Computer games: learning objectives, cognitive performance and effects on development 9781617611780, 1617611786

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Computer games: learning objectives, cognitive performance and effects on development
 9781617611780, 1617611786

Table of contents :
COMPUTER GAMES: LEARNING OBJECTIVES, COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE AND EFFECTS ON DEVELOPMENT......Page 3
COMPUTER GAMES: LEARNING OBJECTIVES, COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE AND EFFECTS ON DEVELOPMENT......Page 9
CONTENTS......Page 11
PREFACE......Page 13
Abstract......Page 19
1. Introduction......Page 20
2.1. Game Application Model......Page 23
2.2. Game Load Complexity Model......Page 26
2.4. Complete Game Ecosystem Model......Page 27
3. Architecture......Page 30
4.1. Real-Time Metrics......Page 33
4.2.2. Game Process Entity......Page 34
4.3. Monitoring Method......Page 35
5.2. Prediction Method......Page 37
5.3. Neural Network-Based Prediction......Page 39
5.3.2. Signal Expander......Page 40
5.3.3. Neural Network......Page 41
5.3.6. Complexity Analysis......Page 42
5.4. Implementation......Page 43
5.5. Distributed FPS Game Simulator......Page 45
5.6. Neural Network Tuning......Page 46
5.6.1. Network Type......Page 48
5.6.2. Network Structure......Page 50
5.6.3. Transfer Function......Page 52
5.6.4. Signal Expanding......Page 54
5.7. Prediction Results......Page 55
6. Capacity Management......Page 58
6.1. Processor Load Model......Page 59
6.2. Memory Load Model......Page 61
6.3. Network Load Model......Page 62
7. Resource Allocation......Page 63
8. Conclusions......Page 66
References......Page 67
Abstract......Page 71
Introduction......Page 72
Game Categorization......Page 73
Epistemic Patterns......Page 75
Assigning......Page 77
Comparing......Page 78
Linking......Page 79
Selecting......Page 80
Adventures of Lolo......Page 81
Bejeweled......Page 83
Blocksum......Page 84
Bookworm......Page 85
Civilization IV......Page 87
The Incredible Machine......Page 90
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time......Page 91
Myst......Page 93
Step-By-Step......Page 95
Tetris......Page 97
References......Page 98
Abstract......Page 103
Digital Game Playing and Emotion Regulation......Page 104
Patterns of Playing Digital Games and Depressed Mood......Page 105
The Current Study......Page 108
Study Procedure......Page 109
Measures......Page 110
Descriptive Results......Page 112
Digital Game Playing Patterns......Page 115
Conclusion......Page 118
References......Page 123
Abstract......Page 129
Scope of this Chapter......Page 130
Video Games for Learning......Page 131
Video Games for Health......Page 133
Concrete Versus Conceptual Games......Page 134
Learning Theory and Health Game Design......Page 135
The Example of Re-Mission......Page 136
Symbolic Self Modeling in Re-Mission......Page 138
Other Learning Principles in Re-Mission......Page 139
Conclusion......Page 140
References......Page 141
Introduction......Page 145
Lucid – Control Dreams......Page 146
Hard Core Gamer Interviews......Page 147
Dream Bizarreness......Page 148
Nightmares and Threat Simulation......Page 150
Conclusions and Implications......Page 152
References......Page 153
Abstract......Page 155
2. Players......Page 156
5.1. Time Delays......Page 157
6. Variety of Racing Games......Page 158
7. Adjustment of Parameters......Page 159
8. Computer Plays with Itself......Page 160
Abstract......Page 161
1. Introduction......Page 162
2. Probabilistic Computational Agents......Page 163
2.1. Extended Ising Prior......Page 166
2.2. Inference......Page 169
3. Model Parametrisation......Page 172
3.1.Choosing ß......Page 173
3.2. Other Parameters......Page 175
4. Intrinsic Time Scale......Page 176
5. Simulations......Page 179
6. Conclusions......Page 181
References......Page 183
Abstract......Page 185
1. Introduction......Page 186
2. Background: Computer Games in Education......Page 187
3. The Math Game......Page 189
3.1. The Game Setting......Page 191
3.2.1. Practical Considerations......Page 193
3.3. Evaluation of the Design from a Didactical Perspective......Page 194
4.1. Determining the Difficulty Level......Page 195
4.2. Question and Number Formats......Page 196
4.3. Example of a Problem Type Definition......Page 197
4.4. Design of the False Alternatives......Page 199
5.1. The First Trial......Page 200
6. Results......Page 201
6.1. The Questionnaires......Page 202
6.2. The Diagnostic Tests......Page 203
7. Conclusion......Page 204
A. A Complete List of the Question Types......Page 205
References......Page 208
INDEX......Page 211

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