Growth of Muslim Population in Medieval India (A.D. 1000-1800)

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GROWTH OF

HUSLIH POPULATION IN

MEDIEVAL INDIA

K. S.

LAI

ffoTcJSPr «f llislory UnsvcTSlty of Jodfipcf

BLS£AI!CL{

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SEIJI

Br

tie ssr.e eathet

Histcrr ol tin Khaliis Twilight o! tho Sultanate

Muslim State in India Studios In Medioval Indian Histniy Studies in Asian Histoiy (Ed.)

ill

RIGHTS RESERVED, 1973

Rs 40.00



PRIKTEO IK IHDIA

PeMishfd by RESEARCH fUBUCATTpNS

DtW-6 and^'inlcd

at R.

P.

PfRjjetl,

in

Social

TS26-B.

Sciences, 2/3puladon ha-j b-cen

tins

A'lrea.

is

rdinast

times from centemporary sources has

in medieva!

been an uphill

of pre-census times can be based only on estimates and estimates by their very nature tend to be tentative. In our computation, however, sufTicient historical Besides, any study of population

task.

evidence has been forthcoming for any demographic behaviour.

nothing more.

and

direct

I

have

indirect

at

least

evidence leading

fairly

to

mediev.a! Indian population, although the

good estimates of

estimates themselves

may

hope that the magnitude and delicacy of the task would make the

not always be invulnerable to challenge. uniqueness,

If

been able to collect in one place

However

I

reader indulgent and the critic tolerant. In this stiidj turies

I

have found

it

fruitful

of the medieval period into four

to

divide the eight cen-

of two centuries each, well as the growth of

parts

and study the overall population as Muslim numbers separately for the periods A. D. 1000 to 1200, 1200 to 1400, 1400 to 1600, and 1600 to 1800, These bench-marks are not as arbitrary' or unscientific as they look. The year 1000 saw the introduction of Muslims in the cis-Indus region consequent upon the invarious from Ghazni. 1200 witnessed the establishment of Turkish rule and 1400 its decline. Akbar’s Age came to a close by about 1600. The two last centuries witnessed the peak of glory and the nadir of decline of Muslim power in India. A number of friends, belonging to the University ofDelhi where. this study was carried out, helped and encouraged me in completing' the work. Professor Donald F.Lach of the University of Chicago and a Visiting Professor in the Department of History, Delhi University, duting the year 1967-68, gave me some Dcmograph'c Tables of European cities prepared for his own use. Dr. Ashish Bose. Professor of Demography in the Institute of Economic Growth, -went through the first draft of the book, lent ready advice on many points, and helped me in preparing Tables and Diagrams. Dr. Suren Navalakha of the Asian Research Centre placed at my disposal some very valuable material on the growth of Muslim population in Bengal. Dr. Feroz Ahmad of the Physics Department ungrudg-

me some calculations on the electronic comH. C. Varma was kind enough to prepare the Index. and many others not mentioned here I owe a debt of

ingly carried out for

puter, and Dr.

To

all

these

jjratitude.

K. S. Lai

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Total Popftlftlton of jMcdfcval Tndi^,^

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in. Total Population— PrC'lOOOposUion IV.'A.O. .1000*1200 1200/1400

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'1400* 1600'' *

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