surveyed and settlements were located in

Many

various directions.

houses were built

immigrants, mostly English and German, came in

great

numbers

;

were founded

schools

printing press was set up

;

a

jiost

;

a

was estab-

— HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYJ.VANIA.

10

and the great outposts of

lished,

were

civilization

Penn was

vice his portrait

was painted, which

be the only genuine portrait of

erected.

particularly .successful in his treaty

He won

with the natives.

their unqualified

He

duced.

then

said to

is

him ever pro-

with the Society

united

of

Friends, having been imbued with the principles

confidence.

of this sect through the preaching of

Thomas in

intentions to

His earnest preaching at Cork, caused his arrest and imprisonment.

In the following kind and remarkable language he expressed his ideas and

"

them

:

We

meet on the broad pathway of good faith and no advantage shall be taken on either I will not side but all shall be openness and love. call you children, for parents sometimes chide their good-will

;

;

children

t(io

The

diflfer.

compare

severely; nor brothers only, for brothers

to a chain, for

me and

you I will not that the rains might rust or

friendship between

We

the falling tree nught break.

are the

same

one man's body were to be divided into two we are one ilesh and blood."

as

if

[larts;

We

ligious writings then

when he

moon and

the sun shall endure."

;

\\as

led to

imprisoned

His

re-

his second arrest,

in the

Tower.

Whilst

there he wrote his distinguished religious work, entitled, "

No

His

Crown."

Cross, no

obtained his discharge,

l)ut

he

father

ex-

persisteidly.

But com-

adjoining counties claimed

ERECTION OF COUNTY. the right of levying taxes on

Eastern Division (twelee).

inhabitants

the

and their property along these

and

lines,

79

Amity.

this

Maiden-creek.

Act was therefore ])assed on the 18th of February, 1769, which authorized commissioners (William McClay,

Oley.

Maxatawny.

Colebrookdale.

Albany.

Douglass.

William Scull and John Biddle)

Alsace.

Kichmond. Ruscomb-manor.' Longswamp.'

An

caused dissatisfaction.

between

Lancaster,

to

run the

C\imberland

and

Exeter.

lines

Berks

Western Diiision {eight).

Counties, and also between Berks and North-

Caernarvon.

ampton Counties, by actual survey, and extend them in a northwestwardly course as far as the

Robeson. Tulpehocken.

Bethel.

lands extended, which were purchased by the

Heidelberg.

Brecknock.

l>roprietaries

from the Indians

The most extended

limits

cluded about one-tenth

i)art

five times the present area.

in 1768.

of the county in-

Immediately after the erection of the county and the formation con-

tinued for a period of one hundred years.

As

were as follows

the .State

is

at

now bounded

:

Hereford.

All of Montour and Northof Schuylkill,-

the greater part

Union, Lycoming, Clinton and Potter, and part of Columbia,

Snyder, Tioga,

McKean. The population of its

erection

The

Cameron

Pike.

Cxreenwich.

Washington.

Windsor. Rockland.

Perry.

Outelaunee.

District.

Muhlenberg.

Earl.

and

Western Division

Union. Bern, Upper. Tulpehocken, Upper. Penn.

the county at the time of

cannot be ap])roximatcly estimated.

records at Philadelphia and Lancaster were

examined

the

for

Heidelberg, North.

Marion. Spring.

The upon

its

County

erection

Etstern Divisiin.

was taken from Philadelphia

Rjading from Alsace. BoyertowufromColebrook-

to the east of the river Schuylkill,

and

to the west.

estimated area of land contributed by the

named

several counties 2>reseut enclosed

Ipws

follovving districts were erected froiu the

which comprised the county

from Lancaster and Chester Counties

The

The

townships as named:

been about twelve thousand.

territory

Jefferson.

assessments

of the years 1750 and 1751 without success. It

may have

to the county, as

by boundary

(ten).

Heidelberg, Lower.

Centre.

thoroughly

They

Eastern Division (eleven).

the follow-

ing twelve counties, either in whole or in part,

umberland,'

;

of the province, or

away from Berks County constitutes as

Cumru.

townships were formed

vast tract of land cut

])resent subdivided, the

Bern.

it is

at

as fol-

lines, is

dale.

Fleetwood from Richmond. Hamburg from Windsor. Kutztown from Maxatawny. Topton from Longswamp.

The

:

W'it'.rii

total

Division.

from Robeson and Union. Bernville from Penn. Centrejiort from Centre. AVomelsdorf from HeidBirdslioro'

number of

elberg.

territorial

districts in

Acea.

) ''

Philadelphia County

280,000

Lancaster County Chester County

238,o00 7,500

Total area of county

Districts.

—At the

in 1752, there ships.

were twenty

Taking the

526,000

erection

of the

districts

county,

or town-

river Schuylkill as the di-

viding Hue which separates the county into two great divisions, they were as follows

the county

is

fifty-one.

Names of Townships. From

this fact

it

might be supposed that the

majority of the names given to the townships erected

German.

upon application

But

this

to

was only one township to the kill

named by

the

German

Coumy

in 1811.

case

for there

;

east of the

influence,

to the west,

Erected partly from Berks County ia 177^.

'Erected mostly from Berka

would be

court

was not the

was Alsace, and only two '

—The great majority

of the early settlers in the county were Germans.

'So known before 1752.

Schuyl-

and this

and these

HISTORY OF BERKS COTl\TY, PENNSYLVANIA.

80

The English were and

were Heidelberg and Bern.

more

successful in this respect to the east of the

they having

river,

townsliips

named

the following nine

other

the

feature

class

after

localities

neighborhood, and

of the

" local."

PERSONAL NAMES Richmond.

Exeter.

Greenwich. Windsor. Albany.

Hereford.

Ruscomb-manor.

Mavatawny Barto.

Welsh

the

to the

west, they

having

Cumru.

named

other townships were

after their

several localities or prominent individuals.

LOCALITY.

Blandon. Bovvers.

Boyertown.

Coxtown (now

Claytonville.

Evansville.

Douglassville.

FetheroUsville.

Engelsville.

Grim-iville.

Esclibach.

Hancock.

Fredericksville.

Jeftersonville.

Gabelsville.

Kearnsville.

Griesemerville.

Kempton.

West nf River.

Oley.

Hillegiasville

Amity.'

Tulpehucken. Union.

Herefordvillc).

Kutztown.

Pike.

Spring.

Jacksonwald.

Lecsport.

District.

Centre.

LobachsviUe.

Lenhartsville.

Rockhind.

Bethel.

Marysville.

Kirbyville.

Greshville.

(now

Klinesville.

MaXatawny. Longswamp.

Pricetown.

Lyons. Mertztown.

Schultzville.

Mohrsville.

Ontelaunee.

Seisholtzville.

MoUtown.

Enst of River.

West of River.

Douglass.

Washington.

Robeson. Peun.

Earl.

Jefferson.

Muhlenberg.

Marion.

Fleet-

wood.)

East of River.

INDIVIDUALS.

Shaneaville.

Rothrocksville.

Snyderville.

Shoemakers vi lie.

Spangsville.

Smithsville.

Stonersville.

Trexlertown.

Stoneville.

Wessnersville.

Treichlersville.

Tuckerton.

Perry.

Weavertown.

Names of Towns. — In

the

county there

The " number of them are named after individuals. They are well distributed throughout For convenience I have arranged the county. them in two classes in the two divisions and one hundred and twenty towns.

are

Ontelaunee Section (24).

Baumstown. Bechtelsville.

Brecknock.

The

Section (27).

'

three,

Caernarvon.

(78).

East of SehuylkilL

Maiden-creek.

named

some called

:

Colebrookdale.

And

or

are

West of Sclnnjlkill.

greater

four sections of the county according to

The names

torical narrative^

my

his-

of the one class

were given to the towns after the individuals who laid out the town-plans or owned the land in the vicinity, and sold oif lots or first began local

improvements, and are called " personal ;"*

with Indians.

'

From

2

IncUiding

^

See narrative of townships.


,300

221)

1

and grist-mill ))roducts Foundry and machine-shop products

21(i,570

51,800 102,091 20,100 50,000 150,000 789,300

'

Flouriiig

1880.

Hands

1

'

1044 10008* $12,522,140

Wages.

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. was engaged during the beginninjr

War, 1755 to 1702 English War, 1812

;

1846 1

1848

to

War

;

eventful history, from

its

now

till

French and Indian Revolution, 1 775 to 1 782 :

;

1815; Mexican War,

to

of the Rebellion, 1801

to

At

present

we have a strong

a great blessing.

It

tion of labor in the

and

try,

is

to the

This

])roperty.

both inspiring and en-

It conduces to the

nobling.

feeling of secu-

enjoyment of life and

rity in tlie is

respect to territory

persistent direc-

various channels of indus-

development of our general

life

This feeling did not exist one hundred and thirty years ago. Then, for some years, our ])et in his back, and otherwise cruelly at Mr. Weiser"s with an account that the Indians had beset George Bollinger's house, and his family were used, which regard to decency forbids mentioning; whereupon Philip Weiser, and the deponent, and that Beslinger's brains were beat out, his mouth fled and a person whose name deponent does not know, much mangled, one of his eyes cut out, and one of his ears gashed, and had two knives lying on his breast. set off immediately, and at Christopher Weiser's overtook a large company, consisting of about one That the whole country thereabouts desert their inhundred men, and with them proceeded to George habitations, and send away all their household goods. The horses and cattle are in the cornfields, and every Dollinger's, and surrounded his house, where they found a good deal of damage done, and in the gar- thing in the utmost disorder, and the people quite deden, a child about eight years old, daughter of one spair. And further that he heard of much mischief done by burning houses and barns but not having Cola, lying dead and scalped, which they buried. " That the whole company went on to a plantation been where it was reported to have been done, he



:





!

;

;

;

;

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. chooses not to have any particulara thereof inserted in this deposition.

"James Morgan. "

Sworn

at Reading, the 18th of

November,

1755,

before us.

JoxAs Seely.

"

Henry Harry.

one Sebastian Brosiua was murdered and scalped, whose scalp was brought to Philadelphia, having been taken from an Indian." position,

—The following

by Edward Biddle, of Reading,

.

.

hi.s

.

;

ulations, with God's help letter, writ-

to

mow

and give such advice as I am able to do. There can be no force. We are continually alarmed; and last night I received the account of Andrew Montour. My son Peter came up this morning from Reading, at the head of about fifteen men, in order to accompany me over the hills. I shall let him go with the rest had wc but good regso far as the hills

"James Read.

ten

townships of Heidelberg and Tulpehocken, that they few who are alive and remaining there (the most part is come away) shall be forewarned to come to the south side of the hills, and we will convey them to this side. If I don't go over the hills myself, I will see the

"

" Besides the persons mentioned in the above de-

BiDDi.E Letter.

121

we could stand

of abode, but if the people

fail

(which

at our places I

am

afraid

father

they will, because some go, some won't, some mock, in Philadelphia, expresses the perturbed state of some plead religion and a great number of cowards), There is no I shall think of mine and my family's preservation feeling ju the city of Reading. and quit my place, if I can get none to stand by me date attached to it, but it is supposed to have to defend my own house. But I hope you will excuse the 16th of November been written on this hurry, I have no clerk now, and had no rest these :

" Mij Dearest Father

confusion

drum

is

I

scarcely

—I

am

in so

know what

I

much

am

beating to arms, and bells ringing and

people under arms.

and

horrcjr

writing.

The

all

the

Within these two hours we have

several days nor nights hardly."

And two weeks

afterward he addressed the

following two letters to the Governor in refer-

though too certain accounts, all corrobmoment is an express arrived, dispatched by Michael Reis, at Tulpehocken, eighteen miles above this town, who left about thirty of their people engaged with about an equal number of Indians at the said Reis'. This night we expect an attack truly alarming is our situation. The people exclaim against the Quakers, and some are scarcely restrained from burning the houses of those iew who are in this town. Oh, my country! my bleeding country I commend myself to the divine God of armies. Give my dutiful love to my dearest mother

ence to the murders committed upon the settlers

and my best love to brother Jemmy. "I am, honored sir, your most affectionate and obedient son, "E. Biddle.

Soon after my sons, Philip and Fredfrom the pursuit of the Indians, and gave me the following relation: That on lastSatuiday, about four o'clock in the afternoon, as some men from Tulpehocken were going to Dietrich Six's place, under the hills on the Shamokiu road, to be on the watch appointed there, they were fired upon by the Indians but none hurt nor killed (our people were but six in number, the rest beingbehind), upon which our people ran towards the watch-house, which was onehalf of a mile off, and the Indians pursued them, and A bold, stout killed and scalped several of them. Indian came up to one Christopher Ury, who turned about and shot the Indian right through his breast. The Indian dropped down dead, but was dragged out of the way by his own companions (he was found next day and scalped by our people). The Indians divided themselves into two parties. Some came this way, to meet the rest that were going to the watch, and killed some of them, so that six of our men were killed that

had

different

orating each other, and this

;

!

" Sunday, 1 o'clock.

I

have rather lessened than

exaggerated our melancholy account."

Weiser Letters.

—The following

letter de-

beyond Mountain during this exciting period; also shows to some degree a waut of pa-

scribes the condition of the settlements

the Blue

and

it

triotic

on the part of the inhabitants,

feeling

notwithstanding their perilous situation.

was addressed "Weiser, from

It

Governor Morris by Conrad his home, on 2d of November,

to

1755, at night: " I am going out early next morning with a company of men, how many 1 can't tell as yet, to bring away the few and distressed families on the north side

of Kittidany Hills yet alive such). as

my

They

(if

there

is

yet alive

cry aloud for assistance, and 1 shall give

opinion to-morrow, in public meeting of the 16

in the "

county south of thy Blue JMountain,

Honored Sir : On

my return

from Philadelphia,

I

Amity township, Berks County, the first news of our cruel enemy having invaded the county this met

in

and Tulpehocken. I left the papers as they were in the messenger's hands, and hastening to Reading, where the alarm and confusion was very great, I was obliged to the stay that night and part of the next day, to wit 17th inst., and set out for Heidelberg, where I arrived side of the Blue Mountains, to wit: Bethel

:

that evening.

erick, ari'ived

day and a few wounded. The night following the enemy attacked the house of Thomas Brown, on the Swatara Creek. They came to the house in the dark

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

122 night,

aud one of them put

window and

his fire-arm through the

shot a shoemaker, that was at work, dead

on the spot. The people being extremely surprised sudden attack, del'euded themselves by firingout of the windows at the Indians. The fire alarmed a neighbor who came with twoor three more men. They fired by the way and made a great noise, scared the Indians away from Bower's house, after they had set fire to it, but by Thomas Bower's dilligenceand conduct it was timely put out again. So Thomas Bower, with his family, went off that night to his neighbor, Daniel at this

who came to his assistance. By eight came up from Tulpehocken and HeidThe first party saw four Indians running off.

Schneider,

o'clock parties elberg.

They had some diately

;

prisoners,

whom

they scalped imme-

three children they scalped yet alive, one

died since and the other two are likely to do well.

Another party found a woman just expired, with a male child on her side, both killed and scalped the woman lay upon her face; my son Frederick turned her about, to see who she might have been, and to his and his companion's surprise they found a babe about fourteen days old under her, wrapped up in a little cushion, his nose quite flat, which was set right by Frederick, and life was yet in it and it recovered again. Our people came up with two parties of In;

"

May

it

please the Governor

:

That night

after

ing was appointed (of the people of Tulpehocken,

Heidelberg and adjacent

places,)

in

Tulpehocken

township, at Benjamin Spicker's, early next morning. I made all the haste with the Indians I could, and gave them a letter to Thomas McKee, to furnish them with necessaries for their journey. Scarujade had no creature to ride on. I gave him one. Before I could get done with the Indians, three or four men came from Benjamin Spicker's to warn the Indians not to go that way, for the people were so enraged against all the Indians, and would kill them without distinction. I went with them, as also the gentlemen before named. When we came near Benjamin Spicker's I saw about four or five hundred men, and there was a loud noise. I rode before, and in riding along the road (and armed men on both sides of the road), I heard some say. Why must we be killed by the Indians and we not kill them ? Why are our hands so tied? I got the Indians to the house with much ado, when I treated them with a small dram,

and so parted with them

in love and friendship. " Captain Dieffenbach undertook to conduct them

dians that day, but they hardly got sight of them.

(with five other men), to the Susquehanna.

The Indians ran

this a sort of a council of

off

immediately.

did not care to fight them,

if

Either our people

they could avoid

it,

or

(which is more likely), the Indians were alarmed first by the loud noise of our people's coming, because no order was observed. Upon the whole, there were fifteen of our people killed, including men, women and children, and the enemy not beat but scared off. Several houses and barns are burned. I have no true account how many. We are in a dismal situation. Some of these murders have been committed in Tulpehocken township. The people left their plantations to within six or seven miles from the house. I am now busy putting things in order to defendmy house against another attack. Guns and ammunition are very muili wanted here. My sons have been obliged to part with most of that which was sent up, for the use of the Indians. I pray your Honor will be pleased, if it is in your power, to send us up a quantity upon any condition. I must stand my ground, or my neighbors will all go away and leave their habitations to be destroyed by the enemy or our own people. This is enough of such melancholy account for this time. I beg leave to conclude, who am, sir, "

Your very "

" Heidelberg, Berks County, " P.

S



I

am

obedient,

November

After

war was held by the officers named and other free-

present, the gentlemen before

was agreed that 150 men should be as out scouts, and as guards at certain places under the Kittatinny Hills for 40 days. That those so raised to have two shillings per day, and two pounds of bread, two ])ounds of beef and a gill of rum, and powder and lead. Arms they must find themselves. This scheme was signed by a good many freeholders and read to the people. They cried out that so much for an Indian scalp they would have (be they friends or enemies) from the Governor. I told tliem I had no such power from the Governor or assembly. They began, some to curse the Governor some the assembly holders.

It

raised immediatel}', to serve

;

called

me

;

a traitor to the country,

Indians, and must have

known

who

this

held with the

murder

before-

low window. Some of ray friends came to pull me away from it, telling me I that some of the people threatened to shoot me. offered to go out to the people and either pacify them proclamation. those in the King's But the or make hand.

I sat in the

house

at a

house with me would not let me go out. The cry was The land was betrai/ed and sold. The common The peO])le from Lancaster County were the worst. wages, they said, were a trifle, and said somebody pocketed the rest, and they would resent it. Some:

Conrad Weiser.

creditably informed just

my

Emanuel Carpenter and Simon Adam Kuhn, Esqrs., came to my house and lodged with me. They acquainted me that a meetarrival from Philadeli)hia,

19, 1755.

now that one

Wolff, a single man, killed an Indian at the

same

time when Ury killed the other, but the body is not found yet. The poor young man since died of his wound through his belly."

body has put it into their heads that I had it in my power to give as much as I pleased. I was in danger of being shot to death. In the meantime a great smoke arose under the Tulpehocken Mountain, with the news following that the Indians had committed

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. murder on Mill Creek (a fulse alarm) and set fire to a barn. Most of the people ran, and those that had horses rode off without any order or regulation. I then took my horse and went home, where I intended to stay and defend my own house as long as I could. There is no doings with the people without a law or regulatidu by Governor and Assembly. The people of Tulpehocken have all fled till about six or seven miles from me some few remain. Another such attack ;

123

They are King George the Second, of

der to us, and the Governor's the same. true subjects to our

Great Britain or are willing to deliver us into the hands of these miserable creatures. "I am your friend, ;

"

"N. B.

—The

Peter Spicker.

people are fled to us from the

hills.

Peter Kryger and John Weiser are the last."



Report of Cruelties. On the 24th of November, 1755, Conrad Weiser, Emanuel " Conrad Wkisek. Carpenter and Adam Simon Ruhm subscribed " Heidelberg, Berks County, Nov. 19, 1755." and addressed a communication to the GovSpickeu Letter. Three days before these ernor, which set forth to him the result of their deliberations upon the " miserable condiletters were addressed to the Governor, Conrad Weiser received tlie following letter from Peter tion of the back inhabitants of these parts," and Spicker (who resided on the Tulpehocken road, the means which should be adopted in order!' to near the western boundary line of the county), withstand our cruel Indian enemy." will lay all the country waste on the west side of the " Your most obedient, Schuylkill. I am, sir,



detailing the great anxiety of the

community

in

that vicinity, and the losses which the people suffered

left

:

"

TuLPEHOCKEX, Nov.

10, 1755.

"CoNR.iD Weiser, Esq. "Jofin Anspack and Frederick Read came

to

me

'

;

ing to

Thomas Bower's

killed

with a gun-shot.

guns; running

to

house, finding a

man

dead,

Soon we heard a firing of that place and found four Indians

sitting on children scalping; three of the children are

dead; two are alive; the scalps are taken off; herewe went to the watch-house of Dietrich Six, where the Indians first attacked, finding six dead about a mile this side bodies, four of them scalped of the watch-house as we went back the Indians set fire to a stable and barn, where they burned the corn, cows and other creatures, where we found seven In-

after

;

dians, five in the house eating their dinner and drink-

ing rum, which was in the house, and two outside the

house we fired to them but in vain the Indians burned four plantations more than the above account told me. Peter Anspack, Jacob Caderman, Christopher Noacre, Leonard Walborn told me in the same manner; George Dollinger and Adam Dieffenbach sent me word in the same manner. "

Now we

;

are in a great danger to lose our lives or

whole Tulpehocken will be ruined by the Indians in a short time, and all buildings will be burned down and the people scalped, therefore you will do all haste to get people together to assist us. The Assembly can see by this work how good and fine friends the Indians are to us, we hope their eyes will go open and their hearts tenestates, pray, therefore, for help, or else

— Since the last cruel murder committed habitations

their

their effects

;

those in Heidelberg

;

Bethel township

''Second. —There

and told me the miserable circumstances of the people murdered this side of the mountain yesterday. The Indians attacked the watch, killed and wounded him at Dietrich Six's, and in that neighborhood a great many in that night. This morning our people went out to see came about ten o'clock in the morn-

;

" First.

by

the enemy, most of the people of Tulpehocken have

is

moved

entirely deserted.

no order among the people; one cries one thing, and another another thing. They want to force us to make a law, that they should have they dea reward for every Indian which they kill mand such a law of us, with their guns cocked, pointing it towards us. "Third. The people are so incensed, not only against our cruel enemy the Indians, but also (we beg leave to inform your Honor) against the Governor and Assembly, that we are afraid they will go down in a body to Phihulelphia and commit the vilest outrages. They say they will rather be hanged than to be butchered by the Indians, as some of their neighbors have been lately, and the poverty that is

;



some are

in is very great.

"Fourth.

men

to the

—Yesterday mountain

we

sent out about seventy

to take possession of several

houses, and to range the

woods along the mountain

in

Berks County, on the west side of Schuylkill. The same number are sent to the back part of Lancaster County, we promised them two shillings per daj",

two pounds of bread, two pounds of beef, and a gill of rum a day, and ammunition, and that for forty days, or till we shall receive your Honor's order. We persuade ourselves your Honor will not leave us in the lurch; we must have such a thing done or else leave our habitation, if no worse; and all this would not do, we and others of the freeholders have been obliged to promise them a reward of four pistoles for every enemy Indian man that they should kill. Many things more we could mention, but we don't care to trouble your Honor any farther."

And Conrad postscript

Weiser added

tlie

following

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

12-t

" I cannot forbear to acqviaint your tain

Honor of

circumstance of the late unhappy

a cer-

affair:

One

pose of acquainting himself with the situation

of the people, and, after an

examination, he

Kobel, with his wife and eight children, the eldabout fourteen years and the youngest fourteen days, was flying before the enemy, he carrying one, and his wife a boy, another of the children, when

to

they were fired upon by two Indians very nigh, but

also consulted with the Executive Council

est

hit only the

man upon

the breast, though not danger-

They, the Indians, then came with their tomahawks, knocked the woman down, but not dead. They intended to kill the man, but his gun (though out of order, .so that he could not fire) kept them off. The woman recovered so far, and seated hereelf upon a stump, with her babe in her arms, and gave it suck; and the Indians driving the children together, and s])nke to them in high Dutch, be still, we u-on'l htirl vuu. Then they struck a hatchet into the woman's head, and she fell upon her face with her babe under her, and the Indian trod on her neck and tore off the The children then ran four of them were scalp. scalped, amting which was a girl of eleven years of of the scalped, two age, who related the whole story are alive and like to do well. The rest of the children ran into the bushes and the Indians after them, but our people coming near to them, halloed and made a noise. The Indians ran and the rest of the children were saved. They ran within a yard by a woman that lay behind an old log, witli two children there were about seven or eight of the enemy." ously.

:

found that the policy of defense was not factory,

and that new measures had

subdue the Indians.

the commissioners in

to be

satis-

taken

Whilst at Reading he

and

respect to a proper dis-

which had arYork. The Gren-

tribution of the regular troops

rived at Carlisle from

New

adiers were ordered to be quartered at Reading.

Their rations were three pounds of pork, three

pounds of

beef,

one pound of

fish,

ten

and one-

half pounds of bread or meal for a week, and

one

gill

of

rum

per day.

Premium for Scalps.

—In

pursuance of

of carrying on active measures again.st

this spirit

the board of commissioners de-

the Indians,

cided on the 9th of April, 1756, to

recommend

;

The onward movement of tlie

the Indians and

terrifying reports of their barbarity excited

the settlers to such a degree that the sections of

the county near by and beyond the Bhie tain

became almost entirely deserted.

MounEven

t\w inhabitants of Reading, though they were a

Governor that bounties, or premiums, be paid for prisoners and .scalps,

to the

For every male Indian prisoner above ten years old, that shall be delivered at any of the government forts or tewns $150 For every female Indian prisoner or male prisoner.of ten years old and under, delivered as above 130 For the scalp of every male Indian above ten 130

years old

For the scalp of every Indian woman

Probst Letter.

— By

50

the foregoing letters

would seem that the Indians coninto the county beyond anxiety for their welfare. Conrad Wei.ser the Blue Mountain before 1756, to the west of But in the beginning of 1756 stated in a letter from Reading, dated 13th of the Schuylkill. December, 1755, they reached the district along the mountain to the east of the river, and committed similar " The people of this town and county are in very Valengreat consternation. Most of this town are but day- outrages upon the unprotected settlers. laborere, and owing money, are about to leave it, they tine Probst, a resident of Albany township, adhave nothing at all wherewith to support their fami- dressed the following letter to Jacob Levan, considerable

body

together,

luanifcsted

ninch

All trade is stopped, and they can get no employment, and unless the Government takes about thirty or forty of them into pay to guard this town,

lies.

they must go off and the rest will think themselves unsafe to stay, and the back inhabitants will have no place of security

when they

left

for their

wives and children,

others,

it

fined their invasions

(one of the justices of the county, in

Maxatawny township,) on

who

resided

the 15th of Feb-

ruary, 1756, in which he mentions the horrible

murders committed upon the Reichelderfer and Gerhard families:

are out either against their enemy, or tak-

ing care of their plantations and cattle, and things should

come

after

when

to extremity."

The massacres by month

and

the

Indians contiiniing

month, the Governor visited Read-

ing in the latter part of December, for the pur-

"

Mr. Lev ax

—I

cannot omit writing about the

dreadful circumstances in our township, Albany.

The

Indians came yesterday morning about eight o'clock, to Frederick Keichelderfer's house, as he was feeding his horses,

followed

and two of the Indians ran upon him, and

him

into a field ten or twelve perches off;

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR.

125

A

house was immediately

house, with a design to fetch

and ran towards Jacob Gerhard's some arms. When he

afterward built on the spot where the original

came near Gerhard's he heard a lamentable cry, which made him run back Lord Jesus! Lord Jesus towards his own house but before he got quite home, he saw his house and stable in flames, and heard

It was torn down by Mr. Bolich, who erected a handsome dwelling in its stead. The traditional accoimt of the murder, one hun-

escaped

but he

'

!

'

;

the cattle bellowing, and thereupon ran away again.

"Two

of his children were shot; one of

them was

found dead in his field, the other was found alive and brought to Hakenbrook's house, but died three hours after. All his grain and cattle are burned up. At Jacob Gerhart's they have killed one man, two women and six children. Two children slipped under the bed

;

one of which was burned

;

the other escaped,

We

and ran a mile to get to the people. we must leave our homes."

desire help,

or

Muhlenberg Letter.



Tlie Rev.

Henry

Melchior Muiilenberg described this shocking affair as follows

George Bolich. house stood.

dred and twenty years after

it

occurred,

as

given by Mr. Bolich, was as follows "

While the whole family was

in the house, quietly

enjoying the comforts of a rural home in the wilderness of Albany in the month of February, an unusual noise was heard in the vicinity of the house.

ing was

known

Noth-

of the presence of the Indians or of

any other person, until they heard a suspicious noise which excited their fears at once that a sad fate was awaiting them. Mr. Gerhart, solicitous about the safety of his beloved family, opened the door and peeped out, but saw no one. He quietly stepped out-

make a closer inspection of his when a concealed Indian shot him and he fell dead at the door. The women dragged Mr. GerThe Indians knowing that the hart into the house.

side of the door to :

premises,

"In New Hanover (Mont. Co.) I had confirmed two grown daughters of Frederick Reichelsdorfer. This man subsequently bought a tract of forest land head of the family was killed, had less to fear, aj near the Blue Mountains, which he cultivated suc- proached the house and set it on fire. The women and children knew that a horrible death was staring cessfulTy, with much toil and great sacrifice, to enable him to support his family. But fearing the IiuliaHS, them in the face that they must either be burned who scouted the region, sacking, burning and mur- alive, or leave the house and submit to a death fully A dering, he removed his family back to New Hanover, as revolting. They chose the first alternative. whilst he journeyed to and fro to attend to his place. boy of about twelve years of age, whose hair had In the month of March, after he and his daughters already been burned off his head, and had seen sufferhad threshed out his wheat, on a Friday morning, ing among his mother, little brothers and sisters, they suddenly felt an uncomfortable presentiment of which no pen or human tongue can portray, jumped fear. Entering upon their evening devotions, they out of a window on a side of the hou-e opposite the joined in singing the old hymn, Wer weiz wtc uahe Indians. He ran to a family over a small hill south mir meiii Ende.' Committing themselves to God, of this place to giv(» the alarm, but when assistance they retired. On the following Saturday morning, as came the house was consumed by the flames and the the father had gone upon the open field to bring in Indians had made their escape." his horses, and on the eve of starting for home, he This occurrence naturally alarmed the neighwas surrounded by Indians. From sudden fright, in the settlers moved away view of his great peril, he could neither utter a cry, borhood and many of nor move a limb. As the savages were within twenty to places where they could feel secure in the paces, he turned his thoughts to God, and was enabled letter enjoyment of life and property. Jesus I live by Thee Jesus I die in Thee to cry dated 24th of March, 1756, describes the fatal In the moment of this exclamation, he felt himself at consequences to a party in an attempt at removonce endowed with superhuman energy, in virtue of :— which he turned, became swift-footed as a deer, and ing



'

'

A

!'

'

:

!

!

winged, like the ostrich.

He

!

escaped from their sight

and reached his home but, alas his hut lay in ashes the cattle were bellowing in a sheet of flame, his eldest daughter lay a crisp, and the younger, partly alive, scalped and horribly mutilated, had barely strength to relate the harrowing circumstances, and to impress a dying kiss upon the distracted brow of her father, bending over her." ;

Gerhart MuRDEii.

!

—The

was committed on a form we.stera section of

Gerhart murder

in the

" Ten wagons went up to Allemaengel to bring down a family with their effects and as they were ;

returning, about three miles below George Ziesloff's,

upon by a number of Indians from both upon which the wagoners left their wagons and ran into the woods, and the horses frightened at the firing and the terrible yelling of the Indians, ran down the hill and broke one of the wagons to pieces. The.eneray killed George Ziesloff and his wife, a lad of twenty, a boy of twelve, also a were

fired

sides of the roads,

extreme north-

Albany township, owned by

'

Brunner's "Indians of Berks County,"

p. 47.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

126

girl

of fourteen years old, four of

whom

they scalped.

off his moccasins,

and gave him a blanket

Another girl was shot in the neck and through the mouth and scalped, notwithstanding all this she got ofl'. A boy was stabbed in three places, but the

cover himself; but at midnight,

wounds were not thought

and

at

He

passed

to be mortal.

They

killed

two of the horses and five are missing, with which it is thought the Indians carried off the most valuable goods that were iu the wagons." ]\[arch,

Ill

house and

barii

Indians burned the

17o6, the

of Barnabas Seitel and

tlie

mill

of Peter Conrad, killed Balser Neytong's wife

and took a son eight years of age captive.

men

Captain Morgan sent seven

pursuit

in

Kluck Muuder.

—On

the 24th of March,

Kluck (about

from Reading) was

set

on

fin;

and the whole family killed were

.still

ht)u.se

;

fourteen miles

by the savages,

while the flames

ascending, the Indians a.ssaulted the

of one Linderman, in which there were

two men and a woman, all of whom ran upstair.s, where the woman was shot dead through the roof

fast asleep,

daybreak had traveled about on

that

day,

all

to

the

escape,

six miles.

sometimes wading

streams neck deep, in the direction of the Blue

Mountain

;

The next

that night he stayed in the woods.

day, exhausted and hungry, he ar-

rived by noon at Uly Meyer's plantation, where Charles Folk's company lay, who wished him to remain till he had regained strength,

and they would conduct him

He

to his father.

was accordingly sent home.

but they failed to overtake the Indians. the house of Peter

Indians M'ere

when he made his

The

eastern part of the county

and Indian War. invasions, go

They would

any distance

not, in

their

into a country settled

by the white people where intercept their retreat.

it

was possible

to

In March, 1756, they

On' the

ventured as far south as Hereford.

22d of that month (March) one John Krausher and his wife, and William Yeth and his boy

The men then ran out of the house when Linderman was about twelve

years old, went to their place to

to engage the Indians,

shot in the neck and the other through the

was disturbed French

only once by the Indians during the

find their cattle,

and on

their return

were

fired

Linderman ran towards the upon by five Indians, who had hid themselves Indians, two of whom only were seen, and shot about ten perches from the road, when Yeth one of them in the back, when he fled, and he was mortally wounded in the back; Krausher's and his companion scalped him and brought wife was found dead and scalped, and had three cuts in her right arm with a tomahawk. away his gun and knife. The report of the several jtreceding massacres Krausher made his escape, and the boy was carried off by the enemy. is not definite with regard to the locality; but Indian Treaty. During the war, messenit is probable that they occurred within the gers were sent by the Governor to the chiefs of limits of Albany township. At the same time' the Indians carried off a the Indians, and the Indians sent representayoung lad, named John SIioop, about nine years tives of their tribes to Philadelphia or some old, whom they took by night seven miles be- place midway between Philadelphia and the

jacket.

Upon

this,



yond the Blue Mountain

;

but where, accord-

ing to the lad, the Indians kindled a liim to a tree,

and took

off his shoes

fire,

tied

and put

council

fires

of the Indians.

One

of the most

important treaties was held at Easton in the latter part

of July, 1756.

Teedyuscung, with

He

moccasins on his feet; that they prepared them-

fourteen other chiefs, was present.

some mush, but gave him none. After su])per they marched on further. The same Indians took him and another lad between them, and went beyond the second mountain having gone six times through streams of water, and always carried him across. The

was an ambassador appointed by ten nations, and authorized to treat with the Governor of

selves

second evening they again struck up

fire,

took

Pennsylvania. breach

said he

In attempting to palliate the

of former treaties and the numerous

massacres of settlers upon lands bought of them, he assured the Governor that the " present clouds " owed their origin to the custom of their ancestors from having a " multitude of kings."

1

Time of the

Ziesloff

murder.

He made

strong professions of friendship, de-

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. between the white

j)lored the hostile feelings

and the Tndians, and said tliat all the harm inflicted upon the white people was committed by the French Indians who lived on the

]>eople

After faring well for a week at the ex-

Ohio.

pense of the government, and receiving a large quantity of presents, the tiiat

our pipe," and turn

ciiiefs

took

"some of

good tobacco that the Six Nations put into parties

all

smoked the pipe

in

and, according to their custom, a lasting

;

peace and friendship was to be maintained. But the fumes of " that good tobacco " had scarcely

disappeared the

when of

.settlers

the Indians again

fell

upon

Berks County, burned their

buildings and cattle, lurked behind the thickets and shot men at work in their fields, scalped women and children alive and captured others,

many of whom were

subjected to great hard-

ships and cruel sufferings.*

Two Women

Scalped.

— Three

months

afterward, Conrad Wei.ser addressed the follow-

ing letter (dated at Heidelberg, 19th of October, 1756,) to Governor

"Honored

Sir:

Denny

:

Last night about 10 o'clock

received the melancholy news that the

I

enemy Indians

had again made an invasion in Berks county, and killed and scalped two married women and a lad of fourteen years of age, and wounded two children of about four years old, and carried off two more; one of the wounded is scalped and like to die, and the other has two cuts on her forehead, given her by an Indian boy in order to scalp her, but did not; there lieing eight men of Fort Henry posted in two different neighbors' houses about one and a half miles off, when they heard the noise of the guns firing they

made towards it but came too late. " The people are moving away, leaving their barns full of grain behind them and there is a lamentable cry among them. It is with submission a very hard case that so many men are taken away to protect Shamokin (a wilderness) and the inhabited part be with;

out it. I have ordered eighteen men out of the town guard of Reading to re-enforce Fort Henry immediately, of which I hope your honor will ap-

..."

prove.

127

"Yesterday morning at break of day one of the fire at a distance from him he went to the top of another mountain to take a better observation, and made a full discovery of the fire, and supposed it to be about seven miles off, at the house of John Fincher; he came and informed me of it; I immediately detached a party of ten men (we being about 22 men in the fort) to the place where they saw the fire, at the said Fincher's house, it being nigh Schuylkill, and the men anxious to see the enemy, if there, they ran through the water and the bushes to the fire, where to their disappointment they saw none of them, but the house, barn, and other outneighbors discovered a

houses

flames, together with a considerable

in

all

amount of corn

they saw a great

;

many

tracks

and

came back to the house of Philip Culmore, thinking to send from thence to alarm tiie other inhabitants to be on their guard, but instead of that found the said Culmore's wife and daughter and son-in-law all just killed and scalped; there is likewise missing out of the sam-e house Martin Fell's wife and child about one year old, and another boy about seven years of age, the said Martin Fell was he that was killed, it was just done when the scouts came there, and they seeing the scouts ran off. The scouts divided in two parties, one to some other houses nigh at hand, and the other to the fort (it being within a mile of the fort) to inform me. I immediately went out with the scout again (and left in the fort no more than six men), but could not make any discovery, but brought all the families to the fort, where now I followed them, and

believe there are

upward of sixty women and children

that are fled here for refuge."

''



Ten Women and Children Rescued. On the 14th of the same month. Lieutenant Samuel Humphreys,

above

the fort

who was

stationed at

Northkill, wrote

to

Conrad

Weiser as follows

"May it please the rb^nc/.-—Yesterday we were alarmed by a number of Indians who came and took a child away. Immediately upon hearing the news, I, with nine men, went in pursuit of them, leaving a number of farmers to guard the fort till we should return. But we found nothing till this morning, we went out again and, in our return to the fort, we were apprized of them by the firing of several guns; when ;

I

ordered

We

ran

my men

till

to make what speed they could. we were almost out of breath, and, upon

finding Nicholas Long's hou.se attacked by the In-

CuLMORE AND

Fei,l

Murder.— On

the

4th of November, 1756, Jacob Morgan, the

commander lowing

at

letter

Fort Lebanon, addressed the to the

outrages committed in

Governor

fol-

in reference to

dians, the farmers

We stood

fled,

in battle with

us to the

we put the Indians

number of

leaving the soldiers to fight.

them

for several

there were about sixty guns discharged,

minutes

and

till

at length

to flight.

Albany township: 23 Pa. Arch. 30.

'

who were with

twenty, deserted and

Brunner's " Indians of Berks County,"

p. 51.

Subsequently, in September, 1708,

Fincher and his family were murdered by the Indians.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

128 "

We

have one man wounded, and

my

coat

was shot

The mimher of the Indians was twenty. Our number at first was twenty-four. But they all deserted and fled except seven. Two old men were killed before we came, one of whom was scalped. Ten women and chililren were in the cellar and the house was on fire; but we extinguished it and through

in four phices.

brought the

women and

the Colonel to send

solemnly say they

children to the

me

will

a reinforcement, for the

men

not go out with the farmers,

as they deserted in the battle

The Indians

I desire

fort.

and never

a gun.

fired

We

cried the halloo during the battle.

guns and a blanket which had two holes with a buUet in it, and is bloody. The Indians had all red hats and red blankets."

have one of

their

GiKL TAKEN Captive.— A

letter

was ad-

Governor from Bethlehem, on the 30th of November following, stating the commission of another murder in Albany township

dre.ssed to the

"John Holder came here

this

mangle and informed me that

evening from Alle-

last

Sunday evening,

the 28th instant, three Indians came to the house of a certain

man

" That your petitioners humbly conceive that it would be the safest way to have the said Fort continued and rebuilt, as it is very much out of order and repair. " Therefore

Honor

your petitioners humbly pray

to take the premises into

issue such orders as will prevent the removal of the

and order a sufficient number of men in it, and to grant your petitioners such other relief as to you in your wisdom shall deem meet. "This petition was signed by George Gilbert and Adam Spittlemeyer, at the request and in behalf of said Fort,

following persons, all inhabitants of Berks County, within four miles of and about Fort Franklin over the Blue Mountains

the

'

'

'

George Gilbert.

William Weigand.

Adam

Anthony Krura.

Spittlemeyer.

Henry Hauptman.

Philip Scholl.

Casper Langeberger. Nicholas Kind. George Merte. Henry Norbeck.

Jacob Keim.

Widow

John Wissemer. George Wartman. Jacob Richards.

of

Mark

John Frist. William Gable. Philip Kirsbaum.

Grist

(deceased).'

nameil Schlosser and knocked at the

the peojde within called who is there. Answer was made, a good friend they within not opening the door, they knocked again they within asked who is

Widow of Geo. Krammer

no answer being made from without, then one of the men named Stonebrook looked out of the window, when an Indian discharged a gun and killed him on the spot. They then opened the door, the woman and two children endeavored to escape, and the In-

Philip Annes.

door

;

your

consideration and

Christopher Sprecher.

(deceasel).'

;

;

there

;

dians pursued and took

men fired at when one of the

the

both the children.

the Indians and saw one of girls

One them

of

fall,

he had possession of made her

escape from him, but the other they took away.

this

this

time the Indians also appeared in

township and carried off the wife and three

children of

Adam

Burns.

was only four weeks old. Petition' for Fort.

The youngest

— At

ExecutiveCouucil,held on

tiie

child

a mseting of the

7th of May, 1757,

a petition, addressed to the Lieutenant-Governor,

was

read, setting fortli,

"

That your petitioners are informed that Fort is to be removed to this side of the Blue Mountains, and a considerable way into Albany townFranklin

ship.

"That, if in case the said Fort is to be removed, your petitioners will be obliged to desert their plantations, for their lives and Estates will then lay at stake, and a great part of this province will lay waste, and your petitioners will become a burden to the other inhabitants.

John

Ball.

Scheefer.

George Sprecher."

Jacob Leisser.

Peter Gersinger was shot and scalped about the middle of June, 1757, while plowing in a field.

The

place of this

but the report of

it

murder

is

not named,

seems to indicate Bethel

township.

The

Indian that was fired at fell, cried out very much, but in a short time he got up and made oft'."

About

William

Trump Murder. — James

Head, Esq., ad-

dressed the following letter from

Reading on

the 25th of June, 1757: " Last night

Jacob Levan, Esq., of Maxatawny, me, and showed me a letter of the 22d inst., from Lieutenant Engel, dated in Alleniangel, by which he advised Mr. Levan of the murder of one Adam Trump, in Allemangel, by Indians that evening, and that they had taken Trump's wife and his son, a lad of nineteen years old, prisoners but the woman escaped, though upon her flying she was so closely pursued by one of the Indians (of which there were seven) that he threw his tomahawk at her, and cut her badly in the neck, but 'tis hoped not dangerously. This murder happened in as great a thunderstorm as has happened for twenty years past which extended itself over a great part of this and Northampton Counties for I found much mischief done, as I came from Easton, Northampton County, to this

came

to see

;

;



'

'•Which said Grist and

Krammer have

the defense of their cuuuiry lost fall."

lost their lives in

AND INDIAN WAR.

FREx\CH town, the length of fifty-two miles

and which

yesterday,

— the

day before

I hear has brokeu

dams of seven forges and six grist-mills tawny Creek, chiefly in this county, the rest

down the on Maxaiu Phila-

delphia County.

Mr. Levan told me that at the same time that the Indiansdid the mischief in Allemangel, another party killed and scalped a man near Fort Henry, in this county, and the next day carried off a young woman from the same neighborhood. I am told too though "





cannot tell what credit is to be given to it that two persons were killed and scalped near the Foit at Northkill, in this county, Wednesday evening last, I

at the time of the thunderstorm. " I had almost forgot to mention (for I

Ill

In this house there were also twenty women and children who had fled thither from their own habitations to take shelter. The men belonging to them were distant about onehalf a mile, engaged in jjicking cherries. They came as quickly as possible and went in pursuit of the Indiiins, but to no purpose, for the Indians had concealed her children were taken captive.

themselves."

Appeal for sistance

am

so hur-

Aid.



would seem that

It

was asked generally from the

as-

peoj)le

of

the province by the inhabitants of Tulpehocken

township during their lo.sses.

no wonder) that the Indians, after scalping Adam Trump, left a knife and a halbert, or a spear, fixed to a pole of four feet, in his body." ried just now,

129

A

terrible sufferings

notice to this effect

German newspaper, published

the

and

was advertised at

in

German-

'tis

a letter from Tulpehocken, dated 4th of

July, 1757, to the Pennsylvania Gazette,

it

town by Christopher Saner, in Jidy, 1757. It was as follows (being translated from the German) :

"

was

The

pray stated,

distant inhabitants of Tulpehocken

for assistance to

would

enable them to give more atten-

tion to their security, inasmiich as the forts lay so far "'

If

we

get no assistance from the county all the

inhabitants of Tulpehocken will

county ^lould Indians

off',

move away.

and send a large body to drive the and keep a strong guard in the houses on rise

the frontiers besides the soldiers, or

On

The

the 4th of July, 1757,

all will

two

be

lost."

ludian.s were

from one another, and the persons therein do little Whoever may be willing to give anything, can inform Reverends Otterbein and (icrock, Lutheran ministers in Lancaster; Revs. Muhlenberg and Leydig. at New Hanover and Providence; Dr. Abr.iham

service.

Wagner in Madeische; Mr. Michael Reyer, in Goschenhoppen Christopher Sauer, Sr., at Germantown and Rev. Handschuh, in Philadelphia, and write also how much they may have given. And these persons can forward the same to Col. Conrad Weiser or Peter ;

seen near Reading.



Seven Pej!sons Murdered On Jidy 5, 1757, "seven persons (three men and four children), who had been murdered and scalped all in

one house, were

ground

for burial.

brought to our burying-

They were

killed

by the

;

Spycker, or Rev. Kurtz, as each

may be

Indians yesterday, about sun-down, five miles

from here."

following extract

is

taken from a

Heidelberg, on 9th of July, 1757

lettet

— The

dated at

—A

letter

from a place in Lynn township (now included iu

Greenwich) reported the following

"Adam Klaus and

:

cruelties:

his neighbors were .surprised

by

a party of Indians on the 9th of July, whilst they

" Yesterday, about three o'clock iu the afternoon

between Valentine Herchelroad's and Tobias Bickel's, four Indians killed two children, one about four years old and the other five. They at the same time scalped a young woman of about sixteen, who, with ])roper care, is likely to live and do well. A woman was terribly cut with the tomahawk but she was not scalped her life is despaired of. Three children were carried off prisoners. Christian Schrenk's wife who was among the partj' bravely defended herself and her children for a while. During an assault upon her, she wrested the gun out of the Indian's liands, and also his tomahawk and threw them away and in the meantime, whilst saving her own life, two of



;





Four Killed and Six Scalped.

This was at Tulpehocken church.'

Mother's Defen.se of Children.

pleased to

Those who have been able to carry on their harvest in peace and security, cut and deliver it at home, have reason to be thankful to God." do.



two men, two women Martin Jaeger and his wife were killed and scalped John Kraushaar's wife and child, Abraham Seckler's wife and one of Adam Clauss's children were scalped, but they still lived, though badly wounded one of the women is wounded in the side and the other in the hip two of Kraushaar's children were killed, and one of Seckler's and ene of Philip Eschton's, but these were not scalped. The alarm being raised, a party went in pursuit of them, and, overtaking nine, fired upon them. But they soon eluded the pursuit of the whites." were engaged in reaping rye

and a young

girl

escaped

;

;

;

;

;

;

Conrad Weiser, whilst

at

Easton for the pur-

pose of conferring with the Indians, detailed the i

rentisylviinia Gazette, July, 1757.

circumstances connected with a murder of ten

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

130

people, in a letter to the

Governor on the 15th

"Incoming along through Maxatawny I heard a melancholy account often people being killed by the enemy Indians. They pji-ssed by two or three plantations on this side of the mountain before they attacked. A certain woman ran otF towards her place and told her husband of the attack, who cut the gears off his horse.s then in ihe plow, and rode as fast as he could to Lieut. Wetherholt, about three miles off. Lieut. Wetherholt, with a small detachment. I am told seven in number, came away immediately, and came to the place where the murder was committed, where by that time a number of people had gathered. Wetherholt proposed to pursue the enemy, but none would go with him, so he took his seven men and pursued the enemy a few miles from the house and found the place where they rested themselves, and in about three miles he overtook them in thick bushes, at a very little distance. It seems they saw one another One of the Indians was beforehand with at once. Wetherholt and aimed at him, but his gun flashed. Wetherholt, a moment after, tired at the Indian, and thinks he hit him, but is not sure. Several guns were fired by our people, but did no execution, and the Indians' guns missing fire, they ran off and left two horses behind them, one belonging to the man they killed, laden with the best of his household goods."

Morgan Journal. — A

monthly

1757, indicates that considerable vigilance was

stances

records the

by the Indians.

followiug

circum-

:

"July the

1st.

—Sent a corporal

with 11

men on a who

scout to Clingaman Hausabough's, at AUemingle, staid all niglit. " 2nd.

ported

— The scout returned from AUemingle and rethat

they had

made no

discovery of the

enemy. "3rd.

—Sent a party

range to AUemingle.

to

—Our men returned

from AUemingle and rewho were afraid near the mountain, were removing downwards. " 5th, 6th and 7th. Was exceeding heavy rain and waters very high. "8th. Being a day of humiliation we apjilied our"4th.

ported that

some of

tlie

inhabitants,





selves thereto. " 8th. Rainy weather,

— "10th. —

— The scout

" 13th.

we

to stay all night;

sent

some

parties to



morning to the fort. and this day in my met the scout which I had posted in Windsor I returned in the

.

.

.

Parties went to guard the farmers,

return I

township, ranging about the farmers' houses. "14th. " 15th.

—Parties ranged and guarded the farmers. — Being day heavy and the creeks so rain,

all

high that the Schuylkill rose perpendicularly fifteen feet in nine hours' time, being considerably higher than ever was known in these parts the guards could ;

not return, and we remained in the fort with only eight

men

to

guard."

During the remainder of July sent out dailj' to ricultural

soldiers

guard the farmers

were

in their

ag-

work, but no Indians came to molest

them.

On at

the 27th of July, 1757, James Read, Esq.,

Reading, wrote to the Governor stating that

white

men had appeared

in

Bern township and

were co-operating with the Indians. is

His

ac-

as follows

" It is with great uneasiness I must inform your honor that the day before yesterday four white men took away from a plantation in Bern township, about Good (I think thirteen miles from this town, one that is the surname), a lad about sixteen years old, and carried him to four Indians about eight miles The white men from the place where he was taken. and Indians all got very drunk, and the lad happily

Of his being taken I his escape in the night. heard the evening it happened; of the rest I was informed bf Robert Smith, a sergeant, who came yesterday from Fort William (Lebanon), and on his roarl was told by one Peter Rodermel, a farmer of very good credit, who had seen and conversed with the Monday, in the afternoon, an Indian was seen lad. made

near Sinking Spring, five miles from the town, by Peter Rood, a person of as high credit as is in the county. Some of the inhabitants went immediately in pursuit of the Indian, but returned without having overtaken him. I have taken care ever since the 9th of this month to keep a patrol of ten of the inhabitants every night about this town and, as our ])eop!e ;

we could not

scout.

are very uneasy

I sent out a party to range to AUemingle. This day Sergeant Matthews returned from Colonel Weiser's with orders for me to station 10 men in Windsor township, and to keep 10 men in readiness to go to Easton.

"11th.

me

obliged

guard the farmers.

journal,

exercised in this vicinity, and yet the outrages

just mentioned were committed



count

kept by Jacob Morgan, for the month of July,

The journal

according to ordefs; and sent some men guard the farmers in their harvest. " 12th. I went with ten men to Windsor township and stationed them there, where I found the most proper. In the evening verj' heavy rain and thunder, in readiness

to

of July, 1757:

returned.

I

prepared the

men

among

upon hearing that white men are

the Indians,

we purpose

to

have a guard

to-

—seven at either end of the town and seven in the centre, — who will keep out a patrol night of twenty-one, all night.

In this service

I

Mr. Seely and Mr. Biddle.

am

cheerfully assisted by

We

hope our very dan-

gerous condition will be considered and some measures

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. taken for our security.

will be

.

.

I

.

am

sorry to

have occasion to assure you that if our defense be committed to the soldiers now in these parts, our people will be still as uneasy as they are now."

By

the latter statement

it

would appear

that

evening at Fort Henry and give them proper inFor God's sake, dear sir, beg of the Governor, press it upon him in my behalf, and in behalf this

struction.

of these distressed inhabitants, to order

from Fort Augusta. that I

the soldiers were not thoroughly patriotic, hav-

ing doubtless done something

to sacrifiee the

confidence of the people. There

is

131

am

I will give

in the right.

I

my

my men

back

reason afterwards

my humble

conclude with

respects to his honor."



he would not then assign reasons,

Petition for Soldiers. In March, 1758, Conrad Weiser forwarded to the LieutenantGovernor a petition subscribed (in German) by a number of the inhabitants of Bern township,

though he might "some time next week acquaint

with the recommendation that they be favored

him with the

with soldiers, to be stationed for their defense

Read added

information on the subject. letter that

no published in his

principal grounds of their objection

to such a protection."

In August, 17o7,

in

fifty

men from Cumru and

other townships near Reading set out in expec-

some Indian scalps. Alarmixg CoxDrxroN of People. The following earnest, pathetic letter was addressed by Conrad Weiser from his home in Heidelberg on the 4th of October, 1757, to the Govr tation of bringing in



ernor's

secretary.

It

narrates

the

alarming

condition of the people at that time, showing that the Indians were ties,

afforded by forts



"Sir:

my

still

active in their cruel-

notwithstanding treaties or the protection

I

till

he entered

have written particularly to the have been very busy with writing to the commanding officers of the several forts under my care. It is now come so far that murder is committed almost every day; there never was such a consternation among the people they must now door, else I would

Governor, though

I

;

leave their houses again, with

their barns

full

of

Friday some days before a fick man was killed upon his bed he begged of the enemy to shoot him through his heart, which the Indian answered, I will, and did so. A girl that had hid herself under a bedstead in the next room heard all this two move families were about that time destroyed. Inclosed is the journal of last month of my ensign at Northkill. Captain Busse lies dangerously sick at John Harris'. I hear he is tired of everything. I have neither men nor a sufficient grain

;

five children

were carried

off last

;

;

;

number of officers

to

would be pleased

to

belonging to

my

defend the country. If his honor

send orders to recall all the men battalion from Fort Augusta he

would justly bring upon him the blessings of the Most High. I cannot say any more. I think myself unhappy; to fly with ray family in this time of danger I can't do. I must stay if they all go. I am now -preparing to go to Fort Henry, where I shall meet some officers to consult with what may be best to be done. I have ordered ten men, with the Governor's last order, to Fort Augusta; I shall overtake them

The

"

That from the beginning of the Indian incursions

neighborhood wherein your pehath been frequently harassed by the enemy, and numbers of their neighbors cruelly murdered, others captivated, and many of your petitioners obliged to fly from their dwellings to avoid the into this province, the

titioners live

same unhappy fate, to their unspeakable terror and distress. That during this winter the severity of the weather had prevented those barbarians from commitbut, as the snow is now ting their wonted cruelties melting and the weather is growing fair, your peti;

tioners are every

and scouting-parties

did not thint of the post

some of the most exposed farm-houses.

petition set forth

moment dreading an

attack from the

enemy, and find themselves less secure than heretofore from their attempts, as the block -house at Northkill is destroyed and no garrison kept in those parts. "

Your

petitioners, in the deepest distress, implore

your honor's protection, and most earnestly beg that they may not be left a prey, to the savage enemy, protesting that, without assistance from the public, they are utterly unable to defend themselves, and must, on the first attack, abandon their habitations and rather embrace the most extreme poverty than remain subject to the merciless rage of those bloody murderers. And that they have the greatest reason to expect an attack

is

obvious from the

tempts of the

many former

enemy—three or four

successful at-

Indian-paths lead-

ing into their neighborhood."

In the following month, (April, 1758,) the people of Reading were likewise alarmed, and they, too, sent a petition to the Governor, setting forth their dangerous situation assistauQe.

The Governor,

in

and praying for pursuance of

its

earnest representations, said, in a message to the

"We Assembly on the 27th of April, 1758 have just received a petition from the distressed inhabitants of the town of Reading their un:

;

seems to be more easily conceived than described, occasioned by the want of

happy

situation

a due exertion of the military force in that

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

132

([uarter."

He

therefore entreated the

Assembly

vertheilet

mediate

:

Einige dencken es seien von den Indianern wek-he schon Frieden gemacht. Andere aber glauben Weil

Their prayer was granted and

relief.

und kriechen durch das Gebuesch zu den

Plantaschen. Esgiebt verschiedene Muthmassungen

to order provincial forces to be sent to their im-

:

a

hundred men were

sent.

LiEBENGUTH MuRDER.

— Aboiit

Macht von Krieg-Schiffen und Landvolkern aus England kommt. und hier viel Viilker angewerben werden, wekhe alle die Frauzosen

this

time

the Indians again divided themselves into small

gegen die Franzosen fechten sollen, so batten die Franzosen eine sehr grosse Menge Indianer, welche mit ihnen nicht nur in Freund.^chaft sondern gar in Verwandtschaft stelien, die ?chickten sie an die Grenze um Schaden zu thun, damit die Volker in den Forten bleiben sollen und nicht gegen ihre gros.se Festungen hinziehen sollen u. s. w. Die Todten kiinnen eben

and surprised the settlers unawares. At Tulpehocken they killed and scalped a man by the name of Liebenguth and his wife and at

parties

;

Northkill they killed and scalped Nicholas Geiger's wife

and two children and Michael Ditzel-

er's wife.

Tiie following correspondence in

is

wanii wirs wustzen, so hiitten wir wenig Nutzen dafon.

Nur

'

.

sind

.

.

"Im ubrigen gehen schwereGerichteueberden Erdbodeu und das Gericht der Verstockung ist ein schwe-

from

Penni.

Gazette,

Hund, der

by

auf die

Hand

sehen, die mit

und nicht auf die Ruthe wie den Stein beiszt, womit er getroffen

in

Wir horen

Juni, den 16teu. 1758.

ein ist.

dass seither noch

raehr Botschafter von fremden Indianern nach Phila-

delphia

gekommen

sind, welche sich

auch erbieten,

dass sie mit den Englischen in FreundSvhaft leben

woUen.

Es

sei

ihnen aber nicht gar zu freundlich

geantworlet worden.

kommen um

Doch werde

ein Traty

halten.

eine grosse

Ob

Menge

aber die hin-

tern Einwohnern diesen Soramer so ruhig sein werden wie den Winter das ist ungewisz, ueberhaupt mogen wir wohl ein hartes Jahr haben."

Frantz Murder. Henn.-,

— Captain

Busse, at Fort

wrote to Conrad Weiser on

19th of

June, 1758,

"At noon

I received

news that

this

morning about away the

eight o'clock the Indians took and carried

John Frantz, with three children, six miles from here, deep in the country. I sent momently Lieutenant Johnston with a party of nine men to go wife of

along the mountains and to stay at the Hole to intercept them. They being gone, a farmer who was fol-

.

lowing on horseback, came back and told me that he saw three Indians near the Fort at Six's (Dietrich Being not Six's or Fort Henry, in Bethel township). able to spare more men, as just a detachment was out to meet the wagon with provision, I sent Sergeant Christ. Mowrer with only two men to look for their we tracks. It is a cruel fate that we are brought to shall fight without powder and lead. If some is there, be pleased to send it to us. "Just now I received news that the son of John Snabele, not far from Dub's, is killed and scalped, having five shots in his body. As this has happened at the same time there must be undoubtedly a good ;

.

priuleJ

sollte

der Ruthe streichet,

.

all gescolpt.

'Tiiken

Man

res Gericht.

" Die Indianern haben sich in kleinen Partheien

Franklin, 1757-58.

im dem Herrn sterben. Sie ruhcn und ihre Wercke folgen ihnen naoh.

selig sind die

ihrer Arbeit,

PennsylWichtige Nachrichten aus Sauer's vanische Nachrichten,' von dato Isten April 1758. " Am verwichenen Montag sincl abernaahl bei zwaiizig ganz fremde Indianer zu Bethiehcm angekommen, welche audi willens sind mit den Englischen in Frieden und Freundschaft zu leben. Wie man versteht so haben sie der Tidiuskung's Siihne berednet zum Frieden, und haben sie raitgebracht. Sie melden auch, dass dem Tidiuskung sei angesagt worden dass der so sehr beruffene Indianer Captain Schingas auch konimen wollte, und wieder mit den Englischen in Fried und Freund-chaft leben. Darauf habe Tidiuskung fuer Freiden einen hohen Luft-Sprung gethan. welches er kaum verinuthet hat. " Und also dorfFten die Forten an der Grenze mit ihren Garisonen von wenig Nutzen sein, und viele von un-iern Landes-Leuten aus ihrer Gefangenschafll losz und wieder heim kommen. "Auszug eines Briefs von einem Officier in dem Dienst dieser Provinz geschrieben zu Dolpehacken den 8. April 1758. "Ich und Mr. Kern sind soeben bei Jacob Scherman angekommen, da hat man uns berichtet, dasz den vorigen Abend eine Frau von den ludianern getiidtet und gescolpt worden, von feindlichen Indianern etwa drci Meilen von hier. "Wir sind soeben bereit ihnen nachzufolgenDie Liste von denen die getodtet worden, nebst einer die sie mitgenommen haben lautet wie folgt, nehmlich: zu Schwatara sind zwei ledige Bursche zwei Brueder mit NamenSchnatterle getodtet, Michel Sauter und William Hardt sind auch todt, und eine Wittfrau haben sie mitgenommen In Dolpehacken ist ein Mann mit Namens Liebegut und seine Frau getodtet und gescolpt worden. An der NordKill ist des Nicolaus Geigors Frau und ihre zwei Kinder getodtet, und auch Michel Ditzeler's Frau, die .

und

nicht sagen wer die sind die sie getodtet haben,

German

added, relative to the murders just mentioned:' "

wissen, dass eine grosse

number of

BenjaDiin '

still

the Indians.

.

It is

.

probable that they are

in the country, all the tracks

going

in

and none

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. out.

I

suppose, according to the tracks, that there I believe that our

are about twenty in the country.

very good allies at

Wyoming have done

to us, as all the tracks

this service

over the mountains come from

"The fjirmers of Tulpehocken have brought up some men toward the Hole, and desired me to join them with a part of the

garrison, whercui)on

I

have

sent them a sergeant with eight men."

A

county during the years 1755, 175G, 1757 and 1758, there would seem to have been no invas-

letter

from the same place about the same

ehiklrcn were carried off by the Indians,

and that the

woman was murdered

a

little

way

from Frantz's house, she having been weakly

and not able

to travel.

Also, that the son of

Jacob Snavely, a shoemaker, was killed and

From

scalped about the same time.

No

mention.

in life

and property worthy of

letters

have as yet come

indicating that the

the tracks

to light

Indians had been on this

the Blue Mountain.

side of

was quiet with the

time mentions that the wife of John Frantz and tlircc

the terrible excitement which prevailed in the

ions or losses

tlie east.

133

But,

whilst all

along the frontier,

settlers

and they were busily and hopefully carrying on their daily labor on their farms and in their shops,

how they must have been shocked by invasion over the mountain and

a sudden

into

Albany

township during the month of Septf-mber,

176;5,

when a party of Indians fell upon and murdered John Fincher and his family, and this, too, within a mile from the place where a small

number was supposed to be body of soldiers were stationed under the comTlie following letter about twenty. {Fenna. Gt/srffc, June 29, 1758). mand of Ensign Shaffer " The Indians burnt a house on the Swatara from Jonas Seely (one of the justices of the of the enemy, their

!

Three men are missing.

ard killed one man.

Two

boys were found tied to a tree and

leased.

AVo are alarmed

night by a

terril)le

in the fort

re-

almost every

barking of dogs

;

tember, 1763, communicated the sad intelligence

"Honored

'

1759, large enough accommodate five hundred men. Horses Stolen. In the middle of September, 1759, three Delaware Indians were hunting near Tulpehocken, and whilst tiiere stole six hor-ses. The owners pursued them as far as Fort Augusta and there informed Major Orndt of their loss. L^pou making inquiry tiie In their confesmajor discovered the thieves. be erected at Lancaster, in

to



sion they expressed themselves sarcastically that

when any of

their property

was said about

it,

but

was taken very

when they took a

few horses a great noise was made.

An

— For

your

which

several years after

I

received from Captain

Keru last night: On came to the house

the eighth instant a party of Indians of one

John Fincher, about three-quarters of a mile

Captain Kern's men, commanded by Ensign Shaffer; they killed Fincher, liis wife and two of his sons, his daughter is missing; one little boy made his escape from the savages and came to the ensign, who immediately went to the place with his party. But the Indians were gone, and finding by their tracks which way they went, pursued them to the house of one Nicholas Miller, where he found four children murdered; our party still ])ursued, and soon came up with the enemy and fired on them. They returned the fire, but the soldiers rushed on them so furiously that they sdou ran offand left behind them two prisoners, two tom.ahawks, one hanger and a saddle; the Indians were eight in number, and our party seven three of the enemy were much woundThe two. prisoners that our party recovered were ed. two of said Miller's children that they had tied together and so drove them along. Miller's wife is

distant from

;

missing in that

;

in all there are eight killed

and two missing

neighborhood."

And on

following

the

day

he

addressed

another letter (then at Reading) to the Governor, relating to an attack in

'Letter to Pennn. Gazette, Oct. 17G8.

Sir: I am sorry 1 have to acquaint honor of the following melancholy account

order

was given that they restore the horses to the owners; but they went away without compliance.

FiNCHER Murder.

Governor, John Penn

to the

there are

some Indians about us. " After General Forbes had taken possession of Fort du Ciuesne, 25th of November, 1758, many of the soldiers were marched to and They quartered at Lancaster and Reading. were quartered among the inhabitants, and their To remconduct caused grievous complaints. edy the evils, the Assembly cau.sed a barracks to

certainly

little

county), at Sinking Spring, dated 10th of Seji-

Bern township

Upper Bern.

It

upon Frantz Plubler's house,

—the premises was as follows

being :

now

in

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

134

" Honored Sir This moment, at Reading, as I was sending off tlie express, certain intelligence came that the house of Frantz Hubler, in Bern township about IS miles from here, was attacked Friday evening last by the Indians; himself is wounded, his wife and three children carried off, and three other of his children scalped alive, two of whom are since dead." :

Small-Pox.

— During

ruption from the time of the till

settlement

first

1744, and even a decade afterward.

The

had become so pleasant and firm that certain Indians remained in the county unmolested during the war, and carried on their relations

peaceful vocations, such as basket-making, bead-

work, etc. and after the war traveling parties James of them frequently visited the county antl sold informed the Governor articles of their handiwork. During the French and Indian War the Inhad brought the disease

November,

17(33, the

;

small-pox prevailed at Fort Augusta.

Burd, stationed

tiiere,

that volunteer parties there,

with

had

and that sundry of the

it it,

soldiers

were down

dians killed about one hundred and

fifty,

and

number of the men never captured thirty inhabitants of the county. Several of those who were taken captive returned and he expected all would be infected ;

that a great

;

and having no medicine, Nature would have

to

Thkke Men Killed.

—On the 25th of No-

But, strange to say, during these

after the war.

eight

eifect a cure.

years,

only four of the

We may

killed in the county.

Indians

were

well ask

what

vember, 1763, Jonas Seely addres.sed a third

enabled the Indians to be so successful in their

which he stated that three men were murdered hy the Indians on the

protection

north side of the mountain, in the forks of the

wholly inadequate.

Schuylkill, about twenty-two miles

number

for the

frontier

which they were designed

letter to the

ing.

Tiiese

Governor,

men were on

to a plantation,

tain

in

fi-orn

Read-

way returning

their

which they had deserted.

Cap-

Kern, immediately after hearing of the

murder, marched

in pursuit of the

days, but, a very heavy

enemy

snow having

for

two

fallen

and

the Indians having fled a considerable distance,

he desisted from further pursuit upon reaching the place where the murder had been committed.

This

is

supposed to have been the

committed

in the

last

murder

— After

afforded

by the

The

government

forts

was

were too few

in

one hundred and forty miles of

they were too far apart

to

to protect;

render assistance to

people when danger was But the Indians were cunning, fleet and enduring. They approached settlements stealthily, committed outrages, arson and murder, and then departed speedily. They fleeing, terror-stricken

upon them.

were always in small parties of three, four or Being thoroughly acquainted with the

six.

mountains, they were enabled to escape pursuit

county.

Peace Declared.

The

warfare against the colonial government.

the French had

receded into Canada before the advancing

army

of English soldiers, the Indians naturally

fol-

by various

routes.

Persons Murdered, taken Pri8oner.s and Mlssing. The following persons were



Hence the cruelties here murdered by the Indians in the county during ceased after 1758. And when Canada was sur- the " French and Indian War," the number The exact rendered in 1760, the peace and safety of our being about one Uundred and fifty. community were assured. The declaration of number cannot be stated, because in four inlowed their

allies.

peace was delayed for three years.

When

it

was

published in 1763, only a few Indians remained in the eastern section of Pennsylvania.

settlement of them,

who were

A

small

friendly to the

government and the inhabitants, remained at Shamokin and some families were scattered

stances a

the

man and

his family

were killed

number was not mentioned

in

—but

the report.

Twenty-seven persons were taken prisoners and eight were reported as missing.

were wounded, some of

from their wounds

whom

jNIany persons

doubtless died

:

;

in

different parts of

remained for

many

the county,

MURDERED.

where thev

years afterward.

Before the war considerable trade had been carried on successfully between the settlers and the Indians, continuing indeed without inter-

June,



June, 1754.

— —

175-1. Peter Gcisinger, Tulpehocken. June, 1754.— Fred. Myers and wife, Tulpehocken. June, 1754. Young girl, Tul|H'hocken.

Hostetter family, Bern. June, 1754.— Sebastian Brosius, Bethel.

FKENCH AND INDIAN WAR.

— Henry Hartniari, Bethel. —Two men (iinknonn). Bethel. October, 1755. — Odwaller and another unknown,' October, 1755.

October, 1755. Bethel.

November,

1755.

—Thirteen

unknown,

persons

Bethel.

November, 1755.— Child, eight years of a

man named

— Cola's November, 1755. —Philip November,

old,

daughter

Cola, Bethel.

1755.

wife

and two children

older. Bethel.

a shoemaker. Bethel.

November, 1755.— Casper Spring, Bethel. Beslinger,'- Bethel. November, 1775. November, 1755. Child of Jacob Wolf, Bethel. November, 1755. John Leinberger, Bethel. November, 1755. Rudolph Candel, Bethel. November, 1755. Sebastian Brosius, Bethel. November, 1755. Six men killed,^ Bethel. November, 1755. Unknown man, a shoemaker

— — — — at — Brown's house, Bethel. November, 1755. — A child scalped and Bethel. November, 1755. — A woman^ and male child. Bethel. November, 1755. — Fifteen persons (excluding preceding), Bethel. Novelhber, 1755 — Christopher Ury, Bethel. Youngman, Bethel. November, 1755. Kobe!," Bethel. November, 1755. — Wife of February, 1756. — Two children of Frederick Reichelderfer, Albany. February, 1756. — One man, two women and six —

died,*

five

February, 1756.

—George Zeisloffand wife, two boys —

Albany. February, 1756. Wife of Balser Neyfong, Albany. March, 1756. Peter Kluck and family, Albany. A woman at Linderman's house, INIarch, 175G. girl,

— Wife, daughter andsoli-in-law of —Martin Fell, Albany. 1756. —Two old men," Bethel. 1756. Stonebrook, Albany. June, 1757. — Man unknown, near Fort Henry, Bethel. June, 1757. — Two persons near Fort Northkill, Tulpehocken. June, 1757. — Adam Trump,'" Albany. June, 1757. — Peter Gei singer, Bethel. July, 1757. — Three men and four children," Bethel. July, 1757. — Two children near Bickel's. fJreenwich. July, 1757. — Martin Jaeger and July, 1757. — Two childreu of John Krausher, November, 1756.

Philip Culmore, Albany.

November, November, November,

1756.



wife,'^

Greenwich. July, 1757.

— One child of A. Seehlcr, Greenwich.

July, 1757.— One child of Philip Eshton, Greenwich. July, 1757.

—Ten people.'^ — — —

September, 1757. A man shot in bed whilst sick. September, 1757. Two families." April, 1768. Jacob Lebenguth and Margaret his wife, Tulpehocken. Wife and two children of Nicholas April, 1758.



Geiger, Tulpehocken. April,

1758.^Wife of Michael Ditzeler, Tulpe-

hocken. June, 1758.

—Wife of John Frantz, Tulpehocken.

June, 1758.

— Son of John Snabele, Tulpehocken.

October, 1758.— A man. Bethel.

September, 1763.



— — William Yeth, Hereford. — Wife of John Krausher, Hereford. October, 1756. — Two married women and two

Albany. March, 1756. March, 1756.

boys,'*

Bethel.



September, 1763. Four Nicholas Miller,'' Albany.

Possibly these two and the two immediately before are



Near by an Indian was found dead and scalped of scalped by Frederick Weiser. Another tribe



Delaware

was shot and scalped several weeks afterward. ' Supposed to have been soldiers. '

Under

found. 6

otliers also scalped,

It

this

woman

was

alive,

Four of their

who

kill."

'

Ten women and children were rescued

from the cellar of a burning

of

at

this place

buildinj;.

Found with a knife and a spear

(fixed

to a pole four

body.

"

All murdered and scalped in one house. John Kraushaar's wife and child, Abraham Sechler's wife, and a child of Adam Clauss were scalped at the same time and badly wouuded.

'•

her babe only fourteen days old was

wrapped up in a little cushion. children were scalped at 'he same

Two

them reported as

likely to die

Alluded

to in

Weiser's letter.

Probably he referred

to

No number mentioned.

5 Two rescued.

time.

probably died.

All killed at house of Jacob Gerhart, situate in

One

of

—Two children of Frantz Hubler, November, 1763. — Three men near forks of Schuyl-

''

the

upper section of the township, commonly known as the ''Eck" (corner). Eight of them were burned. "

house

at

party killed in Greenwich.

doubtless recovered.

They had eight children with them. The father was wounded. '

children

''^

tlie .«ame.

Two

two

September, 1763.

'"

*

and

Fincher, wife

Bern.

feet long) in his

2

—John

sons, Albany.

children,' Albany.

and a

135

from scalping.

of Miller's

When

children were prisoners, but were

rescued they were tied together, in which

manner they had been driven

along.

'* These are supposed to have been the last persons killed by the Indians at this time. But during the Revolutionary War, in August, 1780, John Negman and his two young

children were cruelly murdered

by the Indians thirty-

three miles from Reading on road to Shamokin

same time a

little girl

was carried

off.

;

and

at the

(8 Pa. Arch., 529.

'

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVAXIA.

136

TAKES PRISOXERS. June, 1754.— Daughter of Balser Schmidt

(fifteen

years old), Tulpehocken.

were being conducted in their midst to keep them interested in public progress. But following the " Indian Invasion," the establish-



June, 1754. Three children of Frederick Myers (two boys, ten and six years old, and a girl eight years old), Tulpehocken. Reichard (eight years old), June, 17-i4. Son of



Tulpehocken. February. 1756

ment of the "

house and the opening of the public etc.,

— — — —

Son of Balser Xeyfotig, Albany. March, 1750. Son of William Yeth, Hereford. November, 1756. Girl nameil Stonebrook, Albany. June, 1757. Son of Adam Trump, Albany. Tune, 1757. Young woman from near Fort Henry.



District of Reading," the proposed

change of gDvernment, the erection of the courtoffices,

public matters one succeeding the other in

quick succession, together with enterprises, there

came

a general excitement surpassing

all

The way was

subjects combined.

many

jirivate

a subject which developed

the previous

unconsciously

prepared for them by foreign legislation, and,

Bethel.

—Three children from near Bickel's. same time, July, 1757. — Tsvo children September, 1757, — Five children, June, 1758. — Three children of John Frauiz. Tulpehocken. September, 1763. — Wife and three children of July, 1757.

at

Frantz Hubler, Bern.

it

—Wife and

child of Martin Fell,

resulted in

no increased burdens,

it

stimulated the discussion and appreciation of pei-sonal rights to

such a degree during the next

decade as to develop in them a wonderful energy

and combined through

MISSIXR.

November, 1756.

though

which carried them

resistance

suffering

warfiu-e

for

seven

years,

and eventually realized the establishment of an independent, representative government.

Albany.

— — —

A boy seven years old, Albany. October, 1758. Three men missing. Bethel. September, 1763. Daughter of John Fincher, Albany. September, 1763. Wife of Nicholas Miller. Albany, November,

1756.



CHAPTER

IX.

EEVOLCTIOX AXD IXDEPESDEXCE.

BRITISH STAMP.

Re.iJing —Stamp Duty — Various Cotninittees Chosen — Battle Lexington awakens County —Companies Berks County —ConScruples against War — Tory Feeling in scientious Reading— Associators County — English Prisoners Brigndier-General Elected — Quota of County Excee

On command On furlough

47

Fit for duty

Total

Deserted

21

When had

they reached

left.

Philadelphia, the

The wagons

got nothing.

enemy Twenty

were taken into service. The men returned and demanded pay. Henry Clirist, Jacob Shoemaker and John Ludwig requested the president of the Executive Council to forward money for this purpose. The sum i-equired was between twenty-five hundred and three thousand pounds.

The quota of County hundred

articles,

to the State in

etc.,

from

Berks

July, 1780, was



si.x

month six hundred bushels of forage per month twenty wagons and two hundred horses; and three hundred barrels of flour per

;

;

1

1

272

210

2

4")

militia

;

and there having been then a great in the army, a requisition was

want of teams

The

total

number of the

State Avas two thou-

sand nine hundred and seventy-three.

Army

Stippi.ies.

— In

the beginning of the

Revolution, Reading was selected as a place,

made on

the county to furnish twenty wagons.

In September, 1778, the quota of wagons was one hundred and

ten,

and these were then ordered On June 14, 1779,

to be sent to Philadelphia.

its situation, for storing army supJacob Morgan, Jr., reported that he liad sent to was capable of easy defense in the cam]) at jNIiddle Brook, thirty-six good Conevent of an attack from the enemy and it was tinental teams and fifty-four spare horses, and not far distant from the operations of war in the on the next day twelve teams properly State. Large quantities of provisions M'ere equip]>cd. stationed here. In April, 1780, the Executive Nicholas Lotz, as commissioner of forage, reCouncil was directed by General Washington to ported on June 5, 1780, that he had purchased furnish the State out of the supplies at Reading, forty tons of flour, one hundred and seventywith the following articles Two hundred bar- two bushels of oats and nineteen bags and on rels of Hour five hundred and sixtv gallons of the I9th of June, following, he reported the

adapted by plies.

It

;

:

;

;

KEVOLrTIOX AND INDEPENDENX'E. purchase of teu head of cattle and forty sheep, wliich

was obliged

lie

under the law.

to take

aud sheep he reported to be scarce, because luanv butchers and drovers had come fidin Philadelphia and other places and bought Cattle

tiicni

up.

April

3,

He

was appointed coniiuissioner on

1780.

J-lb.,

llil

with a quantity of canister shot. But he an-

them down. That week he sent down to Philadelphia two tons of .shot,— 62 18-lb. shot; 250 .3-lb. shot; 400 1-lb. shot; 300 *-lbshot; 1350 Ij-lb. shot; 815 pounds canister shot. ticipated difficulty in getting teams to haul

Owing to the aid given by divers inhabitants by agreement with of tiie State to the enemy, the Council of Safety Captain Jay, agreed to supply the Board of appointed a committee in the several counties to War with ninety tons of shell and shot for seize upon and dispose of all the property of wliich purpose he put his Berkshire Furnace in such offenders and make an inventory and return i)last. He was then at work but how long lie of their proceedings under oath. This was in was reported

It

ITsO, that John

Council on August 12,

to

Patton

;

;

The following committee County Thomas Parry, David Morgan, Peter Xagle, Henry Haller, Daniel Udrce, Henry Spyckcr and

would continue he could not tell becan.se his workmen were not exempted from military duty. Tiicn they were oi'dered out, and unless they were released he could not keep his works going.

September, 1777.

At

Joseph Hiester.

he also had .some Hessian prisoners

this time

employed.

and

These were demanded from him

they were not returned his bond would

if

be put into

in

Mark

buy or Berks County, one hundred mus-

provided

kets,

necessary funds.

Bird offered

to

he were

supplied

This

was accepted by the him for four

offer

with

the

E.xecutive Council and an order to

And

hundred pounds was drawn. 1

77(), tiie

in

making

On tion "

or

in

August,

committee of safety also drew an order

favor of Samuel High, a county commissioner,

for six

hundred

dollars, on

account of arms

8,

1776, the Council passed a resolu-

:

That the Irou Masters employed shot

for the

public service in

in casting

cannon

the counties of

Chester, Lancaster and Berks, be permitted to

any of the

soldiers, prisoners of

war

at

employ Lancaster and

Reading, as laborers in the said business, giving an account to the committees of Lancaster and Reading of the time of such soldiers as they shall so emidoy. " This permission was given in view of the public exigency which required additional artillery and war materials to repel the invasion of the country by the

army of General Howe, who had recently appeared at New York with the British fleet."

On

:

about that time the Council also ap-

from the

inhabitjints of the county

not take the oath of allegiance, or

enemy, and deliver them

The committee Christ, Henry

in

who

January 10, 1777, Captain Daniel Jay

reported to Councils from

tlie Reading Furnace Mr. Old was casting different sizes of shot and expected to have by January 12, 1777, four

did

to the clothier general.

Thomas

Haller,

Parry, Daniel

Nathan

Lewis, John, Lower, Godfrey Ream, Jacob Seltzerand Nicho-

Udree, Philip Miller,

las Shaffer.

Jacob Morgan was

cpialified

on September

3,

1777, as a councillor from Berks County in the then took his

seat.

On May

State,

and he

25, 1778, an order

was drawn to him for three hundred and one pounds and five shillings for attending Council one hundred and eighty days, including mileage.

James Reed succeeded him from Berks County and was

as

the

qualified

councillor

on June

30, 1778.

The

following intere.stiug miscellaneous items

are added to this chapter.

Aug. 15, 177(3.— The Committee of Safety appointed two persons in each district of the county to make provision for distressed families whose husbands and fathers were in actual service. Henry Hahn and Peter Feather were appointed for Reading.

December 4,

1776.

— Order to pay expense of remov-

ing public papers to Reading.

that

tonsof.shot,— 3-lb.,2i-lb.,2-lb.,"li-lb.,l-lb.and

who

aided the

Berks County was Henry

Supreme Executive Council of the

in the county.

July

And

Berks

in

pointed a committee to collect arras, clothing, etc.,

suit.

In Jray, 1776,

have made

was appointed

June

9,

1777.

—Order

to

Colonel Jacob Morgan

(lieutenant of Berks County) for one hundred fifty

and

stand of arms and one thousand five hundred

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PE.XXSYLYAXIA.

1(12

fliuts

and order ou treasurer

Jlorsau for

to Colonel

£500.

August

2(1,

1777.

— Henry

Spyker appointed pay-

master of militia of Berlcs County in place of Colonel Hunter, to whom inconvenient.

September 12, 1777.— Ordered that Rucks County employed as a guard to conduct the British prisoners to Reading, and puch others a.s may be necessary to be added and ordered that the third and fourth class of militia of Berks County be called into immedmilitia be

iate service.



October 23, 1777. Ordered th.at si.xth and seventh Berks County be immediately called out. January 1, 1778. Orderto pay expenses for remov-

class of

— id. ing Quaker prisoners to Reading — £ir)9 1778. — Leonard Reed was wagon-master January 3s.

9,

Subsequently the appointment of wagon master-general was tendered to him. Henry Haller was appointed wagon-master in 1778, and he held this appointment till 1780. In June, 1779, he

of Berks County.

was wagon master-general. January 10, 1778.— Ordered that Yal. Eckhard and John Lesher, of Berks County, appointed to act as commissioners for purchasing forage, supplies and fire-arms.

February 20, 1778.— Ordered that the sum of £4000 be sent by Jacob Morgan to Yal. Eckhart and John Lesher for purchasing supplies. Order to treasurer for $lo0 for recruiting, etc. March 2-1, 1778. Ordered that two hundred militia of Berks County, for guard at Reading.

— —Order drawn ou treasurer in favor

March of Henry Spyker, paymaster 28, 187S.

County July

of militia

of

Berks

for £5,000.

1778.— Letter of Colonel D. Hunter

13,

to

several colonels of Berks County militia for inmiediate assistance, laid before Congress.

July

23, 1778.

der, etc.,

— Order of one-third ton of gunpow-

be delivered

to lieutenant of

Berks County

militia.

June

1,

1779.

— Letter

some other June 29,

to

Mr. Haller,



— Congress authorized a loan of$20,-

000,000, and suggested the aiqiointment of persons to

The Executive Council, on the 14th of July following, appointed Henry Haltake subscriptions for loans.

a commissioner for this purpose in Berks County. July 14, 1779. Henry Haller, Esq., appointed to receive subscription in Berks County for loan of $20,000,000 on interest. July 1-5, 1779. Letter from Henry Haller as to sugar

ler





and rum, sent

to

John Wiliuan, tavern-keeper

at

Reading.

March

13,

1780.— Petition of Christian

19,

1780.

— Letter

from commissioners of

SShultz, as-

complaining of commissioners; read and referred to judge of the Supreme Court.

August

14, 1780.

—Jacob Morgan,

Jr.,

was appointed

superintendent of the commissioners of the State for purchasing supplies, and also of the wagon-masters,

annum, and an order was

at a salary of £1,000 per

then drawn in his favor for £20,000, which he was directed to forward to the commissioners to enable

them

to

purchase supplies.

November

— John Witnian

25, 1780.

appointed col-

lector of excise for Berks County.



November 30, 1780. Order on treasurer drawn to Henry Spyker, paymaster of Berks County, for £l(i3,000 to pay militia of said County, if so much in treasury for nulitia fines. December 13, 1780. Resolved that Jacob Morgan

pay

otf militia

December

— late tour of duty. 1780. — A petition from divers inhabit-

who marched on

13,

who were convicted of misdemeanor, in associating together, to oppose the collector of the public taxes iu said county was read, setting forth that they are unable to pay fines laid on them by court, and pray remission. Resolved that

ants of Berks County

they be remitted.

January

26,

1781.

— Petition

of

Inhabitants

of

Bern, praying for remission of fine of £300 sentenced for misdemeanor in confederating against payment of taxes.



1781. Letter from Henry Christ and Henry Ordered that secretary do answer that council understand the tract of land, on which the town of Reading stands, to be an estate held by the proprietors in their public capacity, and accordingly devolves to the State but that if any advice respecting construction of law be necessary to Christ and Haller, that it is proper they should state the ijuestion to the

July

1,

Haller.

;

who

will,

of

course,

opinion.

Affairs at Reading ix 1777.

give

—The

his

j^teacly

advance of the English upon Philadelphiaduring the Summer of 1777 hatl thrown the city into a great panic.

]>lace.

1779.

May

sessor of county of Berks,

Attorney-General,

from Reading

sundry papers respecting prisoners at Reading, and disturbances between them and the inhabitants of the town. Ordered that papers be sent to Board of War and request that prisoners be sent to

inclosing

Berks County as to obstructions, in way of executing their office, and answer.

Many

as a phice of safety

persons went to Keading

— the fugitive families having

been estimated at a score or more.

The ensuing

Reading was gay and agreeable, notwithstanding that the enemy was in The society was possj.ssion of the metropolis. winter

(1

777-78)

sufficiently

common

at

large and

select;

and a sense of from their

snifering in being driven

homes had the effect of more closely uniting its members. Besides the families established in this place, it was seldom without a number ot

REVOLITTION AND INDEPENDENCE. gentlemen of the array and

visitors,

The

of

dissipation

were numerous.

balls, etc.,

was at home complaining, though not at this

era,

and some members of Congress to bring about the removal of Washington. The correspond-

General Miitlin,

ence between Gates, Mifflin and Conway, reflect-

others.

—a

chief out of war,

ing upon Washington, became

ill,

considerably mal-

the

and apparently not

content,

parties,

sleighing

cards,

1(«

high favor at

in

indiscretion of Wilkinson,

one of the

known through who had seen

and repeated

letters

its

purport to

The unfavorable impression produced tiie commander-in-chief was exclusively posby this discovery was not removed when Gates, sessed by Green, who was re])resent€d to be with some bluster, first demanded of Washingneither the most wise, the most brave nor the ton to know who had tampered with his letters, most patriotic of counsellors. In short, the cam- and then denied that Conway had written the According

headquarters.

him, the ear of Stirling.

to

paign in this quarter was stigmatized as a series

letter

whose words had been quoted."

iNIifiliii

who had had written to Gates, informing him that ai> reprobated. The extract from Conway's letter had been procured

of blunders; and the incapacity of those

conducted

it

was unsparingly

l)etter

fortune of the northern

to the

superior talents of

army was

ascribed

and

leader;

its

began to be whispered that Gates was the

who

it

man

should, of right, have the station so incom-

There was,

petently sustained by Washington. to all appearance, a cabal

which

sition, in

MifHin"Tin(l

forming for his depo-

not improbable that Gates,

it is

Conway were

already engaged, and

which' the congenial spirit of Lee on his

in

exchange immediately took a share. Icuown apostrophe of porting " that

Conway

The

well-

America, im-

to

Heaven had passed a decree in her

and sent to headquarters. This perplexed Gates

and caused him and

at this

time familiar at Reading.

And

I (Grav-

— when he was afterwards to that place — express himself to this

don) heard him myself

on a

visit

effect

man

" That no

:

intercourse of

at

life

;

his table or in

but, as to

command of an army

his

(witli

shrug), they were miserable." this

a gentle-

than General Washington, or appearetl to

more advantage the

man was more of

the usual talents for

a

French

Observations of

kind continually repeated could not

make an impression within circulation larity

;

and

it

may

be said that the popu-

of the commander-in-chief was a good

— The

"

Conway-Cabal was a secret movement by which it was intended to remove Washington and put Gates in

his

in a state of mental trepidation he wrote to

among

other things, he said

Excellency to give in tracing the

me all

at

tiie

assistance

you can

Conway's letter to me in Washington replied with char-

extracts from General

your hands."

acteristic dignity

uary following, " I

on

am

liis

fell

to inform

way

Lord Stirling

confidence that

I

:

you theu, that Colonel Wilkinson,

Congress in the month of Octoljer

to

in witli

and candor on the 4th of Jan-

—saying, among other things at

Reading and

ever undei-stood

last,

— not

iu

—informed his aid-

de-camp, Major Williams, that General Conway had written this to you: 'Heaven has been determined to save your countiy, or a weak general and bad counsellors would have ruined it.' LordSterling from





motives of friendship transmitted the account with this remark: 'The enclosed was communicated by

Such Wilkinson to Jlajor McWilliams.' wicked duplicity of conduct I shall always think it '' my duty to detect.' Colonel

Attempts

to

legislatures

State

influence

proved^ equally abortive, and when the purpose of the "Cabal" became

known

and

met

to

the

army,

condemnation. " Cabal " dition

It

it

has

was conceived

locating

the

been at

place

to the country

with

5,

this

Reading, one traof

^3 Irving's "Life of Washington." of Washington,'' vol.

universal

said that

meeting in a

Conway spent the winter of low one-story log building on the York intriguing with ^Mifflin, Lee '3 Bryant's " History ofU. S.,"596. 'Graydon's Memoirs, 283.

which,

author of the infidelity which put

place.

1777-78

in

" I conjure your

:

fail to

the sphere of their

deal impaired at Reading."'

Cosway-Cabal.

copied,

letters

Washington on the 8th of December,

favor or her ruin must long before have ensued

from theimbecility of her military counsels," was

had

to suspect that his portfolio

been stealthily opened and his

pp. 484 et seq.

south side of

Also Sparks' "Life

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

I(i4

Peuii street sixty feet above Eighth, (which was

down

toru

tradition

south

ago),

aud another on the

in a two-story stone building

Penn

of

side

twenty

years

several

street,

one hundred and

above Tenth, called for many years

feet

said

" I hope you are very

:

Bowen immediately him:

"Don't major me,

You know

majors!

I

What do you mean,

replied to

None

sir!

am

not a

of your

major, sir!

Bower

sir?"

Major."

well,

up aud

started

declared

that he had

not intended to give any offense.

not correct.

Bowen then

took Biddle into an adjoining room

any time.

and inquired

the " Fountain Inn."

Saratoga

But these

traditions are

Conway was not at Reading at Wilkinson was ou his way from to York, where Congress was then

assembled, with

from Gen. Gates

dispatches

if he should not challenge Bower. Biddle replied to him that " a man who would

not fight on some occasions was not

to live,

fit

concerning the surrender of Burgoyne's army

nor was a

man

on the 17th of October. Accordingly the people of Reading knew of the surrender before

reling."

They

captains shake hands, aud so avoided a second

Congress.

duel.

Boweu

Major

for a time.'

Duel at

Readix(;.

— Col.

regiment was quartered

at

Richard Butler's

fit

to live M'ho

returned, and Biddle

made

held the appointment of

IXDEPESDEXCE

Reading during 1780

was always quar-



WOX AND

the

Town-

PeACE De-

CEARED. The surrender of liOrd Coruwallis, men. It was commanded by Lieut.-Col. Metz- at Yorktown, on the 19th of October, 1781, ger, in the absence of the Colonel, who was was virtually the end of the Avar between EngMetzger land and America. The news of the surrender not at Reading most of the winter. was one of the very few foreign officers who reached London on the 2oth of November, folwere valuable to the colonists. There was a lowing. Several months afterward, the warHe was fare in the American Colonies was discussed Captain Boweu in the Regiment. recognized as an excellent officer; but he had a aud its continuance discouraged in the House of warm temper which occasioned some disturb- Commons, a resolution having been passed, ances at Reading about that time. On one declaring that chey who advised the continuaoccasion he took offense wlien none was intended, tion of the war were enemies of their country. -81.

of

jNIost

officers

its

were very w-orthy

and on that account, fought a duel with the

These discussions were continued

major of the regiment. The duellists each

ness

a shot, and

Bowen had

Their .seconds

coat.

An

between them.

a button shot tlien

fired

from

settled the

his

matter

investigation of the cause

of the difficulty was then made.

" It appeared

the major was walking with some girls on the

night before, aud they bur.st out laughing just

Bowen had passed them. Their laugiiter was caused by the major telling them of his and Bowcn's being at a dance on the evening

after

when

before,

it

for

This story even

and

Upon

they

all

set the seconds

returned

another occasion,

in

.soon

good after-

ward, whilst Bowen and Charles Biddle (who

was then backgammon,

residing at Reading)

tiie

first article

was recognized. The treaty was not made final Great then, owing to the three allied powers having been Britain, France and Spain





[jledged to one another not to conclude a treaty

except by

common

consent

France and Spain was

;

aud the consent of

to be obtained.

This

States to await the adjustment of the differences

to laughing

—an

In

of this treaty, " the independ" ence of the thirteen United States of America the

and the landlady took a him while he was fitting

string."

humor.

of peace on the 30th of November, 1782.

occasioned further delay and obliged the United

caudle and held

new

witii earnest-

they culminated in a preliminary treaty

the blind fiddler broke one of the

strings of his fiddle

a

till

at a certain place.

between tlicm. concluded at

iifficer in the same Regiment, came into room and, addressing him.self to Bowen,

final

treaty of peace

was

'

1783, and thereby the United States were acknowledged to be "free, sovereign and inde-

pendent."

During

were playing Captain Bower

The

Paris on the 3d of September,

-

these

two years of negotiation and

delay there were no general militai'v operations. '

-'

Autobiog. of Cbarles Biddle, pp. 150-51, Bryant's U. S. History, pp. 73-90.

REVOLUTION AND INDEPENDENCE. But great anxiety was felt over the prospects Through the inactivity for a permanent peace. of the army, the officers and soldiers became also discontented because they were restless ;

An

not rewarded for their patriotic services.

attempt was publications

made by anonymous and inflame

to

seditious

and

minds

their

to

induce them to unite in redressing their griev-

But

ances whilst they had arms in their hands.

Washington succeeded in quieting them. His wisdom and eloquence elicited from the ofificers the unanimous adoption of a resolution by

Doubtless the citizens of the town

returned. rejoiced

165

with

all

the people of the

country

when the struggle was over and peace declared. Revolutioxary Survivors. The follow-



ing survivors of the Revolution,

who were

resi-

dents of Reading, are presented in this connec-

though not strictly a part of this period. In 1823 there were thirty-nine survivors. They held a public meeting on the 19th of

tion,

August, of that year, for the purpose of endorsing

Andrew Gregg

of the State.

as a candidate for

Governor

Peter Xagle was chairman of the

which they declared " that no circumstances of meeting and Michael Madeira secretary. or danger should induce a conduct propriate resolutions were adopted, that might tend to sully the reputation and Michael Madeira. Peter Nagle.

Ap-

distress

army con-

glory they had acquired; that the

tinued to have unshaken confidence in the justice

of congress and their country

and that

;

they viewed with abhorrence and rejected with disdain the infiimous propositions in the late

anonymous address In

orcler to

army."

to the officers of the

avoid the inconveniences of dis-

missing a great number of soldiers in a body,

In this way a

furloughs were freely granted. great part of the unpaid

and dispersed over the

The

disorder.

army was disbanded

states

without tumult or

As

soldiers returned to labor.

they had been easily and speedily formed out of farmers and mechanics and laborers, in 1775,

throw off their and resume their former

so with equal facility did they

military

character

occupations.

They had taken up arms

estly for the purposes of self-defense cal

freedom, but

necessary they laid

when

and

these were no

them down peaceably

come again good industrious

citizens

earn-

war There was no

and, at that time,

was no newspaper publication

to report the aj-rivals.

No

Gottlieb Christine.

Henry Henry

Miller.

William Mannerback.

Stiles.

Philip Nagle.

Michael Reifschneider. Michael Spatz.

John

Snell.

in the

town

written or printed

statement has been prepared or published, show-

men which were supplied by the county, the men killed or wounded, or ing the companies and

George Slear.

-

-

George Price. David Fox.

John Bingenian.

Christian Miller.

Henry Holm.

Jacob Petree.

Christopher Diem. George Yerger.

Andrew Fichthorn. Peter Stichter.

.John Fox.

John Row. Ludwig Katzenmyer.

James Haiden. John Giley. John Sell.

Cliristian Hoffman. Samuel Homan.

Frederick Heller.

Henry

Diehl.

John Syder.

Revolutionary soldiers

Michael Spatz, aged seventy-eight years. Peter Stichter, aged seventy-eight years. Aaron Wright, aged seventy-eight years. William James, aged seventy-nine years. Sebastian Allgaier, aged eighty-three years. John P. Nagle, aged eighty three years. Henry Stiles, aged eighty four years. Joseph Snablee, aged eighty-four years. Christian Miller, aged eighty- five years. In 1846 two still survived Michael Spatz



U. S. History (Introduction-pp. 85-37).

and

William James.

Continental Paper Money.

— During the

progress of the Revolution the government of

was compelled to resort to the emission of " bills of credit " with which to the United States

'Ramsay's

Alexander Eisenbise. Balthaser Ottenheimer.

ment, viz.

the time of the return of

record here or elsewhei:e;

George Snell.

to be-

as they

the Berks county troops from the seat of

there

Daniel Rose.

longer

soldiers.'

have not as yet been ascertained.

Jacob Dick.

Nicholas Dick.

In 1840 the census reported nine surviving in Reading who were then drawing pensions froui the State Govern-

politi-

had been for eight years devotetl and patriotic

The manner and

John Strohecker.

HISTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

166

purcliase army supplies, etc, and to satisfy the Gold and demands of carrying on the war. silver

try in

was not tiien known any (luantity equal

puzzling themselves for

which

taxes and funds ou raised

by resolutions directing paper of no

to exist in the coun-

demands of value

to the

new

raise supplies, congress

to

to be struck off in the

theirs

intrinsic

form of promissory

But there was a point both in time and tion, thougli practicable, was deemed impolitic. quantity beyond which this process ceased to The only plausible expedient in the power of operate; that time was about eighteen months Congress was the emission of bills of credit from the date of first emi.ssiou and that quantity The rulers thought it still which were to represent specie under a public twenty millions. engagement of redemption through taxation, or premature to urge taxation, and they therefore

war

;

Direct taxa

nor could they be procured.

notes.

This practice resorted to the expedient of further emissions. for gold or silver. had been familiar from the first settlement of The ease with which the means of ])rocuring the colonies and, under proper restrictions, it supplies were furnished by simply striking off bills of credit and the readiness with

of exchange

;

which

people

the

prompted congress

Thirty Dollars. THE Bearer enSpanljh milled

Thirty

DOL

unavoidable consequence. At

rst this

iulionof'COA^G^i'^S

currency became worthless.

llie

but

14th "January,

it

increased daily,

the

^//a/^

middleof the year 1777, and then jirogressively

several

After this year the circulation

had been found highly advantageous. Congress,

fifty for one.

was limited to certain

in

for

In the latter part of 1777 it was two dollars in currency for one in specie; in 1778, five for one; in 1779 twenty-seven for one; in 1780,

therefore, resolved, in June, ITTo, to emit such

for their

de-

years.

CONTIXEXTAL CT-RREXCY.

more, and

The

different States; but in general about

increased

amount of two millions of

finally the

till

preciation began at different periods in

o Dollars.

more; and

fi

depreciation was scarcely perceptible,

1779-

in July, ordered a million

and

or an equai Sum in Gold or Silver laccordiiig to a Refo

of

ber, three millions

;

a depreciation of their value was the

LARS,

bills to the

tjjem,

beyond the limits of prudence

is

titled to receive

received

to multiply tliein

dollars;

currency ])assed

Novem- and redemp-

tion congress pledged the Confederated colonies.

1,

localities

council

;

but where the

depreciated to one hundred

dollars for one.

fifty

executive

ruary

it

In Pennsylvania the

resolved,

as

late

Feb-

as

1781, that continental money should

and,

be received for public dues at the exchange of

was the animation of the times, that these several emissions, amounting to twenty millions, circulated for some time without any deprecia-

seventy-five dollars in currency for one in specie.

Subsequently other emissions were made

;

.such

and

tion,

commanded

the

resources

of the

9,

C:ipt.

Mont-

gomery's troop of Light Dragoons arrived here on their march from Lancaster to Northampton County,

apprehend the rebels,' and to quell the But tlieir determination will be more likely to create an uproar than to restore order. " Upon their arrival here, their first undertaking was to go quietly and unnoticed to a citizen of the town who had erected a Liberty Pole upon his own ground and cut it down. But not satisfied with this they were desirous of disturbing this man's family, before whom they flourished pistols and drawn swords and took with them the instrument with which they in order to

'

insurrection.

.

ficers,

and

threats.'"

solemnly forewarning the

accompanied

The

many

leader in this

times

of-

with

insurrectionary

proceeding was John Fries, of Bucks County

who was

tried

and sentenced

Adams,

and convicted of high treason to be

hanged.

But President

.

.

against the advice of his Cabinet, par-

doned Fries and also issued a general amnesty

''Names, incUuling Fries, are given in Adler,

-Vjiiil

1709. '

Day's Penna. Historical Coll. 422.

^

Adler,

.-ipril 9,

1799.

Translated from the Germiin.

16,

HOUSE TAX AND LIBERTY POLES. had cut dowu the symbol of true freedom. Then they went upon a second expedition. At a particular place chilih'en had raised a pole with some patches attached

;

but when they observed the troops

it dowu and carried it into the house. But these troops went into the house with pistols and drawn swords, struck the owner of tlie house upon his breast and threatened to shoot him if he said one word. They broke the pole in pieces, took up the patches and other articles which did not concern them at all and carried them away. They sought a third adventure a short distance away and found a single small boy whom they commanded not to throw a certain tree (already cut down and lying near the river), into the water, and clubbed him unmercifully without the slightest reason. Thence they went to numerous other places and committed offenses not any less shameful and cruel. By this time night had come when they were forced to discontinue. " On the following morning they arose very early But they were so unfortunate for new adventure.-. Why unfortunate? as to find one immediately. Yes, it appeared dreadful to them, for these adven-

coming, they took

turous cannibals feared to ajiproach within eighty steps of a well -guarded Liberty Pole,

.

.

.

which ap-

the following ing

all,

169

Monday

afternoon and Tuesday morn-

excepting the regular troops, marched to their

A party of them (Captain homes. '. Montgomery's Company of Light Dragoons) came into my printing establishment, not as men of good character, but as scoundrels and rascals, tore off my clothing and dragged me before their fine captain, who is not a particle better than any of his company. He immediately commanded them to give me twentyfive lashes on my back at the Market House, and this would have been done, if one of Captain Leiper's company, from Philadelphia, had not interfered, and said that they should be ashamed of their performrespective

ance.

.

Through

whole number.

.

this interference I did not receive the .

.

[An

."

in

editorial

23

Adler,

proprietor,

Jacob

Mr. Schneider made coniphiiut before a

justice

April,

subscribed

1799,

by the

Schneider.]

of the peace and caused the criminals to be arrested,

Captain Montgomery

l)ut

make

denied

the

The matter was then referred to General Macpherson, who said he would look into it; and so they rode away on Sunday evening. \_Adler, 7th May, 1799.]

authority to

the arrest.

surrounded with explosive pipes. They hesitated, stood still and gaped at this wonderful They thing, as a cow at a newly painted stable door. were asked to come nearer but they were afraid till messenger would not move a step, a was they

turned to Reading on their way home, Stro-

them they might come a little nearer be able to see.the emblem of Liberty, for no

the soldiers went to Strohecker's place and there

peared

t9,ije

;

sent informing in order to

By

the time that Montgomery's troops re-

hecker had erected a liberty-pole in the place of the one erected by his children.

Hearing

this,

'

harm should be done to them.' Upon this one of attempted to compel a common laborer to cut them took courage and rode along when the others down the "offensive wood," notwithstanding saw that nothing was done to him, another followed. that he protested against doing so, declaring at They were then asked what they wanted. They the same time, on the most solemn asseveration, Nothing more than to see the country and replied that he also was a Federalist. They succeeded this Liberty Pole and to give their horses a little exercise.' They were asked further whether they in divesting the pole, and with it appended as a had not intended to cut down this Liberty Pole, and trophy, they rode through the streets of Readthey answered Xo.' Still another question was put ing to their quarters. In a few days they left, to them whether they had a right to cut down such a but on the 24th of April an army, under the Liberty Pole and to abuse the peojile. They answered 'They did not in reality have the right then, command of Brigadier-General W. MacplierThey apprehended but they might perhaps obtain it, in which case they son, arrived at Reading. would not ouly cut down all the Liberty Poles but some of the insurrectionists, who were afteralso burn and destroy everything where such poles wards tried before Judge Peters some of them Upon this they were stood and were erected.' Mere found guilty, some were fined and imexanune ;

'

:

'

:

;

this Liberty Pole particularly to asked to see if anything objectionable was upon it, and if so they were welcome to cut it down but they replied ;

that they could not see anything it

the

slightest

shouted, and

could

flourish

." . hats. " The troops .

injury

we saw

and would not give

Then three cheers were

punished

;

but none atoned with their lives

they were pardoned through executive clemency.'

'



that the caps of the Dragoons

Complaints. Some persons doubting that in the air as well as the round the troops had misbehaved themselves, the which left here to arrest the disturbers charge was reiterated, and the names of other

of the peace in

Northampton County returned

Reading on April

20,

20

prisoned and others condemned to be capitally

1799

— Saturday afternoon.

to

On

'

Rupp's History of Berks County., pp.

165-'



;

HISTORY OF BERKS UOUiNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

170

persons were

atkled

who

from

suffered

tlieir

These persons were,

cruel treatment.

Rudolph Lampe. Isaac Feather, a landlord, and his family,

him in the most of May, 1799].

cruel

treating

21st

On

the isth

manner

printer was looked

\^Adler,

1799, the following Esq., a

letter to

Jacob Gosiu, bad treatment of himsflf aud famand larceny of an ax. 2. John Strohecker, bad behaviour and the taking of a flag from a Liberty Pole which his children had erected and of other things which did not belong to them. 3. Jacob Epler, assembling and resolving to cut down a certain Liberty Pole which stood near bis house (in Bern township) \^Adkr, 21st of May, 1799]. 1.

ily

Captain Dewees narrates the following account in relation to the cutting

down of

and the cow-hiding

[Hanna's Life of Dewees,

p.

329]

to

Epler'.s

Schneider

:

"There was a farmer of the name of Epply, who who was an Epply stood in the influential and wealthy man. lived about three miles from Reading,

rank of the

the country.

'

The

Liberty Boys,' in that section of insurgents rendezvoused on

following

the

Keim

Captain Daniel

W. Mac-

interesting

:

you and the company you command on their return home, I take an additional

While

I congratulate

pleasure in expressing

my

complete satisfaction with

every part of their steady and soldier-like conduct

during a very fatiguing though short expedition.

much

It

be regretted that in a country blessed as this is, by an excellent constitution faithfully administered, there should be found any portion of its inhabitants so ignorant, or so wicked, as to oppose laws peculiarly adaptedriated

dollars additional for

;

thousand

ten

pui-pose of encourag-

tlie

ing volunteer etdistmenls; and

in

.Time, ISfi;?,

The

city of Reading ai)propriated altogether war purposes, in bounties, relief, etc., f'ST;?,179, as follows: 1861, $oO0; 18(i2,$S0-t; 18(;:l,

for

18()4,

And

$1 10,fiO(i

the

861

Street,

society were

on the second

floor,

the

room

by Mr. John terward

S. Pearson, free of rent

;

and

af-^

building occupied by the provost-

in the

marshal of this

No. 520 Penn

district,

Street.

1865,

;

as follows:

9 1 862, $45,082 ; 1 863, 1864, $347,7-50; 1865,

.fl 2,;?1

,

432 Penn

tiie

Pearson Building," No.

''

Comity of Berks

sum of 1452,389,

the 1

$2.58,7()0

held for a time in the

for this ])urpose having been generously given

similar meetings were held.

$2,509;

The meetings of

to Reading.

.'#19,788;

;

$27,450.

The

amount, for the

totiil

county, was $825,568.

sum,

priati'd_

and

21

moneys

raised

same purpose

:

Kiit/.town,

Bcrnville,$69.53.8]

;

melsdorf,

;

the

;

Wo-

—Tlie men

SA.NITAKY FAIR BUII.DrXGS.

community are presented very

women

period of our history.

tliis

arc also

worthy of

for their patriotism. tical

for

.

[)romincntly in the

'•-^

Boyertown,

Ladies' Aid Socikty. of our

A

$1(),()05-

Hamburg,

;

and

likewise appro-

l)iiroiigIis

tlie

city

Besides this

military service

They did ;

not enlist in prac-

but they gave the national

administration a moral support which

is

truly

Just as the " Ringgold Light

praiseworthy.

Artillery " were preparing to take the

Lebanon

Valley railroad train on the afternoon of April 1861, to proceed to Harrisburg in answer

16,

to the call

in

of President Ivincolu for troops, cer-

influential

tain

of Reading

ladies

the parlor of Mrs.

Penn

Street (No. 530),

which they

entitled

This was the

I'>nl

respectful mention

assembled

in

was the and

as

wc take a just

respond to the

to

first

we take

pride

call

for troops

do

a similar pride in having organized this

Aid Society, which was the first to take and successful steps towards providing for the comfort and welfare of the soldiers. This society participated actively in the matLadies'

active

ters pertaining to the

ber of ladies

was held

Sanitary Commission at

was represented by a numat the great "Sanitary Fair," which

and formed a

society,

society of the kind organ-

and

report at Harrisburg for service, so

to

Philadeljihia,

Society."

;

having furnished the military company which

Dr. Diller Luther, on " Ladies' Aid

first

ized in the country

and

it

in that city for

the purpose of raising

was to supply the soldiers with clothing and materials useful whilst in military service away from home. It was actively en-

funds to relieve the wants of the soldiers.

gaged during the entire period of the war,

col-

vice-president;

Mrs.

Annie H. Muhlenberg,

and forwardino; tons of materials.

A

treasurer; Mrs.

Maria

W.

Its

object

lecting

The

officers

of the society were Mrs.

C. Nicolls, president;

Rosa

Mrs. Catharine Hause, Brooke, secretary.

— —

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENXSYLVAXIA.

192

In July, 1866, a general review of its chariwork wa.s piiblij^hed bv the treasurer, Mrs.

table

Annie H. Muhlenberg (widow of the Hon. It was as follows:

Henrv A. Muhlenberg). "

A

statement of

money and

forwarded during the war "

;

:

:

Cash received from

supplies received and

for troops.

But

126o.l2

collections

237.00

Mite Society State of Pennsylvania for w(X)len

to prosecute

it

nobly to the

sevei-al calls

here, as elsewhere, the draft

to be made.

There were four §1541.30

one in

drafts,

of the

e;ich

The

years 1862, 1863, 186-1 and 1865.

pro-

vost-marshals of this district were, in succession,

Henry

I.

Kupp, Jacob C. Hofl'and George W.

181.28

Soldiers'

sovks...

Fairs, exhiliitioos aud concerts Sanitary Fair for " Berks Co. Kitchen

"

this district resjx)nde1,

at

six

o'clock,

reaching

Harrisburg

at

eight o'clock."

THREE

XtONTHs'

SEI!VI(_'E.

First SoEinERs from Berk.s County in (JiviL

War.



Tlie following eight companies

comprise the luen from Berks County who, as voliniteers, offered

ment

in

answer

their services to the govern-

to the call

of the President for

and were nuistered into military service for three months

troops,

:

Ringgold Light Art., 25th Regt., Capt. Jas. McKnight. ( 'o. G, 1st Regt., Capt. George W. Alexanart

of

following three companies were re-

cruited in Berks

Company

C.

County

:

— Remniited

Berks County, and mustered

at

Fricdensburg,

in Ajiril 2P>,

1801

:

Isaac Schroeder, captain.

Henry R. Myers, Petei;,Y.

tirst

lieutenant.

Edelman, second lieutenant.

18()1

George S. Heibst, captain. Samuel Bans, tirst lieutenant. Joel Ruppert, second lieutenant.

Charles G. Kline,

tirst

sergeant.

Abraham Ruppert, second

sergeant.

Peter Shafer, third sergeant.

Edward F. Reed, fourth sergeant. John J. Nash, first corporal. William Hassler, second corporal. Jacob Shafer, third corpoial. Lenhard Swizhard, fourth corporal. Joel Frederick and Elias Angstadt, musicians. Privates. Benjamin Angstadt, Abner Brutzman, Henry Bobb, Henry Beck, Abraham Bobb, Marcus Bean, Franklin Burns, Henry Boyer, William Bouchat, Simon Clouser, Levi Clouser, William Cleaver, Daniel Crackens, Jacob Drezer, David H. Delcamp, William Dreyer, Peter Eck, Samuel Eckert, Robert Engel, Francis Fisher, William Foreman, Benjamin Goodwin, George Hewett, William Hassler, Jonas Hassler, Joel R. Housman, .Tosepli Harris, George F. Hungerford, George Hummel, Edward Harper, Charles Hatner, Henry Kash, Geo. Kemp, John List, John S. Leed.s, Franklin Lins, Daniel Moyer, George Moore, Michael



Franklin B. Laucks, tirst sergeant. S. Boyer, second sergeant.

James A. Murroii, John Mitchell, (.'. Henry Mathcw, David Paul, Franklin Keidenauer, .John Reimer, William Roland, Francis Rothenberger, George

William C. Baker, third sergeant. Reuben Kaufman, fourth sergeant.

Richards, Julius Shafer, Franklin Specht,

Henry

Isaac Pott,

tirst

corporal.

George P'oos, Jr., second corporal. Jeremiah H. Hauck, third corporal.

John

C. Steckline, fourth corporal.

Peter H. Hauck and George A. Eltz, musicians. Privates Enoch Adam, Benneville Angstadt, Edwin S. Bear, Aaron Bright, Thomas Best, Wm. D. Brown,



Edmond Y.

Bock, Alexander Bigger, John H. Clemmens, Washington G. Dengler, .lohn G. Dengler, Edward Draher, Wellington Egel, Jos. Eberhardt, John Fiese, Joe! Ginder, Celestial Good, Caleb Gallagher, Harrison Gechter, Charles Hafer, Israel Hafer, Daniel

Hunter, Jas. H. Harner, Henry Hauck, Jacob Holm, Henry H. Harbold, Samuel B. Jones, Fred'k Kindly, David Keller, Ebenezer C. Lell, Henry R. Laucks, Jacob Link, Nathaniel Linderniuth, Jeremiah Lotz, Daniel Meek, Aaron Moyer, Frederick Moble, Seyer Melot, John Madary, Peter Maurer, Mahlon A. McNoldy, Wm. Poorman, Chas. Bothermel, Ginder Rank, Daniel Rothenberger, Henry Sheafler, Jacob F. Schild,

Henry Schroeder, Zachariah Swavely, Isaac Sider, Henry Schmeck, Michael R. Shultz, Frederick H. Sener, Jacob Tre.xell, Albert S. Tool, William Voght,

Amos Wentzel, Jonathan Wentzel, John Weidner, Daniel Wentzel, .John Williams, Aaron Yoder, Solo-

mon Yeakle.

Miller,

Amos Syler,

Daniel Staufer, D. George Sellers, Paul Simon, Simon Stout, H. John Sowers, Michael Stilvier, William Souder, Albert Stewart, Albert Sides, Levi Strunk,

Ephraim Updegrove, Joseph Wibel, Daniel Yoder, Peter Yoder.

Company

G.

— Recruited

at

Reading, Berks

County, and mustered in April 23, 1861

:

Albert F. Rightmyer, captain. Cornelius Wise,

first

lieutenant.

Jacob H. Worth, second lieutenant.

John G. Ulrich, first sergeant. Anthony Heller, second sergeant. Abraham Latshaw, third sergeant. William Runyeon, fourth sergeant. Jacob Ege, first corporal. William H. Dehart, second corporal.

Thomas

Craton, third corporal.

George Hart, fourth corporal. Gideon Ginder and Henry Benneville, musicians. Piirates. John C. Anthony, Charles Bachman, Marks Bechtel, Sidney Bank, William Brown, James Boyer, Augustus Burkert, William Boone, William Breneiser, Fillermachus Berkert, Daniel D. Baker, James Berstler, Samuel T. Baker, William Clymer, Aaron Deem, Edward Dyer, John Denhard, George Dougherty, Stephen Edgar, Reuben Freas, Martin S.



:

:

HISTORY OP BEftKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

204

W.

Grant, William Graiil, Levi

John

Nelson Bell, Joseph Chalfant, William Cook, Bartholomew DeVoute, Charles M. Dichm, Jacob Finkbone, Augustus Farrel, Daniel Finkbonc, Samuel Fix, Henry Getrost, Leonard Getz, Aaron Goodman, Emanuel Gottschall, Gotlieb Hiller, John S. Hindman, John H. Hassinger, George M. Hayes, Jacob Houder, James High, Samuel Husk, Benjamin Hummel, Benjamin Klemmer, Nicholas Kramer, Daniel Kerper, Willi.iiu R. Lewis, William Large, William

Henry Siegfried, Alfred J. Stout, James E. Stout, John Taylor, Francis Thomas, James H. Vandeever, James D. AVhitman, George Wunder, Oliver B. AVilson, Frank ]?. Wilson, Godfrey Weiler, John A. Walker, John Whitman.

Lawrence, .Joseph Lawrence, Levi Miller, Charles Miron, Joel May, Charles Noland, George Pollam, Henry Quimby, Charles Riegel, Milton Roy, Henry Regenfuss, Ephraim Snieck, Harrison Stieft', Robert Simon, Charles Smith, Nicholas Smith, F. B. Shalters, Jr., A. S. Seaman, Henry Sailor, Henderson Sample, James A. Shultz, Cyrus Trout, Urias Traite, James

George

Gnodliart,

Hildebrand, Henry A. Haak, William Heifert, Augustus Hauck, Samuel H.Jones, George L. Knupp, William Kline, Samuel Kissinger, John C. Kribbs, S. Ludwig, William A. Lewis, William Mohr, George Miller, John Mergert, William Murphy, Russel Miller, George Obenhauser, Obediah R. Priestley, Henry J. Penrose, Marion Rauck, Simon M. Rush, Isaac E. Robinson, Damon Steuben, Albert A.Simon, William Sands, Damon Shultz, Jacob Spotz, John R. St. Clair,

FOUUTEENTH REGIMENT. Regimeut was organized

Tlie Fourteenth

Camp

Curtin on April

Michael

was

^

elected

at

Mc-

Richard.s

.30th.

lieutenant-colonel, and

A. McLean major of the regiment. Both were from Reading. It was encamped at

Jo.'-eph

Camp

Johnston, in

Lancaster,

till

.lune

been thoroughly drilled during

having interval

and

;

subserpiently

it

marched

.'kl,

thi^:

to

Chambersburg, Hager.stown, Sharpsburg, ]\Iartinsburg, Bunker's Hill and Harper's Ferry, doing picket and guard duty, and making various expeditious to encounter the enemy. Whilst at tlie latter place the

was accordingly ordered to Harrisburg. way it encamped and remained two weeks Carlisle, where it was mustered out of service.

and

it

On

its

at

term of enlistment expired

Harrisburg was then

of returning troops.

various military organizations of Pennsylvania.

two companies from Berks County.

Company mustered

in

A.

—Recruited

at

Reading and

April 27, 18(51

D. A. Griffilh, captain. .1.

E.

A. McLean, first lieutenant. .1. Ranch, second lieutenant.

J. Phillippi, first sergeant.

Amos

.\rni)ld,

second sergeant.

H. Missimer, third sergeant. F.

W.

Berg, fourth sergeant.

Thoma.s Gabriel, first corporal. G. W. Rapp, second corporal. S.

Dampnian,

Bentley

third corporal.

vSniith, fourtli corporal.

H. (ioodhart and Francis Bauer, musicians. Privates.

—.lohn

Bauman, Daniel '

I'or

James M. Thompson, Van Tassel, Frederick Ulmer, Cornelius LTxly, Peter Wolf, Edwin Whitman, Philip Weidner, Samuel Zellers.

Toole,

Company

E.

— Recruited

Berks County, and mustered John John

in

at

Womelsdorf,

April 24, ISfil

C. Shearer, captain.

T. Schoener,

first

lieutenant.

William G. Moore, second lieutenant. George N. Steach, fii-st sergeant. Cyrus Oberly, second sergeant.

Henry Weighman,

third sergeant.

William Wcinhold, fourth sergeant. .Tames Gaul,

first

corporal.

Henry Gutwald, second

corporal.

Levi Bennethum, third corporal. Eli Dougherty, fourth corporal.

John Daniels and Cyrus I'rird/e^.

Hefi'clfinger, musicians.

— James Ayres, Henry Arnold, Samuel Ar-

Samuel Barket, William Bennethum, Charles Bennethum, John Brechbill, Jonathan Bennethum, .Tohn Clouser, Peter Capp, Jacob Deppcn, David Dissinger, Levi Dehart, Isaac Fiddle, William Fink, Chas. Folk, William Fry, William Giist, Henry Haywood, Henry Harp, Wm. Honies, Mandon Hawk, Reul)en Hendricks, John Hampton, Frederick Hotlinan, William Himmelreich, John Haas, Samuel Klahr, Israel Koch, George W. Kuhns, Henry P. Kaufz, Henry Kohler, William Lash, .John H. Liveringhouse, Benjamin Lash, Lawrence Meek, Elias Moyer, William Madary, Samuel Mathew, Thomas McGuiie, Augustus nold,

full

A large proportion of this regiment re-enlisted in It includ(!(l

Bell,

Armstrong, Moses Burns, Joseph John H. Brookins, Matthias

Bosler,

AiiHid' account see

l'J4tli

Regiment.

Milligsock, Peter Muskuess, Milton U. Nice, Lew Owens, Samuel Parsons, Frederick Putt, Ja.s. Pollum, .Tames Reinhart, Henry Rosenberger, .leremiah Russell, Isa.ac Rose, Isaac Scholl, Emanuel Stout, Zadoc Smith, Michael Shafl'er, William W. Seidel, William Strousc, .Tames Seidel, Daniel Sjiotz, Cyrus Ulrich, Peter Wise, William H. Wenrich, Levi Wise, George Weiser, William H. Wells, Samuel Whitaker, Percival Zechman.

Gener.vl WiLrjA>r H. Reading on June lo, 181.3.

Keim was born at He was the eldest

THK cniL son of Benneville Keim, the President of the

Farmers'

Bank

number of

for a

years,

w.vi;.

sides the store business, he encouraged enter-

Mayor

prises generally for the

of Reading for three terms, and a prominent and enterprising business man of tlic county.

ing.

His mother was Mary Higii, a daugiiter of General William High, a wealthy farmer of Cumrn township, at " Poplar Neck," and a man

ural taste for

His early military training gave him a natmilitary affairs, and he found a

field for its gratification in

of the State Militia.

]n-omincnt in the military affairs of the county.

At

the age of twelve years he entered

the

development of Read-

the volunteer service

Before the age of seven-

was an Orderly Sergeant of the " Washington Grays," and in 1837 he became teen years, he

i

>. >•

Military

Academy

at

Mount

delphia, which, during

its

Airy, near Phila-

active existence,

was

one of the foremost educational institutions

in

the United States, and was graduated with honor in 1829.

Upon

returning

the store of his father,

home he

entered

Captain

—succeeding

the largest general hardware-stores in Reading,

part in the Military ing,

—the greater part of the

time as a proprietor of a large store in co-partnership with his brother, John

H. Keim.

Be-

and Schuylkill

In that year he took a prominent

and continued actively engaged in this for nearly thirty years

Captain Daniel

Division of Penna. Vols., which was composed

of Berks, Lebanon, Dauphin

which was then one of Counties. pur'suit

his cousin,

M. Keim. He was promoted rapidly till 1842, when he was elected Major-General of the Fifth

Encampment

held at Read-

which was an eventful occasion

in the liis-

tory of military affairs in this county.

Among

other distinguished military men, General field

Scott was in attendance.

Win-

In 1844, during

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, 1'K^NSYI>^AXIA.

2(16

the terrible religious riot at Philadelphia, he was

sult of the Presidential election in favor of the

ordered to assist in quelling the disturbances,

Republican party had become known, General

which resulted in loss of life and property. He was under Gen. Robert Patterson, kSenior Major-

Keim suggested to Governor Curtin that the commonwealth be put in a condition of defense,

The good oj)inion, which inasmuch as the signs of discontent indicated command had won, was justly civil strife; and he recommended in that behalf

Geueral in the State. General Keim's

encampment of

expressed in the following extract from General

a general

Order, No.

by General Patterson, when the detachment of the Fifth Division was

State.

relieved until further orders

him, an encampment was held at York, in the

issued

.30,

"The Major-Gcneral

:

further desires to express his

the militia of the

Governor Curtin accepted

this timely

suggestion, and, in pursuance of an order

by

beginning of September, 186(^, with General

Keim

His services in organizing our local militia and in bringing them under jn-oper discipline

command. In January following, upon visiting his home at Reading, he ciilled upon Captain .James iNIclCnight, who commanded the Ringgold Light Artillery, a company of volunteers in his brigade, and asked him to keep his company in readiness so as to

were both untiring and successful, thereby plac-

be able to respond prom|)tly to any order that

ing them in the front rank of the volunteer sol-

might

knowledge of their exemiilarv and soldier-like deportment while under his command. He will at all times be happy to serve with such troops. Berks County may well be proud of her volunteer soldiery."

tliers

of the State.

In 1X48 he was elected

run as the but a

He

city.

Whig

tiiird

to the office

He

of

Mayor company

was the second

had been nominated and

candidate in the previous year,

candidate in the

field,

who

ran inde-

pendently, caused his defeat. Several years after-

ward, he took great est





not the principal interin establishing at Reading the " Pennsylvania if

and reported

burg

1861.

in April,

services

when

under the

the campaign

eral

ber, previously, .Jones ha\

certit'.,

in

30, 1862.

diseh.

;

11, 1861.

must, in .June

S. (xood, private,

diseh. on surg.

18()1

7,

ing

1861.

in Sept. 30, 1862; must.

private, must, in

Reuben G. Gearhart,

7,

1861.

7,

.loseph Rorke, private, must, in July 13, 1S61

must, in June

on surg. certiC, Nov. 27, 1862. Frill, private, must, in June

June

in

1862.

trans.

;

trans.

;

4, 18(i4.

;

1864.

Edward

July

William Rank, private, must, in June 7, 1861 died at Fairfax Seminary Hospital, Va., Sept. 24,

;

1864.

Josiah Focht, private, must, in June

M'C'ord, private, must, in July 18, 1861

Geo. A, Raudenbush, private, must, 7, 18(11

must, in Sept. 30, 1862

to 54th Regt. P. V.,

Franklin

1,

Heber

1802;

to 54th Regt. P. V.,

June

private, must, in

pro. to com.-sergt.,

William

must, in Sept. 30,

private,

.54tli

Henry

M, a4th

S.

]>ro. to

1863.

Regt., P. V. July

Moulton, 2d

lieut.

1st lieut.,

Oct.

4,

1864.

must, in July 28,

1, ]S(;2;

1S(;1

;

to 1st lieut. Sept. 15,

TIIK ClVir. Albeit A. Jamison, 2d

EdwarJ K. Moll, 2d

must, in June

resigned July 28, 1862. Benjamin D. Hemming, 2d

11,

1801

;

must, in June 11, Sept. 16, 1863 must, out

Murphy, sergt., must, wounded diseh. March 4,

Daniel

in

June

11,

ISdl

54th Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 vet. Daniel Filbert, must, in June 27, 1861

1S63.

;

Robert Smith,

must,

V. July V. July

to 54th Kegt. P.

.lames

M.

V. July

M.

.lolin

11, 1861

trans.

;

trans.

vet.

;

June

4,

1861

11,

;

trans.

V. July

4,

4,

864

1

June

;

11, 1861

;

trans.

;

54th Regt. P. V. July

27, 1865, to

June 20, 1861; must, date June 18, 1864. in

Charles Adler, must, in July Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 Jesse

IS,

1X61

out

Oct.

June

trans, to 54th

;

28, 1861.

in June 11,1801. Haverstick, must, in .Tune 11,1801; died at Easton, Pa., July 10, 1801.

Herbrant, must, in June 11,1801; died at 24, 1801 buried in Military

Washington, Aug. A.sylum Cemetery.

Henry

Hai-sta, must,

;

Gaine.s' Mill,

June

in

June

William Henry, must,

1861

11,

killed

;

at

27, 1862.

in

June

11, 1861.

at Philadelphia Oct.

disch. Feb.

1,

1802.

7,

in

June

27,

18(!1

wounded

;

;

1803.

Henry Jones, must.in June

trans, to 54th

;

vet.

;

to

Jacob Heming, must,

William Jones, must,

Andy, must,

tran.s.

;

.Joseph Helbrick.

Privates,

.lohn

;

1804.

4,

.Tames Glennose, must, in July 20, 1801 Regt. P. V. July 4, 18(i4.

Mark Hogan, died John House.

1861.

1,

.Vdam Gilbert, must, in June 11, 1801. Andrew Gangwer, must, in June 20, 1801

Josejdi

1864; vet.

June 11, 1S61. Levan Lehr, corp., must, in June 27, 1861. Wellington Miller, Corp., must, in June 11, 1861. John P. Douth, musician, must, in June 11, 1861. Calvin Reedy, musician, must, in June 11, lsi;i pro. musician Oct.

wounded

;

20, 1862.

Rudy

vet.

(icorge Able, eorp., must, in

to

June

.J:imes Hartzel, must, in

1864; vet.

V. July

Biery, sergt., must, in

to 54th Regt. P.

;

must, in June 11, 1861;

Phillips, sergt.,

trans, to 54th Regt. P.

1864

4,

Ivlw.ard Clater, sergt., must, in

;

disch.

1864; vet.

4,

must, in June

sergl.,

tor,4th Regt. P.

:

1S62.

ii,

;

;

;

in

must, in June 20, 1861

sergt.,

to 54th Regt. P.

John Vandorn,

killed in

;

1861;

;

disch. on surg. certif. Dee.

11, 1861

11,

Isaac Addis, sergt., must, in .June 11, 1861 detached to Bat. G, 43d Kegt. P. V.; disih. Dec. 4, 1862.

sergt.,

June

in

June 27, 1861. Joseph Connor, must, in June 11, 1801. .Joseph Bellas, must, in

June

;

Sept. 27,1864.

Levi HofTmaster,

Henry Burkhart, must,

Allen Christmau, must, in July 20, 1801 trans, to 54th Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 vet. .Jacob Cooper, must, in June 11, 1861. Henry Eisenboth, must, in July 20, 18(;i disch. by order of War Dept. Aug. (i, 1862. Henry Ecknold, must, in June 11, 1X61; trans, to

lieut.,

lieut.

213

action July 10, 1862.

24, 1861. lieut.,

1861; pro. to 2d

must, in June 11, 1861;

lieut.,

June

pro. to adjt.

WAR.

11, 1801 killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. Charle.s Jennings, must, in July 22, 1861 trans, to 54th Regt. P. V. July 4, 18(i4 vet. ;

;

Adams, must,

in

June

20, 1861

trans, to

;

54th

;

Regt. P. V. July

1864

4,

vet.

;

Edward

Henry Acker, must,

in June 20, 1861 ericksburg, Dec. 13, 1802. .lohn Brown, nuLst. in June 11, 1861 Res. Corps .July 1, 1863.

killed at Fred-

;

trans, to "Vet.

;

June 11,1861

Killpatrick, must, in

;

trans, to

Vet. Res. Corps July 1, 1803. Theo. Killpatrick, must, in June II, 1801; trans, to 54th Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 vet. Thos. Kochel, must, in June 11, 1861 trans, to 54th ;

;

J(din L. Bard, must, in certif.

Sept.

1,

William P. Butz,

June

20, 1861

disch. on surg.

;

1862.

John H.

nuist. in

June

20, 1861

disch. on

;

surg. certif. Feb. 6, 1863.

Henry Bowman, disch. on surg. certif. May 13, 1863. Kdward Blose, must, in July 21, 1801 trans, to 54th ;

Regt. P. V. July 4, Levi Beechart, must, in Regt. P. V. July 1, Levi Bernheisel, must,

Regt. P. V. July

1804

vet.

;

July

17, 1861

trans, to 54th

;

4,

1804

Killian, must, in

vet.

;

June 20,1801;

killed at

Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. Manassah Kline, must, in June 20, 1861. John Kelly, must, in .Tune 11, 18()1. Willoughby Labold, must, in June 20, 1861. Pompelius Lippi, must, in June 20, 1861.

Harrison Lutz, must, in June 11, 1861 must, out Oct. 27, 1865, to date June 17, 1864. .Tames Leese, must, in June 20, 1861 killed at An;

1864 in

vet.

;

June

11, 1801

;

trans, to

;

54th Regt. P. V. July

William Borman,

4,

1864; vet.

trans, to 54th

tietam, Sept. 17, 1862.

Regt. P. V. July

4,

Franklin I^eh, must, in July

K

Samuel Miles, must, Eugene Mertz, must,

1864; vet.

Henry Boger, must, Oct.

2,

in

June

27, 1861

;

trans, to Co.

1861.

John A. Becker, must,

Regt. P. V. July in

July

Creek, Va., Sept. 19, 1802.

18, 1861

;

died at Mill

Adam

Mier, must, in Regt. P. V. July

in in 4,

1861.

;

trans, to 54th

1864; vet.

June 4,

8,

June 11, 1861. June 28, 1861

1864

20, 1861 ;

vet.

;

trans, to 54th

BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

fllSTORY OF

214

Monroe Mertz, must,

June

in

20, 1861.

Lew. D. McFarlaiid, mustered

1S61

20,

;

killed at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862.

George

June

S. Neal, must, in

Kegt. P. V. July

1S64

4,

11, 1861

trans, to r)4th

;

Uriah Nunemaclier, must, in June 20, 1861 trans, to vet. r)4th Regt. P. V. July 4, 1S64 Josephus Ruth, must, in July IS, 18()1 diseh. en surg. ;

;

;

certif.

Dec.

1,

1862.

Alexander Rambo, must, in June 54th Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 Peter Rusk, must, in July 18, 1S61

John

1861

11,

June

;

Andrew Rohrer,

must, in

Antie-

at

Feb.

at

men were The regiment

Auder.souville.

The following men (i.

the

the latter battle, and the

(•a]itured in

Joseph

Compauy

in

IG,

1864.

I were

from

Holmes, capt., must, Nov. 7, 1861.

:

May

in

10, 1S61

;

pro. to capt. 1.S61

26,

not on

;

May

.\aron /cigler, 1st lieut., must, in

roll.

July 5, 1862. Marquette, 2d lieut.,

28, 1S61

;

pro.

to 1st lieut.

John School, must, in June 11, 1861. John Silbeman, must, in June 11, 1861. Levi Schneer, must, in June 11, 1861 trans,

J.

Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 vet. William H. Stotz, must, in June 20, 18(!1 54th Regt. P. V. Julv 4, 1S64; vet.

.')4lh

;

John Seidere, must, in June 28, 1S61 Mill, June 27, 1862. John Stadler, must, in July 20, 1861.

H.

Wm. Harmon,

trans, to

;

;

July 1, 1862. Edward F. Smith, sergt., must,

wounded March 5,

June

in

Regt. P. V. July

John Wentzel, must,

1864

4,

May

in

pro.

26, 1861

trans, to 54th

;

;

;

Edward

must, in

May

June

disch.

26, 1S61

;

caji-

16, 1865.

May

C. Geiger, corp., must, in

26,

1861

;

company June 16, 1864. Henry G. Housum, C(jrp., must, in May 26, wounded at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862

1861

;

must, out with

;

on surg.

certif.

oner from

disch.

Jan. 14, 1863.

May

5,

1861

7,

;

pris-

1864, to Feb. 27, 1865.

Vondrock, Corp., must, in May 26, 1861 died at Point Lookout, Md., July 25, 1862. Oliver Vondrock, musician, must, in July 15, 1861

,los. ;

1864.

4,

;

1863.

Wm. Vancamp, sergt., tured May 5, 1864;

trans, to 54tli

;

vet.

in July 12, 1861

Regt. P. V. July

1, 1.S61

.Tune 30, 1862; disch. on surg. certif.

Peter F. Seaman, corp., must, in July

27, 1861 ;

;

R.Smith, sergt., must, in July 7,1861 wounded at South Mountain Sept. 14, 1.S62; disch. on sur certif. Feb. 1863. Peter S. Haintz, sergt., must, in July 7, 1861 missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

;

1862.

1,

must, in June

lieut.,

20, 1861

16, 1864.

Wm.

Joseph Seidere, must, in July 24, 1861. Hugh Sweeny, must, in July 15, 1861. John H. Stailnecker, must, in July 18, 1861. Win. Tonia, must, in June 20, 1861. Michael Tracy, must, in July 20, 1861. John Trexler, must, in July 12, 1861 trans, to 54th vet. Regt. P. V. July 4, 1864 Lewis B. Tice, must, in June 11, 1861. Trapold, must, in June 11, 1861. Jacob William Walters, must, in June 11, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Sei)t.

2d

May

mu.st. in

company June

to 2d lieut.

;

killed at Gaines'

;

(i.

must, out with to

;

Weber, must,

and

Frederick.shurg

Nearly the entire regiment was

Wilderness.

was mustered out of service June

killed

11, 1861.

in .luly 20, 1861.

Adam

Antietam,

to

iu the bat-

Berks County, recruited at Reading

Cyrus Reed, must, muster-out

of

tles

answer

to

was also engaged

It

trans, to

;

vet.

Sejit. 17, 1862.

Rulile, must, in

two hundred men were present

imprisoned

;

tam,

fighting,

their names.

vet.

;

It passed through seven days of and upon nuistering the regiment only

1862.

30,

June

in

;

;

Edward Wild,

July

mu.st. in

Jacob Whiteiieck, must,

Adolph

Zetze, must, in

Regt. P. V. July

4,

20, 1861.

disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 15, 1862.

June 11, 1861. June 11, 1861 trans, in

:

1864

Privates.

to 54th

vet.

action at Wilderness

THIKTY-SIXTH KEOIMENT.

The

Tliirty-Sixth

comjianics recniited the

made up of men Counties.

Regiment in

reeruited in

Charles August, must, in July 18,

wa.s corapo.sed of

several

counties east of

Compauy

Mountains.

AUeglieiiy

Berks and Lebanon

It

was not engaged

in

fighting until the latter pa«'t of June, 18G2, it

w;us

engaged

in the battle

at Charles

.ser-

any

when

of Gaines' Mill.

octaipied the left of the line.

ment was

was

I

Tlie regiment was mustered into

vice July 27, 1S61.

May 26, 1861 May 5, 1864.

.Vlonzo Auberton, must, in ;

Its next engage-

City Cross-Roads, June

1861

died of

;

wounds received at Bull Run Aug. 30, 1862. Lewis Bournman, must, in July 17, 1861 died May ;

12, 1863.

George Becker, must,

in

May

26, 18()1

killed at

;

An-

tietam Sept. 17, 1862. .Tohn

Drom,

mu.st. in

May 26, 1861;

missing

in action

at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.

Frederick Fey, must, in

1802 It

mi.ssing in

;

;

May

Cornelius Gerhart, must, in at (iaines'

1863.

26, 1861

;

died Aug.

buried in Cypress Hill Cem., L. Mill

;

disch.

May

26, 1861

on surg.

;

7,

I.

wounded

certif. .Jan. 16,

THE CIVIL WAR. Jeremiah Horner, must, in May 26, 1861 action at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

Wm.

J.

Haines, must, in June

May

1863

1,

1864, to Feb. 28, 1865

5,

missing in

;

tlisch.

July

5, 1.S64;

died at

15.

;

May

Miller, must, in July

tion at Wilderness

May

Lawrence Roesler, must,

1861

1864 1861

7,

service

missing in

;

veteran.

;

missing in ac-

;

May

7,

;

Stehle, must, in July 16, 1861

May

disch.

;

at

on surg.

September

to 190th Regt. P.

V.

May

Alfred Shappel, must, in July tion at Wilderness

May

must, in

F. Shollenberger,

May

must, in

5,

26,

31, 1864 7,

1861

1861

;

trans.

veteran.

;

mi.ssing in ac-

;

1S61

7,

died

;

ol

with company June

J. 0.

A. Hoffeditz,

Tlie

must, out

;

Coinjiany

M

a

number of

First Cav-

counties

Berks C'onnty, and Company

in

h in Berks, Lebanon and Lancaster C'ounties. Company L was mustered into service as an independent comj)any on July 30, 1861, and

was stationed

Company 5, (

M

at

Baltimore for five months, and

was mustered

into service

August

1861, and was stationed at .same place until

On

)etober od.

joinet.,

William A, kSands, capt., must, in July 30, 1861 pro. from 1st lieut. April 16, 1862; captured June 21,

1864; died in 26, 18t)l

FOUTT>-1'OIIRTH RECilMENT (FIKST CAVALKY).

alry, wa.s recruited in

9,

1864, except where otherwi.se mentioned.

;

certif.

May

was recruited

25, 1863.

wounds received at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862. John lllnier, must, in July 16, 1861 disch. on surg. October 8, 1862. John Weikami), must, in

1864.

9,

—This company

C. A.Litchenthaller, 2d lieut., must, in July 30, 1861

1864.

July

L.

Reading, and was mustered out Se])tember

Henry

31, 1864.

.Jacob T. Strohecker,

to

signed April 16, 1862.

Ifilled must, in July 7, 1861 Charles City Cross-Roads June 30, 1862.

certif.

and proceeded

1st,

;

1863.

W. H. Rothenberger, John

at

1864; veteran. trans, to 23, 1X61

5,

in

Vet. Res. Ckirps Oct.

5,

7,

i.ssued

where they were mustered out of

Pliiladelphia,

Company

Jleck, must, in July

Their term

They withdrew

from duty.

relief

from the front SeptembiuJuly 7, 1S6I prisoner Andersonville ( )et. 26, 1864; in

aetion at Wilderness

Aaron

their

for

grave 11,481. Alfred

of the army.

left

17,

1865. Freflerick Hertzel, must,

May

Road, near the

of service having expired, an order was

prisoner from

;

;

213

Mary's Church, Malvern Hill, Gravel On August 2\), 1864,

Hill and Ream's Station.

they were encamped on the Jerusalem Plank-

from sergt. June 28, 1863. Daniel Howdcr, q.m. -sergt., must, in July

.30,

1861

;

captured June 21, 1864; absent at muster out. Augustus Rhoads, com. -sergt., must, in July 30, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. March 10, 1863. John Howder, com. -sergt., must, in July

30, 1861

trans, to battal. Sept. 9, 18(!4; veteran.

W. D. Kofenhaver, Benj. F. Bright,

must, in .Inly 30, 1861

sergt.,

Nov.

disch. on surg. certif. .sergt.,

;

1861.

8,

must, in July 30, 1861

disch.

;

by order See. of War, March 25, 18(i3. George Keni]), sergt., must, in July 30, 1861 died July 17, 1863; burial record, July 18, 1863. Michael Donovan, sergt., must, in July 30, 1861; ;

killed at Brandy Station, Va., June 9, James N. Hunter, sergt., must, in July

disch. on surg. certif.

Joseph Buck, in action

sergt.,

June

Milton Hofl'editz,

Nov.

1863. 30, 1861

1863.

8,

must, in July 30, 1861; missing

21, 18(i4.

sergt.,

must, in Dec. 15, 1861

;

trans.

to battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

Samuel H.

Shiffert, sergt.,

pro. from corp.

July

must, in July 30, 1861

;

22, 1863.

William A.Tobias, sergt., nuist. in July 30,1861; pro. from Corp. July 22, 1863 absent, in hospital at muster out. ;

;

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, I'ENNSYLVANTA.

216

Peter Dasher, sergt., must.in July 30, 1S61

pro. from

;

Aaron E. Bacbman, Dec.

Corp. July 22, 1863. I>.

(t.

Pretzman, corp., must,

on surg.

certif.

John Guires,

June

July

in

'JO,

ISOl;

iliscli.

27, l.S(>2.

July

corp., mu.st. in

30, ISOl

discli.

;

on

surg. certif. Dec. 9, 1S(J2.

John Kramer,

corp., nuist. in July 30, IStil

Culpeper, Va., Sept.

at

June

tion

21, 18(;4.

John H. Johnson, ured .lune

June

21,

July 30, ISGl

corp., must, in

0, 18()3,

trans, to battal. Sept.

1S(J4;

capt-

;

Brandy Station, Va., and

at

!),

;

Sept.

mond, Va.; veteran. M. Devine, corp., must,

Ilobcrt

trans, to battal. Sept.

!»,

.luly

in

30,

18()1 ;

1864; veteran. ;

Algier, corp., must, in July 30, 1861

David IMundshower,

pro.

;

;

pro.

George Kesler, bugler, must,

July

in

30, 1861

;

trans,

must, in

.July 30,

1.S61 ;

trans, to battal. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

James

June Sept.

.John

Daniel Addis, must, in July 30,

Brandy Station, Va., June 9, James Angstadt, must, in Feb.

wounded

at

1864; trans,

to

1,S61;

6,

in

Feb.

12,

1864;

trans,

to

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

6, 18ti4; captured June 21, 1864; trans, to battal. Sei>t. 9, 1864; must, out with Co. L by G. 0. Aug. 7, 1865.

Franklin Brenizer, must.in Feb.

9,

must, out .Tune

18(i4;

in

Aug.

to sergt. 20,

17,

9,

30, 1861

;

captured

battal. Sept.

must, in

John Black, must,

trans,

to

Co. "L Dec.

.luly

1861

30,

;

killed in

1863; trans, to battal.

Feb.

6,

July

1S64

;

9,

9,

1864

6,

;

captured

Se|)t. 9, 1864.

1864; trans, to battal. Feb.

in

1864; trans, to battal.

I,

1864.

must, in

I'^eb.

1864; trans, to battal.

(i,

1864.

must, in

f!ro.ss,

1864; trans, to battal.

I'Vli. 6,

must,

Feb.

in

1864; trans, to

6.

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

Jer.Gromlich, must.in July

2lt,

Nov. Hamilton

.luly

1.S61

;

killed in action

17, 1863.

Geliert, must, in to

.luly 11

30,

1861; prisoner

must,

10, lX(i4;

Dei'.

Charles L. Harrison, must,

on surg. Peter

out Feb.

;

trans,

certif.

Hummel,

May

July

in

30,

1861

;

discli.

6, 18(!2.

must, in July

30, 18t.

;

3, 18()1.

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

q. m. -sergt.

corp.,

wounded

30, 1861.

John H. Doyle, must, in July 30, Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. action June 21, 1864.

Sept.

to Corp. Oct., 1863.

ICIias

Nov.

surg. certif.

;

1861

30,

Isaac S. Dissenger, mu.st. in July 30, 1X61

trans, to battal. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

M. A.

.Inly

in

Nov. 27, 1863. Jago Doyle, must, in July

Peres S. Fisher, must, in July 30, 1861.

Dewilla H. Long, corp., must, in July 30, 1861

Wni.

1864.

9,

Henry Derrick, must,

must, in July 30,1801;

corp.,

captured; died Jan. 23, 1864; buried at Rich-

John M.

;

Daniel K. Di.xon, must, in Feb.

Wendling,

1861; captured

.30,

31, 1865.

in Jan. 1, 1864; wounded June 21, 1864; jtro. to corp. Co. L battal., March 4, 18(i5 must, out June 20, 1805 veteiaii. James Conrad, must, in Feb. 3, 1864; trans, to battal.

1804;

veteran.

riiumas

May

H. H. Biowumiller, must,

wounded

;

13(53; killed in ac-

13,

July

nuist. in

1863; nuist. out

1,

in

Feb.

5,

1S64;

tran.s. to battal.

1864.

Samuel Hendricks, must, battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

in Feb.

1,

1864; trans, to

THE Reuben Homan, must, in July 30, 1861. Robert F.Irwin, must, in July 30, 1861; trans,

Civil.

to

H. Irwin, must,

1865; must, out

1861

30,

;

L

L

Jan.

July

30, 1861

1,

Nov.

1864

1,

9,

tal.

Sept.

Robert

9,

W.

21, 1862;

Feb.

in

6,

1864; trans, to battal.

1864.

Jackson, must, in Feb.

in action

June

1864; killed

11,

21, 1864.

Tbomas Knauss,

must, in July 30, 1S61 captured at Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862; wounded in action Nov. 27, 1863. Jobn A. Kerns, must, in July 30, 1861 disch. on ;

surg. certif. Dec.

1862.

8,

;

Edwin

Kerling, must, in

Feb.

Thomas

ISfil

30,

;

must, in July 30, 1861

Rudy, must,

disch.

on

disch.

on

S.

in .Inly 30,

;

trans, to

1

861

;

trans, to

battal. Sept. 9, 1864; vet.

Jacob Ringler, must,

trans, to

;

;

battal. Sept. 9, 1864; vet.

Sept.

in Feb. 3, 1864;

trans,

to

in Feb. 3, 1864; trans, to battal.

1864.

9,

Thomas Ramer, must, tal.

July

died Dec.

;

11, 1863.

W. A. Rightmeyer,

15, 1864.

in

30, 1861

Daniel H. Ruth, must, in July 30, 1861 surg. certif. Dec. 16, 1861.

;

Henry W. Loy, must,

July

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

Lindley, must, in July 10, 1863 wounded at Culpeper C. H., Va., Sept. 13, 1863; disch. on

June

in

surg. certif. Dec. 19, 1862.

J.

surg. certif.

1864.

H. R. Reifsnyder, must,

H. A. Lindeniuth, must, in July 30, 1861. Albert S. Levan, must, in July .30, 1861.

trans, to bat-

;

Effinger Rhodes, must, in July 30, 1861

1864; trans, to

13,

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

30, 1863

;

Henry

9, 18(i4.

;

muster out.

March

burial record, Dec. 81, 1862, buried at

Dec.

certif.

;

Sept.

9,

surg.

absent,

Point Lookout, Md. Joseph F. Rodgers, must, in July .30, 1861. Jacob Roland, must, in July 30, 1861. Daniel L. Ringler, must, in July 30, 1861. Joseph Ritter, must, in July 30, 1861 disch. on surg.

;

Lewis Karshsarf, must, in July 30, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 17, 1863. Jonas Keller, must, in Feb. 5, 1864 trans, to battal.

service, at

George Patterson, must,

20, 1865; veteran.

Jobn Jackson, must,

Sept.

on

in Dec. 12, 1861; disch.

surg.

19, 1862.

Isaac Porter, must, in

1864;

must, out June

;

disch. on

;

Pfleager, must, in July 30, 1861

on detached captured

;

Dec.

certif.

Samuel M.

20, 1865; veteran.

in

1864; trans, to battal. Sept.

21,

pro. to Corp. Co.

Peter Noll, must, in July 30, 1861 certif. April 24, 1862.

trans, to

;

pro. to corp. Co.

June

George W. James, must,

June

July

in

1864

battal. Sept. 9,

217

Samuel Ness, must,

battal. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

Wm.

WAR.

Sept.

9,

Jacob H. Reber, must,

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

in Feb. 11, 1864; trans, to bat-

1864.

July

in

30, 1861

died Aug.

;

8,

1864.

William B. Leister, must, in Feb. inaction July 28, 1864; trans,

6,

1864; wounded

Levi Reeder, must, in July

to battal. Sept. 9,

18(i4.

30, 1861

;

died Sept. 10,

1862.

Samuel P. Reed, must, in July 30, 1861 wounded in action June 21, 1864; died Aug. 3, 1864; buried ;

William D. Lotz, must,

in

Feb.

18()4

4,

trans, to

;

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

Cyrus Lesher, must, Sept.

9,

at Philadelphia

Feb. 11, 1864; trans, 1864; must, out May 14, 1864. in

to Battal.

Joseph R. Lacy, must, in ,Tuly 30, 18()1 died Dec. 3, 1863; buried at Culpeper C. H., block 1, sec. A, row 1, grave 23, Henry Minker, must, in July 30, 1861. Adam Moyer, must, in July 30, 1861 trans, to battal. ;

;

Sept.

9,

1864

;

veteran.

Andrew McElwee, must,

March

in

Feb.

in

30, 1S()3

;

trans, to

6,

1864;

trans, to

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

Charles H. Millet, must,

in

Feb.

Miller, must, in July 30, ISCl

in

July 30, 1861. July 30, 18(il.

Daniel Reed, must, in Feb. 6, 1864; captured .hine 25, 1864; not on nuister-out roll. J.

W.

Reinoehl, must, in April

out

4,

1864

;

not on muster-

roll.

D. B. Reifsnyder, must, in Feb.

3,

1864

;

not on mus-

Lewis Sherman, must, in .Inly 30, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Aug. 11, 1861. Aaron Stamm, must, in July 30, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Aug. 8, 1861. Nicholas Seyfert, must, in July 30, 1S61 disch. on ;

;

trans, to

surg. certif. Dec. 16, 1861.

Samuel Schmale, must, ;

died Oct. 13,

battal.

1863.

Henry Machainer, must,

in in

;

15, ]S(!4;

battal. Sept. 9, 18(;4.

John

vet.

ter-out roll.

battal. Sept. 9, 1864.

John McLellen, must,

;

Richard Reinhold, must, John Raudenbush, must,

Nov.

in

Sept. 9,1864;

July

30, 1861

;

must, out Aug.

trans, to 9,

1865;

vet.

28, 1861

;

died April

7,1862; buried in Military Asvliiiii Cemetery, D. C. Aug. R. Noaeker, must, in July 31), 1861. John Newkirk, must, in July 30, 1861.

Isaac Seiders, must, in July 30, 1861

1864 vet. James Sanders, must, in Feb. Sept.

9,

Sept.

9,

Jesse

W.

;

trans, to battal.

;

6,

1864; trans, to battal.

1864.

Strasser, must, in Feb. 15, 1864

;

trans, to

HLSTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, J'ENNSV],VANIA.

218

by G. O. Aug.

battal. Sept. 9, 1864; must, out

10,

i8or..

9,

in

Feb.

in

Feb.

0, 18154;

trans, to battal.

4, 18t.

9,

1894;

Thomas Devine, must,

Aug.

in

M. Denny, must,

18, it participated in engagement near Chancellorsviile; and

July following

it

On

the 3d

the extreme right of the line. it

it

a

was attached

was

in

to the

Army

guarding

of

the Nashville

Bridgeport.

from 2d

furlough,

the greater

part of the officers and

men having

re-enlisted

men

the re-enlisted

Samuel Evans,

He

he was takeu prisoner and confined in Libby

also

for

at

July

1,

five

He

weeks.

received

wounds

Peach Tree Creek and Atlanta. 186.'), he was seventeen years

The Keystone

On old.

Samuel

Upon army

in tiie service.

ranks

its

at Chattanooga,

and

march

to

the

it

rejoined

the

in

the

participateil

After nearly

sea.

years of faithful service

it

Bir^DsiiORo' three

Band.

four

was mustered out on

July 16, 1865, near Alexandria, for

Edmund

May

jjro.

March

1868.

2,

Nov. disch. July

to 1st

;

13, 18(54.

must, in Sept.

1st lieut.,

1801

4,

18()2

1,

May

4,

1801

22,

1865

May

May

22,

;

must, in Sept.

4, 1801 Dec. 22, 1862; to 2d prisoner from Jlay 2 to

lieut.,

priv. to

1861

4,

1862.

!),

sergt.

ISO.")

;

13, 1803.

Ward,

li.

May

sergt.

must, in Jan.

1st sergt.,

from Corp. to

pro.

must, in Sept.

lieut.,

Cramsie, 2d

lieut.

Josej>h

2d

Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug.

from

March

sergt.

13, 18(14;

1863; to 1st

21,

vet.

1, ISd.*");

Reese B. Thompson, Isl sergt., must, in Sept. 4, 1801 wounded at Moutieth Swamp, Ga., Dec. !>, 1864 died at Savannah, Ga., Feb. 18, 186.') vet. Daniel 1). leaker, 1st sel^t., must, in Sept. 4, 18(il

;

;

wouuded

Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July

at

1864; died at Vining's Station, Ga.,

— Mustered

years on August 27,

to Corp.

May Samuel

into

servi(!e

1861, as the

order dispensing with regimental

bands.

;

.July

;

20,

31,

2 to

B.

to sergt. Sept. 6, 1864

May

John W. Deeds. Bcnneville Evans.

.Joseph Ijaeey.

Daniel Fix.

Augustus MiTiker. James U. Miuker.

Isaac Hoyer.

must, in Jan.

sergt.,

sergt.,

sergt.,

Charles A. Row, out Sept.

sergt.,

18, 1864,

1,

to sergt.

;

;

May ;

;

1,

1805.

pro.

fnjm

18(i5.

must, in Sept.

4,

1801

;

must.

expiration of term.

must, in Sept.

St. Clair, sergt.,

9,

4, ISlil^; killed

1862.

Corp., must, in Jan. 13,

to corp.

Sept. 6, 1864

May

1803

;

18(i4

l.'l,

vet.

;

must, in Feb. 28, 1804

Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug.

13,

1804

must, in Jan. 13, 18(54

May

priv. to sergt.

from

priscuier

;

vet.

to Corp. Sept. 5, 1804

Samuel Rork,

at

;

to sergt. Sept. 4,

;

Ruebeu R. Burkbert,

John R.

1863

13,

Weidner,

David E. Snyder, George W. Horner. Jolni H. Karcli. William V. Light.

Stiiiiley, leiuler.

Augustus Dewitt.

must, in January 13, 1864; pro.

sergt.,

pro. to Corp.

I)ro.

but discharged on August 16, 1SG2, in pursuance of an

John Bechtel,

V^a.

regimental band of the Forty-sixth Regiment

R. J.

ISfil;

4,

to 2d lieut.

1864; vet.

recruiting

Atlanta campaign under General Sherman in his great

Tree

I'each

must, in Sept.

lieut.,

21, 18(;4;

F. .Jones,

killed at



youngest veteran soldier

pro.

veteran.

claimed him to be the

State

March

lieut.

first

Prison

;

pro. from sergt. to 2d lieut.

Resac^a,

Kenesaw and Peach Tree Creek. He wounded at Cedar Mountain, where

18(11;

at

in Sept.

killed at Chancellorsviile, Va.,

pro.

Dallas,

capt., must,

Levi Hildebrand, 1st

the battles of Winchester, Cedar

Mountain, Chanccillorsville, (Gettysburg,

4,

re-

;

20, 1SG4; to capt. May 22, 18(i,'j; veteran. Obadiah R. Priestly, 1st lieut. must, in Sept. 4, 18(51;

entere,

1861

;

TIfE CIVIL from 2d

pro.

signed Nov.

H. A. Hyneman,

]

K

Co.

lieut.

4,

Aug.

1862; re-

1,

862.

1st

must, in Sept. 16, 1861

lieut.,

WAR.

29

R. Hoffmaster, corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1861; disch. Dec. 10, 1862. Robert Smith, corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1S61 not on muster-out roll. Charles Barlet, corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1861 ; vet. J.

;

pro. to 1st sergt. Feb. 15, 1862

to 1st lieut. Dec.

;

17,1862; disch. for wounds, with

of arm,

loss

rec'd. in action, Sept. 28, 1864.

Alfred J. Stevens, 1st

from sergt.-maj. to

pro.

Robert Bingamen, musician,

must

lieut.,

in Sept. 16, 1861

Mar.

1st lieut.

1865;

21,

Joel Coflman, musician, must, in Sept.

Samuel

vet.

Charles G. Gresh, 2d resigned Dec.

7,

must,

lieut.,

Sept. 16,

in

nuist. in Sept. 16, 1861

vet.

ISCi]

Shaffer, muscian,

disch.

;

May

must,

16, 1S6]

Sept.

in

vet.

;

1862;

16,

20, 1862.

1861.

Daniel H. Snyder, 2d lieut., uuist. in Sept. 16, 1861 pro. from sergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. 17, 1862 dis-

Pi'ivates.

;

;

missed Sept. 27, 1864.

Lucian H. Pluoker, 2d lieut., must, in Sept. pro. from priv. to sergt. Mar. 1, 1863 to ;

to

2d

Apr.

lieut.

Frederick R. Eidel,

from

pro.

().

16, 1861

;

1st sergt.;

to sergt.

;

May

to 1st Sergt.

;

;

vet.

Robert Gerlach, to Corp.

sergt.,

licnjamin Robinson,

must, in Sept. 16, 1861

May

to sergt.

;

1,

sergt.,

1865

;

pro.

vet.

;

must, in Sept. 16, 1861

pro from corp. to sergt. Jan.

1,

1865

William \y. Hart, sergt., must, in Sept. from priv. to sergt. vet.

;

Hyneman,

,T.

to corp.

j)ro.

Howard

;

sergt.,

1861; pro.

March

to sergt.

1865

10,

from corp. to sergt. Mar. 1, 1863 certif Jan. 22, 1865; vet.

H.

16,

;

vet.

disch. on surg.

;

;

;

vet.

corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1861

;

pro.

to corp. Jan. 1, 1865; vet.

1,

1865

;

1,

Joseph White, corp.

;

1865

;

pro. to

;

pro. to

;

corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1861

pro. to

;

vet. 16, 1861

;

16, 18(!1

;

pro.

;

May

1,

pro.

1865; vet.

Augustus Graber, corp., must, in Sept. at Wilderness May 6, 1864 vet.

16, 1861

;

killed

corp., must,

corp. July

Henry Plucker,

1861

vet.

;

;

Benjamin, nuist. in Mar. 10, 1865, one year; sub. Geo. K. Beidleman, must, in Jlar. !), 1866, one year; S. E.

Borrell, must, in Sept.

l(i,

18(il

;

must, out

Sept. 29, 1864, expiration of term. C. Bertolette, must, in Sept.

Samuel Brown, must, in Sept. by G. O. June 2, 1865.

20,

Cyrus Burket, must, in Sept.

Thomas

1861

16,

1864; drafted

;

must,

;

disch.

16, ]S(;i

May

John

murd.

;

in

Cin-

unknown.

B. Burcher, must, in Sept.

16, 18(il; disch.

21, 1862.

Jacob Bothner, must, in Sept 16, 1861 E, 2d U. S. Art., Oct. 5, 1862. B. Bard, must, in

Josiah Bradford, must,

trans, to Co.

;

Sept. 16, 1861

in

Sept.

;

disch. Dec.

1861;

16,

absent

Daniel Bixler, must, in Sept. 16, 1861. in Sept.

16, 1861

;

Dec.

disch.

18, 1862.

Joseph Cooper, must, in Sept. 16, 1861 vet. William Coleman, must, in Mar. 13, 1865; sub. Wm. J. Correll, must, in Mar. 9, 1865, one year; sub. Philip Cunrod, must, in Mar. 9, 1865, one year sub. James Calloway, must, in Mar. 13, 1865, one year;

1,

in Sept. 16, 1861

;

pro. to

substitute.

F. Christley, must, in Sept.

16,

vet. 1, 1863 Franklin Fabian, corp., must, in Sept. disch. on surg. certif., Jan. 13, 1862.

1861

;

pro.

;

16,

1861

;

20, 1864,

year; drafted; disch. by G. O. .Tune

Glenn W.

1865; vet.

corp., must, in Sept.

to corp. Feb.

;

Thomas

;

B.atz,

16,

;

Endy, corp., must, in Sept. to corp. Mar. 10, 1865 vet. H. A. Bingamen, corp., must, in Sept.

Daniel

Albert Bartlett, must, in Sept.

David Baker, must,

vet.

J.acob G.

to corp.

absent, pris-

;

sick, at must. out.

vet.

Eyler, corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1861

corp. Jan.

16, 1861

31, 1862.

.lacob Eidel, corp., must, in Sept. 16, 1861 corp. Jan.

on mus-

John Baker, must, in Sept. 16, 1861 vet. Samuel Becker, must, in Feb. 11, 1864.

cinnati, date

O'Connell, sergt., must, in Sept. 16, 1861 pro. from corp. to sergt. Mar. 1, 1863; died at City Point. Va., .Tune 27, 1864, of wds. rec'd in action

Henry A. Boyer,

not,

;

out Sept. 29, 1864; cxp. of term.

1861; pro.

J.

Henry

in Sept. 16, 18(;i

oner, absent at must, out; vet.

H. G.

must, in Sept. 16, 1861

Potts, sergt., must, in Sept.

on

substitute.

;

Thomas

disch.

;

ter-out roll,

Henry A.

vet.

16,

1861

IC,

unknown.

Franklin Boyer, must, in Sept. 1st sergt., must, in Sept. 16, 1861

from corp. to sergt. March 1,1863; to 1st Mar. 9, 1865, for wounds rec'd. in ;

17, 18fi5.

Samuel Albert, must,

1,

sergt.; disch.

action

June

Augustine, must, in Sept.

surg. certif, date

18G5; vet.

William Weidner, pro.

Adam

vet.

;

must, in Sept. 16, 1861

sergt.,

l.st

priv.

1865

16,

.lames Allen, must, in Mar. 13, 1865, one year; sub. .1. 1). Anderson, must, in Feb. 10, 1864; disch. by G.

2,

Christie, mu.st. in Sept. 20, 1864,

drafted

;

disch. by G. O.

June

one

1865.

one year;

21, 1865.

Washington Campbell, must, in Sept. 20, 1864, one year drafted disch. by G. O. June 2, 1865. Frederick Capper not must, into U. S. service. ;

;

;

;

IIISTdKV OK

230 Martin Cordell, must, suIj., discli. l)y

iMarili

in

G.

June

< ).

discli.

;

Frank W. Kepmer, must, year

one year;

18G4,

;

John Kreider, must,

by Special Order, June 2, 1865. ISOl, nne ye.ar; not on in Oct.

in

;

Charles Lyons, mu.st. in

John Long, must,

;

1,

ISGl

IG,

Scjit.

18(i4;

killed at

;

Adam

disch. Feb. 20

;

must, in Sept.

died Sept. 26,

18(il;

1(!,

1863, of wnds. rec. at Ohantilly, Va.

must.-out Sept. 16, 1861

disch. Sept.

;

disch.

;

by

in Sept.

William Green, must,

20,

O. June

(t.

one year.

1864; absent,

13,

sick, at must. out. I'ctcr

H. GeitoM, must,

Marcli

in

10, |8(;r),

Conrad Huber, must, in Feb. 20, 18(i4. Cyrus HoHa, must, in March 29, 1864;

one year;

iMit, |iris-

ali

;

iMarch 20, 1865, one

Jr.,

March

must

Id,

1865, one

sul).

George Hagan, must,

March

in

nne vear

ISii

10,



sub.; absent at must. out.

29, 1864, e.\p.

16, I'^Gl

e.\p.

disch. by G. O.

16, 186]

6,

;

in Se|)t. Ki, l.S()]

March

in

7,

1864;

not on must.

16, 186:!; drafted.

20, 1864, one year; by G. O. June 2, 1865. Thos. D. McFarland, must, in Sept. 20, 1864, one year; drafted disch. by G. 0. June 2, 1865. Andrew McMurray, must, in Sept. 20, 18()4, one year; drafted; discli. by G. O. June 2, 1865. Samuel A. McKinucy, must, in Sept. Hi, 1861 not on

J.

McKissick, must, in Sept. ;

disch.

;

;

Henry Newman, must, in March 10, bsii,') sul>. Neatman, must, in March 14, 18(i5, one year; sub. John O'Bryan, must, in March 15, 1865, one year sub.; di.sch. by G. O. June 29, 1865. John Paul, must, in Sept. 16, ]8(il must, out Sept. ;

;

;

Daniel Plucker, must,

Sept.

;

disih. by G.

disch. on surg.

;

John

in Sept. 10, 1861 1,

;

wounded

1862; noton must.-out

in

George Jackson, must,

in Sejit.

discb. by G. O.

June

miirt. in Sept. 16,

nuisl. in

March

20, 1861, 2,

1865.

1861

14, 1865,

one year;

;

vet.

one vear; sub.

ilisch.

not

;

on

Phillips, must, in Sejit. 16, 1861

discli.

;

March

18, 1863.

Horace Reber, must, George Reber, must,

in

Feb. 11, 1864.

in Feb. 11, 1864.

Henry Redmond, must,

in Feb.

1864.

2,

in Sept. 16, 1861

vet,

;

John Rice, must, in March 16, 1865, one year; sub. Solomon Rhoads, must, in Sept. 16, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 22, 1865

roll.

1861

16,

;

roll.

George Rowe, must,

at Chantilly. Va., Sept.

John Kerr,

not on

disch. Sept.

in March 9, IS65, one year; June 29, 18G5.

John Hyneman, Sr.,must.

George Keiblr,

sick at

left

;

1863;

21,

20, 1864; drafted

certif Jan. 15, 1863.

;

16, 18(;i

March

John Patton, must, in Sept. by S. O. June 2, 1865.

1865; veteran.

Peter Hartz, must,

drafted

Va.,

roll.

must.-out

Lucien Heller, must, in Sept. 16, 1X61 O. June

disch. on

;

disch. Sept.

of term.

Franklin Hanford, must, ;

;

of term.

Philip A. Huber, must, in Sept.

sub.

16, 186]

14, 1863.

28, 1864, exp. of term.

Peter Herman, must, in Sept.

29, 1864,

one year

10, 1865,

C.

suli.

Jasper HiiaiUry, year

March

nnist.-out roll.

James W. Hasting, must. ;

1861; killed at

roll.

drafted

oner, at must. out.

year

in

16,

1864; vet.

11,

Peter McLatferty, must, in July

Wm.

1865.

2,

.March

in

March

Jeremiah Moll, must, out

1S(;4,

Sept.

May

Machulder, must, in Sept.

Newport News,

1864; exp. of term.

drafted

in

Daniel Madana, must, in Sept.

bur. in Mil-

;

C.

John Grossman, must,

not on must.-out

;

sub.

surg. certif.

in

;

in Sept. 16, 186]

Jeremiah Miller, must,

1863.

2i),

one year;

in ;\[arcb 13, 1865,

Spottsylvania C. H.

Peter Farren, must, in Sept. 16, 1S61

Mathias Gahris, must,

vet.

1861.

Patrick Morris, must,

vet.

;

1).

;

roll.

;

Asyl. Cem.,

in Sept. 16, 1861

March 10, 1865, one year sub. John Lamont, must, in March 13, 1865, one year; sub. Henry Lichtly, must, in Sept. 16, 1861; disch. Nov.

of tiMui.

John Flickinger, must, in Sept. 16, 1861 ilied at Andersonville, Ga., Aug. 12, 1864; grave 5586 vet.

licvi Fritz,

must, out

;

vet.

must. out. James Fislicr, must, in Mar. 10, 1SG5; sub. Daniel Feterow, must, in Mar. 9, 1865, one year; sub. John Folk, must, in Sept. Ki, 1861 must, out Sept. in

1861

16,

Sc[>t.

sub.

at

(i,

one

1865,

19,

Henry Lebengood, must,

;

May

.March

in

Harrison Leininger, must, in Sept. 16, 1861

Benjamin Landis, must,

;

Wilderness

;

Sept. 29, 1864, exp. of terra.

'.i,

Samuel Firing, must,

one year

19, 18i;5,

sub.

Jacob Fair, must, in .Vpril G, 1SG4. Eurch, Plieg, must, in Sept. 16, ISGl vet. vet. Jeremiah Focht, must, in Sept. 16, 18G1 Orlando Fry, must, in Mar. ;'.0, 1SG4; absent, prisoner

29, 1864, e.\p.

March

Ke])ncr, must, in

sub.

vet.

;

drafted

John A.

one year;

lSi;">,

i;i,

COUNTY, 1M';NNSYF>VAN[A.

27, 1865.

Henry Deace, must, in Feb. 8, 1SG4 Henry P. Douple, must, in Sept. 20, Daniel Eyler, must, muster-nut roll.

I'.KIiKS

Emanuel

;

vet.

one year;

S. Riddle, must, in Sept. 20, 1864,

drafted; disch. by G. O.

John Robinson, must, Spottsylvania C. H.

in

June

Sept.

May

2,

16,

1865. 18iil

11, 18(i4.

;

killed at

THE OTVIL WAR. John Reiger, must, in Sept.

left sick at 16, 1861 ricasant Valley, Md., Oct. 15, 1862 not on must.out roll.

March

.Joseph Reinhart, must, in

Company

;

;

28, 1864

not on

;

niust.-out roll.

231

—This company was

E.

William H. Diehl,

Isaac Steinrack, must, in Sept. 16, 1861 must, out vet.

absent at

;

signed Feb.

Daniel Showers, must, in Feb. 29, 1864 woiindetl, at must. out.

absent,

;

Feb.

;

sub.

Juue

in Sept. 13,

1861

;

re-

1863.

capt., must, in Sept. 30,

from sergt.-maj. to capt.

Samuel Snavely, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. George Seid, must, in March 8, 1865, one year sub. Daniel Shannon, must, in March 11, 1865, one year;

capt., must,

3,

Henry A. Lantz,

;

recruited

Reading, and was mustered out July 30, 1865, e.Kcept where otherwise mentioned.

at

1st lieut. Jan.

killed

4, 18(;3;

1861; pro.

1862;

18,

to

Petersburg, Va.,

at

18, 1S64.

Richard Herbert, capt., nuisl. in Sept. 13, 1861 pro. from Istsergt. to 2d lieut. Dec. 17, 1862; to Ist ;

Gibson Steeter, must, in March 9, 1865, one year; sub. Joseph Stoke.s, must, in March 10, 1865, one year sub.;

lieut.

Nov.

Sept.

2,

May

to capt.

8, 1,>1. John B. Mover, corp., must, in .\ug. 8, 1801; must.

It

at

Dec

disch.

I

Appomattox, and

surrender at

]>articipated in the

;

of Captain in

present at the

;

1861. ;

Nicholas Burfchart,

disch.

farrier,

must, in .\ug.

Isaac Steffy, saddler, must, in .4ug.

on surg. certif. .ipril 2, 1863. Henry Winsor, Jr., capt., must, in Oct. 14, 1861 pro. Irom fcmmissary Aug. 10, 1863 disch. July 28,

Reiser, bugler, must, in Aug.

John G.

8,

1801.

1861.

8.

S,

1861.

;

.

;

Joseph Winters, bugler, must,

in

Aug.

8,

1861.

I

1864.

Edward

May

"Whiteford, capt., must, in

from commissary Feb.

pro.

10,

1865

28, 1863

disch.

;

Priva/e.t.

June

Samuel Armpriestcr, must, in .Vug. 8, ISTl. Anthony Aberle, must, in Ojt. 9, 1801 mu^t. out

20, 1865.

Augustus F.

;

Bert'^lette,

licut.,niust. in

l.st

Aug. 8,1861;

Dec.

from 2d

pro.

E

must, in Sept.

D

Co.

lieut.

1862; to capt. Co.

Eugene

lieut..

1.3,

1861

April

to 1st lieut.

1.5,

pro. from 2d lieut. Co.

K

out Oct. 31. 1864,

of term.

e.xp.

March

trans, to Co.

9,

Asylum Cemetery, D.

C.

;

Aug. 1,

29,

1S63

1831

buried in Military

;

John K. Becker, must, in Aug. 8. 1861 trans, to Co. M, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1835; veteran. Benjamin F. Boyer, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Hiram Barder, must, in Aug. 8, 1861; trans, to Co M, 2d Pro. Cav., June 27, 1805; veteran.

1863; must.

;

Charles A. Vernon, 1st lieut., must, in Feb. 19, 1865; to capt. Co. D TO. to 1st lieut. Feb. 19, I860 I ;

March

:

G, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. John Builer, must, in Aug. 8, 1801 died Dec. ;

.\pril 16, 1863.

P. Bertrand, 1st lieut., must, in

1804, exp. of term.

Lewis Bower, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Tellamac Burket, mut. in Aug. 8, 1861

disch. April 5, 1862.

Emlen N. Carpenter, 1st

7,

22, 1865. I

T. Campbell Oakinan, 1st lieut., must, in

1865

;

pro. Irom 2d to 1st lieut.

to capt. Co.

A March

March

March

4,

22, 1865

j

27, 1865.

:

William B. Call, 2d lieut., must, in Aug. 8, 1861 disch. Nov. 29, 1861. Osgood Welch, 2d lieut., must, in July 29, 1862; ;

disch. Sept. 19, 1863.

John

Liiird,

2d

lieut.,

must, in

D

9,

1st lieut. Co.

June

May

7,

1805; pro. to

1865.

John D. Koch, 1st sergt., must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Henry Umpleby, q.ra. -sergt., must, in Aug. 8, 1861.

Thomas

Aug. 8. 1861. must, in Aug. 8, 1801

to Co.

M, 2d

Pro. Cav.,

June

17,

1865

Christian Huber, sergt., must, in Aug.

William G. Gummcre, pro. tocorp. Jan.

disch. by G. O.

1,

sergt.,

must,

in

1805; to sergt.

June

20, 1865.

8,

;

;

trans.

veteran.

Oct.

Aaron S. Boyer, must, Joseph Bennett, must,

May

Aug.

2,

1802;

31, 1805;

S, 18.il

8.

;

veter

in.

1801.

in .\ug. 8, 1801. in

Jan.

5,

1834

;

disch.

by G. O.

25, 1865.

j

Jacob BuUinger, must,

in

,T.in.

1,1814; trans ti Co.

M. 2d Pro. Cav., June 17. 1805; veteran. James Barton, must, in Oct. 31, 1804, one year. Henry Blair, must, in .March 3. 1805. one year. John A. Dougherty, must, in .Aug. 8, 1801. Charles H. Dankle. must, in Aug.

8,

1801.

Aug.

8,

1861.

in

Franklin Dengler, must, in .\ug. 8, 1801. J. R. Dunklebcrger, must, in Aug. 8, 1831 Co.

1801.

May

in

Bechtel, must, in Aug.

H. R. Davidsheiser, must,

Best, sergt., must, in

.John R. Smith, sergt.,

Cyrus Boone, must,

Emanuel

;

51,

;

trans, to

2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865; veteran.

William H. Dean, must,

in

Aug.

8, 1861.

John M. Knglehart, mu.st. in .\u;i;. 8. IS il tr.ms. Co. M, 2J Pro. Cav., Juno 17, 1835; veteran. ;

to

THE CIVIL WAR. Frederick Epler, muj^t. in Aug.

Joseph S Esttrly,

niuat. in

May

9,

;

disch.

by G. O.

W.

Valentine

1861.

8,

Fisher, must, in Au?.

1861.

8,

Fireing, must, in Aug. 8, 1861.

Aug. 8, 1861. Augustus Fall, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. M, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 186-'); veteran. James A. Fasig, must, in March 24, 18o.5, one year. IJenneville Goheen, must, in Aug. 8, 1861; trans, to Co. D, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865; veteran. John A. Gross, must, in Aug. 8, 18(31. .John P. Felden, must, in

;

John A. Griner, must, Kobert

Griffin,

in

March

30, 1864.

must, in Oct. 31, 1864, one year.

-Varon P. Gring, must, in

March

3,

one year;

1865,

June 17, 1865. Hezekiah K. Gaul, must, in March 4, 1865, one year trans, to Co. F, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865. Francis Harman, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Samuel Hover, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. M, 2J Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. James R. Handwork, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. trans, to Co. F, 2d Pro. Cav.,

;

;

;

Daniel Hoffman, must, in Aug.

1861

8,

trans, to Co.

;

H, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. Harrison Howe, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 veteran. William Heckler, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. ^, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. William Harbeson, must, in Jan. 1, 1864; trans, to Co. L, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. John H. Hamilton, must, in March 4, 1865, one year; tran.s. to Co. B, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865. John Hoban, must, in March 9, 1865, one year trans, to Co. A, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865. .John H. Johnson, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. G, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. John W. Kemp, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Jacob H. Kissinger, must, in March 3, 1865, one year; trans, to Co. F, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865. Conrad Kilman, must, in Sept. 14, 1864, one year. Peter B. Lessig, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. M, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. Evan Moyer, must in Aug. 8, 1861. .Joseph H. Marks, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 died Jan. ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

9,

1863

;

buried in National Cemetery, Antietam,

Md., section

26, lot

John Morrow, must, in March 9, 1865, one year trans, to Co. D, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1863. Samuel G. McNabb, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Daniel O'Brien, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. .John Pewterbaugh, must, in March 31. 1861; died March 16, 1865; buried iu National Cemetery, ;

18G1.

8,

1864

31, 1865.

Daniel H. Fasig, must, in Aug.

Henry

1861.

8,

Aug.

Peter Eckhart, must, in Nov.

243

Winchester, Va:, lot 25. Martin V. Pabor, must, in Sept. 23, 1854, one year. Isaac K. Richards, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Samuel Rhoads, must, in Aug. 8, 1S61. William Reedy, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 veteran. William Reeser, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. John D. Roth, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Samuel Roth, must, in .Jan. 1, 1864; veteran. John B. Regan, mu.st. in .March 30, 1864. Lewis Richter, must, in Nov. 22, 1864; died, date unknown buried in National Cemetery, Win;

;

chester, Va., lot 18.

Isaac

Steiff,

must, in Aug.

1861

Peter R. Schlegel, must, in Aug.

trans, to Co.

;

M,

1861.

8,

William Sands, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 veteran. Daniel Strunk, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Henry Simmers, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Peter Stout, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. G, ;

;

2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865; veteran. John R. Stout, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. G, ;

2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. William Sciders, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 veteran. ;

;

Henry R.

Sallada, must, in Aug.

8,

1861

;

trans, to

Co.

G, 2d Pro. Cav., .June 17, 1865; veteran.

John M. Setley, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, H, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. ;

to Co.

;

Cornelius Strain, must, in Aug.

8,

1861.

Alexander L. Smith, must, in Aug. 8, 1831 veteran. John Schmale, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Mahlon Sands, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. William H. Schaffer, must, in Aug. 8, 1831 died at ;

;

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept.

16, l*Jl.

Frederick Smith, ma-t. in Dec. 12, 1861; must, out

Dec.

Edmund

of term.

12, 1864, exp.

B. Stout, must, in Jan.

1,

1864; trans, to Co.

G, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865; veteran.

George H. Stout, must, in March 21, 1861 Lynchburg, Va., July 21, 1864.

E, grave 484.

John Mell, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. H, 2d Pro. Ca"., June 17, 1865 veteran. Charles F. Miller, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. William K. Masser, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Henry F. Miller, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Charles H. Miller, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. M, 2d Pro. Cav., .tune 17, 1865; veteran. Joseph Morgan, must, in Aug. 8, 1861.

8,

2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865; veteran. Andrew Simpson, must, in Aug. 8, 1861.

William Stout, must,

in

March

;

died at

21, 1864.

;

Charles H. Thompson, must, in Feb. 25, 1865, one

;

;

G3^rge.^I)hr, must, in Feb.

4,

1835, one year.

polis,

Md., Nov.

9,

1864.

I,

2d Pro. Cav., June

March 9, 1865 Cav., June 17, 1865.

Co. A, 2d Pro.

;

Henry

G, 2d Pro. Cav., June 17, 1865 veteran. Henry S. Wright, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. ;

Anna-

17, 186).

trans, to

Ulrich, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. Benjamin Weaver, must. Aug. 8, 1861. George Whitmoyer, must, in Aug. 8, 1861. John H. Weaver, must, in Aug. 8, 1861 trans, to Co. ;

.John A. Mover, must, in Jan. 29, 1864.

Williiim Mell, muit. in Feb. 25, 1864; died at

year; trans, to Co.

Patrick Thomas, must, in

Samuel D. Warner, must,

in

Aug.

8,

1861.

— HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTV, PENNSYLVANIA.

244

SEVENTY FOURTH EEGIMEN'T.

Joel Ebaugh, must, in Feb. 16, 1865.

The Seventy-fourth Regiment included some John T. Feeser, must, in March 2, 1865. Samuel Fitz, must, in Feb. 15, 1865. men recruited in Berks County in Company G. Tiie regiment was mustered into service on Sep-

tember 14, 1861.

After breaking up winter-

quarters at Hunter's Chapel',

the Peninsula campaign.

was

at

Cross Keys, on June

next near Groveton, on quently lorsville ices in

West

it

it

particij)ated in

engagement 18G2 and the

Its first 8,

;

June 29-30.

Subse-

participated in the battles of Chancel-

and Gettysburg, and performed serv-

South Carolina, at Washington, and in

Virginia.

The

company

entire

not being able to designate the

given

is

Oliver

William J. Bart, capt., must, in Feb. 6, 1865. Jacob Lolir, 1st lieut., must, in Feb. 16, 1865. Charles Helfrich,

2cl

lieut.,

must, in Feb.

captured; disch. by G. O.

James A. Werkert,

May

sergt.,

W. Hankey,

sergt.,

18,

1865;

15, 1865.

1st sergt., must, in

Franklin Beamer,

Feb.

15, 1865.

must, in Feb. 15, 1865.

must, in Feb. 24, 1865. Theodore B. Horner, sergt., must, in Feb. 16, 1865. Isaac

Edmund

Lippy,

must, in

sergt.,

March

Stewart Walker, corp., must, in Feb.

I-a.ac

Uriah

Myers, corp., must, in Feb. J.

Baughman,

9,

1865.

15, 1865.

15, 1865.

corp., must, in

Feb. 27, 1865.

Henry K. Wentz, corp., must, in March 8, 1865. John W. Flaherty, corp., must, in Feb. 24, 1865.

Amos

Leister, corp., must, in

Feb.

25,

1865

Feb.

17,

1865; pro. to

;

pro. to

Corp. July 15, 1865.

John Wagner,

corp., must, in

W.

Garrett, must, in

Jacob C. Geehr, must,

Edmund Garrett,

28, 1865.

March

1865.

8,

in Feb. 21, 1865.

Chas.M. Gallagher, must,

in

Feb. 16,1865.

must, in March 10, 1865.

Titus E. Geehr, must, in Feb. 21, 1865.

Peter Gouker, must, in

March

4,

1865.

Franklin Hartsock, must, in March 10, 1865. Hofford, must, in March 3, 1865. .lames Helbert, must, in March 21, 1865. John Hart, must, in March 16, 1865.

Company G. — This com])any was recruited Adams and Berks Counties for one year, Adam

and was mustered out August 29, 1865, except where otherwise mentioned.

J.

;

General Order May 31, 1865. Charles W. Gilbert, must, in Feb.

men from Berks John W.

County. in

James Felix, must, in Feb. 24, 1865. Anthony Fowler, must, in Feb. 15, 1865. Wm. N. Flaherty, must, in March 10, 1865. William Forney, must, in March 2, 1865 disch. by

Corp. July 24, 1SG5.

Samuel A. Kindig, corp., must, in March 9, 1865. James S. Snyder, musician, must, in Feb. 21, 1865. Daniel E. Weiss, musician, must, in March 9, 1865.

Harget, must, in Feb.

15, 1865.

March 13, 1865. March 27, 1865.

Elijah Hofl'man, must, in

John

Irvin, must, in

George Krug, must, in Feb. 6, 1865. William Krug, must, in Feb. 15. 1865. Levi King, nuist. in Feb. 16, 1865. Cornelius King, must, in March 10, 1865. Valentine J. Long, must, in Feb. 24, 1865. Daniel Lorash, must, in Feb.

21, 1865.

Cornelius Mathias, must, in Feb.

16, 1865.

Jacob Miller, must, in Feb. 15, 1865. William Mathias, must, in Feb. 16, 1865. Edward Markle, must, in March 8, 1865. Robert Newman, must, in Feb. 21, 1865. Lloyd Norris, must, in March 8, 1865; disch. by General Order June 3, 1865. Francis Null, must, in Feb. 16, 1865; disch. by General Order Aug. 1, 1865. Lewis Overdeer, must, in Feb. 16, 1865. William Ohlinger, must, in Feb. 16, 1865; disch. by General Order May 30, 1865. Chas. K. Overdorf, must, in Feb. 27, 1865.

Andrew Rickrode,

must, in Feb. 16, 1865.

William B. Robert, must, in March 6, 1865. Samuel Rimert, must, in March 7, 1865.

John

B. Shafer, must, in Feb. 25, 1865. Michael Sanders, must, in Feb. 16, 1865.

Priva/cs.

Isadore Brechncr, must, in Feb. 21, 1865.

Ephraim Spangler, must,

Jacob Baughman, mustered in Feb. 28, 1865. Ezra N. Baughman, must, in March 4, 1865. John Berk, must, in February 22, 1865.

Isaac Z. Shriver, must, in Feb. 15, 1865.

John Betz, must, in Feb. 21, 1865. Samuel Breniser, must, in Feb. 27, 1865. Ephraim Bowers, must, in Feb. 22, 1865. Emanuel Bunty, must, in Feb. 17, 1865. Josiah Becker, must, in Feb. 21, 1865. Adam R. Bolinger, must, in March 13, 1865. David Conovcr, must, in Feb. 25, 1865.

John Gulp, must, in March 1, 1865. John W. Cranmer, must, in March 8,

1865.

in

March

8,

1865.

Abra'm Sponseller, must, in March 6, 1865. John Sponseller, must, in Feb. 20, 1865. Jesse ITtz, must, in March 8, 1865. George Willet, must, in March 9, 1865. David Willet, must, in March 8, 1865. Cornelius S. Wink, must, in Feb. 21, 1865. Edward C. VVintrod, must, in March 7, 1865. Nathan Wink, must, in March 10, 1865. William Wisner, must, in March 6, 1865. Jacob Yingling, must, in March 9, 1865. John Zumbrum, must, in March 8, 1865.

THE CIVIL WAR. Lafay'e Zetelmoyer, must, in Feb. 21, 1865. David Zumbrum, must, in March 8, 1865; died at

W.

Clarksburg,

Va., Aug.

6,

245

George W. Smith,

1st sergt., must, in Dec. 7, 1861 died at Munfordsville, Ky., March, 1862.

W.

Francis

Reed, 1st sergt., must, in Dec. 5, 1861 from sergt. Aug. 31, 1862 com. 2d lieut. June 28, 1863; not must.; killed at Shelby ville,

1865.

;

pro.

EIGHTIETH REGIMENT.

The Eightieth Regiment, or Seventli Cavahy, men who were recruited in Berivs County, and mustered into service witli Company inchided some

Jj.

It participated in various

tlie

Army

engagements

witli

had

it

In March, 1865,

been

marched under Gen. Wilson across the Gulf" States, and .service.

it

beginning of April participated in the

battles of Plantersville latter place the

and

Selnia, Ala.

regiment led

At

the

8,

from priv. April 30, 1865. Thomas H. Parker, com. -sergt., must, in Oct.

15,

1864

;

pro.

men was

la.st engagement was Columbus, on April 16, 1865. It was then stationed at Macon, Ga., from April 20, to August l.'ith, when it was mustered out of ser-

highly meritorious.

Benjamin E. Rakea,

1861;

Its

near

must, in Oct. 15, 1861

sergt.,

vet.

John

Duffy, sergt., must, in Sept. 26, 1861

March

Corp.

John H.

May

John M. Berger,

must,

sergt.,

May

from corp.

from

Dec.

1861; pro.

12,

1865; vet.

1,

1,

1865.

sergt.,

must,

from Corp. March Corps 1865 vet.

Dec.

in

from Corp. May 1, 1865; vet. Chas. M. Ketner, sergt., must. In

James Rawley,

pro.

;

1864; vet.

1,

Miller, sergt., must, in

from Corp.

upon

in the assault

work, and the conduct of the

the

Tenn., June 27, 1863. Isaac E. Robinson, q.m. -sergt., must, in Feb.

vet.

of Tennes.see, where

ordered to

in the

;

1861

7,

March

;

1864; pro.

5,

Sept. 26, 1861

in

pro.

;

pro.

1864; trans, to Vet. Res.

1,

;

vice.

Not being

able to designate

tiie

men who

were from Berks County, I publish the entire

company.



Company

L. This company was recruited Berks and Northumberland Counties, and was ihustered out August 23, 1865, except where otherwise mentioned in

:

Chas. C. JlcCormick, capt,, must, in Oct.

from priv. Co. D. to capt. Nov. Jan.

9,

1861

pro.

;

Chas. J. Loeser,

from

John

Riley, sergt., must, in

William Rader,

1st

Dec,

lieut.

15,

1862

;

capt. Co.

to

G

11, 1865.

Otis G. Gerald, 1st

lieut.,

must, in Dec.

7,

from 1st sergt. Feb. 13, 1865; vet. Albert Bechtel, 2d lieut., must, in Dec.

wounded

accidentally

1861

;

pro.

1861;

18,

July, 1862; resigned Aug.

H.

corp., must,

William D. Webster,

De Witt

dismissed June

1,

John Stanley,

May

corp.

Richard H. Fisk, 2d lieut., must, in March 11, 1864 com. capt. Co. F Oct. 15, 1864 nut must.; disch. July 25, 1865. Henry H. Snyder, 2d lieut., must, in Djc. 2, 1861 pro. from q.m. -sergt. May 1, 1865 vet. ;

1861

],

in Sept.

27, 1861

pro.

;

1,

March

1861;

8,

1865.

May

1

,

1865.

Corp., must, in

Feb.

1864; pro. to

8,

1865.

1,

June

corp.

Franklin

S.

30, 1864.

Ebling, corp., must, in Dec.

Washington Frizell, must, in Feb. 4. Adolph Frohn, Corp., must, in Aug. from Oct.

May

1,

7,

1861

trans.

;

Corps 1863.

to Vet. Ret.

1864. 20,

1862;

pris.

1864, to April 21, 1865;

disch!

May

May

Corp.,

18, 1865.

must, in Dec.

7,

1861

;

by G.

disch.

18, 1865.

Seth Morgan, corp., must, in Nov. 14, 1862; pro. to corp. March 1, 1864; disch. by G. O. June 23,

;

;

1865.

James

Seibert, corp.; died

1862

;

burial record,

at Murfreesboro', Tcnii.,

June

15,

1863

;

grave 341.

;

S.imuel

Milm

)re,

1st sergt.,

must, in Oot. 14, 1861

pro. from sergt. April 30, 1865

H. H. Brown, from Aug.

1st sergt.. must, in

sergt.

May

18, 1862.

1,

;

Jacob Neargard,

Dec.

corp., must, in Dec.

to corp. April 30, 1862 7,

1861

1862; disch. on surg.

Aug. ;

1861

18,

;

pro.

;

vet.

pro.

certif.

;

Kyle, corp., must, in Jan. 22, 1863; pro. to

St. Clair

O.

1863.

killed at

;

Nov.

in

pro. 1865,

0. Robinson, corp., must, in Feb. 29, 1864;

John Lutz,

B. Warfield, 2d lieut., must, in Dec. 26, 1862

1861

7,

corp., must, in

May

pro. to corp.

31, to date

18, 1862.

Jas.

Dec.

;

3,

to corp. April 30, 1864; vet.

;

March

1861

18,

vet.

pro. to corp.

William Wren, capt., must, in March 11, 1864; pro. from 1st lieut. Feb. 13, 1865. John Umpleby, 1st lieut., must, in Dec. 7, 1861 resigned Nov. 1862. Robert McCormick, 1st lieut., must, in Dec. 15, 1862

must, in Dec.

1,

Lebanon, Tenn., May 5, 1862. William D. Williams, corp., must,

18, 1861; to col.

10, 1865.

pro. to

sergt.,

May

1863; must, out Jan. expiration of term. priv.

;

died at Nashville, Tenn.,

30, 1863.

Wiufield S. Carpenter, corp., must, in Dec.

John Slunv,

Corp., must, in Dec. 7, 1861.

7,

1861.

;

HISTORY OF BEEKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

uc,

Lloyd B. Husted,

Thomas Drew,

corp., must, in Dec. 7, 18()1.

Sebastian Dellscit, bugler, must, in Dec.

vet.

;

18, 1801.

on

surg. certir'. Aug., 1862. Miles G. Lee, blacksmith, must, in Nov. 20, 1861 absent, siclc, at muster out; vet. Simon Greer, blacksmith, must, in Feb. 29, 1804. ;

;

May 19, 1865. George W. Dunlap, must, date

in Feb. 22, 1804; died at Stone River, Tenn., Oct. 29, 1804 buried in Nat. Ceni., sec. L, grave 370. Charles H. Ebbcri, must, in Feb. 4, 1804. ;

Christian Erb, must, in Feb. Pi-ivates.

Henry Eberly, must,

Burklinrt, must, in Oct. 19, 1861

;

;

sick, at

Dallas, Ga.,

Wm.

June

A iron

1861

5,

Co.

K

;

disch.

by G.

Feb. 27, 1804; pro. to 2d

in

in Dec.

7,

1861

disch. on surg.

;

7,

1861

died at Bards-

;

town, Ky., Feb., 1802. Jesse Bryant, must, in Feb. 29, 1804; died at Louisville, Ky., Feb. 24, 180.'); burial rec, Feb. 24, 1864 sec. C, range 3, grave 10l». Charles Cooney, must, in Nov. 22, 1831 Adam Coble, must, in Feb. 6, 1864. ;

Feb.

0,

;

1804. sick,

Cohoon, must, in March 19,1804. Daniel Cook, must, in Dec. 7, 1801 disch. on surg. J.

;

Wm. A.

April, 1802.

Campbell, must.in Dec.

Dec.

0,

surg. certif.

May

Cluff, must, in

boro',

1861; must, out

1804, expiration of term.

Paxton L. Clark, must,

John

7,

July

1804.

1864. disch.

in Feb. 29, 1864;

disch. on

Dec.

7,

1801

;

died at Murfrees-

wounds received

Tenn., June 27, 1803. Horace Dart, must, in Feb. 29,

1864.

at

Shelby ville,

on surg.

certif July, 18{i2.

June

in Sept. 6,

1862; disjh by G. O.

23, 1805.

Abraham Hennes,

in

Feb.

4,

1804.

must, in Sept. 28, 1801

vet.

;

George F. Haines, must, in Dec. 5, 1801 vet. Stephen Hilliard, mus:. in Feb. 24, 1864. Sidney A. Hoagland, must, in Feb. 28, 1834. John Haas, must, in Feb. 10, 1864. ;

Feb. 15, 1864.

in

William Hardnut, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. B.D. Uellenthall, must, in Feb. 27, 1804. Thomas N. Herman, must, in April 2, 1804. Robert Huntzinger, must, in Dec. 18, 1861 disch. on ;

surg. certif. 1803.

certif

March

5,

1801

;

disch. on surg.

24, 1863.

John Hutchings, must, in Dec. 7, 1801 must, out Dec. 6, 1864, expiration of term. Jacob Hartmau, must, iu Dec. 7, 1801 nm^t. out Dec. ;

;

6,

12, 1805.

27, of

6, to

Feb. 17, 1864.

in

Francis Hobson, must, in Dec.

Cator, must, in Fell. 29, 18(i4

certif.

4,

Randolph Goodman, ujust. iu Feb. 17, James Gardner, must, in De.^-. 7, 1861

Henry Hartland, must,

vet.

Joseph Coryell, must in Feb. 29, 1864; absent, at muster out. Francis M. Co]ip, must, in Feb. 29, 1804.

John John

27,

Isaac Gill, must, in Feb. 22, 1804.

William F. Hoy, must,

July, 1862.

mu.st. in

Gantz, must, in Feb.

David Gardner, must,

17, 1864.

Dec.

Josiah Briner, must, in Dec.

John Coble,

1804; died near

;

James Bowman, mus*. certif.

29,

wounds received May

John H. Gehret, mu-st. in Feb. 20, 1804. Samuel Gehret, must, in Feb. 10, 1864.

23,186,5.

O. Bateman, must,

lieut.

Dec.

died at

;

William Glennou, must, in

Feb.

in

28, of

;

;

July, 1862.

Harrison Bechtel, must, 0.

May

1861

7,

18, 1862.

,

Jacob L. Ely, must, in Feb. 8, 1834 disch. Sept. date Au-. 23, 1865. Jacob Fastler, must, in Nov. 27, 1861 vet. Jacob Frick, must, in Feb. 24, 1854. William Formaii, must, in Feb. 21, 1864.

disch. on surg.

;

Tenn April

1804.

Francis Brown, must, in P'eb. 27, 1804. Abraham Bau«-r, must, in Dec. .5, 1801. in Dec. 7, 1861

Murfreesboro',

Henry Emberger, must,

John Betz, must, in March .S, 1864. David Buchter, must, in Feb. 5, 1804. Charles Bowsman, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. John Brown, must, in Feb. 29, 1804.

certif.

1864.

in Feb. 20, 1804.

Charles Eben, must, in Oct. 7, 1804. Reuben Euglehart, must, in Dec.

vet.

Joseph Bowtrs, must.in Oct. 1, 1861 absent, muster out; vet. Pierce Bowsman, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. Adam Bowers, must, in Feb. 19, 1864. Charier Bellman, must.in Feb. 5, 1864. Daniel Barnliart. mnst. in Feb. 5, 1864.

David Bloch, must,

4,

Christian Eberly, must, in Feb. 14, 1864.

Wellington Adams, must, in Feb. 5, 1864. Henry Abson, must, in Dec. 8, 1863.

Solomon

must, out

;

Donaldson, must, in Feb. 23, 1864; pris. from disch. Jan. 10, to 1, 1804, to April 21, 1865

Oct.

di.sch.

;

1861; trans, to Vet.

7,

Eliphalet Decker, must, in Dec. 7, 1801 Dec- 6, 1864, expiration of term. Isaiali

Jacob Uplingcr, saddler, must, in Dec. 18, ]8(>1. Jeremiah Keller, saddler, must, in Nov. 28, 1803. Elias Seller, farrier, must.in Dec. 28, ISOl

must, in Dec.

Res. Corps, 1863.

Charles Gillams, bugler, must, in Feb. 8, 18(i4. Edwin S. St. Clair, bugler, must, in April 28, 1864

1864, expiration of term.

George W. Hulchens, nuist. in Sept. 14, 1802; disch. by G. O. June 23, 1865. Martin L. Havens, must, in Sept. 14, 1802 disch. by ;

G. O. June 23, 1805. Wm. S. Hoagland, must, in Aug. 29, 1864, one year disch. by

G.O. June

23, 1866.

THE

CmL

WAR.

247

in Dec. 18, 1831 captured at Stone River, Tenn., Jan. 1, 1883; died at Annapolis, Md., February 10, 186.S. Jacob Hammer, must, in Dec. 7, 18(51.

David Pittington, must, in Feb. 24, 1864. John Pay, must, in Feb. 26, 1864 absent

David

David D. Playford, must,

John T. Hazzard, must,

;

Dec.

S. Ireland, must, in

Dec.

6,

18G1

7,

must. out.

;

1864.

2,

David Jericbo, must, in March 16, 1864. Alonzo L. Johnson, must, in Dec. 7, 1861 in

Feb.

disch. on

;

1861

7,

;

disch.

on

Dec.

7,

1861

;

died at

died at Hards-

;

3,

1864; died at Colum-

bia, Tenn., Aug. 24, 1864 buried in Nat. Cem. Stone Kiver, sec. L, grave 379. in Feb. 29, 1864 not on muster;

Henry

;

.5,

vet.

;

1864.

8,

Feb.

in

29, 1864.

Schaeffer, must, in Jan. 19, 1864.

March

Patrick Sullivan, must, in

William

Sell,

Marvin,

certif.

4,

1864.

must, in Dec. 18, 1861

Oct.

disch. on surg.

;

absent, sick, at

mu.st. in

Feb. 29, 1864; disch. July

June 28, 1865. EiwarJ W. Maynard, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. Henry Miller, must, in Feb. 4, 1864. David W. Morton, must, in Feb. 8, 1864. Daniel M. Morgan, must, in Nov. 14, 1862; disch. by G. O. June 23, 1865. Marion May, must, in Feb. 19, 1864; pris. from Oct. 1, 1864, to April 21, 1865 disch. June 10, to date date

;

19, 1865.

Feb.

4,

1864

disch.

Aug.

1861

7,

disch. on surg.

;

Sheele, must, in Dec. 1,

29, 1864; disch.

1,

1862; prisoner from

June

1864, to April 21, 1865; disch.

May

on

6, 18(55.

10,

19. 1865.

Henry W. Snyder, must,

Dec.

in

18, 1861

1861

7,

;

disch.

died at

;

Nashville, Tenn., July 27, 1864. Brittian

W.

must, in Feb. 24, 1864; not on

S^lerly,

muster-out

roll.

William G. Thompson, must, in Feb. Michael Troy, must, in March 5, wounded, at muster out.

James

March

Teseter, must, in

Isaac Trout, must, in April

out

5,

22, 1864.

1864

absent,

;

1864.

1864.

5,

10,

1864; not on muster-

roll.

in

Feb.

1864; not on muster-

4,

roll.

Richard C. Videan, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. Barnet Vankirk, must, in Feb. 17, 1864. William Wain, must, in Nov. 19, 1861; vet.

Samuel ;

23, 1865.

B. Wolfkill, must, in

March

Philip A. Wertz, must, in Feb.

8,

3,

1864.

1864.

James Walker, must,

Jesse O'Brigant, must, in Feb. 25, 18()4; not on muster-out roll.

Joel Packer, must, in Feb.

May

cenif

John Taylor, must,

1864, expiration of term.

Jacob Packer, must, in Feb.

in Dec.

William J. Stephens, must, in Dec. on surg. certif. Aug., 1862.

out

George W. McMichael, must, in Feb. 11, 1864. John McQuiston, must, in Feb. 24, 1864. Lindsay Newcomer, must, in Dec. 7, 1861; must, out

1864; disch. on

7,

1863.

Peter Timner, must, in Feb.

Nathan Moyer, must, in Dec. 7, 1861. PatriL-k Murphy, must, in Dec. 7, 1861. Henry Marboil, must, in Dec. 18, 1861.

Noll, must, in

Dec.

in

8,

April 27, 1863.

to date

29, 1864. ;

March

Siegfried, must, in Feb.

Anthony 1864.

mu-iter out.

6,

in Oct. 14, 1861

Albert Siegfried, must, in Feb. 29, 1864.

Samuel

surg.

Isaac Marvin, must, in April 15, 18()4

Dec.

disch. on surg.

;

Josejih L. Shull, must, in Feb. 24, 1864.

Henry

Charles A. Marvin, must, in Feb.

Henry W.

on

1864.

2,

must, in March

John W. Smith, must, sick, at

in Feb. 3, 1864.

Edward Lee, must, in Dec. 8, 1863. Ephraim Mattern, must, in Feb. 3,

M^.y

Augustus Shott, must,

surg. certif.

must. out.

Jacob Lard, must,

U.

March

in

in Dec. 18, 1861

Merrick C. Seely, must,

Lett, must, in Sept 23, 1861; vet.

12, to

disch.

certif April, 1862.

roll.

Heny J. Lavalliy, must, in Feb. 29, 1864. Raymond B. Lewis, must, in Feb. 12, 1864. Andrew Long, must, in Feb. 1864; absent,

Henry

John Rossey, must,

Jacob H. Siegfried, must,

March

Joshua Kayton, must, out

;

RobiiiSon, must, in Feb. 29, 1864.

Thomas H. Sheridan,

town, Ky., Nov., 1862. Peter Koch, must, in

1861

7,

certif. April, 1862.

Samuel Katzmoyer, must, in Dec. 7, 1861 Murfreesboro', Tenn., Aug. 18, 1862. in

1864; not on

in Feb. 16,

in Feb. 5, 1864.

Geoige W. Raber, must,

1864.

4,

July, 1862.

Robert Keener, must,

Reuben Rabcr, must, Warren

15, 1864.

William Keener, must, in Dec. certii".

in Dec. 7, 1861.

Hillarus Roth, must, in Feb. 25, 1864.

Adolpli Krauskoplf, must, in Feb. surg.

muster

at

surg. certif. July, 1862.

surg. certif. June, 1862.

Jacob Kemp, must,

John Patchen, must,

muster-out roll. William F. Quigg, must, in Dec.

1864, expiration of term.

S.imuel Jobaon, must, in Feb.

;

out.

in Feb. 29, 1864; captured at Lovejoy Station, Ga., Aug. 20, 1864.

W. H. Weidenhammer, must, 8, 8,

Lovfjoy Station, Ga., Aug.

1864.

1864; captured near 20, 1864.

sick, at

muster

Samuel Weaver, must, at muster out.

in

March

3,

1864 absent, ;

out. in

Feb.

16,

1864; absent, sick,

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

248 Samuel Wagoner, must, Albert Wheat, Dec.

6,

March

certif.

Juliui Wrinkle, must, in Dec.

Henry

Samuel Boyer, must,

in Feb. 4, 1864.

on surg.

ili?ch.

7,

4,

must, out

1861;

1864, expiration of term.

May

AVrighter, captured at Daihis, Ga.,

1864; died at Aiidersonville, Aug.

27,

16, 1864.

Nicholas A. Wyiikoop, must, in Oct. 15, 1861 pro. to battalion adjt. Jan. 1, 186.3. Isaac B. Walker, must, in Feb. 13, 1864; not on mus;

ter-out

Feb.

8,

1

must, in Feb. 29, 1864.

865.

1865.

8,

John Brandon, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. John Bechtol, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Levi Berger, must, in Feb.

15, 1865.

James Brown, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. James Black, must, in Feb. 8, 1865; not accounted Henry Campbell, must, in Feb. 8, 1865.

Wm.

VV.

Conover, must, in Feb.

for.

1865.

8,

John Callahan, must, in Feb. 8, Benjamin Demar, must, in Feb.

roll.

W. H. H. Yonman,

in

Fidel Book, must, in Feb.

1863.

1865. 1865.

8,

Richard Densmore, must, iu Feb. 25, 1865 not acHenry Yoh, must, in March 1864. counted for. EKiHTY-THIRD HEGIMEXT. The Eighty-third Regiment was composerl of William A. Evans, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Joseph Echilberger, must, in Feb. 23, 1865. men mo.stiy from western countie.s in the State. Barger Freeburn, must, in March 1, 1865. Company I of the regiment inckuled .some men John Fink, must, in Feb. 15, 1865; discli. by G. O. who were recruited at Reading. It was musMay 30, 1865. tered into service near Erie, on Septemljer 8, John C. Gantt, must, in Feb. 23, 1865. 1861. After tiiorough preparation it partici- John C. Gelts, must in Feb. 8, 1865. .3,

;

pated in the Peninsula campaign and battles,

and afterward was engaged

Charles Gibson, nuist. in Feb. its

several

at Gettys-

burg, in the Wilderne.ss, and in the several bat-

preceding the surrender

tles

at

A))pomattox.

It was mustered out of service at Washington

June

The regiment was engaged

28, 1865.

in

twenty-five battles, two more than any other

Not

regiment of Pennsylvania Infantry. ing able to designate the

be-

men from Reading,

I

I.

— This company was recruited at

Harrisburg and Reading for one year, and was mustered out .June 28, 1865, except where other-

three years.

Abraham Frauenthal,

2d

lieut.,

must, in March

1,

186.5.

S. Cam[)bell, 1st sergt.,

William H. McConnell, Alex. Backenstoss, Philip P.

must, in Feb.

sergt.,

sergt.,

De Haven,

23, 1865.

must, in Feb. 15, 1865.

must, in

March

1,

1865.

must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Benjamin K. Taylor, sergt., must, in Feb. 28, 1865. Wm. H. Saultsman, corp., must, in March 1, 1865. sergt.,

Wm.

H. Pritchard, corp., must, in Feb. 16, 1865. Chauncey M. ShuU, corp., must, in March 1, 1865. John A. Mattis, corp., must, in Feb. 8, 1865. George W. Burd, Corp., must, in Feb. 16, 1865. David D. Burross, corp., must, in Feb. 16, 1865.

John Stoomer,

John Holtry, must,

in Feb.

8,

1865.

Solomon Hilbert, must,

8,

1865.

in Feb.

Charles Hasson, must, in Feb.

Thomas C. Hay, must, June 2, 1865. Henry Hantz, must,

Privates.

Hiram Ahvin, must,

in Feb.

in

Feb.

8,

8,

1865.

in Feb. 23, 186.5

;

dish,

in Feb. 10, 1865; not

Hetherington, must, in Feb.

counted

by G.O.

accounted

8,

1865.

1865.

1,

1865.

8,

1865; not ac-

for.

John Harvey, must,

in

Feb.

10,

1865; not'ajcounteJ

for. 8,

l.%5.

Michael Knapp, must, in Feb. 16, 1865. Charles Kain, must, in Feb. 16, 1865. Charles Kroninger, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Harrison Lorah, must, in Feb. 15, 1865. Alexander Lorah, must, in Feb. 15, 1865. Alonzo Myers, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Oliver D. Marks, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Henry Marks, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. James K. P. Martin, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. William McCarty, must, in Feb. 22, 1865. John McCurdy, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Amos Nigh, must, in Feb. 16, 1865. William D. Neff, nuist. in Feb. 8, 1865. William Philli|)s, must, in Feb. 8, 186-5.

Anthony Ruelius, must, in Feb. 15, 1865. John Richards, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Daniel Smaltz, must,

Corp., must, in Feb. 8, 1865.

Francis Alexander, corp., must, in March

John Anderson, must,

1865.

8,

William Herring, must, in Feb.

Jesse Irvine, must, in Feb.

wise mentioned. Kobert W. McCartney, capt., must, in March 1, 186.5. Lewis F. Mason, 1st. lieut., must, in Dec. 22, 1861,

John

F. Gardner, must, in March 1, 1865. Andrew Graft, must, in Feb. 8, 1865. Abraham Huss, must, in JIarch 1, 1865.

for.

present the entire company.

CoMi'AXY

16, 1865.

James

Henry

in

Feb.

Shell, must, in Feb.

8,

8,

1865.

1865.

Jacob Seidell, nm4,

1,

Friesleben, Corp., must, in Nov.

to Corp.

;

2-'),

1, ISf;.").

year; pro. to corp. April .lohn

18in

\)i,

1, 18()r).

Corp., must, in Oct.

pro. to Corp. April

;

Nat.

C, March

died at Salisbury, N.

;

1861

6,

1865, one year

.'i,

March

Francis Bo(|uel, must, iu

Win. Brubaker, must,

.'J,

sub.

Icilledat

buried in

;

Henry Moore, Corp., must, iu Sept. 9, ISGl William Kenny, corp., must, in Oct. ;

Sept.

iu

roll.

Peter Blezer, must, in .Vpril stitute.

18(i8

1,

18(;4; burial record, .Tan. S\,

year

;

John G. Anderson, must, muster-out

died at

181;').

(i,

Cem., section F, grave (il. William D. Clemens, sergt., must, ;

pro.

;

ISM.

1(5,

13, 184,

drafted

Henry

Sejit. 12, 1861

in

1865,

substitute.

Adam

vet.

Henry H. Fry, must, Francis F.

trans, to Co.

;

23,

substitute.

John Kelly,

nuist. in Sept. 11, 18til

not on mus-

;

1864. one year;

Sept. 26,

in

William Kamcr, must,

20, 1X62.

Ebliiig, mu.st. in Sept. 12, ISdl

S. Eagle,

nutst.

Ernest Kerzcr, must, in March on

;

surg. certiC. Feb. 26, 1863.

Wm.

Kent/.,

in Sept. 16, 1861

vet.

;

drafted.

muster out.

.Mfred Ermentrout,inust. in Sept. 12, 1861

ter-out roll

Dec.

2,

1861.

16, 1861

discli.

;

on

William McCmnb, must, surg. certif Aug. 11, .lohn

McGean, must,

stitute ;

trans, to

;

disch.

in Sept. 27, 1X64,

by G. O. June

Watson McNelly, must,

;

disch. on

1X62.

iu

Aug.

substitute; disch. by G. O.

one year; sub-

10, 1865.

27, 1X64,

June

one year

10, 1865.

;

THE Hugh McMullen,

K

Co.

Feb.

(5,

must, in Sept. 11, 1861

CTVTl.

trans, to

;

in Sept. 18, 18(jl

niu.it.

killed al

;

Dabney's :\tili, Va., Feb. 7, 1S6/J vet. Charles McGregor, must, in Sept. Ifi, 18(51

;

not on

March

in

one year; sub-

25, 18()5,

William Obrien, must,

in Sejit

14, lS(il

not on mus-

;

IXiil

on

iliscli.

;

William Powers, must, in Sept. 28, 1864, one year substitute diseh. by G. O. .Tune 10, 1865. Henry Pretlove, must, in March 22, 1865, one year; ;

Nathaniel I'orter, must, in Sept. U;, lS(il. vet. Albert H. liepjiert, must, in Xov. 14, 1S(JI Robert Rosebaugh, must, in March 16, 1865, one ;

year; drafted. 18(i5,

16,

one

year; substitute. Ross, must-

.March

in

16,

one year;

l.St)5,

Balduzer Roger, must,

in

.\|iiil

one year;

1865,

1,

Roach, must,

in

March

2'.),

one year;

1865,

substitute.

must, in Sept.

(Jettysburg duly

)S6I

2,

12, I8()4,

wounded

;

at

absent at muster out.

o, 186.'?;

Reifsneider, must, in Sept. 12, 1861

Antietam, Md., WilliiiMi

;

wounded

at

1862; must, out Sept.

Se])!. 17,

must, in Sept.

1861; must, out

12,

must, in Sept. 12, 1861; 1864, expiration of term.

must, out

Roif,

1).

Sept. 12,

William Ramich,

mu.st.

Co. G Feb. 6, 1864; Daniel Smith, must, in Sept.

William H. Smith,

;

trans, to

Samuel Sharosky,

nnist.

20, lS(;i

in

March

2o, 1865,

one

nuist. in Marcli 8, 1865,

one year

Storks, must,

March

in

22,

one year;

lSli5,

in

March

2'.(,

l.$65,

one year; sub-

Stauflei-,

muster out

;

must, in Sept. 12, 1861

Nov.

W.

in

Feb. 2y, 1864

disch. by G. O.

;

record, at Alexandria,

22,

1862

;

burial

March

11),

1864

;

grave

15,50.

John Seery, must,

one year; died

in Sept. 5, 1,864,

at

Point Lookout, Md., March 18, 1,865. George W. See, must, in July 12, 1.862.

Michael Steiger. E. Fenton Shin, must,

in Sept.

1861

l.'l,

;

not on

mus-

roll.

Charles H. Turner, nuist. in Sept.

12,

1861

must, out

;

George Teed, must, in Sept. 12, 1861; trans, to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 30, 1863. Samuel Vankirk, must, in Sept. 14, 18t)l disch. on ;

.surg. certif.

March

2, l.Sti3.

William H. Vaukirk, must, muster-out

iu Sept. 14, 1S61

not on

;

roll.

in

March

29,

1865, one year

(ieorge Wartz, must, in

March

30,

1865, one year

;

substitute,

substitute. in

one year

.\i>ril 3, 1.S65,

drafted.

l.'5.

1864,

June

disch. by G. O.

David Sneal, must,

ter-out

drafted.

]!cc(l,

;

one year;

1.864,

8,

June

Sowers, must, in Sept. 12,

Fairfax Seminary,

substitute.

Henry

Adam

substitute

surg. certif. Feb. 24, 1862.

Christian Risestetler, nuist. in JIarch

on

1861; disch. on

12,

Frederick Sohns, must, in Sept.

certif.

ter-out roll,

(ieorge Petermaii, must, in Sejit. 20,

disch.

;

1863.

.lames Seyferd, must, in Sept.

drafted

stitute.

Patriclc

in Sept. 13, 1861

6,

substitute; disch. by G. O.

roll.

Henry Owen, must,

Laird

Joseph Sterney, must,

surg. certif. Dec. 9, 1864; vet.

;

muster-out

257

surg. certif. April

1S(!4; vet.

Cornelius jAlcNiilty,

WAR.

Waterman, must, in July 30,1863; died at C, Feb. 7, 1865. William H. Whitehead, must, in Sept. 14, 1861 not

licwis

Salisbury, N.

;

discli.

on

;

on muster-out

roll.

;;;

;

HISTORY OF BP]RKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

25S DiUiirl Vdiiiit,

iMiist.

Oct.

Ill

5, lS(i4,

by G. O. June 2:i, 1SG5. Geiirgc W. Vockey, must, in Sept. di.sch. l)y

O.

(i.

June

10,

Frederick Voekey, must, disci), by G. O. June

James Yoder, must,

Henry E. Quiinby,

disch.

;

1861

:iO,

l.Sii4

James

one year

ISlio,

1^3,

Zacarius, must, in Aug. 24,

He

time associate judge of Berks Connty.

He

Sciiool to join the array, bnt

being under

Sejit.

in

10,

1,

from

was

2d

May 7,

lieut.

priv. to sergt.; to 1st sergt.; to

1864; com. 1st

John Wilmoycr,

May

lieut.

2d

16, 18()5

1862

;

pro.

June

lieut.

not nuist.;

;

com.

18()5;

2.

March

in

to

at Antietam,

James McCallicher,

one year;

Id, 1S(;5.

Marcli

must, in Aug. 30, 1861

1st lieut.,

j)riv.

wounded

1802;

resigned Oct. 20, 1803.

in Sept. 30, 1S(J4,

in

from

]iro.

one year;

IStU,

'V),

18ti.').

Dabiiey's Mills, Va., Feb.

Gadlip Zeller, must,

one year

pro.

;

vet.

;

Through the intercession of John K. Wesner, sergt., must, in .\ug. 30, 18(il pro. to MeKnight, however, he was vet. sergt. May 1,1865 pro. a private, and made a corporal at Reuben Drexel, sergt., must, in Aug. 23, 1801 size.

;

Colonel

Charles

accepted as

;

;

Washington, having enlisted

1861, as

in April,

a private in the Ringgold Light Artillery for

Afterward he entered the three

three mouth.s.

the Pjighty-eighth Regiment

years' service in

Pennsylvania

Volunteers,

sioned second lieutenant in

Company

he was appointed ca])tain of

field,

For

B.

uniform good conduct and intrepidity

the

in

from 1804

to sergt.

June

1805; vet.

15,

Rutz, sergt., must, in

,T.

wounded

priv.;

at

.\ug. 30, 1861

absent, in hospital, at must, out

;

jiro.

;

Laurel Hill, Va., Jlay

8,

vet.

;

Benner Hummel, sergt., must, in Sept. 13, 1861 \>tv. from priv.; wounded at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862; disch., date unknown. Samuel Husk, sergt., must, in Aug. 20, 18l

May

Jiscli.

;

20,

wds. rec. in action.

Benhart Umbacher, must, in Sept. 25, 1864, one year; sub. disch. by G. O. June 10, 1865. Michael Volkir, must, in Sept. 9, 1864, one year ;

ISGl

\\

;

trans, to Vet. Res.

sub.

18,

1864, one year

">,

Feb.

in

;

by G. O. June

disch.

sub.

2.'>,

186r),

;

stib.

one year;

June

writ of habeas corpus Oct.

B.

Whitman, must,

;

10, 1865.

Sept. 17, 1861; disch. on

in

5, 18t)l.

William A. Wise, must, in March Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 17, 1864.

Adam

10, 18(>5.

Sept. 30, 18(54, one year

disch. by G. O.

;

Andrew Wilson, must,

;

ter-out roll.

Henry Steinbach, must,

sub.

;

Gottleib Wise, must, in

vet.

William Rightmoyer, must, in Sept. 4, 1861. .lolin D. Richter, must, in Feb. 28, 1865, one year. Henry Rlioads, must, in Aug. .30, 1861 not on mus-

William H.

261

1864; trans, to

16,

in Sept. 10, 1861

;

died Dec.

18 of wds. rec. at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862-

drafted.

Samuel Stanley, must,

Feb.

in

1805, one year;

2.5,

.Fonuthan Wiser, must, in Aug. 27,

George W. Schull, must, in Fel). 28, 18().''), one year; sub. Aleah Sjiencer, must, in March 22, ISdo, oncyear; sub. Frederick Soulliard, must, in Mardi 29, 186.'), one

18(>1

1864, of wds. rec. in action

12,

drafted.

grounds. Wilderness, Va.

;

;

died

May

bur. in burial

vet.

;

Peter Wolf, must, in Aug. 27, 1864, of wds. rec. in action

18()1 ;

;

died

bur. record,

June June

20,

30,

1864, at City Point, Va.

year; sub.

John Stern, must, in March 29, 186ri, one year; sub. Timothy Sourlbus, must, in March 27, ISliri, one year; sub. Matthias Swavely, ninst. in Feb. 2"), 1864; disch. liy G. O. July S, 1865. John Schartf, must, in Aug. 30, 1864, one year sub.

George Wonder, must, in Aug. 30, 18|>1. Benjamin Youse, must, in Feb. 25, 1865, one year; drafted.

George

I).

Youse, must, in Aug. 30, 1861.

NINETY-THIRD REGIMENT.

;

disch. by G.

Andrew

().

June

Shule, must, in Aug. 30, 1861

surg. certif.

May

surg. certif.

May

Joseph Sailor, must, certif.

Dec.

2,

18()1

disch. on

;

(t,

in Sept. 4, 1861

;

disch. on surg.

Stine, must, in

Sept.

in

1861

4,

;

disch. on

18i>:!.

Aug.

.30,

William Spicker, must,

;

disch. on surg.

in Sept. 4, 1861

;

disch. Sept.

Joseph Springer, must, in Oct. I, 1861 trans, to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 29, 1863. killed at Robert Simons, must, in Aug. 30, 1S61 Gettysburg July 1, 1863. ;

;

killed at Salisbury,

at Salisbury,

in Sept. 13, IStil

N. C, Jan.

N. C, Feb.

8,

1865

Oct.

in

;

captured;

12, 18li5;

in Sept. 10, 1861;

William Timothy, must,

;

1,

vet.

captured

;

died

James Toole, must,

in Sept. 4, 1861.

John Ulrich

must, in Feb. 25,

B and

it

K from

proc'ee, 18(51 wounded .'it Wihierness, Va., May 5, 18(>4. John R. Kuhn, capt., must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one ;

year; wounded at Petersburg, Va., April

Wm. P.

2,

1865.

1st lieut.

A. Kuddack,

1st lieut., uuist. in Oct.

2i5,

ISiJl.

Woomer, 1st lieut., must, in Oct. 2G, 18G1; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.

I.

Wm.

Oldlield, 2d

wounded

Wm. B. D.

K.ale,

lieut.,

must,

at Fair Oaks, Va.,

2d

lieut.,

in

May

Oct.

26,

1861;

must, in Oct. 12, 1861.

Zimmerman, 2d lieut., wounded March 25, 1865.

Geo. Leedom,

at Petersburg,

1st

must,

sergt.,

in

Oct. 26, 1861

missing in action at Fair Oaks, Va.,

May

31,

Peter Eu.sk,

sergt.,

must, in Oct. 26, 1861; wounded

May

at Fair Oaks, Va.,

at

one year. one year. Josiah Barnedt, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Jacob J. Bowman, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Aaron Bames, nuist. in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Cornelius Buckley, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Hezekiah Buckley, nuist. in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. John F. Bender, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year; Michael Blaugh, must, in Sept. James H. Baush, must, in Sept.

17, 1864,

17, 18()4,

March

at I'etersburg, Va.,

25, 1865.

one year. Harrison Bender, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Hiram Baker, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. John Barnet, must, in Sept. 19, 18(54, one year. Perry Barnt, must, in Sept. 19, 1864, one year. Samuel Barnet, must, in Sept. 19, 1864, one year. David Crichfield, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Jonas Custer, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Joseph Chalt'ant, must, in Oct. 12, 1861. Daniel Connor, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Levi Coleman, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year; mu.st. in Sept. 10, 18()4,

killed at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 18(i4. William Casbeer, must, in Sept. 17, 18(>4, one year. Martin Crandall, must, in Oct. 2(i, 1861 wounded at ;

William Delaney, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. William Daly, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Jonathan Dormayer, must, in Sept. 17, 18(54. one year; wounded at Cedar (Ircik, \'a., Oct. 19,

May

at Fair Oaks, Va.,

year; died

May

26,

one

buried in Nat. Cem.,

Loudon Park, Baltimore, Md. William Davis, mus., must, in Oct.

26, 1S61.

Privatcit.

James Adams, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. George Ankney, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Samuel Baldwin, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Noah Barnett, Jr., must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Boytz, must, in Sept.

10, 1864,

Charles Becker, must, in Oct. 26, 1861 Chancellorsville, Va.,

August Bertbold, must,

May

3,

;

1863.

in Oct. 26, 1861.

Boyles, must, in Oct. 26, 1861.

Sept. 10,

one year.

wounded

at

May

1861

wounded

;

at

1863.

3,

one year.

12, 18(51

tion at Chancellorsville, Va.,

in

one year

1864,

Oct. 19, 18(54.

in Sept. 17, 18(54,

Daniel Fox, must, in Oct.

in Sept. 17, 1864,

18(55;

in

Charles Foreman, must, in Oct.

Solomon Fox, must,

12, 1861.

Isaac Blasnet, corp., nuist. in Sept. 17,1864, one year.

Peter Ankney, corp., must,

Douges, must,

Benjamin Enos, must,

31, 1862.

Vogt, Corp., must, in Oct.

Jacob

Chancellorsville, Va.,

Albert Woltinger, corp., must, in Oct. 26, 1861. John Milton, corp., must, in Oct. 12, 1861; wounded

Edward

wounded

;

Thomas Boone, nuist. in Oct. 26, 1861. Henry Beard, must, in Oct. 2(>, 1861.

wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Peter Embich, must, in Oct. 26,

31, 181

2t>,

May

wounded

;

at

3, 18(>3.

M'illiam C. Horner, must, in Sept. 10, lS64,one year.

Charles Parker, must, in Oct.

Henry Iserman, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Henry Inglebach, must, in Oct. 26, 1861.

Martin Penrod, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Nosmin B. Penrod, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. George Peterson, must, in Sept. 19, 1864, one year. Ambrose D. Ryan, mu.st. in Sept. 1, 1862. William R. Richburger, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one

Tliomas .Johnston, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. William Jones, must, in Oct. 26, 186J. George Johnson, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Josiah Johnson, nuist. in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. William Johnson, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. George W. Johnston, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one

year.

Daniel Ringler, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Laufer Rudolph, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Josiah Risheberger, must, in Sept.

year.

William Karsnitz, must, in Oct.

Henry Kline, must, Christopher

wounded

must,

at Fair Oaks, Va.,

Oct.

in

May

26,

1861

;

31, 1862.

1861.

2(!,

Jacob J. Repplogle, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Jonathan Rhodes, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Alexander Rayman, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. Augustus Solomon, must, in Oct. 12, ]8(!1; missed in

Kester, must, in Oct. 26, 1861.

Frederick Katzmer, nuist. in Oct.

action at Chancellorsville, Va.,

Benjamin Strause, must,

26, 1861.

Henry Koutz, must, in Sept. 10, 18()4, one year; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. ii), I864! Henry Leliman, must, in Oct. 26, 1861 mis. inaction

Adam

3,

Franklin Lebo, must, in Oct. 12, 1861. William Long, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Philip Lape, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year.

Joseph Lohr, must, in Sept. 17, ]8()4, one year. Joseph Lape, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. John Lohr, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. Henry W. Maurer, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. John Meredith, must, in Nov. 24, 1861. Jonathan Meyers, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Jacob Morton, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Daniel Meonan, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Jeremiah Moll, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Samuels. Miller, must, in Sejit. 17, 1864, one year. Adam J. Miller, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. ;

Noah

J. Miller, must, in Sept. 2(!, 1864, one year. William H. Miller, must, in Sept. 10, 1864, one year. William Mowry, must, in Sept. 17, 18()4, one year; dietl

Oct.

9.

George O. Mong, must, in Sept. Warren I. Mcllwaine, must,

wounded

May

10, 1864,

in

at Spottsylvania

one year.

March

7,

Court-House,

John McQuade, must, in Sept. 1, 1862. John McColIy, must, in Oct. 26, lS(;i.

Oaks, Va.,

May

wounded

31, 1862.

William Obyle, must,

in Oct. 12, 1861.

3,

wounded

;

at

1863.

26, 1861.

Oct. 26, lS(il

wounded

;

at

;

ington, D. C.

William Savage, must, in Oct.

26. 1S61.

John Souder, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. John Shaeffer, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. William Surch, must,

John Smith, must,

in Oct. 26, 1861.

in Oct.

2,

Stahl, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year.

George Spangler, must, in Sept.

17, 1864,

one year.

Christian Spangler, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. Aaron Shaffer, must, in Sept. 17, 1.S64, one year.

William Stahl, must, died Oct. tery,

2(),

in Sept.

18()4;

Joseph Stahl, must, in Sept. David Smith, must, in Sept. Lewis Stinebaugh, must, in

10, 1864, 10, 1864, Se])t. 10,

died in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan.

W.

1864, one year;

10,

buried in National Ceme-

Loudon Park, Baltimore, Md.

Schmucker, must,

one year. one year. 18()4, one year;

B.

13, 1S65.

in Sept. 10, 18()4,

Pemb'e Thompson, must, in Sept. 17, John Vause, must, in Oct. 26, 1861.

26, 1801. ;

May

one year. Levi F. Shaffer, must, in Sept. 19, 1864, one year. Charles Thomas, must, in Oct. 26, 18(il.

12, 1864.

Franklin JlcOuade, must, in Oct. Jacob Nair, must, in Oct. 26, 1861

1863.

Daniel Shay, must, in Oct. 26, 1861 died Jan. 15, 1862, buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, Wash-

1864; Va.,

3,

Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 18(;2. Moses Stevenson, must, in Oct. 12, 1861. Solomon Straway, must, in Oct. 26, 1861.

19,1864; buried at Nat. Cem., Win-

chester, Va., lot

Snyder, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. Stultz, must, in Oct. 26, 18(il

Chancellorsville, Va.,

John Stouer, must, in Oct. John Smithenger, must, in

1863.

May

in Oct. 12, 1861.

Lemuel

;

at C;hancellorsville, Va., lHay

one year.

17, 1864,

Jno. H. Risheberger, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year.

26, 1861.

in Oct. 26, 1861.

Kreppanak,

Oliver Kei^er, must, in October

John

26, 1861.

at Fair

lSti4,

Jacob Wecbcr, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. William P. Weeks, must, in Nov. 15, 1861. Alfred Witman, must, in Oct.

26, 1861.

one year.

THE CIVIL WAR. Frederick Weller, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. George Walker, must, in Sept. 17, 1864, one year; wounded at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864, and at

March

Petersburg, Va.,

25, 186").

Josiah Waters, must, in Sept.

Henry Young, must,

May

Fair Oaks, Va.,

one year.

18G1

26,

;

at

year. in Sept. 10,

one

1864,

year.

Zimmerman, must, in Sept. 10, Zimmerman, Jr., must, in Sept. 17,

D. F.

C.vPTAiN'

Alexander

C.

1S64, one year. 1864,

one year.

Maitlani)

— Wat^

in

j)articipated

Virginia oampaign

in the

Upon

General McClellan.

re-

Whilst

tiiercheenli.sted in tiie three months' service,

company

and

three years' service, which he

for the

" Coleman

the

Rifles," after

equipping the company.

It

a.^isisted

Dawson him in

was accepted by

the government, and a-ssigned to the Ninety-third

Regiment as Company G. He was in the battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, having been wounded in the latter. He was removed to St. Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, where he died

His

on Jiuie 10, 1862, aged thirty years.

mains were brought

to

re-

Reading and burled

Company K.

Va., Aug. 21,

must, in Oct. 24, 1861; pro. killed at Charlestown,

sergt.,

18,1864; 1864 vet. ;

vet.

;

Frederick Miller, corp., nuist. in Oct. 21, 18(>1 vet. Augustus Snyder, corp., must, in Oct. 21, 1861 w'nded ;

—The

following enlistments

This company was

mustered out June 27,

18(55,

Nov.

12,

where

except

1862;

to

1st

from 2d

in Oct. 21, 1861

May

1863

;

31,

and

1862

;

;

wound-

at Gettys-

at Spottsylvania

1864; pro. from 1st lieut. to capt.

Solomon Yeakel,

8,

2,

maj. Nov. 23, 1864. lieut.,

lieiit.

Nov.

must, in Oct. 21,1861; 8,

1862; resigned April

23, 1864.

William Van Buskirk, 2d ;

wounded

vet.

;

21, 1861

May

at Chancellorsville, Va.,

1863

3,

;

disch. on surg. certif. Sept. 6, 1863.

.\mos M. Yergey, corp. must, in Oct. 21, 1861 died at Washington, D. C, Oct. 12, 1862. Roland Lang, nuisician, must, in Feb. 18, 1864; vet.

Gideon Guinther, musician, must,

in Feb. 29, 1864.

Privates.

David Angstadt, must .lohn

in Feb. 29, 1864.

March

Bartolet, must, in

May

Wilderness,

5,

and

1864; woiuidcd at

7,

Fisher's Hill, Va.,

at

Sept. 22, 1864.

Levi Breidegam, must,

in

wounded at June 30,

Feb. 17, 1864;

Petersburg, Va., April

2,

1865; disch.

18t>5.

.\braham

Briel, must,

in

Oct.

18(il

21,

disch.

;

on

surg. certif Feb. 11, 18()3.

Jacob Brown, must, in Oct. 21, 1861 wounded at Salem Heights, Va., May 3,1863; must, out Oct. ;

27, 1864, expiration of term.

Daniel Bartolet, must, in Oct. 21, 1861

disch. on surg.

;

1862.

Daniel Breidegam, must, in Feb. certif, date

May

17,

1864; wounded on snrg.

31, 1862; disch.

unknown.

Isaac Dreibelbies, must, in Feb. 25, 1864.

Martin Dumback, must, in Oct.

21, 1861

wounded at

;

Opcijuan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; vet.

ed at Fair Oaks, Va.,

H.,May

;

Rufus K. Dieter, must,

David C. Keller, capt.must. burg, Pa., July

vet. at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 Moses Snyder, corp., must, in Oct. 21, 1861 Benjamin B. Laucks, corp., must, in Oct.

at Fair Oaks, Va.,

otherwise mentioned.

1861

vet.

;

May

.lames Briel, corp., must, in Get. 21, 1861

certif.,

in

Evans' Cemetery.

were from Rerks County.

]>ro.

1864

to sergt.

receiving his dis-

Coleman, who had generously

C.

5,

Aaron K. Cleaver,

under

charge, he returned to Reading and recruited a

'iiarles

disch.

;

He

Reading about the year 1832. moved to Ohio wiien a young man.

(

;

on surg. certif 1862. Charles Rothermel, sergt., must, in Oct. 21, 1861 pro. to sergt. Nov. 8, 1863; killed at Wilderness, Va.,

;

Jonathan Zimmerman, must,

called

.Jonas F. Hassler, sergt., nuist. in Oct. 21, 1861

May

31, 1862.

in Sept. 10, 1S64, one year. Eneas Zerby, must, in Oct. 26, 1861. J. H. Zimmerman, nuist. in Sept. 17, 1864, one year. J. J. Zimmerman, must, in Sept. 17, l.S()4, one year. Samuel Zimmerman, must, in So])t. 10, 1S(!4, one

born

1864; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept.

1,

1864; vet.

;

wounded

John A. Young, must,

J.

19,

,

10, 18(i4,

in Oct.

Jan.

271

lieut.,

must,

pro. fromsergt. to 2d lieut. Jan.

in 1,

Oct.

L. Endy, sergt., must, in Oct. 21, 1861 from priv. Nov. 8, 1862 vet. Charles Herbst, sergt., Oct. 21, 1861 pro. to

.lohn

24,

1865; vet. ;

pro.

Chancellorsville, Va.,

Aug.

May

2, 3,

1862; wounded

at

1863; disch. by G.

O. June 20, 1865.

Jacob Drexel, must, in Feb. 10, 1864; wounded at Wilderness May 5, 1864; died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, 1864. Charles Derol[)li, uuist. in Oct. 21, 1S61

died ,lune

;

of wounds received in action June Joseph Eberhart, must, in Feb. 25, 1864. 14,

Daniel Edinger, must, in Oct. 21, 1861 surg. certif. April 7, 1863. .Tames Edinger, must, in Oct. 21, 1861

;

;

7,

1864.

disch.

on

must, out Oct.

27, 1864, expiration of term.

;

;

in

sergt.

Alfred Fegley, must, in Oct. 21, 1861

;

wounded

at

:

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENXSYLVAXIA. May

Spottsylvania Court-House, Va.,

12,1864;

vet.

Nathan Folk, must,

Feb.

in

woiimled at

lS(i4;

24,

Fisher's Hill, Va., 8ept. 22, 1S(;4.

.John Filman, must, in Oct. 21, IStil

May

Oaks, Va.,

SI, 1862.

George W. Feierstein, must, in June 4, of wounds received

May

.SI,

21, ISfil

)(t.

(

wounded

Feb. 24, 1864;

May

ierhart, must,

1864.

D,

Oct.

in

;

t-Samuel Hell'ner, must, in Feb.

March

Patrick Hooscy, must, in at Spottsylvania

March

Winchester, Va., Sept.

certif.,

,Iohn

wouuded

at

March

14, 18(i5.

surg. certif.

Maberry Weidner, must,

May

;

wounded

May May

at

21, 1861

1864

wounded

;

disch. Oct. 21,

;

wounded

prisoner from

;

at Wilderness, \'a.,

;

Oct. 21, 1861

in

;

disch. on

Aug.

in

(i,

Fair Oaks, Va., 1m;4; died

Ajiril

8,

May

Va., Se|)L 19, 1864; vet.

Tyler Leiubach, must, surg. certif., date

in

;

certif.,

21,1861; disch. on

unknown. 7,

March

18(il

;

disch. on

1863.

Nathaniel Mathias, must, in Oct.

ill

21, 18()1

;

disch. on

wounded

in Oct. 21, 1861

;

31, 1862; disch.

at

wounded

;

date

unknown.

Ile^iinciit

rwuTiited

\va.^

Some men from

Schuylkill County.

It wa.s mustered into service on

September

1861, at Pottsville, and partici-

Berk.s

2;:5,

County were iueluded

pated in various engagements in

Gettysburg and

paign.

VVe.st

It

tiien in

tiie

in

Peninsida,

the Wilderness cam-

was

It

also engaged in the Shenandoah was mustered out of service in

Philadelphia ou October 21, 1864.

CoMi'ANY G.

—This

company was

reci-iiited

The

at Pottsville, in Schuylkill County.

29, 1862.

in Oct. 21, 1861

;

Hamhurg and Company G.

Valley.

Matthias Minker, must, in Oct. 21, surg. certif. Ajiril

on surg.

disch.

tnostly

at Oct.

18()1

31, lSli2; vet.

at Fair Oaks, Va., Jlay 31, 1862; disch. on surg.

The Ninety-sixth for.

10, 1864.

21, ISlil

at Peters-

NINETY-SIXTH RECilMKXT.

Alahlon Lees, must, in Feb. 10,1864; wounded at Wilderness, Va, May 5, 1864; and at Ojiequan,

John Lease, must, in Oct. certif. June 11, 18(;2.

Oct. 21,

in

May

Jonathan Zluhan, must,

Isaac Koch, must, in Feb. 25, 1864.

Feb.

and

12,1864;

.lohn Kreider, must, in Feb. 15, 1864; notacc'ted in

19, 1864,

1865.

2,

James Youse, must,

disch. by G. O. June 19, 1865. Charles H. Keller, must, in Oct. 21, 1861.

May

5,

in Oct. 21, 1861 ;

Opequan, Va., Sept.

at

;

Oaks, Va.,

3 to 11, 1863

burg, April

K

John Neting, must,

May

5, 1864; died April 1, 1865; buried in Nat. Cem., Arlington, Va. vet. Eugene H. Yoder, must, in Feb. 22, 1864 wounded

ou surg.

31, 1862; disch.

Spottsylvania Court-House, Va.,

surg. certif.

1861; disch. on

1864, expiration of term.

1865; buried in Nat. Cem., Arlington, Va. wounded at Keller, must, in Feb. 15, 1864 John

James Loucks, must,

21,

disch. on

;

1862.

3,

at Wilderness, Va.,

date unknown.

Heck, must,

in Oct.

10,

31,

C.

1).

1861

21,

Harrison K. Wheat, must, in Oct.

date unknown.

certit'.,

Win-

;

Augustus Herman, must, surg.

at

1865; disch. by G.

mu.st. in Oct. 21, 1861

Fair Oaks, Va.,

in Oct.

12,1864.

wounded

186.5.

Hunter,

1862; buried in Mil. Asy. Cem., Isaac Vansickle, must,

H. Werkmeister, must,

21, 1864;

2.'),

Jeti'erson

May

1864;

19, 18ii4.

Abraham Heck, must, in Aug. Petersburg, Va., March O. June 20,

wounded

1864;

10,

1,

1862; killed at Wilder-

31,

1864.

Seiger, must, in Feb. 19, 1864; killed at

surg. certif Dec.

Court-House, Va.,

Ellas Harding, must, in

May 5,

Henry Shearer, must, in Oct. 21, 1861; died July of wounds received at Fair Oaks, Va., May

l>!i;4.

2''t.

30^ 1864; exp. of term. Joseph Correll, must, in Sept. 22, 1861; disch. Sept.

30,1864; exp. of term. Jonas Correll, must, in Sept.

22,

1861

;

disch. Sept. 30,

1864; exp. of term. William Dilcanip, must, in Sept. 12, 1862; dis h. by

G. O. June 16, 1865.

THE CIVIL WAR. Xath-iniel

Dipoe-y, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 exp. of term.

Sept. 30, 1864

James Dean, must, Oaks, Va.,

;

disch.

Jan.

in

May

31, 1862

wounded

;

at Fair

diseh. by G. 0. Dec. 13,

;

Joseph

in Sept. 22, 1861

Z.

30, 1864; exp.

Morris Island, S. C, Sept. Fisher, must, in Sept.

Henry

1861

wounded

;

at

in Sept. 22, 1861

1863

diseh. Sept.

;

30, 1861; exp. of term. J. Fisher,

must, in Sept. 12, 1862; disch. by

G. O. June 16, 1865. Levi B. Fox, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 disch. Sept. 30, 1864; exp. of term. disch. on Charles Forbian, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 writ o( habeas corpusSept. 27, 1862. Albert dicker, must, in Sept. 22, 1861. James Gallighan. must, in Sept. 22, 1831 died in ;

;

;

May

Baltimore, Md.,

30, 1862.

March

in Sept. 22, 1861; disch.

May

Fair Oaks, Va.,

Sept.

in

22, 1861

discdi.

;

on

Henry Hartz, must,

22,

1861

disch. on surg.

;

;

exp. of term.

trans, to Vet.

;

Res. C.)rps. Aug. 13, 1863.

John Harner, must,

died at Balti-

;

1862. in Sept. 22, 1861

30,1864; exp. of term. Peter Leiby, must, in Sept. 22, 1861

disch. Sept.

;

disch. Sept. 30,

;

Henry

in Seiit.

12,

May

surg. certif July

killed at Fair

;

31,1862.

Edward Maicks, must,

in Sept. 22, 18lil

for

disch. on

;

in Sept. 22, 1861

wounds received

;

disch. on

;

disch. Dec. 3

at Fair Oaks, Va.,

May

trans, to Vet. Res.

on

1861

12,

;

disch.

on

Seidere, must, in Sept. 22, 1S()1

Fair Oaks, Va.,

May

ed

ed

;

killed at

31, 1862. ;

not account-

for.

18()1

;

not account-

for.

James Toole, must, in Sept. 22, 1S()] Henry Witman, must, in Feb. 11, from Co. B. Elias Wolf, must, in town, Va., May 6,

vet.

;

18()5,

one year;

Se|)t. 22. l.si>2

;

1861

;

died at York-

buried in Nat. Ccm., Sec.

B, grave 251.

trans,

in

Feb.

11,

1865,

one year;

from Co. B.

Durell's Independent Aktielerv, Bat-



TliLs battery wa.s recruitetl iu Berk.-^

and Bucks Counties. It was organized at Doylestown on September 24, 1861. On November 6th it proceeded to Washington and

31,

there received four ten-pound Parrott guns

1862.

Benjamin Miller, must,

disch.

surg. certif. Sept. 12, 1S62.

tery D.

21, 1862.

Charles Mirom, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 surg. certif. July 21, 1862.

George Mover, must,

;

surg. certif Sept. 4, 1862.

Alfred Young, must,

Lutz, must, in Sept. 22, 1861

Oaks, Va.,

1862; pro. to

unknown.

sergt. -major, date

disch. Sept.

;

1861

in Sept. 22,

trans,

1864; exp. of term.

George A. Leinbach, must,

1861

22,

1864; exp. of term.

Elisha Strauser, must, in Sept. 22,

in Sept. 22, 1861

more, Md., Nov. 6, James Kissinger, must,

30,

Christian Stcfly, must, in Sept. 22, 1861

in Sept. 22, 1861

in Sept. 22, 1861;

Corps Nov.

wounded;

2?, 1863.

Charles Nagle, must, in Sept. 22, 1861

;

killed at Fair

Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862. Potts, must, in Dec. 30,1861; disch. on surg. certif. July 31, 1862.

Aaron

Charles RiefF, must, in Sept.

June 16, 1865. David E. Rhoads, must, in G. O. June 17, 1865.

12,

S.

;

1864

Solomon

surg. certif. Oct. 29, 1862.

Aaron Helms, must, in Sept. certif. June 2, 1863.

U.

Lawrence Schlegel, must, in Sept. 27, 18(52; disch. by G. O. June 22, 1865. Samuel Shoppell, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 diach. Sept.

Charles Schlegel, must, in Sept.

30, 1864; exp. of term.

John Hinman, must,

died at

;

31, 1862; buried in

June 8, 1862. William Hughes, must,

disch. Sept

18(il

22,

killed at

;

Gen. Hosp. Cem.

Charles Shafter, must, in Sept.

;

22, lS(n

.it

Annapolis, Md., June 25, of wounds received at

George F. Saylor, must, in Sept. 22, 1801

died

Sept. 22, 1861;

in

Nathaniel Gay, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 trans, to gun" boat service killed on gun-boat " Mound City ;

on

28, 1862.

Reading, Pa., Sept. 21, 1862. William Richards, must, in Sept. Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862. William D. Rhode, must, in Sept.

30,

;

disch. Sept.

;

of term.

William Rolland, must,

1863.

1.

24,

surg. certif

disch. Sept.

;

of term.

Row, must,

H. Renneberger, must,

1862.

Charles Enix, must, in Sept. 22,

Henry

Thomas Ruth, must, 30, 1864; exp.

;

8, 18')2

275

1862

;

disch.

In'

G, 0.

horses

and equipments

by

Levi Rathraan, must, in Sept. 22, 1861 wounded at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 18 J2; disch. S.-pt. 30, 1864; exp. of term. ;

and

a six-gun battery.

On DcIt was encamped east of the Capitol. cemberlSth it moved to Munson's Hill, where it was assigned to McDowell's division and two It was in the additional pieces were provided. march upon Manas.«as on March I'O, 1862, witli and upon its return enthe leading column camped between Alexandria and Bailey CrossRoads. Thence it moved to Falmouth, opposite Wlien JackFredericksburg, on April 18th. son raided Shenandoah Valley this battery made ;

Sept. 12, 1862; disch.

for

ni.'^TORY

270

OF BERKS COUNTY, PEXNSYLYANIA.

march with the corps to Thoroughfare after the enemy toward Antietam. On the 17th him on his retreat, but arrived it was shelled out of camp at daylight, and gotoo late and so returned to Fahuouth, where it ing into position opened fire in reply. At nine continued two months. On August 12th it was A.jr. it was ordered to the rear of Stone Bridge assigned to the Second Division of the Ninth No. 3, nearly opposite Sharpsburg, and just beCorps, and marched to the assistance of Pope. fore General Hartranft took the bridge its It was brought into action for the first time, at centre section moved near the bridge and a forced

Gap

to intercept

The

Kelly's Ford on August 21st.

left section

crossed

it clo.sely

This

infantry.

after his

sec-

went into action (flanked by a regiment of Buford's cavalry) and drove tJie

was joined by the remainder of the battery soon afterward and the whole battery went into position about nine hundred yards from the opposing rebel guns. These guns were engaged

enemy from

at short intervals for

became

first

engaged and exchanged rapid shots

The

with the rebel guns for half an liour. wiiole battery

his position after delivering about

It crossed the river at night

and

moved towards VVarrenton next morning,

the

iorty rounds.

centre section supporting Buford's cavalry for

On

a day and night.

the 27th

it

was assigned

Hooker's division. At Bristoe Station, aided by a Rhode Island battery, it drove the enemy from three successive positiiMis. One horse was killed here. On the morning of the 2(Sth it moved to Manassas Junction and at night to to

Centreville.

(

)m

29th

tiie

it

advanced across

Bull liun, and, when the battle began to rage

with great violence,

it

went into position a half-

mile to the right and front of the Stone Hos-

remained

It

j)ital.

night of the 30th,

this

in

when

jiosition

until

near

the left of the line was

forced back and the enemy's shots began to U]ion

its lett

two Imr^es

tell

One gun was dismounted, and one man woundrd. It retire upon learning that the

flank.

killed

was ordered

to

ground was untenable. A new position was taken a faw hundred yards to the rear and fire opened at long range, but at the end of twenty minutes

it

was again ordered back and

to Centreville.

the fortifications

day

it

retired

During the 31st it remained in and on the evening of the next

])articipated

in

battle of Chantilly, in

two

it

the

which

short it

but

bloody

was one of only

batteries engaged.

On September

2d

Arsenal and was

it

proceeded to Washington

refitted

and fully equipped

;

top of South Mountain at three r.u. on the

was successful

13th.

It

fired

dred and

in

this

engagement,

from the six guns about two hun-

fifty

rounds.

The next day

it

moved

two hours whenever they

opened, and the battery only retired after the projectiles

were

This was the most des-

spent.

perate engagement

and

wounded

dangerously

dropped

had

Two men

to be left

and

on the

horses

several

field.

army returned

the

in

were

harness from exhaustion, which

in their

When

range

shortest

at

which the battery participated.

Virginia the

to

was engaged at Sulphur Springs on November loth. For more than an hour it battery

answered a

fire

lurt

of the enemy, expending

over three hundred rounds.

Lieutenant Mcll-

vaine was mortally wounded anil one verely.

December

Ill

range and sustained no

Near the

close

the

man

se-

par-

Ijattery

Fredericksburg at long

ticipated in the battle of

loss.

of March, 1863, the battery

accompanied the Ninth Corps West and was stationed for

some time

ing and Crab Orchard,

embarked

at

at Paris,

Mount

On June

Ky.

Sterl-

6th

it

Lexington for Vicksburg to sup-

port Grant's array, and then took a position

twelve miles

in

the rear of Vicksburg, facing

Jackson, to intercept the enemy

if

any attempt

should be made at raising the siege.

Immediately after the

fall

of Vicksburg the

moved towards Jackson, town on July 10th. The

battery

the

and shortly afterward it moved on the MarvIt went into position near the land campaign.

having

tion

position there, and tlie

arriving before battery took a

kept up a steady

fire

upon

place for several days, sending a shell every

ten minutes.

returned to

Johnston

camp upon

retired,

and the battery

the Yazoo.

When

the

Vicksburg it was in a fine condition, numbering one hundred and twenty strong, and having arms, accoutrements and battery left for

hor.ses well supplied,



all

in the highest state

THE CIVIL WAR. of

Upon

efficiency.

of a

little

(lied,

its

return, after an absence

more than two months,

Henry

forty were sick in the hospital,

and only

twenty or thirty of those in camp were

spring of 1864.

Lake

It

was sent

Washington

to

be

in

refitted.

entire

;

pro.

;

to 1st lieut.

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

1st lieut.,

;

May

to sergt.

1864;

1,

Nov.

24,

186.4; vet.

to

the

till

George W. Silvis, 2d lieut., must, in Sept. 24, 1861 com. 1st lieut. Nov. KJ, 1862; not must.; discli. Oct.

Johnson's

April

went

it

new

its

Charles A.

1864, and was at once put upon the front.

It

to sergt. Sept. 24, 1864

;

Nov. 24,1864;

lieut.

;

to sergt.

May

Nov. 24, 1864; vet. McNair, 1st sergt., must,

lieut.

1,

pro.

;

1864; to 2d

in Sept. 24, 1861

;

;

Nov.

pro. to q.m. -sergt. Oct. 8, 1864; to 1st sergt. 24, 1864

;

;

vet.

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

lieut.,

VV^illiam S.

It arrived

before Petersburg about the middle of June,

1864

1,

to Corp. Oct. 1, 1863

It

during the Wilderness campaign.

2d

1862;

12,

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

lieut.,

May

James L Mast, 2d

,

May

must, in

lieut.,

18(i4.

2d

CufiFel,

pro. to Corp.

battery of ten Parrott guns.

marched with the Fourth Division of the Ninth Corps, and covered the wagon-train

1864, expiration of term.

resigned Oct. 12,

Recruits were

original strength,

8,

Christopher Leoser, 2d

to

received to give the battery

and an

1864

to 1st sergt. Oct. 8, 1864; to 1st lieut.

Erie, to prevent a threatened

rescue of prisoners there, and to

12,

;

battery remained at Covington

Island, in

Aug.

pro. to corp. April 22, 1863

About half of the horses had died, and only a small number of those that remained

The

lieut.

vet.

;

Adley B. Lawrence,

duty.

were serviceable.

2d

sergt. to

Oct. 17, 1864

for

fit

Sailor, 1st lieut., must, in Sept. 24, 1861

from

men had

ten

277

vet.

Samuel K. Whilncr, q.m. -sergt., must, in Sept. 1861 pro. from sergt. Nov. 24, 1864; vet.

24,

;

was posted

Fort Morton, and kept up a

at

Azariah L.

must, in Sept. 24, 1861;

llatz, (|.m. -sergt.,

disch., expiration of term. when the mine was exploded on July 30th. A month later it was engaged at John L. Lewis, sergt., must, in sergt. Sept. 24, 1864; vet. Pegram's Farm, and during the subsequent

ceaseless fire

Henry Dense,

operations occupied various works before the

In September, 1864, Captain

lii^leaguered city.

him.

When

the final

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

pro. to

;

pro. to

;

eorp. Sept. 24, 1864; to sergt. Nov. 24, 1864; vet.

Stewart McAleese,

sergt.,

must, in

Sejit. 24,

1861

;

pro,

to sergt. Sept. 24, 1864; vet.

Durell was honorably discharged, and Lieuten-

ant Rhodes succeeded

sergt.,

Sept. 24, 1861

John Hennershotz, sergt., must, to sergt.

Nov.

1864

24,

;

in Sept. 24, 18()1

;

pro.

vet.

was made on the defenses of Petersburg, pro. to Jacob Bauer, sergt., must, in Sept. 24, 1861 on April 2, 1865, l)y Hartranft's command, Corp. Sept. 24, 1864 to sergt. Oct. 8, 1864; vet. the entire battery of six guns was brought to John B. Jones, sergt., must, in Sept. 24, 1861 pro. to Corp. Sept. 24,1864; to sergt. Nov. 24,1864; vet. bear npon the rebel works, and when these \vere carried, detachments from the battery B. Frank Bender, sergt., must, in Sept 24, 1861 disch. expiration of term. turned the captured guns upon the flying John A Burdan, sergt., must, in Sept 24, 1861 disch., enemy. After the evacuation of the city, it expiration of term. moved along the South Side Railroad as far as James Q Irwin, sergt must in Sept. 24, 1861 died at Evansville, Ind., Aug. 16, 1863. Wilson's Station, and upon Lee's surrender attack

;

;

;

;

;

,

]>roceeded to Alexandria, via City Point.

It

George

A

Everhart,

died at

was mustered out of service, at Philadel]>hia, on June 13, 1865, except where otherwise men-

.lohn

tioned.

John

W.

Mound

;

sergt.,

City,

111.,

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

Sept

17,

1863

MorrLs, Corp., must in Sept. 24, 1861

;

pro.

to corp. Sept. 24, 1864; vet. S.

Schroeder, corp., must, in Feb.

3,

18()4; pro.

to corp. April 6, 1865; vet.

George W. Durell,

capt., must, in Sept. 24, 18fU

;

discli.

Aaron Martin,

Sept. 23, 186-i, exp. of term.

Samuel H. Rhodes,

pro. from sergt. to 2d lieut. Aug. 19, 18G4

Oct.

Lemuel

3,

1864

;

;

18()1

;

to capt.

vet. ;

re-

1st lieut.,

corp.

A

19, 1863.

Howard McUvaine,

Lewis Bollman, corp, must in Feb. corp. Nov. 14, 1864; vet. Charles C, Berg,

Gries, 1st lieut, must, in Sept. 24, 18G1

signed June

corp., must, in Sept. 24, 1861; pro. to

Corp. Sept 24,1864; vet.

capt., must, in Sept. 24,

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

died Nov. 15, 1863, of wounds received Sulphur Springs, Va.

at

White

Nov.

1864; pro. to

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

cor]).,

24,

1,

1864

;

;

pro to

vet,

J. Schvveimber, corp., must, in Sept. 24, 1861

to corp

1, 1864; vet. Jacob L. Beam, corp must, in Sept. 24, 1861 ,

corp.

;

pro,

May

May

1,

1864

;

vet.

;

pro. to

;;

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

278

Abm. D. Blundin,

corp

must,

,

'in

Sept. 24,

May

to corp.

1,

corp., must, in

1865

March

1864

r!,

corp. Sept. 24, 1864

;

pro.

pro. to

;

Quaintance, corp.. must, in Jan.

30,

1864

;

pro.

Bechtol, Corp., must, iu Sept. 24, 1861; disch.,

expiration of term.

I.

Buckman,

B.

disch

corp., must, in Sept. 24, 1861

;

expiration of term.

,

Carey Carver,

corp., must, in Sept. 24, 1861

;

disch.,

;

disch.,

;

discli.,

corp., must, in Sept. 24, 18(!1

expiration of term.

Robert Conrad, corp., must,

in Sept. 24, 1861

expiration of term.

Oliver D. Giffens, corp., must, in Sept. 24, 1861

;

disch.,

Bertolett Y. Yoder, corp., must, in

William W. Drayer,

Sept. 24, 1861

William G. Mack,

of term. must, in

corp.,

May

1862

1,

1861

,

must, in Feb. 1,1864;

artificer,

1861

John R.

artificer,

Rice, artificer,

must, in Sept. 24,

J.

must, in Sept.

1861

24,

B. Bitting, must, in Feb.

1,

1864

;

pro.

Barst, must, in Sept.

Edward

March

Boyle, must, in

W.

in Sept. 23,

1864

substitute.

;

in Se|)t. 24, 1861

:

veteran.

;

veteran.

Stephen D. Bechert, must,

in Sept. 24, 1861

;

disch.,

Sept. 24, 1861

;

disch.,

in Sept. 24, 1861

;

disch.,

L. Breese, mu.st. in Sept. 24, IS61

;

disch.,

Valentine G. Bissey, must,

Thomas James

;

disch.,

;

disch.,

Daniel D. Altl\ouse, must, exp. of term.

Henry

;

L. Buck, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

disch., exp.

;

Har. Breidigham. must,

May

mus*^.

Aj

iu

.Tan. 29,

1864

disch. on

;

19, 186').

in Sept. 24, 1861

ril 3,

in

;

disch. on

1862.

April 22, 1861

;

disch., exp. of

in Sept.

;

disch.,

Milton H. AKbouse, must,

in

Israel 0. Beagle, must, in April 22, 1861

;

disch., exp.

;

disch., exj).

of term.

exp. of term.

Onatus D. Bump, must,

in April 19, 1861

of term. 24, 1861

William H. Brown, must,

in April 22, 1861

;

disch.,

exp. of term.

Dec. 18, 1861; disch.,

exp. of term.

James Buchanan, must,

in Oct. 18, 1861

;

disch., exp.

of term.

Althouse, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

on surg. certif March

9,

;

disch.

1864.

must, in Sept. 24,

of

in Sept. 24, 1861

;

disch., exp.

;

disch., exp.

of term. in Sept. 24,

George Bluch, must,

in

Sept. 24, 1861

ericksburg, Va., July

LSiil; disch., exp,

term.

Amidon, must,

disch., exp. of

term.

in Sept. 24, 1861

J.

in

Bissey, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

William Beck, must,

exp. of term.

Benjamin Albright, must,

Jacob

substitute.

;

21, 1864.

Berg, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

surg. certif

William Arnold, must, in Aug. 23, 1864. William P. Andrews, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

Samuel O. Allen, must,

1864.

in Sept. 21, 1864

George Barton,

Amos Antrim,

9,

Alexander Bauer, must,

surg. certif.

Privates.

J.

1864; veteran.

of term.

A. Montgomery, bugler, must, in Feb. to bugler Oct. 8, 1864.

William

1,

Horace D. Boone, must, in Feb. 3, 1864. William F. Bracefield, must, in Sept. 5, 1864. William R. Bayne, must, in Sept. 5, 1864. Nathan Barlot, must, in Aug. 16, 1864. John Byle, must, in Aug. 16, 1864.

term.

1864; veteran.

Anthony Arley, must,

1864; veteran.

Louis P. Bogid, must, in 1864. William W. Bowers, must, in Feb. 2, 1864. Wellington Bertolet, must, in JIarch 3, 1864. Benneville Bertolet, must, in Feb. 2, 1864.

exp of term.

Graetf, bugler, must, in Jan. 29, 1864; pro. to 8,

1864.

5,

exp. of term.

disch., exp. of term.

bugler Oct.

1,

March March 8,

in

Valentine Bloomer, must,

disch., exp. of term.

;

1864.

1,

;

Sept. 24, 1864; veteran.

Charles H. McCorckle,

on

exp. of term.

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

artificer,

not

;

exp. of term.

pro. to artificer Sept. 24, 1864.

])ro. to artificer

Barker, must, in Feb.

Harrison G. Bouse, must,

died

;

1864

7,

;

at Covington, Ky., Sept. 23, 1863.

John H. Thompson,

.Tan.

roll.

Leonard Bollman, must,

Frederick

corp., must, in Sept. 24

August K. Musser,

in Sept. 24. 1861.

;

disch., expiration of term.

George

re-

Jacol) Boas, must, in Jan. 29, 1864.

Henry

expiration of term. disch., expiration

muster-out

Anthony

expiration of term.

George Carver,

Armstrong, must,

Daniel F. Bressler, must, in Feb.

to corp.Sept. 24, 1864.

Mahlon

J.

Edward H.

vet.

;

Samuel

Charles Andrews, must, in

vet.

;

Elias K. Cooper, corp., must, in Sept. 24, 18(!1

Amos

wounds

of

29, 1864,

ceived at Petersburg.

Joseph E. Kaucher,

W. H.

June

City Point, Va.,

18t. in

Sept. 24, 1861

in

Annapolis, Md., April

Mover, must,

;

vet.

of term.

George

1861

24,

Meniiihis, Tcnn., Aug. 15, 1863. ;

March

;

26,

died at

Mem-

1864; not on

THE CIVIL WAR. William Eyan, must, out

in

March

7,

1864; not on must.-

out

Isaac C. Stenner, must, in Sept. 24, 1861 vet. C. Stahk-r, must, in Sept. 24, 1861; vet. ;

Joseph Shunk, must, in Feb. 1, 1864. Henry N. Schwartz, must, in Jan. 29, 1864.

Thomas

March

Shipley, must, in

of term.

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

;

;

Seagrist, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

disch., exp.

of term.

1,

John

C. Schmidt,

must

in Sept. 24, 1861; disch.

May

1862. C.

;

died at

Captain CJeouge W. Duiiell was born at November 25, 1816.

and then removed to Reading, finding employment with the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company. After .serving for .several years, he was elevated to be foreman painter, and continued in this position till he enlisted in the Civil War. In April, 1861, he was mustered into ser-

of term. ;

1864

16,

12, 1865.

disch., exp.

disch., exp.

;

March

Wernersville, Pa.,

He 24, 1861

Patrick Scanlan, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

John

S. Zellers, must, in Feb. 1, Franklin A. Zellers, must, in Jan.

1S64.

Wilmington, DeL, on

of term.

Henry

Eli Yeager, must, in Aug. 2.'), 1864. Francis R. Yocum, must, in Feb. 1, 1864. Edmund S. Yoder, must, in May 1, 1862 disch., exp.

disch., exp.

of terra.

Martin H. Smith, must, in Sept.

1864; not on must.-

13,

John

Davis Sisler, must, in Sept. 13, 1864. Joseph D. Shadt, must, in Aug. 20, 1864. Henry Slicliter, must, in Sept. 24, 1861; disch., exp. Sellei'.s,

June

;

1864.

8,

in

roll.

of term.

J.

Isaiah

James Wright, must,

roll.

Henry

281

Sherwood, must, in Sept. 24, 1861 died Aug. from wounds received at Antietam, Md.,

learned his trade of painter at Philadel-

phia,

;

20, 1863,

John L. Smith, must,

in Sept. 24, 1861

died Oct. 26,

;

1862.

rai.sed

months.

three

for

independent

an

which was mustered

Jacob H. Schaeffer, must, in Sept. 24, 1861 died at Washington, D. C, Dec. 8, 1861. George H. Schwenk, must, in Jan. 25, 1864 died at Peeble's Farm, Va., Oct. 18, 1864. John Smith, must, in March 26, 1864; not on must. ;

Light Artillery as

vice with the Ringgold sergeant,

Sept. 17, 1862.

of

battery

he

artillery,

September

service

into

first

Afterward

21,1861, as Durell's Independent Battery D. He was commissioned cai)tain, and continued

;

out

roll.

in active service

account of sickness.

Samuel A. Tobias, must,

in Sept,

1,

1864. ;

Nathan Thomas, must,

May

in

16, 1861

and

trict,

disch., exp.

;

.served this office

He

tinued.

must.-out

must,

in

March

7,

1864; not on

roll.

in

Aug.

23, 1864.

Patten, must, in

to 134th Eegt.

Company, 1883.

Jacob Ulmer, must,

March

tics,

1864; trans.

23,

N. Y. Vols., date unknown.

Charles P. Weisig, must, in Sept. 24, 1861

Henry Wensel, must, in Feb. James Warr, must, in Feb. 1,

1,

;

vet.

1864.

1864.

He

John Wolf, must, in Feb. Henry Waltman, must, in

1,

Sept. 19, 1864; drafted.

was discon-

and

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

Edward H. White,

;

disch., exp.

must, in Sept. 24, 1861

Wealthy, must,

died

November

in religious belief a devoted

in

9,

poli-

Baptist.

and Masons. He possessed a fine musical education, having been a superior tenor singer. In his associations he was very highly esteemed.

The

following

County

.service.

volunteer com]ianies

were

enlisted

in

the

from nine

months' service

;

disch.,

Company A, One Hundred and Regiment, Captain L. Heber Smith.

Company

B,

Twenty-eighth

One Hundred and Twenty-eighth

Regiment, Captain William McNall.

exp. of term.

exp. of term.

He

took an active interest in the Odd-Fellows

Berks

of term.

J.

it

was an ardent Republican

NINE months'

1864; vet.

George Williams, must, in Aug. 25, 1864. George Weaver, must, in Sept. 5, 1864. Charles Weaver, must, in Sept. 5', 1864.

Emanuel Wolf,

as foreman.

He

Dillman Worley, must, in Feb. 1, 1864. David Walters, must, in Feb. 1, 1864.

William

till

then resumed painting in the em-

ploy of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad

of term.

Taylor, William,

Van

U))on his return home,

he was appointed provost-marshal of this dis-

Levi Thcjmas, must, in Sept. 24, 1861 vet. James Thompson, must, in Sept. 27, 1864; sub.

Silas C.

September 23, 1864, when

till

he was obliged to resign his commission on

in Sept. 24,

1861; disch.,

Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Regiment, Captain William H. Andrews.

— HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLYANIA.

282

Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Regiment, Captain John Kennedy. Company I, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Regiment, Captain Richard H. Jones. Company K, One Hundred and Twenty-eiglith Resiment, Captain George Newlcirk. Company

E,

One Hundred and

ment, Captain Jacob

Fifty-first

Regi-

S. Graeff. Fifty-fir.st

Regi-

Fifty-first

Regi-

Fifty-first

Regi-

ment, Captain William K. Boltz. I,

eleven p.m. of same evening

led across the stream to the support of

and at two A.M. on the 17th ploughed field close to the

troops, in a

At earlj^ dawn

it

was

Hooker's

bivouacked

it

hostile lines.

the battle opened, and the brigade

was immediately advanced

in close colimin.

At

was ordered into the fight, and it made a most gallant charge through the wood and into the memorable cornfield where the enemy lay concealed. Unforhalf-past six A.M. the regiment

Company G, One Hundred and ment, Captain Levi M. Gerliart. Company H, One Hundred and Company

At

Creek.

One Hundred and

ment, Captain William L. Gray.

made by

tunately the charge was

the flank, and

before the regiment could be formed into line

Company K, One Hundred and W. Weida.

Fifty

first

Regi-

ment, Captain James

the

of the enemy had

fire

become very

hot.

Colonel Croasdale was instantly killed while in

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIJIENT. This regiment

vva.s

resjionse to

recruited in

Governor calling

the proclamation of the

for

issued July

for nine months,

troops to serve

K

Companies A, B, E, H, I and Berks County. The regiment rendezvoused at Camp Cnrtin, and was there 21, 1862.

the act of giving orders and bringing his

mand

into position

;

com-

and soon afterward Lieut-

enant-Colonel Hamersley was severely wounded and borne from the field. This caused the men to fall into confusion for a time,

but being soon

command

then held the

Avere recruited in

restored to order, the

mustered into the service of the ITnited States

ground where the struggle had been most desperate, and where the regiment had lost some of its bravest and best men, and was afterwai-d

from the loth to the loth

of August.

The

majority of the regimental officers were selected

On

from the companies named.

August

was ordered

it

to

the 16th of

Washington, moving

command of Captain William H. Andrews, of Company E, because no officers had

when it rested on the field until nightThe loss was thirty-four killed and eighty-

relieved, fall.

five

wounded, of

whom

six died subsequently of

William H. Andrews

under the

their

been as yet commissioned. Soon after

was among the killed, he having in the fight exhibited the most daring courage. After the

at the capital

it

encamped on Arlington Heights the 21st

it

its

arrival

crossed the Potomac, ard for a week.

was

moved to Fairfax Seminary, and on Woodbury, where for a week

the fierce

Chantilly



it

fighting

at

Bull

was incessantly engaged

timber and erecting

it

was

field's corps.

evening, where

it

was held

battle.

But the enemy

evening of the 16th

it

in

assigiied to

Mountain by

position during

of a renewal of the retired,

arrived

being employed at the latter place

Much

ing fortifications.

and

late in the

at

Antietam

Reading, he having this

regiment.

in construct-

needed clothing was

resume the duties of his

The command, moving forward

the night in expectation

at Sandv Maryland Heights,

obtained here, and Major

Crawford's brigade, of Williams' division, Mansrapidly, arrived in front of South

regiment was encamped

and afterward on

in felling

Captain Samuel Croasdale, of Bucks County, had been appointed colonel and the staff .selected. On September 6th the regiment, in light marching order, recrossed the Potomac; and entered upon the Maryland campaign. At Frederick City, on the 14th,

Cajitain

Run and

In this time

fortifications.

the

battle

On Hook,

the 29th to Fort

during

wounds.

Wanner

resigned to

office

as

mayor of

left to assist

in

recruiting

]\Iajor

Matthews

com-

was

missioned as colonel and Captain Dyer as major.

The regiment Mas then thoroughly December 16th where

it

halted,

it

and on the 17th

to Fairfax Station.

drilled.

arrived at Neabseo

With

it

On

River,

turned back

the exception of

some

toilsome marching after Stuart's cavalry on the 28th,

it

remained in camp until January

1863, when

it

proceeded to Stafford

House, and went into winter-quarters,

guard and picket duty

till

lv3.

Aug. 14, 1862. Aug. 14, 1862; captured

Chancellorsville, Va.,

Henry Schmeck, must,

Joseph Becker, cai)tured at

19, 1863.

in Aug. 14, 1862. Aug. 14, 1862. Frederick Brown, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Van R. Barnhart, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. James A. Benade, must, in Aug. 14, 1862 disch. by Special Order Oct. 'J, 1862." Nicholas L. Becker, must, in Aug. 14, 1862 disch. on surg. certif Dec. 3, 1862. Daniel Beyler, must, in Aug. 14, 1862 disch. on surg.

Lemon Buch,

must,

in

;

William H. Andrews,

Aug.

capt., must, in

1862;

16,

killed at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

Thomas M.

1862

1st lieut. Sept. 18,

Chancellorsville, Va.,

Charles Rick,

May 2d

1st sergt. to

2,

wounded

;

at

1863.

must, in Aug. 14. 1862;

Jr., 1st lieut.,

from

pro.

;

Richards, capt., must, in Aug. 14, 1862;

from

pro.

lieut.

Aug.

1862

25,

;

to

pro. to adjt.

from

pro.

John

Aug.

must, in Aug.

lieut.,

14. 18()2;

25, 1862.

T. Eyrich, 2d lieut., must, in Aug. 14, 1862

Thomas

;

sergt. Sept. 18, 1862.

L. Snelljlst sergt, must, in Aug. 14, 1862; pro.

from

sergt. Sept. 18, 1862.

William C. Eben,

1st sergt.,

died Sept. 20 of

Md., Sept.

must, in Aug.

wounds received

to Corp.

Henry

1.S62

14,

;

at

Antietam,

14,

1862; pro.

17, 1862.

Wilson Sterling, sergt., must, from Corp. Aug. 25, 1862.

Reuben Burkert,

sergt.,

Aug.

25,

in

Aug.

must, in Aug. 14,1862; pro.

1862

;

to sergt.

Siegfried, sergt., must, in

March

Aug.

14,

1,

1863.

1862

;

pro.

i'rom Corp. Sept. 14, 1862. sergt., must, in Aug. on surg. certif Feb. 13, 1863.

Aaron Arnold,

William H. Koch,

sergt.,

14,

1862; disch.

must, in Aug. 14,

18()2;

disch. on surg. certif. April 13, 1863.

Henry Clemens, Samuel

Aug. 14, 1862. Aug. 14, 1862;

corp., must, in

Faff, corp., must, in

corp. Sept. 18, 1862 cellorsville, Va..

;

May

pro. to

missing in action at Chan2,

1863.

E. G. Gattschall, corp., must, in Aug. 14, lS(i2 to corp. Sept. 18, 1862.

certif March 25, 1863. John A. Buch, must, in Aug.

14,

1862

;

pro.

E. Boone, must, in Aug. 14, 1862 Harper's Ferry, Va., Oct. 22, 1862. Frank Cannon, must, in Aug. 14, 1862.

pro.

com.

;

died at

Henry

C. Care, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. George W. Clark, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Amos Dease, must, in Aug. 14, 18:!2. William Diefenbach, nui-t. in Aug. 14, 1862. Lewis Diefenbach, must, in Aug. 14, 1862 killed Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862. Matthias Dunkle, must, in Aug. 14, 1862; died ;

at

at

Stafford C. IL, Va., April l,l8(J3.

George B. De Hart, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. S. C. Ermentrout, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Jacob Ely, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. David Fleck, must, in Aug. 14, 1852. John Faber, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Frank Gable, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Clinton M. Graul, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Lewis Gable, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Peter Geiger, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. A. H. Goodenough, must, in Aug. 14, 1862George Graeff, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Joseph Gable,' must, in .Vug. 14, 1862 disch. on surg. ;

certif ;

to

sergt. Sept. 1, 1862.

Thomas

1st lieut. Sept. 18, 1862.

James H. Gentzler, 2d

;

James Hiram

March

25, 18153.

L. llcss, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. llafer, must, in

Aug.

14, 1862.

THE CIVIL WAR. When

John Hess, must,

in Aug. 14, 1862. Jacob Hull, must, in Aug. 14, 18(52. Henry C. Homan, must, in Aug. 14, 1862

disch. on

;

1863; absent, in

3,

hospital, at muster out.

1862.

Aug. 14, 1862. Edmund Leaf, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. James E. Moore, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. George A. Masseno, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. George Merget, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. William Mason, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Bently H. Miller, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Henry Maderia, must, in Aug. 14, 11^62. Jacob A. Miller, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Daniel F. Moore, must, in Aug. 14, 1S62. John D. Miller, must, in Aug. 14, 1862; missing action at Chancellorsville, Va., S. Oster,

May

2,

in

1863.

14, 1862.

roust, in Aug. 14, 1862. William Seigfried, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. John D. Stieff, must, in Aug. 14, 1862. Nicholas Seitzinger, mu94

They defended

perishable fame.

of the First Corps agaiu.st bers; covered

its

the

front

left

overwhelm-

retreat against the

with the army

num- with

snperior

vastl}'

up

pursuit of Lee, coming

in

his rear-guard at

Funk.stown on the 12th,

and his main body near William.«port on the

ing ma.sses of the enemy at the Seminary, west

14th.

of the town, and enabled me, by their deter-

term of service had now nearly expired.

mined

was, accordingly, relieved from duty on the

withdraw the This was on the

resistance, to

parative safety.

com-

corp.s in first

In

day.

the crowning charge of the third day of the battle the shattered

remnants of the One

Hun-

dred and

Fifty-first

Pennsylvania,

Twentieth

New York

State Militia, flung them-

with the

upon the front of the rebel column, and drove it from the shelter of a .slashing in which

selves

it

had taken shelter from a flank attack of the

Vermont

I can never forget the ser-

troops.

me by

this regiment, directed by and genius of McFarland. I believe they saved the First Corps, and were

vices rendered

gallantry

the

among

Army

the chief instruments to save the

of the Potomac and thecountry from unimaginable disaster."

by

The encomium

General Doubleday

.shunned hard fighting) was

and

here awarded

won

a fearful

at

was by the stubborn fighting of this regiment, and other fighting like it, that the

cost,

it

was finally won. Lieutenants Seaman and George A. Trexler were of the killed, and Lieutenaut-Colonel McFarland, Adjutant Samuel T. Allen, Captains George L. Stone and James W. Weida, and Lieutenants Benjamin F. Oliver, Thomas L. Moyer, Henry H. Merkle, AVilliam O. Blodget and Albert Yost were of the wounded, and Captains William K. Boltz and William L. Gray, and Lieutenants James L. Reber and

great

battle

Aaron

S.

Charles P. Potts were taken prisoners. tenant-Colonel

McFarland submitted

amputation of one leg on the

field,

Lieuthe

to

and for want

of suitable medical attention, the operation had

be repeated, and the other leg was

to

ribly mangled.

despaired

of,

For many weeks

left ter-

his life

meu

suffered all the hor-

rors of long imprisonment.

Colonel Allen,

who had

been granted a furliattle

was

imminent, hastened to the front, arriving on the

and resumed command.

escaped.

Its It

and returned to Harrisburg, where, on it was mustered out. Company E. This company was recruited in Berks County, and was mustered in October 28, 1802, and mustered out July 30, 1863, unless 19th,



otherwise mentioned. Jacob

S. Graeff, capt.,

Aaron

S.

Seaman,

Ist

must, in Oct. 29, 1862. lieiit., must, in Oct. 29, 1862

killed at Gettysburg, Pa., .July

Caleb C. Parvin, 2d

lieut.,

March

resigned

must, in

23, 1863; died

Thomas L. Moyer, 2d lieut., pro. from 1863;

wounded

Azariah P. Brady, 30,

1863

;

;

29, 7,

1862;

1863.

Istsergt. April

July

1,

1,

1863.

pro. from sergt. April

absent, sick, at muster out.

Franklin Parvin, 1863;

Oct.

April

at Gettysburg, Pa.,

1st sergt.

;

1863.

1,

sergt.

wounded

sergt., pro.

from private April

at Gettysburg, Pa., July

1,

1,

1863;

absent, in hospital, at muster out.

James Dulson, sergt., pro. from |)rivate April 30, 1863; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. Elias K. Wagner, sergt., pro. to com.-sergt. Nov. 8, 1862.

William F. Seaman, corp., killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. Benjamin F. Egolf, corp., wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. Edmund Kauffman, cor))., wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. William Heckman, corp., wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. William F. Harvey, corp.

John Hinkle, corp. Henry M. Miller, July

1,

Corp., killed

at

Gettysburg, Pa.,

1863.

Michael Lienk, musician, wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 184.

P. Lee, Corp., must, in

to 'J7th Regt. P. V. Sept.

(1,

July lS(i4.

21, 18(14;

trans.

THE CIVIL WAK. John

B. Penrod, Corp., must, in July 21, 1864; trans.

to 97th Regt. P.

V. Sept.

6,

1864.

William Snyder, musician, must, Frank McCoy, musician, must, in

July

in

21, 1S64.

.July 21, lS(i4.

PrlnileK

Frank M. Amos, must, Joseph

JI.

in .July 21, 1864.

Armstrong, must, in July

21, 1864.

Jacob Auman, must,

John

Beard, must, in July 21, 1864. William G. BarndoUar, must, in July 21, 1864. Joseph Bayer, must, in July 21, 1864. Jacob S. Biddle, must, in July 21, 1864. Jacob S. Baker, must, in .July 21, 1864.

S.

Ritchey, must, in July 21, 1864; trans, to (i,

1864.

Calvin L. Snare, must, in July 21, 1864. .John W. Swarts, must, in July 21, 18t)4

Clouse, must, in ,Iuly 21, 1864.

trans, to

;

97th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. Jacob E. Steeley, must, in July 21, 18(J4 trans, 97th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. Augustus Skijjper, must, in July 21, 1SG4. Thomas Werts, must, in July 21, 1864. Benjamin F. Whitman, must, in July 21, 1864. Charles R. Whitehead, must, in July 21, 1864. Richard Williams, must, in July 21, 1864. ;

Cleaveland, must, in July 21, 1864.

Jacob H. Castner, must, 6,

21, 1864.

John C. Sparks, must, in July 21, 18t)4. John Sparks, must, in July 21, 1864. Henry Swarts, must, in July 21, 1864.

Irvin B. Cleaver, must, in July 21, 1864.

W.

July

97th Regt. P. V. Sept.

Per. Chamberlain, must, in July 21, 1864.

Fr.

in

B. Richards, must, in July 21, 1864.

Adam

Amos H.

trans, to

L. Repogle, must, in .Tuly 21, 1864

Jacob M. Rahn, must,

in .Tuly 21, 1864.

.John S. Bechtol, nuist. in July 21, 1864.

Harmond

Henry Myers, must, in July 21, 1864. Nelson Moore, must, in July 21, 1864. William McMahan, must, in July 21, 1864. L. H. Peck, must, in July 21, 1864. Henry C. Penrod, must, in July 21, 18(i4; 97th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. William B. Reed, must, in July 21, 1864. Simon

Allison Abbott, must, in July 21, 1S64.

328

1864, organization

in

July

1864

21,

97th Regt. P. V. Sept.

6,

Benjamin Donaldson, must, Sept.

18(i4; trans, to

18(;4; trans, to

1864.

in

organization

6, 18()4,

trans. Sept.

;

unknown.

William Cramer, must, in July 21, il7th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. Alexander Clark, must, in July 21, July

21,

1864; trans.

unknown;

disch.

ONE Ht'XDREn AND NINETY-FIFTH KEIilMENT. Tiiis

liy

G. O. July 22, 1865.

regiment

wa.s principally recruited

Lancaster County

in July,

period of one hundred days.

Levi M. Gockley, Erastus J. Gump,

organized at

July in July

xnust. in

21, 1864.

mu.st.

21, 1864.

companies,

Camp

must, in July 21, 1864.

major.

in

97th Regt. P. V. Sept.

July

21, 1864; trans, to

6, 18(i4.

William Henershitz,

July 21, 1864. July 21, 1864; trans. Sept.

C. Hamer, must, in 6, 1864, organization unknown. James M. Isett, muat. in July 21, 1864. James A. Ib.acli, must, m July 21, 18«;4;

97th Regt. P. V. Sept.

6,

its

organization

After

a halt

elected it

pro-

of three days

moved on to Moiiocacy Junction, where,

two months, it was engaged in guarding the bridge which spanned the creek, and the lines of railway and it was thoroughly for a period of

nnist. in

John

it

Company B, was

the day of

ceeded to Baltimore. there

Washington Hall, must, in .Fuly 21, 1864. Samuel G. Hetrick, must, in July 21, 1864.

two

Curtiu, on the 24th of July.

Oliver C. James, of

On

It included

B, from Berks County. It was

must, in July 21, 1864.

Levi P. Garrett, must,

Thomas

A and

in

1864, to serve for a

William Fulton, must, in July 21, 1864. Benjamin H. Grove, must, in July 21, 1864.

Andrew B. Garner, Thomas G. Garner,

to

;



and instructed for many of the officers and men had no previous military training. On drilled

trans, to

1864.

Jacobs, must, in July 21, 1864.

Joseph Jessner, must, in July 21, 18(14; trans, to 97th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. F.lijah Kettering, must, in July 21, 1864. Samuel B. Kauftman, mu.st. in July 21, 1864; trans. to 97th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. William Leonard, must, in July 21, 1864. Joshua T. Lucas, must, in July 21, 1864. Daniel Liuderman, must, in July 21, 1864. William P. Long, must, in July 21, 1864; trans, to 97th Regt. P. V. Sept. 6, 1864. Frank M. Masters, must, in July 21, 1864. William J. Masters, must, in July 21, 1864. John Morris, must, in July 21, 1864.

the

1st

of October

it

proceeded to

Berkley-

County, Went Virginia, and was posted along the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad,

with headtpiarters at North Mountain Station,

where

it

remained

till

the expiration of

its

term

Three hundi'ed of the men reenlisted to serve for one year, who were con.solidateewis, .lames Longacre, William Longlott, Z. Taylor T^acy, Henry C. Ludwick, George Mason, James Moore, Winfield S. Miller, Marehall Miller, Peter McNoon, William Mcjyaughlin, Adam McCove, George Nagle, William H. Nail, Zacharias Oswald, James O'Neil, Edward Pettit, .ioseph Purchase, Alexander Price, Peter Price, Tliomas Quinn, Fr.ancis Ray, Lawrence Resler, Henry Row, Charles Rogers, Franklin Roberts, James O. Rooke, William Soudera, Albert Stroud, John Kilpatrick, ,Tohn I),

Thomas

John Steely, Lawrence W'biteman, John AVells, Thomas R. Werner, Henry L. Wolfskin, Jacob Wolf'skill, Samuel White, Fran-

Seitzinger,

cis

Staflbrd,

Young.

ONE year's service.

the 5th the regiment

The

following six volunteer companies were

liaviiig lieen enlisted

Co. B,

20.'5th

in

tlie

in

one year's service,

August, 1864:

Regt., Capt. Joseph G. Holmes.

Co. E, 205th Regt., Capt. William F. Walter.

Co. H, 205th Regt., Capt. Franklin Schmehl. C!o.

D, 19Sth Regt., Capt. Isaac Schroeder.

Co. G, 198th Regt, Capt. William L. Guinther. Co. F, ly2d Regt., Capt.

John Teed.

TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTH REGIMENT.

H

Companies B, E and of tliis regiment were Berks County. They rendezvoused

recruited in

iuid served

Harrisburg, pro-

left

Washington, crossed the Potomac,

to

and went into camp at Fort Corcoran. At the end of a week it moved to Camp Distribution, and taking

hundred recruits

charge thirteen

in

and drafted men there, proireded with them by transports to City Poinl.

James, and

in

was engaged

It

army

of (he

left

in

line to the

building forts and earth-works

for the defense of City Point, nearly the

entire

On OctoArmy of the

regiment being called to duty daily. ber

{)th

was ordered

it

James, and

;it

the

to

the end of twenty day.s, during

was cmployi'd

which

it

ttirned

and ])roceeded

Potomac.

_With

regiments,

it

picket duty,

(Ui

the

join

to

Army

it

re-

of the

new Penn.sylvania

five other

formed a pi'ovisional brigade, com-

manded by General Hartranft, and was attached Ninth Corps. Early in December this brigade moved to the relief of the Second and to the

Fifth Corps, which

were threatened with

an

upon a demonDecember 15th the

attack l)y the enemy, while out

on the

stration

regiments

si.\

organized Tliinl

of the

brigades.

the

in

into

brigade

this

Ninth

Second

Corj)s,

composed of two Fifth was

Brigade.

With the

corps.

General

the division, and

marches to the

left,

e.xception in

Hartranft

General Parke of oc«isional

support of aggressive

movements, the regiment remained during the winter, where drill

were

a division, which, became the

The Two Hundred and

commanded the

On

left.

comimsing

near Fort Prescott, on the

from Berks County

E, as lieutenant-

One Hundred and Fourth Regiment.

picketing from the

Fritch.

:

the

in

ceeded

Hyneman, David Bingeman.

Francis

Company

1864,

2,

William

selected, including

Lieuteuant-Coloncl Walter

colonel.

On

Sergeants: Nicholas Seitzinger,

Corporals

were

Slia.abor.

Second Lieutenant, John Wesley. First Sergeant,

Curtin, where, on September

officers

r. Walter, captain of

I.

(Recruited at Reading; mustered in July 13, 18G4; mustered out November 17, 1804.)

Co.

Camp

at

field

1864.

325

Army it

c, 1865 disch. by G.

2,

was

It

Company D, of

for a time a battalion composed of companies in Oley and E.\eter townships. His

wounded

1864;

29,

one year.

commanded

1864.

6,

September, 1864,

in

for

men, from the

hospital, at muster out.

O. June

company

whilst in battle on the

in Sept. 6, 1864.

John M.

2,

a

at Hatcher's

March

G. 0.

June

he raised

One Hundred and Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania

William H. Riugler, must, in Sept. 6, 1864. Jncob F. Reich, must, in Sept. 6, 1864. Jacob Rahnenzahn, must, in Sept. 6, 1864; wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29,1865; disch. by

O.

and

of 1863;

mustered into service as

ter-out roll.

George

as a private during the rebel

also served

invasion

Biiruey O'Brian, must, in Sept. 13, 1864.

John O'Harra, must,

333

He

Friedensburg,

in Sept. 10, 1864.

in Sept. 10, 1864; pro. to

sergt., musi;. in Sept. 10,

ded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March by G. O. June 6, 1865.

Henry Smith,

sergt.,

29,

1864

;

woun-

1865

;

disch.

must, in Sept. 10, 1864; killed

Farm, Va., March 29, 1865. Isaac W. Brown, corp., must, in Sept. 10, 1864. at Lewis'

Cornelius Heist, corp., must, in Sept. 10, 1864. W^illiam Angstadt, corp., must, in Sept. 10, 1864

wounded

at Peeble's

James Deverau,

Edward

Farm, Va., Sept.

30, 1864.

corp., must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Lorish, corp., must, in Sept. 10, 1864; pro. to

corp. Dec. 10, 1864.

Frank Reifsnyder, to corp.

coqi., must, in Sept. 10, 1864; pro.

March

30, 1865.

which was known as the " Washington Grays," and mustered into the three months' service as

Aaron Detweiler, corp., must, in Sept. 10, 1864 wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865 disch., date unknown.

Company

Abraham Babb,

C, in the Seventh Regiment Penn-

corp., must, in Sept.

;

10,1864; died

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

334 of

wounds received

at Lewis'

Farm, Va., March

29, 1865.

William B. Weiser, mus., must,

in Sept. 10, 1864.

Samuel Heist, must, Elias Hopper, must, Philiji

in Sept. 10, 1864. in Sept. 10, 1864.

Hertzog, must, in Sept.

James G. Heilman, must, G. O. Juue 14, 1865.

Priraies.

Peter Ang-stadt, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Solomon Angstadt, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. David Allbright, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. William Alexander, must, in Sejrt. 10, 1864 wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; disch., date unknown.

in

10, 1864.

Aug.

29, 1864; disch.

by

William Hirst, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; killed at Lewis' Farm. Va., March 29, 1365. James Higgins, must, in Aug. 30, 1864; not accounted

for.

;

Jacob Ackerly, must, in Sept.

10, 1864.

Levi Boyer, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. William Batz, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

John

Barrett, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

William Butterweck, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. David Bernhardt, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Henry Babb, must, in Sept. 10, 1864 wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; disch., date ;

unknown. F. C. Brenthingcr, must, in Sept. 10,1864; disch.,

1864; wounded at

Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; disch. by G. O. July 16, 1865.

Reuben Eck, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. John Ely, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865 disch. by G. O. Sept. ;

in Sept. 10, 1864.

Jacob Fenstermaker, must, Benjamin Fahringer, must,

Abraham

in Sept. 10, 1864. in Sept. 10, 1864.

5,

1864.

John Fossler, must, in Sept. 6, 1864. Adolph Fuchs, must, in Nov. 12, 1864; O. June 9, 1865.

disch.

by G.

David Good, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. John Graw, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Laphner Guinther, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Charles Greaff, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Frederick Gintzley, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; disch. by

G. O. June 20, 1865. Michael Gerlach, must, in Sept. 7, 1864; died at New York Nov. 13, 1864; buried in Cypress Hill Cemetery, L. I.

David D. Gtith, must,

in

Aug.

29,

1864; not on mus-

10,

1864; wounded

Farm, Va., March 29, 1865 G. O. June 15, 1865. William Koch, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; died at Lewis'

ington, D.

;

C, Dec.

5,

disch.

at

by

Wash-

1864.

in Sept. 10, 1864.

10,

1864

died at City

;

George Miller, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; wounded White Oak Road, Va., March 31, 1865. Edwin L. Miller, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. Michael Mills, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Reuben Moyer, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Henry Mertz, must, Francis

Muman,

at

in Sept. 10, 1864.

must, in Sept.

7,

1864.

in Sept. 10, 1864 wounded Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; disch. by G. O. June 5, 1865. Henry P. Michael, must, in Aug. 29, 1864; wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; disch. by

Wellington Miller, must,

;

Levi Gresle, must, in Aug.

Sept. 10, 1864.

Jacob Noll, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. William H. Potter, must, in Sept. 12, 1864; not accounted for. Philip Rapp, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Reuben Reifsnyder, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; wounded at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 18()5 disch., dale unknown. Samuel Reifsnyder, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. ;

Alfred Seiple, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. Jacob Smith, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Augustus Shupurt, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Levi Schlegel, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Annes

Sicher, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Thomas

Strach, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Peter Shunk, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; wounded at

ter-out roll.

John

Morris Kissinger, must, in Sept.

G. O. May 31, 1865. Amos McCarty, must, in

Frederick, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Tilghn. S. Frederick, must, in Sept.

out

Franklin Jacoby, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. William J. Jefferson, must, in Aug. 19, 1864; not accounted for. Levi Kressler, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. Levi Klopp, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

at Lewis'

11, 1865.

James Fegley, must,

not accounted

Point, Va., Jan. 23, 1865.

Dull, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. 10,

30, 1864;

Charles Laderer, must, in Sept.

Joseph Dethamble, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Nicholas Dry, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Dry, must, in Sept.

Aug.

Jonathan Landes, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Abraham Levan, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

in Sept. 10, 1864.

Charles Dillinger, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. Lewis Deroner, must, in Aug. 29, 1864.

Lewis

in

for.

John Long, must,

date unknown.

Thomas Christman, must,

Abraham

John Hart, must,

29,

1864; not on muster-

roll.

Heist, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

D.ivid Heist, must, in Sept. 10, 1864.

Lewis' Farm, Va.,

O.

May

March

29, 1865;

disch.

by G.

16, 1865.

David Smith, must, in Sept. 10, 1864; killed at Lewis' Farm, Va., March 29, 1865; buried in Poplar

THE CIVIL WAR. Grove National Cemetery, Petersburg,

William Eyrich,

D,

div.

A, grave 45. Gideon D. Staudt, must, in Sept. 10, 1864 killed at Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 buried in Poplar Grove National Cemetery, Petersburg, div. A, sec.

;

;

sec. B,

grave

George Williams, must.in Oct.

1864; not on muster-

6,

In July, 1864, a regiment was recruited in for a service of one hundred days, and mustered in as the One Hundred and

One of

following.

com-

the

new companies

united with

it,

which,

together, were mustered in as a second regiment

of the same number (One Hundred and Ninetysecond).

One

of the nine companies was

department and engaged in various duties

August 24th, when

was mustered out of

it

till

ser-

vice.

at

F.

pro.

—This

company was

Reading and, unless otherwise

men were mustered

1,

1865.

Sebastian Muringer, corp., must, in Feb. 14, 1805

March

recruited

the

stated,

out of service August 24,

corp., must, in Feb.

10,

1865; pro. to

Aug. 7, 1865. Benneville Weidner, corp., must, in Feb. 10, 1865; pro. to Corp. Aug. 7, 1865. Solomon Kuth, corp., must, in Feb. 18, 1865; pro. to corp. Aug. 7, 1865. George Shoemaker, corp., must, in Feb. 22, 1865 pro. to corp. Aug. IS, 1865. corp.

George Clay, corp.

5,

Feb. 10, 1865

;

John Teed, capt., must, in March 3, Samuel Snyder, 1st lieut., must, in March 3, 1865 disch. June 5, 1865. James W. Hill, 1st lieut., must, in Feb. 17, 1865 pro. to 2d lieut. March 3, 1866 to 1st lieut. Aug. 6, 1865.

;

;

;

5,

1865.

corp., must, in Feb. 14, 1865

May

5,

;

June

6,

1,

1865; com. 2d

;

lieut.

1865; not mustered.

Charles Shanberger, pro. to sergt.

sergt.,

March

1,

must, in Feb.

from Corp. March

1,

14,

1865

;

1865.

Franklin Teed, sergt., must, in Feb. from corp. March 1, 1865. William Kutz, sergt., must, in Feb.

14,

10,

1865 1865

;

Charles E. Williams, corp., must, in Feb. 22, 1865. 14, 1865. 14, 1865.

Privates.

Jacob Andy, must,

in Feb. 10, 1865.

Henry Adams, must,

in Feb. 10, 1865.

George Alspach, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Victor Bower, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Henry Benade, must, in Feb. 10. 1805. Jacob Bord, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Conrad Bower, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Daniel Brown, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Abraham Bridigham, must, in Feb. 10,1865.

Henry Casper, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Henry Cole, must, in Feb. 10, 1805. Elwood Dickinson, must, in Feb. 10, 1865; by G. O. Aug.

Thomas O. Doyle, must, in Feb. 22, 1865 died at Harper's Ferry, Va., June 10, 1865 ; buried in

from Corp. March

Wanner,

corp.

Nat. Cem., Winchester, lot 25. Frederick Dorey, must, in March 1, 1865. Joel Deisher, must, in Feb. 10, 1865.

Mahlon Doutrick, must, in Feb. 22, 1865. Samuel Derr, must, in Feb. 14, 1865.

;

1,

March

5,

1865.

Andrew

J. Fisher,

in Feb. 10, 1865.

must, in Feb. 10, 1865.

William Foreman, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. William H. Fassig, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Daniel Finkbone, must, in Feb. 10, 1865.

pro.

Reuben Y. Gruff, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. James Gambler, must, in Feb. 14, 1865.

1865.

corp., must,

Esser, must, in Feb. 22, 1865.

Joseph Foreman, must,

Charles Gear, must, in Feb.

1865.

in Feb. 14, 1865; pro. to

disch.

28, 1865.

pro.

A. Weidenhamer, sergt, must, in Feb. 14, 1865; pro.

Wm.

pro. to

1865.

Fredk. A. Clouse, mus., must, in Feb. Oliver R. Hoover, mus., must, in Feb.

Henry

1865.

Philip Carling, 1st sergt., must, in Feb. 14, 1865

March

pro. to

1865.

corp., must, in Feb. 10, 1865; pro. to

May

George Gatz, corp.

corp., must, in

May

;

1865.

pro. to 1st sergt.

;

1, 18i)5.

Com-

pany F, recruited at Reading. The regiment was organized at Harper's Ferry, and when the spring campaign opened, it moved up the valBut few of ley to Staunton and Lexington. the enemy were met, for the fighting there was It was retained in the substantially at an end.

Company

;

March

John Bouse,

It was mustered out of service

panies re-enlisted for one year, and in February,

1865, nine

B. Baker, cnrp., must, in Feb. 14, 1865

to corp.

;

Philadelphia,

November

pro.

10,

15, 1865.

corp.

ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-SECOND REGIMENT.

in

;

corp.,

March

Henry Horn,

roll.

Ninety-second.

Henry

must.in Feb.

1865

to corp.

pro. to Corp.

15.

Aaron Troxel, must, in Aug. 29, 1864. John Weind, must, in Sept. 10, 1864. out

335

Joseph Gambler, must,

14, 1865.

in Feb. 14, 1865.

Isaac Grett, must, in Feb. 14,1865.

Isaac Good, must, in Feb. 14, 1865.

Benjamin Hilbert, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Daniel S. Herbine, must, in Feb. 14, 1865.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

336

were enlisted and mustered

Daniel F. Heister, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Daniel Hain, must, in March 4, 1865. Wm. Hinnershitz, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Daniel C. Hughes, must, iu Feb. 14, 1865 G. O. June

of "Port ;

disch.

by

Charles Heller, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. David Hinkle, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. 14, 1865.

James Howard, must, in Feb. Samuel Haffer, must, in Feb.

10, 1865. 10, 1865.

Bernard Inspink, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Thomas King, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. William Kline, must, in Feb. 14, 1865 G. O. Aug. 1, 1865. Reuben Kline, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. John Keptner, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Thomas Kocher, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Francis Kocher, must, in Feb. 14, 1865.

John Lash, must,

;

disch.

by

Feb.

Grime, James McGuigan, John A. Weber, H. Kerschuer, James Snyder, Adam P.

S.

William Wenrich, Lewis Frantz, Robert H. Scott, George Dewald, Cyrus HefFelfinger, John Gery, Charles A. Andrews, Levi Kaufman.

10, 1865.

This band was

mustered

into

service

at

Bladensburg, Md., on the IGth of September,

Samuel Phillips, must, in March 1, 1865. Samuel Rollman, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. William B. Reeser, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. James Regiel, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Henry S. Reber, must, in March 4, 1865.

Adam

:

BEEXVILLE BAND.

Jacob Mink, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. B. Franklin McCoy, must, in March 4, 1865. Henry Phillips, must, in Feb. 10, 1865.

;

County

Joseph Maurer,* Joseph Bridegam,* Henry Hyneman,* Samuel S. Moyer, Nathaniel Confer, Aaron Boyer, Thomas P. Smith, John A. Moyer, Levi Strunk,* George Kemp,* Thomas W. Combs,* Franklin Fabian,* Henry Hyneman, Jr.,* Daniel Fox, M. P. Thompson, Justice Garrett, John Seaman. William Deem, Henry Snyder, W. S. Hertlinc, T. P. S. Roby,* Moses Nolan, Richard Lenhart, Frank Nolan, George Lindsay.

Henry

Jacob Sweetzer, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Joseph Sweezy, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. William Scbuck, must, in Feb. 10, 1865 absent, at muster out.

commanded by

Captain D. B. Kaufman, in May, 1861, ac-



Valen'e Muringer, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Christian Miller, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. in

with the company

Note. Those marked with a star were from Reading. The greater part of the others were from Lee^po.'t.

in Feb. 25, 1865.

Henry Moyer, must,

in

Artillery,"

credited to Schuylkill

13, 186.5.

Jonas Hoch, must, in Feb.

Clinton

1861, as a regimental band, with Twenty-sixth

Regiment of Penn.sylvauia Volunteers (three years' service), and attached to Hooker's First Brigade. It remained at Bladensburg about then it moved to Budd's in camp Lower Potomac, on Maryland Shore,

two months sick,

Ferry, in

;

and continued there

all

During

winter in camp.

March 14, 1865. Levi Stutzman, must, in March 14, 1865. George D. Smith, must, in March 25, 1865. John Trupp, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Redam Trump, must, in Feb. 10, 1S65.

the latter part of April

Samuel Weidner, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. John Wells, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. William H. Wall, must, in Feb. 10, 1865.

tered out of service at Harrison's Landing,

Speicker, must, in

William Weiler, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. David Weiler, must, in Feb. 10, 1865. Wm. Whitmoyer, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. William Youse, must, in Feb. 14, 1865. Henry D. Young, must, in March 7, 1 865.

MISCEI-LANEOUS EXLI.STMEJJTS FROM BERKS COUNTY.

army

at Fortress

it

joined McClellan's

Monroe, and was engaged

in

Peninsula campaign, commencing at Yorktown at Harrison's Landing. It

and ending

August

8,

was muson

1862, by reason of an act of Congress

passed to dispense with regimental bands.

men

The

returned to Philadelphia, where they were

paid off and sent home.

TWENTIETH CAVALRY.

The

following veterans were enlisted for three

Company One Hundred and

years in

H of the Twentieth Eighty-first

Cavalry,

Regiment Penn-

Numerous men from Berks County were en- sylvania Volunteers. They had been enlisted War, for which the county in the nine months' service, and upon the exThe following statement piration of their term of service re-enlisted, and received no credit. contains the names of those that I could ascer- were assigned to the company named. This tain. It is not complete. was in January, 1864. The company had been listed in the Civil

PORT CLINTON ARTILLERY.

The following

volunteers from Berks Countv

enliisted in

enlisted

the six months' service, and also re-

upon the expiration of

its

term.

THE CIVIL WAR. was struck

head by a musket-bullet and His remains were brought to Reading and interred in Charles Evans' Ceme-

Tliey were in the Shenandoah Valley cam-

Hunter and Sheriin numerous battles, includ-

ing

New

Market, Piedmont, Quaker's Church,

Liberty, Salem, Snicker's

Gap and

tery.

UNCLASSIFIED.

Gordonville,

and they were also in various battles during the concluding campaign before Petersburg the regiment occupying the extreme left. It was

Isaac Addis, sergt., Co. F, 3d Pa. Art.



mustered out of service

in

July 13, 1865.

Wm.

in

in

Aug.

11,

1862

Joseph F. Angstadt,

G. Hill, commissary-sergeant.

Solomon Ash,

Hoffman, George W. Johns, Samuel Karnes, George Paulhamus, John Hill, Henry A. Phillippi, Livingston Saylor, Samuel yhaeffer, Archibald Suavely, Joseph F. Watson,

I,

122d Regt. P. V., must.

resigned Oct. 11, 1862.

;

3d Regt. Art. 25th Regt. P. V., must, in

priv.,

priv., Co. C,

April 18, 1861.

Joseph Aulinbach,

priv., Co.

must, in Feb. 16,

1864

Plank-Road, Va., Oct.

Alfred Wentzel, Daniel Yohn.

;

E, 182d Regt. P. V., wounded at Boydton

27, 1864.

Dr. Jonathan Bertolette, surg. U. S.

FIFTY-THIRD REGIMENT.

B,

P. V.,

April 18, 1861.

John M. Amweg, capt, Co.

— Emanuel

COMPANY

Regt.

must, in Sept. 22, 1861. must, out Sept. 30, 1864. Anthony Aman, priv., Co. A, 25th Regt. P. V., must.

(See

Francis C. Khode, sergeant. Edward C. Eben, first corporal.

Thomas

Aikens, priv., Co. C, 8th Ind. corp., Co. H, 104th

Theodore Aker,

5 Bates' "Peuna. Vols.," 65-66.)

Privates.

in the

instantly killed.

paign, under Generals Sigel,

dan, and participated

337

John D.

The following men from Birdsboro' were enin Company B, Fifty-third Regiment

frig.

"Lancaster."

Bertolette, adjt., 6th Regt. P. V.; also of 48th

Regt.; pro. to capt.

and A.

A

G. Sept. 25, 1862.

listed

Benneville Barnhart, com. -sergt., Co. H. 5th Pa. Cav.,

Pennsylvania Volunteers

must, in Aug. 10, 1861 must, out Aug. 7, 1865. Joseph A. Barford, Corp., Co. D, 2d Pa. Res., must. in May 25, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 1862. Charles Bellman, priv., Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in Feb. 5, 1864; must, out Aug. 23, 1865. Israel H. C. Becker, sergt., Co. E, 23d Regt. P. V., must, in July 17, 1861 pro. to sergt. -maj. Henry W. Bland, 1st sergt., Co. H, 82d Regt. P. V., nmst. in Aug. 31, 1861 must, out Dec. 27, 1862. H. Beckhardt, sergt., Co. M, 5th U. S. Art. George Beyerle, corp., Co. E, 80th Ohio Inf Henry Bower, priv., Co. H, 104th Regt. P. V., must. ;

Lewis R. Bland, second lieutenant. William W. Millard, sergeant.

;

Samuel Lacy, Henry Haliu, Albert Hoffman, Samuel W. Kerst, Augustus Wert. Musician, Caleb H. Bland. Corporals

:

— Edward

;

Jacob Bower, John Davis, George Davis, Enoch Hoffman, Henry Henry, George B. Kupp, Charles Lacy, Cyrus Rhoads, Augustus Shirey, George Siegfried, Joseph S. Wickline, Jacob Yerger, George Wanger. -

Privates.

And

the following

A

Company

in

Bland,

Corporals

Levi

Britton,

in Sept. 22, 1861

men from Boyertown were

Cornelius

Franklin

June

Gobel,

32d Regt., P. V., must, in on surg. certif Nov. 13,

S. Bickley, q.m., 7,

1861

disch

;

.

1861.

Jeremiah Boone,

Captain

must, out Sept. 30, 1864.

;

Geo. S. Bickley, priv., Ringgold Art.

of this regiment

Uxley, Richard Isaac Spotts, Levi Walleigh. :

;

Bowman Bell

priv.,

Co. D, 2d Pa. Res., must, in

was the son of June 7, 1861 must, out June 17, 1864. Hon. Samuel Bell, and born at Reading Jan- Joseph Bowers, priv., Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must, Oct. 1, 1861; must, out Aug. 23, 1865 vet. uary 20, 1825, where he was educated. After remaining at home till about 1860, he removed to Conrad Bower, priv. Co. F, 192d Regt. P. V., must, J.

;

in

;

Philadelphia.

When

Feb. 10, 1865

the Rebellion broke out

he was commissioned a captain

;

in

must, out Aug. 24, 1865.

Bowman, priv., Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav. A. C. Buckwalter, marine, enlisted in naval service, Jer.

in the Fifteenth

Regiment of Regular Infantry, and spent the sum-

1863, for two years on flag ship "Louisville," in

mer of 1 861

Mississippi Squadron,

at Erie

ing and mustering

he was transferred

and Philadelphia

as a recruit-

"Sampson." Samuel Breneiser,

In October following the Western army, under

officer.

to

Henry A. Brown,

General Buell, and participated in the battle of Pittsburgh Landing. Whilst gallantly leading his

company

against the enemy's works, in

battle of Murfreesboro',

in

G.

the

on Dec. 31, 1862, he

|

July

W. H.

14,

priv., Co.

and afterward on

ram

G, 174th P. V.

D, 192d Regt. P. V., must. must, out Nov. 11, 1864.

priv., Co.

1864

;

Berbeck, priv., Co. B,

1st.

Mass. Inf.

Lewis Brownbach, priv., Co. F. lt)7th Regt. P. V., must, in July 18, 1864; must out Nov. 11, 1864.

;

HISTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENXSYLVANIA.

338 A.

W.

Burkert,

Co. B, 62d Regt.; killed at

priv.,

Josiab Ebbert, priv., Co. G, 1st Battal. 19th U. S.

Memphis.

Lemon in

Inf.

V.

Biich, 1st lieut. Co. D, 213th Regt. P.

March

1865; resigned

4,

May

mu.st.

2G, 1,«65.

Uriah R. Burkert, Co. A, 6th Regt. Res. Vol.; must. pro. 1st lieut., and then in service July 27, 1861

Lewis Eltz, priv., Co. B, 98th Regt. P. V. Daniel Epstein, sergt., Co. A, 34th N. J. Vols. Jervis

H,

to capt. of Co.

191.?t

commanded

Regt.

Regt.

on June 16, 17, 1864, in front of Petersburg taken prisoner Aug. 19, 1864 paroled Feb. 22, ;

Aug.

May

must, out with Co.

11, 1862;

15,

William Edwards, Sept. 23, 1861

19, 1861

;

Aug.

disch.

Va.,

;

1864. Cline, sergt., Co.

Daniel F. Coller,

May

John

Sept.

lieut.

capt., 11th Regt.

;

1st lieut., Co. F,

10, 1861

Dec.

Aug.

5,

1864; to adjt. April 16, 1865;

priv., Co.

29, 1862

Hiram Dickinson,

vet.;

May

29, 1865.

priv.,

Aug.

Co. A, 195th Regt. P. V.,

priv.,

priv., Batt.

M, 3d

;

Pa. Art., must, in 9,

capt., Co. F,

Nov.

1,

173d Regt. P. D. M.,

1862; must, out with

company

M.

Geiger, priv., Co. D, 46th Regt. P. V.,

2,

;

153d

D, 46th Regt. P. V., must, in

priv., Co.

1861

operator, Co. G,

died July 31, 1864, of wounds re-

ceived at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., on July 20,

1864; buried at Chattanooga, Tenn., grave 247.

Charles Gerlach, priv., Co. B, 98th Regt. P. V., must.

company

in Sept. 25, 1861

June

vet.

;

in

N. Y. V. Joseph Geiger,

Oct. 11,

Co. D, 47th Regt. P. V.,

1864; must, out with

2,

Feb. 15, 1865

17,

vet.

must, out, expiration of term.

Donahower,

to sergt.,

;

company July

John M. Geiger, telegraph

Fred. Dehart, corp., Ind. Batt. B, must, in

Dec. 25, 1865

pro. to corp.

must, in Jan. 13, 1864; must, out July 16, 1865;

Sept.

must, in Jan.

9,

16, 1863.

Frederick

21, 186.5.

;

;

must, out with

John R. Faust,

G, 114tb Regt. P. V., must.

must, out

;

in

1865.

must,

must, in July 16, 1864; must, out with Co. June

Doremus, priv. Co. I, .56ih X. Y. Vols. Wm. F.Dougherty, 1st. lieut., Co. K, 59tli Regt. 2d Pa. Cav., must, in Nov. 30, 1861 disch. Dec. 16, F.

;

1864.

;

wounded

at Petersburg, Va.,

18, 1864.

Charies A. Golding, priv., Co. B, 1st P. V. Isaac Good, priv., Co. D, P. V. Art.

Charles Gillman, bugler, Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in

Feb. 8, 1864 must, out Aug. 23, 1865. George E. Goodhart, priv., Co. B, 152d P. V. David Gilmore, corp., Co. I, 88th Regt. P. V., mu.*t. in Sei)t. 24, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. March 7, ;

Martin P. Doyle, 1st lieut., Co. I, 21st Pa. Cav. must, in July 11, 1803; wounded at Cold Harbor; resigned Jan. 11, 1865.

Henry W. Drake,

priv.,

;

May

3,

1863

;

disch.

May

20, 1865.

Thomas Deem, marine,

enlisted in naval service 1861; served during war, mostly on "Tallapoosa."

Charles H. Ebbert, in Feb. 4, 1864

;

1864.

Co. C, 12th N. H. Vols.

Rufus K. Dieter, priv., Co. K, 93d Regt. P. V., must. in Aug. 2, 1862 wounded at Chancellorsville,

priv.,

Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must.

must, out Aug. 23, 1865.

Hiester Ebbert, corp., Co. G, 1st Battal. 19th U. S. Inf.

;

Feb. 23, 1864; must, out with battery Nov.

1st

;

Va.,

V.

vet.

50th Regt. P. V., must.

from com. -sergt. to

pro.

;

Jan. 26, 1864 must, out Aug. 7, 1865. Dehart, priv., Co. D, 15th U. S. Inf.

John

at Chancellorsville,

Fries, Jr., priv., Co. A, 25th P.

1865

Dehart, priv., Co. H., 5th Pa. Cav., must, in

F.

wounded

1863.

in Sept. 19, 1861

33d Regt. P. V., must. must, out with Co. June 17,

Wm.

John

8,

115th Regt. P. V., mu.st.

priv., Co. I,

Isaac L. Fritz, sergt., Co. B, 48th Regt. P. V., must.

Reg. Inf.

priv., Co. B,

1861

Frank Coleman,

1861

K, 77th Regt. P. V., must, in

1865.

must. out. with Regt. July 30, 1865. in

May

David Farling,

Lewis Crater,

Adam

priv., Co.

Abraham Fry, priv., Batt. I, 3d Pa. Art., must, March 7, 1864 must, out with battery Nov.

29th Conn. Vols.

Co. F, 15th U. S. Inf.

sergt.,

25,

I,

1864.

in

A, 96th P. V., must, in

must, out Oct. 21, 1864.

;

Frank M. Cooley, George H. Corbit, in

priv., Co.

;

in Feb. 17, 18()2;

18, 1864.

Frederick A. Clouse, musician, Co. F, 93d Regt. P. v., must, in Oct. 28, 1861 must, out Oct. 28,

1864; must, out July

14,

Jan. 16, 1865; disch. by G. O. Aug. 19, 1865. Samuel J. Fields, landsman, U. S. Navy.

Care, priv., Co. B, 11th Pa. Cav., must, in Aug.

John H.

wounded May

Nicholas Fogel,

1863.

John

;

John A. Fehr,

must, out June 28, 1865.

Effinger Cake, sergt., Co. C, 122d Regt. P. V., must. in

Edes, priv., Co. C, 91st P. V., must, in Aug.

10, 1865.

;

1865

W.

30, 1861

;

W.

F. Gorrell, priv., Co. K, 11th

George W. Green,

Md. V.

1st lieut., 7th Regt..

Res. Inf. Daniel S. Graeff, priv., Co. E, 14th U. S. F. John Grogg, engineer, enlisted in naval service in 1861 served throughout war, and continued in ;

this service of

government

till

his decease, in

1885.

Andrew Grant,

K, 16th Regt. P. V. Militia. William B. Graul, 1st lieut., Co. K, 2d Pa. Cav., must, in Nov. 30, 1861 disch. Nov. 2.5, 1864. priv., Co.

;

THE CIVIL WAR. Charles Glaze,

July

Co. C, 62d Regt. P. V., must, in

sergt.,

1861; wounded in action July

25,

Owen Hamilton,

2,

1863.

Co. B, 11th Pa. Cav., must, in

priv.,

Aug. 19, 1861 disch. Aug. 18, 1864. Robert Hamilton, priv., Co. K, 136th Regt. P. V., must, in Aug. 27, 1862; must, out with company ;

May Frank

K.

fireman, U. S. Navy.

Hain,

U.

eng.

asst.

S.

priv., Co. B, 2.5th Regt. P. V.,

Hawk,

must,

in

must.

must, out July 26, 1861. musician, Co. G, 88th Regt. P. V.,

in April 18, 1861

Julius A.

;

Feb. 19,

1864; must,

June

out

30,

Owen Hamilton,

priv.,

Wellington Harbach,

Co. B, 11th Pa. Cav.

priv., Co. B,

3d Batt, 15th U.

S. Inf.

W.

Harrington, sergt., Co. F, 15th U. S. Inf. Hartman, priv., Co. M, 5th U. S. Art. Joseph B. Haslett, priv., Co. D, 40th Regt. P. V. Samuel Heckman, priv., Co. B, 48th Regt. P. V., must, in March 31, 1864 (3 years); died June 12, 1864, of wounds received in action buried in Nat. Cem. at Arlington. Israel

;

Frederick Heifer, C.

M. Heilman,

priv., Co. B,

corp., Co.

in Feb. 24, 1864

;

3d Batt. 15th U.

S. Inf.

G, 50th Regt. P. V., must.

must, out with

company July

Daniel M. Heller,

priv., Co., B,

March

1866;

2,

105th Regt. P. V.,

July

must, out

11,

priv.,

22, 1864; must,

Co. F, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in Feb.

out Aug. 23, 1865.

H, 20th Pa. Cav. sergt., Co. H, 20th Pa. Cav.

Thomas G. Hill, Henry G. Hunter,

sergt., Co. L,

must, in Sept. 17, 1862 1,

;

162d Regt. P. "V., on surg. certif.

disch.

priv., Co. ;

;

must, out Sept. 18, 1864, ex-

;

James Koch, James Koch,

Co. L, Ist Pa. Cav.

priv.,

98th Regt. P. V.

priv., Co. B, priv.,

Co. F, 2d Battal. 15lh U. S. Inf.

George H. Koons, priv., Co. A,* 200th Regt. P. V., must, in Aug. 29, 1864; wounded at Fort Steadman, Va., March 25, 1865. Jacob Kunsman, priv., Co. H, 1st Battal. 18th U. S. Inf.

Jacob H. Kunsman, priv., Co. H, 21st Pa. Cav. Louis Lichstern, 2d lieut., Co. F, 98th Regt. P. V., must, in Aug. 22. 1861; wounded at Salem Heights, Va.,

May

1863.

3,

William Laning, priv., Co. Aug. 1, 1861.

Henry

I,

8th Pa. Cav.

;

must, in

Lott, priv., Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in Sept.

23, 1861; must, out

Aug.

23, 1865.

W.

Lewis, priv., Co. G, 82d Regt. P. V., must. in Dec. 20, 1863; must, out July 13, 1865; vet.

Joseph H. Lutz, 2d

;

Co. D, 198th Regt. P. V.,

lieut.,

F. M.arion Jones, priv., Batt. B, 4th Mass. Art. sergt.,

Co. G, 2d Pa. Cav., must, in

Oct. 25, 1861; captured; died at Andersonville,

Lees, priv., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf. priv., Co.

Valentine H. Lieb,

A, 3d Battal. 15th U.

S.

priv.,

Co. E,

l.st

Battal. 18th

U.

S.

Inf.

Jan. 12, 1864; must, out July 17, 1865. Franklin S. Lins, priv., Co. A, 48th Regt. P. V., must. in Feb. 6, 1865 must, out July 17, 1865. George A. Leinbach, sergt.-maj., 104tli Regt. P. V., ;

Johns,

priv.,

Co. H, 181st Regt. P. V.,

must, in June 25, 1863; must, out with

company

Jan 6, 1864.. Jeremiah Kachel, corp., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf. James Kerper, sergt., Co. G. 1st Battal. 19th U. S. Inf Jonah Keim, priv., Co. A, 53d Regt. P. V must, in Sept. 18, 1861 must, out June 30, 1865. ,

;

;

disch.

by G. O. June

16,

1865.

Joel Lins, priv., Co. A, 48th Regt. P. V., must, in Jan. 16,

1864

;

must, out July 17, 1865.

Lins, priv., Co. A, 48th Regt. P. V., must, in

Feb.

6,

1865

;

Michael E. Lutz, April 20, 1861

John Lyons,

Ga., April 15, 1864; grave 565.

W.

Lees, priv., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf.

Nathan

16, 1863.

JohnH. Johnson,

Gaben James

must, in Sept. 12, 1862

27, 1863.

John Hunter, priv., Co. H, 1st Md. Militia. William H. Houck, priv., Co. G, 124th Regt. P. V., must, in Aug. 12, 1862 must, out with company

George

1861

18,

piration of term.

Elias Lins, priv., Co. A, 48th Regt. P. V., must, in

A, 7th Pa. Cav.. must, in Feb. 10, 1865 must, out Aug. 23, 1865. Fritz Hinterkirch, priv., Co. E, 75th Regt. P. V., must, in Aug. 28, 1861 disch. on surg. certif.

May

1863.

Inf.

1864.

Benjamin B. Hollenbach,

Feb.

in Sept.

Augustus Lessig,

Hill, priv., Co.

Oct.

6,

must, in Sept. 17, 1864.

1865.

David Henry,

John

May

E, 135th Regt. P. V.,

1862; captured at Chancellors-

Knauer, corp., Co. H, 31st Pa. Cav. James H. Knerr, priv., Co. G, 47th Regt. P. V., must.

Isaac

30, 1865.

must, in

priv., Co. 18,

Adam

Daniel Koller,

1865.

C.

;

June 13, 1864. Heniy A. Kinch, viile.Va.,

war

sloop of

" Iroquois."

Thomas Hammer,

Levi Keller, priv., Co. D, 3d Prov. Pa. Cav. Michael Kelly, priv., Co. E, 28th 111. Inf. Wm. Klineyoung, musician, Co. D, 30th Regt. P. V., must, in June 8, 1861 must, out with company

must, in Aug.

29, 1863.

Thomas Haines,

339

priv.,

must, out July 17, 1865. priv., Co.

March

Anthony Matter,

P. V., must, in

Co. B, 2d Battal. 18th U. S. Inf.

Benjamin Markley, must, in

H, 5th

must, out July 24, 1861.

;

Co. E, 88th Regt. P. V.,

priv., 6,

1862

sergt.,

;

must, out

March

5,

1865.

Co. C, 116th Regt. P. V.,

must, in Aug. 11, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1S62 must, out with company June ;

3,

1865.

Levi McChalicher,

1st lieut., Co.

H, 88th

P. V., must.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

3i0

wounded

at Five Forks, Va., by G. O. May 15, 1865. Richards McMichael, lieut.-col., 53d Regt. P.V.; also lieut.-col., 194tli Regt. P. V., must, in July 24, 1864 must, out with regiment Nov. 6, 1864. in Sept. 10, 1861

April

1,

1SG5

;

;

;

James McGuigan, band, 26th

Wm.

Henry M. M. Richards,

Pa. Regt.

Samuel Richards,

priv., Co. E, 1st Battal., 18th U. S. Inf N. P. Rodney, priv., Co. E, 15l8t Pa. Vols. George W. Roland, priv.. Bat. B, 1st Pa. Art., must.

McManus, capt., 15th Regt.U. S. Reg. Array. Peter McKenney, priv.. Bat. A, 1st Pa. Art., must, in

in Feb.

S.

Feb.

2,

1864; must, out with battery July 25,

1864; must, out Aug. 23, 1865.

James McKinney, in

9,

Henry Romig,

priv., Co.

G. 1st Battal., 19th U.

S.

Jnf.

Miller, priv., Co. A, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in Feb.

2.3,

1864; must, out with battery June

3,

1865.

1865.

Edwin

Co. A, 26th Regt. P. V.

priv.,

Militia.

disch.

May

27,

priv.,

1861

;

Co. E,31st Regt. P. V., must.

wounded

at Charles City Cross-

Roada June 30, 1862 must, out with company June 16, 1864. Samuel Millmore, sergt., Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in must, out Aug. 23, 1865. Oct. 14, 1861 D. F. McLean, priv., Anderson Troop.

Charles Rothenberger, mus., Begt. Band 23d Regt. P. V.

David Rohrbach, priv., Co. C. 116ih Regt. P. V., must. in Aug. 16, 1862; killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 1.3,

1862.

;

George Reber,

1st lieut., Co. F, 116th

wounded

must, in Feb. 19, 1864;

May

Va.,

8,

Regt. P. V.,

at Wilderness,

1864; must, out July 14, 1865.

;

Dr. R. B. Rhoads, surg., com. Oct., 1862, at

Howe,

Robert Martin, priv., Co. I, 51st Regt. P. V., must, in Feb. 26, 1S65 (one year) must, out with company July 27, 1865. Augustus Millard, priv., Co. A. 6th Regt. Pa. Res. Vol.

at Pittsburgh,

Pa. Drafted Militia,

;

Henry

K, 55th Regt. P. V., must. in Jan. 29, 1864 must, out Aug. 30, 1865. Franklin Minkhouse, priv., Co. E, 1st Battal. 18th U. S. Inf. also Co. E, 42d Regt. P. V. Andrew Mitthower, priv., Co. G., 49th Ohio Inf. James McKnight, capt., 5th Regt. Reg. Art. Wm. Monyer, 1st lieut., Anderson Troop. Ohas. P. Muhlenberg, 1st lieut., 5th Regt. Reg. Art. Daniel Moore, priv., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf. John M. Moyer, priv., Bat. D. 3d Pa. Art., must, in Feb. 28, 1S64; must, out with battery Nov. 9, Miller, corp., Co.

Camp

and then with 169th Begt. as ass't surg., having- com-

plete charge of entire regiment; disch. with regt.

July, 1863.

John D. Sauerbier, Augustus Shott,

priv., 1st.

priv.,

Regt. N. Y. Inf

Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav., must, in

;

Oct. 14, 1861

John W.

must, out Aug. 23, 1865.

;

Schall, col., 87th. Regt. P. V.

;

1865.

Frank

Muhlenberg,

P.

Peter Noll,

3st lieut., 13th Regt.

Reg. Inf.

Co. A, 3d Battal. 15th U. S. Inf.

priv.,

Wm.

Parleman, priv., Co. H, 99th Regt. P. V., must. Feb. 25, 1864 must, out July 1, 1865. C. C. Pike, priv., Co. H, 1st Conn. Art. William Plucker, priv., Co. G, 1st Battal. 19th U. S. in

William A. Schall,

priv.,

James G. Seagreaves,

Co.

.

priv., Co.

H, 11th Pa. Cav.

Luther Seiders, priv.. Bat. D, 1st Pa. Res. Art. Michael Shade, priv.. Bat. B, 5th RcL't. U. S. Art. Jacob Simpson, priv., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf .lohn Sipple, corp., Co. B, 32d U. S. Colored Troops. Edmund L. Smith, capt., 19th Regt. Reg. Inf James H. Spohn, priv., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf Jacob Stahlneckcr, priv.. Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf Jacob Swoyer, priv., Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf William Still, ord.-sergt., 11th U. S. Heavy Art. Henry Stine, priv., Co. D, Ind. Pa. Regt.

;

Peter Strasser, priv., Co. A, 6th Reut. Pa. Res. Vols.

Henry

J. Souders,

must, in Nov.

priv., Co. E, 178th 8,

Regt. P. V.,

1862; must, out with Co. July

Inf.

George C. D. Powell, sergt., Co. I, 4th N. J. Vols. B. G. Prutzman, priv., Co. F, 65th Regt. P. V., must. in Feb. 3, 1864; must, out with Co. Aug. 7, 1865. George H. ReifT, 1st sergt., Co. A, 88th Regt. P. V., must, in Sept. 18, 1861; pro. to sergt. June 1865 must, out with Co. June 30, 1865. D. B. Reifsnyder, priv., Co. G, 2d Pa. Prov. Cav.

1,

;

Allen J. Reigcl, priv., Co. E, 46th Regt. P. V., must. in Feb. 28, 1864; must, out with Co. July 16, 1865. priv., Co. I,

48th Regt. P. V., must.

in Feb. 23, 1864, three years; must, out with Co. 17, 186.5.

7,

1861

;

2,

March

W.

1861

27,

priv.,

Co. B, 23d Regt., must, in

prisoner irom

;

1865

;

disch.

A. Thompson, corp., Co.

June I,

June

1,

must, out June

17, 18G4.

1864, to

10, 1.865.

8th Ohio Vols.

Ira U. Travis, priv., Co. C, 11th N. Y. Vols.

James P. Turner, sailor, V. S. Navy. John Teed, capt., Co. C, 116th Regt. Aug. 1863 Feb.

26, ;

P. V., must, in 1862; captured at Gettysburg July 2,

disch.

Nov.

28, 1864.

F. Tracy, priv.. Bat. 28,

1862

;

I,

2d Pa. Art., must, in

disch. Feb. 28, 1865.

James Trumbore,

priv., Co. C, 174th Regt. P. V., must Oct 31. 1862; must, out with Co. William Van Reed, 2d lieut., 5th Regt. Reg. Art. Thomas Watt, priv., Co. D, 67th Regt. P. V., must.

in

AVilliam Rhine, priv., Co. B, 2d Battal, 18th U.S. Inf. Henry J. Richards, mus., Co. A, 3d Pa. Pes., must, in

June

Aug.

Edward

Albert Reinhard,

July

27, 1863.

Albert Thalheimer,

in Dec. 6, 1861

;

must, out Dec. 31, 1864.

THE CIVIL WAR. John Wadsworth,

priv.,

in Sept. 19, 1861

Co. B, 48th Regt. P. V., must.

must, out Sept. 30, 1864, ex-

;

piration of term.

Henry

Adam

S.

Wagner, 13, 1801

trans, to 54th Regt. P.

V. July

4,

1864.

John Arnold, Co.

B, 35th Pa. Inf.

Jacob Bobst, Co. E, 213th Pa. Regt. Charles Bobst,

Wm. Walkner, corp., Co. E, 3d Pa. Res. Dilman Warley, priv., Co. D, Pa. Vol. Art. Adam Waltman, priv., Co. G, 1st Battal. 19th U.

,

195th Pa. Regt.

John W. Burkhart, Co. K, 128th Philip A. Burkhardt, S.

Inf.

Pa. Regt.

.

John H. Brunner, Co. D, 213th Pa. Regt. Henry Bright, David Bechtel, Co. I, 20th Pa. Militia. Lewis B. Bachmiin, Co. M, .5th U. S. .\rt. .

Samuel Weiler,

March

in

Inf.

Amos

Arnold, Co. A, 14th Pa. Inf. William Arnol, Durell's Bat.

Co. B, 98th Regt. P. V.

priv.,

;

Enoch Adams, Co. C, 7th Pa. Inf. George Armpriester, Co. K, 151at Pa. Sergt.

F. Waid, corp., Co. D, 3d Pa. Res., must, in

July

341

1,

priv., Co.

1864

D, 59th Regt. P. V., must.

must, in Prov. Cav. June 17,

;

George W. N. Bitting, Co. B, 167th Pa.

1865.

Weidner, priv., Co. F, 192d Regt. P. V. Benneville Weidner, corp Co. F, 192d Regt. P. V., must, in Feb. 10, 1865; must, out Aug. 24. 1865.

B. B.

,

John Wells,

Egidius Bach, Co.

I,

William Boas,

Co. E, 8Sth Pa. Inf.

Sergt.

John

Sr.,

Inf.

179th Pa. Inf.

Bechtel, Co. K, 46th Pa. Inf

priv., Co. F, 192d Regt. P. V., must, in Feb. 10, 1865 must, out Aug. 24, 1865. H. W. Wentzel, priv.. Co. B, 195th Pa. Tnf.

Charles Bechtel, Co. I, 128th Pa. Inf Corp. Joseph Becker, Co. E, 128th Pa. Inf. Henry Becker, Co. I, 179th Pa. Inf.

Israel H. Wentzel, priv., Co. B, 195th Pa. Vols. Thomas E. Weber, 2d lieut., Co. A, 97th Regt. P. must, in Aug. 22, 1861 wounded at James

William Burns, Co. L, Jacob Christman,

;

;

V., Is-

W. H. Weidenhamraer, March

Thomas H. West, Feb. 26, 1864

3,

Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav.,

priv.,

1864

priv.,

;

must, out Aug. 23, 1865.

Co. B, 93d Pa.

must, out June

;

George Wineland,

priv., Co. B,

must, in

Inf.,

A, 46th Regt. P. V., must. must, out July 16, 1865.

'Wirtz, corp., Co.

in Sept. 2, 1861

;

Woodland, priv., Co. G, 30(h Regt. P. V., must, in June 6, 1861 disch. on surg. certif. Dec. J,

;

22, 1862.

Henry Wahl, Sept.

19,

Co. F, 6th Pa. Cav., nuust. in

priv.,

1861

;

disch.

on surg.

certif.

March,

Henry Yeager, sergt., Co. G, 1st Battal., 19th U. S. F. R. Yoeum, priv., Co. D, Pa. Vol. Art. David Young, priv., Co.G, 1st Battal., 19th U. S.

,

Sergt.

Henry W.

Corbit, Co.

Adim Deem,

.

Christian Eyler, Durell's Bat.

Daniel Eckert, Co. H, 88th Pa. Inf. John F. Fox, Co. H, 21st Pa. Cav. Corp. Frank Fabian, Co. B, .50th Pa.

J.

Corp. Jackson Guilden, Co.

128th Pa. Regt.

locality

where buried.

The





several city

for facility of reference.

CITY CEMETEEIES. Aulenbach.

Cyrus D. Anthony, Obadiah Ack, Co. D, 3d Pa. Res. Charles Auchenbach, Co. C, 48th Pa. Regt. .

I,

.

Inf

Inf

buried in the county

cemeteries are arranged in two classes

.

John Groetzinger, Co. A, 195th Pa. Regt. Corp. Emanuel G. Gottshall, Co. E, 128th Pa.

of Berks, so far as they could be a.scertained,

and the

Inf.

196th Pa. Inf.

I,

.

contain the names of the

who have been

Fisher, Co.

Inf.

SOLDIERS BURIED IN BERKS COUNTY. .soldiers

.

George Drenkle, 1812. Peter De Hart, Co. D, 32d Pa. Inf. William Eck, Co. H, 5th Pa. Cav.

James K. Fisher, David Frankenhauser, John Gruse, Co. F, 34th N.

18, 1863.

lists

Inf.

194th Pa. Inf.

I,

Colonel Fox,

;

followiug

1812.

Inf.

Alfred G. Yeager, priv., Co. B, 129th Regt. P. V., must, in Aug. 10, 1862 must, out with Co. Mav

county

.

.

William J. Carmon, Co. F, 7th U. S. Henry Coleman, Co. A, 25th Pa. Inf.

Howard

1862.

The

Pa. Cav.

Jefferson Dengler,

W.

Wm.

1st

Francis Hartman, Co. G, 6th Pa. Cav.

27, 1865.

2d Battal., 18th U. S.

Inf.

Geo.

Christ,

Abraham Clemens,

land, S. C.

must, in

John

and

Heckman, Co. I, 91st Pa. Inf Mark B. Heckman, Co. K, 115th Pa. Inf. Hiram Hafer, Co. E, 128th Pa. Inf. Corp, Enos B.

Gideon Hepler, Co. E, 46th Pa. Inf. William Hill, Co. G, 28th Pa. Inf. Corp. Daniel E. Hafer, Co.

M, 6th Pa. Cav.

Sergt. Levi Hoffmaster, Co. F, 32d Pa.

Henry A. Harbold,

Co.

Inf

H, 88th Pa. Regt.

Valentine Himmelreich, Co. B, 6th Pa. Cav. Amos Hafer, Co. L, l.st Pa. Cav. John Harner, Co. H, 104th Pa. Inf. Lieut. Levi J.

Homan, Ringgold

Art.

Timothy Heineman, Co. K, 3d Pa.

Art.

.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

342

Francis Hartnian, Co. G, 6th Pa. Cav. Amos F. D. Hook, Co. A, 195th Pa. Inf.

John O. Schoener,

James H. Harner, Joshua Hiller,

Isaac

.

William B. Hofl'master, Co. E, 46th Pa. Regt. Lewis Hotlraaster, Zeno Hoffmaster, Co. I, 20th Pa. Regt. Frederick A. Heller, Mexican War. Nathan Hantsch, Co. E, 46th Pa. Regt. .

Nathan Herring, Henry Herden,

——



Sergt.

.

.

James Monroe Kissinger, Co. H, 50th Pa.

John H. Kendall, Co.

B, 55th Pa. Inf.

G-iorge Kistler, Co. H, 184th Pa. Inf.

John Lotz, John Lautensweiler,

.

A. Lewis, Jackson Levan, A. F. Lewis, Marine. Jacob Leeds. Ringgold Art. Corp. Charles Matthews, Co. A, SSth Pa. Jnf Franklin Maurer, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf. Franklin Maurer, Co. E, SSth Pa. Inf. John McKnabb, Co. H, 50th Pa. Inf. .

.

Sergt.

John

L. Morris, Co. B, 167th Pa. Inf.

Isaac D. Morris, Co.

John

Seigreavcs,

,

128th Pa. Regt.

William B. Schmale, 5th U. S. Art. Corp. George F. Strouse, Co. A, 195ih Pa. Inf

H, 5th Pa.

Cav.

Moses Snyder, Co. K, 93d Pa. Inf. David R. Shadell, Co. G, 1st Ind. Art. David Smeck, Co. M, 5th U. S. Art. John Swavely, Ce. H, 8th U. S. Inf. Matthias Stumpt, Co. C, 6Sth N. Y. Inf. Zacharias Snyder, Co. F, 50th Pa. Inf. Levi Swavely, Co. C, 173d Pa. Inf

-.

W.

.

Damon Struting, Co. E, 46th Pa. Inf. Corp. Adam Shaaber, Co. H, 21st Pa.

.

Inf.

Lieut.

M. Sched, Washington Smith, Co. A, 28th Pa. Regt. George W. Saylor, Co. H, 104th Pa. Regt John Troxel, Co. E, 46th Pa. Regt.

John B. Snyder, Co. B, 41st Pa. Inf. John Shelhorn, Co. F, 1st Pa. Art.

.

Cyrus Hare, Jacob Hawk, Benjamin Kutz,

.

Capt. F. R. Straub, Co. D, 3d Pa. Res.

.

John W. Seitzinger, Co. I, 196th Pa. Inf. John Vickers, marine. John H. Weaver, Co. G, 6th Pa. Cav. Henry Wunder, Ermentrout's Ind. Bat. H. Michael Winter, Co. B, 5th Pa. Inf James Walter, Ringgold Bat. James W. Weidner, .

Daniel C. Weinland, Co. B, 195th Pa. Regt.

John Wunder,

War

,

of 1S12.

Richard Yeager, Co. A, 3d Pa. Res.

Inf.

Slaurer, Co. G, 93d Pa. Inf.

CathfAk.

George Mason.

John Madeira,

Aloysius Araberton, Co.

Sr.

I,

7th Pa. Res.

John W. Anthony,

Isaiah Miller.

Corp. George Miller, Co. A, 196th Pa. Regt.

John Madeira, Jr., Co. K, 2d Pa. Cav. John Marquet, .

Daniel Meek, Jeremiah Miller.

.

Mills, Mexican War. Samuel McKnabb, John S. Nagel, Co. H, 20th Militia. Corp. Harrison Neider, Co. H, 50th Pa. William Henry Philips, Co. H, 5th Pa.

George

.

Benjamin Boulton, Co. H, 50th Pa. Inf. Joseph Bettiuger, Co. C, 4th N. J. Inf. Sergt. Patrick Bloom field, Co. G, 1st Pa. James Boyland, Co. D, 33d U. S. Inf Joseph Bolster, Co. 8, 2d Pa. Cav. John S. Brown, Co. E, 46th Regt. Pa.

Henry

Burkitt,

Inf.

.

.

Harrison Reed, Co. Daniel Ramsey,

S,

Inf.

Inf.

213th Pa. Regt.

Joseph B. Reeser, Co. L, Samuel P. Reed,

.

1st Pa.

Cav.

Rinehart,

.

James E. Eckcnroth, Co. A, 2d Pa. Inf John Eckenroth, Co. E, 176th Pa. Inf. Ignatius Fleig, Co. B, 50th Pa. Inf.

.

John Ruth.

Abraham

JohnCallahan, Co. B, 12Sth Pa. Inf John Deal, Matthias Deysher, Co. H, 61st Pa. Inf Jeft'erson Erlacher, Mexican War.

Lewis Gross, Co. A, 73d, Pa. Inf Michael Gavin, .

.

David Renno, 1812, Uriah Ramsey, Co. I, 1st Pa. Art. Samuel Roland, Co. G, 48th Pa. Inf. Corp. Franklin Rowe, Co. K, 157th Pa. Inf. Lieut. George W. Rapp, Co. H, SSth Pa. Inf. John Roy, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf. William Roland, Co. H, 104th Pa. Inf. William J. Scliohter, Co. M, 19Sth Pa. Inf. Franklin Smeck, Go. 8, 82d Pa. Inf. .

Edward Greth, 25th Pa. Regt. Jacob Gansler, 3d Pa. Regt.

John A. Hock, 25th Pa. Regt. John Heiser, John Hagan, Co. A, 184th Pa. Inf Sergt. George Kemp, Co. D, 1st Pa. Cav. .

Martin Leader, Corp. David Lingle, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf. -.

Redmond McManus,

.

THE CIVIL WAR. Karl F. Miller, Co. G, 6th Pa. Cav. Michael Mulramy, 128th Pa. Regt. George P. J. McKinny, 128th Pa. Regt. War of 1812. Patrick McGivin,

John McManus,

.

Maximilliaii Marquart, Co. C, 200th Pa. Inf.

Nat. Guards, Pa.

Thomas Riley, Co. B, 128th Pa. Regt. Corp. John A. Reichard, Co. H, 21st Pa. Cav. Sergt.

Daniel Reichard,

.

John Rituer, Dick Riley, Thomas Richards, Co. A, .

.

19.5th Pa. Inf.

Zach. E. Snyder, Co. B, 118th Pa. Inf.

Richard Sauter,

.

Sebastian Vinegar, Co. C, 3d N. J. Cav. John Weaver, Co. G, 19th U. S. Inf.

Nicholas Wingert, Co. F,

John Warren,

1st Pa. Art.

.

Charles Evans.

Capt.

W. H. Andrews,

Co. E, 128th Regt.

Paul Aramon, J. C.

.

Ammons,

S.

.

1st

Thomas

Adam

Diefenbach,

E. Brenholtz, 50th Pa. Regt.

.

John

F. Danfield,

Reuben

Ditzler,

Charles Briner, 46th Regt.

Lewis K. Briner,

W. W. Diehl, Co. E, 5th Pa. Inf William Dunlap, Co. H, 50th Pa. Inf Lieut. W. G. De Turk, Co. B, 129th Pa. William Deem, Co. B, 3d Pa. Art. Nathan Eisenhower, Thomas

.

Espenshade, Co. E, 46th Pa. Inf Sergt. Thomas T. Elliott, Co. H, 6th U. David Fox, Co. K, 2d Regt.

.

S. Cav.

.

Faust, Co. D, 198th Regt.

Frill,

.

Rudolph Fueller, U. S. Navy. James A. Fox, Ringgold Bat. John Faber, Col. John Fritz, 93d Pa. Regt. Henry Fleck, Ringgold Bat. Corp. John Henry Fix, 142d Regt. .

James Boyer, Hiland H. Banks, Thomas. E. Boone, Co. E, 128th Regt. .

.

F, 34th

Adam

William

.

William S. Ball, 118th Regt. Robert Bell, Harrison G. Baus, Ringgold Bat. J. Bowman Bell, U. S. Art.

Bat.

Alfred Ermentrout, Co. B, 86th Regt.

Capt.

Alexander Bridegam, Co.

Inf.

F. Eyrich, Co. E, 128th Regt.

Benjamin Ermentrout, Ringgold John East, Co. D, 198th Regt.

Reese Frescoln,

.

.

S. Bickley,

Inf.

Capt.

Emanuel Eck,

J. Regt.

N.

B. R. Bratt, militia.

Henry

.

L. Dellet, Co. B, 30th Pa. Inf.

J. L.

Franklin

.

Robert M. Divine, Co. L, 1st Pa. Cav. Lewis Diefenbach, Co. E, 128th Pa. Regt. George Dobbins, U. S. Navy. W. W. Douglas, Co. K, 95th Pa. Regt. John N. Downs, Co. A, 145th Regt.

H, 88th Regt. Lieut. Michael P. Boyer, Co. H, L28th Regt. Brittian, Co.

John Banks,

.

Jacob Donahower, Ch;irles Diehm, Co. H, 88th Regt.

Capt. Sidney Banks, 3d U. S. Cav.

John

.

Jacob Crow, Co. J, 42d Pa. Regt. Jeremiah Clous, Co. A, 32d Pa. Inf. William Coxell, Co. G, Ist Pa. Inf. George R. Coxell, Co. B, 138th Pa. Inf. Corp.^Isaac Cox, Co. H, 79th Pa. Inf. J. H. Caswell, 1st City Troop. John K. Dunkleberger, Co. G, 6th Pa. Cav. William W. Drayer,

Lieut.

Pa. Art.

William Baehr, Co. H, 50th Pa. Regt. Lieut.-Col.

H, 50th Regt.

.

James Boyer, Co. E, 128th Regt. Charles Briner, Co. E,

.

Lieut. Philip Curling, Co. F, 192d Regt.

W.

.

John Armstrong, Co. G, 5th Pa. Cav. John Althouse, Daniel Auchenbach, Co. H, 68th Pa. Inf. Conrad Anthony, Co. A, 195th Pa. Regt. George

Peter Cline,

Capt. H. E. Cleveland, Co.

Jacob Drexel, Co. K, 93d Pa.

.

Auman,

George R. Coxel, Co. B, 128th Pa. Regt.

Daniel Clouser,

.

William Mc-Manu.s, Albert A. Nagle,

343

Beyerle, Co. C, 194th Pa. Inf.

Volney Bell, Co. C, 50th Pa. Inf. Corp. "Wm. B. Bright, Co. A, 33d U. Corp. George Bost, Co. H, 104th Pa.

S. Inf.

Inf.

Henry Barr, Co. D, 32d Pa. Inf. Henry C. G. Bertolette, Co. B, 50th Pa. Inf Elhanan S. Bechtel,Co. H, 104th Pa. Inf.

George S. Fox, Jacob Frill, Musician Oscar T. Flemming, 93d Pa. Inf Franklin Fenstermacher, Co. C, 50th Pa. Inf Sergt. Charles F. Fredericks, Co. A, 32d Pa. Inf Reuben Frees, Co. M, 5th U. S. Art. Daniel H. Fasig, Co. G, 6th Pa. Cav. Corp. Gabriel Faust, Co. C, 1st N. Y. Engineers. Edward Gentzler, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf .

.

Henry

Grainer, Co. D, 198th Pa. Inf.

Augustus Berger, Ringgold Art.

Corp. H. A. Goodhart, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf

Philip Bitting, Co. D, 32d Pa. Inf.

George

W.

Gentzler, Co.. E, 52d Pa. Inf

.

.

.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

344

William H. Green, Co. E, 128th Ohio

Inf.

Adam

Goodhart, Co. A, 48th Pa. Inf. Henry Gossler, Co. F. Ist Pa. Art.

Sergt. Albert

H. Goodenough, Co. F, 88th Pa.

Inf.

Lewis Gable, Co. E, ll'Sth Pa. Samuel Gross, Co. E, 4(jth Pa.

Inf.

David Heifer, Co.

George Getz,

,

Gries, Durell's Bat.

Major John M. Gries, Capt. George W. Green, 17th U. .

.

.

James Gentzler, 128th Regt. William Gass, 88th Pa. Regt. Aaron Goodman, Co. E, 50th Pa. Regt. Gabriel,

.

Chaplain William R. Gries, Nathaniel Green, U. S. Navy.

.

George Getz, 1812. Garrett H. High, Co. F, 197th Regt.

John Henry Harncr, Co.

Amos

B. Hoff,

B, 93d Regt.

.

.

F. A.

M.

.

Wm. W.

Corp. Charles S. Hornberger, Co. B, 93d Regt. 88th Pa. Regt.

A.

S.

Frederick Hunter,

.



Capt. Samuel Harner,

Henry Homan, Co. E, John Haller, 1812.

12.'^th

Regt.



William Himmelrcich, H. Hunter,

Col. Charles

.

Corp. Henry C. Housum, Co. Sergt.

W. W.

Aaron

B. Hetrich,

30th Regt.

1,

Hart, Co. B. 50th Regt.





George S. Hause, Co. D, 11th U. S. Inf Jacob A. Hamilton, Co. D, 213th Regt. .

Paul Hungerford, Wellington Hawkins, Winfield Holmes, Peter Henley, John H. Henninger,Co. A, 88th Regt. Joseph Heister, Rev. War. Abraham V. R. Hill, Adam J. Heilman, color-bearer, Co. K, 151st .

-

.

Kraft, Co. K, 128. h Pa. Inf.

.

Henry A.

Lotz, Co. A, 93d Pa. Regt.

W. Lawrence,

Co. H, 88th Regt.

Henry A. Lantz, Co.

E, 50lh Regt.

Horace Longenecker, Thomas S. Loesser, Mexican War. George F. Linderman, Mexican War. .

Michael Lotz, Co. E, 46th Regt. Jeremiah Lotz, Co. E, 46th Regt. George Lauman, .

Nicholas Lotz,

.

George M. Lauman, Capt. Jacob Lenhart, Co. A, 3d Pa. Res. Charles E.Mason, Co. H, 55th Mass. Inf George M. Blorgan, Peter Maurer, Co. C, 7th Regt. .

.

Capt. Alex. C. Maitland, Co. G, 93d Regt.

Regt.

Francis L. Hobson, Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav. Henry A. Hinnershitz, 128th Regt.

James M. Hoffman,.

Keifly, Co. B, 55th Pa. Inf.

William Kalbach, Co. E, 205lh Pa. Inf. Lewis Krausher, Co. L, 1st Pa. Cav. William Lorentz, Co. I, 25th N. Y. Cav. Lieut. W. A. H. Lewis, 93d Pa. Inf Corp. Isaac S. Leeds, Co. E, 128th Pa. Inf Corp. Cyrus Lotz, Co. K, 151st Pa. Inf Sergt. John Leininger, Co. B, 50th N. Y. Engs. William Lindecnkle, Co. K, 151st Pa. Inf Joseph Lacy, Co. B, 205:h Pa. Regt. Corp. John F. Linderman, Co. G, 1st Pa. Vol. Benneville Lindemuth,

Capt.

Henry Haberackcr, 12Sth Regt.

John Harbster,

.

.

John

Frank Hrester, U.

.

Levi P. Knerr, Mexican War. Capt. Anthony Kanalassy, Hungarian army. Col. Charles A. Knodercct, 107th Regt. Sergt. Thomas Keely, 142d Regt. Sergt. Daniel Kreishner, Ringgold Bat. William Kreishner, Charles A. Keiter,

James L. Hobson, Co. D, 32d Pa. Regt. Samuel L. Hughes, Co. B, 205th Regt. Francis Kern Hesler, Co. B, 93d Pa. Regt. Capt. Jacob Houder.

Keller.

Lieut. William Krick,

Lieut. Levi J. Hildebrant, Co. E, 40th Pa. Regt.

Sergt.

B, 12Sth Pa. Inf.

Melzer Hughston, Co. A, 88th Pa. Inf William James, Adjt. Albert Jamison, 3Gth Pa. Regt. John D. De B. Koch, Oth Pa. Cav. Thomas Kepple, Revolutionary War. John H. Kershner, Maj. William H. Keim, Army of Potomac. Allen Kutz, Capt. Daniel DeB, Keim, .

S.

Adjt.

Thomas

Inf.

.

George Goodman, Revolution. Allen Gilbert, 93d Pa. Regt. Martin g. Goodhart, Co. G, lUh Pa. Cav.

Charles Green,

Inf.

S.

.

Lemuel

Jonathan Holt, Co. G, 79th Pa.

Henry B. Hartz, Co. H, 104th Pa. Inf. Corp. John Henry, Co. I, 83d Pa. Inf Drum-Major Augustus W. Homan, 93d Pa. Inf Henry G. Heuninger, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf John S. Hinman, Co. H, 104th Pa. Inf. Franklin Harbach, Co. B, 12Sth Pa. Hamilton, Ringgold Art,

Inf.

A. C. Greth, James D. Gabriel, Durell's Bat. Lieut.

Sergt.

.

George W. McMichael, Co. L, 7th Pa. Cav. Joseph Maurer, 5th tJ. S. Art. Henry Martz, Co. G, 198th Pa. luf

THE CIVIL WAR. William Mohr, Co. F, Ist Pa. Art. Maj. Peter Muhlenberg, 31st U. S. Lieut.

Howard Mcllvain,

Jeremiah Mengel, Samuel K. Markley, James Miller, N. Y. Cav. William Moore, James McElroy,

.

J.

Schroeder, Co. H, 2d Pa. Cav.

Elias Schaeffer, Co. E, 46th Pa. Inf.

John Stout, John H. Spitter, Co. A, 195th Pa. Regt. .

.

.

George W. Setley, Co. D, 32d Pa. Regt. Jacob Sweitzer, Co. F, 192d Pa. Regt. A. Schemmelpfenning,

War.

.

W. Xewkirk,

.

.

Edward F.

Co. F, 33d U. S. Inf.

S. Noll,

Sallada,

Lieut. Henry Nagle. Ringgold Bat. George Newkirk, Co. K, 128th Regt.

Peter Stitchter,

James Nickolson,

Peter Shitler,

Augustus Noecker,

Henry F. Orner,

J.

.

.

James Peterson, Henry Pott,

Capt.

.

.



Phillippi,

.

Ferdinand Presser, Durell's Bat.

James M. Phillips, Co. Corp. Henry A. Plucker, Co. Sergt.

.

D, 32d Regt.

J. Stetson, Co. .

Theodore Seyfert, Andrew F. Sigman, William D. Shearer, George M. Taylor, Lieut. Jas. N. Trexler, Co.

F, 32d Pa. Inf.

Sergt. Chas.

B, 50th Pa. Inf.

Sergt.

W.



.

.

.

I,

128th Regt.

Tothero, Co. B, 93d Regt.

Thomas Roberts, 18th U. S. Inf. G. Tre-xler, Co. B, 93d Pa. Inf Milton Trace, Co. A, 20th Pa. Cav.

Wm.

Albert Price, 5th U. S.Art. Lieut. Jas. C. Petit, Co.

Andrew

Albert S. Sheradin, Co. G, 72d Regt.

.

Lieut. William Priestly, Co. D, D. Cr. Regt.

Henry A.

.

.

Nathan Sassaman,

.

Johii Patterson,

.

George Schultz, Daniel Seiders,

Lieut. Jacob Parvin,

John Paulus,

.

Albert Stoutler,

.

.

Peter Phillippi,

.

H. Shultz,

.

Co. E, 46th Pa. Inf.

Jesse Orner,

.

Henry N. Shingel, Corp. Ephraim Strohecker, Co. D, 32d Regt.

Cav.

1st Pa.

William Otto,

21st Pa. Cav.

Jacob Snell, Co. K, 213th Pa. Inf. Irvine J. Seifert, Co. K, 128th Pa. Inf John S. Seiders, Co. B, 128th Pa. Inf

Wm.

Charles Melcher,

William

John H. Snyder, Co. H,

Sergt. Tiif.

Bat. A, 104th Regt.

.Jacob 8. Miller, Revolutionary

Charles

345

H, 88th Pa.

Inf.

Chas. J. Petit, navy.

Major

Corp. Jas. A. Quimby, Co. H, 104th Pa. Inf.

Urias Trate, Co. G, 52d Pa. Inf

Caplaiu John Quimby, 93d Pa. Inf

Geo. Thompsou, Co. E, 54th Mass. Inf (colored).

Reuben Ringler,

J.

Teed, 116th Pa.

Inf.

William E. Ubil,

.

Wm.

.

Van Home,

K. Reifsuyder, Co. E, 128th Regt. Josiah Reber, Co. E, 1st Art. Regt.

.James

Daniel Richards, Co. B, 205th Regt.

Peter Wanner, Co. C, 7th Pa. Inf.

John

James M. Wanner,

Ritter,

.

.

William A. Williams,

.



George B. Rhoads, 88th Regt. Capt. Washington Richards, Co. F, 32d Regt.

Corp. Cyrus W. White, Co. E, 79th Regt. Albert B. Werner,

Henry R. Reinhart,

Henry A. Whitman,

Co. B, 108th Regt.

H. Richards, Co. G, 2d Rhode, Co. E, 128th Regt.

Lieut. Charles

Francis C.

John

Pa.' Mil.

S. Reeser, 11th Pa. Cav.

Joseph R. Robinson, 88th Pa. Inf. Henry Rorke, Co. C, 42d Pa. Inf. Aaron Rightmyer, Co. E, 4,

16,

tion

ject of the organization

are

Adams

— County

in 17!)8

County Military Division— Encampment at Reading in 1842— Battalion Day of 1843— County Militia Companies in

1856— Stiite

National Guard

— Reading

Artillerists

Military Cadets.

The

Revolution closed successfully, but the .spirit of the people continued to pre-

military vail.

ment.

It

was encouraged by the State govern-

Legislation required

it

to be

exercised

for the purpose of maintaining familiarity with its affairs.

This was not only sensible, but also

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PKNXSYLYANIA.

350

Companies, regiments and brigades

prudent.

organized and

were

drilled

fixed

certain

at

tem provided by tiie government of the United Without any training in the " military

States.

The and places within tiie county. meeting was commonly called " Battalion Day."

art," the

It preserved a strong general interest in public

face.

times

aftairs, especially

enabled the

terest

several

respond promptly to

organizations

to

In this

their services.

liberty.

Their promptness was a distinguishing char-

And

acteristic.

them and

for

it

has ever been

Fortunately

the country, their

especially for

services were not needed

.so.

Not

freject

of this biographical sketch, was

Union township on August 21, 1817. His parents died when he was only seven years old, and until his eleventh year he was sent to in

the pay schools which the township afforded,

having lived during sister.

He

this

time with an

elder

then apprenticed himself to the busi-

ness

of printing under George Getz, in

Peter, Jacob, Daniel, Susan, Sarah, Catliarine

office

of the Berks unci Schuylldll Journal, and

and

continued there

ship.

Eight children survived him,

]\Iarv.

Knabb,

Jacob

the

third

son

of

Michael

till

the

Mr. Getz transferred the

newspaper and printing establishment to David

Knabb, the father of the subject of this sketch, F. Gordon, Esq., which terminated his apprenwas born in Oley townshij^ in 1771. In 1800 ticeship. Being desirous of extending his eduhe was married to Hannah Yoder, a daughter cation, he then took a course of study for a year of Daniel Yoder, who was a son of John Yoder, at the Lititz School, and subsequently another of Oley township. The Yoder famil)' in this year at Lafayette College, and afterwards till county descended from John (Hansel) Yoder, a 1840 he was engaged at printing, part of the Huguenot, who emigrated with his brother, time at Reading and the remainder at HarrisYost Yoder, from Switzerland in the early part burg. Whilst at the latter place he was in the of the eighteenth century on account of religious office of the Harrisbury Telegraph, at which The persecution, proceeding first to England and the printing for the State was then done. thence

to

Pennsylvania,

where

they

were

Colonial

Records were being printed

at this

IILSTORY OF

402

BERKS COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANIA.

establishment aud he held the position of fore-

with himself and conducted the newspaper under

man

the firm-name of J.

for a time.

Lawrence Getz as co-partner, began the publication of an English weekly newspaper at Reading which they entitled Reading Gazette. He was interested in In 1840

jNIr.

Ivuabl>, with J.

the publication of

paper

tiiis

till

1843,

when

lie

firm purchased the

Knabb & Co. In 1869 his Reading Daily Times aud

several years afterward the Evening Dispatch,

consolidating the two under the

and Dispatch.

Times

these two papers

—daily and

sold his share in the enterprise aud i-emoved to

with increasing success.

Harrisburg, where, in 1844, he began a cam-

the

paign paper entitled the Clay

brick building whicii

and

Biif/le,

]iub-

fine,

commodious and tlie

title

Reading

They have published weekly



till

now,

In 1881 he erected substantial four-story

firm

is

occupying in

L^c^d ^^""^ lished

it

during the Clay and Polk Presidential

campaign, giving

it

a popularity and success

Whig

equal to any other

paper issued in the

State.

In Januar)', 1845, ]\Ir. Knabb became the editor of the Berks and Schuylkill Journal, a well-established

Whig

some years

its

ued

its

paper at Reading, and

proprietor.

He

has contin-

regular and successful publication from

that time years.

after

till

now, a

jieriod covering

forty-one

In 1866 he associated two co-partners

conducting their business of publication and

He

printing.

has occupied this locality without

change for over thirty years.

Mr. Knabb, upon attaining his majority, came a Whig in politics. From that time

now he

betill

has been prominently identified with

the Wiiig and the Republican

some years

as

jiarties,

acting for

chairman of the County Republi-

can Committee.

In 1860 he was a delegate to

the Chicago Convention, from the Berks District,

which nominated

Abraham Lincoln

for

NEW8PAPEKS. In the matters of protection to home common-school system and of local and internal

president.

industry, of general education through the

imiiroveraents he has been a firm believer, giving

403

which were published in the They were highly appreciated by the community for their clear and sententious style and their valuable information, and the general interest in them grew to such an interesting letters,

Times and Journal.

them through the Journal and the Times unqualified recognition and encouragement. The extent that he was invited to issue them in book"Reading Library" has received his active form, but he modestly declined to gratify this assistance for many years, being now, and hav- desire of many friends. ing been for some time, one of its managers. In 1856 he published the first "Directory of This volume is rare and valuable, Its collection of books was in his old printing- Reading." establishment, No. 11 N. Sixth Street, from the after the lapse of thirty years. It affords abuntime when they were removed from the dant evidence of his enterprise in behalf of "Reading Academy" building till they were serving the public. It contains a large collecLibrary Hall. tion of valuable information relating to Reading placed in its present building



He

was a fearless advocate for upholding the government in its great efforts to sustain the Union during the terrible convulsions of civil In

strife.

this period,

under the administration

of President Lincoln, he held the master of Reading

;

and

office

of post-

1876 he was the

in

Presidential elector from this Congressional district

to

the college M'hich cast

its

for

ballot

Hayes, President, and Wheeler, A^ice-President.

His prominence

local politics

in

won

him admin-

for

the recognition of the national and State

of that period, including a complete

list

of the

taxable inhabitants of the several wards of the

borough for the year 1806.

Mr. Knabb was married

in

1846

to Ellen

C,

daughter of Maehiavel Andrews, a lady highly her many excellent qualities, a member of Christ Episcopal Church

esteemed for

devoted

and

poor people of Reading a great friend,

to the

who was

ever solicitous for

welfare.

During the Civil

their

War

relief

and

she was par-

ticularly active in kindly assistance to the sick

our local hospital, and in matters

istrations in the distribution of political patron-

soldiers in

age during the twenty-five years that the Re-

pertaining to the Sanitary Fair at Philadelphia,

publican party was in power.

The

leaders of

having had charge of one of the departments.

party were his associates, including such

Nicolls, Isaac Eckert,

She died in 1875, leaving a devoted husband and many sincere friends to mourn her departure. In 1879 he was married to Ellen M., a daughter of Mr. James Jameson, a very successful merchant and now the oldest surviving bus-

Boas, Alexander P.

iness

the

prominent men as John

S.

Richards, Levi B.

Smith, William M. Baird, Jacob Hoffman, Dr. Diller

Luther,

Edward Wallace, G. A. Edward Brooke, A. F. Tutton and Henry S. Kupp.

Dr.

These were men distinguished for large intelligence, experience and influence. Such were, indeed, necessary in an agitated condition of the

community during the were equal

to

Civil

but they

towards subserving

its

man

in

Reading.

Mr. Knabb is an Episcobecame a member of this church at

religious belief,

palian.

He

Reading

in 1848, being

surviving members.

now one of

He

is

the oldest

at present,

and has

its

been for some years, a vestryman of the church.

thoughts and

In character, manner and deportment he is unassuming and straightforward and in his busi-

the occasion of preserving

equanimity and of directing feelings

War;

In

the public

wel-

;

ness and social relations he enjoys the confidence

fare.

In 1878 Mr. Knabb, with Mr. William H. Levan, of Schuylkill Haven, as a traveling

companion, made an extended tour through

and esteem of the entire community.

Jacob K. Sterrett was born township,

Berks County,

David

May

1,

was a native

Union His of Cumberin

1827.

Great Britain, France, Switzerland, Italy and

father,

Germany,

land County, Pennsylvania, and died in Berks

visiting all the

in these several old

and

places of importance

historic countries.

In

the course of his travels he forwarded numerous

Sterrett,

County, in 1833, having previously cation

here

traveled

extensively

to his lo-

throughout

— HISTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

404

the United States, and compiled a dictionary of the

Chippewa language.

Knabb

age he entered the

&

(who then published the Reading Gazette) as an apprentice, to learn the trade of a printer, and conof

tinued in this

office till

the office of the Berks

After being in this

Getz,

when he

1845,

and

office

entered

Schuylkill Journal.

twenty years he be-

came one of the proprietors of the Journal.

He

Knabb and

Journal and Times, on account of

ill

terest to his son

till

Co., publishers of the

December, 1881, when,

health, he transferred his in-

William.

He

died

Rhoads'

1884.

occasionally

articles

in

Captain

memory and

He

company.

Forty-second

War

Civil tary

affiiirs

he took an active part

Regiment Before the in the mili-

of the county for some years, hav-

member of the Ringgold Light Arcommanded by Captain James Mc-

ing been a tillery,

K night. Mr.

Sterrett

was married

to

Anna

^VI.

Arnold,

daughter of John Arnold, of Reading) in

(a

1855,

and

had

three

surviving children,

William, Henry and Ellen.

Thomas and

C.

translator,

Zimmerman, was born

at

publisher, editor

Lebanon, Pa., on

the

23d of January, 1838, and was educated

the

common

schools of that place.

At

in

thirteen

was and by

years of age he was apprenticed to the printing

a facile pen, he

After the expiration of his apprenticeship he

of rare interest.

particularly fond of local reminiscences,

the aid of a strong

first

Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia.

November

He

was a superior printer and an enterprising journalist. During his connection with the Journal and Times he contributed 2,



gency of 1862, and then, in 1863, in Captain

continued his business connection with the

firm of J.

he enlisted twice,

Bickley's company, which served in the emer-

tiiirteen years oi'

A\'lien

printing-office

War

Civil

published a series of historical sketches, which related to the early times of Reading.

He

was

business in the

was employed

office

of the Lebanon Courier.

for a short time in the office of

the Philadelphia Inquirer, but soon thereafter,

a great reader and became familiar with the

January 8, 1856, removed to Reading, where was par- he entered the office of the Berks and Schuylkill tial to the works of i\Ioore, Poe, Irving and Journal as a journeyman printer. He remained Cooper. His nature was of a most genial kiud, here until the fall of 1859, when he went to which won him many friends. Though positive Columbia, S. C, wiiere he worked on the State in his actions, he created no enmities. laws in the printing establishment of Dr. Robert In the early history of the St. Matthew's Gibbs, who subse(juently became surgeonLutheran Church he was one of its vestry- general of the Confederate army. On his way men and when the Reading Musical Society thither, while passing through Virginia, Mr. was in its active existence, previous to 1860, he Zimmerman witnessed the great excitement was a prominent member. incident to the John Brown insurrection. While He always resided here in Berks County. on his way to Richmond he was grossly iusulted For several months about the beginning of the by a number of Southern soldiers who were on year 1853 he M'as in South Carolina, engaged the train, their indignation having been excited as a journeyman printer on the legislative pro- by seeing a copy of the New York Tribune in ceedings of that state. his hands, and which he had been quietly i-eadMr. Sterrett was an active Republican and ing. During his stay in Columbia, for having took an earnest part in the management of the expressed sympathy for a poor fellow who had Republican party in Berks County. He fre- been tarred and feathered for mere opinion standard literature of his time.

He

;

quently represented his district in local conventions,

and

his party here in State

conventions

National

— having been

Republican

and national

sake he, too, was threatened with a like indignity. It

was

at this time,

it

should be remembered,

to

the

that the preliminary legislation looking towards

Convention which

as-

disunion was being formulated.

a

delegate

Secession

was

hours of the day and night.

sembled at Cincinnati and nominated Hayes.

discussed at all

He

acted as a jury commissioner of the county

for

the

Rumors of slave insurrections were rife, proclamations summoning the citizens to arms were

years

1881

and 1882.

During the

NEWSPAPERS. and the people wei-e terrified as never Northern men were eyetl with suspicion, and their movements were closely watched. Postal commuuication with the North was tem-

issued

before.

which was afterwards worn so extensively during the war, was being manufactured for the time in that

Knabb's term, July, 1865. He again returned Journal office, and in January following he was admitted as a partner and became associate editor. From that time till now he has to the

The Confederate gray been identified with the publishing firm of J. Knabb & Co. In 1869 the firm became the

porarily suspended. cloth,

first

405

Peace commissioners

city.

proprietoi's

of the Reading Daily Times, and in

1871 of the Evening Dispatch, when these two Times and

were appointed to represent the Southern States

papers were consolidated into the

Washington in the interest of general harmony, and for the uninterrupted preservation

Dispatch.

of slavery. Soldiers were drilling almost nightly

During the Civil War in 1863, he enlisted in Captain D. G. Rhoads's company. Forty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia.

at

John Brown was burnt Columbia in the presence of the multitude. The excitement was intense, and foreshadowed the approaching storm. Even the condemnation of a great wrong like the tarring and feathering of a poor wretch, whose throughout the in effigy

city.

on the

streets of

He

has been the editor of this daily

newspaper ever

since.

In the course of his journalistic experience he has visited numerous points of public interest

His published

throughout the country.

descriptive of these visits in

the

among Journal were widely copied. One of John Brown raid, his description of the Luray Caverns

only offense consisted in a justification, his fellow-workmen, of the

was construed

into

an ev'idence of avowed hos-

tility to the interests

of the South, and indignities

of one kind or another were swiftly

A

such offenders.

visited

upon

single example will illustrate

ginia

—was published

in

letters

and

Timeit

these

Vir-

in

pamphlet form,

illus-

by the proprietors of the Hotel and Cave Company, who printed upwards of sixty thou-

trated,

sand copies for general circulation.

A

repre-

One day, while Mr. Zimmerman and Mr. sentative of theSmithonian Institution prepared Thomas Scott (the latter long a resident of about the same time a scientific report of his this

:

Columbia, and foreman of the State printingoffice)

were on their way to dinner together, Mr.

Scott, addressing

Mr. Zimmerman, was over-

heard, while passing the guard-house, in a mild

denunciation of the tarring and feathering out-

A

rage which had just been committed.

half-

and geological two having been distributed simultaneously by the proprietors of the caverns. Mr. Zimmerman's letter having been reproduced in some of the Richmond papers and other investigations of this great natural

curiosity

—the

Southern

journals,

he shortly afterwards re-

hour had scarce elapsed ere a notice was served by the mayor on Mr. Scott to "leave the town

ceived an invitation to write up the undeveloped

take the conse-

Mr. Zimmerman's Pennsylvania German ex-

hours, or

witiiin forty-eight

resources of

Alabama.

him

It is needless to add that he left, Mr. Zimmerman remaining, however, for a

traction naturally interested

short time, but under the added suspicion which

ago, he began the translation of

quences."

such association and presumed sympathy with so grave an offender carried witli

him

in the eyes

it

towards

of Southern people.

In March, 1860, Mr. Zimmerman returned Reading, and re-entered the office of the Berks and SchiujlkiJl Journal. In May of that

to

bilities

of the vernacular, and

in the capa-

so, several

years

poems from the English classics into that dialect. His first attempt, Moore's " 'Twas the Night before Christmas," was received with marked favor by the press of the State. Congratulatory letters from prominent men came in from all sides, among them from the late Professor

the

Haldeman

(the

Journal, was appointed postmaster of Reading.

University

of

Upon taking possession of merman became his chief

Mr. Zim-

Cameron, Governor Hartranft, P. F. Rothermel

clerk, continuing in

(painter of the " Battle of Gettysburg "), Pro-

year

this

Mr.

Jacol)

position

Knabb,

until

the

proprietor

the office

close

of

of

Postmaster

fessor

Porter

eminent

philologist

Pennsylvania),

(Lafayette

Hon.

College),

of

the

Simon

Professor

— HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

406

Home

(of

Muhlenberg

Fisher, Esq., of York.

College),

Tom

" Barry Cornwall,"

and H. L.

Other translations from

Hood, Oliver Gold-

smith, Heine, the Greek Anthology,

Some

lowed.

etc., fol-

of these have been selected and

arts, as

many of

He

his articles attest.

is

one

of the ablest writers in the old commonwealth.

Many artist

of his articles show alike the eye of the

and the hand of the

One of

litterateur."

Reading's foremost pulpit orators once said,

in

a

Mr. Zimmerman's

arc introduced in this history in the chapter on

publisheil article concerning

" Language, Manners and Customs."

management of the Times: " In his 'History of American Tjiterature,' Professor Nichols says of Edgar A. Poe's poems, in their pureness, sim-

During the past year Mr. Zimmerman has made translations from the German classics into the English. These have been received with even greater favor than the translations

Pennsylvania German.

into the

Among

commendations received by him were

the

letters

from B.

P. Shillaber (" Mrs. Partington "), Clemens ("Mark Twain") and Dr. Frank Cowan. In all these translations, whether from the English into the Pennsylvania German, from the Scottish into the same dialect, or from the German into the

S.

'

and sweetness they stand forth from the confusion of their author's life like white nuns plicity

Zimmerman

English, Mr.

preserves the

exact

has shown remark-

He

not only invariably

measure of the original

forth in this city," etc.

Mr. Zimmerman was married KaufFman, of Reading, on June

Rarely, indeed, does

fidelity.

he resort to the transposition of the author's lines as

an easier method of translation, as may

be seen

in his

published efforts in the

files

of the

to

Tamsie T.

11, 1867.

Mr. Zimmerman is an ardent lover of nature, and evidently believes, with a distinguished writer and fellow-pedestrian, that '' the shining angels second and accompany the man who goes afoot, while all the dark spirits are ever looking out for a chance to ride."

Chronicle of the

poems, but the rhythmical beat of each syllable with remarkable

So the

city.'

conduct of the Reading Times stands

editorial

L.

able aptitude and skill.

and contentious

corrupt

in a

W. Hyde

Douglass of the vertiser.

Times and It

Tijies.

—This

news-

by Samuel Myers and

paper was instituted

with the

Chronicle

title

Berks and Schuylkill Ad-

was an English weekly paper, on a

Times and Journal, where they appear every

sheet twenty-one by twenty-eight inches, with

Saturday in parallel columns. The range of his

six

selections

is

extended, and comprehends

many was

columns on each page. issued

of the best lyric productions of the most noted

half of the

authors. His library of (xerman poetical works,

ginning of

among them twenty-seven volumes from an

to

mirer, resident in Berlin,

Germany,

is

ad-

the gift of

friends in attestation of the appreciation of the

viously,

no

Mr.

Zimmerman

has had

many tempting

were declined.

all cases these

A

work, but

in

brother editor's

opinion of him will serve to show the estimate in

which

are held

" Mr. ability.

his extraordinary journalistic abilities

The

first

number

1822. In 1823 the latter

was dropped

tenth year the

;

with

title

the

be-

was changed

—possibly

as early as 1826,



there being

and therefore I cannot On September state the time with exactness. 27, 1831, Jesse James became the proprietor and editor, issuing his first number of the paper on file

for reference,

the 4th of October following.

In

politics

it

had been previously devoted to the principles of but with the ownership the Democratic party ;

:

Zimmerman

is

He

is

and

a writer of force

His writings are

ful in diction.

pui'e,

easy and grace-

witty and humorous

when

In controversy he is gentletimes, and in argument he is fair

occasion demands.

manly at all and generous genuine

title

its

9,

The Reading Chronicle. Robert Johnston had become the proprietor several years pre-

excellence of his efforts at translation.

offers to relinquish his journalistic

May

on

to

his opponents.

taste for literature, poetry

He

has a

and the

fine

Mr. James it became Democratic-Republican. It was conducted in a spirited and successful manner by ]\Ir. James till March 5, 1833, when it was purchased by one of its founders, Douglass W. Hyde, who restored the original title. In November, 1835, Lloyd Wharton, Esq., an attorney at Reading,

and direction

in

NEWfanies specially incorporated

thorized for that purpose

its

existence.

" Kissinger's "

the First Bridge.

" Harrisburg Bridge" was .steps

towards

but

was not completed

it

erection

its

Bell's.

Birdsboro'.

Monocacy.

Leiss'.

Douglassville.

and finished

in

— In 1822, Samuel Bell was

authorized to erect a substantial bridge across the Schuylkill near his fording-place, opposite

name of Lardner's finish the

prevented from completing

its it

same within

erection, but

Reading

by

act

erect a toll-

mill

at

his

to

Sunbury

Bern township crosses the river." This was at the place where the " Kissinger

now

Bridge"

He commenced

Among

time.

through

" Harrisburg Bridge."

five years.

this

Kissinger was authorized

Windsor Haven.

Lane, provided that he

1795;

the county.

Mohr's.

the

in

them was a bridge across the river farther north, erected by Ulrich Kissinger in 1810. It would seem that he wasted no time in completing this improvement and, by his promptness and energy, he became the builder and owner of the first bri(l(je which spanned the river in

where the road from

Althouse's.

known by

taken

the lap3e of twen-

February 12, 1810, "to bridge over the Schuylkill River

Stoudt's Ferry.

the road

first

tiil

—Tiie

suggested and

Different enterprises were in-

ty-two years. stituted

first

passed

South of Reading.

Kissinger's.

Bell's Bridge.

in use till

was swept

it

away, leaving only the abutments to indicate

Ulrich

:

North of Reading.

was

;

following private bridges were erected

across the Schuylkill

;

common

movable planks It

when

the great freshet of 1850,

883.

was known as "Lewis' Ferry." In 1816 a company was authorized to be organized, and certain commissioners

across the river with

till

the

been conducted for

a bridge across the Schuylkill at

but Mr. Bell succeeded in extending a

was

on account of the

is

situated, over a mile

two spans.

of chains in

built

about three hundred after the projector

since

known by

" chain

feet.

Its length

It took

and owner, and

it

its

has been

About 18-30 this was removed and a wooden

bridge, with roof and

sides, substituted.

was swept away by the freshet of 1850.

prevailing sickness in the neighborhood, which

new

had been occasioned by the construction of the Schuylkill Canal near the bank of the river.

hundred still

feet

This

A

same style, with one span, two long, was built in 1851. This is

bridge, of

standing.

was

name

name.

this

bridge "

above the

The bridge was then

It

is

a private toll-bridge.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

438

Leiss' Bridge.— Iu 1833 David Bright, Schuylkill, at or near Althouse's, about eleven David Gehr, Joliu Stanch aud Henry Hahn, miles above Reading (now Leesport). The of Reading Adam Leiss, of Alsace township; bridge was erected in 1835. From that time aud Jacob Ebling, Jacob Kline, William Hain till January, 1886, it was continued as a priand Philip Fox, of Bern township, were ap- vate toll-bridge, and then, upon proceedings of pointed to form a stock company for the pur- appraisement, it was taken by the county and ;

pose of erecting a bridge over the Schuylkill, near Leiss'

mill.

and

raised,

a

The

covered

necessary

wooden

was was

stock

bridge

erected, within a year, at the place designated,

and

has been successfully maintained as a

it

private toll-bridge from that time is

till

now.

It

situated about five miles above Reading.

Stoudt's

Ferry Bridge.

commissioner.s

Jacob

—Jacob

Leiubach,

—The

following

Stoudt, Samuel Moser,

Abraham Koenig, Daniel Abraham Rieser,

declai-ed a free

county bridge.

Mohr's Bridge (Mohrsville).

—In

1836

the following commissioners, citizens of Berks



County John Gernand, George Loose, John H. Mohr, Peter Addaras, Isaac Addams, Geo. Haag, Jacob Kline, Jacob D. Klein, John Kauffman, Christopher Klein, Jacob Yoder, John Yoder, Philip Schneider, John Snyder, Jacob Philips, Philip Kliue, Daniel Guldiu and Valentine Wagner were appointed to form a



Aulenbach, John Koeuig,

stock

Abraham B.

bridge over the Schuylkill, at or near Mohr's

Tobias, George INIaurer, George

Medler, Reuben Herbine, Abraham Herbine, John Zacharias, John Zacharias, Jr., Jonathan Koenig, Jonas Shalter, Samuel INIengle, George

George Fo.x, William Dunkle, Jacob Kalbach, Adam W. Kaufman, Dr. D. L. Beaver, Peres Hehn, Jacob S. Ebling, Jacob Ahrens, Dr. J. H. Spatz and Jonathan Bittner

Shalter,

— were appointed, by an

act passed in

]

850, for

company

tavern.

It

tained as a it

for the

purpose of erecting a

was constructed

1837, and main-

in

private toll-bridge

till

1886, when

was appropriated by the county aud

set

apart

as a free county bridge.

W1ND.S0R VILLe).

—In

Havex Bridge

(Shoemaker'sc[)li

Zimmerman.

A the"

longiiill"^to the

and

thence

this road

the borougii, over

in

till

the road

was



Oi.EY Road. In September, 1727, a petiwas presented to the court at Philadelphia for a road to extend from the " Lntiiernn Meettion

the Tidi)ehocken* to the

The

si

of

in Oley.

Eight years

af-

was presented in Council on was signed by the following prom-

petition for this road

May, 1753.

It

men of the county, who represented that ' the roads now commonly used were not laid out by any authority,

inent

either from this Board or from

Highway."

now

Its eastern terminus

;

and obstructed and rendered almost im-

was

at a point

This was the road to Phila-

Amityville.

many years, till changed by a road" from a point near the " Black Bear Inn," by

delphia for

way of Bishop's Hill, to a point near Molatton now at Donglassville. In 1810 a turn-

church,

pike was authorized to be con.structed on this road from Reading, by way of "White Horse tavern" and Pott.sgrove, to Perkiomen Mills, at

Perkiomen Creek. In 1811, commissioners were named, those from Berks County having been George Douglass, Matthew Brooke, Jolm Brower, Conrad Fegar, I^ewis Reese.

They immediately commenced tion

and («mp]eted

cost of seven

it

its

in four years at

thousand dollars per

The road from

the

construc-

an average

niile.^

"Old Philadelphia

road,"

near Schwartzirald Church, to the King's High-

way

(Pleasantville to Amityville) was in

Itiid

out

The "Oley Turnpike"

1755.

constructed on this road from Jacksonwald

is

eastward.

The company

for this superior, well-

kept turnpike was incorporated in 1862. The road extends from " Black Bear Inn " to Pleas-

the respective Courts of

the said counties [Northampton and Berks], and they are often diverting

at the ford

a road called the " King's

line eastwardly to

and confirmed '

reported a road

thence .south 80 degrees east 80 perches; south

High

"Quaker Meeting House,"* near

George Boone's mill

21

They

which began

sessions, 1736,

;

great franchise not resulting

road at the

June

;

declared a nuisance for want of repairs.

at

Lin-

mouth of the Maiden- 75 degrees east 800 perches south 70 degrees by way of east 420 perches, etc. onward in almost a direct

and "Sharp Mountain Gap," and northwestwardly over Broad Mountain, by way of a point now Ashland, to Sunbury. A company for this jiurpose was incorporated in 1805 to be called "Centre Turnpike Company." The turnpike was completed before 1812.. The commissioners from Berks County were Joseph Hiester and James May, of Reading, and Jacob Toppell, of Hamburg. The turnpike was conducted and tolls were exacted till 1884, when it was abandoned, such a conclusion of a

House"

at

nortiiwardly,

Hamburg, "Schuylkill Gap"

ing

the court appointed Mordecai

Marcus Hulings, James Thompson, Peter Robeson, Benjamin Boon, Thomas Potts to lay out this road from the high road eastwardlv

coln,

to the Schuylkill ford.

turnpike was constructed on

from Callowhill Street, creek,

441

antville,

ten

The total cost was fifty The commissioners appoint-

miles.

thousand dollars.

ed to receive subscrijrtions of stock were WilConrad Weiser, Thomas Craig, Henry Harding, Jonas Seely, James Read, John Jones, .Jasper Scull, Thomas Armstrong, Benj. Lightfoot, Hosea Heyman, Jacob Levan, William Parsons,

Wm.

Craig, Hon. Wilson, Peter Haws, Conrad Bower,

John Ilutlou, James Biddle, Richard Rigg, Yost Heinrich, Sesmans Huse, Lewis Gordon, Theobald Baum, Merrick Starr, James Starr, Lyon Nathan, George Beale, Isaac Levan, Peter Weitner,

Abraham

Crosius,

Peter Weiser. —

liam Herbst, George S. Yoder, Enoch E. Grie.semer, Peter D. Grie.semer, Wellington B. Grie.semer, John Snyder,

Amos

Schuylkill Road.

County

the court of Lancaster laid out

Ritter.

—A road was ordered bv 1750

to be

line, in

Caer-

in

from the Chester County

2 Penna. Arch., 98-99.

The northern part of this " Charles Evans Cemetery." '^

»

hill

is

now

occupied by the

Situate a short distance east of a point

now Stouchs-

bui'g. *

At the township line between Oley (now Exeter) and

Amity.

5

May

sessions, 1735.

"Supposed about 1790. records

it is

called "

New

In

"Road-Book"

of

county

Philadelphia road," in 1797.

'The highest point in the entire pike from Perkiomen to Reading is near the seven-mile stone, in Exeter

Creek

township.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

442 iiarvon township, in tion to Reading.

It

a Dorthwestwaally direc-

was surveyed by George

Boone, and reported in 1751. This is suppo.sed to be the road from Warwick Furnace, by way of "Plow tavern" and "Green Tree tavern,"

through Caernarvon, Robeson and Cumru townships and along the western bank of the Schuylkill,

ing."

" to the

Tulpehocken road opposite ReadIt was twelve and a half miles in length.



Other Roads. "Neversink road," from Reading southwardly to " Flying Hill," in 1 753. "Alsace Church road," from Reading northwardly through Alsace township, in 1753.

from Reading during

its

earlier history.

And

these have continued to be the great roads for travel

till

now.

In 1822 the State held suKscriptions of stock in the three

turnpike companies, as follows:

Berks and Dauphin $29,000 (individual subscription S63,'.105)

;

tion S62,000);

Centre, $80,000 (individual subscrip-

Perkionien, §53,0(10

2,

75 miles;

3, 28;|

(individual sub-

Length reported: 1,34 miles;

scription $133,000).

miles.

STAGES.



First Stages. The first ]iublic convevance at Reading was a two-horse coach. It was in"Lancaster road," from Reading south we.ststituted by Martin Hausman in 17Sf)' and wardly through Cumru township, in 1762. traveled weekly between Reading and Philadel"Bern road," from Reading northwestwardly phia for the transportation of passengers and over the Schuylkill at point now occupied by letters. The distance was about fifty-one miles, Ki-ssinger's bridge, through Bern township, in and the passage Avas made in two days. Tlie 1772. fare was two dollars, and letter carriage three "Alsace road," from Reading northeastwardpence. During this year he transferred the esly through Alsace town.ship into Oley townsliip tablished business to Alexander Eisenbeis. After to a point in the "King's Highway" (suppo.sed operating it two years, Eisenbeis .sold it to Wilto be near Friedensburg, and now called the liam Coleman, and from this time onward, for " Friedensbnrg road ") in 1776.

Numerous ways

nearly seventy years, 'without intermis.sion, the

other public roads have been laid

out round-about Reading.

The prominent

high-

distant from

several sections

Reading are mentioned in the into which I have divided the

countv.

Coleman family were prominent throughout Eastern Pennsvlvauia for their connection with this great enterprise.

CoLE>rAN Lines.— Soon

after

Coleman had

obtained the possession of this stage-'ine he ex-

tended

it

westwardly, by way of Womelsdort

and Lebanon, to Harrisburg, and northwardly, by way of Hamburg, Orwigsburg, Sharp Mountain

Gap and

bury.''

over the Broad Mountain, to Sun-

In 1818 the stages ran twice a week

from Philadelphia

to

Sunbury.

They

left

Phila-

delphia on Tuesdays and Saturdays at three a.m.; arrived at Reading at five p.m., and lodged at

Hamburg on

the same days; and on the follow-

left at three a.m. and arrived at Sunbury on the succeeding days at ten a.m. And

ing mornings

The first coach in New England began its trips in 1744. The first st.age-line between New York and Philadelphia then the two most populous cities in the colonies was estal)lished in 1756. The trip was made in three days. When the Revolution came, most of these public convey'





ances ceased to run.

PLAN OF ROADS TO

READINCi-.

the return of peace.

And they did not take the road till Many years elapsed before the traffic

over the highways became at

The accompanying plan will indicate in a way how the prominent roads extended

general

''

all

considerable.

Daniel Lebo ran a line from Reading

return, bi-weekly for a time.

to

Sunbury and

INTERxXAL IMPROVEMENTS. they ran thrice a week from Philadelphia' to

Harrisburg' days, at

—Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur-

— leaving Philadelphia

Reading and arriving

at

at four a.m., lodging

Harrisburg the next

The same order was observed in reThe length of the respective lines over

evening. turning.

the turnpikes to the south, west and north

Monday,

cept

443 dined at Reading,

at four a.m.,

lodged at Lebanon, and proceeded to Harrisi)urg

next morning.

Returning, they

daily, except Tuesday, in

Lebanon, took breakfast at Reading next morning and arrived in Philadelphia at eight p.m.

Through

was Reading to Philadelphia, fifty-one miles Reading to Harrisburg, fifty-three miles; Reading to Sunbury, seventy-seven miles. In 1820 William Coleman died. His widow carried on the stage-lines till May 21, 1821,

&

when the

business between three liues

as follows

From

:

;

sons,

John and Nicholas, purchased

and conducted them. the following schedule

They

then

advertised

" Leave Philadelphia on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 4 a.m.; arrive at Reading at 3 p.m. (a gain of two hours), and lodge at Wonielsdorf, proceeding next morning to Harrisburg and in returning ;

same days at 11 a.m., lodge at Womelsdorf, start next day at 4 a.m., breakfast Reading and arrive at Philadelphia in the evening. Through fare was $7 to Reading from either place, leave Harrisburg on

;

From Philadelphia

to Sunbury, leave PhilaTuesdays and Saturdays at 4 a.m.; and returning, leave Sunbury Wednesdays and Fridays at 9 a.m. Hamburg was the lodging-place on the way. Fare, $8; way passengers, seven cents a mile.

delphia on

In 1823 they ran weekly stages

thirty-two miles, and to the northeast to Easton,

times a week, leaving Sundays, Wednesdays and

and arriving at Harrisburg and on return leaving Harrisburg on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at five a.m. and arriving at five p.m. The passenger fare was

was manufactured

to

to

Lebanon and $2

to Harrisburg.

Stage Combination. tion was made between Peters and Colder

&

—In

Co. to run a daily line of

stages between Philadelphia

and Harrisburg via

The arrangement began June The stages left Philadelphia daily,

Reading.

27,

1826.

ex-

tiie

stage-coach

passengers. It

by Sleighmaker

at Lancaster

arose in this

the

first,

;

"Old

&

Piatt's

;

and

third,

Mintzer's.^ This was in 1827.^ A new and improved stage-coach was introduced as a con-

sequence, called

"Troy Coach."

the

room

eleven passengers with

for five

It held

and more

on top.

1830 the competition was

In

The

were reduced one-half.

rates

Line"

of

full

But

tlie

forced the others to withdraw.

life.

"

Its mail

contracts were a great support and enabled

bear the pressure.

Decline op Stages. continued active and directions from

the railways,

when

—The

till

stage business tlie

several

the introduction of

The

was discontinued.

it

to

with motive-

lines

profitable in

Reading

it

hundred horses

It carried a

always on hand to supply the power under any emergency.

Old

stage-coach could not compete with the railroad train, or

horse-power with steam-power.

in

respect,

this

as

strongest survived.

others, the

in

And

fittest

The discontinuance on

and the

was as follows From Philadelphia, 1838 from Pottsville, 1842 from Harrisburg, 1858 from AUentown, 1859. several lines

:

;

;

;

A

daily line of stages on the road to Lancas-

begun on June 15, 1848, and

tinued in successful operation tion of the

Stages

till

Columbia Railroad,

still

this con-

the construc-

in 1864.

run in different directions from

'This firm was composed of John N. Miltimore and George M, Keim, of Reading John F. Smith, of Philadel;

phia; and William Mintzer, of I'ottstown. '

Left Philadelphia, at

tween Thiiil and Fourth Tavern.

Swan Tavern, on Kace ;

and

left

Street, be-

Ilarrisbuig at Buehler's

;

Miltimore

&

ter wa.s

1826 a combinathe Colemaus, Jacob

1826

till

Line," or Coleman's, which conveyed the mails

five a.m.,

Womelsdorf; |1

Reading, §3.

Then a sharp competition

Co.

at five P.M.;

50 cents

to

;

called a "steamboat," an uncovered

in length fifty miles.

In 1825 Colder & AVilsou ran the "MailStage" between Reading and Harrisburg three Fridays at

$6

wagon capable of holding twenty

to the south-

west to Lancaster, over a natural road, in length over a natural road,

was

in use

at

$3.50.

fare,

the beginning

second, Reeside

:

Harrisburg

left

afternoon, lodged at

^Soon afterward John Coleman died, and Nicholas, his and continued sole control of the stage

brother, obtained

business

till

shortly before his death, in 1857.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENXSYLVANIA.

444

Reading and carry passengers, merchandise and The lines extend to (1) Bernville and Millerslnirg, (2) Adamstown, (3) Friedensburg and Pikeville, (4) Oley Pike to Pleasantville and Shanesville. mail.

A

line

of mail-stages was conducted for a

they accomplished nothing in the nature of a

improvement.

practical

On

April

1811, the Lsgislature passed an

2,

act to incorporate "

The Union Canal Company The name was chosen be-

of Pennsylvania."

new corporation was

cause the

really a union of

time by Courad Stanch from Womelsdorf via

the old Schuylkill and

Rehrersbnrg and IMillersburg to Pine Grove,

Delaware and

Susquehanna and the Schuylkill Canal Companies.

Mon- The preamble

recited that those corporations

leaving

Womelsdorf

three times a week,

days, Thursdays and Saturdays, and returning

had made strenuous

from Pine Grove Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. Through fare was $1.25.

jects

efforts to carry

out the ob-

They new company

of their charters, but had

failed.

were, therefore, dissolved, and a

was formed by the stockholders of the old corwhose relative rights were adjusted

porations, in a

The

great

iniprovera?nts

internal

new

The manwork with hope, but not with

distribution of the capital.

this

agers went to

country were projected in Pennsylvania.

The

vigor.

enterprise of her early citizens directed the

first

was

in

They had

insufficient,

trouble because their capital

and were waiting the slow pro-

public attention to the establishment of canals fits which came through the grants of lottery and turnpikes for convenient transportation. privileges. Seventeen years had gone by before Tn 1690 William Penn suggested the idea of the canal was finished. It was announced on connecting the Susquehanna and Schuylkill by the 1st of January, 1828, that the work was commeans of a canal, but it was not acted upon. pleted, but it was nearly three months afterward

Seventy years afterward

this idea was again and then a survey was made by David Ritten house and others. A course was

before

considered,

went west was the " Fair Trader," Cajitain Smith, which left Philadelphia on the 20th of

marked out

March of

rivers

;

a

for

between these two

canal

but nearly seventy years more elapsed

before the great scheme was realized and put into practical

and

Union Canal.

to

to

Middletown, arriving

—In 1791 the Legislature of

brated at ^liddletown.

for the purpose

rivers

by a

and

of connecting the two

The

aqueducts.

Delaware and Schuylkill Canal Company,

of Lebanon)

the purpose eastern

of extending a canal from

terminus

of the canal

mentioned

for

the at

Reading, along the Schuylkill to the Delaware at Philadelphia.

These canals were

to be part

of a great scheme conceived by an association of enterprising

individuals

in

order to

promote

the

latter cele-

There were seventeen

length of the canal

and in 1792 another company was chartered, under the name of the ;

at

The event was duly

Union Canal boats in service in July, 1828, and over two hundred were in operation before the end of that year.

facilitating traffic thereby

from the one to the other

canal-boat that

Reading, and thence by the Union

place on the 23d.

pany

first

by way of the Schuylkill

that year,

Navigation

Canal

The

was used.

successful operation.

Pennsylvania passed an act incorporating the Schuylkill and Susquehanna Navigation Comcanal,

it

locks, 8 basins,

is 79J miles, with 91 93 bridges, 16 dams and 17

From to

the

the

summit (four miles east mouth of Tulpehocken

37 miles. This section wide at bottom, and 36 feet at water surface depth of water, 4 feet, and width of towing path, 10 feet. The number of Creek the distance

of the canal

is

26

is

feet ;

locks required to overcome the is

The

52.

fall

of 310 feet

locks are faced with dressed sand-

chambers 8 J feet wide and 75 feet long internal improvements, whereby Philadelphia stone and Pittsburgh were to be connected by water and lifts vary from 5 to 8 feet. About 1855 communication. But these creatures of the law the locks wei"e enlarged to correspond with the would appear to have received little life from locks of the Pennsylvania Canal first from Pine the Legislature and their projectors, because Grove westwardly to Middletown, and after;

;



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS. ward from the Swatara eastwardly

to

Read-

The

success of this canal was dependent

upon

construction of a similar canal along the

tlie

Schuylkill, in order to encourage traffic from

Susquehanna

A

the two companies, which were afterward united,

was believed

ing-

by way of Reading.

to Philadelphia

company had been chartered

purpose, which then began desired,

and finished

it

in

1815

for this

the improvement

in 182.5.

In 1830 the canal was extended along the western bank of the Schuylkill, three miles

be-.

low Reading, to the " Little Dam," having

its

"Big Dam," about

outlet in the

But

below.

a thousand feet

to be insuificient for the execution

of the work, and the Legislature, in order, as

was supposed,

money " by way of lottery." The whole amount specified in the grant was §400,000, of which the Schuylkill and Susquehanna to raise

Company was

to have two-thirds, and the Delaware and Schuylkill Canal Company one-third. This act Mas passed April 17, 1795, and under it

the companies began,

This power was exercised for realized

wholly

insufficient for

c()m])lained that

burg Bridge.'

disortler

form an idea of the extent and

growth of the business over this canal, soon it was completed, the following .statistics

after

are presented

Till

profit.

and embarrassment



the public confidence

In the

privileges were renewed

had not made much by

they were empowered to lottery rights to select.

The company

in large

95,953

funds.

148,832

86,800

that the lottery managers

A

report

The March, the

act of

183.'5,

declared that the lottery rights of

company were exhausted, and prohibited

the sale of lottery tickets of any kind after Dec.

31st of that year.

a

dam

company had constructed, .about 18'i8, "Union Dam" (commonly known as the

called

Lotz's Dam), for the purpose of forming a connection with theSehuylkill Canal; and this was the only connection

made many millions, Company got but $269,-

and nmch bad blood. Assembly for the suppression of Pennsylvania on and after the 1st of

lotteries in

this point tlie

to the Legislature states

210.40. There was high dispute about the busi-

the actual cost of the improvements as in the

At

made

while the Union Canal

ness, great scandal

of

Under

did not have

work between theSehuylkill and Susquehanna Rivers was enormous, not so much from

capital

lottery

amounts of money, but the Canal much added to their

153,222

The

they might the

arrangement and in the course of years the lotteries became very successful. The managers

1848

did no good to the enterprise.

or assign their

whom

leased out

1849

way in which the money was raised, and the amount taken from the community which

sell

this

Company

wasteful

company own management,

privileges to various lessees or managers.

took

of the

in their ef-

and, as the

any persons

4(91,3.56

amount of money

they were

the lottery grant

act,

their

Tolls rec'd.

canal

'

;

Tons.

raised in the course of the prcsecution

that

was impaired

139,256

— The

fallen into

This led to the union of the two corpo-

forts.

1847

Lottery Privileges.

;

They

had "

covered with reproach and ridictde," and that

;

follows,

their purposes.

their aifairs

rations in 1811.

:

For the week ending May 27, 1831, eighty boats passed Reading going down, lorty-tive being loaded with lumber and coal, and the others with flour, whiskey, castings, etc. and sixty passed going up, seventeen of wdiich were loaded with merchandise. For the week ending June 14, 1835, one hundred and twenty tive loaded boats passed down, and one hundred and twelve loaded boats passed up. Some years afterward the tonnage and tolls were as

with

fifteen years,

1810 the companies had about $60,000 from the lottery, a sum

the Schuylkill Canal at a lock near the Harris-

to

shortly afterward, to

exercise the privilege of i.ssuing lottery tickets.

small

In order

it

them, granted them power

to assist

was washed so badly by the freshet of 1850 that it was rendered useless, and connection was altogether made with this portion

445

But, as a compensation for

the privileges which were taken

away from the company, the Governor was authorized to subscribe for 1000 shares of the stock on behalf of

till

The lotteries of the Union Canal Company were drawn at stated

nection was afterward made.

periods from the gallery of the stairs in the

1855, when the canal was extended to a point opposite " .Jackson's Lock," at the foot of Sixth Street, where con-

the State of Pennsylvania.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

446

up-

carried on over the Centre turnpike to Reading,

After the Arcade was finished,

and the Perkiomen and Germantown turnpikes

tower of the State-House, which led per chambers. in

to the

1827, tliey were drawn from the gallery in of the

front

second-story

offices,

drawings.

ble

Certain commissioners were

among them being the following prominent and enterprising men from named

the act,

in

Berks County Lewis Reese, John S. Hiester, John Wiley; James May, Jacob K. Boyer, John by the com- Brower, Matthew Brooke, Robert Scott, Abra:

long after

road,

nected

these

Philadelphia.

to

canal was supposed to be the only possi-

means of conveyance,

mon

the east

Hundreds of persons attended

avenue.

The

in

all

exce|)t

the companies con-

with the navigation

of the Schuylkill

were chartered. The Columbia Railroad, under

management of the State, began to be a Union Canal in bringing produce and passengers from the Susquehanna as soon The movement for its estabas it was finished. lishment commenced in 1826, when a company was incorporated to build a railroad from Lanca.ster and Columbia to Philadelphia. The plan not ])roving snccessfnl, in 1828 the State of

ham

Abraham Wolf.

Bailey,

These commissioners were directed subscription books at various i)laces

The par value of a

the

1815.

rival of the

fixed at fifty dollars,

Pennsylvania authorized a survey, and followed

up

by appropriations, under which the work was carried on. The road was finished to Lancaster in April, 1834, and oi)cned through to Columbia in the summer of 1835. Just as soon as this means of transportation was finished the Union Canal Company lost a large share of its business and prospects. The railroad oifered a shorter route and quicker method of communication between the Susquehanna, Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. The opening of the Lebanon Valley Railroad, from Reading, to Harrisburg, in 1857, through the same section of territory, proved the final and crusliing blow to the Union Canal Company. FrOm that time onward it liegan to decline more and

it

in

after-years

It has not been in full ojieration for

more.

some years soon after

;

in

its

fact,

the traffic upon

it

declined

enlargement, owing to the com-

petition referred to

sylvania canals.

and the disuse of the Penn-

shares were to

share of stock was

and twenty-five hundred be subscribed at Reading one-



The

board of directors was elected at

first

Norristown on October

It included

1815.

5,



two members from Berks County Lewis Reese, of Reading, and .John Wiley, of ]Maidcn-crec!:.

Samuel Baird, of Puttsgrove (now Pottstown), was also a member, having soon after removed

Reading and practiced law. The construcwas begun in 1817. In 1822 the presiConstruction of Road. dent of the company, Cadwallader Evans, reported that " the canal was completed from John to

tion of the canal

Potts', at the



mines, to within one-half a mile

of Hamburg, below the Blue Mountain, and

This included the

sixteew-OH^s from Reading. tunnel at the mountain.

The remaining

tion of the upper section, north of Reading,

The lower

not finished. caster

Schuylkill

section,

por-

was

from the Lan-

bridge (at Philadelphia) to

Reading, was finished."

He

also reported that

boats* had carried during the year (1821) over

the

completed portion of the canal, from the

coal-mines

to

the vicinity of Plainburg, large

quantities of coal,

which were deposited there

and sold out by the ton to the country people

from the neigliborhood and ibr many miles distolls were required from the boats





incorporated on Marcli 8, 1815, for the purpose

of transporting coal, lumber, merchandise, pro-

by a system of canals and slackwater navigation, which was to be affi)rded by appro-

fall

of 1821.

The

unfinished por-

was reported to have been completed during the year 1822 and this was tion of the canal

;

etc.,

priating the water of the Schuylkill River from

1

The boats were diminulive, being only

capacity at the opening of the canal

increased

Mill Creek, in Schuylkill County, to Philadelphia.

open

May,

fourth of the total shnres.

Schuylkill Canal Licorpnmlion of Com- tant. No pany. The Schuylkill Canal Navigation was during the

duce,

to in

Tiie transportation

of articles was then

to

twenty-three tons;

;

eiglifeen tons'

afterw.ards, in \S'2S,

and,

further,

the size

and tonnage of boats was increased unlil 1810, when the capacity was si.xty tons.

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS. tlie first

in the

completed navigation enterprise

The

versary day " for the purpose of celebrating

total length

from Mt. Carljon

Phila-

to

was on July

5,

For

1824.

several days pre-

delphia was one hundred and five miles (sixty-

viously the water had run into this

two miles of canal and forty-three miles of pools in river), was a fall of five hundred and eightyincluding one hundred and twenty eight feet locks (eighty-one above Reading and thirty-nine

to prepare the

;

twenty-eight

below), .stone

arched

aqueducts and a tunnel four hundred and

fifty feet long,

cost

dams, seventeen

cut through solid rock.'

The

total

was one million eight hundred thousand

it

an event deserved to be celebrated. This

as such

country.

447

way

new highway

On

for the celebration.

the

day

fixed, at seven o'clock in the

the

booming of cannon and the applause of

many

spectators, three

boats

And

canal from Reading.

morning, amid

moved down

the

then there was wit-

nessed the first triumph in a class

of internal

improvements wliich had been recommended by the good and noble and fai'-seeing Penu over one hundred and thirty years before.

dollars.

In 1827-28 the canal was extended Creek, making the

total length

Mill

to

108.2.3miles;and,

The

three boats which were used

upon

occasion were the " Thomas Oaks," " Girard " and the " Dc Witt Clinton."

tiiis

iStc|)heii

by an enlargement in 1846, the nundier of locks The first boat was named after the civil enwas reduced to seventy-one, with a total fall of about six hundred and twenty feet. The size gineer under whose supervision the canal had It was occiipieil of the locks was eighteen by one hundred and been principally constructed. ten feet width of canal, sixty feet depth of by General Joseph Hiester (ex-Governor of water of six feet. The capacity of boats was Pennsylvania), managers and engineers of the canal company and specially invited guests of one hundred and eighty tons. the second was occupied Its Completion Celebrated. From a " local " the management by young gentlemen and ladies of Reading; and in the Berks and Schuylkill Journal, on July A fourth boat fol10, 1824, it would appear that the water was the third by business men. ;

;



not turned into the canal

July, 1824. the

;

the

till

beginning of

This event was anticipated

management accordingly

;

and

selected an " anni-

lowed

— being

loaded with agricultural imple-

Upon

ments.

entering Lewis' Dana, beyond

Poplar Neck, the boats were

anchored and

Charles Evans, Esq., delivered an appropriate address. This was situate above Port Clinton. Some years afterwiwd the tunnel was removed by a thorough cutting away

Immediately afterward

a

public an-

'

the material to the surface above. This tunnel was remarkable as being the first one executed in the United States. It was completed in 1818. It was excavated by George Duncan, a Scotch engineer. He also constructed a

portion

of the canal south of Leesport, which

been known as the " Duncan Canal.''

has since

In 1884 he also per-

formed the work in a re-construction of the canal from Felix's Dam southwardly to Reading, which theretofore extended along but a short distance from the river, in one level, to Washington Street, and thence through Reading near present outlet.

This portion had been constructed over cavernous limestone, which was subject to sink-holes. to

The loss of water was frequent, causing the passing boats to become grounoed unexpectedly; and a great portion of this sinking water, strange to say, did not

empty

into the

nouncement was made that the .section of cantil for twenty-two miles below Lewis' Dam siiould be called the " Girard Canal," as a deserved tribute to the enterpri.se

Girard.

The

and

boats then

liberality

proceeded

five

hundred.

a military salute

from the Union Guards of Pottstown. Patriotic toasts

The

'

at

an impromptu meeting.

Thomas Oaks"

then returned to Reading

were

oif'ered

—having been drawn by one

nearly six miles an hour without

overcome

this difficulty, the

company ^lad

lined

the canal

Reading with planks. This re-eonslruction consisted of dams and pools for slack-w.iter navigation to Kissinger's Dam, at mouth of Tulpehocken Creek. thence

to

the

Their arrival was announced by

a discharge of cannon and

an outlet in the

and found on the opposite side. This was particularly the case near Leiss' Bridge. At one time, to

down

There they were welcomed by a great number of ladies and gentlemen from Pottstown and vicinity, estimated at canal to Laurel Hill.

river near by, but passed undirneath the rivor, fields

of Ste[)hen

horse at the rate

much

oi'

effort

The "Girard" and "Clinton" proceeded ten miles farther down the canal and returned to Reading about dusk.

Three weeks afterward

(26th of Jidy) the " Girard "

made her

first

voy-

:

448

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

age to Philadelphia.

This packet was occasion-

ally used for pleasure trips.

Cod

atul

TraJ/ic.

— The

of transporta-

cost

from Reading to Philadelphia was forty cents a hundred-weight by canal it Mas reduced to twelve and a half ceiih. The tion (by land)

;

toll

on coal from Mt. Carbon to Philadelphia

was, in 1825, six cents a bushel or one dollar

and sixty-eight cents a

ton.

Horses or mules were not used

The

boats previous to 1826.

for

towing

boats were

first

towed through the canals by men at the end of

Two men drew

long tow-lines.

them by pressing

their

a boat after

shoulders or breasts

against a stick fastened crosswise to the end of

the tow-line.

With such

from IMuuut Carbon generally required

to

six

locomotion, a

trip

Philadelphia and back weeks.

At

this

time

there were no tow-paths along the pools of the

navigation

The

hence the necessity for man-power.

;

following statistics are presented to show

the great

traffic

over the canal during the

five years after its

jiom reports Passed

down

Canal.

completion— articles

first

selected

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS. September 28, 1846. It Mas built of iron, with two Ericson propellei's, eighty-five feet long, and thirteen and a half feet wide. These packets began to run regularly on October 5, They departed from Reading every 1846. day, except Sunday, at two v.m., and arrived at

And

Philadelphia on the next morning.

Philadelphia and arrived

departed

from

Reading

at the

dollar a trip.

long

they

same time.

The

fare

—The most jirominent

per-

canal

the

navigation system, by reason of his long-continued

service with the Schuylkill Navigation

Company and is

his residence in this

James F. Smith.

He

community,

was born December and began his en-

25, 1813, at Pittsburgh, Pa.,

gineering practice in 1831, on the Allegheny

Portage Railroad.

Afterward he was employed

on railroads in Pennsylvania and

and on the

came tion

INIorris

New

work

in 1843,

He

He

en-

remained in that position until

1850, the year of the disastrous freshets, by

time the

late Ell wood

RAILWAYS.



At

that

Morris was resident eu-

to

Summit

Hill, in

length nine

was constructed to complete the transportation of coal from Mine Hill to PhilaIt

miles.

delphia.

From

Chunk

INIauch

to Philadelphia

a canal had been constructed shortly before

by

Navigation Company.^

the Lehigh Coal and

But the canal could not be extended to Mine Hill so the company wore compelled to devise and build a railway to take the place of ordinary ;

roads.

"The

Soon afterward

Little Schuylkill Rail-

" was incorporated, and

Company

road

Clinton.

its

Com-

First in Pennsylvania. The first railway in Pennsylvania was built in 1827 from

and was connected with

which the canal was greatly damaged.

of the Allentowu Railroad

pany.

structed

largement in 1846, having charge of the lower division.

Company and

Naviga-

as resident engineer during

of

of the East Pennsylvania Railroad

president

York,

Jersey.

into the service of the Schuylkill

Company

that

Canal in

New

engineer

con.sulting

which place he retained until the summer of 1885. In January, 1886, he was elected

canals,

Mauch Chunk

in operation.

son in the county, connected with

In 1876 Mr. Smith was relieved as chief engineer and appointed

at

was one

This enterprise did not continue

James F. Smith.

449

it

con-

from Tamaqua to Port

the railroad

Philadelphia and Reading R.ailroad Company. In 1833 a railroad was projected



from Port Clinton via Reading to Philadelphia.

The

Little Schuylkill Railroad

Company was

authorized to extend their railroad to Reading,

and

to construct a railroad

from Reading

to

A company waschartered on April

gineer of the line of works above Reading, but

Philadelphia.

Mr. Smith was then made chief engineer, ho taking entire charge of the Navigation Company's works and

and Reading Railroad Company." Twentyseven commis-sioners were appointed, including

resigned near the close of 1850.

completing their repairs.

In 1870 the caual was leased to the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, and

1833, under the

4,

Immediate

ing. this

thousand eight hundred

feet in length,

prising one

Susquehanna River

Columbia, was greatly

at

damaged by ice-floods in 1874 and in 1875. The work of repair was one of great magnitude, but it was successfully executed under Mr.

ice

45

stood the

te.st

of the river floods,

and water, without material injury

since.

A

were taken to

steps

considerable

con.striict

portion was con-

and by December, 1837,

one track of the road was completed from Read-

An

ing to Pottstown.

hundred

a trip on the cars,

by

6t]i

temporarily

five horses.

excursion party, com-

citizens of

Reading, made

of December in five freight-

fitted

up with seats and drawn from the depot at

It started

nine A.M., and arrived at Pottstown in two and 1

both

road.

structed during 1835,

Smith's direction and according to his plans.

The dam has

the " Philadelphia

George de B. Keim, Matthias S. Richards, Isaac Hiester and James Everhart, from Read-

Mr. Smith was continued as chief engineer. In 1872 he took charge of the Susquehanna aud Tide-Water Canal, from Columbia to Havre de Grace, Maryland. The Columbia dam, six over the

name of

The Lehigh Coal Mining Company was

1793, and the Lehigh Canal conipaiiies

Company

instituted

in 1818.

were united and reorganized in 1821.

in

These two

:

:

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

450

In

tliree-quurter hours, iucluding all stoppages.

returniug,

left

it

two

at

p.m.,

and arrived

at

former

Reading at five p.m. The first regular train from Reading to Pottstown ran on Tuesday, May 1, 1838. The schedule comprised two

at a cost of twelve

daily trains

ville

:

and the

dollars,

Left Reading at 8 A.M. and 12.80 P.M.

forty-eight dollars.

The second

track from Philadelphia to Potts-

was opened for travel

To Philadelphia

To

was opened to Norristown on July 16, 1838, and to Philadelphia in December, 1839. In May, 1840, the time-table to and from Philadelphia was as follows

latter

thousand eight hundred and

January, 1844.

in

In June, 1848, the trains ran as follows

Left Pottstown at 10.30 a.m. and 3 p.m.

And

thousand three

at a cost of twenty-six

hundred and ninety-three

Pottsville

:

:

and 3..50 p.m. 10.45 a.m. and 5 p.m. 9.10 a.m.

:

the road

The

distance from

Reading

Philadelphia

to

was traveled in two hours; and one hour and twenty minutes.

to Pottsville in

In IMay, 1855, there were eight daily passenLeave Reading at 7.15 a.m., and 2.45 p.m. Leave Philadelphia at 5 a.m., and 2.15 p.m.

The

was

fare

Little

Tlio

$2.50

First-class,

:

;

The

secoud-class,

Railroad

Scliuylkill

ger-trains

—four

the increase of traffic over the road,

its

and income,

now

extended

to

;

culties

2X8,711

2r.,Ki

2,2l:i,292 3,I180,«14

in, --J

cover the construction and

4.1>22,916 12,5311,594

Company was

and notwithstanding the financial diffiwhich prevailed in and after 1838, this

great project was completed within four years

The

afterward. line

train ran

first

from Philadelphia

to

over the whole

Pottsville, ninety-

188.">

Note.

named

—The

..'

nineteen hundred and thirty-one

of one hundred and

tiiree dollars;

Clinton,

in

feet, at

length

8179.395 j.'ttt.oio 1,^12,271

!

I.'

_.-

II,..

I

".1

'

i.TlT.UU

;i

Ij.,vj7,05»

;,

fii^st

number

of passengers carried during 1885.

The statement the road and all

The

includes the total business of

branches.

its

introduction of this railway imitiediately enterpri.se at

The

to

Reading, and caused be

directed

towards

increasing tide of

affjiirs

induced people and capital to concentrate here

more and more every succeeding year antl buildings multiplied rapidly to answer the de;

mands of the rapidly increasing jiopulation. The company established its work-shops here near Port when the railway was completed. And these

feet, at

a cost

thousand three hun-

fifty

dred and

I

number through passengers, i. e., Phila(lel]ihia to one way, and the figures fur the last year named are total

manufacturing.

near Plxieni.wille, in length

f.'.94,ni8 i,.::i,:'roperly marked for the voters. The poll for the electors of Reading was at the eastern win-

dow on

which this borough is justly on a cut sandstone base. The building is 62 by 118 feet, and in height, to ape.x of the roof, is 60 feet. In front, resting on the basement story, is a handsome portico ornamented with s x columns, 27 feet in height, of the Ionic order, cut from sandstone quarried in this county. The whole and

celebrated,

years afterward.

of the editice are constructed of handbrick, for rest

'

of the front base, columns, cornices,

the side facing south.

material, and the efiect

This building was used for the purposes of

is

'

ersons. Si)eeches were people. made by prominent men from different parts of Democratic State Conventions at the country. The most distinguished guest Reading. Three Democratic State Conven-



upon

this

unusual occasion was Gen. George B.

McClellan, whose presence

elicited great

ap-

plause wherever he went.

Electiox

of

Berks County were lations for

it

1876.

—The

(jertain

had been made.

taught to expect

it,

Democrats

of victory.

in

Calcu-

They were

and when the night of the

Reading at which candidates Governor were nominated the first on June 4, 1851, when William Bigler was nominated by acclamation the second on February 29, 1860, when Henry D. Foster was nominated and the third on May 30, 1872, when Charles R. Buckalew was nominated. At the second tions were held at for

:

;

;

POLITICS couventioD,

was

AND

Hon. George M. Keim, of Reading,

selected as

an elector-at-large.



Mass-Meetix«s. Numerous " Mass-Jfeetings " have been held at Reading by the respective political parties for

many

The

years past.

CIVIL LI8T.

487

day, which exhibited in a proud and nationality of Democratic

light the

power and

principles,

the completeness of that union in the ranks of

the American Democrah

could lower himself in his

own

esteem or in

that of others.

His standard was a very high

one, anurtenant

He

vice.

His wife

was born in 17.'>2; and she died in mains

men

listment of

died in

1757, aged years.

discussing

plow

him

so

prostrate.

In the

inter-

pri.soner

in

in

New

York.

the latter place he was

taken sick with a low fever, and became so feeble that in passing

was obliged

up and down-stairs he hands and knees-

to creep on his

'See Chap.

ix.

Revolution.

POLITICS

He

AND

and the other meu imprisoned endured

many

and much

hardship;*

After

suffering.

having been held

in prison several

was exchanged.

He

mouths he

proceeded immediately to

Reading, and remained at home only a short time, sufficient to regain his health

and strength,

when he again joined the army, which

He

towards Philadelphia.

returned in time to

Germantown.

participate in the battle of this

lay

In

engagement he received a wound on his

He

head.

A

52:i

Convention of 1789, having been the

framing the Constitution of 1790.

assisted in

After serving in this representative capacity, he

was chosen the trict for

Berks County

in Congress,

cousin, Daniel Hiester,

tion, led to his selection as

County

on June

]

one of the ten dele-

to the conference held 8,

1776, which decided

that a Provincial Convention should be cxdled on 1

from 1789

to 1797,

continued as the representative for five terms,

His earnest participation in the public meetings at Reading, which encouraged revolu-

5,

fii-st

held this office

record of his services, or

from 1797 to 1807.

1

succeeding his

who had

for the first four terms,

1790 to

to represent

under the national Constitution, and he was^

till

eight years

July

— from

In 1797 he was elected

179-t.

served.

at Pliiladelphia

State Senator from this dis-

first

one term of four years,

of his company, unfortunately, has not been pre-

gates from Berks

on

first

of delegates from Berks County, and ho

list

the

continued in active service

close of the war.

al

CIVIL LIST.

776, for the express purpose of " form-

ing a new government in this province on the

After an intermission of

— wliich he devoted entirely business at Reading — he was again sent Congress to

to

in

1815 and

the political that in

re-elected twice.

Whil^t holding

he was ])rominently identified with

this office

affiiirs

of Pennsylvania, so

much

1817 he became the nominee of

Though

Governor.

Federalist party for

elected then, his great popularity

so

tlie

not

was shown

in

the flattering vote which he received.

cousin,

He

Gabriel Hiester, w\as elected as one of the eight

tif'ket

delegates to this convention, but he himself be-

the

came engaged

candidate, and also in the southeastern section

authority of the people only."

in

His

first

the military service

of

his

his return

from the Revolution

he

entered into partnership with his father-in-law,

Adam Witman, in the mercantile business, and some years afterward became the sole proprietor He

of the store.

conducted his business ojiera-

number of much of his

tions very successfully for a

years.

Public

atten-

affairs also received

tion, not

only relating to political government,

but also to the development of Reading and the

county by internal improvement. after his return he

bers

of

the

was

Four years

elected one of the

General Assembly

from

memBerks

County, and re-elected twice, continuing in office for three years,

—from 1787

to 1790.

this

He

was a member of the General Assembly when that body ratified the Constitution of the United

first

candidate on the Federal

received a majority of the votes in

county of Berks against the Democratic

of the State, which comprised eleven very pop-

country.

Upon

was the

who

States,

which went into operation in

ulous

and

influential

him

counties.

The party

1820 a second time as the most available candidate, and he was elected. This was a great victory for him, but especially for his party, inasmuch as he was the first successful candidate which the Federalists had placed in the field against the DemoThe political returns show his increased crats. popularity. The majority against him at the election of 1817 was 7005, but the majority for him at the election of 1820, notwithstanding that his opponent on the Democratic ticket had been Governor for the previous three years, was 1605. A careful study of the election naturally selected

in

returns reveals the fact, however, that the de-

votion of the j)eople of Berks County to

and also when it decided that and amendments to the Constitution of 1776 were necessary, and that a convention for that purpose should be called. He was

always been Demcjcratic by a sure,

certainly

have been defeated.

chosen one of the delegates to the Constitution-

therefore

entitled

March, 1789

;

alterations

large, majority, fast to the

him

Theretofore the county had

caused his election.

and

if

it

if

not a

had continued stead-

Democratic party in 1820 he would to

the

The county

is

greater part of the

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

524

Having been

credit for his election.^

elected to

position, he resigned his seat in Congress.

tills

He

iiad

litical

been induced by his personal and po-

become a candidate for

friends to

this

upon the express condition that he would serve only one terra, and notwithstanding his office

and a great pressure from partisans and many friends to be a candi-

successful administration

date

re-election, he

for

resolutely refused

to

graceful

The

Harsh

those

who

in that period

occupied

with great

were made against

criticisms

prominent positions and

The

directed public affairs.

administration of

his immediate predecessor, Governor Findlay, was condemned without measure. The condemnation was so furious that it made a deep impression upon Governor Hiester, so deep, indeed, that lie was led to refer to it in his in-

augural said,

committed,

I

trust,

they

of

our

human

if

other

owe

things,

any errors

not

will

Tliey will

intention.

imperfection limits of

Among

address.

— "But

be

sliall

their origin

foresight.

to

They

my

part,

nor from any want of devotion to the best interests of

our beloved country.

Such

errors, I

may justly hope, will meet with Indulgence from an enlightened and liberal people. Where censure shall, upon a full and impartial view of matters, be merited, It

is

into

let

it

not be withheld.

the duty of freemen to examine closely the conduct of those to

whom

manufactures encouraged with success, and that there existed an imperative duty to introduce

and

suiiport a liberal system of education, con-

nected with some general religious instruction.

During

the

session

they have

of 1822

the

city

and

county of Lancaster were erected into a school district, called

the Second, the First having been

the city

and county of Philadelphia,

1819.

According

Governor Hiester

way encouraged

possible

erected in

to his sentiments, expressed

to the Legislature,

the

in

system

every of free

but a decade elapsed after his term

before the system

the

improvements

public

made advantageously and domestic

education

will not j^ro-

ceed from a willful neglect of duty on

good, that

could then be

be

and the narrow

nature

also sug-

be shortened without detriment to

public

he

chargeable to

He

the Governor could be relieved.

gested that the annual sessions of the Legisla-

ture might

were conducted

This

was particularly experienced by Governor Findlay, and Governor Hiester, knowing this, asked the Legislature to devise some method by which

the

bitterness.

a

great patronage at the disposal of the

Governor Hiester was characterized by great activity in promoting the gi'owth of the commonwealth, especially through internal improvements. Political contests

of

executive had become very troublesome.

permit the use of his name. Tiie administration of

the Governor

of

appellation

party."

;

legislation to

was perfected

make

it

effective.

sufficiently

And

by

whilst

Governor Hiester occupied the gubernatorial was removed from Lancaster to Harrisburg. The building was begun in 1819 and finished in 1821, and the General chair the State capital

Assembly convened in it for the first time on January 3, 1822. The capital had been at Lancaster since 1799, and previously at Philadelphia.

In

his last annutd message to the Legislature

Governor Hiester expressed many sentiments which indicated his strong love for the State and

his zeal for her welfare

delegated their power, or the guardianship of cluding

it

as follows

and

jirogress, con-

:

" Having been for nearly fifty years occasioncensure the abuse mismanagement of ally engaged in various highly responsible situthe other. Considering myself as elected by ations in the service of my country, and having the people of this commonwealth, and not by witnessed its progress from colonial vasstdage to any particular denomination of persons, I shall independence and sovereignty, it is with most endeavor to deserve the name of chief magis- sincere pleasure that, on quitting the theatre of trate of Pennsylvania, and to avoid the dis- action, I ciin congratulate you and our fellowtheir rights

and

interests, to

'of the one, or the neglect or

citizens at large '

ing.

His election was celebrated by a grand festival at Read(See Chap. six.



Politics).

which

it is

now

the occasion

it

on the propitious situation

in

placed; and I avail my.self of

affords

me

of repeating

my

fer-

J'OLITICS

AND

CIVIL LIST.

525

vent prayers to the Almighty Ruler of the

high station and large means, that the people

Universe, under whose superintending influence

of this community were thereby most favorably

has attained

it

may

present

its

continue to cherish

ing care, preserving

its

it

eminence, that he

with his fosterthe free en-

citizens in

joyment of their just rights and republican institutions, until

earthly governments shall

all

The men of

impressed.

who

gray,

to-day,

now

old and

then were boys at Reading,

him with

him

pleasure and speak of

highest terms

of respect.

And

recall

in

just as

the tliey

speak of him so do they also speak of his wife.

He

was a member of the Reformed Church. His wife died June 11, 1825, aged seventy-five lived in retirement at Reading. His residence years, two months and nine days. He died was situated on the northern side of Penn seven years afterward, June 10, 1832, in the Street, midway between Fourth and Fifth home which he had occupied for two-score Streets.^ The dwelling consisted of a two-story of years, aged seventy-nine years, six months His remains were buried brick building, with a large frame stable on the and twenty-two clays. rear of the lot. He owned a number of farms in the burying-ground of the Reformed Church. in Alsace (now Muhlenberg), Cumru and Bern The funeral was conducted without display of townships, and also tracts of woodland on any kind, according to the known wishes of the Mount Penn, altogether numbering nearly two Governor but though the occasion was not sigthousand acres, seven prominent business stands nalized by a great military parade and other and dwellings in Reading, valued at over fifty demonstrations of respect, because they were thousand dollars, and also out-lots. He occu- declined by the family, a great many j)eople pied and farmed the out-lots for his own use, nevertheless assembled to witness the simple and kept horses and cows a custom carried on ceremonies which were performed in carrying by the more prominent inhabitants of Reading to the grave him who had occupied for over be terminated by the consummation of time."

Upon

the expiration of his term of office he

;



supply their

in order to

fiimilies

with vegeta-

He

Upon one

frequently visited his farms.

occasion, Sailor,

about

he called to see John

1825,

who was farming

the three hundred and

twelve acre farm on the Kutztown road, at " Hiester's Ijane " (now in North Reading, and

owned by the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company). Finding Mr. Sailor on the threshing

barn-floor,

pulled

his coat

off'

with a

flail,

he

and handled the

flail,

not

During

his

grain

only vigorously but successfully.

youth he was recognized as an accomplished

workman

at

all

kinds of farm labor.

Mr. Sailor reached an advanced age and retirement,

in

much

with

he narrated

this

When lived

circumstance

pleasure.

feet

pounds.

and weighed about two hundred His manners were simple and unas-

tall

suming, so much

'

years the most prominent positions before

Some years afterward the remains of Governor and his wife were removed t(j the Charles Evans Cemetery. He left an estate which amounted to four hundred and sixty-eight thousand dollars.

On

so,

the

The -

greater part consisted of bonds

— the

fifty

latter

having included,

thousand dollars

in

it

the

and stocks

is

believed,

United States

His surviving children and granda SQn, John S. Hiester two daughters, Catharine Spayd (widow of Hon. John Spayd) and Rebecca Muhlenberg (intermarried with Rev. Henry A. Muhlenberg) a granddaughter, Mary E. Muhlenberg (the daughter of Mary Heister, who was intermarried with Rev. Henry A. Muhlenberg) and Bank.

children were

;

;

;

Governor Hiester was a man of commanding presence and pleasing address. He was about six

fifty

them.

bles.

indeed, for a

the western half of lot No. 30

occupied by Tobias Barlo, No. 437.

man

of his

town phin, nov

seven grandchildren, the children of Elizabeth

who was intermarried with Levi Paulnamely Joseph Pauling, Henry Pauling, Elizabeth Pauling (intermarried with Thomas Ross), James Pauling, Rebecca Pauling, Ellen Pauling and Mary Pauling. Hiester, ing,



Governor John Andrew

Shi-lze, though

not elected Governor from Berks County, his

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. birtli

and

earlier life in the

county

entitle

him

John Andrew

was born in Tulpehocken township, Berks County, on July 19, He was the son of Rev. Christian 1775. Shulze, a Lutheran clergyman. His mother was Eve Elizabeth Muhlenberg, the oldest daughter of Rev. Heury Melchior Muhlenberg. He was Sliulze

for the ministry,

liberally etlucated

larly ordained

and he

charge of pastoral duties to several congregations in

Bei-ks,

Owing

to a

obliged

to

Lebanon and Lancaster Counties. rheumatic affection, he, in 1804, was relinquish

office

He

preaching.

then

of Governor, excepting upon 1840,

the Harrisburg

when he was

Whig

a

one

member

of

Convention, which nom-

General Harrison

inated

this connection

for

President.

In

he ran as a Senatorial elector upon

the Harrison ticket, and was elected, and after-

ward

officiated

as president of the State Elec-

toral College.

Upon

and regu-

as a miuister in 1796,

his lather for eight yeare in the dis-

assi.-^ted

the

occasion, in

to a place in this history.

from

retiring

office

he removed to

Lycoming County, where he continued to During that period he was side till 1846.

en-

gaged in certain extensive speculations in

this

re-

great and enterprising county, but he was not

Then

successful in them. ter,

where he continued

lie

moved

to reside

till

to Lanca.s-

his death,

moved to Myerstown, then in Dauphin County, November 18, 1852. He was a superior man, In and he enjoyed the high esteem of his fellowand pursued the business of merchant. 1.S06 he was elected a member of the State citizens for his many excellent personal and social Legislature,

and

serving

constituents

his

afterward

twice

re-elected,

with distinction for

characteristics.

prominent men

He was one whom this

of the few really

county produced.

In 1813, ujion the erection of His predecessor in the gubernatorial chair ot Lebanon County, he was appointed to fill the this State was .Joseph Hiester, who was elected to this high office from Berks County. office of prothonotary, in which he continued Frederick Smith, one of the most distinIn 1821 he was again elected for eight years. three terms.

to the Legislature, and, in 1822, he

Senator,

to

represent

the

was chosen

Senatorial

district

composed of Dauphin and Lebanon Counties. Whilst serving as a Senator he received the Democratic nomination for Governor, and was

men that Berks County has produced, was born in tlie year 1773, and was a .son of Rev. Joini Frederick Smith, an eminent divine of the Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania, and

guished

one of the pioneers of that denomination in Frederick

by a majority of twenty-five thousand seven hundred and six over Andrew Gregg, the

America.

Federal candidate; and, in 1826, he was re-

a.s

Governor with little opposition, the Federal party having run John Sergeant against him. Iu.1829 he was again brought out as a

admitted to the bar

electetl

elected

candidate, but, for the sake of party, he withdrew,

inated and elected.

harmony

in the

and George Wolf was nom^Miilst acting as

Governor

he had the honor of tendering the courtesies of the State to General Lafayette,

who was

Smith obtained a su-

perior classical education, and, selecting the law

was Reading August 7, 1795. He soon thereafter won prominence and distinction, both as a counselor and as an attorney his profession, after a careful preparation, at

in important litigation.

In the mean time he

became actively interested in the politics of his native State, and was a member of the Legisla1802-3. He was appointed ture for two years deputy attorney-general for Berks County in



upon his celebrated tour through the 1818, and occupied that position for three His administration of the affairs of years. the State government during his official career He served from 1823 to 1828 as attorneywas distinguished for integrity, wisdom and general of Pennsylvania, under Governor Anstatesmanship. drew Shulze, by whom he was appointed asDuring President Jackson's opposition against sociate justice of the Supreme Court of the the Bank of the L^nited States, Governor Shulze State in 1828, which position he filled uutil the left the Democratic party. But he was not ac- time of his death. His judicial career, though His decisions are tive in political life after his retirement from brief, was distinguLsheil. then

country.

POLITICS cited as emphatic expositions of the law, S23.

becane a member of the Legislature of State, and later, was a representative from

to Ohio,

Ohio

in the

Twentieth Congress.

away County, Ohio,

He

died in Pick-

in 1832.

Nathaniel Potts Hobaet was Philadelphia, born October

the

office

of

John

3,

a native

of

1790, read law in

C. Smith, and was admitted to

where he was appointed

kill

a liberal education,

private secretary of Governor Joseph Hiester from

Pennsylvania Militia, which was composed of the

till

Philadelphia

in

was admitted a member of

and

the Berks County bar

the bar of his native city

Lebanon and Schuyl-

son of General

born

obtained

was elected major-general of the Sixth Division troops in Berks, Dauphin,

survived him,

Muhlenberg,

S.

Peter Muhlenberg,

that

'

to his

as a president judge he officiated in as prothonotary

florid

fine

but the law, as a

for him."

In the year 1818, previous

He

in anecdotes.

was a large man, with a large head and

Berks

was married to

;

removed

to Pottstown,

justice of the peace

by

Governor Simon Snyder; joined Captain Daniel

De

B. Keim's company of Washington Blues in

August, 1814

;

marched with

it

to

Camjj Dupont,

and there joined the First Regiment of Pennsyl7, 1814, and served as company until December when they returned to Read-

vania Volunteers October fourth sergeant of the

were brought to Reading and buried in the grave-

r)th

yard adjoining Christ's Episcopal Church.

ing

of the same year, ;

admitted an attorney of the Berks County

James B. Hubley was born in the year 1789, bar January 3, 1818 was clerk in the prothonotary's office, under John Adams, for several years in Montgomery Co., Pa., and was a son of Joseph Hubley and brother of Edwin B. Hubley. He was assistant clerk in the House of Representawas admitted a member of the bar of Berks tives at Harrisburg, under chief clerk Francis R. ;

;

Shunk. 'From

Egle's " History of

Dauphin County."

In 1827 Governor Shulze appointed him

clerk of the Orphans' Court

and Court of Quarter

BENCH AND BAR. Berks County, which position he held

Sessions of

when he removed

until 1830,

to Pottstown.

In

Witman, 1823

561

was born at Reading

1836 he was appointed auditor-general of Pennsyl-

1790, and was

vania by Governor Ritner, and held the

County August

office for

three years; resided at Pottstown from 1830 until

July

his death,

18, isio,

to

3,

He

1860.

was married April

Joanna Holland.

Their children

were John Potts (now an attorney

Sarah

Anna

Eliza R.,

P.,

in Pottsville),

Sophia,

James D. Biddle was lish

Marks

the only son of

education he studied law under the direction

of his father and was admitted to the bar at Reading April

For many years he was a

1815.

9,

He

1818.

removed

to

and practiced

lived

Orwigsburg, Schuylkill County, where

he practiced his profession

till

his

death February

13,1856.

Edward B. Hubley He was the son of

1792.

After obtaining a good Eng-

John Biddle, Esq.

of Berks

admitted to the bar 9,

from

the year

in

law at Reading for a number of years aud then

Robert H.,

Nathaniel B., William R. and Ellen G. Hobart.

Berks County

associate judge of

to 1828,

attorney

cing

was born at Reading

in

Joseph Hubley, a practi-

of the Berks County

He

bar.

studied law with his father and was admitted to

the bar April

After practicing at Read-

1820.

5,

ing for a while he

moved

Orwigsburg, then the

to

county-seat of Schuylkill County, and there con-

number of years.

He rep-

notary public, and became a very popular lawyer,

tinued his profession for a

but died when yet young.

resented that district in Congress for two terms from

Charles D.wis,

son of Moses Davis, was born

Easton December 25, 1795, and upon attaining

in

manhood, read law

in

the office of Hon. Samuel

Sitgreaves of the Northampton bar, and was ad-

mitted to practice January 16, 1817,

removed

Allentown.

to

erection of

He

Lehigh County.

of the leaders of the bar of that

tinued uuinterrujjtcdly to

where he followed this

to

to

Reading

By

physical constitution would

He

demands.

remove

to the

and died

in

piactice as

no longer withstand

accordingly

home of

determined

to

and youth,

his childhood

Easton on January 19, 1873.

During

town, he lived a

his If St residence in his native

but was

his

the full enjoyment of

semi-retired

life,

his faculties

and was frequently consulted by other

in

members of the Northampton of Mr. Davis, Judge Maxwell

bar.

In speaking

said, " It is

worthy

of remark that no attorney had been more diligent in the practice of his profession,

and devoted

nor more faithful

as a

com-

missioner of Indian affairs under President Polk.

In

he discharged his duties with

all these positions

ability

and

About 1848 he returned

fidelity.

yeai-s;

profession

his profession until 1867.

his

Governor David R. Porter, and acted

county and con-

practice his

relinquish

held the appointment of canal

Reading aud continued

time increasing years and declining health

impelled him

its

he

He

to 1839.

soon became one

1839 when he came

at Allentown until

when

This was shortly after the

1835

commissioner of this State for several years under

to

here for eight

to reside

then he removed to Philadelphia, and died

there shortly afterward, on February 23, 1856,

He

aged sixty-four years. rine, eldest

James

L.

was born

He

was married

to

Catha-

daughter of Judge Spayd.

in

Dunn,

the only son of James Dunn, Kent County, Md., July 25, 1785.

was educated

in

of

the schools

Baltimore,

then went to Philadelphia to live in the family of his

uncle,

He

John Lorrain.

there studied the

art of book-keeping, and, for a time,

was engaged

In 1815 he came to

in the mercantile business.

Reading aud read law under the direction of Samuel Baird, Esq.,

and was admitted

Berks County, November

was an excellent lawyer, a

in

appearance.

bar of

Mr. Dunn

fine scholar,

companion, courteous and affable

and prepossessing

to the

10, 1821.

in his

a genial

manners

During the

last

whose twelve years of his life he was a confirmed invalid causes or business he devoted all the powers of and was compelled to retire from an extensive his vigorous mind. He was not only an able and practice at the bar. He was a prominent and to the interests of his clients to

successful lawyer but a valuable

He had his

and useful

citizen.

always been a consistent Christian, and by

walk and conversation, honored

his profes-

sion."

Chakles

Witman,

son

of

Hon.

William

influential

member

and one of the the

of

the

original

Charles Evans

Episcopal

Church,

board of directors of

Cemetery.

He

was mar-

who

ried to Sara

Rees,

before him.

Their children were Charles C. Dunn,

of

Philadelphia,

died

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

562

Dunn, of Philadelphia, Mrs. De B. Reading for a number of years, he removed to the William Fullerton Mrs. Nelson B. Bowman, of State of Ohio, where he died. Brownsville, Pa., all of whom are living, and Mrs. Duncan, who was admitted to the bar at the same time, also moved to the west after a few years' Edward jMcLouegan, deceased, of Reading.

George R.

Keim, of Reading

William

;

who was

Leavenworth,

C.

ad-

practice here.

Henry W.

bar at Reading, August 18, 1822,

mitted to the

New

was a native of

During a

England.

resi-

guished

Smith,

member

many

for

years a

distin-

of the Berks County bar, was a

Reading he won

son of Judge Frederick Smith, of the supreme

considerable distinction in the legal jn'ofession and

court of Pennsylvania, and was born January 4,

dence of about twenty years

was a man of

in

He

fine intellectual attainments.

tide of emigration to California

accompanied the

during the " gold-fever " and died in that State.

Henry

Philadelphia,

is

prominent

the

Dreer,

of

obtained a good educa-

then pursued the study of law, was admitted

elsewhere, and, on

member

March

in practice at

Reading

when he moved

1824, became a

He

year

continued

until about the year 1840,

to Philadelphia county

on the Delaware, near in the

24,

of the Berks County bar.

1835,

While

Bristol.

and lived Reading

in

he was instrumental iu

se-

curing the charter of the Berks County Bank, and for a time,

He

he was the principal stockholder

in

it.

disposed of his interest to Elijah Deckert and

William Darling from Reading

Soon after

in 1839.

his

his

name was changed

Wharton Beckley, and he

removal

to

Lloyd

thus became heir to a

He

large part of the Beckley estate

was a man

of rare intelligence and well versed in

general

He

1825.

5,

studied law under the instruction of

and was admitted was active

in

to the politics

bar January

was a

;

dele-

gate to the State Democratic convention of 1832,

He

the National Democratic Convention in 1835.

was a candidate

for

Congress on a combined ticket

Whigs and Democrats,

of

in 18.36, against

A. Muhlenberg, Democrat, who was served as a

member

1843 and 1844.

Henry

He

elected.

of the State Legislature, in

In 1846 he was a candidate for

Congress against Judge William Strong.

He

was

the candidate fir president-judge of the county, in 1X51, against J.

Pringle Jones, and in 1861,

was the candidate

for the

"

Union

" ticket against

Smith had an

e.xtensive

same

W.

office

on

the ablest lawyers Berks County has produced. last

a

important

member of

the

Woodward. Mr. practice and was one of J.

official position

he

filled

The

was that of

the convention that framed the State

At one

Constitution of 1873.

time, he

and

his

brother George owned one-half of the stock of

literature.

Thomas Morris was born Pa.,

He

his fiither,

1835, 1841, 1844 and 1846, and was a delegate to

married to his daughter.

Lloyd Wharton, who tion,

nur.seryman

1804.

near

Doylestown,

and was a son of Thomas Morris.

After

the Reading 27,

Water Company.

He

died August

1878, leaving a widow and an only son, F.

Hon. John Chap-

Leaf Smith, now a member of the Reading bar. Edward P. Pearson, for many years one of

man, a distinguished lawyer of the Bucks County

the leading attorneys of the Reading bar, was a

tending an excellent academy in his native town, he entered the

bar,

office

of the

and having completed the required course of native of

legal studies,

was admitted

to the bar.

thereafter he lived at Pottsville

For a time

and became a

New

legal studies

Jersey,

moved

to

and

after completing his

Lebanon, Pa., and from

thence to Reading, where he became associated in

member of the Berks County bar by admission practice with Henry W. Smith, Esq., and succeedNovember 1, 1824. He was an active Democrat ed to a large and lucrative business. He was and ardent supporter of Henry A. Muhlenberg for married to Fredericka, a daughter of Judge Fredgovernor of Pennsylvania. That department of erick Smith. Edward P. Pearson, one of his sons, practice relating to land titles was a specialty with is now a lieutenant-colonel in the Regular Army. Frederick Peai-sou, another son, was a commodore him. He died June 17, 1872. David Evans, who was admitted to the bar at in the American Navy and won distinction in asReading, January 5, 1825, was born at Morgan- sisting the English Navy to quell an insurrection town, this county, and

After engaging

in

tiie

was of Welsh descent. duties of his profession at

For gallant services on this occasion Queen of England offered him a knighthood.

in Japan.

the

BENCH AND BAR. but being in the American service he was obliged

563

the

numerous descendants are active members of Another brother, Samuel, removed to Springfield, Ohio, where he M'as a

Pectoral."

leaving to survive him a

He

to decline the proffered honor.

retired

from

Navy soon after his marriage with ^Nliss Ayers, of Boston, daughter of the originator of " Ayers' Charle-s

came

Jack, a native of Philadelphia,

J.

Reading

to

and

in 1S25,

year was admitted a

member

in

the community.

died there in 1884,

widow and numerous

children and grandchildren.

August of that

of the Berks County

He

leading manuf;icturer.

Elijah Dechert was chief clerk in the pro-

thonotary's office at Reading, under

General

John Adams and Marks John Biddle, Esq., and published a newspaper in Reading for a num- and was admitted to the bar on January 4, ber of years, known as the Jackson Democrat. He 1827. For many years he had a large pracwas a man of brilliancy and power and attained tice, and by his integrity, industry and ability, Being a devoted Democrat he established

bar.

considerable influence in the politics of the State.

held a high position at a bar which ranked

He

among

ceased the publication of his paper about 1834

and soon afterward removed

to Philadelphia,

he died.

elder

Joseph H. Spa yd, son of John Spayd,

presi-

the strongest in the State.

Early in

where

life

of the

and he was,

grandson of Governor Hiester, was born

of

and died

in

He

3'ears.

Reading, June

1865, aged si.xty-two

obtained a liberal education

graduate of Yale College mitted a

5,

;

his admission he

attorney-general

was a

;

studied law and was ad-

member of the Reading bar

years after

1803

in

1

82().

Ellmaker, prosecuting attorney

of the courts of Berks County.

Being possessed of

considerable means he relinquished the practice of his profession early in life

liberal reading,

eral

and devoted

his time to

having a strong partiality for gen-

He

literature.

accumulated

an excellent

library and was especially interested in the study

of natural science,

his

favorite

branches being

geology and natural history

Elijah Dechert was born

in

Ciimru

township, Berks

County, Octoljer 15, 1799, and was the son of John and Deborah Dechert.

His

its

for

his

convictions

he was

ingly,

community

of the family his

is

own and of

shown by the

fact that all

of

the preceding generations re-

ceived Biblical names at their baptism.

His elder brother, Daniel, died

at his

home

Sinking Springs, in this county, September 17th, 1884, aged ninety-one years. He had lived upon his farm in that vicinity for many at

years,

and was highly respected.

Many

of his

was earnestly interand other moral re-

citizen,

ambition, was

of private

He

of right and shrinking

known and

Accord-

respected

in

the

an independent and honorable who, avoiding politics and political satisfied

to

perform the duties

life.

was an early friend of the public-school it was said, in a leading newspaper,

system, and

" Berks County and Reading owe him a debt of gratitude for his valuable and persevering labors in behalf of

at the time of his death

:

the youth of the city and county."

He

died in the City of PhiladeliJiia, whither

he had removed, June 14, 1854. ber 15, 1824, he was married

the

earnestness of the religious faith

He

a.s

pilgrimage, to escajje religious persecution in

The

years, the superintendent

performance of no duty.

the

daughter of

Europe.

also

Church of

forms of the day, ever acting in accordance with

was a lieutenant in the army of the Revolution, and ^^•as the descendant of ancestors who came Mith tiie German father, a farmer,

many

Sunday-school.

ested in the temperance

Two from

was a])pointed by

member and

Presbyterian

Reading, of which he was one of the founders,

dent judge of the courts of Berks County, and in

he became a

First

Hon. Robert

On to

Porter,

Septem-

Mary

Vs\,

then

the

president judge of this district, having filled office, for more than twenty years, with the deserved reputation of an honest man, a fine

scholar and

a sound lawyer. Judge Porter had been a lieutenant in the Revolutionary Army, and was the son of General Andrew

Porter, of the Pennsylvania Line of that army, and who nas afterwards surveyor-general of

Pennsylvania.

Mrs. Dechert survived her husband, and January 15, 1872, leaving a family of

died

— HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

5(54

seven

Of

children.

W. (now

deceased),

of the Camden and

Howard

another, ter,



one son, William

these,

became the vice-president

Amboy

Railroad Company;

P., is a Presbyterian minis-

and the other two, Henry

P., are

]\I.

and Robert

now prominent members of of

ant-colonel

the Phila-

Robert P. Dechert was lieuten-

delphia bar.

Regiment

Twenty-ninth

the

Pennsylvania Volimteers during the the Rebellion, and

is

now

War

of

the controller of the

city of Philadelphia.

One

B., married

daughter, Sarah

Edmond

combined with intelligence,

New England

make up

tlie

enterprise

and

strength of Americau

character.

Jacob Hoffman, brother of the late Dr. Charles Edward Hoffman, of Reading, and Dr. William Hoffman, residing

244 South Fifth

at

was

Street,

born in 1805, on a farm in Northauipton County,

He

Pa

acquired

preliminary education

a

in

Easton, where he read law under the direction of the late bar,

Hon. James Porter, of the Northampton

and was admitted two years

He

later.

began

In 1829 he married Mary

practicing at Easton.

Young, a leading lawyer of Dayton, Ohio; Gehr, daughter of Jacob Gehr, of Oley township, Agnes G., married Rev. Alfred TayBerks County, and in 1831 removed to Reading, youngest (now N. and the Brooklyn, Y., lor, of

S.

another,

having been admitted as an attorney

deceased) late

married Rev.

Charles

E. Griffith,

William W. married Y. D. Dashiel,

of Allentown, Pa.

Esther, daughter of Colonel

practice

to

November

before the courts of this county

10,

Mr. Hoffman early gained an enviable

1829.

reputation as an influential lawyer in important

who are now land cases, especially where disputes arose in referYellott D., of the New York bar, living, ence to titles. In his litigations relating to certain Henry M. Dechert Mary P. and William W. coal lands lying in the county of Schuylkill, his married Esther S., daughter of Thomas S. services were of great value, in consequence of They have four Taylor, of Philadelphia. which much of his practice was before the courts Henry T., of the Philadelphia bar. children, He died in Reading November of that county. Bertha M., Ellen G. and Edward Porter. During the Civil War he was an ear21, 1870. Mrs. Young has two sons, George R. and nest suppiirter of the administration of Abraham

U.S.A., and

left

three children,







William H., of the Ohio

bar,

and a daughter,

Lincoln.

Howard P. married Caroline SandRobert M. Bare was born at Lancaster, Pa. they have one daughter, ford, of New York He was admitted to the bar of Berks County on Mrs. Taylor has a son, Thomas P., Caroline. Mary.

;



of Bridgeport,

Conn., and

two daughters,

Mrs. Fanny Rowell and Isabella.

Mrs. Grif-



two children, Mary D. and Charles E. In taking up the histories of families in this

fith left

county,

we

notice the remarkable, widespread

emigration going out from Berks County. is

the case witii this and

many

other families,

tral

In Philadelphia,

tlie

cen-

parts of Pennsylvania, and in Ohio, In-

Iowa and other of the Western States, Berks County names are almost as familiar as

diana,

here at home.

Many

persons ignorantly sup-

3,

Reading.

1831, about which time he

He acquired

was recognized

man

moved

to

an extensive practice and

He

as a superior lawyer.

was a

of fine personal appearance and possessed a order of eloquence.

higli

As County

her sons and daughters have gone out to the

East and the West.

January

in the

Assembly

He

represented Berks

1841, aud in

for the year

1845 he received the appointment of State reporter

from Governor Shunk

—the

created in the year named. office

was

five years.

He

office

The

having

been

prescribed terra of

died whilst filling this

appointment, having compiled aud published the first

ten State reports

Reports."

His

commonly known as

" Barr's

friend, J. Pringle .lones, Esq.,

New England emigration has deter- (who subsequently filled the office of president mined the fortunes of our land but the traveler judge of Berks County) completed the compilation and the scholar know that the German and of the cases adjudicated during his term and pubScotch-Irish ancestry of Pennsylvania brought lished them in two volumes, commonly knowQ as " Jones' Reports." He died at Reading, December to us those elements of industry and intellipose that

;

gence,

and that sturdiness of purpose, which.

25, 1849, aged forty-seven years.

He

was married

BENCH AM) BAR. a daughter of Dr. Holmes of Lancaster, Pa.,

to

aud

Peter Filbert was born and was a son of Peter

in

Reading

in

He chose

profession of law

and was admitted

Reading January

6,

1831.

the

Mayer

mayor, and

first

While serving

years.

as

deputy attorney

district

was

He was a He died

born

acquired a good

education

admitted

bar January

engaged

to

the

in his

;

notary

on the

Lancaster

at

law and was

read

While

1831.

8,

profession with

future success, he was stricken

fine

down

prospects

Francis Aurand, who was admitted Reading November

disease

May

29, 1837,

William Betz was

He

13, 1833, died of

pulmonary

born at Reading

many

in

1812.

sheriff of

one term (1821-23) and

for

bar

aged twenty-five years.

was the son of Heniy Betz, Esq.,

Berks County

to the

for

years a justice of the peace of Reading.

After receiving a general education

at

home he

studied law and was admitted to practice on Janu-

ary 10, 1834.

Reading

for

removed

to

He

carried on his

upwards of twenty

profession

years,

Philadelphia about 1857,

died on August

25, 1860,

at

;

and upon the

ei'ection

office

He

of Read-

he

filled

was generally

recognized as a magistrate of decided ability, and

man

phia

he

of generous disposition.

George born

Philadel-

was one of the principal clerks in the

post-office,

clay, a

At

dying whilst

politics

he was an

for

many

years, but

eventually became more conservative in political In 1873

matters.

he was chosen

one

the

of

Representatives from Berks County to the Convention at Philadelphia

which framed

the

present

About 1875 he removed to Philadelphia and there became associated in the practice of law with Judge Wilson. He now lives

State Constitution.

retirement

in

member

in that

He

city.

of the Berks County bar

Newton

Strong was born

D.

Conn., in the year 1810.

He was

one of the

He

class.

Somers,

in

Yale College

in 1831, with

oldest

living.

acquired a good

academic education aud

of his

the

is

now

from

graduated

honors

first

was then appointed a tutor at

Yale, which position he held two years.

At the

expiration of this time, he removed to

Reading

and became a law student in the brother, to the

Hon. William Strong.

bar he practiced

at Easton, Pa.,

his profession for a

and then removed

where he soon took a leading lawyers of that State.

of his

office

After his admi.«sion

jiosition

Upon

few years

Alton, 111,

to

among

the

the election of his

G. Barclay, son of Andrew C. Bar-

After obtaining a preliminary

education, he entered Yale College from

in this county. St.

A

few years later he removed to

Louis, Mo., where he was engaged in the duties

of his profession at the time of his

August

death,

1866, in the fifty-sixth year of his age.

9,

His

remains were brought to Reading and interred Charles Evans' Cemetery.

in

accomplished education, was a

He

possessed

fine

lawyer,

brought to the exercise of his profession

all

an

and the

resources of a well cultivated mind.

Anthony

Miller was born February

F.

25,

1805, in Reading; was educated in the schools of

filling this position.

prominent merchant of Philadelphia, was

in that city.

the

In

brother to Congress from Berks County he return-

alderman of the

north ward, for one term, which acceptably from 1847 to 1851.

Whig

and

in

ed to Reading and assumed his brother's practice

aged forty-eight years.

ing into a city, he was elected

as a

excellent

during which

and then

of justice of the peace for some years and

also chief burgess

ardent and consistent

to

where he

Whilst practicing law at Reading he also held the office

development of the county.

of

with consump-

tion at the early age of twenty-eight years.

at

with

profession

his

and

Reading aud

to

and

Berks County.

B.

continued

came

growth

28th of May, 1864, aged seventy-one years.

John

here

1835 he

lu

bar.

prosperity of the city of Reading,

held the latter office one year.

number of

the

time he took great interest in the

ed in 1847, then was elected the

for

'

During the year 1840,

ing for several years until a city charter was obtain-

public for a

soon

was admitted

success, for a period of forty years

He filled the position of chief burgess of Read-

general

He

in 1832.

to practice at

he represented Berks County in the State Legisla-

mayor he was appointed

was graduated

after the necessary preparation

179.3,

Berks

Filbert, sheriff of

County, for the years 1785-86-87.

ture.

institution he

thereafter engaged in the study of the law,

a surviving daughter.

left

565

which

his native

town

;

read law in the

John Banks, and was admitted 15,

1836

;

office

of Hon.

to the bar

August

practiced in Reading for several years,

and died August

16, 1863.

HISTORY OF BERKS COUXTY, PENXSYLVANIA.

566

Franklin and educated

B.

Shoener was born

in the

management of Major

native town then under the

He

Medara.

read law under the instruction of

Elijah Deckert, Esq

,

and was admitted a member

of the Reading bar January ticed

Reading

at

Lancasterian school of his

3,

He

1837.

law for several years, but died at the age of

twenty-seven.

He

was an

officer in the

Washing-

a volunteer military company com-

ton Greys,

manded by Daniel M. Keim. John S. Richards was born February in

prac-

5,

1815,

Furnace, and was the eldest son of James Richards,

ature,

He

early developed a taste for

and read the books of

liter-

his father's library

Upon

with the assiduity of a mature student.

the

death of his father in 1827, he moved to Reading to live

bar April

4,

1837, and the next year he became

Henry Rhoads

associated with

with his uncle. Judge William Darling, and

attended the Reading Academy, where he acquired

in the publication

of the Berks and SrhuylkiUJournal. to edit

He

1845 and

until

it

took an active part

Whig and

devoted

He

finally sold

in 1860.

He

that subject.

was a

Henry

Clay,

in support of the

Ken-

a great admirer of

and made many speeches

continued

it

and wrote many

in politics

vigorous editorials on

tucky statesman for

Robeson township, Berks County, near Joanna

a merchant.

of Elijah Deckert, Esq., and was admitted to the

President

United

the

of

States.

While engaged fession

the active duties of his pro-

in

he took a devoted interest in the cause of

education, served nearly thirty years as a

member

of the Board of School Controllers of Reading and assisted in establishing the City

Richards possessed great

His

and

intellectual

High School. Mr. powers.

versatility of

professional

acquirements

were very extensive, and as a member of the

Reading bar he maintained a very high standing.

For the years 1849 and 1850 he served Berks County and was

attorney for

as district for a time

attorney for the Philadeljjhia and Reading Rail-

road Company.

After an industrious and useful

career he

in

died

the

year 1872 universally

honored and respected.

He

was a prominent

member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Dennis W. O'Brien was born in Reading and obtained a preliminary education in the schools of

N.

,'

his native town.

Europe

tour of

O'Brien

When in

yet a

After returning education

classical

young man he made a

company with

Joseph

his uncle,

home he acquired a

at college

and then

entered

upon the study of law under the direction of ,R>]1N

s.

Charles Evans, Esq., of the Reading bar, and was

richahu.'-;.

a good preparatory education.

In

1830 Judge

183X, and was en-

admitted to practice August

7,

gaged

Reading

his

in

profession at

until

1844,

Darling removed to Joanna Furnace and young

about which time he removed to the city of Phila-

Richards became a clerk in

delphia, where he

liis

store at that place.

In 1832 Mr. Richards organized the

Men's Temjierance Society

at

Young

Morgantown and

also established a public library for the citizens of

Robeson township. began

write

to

for

At

the

the

age of sixteen he

newspapers

tinued the same until his death, cational, topics.

the

social,

He

Latin,

scientific,

— on

and

con-

political, edu-

moral and

religious

acquired a considerable knowledge of

German and French

languages.

1834 he began the study of the law

in

In

the office

courts.

He

was elected judge of one of the

died a few years ago.

Jeremiah D. Bitting was admitted August

8,

interest

in

was

1838. politics

sheriff of

to the

bar

For a time he took an active and from 1859

Berks County.

to

1862

He removed

he to

Philadelphia, engaged in mercantile business and

now

resides in that city.

Andrew Sallade was a native dorf. He was admitted to the bar

of AVomels-

August

11,

1838, practiced law at Reading successfully and

BENCH AND BAR. then moved to Philadelphia and practiced before

He

the Court of Claims.

member

vfas a

of the

567 which he

integrity, for

Legislature from Berks County in the year 1855.

George

War, through

he obtained a

During the

Civil

the influence of

to the

now an officer in the Regular Army. Jackson H. Sherman, a native of New England, studied law in the office of Judge William

Keim, a

Darling, and soon after removed to the West.

delphia.

Peter Shearer was born February

He

Reading.

tion in his native

town and became one of the

first

teachers after the adoption of the public school

system

Esq.

was admitted

;

reading in the

after ;

left

Reading

in

of

1843

for

the

Mexican

War

Monterey and took part

Orleans

was a

;

New York Hunter

to

Maria who

their

after

marriage, leaving one

Keim Ludwig, now

Benneville

of Phila-

James Donagan was born in Philadelphia in He came to Berks County at an early

1793.

age

;

John

studied medicine under Dr.

C. Baura, of

After his graduation from the

Exeter township.

then abandoned the medical profes-

upon the study of the law, was ad-

1841, and continued in active practice until about

number of years 1862 enlisted in a

in

He

of years.

sion, entered

mitted to the bar of Berks County December 22,

regiment and served under General

was wounded

;

De

was married

of General William H. Keim,

of Vera Cruz.

After the war he located in Mansfield, La., and

;

shortly

child,

1840, where

years and then re.

in the battle of

in the siege

returned to Reading in 1857

died

He

was admitted

3,

town, where he practiced medicine for a number

New

published a newspaper for a

fifteen

to Philadelphia. sister

;

November

University of Pennsylvania he located at Kutz-

was

;

moved

born in Berks County;

education

1840,

7,

volunteer in Captain Blanchard's company, of that city, in

classical

Henry W. Smith,

bar April

to the office

Ludwig was

he practiced for about

1819,

3,

acquired a preparatory educa-

E,

bar at Reading

Hon. Simon Cameron, he was appointed a paymaster in the Union army. He died in the far West, while on a visit to his son Madison, who is

in

be remembered,

will long

as well as for his original witticisms.

in the battle of

Piedmont,

He

1860. tions

;

held several important political posi-

was one of the

County

and was the

last

from Berks

five delegates

to the Constitutional

Convention of 1838,

survivor of the delegation from this

During the years 1840-41-42 he held the

county.

of clerk of the Orphans' Court of this county.

taken prisoner and sent to Andersonville for six

office

months, and was released just before Sherman's

In the spring of 1863 he was chosen to represent

March

the Fourth

Since the war he has lived in

to the Sea.

Matthias Mengel was born near Morgantown, in

Caernarvon township, January

He

13, 1814.

spent his boyhood days on the farm of his father, until 18.38,

when he came

student-at-law Esq.,

to

Reading, became a

the office of

in

and was admitted

to the

Elijah

in 1847,

9,

1840.

when Reading was

incorpor-

ated into a city, and served in that office continuously until 1860

to

1868,

when he was again

alderman, serving until

1873

;

was

re-

elected in 1875 and filled two consecutive terms,

ending

He

in 1885.

spirit,

has recently been appointed

Mr. Mengel has been a suc-

a notary public. cessful business

man.

He

maintains

his jovial

which has been one of the prominent

of his character

known through

in the City Councils,

all

through his

the county as a

life.

man

He

is

traits

widely

of the highest

While occupying that

president.

position he

died suddenly of heart disease January 20, 1864,

aged seventy-one

His

years.

various

duties were performed w'ith ability

Samuel Sohl was born 1842

and

;

read to

practiced law at Reading

5,

several years

retired from practice

;

;

was admitted

the bar April

;

public

fidelity.

Heidelberg

in

law with Hon. William Strong

and died near

the place of his birth.

Silas E.

was treasurer of the city School

;

Board from 1866 elected

its

Dechert,

bar April

In 1845 he was elected a magistrate, became an

alderman

Ward of Reading

and upon the organization of that body was chosen

Berks County.

Buzard was born

Monroe County, of

New

Pa.;

at Buzzardsville,

was a graduate of the College

Jersey, at Princeton

;

became a member of

the Berks County bar April 8, 1845

;

located at

Kutztown, where he practiced a few years and died at the age of twenty-seven years.

Charles Weirman was born County

;

read law

;

was admitted

practiced qibout five years and then

gaged

in the

in

May

Lebanon 17,

1842

became

;

en-

manufacture of bricks and extensively

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

568

interested in patented brick

He

macliines.

George W. Arms was born ship

;

came

bar March

to

Reading and was admitted

He

1843.

8,

(Biddle) Baird, was born in Reading August

Douglass town-

in

sick,

where he

died.

years,

home

in the country,

to the

practiced at Reading for

and being taken

some

went

to

his

;

bar November

6,

1843

where he continued

origin.

of William

master

])e()j)le

of Scotch, English

are

Samuel Baird, the grandfather

M. Baird, was an assistant quarterarmy when they were

quartered at Valley Forge.

William Biddle,

came

ancestor on the maternal side,

to

his

America

and was the pioneer of the Biddle family

in 1681,

Thomas

noted in Pennsylvania annals.

Colebrookdale Furnace, a pioneer

Potts, of

the iron bus-

in

Berks County, and Rev. Elisha Spencer,

iness in

some time, was transferred

D.D., (whose loyalty was such during the times that tried men's souls that he was sent by

Wash-

to

Dickinson

College, where his mother resided at the time,

where he graduated

and year

in 1837, in the twentieth

He subsequently

Washington's

in

there for

entered

1834, and after remaining

and was admitted

They

He

Nottingham Academy, Maryland.

at Carlisle

— The Bairds and the Bid-

His

such as they then were.

of his age.

to

have always been among the most noted

and Irish

schools,

4,

at the

father died in 1833, after which he spent a year at

Allentown,

William M. Baird. of Pennsylvania.

Reading

in his profession succes-sfully.

months and then returned

for a few

dies

practiced law in Reading

;

His early education was obtained

1817.

Lafayette College in

John K. Longnecker was a native of Lehigh was admitted a member of the Reading

County

William M. Baird, son of Samuel and Lydia

died

while actively engaged in that business.

attended a law school

bar there in

to the

1840, but soon after removed to Gettysburg to

In 1841 he was appointed

practice his profession. to

a clerkship at

Washington under

Hon. Charles B. Penrose, who was

his uncle,

solicitor of the

treasury during the Harrison and Tyler adminis-

He

tration.

came

County

held this place until 1844,

Reading and was admitted

to

bar, April 12th of that year,

when he

the Berks

to

and

at

once

took a prominent position in his profession.

On

the 2d of December, 1847, he was married to Harriet,

daughter of Robert

County, N.

J.

On

his

W.

life

Whig

and

he identified himself with the

was one of the leading

May

Holmes, of Cape

entrance into political

sj^irits

party,

of that organization,

ington into Georgia to arouse the patriotism of the

and of the Republican party, which succeeded

people of that State, and upon whose head a price

In 185.5 he was elected mayor of Reading by a

was

set

by the English Tories,) were

also collateral

relatives of the maternal line.

Samuel Baird,

the

William

of

M.

Baird, was a leading attorney at the Berks County

bar half a century ago.

He

majority of seven hundred and four, one of the largest majorities ever given to

father

was the contempo-

it.

fore or since for that oflice.

any candidate

be-

His administration of

the city government was noted for

but after a year's experience of

its

its

efBcieney

;

annoyances he

rary of Governor Hiester and Judges Spayd, Smith,

refused to stand as a candidate for re-election.

Franks, Porter and Mallery.and of the elder Keims,

1862 he was chosen treasurer of the old Reading

Hiesters, Muhlenbergs, Biddies, Darlings, Bells

and

other leading citizens of the old borough half a

He

century ago. ral sciences,

training,

had a strong

taste for the natu-

which, by force of example and early

was imparted

to his children.

William

Water Company and held until the city purchased

works.

At

and during port of the

that responsible office

and took charge of the

the outbreak of the Civil its

In

War,

in 1861,

continuance, he was earnest in sup-

Union and the administration of Pres-

ornithology

ident Lincoln, forming one of the coterie of stanch

and mineralogy, and collected many valuable spec-

Republicans and Union Democrats in his native

imens now in the Smithsonian Institution at Wash-

county of Berks who stood by the government in

turned

his

attention

especially

Spencer F. Baird, the second sou,

ington.

and has

for

many

in

nowned.

the

is

now

years been the secretary of the

Smithsonian Institution, and as a cially

to

department of

scientist, espe-

fishes,

is

world-re-

Samuel, another son, died about a year

ago at Curlisle, Pa.

its

desperate struggle for supremacy.

Though

his

health prevented him from enteiing the army, he

did all he could by voice and pen to strengthen

and uphold the government and and was a wise and the war.

flag of his

country

influential counselor during

So prominent and valuable were

his

BENCH AND BAR. services in this direction that after the

over,

war was

ity in

and by General Grant as President, he was

ily

appointment

nue

in the

vania, in ability liis

to the eollectorship

of internal reve-

Eighth or Berks District of Pennsyl-

which

and the

office

fidelity

served

he

and

which he

he was

His wife

complimented by the important and responsible

569

still

lived, while to his

that a husband

all

jNIarv

and honor

name.

Isaac

his

—who

High Keim,

was born in Reading

high personal character until his death, which

ton College

and soon

occurred October 19, 1872.

;

;

memory

reverence his

son of

be.

and daughter

survives, as do a son

—Eobert and

with marked

integrity consistent with

immediate fam-

and father could

De Benneville Keim,

was graduated from Prince-

was admitted

to the

after his admission

bar at Reading,

removed

to St. Louis.

Mo., where he successfully practiced his profession

Collector Baird inherited from his ancestors the

f^' i

^^^^-^^i-i2.»>-o

Pitsbyterian faith, and was through

life

a faithful

and consistent member of the Calviuistic Church, having

tilled

Church of that denomination

He was

'

of a tall and

j)ossessed of a fine

in

Reading

commanding

for

many

presence,

and well-cultured mind, a Chris-

tian without bigotry, charitable without ostenta-

"-^K^

and attained great prominence, and

Franklin

B.

Miller, son

in

Reading November

of

city

John

Hon.

studj'

of

December

law

and

14,

1844.

was

After he ac-

1831.

12,

quired a preparatory education

he took up the

admitted

In 1851 he

Ward

a genial companion, a good and patriot and a true friend. His personal character was of the highest order and won for

alderman of the North

citizen

re-elected,

and held that

December

13, 1865.

him the respect and esteem of the

capable magistrate.

commuu-

which

Miller, a State Senator from this district, was born

tion, a wise counselor,

entire

in

he died a few years ago.

the positions of the eldership and

superintendent of the Sabbath school of the First

years.

/^«

'^K

He

practice

to

was elected

of Reading and twice

office until

was an

his

death,

intelligent

and

!

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

570

Jacob

Livingood was born

S.

at

is

for

many

prominent physician of that

years a

town.

He

grants

who

a descendant of one of the

is

first

emi-

located in the Tulpehocken settlement.

His preliminary education was acquired at Womelsdorf Union Academy and at Franklin Col-

He

Pa.

lege, Lancaster,

then entered the

office

of

early in

Law

Returning

School in 1845.

to

Berks County, he was admitted a member of the bar January

1845, and soon thereafter began

7,

the practice of the law

with

co-partnership

in

Robert M. Barr, Esq., who afterwards became State

Mr. Livingood has continued

reporter.

uninterruptedly in the pursuit of his profession at

Reading since

in

Berks County

with Levi Hiester in the

He

1847.

manufacture of hoes

practiced for a short time and

then

during the "gold fever."

He

went

to California

died

in

that

after being there

State

about six

months.

Samuel

Yoltjc; was

L.

born in Rockland

township, Berks County, September 24, 1.S22, and is

a son of the late associate judge, Daniel Young.

He

attended

Bolmar Academy,

the

and then began the study of law under the

direc-

William Strong, Esq., subsequently judge

tion of

of the Supreme Court of the United States

was

;

of the Berks County

prominent attorney. In 1855 he was appointed commissioner of the Circuit Court of the United States,

1813, in

29'

and

Reading; attended the schools of

his

Civil

B.

under

town,

native

He

jMadara.

the

office

He

J.

De Puy

July

bar August

1882.

4,

1826.

in

After a careful

preparatory education, he read law in the his father

Law

;

Institute, in Philadelphia,

to the

office

of

then attended lectures at the Hofi'man

bar January

4,

1847.

and was admitted Shortly after his

admission he went to Mexico as a private in the

Third Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers, and

War

turned at the conclusion of the Mexican

re-

as

second lieutenant of the Eleventh Infantry of the

During the

regular army.

Union army

Hundred and

Civil

War

he entered

as lieutenant-colonel of the

One

Sixty-seventh Regiment of Pennsyl-

vania Volunteers.

When

the

commander

of this

continues to

still

War

that

fill

During the

office.

he was appointed chief of staff to ^lajor-

General William H. Keim, and remained with

him the

When time.

first

cavalry

Major Young raised an independent

company

the

and retained

for the State service,

until after the battle of Antietam,

company returned home.

In 1863 he

the military service as chief of a recon-

entered

noitering party of cavalry, and continued in

Upon

several mouths.

resumed

;

is

an excellent French and German

scholar and a gentlemen of fine legal attainments.

A. Lucius Hennershotz was born township,

young

;

now Muhlenberg came ;

to

in

entered upon the study of the law and was

admitted

November

11, 1847.

He

engaged in the

practice of his profession for about ten years, in the

lect Council.

He

County

in in

office until

war Colonel Davis returned

to

Read-

1867 was chosen to represent Berks the State Senate, and occupied that

1873.

In 1874 he went to Marshall,

Texas, and was for six years solicitor of the Texas Pacific Railroad.

He now

resides in

Reading.

J.

Bright Sjiith was born

educated

in the schools

at

Reading

in the office of his uncle,

ticed at

to the

resides

1827;

in

of his native town and at

the University of Georgetown, D. C.

and was admitted

Se-

then moved to Philadelphia and

in that city.

and

and

meantime was several years clerk of the

became a broker and conveyancer, and now

close of the

Alsace

Reading when

was promoted

After the

for

Mr. Young possesses

his legal practice.

a fine library

it

Reading he

his return to

regiment. Colonel Charles Kuoderer, was killed, he to the position of colonel.

re-

General Lee invaded Pennsylvania

command of it

when

command was

active'service until the

in

lieved.

the

Davis, son of Charles Davis, Esq., Allentown

in

to the

continued to practice his profession

until his death,

was born

of Jeremiah

president judge of the courts of

Berks County, and was admitted 15, 1846.

of Major

instruction

read law in the

Hagenman, now

and

West

in

Chester, where he received a preparatory education,

Schoener was born February

William

ing,

;

admitted to the bar in 1847, and soon became a

is

bar.

the

Jones was born

he came to Reading and was engaged

now one of the

and

his admission,

oldest active practitioners

life

read law and was admitted to the bar January 5,

Charles Davis, Esq., for a time and was graduated

from the Yale

May

James

Womelsdorf

a son of the late Dr. John B. Livingood,

and

;

studied law

Henry W. Smith,

bar April

5,

1848

Readini; for a few vears and then

;

Esq.,

prac-

moved

BENCH AND BAK. to Freeport,

111.,

where he continued

there was

Supreme Court,

elected one of the judges of the

Charles B. Weaver was born

in his profes-

He

sion until his removal to Denver.

571

ty,

He

near Weavertown.

the bar

November

Berks Coun-

in

became a member of

1850, practiced law for a few

9,

government of Colorado, and

years and then engaged with his father, near his

afterward practiced his profession in Denver for a

home, in the iron business, and died while thus

under the

territorial

number of years.

He is now

a resident of Reading.

employed.

William Eumund Banks,

son of Judge Banks,

William F. Filbert, was a son of Peter Filbert, Esq., with whom he read law, and was admitted

read law with his father, practiced here for a time

August

and then moved

9,

After practicing his profession

1848.

for about ten years

A. Jordan Swartz was born

He

in 182-5.

was

admitted to the bar of Berks County September 12,

After practicing law nine years, he

1848.

to

Mercer County,

where

Pa.,

he continued in his profession until his death.

he died, unmarried.

Albert

G. Green, son of John Green, a mer-

He

chant of Reading, was born in 1828. tained a preparatory education

ob-

the schools

in

was elected mayor of Reading by the Democratic

of his native city and then entered Yale College,

party and held the

from which

In 18-59

one term.

office for

he

He

was graduated in 1849.

Hon. David F. Gor-

he received the appointment of a clerkship in the

studied law in the office of

Treasury Department at Washington and shortly

don, and was admitted to the bar

thereafter was promoted to the position of Second

1851, since which time he has been actively and

Auditor of the Treasury, which position he held

succcs.sfully

until his death, in July, 18H5.

He served

Wanner

Joel B.

township, Berks

worked on

was born

jMaxatawny

in

March

County,

He

1821.

-5,

farm and taught school

his father's

until twenty-one years of age, after

which he en-

and

1846; read law under the direction

institution in

He

Berks County in 1849. mayor of Reading in 1856, and

tice in

in

Democratic candidate for Congress,

was elected

18-58 to

fill

expired term of Hou. J. Glancy Jones.

in

practice

Reading.

at

from 1857

ber of the Board of School Controllers, officiating as president of that

Edmond and

is

body

for

two years.

L. Smith was born October 23, 1829,

a son of the late George Smith and grand-

son of Hon. Frederick Smith, judge of the Supreme

Court of Pennsylvania.

He

obtained his elemen-

Reading Academy and

tary education

the un-

afterward entered the University of Georgetown,

In 1861

D.

C

,

where

nineteen,

at

the

he was graduated

taking the second

age of

the

at

honor of

his class.

major of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth

He W.

Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and

admitted to the bar in November 11, 1851.

]iated in the battles tani.

as

partici-

of South Mountain and Antie-

During the same year he was again a can-

He

didate for Congre.=s. ])ractice

;

had an extensive

was at one time largely interested

estate matters.

He

knew him.

legal

in real

was an estimable gentleman,

congenial companion and a

warm

friend to all

In 18-51 he married Miss

Zieber, daughter of Philip city.

army

the

who

Anna

L.

Zieber, Esq., of this

His wife and four children survive him.

Jacob M. Sallade, a native of Reading, read Andrew M. Sallade, Esq.,

law with his brother,

and was admitted April his profession

public.

He

and was

1849.

6,

for

many

died while yet a

He

practiced

years a notary

young man.

to

For a period of eight years he was a mem-

was the

he was again elected mayor, and in 1862, while holding that position, he entered

11,

as city auditor during the years 1856-57,

as city solicitor for one term,

1859.

tered Marshall College and was graduated from that

of Hon. William Strong and was admitted to prac-

engaged

November

studied law in the office of his uncle,

Smith, and

Edward

P. Pearson, Esqs.,

Henry

and was In

1858 he was a member of the Legislature from

Berks County.

When

War

the Civil

opened he

army with Ringgold's Battery as a Owing to the large number of men private. desiring to enlist in this company, another company

joined

the

was formed and Mr. Smith was chosen

its

captain,

but was transferred to the regular army by a captain's

commission dated

May

14, 1861, and,

excepting a year of captivity, wiis in the military service to the

end of the war.

In

the East

he

served under General McClellan in the battles of the Peninsula, South Mountain and Antietam, and

under General Burnside at Fredericksburg. these engagements he

commanded

In

a battalion of

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

572

Charles Oscar Wagner was born

lu the following spring he was

regiment.

his

Germany,

He

in Leip-

ordered with his regiment to join General Rose-

sic,

craus in the West, and was captured at the battle

when a young man and was dependent upon his own energies for support. He first engaged in teaching the German language for several years,

of

Chickamauga, September

second day of this

During the

20, 1863.

command

the

battle,

of the

regiment devolved upon him, and whilst leading

enemy's

to repel the

He

from under him. for bravery

received a major's

thirteen

and other Southern

Whilst

was engaged with others

in

Libby

Libby he

in

sixty days

for

brevet

this occa-

months he was

prisons.

it

horse was shot

and meritorious conduct on

For nearly

sion.

assault, his

the

in

construction of a tunnel, through which, on a dark

1824.

in

came

Reading

to

and, after the necessary preparations, was admitted

November

the bar on

to

During the

1852.

5,

Confederate invasion, in 1863, he enlisted as an the Ringgold Artillery, and, while in

in

officer

the service, contracted typhoid fever, from the

ef-

of which he died September 6, 1863, aged

fect

thirty-nine years.

Michael

Boyer was

P.

born September 13,

night in February, one hundred and ten ])risoners

1831, at Gibraltar Forge; acquired a preparatory

passed into freedom, but only for a time

education in Bernville

for within

;

three weeks one-half of the fugitives, of which he

and served

was one, were recaptured and

office

for

two weeks placed

in a dungeon, on an allowance of bread

and water.

Subsequently, in May, whilst en route to Andersonville,

he jumped from the car with three of his

as

came

;

an assistant

He

three years.

for

J. Pringle,

August

8,

He

ture in 1860.

early age of thirty-five years.

upon berries and raw

He

rice.

was

Wharton

1849

to the

bar

was a member of the Legisla-

;

of six weeks, lurking in the swamps of Georgia subsisting

in

H. W. Smith and

and was admitted

Esqs.,

1853

Reading

the prothonotary's

pui-sued the study of

the law under the direction of

companions, at night, and remained out upwards

and

to

in

died August 29, 1867, at the

Morris, son of Thomas

Jlorris,

recaptured with his comrades on an island in the

Esij., is

Savannah River, where they had taken refuge from a close pursuit made with dogs. Thi? was followed by another dungeon sojourn on meagre dietin the

preliminary education, he pursued the study of

Charleston

It

jail.

was whilst confined here that

Edmund

by Major

he was visited

army an

Deslonde, of

a native of Reading.

the law

After acquiring a

under the instruction of

Heiskill, Esq., of Philadelphia,

Having completed

of his father. course, he

William B.

and

was admitted

to the

bar

in the office

the

required

November

15,

and

1854, and has since practiced in Reading. During

fellow-graduate, through whose good offices he was

the years 1860-61-62 he was solicitor for the di-

the Confederate

paroled and

finally

old school-mate

subseijuently exchanged

in

October, 1864.

In

l.H(i7

he resigned

Bright Smith,

J.

commission

his

his residence in

his

in the practice

at Denver, Col., where he

now

Denver he has

in the

brother,

of the law

During

resides.

several times repre-

sented the strong Republican county of Arapahoe in the Legislature,

On

though himself a Democrat.

his brother's retirement

F.

Leaf Smith,

He

and was admitted

now connected. Charles K. Robeson was born

County

;

&

Mason,

to the

in

Berks

Reading bar April

8,

1852, and soon became prominent as a lawyer before a jury, in

which

])ractice

he had few equals.

Henry W.

latelj'

Amos

B.

the leading honors of

to the

retired

office

of his father

bar November 10, 1»55.

from practice, devoting

his

affairs.

Wanner

was born

tawny township, Berks County.

is

admitted

has

all

read law in the

He

well-known legal firm of Wells, Smith

of the late

and was graduated from Georgetown College,

D. C, in 1854, taking

time to his private

the

son

born in Reading, attended the schools of his native place,

Supreme Court, and Hon. Thomas Mason,

in

to

Smith and grandson of Judge Frederick Smith, was

his class.

from the practice he

after-

1865

1868

united with Judge Wells, formerly of the Colorado

with which he

Berks County, and

wards served as District Attorney from

army, and associated himself with

Hon.

rectors of the poor of

in

1831

in ]\Iaxa-

His preliminary

education was acquired in a private academy near his native place,

Philadelphia.

and

He

at Port

Royal Seminary,

in

then pursued the study of the

law, under the instruction

of his brother, J. B.

BENCH AND BAR. Wanner, Esq., and Hon. J. Glancy Jones, and He to the bar January 12, 1857.

was admitted

has since practiced

Berks County

represented

House of Representatives was a delegate

Mr. Wanner

Reading.

at

the Pennsylvania

in

in

1875 and 1876, and

the National Democratic Con-

to

vention which met at St. Louis in 1876.

David

P.

Green, son

He

born in Reading December 22, 1831.

ac-

quired a preliminary education in the schools of

He

lege in 1852.

John

and

read law under the direction of

S. Richards, Esq.

in 1855,

graduated from Yale Col-

wa.s

;

was admitted to the bar

From 1862

he served

in

the

Union army.

rate Criminal Court

to

1865

In 1867 a sepa-

was established

in Schuylkill

County, of which Governor Geary appointed him

The same year he was

elected for a term

of ten years, during which time the court, originated for a special purpose, was abolished,

and

November

structed for

some years

1853 entered the sophomore 1856

1835, at Bernville, Berks County.

In 184S he

came, with his parents, to Reading, and attended

when the family

the public schools until 1853,

moved

to

Jeflerson

County,

Pa.

In

re-

1856 he

returned to Reading and became a clerk in the pruthonotary's

office,

law and was admitted to the

and practiced

vember

mean time, read bar March 15, 1857, until his death, No-

and, in the

his profession

James B. Bechtel

is

a native of Northum-

May

10, 1832.

the age of fifteen years he removed to Kutz-

town, and was apprenticed trade of a saddler.

there

to

learn the

In the meantime he attended

night-school, afterwards taught school for a few

terms,

and then, attended Franklin and Marshall

College.

In 1855 he was chosen principal of Lee

Seminary, on South Fifth Street, Reading, and, while occupying that position, read law under the instruction of

Samuel L. Young,

admitted to the bar April 14, 1857. district

;

began the study of law with Na-

his legal studies in the office of

Hon.

J.

Pringle

He

1859.

practiced his

Reading War, when, in

profession in

April, until the opening of the Civil

1861, he became a

The

Artillery.

member

following

of the Ringgold Light month he was commis-

United States

as first lieutenant in the Fifth

Artillery Regiment. artillery

He

served as an officer of

during the whole of the war.

He received

the brevet of captain for services in the Peninsula

campaign

;

he received the brevet of major for

gallant conduct at the battle of Antietam in the

he was

;

campaign of the Wilderness and of Peters-

burg under General Grant, and resigned from the at the close of

1867

to

resume the practice of

He

Reading.

William H. Livingood,

January,

died

1872, at the early age of thirty-four

yeai-s.

He

John

a son of Dr.

Livingood, was born at Womelsdorf April

5,

1837.

was educated at the Union Academy, in

melsdorf, and at the Phillips

Wo-

Academy, in Andover,

Mass., was graduated from the former in 1851

and from the Phillips

Before entering the

latter in 1855.

Academy he taught

school

years in Heidelberg township.

for several

Afterward he

at-

tended law lectures at Harvard College and was

28, 1873.

berland County, Pa., and was born

At

In

Pennsylvania

class in

Jones, and was admitted to the Berks County bar in

his profession in

13,

in-

thaniel Ellmaker, Esq., of Lancaster, but concluded

army

was born September

was

College at Gettysburg, and was graduated from that

of the term.

Frank Boyer

He

home and then obtained

at

a common-school education in his native city.

he became additional law judge for the balance

B.

and was the

24, 1838,

son of Dr. F. A. ^Muhlenberg.

and soon afterward began the practice of sioned

his profession at Pottsville.

judge.

Lancaster, Pa., fifth

institution in

of John and Catharine

Green, and brother of Albert G. Green, Esq., was

his native place

573

Esq.,

and was

He served

as

attorney of Berks County from 1859 to

1862.

Charles Philip MuHLENBERf; was born

admitted to practice law at Lowell, Middlesex

County, Mass., on motion of General B. F. Butler.

Upon

turning

home he was admitted 19,

1860.

to the

He

has

practiced his profession since at Reading, excepting

an interval of six years, from 1873

to 1879,

when

he resided at Philadelphia, and where he was admitted for that purpose.

In 1874 he was admitted

Supreme Court of the United States at Washington, D. C, on motion of Hon. Jeremiah S. Black. In September, 1862, Mr. Livingood to the

was a private in the Independent Cavalry Company from Berks County, commanded by Major S. L.

at

r

Berks County bar January

J.

Young.

George Seltzer was

born at Womelsdorf;

;

;

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PEXXSYLVAXIA.

574 attended

Harvard Law School, was admit-

the

the location and construction of the East Pennsyl-

ted to the bar at Boston, and returning to Berks

vania Railroad.

County, he became a member of the Reading bar

father,

February

After practicing here about

5, ISGl.

twenty years he removed

to

Boston, where he con-

Abnee K. Stauffer

was born October

1836, at Boyertown, Berks County

Mount

preliminary education at

father.

Judge

;

11,

acquired a

Pleasant Semi-

town, which institution

in his native

his

He

in 1850.

Stauffer, instituted

was graduated from Franklin and Marshall Col-

1858

lege, at Lancaster, in the class of

to

Reading

1860

in

;

read law in the

;

April 15, 1861

from 1869

;

tlie

Common

was born

He

Berks

in

obtained a good

common-school and academical education law

in the office of

read

;

Charles Davis, Esq., and was ad-

mitted to the Berks County bar August 15 1861

was

district attorney of the courts of

from 1868

to 1871,

Berks County

and was a member of the Ren-

ate of Pennsylvania from 1880 to 1884.

John Ralston was born ter

County, Pa.

;

1834, in Lancas-

in

acquired his education in the

Trappe, Pa., and at Strasburg Academy, at

Strasburg, Pa.

read law in the

;

office

B. Wanner, Esq., and was admitted

August

P.

bar

at Ephrata,

Lan-

County, March 20, 1839, and removed,

with his father, to Reading in 1854.

spending two

years

at

He entered the

Union

Schenectady, N. Y., he entered the

John Banks,

9,

office

Philadelphia,

ers

was

solicitor to the

his profes-

Park commission-

during the laying out of Fairmount Park, from

1869

1874 was the candidate of the Democratic

to

;

nial Exposition of

He

phia.

1876

and

;

at present (1886)

is

deputy-collector of the port of Philadel-

special

was prominent

many

as counsel in

Charles Henry Jones,

son

of

He

is

fiction,

number of works of history and among them the " History of the Campaign

for the

Conquest of Canada in 1776,"

the author of a

several companies from Berks

command

spicuously, under the father. Colonel

in

which

County figured conof his great grand-

Jonathan Jones.

Richmond Legh Jone.s was

born February 17,

the fifth generation of his family,

He

Berks County.

was prepared

in

enter Y'ale

to

College in 1858, but the disturbance between the

United States and Paraguay having culminated

in

that year, he accepted the invitation of Captain

Ridgely

accompany the United

to

States naval

expedition against Lopez, as captain's clerk of the

tral

America and

visiting the

Brazil,

West

ana River one thousand miles into the South America.

Upon

sailors of the fleet into

Indies, Cen-

and ascending the Parinterior of

the organization of the

a military force for opera-

was appointed second lieutenant

College,

of one of the companies formed of the crew of the " Atalanta."

Hon.

Peace having been concluded with Paraguay, the

and he

expedition returned the following year,

then joined his father, the Hon. J. Glancy Jones, J.

Glancy Jones, of Reading, Pa., was born Septemeducated as a

of

the notable contested election cases in the Phila-

of Hon.

1863, since which time he has

He was

in April, 1863.

to

tions on land, he

been engaged in active practice at Reading.

ber 13, 1837.

removed

in 1858.

studied law and was admitted to the

bar February

He

sion.

gunboat " Atalauta,"

Reading High School and was graduated After

Amos

Bard, son of Adam Bard, a retired

hardware merchant, was born caster

of

to the

14, 1862.

William

Reading bar

where he has since actively practiced

1840, in

schoolsof his native place, iu Hunsicker Academy, at

to the

delphia courts during the past ten years.

year 1873.

10, 1836.

was admitted

In the .same year he

counsel for the Department of Protection, Centen-

from 1873 to 1877, and from

Edward H. Shearer County January

the

America,

to

of John

office

1881 to 1884; and was president of Council for

Having returned

legation in 1861.

States

as attache to

party for city solicitor of Philadelphia iu 1874

was a member of City Council

to 1871,

and served

removed

Richards, Esq., and was admitted to the bar

S.

minister to Austria,

he studied law under his father's instruction and

tinues in his profession.

nary,

In 1869 he accompanied his

who had been appointed United

civil engi-

United States minister

to Austria, at

berg,

Germany, where he was graduated

Returning

Troy, N. Y., and served in the engineer corps

instruction of his father,

to

in 1861.

America, he studied law under the

neer in the Rensellaer Polytechnic Institute, at iu

Vienna, and

soon thereafter entered the University of Hiedel-

and was admitted

to the

BENCH AND BAR. In 1862 he joined

moved

Captain Hunter's company of Pennsylvania Vol-

tion of

Reading bar April unteers,

23, 1863.

which was of the force that held HagersIn 1863 he

575

Reading, studied law under the direc-

to

Hon. John Banks, and was admitted to the bar November 14, 1863. He served as city 1873-74, and took a prom-

town during the battle of Antietam.

solicitor for the years

was captain of Company A, Fifty-third Regiment

inent part in the educational affairs of the city,

In 1866 he was elected

Pennsylvania Volunteers. to the Legislature

elected in 1867

and 1868.

Ward

Seventh

in

for

In 1868 he received

now a member of the board stone State Normal School.

of trustees of the Key-

Democratic

the

of

party for Speaker of the House of Representatives,

He has

been promi-

nently identified with the Republican party for

and, although his party was in the minority, he

upwards of twenty years,

was given, in a triangular contest, the highest

for Congress,

number of votes

as a candidate for Lieutenant-Governor of

retiring

from

for forty-fiwe ballots.

politics,

jiractice of his profession at the

dtM',

Jones,

J\Ir.

resumed and continues the

Daniel E. Shroeder, Esq., sheriff of Berks

Reading

of

J.

in

1859

;

County from 1847

the centre of it a fine large

to

Reading the

president

judge)

(now

Hagennian

office

and

its

nominee Penn-

sylvania.

gantown, laid

read law in

1880 was

in

1882 was favorably mentioned

in

Mr. Jacobs jJurchased a

bar.

and was graduated from the

High School

and

son of John H. Shroe-

1850, was born at Reading, attended the public schools

the

many years. He is

Board of School Controllers

unanimous nomination

the

having represented the

re-

from Berks County, and was

it

tract of land at jMor-

out as a cemetery and erected in

monument.

Israel C. Becker was born

in Alsace township,

West Chester Academy, and was graduated from Dick-

February Military

1842

22,

attended the

;

inson College in 1859, and from the

Albany Law

was admitted to the bar April 23, 1863, since

University in 1861; joined the Fourth Pennsyl-

which time he has been

vania Volunteers on

in

active

practice

at

Reading.

to first

Charles Leopold,

son of Augustus Leopold,

a prominent farmer, was born in studied law in the office of

was admitted

to the

listed in the

Civil

contracted

a

Union township

Hon. John Banks, and

He

bar April 23, 1863.

War, and, while from

disease

;

which

in the

he

en-

army

died

at

Warren

Tryon, son of Dr. John Tryon, was born at Rehrersburg, Berks County entered upon the study of law in the office of John S. Rich;

Law

Reserves

with

the

7,

1861

was promoted

;

Company F,

the Third

in

was mustered

;

rank

adjutant-general in 1864

;

out

of

major and assistant

of

commenced

to practice

law in Reading after his return from the war.

Horace was born

June

Reading. J.

Pennsylvania service

May

lieutenant of

5,

in

A. Yundt, a son

of

Henry Yundt,

East Earl township, Lancaster County,

1839

;

obtained a preparatory education in

the public schools and then entered Franklin and

Marshall College from which institution he was

graduated in 1859.

He

engaged

in teaching at

Mount Joy Academy and Paradise Academy, and was admitted to the bar June 14, 1863. He in Lancaster County, for two years, when he took an active interest in county politics and enlisted in the army and commanded Company B, served, for a time, as chairman of the Republican of the One Hundred and Seventy-eighth Regiment County Committee he filled the office of solicitor of Pennsylvania Volunteers of nine months' men ards,

Esq.

;

attended the Harvard

School,

the

;

;

for the county commissioner for the year

having been the

first

1875,

and only Republican who

Howard

Jacobs, son of Samuel Jacobs, a

prominent farmer and a descendant of one of the earliest families of the iu

Conestoga Valley, was born

Caernarvon township, Berks County

;

was edu-

cated in the schools of his native township and at the Millersville State

he was one of the

office

of Hon. John Banks and was admitted to

the bar at Reading August

occupied that position. J.

at the termination of this time he read law in the

Normal

first

pupils.

School, of which

He

then

re-

9,

1864, since which

time he has been actively engaged in the duties of his profession.

In 1879 he was the nominee for

judge on the Republican

ticket.

Charles H. Sch.\eb"fer was born Ohio, on August late

4,

1840.

He

at

Columbus,

was the son of the

Rev. C. F. Schaeffer, D.D., president of the

Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Philadeljihia,

a

HISTORY OF BEKKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. and was educated

Pennsylvania College,

at

came

Reading and

to

Gettj's-

when he

burg, where he was graduated in 1860,

two years conducted.

for

academy, and during the two following

classical

grammar

years was principal of one of the city

engaged

newspaper business as a member of

in the

Knabb

the firm of J.

Co., publishers

He

and then resumed the practice of law.

Mr. Richards has taken an active

He served sylvania

in the

Forty-second Regiment Penn-

Volunteers

he

;

law with Hon.

read

municipal

affairs

He represented the Fir.st Ward of Reading Common Council from 1875 to 1878, and whilst

in

County bar on August

serving in this

He

practice.

Since his admis-

1864.

9,

Reading

in

continuous

in

has always been identified with the

Democratic party

has been a representative

;

in

interest in the

of Reading for a number of

years.

Daniel Ermentrout, and was admitted to the Berks

he has resided

of the

continued

practically engaged in journalism for three years

schools.

sion

&

Daily Times and weekly Journal

position

ordinances relating

to

compiled the laws and

Reading, which were pub-

lished in the form of a " City Digest" in

1876 by

Councils, and ten years afterward he supervised

National, State and County Conventions, but has

the publication of a revised edition.

never been a candidate for public

he .served as secretary of the Municipal Commis-

with the

office,

member

exception of having served as a

of City

Franklin was born

in

B. Laucks, son of Benjamin Laucks,

Oley township, and there attended the

public schools

;

read law in the

sion of Pennsylvania,

of B. Frank

office

1864; practiced

at

Reading with success

until

purpose of prepar-

for the

ing a plan for the better government of cities in

In 1884 he received the nomination

the State.

Congress on the Republican

for

ticket.

Irenaeus Shalter, son of Benjamin

Boyer, Esq., of Reading, and was admitted August 13,

which was specially appointed

by Governor Hartranft

Councils and the Board of Health.

In 1876-77

was born in Alsace township

Shalter,

educated in the

;

township schools, and then entered Franklin and

the time of his death.

William M. Goodjian was born December Marshall College, from which he was graduated in studied law in the office of Jacob S. Liv10, 1836, in Cumru township, Berks County was 1863 ;

educated

in

thean Institute at Birdsboro' five years in the

1862.

He

;

the public schools and the Philoma-

I'ead

;

taught school for

offices

of Jacob S. and

August

13,

1866 he was

In

1864.

elected city auditor for the term of three years, in 1877

was elected

a son of Jonas Shalter, was

born near Tuckerton, Berks County

graduated

;

from Franklin and Marshall College

under the direction of Jacob to the

S.

;

in

Ross Miller was born

5,

1841

educated

;

Livingood, Esq.,

Reading with success

LouLS Richards, son of John Richards

(a

enlisted

;

Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers; was wounded Antietam and discharged from the

Esq., and was admitted J. at

He

Reading Hospital.

studied law in the office of William

August

7,

tlieu

M. Baird,

1865.

Dall.\s Schoener was born aud educated

Reading

read law with his uncle, William B.

;

Schoener, Esq., and was admitted to the Reading

bar August

7, 1.S65.

Harrison Maltzberger,

until his death, a few years since.

Reading, Decem-

at

in the local schools

Company H, One Hundred and Twenty -eighth

at the battle of

read law

bar August 13, 1864;

practiced his profession at

J.

ber

service while in the

district attorney.

Edwin Shalter,

and was admitted

and

bar Jan-

to the

uary 16, 1865.

county and came to Reading in law in the

William H. Livingood, Esqs., and was admitted to the bar

ingood, Esq., and \\as admitted

berger, was born at

Reading

;

son of John Maltz-

graduated from the

Amity township, Berks County, of Reading High School in the year 1856 studied Welsh descent, who became a prominent iron law under Hon. J. Glancy Jones and was adnative

of

;

manufacturer), was born at Gloucester Furnace, in

mitted

to the

re-

berger

took,

ceived an academical education, and then removing

affaii-s,

Atlantic County, N.

to

J.,

on

May

6,

1842.

Reading, began the study of law in the

John S Richards, Esq. (a

cousin).

mitted to the bar January 16, 1865.

He

He office

of

was ad-

In 1869 he

bar August an

active

1865.

having represented the Fourth

Board of School Controllers and acted

He

7,

interest in

as

for a

Mr. Maltzeducational

Ward

in

the

number of years

chairman on the finance committee.

has been the register in bankruptcy for the

BENCH AND BAR. Berks I

District for

He was

about twenty years.

he Republican nominee for Congress some years

burg, with the class of 1865; read law in the office Baird, Esq., and was admitted to

Bar in 1867. He was a school director of Reading from 1868 to 1877 and secretary of the

Peter D. Wanner, son of William Wanner, a Maxatawny township, and board

farmer, was born in

educated in local schools. Union Seminary (Union

and Franklin aud Marshall College

(\iunty, Pa.),

at Lancaster, Pa.,

graduating from the latter Before graduating he

stitution in 1805.

Ijancaster,

tember

where he was admitted

Upon

18(3.5.

In 1871 Mr.

attorney

;

up ,

at

in Sep-

home he located at practice November 4,

returning

Reading and was admitted 1865.

bar

to the

in-

tooTc

Esq

the study of law under Isaac E. Hiester,

till

M.

of William the

ago.

to

Wanner was

he served

elected

district

one term of three years,

1874, and officiated as solicitor to the county

He

commissioners for the years 1877 and 1878.

ber of years.

by appoint-

the delegate election, and the

to

Though

choice of delegates was closely contested.

not elected, he awakened great interest in the campaign. In 1879 he

became

interested in the

manu-

facturing business, and connected himself with the

He

Mellett Brothers, founders.

is

now

and Machine Company (Limited) and mentioned

Wanner

in the

trout

ner, ex-register of

its

enter-

Berks County, was born

Kutz-

B. Wanner,

November

bar

the

to

boys at Norristown,

of Hon. Daniel Ermen-

Ward of Reading in

1S77, and re-elected

George

Baer

F.

September

(near what

is

Ixjrn in

Unionville, in Lehigh

and moved, with

his parents, to

Maryland, near Cumberland, when

and he

settled in

six years old

he continued to reside

till

him four daughters and three

left

to survive

sons, the latter

Herman

L. (a practicing

the

Common

of this sketch

;

a fourth son,

enlisted in the Civil

B, Fifty-fourth

War as

Harry G. (who was

an

officer in

Company

Regiment Pennsylvania Volun-

commanded by

Col.

Jacob M. Campbell),

died in 1874.

John Jacob Baer, the was born

in

Solomon Baer,

father of

Northampton County

in 1761,

on the

homestead, and removed to Maryland in 1800,

;

in

emigrated from the Palatinate

grandfather,

1747, and, upon arriving in Philadelphia on

1871

to

1823,

and Christophel Baer, the

where he continued

Council of Reading from

at-

torney at Somerset) and George F., the subject

He

was president of

being

judge of the Somerset and

aged sixty-two years

to the Siate of Illinois,

He

his death, in 1882.

was aged eighty-eight years aud

where he carried on farming and died

the practice of his profession.

:

Somerset County in 1816, where

Esq., and was admitted to the

moved

Solo-

fiither,

Northampton County

in

now known as

in 1794,

Somerset County,

His

1842.

was born

Baer,

County)

was

26,

after practicing law for a

Bar August, 1866; number of years, he re-

27,

iu 1882.

teers,

in

;

and was elected alderman of

as school controller,

the Sixth

Wan- having

town and graduated from Franklin and Marshall

Henry Er-

1867, and has since practiced at Reading; served

District),

organization.

Amos

was admitted

;

for

office

Bedford

son of J. Daniel

read law with his uncle,

and a seminary

read law in the

Foundry

also of the

has taken an active interest in the Read-

Llewellyn Wanner,

;

;

J. (president

chapter on Industries. Mr.

ing Board of Trade since

College

Pa.

William

Reading Foundry Company (Limited), large ])rises

tive place

serving as

secretary and treasurer of the Mellett

son of

attended the public and private schools of his na-

mon

dresses in every section of the county

ment previous

George M. Ermentrout,

In 1878 he ran for Congress against

Hon. Hiester Clymer, having made numerous ad-

from

city solicitor

mentrout, was born at Reading October 13, 1840

Pa.,

mittee of Democratic party in Reading for a

was

poor of Berks County for five years

Comnum-

acted as chairman of the City Executive

He

for four years.

1874 to 1875, and attorney for directors of the

ust Ist of that year, proceeded to

in

AugNorthampton

County, purchased farming land and carried on

1873.

William M. Riohtmyer was born October

10,

1842, at Springs Forge, Berks County, attended

common

schools and was prepared for college under

He

farming.

When

George F. Baer was

six

years old his

parents removed to the town of Somerset, and he

was

there attended the schools of the town and the

graduated from Pennsylvania College, at Gettys-

Somerset Institute (of which Professor Charles L.

tlie

instruction of Rev. J. S. Ermentrout.

54

HISTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

578

Loose was the principal)

1855,

till

when he

en-

April, 1868,

when he removed

to

Reading, having

tered the printing-office of the Somerset Democrat

been admitted to the Berks County bar a short

(then published by Chauncey F.

time before (January 22, 1868), whilst on a

worked

He

Mitchell), and

at the printing trade until April,

then attended the Somerset

Academy

1858.

for one

In the spring of 1859 he became the chief

year.

clerk and

book-keeper of the Ashtola

Mill--,

a

large manufacturing establishment ten miles from

He

Johnstown.

occupied this position

summer

of 1860,

class of

Franklin and Marshall College.

when he entered

pursuing his course of study Civil

War

and

his brother

broke out, and

the

till

the sophomore

Whilst

in that institution the

in the spring of

Harry purchased

1861 he

the Somerset

Democrat and began

its

publication.

ducting

till

the following .September

it

successfully

Harry

his brother

After con-

enlisted in the volunteer service,

He

leaving him in sole charge of the newspaper.

was employed at the case during the day, and at

At

night edited the paper.

times he was so busily

to

visit

Reading.

During

his

practice of four

years under

his

brothers at Somerset, he became thoroughly ac-

quainted with the practice of the law

in all

lated to i)leading

A

and the

of cases.

trial

few years after his arrival at Reading his

general practice began to increase rapidly and he

soon won a place in the foremost rank of the

cessful with fifteen

with

During

each passing year.

all

the important litigation before the several

courts of Berks County,

and

this

and other

Su-

also before the

preme Court of Pennsylvania, upon from

the past

years he has been prominently identified

cases

removed

Shortly before the

districts.

death of John S. Richards, Esq., in 1872, he be-

came

pose and set up his editorials while standing before

Reading Railroad Company, and he has since

During

this

time he kept up a private

course of studies, with the view of eventually re-

turning to

Democrat

college.

until

company of

He

At

of which he was duly commissioned captain.

for

He

served

nine months, the period of enlist-

ment, acting part of the time by detail as adjutant-general of the Second

Humphrey's

Army

division.

Brigade, in General

His regiment joined the

of the Potomac at the second battle of Bull

Run, and was with that army tietam, Fredericksburg

at the battles of

line of the

army

Au-

and Chaucellorsville.

in

Its

their

to in

it

distinguished

and

profession

which well directed

In 1876 he was adrcitted to prac-

energy merits. tice in

who have

bar,

this

the Supreme Court of the United States, at

Washington, D. C. Since his residence here Mr. Baer has been

in-

development of the com-

terested in the general

munity, through improvements of various kinds.

He

is

connected with different enterprises of an

industrial nature.

At

the present time he

is

presi-

dent of the Temple Iron Company, chairman of the

Bushong Paper Company Limited) and a diin the following orjjanizations: Reading (

rect.ir

forming the ad-

Fire Insurance Company, Reading Iron- Works,

the famous charge on

Clymer Iron Company, Keystone Coal Company,

most distinguished service was vance

at

have won that success

Company E, One Hundred and

oc-

county

in this

marks the beginning of a new generation of young attorneys

which was mustered into

that time he was not twenty years old. as captain

His arrival

cupied that position.

themselves by devotion

Thirty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers,

and

the resident solicitor of the Philadelphia

August, 1862, when he raised a

volunteers,

the service as

continued to edit the

at-

torneys at the bar, becoming more and more suc-

engaged at printing that he was obliged to com-

the case.

its

branches, especially in that department which re-

in

the Fredericksburg Heights, December 13,1862.

Boyertown Mining Company, Penn National Bank

He

and the Reading Hospital.

on

was mustered out of service with

May Upon

as his

his

company

returning profession,

home Mr. Baer and

after

selected the law

pursuing a regular

course of legal studies in the office of his brothers

—who were practicing bar— he was admitted 1864.

He

attorneys at the Somerset to practice at

April term,

practiced his profession at Somerset

till

of Palatinate College. ferred

Mr. Baer

also a

The former

institution con-

upon him the degree of Master of Arts.

Theodore H. Garrigues was ing

is

and Marshall College and

trustee of the Franklin

26, 1863.

December

28,

1845

his native city, and, at to Pliiladeljthia,

;

born at Read-

acquired his education in

the age of seventeen, went

where he remained three years

iu

BENCH AND BAR. In 1865 he became a student-

a hardware-store. at-la\v iu the office

was admitted

of John S. Richards, Esq., and

his preceptor, soon

the defective eyesight of

to

Owing

bar August 10, 1868.

to the

he assumed almost the

after admission to practice,

management of Mr. Richards' extensive

entire

business,

In the

and executed

with ability and dispatch.

it

mean time he was an ardent student of his and overtasked his mental powers,

profession

579

Morton L Montgomery,

the author of this

was born at Reading November

history,

Northumberland County,

and

1842 was married

in

was born at Reading Rush, a fife-major

Pa., to

Her

in 1810.

in the

Reading

to Catharine

War of

1783

;

from Hereford township,

birth

Laucks was born

B.

educated

in the schools

Oley town-

in

of the vicinity of his

read law in the office of his father, Franklin

;

B. Laucks, Esq., of Reading, and

January

was admitted

to

the bar

for

a while at Reading, removed to Pottsville, and

1869.

'11,

After j)ractieing

H. Willis Bland was born August at Blaudon,

Berks County

20,

1846,

acquired a preliminary

;

On

education in school at Birdsboro'.

September

Company H, Eighty-second

1861, he joined

4,

Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served all the

engagements

in

])ated until expiration

ber, ]8i;4.

which the regiment

in

partici-

of term of service, in Septem-

In Febuary, 1867, he removed to Read-

and read law

ing

Jacobs, Esq

,

in

the office of J.

and was admitted

Howard

bar April

to the

Rebek was

till

the last three years in the

in

he

entered

then

county

Zacbarias,

Reading

common

the

1863, having spent

Reading High School

and, being inclined to mathematics and

surveyor

draught-

Daniel

of Mr.

the office

of Berks

County,

Readiug, for the purpose of

city engineer of

learning practical surveying and civil engineering.

He

continued

this office

in

months, when he

went

at

Readiug

eight

Pottsville, Schuylkill

to

County, at the request of Mr. Zacharias, to enter a

and

larger field for the prosecution of his studies,

he was there employed by Mr. Daniel Hoffman, a

mining,

civil

and topographical engineer.

After

remaining with Mr. Hoffinan the greater part of

two years he returned office

to

Reading, and entered the

of Jacob S. Livingood,

He

law.

12, 18(;y.

Henky

Mr. Montgomery was educated

and

died there.

in this county, to

schools of his native place

ing,

in

and her grandfather, Stephen Rush, moved

shortly after the town was laid out.

;

father, Philip

weaver by occupation, was also born at Reading,

causing sickness and premature death at the age

Benjamin

iu 183.5,

Rush, who

1812-15, and a

of about thirty years.

ship

1846.

10,

His father, John Leonard Montgomery, came from

as astudentat-

E.sq.,

spent the required term of three years

Penn town-

with Mr. Livingood, and, besides prosecuting his

was

legal studies, he attended to an extensive practice-,

educated at Franklin and Marshall College, from

the labors of which consisted in the jireparation of

which he was graduated

ship,

C. G.

born

Berks County, Pecember

in

1846;

18,

1866.

Immediately

cases,

thereafter he entered the law office

of Jeremiah

ancing, etc.

Hagenman,

Esq., at Reading,

and

of Berks County,

studies for three years, Ai)ril 12, 1869.

at

in

Reading since

after

now

president judge

pursuing his legal

was admitted

to the

He has practiced his He filled the office

bar

He

was born July

18,

Eastern States,

Law Department

of

Harvard

Upon

of Samuel L. Young,

1848,

obtained his education

t(j

at

iu the

William M. Derr, Esq.; attended the

LawDepartraentoftheUniver.'jity of Pennsylvania;

was admitted a member of the Lebanon County bar 1869, and in 1872 located in Reading, where he

has since practiced his profession.

the

University and remained there two terms.

the

new

during

Lebanon, Pa.

in

he entered

of district

schools of his native town; read law in the office of his father,

of 1869 through the Middle and

returning to Reading he spent a year in the office

1877.

G Dekr

convey-

in partition,

'After traveling for a time in the fall

profession

attorney for one term of three years, from 187.5

Cyrus

arguments, proceedings

rules his

order to comply with

been

adopted

absence and which required the

year of study to be

He

Escj., iu

of court which had

was admitted

passed in a lawyer's

to the bar

last

office.

on August 28, 1871,

since which time he has been in active practice at

Reading. Shortly after

.his

admission to the bar he became

earnestly interested in

the history

county, and, after he had collected

of his

native

much valuable

material relating to the early tettlements and fur-

HISTORY OF BERKS COUXTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

580

mation of the townships and the development of all

the districts in

the county, he determined

to

Edgar M. Levan was

born December 25,

1850, in Clarkson, Columbia County, Ohio

write and publish the "History of Berks County."

to

In the course of his investigations he contributed

from Reading High School

a

number of historical

articles to the press,

and

in

Reading with

law in the

1883 he published the " Political Hand-Book of

was admitted to the bar in

announcing

tus,

proposed publication of the

his

Reading

(1886),

" History of Reading;" but finding, in the course

when he removed

Frank

R.

18(55

he read

;

He

1870.

in

January

until

in

came

;

graduated

;

of George F. Baer, Esq.. and

office

Berks County, Pa."

In 1884 he issued a prospec-

1859

his father in

practiced

1st of the present

year

to Lancaster.

Schell was born January

1851,

1,

of his undertaking, that the practice of the law

in

and the labors of an author and publisher could

Edgehill Academy, College of

not be conducted together successfully, he entered

Princeton, and Yale College, graduating from the

into

a

contract

with Messrs.

Richards, publishers of histories

Peck

Everts, etc.,

&

Philadel-

at

Bedford County, Pa.;

was educated at the

New

last-named institution with the class of 1870

Law

tended lectures at the Columbia

phia, for the publication of the " Historj' of Berks

law in the

County"

admitted to the bar September 16,

in

one large octavo volume, to comprise

the history of the entire county, and

all

thereby con-

The

labor of 3Ir.

Montgomery

in

behalf has been necessarily severe during the

this last

ten years and has required the utmost persistence to accomplish his purpose.

During

this

carried on his investigations without

having visited different

jilaees,

time he has

any assistance,

traveled throughout

the county rejjeatedly and examined files,

newspaper

county records and libraries here and elsewhere.

Montgomery was married to Florence Baugh Bush, a daughter of Dr. Andrew and Mary Baugh Bush, of East Coventry township, Chester County, Pa. They have a daughter, Florence Baugh IMontgomery, who was born at In

1874,

Gakrett

B. Stevens

County September, 184S. tion

was acquired

in

was born

Bucks

in

His preliminary educa-

the public schools

taught

;

of John C. Bullitt, Esq., and was

office

James A. O'Reilly, born at Reading

;

Indiana

;

Richards

studied law in E.sq.,

uary 13, 1873. in

Common

He

in

academy

Jliiitary

Academy,

at Lititz, Lancaster

County;

School at Westchester, and

He

also the

Tuscarora

Graduated from

Ward

Stephen M. Meredith ter

i.s

a native of Ches-

County, Pa., born February 11, 1851, at

Pughtown.

He was

educated

in

tiie

public

schools of his native town, the Ivy Institute and

OaUdale Seminary. He began the study of law at Reading under the direction of Jes.se G. Hawley and H. Willis Bland, Esqs., and was admitted a member of the Berks County hai- in August, 1873.

D.\NiEL H. WixoEiH), lie

the

finished

a

tiiat

native city

of Balti-

August

collegiate

course

18, at

Franklin and Marshall College with the class

these

in.stitutions.

of Berlin, Germany, and the

Law

Departments of

Returning to America, he

wa,s,admitted to the bar from the law-office of

Kennedy

&

Stewart, of Chamber.shurg, Pa., and

read law

on September 29, 1873, was admitted a member

George F. Baer, Esq., and was ad-

of the Reading bar. lu 1875 he was elected city

the Lafayette College, in Easton, in 1879 in the office of

S.

bar Jan-

of 1869, and studied the three succeeding years

12, 1872.

in Juniata County.

John

was elected president of that body.

Horace Roland was born September 2C, 1848, at the Universities New Holland, Lancaster County, Pa.; attended Vienna, Austria, in

the

to the

represented the Fourth

1847.

County bar August

University,

Council for the years 1885-86, and

John

Berks

Dame

the office of

and was admitted

more, Md., was born in

the requisite course, was admitted to the

iSIr.

educated in the public schools

began the study of the law under the direction of Richards, Esq., and having completed

1)^72.

son of Patrick O'Reilly, a

of his native city and Notre

school until the age of twenty-one years and then

S.

at-

School, read

prominent and successful railroad contractor, was

Mr.

Reading, 1876.

;

at

Schell died on February 26, 1886.

clude his undertaking more speedily and satisfactorily.

Jersey,

;

mitted to the bar in August, 1872, and remained

solicitor,

in his office for five years as his assistant.

is

and re-elected in 1877. Reading School

the attorney for

In 1886 he District.

BENCH AND BAR. Hiram Y. Kauffman County, born

in

is

a native of Berks

Oley township June

4, 1850.

Ilis preliminary education was obtained in the Oley Academy, Keystone State Normal Scliool,

Hudson River

Academy, Seminary, N. Y. He

Institute, C'laverack

Amenia

N. Y., and

entered Yale College and was graduated from that

institution

1872;

in

taught school

at

Amenia one

year and then entered the law office

of Horace

A. Yundt, Esq., at Reading, and

was admitted

He

November

bar

to the

1874.

9,

served as district attorney of Berks County

during the years 1881, '82,

John

C.

was born

Reading;

attended

the

{)ublic

schools of his native place; was graduated from

the Reading

High School with

Classical

berg College, at Allentown, Pa. ; read law in the office

Collegiate Seminary, in his native county

New

;

pre-

of the law under (he

A. G. Green, Esq., and was admitpractice at Reading, April 5, 1875. In

1881 he was elected city

and served one

full

solicitor for

Reading,

attended

;

and

tlic

sions in

common

returned to Reading in 1§7:>;

and was admitted

schools of his township

Reading Classical Academy summer, and taught .school

win-

Edward

ter

;

H.

Shearer, Esq., and was admitted to the bar

Ci.

Derr, Esq.,

August

1875.

9,

Jefferson Snyder was born November 1848,

in

6,

Exeter township, Berks County; at-

tended the schools of his native county, entered Lafayette College at Easton, Pa., and was grain

1872; pursued the study

of law under the direction of George F. Baer, Esq., of Reading, and was admitted to the bar

August

1875.

9,

Daniel

B.

Young,

son of Major Samuel L.

Young, was born December

He

25, 1852.

ceived a preparatory education at Weyer's

i-e-

West

Chester Academy, at I'enn.sylvania College and

He stud-

spent two years in Harvard College.

and was admitted The next year he removed to

law in his father's

ied

June

10, 1876.

Chicago, wliere he

is

office

now

practicing.

Adam H. Schmehl

was

born

May

15,

1852, in Reading; prepared for college in the schools of his native city and was graduated

the

cla.ss

at

Allentown, with

of 1874; pursued his legal studies

under the direction of Amos B. Wanner, E.sq., and was admitted to the bar January 6, 1876.

Edwin

for ten sesin the

read law in the office of his uncle,

to the bar

from Mulilenberg College,

term of two years.

Ben-iamin Y. Sheakeu was born December 15, 1842, in Bern township, Berks County, Pa.

He

York.

entered the law-office of Cyrus

direction of ted to

of John S. Richards, after which he at-

tended the Law Department of Columbia College,

the class of

1870; read law with Hon. Daniel Ermentrout, and was admitted to the bar April 12, 1875. Benjamin F. Dettka is a native of Montgomery County, tjorn in Upper Providence township July 4, 1845; attended Washington jKired for the profession

and Reading Academy, and attended the ^Iiihlen-

educated in the public schools

duated therefrom

'83.

K. Heine, son of Gregory Heine, at

581

B.

Wiegand

is

5,

l'^52;

LycomNovember

a native of

ing County, Pa., born at Somerset,

was graduated from Franklin and

Marshall College, at Lancaster, in the class of

1S74; read law in the office of ex-Attorneywas born in Cumber- General Thomas E. Franklin, of Lancaster, and laud County, Pa., August 7, 1853; was edu- was admitted to the Lancaster bar in Novemcated in the public schools of Carlisle, Pa., and ber, 1875; moved to Reading in January, 1876, at Dickinson College; read law in the office of and was admitted to practice in the courts of He was examC. E. Maclaughlin, Esq., at Carlisle, and was Berks County the same year. admitted to the Cumberland County bar Augu.st iner in the Department of Justice at WashingApril 12, 1875.

Christian H.

24,

Ruhl

1874; removed

to

Reading and was ad-

mitted to the Berks County bar April 15, 1875;

was

city solicitor

from March, 1879,

to

March,

F.

to

Reading with

his father in

to

August, 1884,

torney-General of

the United States.

Since

;

1853; was

County, Pa., received his preparatory education

Smith was born December

12,

1849, in Richmond township, Berks County

came

D. C, from August, 1881,

with the Hon. Benjamin Harris Brewster, At-

1884 he has been practicing at Reading. Wesley D. Horning was born July 3, 1848, in Chilcoat's Hollow, in Huntingdon

1881.

John

ton,

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

582

of his native place, and attended a

in the school

Semlaw with Hon.

course of study at Kishacoquillas

special

County; read E. Milton Speer, of Huntingdon, and was admitted April, 1875, to the bar in Huntingdon; removed to Reading in April, 1876, and was admitted a member of the Berks County bar the same month. Gt'STAV A. ExDLiPH was born January 29, inary, in Mifflin

County,

1846, and educated

in

He

town.

studied law

in

his native

the office of

in

Schwartz, Esq. (now judge

H. H.

of the Orphans'

Court of Berks County), and was admitted

He

the bar August 13, 1878. law-office

to

then opened a

Kutztown, where he has since

at

practiced his profe.ssion.

1856, in Alsace township, Berks County; from

Jeremi.vh K. Gr.\nt was born October 24, was educated in the common schools and the Keystone

1867

State

1872 he was

to

in the sciiools of

Germany,

returned to his native country and entered the (

"ollege

of

New

Jersey, at Princeton, from which

was graduated in the year 1875 read law in the office of George F. Baer, Esr[., of Reading, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1877 in 1882 he wrote and pui>lished a work on the law of "Building Associations in the United States," in 1884 a work on the "Affidavits of Defense in Pennsylvania," and in 1885 edited two volumes of the decisions of Warren institution he

;

;

J.

Woodward,

late president

judge of the Twen-

ty-third Judicial District of Pennsylvania.

SiMO.v P. in the city

O'Reilly was born

of Reading.

from Mount

St.

in

June, 1853,

After his graduation

Mary's College,

at

Emmitsburg,

1847, in Pike township, Berks County

Normal School

Law Department vania

attended lectures at the

of the University of Pennsyl-

read law

;

;

;

in the

of William H.

office

Livingood, Esq., of Philadelphia, and was admitted to practice in the several courts of that city

1877;

in

commenced

in

1878 came

practice;

to

solicitor for the

Reading and

to

present (1886)

at

is

Board of Prison Inspectors

for

Berks County.

Walter

B.

in the city of

Craig was

liorn

June

5,

1855,

Reading, completed the course of

study in the Reading High School with the class of

1872 and afterward

the United States jNIilitary

He

Point. direction

.spent

two years

Academy

at

in

West

began his legal studies under the

of George F. Baer,

E.sq.,

and

after

^Id., in the year 1875, he entered the office of

completing the required course of reading, was

A. G. Green, Esq., as a student-at-law, and was

admitted to the bar in November, LS78.

admitted to the bar January 14, 1877.

D. Nicholas Schaeffer Avas born September 10, 1853, in Ma.xatawny township, Berks County. He is a brother of N. C.

Henry 1848,

A. Zieber was born March 27, Reading; was educated in the Read-

at

High School read law in the office of Amos B Wanner, Esq., and was admitted to

ing

;

the bar in April, 1878.

He was

appointed a

notary for the city of Reading in 1876 and

Schaeffer, Ph.D.,

State

principal

Normal School

at

of

the

Ke_vstone

Kutztown, and

tained a preparatory education at the Keystone

served until 1885. ISA.\c HiESTER, son of William

M.

Hiester

State

Normal

School, and was graduated from

and grandson of Dr. Isaac Hiester, was born in Reading, January 8, 1856. He acquired his

the class of 1876

jireparatory education in the public schools of

George F. Baer, Esq., and was admitted

Reading, completing the course of the High

bar November 12, 1878.

School

in

1871

of

Rev. William C. Schaeffer, President of the He obPalatinate College, Myerstown, Pa.

and

.soon

Franklin and Marshall College, at Lancaster,

in

studied law in the office of

M. Bravton McKxight was born

afterward entered

Trinity College, at Hartford, Conn., from which

;

at

to the

Read-

ing in 1855; obtained a preliminary education

institution he

was graduated in the year 1876. was admitted a member of the Reading bar

in

He in

1878,

Reading High School with the class of 1872 subsequently entered Amherst College, Massachusetts, and was graduated in 1876; read law in the office of Charles H. Shaeffer, Esq., and

after

having finished the required

course of studv in the office of George F. Baer,

Esq. J.

H.

Marx

was born

at

Kutztown, Berks

the public schools

;

completed the course in

the

was admitted

;

to the bar in 1878.

BENCH AXD BAR. Daniel G. Gulden was

born in Oley townwas a sttident-at-law under the instrucof Henry C. G. Reber, Esq., and was ad-

sliip;

tion

mitted to practice January 20, 1879 in

Reading

In 1886 he

for several years.

engaged at teaching

practiced

;

\vas

the eastern section of

in

Berks County.

Frank

583 the courts of Berks County in

to practice in

April, 1880.

William

J.

Roirke was

September 11, 1859

;

born

in

Reading

attended the public schools

and finished the course in the City High School in the year 1876, and afterwards entered LafayIn 1877 he became a law-student

ette College.

Livtngood was born February of Peter D. Wanner, Esq., and was admitted On February 24, 185o attended the schools of Reading until to the bar November 22, 1880. 1809, when he entered Phillips Andover Acad- 28, 1885, he was elected solicitor for the city of S.

;

emy,

Andover, Mass., and afterwards com-

at

coarse at

jileted the

Harvard

ing with the class of 187()

read law under the

of his father, Jacob S. lyivingood,

direction

Esq.,

;

and was admitted

to the bar

in

August,

John W. Apple

;

went

thereafter

1857

at

Reading

May

1872 he completed the course of the City High S(-hool and then entered

studies in

Yale College, from which

institution

graduated in the class of 1877

;

he was

read law under

instruction of his father, Albert G. Green,

Esq., M-as admitted to the bar in 1879; was ap-

pointed

notary public the same year and re-

member of

appointed in 1882; was elected a

House of Representatives years

1883-8-1 and

at

Harrisburg for the

re-elected

for

the

years

York

C.

Heacock was

a native of

the

E.

Ream

was born

in

New

Hol-

land, Lancjister County, Pa.; attended the publif!

schools

;

H. Willis

read law in the office of

mitted to the bar in November, 1880.

George 7,

F.

New

Hagenman

was born March

1857, in Reading; was graduated from the

Reading High School

in the class

then, to continue the

study of

pupil of Prof.

of 1876, and

Henry

was a

classics,

John P. Slocum, of

entered the office of

tiiis

city

;

C. G. Reber, Esq.,

and was admitted to the bar January 22, 1881. Israel H. Rothermel was born in Rich-

mond

township, Berks County, Pa., April 26,

1853;

was

Academy and

1885-86.

William

September

attended

Pa.,

22, 1880.

Alonzo

in

;

Strausstown,

Bland and H. Y. Kauff'man, Esqs., and was ad-

to the State of Missouri.

Heni:y D. Green was born

R. Heilig was born at

Reading High School, read law in the office of Cyrus Derr, Esq., and was admitted to the bar

read law in the office of

Frank R. Schell, Esq. was admitted to practice at Reading August 11, 1879, and immediately

tlie

Albert 16, 1859,

November

1879.

3,

Reading.

College, graduat-

educated

Reading

in

Miilersville State

at Miilersville, Pa.; read

Scientific

Normal

School,

lawin theoftice of A.G.

Esq., and was admitted to the bar August 20, 1881 ; was solicitor for directors of to Reading in 1878, and, after reading law, was the poor for 1883, and is now (1880) district attorney for Berks County. admitted to practice August 12, 1880. John H. Rothermei- was born March 7, W. Oscar Miller was born August 28, 1857, in Maxatawny township, Berks County; 1850, in Richmond township, Berks County was graduated from the Keystone State Normal acquired his preparatory education in schools of School in 1875, and also from the Wyoming his native place attended Reading Scientific Seminary, at Kingston, Luzerne County, in Academy and Keystone State Normal School 1878. He pursued his legal studies in the Law read law in the office of A. G. Green, Esq., and Department of the LTniversity of Michigan, at was admitted to the bar August 20, 1881. Daniel F. Westley was born in Robeson Ann Arbor, and was graduated from that inwas educated in stitution in 1879 was admitted to the bar township, Berks County of that State, and immediately thereafter re- publicschools,the State Normal School, atKutzState,

and

for a

number of

years was a

lieutenant in the United States navy.

Green,

He came

.

;

;

;

;

moved

to

Reading, entered the law-office of town, and the Reading Scientific

Harrison Maltzberger, Esq., and was admitted

read law in the office of

Frank R.

Academy

Schell, Esq.,

HISTORY OP BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

584

and was admitted 1881.

to tlie

lie taught school

bar

November

14,

was engaged in the profession of teaching for

years in this county. In 1871 he beBerks County, and was for a time an assistant gan the study of law, and had as his preceptors teacher in the Reading Scientific Academy. He Judge Sassaman, William M. Goodman and B. died in 1883, in Reading, at the age of twenty- Y. Shearer, Esqs., and was admitted to the bar nine years. in November, 1882. Charles C. Keiir was born in Outelaunee Adam B. RiESERwas born October 22, 1854, township, Berks County attended schools of in Bern township entered Franklin and Marhis native place; was graduated from the State shall College, at Lancaster, and was gnuluated Normal School, of Kutztown, witii the class of from that institution in 1880; studied law under 1877 taugiit in the jJublic schools of Berks the direction of Henry C. G. Reber, Esq., and County for three years; read law in offices of was admitted to the bar November 14, 1882. Horace A. Yundt and William P. Bard, Esqs., Elwood H. Deysher was born January 9, and was admitted to the bar in 1881. 1857, in Reading; graduated from the High for twelve years in

thirteen

;

;

;

Hexry MALTZUEitGER 1858, and

was born October

Ho

Reading.

a native ot

is

10,

pursued

tlie

Reading High School College, at

and was graduated from of 1879.

tlie class

He

in the State

continued his studies

;

Normal School

at Millersville; read

Howard Jacobs, Esq., and was adin 1874. He then mitted to practice November 13, 1882. New Haven, Conn., Philip S. Zieber was born June -30, ISOl,

the public-school course; was graduated from entered Yale

School of his native city

that institution with

then took up the study

law with

in

J.

Reading.

ing

He

High School

was graduated from the Readin 1876, and from Lafayette

of law under the direction of his father, Harrison

College, at Easton, in 1881, and then became a

Maltzberger, Esq., and was admitted to the bar

student-at-law in the office of George F. Baer,

in

November, 1881.

George

Esq.

F. Gross, Jr. was born

Phila-

1860 educated at the UniDame, Indiana studied law under the direction of Daniel H. Wingerd, Esq., and was admitted to practice November 14, delpiiia,

June

in

25,

J.

;

versity of Notre

;

1881.

;

was admitted

the

to

at

Edward

Millei; was born

Hamburg, educated

native

town and

at

in

O.

.Tune G, 1860,

schools of his

the

Keystone State Noi-nial

School, from which he was graduated in 1879

read law in the office of J.

Henry

bar in November,

1884.

Howard

;

Jacobs, E.sq.,

Shrader

is a native of Reading, of Reading, and was admitted to the bar in No1859; attended the schools of vember 1883, and then located at Hamburg, his native city and completed the High Sciiool where he is practicing his profession. course in the year 1875; was proof-reader on Charles H. Tyson was born May 30, the Reading Eagle for one year and then en- 1863, in Reading. He completed the course in tered upon the study of tlie law in the office of the Reading High School with the class of 1 880, Morton L. Montgomery, Esq., remaining two and tlien studied law in the office of Frank R. years, and one year witii Israel C. Becker, Esq. Seliell, Esq. He passed the required examinaHe was admitted to tiie bar November 6, 1882. tion in the year 1883, but was not admitted to

born January

I.

4,

Comley Fetter was

born January

1857, at Warminster, Bucks County

;

5,

acquired a

the bar until the following year,

Henry

preliminary education in the academy at Hatboro'

;

graduated from the Millersville State

Normal Sciiool, at Millersville, Pa.; read law under the direction of J. Howard Jacobs, Esq., and was admitted to the bar November, 1882.

James April .20,

Baker was born in 1851. He attended

B.

Normal School

for a

when he

attained

his majority.

in

P.

Keiser was born

January, 1860.

at the

He

Union Academy,

in

Womelsdorf

acquired his education in his native

town, and

left that institution to

pursue the study of law

under the direction of

J.

Howard

Jaui!t

last

position

of Ohio, with headquarters at Cincinnati. died April

home

1864, at his

9,

He

Reading, at

in

Hi? death

the early age of thirty-six years.

was much regretted, as he was a young man of brillaut pi-omise.

John

railroads, built

P.

of Dr.

brother

Hie.si'ei!,

Isaac

by the Rhi]:id('lj)lua and Reading Company and others wliich liavc been constructed since, were ciiartered as separate com-

was one of the most scholarly men that Berks County has produced. He was

panies and eventuall}' merged in the Philadel-

1854, not having quite passed his

phia and Reading Railroad.

When

as branches

Hiester,

born July

3,

1803, and died September 15, fiftieth year.

but a youth he evinced a great interest in

selected as the president of study, and eagerly perused the books that came and discharged the duties of within his reach. This thir.st for knowledge He was was encouraged and he afterward acquired a the position until it was completed. This also elected president of the road from Reading liberal education in school and college. I)r. Iliester

was

the first-named

to Philadelpliia,

and served

early period of

tiie

its

in

that

cii])acity in

he greatly enlarged by study and travel.

After

receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine he

organization.

influential Dr. Hiester was the first president of the became a very prominent and Reading Gas Company, a member of the ves- practitioner in his cho.sen profession in the town Jjjii.scopal Church and one of of Reading. In order to recuperate his failing try of Christ

members of

Charles Evans

health, he decided to take a trip through Europe,

Cemetery Company, of which he was president

and on April 16, 1 841, he set sail from New York City and traveled through England, France,

the

original

tlic

at the time of his death.

On

April 10, 1810, he was married to Esther

IMuhienberg,

a

daughter

of

Ceneral

Peter

Belgium,

Italy,

While

France.

Germany,

Switzerland

and

on his journey he regularly

He died Sejitember 12, 1855. Frank M. Hiestek, son of Dr. Isaac Hiester, was born in 1828. He received a

contributed to the Reading Gazette very ably-

preparatory educational training in the schools

ities

of his native town and then entered the College

received with

Muhlenberg.

of

New

Jensey, at Princeton,

from which

tution he was graduated in 1849.

insti-

Aflerspend-

ing the succeeding two years iu the Medical

written descriptive articles of the scenes and incidents on the way,

which

he

and of the interesting

local-

These

were

visited.

.so

much

interest that

duced to publish them

under

tl)e

returned

name of to

in

he was in-

book-form

in

" Notes

Reading

lettei's

in

of Travel."

1842 and

1844,

He

resumed

Department of the University of Pennsylvania, the practice of his profession. Dr. Hiester he was graduated in 1852 with the degree of enjoyed for many years an extensive practice Doctor of Medicine.

He

and

months

spent

hospitals

home he fiither

in

eighteen

next visited Europe

Reading.

his

profession

Soon

after

death, in 1855, he relinquished

medical

the

Upon

of Paris, France. followed

in

until 1861,

Reading and

In the sick-chamber

vicinity.

sterling cpialities of

known and

mind and

returning

well

with

ous for the welfare of his

the

his

latter's

the practice

,

April

Va.,

Petersburg,

.hi

14

ne 9-16,

;

29 and October October

Seven

18(54;

7,

Pines, Octol)er

New Market Heights, October

18(55;

1, 18(55

5, 18(>5,

and Appomatox Court-House, April practice.

9,

Reading and

He

;

Deep Creek, April

;

his return he settled in

27,

10, 18(54

Amelia Court-House, April

a lucrative

Road,

18(34; Darl)ytown

1,

Five Forks, April

On

that

in

I

of

Ream's Station, June 29, 18()4; Deep Richmond, September 9, 18(i4

18()4;

Bottom, July

4,

August

17th

otlice

tlic

nieanwhilc in the following en-

partici])ating

;

to

4,

I^levciith

of the regiment, and served

capacity until

]8(i4

the

was, on the

lie

of De(^eml)er. 18(;4, promoti'd

surgeon

Exeter

j)ractice in

Berks County, and remained there

is

a

18(55.

.secured

member of

the

Medical Society of the County of Berks and of the Pathological

Mediad

Accepted Mason, he

As a Free and member of Lodge

Society. is

a

611

Lutheran Church

Evangelical

of Trinity

John S. Tryon' was born in Rehrersburg May 12, 1835, and is the second son of Dr. Jacob Tryon. He obtained his education in common

the

lege,

schools and at Pennsylvania Col-

He

Gettysburg.

the tuition of his

studied medicine under

and was graduated

father,

from the University of Pennsylvania

He

his profiission in his native town,

where he has

and where he has met with suc-

since resided,

wss, especially

in

George F.

Drs.

surgery.

Brendle(Mahanoy City), Daniel Dechert (C'rcssona), Simon Seyfert (Pinegrove, Schuylkill County) and John Wagnc-r (Hamburg, Berks County) were students under

John

B. Stkki.ky was

Montgomery County, of French

Pa.,

and

He

ancestry.

his instruction.

born is

cine in the office of Drs. Keeler and

from that

institution

March

6,

1857; began

Earlville, Lancaster County, Pa.,

practicing at

coutiimed until 1862, when he entered the

army

as surgeon

risburg,

for



three

Camp

first in

surgeon of the Eleventh

He was

aftei'ward

Curtin, at Har-

months, and transfei'red

surgeon, to examine drafted

to

Reading, as

men and

I

he office of county treasurer from 1874 to 1876,

two years a member of the City Council, the firet of which (1878) he filled the

chair of

for

its

president.

He

was, iu July, 1885,

appointed examining surgeon for pensions.

Nagle was, on the 18th of to Lucretia,

Howard

are deceased.

Dr.

married

One

Hundred and Sixty-seventh Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, was chosen

its

surgeon.

Pie was next appointed examining surgeon in the

came

to

Montgomery County, and

In 1864 18(55

iu

Reading, where he has since practiced

few years when he Western Pennsylvania. Dr. Sterley was

his profession, excepting a

was

in

for three years a

member of

the United

States

board of examining sui'geons for pensions.

John A. Brobst, October 26,

of Bernviile, was born

1835, at Rehrersburg; attended

daughter of Henry B. and Susan

the public and private schools, and, at the age

Their children are Henry

of fourteen, was sent to Pennsylvania College,

Boyer, of Reading. B.,

.lune, 1872,

substi-

and, upon the organization of the

tutes,

returned to

and was

became

then

Pennsylvania Militia.

provost-marshal's ottice at Pottsville.

filled

of

Univer-

attended lectures at the

;

medi-

Grofl",

of Pennsylvania, and was graduated M.D.

sity

antl

Freeland

read

;

in

descendant

atteniled

Seminary (now Ur.sinus College) Harleysville

1835

in

a

Reading Commandery, No. 42. As a Democrat, he was elected

and

1857.

in

immediately entered upon the practice of

No. 62, of Reading, of Chapter 152 and of

to

of

Reading.

B., Paul, Charles E.

The

doctor

is

and two who

an esteemed member

at Gettysburg,

where he remained

ished the studies of the

until

sophomore year

he ;

fin-

read

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

til2

medicine

iiiuler

Siioencr,

and was

Medical

Adam

directions of Dr.

the

from Pennsylvania

' Schneider.

Stager.

.

1773.

;

Christopher Spengler.

,

Martin Moll.

.

1772.

Reifell.

Court-House and Prison.

Everhard 3Iartin (soap-mak-

.

1771.-1,

Nicholas Souter.

,

Alexander Klinger. Martin Moll.

.

AdamReifell.

,

1

By

act of 27th of

proprietaries

and placed

in the State

at the disposal of the Legisliilure

were abolished,

and

November, 1779, the estates of the

of Pennsylvania were vested

etc.,

thousand pounds

;

quit-rents

and a donation made to the devisees hundred and thirty

legatees of proprietaries of one sterling.

READING. ground-rent.

Over

sixty years after the

town

charge, having become

generally overlooked, was a great subject which agitata! the citizens to a considerable degree

and

In 1815, and

a considerable time.

for

Egy, Martin

1

Adam

12

Eplar,

laid out, this

had been

655

Earman, William

5

Kortz, John

Adam

attorney for the Penns

was apparently very lenient

He

his

in

demands.

endeavored to satisfy the public that the

ground-rents due could

be

legally

collected.

10 2

2

Krauser, Sebastian

Frick, William

3

Kraflt,

Lawrence

3

Kost, Martin

Adam

3

Kurrer,

Feagle, Matthias

3

Kepuer, Joachim

1

Thomas John

Focks,

Fix,

paid; otherwise the lots remaining charged with

The

I

10 2

Kime, Nicholas

12

Fichthorn, Michael

sold.

Klinger, Alexander

Fisher, Jacob

Fass,

would be

Klinder, Conrad Keiser, Jacob

Feather, Peter

again in 1818, a public notice was given to all delinquents that the ground-rents due should be

tlieni

3

Martin

Adam

2 2

14 Daniel

4

9

Lincoln,

7

4

Lesher,

2

Fetter, Michael

2

Lapler, Lorentz

1

Fisher, Dorst

(>

Lebo, Paul

7

1

Levan, Isaac

7

2

Leibrook, Jacob

4

4

Lutz, Jacob

1

Fricker,

Anthony

Fichthorn,

Andrew

Feseing, Ph. Jacob Geissler,

George

Gibson, Francis Garrutt,

Henry John

2

Lehman, Christopher

1

Loch, Peter

1

1

Meierly, David

2

Martin, Kberhard

3 4

2

This professional service must have been found very objectionable, for in 1822 he notified the

Geiger,

Gross,

John

any further ground-rents after October 15th, and that he would discontinue his agency for the Penns after Nothing was subsequently done that time. In 1820 numerous releases of in this demand. ground-rents were issued and recorded in the

Graff,

William

4

Henry Gosler, Henry

3

Gotschall, Nicholas

3

Moyer, Jacob Morgan, Francis Meng, Melchior Morgan, Jacob Marx, William

Haga, Wolfcang Hausf, Peter (mason)

6

Messersmith, Valentino

1

2

Miller, Andreas

1

Huttenstein, William

15

Moritz, Nicholas

2

public that he would not

recorder's

office

at

settle

Many

Reading.

of the

early patents are also recorded at Reading,

List of Taxables, 1759. list

—The

of persons comprises the assessment of the

town

for the year 1759.

could be found

among

court-house.

It

It

the earliest that

the county records in the

includes

sixty-nine taxables.

is

The

two

Gerst,

hundred and

total assessed

value of

taxable property amounted to nine hundred and ninety-four pounds; and the tax levied, ninety

was the

collector.

Benezet, Daniel

4

Daum, George

Bright, Michael

8

Bird, William

9

Biddle, James

12

John

2

2 4 2 3 1

1

aieyer, Matthias

Hautt, Peter (junk'r)

8

Miller, Frederick

1

Maurer, Ernst

1

Henderson, David

12

1

Henig, Balthaser

1

Megly, Jacob

2

Heiuer, KrafTt

U

Meyerly, Balthaser

4

8

3

6

Mergen, John Miller, William

Hart man, John

3

Milleisen, Christopher

Hollig, Barbara

3

Marsteller,

Hugh, Owen Hughes, John

3

Marckle, Christian

Samuel

Holdzader, Peter

Henry

1

Hauck, Joseph

2

7 :;

1

8

Neidly, Nicholas

1

Neidly, Christopher

8

i

Hiddings, William Heinlein, Matthiaa

2

Newhardt, Conrad Nagle, Simon

Haag, Michael Heist, George

2

Nagle, Philip

2

Parvin, Francis

2

Hillegas, Michael

3

Pearson, Benjannn

4

Hey man, Sloses were-- Haun, Henry

pounds and three shillings. Single men each assessed at twenty shillings. Henry Hahn

1

Henry, John

Until,

following

Adam

Geiger,

3

4 8

Philipi,

John

Paul Perlet, Frederick Perlet,

1 1

5 2 1

Hitner, George

5

Hausihl, Michael

1

Hetler, Jacob

3

Hart, Philip

1

Rush, Michael

Handshoe, George

2

Itiehm,

C

Reitmoyer, Henry

4

3

Ludwig

Price,

Evan

Read, James, Esq

Edward

3 14 2

2

2

Imler,

2

Jack, George

3

Rice, Michael

5

Jacob,

John

2

ReitMe,

6

Jager, Jacob

8

Reasoi, William

3

Diehra, Jacob Diehm, Adam Dick, Jacob Degenhardt, Henry

4

Jung, Martin

2

Rieff,

Bucher, Jacob..,.;*. Beriihisel, John, Barret, Joseph Burkhardt, Jacob Buckman, Matthias

5-

Drury, Edward

7

Jung, Isaac

6

Rule,

5

5

Jacobs, Israel

'J

2

Job, George....

7

1

Kuhn, Adam

4

1

Kooch, William

Boyer, Chrietopher

4

1

Kerper,

Backtold, John

2

\

Bauni, Peter Beruhard, George

7

2

Kern, Jacob Kline, Peter

4

Diehm, Peter Diehm, Thomas Dehaven, Edward Debler, Melchior Dorff, Samuel Depoy, AVidow Deible, George Dangler, John

2

Kiney, Christian

Balde, Jacob

2

Dorst, Paul

3

Kerper, Julias

Brendlinger, Joseph

2

Dick, Nicholaa

4

Kendle, Catharine

1

Reitner, Joseph,

Did, George

G

Klinger, Philip

9

Reese, Josiah

1

Amos Engel, Andrew Ege, Adam

6

Kock,

1

5

9

3

1

KHnger, Peter Koch, Johannes

Rop, Peter Rush, Michael, Jr

2

Reser, Jacob, Jr

1

6

Kerber, Valentine

i

Krimler, Henry

5

Sammet, Christian Sweitzer, John

4

3

Kemrer, Agath

2

Smith, Christopher

2

Bishotf,

Bower, Conrad Brosins,

Abraham

3 2 2

IS 7

Evans,

Brown, Conrad

2

Breidenbach, Philip

2

Creek, Francis

1

Ermel, William

Cluse, William

3

Early,

Dalman, William

3

John John

Abraham

Adam

Adam

Peter

Henry

4 16

2 1

Rhine, David

3

Ruth, Peter Riehm, George

5 1

Riehm, John, Sr Conrad Rorebouet, Bernhard

3

1

Rabbold, Jacob

8

1

Rose, Everhardt

5

6

Reitmoyer, Michael

1

1

5 6

IC

Reiff.

1

4

1

2

1

;

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

G56 SbomOD, Joeaph

7

Weiser, Peter

1

Wenrick, Francis

7

7

Weis, Philip

3

Springer, George

John

Shrite,

10

Snyder, Jacob

3

Stichter,

Conrad Stedman, Alexander

5

Wagner, Adam Whitehead, James Wicks, Christian Weiser, Conrad Wirtenberger, George Wunder, George Witman, Adam

1

M^itman, Ludwig

Shapport, Nicholas

2

Schultz, George

7

Spang, Lenhart

1

Shower, Michael

1

Shultz,

Samuel

2

Smith, Peter

2

Michael

Seiater,

7

Strohacker, Godlieb

2

Witman, Christopher Wickersham, Isaac Williamson, James Witman, John

Smith, Philip

2

Zinn, Frederick

Sowerbry,

Widow

2

Andrew Henry

Sharpar,

1

Barger, Thomas. Hartley, Kichard.

Shorp, John

6

Jackson, Samuel.

Shop, Gabriel

6

Josephson, Myer.

Shreck, David

Sleagle.

Adam

Sprincker, Philip

Henry

Senger,

Sasaamanhousen, Henry Seitzinger, Nicholas

Salsgaber, Andreas

Sump, George

1

May, Thomas. Nathan, Lyon. Peai-son, Elijah.

12

Popkin, Robert. Shegtley, Michael.

Spindler, Lorentz.

Valentine

Wolf, Henry

1

Sowermilk, John. Starr, James.

4

Weiser, Samuel.

3

Witman, Henry.

Friends

no record

is

a fine

had

a

to establish the fact.

sUme church

in

The

1761.

meeting-house before

1760.

Their minutes refer to

it as having been too small and inconvenient to accommodate their

In 1765 the several meetings of Friends at Philadelphia and Exeter concurred

services.

;

Episcopalians and Roman Catholics ; but these denominations did not come to possess churches during that period ending 1783, though they

They assembled in The nearest

the dwellings of certain members.

Adam.

Sheirer,

though there

They had

held services occasionally.

2

3

believ-

The Baphad an organization at that time and if they did not have a place of worship in the town, it was not far distant.^ There were also

Koch, Michael.

4

is

in the necessity of erecting another.

Lightfoot, Beiyarain.

2

It

ed that the Calvinists also had one at that time,

tists

7

1

I'rledig,

1

2

Lebo, Isaac.

3

Smith, Andrew

6

1

Abraham

:....

2

4

1

Suder, Barbara (widowi

Smith,

1

Reformed). The Lutherans had, beyond

23

Kimrer, Matthias.

1

Lawrence

Spatz, Michael

1

SINGLE MEN.

1

5

Spatz,

1

26

2

Seiler, Philip

Snider,

1

12

ists (or

a doubt, a meeting-house in 1752.

of the

cliurch

" Molatton," in

former denomination

was

at

Amity township, twelve miles

and of the latter* at " Goscheuhoppen," in Hereford township, near

distant to the southeast;

the county line, twenty-five miles distant to the

In 1780 the town had four hundred and seventeen resident taxables, or fully two thousand inhabitants.

joining

it

were erected into a

Township and

sessions, 1760.

district called the

District of Reading," at

The boundary

May

lines to the east-

ward were not then fixed. A petition for this purpose was presented on February 11, 1761 a survey was made on May 11, 1761, and the proceedings were confirmed at May sessions, 1761.

Po.ssibly there

was a Catholic Church

Maxatawny township

also,

to

the

in

northeast

about twenty miles.



District of Eeadinc; Erected. The town of Reading and part of Alsace township ad"

east.

There were Ri:)man Cathtown from the beginning. Written complaints against them were made by certain olics in the

prominent men to the provincial government in 1755; but these were disregarded.' The largest religious

denomination in the town was the

Lutheran, though the Reformed was not much

The members of both were zealous. They exhibited their devotion b}- promptly erecting, or moving toward the erection of, smaller.

The commissioners appointed by the churches in which to carry on their services. Edward Drury, And this they did, though they had a church

court were Benjamin Pearson,

William Iddings, Martin

Kast, Christopher

Witman, Michael Brecht. The district contained about nine hundred and

only several miles to the north, in Alsace township.

The number of

not be ascertained.

denomination could Judging from a list of

either

fifty acres.

Churches.

—During

town the several active. first

But

it is

the

first

decade of the '

religious denominations

not

in the erection

known which

were

of them was

of a meeting-house.

The

Friends were in the ascendency in respect to gov-

ernment but their number could not be compared ;

with the number of the Lutherans and Calviu-

In

Cumru

township, along the Wyomissing Creek

;

an-

other at Sinking Spring.

2But by the preamble of the act incorporating Reading it would appear that there was a Roman

into a borough

Catholic meeting-house in Reading in 178a.

Four are

there mentioned, three of which certainly were the Lutheran, Calvinist and Friends. 3

6 Col.

Rec, 503, 533-534.

READING.

657

The court-house

commimicants in the Lutheran congregation in 1775, their membership was about one hundred

opened

in

was not

built uj^on

and twenty-five. ScHOOiA In the matter of

building was not necessary.

The

ness of a judicial character

was



habitants religious



much

displayed

schools, the in-

Each

earnestness.

denomination carried on a separate

One

A

county

was backward

dwellings,

early period,

in this district of territory in that

—those which existed

having

at all

This

been in villages and towns.

is

a mistake.

Before Reading was laid out there were at least

Bei-ks County,

— four

to the east of the river, in

large

public busilimited.

still

till the Revoluwas erected in 1770." Fairs. In one of the peti-

jail



Markets and tions to the

Assembly

for the erection of

Berks

County, the petitioners represented that Reading, in 1751, contained

three hundred

By

one hundred and thirty

one hundred and six families and

and seventy-eight inhabitants. it would appear

the foregoing assessment,

that Reading, in

now comprising two hundred

eight schools in the territory

A

scale.

from the erection of the county tion.

especially the Lutherans,

an extensive

clerk held all of the five offices at one time

Reformed and Though the education was secular in Friends. kind, it was tinctured to a great degree with religion. Statements have frequently been made that schools were scarce and their encouragement school

February, 1766.'

hundred per

1

759, contained one thousand

inhabitants,

—a

growth of three In 1761

cent, within ten years.

Hereford, Oley, Exeter and Maiden-creek, and

the town was erected into a separate district

four to the west, in Caernarvon, Robeson, Tul-

out of Alsace township.

The

pehocken and Bethel. ited,

education was lim-

having been confined mostly to spelling,

Each

reading, writing and simple arithmetic.

scholar was obliged to pay for tuition, generally

In some instances

several dollars for a quarter.

scholars paid a cent a day, and this

all,

of the scholars assisted daily in labor of

With

so large a pop-

their importance, the citizens

quite naturally desired the

town to possess the and fairs. They

privilege of holding markets

accordingly presented the following petition to

John Penn, Governor of the province

payment

was made each day at the close of the session. Teaching was conducted during the spring, The greater number, if not fall and wintei-.

and feeling

ulation

"The Reading,

:

petition of the Inhabitants of the in the

Town

" That about twelve years since this Tract of try,

of

county of Berks,

"Most Humbly Sheweth, —

now known by

the

Name

Coun-

of Berks County, part

of the Province of Pennsylvania, by

Act of General

some kind or other at their homes. The teach- Assembly was made a Separate County, and in coners were men, and men only; no women, and sequence Whereof, by order of the Honorable ProThe schools were prietary s, this part of the said County was Located, especially no young people. fixed and Surveyed for the County Town, and called generally small one-story buildings. In some by the Name of the Town of Reading, and very many consisted of rooms rented for that cases they Lots granted to your Petitioners and others, under purpose.

certain Rents payable to the Proprietarys

Public Buildings.

— LTpon

the erection of

the county and the establishment of Reading as

the

county-town, quite naturally the county

officials,

the

especially

commissioners,

took

erection of public

and

justices

county

immediate steps for the

buildings

to

subserve

the

convenience of transacting the public business

But some time elapsed

of the county. their

efforts in this direction

before

were successful.

In the mean time private buildings were used instead.

The The

The

courts

were held

court-house was the

first

to

in

taverns.

be erected.

enterprise of the officials in this behalf

accomplished

in

1762.

The

public

offices

and their

Heirs forever. " That your Petitioners are Tenants under such Grants, and have been at very considerable Expences

Houses and making other Valuable Improvements in the said Town, But humbly conceive that could we be favour'd with a Charter of Incorporation, granting Liberty to hold and keep Publick Markets weekly, and Faira twice in the Year on certain Days, it would greatly tend to advance the Value of Lotts Lett and to be Lett, encourage many others in Erecting

to

come and

Settle

among Us, Increase our Number More Wealth and render the

of luhabitants, bring

Town

of Reading

more happy and abundantly more

flourishing.

was

1

Letter to Pennsylvania Gazette.

were

-

See

p. 463,

chapter on Internal Improvements.



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

658

" W/iere/ore your Petitioners pray your

Houour

to

Premises in your Consideration, and promote and forward tlie Prosperity, Happiness and Increase of one of the Proprietaries' Towns by Incorporating

take

tlie

and Granting them the Privilege of Fairg and Marlins, as aforesaid."

This petition

in

a

superior

handwriting, by James Wiiitehead,

Jr.,

an attor-

wa:^

written,

And We do

forever.

Town, who shall have the Assize of Bread, Wine, Beer and all other Provisions brought for the use of the said Inhabitants, who shall and may perform all things belonging to the Office of a Clerk of the Market, within the said Town; And that Henry Haller shall be the present Clerk of the Market,

ney, dated at Keadiug, February 10, 1764, and

Peace of the said County of "Berks, or a Majority of them, in

The names were mostly

of the town.

written

Their application was

German.

in

favorably entertained,

though

somewhat de-

and on the 30th of July, 1766, a charter was granted, Ijy which the town was authorized to hold weekly markets and semi-annual fairs. This charter was as follows layed,

:

CHARTER TO READING FOR MARKETS ASH

FAIRS.

"

Thomas Penn and Richard Penn, Esquires, true and alisolute proprietaries and Governors-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsylvania and Counties of Newcastle, Kent and Sussex on Delaware, To All to whom these Presents shall come, send Greeting: "

Whereas

hath been represented to Us that the Town of Reading, in the County the said Province, are in great want of a it

Inliabitants of the

of Berks, in

And

sary.

and may erect so many Stalls and Let the same such reasonable rates as the said Justices may from time to time direct and see necessary, and that such Clerk shall exhibit his Accounts to the said Justices, to be by them examined and passed in their at

which shall be in the Jlonth of May every and the Moneys arising therefrom shall be appropriated by the said Justices to the erecting and maintenance of the said Stalls, the paying the said Clerk of the JIarket for his services, and to such other Publick Uses within the said Town as they the said Justices shall think proper and direct. Sessions,

Year

forever,

" In

hereunto

on the Twenty-seventh Day of October next, to be held in Penn Street and to Day next following, and and the continue that Day to begin

the other of the said Fairs to begin on the Fourth Day of June, to be held in Penn Street aforesaid and to continue that

Day and

Days

shall

the

Day

happen

after.

to fall

But in case on Sunday,

then the said Fairs to be held the succeeding Day or two Days following together, and no longer, With all the Liberties and Customs to such Fairs belonging or incident. And Wc do also hereby grant to the Present and succeeding Inhabitants of the said Town of Reading, that they shall and may hold and keep within the said Town, in Penn Street Square, betwein Queen Street and Prince Street, two Markets in each Week, that is to say, one Market on Wednesday and

one Market on Saturday

in every

week of the Year

We

Testimony whereof,

have caused

the Great Seal of the said Province to be affixed. Witness

John Penn, Esquire,

Lieutenant- Governor and Commander-in-Chief

of our said Province, at Philadelphia, the

[Seal.]

Thirtieth

Day

of July, in the Sixth Year

of the Reign of George the Third, by the

Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and and so forth, and in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty-six.

and do, by these Presents, for Us, our Heirs and Successors, grant to the present and succeeding Inhabitants of the said Town that they shall and may forever hereafter have and keep within the said Town of Reading two fairs yearly, and every year, that is

either of those

do hereby further grant and ordain

shall

granted,

first

Tie

that the Clerk of the Markets, for the time being,

rived through their Industry, have, of our free will,

to say, the

time being,

;

We, favouring the reasonable

request of the said Inhabitants, and considering the flourishing State to which the said Town hath ar-

for the

their Court of General

their said Sessions as often as they shall find neces-

dize and Cattle, ye that

shall

Quarter Sessions of the Peace for the said County of Berks and another Clerk of the Market shall from time to time be by them appointed and removed in

Market, for buying and selling Provisions, and of Fairs for buying and selling Goods, Wares, Merchan-

"Now know

who

be removable at the pleasure of the Justices of the

subscribed by two hundred and fifteen inhabitants

and ordain

also hereoy grant

that there shall be a Clerk of the Market for the said

Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith

"

The

the fall

of 1766;

then erected Callowhill

in

a large market-hou.se was

Penn Square

(Fifth)

Street

and butchers began the ter,

John Pexx."

.semi-weekly markets were instituted iu

eggs, meat,

etc.,

;

to

the east

of

and then farmers

sale of vegetables, but-

twice a week, in the morn-

ing of Wednesdays and Saturdays, the articles

named having been

expo.sed

for

sale

iu

the

market-house.

The serai-annual fairs began iu October, 1766. They were held regularly on the 27th day of October and 4th day of June during that period and they were generally well attended.

All

kinds

of

goods and merchandi.se were

READING.

659

brought to the market-house and exposed for joyed'' the most perfect internal Tranquility; that the The people of the country and of the Spirit of Riot and Violence was foreign to GeneralTemp-

sale.

town doubtless looked upon these fair-days with much pleasure. In the beginning their dealBut ings were mostly of a practical nature. gradually they introduced festivities of various kinds.

the

first

The exhibition continued two days, by common cpnsent having been taken

er of the Inhabitants, that disturbances

were quieted,

the Civil Powers were supported and no offenders were

and that if executive power were too weak, the Assembly could strengthen

screened from public justice

it

— therefore

;

they prayed the King to disregard the Assembly as grievous and not properly

petition of the

representing the state of the Province."

One of them was signed by citizens of Readand the second by the town-people. Dancing, ing, eighty-six in number; among these, promwith music, produced on the violin, was a uent men, such as James Whitehead, Jr., prominent part of the programme and (if we James Scull, Isaac Levan, Abraham Levan, may judge of the exhibition then by the John Scull, Nicholas Scull, Conrad Bauer, by the farmers and country people generally,

;

practices of the people four-score of years after-

wards)

the

conclusion

was

enlivened

with

and revelry. CiTIZEXS AGAIXST ChAX(1E OF GOVERX-

fighting

Christopher Witman, Anthony Fricker, Jasper Scull,

The

Henry Vanderslice.

majority

gretit

of the signatures were in German handwriting.

Another from citizens of Reading was signed Jonas Seely, James Read, .lohn Patton, of the charter to the town, a considerable agita- Henry Christ, Jacob Weaver, (sheriff), John tion prevailed amongst the people of the Bishop, Samuel Weiser, (coroner), Jacob Mechcountry concerning the question of a change of lin, Richard Lewis, (commissioner). Early Ixn-keepers. The tavern was a government which had been recommended by Licenses the Assembly of the province for the reason, as prominent public place in the town. were granted by the Governor of the State upon it was alleged, MEXT.^

—Several years previous

to the granting

by



" That mischievous disagreements subsist in this government, which proceed, as they conceive from the very Nature of it, and that a Si)irit of Violence, Riot and Confusion prevails among us which cannot be controlled by the present Power of Government and renders a change of the same necessary."

But they were generally against a change which indicates a "Tory" feeling. Their disapprobation of this movement was expressed in memorials to the King. printed.

These memorials were

In them the subscribers represented,

"

That they had received information that a certain petition praying for change of government had been drawn to the King; and alarmed at its nature, they asked for a copy to know its contents that they were informed that it had already been forwarded, and no copy could be granted witliout leave of Assembly at next meeting in September; and, apprehending that delay would prejudice them so tliat they could not submit their sense of the matter, they represented ;

that they held their

Frame

of

Government

in

the

though disagreements had arisen, otliers around them were not exempted from like misfortune, and that they were not incident to the Nature of their Government that the Province enhighest estimation

;

that

;

1

Penn Manuscript Papers, pages 90 and

114, in posses-

sion of Historical Society of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia.

recommendation

the

county.

of

issued for taverns in Reading. jjersons

of

the justices

the

over thirty licenses were

In 17()2

The

following

were recommended

Christopher Witman.

Jlichael Kraus.

Alexander Klinger.

'

Leonard Rupert.

Peter Fetter.

Frederick Braun.

Peter Withington. Henry Kehler.

John Hartman.

Henry

Elias

Yungman.

Jacob Jager.

Jacob Shoemaker. Nicholas Seitzinger.

Anthony

Abraham Weidman.

Haller.

Fricker.

Conrad Longsdorff.

Jacob Graul. Jacob Keyser. Erhard Roos. George Albert. Michael Brecht.

.

Casper Pfatteicher. Christian Maurer.

Peter Weiser.

Jacob Rabolt.

Ludwig

Peter Brecht.

Byerle.

Jacob Moyer. Andreas Engel. William Frymyer.

A

tavern-keepers

named

were prominent, not only in the town

affairs,

number

of

but in the county

the

political affairs.

The pro-

portion of taverns to the population was rather surprising, forty

having been about one

inhabitants.

" Witmau's,"

now

A

prominent

to

every

tavern

was

the building occupied by the

^

;

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

660

"Farmers' Xational Bank." This building 1763 by Adam Witman, an innkeeper, who, doubtless, ei-ected it for an inn. M'as erected in

He

held

In 1799, Michael AYood,

1778.

it till

came to own it. He had some years previously. From his possession it took the name of "Wood's Inn," and it was so known till 1814, when the Farmers' Bank purchased it and took possession. The bank has held it for banking puralso an

inn-keejier,

leased

for

it

poses continuously

seventy

till

now, a period covering

This

years.

is

the

second

oldest

Washington sojourned in it whilst visiting Reading in 1793. He was very kindly received and hospitably entertained. He held a levee, and many persons called to show him honor and affection. building in Reading.'

—The

early industiy

of the town was very diversified.

It comprised

Early

Occijpatioxs.

numerous trades. The mechanics were the life and development of the town. They were happy because they were employed and they were contented because they supplied their wants, not only by laboring for others, but also by cultivating lots and out-lots for themselves. And many of them were in good circumstances. Hat-making was then a prominent employ;

1757.

—Jacob Yeager, carpenter

hardt, tinner

Henry

;

Gabriel Shopp, saddler

;

F. DegeuGeorge Diehl,

cordwainer; Nicholas Shopper, joiner. 1758.

— John Shreidt, gunsmith

;

Sebastian Grauser,

carpenter; Martin Kraflt, inn-holder.



1759.- Paul Lebo, blacksmith Isaac Lebo, hatter; Christopher Laman, joiner; David Henderson, law-

yer;

;

Adam

cooper;

Bernhard Rorebauch,

Brosius, tailor;

Henry

Senger, leather-dresser; John Gross,

book-binder.



1760. Robert Popkins, carpenter; Peter Haas, wheelwright Jacob Yeager, inn-keeper Edward Drury, inn-keeper; Nich olas Keim, wheelwright; Casper Jost, nailer Peter Holtzader, cooper Isaac Y'oung, shop-keeper; Matthias Hineline, hatter; Lawrence Fix, cooper Isaac Wickersham, carpenter. 1761. Meyer Josephson, shop-keeper; William Frick, barber; Jacob Hoffman, inn-holder; John Miirchin, carpenter William Graeff, lock and gunsmith Edmund Rose, weaver Adam Scheir, carpenter. 1762.— Francis Ficks, cooper; John Collier, tailor; Samuel Weiser, scrivener; Frederick Goodhart, wagoner; Elias Yungman, hatter; David Meyerly, mason; Balthaser Bach, tailor; James Whitehead, Jr., lawyer; Paul Kerber, cordwainer; Ludwig Fil linger, weaver; Edward Biddle, lawyer Jonathan Worrall, shoemaker Andrew Schenck, wheelwright. 1764. Jacob Robold, brick-maker Adam Schlegel, tailor John Bingeman, carter Peter Rapp, butcher George Shultz, hatter Thomas Lincoln, mason Peter Rein, glazier; John A. Gottschall, locksmith. 1765. Christopher Neidle, wheelwright; Henry Haller, tailor Peter Brecht, saddler Nicholas Keim, shop-keeper John F. Mover, cordwainer Henry Gossler, baker Andreas Fuchs, cooper John Witman, cordwainer; Valentine L'rledig, c^ock-maker; Matthias Moyer, joiner Jost Tietz, miner Conrad Babb, tinman. 1766. Henry Eckert, brewer John Spwhn, brewer; ;

;

;

;

;



;

;

;

;

;



;

;"

;

;

;



;

;

ment.

;

;

;

The following

list

connection with the

(in

;

previous

list,

which embraces the patentees

ot

town-lots) indicates the occupations which the

town afforded and tain

meu

also the pursuits

which cer-

They were obtained from

followed.

the records in the recorder's office of the county.

The year

indicates

which they appear.

may have

lived in

the year given 1754.

— Martin

date of the deed

the

in

The tlie

persons mentioned town some time before

:

Kast, inn-holder

;

Leonard Rupert,

Adam Wagner, baker Moses Highman, baker merchant; Conrad Deboy, reed-maker; Andrew Steele, blacksmith Joseph Chammond, shop-keeper; Michael Gretter, slaughterer; Jacob Kern, inn;

;

;

holder; ter,

Evan Jones, shop-keeper; George M. GretJohn Jackson, felt-maker; S.amuel

slaughterer

;

Jackson, felt-maker;

Adam

Werterberger, weaver.

;

;

;

— weaver. 1767. — Peter Zimmerman,

Conrad

;

Gei.^t,

mason

oldest building

now standing

in

two-8tory building; the third-story was added in 1817.

John Morris,

saddletree-maker; Jacob Neithack, cordwainer.

— — —

1768. Alexander Murray, clerk Abraham Witman, cordwainer; Jacob Hoff, chirurgeon and barber. 1769. Frederick Stieff, cordwainer; Jacob Graff, hatter; AVilliam Miller, pump-maker. 1770. Casper Pf'atteicher, cordwainer; Henry Printz, stocking- weaver; George Bernhard, skinner ;

;

Ja.sper Scull, surveyor.

—Jeremiah Paul, school-master; Anthony Fricker, inn-keeper. 1774. — Abel Morris, clock-maker; John Mears, 1772.

cabinet-maker; Daniel Levan, lawyer; Daniel Rose, clock-maker Peter Gross, hatter Jacob Gross, hatter; John George, butcher John Dissler, saddler; ;

The

Reading is situated on the northwest corner of Fifth and Washington Streets. It was erected in 1760 by Michael Brecht. Then it was a '

;

joiner; Michael Klein, cordwainer; Jonathan Jones,

;

;

Jacob Boyer, carpenter

;

Jacob Oswald,

Bright, brewer. 1779.

— Baltzer Henri

tze, hatter.

tailor;

Jacob

READING.

A

661

worthy of applied to prevent the conflagration from spreadConrad ing to other buildings. Then the force-pump, manipulated by hand, Weiser began a store on the north side of Penn What an improvement this Street, above Caliowhill (now Fifth), on lot No. was introduced. prominent business stand mention in

special

He

3.

obtained

this

the

is

connection.

patent in

1751, having

probably erected the building (two-story stone)

Here Weiser

shortly before.

intercourse with

ness

the

carried

on busi-

Indians, in

which

respect the building obtained particular historic

This stand has continued promi-

prominence. nent thence

till

now, a period extending over

For many years was commonly known as the "Old White Store." It came to be owned by Nicholas Keim, in 1769 and the Keim family carried on business in it through this period and for

must have been regarded over the slow, tedious and too frequently ineffectual and dangerous method with the bucket? Instead of approaching the

;

seventy years afterward.

Three old buildings, which weie erected this period, are

standing,

still

—two-story

in

stone

and 1760 (many

northwest corner of Fifth

tavern-stand,

Washington

erected

Streets,

in

years afterward imjjroved and enlarged)

;

two-

story stone tavern-stand, on north side of

Penn

below Fifth, 1763 (bank building since

Street,

1814); and two-story stone building, county prison, 1770, on northeast corner of Fifth

Washington Streets

(store building since 1848).

Eainbow Fire Company. ple naturally, after

and

—The town-peo-

having erected numerous

and jiouring on the water, the

and

force the water through a hose

and pipe in upon the burning building.

a continuous stream

No Newspapers nor Internal ImprovejfENTs.

—There were no newspapers

during

its

Gazette had a limited

This supplied the news, and this news was almost entirely " foreign." The local correple.

s|)ondence was only occasional.

and particulars about a growing people,

facts

not being in existence tlien at Reading, affords

no assistance whatever in ascertaining the con-

A

of Reading before the Revolution. " special " to the Gazette reported some of the

dition

and wandering bears in the Reading and a correspondent from Reading, in 1760, intimated the possible improvement of the Schuylkill for navigation. Indian

cruelties

vicinity of

The

;

difficulty of gathering facts

the necessity of an organization for protecting

historical

them from

ciated.

gun

to

It

fire.

is

believed that they organ-

company soon

town had bebe rather compactly built up, though

is

been the only company of this kind here for thirty years

afterward.

extinguishing

fires

ious, especially

Their apparatus for

was, indeed, simplebut labor-

when compared with the appa-

ratus of fire companies one

hundred years afterwas extinguished at first by buckets of water, hooks and axes. Water was carried in buckets and ])assed from hand to hand from the nearest j^ump (then numerous in town) to the burning building and poured upon the fire, and, if not sufficient, the hook and ax were ward.

The

fire

And

after the

no record to establish the fact. A regular company was, however, organized on March 17, 1773, and named the "Rainbow Fire Company." And this would seem to have there

This important

agent for preserving as well as communicating

early period of Reading,

fire

Reading

in

The Fennsyhania circulation among the peo-

history as a town.

dwellings and buildings in the town, considered

ized a

fire-

could stand off one hundred feet and more

one hundred and thirty years. it

fire

men

bank

no

was

there

therefore

will

narrative,

no public water-works, no

no

pike,

nor

nor

canal

no

telephone,

How

improvements

were

nor

nor

gas

the

to

no

found

be appre-

post-office,

bridge nor

railw'ay,

of public

destitute

concerning this

upon which

turn-

telegraph light!

electric

conveniences inhabitants

and

of the

have now

town compared with what

tlie peoj)le



cannot imagine their

year 1886

in the

And

situation.

knew

!

We

yet they were satisfied, for they

not of these things.

Pi'MP.

—The pump was an

town

important feature

was an indispensable and it continued to be for a hundred feature years, till the municipal government discouraged in the

;

in

fact, it



its use,

for sanitary reasons, especially after the

valuable water-w^orks had been obtained from the " Reading Water Company." It is one of

— HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

002 the

things mentioned in connection

first

the town, and

it

with

occupies a prominent position

growth and well-being of the people. It stood in every locality, and was used by everyits utility cannot be over-estimated. body There were some springs in the town, and one This place was supplied with running water. in the

;

was the " Fountain Inn," which was located on the south side of Penn Street, about fifty yards above Tenth. It was conveyed in a wooden pipe from the spring at the " Gravel Hole," on the " commons," a distance of nearly half a

Many

mile.

wells were in use

—the water hav-

ing been drawn up in a bucket by a chain or rope attached to a windlass.

during the period when its light, is

was a town

indeed,

;

coal-oil

lamps,

superior to the light that they had then from

and tallow. There were no evening dramatic performances no entertainments of any kind. Balls and dancing parties were numerous then as they are now. But these were conducted at taverns and

oil, fat



not at halls specially designed for such a pur-

The violin was the only musical instrument used, and the player was an orchestra all in himself, his energetic stamping and motions keeping the dancers in time and awaking considerable activity upon the occasion.

pose.

The



it

produced from improved

people had various pastimes, just as they

The Light, ExTERTAiN>rENTS. only substance which the inhabitants used for fuel for heating and cooking purposes was wood. The wood-stove was common everywhere and so was the open fire-place. Great chimneys were a necessary part of every dwelling. Coal had been discovered in the upper

have had everywhere, time out of mind. Cardplaying, racing, quoiting, rolling and throwing

section of the county, along the head-waters of

did not have any sports which required physical

the Schuylkill, some years before the close of

exertion.

this period, but its usefulness as a substance for

been the

FlTel,

;

fuel

had not as yet been recognized or appre-

running and jumping, ball-playing and

hoop-rolling were most

however, for

men and

common. boys.

The

light of that period

tive state.

was

still in

a primi-

There was no step as yet beyond the fat and oils were still the sub-

lamp; wax and stances

commonly used

was known abroad

;

for this purpose.

but

it

Gas

not yet been

iiad

introduced for lighting public or private places.

Thirty years more elapsed before for lighting the streets of

don, in England.

improvement

was adopted

it

Westminster and Lon-

TJierewas no demand for an

in this direction

beyond the wants

The inhabitants worked when the night came they

of social entertainment. it

was day, for

Tiie

These were,

women and

devoted their spare time mostly to knit-

girls

ting, quilting, fiincy-

sewing and spinning. They

Indeed, with them, such has ever It

case.

is

even so now

one instance, roller-skating.

Hunting and Fishing.

ciated.

while

ball,'

—excepting

—Hunting and

fish-

ing were especially interesting and successful sports in the days

when

the

woods were great

and wild and the waters rolled onward unpolThis was indeed a great section, for luted. woods and springs were in abundance. Before the town was laid, bears w'ere numerous. in this and they continued here for some Several were shot near by in 1754, of which special mention was made in a

vicinity;

yeai-s afterward.

letter to the Pennsi/lrania Gazette at

phia.

All kinds of wild

game were

Philadel-

plentiful

deer, rabbits, pheasants, partridges, ducks, geese

and pigeons. The latter were here in flocks, Gunning for food estimated by the thousand. was common with Work-shops closed at six o'clock or if not for a livelihood junction. sun-down. The stores, however, were kept every man. Traps and snares were used very open till nine and ten o'clock; and the taverns, successfully by many for catching game. The Schuylkill and its many tributaries abounespecially. A dim light enabled the people to move around but talk, gossip and story-telling ded with fish. Fishers were just as successful as

found that they could not work,

realizing, in-

deed, the literal significance of the divine in-





;

were carried on more than business.

A country

tavern of to-day

sample of

store or

what the

stores

is

a

fair

and taverns of Heading were

^

A ball of iron,

five,

and even

varying in weight from seven

fifty

pounds.

lo

twenty-

READING. gunners.

Tliey were not required to walk more

than a mile or two at most from their homes.

663

single Indian dared

away from

twenty miles and beyond the

to venture

his associates

in

The abundance of shad made this locality fa- mountain, but, more surprising that he escaped mous as a fishing-ground. Along the "Never- with his life after having come so far into the sink" and around the "Poplar Neck" they coimty. The citizens must indeed have rejoiced when the declaration of peace was published in were plentiful. The name of the locality Xavesink^ fishing-ground, arose from this cir-

With the Indians

cumstance. district

above

all

other districts.

was a chosen The name im-

it

1763.

Revolution.

—The

declaration of peace

rest

and quiet which

this

produced were certainly

very encouraging to them during their efforts modes of in developing the town into that degree of catching them were used the net and the rod importance which its position as a county-seat and line being preferred. The gig at night was naturally demanded. But these had scarcely frequently adopted. But the first-named was made an impression before a new subject began used mostly for this purpose. A large propor- to agitate their minds. This was in reference to tion of the food of the early inhabitants consist- their personal and political rights as subjects of the King. The importance of these rights was ed of wild game and fish. Indian Invasion. In the early part of not wholly understood or appreciated. Infringethis period the inhabitants of the town were ment upon them did not then awaken a public thoroughly aroused, if not terrified, by the spirit of opposition. The people as a community horrible cruelties of the Indians along the Blue were satisfied with the government over them. Mountain, just twenty miles away. The safety They were not even inclined to unite in a moveof the community was moi'e or less uncertain ment for a change. But in the course of ten during the continuance of their invasion from years their sentiments changed and just as they 1755 till 1763. A military depot was stationed were indisjio-sed at the close of the " French and in the town. Soldiers were quartered here to Indian War" to consider any subject which inspire confidence and the assurance of protec- tended to di.sturb the quiet that was settling tion, and their movements must have kept the round-about them, so were they prompt and Conrad Weiser active in preparing the way for the Revolution. people in constant excitement. was the most prominent citizen by reason of his They enunciated their feelings and principles at active participation in the warfare, not only as p)ubli(^ meetings. They expressed earnest and a commander of colonial troops, but also as an bold sympathy for their fellows in the distant interpreter for the Indians and as a mediator colony of Massachusetts, and encouraged them Many of in the stand which they had manfully taken between them and the goverument. the settlers were murdered in the townships against the encroachments of the British governalong the mountain. But the citizens of the ment upon their political rights. " No taxation town did not suffer any loss at all, for no lives without representation " was a great public were sacrificed, no persons w-ere seized and sentiment to which our community could then carried away and no property was burned or readily subscribe and about which they could stolen. They were fortunate. The Indians formulate a strong and unconquering spirit for feared the town. It was too populous for them war. In that time a new leader grew into and too well-guarded. The nearest point to the jjopular favor, and they unhesitatingly and town which they reached was six miles away. unanimously looked to him for political repreBut then they were not in a squad, not in force sentation, just as they had looked to Conrad sufficient to commit outrages if they had been Weiser twenty years before in their alarming so inclined only a single Indian was seen, and days with the savage Indians. This was he was apparently fleeing from impending harm Edward Biddle.^ Companies of troops were ports the preference.

Other

kinds were here likewise.

fishes

of various

Diiferent





;

;

or imprisonment.

It is rather surprising that a

He came into Then was ensign ''

This

name sbould be

substituted for " Neversink."

Berlts

County from Philadelphia in 1757. Conrad Weiser's company, in

in Captain

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

6i;4

formed and forwarded. Military supplies of all kinds were furnished in answer to all demands. Moneys were collected and paid over and general activity jjrevailed iu the community through the entire period of the Revolution for ;

And

eight years.

nolile exhibition

Many

won

the government, for the

the favor of

leaders in the great

men

stood out prominently, but

from the several county round-about Reading. Sketches of some of the

'

districts,

of the

men named appear

elsewhere in this history.

Nicholas Keim.

naturally, this activity, this

of patriotism,

other

they were

tor of the

Keim

—John Keim, the progeni-

family, emigrated to America

the latter jiart of the seventeenth century,

in

and became one of the first settlers in Oley township, Berks County, having taken up land prisoners of before 1718, and located in the upper section of

movement, recognizing the loyalty of thecitizens, establisiied in the town a large depot for military stores,

and

war.

Altogether this was quite a centre in the

movement

also a large barrack for

the

township,

near

the

present

village

of

though the rolling

for independence,

valleys and elevated hills round-about were not

drenched with the blood of men in actual warfare, though the county was not even invaded by the enemy. The nearest point reached was

Some

Valley Forge.

of the prominent generals

of the Revolutionary army were at Reading

during the war. Mifflin, was

.so

One

of them. General

Cumru town-

that he purchased a large farm in ship,

Thomas

pleased with the laud in this locality

and remained upon

some time.

But

it

is

with his family for

it

known

not

ted

Reading.

Furnace" line

in

the

that

commander-in-chief. General \Va.shington,

visi-

He

in 1777,

was at the "Reading which was near the county

Chester County, about

fifteen

miles

southeast from Reading.

Prominext Mex.

—During the

of Reading, from 1748 its

till

first

citizens distinguished themselves,

some

political representatives,

business

life

and some

period

1783, a number of .some as

in military .service.

can mention the following

NICHOLAS KEIM

in the pursuits of

men

I

:

— —

Conrad Weiser, Edward Biddle, Charles James Read, Henry Haller. Biisiiiesn. Nicholas Keim, Nicholas Scull, John Jackson, Mark Bird, Gabriel Hiester, John Patton, Jacob Graeff, Henry Hahn, Samuel Jackson, Peter Gross, Henry Eckert, Jacob Bright, Baltzer Henritze, Nicholas Lotz, Dr. Jonathan Potts, Bodo r)tto, Adam Witman, Michael Bright, Christopher Schultz, George Douglass, Anthony Fricker.

Lobachsville.

He

his decease, in

1732.

He

follower of Pastorius.

S^

carried on farming there

Pii/ifical.

Biddle,

Militanj.

— Daniel Brodhead, Joseph Hiestev, George

Nagel, John

Sjiolin,

Jacob Moigan, Jacob Graul,

Jacob Maurer.

Arch. i'M seines), 543. T^evolution.

Nicholas Keim, a son of John Keim, was

born

Oley township April

in

pursued the

and Indian

And

see

AVar.

sketcli

in

2 Penna.

chapter on

life

of a fiirmer

till

2,

1719.

He

1755, and then

with his wife, Barbara (Snyder), and an only son,

moved

to

Reading, where he then began

the business of a general hardware-store, and a

In 1769 he purchased Bird the " Weiser Store Stand,"

dealer in grain, etc.

from

Mark

on Penn as the "

active service in the French

till

was a " Friend," a

Street, near Fifth,

Old White

Store,"

commonly known and there carried

on business very successfully years. cipal

At

that period he

merchants

at

for a

number of

was one of the prin-

Reading,

Adam Witman

READ1N(J. having theu also been largely engaged in trade. resided in a large two-story stone dwelling

He on

northwest corner of Penn and Ninth

tlie

He

Streets.

carried on extensive business trans-

actions with the leading merchants of Philadel-

and Gerraantown. His receipt-book for the years 1763, 1764, 1765 and 1766 includes the autogra])hs of the Wisters and Benezets, Samuel Miles (afterwards a colonel in the Revolisher),

Owen

ing change and exchange,

matter for them,

was a complicated so than we,

are accustomed to simple units of value,

imagine.

Calendar

— Old

Style to Neio Style.

old style of reckoning time (Styli

who

would

—The

Veteris)

was

the Julian Style, derived from Julius Caesar

46

The

B.C.

length of

the year

by

this

reckoning was afterward found to be incorrect.

Amos Wickersham, George

But

Dillwyn,

John Coxe, Caleb Foulke and About the year 1785 he transferred

others.

and retired from was a man of progressive

his store to his only son, John,

He

active business.

who encouraged

everything relating to

community in which he

the development of the

He died on August 3, 1802, at the advanced age of eighty-three years, " after a long, lived.

lingering consumption,

Avhich

he

bore

with

Christian fortitude and entire devotion to the

of the Almighty."

will

etc.,

much more

Christopher Saur (the prominent pub-

Jones,

spirit,

The matter of reckoning value, mak-

common.

])hln

lution),

665

[

Weekly Advertiser,

centuries elapsed before it was changed. In 1582 Pope Gregory XIII., issued a brief in which he abolished the use of the Julian Calendar and substituted a corrected calendar

according to the calculations of a learned astron-

omer of Naples, named Aloysius

Lillius.

The

added ten days to the old style. The name of this calendar was called, after the Pope, correction

" Gregorian,"

new

style.

and came

The

styles continued to

the

eighteenth

to be recognized as the

diflPerence

between the two till 1700. In was eleven days.

be ten days

century

it

The order of the Pope was first recognized only August 28, 1802.] Pound Steeling. The term " pound sterl- by governments under the influence of the ing" arose in England under King Richard I., Roman Catholic religion. But the change was



about the year 1190. abbreviation of the

It

word

is

supposed to be an

" Easterling," the

name

gradually introduced into the reckoning of the governments.

In 1751 an

of an oriental coin which was introduced into

ment was passed by the

British

England by distinguished coiners from the East. It is also supjiosed to have been a small coin worth about one jjenuy -which was stamped by

adopting the new style in

all

merchants from Germany called Esterlings dur-

instead of the 25th

ing the reign of

King John, 1199-1216.

In the provincial days of Pennsylvania a pound was equal to §2.42. The pound sterling of England is now represented by a " sovereign," a gold coin valued at $4.84.

The terms were used

in

establishment records

terms

The

show to

]

government

public and legal

and directing that the next year

752 should begin on the

1st

day of January,

day of March

;

that the

names of the months (as January, February, M^rch, etc.) should be substituted for the numbers (as 1st, 2d, 3d, etc.), and that the day following the 2d day of September, 1752, old style, should be reckoned as the 14th day of September,

new

reckoning for some years after the

act

went

The county

the

Assembly of Pennsylvania passed an

" pounds," "shillings," " pence,"

of independence.

a change from the use of these

dollars

and cents

in

the year 1796.

early inhabitants of Reading were obliged

to understand the value of the foreign coins in oi'der

transactions,

to carry

on satisfactory business inter-

course with one another.

Before the change

was introduced there were two units of value the English pound and the Spanish milled dollar, and the values of these standards were not

all

act of Parlia-

March

style.

Previous

to the

time that this

into effect in the .American colonies, act

on

11, 1752, recognizing the act of Parlia-

ment, more especially for the purpose of preventing disputes in reference to the dates of legal convevances.



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANIA.

6GG

PART

The following

11.

worthy of preservation

letter is

in connection with the incorporation of the bor-

BOROUGH FROM 1783 TO Charter of Incorporatinn



I'list-Office

— Eleclion

— Internal

1847.

Districts

Impi'ovenients

ough

— Xewsp.apei's

— Ferries

and

— Fire Companies, Banks and AVater Supply — Public Buildings — Stages, Canals and Railway —Traffic — Merchants of Reading in 1830 — Occupations in 1839 — Distinguished Visitors — MemorBridges Light

Manufacturers

ial

Services

— Streets,

Change of Names

—Executions

Early Exhibitions.

Charter of Ixcorporatiox.

— After

:



have proposed a few amendments to the Bill Reading into a Borough, which you left are written on the sheet accompanying the Bill. If I heard the objections to the Borough being bounded by the Western bank of the river Schuylkill, I could be enabled to give you my opinion better with respect to that matter than at present, but as I am now circumstanced I cannot divine what they can be nor do I perceive the particular advantages that may attend it, being thus bounded so as to render it a point of moment perhaps it is intended that the Burgesses shall be Tnie "Sir.

I

for erecting

me; they

with

;

the

close of the Revohition, with independence not

;

only boldly declared bnt admiraltiy won and firmly established throughout the United States,

the town was ready for a step forward into a distinct

body, with

political

powers and

the

privileges of municipal government.

It then

Trouts. " The question,

whether the Burgesses can be con-

stituted Justices of the peace for the county of Berks,

has been duly attended to

;

and

if

the majority of the

freeholders within the town and district incorporated

contained about four hundred taxables,' or fully

request

two thousand inhabitants.

Legislature cannot gratify them, not only agreeable

population were Germans

Xine-tenths of the ;

and

it

was generally

recognized as the largest, most important and

it, I

to the spirit but the letter of the 30th section of the

Constitution. " I am. Sir, in haste,

progressive inland town in the entire country.

Accordingly, a petition

and on the 12th day of September, 1783 thirty-five years after the town-plan had been



was erected into a borough. Tiiis length of time would seem to indicate a slowness of political action in respect to advancement beyond the ordinary ;uid limited powers of a township but it would also seem to indicate a good, orderly and contented people, who were able to it

;

get along satisfactorily without the aid of police

By

regulations.

come five

that

time the county

to contain a population

thousand

;

Reading

tiie

— Womelsdorf

had

numbering twenty-

and towns had come

out and established in

to

lie

laid

county round-about the

to

we.st,

fourteen

1760; Hamburg to the north, sixteen and Kutztown to the northeast, eighteen

miles, in miles,

miles, about

1

770

;

"

Your most

obedient,

behalf was pre-

in this

sented to the General As,sembly of the State,

laid out

can see no reason to suppose that the

Birdsboro' to the southea.st,

humble servant, "ThO. M'KEAJf."

"I'hila.,

"Aug't 28, 1883, "Daniel Clymer, Esquire." [Original letter written in neat, legible handwriting.]

ACT OF ASSEMBLY.

"An Act

town of Reading, in the county of Berks, into a borough for regulating the buildings, preventing nuisances and encroachments on the squares, streets, lanes and alleys of the same, and for other purposes therein mentioned, passed by the General Assembly September 12, 1783 "Set:. 1. Whereas the inhabitants of the town of Reading have represented, by their petition to the Assembly, that the said town has greatly improved, and is for erecting the

;

:

number of inhabiand four churches'' or houses for public worship are erected, and that the

yearly increasing in buildings and tants

;

that a good court-house, jail

courts of justice for the county are held there; that

encroachments and nuisances have been committed

in

the public squares, streets, lanes and alleys of said town, and its out-lots that contentions happen rela;

nine miles, about 1770;" and

Morgantown

to

the south, fifteen miles, about 1770.

tive to partition walls

and fences, and

a

variety of

other matter, to the great annoyance and inconvenience of the inhabitants.

'

Some one has

sixty-two.

By

^

list

at three

hundred and

of the town for 1780 the

numbered four hundred and seventeen. not known. Bird, the founder, did not

The year is any lots by deed

be obtained.

number

the assessor's

resident taxables

sell

fixed the

It is

;

hence definite information could not

the same as to Morgantown.

"Sec.

2.

And

ir/(ei-eas

it

is

necessary, as well for

the benefit of the inhabitants of the said town

those ^

who

Trinity

as

trade and resort there, and for the advantLutheran, First Reformed, Friends' and

fourth probably Catholic.

the

READING. age of the public in general, that the encroachments, nuisances, contentious, annoyances and inconveniences in the said town and out-lots thereto belonging, should for the future be prevented. And for the promoting industry, rule, order and the better govern-

ment "

of the said town.

667

be duly elected and appointed in their place, as herein after

is directed. " Sec. 5. Style of the corporation.

Time

hereby enacted by

regulated.

Freemen of the commonwealth of Pennsylcania, in General Assembly wet, and by the

each year.

'Sfee.

-Be

3.

it

and

enacted,

it

is

the Representatives of the

That the said town of Reading and the country herein after described shall be, and the same is hereby erected into a borough, which shall be called The Borough of Reading' for ever, the extent of which borough is and shall be comprised with the following boundaries, to wit. Beginning on the westerly bank of the river Schuylkill, opposite (lulhority of the snme,

'

:

Lardner's lane of Hockley's outlets; thence across

The Burgesses

'

and Inhabitants of the Borough of Reading with its corporate powers and privileges enumerated.' "Sec. 6. Election of Burgesses and other officers of Election fixed on

first

of

ated. " Sec. 9. Provisions

for markets and fairs. The markets to be held twice every week on Wednesday and Saturday and the fairs twice every year, on the fourth of June and on the twenty-seventh of October,— each fair to continue two days. John Hart-





;

man

is

named

'who

as clerk of the market,

shall

have

all

other

the assize of bread, wine, beer, wood and

east, six

provisions brought for the use of inhabitants.'

line of land late of

Adam Witman,

Esq., deceased

—Penalty on

" Sec. 10.

oflicers elected

and Philip Sayler's, south twenty-four degrees east, one hundred and seven

neglect to act.

jierches to a stone, being a

the good government of the borough.

thence with said

line,

corner of land late of

Jonathan Potts, Esq., deceased then with the lines of said Witman and Potts, north sixty-six degrees ;

east, fifty-three

said Potts' land Bright,

south

perches to a stone, being a corner of thence with the lines of Potts and ; twenty-four

degrees

east,

seventy

perches to a stone, being a corner of said Bright's land

thence across the mountain, south six degrees

;

hundred and seventy-eight perches, to a being a corner of Michael Bright's land thence

west, four post,

;

south sixty-six degrees west, ninety-three perches, to a stone, being a corner of Isaac Levan's lands

;

thence

by the same and Michael Crowser's land, south twentyfour degrees east, ninety-eight perches

to a stone;

hence by the same, south sixty-six degrees west, one hundred and fifty-six perches to a black oak, being a corner of said Levan's land, on the eastern bank of the said river Schuylkill thence across said river to 1

;

"Sec. 12.



" Sec. 13. No foundation of any party wall shall be laid by any person before applying to the regulators,

who

"Sec.

are to be appointed by the Burgess,

14.— Owners not

forty

perdies to the

" Sec. 15.

And

>9ec. 4.

he

it

on streets en-

build

— Parties finding

respect to foundation wall

themselves aggrieved in

may

appeal to Quarter Ses-

sions.

— Parties to pay regulator for service. — Regulator to regulate partition fences,

"Sec. 16. " Sec. 17. etc.

" Sec. 18.

— Freeholders to choose supervisors and Monday in May. — Notice of their election be given. —Supervisors and assessors to levy a tax

assessors annually on third

to

annually, not exceeding one shilling in the pound, on

the clear yearly value of the real and personal estate?,

place of beginning. ''

to

croached upon.

" Sec. 20.

hundred and

to

croachments be made.

"Sec. 19.

erly bank, seven

refuse or

croach on any street shall not be deemed nuisances; but they are not to be rebuilt nor shall future en-

said river,

bank thereof; thence up the

who

— Power make rules and ordinances for — Buildings heretofore erected that en-

" Sec. 11.

along the several courses and distances on the west-

the western

of

" Sec. 7. Powers of the Burgesses specified. " Sec. 8. Qualiticatious of Borough officers enumer-

said river

and Lardner's lane, north sixty-six degrees hundred and fifty-nine perches to a post in a

May

further enacted, by the authority

That Daniel Levan and William Scull, Esquires, be and they are hereby appointed the present Burgesses and the said Daniel Levan shall be called the chief Burgess within the said borough and Peter Nagle, John Spoon, Benjamin Spyker, Jr., and James May, assistants, for advising, aiding and asafor-esaid,

etc., after first

"Sec. 21.

refusing to serve. Bur-

;



lected.

;

powers and authorities herein given them and John Fry to be High Constable and Collinson Reed, Esquire, to be the Town clerk; to continue Burgesses, Assistants, High Constable and Town Clerk, until the first day of May, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four, and from thence until others shall

etc.,

compensation fixed. gess to appoint others " Sec. 22. Burgess to approve tax levied before col-

;

sisting the said Burgesses in the execution of the

being qualified.

— Supervisors,

" See. 23. tax.

"Sec. 24.

—Tenants' goods liable —Tenants may deduct

to

be distrained for

tax paid out of

rent.

;

" Sec. 25.

— Supervisors to repair

" Sec. 26.

—Supervisors

;

may

streets.

enter lands adjoining

to cut drains or ditches for carrying ofl!"the water.

"Sec. 27.

dutv.

—Supervisors

to

be fined

for neglect

of



HISTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

///.//f/: ///////A/.

i

ri!i:«OKiM)i{ Yri()\

(5()it/// y///./y/y: //////////.

J

im^koihui or kkAdixc;

^

\

\

j

y,//// z/:^'

KEADING. by public couveyauce

traii.sportatioa

intervals

proach and arrival

at regular

the surrounding settlements

to

073

The

!

point

highest

The

competition was reached in 1830.

and

of

fares

|

towns, both near and distant. inclined to

wonder what

We are

had been cut to half their regular

naturally

stage-coaches had

subjects occupied the

men

attention of prominent enterprising

rates,

and the

to fly over the turnpikes

— especially to the

at a gallop

to such

come

south and west

an extent as to hinder them from devising so

even racing side by side at times to reach

important and yet apparently so simple and

prominent places

first.

a thing as a stage for the accommodation

Penn Square was

the prominent point of obser-

trifling

Then

the court-house on

of the public in respect to travel, soon after a

vation in town to witness arrivals.

considerable population had settled in the town,

first

say in 1760

People generally, and

or 1770.

men

business

especially,

]dace to place to a greater

had had

their

own conveyances

We

not.

practiced.

moved about from or less extent. Some ;

in

successful operation.

fifty

useful institution

At

cause

and

was

first

now, who

life,

inform us

then than now,

life

and energy pre-

individual enterprise, and be-

equal chances in their efforts for

But

success.

devising, if

was then

legislation

had not already devised, a new

it

and powerful competitor, and

it

was then

cial

life.

in

reins

Several years afterward stage-lines were

State

extended to the west, through Lebanon Valley

Broad Mountains

to

Sunbury, and

it

By

looking back over this

would seem that

this great party

been developing a creature which was

At

commer-

party had had the

of government over the affairs of the and the direction of legislative policy for

period

to the north-

through Ea?t Penn Valley to Easton.

The Democratic

over thirty years.

Blue and

to Harrisburg, to the north over the

lui-

wittingly creating a great inequality amongst the

introduced on the great

highway between Reading and Philadelphia

east

and

Men

several agencies in this department of

stage

1789.

men had

traffic

laid out.

The

!

were better

times

vailed through

had been in Reading was

it

over forty years before

times, indeed

because more real business

Philadelphia, just

miles off to the southeast,

use for

the

that

Elsewhci-e

realized.

to

are beyond the middle age of

and that considerpass away before any per-

the stage-coach

What

plause.

this kind,

improvement was was then a

ceptible

was common

the stages with a welcome of shouts and ap-

but the majority

that progress was necessarily slow without an

able time would have to

It

a hundred persons assembled there, to receive

can therefore readily understand

accommodation of

Betting on

was frequently see fifty and even

arrivals of competing stages

ple undemocratic

had

in princi-

and which would soon manifest

as

a tendency to hinder the development of personal

public demands required, they gradually became

enterprise for a time and then eventually drive

first,

weekly

trips

were

made

;

afterward,

And this comwas the corporation. It in the development of our local affairs about as did not take hold of the stage-coach as an But it had long after the introduction of the stage as it was institution worthy of its genius. to ol)tain it after the settlement of the town in taken hold of the turnpike and afterward of the 1751. When the daily stages ran to and fro, canal, and had struggled hard with them

semi-weekly, tri-weekly, and eventually daily, the last having bsen reached in 1826

it

—a period

and travel were lively. Their constant and increasing activity provoked competition. In order to " make time," " relays " for fresh horses were established at points along the lines every six miles, and the horses were urged onward over hills and dales under the twirling, cracking lash. How the coaches must have

trade

rocked on their leathern support blasted

by long-winded

sounded on the way 61

in

!

how

through

many

practical

and

years

till

they were

successful operation.

put into

And

these

were hardly given an opportunity to display their utility before it developed the railroad with steam as a propelling power.

forward this was

power by the

the horns,

must have announcing their ap-

out of the market altogether.

petitor, this creature,

drivers,

i

!

—a

What was

What a

step

step to speed, to ease, to

the horse in a coach or boat

side of steam on

a firm railroad track,

which the seasons could not render precarious or even four-in-hand, fi'esh every six imjDassable



HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

674

miles, flying under a lasli and speedy before a

was not completed

horn!

needed a great staple to hasten

Xatnraliy,

away with

the

passed

stage business

new

till

shortly afterward. its

It

development

It found this in lumber, and came to be equally successful for a period. heat or cold, could not aifect, and which was But the development of the country grew betireless and irresistible. yond navigation. The demands of the former Hauling over steep hills and bad roads was exceeded the capacities of the latter. So a new slow and tedious, but it was not discouraging. agent had to be supplied to satisfy the one by The early settlers kept themselves and their taking the place of the other. This was found in strong teams at it in spite of hills and roads and steam. It would appear that this great motive How weather. Navigation was recommended, but it came to us just when it was a necessity. was generally deemed impracticable. Efforts frequently discoveries succeed each other in a

the introduction of

a factor in our daily

life

tiiis

agent,

which wind or weather,

were being made to introduce

it,

but their pro-

and construction. it

order to favor the development, the

natural

A

convenience, the enrichment and the improve-

discovery, however, beyond the mountains led

This is wonderful. Steam and the railroad was supplied. Its construction began in the county in 1835, and it was finished from Pliiladelphia to Reading in 1838, and to Pottsville in 1842. Manufactures. The various trades com-

gress

to

was very slow,

a change, and by

if

physical energy was to

it,

One of

be somewhat relieved.

ments of nature was place of the

common

the great ele-

to be substituted

in the

road and turnpike in order

demands of trade as developed water was to become a high-

to

satisfy the

by

this discovery

way and

not imperceptible.



the boat a conveyance.

ment of a country

!

required a railroad

;



mon

to every industrious

ried

on successfully in Reading from the begin-

community were

car-

In the upper regions of the Schuylkill coal ing of this period. The previous history of the But it town for thirty years had developed industrial had been discovered as early as 1770. was not mined successfully till the lapse of life to such a degree as to give the people a good Its Afler it began to be mined start under a new political management. forty years later. in large quantities, the ordinary wagon, capable extent, beyond enumeration of the several ocof carrying but a few tons, became impracticable cuijations, could not be ascertained. There was The newspaper that for the purpose of carrying it many miles over no place to look for it. mouutains and through gorges. This process great chronicler of all things, that grand historian was laborious, slow and costly. A way had to of events had not yet-arrived. But the people





be found to

make

its.

transportation

laborious and costly, and to hasten

much

its

less

delivery.

This way was afforded soon afterward by the Schuylkill Navigation the

demand.

Company.

It began

to

It

came with

carry coal, lumber,

merchandise and produce in 1818, and every year, for several decades afterward, demonstrated its

great

Its

utility.

traffic

increased

from

had

order to live and grow and thrive.

making ing

being doubtless witliout a thought con-

it,

cerning

it.

The employments of of Reading

They made

of one hundred and eight miles,

ished

for traffic,

other, in 182o.

— and

—from

was finthrough from one end to the

to Philadelphia,

Its success stimulated a similar

enterprise througii the

Lebanon Valley from

the Schuylkill to the Susquehanna. This latter

scheme

for a

highway by navigation had been

projected more than

fifty

years before, but

it

the people gave

industrial condition with

period

Mount Carbon

They were

history for themselves, but not preserv-

The

lengtii

for its introduction, for

Their only thought was to do in

its utility.

hundreds of tons to hundreds of thousands. canal extended along the Schuylkill for a

way

to prepare the

under favorable auspices.

the borough self-dependent and self-

sustaining.

They produced numerous

such as hats,

i-opes,

articles,

chains, carpets, coverlets,

home-spun material,

clocks,

them an

which to begin a new

barrels,

castings,

earthen-ware, boots and shoes, wagons and carriages, etc.,

whiskey a

stituted

build

in

a

must not forget to add, These congood foundation upon which to and,

rich

I

great

quantities.

and

attractive

super-structure

READING. during the two generations that were to follow. manufactured

Tiie

were produced by

articles

hand during the entire period. was introduced about 1836 but

Steam-power

Aud

articles.

was applied

it

;

almost entirely

the manufacture

to

of

about that time the industry

And

in

It

the introduction of steam.

followed

naturally

gradually thereafter this important labor-

saving agent was utilized in the manufacture of building materials, hats, ropes,

way was

The

etc.

Hams Wheat

2209 barrels

Brandy Linseed Iron

329 dozens

Hats

Wheat

Flour

the beginning of

traffic

its

of the borough from

history

was

To

large.

af-

an idea of the nature and extent of the

ford

shipments

made within

the

first

twenty-five

of this period at certain times, the

years

lowing

statistics

are presented.

The

named were shipped

to Philadelphia

store-house of Garber

&

by

from the on the

flat-boats

river .Schuylkill.

Tiiere wereotherstore-housesinReading from

which

large

quantities

of

February

50 J tons

Linseed

3320 barrels 105 tons 11

oil

4J

Butter

9

Bruiidy

"

6,

1802.

1201 barrels

Wheat

1425 bushels

Bar iron

17 tons

Whiskey

1492 gallons 365 pounds

Butter

Snuff

500

Hats

500

March

9,

1809.

1655 barrels

1000 bushels

:

Butter

700 pounds

Brandy

5 hhds



Merchajjts of Reading, 1830. A large amount of business was transacted in Reading about 1830.

At

that time the greater part

done on North Fifth

"

23 gallons.

Paper

3 tons. "

Hams

79 dozens

Wheat

18,135 bushels

:

was

Flour

3150 barrels

Brandy

1761 gallons oil

886

"

22 tons

Paper

6

"

Butter

6

"

The more promi-

nent merchants are mentioned in the following

~t'

Hardware,

etc.

Benneville Keim, Fifth and Washington. John M. Keim & Co., Fifth and Penn.

John

1796.

Street.

statement

li

Hats

Iron

21 tons

200 bushels

"'

Beeswax

Linseed

380 barrels

jMarch

Wheat

Iron

153 barrels

1256 gallons

Flour

And

179.5.

274 casks

lard

Pork Brandy Bread Paper Corn

Flour

various articles.

13, 1798.

1807.

1,

4695 barrels

Iron

goods were also

then, too, teams were busy in transporting

June

13,198 bushels

shipped to Philadelphia- in the same manner.

Flour

15, 1807, to

fol-

articles

StrohecUer, during the

and times stated

years

7957 bushels

— Reading Adler, February

Butter and

canals by water for ten years.

—The

66 tons 5 " " 2i

Paper

Wheat

Traffic.

6209 gallons " 875

oil

life.

twenty years, and

"

10,465 bushels

Flour

standing the fact that turnpikes had encouraged at least

•'

1

1797.

1836 the borough contained no strong and rich manufacturing enterprises, notwithfor

IV

178 dozens

Hats

Before

trade overland

2i tons. ,

Butter rail-

the stimulating influence which caused

development of this great industrial

the

Delir Holz Beeswax

iron

began with commendable enterprise.

iron

675

&

Daniel Keim, Third and Penn.

Keim &

Drenkel, Penn, above Fifth.

Allgaier

&

Dry-Goods, &c.

Wm.

Feather, Sixth and Penn.

Raiguel

&

Co.,

Penn, between Fourth and

Fifth.

W. &

J.

Ermentrout, Fifth, near Washington.

:

HISTORY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

676

John Hanold, G.

D.

Fifth, near

The dry-goods

Walnut.

& D. Boyer, Fifth, near Washinxton. & W. Fiihthorn, Fifth, near Washington.

David Bright,

Fifth, near

And

Washington.

Sholl, Penn,

on

business

to $280,000.

1839 there were thirty-two licensed

in

inn-keepers, distributed as follows

Philip Ziegler, Ninth and Penn.

Samuel

carried

stores

amounting annually

below Ninth.

Penn

Washington

17

Street

Street

Daniel Seifert, Seventh and Penn.

Turnpike

John Young, Fifth, above Washington. Seifert & Mannerbaek, Fifth, above Penn.

Rolling-mill...

2

Seventh Street N. Fifth Street

Franklin Street

2

S. Fifth Street

George Repplier, Penn, above Fourth. Hain & Green, Penn, below Fourth. W. & I. Eckert, Fourth and Penn. David Morris, Fifth, below Franklin. John Schwartz, Penn, above Fifth. William Moore, Penn, above Fifth. Elisha Weils, Penn, above Fifth. Lewis J. PauH, Penn, below Fifth. JVilliam P. Orrick, Fifth and Penn. Wm. Jones, Penn, below Fourth.

1

4

country districts the licensed places numbered

195 33,

;

In 1844, Keading,

total in county, 227.

and country

190

districts,

total,

;

223.

DLSTIXGUISHED VISITORS. J,

John Penn.

—John Penn

April, 1788, whilst on his

Penn, above

Third.

O'Brien & Foster, boots and shoes, Fifth and Penn. Joseph Green, groceries, etc., Penn, near Front. Peter Nagle, groceries, etc., Penn, below Ninth.

William Green, groceries, etc., Si.xth and Penn. William Zieber, hats, etc., Penn, above Fourth. Samuel Bell, flour and feed, Cherry, above Fifth. William Bell & Son, bolting cloths, etc., Penn, above Fifth. David Rhein, cabinet wareroom, Penn, above Second. Dr. G. G. Bischoff", apothecary, Penn, below Seventh. Mrs. Morris, apothecary, Penn, above Fourth. William Mannerbaek, jeweler, Penn, above Fifth. Frederick Kellogg, clocks, Fourth and Penn. Benjamin Witman, brushes, Penn, above Fifth.

visited

Reading

in

way from

PhiladelAfter leaving the " Black

phia to Harrisburg. shoes,

4

In the

Oyster-saloons were in abundance.

Miscellaneous.

John H. Weitzel, boots and

1

1

Hor.?e " (Inn), now Douglassville, where he " baited " his horses, he " passed on thro' a series

of higher

hills,

breaking the horizon with

le.ss

harmony, and resembling somewhat more Pelion

upon Ossa. Near Reading, into which I walked two miles, sending on my horses, I met a

for

person on horseback and questioned him con-

cerning the chiefly to

Manor

examine

here,

at

I

as

leisure

had alighted

my own

ground.

He

showed the fertile valleys and low place.s, which were all settled by encroachers, and the rocky and barren mountains they left unsettled. The town is finely situated on the Schuylkill, surrounded at a distance and sheltered by the.se mountains. Dinner was ordered at one Wit-

& Good, confectionery, Penn, below Sixth. man's, who provefl the only tavern-keeper who Occupations ix 1839. In 1839 the bor- had not lately petitioned against the confirmaough contained the following store.?, trades- tion of the proprietary estate. His accommodaLukins



people, mechanics,

worthy of a respectable country town, and I dined heartily upon catfish, which the river plentifully affords." This was on the 7th tions were

etc.:

Saddlers

4

Dry-goods

3

Tin- workers

S

Hardware

3

Butchers

fl

of April.

Groceries

o

Brick-makers

8

residents called to

4

On

Stores

General Drugs

')4

32

Plasterers

4

Cabinet-makers

H.ats

7

Boat-builders

Shoes

7

Confections

4

Chair-makers Coppersmiths

Carpenters

16

Silversmiths

Blacksmiths

12

M.".sons

13

T.iilors

16

Bakers Locksmiths Coopers

Clock-niRkers

7

Coach-makers

6

Barbers

During the day pay

a

number of

their respects

to

the

him.

the 8th he, with the company of Judge James Biddle and Daniel Clymer, Esq., both of 4 Reading, visited the ferry which the Penns had " A dinner was rented to one Levan. 2 2 provided for us at Mr. Riddle's, the honors of 2 the table done in part by jNIrs. Collins, his 2 daughter, and his unmarried one present. They 2 Mr. Bidare of low stature, but rather pretty. 6 die appears an amiable character. It was men5

4

.

.

.

READING. tinned

of about £3,000

subscription

a

that

currency would remove

tlie

obstructions of the

much that the trade and proptown would most rapidly increase.

Schuylkill so erty of the

Another plan much sooner

to be executed

establishment of a school.

United lic

— In His

States.

the

trustees are to

£100 currency per annum."

allow the teacher

Lafayette.

The

is

'

182-4 Lafayette visited the visit

occasioned great pub-

demonstrations of affection and esteem for

He

him throughout the country.

arrived at

677

Van Buren's United

States,

Visit.

—The President of

Martin Van Buren,

the

Read-

visited

ing on Tuesday, June 25, 1839, whilst on his

way from Harrisburg from

committee

Many

Womelsdorf.

parts of the county

A

to Easton.

borough

the

citizens

— some

met from

special

him

at

different

others

in vehicles,



on horse-back and afoot formed a procession on the turnpike, some distance west of the " Harrisburg

Bridge,"

and united with the

in escorting the distinguished visitor

committee

of August. The news into Reading. He w;is certainly pleased to reReading on the following ceive a generous welcome from the thriving day and it awakened great joy throughout the town on the Schuylkill, which three years betown. Ringing bells, martial music and thun- fore had given him such a handsome political

New York (if

on the

IGtli

his arrival reached

dering cannon were heard

all

authorities assembled on the

appropriate

resolutions

The borough

day.

18th and passed

respecting the distin-

support^ as nearly four to one against Gen.

W.

H. Harrison. The procession paraded through

The

the prominent streets.

President rode on

guished visitor, and in the evening the town

a handsome cream-colored horse, the property

Nearly

of a Mr. Dewees, from Oley, and his graceful

presented

a magnificent appearance.

every house on the prominent streets was

bril-

was estimated that ten were displayed. Triumphal

liantly illuminated

thousand lights

;

it

at

residence of

jjlaces, and a large torchlight procession paraded about the town, accompanied by the " Reading

creditable

A

Rose, Esq.

copy of the resolutions which were adopted

by the borough authorities was transmitted to He acknowledged its receipt by the following letter, addressed to the president of the Borough Council General Lafayette.

" Herr's Hotel."

During the

'

evening a reception was held for him

arches were erected across the streets at several

Band" and marshaled by Daniel

He

horsemanship attracted general attention. sojourned

Samuel

Bell, Esq.,

representation " assembled

He

him honor.

at

the

and " a highly to

show

for whicli was single then reason " the beauty of Reading " comprised the conspicuous, if not the major part of the repre;

and doubtless made

sentation,

He

highly creditable.

left for

it

—as reported

Easton via Kutz-

town on the following morning, a number of citizens having accompanied him

prominent

Reading naturally took a high pride for Van Buren had, in the prerespected citizens and council of Reading have been vious year, paid a great compliment to the much retarded, I hope they will be received with borough i« the selection of a popular, generous that indulgence and friendly feeling to which your Hon. Henry A. kindness has authorized me to apply. The testi- and much-loved citizen, the monies of esteem and friendship which have been be- Muhlenberg, to be the first minister plenipostowed on me in the borough of Reading have made tentiary to Austria. "

"Sir.

Washingtox, February

5,

1825.

— Altho' the expressions of my gratitude to the

my heart a deep imi^ression. Be pleased, sir, and gentlemen, to accept a tribute of these sentiments and of my high respect. Lafayette. " To Peter Nagle, Jr., Esq., Reading." u|>on

Whilst Lafayette was cipient of public city's

at Philadelphia, the re-

welcome and honors as the the Reading Battalion of

noble guest,

thither.

in this visit

;

Scott's Visit.

—Gen. Winficld Scott

Reading on Saturday, great " Military

County

militia,

May

21, 1842,

visited

during a

Encampment " of the Berks He was on the " Commons."



2 The vote was in Reading, Van Buren, fourteen hundred and twelve Harrison, three hundred and ninety-four. In Berks County Van Buren, forty-nine hundred and sixtyseven Harrison, fifteen hundred and eighty-three. ;

troops partici2:)ated in the great demonstrations.

,



;

'John Penn's Journal, tory, vol.

iii.

p.

286-288.

in Pennsylvania

Magazine of His-

'Now and Hotel."

for years

past called

the " United States

:

HISTOKY OF BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

678

accompanied by his

and Carney.

(Seventli

station

Lieutenants Alden

aids,

and Chestnut

by a

Streets)

on and about eleven o'clock the Procession began, moving along Penn

Washington. The Military formed their

Tiiey were met at the railroad

Arms reversed,

Herr's

to

Hotel, where they were cordially welcomed and

Many

])roperIy entertained.

citizens followed

On Monday,

parade.

the

where

it

to Prince street; thence to the

Church,

Masons

were awarded for

shooting.

skillful

carried

Judges of the

Common

Pleas.

Justices of Peace.

General

Attorneys.

was much pleased with the discipline and and he paid

Scott

appearance of the encampment

and sword, by four Masons.

Bier, with a hat

During the day medals

encampment.

in form.

Clergy. left

on the next day for Panville, to review a similar

German Lutheran

in the following order

he

23d,

reviewed the troops at the encampment, and

in line, leaning

to receive the Bier,

west as far as the corner of the Centre Square, cro.ssed Penn street and proceeded eastward

street,

detachment of military and escorted

the

:

Physicians.

;

Citizens.

a special compliment to the " Reading Artiller-

He

ists."

was particularly and favorably im-

pressed with their captain, tall,

Military.

Thomas

Music playing dead march and Bells tolling. " Having arrived at the Church the Bier was placed

Leoser, a

finely-proportioned and charming, social

Numerous ticians,

other ]irominent officials and poli-

both national and State, visited Reading

before 1847, but there was no public demonstration.

Some spoke

at political meetings

campaigns,

Presidential

— including

during

such

as

Harrison, Buchanan, Webster and Dallas.

MEMORIAL SERVICES.



AVashington's Death. Washington, it is .said, visited Reading some time before his 1799.

death, in

He

sojourned at the Federal

The ceremonies commenced with

the Centre.

in

man.

solemn music. The Rev. M. Lehman made suitable prayers and afterwards delivered an animated discourse adapted to the Occasion, from Revelation 2nd chapter, 7th verse. At the conclusion of which the Bier was taken through the Church and the ceremonies ended with the firing of three vollies over it. " The Procession then returned in the same order, drums unmuffled and playing Washington's March, to the place from whence they started, and dispersed."

Harrison's

Death.

— The

death

of

General William H. Harrison,' whilst Presi-

dent of the United States, caused a public Inn (now the Farmers' Bank building), and It was the subject expression of sorrow. was given, whilst here, a " grand reception." of a "day of prayer" in Reading on 14th The event was celebrated by a ball, at which May, 1841. The military, literary and benefinumerous citizens presented themselves to show cial societies assembled in Trinity Lutheran their high respect for him. His death was sinChurch to show their public regard for the cerely mourned by all the people of Reading memory of the distinguished general and statestiie newspapers w'ere clothed in heavy black man. The church was crowded and many perborders and, to demonstrate iu a public manner Rev. R. U. Morsons were unable to enter. their great sorrow for his death and great rever;

;

ence for his name, they held funeral .services

on Sunday, Jaiuiary

5,

1800.

The following

report a])peared in the WeeJdy Advertiser of

January

1

1th

gan,

rector

of

Christ's

Epi.scopal

preached an approjjriate sermon. vices

Church,

In the

sei'-

he was assisted by Rev. Jacob Miller, of

Trinity Lutheran Church, and Rev. William

:

"

Funeral Procession

honor of Lit'Utenaiit-Goneral George Washington, the late illustrious Commander-in-chief of all the Armies of the United States of America. " On Sunday last, arrangements having been previously made by a Committee of the Free Miisons, the inhabitants of this borough met at the House of Mr. Henry Boyer to make a suitable Mark of Respect to the Memory of our Great, Good iwid admirable

German Reformed Church. Change of Names. — Upon the out of the town the streets were named

Pauli, of

Streets,

" In

laying



as follows

Kasi and West.

Penn, extending through the centre of town. I

He

died April

the 4th of

4,

1841, having just been inaugurated on

March previous.

BEADING. To the To the

north,

Thomas and Margaret.

and Hamilton. North and South (crossing the streets named at right south, Richard

angles).

King.

Earl.

Queen.

Clement. Lord. Vigour.

Callowhill.

Prince.

Duke.

These names were contirmed

till

changedbythe

Borougli Council on 6th of August, 1833.

names then substituted were having been retained

as follows,

The Penn

:

— Liberty, Washington and Walnut. South, — Cherry, Franklin and ChestAcross Penn, — Third, Fourth, Niirth of Penn,

Fifth, Sixth,

nut.

Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh

;

and what had been for a time called Bridge and Treat were then changed to Front and Second.

A year previous (in 1832) the borough were graded, according

streets to

of the

regulation,

by Enoch Lewis. On October 18, 1845, the Councils named the follo\\ing alleys, extending, North

fruui Liberty

679

HISTOKY OF BEKKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.

680

walked nearly seventy miles to see the execu; but, having fallen asleep shortly before the

tion

execution transpired, she did not

was over, when she

it

cried

most

wake up

till

Bailey exhibited a menagerie of thirty living

wikl animals, including a lion and lioness, Arabian camels (male and female), llamas (male

and female), hyena, kangaroo,

bitterly.'



tiger,

leopard and

Cox AXD SCHILDT ExECUTIOXS. In 1809 Susanna Cox, a young woman under twenty

panther.

years old, was found guilty of causing the death

panied by a lady, a.scendcd from Reading in a

on the Gehr farm, near the " Oley Line Tavern," and hanged for

year he

of her illegitimate child

The

the offense.

execution created a profound

sensation throughout the county.

A

lengthy

and graphic account of the proceedings connected with her trial and execution was lately published in the Reading Daily Eagle (January

The newspapers

In December, 18.38, William PaiiHii, accom-

named "Comet," and iu the following made two successful ascensions. Joshua Pusey (a pupil of Paulin's) made an ascension

balloon

September 14, 1850, landing at Piiiladelphia in three hours, and on October 5th following he

made

another, landing near Allentown in one

hour and ten minutes.

Eeading, iu

Circuses gave numerous exhibitions and they

1809), contained little relating to the affair. In 181.'5 Jqhn Schildt was executed for kill-

were well patronized, and traveling dramatic

188G).

24,

ing, in a brutal in

manner,

at

his father

and mother,

troupes visited Reading, remaining a week at a time.

This was the most shock-

Alsace township.

PROMIXEXT MEX.

ing murder that ever occurred in this county.

In 1842 Nicolaus Reinhardt was hanged for murdering Conrad Christ in Bern township. Early ExHiBixroxs. Exhibitions were held at Reading at an early day. Reference to



some

will be

made

show

to

In January, 1799, a

in

There were a nimiber of prominent men Reading during its history as a borough the various avenues of business and pro-

fessional

Salauca

'life.

A

number of

chapters entitled

the

in

their character.

man named

at

politics,

sketches appear

militia,

newspapers,

judiciary and medical, in which

many of

room, consisting of legerdemain performances

them came to serve with distinction. John Keim. Among the men who occu-

by himself,

pied a very prominent position in the business

gave a "curious exhibition" in Barr's ball-

by a learned dog and a

tricks

play of fire-works. cents

;

Tickets for adults,

disfifty



and

social

of

affairs

Reading,

during

this

period for thirty years, by reason of his success

for children, twenty-five cents.

merchant and of his large accumulation of

In June, 1808, an elephant eight years old and seven feet high, was exhibited at the publichouse of Daniel Feger advertised as the only

as a

elfphant then in the country.

He was born in Oley township July 6, 1749, and when six years old accompanied his father

;

Admission, twenty-

five cents.

On

August

1,

1815, a whale was exhibited

at the public-house of five

thousand pounds.

November In

in

to

the Delaware, at Trenton, on

The evidence

to Susanna, a

In the

with

of

fall

Lieutenant-Colonel

Lotz's battalion to reinforce the

1777

1831,

Purdy, Carley

&

years,

was honorably discharged

at the trial at

Reading showed

acqui'.ted because the constable, in breaking

open her

trunk, had found a quantity of clothing for an infant.

his return

he entered

army under five

in 1782.

from the Revolutionary

War

with

his

business

into

he

Nicholas

General Washington, and, after serving

that she had thrown the child into the Schuylkill, but she

was

was married

1771.

1.5,

marched

Upon

child.

He

Reading.

tober

This whale

Autobiograpliy of Charles BiUille, pp. 102-194. On p. 202 cfise is mentioned of a young single woman who murdered

her

was the only

Admission, twelve and

1

fi

He

daughter of Dr. George de Benneville, on Oc-

11, 1814.

November,

John Keim.

son of Nicholas Keim, a merchant of Reading.

William Jones, weight,

one-half cents; children, half price.

was caught

property, was

relations

father in conducting a general hardware-store,

and, several years afterward, became sole proprietor.

About

partnership

the year

with

his

1

two

800 he formed a cosous, Daniel and

KEADIXG. George, and they together conducted the busi-

John Keini

ness under the firra-naiue of

&

He

during whicli time he amassed a large fortune, which never caused a widow's tear or orphan's execration.

Sons for a number of years. from 1787 to 1790, and filled the office of burReading for a time. He took an activ'e

.

.

.

What he

"

served one term as a county commissioner,

681

left behind him was justly his own. was ever lenient, and his numerous tenantry can testify to his goodness as a landlord."

As a

has

creditor he

gess of

in the

jiart

internal

John McKnight was

development of Reading through

improvements

He

dwelling-houses.

the most prominent

of banker at Reading during this period, having was prominently ideuti- been the first cashier of a bank established at Reading, and continued active in this business

and

the

erection

the borough was incorporated into a city,

till

and

He

for several years afterward.

was a

native of East Nantmeal township, in Chester

His

May

was born

County, where he

Paul McKnight, came to

father,

31,

1774.

this

coun-

try in 1752, from the northern part of Ireland,

and

settled

age of

Chester

in

twenty-three

service of the Pennsylvania phia,

1808.

At

the

entered

the

County.

years

he

Bank,

at Philadel-

and continued there for ten years, till During the latter part of his service he

Then a branch bank Reading and he was sent

acted as assistant cashier.

was established

at

He

here to officiate as cashier. sponsible position 185fi,

period

a

During

held this re-

his death, on

till

co