Glass Stamps and Weights (Oxbow Classics in Egyptology) 9798888570081, 9798888570098, 888857008X

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Glass Stamps and Weights (Oxbow Classics in Egyptology)
 9798888570081, 9798888570098, 888857008X

Table of contents :
Cover
Book Title
Copyright
Contents
1 Introduction
2
Roman period
3
Byzantine period
4
Omayyad period
5
Abbasid period
6 Stamps and heavy weights
7.Fatimite period
8.The Makers
9.Weights with private names
10 Dates of private workers
11 The weight standards, Roman
12 The kharrubeh
13 The fels
14 The dinar and dirhem
15 Recutting of dies
16 Accuracy of standard and copies
17 Colours of glass stamps
18 Great families of the viiith and ixth centuries
19 The heavier weights
20 Catalogue, pl. 1. Roman stamps
21 Roman coin weights
22 Pl. iii nos. 86–125; 680–740 A.D
23 Pl. v ” 126–153; 727–775
24 Pl. vii ” 154–180; 754–769
25 Pl. ix ” 181–204; 769–780
26 Pl. xi ” 205–236; 780–853
27 Pl. xiii ” 237–286; 856–905
28 Pl. XV ” 287–379; 946–1020
29 Pl. xvii ” 380–479; 996–1035
30 Pl. xix ” 480–592; 1035–1101
31 Pl. xxi ” 593–664; 1101–1259
Backcover

Citation preview

0000DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD0DDD0DDDDD00DDDDDD00DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD0DD0DDC

€it

OXBOW CLASSICS IN EGYPTOLOGY

GLASS STAMPS AND WEIGHTS

W M. FLINDERS PETRIE

DD00DDDDDD00DDDD0DDD0DDDDDDDDDDDDD0D0D0000DDDD00DDD000D0D0DDDDDDD0DDDDDC

GLASS ST AMPS AND WEIGHTS

SIR W . M. FLINDERS PETRIE

f"1 OXBOW

I books

Oxford & Philadelphia

This edition published in the United Kingdom in 2023 by OXBOW BOOKS The Old Music Hall, 106–108 Cowley Road, Oxford, OX4 1JE and in the United States by OXBOW BOOKS 1950 Lawrence Road, Havertown, PA 19083 © Oxbow Books 2023 Paperback Edition: ISBN 979-8-88857-008-1 Digital Edition: ISBN 979-8-88857-009-8 (epub) First published by the British School of Archaeology in Egypt, 1926 Facsimile edition published in 1974 by Aris & Phillips Ltd Oxbow Books is grateful to the Petrie Museum for their collaboration in bringing out these new editions All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission from the publisher in writing.

Printed in the United Kingdom by CMP Digital Print Solutions

For a complete list of Oxbow titles, please contact: United Kingdom Oxbow Books Telephone (0)1226 734350 Email: [email protected] www.oxbowbooks.com United States of America Oxbow Books Telephone (610) 853-9131, Fax (610) 853-9146 Email: [email protected] www.casemateacademic.com/oxbow Oxbow Books is part of the Casemate Group

Front cover: Stamped glass weight with Arabic inscription from the Petrie Museum collection, provenance unknown. Egyptian Islamic Period (c. 750–753AD). Petrie Museum UC23013. Image courtesy of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian and Sudanese Archaeology, UCL.

CONTE~TS l'AfiE

SECT. 1.

2.

3. 4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9. 10. J 1.

12.

13. 14. 15. r6. 17. 18.

19. 20, 2 I. 22. 23. 24.

25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 3o. 3t. 32.

Intrucl uction . Roma n p1:riod . . Byzantine period. Omayyad period . Abbasid period . Stamps and heavy weights Fatimite period . . . . . . . . The Makers . . . . . . . . . . . \Vcights wilh private names Dates of private worke rs .. ThC' wc-ight standards, Roma11 The kharrubeh . . . . . The fcls . . . . . . . . . nw dinar and dirhem Rccutting of dies . . . Accuracy of standard :mcl copie:-; Colours of glass stamps . . . . . . Great families of thr \'iiilh and ixlh centuries The heavier weights Ca/11fot;11e, pl. !. Roman stamps . Roman coin weights .. .. Pl. iii nos. 86--125; 680 740 ,\.D. Pl. ,. I 26-153; 727 - 775 " 154-180; Pl. vii 75+- 769 f'l. ix 181-204; 769- 780 Pl. xi 205 236; 780-853 Pl. xiii 237-286; S56-905 Pl. xv 287- 379; 946- rn20 " Pl. xvii 380 479; 996- 1035 Pl. xix 480- 592: 1035-1 IO( Pl. xxi 593-664; 1101-1259 Pl. xxiii 665 720; Private

2

3

5 5 6

7 8 9

9

9 IO JO

10 IO

11 12.

13 14 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26

LIST OF PLATES i'LA'l'E

PAGF.S

I. Glass stamps, Roman age.

.........

II, ID. Glass weights and stamps, 680-740 A.D. IV, V. ,, " " VI, VU. " " " " " VIII, IX. 1) ,, " " X, XI. n " " " XII, XIII. " weights, " " " XIV, XV. Glass Fatimite XVI, XVII. n ",, " XVIII, XIX. n " XX,XXI. I)

727- 775

761-769 769-785 780-853 856-905 946-1020 996- 1035 rn35-1101 I l0f-i259

" . Private XXIV. \Vr:ights of dinar and dirhem XXV. Dates of rulers and stampers XX VI. Register of heavier weights

xxu, XXIII.

n

" Monograms.

Owing to changes in arrangement on pl. xi, 212 is of Dagely, Delhem; El Motaccm 219 is not numbered, nor copied on pl. x.

r' 2, 14

3, 4. 4, 5, 5,

15 16 I7

18 19

5, 20 6, 2 [ 6, 23 7, 24 7, 25 7, 26 2, 9

7 13 213

of

PREFACE TO THE 2023 EDITION In the 1970s, a much-anticipated new series of publications illustrated objects and themes related to the excavations of the archaeologist William Matthew Flinders Petrie (1853–1942) in Egypt, and aspects of the collection of University College London’s Petrie Museum of Egyptian and Sudanese Archaeology. A young couple setting up in business in the early 1970s, Aris and Phillips published these works, written by members of the UCL Egyptology Department, in their Modern Egyptology series. Building on Petrie’s own observations, the authors of these volumes aimed to complete the great task of publishing the Petrie Museum of Egyptian and Sudanese Archaeology’s vast collection, and to present some of the research that Petrie himself was not able to address in his own published works during his lifetime. As the current Curator of the Petrie Museum, it is a great privilege for me to support Oxbow Books in their mission to republish the series, which remains a key source of information for all those interested in object-based approaches to the study of the ancient world. The Petrie Museum, part of University College London (UCL), is home to one of the largest and most significant collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. Free to visit, this extraordinary collection tells stories about the lives of ordinary people who lived along the Nile Valley thousands of years ago. Originally set up as a teaching collection, the Petrie Museum comprises over 80,000 objects housed together with an internationally important archaeological archive. It is a collection of world firsts and ‘oldests’: the oldest woven garment; the oldest worked iron objects; the first known depiction of loom weaving; the oldest known written document about women’s health; the earliest veterinary treatise; the oldest will on paper. The Museum has Designated Status from Arts Council England, meaning that it is considered to have outstanding resonance and national cultural significance. The collection has a substantial, visible international reputation for research, supporting hundreds of researchers every year, both remotely and in person. The Petrie Museum is named after Flinders Petrie, who was appointed in 1892 as the first Professor of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology in the UK at UCL. Over three-quarters of the material in the Museum comes from excavations directed or funded by Petrie, or from purchases he made for university teaching. In 1880 at

the age of 26, Petrie travelled to Egypt to survey the Great Pyramid. For the next five decades he was at the forefront of the development of archaeology in Egypt and later in Palestine, and his detailed methodological approach continues to shape the discipline today. Petrie worked at more sites, with greater speed, than any modern archaeologist: seeing his life as a mission of rescue archaeology, Petrie aimed to retrieve as much information as possible from sites that were shrinking dramatically in size as Egypt modernised during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He published a large part, but not all, of the finds from his excavations in his illustrated typological volumes, arranged according to object types and themes. Today, much of the Petrie Museum’s collection is displayed and stored in a way which reflects these publications: for example, several storage cupboards are dedicated to the material illustrated in the ‘Objects of Daily Use’ volume, and objects in the drawers are arranged according to the order of the published plates. This offers a unique opportunity for researchers to engage with Petrie’s typological and methodical approach to archaeology, as well as with the history of museum collections. The first catalogue to be published in the Modern Egyptology series was Amarna: City of Akhenaten and Nefertiti in 1972 by Julia Samson, Petrie Museum Honorary Research Assistant. As official publishers to the UCL Egyptology Department the series went on to produce facsimile reprints of eight of Flinders Petrie’s most important site reports and many of his object catalogues, originally published through the British School of Archaeology in Egypt. The substantial annual royalties from these reprints were paid into the ‘Petrie Fund’ at the time, which provided special grants to students in financial need. In many ways, the new reprints of this classic series can be seen as the latest layer in a vast ‘publication stratigraphy’ of the thousands of finds from Flinders Petrie’s excavations, which now live in museum collections around the world. On reading these volumes, I hope that readers will also be inspired to learn more about the Petrie Museum collection and its fascinating history. Dr Anna Garnett Petrie Museum of Egyptian and Sudanese Archaeology, University College London January 2023 v

PUBLISHER’S PREFACE Oxbow Books is pleased to present this title in our Classics in Egyptology series. This series of facsimile re-issues is comprised of two sub-series. The first consists of 16 typological catalogues produced by W.M. Flinders Petrie based on his massive collection of Egyptian artefacts. Mostly excavated by Petrie during many seasons of campaign in the last years of the 19th and early decades of the 20th century, they now reside in the Petrie Museum at University College London. Published between 1898 and 1937 and long out of print, the catalogues were re-issued in facsimile by publishers Aris and Phillips in the 1970s. These were followed in the next 15 years or so by publication of a number of newly commissioned titles, based on more recent examination of elements of the Petrie Collection by contemporary experts, under the name Modern Egyptology. A selection of these additional titles forms the second component of our own series. The archaeology of Egypt continues to fascinate. Multi-​disciplinary investigation and research continues unabated, encompassing methodologies, scientific and data processing techniques, theoretical approaches, and even whole paradigms that were unheard of in the 1970s and undreamt of when Petrie was working in Egypt. Yet all the titles included in this series continue to be invaluable sources of basic data, providing an unparalleled resource that can easily be cross-­ referenced with the actual materials they describe and discuss. They remain within the Petrie Collection where they may be accessed and re-examined as new research flourishes. As historic documents, the Petrie

vi

catalogues stand as exemplars of the craft of typological classification, the backbone of modern archaeology – much of which, though refined by absolute dating and another 100 years of research, still stands the test of time.

A note on presentation The facsimile titles of Petrie’s catalogues re-issued in the 1970s were produced from scans of the original publications. Scanning technology at that time was not of the standard or resolution of today. The scans are no longer available, nor has it been possible to obtain, and in doing so destroy, original copies of the Petrie catalogues. These titles have therefore, of necessity, been rescanned from the 1970s re-issues. Where necessary the pages have been digitally enhanced for clarity of reading and to ensure the good quality of the plates, though inevitably a few are not of the standard we might wish, because of the quality of the previous scan, and occasional blocks of text are not precisely ‘straight’ or evenly situated on the page. However, some pages in the 1970s re-issues had been inserted in the wrong order and this has been corrected. The originals were produced at a folio size. The pages have been reduced slightly to standard A4 for ease of shelving and because this has the effect of slightly improving the scanned images. In some cases, illustrations were presented to scale and the original scale is given on the plate. There were also no digital files available for titles included in the Modern Egyptology series, so these too have been scanned from printed copies.

GLASS STAMPS AND WEIGHTS. ,dth

[NTRonUCT10N I.

THe making

of glass

discs

die is peculiarly Egyptian. and

stamped

by a

there seems

no

evidence of any other source for such manufacture. They were for various purposes; sometimes ali token or counler, ...ometimcs

>

-

amulets; the collection is strong in the

measure stamps, of which there arc but few in the British M USC 11m. The present catalogue is naturally based

011

the work of thc above descriptions, with

48� photogr'lphs, showing nearly all the different dics employed. Tile rebtive e:-.;tcl1t of these series is as follows;-

B.'\!.

Roman

80

Omayyad and 'Abbasid

,8

Fatimite (illcgibh.:) Total legible

397 ,3,

!'ou'luN "

3,3 ,S,

U.c. 55 202

(197)

4' , (205)

659

702

2.

TrlrRE is no cert!lin evidence of gloe

u.� ui\1 ill the :-\ith century.

Pappos. Thif. nlyle. i., the earliest of the monogram;,; 75 i.,

61

centurie:., only the f'mallcr part arc yCt recorded.

the ram of A.men, crowned \\'ilh disc and horns,

as there arc not more than 67 known in O\'cr three

Two stamps of clear green glass (57-8) have a feedin g stand

(i')

before it, and the letters

These

di

below. The style of the

monogram I should have suppo,lific maker. The sizes increased, as in the fine wuqiyeh, no. r11, anrl the fels weights, u2-4 . I'erhaps of this period is a fel:s weight with the name uf'Abclalbh i bn 'Aly (no. r26) the lettering of \Yh1ch is too slrc1ggling to he later, while the large size of the weigln can lrnrdly be earlier. A stamp ( 117) of an 'Abdalla.h may be of the same pen,on.

or

+ (l09, 124, [27: 727,742, 745.) 1-fo.fs: ibn cl \\"elyd wns repeatedly g·ovcrnor ; by the lettering, the dirhem weight, 128, belongs to hi~ laLcr rule. p24 -6 ; 7+2-+. ) El \\'dyd II the khalifoh, has lefL one weight, 129, which i,; quite unlike any nlhers, in its g reen-blue coluur, and the lt-tlerir.g. \Vhere it \\'as made i,- a punk, as there is no point of comparison. The maker Yezyd ibn Aby \'ezyd appears to have acted independen tl y after h is work for Qa,;em ( 121), as well as b1•fore l93). A large Lun--.hapcd weight ( 130) seems to bear the name \."czyd: aud this is likely a!> he marle s im il a r weight-. fol' ?llughyra in 7 ➔ 9 ( no. !37). A small wcigl1t l 131) :.1nd a stamp (132) also have his name' alone. ( 126-i32; 7-H-9-) 'Aycsy ibn Aby '.\tba ( 133 5) is slated Lo be fin.1ncicr, but the Spanish writ,, rs nam1:: him governur. A large bun-s haped weight is of S'ayd ibn ( Lat)ufallah, a pparenlly, by the portion remaining· ( 136). ( 131; 749.) Two other bun-shaped weig·hts arc of Mughyra; two copic-s of the 1138, and in th.: range of private ,1·c·1gln:, as J.lreaoy shown ahun:. Th~ detaib ot th~ ,-,,~par;,,1..' w eights arc t.leah w ith in the ge nera·, dt:scriptioa, wh ile it is better tu wi thdraw t he disCU$Si1,n uf the wl1ole pe r iod to the pr,;;;e11t section, ro. T he dated private \\'eigh ts in chronol og ic:..l 01·dcr arc:-

Muhammc tl c l ' Audy 'Oma r Ahmed

"C".C. 642- 65+ 655 -663

Ca:,;. v, 9, 1S-tg Cas. v. to

U.M. 347,352 B.I\L 366-8

667 Y 'aqub A bu Bela Year forty E l l\fahdy ' J\ly Shuwcykh ' A bel el Male k 'Aly cl l\[ai;ry Muhammed Huseyn ibn Ahmed l\[uhamme d ibn Shahyn Muhamme d

Tile sty le of the lasl t wo is q uite: differe nt from tha t of a century earlier; and Huseyn ibn Ahmed re se m bles M 11ham med ibn Sha hyn. H e nce t hese c ome in to th e vi th ce nt. A.II.

13.J\f. 37+-5 13.:1\l. 3S3 66S 669 672- 6 677

678-Sr

B.l\f. 3 37

Cas. v, 20-1 C::is. v, 7

B.l\1. 342-+ Il.M. 376

C as . v , 17 Cas. v, 23- +

B.M. 386- 7 Cas. v, 6

names would, b y t heir style. fa ll w it hin the s~mc limits. There a re r3 in this collection, 17 p ub li,;hed by Ca s anova , and 20 in the British 1\[uscum. The last are no t included here , a s th ey a r c n nt s o a ccurately we igh ed. Takin g the rlawd one,; o nly, they are

l

THE WEIGHT STANDARDS R o man sol idus weights, that are in good condition here , a re four, of 69·4, 70•6, 71-r, 7r ·6 grains, a verage 70-7 . The two half solidus , or quina rius, a r e 33-6, 36-o g·rains , a verage for the solidus 69-6. The quarte r s olidus is scaled, and tl1c refore under we ight. This 70-7 a c cords with an u ncia o f 424 or libra o f 5090, or slightly ove r the Cons tantine ave rag e solidus of 70 -2, 72 in a libra o f 505 3. 12. The e arlier Arabic we ig hts arc many of lhem marked a s a fels, us ually o f so ma ny kharru beh s. So far as these ha ve names on them, they arc d a t ed between 7 q and 780 A.P. Thos tJf four to six from a .lek ilm 1·e~yd; JJ'eit;ltt of a f el.-. ji1111· and /JJ 1elll_r /;/1,irmbal. (Die, C. ii, 29.) Gre olwC'r-;e), ~Rt•versp, In thL name of Cod. lJ; · the h,w d of .l/ 11h(,1111111cJ) (ib11 Sherhabyl) (ar ound). J11scribed cu111plete centre). lfa:s C. ii , 33). Green 32-51 165 In the name nJ r.od. Ordur of th,• "11~r1 J'ez;-d ib11 H atem; 1J1eigltt rf a third (di11,1r). .r..'x,lcl. \ Reverse as 162, sanu: dit:). Green 21 75 16 6 (Duplicate, same dies, much worn.) G reen 21 72 167 (Same d ie obverse). (Reverse as 163, cli1.: worn and dot added below centre). Dii.!~

as B.III. 16,

Green 21,65

168 (_Same d ie, obver se!. (Reverse as 164, same d ie). G reen ir-70 169-;o In th.! 11a111. 287 11re sen•a,1t nj Cud ls111'11_1rl 1 amyr c!f the .faithj11I, centre. Around, In tlte 11a1110• o.f Cod, order of the imam M,11u;11r; by- God is exactness and justice. Green 64·4 A.II .

3,tt- 365 Al Mo'ezz Ma'ad 953 - 975

i\.D.

288 'Jlbdallal1 lidy-11 Allah Ma'ad abu 1 i:m.ym , around. 1'he Imam Al Mu'ezz. Slightly scaled, light green 127-0 289-90 Ma'ad abu Al .Mo'czz. White 18-r, light green 47•4 ,\.II.

291

365-386 EI "Azyz 975-996 A.D.

El 'A;:rz billtt/1, a11iyr of the faithfu l. Centre around, In the name of God .... /he sen,m1t of God, freedman l!f /1,e Imam Abu el Mdek . . .. of tl,e /1111.1111. Green 128•9

22

F'ATllill E CAlALOGU:F

z92 In the name of God. What was nrdereci bJ' the Imam El 'At;-z bill.th, ,1111.rr of the .faitltful. Circle and dot in centre, pale green 64-1 293-4 Pnrts of die 292. Greenish \\ hite 16·3 16-2 295 The l 111a111 Fl ',t~r= bil!t1h, amyr < .!f" lhi! faithjitl. Centre, Just 1.die B.11. 75; C. iv, i33). Pale green 64-5 296 Early impress, fragment (die B.1\f. 75; C. iv, 133). \Yhite 297 The 1111,1111 I:.'/ 'Ai)'l /,,ii/ah, am.rr. Centre, Just. "~hite 16-2 298 The / 111,w1 El ',t:y..: bi/lair. (C. iv, 116.) Green 45-3 299 \I 'Ital ,11as ordered VJ' the m11_rr El '.-L:J·:. billah, - fi - j *b.t ~ .. V

..

.......

.

c,._'( t'5 '( , GO VE f\NO I\ . 8'!>1 , 8 4 3-7

218

----- 221

~'J'

~ _}-solil ~~ I J}OU>Y. ~Ml JI , ~' y}lpl ~

225 @

.

/1\LC,A BR.

' A BOA L LI\H

r,I U!'> T /\N'., IR.

~J~

.. c¼

226

.

~

32

(:3"

227

228

@ @1)

GLASS WEIGHTS AND STAMPS. 780- 853 A.O.

1: I

G H AWTH

A.O. 780-784

EL FADL

XI

A.O. 785

IBRAHYM IBN CALEH BAGE L Y

ABDALLAH

213

A. D.

793

MALEK

AYESY

A. O. 83 1

MUSY 834 236

It1

GLASS WEIGHTS 856- 906 A.D.

YE. 'Z.Y D ,

C.OVC R.N O R .

856-67

r i- c.r- 6111 ~

JAS lo-o~y.~I~

r't..• ,..J,y..illl~

J.lJ\~

~I~ .y. .>.,y..~I JI

~l!:1;!» ,11~y _,..,.1 JI

~ > - 6 JI ):':"lljo ' - , ~ ~111 J U.I

~ "Jl_......,IJ~o

.: >-" JI ~ I J,... A~ .ill\ JU>I

MIIHAMMEO, G OII~. 90SF

238 289

237

·J-'-~.p.. r-:"I jl

XII

UUl~...UIJU.1

:ir'r'·

'/\Y C5Y

241

I dl}\(U.UJ, I

255

256

~~

~ ~

257

[~]

ACIU AL Hl\2.,-J

273 272

275 274 277 276

279 278 280

8

M u ' Aw 1v1: H .

.BA5HIR. .

282 2 83 284

285

w I

.

258 (259)

r6'illJ'

GLASS WEIGHTS. 856-905 A.O.

1:I

XIII

MUHAMMED A.O. 905

Y EZ YD A.O.

250

251

ABUL HAZN

MOAWIYA

ABU

BA SHIR

A.O. 282 283 284 285

GLASS WEIGHTS FATIMITE 946- 1020 A.O.

I:1

XIV

Q.A 5 E. M

~· .

@72) @75 3:~ 369

(373-)

I

.

co ~l'\.UP'Y

(

J.1Jtrl....J.bJ1 ?

@76 @}77 @ 78 J

I

.

.

d.lllrl,,

~ ,,.-----...__

379

~bJI

tl.ll 11 ~

1: 1

IS M AYL

EL M ANGUR

xv

GLASS WEIGHTS, FATIMITE. 946- 1020 A.O.

EL' AZIZ A.O. 975- 996

288.289

EL MOEZZ A.O. 953- 975

290

..•.

,

EL HAKI M A.O. 996- 1020

352 353



373 37

t• . •

6•4 •·

:•

'

.

9 • . • ' JI ~bJ\

402

.uJ "4l>

~lHJ'°

E Z.

400 1

2

403 (4

~

405 (406)

407

408

®~®8

10 2. 1 - ,H ,

AHIR

7

8

419)

(426>427 (428 429 430)

(421} 2

(436 437 438) 439

433 34 35)

442(443

(440} 1

444

5)

452 8

1

9

(3 I

456 (457 458 460} 459

(463)

5

®65 l

@·· I

469 (470 I)

l472) 473

(474) 475

476

(477) 478 (479)

8 8 8 8

1: 1

EL HAKIM 80 j

.

I.



XVII

384

392

391

A.O. 996 - 1020

(9"



393 94

GLASS WEIGHTS. FATIMITE. 996-1035 A.O.

395

387

385

~390

386

~

'

396 397 398 399

0

402

••

403

405

404

406

407

408

··---·



EZ ZAHIR A.O. l 020- 1035

.25 423

431

424

.

~

.::



442

443

436

433 434 4 35

g~ 439



.

'

451

. ---... .

4 55

61



466

8"'

463

464

-

· •75 • 4 74

4 76

4 77 478

479

I11

GLASS WEIGHTS FATIMITE 1035- 1101 A.O.

XVIII

488(489 490 491 492 4 n3 9 4) •

(495)496 (497 498 499

503 (504)

5

~

,~ ..

..

(520)521 (522 623 524 525 526 527)

530 1)

532 (-549)

576

@) E. L /v\ U S i 'A LY , t 094- - 11 o t

579

677 (578

~

582

(683

(585 688

589

~~~

592

@@88

XIX

GLASS WEIGHTS, FATIMITE. 1035-1101 A.O.

1: 1

EL MUSTANSIR A.D. 1035- 1094

495

496 497

507

••

98 99



5 20 -

527

555 ~ 5 6. 5 7

V

.

558

e

5119

564

• " f,j'

_,m fj::

EL MU ST'ALI A.D. 1094- 1101

582 583

~

584

577 578

585

......_.=.,,.. . . .,.

• -590 591

'-"'-'""~

592

xx

GLASS WEIGHTS FATIMITE 1101-1259 A.O.

' :1

EL MUNTAZ.11'- 1131

~4

v:9 E:L

HA.Fl Z .11~1-49

E: Z. Z. AF IR.

IS M'AYL

1149-54

2

7 ~08

~ CL

f"A.YZ .

~ ~

IIS-4,-bO

14

t L

6 13

'A A DI D.

~o

5

17

18

I I i,, o - 71

628 63 0 t62 9) ...... ~l)

2

.J.

/ ls JI\ .... I o...UI .

~~J

, .........._____.

I

\~

'-- /

639 (640)

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