Civil War in Ancient Greece and Rome: Contexts of Disintegration and Reintegration 3515112243, 9783515112246

Civil war is the most radical form of political conflict. This volume analyses the impact of civil war on society and cu

583 90 4MB

English Pages 437 [438] Year 2015

Report DMCA / Copyright

DOWNLOAD FILE

Polecaj historie

Civil War in Ancient Greece and Rome: Contexts of Disintegration and Reintegration
 3515112243, 9783515112246

Table of contents :
PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
CONTENTS
CONTRIBUTORS
ABBREVIATIONS
INTRODUCTION
CIVIL WARS IN GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY: CONTEXTUALISING DISINTEGRATION AND REINTEGRATION
PART ONE: FROM THE CLASSICAL AGE TO THE EARLY PRINCIPATE
STASIS UND SOZIALISATION. ÜBERLEGUNGEN ZUR FUNKTION DES GYMNASTISCHEN IN DER POLIS
CIVIL WAR AND CIVIC RECONCILIATION IN A SMALL GREEK POLIS: TWO ACTS OF THE SAME DRAMA?
HARMONIE UND WELTHERRSCHAFT. DIE STASIS BEI POLYBIOS
HELLENISTISCHE POLEIS UND RÖMISCHER BÜRGERKRIEG. STASIS IM GRIECHISCHEN OSTEN NACH DEN IDEN DES MÄRZ (44 BIS 39 V. CHR.)
PERFORMING PASSIONS, NEGOTIATING SURVIVAL: ITALIAN CITIES IN THE LATE REPUBLICAN CIVIL WARS
TRIUMPHUS EX BELLO CIVILI? DIE PRÄSENTATION DES BÜRGERKRIEGSSIEGES IM SPÄTREPUBLIKANISCHEN TRIUMPHRITUAL
PART TWO: FROM THE HIGH EMPIRE TO LATE ANTIQUITY
JUPITER, DIE FLAVIER UND DAS KAPITOL ODER: WIE MAN EINEN BÜRGERKRIEG GEWINNT
„TROPHÄEN, DIE NICHT VOM ÄUSSEREN FEINDE GEWONNEN WURDEN, TRIUMPHE, DIE DER RUHM MIT BLUT BEFLECKT DAVON TRUG …“. DER SIEG IM IMPERIALEN BÜRGERKRIEG IM ‚LANGEN DRITTEN JAHRHUNDERT‘ ALS AMBIVALENTES EREIGNIS
GREAT PRETENDERS: ELEVATIONS OF ‘GOOD’ USURPERS IN ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHY
MAXENTIUS’ HEAD AND THE RITUALS OF CIVIL WAR
THE LAW’S AVENGER: EMPEROR JULIAN IN CONSTANTINOPLE
RITUALE ALS MEDIEN POLITISCHER AUSHANDLUNGEN IN DEN BÜRGERKRIEGEN DER SPÄTANTIKE
HOW THE CIRCUS AND THEATRE FACTIONS COULD HELP PREVENT CIVIL WAR
EPILOGUE
THE IMPALED KING: A HEAD AND ITS CONTEXT
GENERAL INDEX

Citation preview

tacular triumphal celebrations there existed a broad range of symbolic forms of communication pertaining to civil war: rituals of reconciliation, reintegration and restoration as well as acts of commemoration and condemnation. The multidisciplinary volume aims at contributing to a better understanding of the performative and communicative logic of civil conflict within the ancient societies of Greece and Rome.

Civil War in Ancient Greece and Rome

Civil war is the most radical form of political conflict. This volume analyses the impact of civil war on society and culture in Greco-Roman antiquity. The collected papers examine phenomena such as tyrannicide, staseis and usurpations from the classical age to late antiquity. The focus lies on the lasting impact violence and disorder had on political discourse and memory culture. In particular, the contributions explore how internal conflicts were staged and performed. Beyond spec-

www.steiner-verlag.de

HABES 58

Henning Börm / Marco Mattheis / Johannes Wienand

9 783515 112246

Ancient History Franz Steiner Verlag

Franz Steiner Verlag

ISBN 978-3-515-11224-6

Civil War in Ancient Greece and Rome Contexts of Disintegration and Reintegration Edited by Henning Börm, Marco Mattheis and Johannes Wienand

HABES 58

29892

Civil War in Ancient Greece and Rome Edited by Henning Börm, Marco Mattheis and Johannes Wienand

habes Heidelberger Althistorische Beiträge und Epigraphische Studien Herausgegeben von Géza Alföldy †, Angelos Chaniotis und Christian Witschel Band 58

Civil War in Ancient Greece and Rome Contexts of Disintegration and Reintegration Edited by Henning Börm, Marco Mattheis and Johannes Wienand

Franz Steiner Verlag

Cover illustration: Reworked sestertius of the emperor Maximinus Thrax (ad 235–238) [private collection, courtesy of the owner; image: H. Lanz, Munich]. For a detailed analysis of this exceptional coin and its historical context, see the epilogue to this volume.

Bibliografische Information der Deutschen Nationalbibliothek: Die Deutsche Nationalbibliothek verzeichnet diese Publikation in der Deutschen Nationalbibliografie; detaillierte bibliografische Daten sind im Internet über abrufbar. Dieses Werk einschließlich aller seiner Teile ist urheberrechtlich geschützt. Jede Verwertung außerhalb der engen Grenzen des Urheberrechtsgesetzes ist unzulässig und strafbar. © Franz Steiner Verlag, Stuttgart 2016 Druck: Hubert & Co., Göttingen Gedruckt auf säurefreiem, alterungsbeständigem Papier. Printed in Germany. ISBN 978-3-515-11224-6 (Print) ISBN 978-3-515-11225-3 (E-Book)

«Acquit me of those triumphs stained with guilt!» Claud. VI Cons. Hon. 409

PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Civil war is the most radical form of political conflict and one of the most decisive catalysts for sociopolitical development. Most notably, internal war is a phenomenon structurally distinct from external war, providing its own cultural modes of discourse and praxis. In order to gain a better understanding of the performative and communicative logic of civil conflict within the ancient societies of the Graeco-Roman world, the Collaborative Research Center The Dynamics of Ritual at the University of Heidelberg and the Center of Excellence Cultural Foundations of Integration at the University of Konstanz jointly organized an international conference in 2011 at Schloss Reisensburg near Günzburg in Southern Germany. Allowing three days of inspiring scholarly exchange, the conference brought together a wide range of European and American scholars, both established and aspiring, in the fields of ancient history, archaeology, and philology. The meeting focussed on the different strategies of framing, staging, and narrating civil conflict in different historical settings throughout antiquity, including phenomena such as tyrannicide and stasis in ancient Greece and the Hellenistic era, civil war in the Late Roman Republic and the Early Empire, and usurpations and uprisings in the High Empire and in Late Antiquity. This volume presents selected papers presented at the conference. We would like to thank the Collaborative Research Center The Dynamics of Ritual at the University of Heidelberg, and the Center of Excellence Cultural Foundations of Integration at the University of Konstanz for financial support. In addition, the organisational team at Schloss Reisensburg was instrumental in creating a pleasant atmosphere, conducive to productive scholarly exchange. Isabelle Dietz expertly carried out her role as conference assistant, Felix Böttcher and Nadine Viermann helped us to prepare the manuscript for print, John Noël Dillon translated Johannes Wienand’s paper and the epilogue, and Sarah Cassidy made linguistic revisions to the preface, the introduction, and the abstracts. We are delighted at the opportunity of publishing these papers in the Heidelberger Althistorische Beiträge und Epigraphische Studien. The support and suggestions we have received from the series editors Christian Witschel and Angelos Chaniotis as well as from the anonymous reviewer have helped us to improve the volume and its internal coherence. We also thank Katharina Stüdemann and her team at Franz Steiner Verlag for their excellent editorial work. Last, but not least, we would like to thank the authors for a collegial, stimulating and fruitful academic exchange. Henning Börm, Marco Mattheis, Johannes Wienand

October 2015

CONTENTS Contributors ........................................................................................................... 11 Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ 12

Introduction Henning Börm Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity: Contextualising Disintegration and Reintegration ................................................................................................... 15

PART ONE From the Classical Age to the Early Principate Hans-Joachim Gehrke Stasis und Sozialisation. Überlegungen zur Funktion des Gymnastischen in der Polis ............................................................................................................. 31 Benjamin Gray Civil War and Civic Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis: Two Acts of the Same Drama? ................................................................................................... 53 Boris Dreyer Harmonie und Weltherrschaft. Die Stasis bei Polybios ......................................... 87 Henning Börm Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg. Stasis im griechischen Osten nach den Iden des März (44 bis 39 v. Chr.) ................................................. 99 Federico Santangelo Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival: Italian Cities in the Late Republican Civil Wars ......................................................................................... 127 Wolfgang Havener Triumphus ex bello civili? Die Präsentation des Bürgerkriegssieges im spätrepublikanischen Triumphritual ............................................................... 149

10

Contents

PART TWO From the High Empire to Late Antiquity Alexander Heinemann Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol Oder: Wie man einen Bürgerkrieg gewinnt ......................................................... 187 Matthias Haake „Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden, Triumphe, die der Ruhm mit Blut befleckt davon trug …“. Der Sieg im imperialen Bürgerkrieg im ‚langen dritten Jahrhundert‘ als ambivalentes Ereignis ............. 237 Martijn Icks Great Pretenders: Elevations of ‘Good’ Usurpers in Roman Historiography ..... 303 Troels Myrup Kristensen Maxentius’ Head and the Rituals of Civil War.................................................... 321 Johannes Wienand The Law’s Avenger: Emperor Julian in Constantinople ..................................... 347 Marco Mattheis Rituale als Medien politischer Aushandlungen in den Bürgerkriegen der Spätantike ...................................................................................................... 367 Peter Bell How the Circus and Theatre Factions Could Help Prevent Civil War ................ 389

Epilogue Johannes Wienand The Impaled King: A Head and its Context ........................................................ 417 General Index ...................................................................................................... 433

CONTRIBUTORS PETER BELL, University of Oxford HENNING BÖRM, Universität Konstanz BORIS DREYER, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg HANS-JOACHIM GEHRKE, Freie Universität Berlin / Albert-LudwigsUniversität Freiburg BENJAMIN GRAY, University of Edinburgh MATTHIAS HAAKE, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster WOLFGANG HAVENER, Universität Heidelberg ALEXANDER HEINEMANN, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg MARTIJN ICKS, Queen’s University Belfast TROELS MYRUP KRISTENSEN, Aarhus Universitet MARCO MATTHEIS, Independent Scholar FEDERICO SANTANGELO, Newcastle University JOHANNES WIENAND, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf

ABBREVIATIONS Abbreviations of journal titles follow l’Année Philologique, all other bibliographic abbreviations used in this volume follow the ‘Erweitertes Abkürzungsverzeichnis’ of Der Neue Pauly (= ‘Bibliographic Abbreviations’ in Brill’s New Pauly) or the ‘Abbreviations List’ in Oxford Classical Dictionary, 4th Edition.

INTRODUCTION

CIVIL WARS IN GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY: CONTEXTUALISING DISINTEGRATION AND REINTEGRATION Henning Börm

Civil wars have, at all times, been among the most serious catastrophes that can befall a community. The reason for this is that social disintegration is an inevitable aspect of civil strife. Although earthquakes, floods, crop failure and epidemics may also claim countless victims, the usual strategies employed to tackle the different contingencies in such situations do not, as a rule, challenge the internal cohesion of the community affected. In the case of external war, on the other hand, most people tend to lay the blame for their suffering primarily on the enemy, and conflicts between states may sometimes even strengthen social cohesion. This kind of coping mechanism, however, does not work for internal violence. Instead, such bloodshed rather tends to strengthen the divisions and enmities that constitute the root causes of strife. In this way, they pose a stronger and greater threat to the cohesion and foundations of a particular society than natural disasters or external attacks. In the case of civil war, resolution thus requires particular efforts, as the disintegration that has preceded it must, if possible, be reversed, the community must be restabilized, legitimate rule must be established and anarchy and the development of failed states must be avoided.1 This process is made more difficult not least by the fact that those who have profited from the conflict are not necessarily interested in the social reintegration of those who have been defeated. Moreover, unwillingness to participate in reconciliation together with a desire for vengeance2 can be important factors that guarantee the internal cohesion of the individual factions and give meaning to them; to renounce these aims in order to procure peace for society as a whole is often difficult.3 For this reason, it is obvious that an engagement with the civil wars of antiquity is of relevance to historians. It is not only the patterns of disintegration and escalation that allow us to draw conclusions regarding the causes and circumstances of the disputes; through the approaches taken towards the re-establishment of peace, insights can also be gained from the preventative measures and attempts at resolution that are attested. At the same time, the strategies implemented to *

1 2 3

I would like to thank Wolfgang HAVENER, Johannes WIENAND and Christian WITSCHEL for helpful suggestions. Cf. FEARON 2004. Cf. GEHRKE 1987; RUCH 2013. Cf. VEIT/SCHLICHTE 2011.

16

Henning Börm

achieve peace and reintegration also inevitably indicate how the phenomena were conceptualized by the political actors involved. This is the case because successful methods of establishing peace must be socially plausible; as a result of this, we are able to draw conclusions regarding the predominant thought patterns and the general political and social conditions by way of the strategies of disintegration and reintegration and attempts to prevent (renewed) escalation as well as by the choices made regarding the propagation and staging of these attempts. In other words, in the context of a civil war, the rules by which a society exists in conjunction with the ruling structures and those underlying them become particularly clear. In the context of an introduction to a publication that is concerned with a comparative, diachronic examination of ancient civil wars and that covers several centuries, it is necessary to turn briefly to the problem of definition. What does the term ‘civil war’ actually mean when it is used here and throughout the volume? It is more difficult to answer this question than it may at first appear.4 We must provide criteria that allow a meaningful classification if a comparative examination of different phenomena, which occur in different historical contexts, is to have any heuristic value at all. Quantitative approaches that focus particularly on the duration of fighting and on the number of participants are not only fundamentally problematic but also simply unsuitable in the context of antiquity, as the sources often do not allow us to make the relevant assertions. Likewise, the supposedly easy option, namely to use a very broad definition of ‘civil war’ that would include any violent dispute within a political system5 and that would largely treat bellum civile as synonymous with bellum internum, is hardly viable upon closer consideration. One problem lies in the fact that it is not always as easy to distinguish between internal and external conflict as it may at first seem.6 How would one classify a situation, for example, in which a Greek aristocrat makes use of the help of external powers in order to establish a tyrannis with violent means in his home polis? What if an internal conflict were to turn into a war between two states? What if, conversely, international tensions were to provide the preconditions for internal outbreaks of violence? In addition to this, the term ‘state’ is fundamentally problematic in a premodern context, a fact which has often been discussed.7 In the present context the problem does not concern the applicability of the concept to antiquity as much as the question of differentiating between a community and a citizenry. How is it possible to determine membership without relying on individuals’ self-assignation to these groups? This is relevant, for example, when we are dealing with a war of secession: for some, such a conflict is a legitimate fight for freedom, for others it 4 5 6 7

Cf. (from a politological perspective) WALDMANN 1998, SAMBANIS 2004, ARMITAGE 2009 and the papers collected in NEWMAN/DEROUEN 2014. See also TASLER/KEHNE 1999. Cf. KALYVAS 2007: 416: “When domestic political conflict takes the form of military confrontation or armed combat we speak of civil war”. However, the Romans had different lexical methods of denoting different types of conflicts, cf. ROSENBERGER 1992. See, for example, WALTER 1998.

Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity

17

is an illegitimate revolt and a breach of peace. The tendency of our sources to view a conflict, at least implicitly, from the perspective of one of the parties involved makes an analysis significantly more difficult. This is illustrated, for example, by the fact that the Romans tended to dismiss those who rebelled against their rule as latrones or λῃσταί, i.e. ‘robbers’, instead of acknowledging them as enemies in war (hostes) in the legal sense.8 In addition to these fundamental problems of definition and differentiation there is a further, no less important issue. The definition of civil war as an internal conflict is so general that it lacks terminological accuracy. It is hardly sensible to simply label every instance of violent unrest, coup, revolution and pogrom as ‘civil war’. How can this problem be solved? There are two approaches possible in order to formulate criteria by which a civil war can be distinguished more clearly from other forms of internal violence, and these approaches can be combined. The first and obvious point is the military component. A civil war is a war. Both sides act violently, unlike, for example, in the case of a pogrom or of genocide, in which the victims are not usually considered members of the group and are not classed as being of equal status but are instead considered to be outsiders. A civil war conflict may be asymmetric, but both sides have hierarchies and leaders. In this way, it has at least rudimentary forms of organization and, because of this, requires the existence of structures, which either exist before the beginning of the civil war or are created afterwards. Thus, not every rebellion is a civil war, but has the potential to become one. It is, however, more difficult to say whether the degree to which the populace is mobilized has any significance. Given what has been discussed so far, though, it would appear entirely possible to include those conflicts in the category of civil war in which most people are merely spectators or victims. The particular context is what appears to be decisive here; if a society is largely unarmed, the number of directly involved participants to be mobilized at short notice is likely, as a rule, to be significantly lower than in the opposite case.9 Furthermore, it is clear that, unlike in the case of a large territorial state such as the Imperium Romanum, a higher percentage of the population was directly involved in conflicts as a matter of course in the case of Anwesenheitsgesellschaften (‘presence societies’), such as smaller Greek poleis, simply because of the lower number of citizens and the relatively confined space. The smaller the community affected the less chance one had of remaining neutral. Nevertheless, not every war, and not every civil war, is necessarily a case of total war. The second and decisive criterion is the fact that the participants must be ‘citizens’ in the wider sense of the word, that is, members of the same group. One

8

9

Cf. Dig. 50.16.118 (Sex. Pomponius): Hostes hi sunt, qui nobis aut quibus nos publice bellum decrevimus: ceteri latrones aut praedones sunt. Flavius Josephus uses λῃστής and στασιαστής almost synonymously: τὸ δὲ στασιῶδες καὶ λῃστρικόν (Bell. Iud. 2.511). Those who were found guilty of committing seditio were often crucified (Dig. 48.19.38) – just think, for example, of the two ‘robbers’ that were executed together with Jesus (Mark 15.27). Cf. ZIMMERMANN 2007.

18

Henning Börm

may object that this definition strains the term ‘citizen’, a term which, in any case, is not without its problems. However, the important point is that one constituent characteristic of a civil war is that people who are (under normal circumstances) social, legal or political equals, or at least share similar status, become mortal enemies. People who were previously considered members of the same group must now be excluded explicitly, encountering whatever cruel consequences exclusion might create. Civil war is, therefore, an extreme form of social disintegration. Violence is directed against people who (up until that time) had shared the same status, people who (it must be stressed) had up until then been considered members of the community, subjectively if not always objectively, and not outsiders. The question of whether one is waging a fratricidal war or not is, therefore, not least a question of one’s perspective. The historian must assess and decide according to each individual case whether these circumstances prevail in each given instance. Thus, the working definition of civil war underlying the contributions collected in this volume is as follows: civil war is a violent conflict between at least two armed parties, both of which, as a rule, have a structure that is at least paramilitary; furthermore, it is necessary for at least one of the parties in the conflict to see the enemy principally as (former) members of the same group, i.e. they themselves consider the war to be an internal affair. If this definition, then, is applied, the attempts at usurpation, for example, by Roman generals between the 1st and 5th centuries CE can, despite the objections of some scholars, by all means be classified as civil war if they resulted in military disputes among Roman armies.10 This is the case because there is nothing that argues against the idea that, for a long time, members of the imperial army considered themselves to be members of the same group, despite an increasing regionalization of recruitment structures. It is only during the course of Late Antiquity that separate identities may have formed, especially, of course, among federated troops (foederati).11 It is true that, following this approach, many staseis in Greek poleis should also be termed civil war.12 The term itself, after all, refers to the near ‘static’ aspect of these conflicts, namely the fact that they often extend over a period of time; the divisions within communities of citizens that occasionally manifested themselves through outbreaks of violence could persist for generations as a basso continuo. This, in turn, was a good prerequisite for the development of informal structures and hierarchies which, for their part, allowed intermittent violence to change into proper military conflicts. However, it is clear that not every instance of stasis was a civil war. On the one hand, the nature of the violence connected to these divisions often tended to be structural rather than physical, and on the other hand, staseis were often intermittent outbursts and, in this regard, to all appearances 10 11 12

Still important is HARTMANN 1982 (focusing on the usurpers of the 3rd century CE); cf. JOHNE 2008. See also the papers by Matthias HAAKE and Martijn ICKS in the present volume. Cf. STICKLER 2007. Cf. LEGON 1966; RUSCHENBUSCH 1978; STE. CROIX 1981; LINTOTT 1982; GEHRKE 1985; WOLPERT 2002; HANSEN 2004; SCHMITZ 2014: 95–110.

Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity

19

resembled pogroms.13 Appian, for example, writing in the 2nd century CE, made a fundamental distinction between stasis and war. When Sulla marched on Rome for the first time in 88 BCE and engaged the Marians in what was to all intents and purposes a battle, this fight, according to Appian, could no longer be termed stasis but was practically a polemos:14 καὶ γίγνεταί τις ἀγὼν ἐχθρῶν, ὅδε πρῶτος ἐν Ῥώμῃ, οὐχ ὑπὸ εἰκόνι στάσεως ἔτι, ἀλλὰ ἀπροφασίστως ὑπὸ σάλπιγγι καὶ σημείοις, πολέμου νόμῳ. And here a battle took place between the contending parties, the first that was fought in Rome with trumpet and signal under the rules of war, and not at all in the likeness of a faction fight.

Given the nature and extent of our sources, it is often impossible to establish with certainty whether a given instance of stasis can be considered a civil war according to our understanding of the term. Both situations are, however, clearly connected through the appearance of social disintegration and, in most cases, through that of violence towards fellow citizens. Precisely because the enemies in these conflicts were not ‘the others’, it was necessary to give special justification for violence against them. Mutilation, robbery, arson, killing; none of these, as a rule, required any particular efforts of justification if terror and violence were directed against outsiders. External wars were usually relatively easy to justify,15 and there were times and places in which even piracy was not considered fundamentally dishonorable.16 However, attacks on one’s own people, perhaps friends and relatives, represented a serious breach of taboo. In order to lend legitimacy to such a breach, it was necessary that the blame for the crime should be laid on the enemy alone. This turned civil war into a breach of peace, a form of treason and a sacrilege punishable by death. It is admittedly the case that, in antiquity, the victor had the power over the life of the enemy whom he had defeated; he could kill or enslave him if he so desired. But for the reasons given above, participants in a civil war, especially the leaders of the opposing parties, had less chance of being spared, for the most part, especially if the victors believed that they needed a scapegoat. If one takes the breaching of a taboo – by disturbing internal peace and by renouncing, at least for a time, any alliance with one’s peers – as the lowest common denominator of those conflicts which are the focus of the present volume, certain questions arise as a consequence. First, it may be assumed that, as a rule, 13

14 15 16

Some useful examples include the events leading to the establishing of Agathocles’ tyranny over Syracuse in 317 BCE (Diod. 19.6–8) and, less well known, the mass murder that occurred in the small city of Hypata in 177 BCE, when around 80 people were slaughtered on their return (Liv. 41.25.1–4). App. civ. 1.7.58; trans. White; cf. App. civ. 1.7.55. On the Roman concept of bellum iustum see RAMPAZZO 2005. Cf. Hom. Od. 3.105f. Thucydides tells us that piracy was considered to be an honorable deed in some Greek communities leading up to his own time: δηλοῦσι δὲ τῶν τε ἠπειρωτῶν τινὲς ἔτι καὶ νῦν, οἷς κόσμος καλῶς τοῦτο δρᾶν, καὶ οἱ παλαιοὶ τῶν ποιητῶν τὰς πύστεις τῶν καταπλεόντων πανταχοῦ ὁμοίως ἐρωτῶντες εἰ λῃσταί εἰσιν, ὡς οὔτε ὧν πυνθάνονται ἀπαξιούντων τὸ ἔργον, οἷς τε ἐπιμελὲς εἴη εἰδέναι οὐκ ὀνειδιζόντων (Thuk. 1.5.2).

20

Henning Börm

certain structures underlie the escalation of violence and that these structures make some citizens consider a civil war to be the only, albeit extreme, way out of a situation which is perceived as unbearable; is it possible for us to identify these structures? Second, it may be supposed that the need to justify oneself was particularly strong during and after a civil war, given that one’s own deeds were also fundamentally reprehensible; what were the strategies employed in this context? Third, after the end of violence, a way had to be found to enable the reintegration of society, especially if it did not seem possible to physically remove all enemies; how was this made possible? All three aspects – escalation, justification and reintegration – required communicative acts. It was thanks to the ensuing tendency to publicly display and demonstrate one’s own position that the title ‘Performing Civil War’ was given to a conference which was co-organized by the Collaborative Research Center The Dynamics of Ritual (University of Heidelberg) and the Center of Excellence Cultural Foundations of Integration (University of Konstanz) and which took place in Schloss Reisensburg near Günzburg in October 2011. It was from this conference that the present volume, focusing on the performative, ritualistic, and communicative contexts of disintegration and reintegration, arose. The emphasis of the contributions collected in what follows lies on approximately six centuries of Roman history between the late Republic and the reign of Justinian. However, as it is difficult to understand Roman civil wars without considering the Greek east of the empire, the Greek world is not left unconsidered. The four contributions that deal with Hellas are intended, not least, to highlight more clearly the features peculiar to the bella civilia in the Imperium Romanum. On the one hand, this is because the internal conflicts in the Roman Empire took place in a large territorial state and not in a polis, the dimensions of which were, as a rule, manageable. Consequently, the conditions of communication differed fundamentally, and the question of ‘flight or fight?’ required different answers in this context.17 On the other hand, and above all, the issue underlying all Roman civil wars from the time of Augustus at the latest was, ultimately, to procure or preserve monocracy.18 The civil wars between 49 and 29 BCE not only marked the violent transition from the rule of the nobility in the old res publica to the Augustan principate, they also played a central role in the establishment of the new order and, for this reason, they played a constant role in the discourse of imperial times.19 A significant factor in the legitimization of Augustus’s exceptional position, which flew in the face of the republican tradition, was the claim to have doused the flames of the civil wars and to have thus established internal peace.20 This is what the phrase pax Augusta primarily referred to, rather than the absence of external conflicts.21 17 18 19 20 21

Cf. HIRSCHMANN 1986 (from a sociological perspective). Cf. JOHNE 2008, SZIDAT 2010 and FLAIG 2011. Cf. GOTTER 2011; AMBÜHL 2015. Res gest. div. Aug. 34.1. Cf. RUBIN 1984.

Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity

21

For this reason, too, guaranteeing internal peace became the central and nonnegotiable prerequisite for all successors of the first princeps in order for their rule to be accepted.22 This was of decisive importance as the ‘constitutional’ position of the Roman emperors always remained questionable and as their position constantly required renewed justification in a context which was characterized by antimonarchic reflexes and which as a matter of principle suspected any ruler of being a tyrant.23 It is true that, in actual fact, imperial rule quickly became accepted as inevitable. Nevertheless, it remained the case that, for the reasons outlined above, each usurpation undermined the princeps’ legitimacy even when he prevailed, because he had not maintained internal peace. This also applied, of course, to usurpers who were ultimately successful, such as Vespasian and Septimius Severus.24 While a relatively quick reintegration and stabilization of affairs successfully took place after the two Years of the Four Emperors in 69 and 193 CE, a number of thoroughly active emperors failed in this task during the 3rd century because of a change in general conditions. It was only Diocletian and Constantine who, after a long period of fighting, largely succeeded in stabilizing the imperial monarchy and bringing internal peace to the empire, even if this was not fully achieved and only temporary.25 For the danger had not been averted permanently. In the 5th century, endless civil wars, which no one was able to control, led to a decline in imperial authority and finally to the disintegration of the Western Roman Empire.26 Meanwhile, in the east, the now ostentatiously Christian empire was permanently established, and thus stabilized, in the virtually impregnable stronghold of Constantinople. As the plebs (δῆμος) of the metropolis could lend significant support to the Augustus but could likewise also represent an existential threat to him,27 communication in the hippodrome became even more important for the preservation of internal peace in Late Antiquity than in earlier periods. This is particularly, and repeatedly, apparent in connection with circus riots, especially in the years 512 and 532 CE.28 Attempts by rebellious generals to usurp the emperor’s power, however, only became a threat again after the end of antiquity. The developments of which I have just given a rough sketch form the framework for the articles brought together here. All of them have in common that they deal with discourses, practices and ‘stagings’ in connection with the explanation, justification, execution, avoidance or resolution of internal conflicts. The events themselves, which can, in any case, often only be reconstructed in part, with the exception of the Roman civil wars at the end of the Republic, are not the focus. Instead, attention is turned to the offers of communication made by participants 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

On the principate as a ‘system of acceptance’ see FLAIG 2011. Cf. BÖRM 2015. On this, see the article by Matthias HAAKE in this volume. Cf. SZIDAT 2010; WIENAND 2015. Cf. BÖRM 2013. Cf. PFEILSCHIFTER 2013 and BELL 2013. Cf. GREATREX 1997, WHITBY 1999 and MEIER 2007.

22

Henning Börm

during and after the conflicts. When one’s own actions and position had been achieved through a victory, how was it possible to legitimize and stabilize them despite their bloody and unlawful roots? How could the reintegration of society be achieved following a conflict? The focus of attention is, therefore, also on the reception of these phenomena in antiquity, in addition to their public stagings. It is, therefore, by no means a coincidence that several contributions attempt to focus on the role of rituals and their modifications in this context. Thus, in the first of the four contributions on Greek history, Hans-Joachim GEHRKE turns to the classical and Hellenistic periods and connects “the institutionalization of the gymnasium that was completed primarily in the Hellenistic period”29 with the attempt to preserve the precarious unity of the poleis, to curb the ‘anger’ of the younger men, which was considered a cause of discord, and thus, ultimately, to work towards preventing stasis. Therefore, the aim was “to include the younger generation in the polis, to socialize it appropriately and to produce citizens”. This was to be done by means of appropriate paideia, which viewed body and mind as inseparable. Following this, Benjamin GRAY’s contribution illustrates that this form of ‘gymnastic’ prevention did not always succeed in avoiding staseis. Proceeding from the epigraphical evidence, he considers ‘stagings’ that were supposed to facilitate the establishment of peace in the poleis after the termination of bloodshed. Thus, a famous inscription from Nakone, which probably dates to the early Hellenistic period, is evidence for a public, symbolic reconciliation of the leading protagonists of both factions after an instance of stasis. An earlier citizenship oath from Dikaia also served this purpose. On the other hand, basing his view on Xenophon, GRAY ascertains that ‘performances’ which were dependent on the particular context can be observed in connection with stasis: “The same civic rituals and scripts could encourage political stability in some contexts, but aggressive factionalism in others”. The reception of an armed internal conflict in one of the most important Hellenistic historiographic sources, Polybius’s Histories, is the focus of Boris DREYER’s contribution. Polybius calls the Mercenary War after the First Punic War stasis30 and gives a fascinating description of this state of affairs, clearly referring to Thucydides’ famous “pathology of stasis”.31 Regardless of whether one is inclined to follow Polybius’s definition of stasis in this instance, it is above all his general remarks on stasis that are worthy of note, as the hubris and avarice of political leaders are identified as the cause of the trouble. DREYER is able to demonstrate that Polybius viewed Rome’s internal unity as the decisive advantage in its struggle against Carthage for hegemony. Henning BÖRM’s contribution discusses the consequences of this Roman hegemony for the late Hellenistic poleis. By the middle of the 2nd century BCE at the latest, most Greek communities had lost much of their scope for action when it 29 30 31

On the gymnasium in Hellenistic times see KAH/SCHOLZ 2007. Pol. 1.66.10, 1.67.2, 1.67.5. Cf. PRICE 2001: 6–66.

Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity

23

came to external politics. All eyes were by now on Rome. Sulla and Pompey had once again demonstrated Rome’s invincibility to the Greeks when, soon after Caesar’s death, the east became the battlefield of the civil war between his murderers and the triumviri. Now Romans were fighting Romans and the outcome was uncertain. Local conflicts appear to have escalated in this situation. Staseis occurred in numerous poleis, and there were significant differences between the ways in which Caesar’s murderers and Caesar’s adherents treated those who were considered to be members of the opposing party. In the next contribution, Federico SANTANGELO examines a very similar circumstance. However, his focus is not on Greek but on Italian communities during the late republican civil wars; since the bellum sociale these communities had generally acquired the civil rights of Roman citizenship. It is true that these towns tried primarily to maneuver their way through those dangerous times unharmed, but “one should not think that the choices of the cities happened in an ideological vacuum …. It is not uncommon to see some cities taking very emphatic and forceful political decisions in this period”. SANTANGELO argues that after the end of the fighting, it was this circumstance, in particular, that caused several communities to find themselves in the unpleasant situation of having sided openly and unambiguously with those that had ultimately been defeated. This posed problems for the communities in question as well as for the victors. In the end, Caesar’s supporter Octavian prevailed. The way in which he dealt with his victory is the focus of Wolfgang HAVENER’s contribution. The divi filius held a three-day triumph in 29 BCE. Arguing against commonly held assumptions, HAVENER argues that Octavian did, by all means, celebrate a triumph for the civil war victory against Mark Antony on the second day, and that the triumph over Egypt was not celebrated until the third day. In the late Republic, triumphs over Romans who had been defeated in bella civilia were considered distasteful, but they were entirely possible. By publicly staging his victory, the future princeps not only marked the end of the lawless civil war period but also began the process of reintegration, which culminated in his position as monocrat over the res publica which facilitated a legal basis, and in the propagation of the pax Augusta. It is true that a new civil war was already looming after Augustus’s death in 14 CE.32 However, it was not until decades later that military means once again decided the question of who was to hold power: in the first Year of the Four Emperors33 following Nero’s death the arcanum imperii was divulged allowing emperors to be elevated by the frontier armies far from Rome.34 In the fighting between the Vitellians and the Flavians, who were ultimately victorious, the Capitol 32

33 34

Velleius Paterculus, being a contemporary of the events, claims that the Roman legions on Rhine and Danube demanded a new leader (dux), a new order (status) and a new res publica. According to him, the only thing missing was a person willing to lead them into battle contra rem publicam (Vell. Pat. 2.125.1f.). Cf. Tac. ann. 1.16–44; Cass. Dio 57.4f. Cf. MORGAN 2006. Finis Neronis ut laetus primo gaudentium impetu fuerat, ita varios motus animorum non modo in urbe apud patres aut populum aut urbanum militem, sed omnis legiones ducesque conciverat, evulgato imperii arcano posse principem alibi quam Romae fieri (Tac. hist. 1.4.2).

24

Henning Börm

also went up in flames; these are the events with which Alexander HEINEMANN’s contribution deals. According to him, the decision made by Vespasian’s followers to occupy the Capitol made little military sense. Instead, like the reference to Jupiter, which was emphasized retrospectively, it was symbolic and was intended to present Vitellius’s enemies as defenders of the res publica. The Flavians intended to demonstrate their legitimacy to the Roman public, not least by way of the reconstruction of the Capitoline temple. Domitian, who had played a minor role in the events of December 69 CE, later stressed this reference in his self-representation, for example, through the cult of Iuppiter Custos. In this context, the assessment of a usurper and the question of justifying the civil war that had become unavoidable as a result of his elevation depended significantly on whether his efforts were ultimately successful, as Martijn ICKS also emphasizes in his contribution. Put briefly, the victory justified the means. As part of a diachronic comparison, ICKS analyses the reports about the proclamation as emperor of three of these ‘good’ pretenders, namely Vespasian, Septimius Severus and Julian. In doing so, he identifies acclamation by a Roman army and (provisional) recusatio imperii as the two decisive elements that are given in biographies and historiography as justifying an act of usurpation.35 It was not until Late Antiquity that the question of whether the emperor’s elevation had been carried out in a ‘formally correct’ way gained greater relevance.36 In this context, the question of justification became increasingly relevant. The reason was that the era of the pax Augusta had come to an end, at the latest once imperial rule rapidly became more unstable after the end of the Severan dynasty, which had already been plagued by growing problems. The numerous usurpations and civil wars in the ‘long 3rd century’ are the subject of Matthias HAAKE’s contribution. There is plenty of evidence for the self-representation and external perception of Constantius II’s civil war victories, and HAAKE uses these as a starting point to examine the developments from the second Year of the Four Emperors (193 CE) onwards, using Septimius Severus, Aurelian and Constantine I as examples, and argues that the emphasis on imperial victory was of central importance. Moreover, Severus’s victories over Roman citizens had a ‘Janus-like’ character because they were both the starting point of his rule as well as a flaw in his accomplishments. HAAKE argues that he was strongly concerned with camouflage, whereas Aurelian staged not only his victories but also his clementia in order to enable a reintegration of the empire, which was threatened by collapse. Finally, Constantine broke new ground, by declaring amongst other things that his rival Maxentius was a tyrannus in 312 CE and thus retrospectively denying the latter as much legitimacy as possible.

35

36

On the recusatio imperii see HUTTNER 2004. Although HUTTNER is correct in distinguishing a ‘staged’ recusatio from a ‘consequent’ recusatio (HUTTNER 2004: 16), one must not forget that they were both ‘staged’. In fact, no man could be forced to become Roman emperor. Thus a ‘failed’ recusatio was just as much a ritual as a ‘successful’ one. Cf. TRAMPEDACH 2005 and SZIDAT 2013.

Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity

25

The fact that Constantine had the decapitated head of his defeated enemy publicly displayed and defiled forms the starting point for Troels Myrup KRISTENSEN’s contribution: what significance did publicly staged violence assume in connection with Roman civil wars, and were the different forms of violence chosen deliberately? The presentation of the decapitated head, in particular, already served as a symbol of victory before 312 CE; KRISTENSEN is right to emphasize “the immense rhetorical and symbolic power of decapitation” and presents the hypothesis that the fundamental purpose of this particular kind of violence was to legitimize an individual’s rule. The bellum civile between Constantius II and his cousin Julian, imminent in the autumn of 361 CE, was avoided owing to the sudden death of the senior Augustus; but when Julian arrived at the eastern court in Constantinople, he had to deal with representatives of an élite who had supported his enemy. Considering the inauguration speech of his new consul Claudius Mamertinus at New Year’s Day 362, in particular, and the numismatic evidence, Johannes WIENAND analyses the communicative strategy of the new monocrat in the first months of his reign as sole Augustus. WIENAND comes to the conclusion that in the early post-conflict period Julian did not try to win his cousin’s former followers over for his own purposes, as could be expected. Rather, a comparably wide segment of the administrative élite of the East was branded responsible for the conflict. Julian thus intended to display his qualities as a ‘law’s avenger’ and ‘defender of Roman liberty’, but the approach was not entirely conducive to reintegration. The face of emperors and pretenders plays an important role in Marco MATTHEIS’s contribution. Following a ruler’s proclamation, portraits of him were sent to the most important towns, which then had to side with either the sender’s opponents or his followers by accepting or rejecting the portrait. MATTHEIS interprets this custom as a ritual and makes it his starting point for more general considerations regarding the significance of ritual in the context of late Roman civil wars.37 The custom made neutrality impossible, as there was no third option available; one either declared oneself for or against a particular candidate. According to MATTHEIS, these instances of staging were fundamental channels through which rulers were able to make their acceptance by the populace visible in the case of success. In this way, they were able to underline their claim that they ruled legitimately and to justify the civil war for which they were in part responsible. But it was not just the civitates that were important addressees of a ruler’s communication. Following the previous contributions, Peter BELL considers another group, namely the ‘circus factions’, the importance of which with regard to the preservation of imperial power in Constantinople was to exceed that of the palatini in the further course of Late Antiquity.38 He stresses the fact that the factiones were heterogeneous with regard to their social, legal and ethnic background and that they played an important role in the stabilization of the imperial position. They had powerful and even imperial patrons, and in BELL’s view, throughout 37 38

Cf. MATTHEIS 2014. Cf. WHITBY 1999. On acclamations in Late Antiquity see WIEMER 2013.

26

Henning Börm

most of Late Antiquity, they usually helped to prevent sedition rather than causing it. But if the court did not succeed in using the rivalries and conflicts between the Greens and the Blues to its advantage, this could lead to a dangerous public delegitimization of the government, a factor which in 602 and 610 CE contributed significantly to the fall of two emperors. Finally, Johannes WIENAND’s discussion of an exceptional specimen of a sestertius minted under the emperor Maximinus Thrax39 forms an epilogue. After the overturn of the emperor in 238 CE, someone reworked the coin in such a way that it showed the unpleasant fate of the ruler whose decapitated head was paraded through Rome on a lance. This impressive case of a damnatio memoriae presents rare evidence for the way in which the images and interpretive patterns emerging from civil war and civil war victory were received and transformed by the populace affected. As such, the coin is a fitting conclusion for the present volume on the cover of which it is depicted.

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY AMBÜHL, A., 2015. Krieg und Bürgerkrieg bei Lucan und in der griechischen Literatur, Frankfurt am Main. ARMITAGE, D., 2009. Civil War and Revolution: What Can the Study of Civil War Bring to Our Understanding of Revolutions? Agora 44, 18–22. BECK, H. (ed.), 2013. A Companion to Ancient Greek Government, Malden. BELL, P., 2013. Social Conflict in the Age of Justinian: Its Nature, Management, and Medition, Oxford. BÖRM, H., 2008. Die Herrschaft des Kaisers Maximinus Thrax und das Sechskaiserjahr 238. Gymnasium 115, 69–86. BÖRM, H., 2013. Westrom. Von Honorius bis Justinian, Stuttgart. BÖRM, H. (ed.), 2015. Antimonarchic Discourse in Antiquity, Stuttgart. BREED, B. – DAMON, C. – ROSSI, A. (eds.), 2010. Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford. BROWN, M., 1997. The Causes of Internal Conflict: An Overview, in: M. Brown (ed.), Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict, Cambridge Mass., 3–25. CARTLEDGE, P., 2003. Class Struggle. OCD3, 335–336. CHANIOTIS, A., 2005. War in the Hellenistic World, Malden. DEPPMEYER, K., 2013. Vom Germanicus maximus zum Staatsfeind, in: H. PÖPPELMANN – K. DEPPMEYER – W.-D. STEINMETZ (eds.), Roms vergessener Feldzug, Darmstadt, 359–364. FEARON, J., 2004. Why Do Some Civil Wars Last So Much Longer Than Others? Journal of Peace Research 41, 275–301. FERHADBEGOVIĆ, S. – WEIFFEN, B., 2011. Zum Phänomen der Bürgerkriege, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (eds.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 9–33. FLAIG, E., 2011. The Transition from Republic to Principate: Loss of Legitimacy, Revolution, and Acceptance, in: J. ARNASON – K. RAAFLAUB (eds.), The Roman Empire in Context, Chichester, 67–84. FUKS, A., 1974. Patterns and Types of Social-Economic Revolution in Greece: From the Fourth to the Second Century BC. AncSoc 5, 51–81. 39

Cf. BÖRM 2008, HAEGEMANS 2010 and DEPPMEYER 2013.

Civil Wars in Greek and Roman Antiquity

27

GEHRKE, H.-J., 1985. Stasis. Untersuchungen zu den inneren Kriegen in den griechischen Staaten des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Munich. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1987. Die Griechen und die Rache. Ein Versuch in historischer Psychologie. Saeculum 38, 121–149. GOTTER, U., 2011. Abgeschlagene Hände und herausquellendes Gedärm. Das hässliche Antlitz der römischen Bürgerkriege und seine politischen Kontexte, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (eds.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 55–70. GRAY, B., 2015. Stasis and Stability, Oxford. GREATREX, G., 1997. The Nika Riot: A Reappraisal. JHS 117, 60–86. HAEGEMANS, K., 2010. Imperial Authority and Dissent: The Roman Empire in AD 235–238, Leuven. HANSEN, M. H., 2004. Stasis as an Essential Aspect of the Polis, in: M. H. HANSEN – T. H. NIELSEN (eds.), An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis, Oxford, 124–129. HARTER-UIBOPUU, K. – MITTHOF, F. (eds.), 2013. Vergeben und Vergessen? Amnestie in der Antike, Vienna. HARTMANN, F., 1982. Herrscherwechsel und Reichskrise. Untersuchungen zu den Ursachen und Konsequenzen der Herrscherwechsel im Imperium Romanum der Soldatenkaiserzeit (3. Jahrhundert n. Chr.), Frankfurt am Main. HERBERG-ROTHE, A., 2003. Der Krieg. Geschichte und Gegenwart, Frankfurt am Main. HEUSS, A., 1973. Das Revolutionsproblem im Spiegel der antiken Geschichte. HZ 216, 1–72. HIRSCHMANN, A., 1986. Exit and Voice: An Expanding Sphere of Influence, in: A. HIRSCHMANN (ed.), Rival Views of Market Society and Other Recent Essays, New York, 77–101. HUTTNER, U., 2004. Recusatio Imperii. Ein politisches Ritual zwischen Ethik und Taktik, Hildesheim. JOHNE, K.-P., 2008. Das Kaisertum und die Herrscherwechsel, in: K.-P. JOHNE (ed.), Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. (235–284), Berlin, 583–632. KAH, D. – SCHOLZ, P. (eds.), 2007. Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin. KALYVAS, S., 2006. The Logic of Violence in Civil War, Cambridge. KALYVAS, S., 2007. Civil Wars, in: C. BOIX – S. STOKES (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics, Oxford, 416–434. LEGON, R., 1966. Demos and Stasis: Studies in the Factional Politics of Classical Greece, Ithaca. LEPPIN, H., 2015. Coping with the Tyrant’s Faction: Civil-War Amnesties and Christian Discourses in the Fourth Century, in: J. WIENAND (ed.), Contested Monarchy: Integrating the Roman Empire in the Fourth Century AD, New York, 198–214. LINTOTT, A., 1982. Violence, Civil Strife and Revolution in the Classical City, London. MATTHEIS, M., 2014. Der Kampf ums Ritual. Diskurs und Praxis traditioneller Rituale in der Spätantike, Düsseldorf. MEIER, M., 2007. Staurotheis di’hemas – Der Aufstand gegen Anastasios im Jahr 512. Millenium 4, 157–237. MORGAN, G., 2006. 69 AD: The Year of Four Emperors, Oxford. NEWMAN, E. – DEROUEN, K. (eds.), 2014. Routledge Handbook of Civil Wars, London. PEACHIN, M. (ed.), 2011. The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World, Oxford. PFEILSCHIFTER, R., 2013. Der Kaiser und Konstantinopel. Kommunikation und Konfliktaustrag in einer spätantike Metropole, Berlin. PRICE, J., 2001. Thucydides and Internal War, Cambridge. RAAFLAUB, K., 2010. Poker um Macht und Freiheit. Caesars Bürgerkrieg als Wendepunkt im Übergang von der Republik zur Monarchie, in: B. LINKE – M. MEIER – M. STROTHMANN (eds.), Zwischen Monarchie und Republik, Stuttgart, 163–186. RAMPOZZO, N., 2005. Il ‘bellum iustum’ e le sue cause. Index 33, 235–261. ROSENBERGER, V., 1992. Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart 1992.

28

Henning Börm

RUBIN, Z., 1984. Pax als politisches Schlagwort im Alten Rom, in: M. SCHLENKE – K.-J. MATZ (eds.), Frieden und Friedenssicherung in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart, Munich, 21–34. RUCH, P., 2013. Rachedesign. Vom äußeren Fremdzwang zum inneren Gefühl, in: Y. MILEV (ed.), Design Kulturen. Der erweiterte Designbegriff im Entwurfsfeld der Kulturwissenschaft, Munich, 109–121. RUSCHENBUSCH, E., 1978. Untersuchungen zu Staat und Politik in Griechenland vom 7.–4. Jh. v. Chr., Bamberg. SAMBANIS, N., 2004. What is Civil War? Conceptual and Empirical Complexities of an Operational Definition. Journal of Conflict Resolution 48, 814–858. SCHMITZ, W., 2014. Die griechische Gesellschaft, Heidelberg. DE STE. CROIX, G., 1981. The Class Struggle in the Ancient World from the Archaic Age to the Arab Conquests, London. STICKLER, T., 2007. The Foederati, in: P. ERDKAMP (ed.), A Companion to the Roman Army, Oxford, 495–514. SZIDAT, J., 2010. Usurpator tanti nominis. Kaiser und Usurpator in der Spätantike (337–476 n. Chr.), Stuttgart. SZIDAT, J., 2013. Zur Rolle des Patriarchen von Konstantinopel bei der Erhebung eines Kaisers im 5. u. 6. Jhd. GFA 16, 51–61. TASLER, P. – KEHNE, P., 1999. Bürgerkrieg, in: H. SONNABEND (ed.), Mensch und Landschaft in der Antike, Stuttgart, 76–82. TRAMPEDACH, K., 2005. Kaiserwechsel und Krönungsritual im Konstantinopel des 5. und 6. Jahrhunderts, in: M. STEINICKE – S. WEINFURTER (eds.), Investitur- und Krönungsrituale, Cologne, 275–290. VEIT, A. – SCHLICHTE, K., 2011. Gewalt und Erzählung. Zur Legitimierung bewaffneter Gruppen, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (eds.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 153–176. WALDMANN, P., 1998. Bürgerkrieg – Annäherung an einen schwer fassbaren Begriff, in: H.-W. KRUMWIEDE – P. WALDMANN (eds.), Bürgerkriege. Folgen und Regulierungsmöglichkeiten, Baden-Baden, 15–36. WALTER, U., 1998. Der Begriff des Staates in der griechischen und römischen Geschichte, in: HANTOS, T. – LEHMANN, G. A. (eds.), Althistorisches Kolloquium aus Anlaß des 70. Geburtstages von Jochen Bleicken, Stuttgart, 9–27. WHITBY, M., 1999. The Violence of the Circus Factions, in: K. HOPWOOD (ed.), Organized Crime in Antiquity, Swansea, 229–253. WIENAND, J. (ed.), 2015. Contested Monarchy: Integrating the Roman Empire in the Fourth Century AD, New York. WIEMER, H.-U., 2013. Voces populi. Akklamationen als Surrogat politischer Partizipation im spätrömischen Reich, in: E. FLAIG (ed.), Genesis und Dynamiken der Mehrheitsentscheidung, Munich, 173–202. WOLPERT, A., 2002. Remembering Defeat: Civil War and Civic Memory in Ancient Athens, Baltimore. ZIMMERMANN, M., 2007. Antike Kriege zwischen privaten Kriegsherren und staatlichem Monopol auf Kriegsführung, in: D. BEYRAU – M. HOCHGESCHWENDER – D. LANGEWIESCHE (eds.), Formen des Krieges von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart, Paderborn, 51–70.

PART ONE FROM THE CLASSICAL AGE TO THE EARLY PRINCIPATE

STASIS UND SOZIALISATION. ÜBERLEGUNGEN ZUR FUNKTION DES GYMNASTISCHEN IN DER POLIS Hans-Joachim Gehrke

ABSTRACT: It is well known that from the late Classical period onwards the gymnasium played an increasingly important role within the polis. Contemporary authors such as Plato, Aristotle, Polybius and Lucian as well as epigraphic sources make it clear that the training in these facilities served not least the purpose of controlling the emotions and the passion (thymos) of the young men. It was thought that, while passion was needed for a polis to survive, uncontrolled emotions and pleonexia could easily lead to stasis and civil strife, and the gymnasium, “taming” the neoi and channeling their passions, was intended to establish euexia within the young men, a state in which bodily and mental health are in perfection. Therefore the main purpose of the Hellenistic gymnasium was not only to provide the young citizens with military training, but also to prevent them from starting a civil war.

I. DIE STASIS UND IHRE THERAPIE Bekanntlich ist Platons ‚Politeia‘ in gewisser Weise ein Schlüsseltext für die Klassifizierung, die innere Erfahrung und die gedankliche Bewältigung der Stasis in der griechischen Poliswelt.1 Wie es sich gehört, beruht dort die Therapie auf der Diagnose. Und diese hält sich nicht mit empirischen Einzelheiten auf, sozusagen mit den Symptomen, sondern zielt direkt auf den Kern. Aus persönlicher, ja intimer Kenntnis des Sachverhalts und nicht zuletzt von dessen psychologischen Implikationen legt Platon den Finger auf die Wunde. 2 In der Wiederaufnahme der Debatte über die Gerechtigkeit im zweiten Buch der ‚Politeia‘ spielen seine Brüder Glaukos und Adeimantos die advocati diaboli. Als Vertreter gängiger und als richtig angesehener Ansichten betonen sie markant den Vorrang der Ungerechtigkeit gegenüber der Gerechtigkeit. Gehe es schlicht darum, was einer wolle – führt Glaukon aus (359c) –, werde auch der Gerechte sich so verhalten wie der Ungerechte. Das liege an dem Naturgesetz des ‚Mehrhabenwollens‘ (pleonexia), welchem nur durch größeren Zwang, nämlich durch Ge-

1

2

Dieser Artikel überschneidet sich mit zwei weiteren Beiträgen, die ich zu der Thematik verfasst habe und von denen einer mittlerweile erschienen ist (GEHRKE 2013), der andere ist noch im Druck (GEHRKE 2015). Einem Vortrag von Oliver PRIMAVESI auf einer diesem Thema („Bürger bilden“) gewidmeten Tagung der Fritz Thyssen-Stiftung (Köln, Dezember 2010) verdanke ich die Anregung zu der hier gegebenen Pointierung. Statt vieler vgl. die prononcierten Bemerkungen bei TRAMPEDACH 1994: 153–161.

32

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

setz und Gewalt bzw. mit der Gewalt des Gesetzes begegnet werden könne.3 Deswegen – so wenig später Adeimantos – sei es notwendig, dass man „einander bewache, auf dass keiner Unrecht tue“.4 Da es überdies nur auf den Eindruck gerechten Handelns, auf das gerecht ‚Scheinen‘ (dokein, 365c) ankomme, könne man heimlich Verschwörungen machen und Cliquen bilden (synōmosias kai hetairias) und im Übrigen, gestützt auf die Lehrer in der Überredungskunst (peithous didaskaloi), mit deren Weisheit (sophia) in der Volksversammlung und vor Gericht durch Überredung und Überwältigung5 erreichen, dass man bei Verfolgung der pleonexia, also der ganz egoistischen Ziele, keine Bestrafung oder Ahndung zu befürchten habe.6 Gerade hiermit aber ist der Kern der Stasis nach seiner Motivik und damit in seinen psychologischen Komponenten präzise bezeichnet; die Nähe zu Thukydides ist mit Händen zu greifen, vor allem wenn man an die so genannte Pathologie denkt: Hier regiert die a-moralische Orientierung am eigenen Besten, ungebremst, sich Komplizen schaffend und im Zweifelsfalle davonkommend mit einer wertfreien Rhetorik, die lehrt, „die schwächere Sache zur stärkeren zu machen“, gewaltbereit und nur überlegener Gewalt sich beugend, angetrieben von pleonexia, die sich à la longue potenziert.7 Welche Antwort(en) Platon auf diese Problematik fand, welche Therapie also auf diese Diagnose antwortete, kann und muss hier nicht im Einzelnen erörtert werden. Eines der in diesem Zusammenhang wesentlichen Konzepte scheint mir jedoch besondere Beachtung zu verdienen, weil es einen Weg erklären kann oder mindestens erklären oder auch nur konturieren könnte, den man innerhalb der griechischen Polis nach meiner Auffassung konkret, nicht nur idealiter beschritt, um die Stasis – ansetzend beim Psychologischen – einzuhegen – was im Übrigen nicht bedeutet, das sei zur Klarstellung gleich vorausgeschickt, dass Platon hier gleichsam als Blaupause benutzt wurde. Bei Platons Konzept ist wesentlich, dass er in der Psyche wie in der Polis zwischen der Vernunft bzw. dem Dominierenden und den Begierden bzw. dem Dienenden eine dritte Größe einführte, im Modell des Staates die Wächter, in dem der Seele das ‚Muthafte‘, das thymoeides; denn in der Welt der Politik komme es, auf Grund der erwähnten pleonexia (vgl. 373d), zu Kriegen, zu deren Führung Spezialisten nötig seien, die die nötige Muße (scholē) sowie Kenntnis und Übung (epistēmē, meletē, 374b–d) in militärischen Angelegenheiten haben sollten. Besonders wichtig sind aber die Charaktere bzw. Naturen derer, die als Wächter ge3

4 5

6 7

Die meisten Manuskripte haben hier asyndetisch die beiden Dative nomōi und biāi, F hat den Genitiv nomou. Das passt haargenau zu den geläufigen Konzepten von der Bedeutung der Gesetze seit Solon, vgl. dazu etwa GEHRKE 1995: 22. allēlous ephylattomen mē adikein, Plat. rep. 367a. peisomen, biasometha; dass mit Rhetorik durchaus die Vorstellung einer überwältigenden Kraft verbunden war, wird vor allem im ‚Gorgias‘ diskutiert, erhellt aber nicht zuletzt gerade aus einem Text des großen Rhetors selbst, dem enkōmion Helenēs; vgl. hierzu jetzt auch prägnant FLASHAR 2013: 140f. dikēn mē didonai, 365d. Hierzu vgl. vor allem GEHRKE 1985: 328–339.

Stasis und Sozialisation

33

eignet sind. Dazu gehören körperliche Qualitäten, und vor allem das schon genannte ‚Muthafte‘ (thymoeides8). Der Mut (oder auch Energie, Eifer, Leidenschaft, spirit – thymos) ist etwas ‚Unbekämpfbares‘ und ‚Unbesiegbares‘ (amachon, anikēton), und wenn das vorhanden ist (parontos) „ist die Seele in jeder Hinsicht furchtlos (aphobos) und unbezwingbar (aēttētos)“ (375ab). Dieser Eifer aber ist zugleich sozial gefährlich, sowohl innerhalb der Wächter selbst als auch gegenüber den Mitbürgern (tois allois politais). Die mit derartigem thymos ausgestatteten Personen sind nämlich wild (agrioi), und deshalb müssen sie zusätzlich auch noch eine philosophische Ader haben und entsprechend ausgebildet werden.9 Kurzum: „Weisheitsliebend (philosophos), muthaft, schnell und stark von Natur wird also sein, wer ein guter und tüchtiger Wächter der Polis sein soll“ (376c). Das Motiv der Wildheit und des Wilden vertieft Platon noch bei der Analogie der Seelenteile, in der explizit von einer ‚Stasis‘ in der Seele die Rede ist, einem Konflikt zwischen dem Vernünftigen und dem Begehrenden, also zwischen Vernunft und Trieb, in dem dann das thymoeides der Vernunft als ‚Verbündeter‘ beitritt (441e). Aber das ist nun ein alles andere als bequemer Alliierter! Eine seiner Leidenschaften ist zum Beispiel die Wut, etwa über erlittenes Unrecht (440a–c), die ihn nicht ruhen und auf Rache sinnen lässt. Darüber hinaus sind in dem späteren Abschnitt über die timokratische Verfassung und den timokratischen Charakter, die erste Abweichung von der besten Verfassung, der Aristokratie, die Siegessucht (philonikia) und der Ehrgeiz (philotimia) die Charakteristika des ‚Mutartigen‘. Sie zeigen sich auch in seinem Hochmut sowie seiner Liebe zu Krieg, Sport und Jagd.10 Dieser ‚mutartige‘ Faktor in der Stasiskonstellation ist also durchaus ambivalent. Viele seiner Triebkräfte sind gerade solche, die zum Bürgerkrieg führen. Das schärft Platon sogar noch in einem gewaltigen Bild ein, das er im 9. Buch liefert, nach der Präsentation des Tiefpunktes der politisch-psychischen Entwicklung, der des tyrannischen Menschen. Dabei kommt er gleichsam resümierend auf die Ausgangspositionen der beiden Platon-Brüder zurück. Hier wird die Seele als ein Wesen imaginiert, das aus einem vielköpfigen Monster, einem Löwen und einem Menschen zusammengesetzt ist (588cd): Durch ungerechtes Verhalten werde dieser innere Mensch (also das oben genannte Vernünftige) schwächer und schwächer zugunsten der beiden ohnehin schon größeren Anderen. So werden dann diese nicht „aneinander gewöhnt und zum Freund gemacht“ (synethizein, philon poiein), sondern dazu gebracht, „einander zu beißen und im Kampf zu verzehren“.11

8

9 10 11

Zu diesem als physische Voraussetzung eines guten Athleten s. auch Philostr. gymn. 6. Sehr erhellend sind generell die Bemerkungen zum thymos bei BLÖßNER 2006: 121f., 138, 141, 145– 147. 375e–376d. 545a, 547d, 548bc, 549a, 550b. daknesthai te kai machomena esthiein allēla, 589a.

34

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Das ist Stasis pur – und markiert zugleich ein totales Dilemma. Gegen die Stasis braucht man ja eine Verbindung von Vernunft und Eifer, Weisheit und Leidenschaft, innerem Menschen und Löwen. Man muss also mit dem Feuer spielen. Und wenn man das nicht unter Kontrolle hält oder nicht in den Griff bekommt, ist eine vollkommene Katastrophe, die Selbstzerfleischung, das Resultat. Der größte Teil der ‚Politeia‘ gilt im Grunde der Frage, wie man das durch Erziehung, insbesondere auch intellektuell, auffangen kann. Dabei geht es aber keineswegs allein um das Philosophische. Gerade im Hinblick auf das von der Natur her so wichtige thymoeides spielen Musisches und Gymnastisches eine wichtige Rolle. Gerade diese tragen dazu bei, die oben erwähnte Ambivalenz in der Balance zu halten, die negative Seite der Leidenschaft nicht auszumerzen (man braucht sie ja bzw. muss sie in Kauf nehmen), aber nicht zu stark werden zu lassen. Das Musische und das Gymnastische fördern eine solche Balance, eine Mischung, welche die Spannung in und durch Harmonie und Rhythmus ausgleicht12 und entsprechend in der Gesamtseele philia und harmonia erzeugt (443de). Gerade hier möchte ich nun ansetzen: Die Erkenntnis, dass man gegen die Stasis mit Kräften operieren und kooperieren müsse, die als solche gefährlich sind, dass man also gleichsam auf einem Raubtier zu reiten habe, scheint mir weit über Platon hinaus verbreitet gewesen zu sein, und desgleichen auch der Versuch, diese Kräfte gerade durch Erziehung so zu bändigen, dass sie ihr Potential behielten, aber im Sinne der Gemeinschaft entfalteten. Dabei finden wir ein ganzes Bündel von Maßnahmen und Konzepten, unter denen aber das Gymnastische, einschließlich des Tänzerischen, eine besondere Rolle spielte. Ich stelle deshalb die These auf, dass die Ausformung einer bestimmten körperlichen Erziehung, beruhend auf Vorstellungen von psycho-somatischen Wechselwirkungen und zum Ausdruck kommend in einer sehr spezifischen Mischung von Kraft und Eleganz, Energie und Bewegung, die männliche Sozialisation deshalb so prägte, weil man auf diesem Wege eine selbstbewusste und kampfesfrohe, leidenschaftliche und ehrbewusste Männlichkeit in die Polis hineinformieren wollte, ohne sie ihrer Antriebskräfte zu berauben, sondern sie zugleich noch effektiver trainierend. Ein klares Bewusstsein für solche Zusammenhänge belegt sehr schön eine Passage des Polybios, der im Übrigen selbst das ‚Produkt‘ einer solchen Erziehung war (die, das sei ebenfalls zur Vermeidung von Missverständnissen betont, auch erhebliche geistige Anstrengungen beinhaltete, über die freilich bisher schon wesentlich mehr gesagt wurde als über die hier herausgestellten Sachverhalte). Es geht an jener Stelle13 um die Rolle der Musik14 und des Tanzes bei den Arkadern. 12 13 14

441e–442a; dazu ist ein ganzes Curriculum entfaltet in 398c–412b. Pol. 4.20.4–21.4. Zur Rolle von Auleten bei Armee und Marine s. MARROU 1977: 243 Anm. 78. Hier ließen sich die generell noch mannigfache Erörterungen über die Musik und ihre soziale und politische Bedeutung anschließen. Dies wäre gewiss wichtig und für eine zusammenfassend-systematische Behandlung der Thematik auch unerlässlich. Hier jedoch muss es aus Zeit- bzw. Platzgründen fürs erste bei der Konzentration auf die körperliche Bewegung und Haltung bleiben.

Stasis und Sozialisation

35

Polybios, der als Megalopolite hier auf eigene Erfahrungen zurückgreifen konnte, hebt die Bedeutung der Musik, des Musikunterrichts und der musikalischen Kenntnisse hervor, insbesondere für die Jugendlichen (paides) und die jungen Männer bis 30 (neaniskoi). Sie praktizieren Musik auf unterschiedliche Weise und unterschiedlichen Niveaus, wobei der von der Flöte vorgegebene Takt15 eine besondere Bedeutung hat. Dazu gehört auch, dass sie nicht nur mit bedeutenden dithyrambischen Weisen vertraut sind, sondern auch in Form von Wettbewerben nach Altersgruppen im Theater Tänze aufführen, mit großem Ehrgeiz und professioneller Begleitung. Die jungen Männer (neoi) führen das Ergebnis ihres Trainingsfleißes in Marschmusik mit Flötenbegleitung und in Formation (embatēria met’ aulou kai taxeōs) sowie im Tanzen (orchēseis) jährlich ebenfalls im Theater vor.16 So bewunderten Xenophon und seine ‚10 000‘ auch die Mantineier und einige andere Arkader, die während eines Opferfestes in Paphlagonien „vollständig gerüstet, so schön es ging, im Takt daherschritten, im Rhythmus des Waffentanzes von der Flöte begleitet, den Paian sangen und wie auf den Götterprozessionen tanzten“.17 Polybios sieht den Sinn dieser Bräuche darin, dass es darauf angekommen sei, den von Natur aus (auf Grund der geographischen Lage) rauen Sinn der Arkader zu mildern und abzuschwächen, weshalb es auch gemeinsame Tänze von Mädchen und Jungen gebe. Wesentlich ist – und das zeigt sich nicht zuletzt in den auch militärisch bedeutsamen Bewegungs- und Tanzübungen – die soziale Komponente, nämlich dass die hochfahrenden, harten und unbeugsamen Naturen18 gerade durch stetig wiederholte, rhythmisch eingeübte und damit einstimmende Weise durch körperliche Bewegungen in das gemeinschaftliche Handeln regelrecht hineingeformt wurden bzw. dass, andersherum gesehen, die Gemeinschaft dem Körper gleichsam eingeschrieben wurde – mit den schon angesprochenen Folgen für die psychisch-mentale Orientierung. Dass Polybios in diesem Zusammenhang den starken Begriff authades gebraucht, ist besonders charakteristisch. Dieser Begriff steht nämlich für ein übermäßig entwickeltes individuelles Ehrgefühl19, also eine besonders gemeinschaftsfeindliche, gleichsam a-soziale Komponente. Er bezeichnet markant, womit man es zu tun hatte, wenn man Gemeinschaft organisieren und bewahren wollte.

II. DAS GYMNASTISCHE UND DIE POLIS: DIE IDEE Wie stark nun darüber hinaus das Gymnastische im engeren Sinne nicht nur für das Griechische steht, sondern auch für die Polis und deren Wohlergehen, demonstriert wohl am besten ein recht später, aber umso plastischerer Text. In seiner 15 16 17 18 19

aulos kai rhythmos, 4.20.6. 4.20.9, 12 mit WALBANK 1957: 467–469. Xen. anab. 6.1.11. Das authades, skleron, ateramnon tēs psychēs (Pol. 4.21.3–4). GEHRKE 1987: 128 mit weiteren Hinweisen.

36

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Schrift ‚Anacharsis‘ nutzt Lukian die Figur des gleichnamigen weisen Skythen als eine Figur, in der man mit dem Barbarischen spielen und auch einmal – analog der Gestalt des Edlen Wilden – eine fremde Weisheit imaginieren konnte. Konkret führt uns Lukian in diesem Rahmen eine Debatte über den Sinn und Nutzen des Sports, der gymnasía, vor. Sie ergibt sich zwischen dem griechischen Weisen Solon und dem Skythen, als dieser sich als Besucher im Gymnasion wegen all der Merkwürdigkeiten, die er sieht, höchlichst erstaunt zeigt, als habe er es mit Irren zu tun (er spricht wörtlich von mania). Der Blick von außen, der hier konstruiert wird, ist in doppelter Ironie gebrochen: Der Ausländer ist nur eine vorgestellte und in mancher Hinsicht auch – im Sinne der erwähnten Tradition – idealisierte Figur (wie übrigens auch der Solon des Dialogs), die sich über die Absonderlichkeiten des ihm völlig fremden griechischen Sports wundert und gerade dessen Nutzen für das Militärische in Frage stellt. Er wird aber andererseits auch selber, als Fremder, ironisiert (30). Gerade damit aber ist auch klar, dass das Gymnastische – so wollen wir die Summe der Aktivitäten im Gymnasion bezeichnen – hier als eine spezifische Eigenheit der griechischen Kultur präsentiert wird, und zwar eine solche, die tief in der griechischen Tradition verwurzelt und deutlich normativ besetzt ist (wie schon die Figur Solons zum Ausdruck bringt). Wie alles Wesentliche bei den Griechen wird der Sport als Spezifikum Gegenstand eines literarisch-intellektuellen Diskurses, in den die elegante Schrift des geistreichen Sophisten hineingehört. Der Diskurs geht über den Nutzen des Gymnastischen für die Polis, also genau um die auch uns interessierende Frage nach der sozialen Rolle der körperlichen Formung. Im ‚Anacharsis‘ Lukians entfaltet er sich in einem bestimmten Sinne, so dass sich aus dem Dialog – dessen Autors Meinung sei dahingestellt – eine eindeutige Position und Konzeption, eine Leitidee oder Norm, sozusagen eine Sollbestimmung, erschließen lässt. Man kann sie auf folgende Weise zusammenfassen.20 Die Polis – nach wie vor gesehen und gedacht als die Form der politischen und sozialen Organisation – ruht wesentlich auf, ja sie besteht gleichsam in ihren Bürgern. Sie machen die Polis aus (20) und ihre Qualität ist ausschlaggebend für das Wohlergehen des Gemeinwesens. Insbesondere die ‚besten Bürger‘ (aristoi politai) sind maßgeblich für die bestmögliche Governance (14, vgl. 15, 20, 30). Für diese Qualitäten aber ist gerade die ‚Gymnastik‘, mithin das Gymnastische, Training und Wettkampf im Gymnasion, wesentlich. Das gilt schon ganz generell, und zwar sowohl im körperlichen als auch im seelischen Sinne. Beides steht, auch das ist von vornherein selbstverständlich wie die Existenz der Polis, in einer inneren und innigen Verbindung. In physischer Hinsicht fördert das Gymnastische die Gesundheit und die Ästhetik des Körpers, und zwar sowohl in der Substanz wie in der Konstitution und

20

Zu beachten ist daneben vor allem die sehr plastische Beschreibung dieser Aspekte des Gymnastischen bei Philon von Alexandreia (spec. leg. 229f.), vgl. BRINGMANN 2007: 250.

Stasis und Sozialisation

37

im Auftreten.21 Damit ist generell auch eine bessere Gesundheit gewährleistet (26). Gerade die Erfahrungen des körperlichen Trainings und des Wettkampfs (empeiriai deinai, 12) und die daraus resultierende Kraft (ischys amachos, 12) wirken sich nun positiv auf die Seele aus. Sie fördern Selbstvertrauen, Wagemut und vor allem Ehrgeiz und nachhaltigen Siegeswillen.22 Die hiermit erworbenen Qualitäten haben nun positive politische (im Sinne der Polis) Wirkungen. Im Frieden verhindern sie falsche Orientierungen und problematische Zielsetzungen, nämlich anmaßendes und rücksichtsloses Verhalten (hybris) infolge von Untätigkeit und Bemühungen um das, was sich nicht gehört (30), sie wirken also, mit unseren Worten gesagt, im Sinne der gesellschaftlichen Normen gegen unsoziale Einstellungen und Verhaltensweisen. Im positiven Sinne fördern diese ‚gymnastisch‘ erworbenen Qualitäten den Gemeinschaftsgeist (sympoliteuesthai, 20), gerade weil sich die Beteiligten in einem ‚gemeinsamen Agon‘ verbunden fühlen, der Freiheit und Wohlstand verbürgt (15). Besonders wichtig ist das Gymnastische nach außen hin, also im Extremfall in Kriegskonstellationen. Zunächst wirkt es auf Nachbarn abschreckend wegen des extern wahrnehmbaren Eindrucks der Überlegenheit,23 und überhaupt bietet es Gewähr für Integrität, Freiheit und damit Wohlstand der Polis auch gegenüber – potentiellen und realen – Feinden.24 Dafür, und das heißt, konkret gesagt, gerade im Gefecht, sind die durch den Sport vermittelten Eigenschaften der Abhärtung25 und Geschicklichkeit26 ausschlaggebend. Die Zusammenhänge von Härte und Eleganz,27 von Substanz und Form, von Körper und Seele kommen nicht zuletzt in einer bestimmten Ästhetik zum Ausdruck. Für diese steht, nicht nur im ‚Anacharsis‘, der Begriff euexia – übersetzen wir ihn zunächst nur künstlich mit ‚Wohlhaltung‘. Hier bezeichnet er generell die körperliche Wohlgestalt: Die Trainierten sind gebräunt und sehen männlich aus (arrēnōpoi, 25). Sie sind weder zu dick noch zu dünn, sondern haben eine ausgewogene Figur (symmetron, 25). Wenn sie nackt auftreten, müssen sie sich nicht schämen (39). Euexia bringt also die gute Konstitution als gutes Aussehen zum Ausdruck. Und diese Konstitution wird eben nicht nur als körperliche verstanden. Die euexia in diesem Sinne macht den entscheidenden psychosomatischen Zusammenhang von körperlichem Training und psychischem Einsatz in der Außenwirkung sinnlich erfahrbar: Wer eine solche ‚Wohlhaltung‘ genießt, „der demonstriert deutlich das Lebendige, Feurige, Männliche“ (empsychon, thermon, andrōdes, 25). 21

22 23 24 25 26 27

Es geht um die ‚Blüte‘ (akmē, Lukian. anach. 6) bzw. die Schönheit und Wohlgestalt im Körperlichen (kallē somatōn / euexiai thaumastai, 12) sowie Abhärtung und Training (diaponein to sōma, askēseis, 15). tolma, philotimia, gnōmai aēttētoi, spudē alēktos hyper tēs nikēs, 12. Die Bürger wirken furchteinflößend auf die Nachbarn (phoberoi tois perioikois, 30). Man kann die Stadt im Kriege retten und ihr Freiheit und Wohlstand bewahren (ek polemou sōsein tēn polin kai eleutheran kai eudaimona diaphylaxein, 20). karterōtera ta sōmata (24f.). Man kann eumarōs agieren (24f., 28). Vgl. auch Philostr. gymn. 6.

38

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Ähnlich wie im klassischen Ideal der kalokagathia gehen hier ÄußerlichKörperliches und Innerlich-Geistiges zusammen, eine markante Melange des Physischen und des Mentalen. Dass gerade angesichts der psychosomatisch ausgerichteten Erziehung diese gymnastische Prägung darüber hinaus durch eine musisch-intellektuelle Bildung zu flankieren, ja überhaupt erst zu vollenden war und dass dabei die mimēsis eine große Rolle spielte (21f.), darf nicht vergessen werden.28 Aber die Basis bildete der körperlich-seelische Zusammenhang und Zusammenhalt, und am Anfang stand konsequenterweise das körperliche Training mit seinen psychischen Begleitumständen und Wirkungen, derer man sich nur zu gut bewusst war. Wenn man die Verbindung des Gymnastischen mit dem Politischen hinzunimmt, lässt sich Folgendes konstatieren: Bei Lukian – und dort schon mit dem sicheren Wissen darum, dass es sich um ein Proprium der griechischen Kultur bzw. des Griechischen handelte – herrscht ein klar entwickeltes und ordentlich reflektiertes Bewusstsein für die Verbindung von körperlichem Training im Gymnasion und politisch-sozialer Organisation, für die Verknüpfung von Gymnasion und Polis, von Gymnastik und Gemeinsinn. Sozialisation der Bürger durch gymnastische Praktiken: Für Lukian war das ein klares Programm; mindestens belegt er die Existenz eines solchen der Idee nach. Die sehr enge Übereinstimmung mit Thesen zur Bedeutung der körperlichen Erziehung auch für das soziale Leben und damit für die Polis, die beispielsweise Xenophon in den ‚Memorabilien‘ dem Sokrates in den Mund legt,29 verweist auf deren lange Tradition (ich werde noch darauf zurückkommen). Man könnte natürlich fragen, ob Lukian als Quelle nicht anachronistisch sei, zumal wenn man das Militärische miteinbezieht, auf das im ‚Anacharsis‘ ja so großer Wert gelegt wird. Wir können jedoch zeigen – und das ist mein nächster Schritt – dass der Diskurs einen Sitz im Leben hatte, dass er aufs engste und ganz konkret an die politisch-soziale Situation rückgekoppelt war. Das Ideal, von dem der lukianische Solon kündigt, war eine Richtschnur im realen Handeln der Polis und im Verhalten ihrer Bürger.

III. DAS GYMNASTISCHE UND DIE POLIS: DIE PRAXIS Die an der nördlichen Seite des Hellespont gelegene griechische Polis Sestos war nach dem Ende der Attalidendynatie (133 v. Chr.), während des darauf folgenden Aristonikos-Aufstandes und angesichts der erst allmählich erfolgenden Etablierung der römischen Herrschaft in jener Region in eine schwierige Lage geraten. Dank häufiger Überfälle durch benachbarte, nicht wirklich befriedete thrakische Nachbarn war sie zunehmend sogar existentiell gefährdet. Nicht anders als der Athener Lykurg nach der Katastrophe von Chaironeia (338 v. Chr.) richtete in jener dramatischen Zeit Menas, ein dominierender Mann aus der Honoratioren28 29

Zur Rolle der mimēsis im Musisch-Kinetischen vgl. auch unten S. 43. Xen. mem. 3.12.4–8.

Stasis und Sozialisation

39

schicht von Sestos und einer der angesehensten Politiker der Stadt, sein Augenmerk auf die Stärkung und Reorganisation des Gymnasion. In zwei Amtszeiten als Gymnasiarch sorgte er für kultische Veranstaltungen und Opfer, besonders für Hermes und Herakles, zwei besonders mit dem Gymnasion verbundene Gottheiten,30 für die Verbesserung der baulichen Infrastruktur, u.a. durch die Errichtung eines Bades, und für den Betrieb selbst, nämlich die Versorgung mit Öl sowie vor allem die Intensivierung und Erweiterung von Wettbewerben mittels Aussetzen von Preisen als Anreiz, vor allem im Laufen, Speerwerfen und Bogenschießen, und zwar für die Knaben und die Jugend (paides), besonders aber die Junioren (ephēboi) und die Herren (neoi). Dass dies aus Anlass des königlichen Geburtstages geschieht, unterstreicht die politische Bedeutung des Vorgangs zusätzlich. Darüber hinaus wurde auch das Bildungsangebot (paideia), u.a. durch großzügige Unterstützung der Referenten von Vorträgen (akroaseis, I.Sestos 1.74–77), ausgebaut. Im Vordergrund stand dabei die Förderung von Disziplin, Übung, Einsatz und Mannhaftigkeit schlechthin.31 Charakteristischerweise gab es nun sogar regelmäßige Wettbewerbe (mit Preisen und ehrenvollen Inschriften) in drei Bereichen: in eutaxia, das ist Disziplin in militärischem Sinne,32 also ursprünglich im Sinne der Einordnung in die Schlachtreihe (táxis), in philoponia, so viel wie Einsatz, Engagement, Eifer, in dem Sinne, dass man die Bemühungen und Schwierigkeiten gerne auf sich nimmt, und in euexia, der ‚Wohlhaltung‘, deren Relevanz wir schon im ‚Anacharsis‘ beobachten konnten, ein Begriff der mit ‚Auftreten‘, ‚Konstitution‘, ‚Kondition‘, ‚Stattlichkeit‘33 übersetzt wird. Es handelt sich, präzise gesagt, um eine von und nach außen sichtbare, aber auch im Inneren spürbare gute körperliche Verfassung. Für sie passt wohl unser Wort ‚Haltung‘, traditionell verstanden, im Sinne von ‚Haltung bewahren‘ bzw. von contenance, am besten.34 In einem Atemzug35 mit diesen drei zentralen Begriffen ist dann von euandria die Rede, die eben dadurch gefördert worden sei (84). Worum es letztlich ging und welches die wesentliche Zielsetzung war, geht aus dem Text der langen Ehreninschrift für Menas, der wir alle diese wichtigen Informationen verdanken, ebenfalls klar und eindeutig hervor. Und damit wird zugleich sichtbar, dass hinter der körperlichen Ertüchtigung im Gymnasion eine psychisch-moralische Orientierung steckte, im Sinne der sozialen Normen, die gerade in der aktuellen Lage besonderes Engagement verlangten. Wörtlich heißt es nach dem Hinweis auf die externen Bedrohungen und den von Menas als Gymnasiarch betriebenen Einsatz: „Mit einer solchen Ruhmliebe (philodoxia) 30 31 32 33 34 35

I.Sestos 1.62; zu Hermes und dem Gymnasion vgl. etwa Pind. Ol. 6.79; Pyth. 2.10; Isth. 1.60; zu Herakles Pind. Ol. 10.28–32, 51–60; generell s. jetzt ANEZIRI/DAMASKOS 2004: 248–251. eutaxia, askesis, philoponia, euandria (I.Sestos 31, 38f., 84). vgl. ROBERT/ROBERT 1954: 285, 289. Eine in diesem Sinne sehr plastische Passage (auch unter ästhetischen Aspekten und im Vergleich mit dem Chor) liefert Xen. oik. 8.4–8. So HGIÜ III 486. Das eueides bei Philostr. gymn. 6 ist ein klares Äquivalent. In seinem Kommentar zu I.Sestos 1, S. 60 sieht J. KRAUSS das als „Oberbegriff“ zu den drei vorangehenden Qualitäten.

40

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

wandte er (sc. Menas) die jungen Leute (neoi) der Übung und dem Einsatz (askēsis, philoponia) zu. Dadurch wetteiferten die Seelen der Jüngeren (neōteroi) um die Tapferkeit (andreia) und wurden in ihrem Charakter (ēthē36) gut zur Tüchtigkeit (aretē) geführt“ (70–72). Zugegebenermaßen herrschte in Sestos, zumal bei der zweiten Gymnasiarchie des Menas, eine Krisensituation. Aber der Duktus seiner Ehreninschrift zeigt an vielen Stellen, dass es nicht nur um außerordentliche Maßnahmen, sondern auch um übliche bzw. traditionelle Praktiken ging, die hier intensiviert, reorganisiert und revitalisiert wurden. Zudem ist expressis verbis gerade an einer wesentlichen Stelle, nämlich wo es um die erwähnten Wettbewerbe in Disziplin, Einsatz und Haltung geht, betont, dass die darin liegende Förderung der euandria „nach dem Gesetz“ (kata ton nomon) erfolgt sei (84f.). Die entsprechenden Praktiken waren also sogar Bestandteil der städtisch-staatlichen Rechtsordnung – was noch einmal ihre generelle Bedeutung und damit die Relevanz unseres Beispiels unterstreicht. Dieses ist nun auch keineswegs eine Ausnahme; denn wir haben zumindest eine ganz treffende Parallele, und zwar sogar in Gestalt eines Gesetzes. Dieses stammt aus dem makedonischen Beroia und ist etwas älter als die Ehreninschrift für Menas.37 In ihm wird verfügt, dass der Gymnasiarch der Polis jeweils im letzten Monat eines Amtsjahres, also im Monat Hyperberetaios38 ein Hermesfest ausrichten solle (B 45–47). Aus diesem Anlass sollten für die Männer unter 30 (das sind die ansonsten neoi Genannten) Wettbewerbe in euexia, eutaxia und philoponia ausgelobt werden, also in denselben Bereichen, die auch in Sestos so wichtig waren.39 Die drei Kampfrichter für euexia solle der Gymnasiarch aus einem Kreise von sieben Männern aus dem Gymnasion auslosen und die Erlosten auf den Hermes schwören lassen, „dass sie gerecht richten würden danach, wer die beste körperliche Konstitution habe (arista to sōma diakeisthai)“. Über eutaxia und philoponia solle der Gymnasiarch, nach Eid auf Hermes, selber entscheiden, wer seinem Urteil nach unter den bis zu Dreißigjährigen im jeweiligen Jahr am diszipliniertesten“ (eutaktotatos) gewesen sei bzw. „am eifrigsten gesalbt (also trainiert)“ (aleiphthai) habe (47–57). Die beiden Beispiele sind plastisch genug, sie stellen aber nur die Spitze eines Eisberges dar, dessen Dimensionen wir allerdings dank des fragmentarischen Zustandes unserer Überlieferung nur erahnen können. Sie erscheinen aber auch so eindrucksvoll genug. Neben eutaxia und philoponia (und nicht selten im Zusammenhang damit) kommt dabei der schon bei Lukian so markanten euexia besondere Bedeutung zu.40 Wie wichtig diese Kategorien waren, erhellt auch daraus, dass 36 37

38 39 40

Zur Bedeutung vgl. RICKEN 2005. Es stammt etwa aus der Mitte des 2. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., zur Diskussion s. KAH 2004: 82; HATZOPOULOS 2004: 95f.; der Text jetzt nach GAUTHIER/HATZOPOULOS 1993 = SEG 43.381; EKM I 1; deutsche Übersetzung HGIÜ III 486. Zur Interpretation vgl. auch GIOVANNINI 2004. Vor den Herbstäquinoktien, entspricht dem attischen Boedromion. Zum Zusammenhang von Kult und gymnastischen Wettbewerben vgl. auch Plat. leg. 8.828bc. Generell s. die Belege bei CROWTHER 1991, vgl. auch GAUTHIER/HATZOPOULOS 1993: 102– 105; GEHRKE 2003: 243f. – eutaxia: neben den o.a. Beispielen I.Erythrai 81; IG XII 6.179 (ergänzt), 180, 181, 183 (Samos, zwischen Ende 3. Jahrhundert und 150 v. Chr.), ferner KAH

Stasis und Sozialisation

41

in Pergamon die ‚Versetzung‘ aus dem Jugendlichen- (paides-) in das Ephebengymnasion nach den Kategorien des eutaktos, philoponos und euektēs erfolgte.41 Kennzeichnend ist darüber hinaus besonders, dass die Institutionalisierung des Gymnasion, die sich vor allem in der hellenistischen Epoche vollendete, gerade in der Schaffung und Ausgestaltung des Amtes des Gymnasiarchen besteht und dass die Inhaber dieses Amtes – die Beispiele aus Sestos und Beroia sind insofern besonders instruktiv – gerade für die erwähnten Bereiche bzw. Wettbewerbe und damit Qualitäten verantwortlich waren, bis in die ganz konkreten Prüfungen hinein.42 Gerade hierin manifestiert sich die Bedeutung solcher Eigenschaften für die Polis und die Sozialisation der männlichen Jugend. Und man darf hierin und vor allem in der Existenz von einschlägigen Gesetzen auch einen Reflex auf das Postulat einer ‚Verstaatlichung‘ der körperlichen Erziehung sehen, das Xenophon an der bereits erwähnten, dem Konzept des lukianischen ‚Anacharsis‘ so nahestehenden Stelle in den ‚Memorabilien‘ (3.12) aufstellt. Davon wird noch des näheren die Rede sein. Der Gymnasiarch jedenfalls war insofern auch „Vorbild für die Epheben und Neoi, denen er ihre künftige Rolle als Bürger der Polis vorlebt“.43 Dass diese Art von Übung und Training in der Regel auch von einem intellektuellen Bildungsangebot flankiert war (wir haben dies am Beispiel der akroaseis des Menas gesehen), sei allerdings nicht vergessen.44 Bereitschaft zu Einordnung und Disziplin, Freude an Übung, Training, SichAbmühen und Kämpfen, gute körperliche Verfassung als Basis für Haltung und anständiges Auftreten – diese drei Qualitäten wurden von der Polisgemeinschaft besonders gepflegt und von ihren Repräsentanten beaufsichtigt. Dass diese Qualitäten im Sinne von Wettbewerben ständig trainiert, präsentiert und evaluiert wurden bzw. sich quer durch alle anderen sportlich-athletischen Disziplinen hindurchzogen, stellte in der extrem kompetitiv orientierten Gesellschaft einen besonderen

41 42 43 44

2004: 79 mit Anm. 175 sowie GAUTHIER/HATZOPOULOS 1993: 104f. – philoponia: I.Erythrai 81; IG XII 6.183 (Samos, vor 150 v. Chr.); I.Priene 113, 28, vgl. GAUTHIER/HATZOPOULOS 1993, 105. – euexia: I.Erythrai 81; IG XII 6.181, 183 (Samos); I.Tralles 106f.; CIRB 1137 = IOSPE IV 432 (Siegerliste aus Gorgippia, ergänzt, wohl frühes 3. Jahrhundert v. Chr.). Hinzu kommt der ähnliche Begriff der eukosmia im Ephebarchengesetz von Amphipolis (24/23 v. Chr.), s. GAUTHIER/HATZOPOULOS 1993: 161f.; WEILER 2004: 41f.; KAH 2004: 82. In Athen gab es einen Agon euandrias (Andok. 4.42; Xen. mem. 3.3.12; Athen. 13.565F), wohl als „Mannschaftswettbewerb der schönen und kräftigen Männer“ (J. KRAUSS, I.Sestos, S. 60). Generell wird man sich die Wettbewerbe nicht immer oder primär als konkrete Wettkämpfe, sondern als ‚Querschnitts-Konkurrenzen‘ vorstellen, die zum Teil auf langfristiger Beobachtung und spezieller Bewertung beruhten, vgl. das Gesetz aus Beroia, Z. 47–57, zitiert o. JACOBSTHAL 1908: 387f.; ZIEBARTH 1914: 142f. SCHULER 2004: 168, 181. SCHULER 2004: 190. Vgl. hierzu die weiteren Beispiele im Kommentar von J. KRAUSS, I.Sestos S. 58 sowie generell SCHOLZ 2004. Besonders instruktiv ist in diesem Zusammenhang die so genannte Schulstiftung von Teos (Laum 1914 II 90; 3. Jahrhundert v. Chr.), in der auch einschlägige Gesetze bezeugt sind (Z. 30, 43). – Zur Gymnasiarchie wichtig sind auch die zu Ehren von Marcel PIÉRART von CURTY 2009 zusammengestellten Beiträge, zur hellenistischen Ephebie generell s. jetzt auch CHANKOWSKI 2010.

42

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Anreiz dar und unterstreicht, wie ernst man es mit ihnen meinte. So prägte das Bemühen um diese und ähnliche Qualitäten wesentliche Stufen der männlichen Sozialisation, bezeichnenderweise noch über die Adoleszenz hinaus: von den paides, den in der Regel unter Achtzehnjährigen, über die Epheben, normalerweise die auf der Schwelle zum Erwachsenen befindlichen Junioren im Alter zwischen 18 und 20 Jahren, bis hin zu den so genannten neoi, den jungen Männern zwischen 20 und 30 Jahren, wobei die einzelnen Jahrgänge auch untereinander verbunden waren, also gleichsam als Alterskohorten marschierten, immer verbunden durch gemeinsames Training und energische Konkurrenz, in einer spezifischen Verschränkung von individueller und kollektiver Formung. Es kann an dieser Stelle nicht im Einzelnen ausgeführt werden, wie spezifisch und verbreitet dieses Phänomen in der Hellenistischen Epoche bis tief in die Kaiserzeit hinein gewesen ist. Neben den bisherigen Hinweisen und Andeutungen sein nur daran erinnert, dass die Institutionalisierung und die ‚Architektonisierung‘ des Gymnasion ein Merkmal des Hellenismus darstellt.45 Dazu gehört auch die Einrichtung der Ephebie, die besonders aus Athen gut bekannt ist46 – und deren Reorganisation durch Lykurg gerade eine betonte Orientierung auf das Engagement für die Polis Athen demonstriert, besonders notwendig angesichts der katastrophalen Niederlage bei Chaironeia und der als Unterdrückung und Versklavung empfundenen makedonischen Herrschaft. Und nicht zuletzt sind die vielen Hinweise auf die Gliederung und Formierung der Männer, besonders der jüngeren, nach Altersklassen zu beachten.47 Es ist klar, dass hier ein vitales Interesse der Polis lag, schon deshalb, weil sie ständig mit kriegerischen Auseinandersetzungen zu rechnen hatte,48 aber auch weil die endemische Form der inneren Kriege, die Stasis, in Griechenland nicht abreißen wollte. So war die Einheit im Inneren, die homonoia – man denke an das sympoliteuesthai bei Lukian – als wesentliche Grundlage für die Behauptung nach außen existentiell. Vor diesem Hintergrund ist auch die Frage nach der sozialen Reichweite der Ausbildung im Gymnastischen zu sehen.49 Da wir im Wesentlichen nur über normative Texte zur Thematik verfügen, lassen sich hier keine empirisch belastbaren Angaben machen. Es ergibt sich aber aus der Stoßrichtung der Texte auf die freie Bürgerschaft sowie aus den gerade hier angesprochenen Bedürfnissen, dass mindestens der Zielsetzung nach ein weiter Kreis im Blick war und dass man sich auch (z. B. durch euergetistische Maßnahmen) bemühte, diesem auch realiter die Möglichkeiten zur ‚gymnastischen‘ Betätigung einzuräumen. Es hat gewiss regionale Unterschiede gegeben und es mag eine Tendenz zur Aristokratisierung gegeben haben – Lukian hebt jedenfalls die aristoi politai her-

45 46 47 48 49

Dies ist jetzt in dem Sammelband KAH/SCHOLZ 2004 manifestiert, vgl. die bisher zitierten Beiträge und zur baulichen Entwicklung WACKER 2004. Hierzu s. GEHRKE 1997. In diesem Zusammenhang s. detailliert zu den neoi DREYER 2004. Das ist besonders herausgearbeitet von CHANIOTIS 2005. Zur Problematik vgl. GEHRKE 2004: 417–419.

Stasis und Sozialisation

43

vor (s.o.) – , aber die hat sich womöglich erst peu à peu herausgestellt und in der Römischen Kaiserzeit definitiv ergeben.50 Selbst dann blieb der Grundgedanke der Sozialisation auf die Polis und ihre Bürger bezogen. Es hat sich nicht die Idee einer internen elitär-exklusiven und distinktiven Bildung ergeben. Elitär war und blieb immer die Bürgerschaft insgesamt. Im Vordergrund blieb die Frage nach der Formung der in sie hinein Wachsenden und die hier herausgearbeitete Bedeutung des Psycho-Somatischen oder vielleicht besser: Somato-Psychischen. Damit stellt sich die weiter gehende Frage, warum man denn den körperlichen Übungen eine solche Wirkung zuschrieb, gerade auch auf dem mental-psychischen Felde, auf welche Beobachtungen sich solche Zuschreibungen stützten und wie sie gedanklich erfasst wurden. Um darauf antworten zu können, muss auch berücksichtigt werden, welche Bewegungsabläufe und kinetischen Prinzipien es denn waren, die Kraft und Eleganz, Ästhetik und Haltung versprachen bzw. welche die Griechen selber als solche einschätzten.

IV. DAS GYMNASTISCHE UND DIE POLIS: DIE INTELLEKTUELLEN GRUNDLAGEN In einem weiteren Schritt möchte ich deshalb darauf eingehen, wie dieses Körper und Geist verbindende Konzept überhaupt gedanklich-didaktisch zustande kam. Wie und wann gerieten die Zusammenhänge in den Blick? Wie ergab sich dabei die Verbindung von Kraft und Ästhetik, von Härte und Eleganz, die im ‚Anacharsis‘ so betont wird und die uns auch lehrt, im Blick auf das physische Training nicht nur auf die Kraftentfaltung zu sehen, sondern auf Rhythmik und Bewegung. Suchen wir also nach Beobachtungen und Konzeptionen des Kräftig-Eleganten im Körperlichen und achten wir dabei auf die damit verbundenen Auffassungen zu dessen mentalen und moralischen Wirkungen. Schon der locus classicus für ein gängiges griechisches (oder mindestens athenisches) Curriculum, eine Partie in Platons ‚Protagoras‘ (325c–326e) hilft uns rasch weiter. Hier orientiert sich Bildung an moralischen Normen und nimmt insbesondere die Qualität des Bürgers in den Blick. Nach der frühkindlichen Erziehung durch die Eltern kommen Lehrer ins Spiel. Dabei wird besonderer Wert auf die eukosmia gelegt. Dichter werden auswendig gelernt, es geht um Nachahmung; und wichtig ist dabei die Musik.51 Denn jedes Menschenleben braucht gute Schwingung und gute Stimmung, wie wir die Begriffe eurythmia und euarmostia versuchsweise einmal übersetzen wollen (326c) – man möchte in diesem Zusammenhang fast das Wort Taktgefühl gebrauchen. In diesem Zusammenhang kommt nun auch der Sporttrainer, der paidotribēs, ins Spiel. Zu ihm schickt man die Kinder, „damit sie, dem Körper nach besser ausgebildet, auch der richtigen Gesinnung (dianoia) dienen können und nicht nötig haben sich feigherzig zurückzuziehen (apodeiliān) wegen des Körpers Untüch50 51

Zu einem Beispiel s. jetzt WIEMER 2011. Zum chorischen Tanz und zur Rolle der mimēsis dabei s. KOWALZIG 2004: 48.

44

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

tigkeit, es sei nun im Kriege oder bei anderen Geschäften“ (Übers. Friedrich Schleiermacher). Richtiges Timing und Abstimmung sowie Körperbeherrschung stehen dicht nebeneinander. Danach erfolgt im Curriculum das Lernen der Gesetze, also die konkrete Einübung in das politisch-soziale Leben. Was bei Schleiermacher treffend mit „dem Körper nach besser ausgebildet“ übersetzt ist und auf Griechisch ta sōmata beltiō echontes lautet, ist nichts Anderes – die Sprache verrät es – als die euexia, die wir schon gut kennen. Schon hier also zeigt sich, dass zumindest in Platons Interpretation eine verbreitete Erziehungspraxis mit den psychischen Konsequenzen des Gymnastischen rechnete, und dass es dabei konkret um Selbstvertrauen, Selbstbeherrschung und Courage geht, nicht allein im Militärischen – und nicht anders als in Menas’ Sestos. Dass es sich hier, im Athen des 5. Jahrhunderts, zumindest der Idee nach um ein traditionelles Bildungskonzept handelt, zeigt eine Passage in dem Plädoyer des dikaios logos in den ‚Wolken‘ des Aristophanes, in der es um die archaia paideia geht (961ff.). Hier wird beim Musiklehrer (kiharistēs), in jeder Gemeinde, an Hand von Dichtungen noch anständig gesungen, in der harmonia, in der die Väter sangen. Die Bewegungen auf der Straße erfolgten ‚wohlgeordnet‘ (eutaktōs), und beim Paidotriben benahm man sich schicklich, auch in den körperlichen Haltungen. Wenn man hierzu noch rechnet, wie sehr die athenischen Bürger, aber auch die Bürgerinnen, durch ihre aktive Mitwirkung bei den Festen und Agonen in gemeinsamem Singen und Tanzen von Jugend an mit harmonischen Klängen und rhythmischen Bewegungen vertraut waren, gewinnen diese Aussagen noch erheblich an Bedeutung. Eine kleine Umschau im Wortfeld von euexia zeigt aber sehr schnell, dass es hier nicht nur um traditionelle athenische Vorstellungen geht, sondern dass vergleichbare Ideen und Konzepte wenigstens seit der Klassischen Zeit auch sonst geläufig waren. Zunächst geht es naturgemäß um die körperliche Konstitution, nicht zuletzt auch die Gesundheit, so etwa ganz dezidiert in den ‚Aphorismen‘ des Corpus Hippocraticum.52 Deshalb erkennt man die Wohltrainierten (gymnazomenoi) auch außerhalb des Gymnasion an ihrer euexia.53 Freilich gibt es hier auch des Guten zu viel, durch übermäßiges Training bzw., besser gesagt, durch einseitige Pflege des Gymnastischen verursachtes Ungleichgewicht, mithin ein zu ausgeprägtes Bodybuilding. Hier ist dann wiederum eine Reduzierung zum Zwecke des Ausgleichs medizinisch angezeigt.54 Bei Aristoteles55 ist euexia deshalb als etwas Ausgewogenes und Mittleres gedacht,56 sie ist nicht pros hen monon wie das Training der Athleten. Und bezeichnenderweise ist bei Aristoteles in diesem Rahmen von einer dem Bürger angemessenen Konstitution (politikē euexia) die

52 53 54 55 56

Hipp. aphor. 1.3; im Plural, vgl. auch Plat. Prot. 354b; Gorg. 450a; rep. 559a; Aristot. eth. Nic. 5.1129a19–23. Aischin. 1.189. Hipp. aphor. 1.3. Aristot. pol. 1335b5–11. Man erinnere sich an das symmetron bei Lukian. anach. 25.

Stasis und Sozialisation

45

Rede, die eben nicht einseitig ist. Dies zeigt einmal mehr, wie fließend die Grenzen von der körperlichen hin zur sozialen Konnotation des Begriffes waren. Das lässt sich an einer wichtigen Stelle bei Polybios konkretisieren, von der aus sich dann schnell eine Brücke zu den Beobachtungen in den beiden ersten Teilen herstellen lässt: Im 18. Jahr des Ersten Punischen Krieges (247 v. Chr.) besetzte der neue karthagische Stratege Hamilkar Barkas einen festen Stützpunkt im westsizilischen Heirkte, um von dort aus mit ständigen Attacken die Römer zu zermürben.57 Polybios hebt gerade diese Strategie und damit die Qualitäten des Hamilkar Barkas in seiner an sich nur skizzenartigen Darstellung dieses Krieges besonders hervor, ja er nutzt sie exemplarisch, um sich generell zu den Eigenschaften der beteiligten Feldherren zu äußern (57.1–3). Um das zu unterstreichen, greift er zum Vergleich und zieht hierzu – wieder muss man sagen, bezeichnenderweise – Sportler heran, und zwar Boxer (pyktai). Da es um besondere Leistungen geht, spricht er von solchen, die durch Haltung (euexiai) und durch Distinktion (gennaiotētes) hervorragen. Wichtig daran ist aber, dass sich die damit markierten Leistungen der Faustkämpfer gerade in ihrer psychischen Einstellung und im daraus resultierenden Planen und Handeln zeigen, in ihrer Agilität, Ehrliebe, Erfahrung, Kraft und Zuversicht.58 So kämpfen sie unablässig, Schlag auf Schlag, im Vorauswissen (pronoia) um die Tricks des Gegners.59 Dass es sich dabei nicht um ein blindwütiges Prügeln handelt, lehrt schon die letzte Bemerkung, wird aber auch im Blick auf viele Darstellungen des Boxkampfes und des Boxtrainings sichtbar. Neben der Kraft und der Reaktionsschnelligkeit geht es auch um Rhythmik und Eleganz der Bewegungen.60 Gerade auch ein entsprechender Zusammenhang prägt die geläufige Vorstellung von Schönheit gemäß der aristotelischen ‚Rhetorik‘ (1361b7–11), und zwar im Hinblick auf die Gruppe, um die es hier auch geht, auf die jungen Männer (neou kallos). Deren Schönheit besteht darin, „einen Körper zu haben, der zum Ertragen von Belastungen (ponoi) geeignet ist, sowohl für die des Laufens als auch für die der Kampfdisziplinen (dromos, bia). Das bietet einen angenehmen Anblick, und deshalb sind die Fünfkämpfer am schönsten, denn sie sind zugleich zu Kraft und Schnelligkeit begabt“. Bei den Erwachsenen (akmazōn) sei der Körper schön, der den Belastungen des Krieges gewachsen sei. Er bietet einen angenehmen Anblick, weil er Furcht einflößt. Die enge Verbindung von Kraft und Eleganz, aber auch die Orientierung auf den Krieg, und damit auf die Polis, wird auch hier greifbar. In diesem Rahmen könnte man des Näheren auf die verschiedenen Bewegungsabläufe in den verschiedenen Sportdisziplinen eingehen. Dabei gibt es vor allem zum Ringen sehr instruktive Texte, zum einen einen Papyrus wohl für den

57 58 59 60

Pol. 1.56.1–11. energeia, philotimia, empeiria, dynamis, eupsychia. Man vergleiche hierzu auch den Hinweis auf anchinoia als physische Voraussetzung für den Athleten bei Philostr. gymn. 6. Entsprechend geht es beim Ringen nach Plat. leg. 7.796a auch um eine Kombination von Geschicklichkeit, Konstitution, Ausdauer und Kraft.

46

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Gebrauch eines Trainers mit Anweisungen über Bewegungen und Griffe,61 zum anderen die Schilderungen geschlechtlicher Vereinigungen unterschiedlichen Typs in den termini technici der Ringersprache (wobei in dem heterosexuellen Beispiel die weibliche Teilnehmerin auch noch Palaistra heißt).62 Hier wie auch sonst spielte die Geschmeidigkeit wie die Geschicklichkeit der Bewegungen eine wichtige Rolle, weshalb sie auch in der Regel musikalisch begleitet waren, vor allem durch einen Flötenspieler (aulētēs).63 Aus Platzgründen kann ich auf diese Phänomene nicht im Detail eingehen. Das gilt auch für die Bedeutung des Tanzes und des Tänzerischen, für die auf die o.a. Polybiosstelle aus dem 4. Buch verwiesen sei.64 Für die Einsicht in den Zusammenhang des Physischen und des Psychischen, auf die man hier immer wieder stößt und die in gewisser Weise den Schlüssel zu den wesentlichen Erziehungs- und Sozialisationsmethoden zu liefern scheint, gibt es auch jenseits der bisher behandelten Phänomene deutliche Belege. Sie häufen sich gerade dort, wo in den philosophisch-sophistischen Diskursen der 2. Hälfte des 5. Jahrhunderts auf sozusagen seiner-zeitgemäße Weise, mit der Antithese von physis und nomos, die Debatte über Natur und Kultur, nurture vs. nature geführt wurde. Dabei herrschte generell eine besondere Hochschätzung der Möglichkeiten zur Erziehung, wie sie auch in den ‚Wolken‘ des Aristophanes oder in Platons ‚Protagoras‘ einen Widerhall fand. In diesem Zusammenhang tritt die Übung, die dauerhafte Gewöhnung in den Vordergrund. Im selbstbewussten Ton des Intellektuellen stellte man sie über die Natur, also die natürliche Anlagen: „Durch Übung sind mehr gut als von Natur aus“, triumphiert der Sophist Kritias.65 Ähnliches schreibt Axiopistos, wohl im 4. Jahrhundert, dem Epicharm zu: „Die Übung, meine Freunde, schenkt mehr als gute Anlage“.66 Noch wichtiger für uns ist die Vorstellung, dass die Übung derart wirkmächtig ist, dass sie sogar selber zur Natur wird, dass also die erwähnte Kluft überbrückt wird. Dies ist auf klassische Weise von Demokrit formuliert worden: „Die Natur und die Erziehung (didachē) sind etwas Ähnliches. Denn die Erziehung formt zwar den Menschen um (metarysmoi), aber durch diese Umformung schafft sie Natur (physiopoiei)“.67 Aristoteles, der im Hinblick auf die Beherrschtheit (enkrateia) bei Leidenschaftlichen zwar davon ausgeht, es sei leichter, Ge61 62 63 64

65 66 67

P.Oxy III 466 (2. Jh. n. Chr.), s. hierzu besonders MARROU 1977: 241 mit Anm. 67; er bietet eine versuchsweise Übersetzung und Hinweise auf ältere Literatur. [Lukian.] asin. 8–10; Anth. Pal. 12.206. JÜTHNER 1909: 301; MARROU 1977: 242f., vgl. auch Plat. leg. 7.796a, erwähnt o. Anm. 60. Es sei nur generell noch hinzugefügt, dass gerade auch der Tanz eine für die Gemeinschaft wesentliche Bedeutung annehmen und insofern in der Erziehung wichtig sein konnte. Bei Platon heißt es apaideutos achoreutos (leg. 2.654a), wer nicht im Chor tanzen kann, ist unerzogen. Wettbewerbe in diesem Sinne sind konsequenterweise auch außerhalb Arkadiens geläufig. Bei den athenischen Panathenäen beispielsweise gab es im 4. Jahrhundert Wettbewerbe für Jugendliche, Junioren und Männer in kriegerischen und pyrrhichischen Tänzen (IG II 2312.72–74, s. generell CECCARELLI 1998). ek meletēs pleious ē physeōs agathoi (Kritias B 9 D.-K.). hā de meletā physios agathās pleona dōreitai, philoi (Epicharm B 33 D.-K). Demokr. B 33 D.-K. (= Clem. Al. strom. 4.151; Stob. 2.31.65), Übersetzung Hermann DIELS.

Stasis und Sozialisation

47

wohnheit (ethos) zu verändern als Natur, gibt ebenfalls zu, dass jene der Natur gleichkommt (tēi physei eoiken) – Franz Dirlmeier übersetzt „wie eine zweite Natur ist“ – und zitiert in diesem Zusammenhang den sophistisch ‚angehauchten‘ Dichter Euenos (aus der 2. Hälfte des 5. Jahrhunderts), der ganz im Sinne des Demokrit-Zitats schreibt: „Dauerndes Üben (polychronios meletē), mein Freund, so sag ich dir, schafft die Gewöhnung; diese verfestigt sich (teleutōsa) schließlich im Menschen und wird zur Natur ihm“.68 Genau hier liegt auch der Rahmen für Platons Erziehungskonzept.

V. DAS GYMNASTISCHE, DIE JUGEND UND DIE STASIS Dass und wie aus Gewöhnung, Übung und Formung – gerade auch solche körperlicher Natur – schließlich wiederum Natur werden konnte, auch in einem geistigmentalen Sinne, war also eine feste Einsicht, mit der wir spätestens für das Ende des 5. Jahrhunderts rechnen können. Da ist dieses Wissen jedenfalls explizit, das vorher offenkundig (man erinnere sich an die bei Aristophanes und Platon reflektierte traditionelle attische Erziehung, könnte aber auch auf die spartanische agogē zurückgreifen) implizit war und die Praktiken bestimmte. Indem man sich die Zusammenhänge aber stärker zu Bewusstsein brachte, konnte man sie auch entsprechend intensiver gestalten. Dies mag hinter den spätklassisch-hellenistischen Konzepten und Praktiken stecken, die wir oben analysiert haben und die den zuletzt vorgestellten Überlegungen im Kern so genau entsprechen. Jedenfalls hat man seit dem 4. Jahrhundert in etlichen griechischen Gemeinschaften offenkundig einen speziellen politischen Handlungsbedarf gesehen und die verschiedenen Praktiken in diesem Sinne systematisch organisiert. Versuchen wir deshalb zum Schluss, eine wenigstens denkbare Didaktik hinter den psychosomatischen Praktiken zu finden. Wir sahen, dass es darum ging, den Nachwuchs in die Polis hineinzubringen, ihn adäquat zu sozialisieren, Bürger zu bilden. Womit man es zu tun hatte, wie die Jugend beschaffen war, lehrt sehr plastisch die ‚Rhetorik‘ des Aristoteles (1389a3–1389b12). Der Autor spitzt hier sehr scharf zu (Junge vs. Alte), doch geht es, dem Genre des Werks entsprechend, um empirisch fundierte Aussagen. Zum Charakter (ēthos) der jungen Männer (neoi) gibt er im Wesentlichen eine Aufzählung, in der vor allem auf die Begierden, insbesondere die sexuellen, auf Leidenschaft und Impulsivität (thymikoi, oxythymoi), auf Ehrgeiz und Siegeswillen, auf Vertrauen und Optimismus, Mut und Hochherzigkeit, Freundesliebe und Kameradschaft verwiesen wird. Vor allem neigten die jungen Männer zur Übersteigerung und zum Exzess, im Gegensatz zu dem mēden agan des Chilon, und wenn sie Unrecht handeln, dann nicht aus Schlechtigkeit, sondern aus übersteigertem Selbstwertgefühl und Anmaßung (hybris). Das Urteil ist ja erkennbar nicht komplett negativ, sondern durchaus differenziert. Wir finden eine Ambivalenz, die der bei den platonischen Wächtern ähnelt. 68

Aristot. eth. Nic. 1152a30–33, Übersetzung Franz DIRLMEIER.

48

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Im Hinblick auf die soziale Integration und Kohärenz allerdings stellen sich gravierende Probleme, vor allem angesichts der Dominanz der kurzfristigen Aufwallung und Leidenschaft, des Ehrgeizig-Ehrbewussten und deshalb leicht zu Kränkenden, angesichts von Menschen, die hohe Ziele haben, aber über wenig Augenmaß verfügen. Wie soll man diese Leute, die „zu sehr lieben und zu sehr hassen“ (1289b3f.), in die Gemeinschaft der Polis hineinbringen? Auf Grund des Hervortretens körperlich fundierter Symptome in Leidenschaftlichkeit und Erregbarkeit lag es nahe, auch somatisch anzusetzen und von hier aus die Disziplin, als buchstäbliche Einordnung sozusagen, auch körperlich zu fundieren. Gerade angesichts der natürlichen Voraussetzungen, nicht zuletzt der Leidenschaftlichkeit, konnte auf Zwang und Druck (bia) gar nicht verzichtet werden,69 weswegen Aristoteles auch sehr dezidiert die Autorität des Gesetzes ins Spiel bringt (ebd. 80a21–24). Gerade bei den jungen Männern, denen das besonnene (sōphronōs) und beherrschte (karterikōs) Leben schwerfällt, muss man sich etwas einfallen lassen. Nun sind in der Erziehung von Menschen natürliche Anlage (physis) und Belehrung (didachē) allein zwar notwendig, aber nicht ausreichend. Man braucht auch die Gewöhnung (ethos), also Training, Übung, meletē. Diese bereitet die Seele auf die Unterweisung vor, so wie auch ein Acker vor der Aussaat präpariert werden muss. (79b32–35). Genau in diesem Kontext kommen bestimmte – am besten durch Gesetze zu fixierende – Aktivitäten und Beschäftigungen (epitēdeumata) ins Spiel, und zu diesen wiederum gehören musikē und gymnastikē, das Musische und das Gymnastische (80b2f.). So führt Gewöhnung in Form von gymnastischem Üben zu einer bestimmten Haltung (hexis) des Körpers.70 Übereinstimmung (homologoumenon) herrscht nach Aristoteles darüber, dass man bei den sportlichen Übungen auf die Altersklassen zu achten hat.71 Für Kinder und Jugendliche72 bis zur Adoleszenz (hēbē) sind leichtere Übungen vorzusehen.73 Erst nach dem Übergang zum Erwachsensein und auf drei Jahre hin, wenn auch anderweitiger Unterricht (mathēmata) erfolgt, geht es um das harte Training (ponoi) und die strikte Diät (anankophagia). Dies ist ganz analog zu den zentralen Altersklassen, die uns schon öfter begegnet sind. Es geht um die Epheben sowie die Gruppen davor (paides) und danach (neoi). Dabei können die jeweils konkreten Jahresschnitte und Verlaufszeiten in den jeweiligen Poleis durchaus unterschiedlich fixiert werden. Entscheidend ist, dass man generell die Schwelle des ‚am Erwachsensein‘ (eph’ hēbēn) mit einer besonderen Sensibilität wahrnahm und dass man mit den hier geschilderten Erziehungsgrundsätzen gerade an dieser Stelle ansetzte. Ein locus classicus dafür ist eine Partie in Xenophons ‚Memorabilien‘. Sie ist gerade in dem intellektuellen Milieu angesiedelt, indem man die Bildungskonzep69 70 71 72 73

Aristot. eth. Nic. 1179b29. Aristot. pol. 1338b4–9. Aristot. pol. 1338b39–1339a7. Wohl ab ca. sieben Jahren, so MARROU 1977: 229 Anm. 25. Beispiele hierzu bei MARROU 1977: 228–230 mit zahlreichen Belegen.

Stasis und Sozialisation

49

te bewusst diskutierte, und operiert mit einer religiösen Gestalt, die im Gymnasion besondere Verehrung genoss und der Heros der Sportler war. Es geht um die berühmte, vom Sophisten Prodikos von Keos maßgeblich ausgestaltete Geschichte von Herakles am Scheidewege (mem. 2.1.20–35). Der springende Punkt ist genau der Übergang von Kindheit und Jugend zum Erwachsensein (ek paidōn eis hēbēn, 21). Er ist deshalb so wichtig, weil jetzt die jungen Leute (neoi) mündig geworden sind (autokratores). Sie können selbständig entscheiden, wohin es gehen soll, und müssen sich diese ihre Entscheidung damit auch zurechnen lassen. Eben das ist der Punkt, wo sich vor Herakles zwei Wege auftun, für den zwei Frauen stehen, Personifikationen des Glücks (eudaimonia) und der Schlechtigkeit (kakia). Gerade hier aber ist angesichts der Jugend des Betroffenen – man denke an die einschlägigen Bemerkungen in der ‚Rhetorik‘ des Aristoteles, aber auch an Platons Wächter – besondere Sorgfalt notwendig, weil die jungen Männer eben körperlich unbeherrscht sind (tois sōmasin adynatoi, 31). Die Physis, also die natürliche Anlage, reicht allein nicht aus. Herakles ist von seinen Eltern her durchaus sehr positiv begabt (27, vgl. 33). Letztlich aber geht es um die eigene Entscheidung, und wenn sie zum Glück führen soll – also einer gelungenen Erziehung und damit einer gelingenden Lebensweise – dann ist man auf die Leistung verwiesen, für sich selbst, nicht zuletzt aber auch für die anderen, die Freunde, die Polis, das Griechentum. Angesichts der Ausgangsposition des jungen Mannes ist die Beherrschung des Körpers für einen Erfolg in dieser Hinsicht ausschlaggebend. Sie ist die Basis der Selbstbeherrschung. Die Rede der Eudaimonia, die Herakles zum Guten ruft, endet gerade mit dem Hinweis darauf: Man muss den Körper daran gewöhnen (ethisteon), der Überlegung (gnōmē) dienstbar zu sein, und deshalb gilt es, „mit Mühen und Schweiß gymnastisch zu üben“ (gymnasteon syn ponois kai hidrōti, 28). Dafür allerdings gibt es auch Anreize, nämlich die später erfolgende dankbare Belohnung und vor allem das Gedenken (mnēmē, 33). Darin steckt ein klarer Appell an den kompetitiven Ehrgeiz und die agonale Befriedigung. Die in dieser wirkungsmächtigen Geschichte verdichteten didaktisch-edukativen Konzepte sind nun keineswegs als Blaupausen für die spätklassisch-hellenistischen Praktiken zu verstehen, aber eben auch nicht allein als ein bloßer intellektueller Diskurs. Sie machten implizites Wissen um psychosomatische Zusammenhänge im Wachsen und in der Formung der Jugend, gerade im Blick auf die Schwelle vom Kind zum Erwachsenen, explizit und konzeptualisierten es damit, durchaus mit praktisch-philosophischer Zielsetzung und demgemäß auf eine Wirkung im Politisch-Sozialen ausgerichtet. Insofern war die oben hervorgehobene Institutionalisierung, ja Verrechtlichung des Gymnasion – immerhin gab es ja, wie wir sahen, auch einschlägige Gesetze – durchaus im Sinne und auf der Linie der hier skizzierten Theoreme. Notwendig waren solche Bemühungen seitens der Polis allemal, wollte sie die Wildheit, die Zügellosigkeit und den unbändigen Ehrgeiz der jungen Machos, mit denen sie zu tun hatte, im Sinne der Gemeinschaft zügeln, ja das Wasser dieser Energien auf ihre Mühlen leiten; denn diese brauchte sie durchaus, wenn sie es im

50

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Krieg mit monarchischen Söldnern oder barbarischen Killern zu tun hatte. Da war es hilfreich, Löwen auf seiner Seite zu haben. Um ihre innere Konsistenz als Grundlage ihres Ranges und ihrer Freiheit nach außen bemühte sich die Polis auf vielfältige Weise, zu allen Zeiten mit je angebrachten Methoden. Jedenfalls hatten die Bürger der Polis und die für sie Verantwortlichen alle Gründe, ihre innere Konsistenz gegen Stasiskräfte zu bewahren, deren Energie aber auch in ihrem Sinne zu nutzen. Erhebliche Anstrengungen zur Sozialisierung waren gefragt. Die Bürger mussten in diesem Sinne recht gebildet werden. Die formierte Erziehung gehörte dazu. Wie wir sahen, war sie nicht nur plumpe Disziplinierung und Abhärtung. Immer hatte neben dem Kräftigen das Elegante, neben dem Marsch der Tanz, neben dem Sport die Musik ihren Platz. Gerade daran lag es ja, dass man diese Erziehungsformen nicht als bloßen Zwang wahrnahm – sie wären dann nicht langfristig erfolgreich gewesen. In ihnen selbst lag Attraktivität genug, und hinzu kamen weitere Motivationen und Anreize: die Wettbewerbe mit ihren Belohnungen und Preisen, die Anerkennung, kurzum, das soziale Kapital, das man gerade mit philoponia, eutaxia und euexia sammeln konnte. Es war also immer auch genügend Begeisterung im Spiel, die ja nach aktuellem Stand der neurobiologischen Forschung für die Formung des Gehirns und damit das Lernen maßgeblich ist, also mit den Worten Demokrits, zum physiopoiein wesentlich beiträgt. Hier liegt ziemlich genau das vor, was Pierre Bourdieu als Habitualisierung bezeichnet. Auch in der griechischen Polis war der die Gesellschaft leitende und zugleich von ihr immer wieder hergestellte und bekräftigte ‚praktische Sinn‘ (sens pratique) dem Körper eingeschrieben.74 Wir konnten sehen, dass dies auf eine sehr spezifische Weise geschah und dass die Griechen sich der Zusammenhänge auf ihre Weise durchaus bewusst waren. Sie waren hier besonders engagiert. Dass man für die Gewährleistung der formierten Erziehung – man denke an die Ehrungen der Gymnasiarchen – immer wieder so viel unternahm, dass man ihre Vorzüge immer wieder pries und offenbar auch preisen musste, zeigt zugleich, dass es der Polis nicht definitiv gelingen wollte, ihren ‚inwendigen Explosivstoff‘, wie Nietzsche ihn genannt hatte, zu entschärfen. Es wird aber auch sichtbar, dass man es immer wieder versuchen konnte, über Jahrhunderte hinweg, dass die Polis letztendlich trotz aller Probleme sehr lange stabil blieb, viel länger als andere Ordnungen. Die Lebendigkeit der Diskurse und Praktiken demonstriert die Präsenz dieser Thematik, und alles das manifestiert die Virulenz und die Kraft dieser Ordnung. Dank tradierter Erfahrung, präziser Beobachtung und eingehender Reflexion hatte man im alten Griechenland ein Verständnis für leib-seelische, physischmentale und psychosomatische Verbindungen, das wir heute angesichts beachtlicher Erkenntnisse vor allem der Neurowissenschaften zur „erfahrungsabhängigen 74

BOURDIEU selber spricht einmal (1993: 552f.) von Akten der gymnastique corporelle als „fundamentalsten Metaphern“. Zu diesem Aspekt vgl. die knappe Orientierung bei GEBAUER/WULF 1998: 46–53, 262f.

Stasis und Sozialisation

51

Neuroplastizität“75 und vor allem über die Zusammenhänge von Bewegung, Fühlen und Denken besonders gut nachvollziehen und weiterführen können – in gewiss allseits fruchtbaren transdisziplinären Analysen. Deshalb sei am Schluss eine These gewagt. Wenn die langen Bemühungen der Griechen um die Paideia der Politen letztendlich erfolgreich waren, dann nicht zuletzt deshalb, weil sie auf den ganzen Menschen (wenn auch primär nur die männliche Hälfte) zielten. Darüber kann und muss man immer wieder nachdenken, gerade heute.

LITERATUR ANEZIRI, S. – Damaskos, D., 2004. Städtische Kulte im hellenistischen Gymnasion, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 247–271. BLÖSSNER, N., 2006. Der Thymos als Urheber der Zuneigung. Ein singulärer Beleg (Arist. Pol. VII 7) und seine Erklärung. GB 25, 115–152. BOURDIEU, P., 1993 (orig. 1979). Die feinen Unterschiede, Frankfurt am Main. BRINGMANN, K., 2007. Judentum und Hellenismus, in: G. WEBER (Hrsg.), Kulturgeschichte des Hellenismus. Von Alexander bis Kleopatra, Stuttgart, 242–259. CECCARELLI, P., 1998. La pirrica nell’antichità grecoromana: Studi sulla danza armata, Pisa. CHANIOTIS, A., 2005. War in the Hellenistic World: A Social and Cultural History, Oxford. CHANKOWSKI, A. S., 2010. L’Éphébie hellénistique. Étude d’une institution civique dans les cités grecques des îles de la Mer Égée et de l’Asie Mineure, Paris. CROWTHER, N. B., 1991. Euexia, Eutaxia, Philoponia: Three Contests of the Greek Gymnasium. ZPE 85, 301–304. CURTY, O. (Hrsg.), 2009. L’huile et l’argent. Gymnasiarchie et évergétisme dans la Grèce hellénistique. Paris. DREYER, B., 2004. Die Neoi im hellenistischen Gymnasion, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 211–236. FLASHAR, H., 2013. Aristoteles. Lehrer des Abendlandes, München. GAUTHIER, Ph. – HATZOPOULOS, M. B., 1993. La loi gymnasiarchique de Beroia, Athen. GEBAUER, G. – WULF, CH., 1998. Spiel – Ritual – Geste. Mimetisches Handeln in der sozialen Welt, Reinbek. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1985. Stasis. Untersuchungen zu den inneren Kriegen in den griechischen Staaten des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., München. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1987. Die Griechen und die Rache. Ein Versuch in historischer Psychologie. Saeculum 38, 121–149. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1995. Der Nomosbegriff der Polis, in: O. BEHRENDS – W. SELLERT (Hrsg.), Nomos und Gesetz. Ursprünge und Wirkungen des griechischen Gesetzesdenkens, Göttingen, 13–35. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1997. Ephebeia. DNP 3, 1071–1075. GEHRKE, H.-J., 2003. Bürgerliches Selbstverständnis und Polisidentität im Hellenismus, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP – J. RÜSEN – E. STEIN-HÖLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Sinn (in) der Antike. Orientierungssysteme, Leitbilder und Wertkonzepte im Altertum, Mainz, 225–254. GEHRKE, H.-J., 2004. Eine Bilanz: Die Entwicklung des Gymnasions zur Institution der Sozialisierung in der Polis, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 413–419. GEHRKE, H.-J., 2013. Körper und Geist in der Erziehung des freien griechischen Mannes, in: B. ZIMMERMANN (Hrsg.), Von artes liberales zu liberal arts, Freiburg, 9–23. 75

HÜTHER 2011: 296; zur Förderung pro-sozialen Verhaltens durch Synchronisierung auf musikalischer Basis s. jetzt etwa PATEL 2008: 324.

52

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

GEHRKE, H.-J., 2015. Polis und Paideia. Zur Funktion des Gymnastischen in der Sozialisation griechischer Polisbürger, in: O. HÖFFE – O. PRIMAVESI (Hrsg.), Bürger bilden, Berlin (im Druck). GIOVANNINI, A., 2004. L’éducation physique des citoyens macédoniens selon la loi gymnasiarchique de Béroia, in: S. CATALDI (Hrsg.), Poleis e politeiai, Alexandria, 473–490. HATZOPOULOS, M. B., 2004. La formation militaire dans les gymnases hellénistiques, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 91–96. HÜTHER, G., 2011. Potenziale entfalten. Forschung & Lehre 4, 296–297. JACOBSTHAL, P., 1908. Die Arbeiten zu Pergamon 1906–1907 II. Die Inschriften. MDAI(A) 33, 375–420; Tf. XXIII–XXVI. JÜTHNER, J., 1909. Philostratos, Über Gymnastik, Leipzig. KAH, D., 2004. Militärische Ausbildung im hellenistischen Gymnasion, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 47–90. KAH, D. – SCHOLZ, P. (Hrsg.), 2004. Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin. KOWALZIG, B., 2004. Changing Choral Worlds: Song-Dance and Society in Athens and Beyond, in: P. MURRAY – P. WILSON (Hrsg.), Music and the Muses. The Culture of Mousikē in the Classical Athenian City, Oxford, 39–65. LAUM, B., 1914. Stiftungen in der griechischen und römischen Antike. Ein Beitrag zur antiken Kulturgeschichte; 2 Bde., Leipzig. MARROU, H. I., 1977. Geschichte der Erziehung im klassischen Altertum, München. PATEL, A. D., 2008. Music, Language, and the Body, New York. RICKEN, F., 2005. Êthos, Charakter, Sitte. Aristoteles-Lexikon, 214–216. ROBERT, L. – ROBERT, J., 1954. La Carie. Histoire et Géographie historique avec le recueil des inscriptions antiques. Bd. 2: Le plateau de Tabai et ses environs, Paris. SCHOLZ, P., 2004. Elementarunterricht und intellektuelle Bildung im hellenistischen Gymnasion, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 103–128. SCHULER, CH., 2004. Die Gymnasiarchie in hellenistischer Zeit, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 163–192. TRAMPEDACH, K., 1994. Platon, die Akademie und die zeitgenössische Politik, Stuttgart. WACKER, CH., 2004. Die bauhistorische Entwicklung der Gymnasien. Von der Parkanlage zum ‚Idealgymnasium‘ des Vitruv, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 349–362. WALBANK, F. W., 1957. A Historical Commentary on Polybius, Volume I: Commentary on Books I–VI, Oxford. WEILER, I., 2004. Gymnastik und Agonistik im hellenistischen Gymnasion, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 25–46. WIEMER, H.-U., 2011. Von der Bürgerschule zum aristokratischen Klub? Die athenische Ephebie in der römischen Kaiserzeit. Chiron 41, 487–537. ZIEBARTH, E., 1914. Aus dem griechischen Schulwesen. Eudemos von Milet und Verwandtes, Leipzig.

CIVIL WAR AND CIVIC RECONCILIATION IN A SMALL GREEK POLIS: TWO ACTS OF THE SAME DRAMA? Benjamin Gray

ABSTRACT: This paper considers the volume’s themes of performance, ritual, civil war and reconciliation in relation to small Greek cities, with an emphasis on the fourth century BC and Hellenistic period. Processes of civic reconciliation after civil war in small Greek poleis, such as those attested in inscribed reconciliation settlements from Nakone in Sicily (SEG 30.1119) and Dikaia in Chalkidike (SEG 57.576), often included collective political and religious performances, especially conspicuous oath-taking and reconciliatory rituals. These performances, and their commemoration in epigraphic form, usually involved explicit or implicit representation of the preceding period of stasis as an uncharacteristic, lawless and uncontrolled period of civic life: an episode of tragic violence, now resolved through the performance of reconciliation, a contrasting final act of the same drama. In this paper, I analyse such performances and texts of reconciliation, but also investigate the validity of the picture they give of stasis itself as a first act in a drama of two contrasting acts. I do so through consideration of the evidence for stasis in the fourth-century Peloponnese, especially Xenophon’s accounts of stasis in Corinth and Phlius in the 390s and 380s BC. I argue that that evidence shows that the performative behaviour of participants in stasis in some cases inverted normal civic roles, but in others fulfilled them. The script of Greek stasis was thus sometimes not far removed from the script of civic reconciliation: the two types of performance were sometimes not contrasting parts of a civic drama, but mutually resembling parts of a different single, unified drama, the ongoing, self-perpetuating but unstable drama of Greek civic politics, governed by certain powerful ideals.

1. INTRODUCTION Plutarch gives a vivid account of the future Achaian leader Aratus’ overthrow of the tyranny of Nikokles in his home city of Sikyon in 251 BC. After surreptitiously climbing over the walls of the city early one morning, Aratus and a small band of fellow exiles, conspirators and mercenaries made for Nikokles’ house. The people gathered in the civic theatre, in a state of confusion about what was happening. A herald then stepped forward, in a great coup de théâtre appropriate to the theatrical location, to announce that Aratus was calling the Sikyonians to their freedom. The citizens then set fire to Nikokles’ house, causing flames visible as far away as Corinth. This dramatic, ostentatious act could have served as a declaration of civil war. In fact, however, no civic bloodshed followed: Nikokles was able to escape through underground tunnels, presumably while the flames burned as a distraction. Citizens and mercenaries then plundered his house, but no one was injured. Aratus completed the peaceful transition by re-establishing a republican constitu-

54

Benjamin Gray

tion.1 Plutarch’s Aratus thus pulled off the magic trick of regime change without bloodshed: he transformed Sikyon back into a republican polis, simply by making a dramatic, well-choreographed re-appearance on the civic stage.2 In this account, the world of the theatre, drama and performance stands in sharp contrast to the narrowly avoided horror of civic division and violent conflict: collective participation in a spectacle of liberation, centred on the theatre, is the unexpected, pleasant alternative to civil war. The same effect is achieved by Herodotus’ account of the way in which Telines of Gela miraculously achieved the peaceful restoration of some exiles to his home city, simply by carrying out sacrifices to the Chthonian gods:3 in that case, performance of a religious ritual stands in contrast to the narrowly avoided reality of civil bloodshed. This article examines whether it is legitimate to draw such a sharp distinction in general between the world of performance and the world of civic violence, with reference to stasis (civil war) in small Greek poleis in the fourth century BC and early Hellenistic period.4 It does so by investigating to what extent the notion of performance is useful for analysing bitter, violent factional strife itself, and citizens’ responses to it, in a number of small Greek poleis in that period. In doing so, this chapter takes its inspiration from the original theme and title of the 2011 conference at Schloss Reisensburg: „Performing Civil War“ (compare the Introduction to this volume, p. 20). The focus on performance encouraged me to think about Greek civil strife in a different way, which I explain here. There are many possible conceptions of performance and its relevance to the analysis of society. This is clear from the varied approaches of different modern anthropologists, sociologists and historians.5 It was also clear at the 2011 conference. I offer here some comments about the ways in which I use the term in this article. A very exclusive understanding of performance would confine it to organised theatrical, musical and athletic displays to an audience. At the other extreme, many sociologists have emphasised that all social actions are in a sense ‘performed’: all social interaction requires agents to engage in selective selfpresentation to an audience, designed to influence the audience’s thoughts and emotions, even if the audience is simply a single interlocutor or observer.6 More-

1 2 3 4 5

6

See Plut. Aratus 8.4–9.7. Compare CHANIOTIS 1997: 224f. Hdt. 7.153. For the continuing prominence of civil war in the Hellenistic cities, see Boris DREYER and Henning BÖRM in this volume. Compare CARLSON 1996: 1f. For a survey of the term’s rise to prominence in historical studies, see BURKE 2005. For a discussion of its relevance to Classical studies, see (with references to much further bibliography) CHANIOTIS 1997; GOLDHILL 1999; HORNBLOWER 1991– 2008: 12–21; S. HORNBLOWER on ‘Theatricality’ in the OCD4 2012. For discussion of this approach, championed by the sociologist E. GOFFMAN, see CARLSON 1996: ch. 2, e.g. 34. Compare HABERMAS 1984: 85f., 91 (discussing his notion of ‘dramaturgical action’).

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

55

over, many social actions involve playing some social role within a society: for example, Butler has influentially emphasised how gender and gender relations are ‘performed’ through role-playing.7 Such role-playing involves following a ‘script’ of some kind: if not a written set of instructions, then at least some focussed set of social, political and cultural norms, relevant to particular occasions and contexts.8 Burke points out that the notion of a ‘script’ has been regarded by some as too rigid to incorporate into any definition of performance: improvisation is central to performance.9 However, even a full theatrical script leaves wide scope for adaptation and improvisation during a performance: a fortiori, the more nebulous ‘script’ offered by cultural norms leaves great opportunities for improvisation. Using a broad notion of performance is an effective way to draw attention to the frequently ‘constructed, composed’ nature of social institutions and events.10 It is, therefore, very helpful to employ this broad notion of performance in some contexts: for example, Farenga has effectively analysed ancient Greek political and legal interaction in terms of the ‘performance of justice’.11 However, in other contexts, it is helpful to be able to distinguish particular types or examples of social activity as performed or theatrical in ways in which others are not.12 What this requires is a more substantial notion of performance, which excludes some forms of social activity, without confining performance to theatrical displays: a notion which allows some episodes of regular social and political life, but not all, to be regarded as Inszenierungen. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to define precisely the qualities which make certain social activities more ‘performed’ than others.13 One probable distinguishing feature is ‘framing’: a performance, in the substantial sense being sought here, should be somehow marked as a special period of activity, with a defined beginning, middle and end,14 which is designed to create a particularly strong impression in its audience, emotional as well as intellectual.15 Another probable distinguishing feature is a significant element of premeditation: performers must have consciously planned their performance, devising in advance some recognisable, meaningful script, structure or plan of action. Indeed, it is probably necessary, in a

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15

See, for example, BUTLER 1997. Compare GOLDHILL 1999: 12f. (on the ‘script of culture’). See also the discussion in CARLSON 1996: 16. BURKE 2005: 41. Compare GOLDHILL 1999: 18. See FARENGA 2006. Compare GOLDHILL 1999: 11; BURKE 2005: 43. See CARLSON 1996: 14f. Compare SCHECHNER 2006: 35: social activities which can be classified as performances in ways in which others cannot are those which are ‘marked, framed or heightened’ in some way. See also BURKE 2005: it is necessary to distinguish ‘framed events’ from role-playing in everyday life. On the particular emotional force of rituals and ‘theatrical’ behaviour more generally, see CHANIOTIS 2010.

56

Benjamin Gray

substantial performance, that the performers should have planned to convey some particular wider message, or to draw attention to some particular wider issue, through their performance: they must have intended to communicate to the audience something which goes beyond the literal or physical content of their performance, often some message about wider questions of social and political order.16 Notably, these distinguishing features do not require that even a social performance in the substantial sense should involve deception or illusion: techniques of substantial performance can be used to advocate sincerely held beliefs, or to draw the audience’s attention to objective facts about their situation.17 Moreover, these distinguishing features do not require that even a performer in the substantial sense should be entirely in control of his performance, capable of exerting any desired effect on his audience, regardless of social constraints.18 On the contrary, those who perform in the substantial sense sketched above may be very strongly constrained in their behaviour by the script provided by the cultures to which they are exposed, as well as by the limits imposed by their environment. This article investigates whether ‘performance’ in the weak and more substantial senses set out here is a helpful category for analysing the behaviour of participants in small-polis stasis. It is relatively straightforward to identify even substantial performance in the context of reconciliation after stasis:19 as discussed in section 2 below, those charged with reunifying a divided citizen-body quite commonly arranged for citizens to perform political rituals, as part of an attempt to reestablish civic structures and values. By contrast, it appears at first sight provocative or even distasteful to apply the language of performance to the actual violence and conflict of stasis itself, in which people were killed and severely injured.20 Such language need not, however, imply that there was anything entertaining or light-hearted about civil war or killing. To take a modern parallel, it does not trivialise terrorist violence to study the ways in which terrorists fulfil social roles, or the ways in which they use careful planning, drama and symbolism to achieve the greatest possible political and ideological effect.21 It is thus legitimate to examine to what extent participants in staseis were playing recognised civic roles, and to what extent they made use of structured, premeditated spectacular or dramatic interventions and demonstrations in order to protest, to assert an ideology or to claim legitimacy and attract support.

16 17 18 19 20 21

Compare SCHECHNER 2006: 35, 76; also the discussion in CARLSON 1996: 17. Compare TAYLOR 1994: 276. For this as a possible drawback of some notions of performance, see BURKE 2005: 42f. Compare TURNER 1982: 74f.: processes of ‘redress’ are the part of ‘social drama’ which has most in common with ‘cultural genres’. Compare BURKE 2005: 42. Compare BURKE 2005: 42; SCHECHNER 2006: 76. For a recent very effective treatment of the connections between performance and civil war, and its commemoration, see the influential film The Act of Killing (directed by J. OPPENHEIMER, 2012) about twentieth-century civil violence in Indonesia, and its after-effects.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

57

As argued in section 2.2, Greek procedures and texts of reconciliation sometimes themselves cast the preceding period of stasis as one of dramatic transgression, in which citizens had inverted the normal script of civilised civic interaction. They thus effectively represented the preceding stasis as the first act of a drama of which the reconciliation itself was the concluding, resolving act: the stasis was a performance by two factions of division, lawlessness and citizen-killing; the reconciliation was a compensatory performance of civic order and unity, in which all citizens participated together. Section 3 examines the accuracy of this ancient model of stasis as performance, taking Xenophon’s accounts of stasis in small poleis of the fourth-century Peloponnese as a case-study. It finds some evidence even for performance in the substantial sense involving transgression and inversion of normal roles: some cases of stasis violence and disorder can be interpreted, not simply as chaotic or opportunistic interventions, but as framed, planned displays of transgression intended to suggest that there was something profoundly wrong with current civic life, which made necessary relaxing of rules and revolutionary change. However, section 3 also finds evidence that dramatic inversion of the normal civic script was not the only possible type of stasis performance: more troublingly, citizens could also become embroiled in bitter stasis by following, or improvising upon, accepted scripts of civic interaction and communication.

2. PERFORMANCE OF CIVIC RECONCILIATION 2.1. Rituals of Reconciliation It was common for citizens to engage in performances in the substantial sense after a bout of stasis: citizens commonly performed political rituals intended to restore order.22 In some cases, such post-stasis rituals had a partisan edge. For example, a decree from Erythrai, probably of the later fourth-century BC, reports that a recent oligarchic regime had removed the sword from a civic statue of an earlier tyrannicide, thinking that “its stance was directed against them” (τὴν στάσιν καθ’ αὑτῶν εἶναι). Through this decree itself, the restored democracy arranges for the statue to be restored to its former condition and for it to be crowned with an honorific crown during civic festivals. This celebration of democracy

22

On the topic of reconciliation after civil war in Greek cities in general, see WOLPERT 2002; DÖSSEL 2003; CARAWAN 2013; TEEGARDEN 2014, all citing earlier bibliography. On the connections between political ideology, political rituals and political order in Greek cities, see also Hans-Joachim GEHRKE’s chapter in this volume; he emphasises the central role of the gymnasium, and socialisation of the young into civic values through the practices and rituals they engaged in there.

58

Benjamin Gray

would probably not have commanded universal support: it would have alienated former supporters of the recent oligarchy, now in exile or still in the city.23 This use of political ritual with a partisan edge to reinforce a post-stasis settlement can be compared with the establishment of a festival of Eleutheria in Priene in c. 297 BC, after the overthrow of the regime of Hieron. The establishment of a festival of ‘Freedom’ implied that Hieron’s regime had been an oppressive tyranny, from which the Prienians had now been liberated.24 It is quite likely that some contemporary or past citizens of Priene would have contested that implication. In this case, there is direct evidence that the overthrown regime had enjoyed support among some citizens: during the stasis itself, at least one civic garrison had taken Hieron’s side.25 In a similar case from a large polis, after the Athenian oligarchy of 411, Athenian democrats used a combination of ritual, legal reform and public building to assert the unique legitimacy of democracy,26 without making any concessions to citizens inclined towards oligarchy, now in exile or keeping a low profile.27 Such cases can be seen, to some extent, as immediate examples of the ‘performance of civil war’ itself: victorious factions continued factional struggle by new, seemingly peaceful means, organising and performing partisan versions of civic rituals, with clear political meanings. At Athens, this partisan approach failed to prevent the establishment of a new oligarchy in 404: it may even have helped to reinforce oligarchic resentment. Probably partly for this reason, the response to this second oligarchy was far more bipartisan.28 As Shear has emphasised, this second post-stasis settlement itself involved wide-ranging use of ritual and performance to restore civic order and reassert civic values.29 There is some evidence for similarly bipartisan post-stasis rituals, rich in political meaning, in small poleis. I select for discussion here two particularly striking cases: a reconciliation settlement from the small polis of Nakone in Sicily, dating to the fourth or third century BC, inscribed on one of the Entella tablets; and a recently published reconciliation settlement from the small polis of Dikaia on the coast of Chalkidike, dating to 365–359 BC.30 Each of these settlements prescribed carefully choreographed substantial performances and rituals, designed to express, publicise and reinforce complex, specific visions of civic order.31 Indeed, the contrasts between the two sets of rituals and performances

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

I.Erythrai 503; see also OBER 2003: 227f.; TEEGARDEN 2014: chapter 5. See I.Priene 11, with CROWTHER 1996. MAGNETTO 2008: text pp. 34–45, ll. 88–90 (part of a new edition of I.Priene 37). See SHEAR 2011: chs. 3–5, discussing many earlier items of bibliography. For a modern parallel, see VINCENT 2009 on the rituals of expiation which former republicans were obliged to perform after their defeat in the Spanish Civil War. Compare DÖSSEL 2003: 55–146 (see esp. 89); SHEAR 2011: 315f. See SHEAR 2011: chs. 6–9; compare WOLPERT 2002. SEG 57.576; VOUTIRAS 2008: text pp. 787–789. For the role of festivals and rituals in constructing Classical Athenian ideals of citizenship, see (for example) GOLDHILL 1999: 21f., 27; KAROULAKI 1999: 304.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

59

show that those involved in devising them were each aiming to convey particular, fine-grained political messages. The contents of the document of reconciliation from Nakone are the following:32

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

32

ἐπὶ Λευκίου τοῦ Καισίου καὶ Φιλωνίδα Φιλ[......] Ἀδωνίου τετάρται ἱσταμένου. ἔδοξε τᾶι ἁλίαι καθὰ καὶ τᾶι βουλᾶι· ἐπειδὴ τᾶς τύχας καλῶς προαγημένας διώρθωται τὰ κο[ινὰ] τῶν Νακωναίων, συμφέρει δὲ καὶ ἐς τὸν λοιπὸν χρόνον ὁμον[ο]οῦντας πολιτεύεσθαι, πρέσβεις τε Ἐγεσταίων παργεναθ[έ]ντες Ἀπέλλιχος Ἀλείδα, Ἀττικὸς Πίστωνος, Διονύσιος Δεκ[ί-] ου ὑπὲρ τῶν κοινᾶι συμφερόντων πσι τοῖς πολίταις συνεβο[ύ]λευσαν, δεδόχθαι τοῦ Ἀδωνίου τᾶ ι τεταρτᾶι ἱσταμένου αλιαν τῶμ πολιτᾶν συναγαγεῖν καὶ ὅσσοις ἁ διαφορὰ τῶμ πολιτᾶν γέγονε ὑπὲρ τῶν κοινῶν ἀγωνιζομένοις ἀνακληθέντας ἐς τὰν ἁλίαν διάλυσιν ποιήσασθαι αὐτοὺς ποτ’ αὐτοὺς προγραφέντας ἑκατέρων τριάκοντα. οἱ δὲ υπενάντιοι γεγονότες ἐν τοῖς ἔμπροσθεν χρόνοις ἑκάτεροι ἑκατέρων προγραψάντω. οἱ δὲ ἄρχοντες τὰ ὀνόματα κλαρογραφήσαντες χωρ̣ὶς ἑκατέρων ἐμβαλόντες ἐς ὑδρίας δυόω κλαρώντων ἕνα ἐξ ἑκατέρων, καὶ ἐκ τῶν λοι[π]ῶν πολιτᾶν ποτικλαρώντω τρεῖς πὸτ τοὺς δύο ἔξω τᾶν ἀγχιστε̣ ιᾶν ἇν ὁ νόμος ἐκ τῶν δ̣ ικαστηρίων μεθίστασθαι κέλεται̣ καὶ ἔστν αὐτῶντα οἱ συνλαχόντες ἀδελφοὶ αἱρετοὶ ὁμονοοῦντες ἀλλάλοις μετὰ πάσας δικαιότατος καὶ φιλίας. ἐπεὶ δέ κα οἱ ἑξήκοτα πάντες κλᾶροι ἀερθέωντι καὶ οἱ ποτὶ τούτους συλλαχόντες, τοὺς λοιποὺς πολίτας πάντας κατὰ πέντε συγκλαρώντω, μὴ συγκλαρ̣ῶντες τὰς ἀγχιστείας καθὰ γέγραπται, καὶ ἔστν αὐτῶντα ἀδελφοὶ καὶ οὗτοι καθὰ [κ]αὶ τοῖς ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῖστα συνλελογχότες. οἱ δὲ ἱερομνάμονες τᾶι θυσ[ί]αι θυόντω̣ αἶα λευκάν, καὶ τὰ ποτὶ τὰν θυσίαν ὅσων χρεία ἐστὶ ὁ ταμίας παρεχέτω. ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ αἱ κατὰ πόδας ἀρχαὶ πᾶσαι θυόντω καθ’ ε̣ καστον ἐνιαυτὸν ταύται τᾶι ἁμέραι τοῖ[ς] γενετόρεσσι καὶ τᾶι Ὁμο̣ νοαι ἱερεῖον ἑκατέροις ὅκα δοκιμάζωντι, καὶ οἱ πολῖται πάντες ἑορταζόντω παρ’ ἀλλάλοις κατὰ τ̣ ὰς δελφοθ̣ ετίας. τὸ δὲ ἁλίασμα τόδε κολαψάμενοι οἱ ἄρχοντς ἐς χάλκωμα ἐς τὸ π̣ ρόν̣ α̣ ον τοῦ Δ̣ιὸς [τοῦ] Ὀλυμπίου ἀναθέντω.

AMPOLO 2001: Nakone text A; see also SEG 30.1119, with 51.1185. The version printed here includes one change, in ll. 19 and 25–6, ἔστν for ἐς τόν; without this change, the clause has no main verb. For a defence of this, see GRAY 2015: 37, n. 2.

60

Benjamin Gray In the magistracy of Leukios son of Kaisios and of Philonidas son of Phil-, on the fourth day of Adonios. It seemed good to the assembly as well as to the council: since, fortune having developed in a fine way, the common affairs (l. 5) of the Nakonians have been put in order, and it is beneficial that they should conduct their life as citizens in harmony for the future, and the envoys who came here from Segesta, Apellikos, son of Adeidas, Attikos, son of Piston, and Dionysos, son of Dek-…, deliberated concerning the common good for all the citizens, let it be decided to convene an assembly (10) of the citizens on the fourth day of Adonios. For those among whom there was conflict, as they competed concerning common affairs, let them, having been summoned to the assembly, conduct a reconciliation with each other, a list of thirty members having been written in advance for each side. Let those who were previously adversaries draw up the respective lists, each of the other faction. The (15) magistrates should write the names of each group separately on lots, and put them in two urns, and draw one from each group, and from the rest of the citizens they should draw lots for three more members, excluding those relatives whom the law requires to be absent from trials in court; and those who have been (20) drawn together should be chosen brothers of one another, united in concord with each other with all justice and friendship. When the sixty lots have been drawn, and also the others drawn together with them, let them assign the rest of the citizens by lot to groups of five, not drawing (25) relatives together, as has been written, and those drawn together should be brothers of one another like those previously drawn together. The hieromnamones should sacrifice a white goat for the sacrifice, and the steward should provide whatever is necessary for the sacrifice. And likewise all (30) the succeeding magistrates should sacrifice on this day each year to the ancestors and to Homonoia a sacrificial animal which they have had tested, one for each, and the citizens should all participate in a festival in groups, in accordance with the creations of brotherhoods. Let the archons inscribe this decree on a bronze plaque and set it up in the entry hall of the temple of Olympian Zeus.33

Some impartial arbitrators from the nearby polis of Segesta had drawn up terms of reconciliation, designed to reconcile two factions, whose members had clearly recently been engaged in intense stasis. Presumably on their recommendation, the assembly prescribed a highly distinctive ritual of reconciliation. The members of the two factions, each thirty-strong, and the remaining citizens were to gather in the assembly. New, artificial civic sub-divisions or ‘brotherhoods’ of five were then to be formed, cutting across factional lines: lots were to be drawn to select the members of each brotherhood, one from each of the two factions and three from the pool of neutral citizens. Once the members of the factions were all assigned, subsequent brotherhoods were to contain only neutral citizens. Significantly, fellow kinsmen could not be drawn in the same brotherhood: these brotherhoods were to be purely political constructions, which would not rely on any preexisting bonds of loyalty. The Nakone settlement offered as a civic ideal a very high degree of civic unity, harmony and solidarity between citizens: ‘brotherhood’ was invoked as a model for relations between citizens, and it was explicitly stated that the members of the brotherhoods were to live together ‘with all friendship and justice’.34 Performance was to be central to the expression of this ideal, and to the process of making it a

33 34

Compare DÖSSEL’s German translation (2003: 237–239). Compare LORAUX 2001: 215–228; DÖSSEL 2003: 235–247.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

61

reality: the orchestration of ‘brother-making’ was intended to shape the emotions and habits of citizens.35 The process of forming brotherhoods would itself have been a demonstrative performance of reconciliation, rich in symbolism. Each faction was to draw up a list of the members of the other faction, as if preparing for denunciations or proscriptions. The names were then to be put in separate urns, a move symbolic of the divisions between them. The appearance of hostility and division was then to be dramatically overturned through the process of drawing and grouping of lots: previously divided citizens were to be merged into indivisible, fraternal groups. The formation of each brotherhood would have been a performance vividly symbolic of an ideal process of reconciliation, representing in microcosm the merging of all citizens into an indivisible, fraternal citizen-body. Moreover, the new brotherhoods were to preserve their identities and importance through performance: they were to participate in an annual political ritual, a festival on this day in each year, accompanied by sacrifices to the ancestors and to Concord (Homonoia). Political rituals were thus used at Nakone to promote the erasure of differences and rivalries within the citizen-body: the aim was to make citizens of one mind, ‘brothers’ even with their recent bitter enemies.36 The political rituals envisaged in the fourth-century reconciliation agreement from Dikaia were equally distinctive, but they conjured up a quite different vision of civic order: one in which there was more scope for disagreement and competition between citizens, within regulated bounds. The city of Dikaia had been founded by settlers from Eretria, probably in the first half of the fifth century BC. They may well have been exiles, possibly former Medisers expelled after the Persian War, who gave their new city the name Dikaia (‘Just City’) in a polemical statement against the regime in their home polis.37 Around a century after the foundation, during the reign of Perdikkas III of Macedonia (365–359 BC), there was a stasis in the ‘city of justice’, probably connected with the complex diplomatic history of the Northern Aegean in that period.38 This made necessary the intervention of a group of arbitrators, led by a certain Lykios; it is unclear whether they were Dikaiopolitans or foreigners.39 These arbitrators made proposals for reconciliation which were ratified and implemented through the five assembly decrees preserved in the text of the reconciliation, discovered and published in the early years of this century. 35 36 37 38 39

See the discussion of this text in CHANIOTIS 2010, where the emotional dimension of the creation of civic brotherhoods is emphasised. For plans to use collective ritual to restore order, solidarity and concern for the common good in a divided citizen-body after stasis, compare RHODES/OSBORNE, GHI 85B, ll. 39–49. See D. KNOEPFLER in BE 121, no. 263. See VOUTIRAS/SISMANIDES 2007: 263f. It is true that Lykios received special permission to chair the assembly (SEG 57.576, ll. 1–4), which might indicate that he was a foreigner not usually allowed to appear there at all. It is, however, equally plausible that he was a Dikaiopolitan citizen who required special authority in order to chair the assembly at this particular point.

62

Benjamin Gray

This reconciliation required the citizens of Dikaia ostentatiously to perform their role as just citizens: the procedures of reconciliation can be interpreted as a ‘performance’ designed to symbolise and reinforce the identity of the Dikaiopolitans as citizens of the ‘city of justice’. There was one day on which the two factions were permitted to bring murder suits against each other: all suits relating to past events were subsequently barred.40 For members of the two factions each to bring controversial suits (δίκαι) of this type on a single day must itself have been a vivid, framed demonstration of the just workings of the ‘city of justice’: just legal proceedings were to continue, despite the risk that contentious trials might reignite civic discord.41 As the decree relates, reciprocal bringing of suits was followed by procedures of reconciliation which were far more straightforwardly ritualistic, and performative in the substantial sense. All citizens were required to swear an oath of reconciliation, whose contents are recorded in the inscription.42 The text of the first part of the oath is the following:

70

75

80

ο̣ ρκος· πολιτεύσομαι ἐπίπασι δικαίς καὶ δημοσίαι καὶ ἰδίαι καὶ τὴμ πολιτείαν οὐ μεταστήσω τὴμ πατρίαν, οὐδὲ ξένους εἰσδέξομαι ἐπὶ βλάβηι τοῦ κοινοῦ τοῦ Δικαιοπολιτέων οὐτὲ ἰδιώτεω οὐδὲ ἑνός· καὶ οὐ μνησικακήσω οὐδενὶ οὔτ̣ [ε] λόγωι οὔτε ἔργωι· καὶ οὐ θανατώσω οὐδένα οὐδὲ φυγῆι ζημιώσω οὐδὲ χρήματα ἀφαιρήσομ[α-] ι ἕνεκα τῶμ παρηκόντων· καὶ ἄν τις μνησικα̣ κ̣ ῆι, οὐκ αὐ[τ-] ῶι ἐπιτρέψω· καὶ ἀπὸ τῶμ β̣ωμῶν καθελέω καὶ καθαιρεθ[ή-] σομαι· καὶ πίστιν δώσω καὶ δέξομαι τὴν αὐτήν· καὶ ἁγνιῶ̣ καὶ ἁγνιοῦμαι καθότι ἂν τάξ[ηι] [τ]ὸ κοινόν· καὶ εἴ τινα ἐπίστωσα [ἢ] ἐπιστωσάμην, δώσω καὶ δ[έ]ξομαι καθάπερ ἐπίστωσα καὶ ἐπιστωσάμην· ἔν τε ταῖς δίκαις αἷς ἐδίκασεν ἡ πόλις ἐμμενέω· καὶ εἴ τινα ἄλλον ὅρκ[ον] ὤμοσα, λύω, τόνδε δὲ σπουδαιότα̣ τομ ποιήσομαι. Oath: I will be just in my behaviour as a citizen towards all in public and in private affairs. I will not change the ancestral constitution, nor will I admit foreigners to the detriment of the commonwealth (70) of the Dikaiopolitans or of any individual. I will not bear grudges towards anyone in word or deed. I will not put anyone to death or punish anyone with exile or confiscate anyone’s property for the sake of what is in the past. If anyone does bear a grudge, I will not allow him. I will take down (others) from the altars (75) and be taken down myself.

40 41

42

See SEG 57.576, ll. 27–45. For fears in ancient Greek poleis that strict justice could be very divisive, compare CROWTHER 1995: 92; LORAUX 2001: 243f.; DÖSSEL 2003: 256, 262f. Among the ancient evidence for this, note especially Tit. Cal. test. XVI, ll. 40–43. SEG 57.576, ll. 67–105.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

63

I will give and receive the same good faith. I will give and receive purification as the commonwealth orders. If I bound anyone by a pledge or gave a pledge myself, I will give and receive as I exacted or gave (80) a pledge. I will remain faithful to the judgements which the polis made. If I swore some other oath, I revoke it, and I will make this one the most binding.

To swear this oath would itself have been a framed, evocative performance of the role of a citizen of the ‘city of justice’. The first promise is to be “just in my behaviour as a citizen in all respects”: this punning opening amounts to a promise to be a thoroughgoing Dikaiopolitan. The subsequent pledges make clear what kind of just citizenship is in question: punctilious respect for established procedures and for the maintenance of strict reciprocity between citizens, of the kind which would be superfluous among fully united civic ‘brothers’ of the Nakone type, but which is highly appropriate for distrustful members of a civic contract for mutual security and advantage. Citizens are to swear to respect the ancestral constitution and to desist from unconstitutional, revolutionary behaviour, including harmful admission of foreigners or revival of grievances connected with the stasis. The pledges give a sense of grudging mutual concessions: for example, citizens promise to take down and be taken down from the altars, thereby giving each other mutual assurances that they will not exploit the sanctity of the altars to avoid the terms of the settlement. Moreover, the emphasis on contractual good faith later reemerges (ll. 77–84) when citizens explicitly swear to respect and enforce particular contracts and legal judgements. The swearing of the oath by all citizens in the agora must have been a vivid performance of the contractual type of civic interaction idealised in the oath itself. Moreover, the oath looks forward to further performative rituals, designed to entrench this picture of Dikaiopolitan civic order. The first relevant clause is the line: “I will give and receive the same pledge of good faith (πίστις)” (l. 75). This is probably a reference to a ritual mentioned elsewhere in the decree: citizens were to exchange “pledges of good faith” (πιστώματα).43 Through this ritual of reconciliation, citizens were in practice to act out a social contract for mutual security, based on strictly reciprocal exchange of the same pledge of faith: they were to create through performance a specific, contractual type of civic order. The next ritual mentioned in the oath reinforces the same conception of civic order: a contractual one based on reciprocity and personal responsibility. This is a ritual of mutual purification: “I will purify and be purified” (ll. 75–7). Through this ritual, citizens were symbolically to give mutual admissions of their share of responsibility for the events of the stasis, and to offer mutual release from responsibility.

43

See SEG 57.576, ll. 11–12, 22.

64

Benjamin Gray

2.2. The Representation of Stasis and Dialysis as Two Acts in the Same Drama in Reconciliation Documents To summarise, therefore, the two settlements discussed above required citizens to act out two quite different ‘scripts’ of civic order: a Nakonian script prescribing fraternity and concord and a Dikaiopolitan script prescribing a just, reciprocal civic contract. As Chaniotis emphasises, the Nakonian settlement was designed to manipulate and intensify citizens’ emotions and feelings of sympathy.44 At Dikaia, by contrast, the performances had a drier, more rationalistic character: citizens were to act out a contract, but not necessarily to form strong emotional bonds with one another. The two settlements are, however, similar in the way in which they both prescribed political performances intended to achieve and symbolise civic reconciliation. Moreover, they both presented the preceding stasis as a period of extreme, visible, meaningful violence, involving the transgression or inversion of normal standards of civic conduct, in which many citizens had been involved, as participants or observers. Indeed, as suggested in my introduction, each settlement implicitly cast the preceding period of stasis as a first, tragic act of discord in a twoact drama of which the performance of reconciliation was the triumphant, concluding act. In the Nakone settlement, the period of civil war is represented as having had its own structure: it was a period of division (διαφορά) between the two clear-cut factions of thirty. Moreover, it is represented as having been forward-moving, like an act in a Classical play: the two factions are said to have been “competing concerning common affairs” (ὑπὲρ τῶν κοινῶν ἀγωνιζόμενοι, ll. 10–11). According to this representation, all citizens had played their dynamic roles within the overall social process, creating, as Loraux emphasises, a perfect, symmetrical image of a divided city.45 It is significant that the verb ἀγωνίζομαι is used to describe the factions competing with each other: the use of a verb which could also be used to describe competing in athletics or in a dramatic festival (as actor or dramatist) could easily have called to mind images of performance and drama. The Nakone settlement therefore gives the impression that the recent stasis was a period of intense, dynamic, bitter division, centred on ‘common affairs’, the diametrical opposite of the performance of civic concord, stability and fraternity which it prescribes. The decree implies that the performance of brother-making would make unity supersede its opposite, a dramatic, almost magical, positive reversal appropriate to the concluding act of a play. The Dikaiopolitan settlement represents the preceding stasis as less sharply structured, but nonetheless as a clear inversion of normal, orderly civic life, in-

44 45

See CHANIOTIS 2010. Compare LORAUX 2005: 47f. LORAUX stresses that the Greeks in general conceptualised stasis as a type of division which paradoxically involves adversaries each following the same rules.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

65

volving dramatic, forward-moving action. Again the stasis is presented as a struggle between two symmetrical, monolithic factions, whose members may now wish to bring legal suits against each other: “Demarchos and those with Demarchos”, who have been in exile, and “Xenophon and those with Xenophon”.46 The Dikaiopolitan settlement gives the impression that these two factions had been engaged in a violent, dramatic struggle, inverting normal patterns of political and religious behaviour. The inclusion of provision for both sides to bring murder suits acknowledges that both may have perpetrated and suffered illegitimate killings. Moreover, the inclusion in the universal civic oath of explicit pledges to abstain from revolutionary, polis-destroying behaviour, including disregard for the constitution, implies that citizens on both sides had recently done such things. The impression created, of an equal, even symmetrical transgressive struggle, can be contrasted with the picture of more one-sided dramatic transgression evoked by some more partisan post-stasis regulations: documents from Eresos concerning later fourth-century tyrants represent two of them, Eurysilaos and Agonippos, as having confiscated weapons, shut the whole people out of the city, imprisoned their women and children in the acropolis, exacted money, plundered the city and sanctuaries and set them on fire, and burned the bodies of citizens.47 The contrasting implicit picture of the recently concluded stasis in the Dikaiopolitan document leaves it open for the reader to interpret the two-sided transgressive drama of the Dikaiopolitan stasis as a fitting prelude to the dramatic, bipartisan processes of attributing responsibility and re-establishing the civic contract described in the settlement itself. This analysis of the implications of the two settlements should not be taken to imply that those involved in each case consciously regarded and presented the stasis and subsequent reconciliation as a two-act drama. Rather, that fundamental pattern should be seen as an underlying framework, a basic cultural template which shaped citizens’ unconscious or unarticulated understandings of the political processes involved. The pattern is evident elsewhere in Greek culture: as Seaford has emphasised, one possible basic structure of an Attic tragedy is for a period of tragic violence, involving vicious, tit-for-tat pursuit of revenge and honour within a narrow elite, to be brought to a conclusion through the establishment of civic institutions for peaceful, consensual resolution of disputes.48 That process can be intertwined in tragedy with the foundation of a new civic cult:49 compare the foundation of a new festival at Nakone. The two reconciliation settlements studied here might, therefore, be seen as examples of life imitating art: examples of theatrical drama providing a model for

46 47 48

49

See SEG 57.576, ll. 36–41. RHODES/OSBORNE, GHI 83, β side, ll. 1–14 and γ front, ll. 5–13. See SEAFORD 1994. Aeschylus’ Eumenides is the clearest example of this structure. GRIFFIN 1998: 53f. notes that SEAFORD probably represents this pattern as more pervasive in Attic tragedy than it was in reality. Consider the conclusion to Aeschylus’ Eumenides.

66

Benjamin Gray

citizens’ understandings of political processes. It is, however, necessary to bear in mind the complexities of the relationships between theatrical drama, patterns of crisis and resolution in social life, and participants’ understandings of those patterns. The anthropologist Victor Turner proposed the influential theory that ‘social dramas’ conforming to a clear template are ubiquitous: all societies undergo fourpart processes of transgression, crisis, redress and reconciliation or acknowledgement of schism. These simultaneously reflect and themselves influence the structure of plays and theatrical performances:50 Greek tragedy is a paradigm case of a type of aesthetic drama in which the four-part process can often be identified.51 The performance theorist Richard Schechner has strongly criticised Turner’s model as too schematic: social dramas can take very many varied forms, and rarely come to a firm conclusion. He himself sees a never-ending, complex feedback loop between social drama and aesthetic drama, with each taking innumerable different forms.52 The implicit representation of stasis and reconciliation as two acts of a single drama in the settlements from Nakone and Dikaia should probably be viewed as elements in the complex workings of this kind of process within Greek culture. Earlier processes of crisis and reconciliation had contributed to the development of distinctive patterns of tragic drama. Those in turn then influenced the political consciousness of citizens engaged in political life, such as the Nakonians and Dikaiopolitans. Moreover, their representations of their political experience could subsequently have provided further material and inspiration for new dramatists.

3. PERFORMING CIVIL WAR 3.1. Introduction: Xenophon and the Role of the στασιώτης The picture of civil war and civic reconciliation as two contrasting acts of a single civic drama, one of transgression and one of restoration of order, would have been a reassuring one for poleis to paint. The implication would have been that citizens could avoid destructive stasis if they stuck to the authorised civic script of political behaviour: it was only if some or all citizens engaged in reckless deviance that peaceful civic life would be obstructed.53 This section investigates whether this 50 51 52 53

See, for example, TURNER 1974: 38–42; TURNER 1982: 68–72. See TURNER 1982: 72. See SCHECHNER 2006: 76f. For the more general prominence in Greek culture of this approach, which made stasis a matter of inversion and misrule, see LORAUX 2005: 61–79. For a recent assessment of LORAUX’s approach to stasis, and its relevance to current debates in ancient history, see AZOULAY 2014. TEEGARDEN 2014 confirms the tendency for Greeks to represent those involved in provoking unrest as tyrants, or aids to tyrants. For the prominence of this approach in Greek historiography, which endured into the Hellenistic period, see DREYER in this volume, esp. pp. 92– 94; also BÖRM in this volume, pp. 102f., with n. 22.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

67

comforting picture is supported by the evidence for the behaviour of citizens in small-polis stasis: it considers to what extent participants in stasis can be said to have ‘performed’, in the weak or substantial sense, dramas and spectacles of transgression and inversion. The discussion concentrates on cases of stasis in early fourth-century Peloponnesian poleis, and especially on Xenophon’s representations of them in his Hellenica.54 As recent scholarship has emphasised, Xenophon applies a wide range of literary techniques in his political narrative, imposing patterns, symmetries and allusions.55 His narratives of stasis are subject to considerable ideological and literary distortion.56 Nevertheless, it is sometimes possible to read between the lines of Xenophon’s narratives, to uncover some of the considerations which could have given particular factionaries the sense of entitlement and legitimacy necessary to motivate stasis violence. At the very least, each of Xenophon’s portrayals of small-polis stasis indicates what contemporaries would have regarded as plausible, on the basis of their experience of polis life: what contemporaries would have regarded as possible, or probable, processes of social breakdown within a small polis. One of Xenophon’s accounts of fourth-century Peloponnesian small-polis stasis shows very clearly why it is legitimate to apply the notion of performance, at least in the weak sense sketched in the introduction, to Greek civil war at all: it was possible for citizens to fail comprehensively to perform the role of factionaries in stasis. The relevant account is his description of a chaotic stasis in Elis in 400 BC. When Spartan troops invaded the territory of Elis, Eleian oligarchs saw an opportunity to overthrow the resented democracy. They rushed out of a house and immediately killed several citizens, including a man they recognised as a leading democrat. They thus seemingly performed the role of insurgent factionaries in stasis. This enticed their supporters also to play the role of revolutionaries, bringing their weapons into the conspicuous public space of the agora. It turned out, however, that the oligarchs had failed to perform their role successfully: the man killed merely resembled the democratic leader Thrasydaios; the real Thrasydaios was lying in his house drunk. The democrats had initially been despondent, but, when they realised their opponents’ error, they swarmed around the living Thrasydaios like bees around their leader. The democratic faction was thus not any better prepared than the oligarchs for a tightly fought, structured stasis. Thrasydaios had been drunk and out of action at a moment of crisis. The other democrats were for a significant time unaware of their leader’s location. When they found him, they took no initiative, but swarmed around him as if awaiting instructions from an autocrat. Admittedly, a conventional stasis did then get underway, in which the democrats succeeded in driving the oligarchic revolutionaries out of

54 55 56

I have developed these arguments about Xenophon and civil strife in the Peloponnese in more detail in GRAY 2015: chapter 5. See, for example, DILLERY 1995; ROOD 2004. See, for example, PONTIER 2007.

68

Benjamin Gray

the city.57 It was, however, preceded by this display of confusion and poor organisation, in which all citizens failed to perform effectively the role of στασιῶται, required of them by the situation. It is very likely that Xenophon’s account was impregnated with topoi: the comically inadequate revolutionary, possessed of more fervour than sense; the democratic leader devoid of self-control; the bee-like followers of a demagogue. Nonetheless, his account shows very clearly the kinds of things which might go wrong for factions in any stasis: blunders which could be avoided through more careful adherence to scripts of citizen vigilance and of conspiratorial timing and accuracy. In order for a true, recognisable stasis to take place at all, it was necessary for citizens to follow certain patterns of behaviour. It was also necessary for them to co-ordinate their actions with those of fellow faction-members and to remain constantly aware of the behaviour of the other side in the drama.

3.2. Stasis as a ‘Performance of Anti-Citizenship’ The majority of the small-polis staseis portrayed by Xenophon do reach the level of factional co-ordination required for qualification as a ‘performance of civil war’, in the weak sense of ‘performance’. They therefore provide useful evidence for answering the central question addressed in this section: to what extent did factionaries in small-polis stasis perform inversions of their normal civic roles. It is quite common for Xenophon to represent organised, successful participants in staseis behaving in ways antithetical to normal, civilised citizen conduct. For example, Xenophon writes that, after seizing power in a democratic coup in 367 BC, Euphron of Sikyon initially established a democratic constitution in his home city. However, he soon plundered public and sacred money, exiled leading citizens and killed or expelled those who had been elected to serve alongside him on the new democratic board of generals.58 Along similar lines, Xenophon represents a faction within the Arcadian League of the 360s BC committing sacrilege: according to Xenophon, one Arcadian faction used sacred money from Olympia to maintain the federal standing army, something which gave rise to disagreements and then schism within the League.59 These cases can be compared with Xenophon’s earlier representation of the vicious, unregulated behaviour of the Thirty Tyrants in Athens. The grim banality of the Thirty’s self-serving and greedy behaviour, including killings, expulsions and appropriations, is there cast into relief by a performance in the substantial sense: the dramatic flight to the civic hearth of the sympathetic figure of Theramenes, seeking asylum after Critias has arbitrarily ordered his execution for

57 58 59

For the whole account, see Xen. hell. 3.2.27–9. Xen. hell. 7.1.44–46. Xen. hell. 7.4.33–5.3; compare Diod. 15.82.1. See ROY 1971: 585f.; THOMPSON 1983: 158; GEHRKE 1985: 155–158; NIELSEN 2002: 490–493.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

69

disloyalty. Taking up his position on the hearth, Theramenes points out that to kill him there will be an offence to the gods, and urges other oligarchs to note that they are no safer than him from persecution.60 Xenophon’s Theramenes thus makes a framed dramatic display of piety and reasonableness,61 which contrasts strongly with the shapeless, mindless violence62 surrounding him: his arguments are disregarded and he is put to death.63 In this part of Xenophon’s narrative, therefore, substantial performance is a respite from, or the antithesis of, stasis. Xenophon’s representations of these examples of transgressive stasis behaviour can largely be explained in terms of Xenophon’s literary and ideological assumptions and purposes. For one thing, Xenophon himself had been socialised into the comforting Greek view which made stasis a comprehensive departure from civilised scripts of civic behaviour: this would have led him to emphasise the contrast between the roles of citizen and factionary. For another thing, Xenophon held particular animosity towards those involved: the anti-Spartan Euphron and Arcadians, and the Thirty at Athens. This animosity probably further encouraged him to manipulate his narrative, in order to discredit the factionaries concerned, by emphasising the extent of their transgression of accepted rules of civic behaviour. For example, Xenophon was probably tendentious in presenting Euphron as a stereotypical vicious, unmitigated tyrant, who overturned all civic institutions and norms for the sake of his own personal power. As Lewis emphasises,64 Euphron clearly enjoyed wide support in Sikyon,65 and was even buried in the agora and honoured as a city founder after his early death.66 As implied at the start of this section, the types of behaviour portrayed by Xenophon in the examples considered above can be seen as examples of successful performance in the weak sense, involving social role-playing before an audience: for example, Xenophon’s Euphron can be seen to be performing the role of the vicious tyrant. By contrast, they lack any of the distinguishing features of substantial performance identified in my introduction. There is, however, one case in which Xenophon presents a group of fourth-century Peloponnesian factionaries committing transgressive violence which does fit quite well the model of framed, strongly symbolic dramatic transgression or inversion of normal civic norms, what might be called ‘performance of anti-citizenship’. This is a case in which he

60 61 62 63 64 65 66

Xen. hell. 2.3.52–3. GRIFFIN 1998: 57, notes the dramatic qualities of this scene, which he finds comparable with those of some Attic tragedy. For the way in which Xenophon presents the Thirty as engaging in mindless, unregulated violence, compare WOLPERT 2006. Xen. hell. 2.3.54–6. LEWIS 2004: esp. 71–74. See Xen. hell. 7.1.45, 3.4. Xen. hell. 7.3.12.

70

Benjamin Gray

describes dissidents literally attacking a performance of civic order and values:67 he describes how anti-Spartan revolutionaries in Corinth perpetrated a massacre in 392 BC during the festival of Artemis Eukleia. Xenophon’s account can be set alongside the description of the same event by Diodorus Siculus.68 It can also be set alongside Diodorus’ subsequent account of oligarchic exiles from Phigaleia invading their home city and perpetrating a massacre of spectators in the theatre at the civic Dionysia in c. 375 BC.69 Diodorus’ Phigaleian exiles were almost certainly oligarchic pro-Spartans, who had been forced into exile as Spartan hegemony in the Peloponnese weakened. It is harder to be certain about the political situation in Corinth which gave rise to the 392 massacre. Some influential, wealthy Corinthians had been involved in securing Corinth’s involvement on the anti-Spartan side in the Corinthian War from 395 BC onwards. According to Xenophon’s portrayal, it was these Corinthians who perpetrated the massacre, anxious that, with the war going badly for Corinth, their more pro-Spartan opponents would seek peace with Sparta: the massacre was a reflection of factional divisions within the Corinthian elite. However, as Kagan has emphasised, it is easier to interpret a massacre of this kind as the work of a broader, anti-Spartan and pro-democratic faction, venting long suppressed anger against the oligarchic, pro-Spartan Corinthian elite: that view can explain better how the citizens involved gained the motivation necessary to go to the extreme lengths of a massacre of their fellow citizens.70 There are several reasons why each account can be interpreted as portraying violence which amounts to a performance of anti-citizenship. In each case, the relevant festival itself provides a very clear and evocative frame for the factionaries’ reported violence: to massacre fellow citizens during a festival would have been a very dramatic, eye-catching performance of anti-citizenship, a terrifying inversion of the role of a civilised, peaceful citizen. Indeed, the presence of the frame of the civic festivals sets these factionaries’ reported violence apart from other reported stasis violence of equal destructiveness, giving it a much more orchestrated character. The normal civic script would have demanded respect for the sanctity of a civic festival as a moment of civic unity, in which political rivalries were out of place. In Xenophon’s and Diodorus’ accounts, the factionaries at Corinth and Phigaleia inverted that script: they killed the political opponents with whom they should have joined in celebration and levity, showing no concern for the religious significance of the festival.

67

68 69 70

For civic festivals as performative celebrations of civic pride, order and values, see (for example) GOLDHILL 1987; SOURVINOU-INWOOD 1990; CHANIOTIS 1995; CHANIOTIS 1997: 245– 248. Xen. hell. 4.4.1–4; Diod. 14.86.1. See also GEHRKE 1985: 82–87; CARTLEDGE 1987: 364. Diod. 15.40.2; compare HORNBLOWER 1991–2008: 16. On questions of dating, see GEHRKE 1985: 127; STYLIANOU 1998: 330–332. See KAGAN 1962: 453; LINTOTT 1982: 224. Contrast SALMON 1984: 356.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

71

In the two historians’ accounts, the revolutionaries in each case also made an assault on the ordered civic rituals and contests of the civic festival concerned, performing their own types of ‘anti-ritual’. Diodorus succinctly expresses this in his report that the Corinthian revolutionaries committed their massacre “while contests were taking place in the theatre” (ἀγώνων ὄντων ἐν τῷ θεάτρῳ) and filled the city with stasis (στάσεως ἐπλήρωσαν τὴν πόλιν).71 The same motif is also present in Xenophon’s account: the revolutionaries killed “one man standing in a circle, one sitting down, one in the theatre, even one who was sitting at a judge” (in an athletic or dramatic contest); they then attacked those who took refuge in religious sanctuaries.72 Similarly, Diodorus’ Phigaleians were presumably awaiting or watching a theatrical performance when the exiles struck. These examples show that the two historians did not think that civic festivals should be events of pure unity and solidarity: there was space for certain forms of competition. As modern anthropologists and sociologists have stressed, such ritualised competition would have offered means of releasing tensions and harmlessly investigating social differences.73 However, it was only productive, cordial competition in athletic and theatrical contests which was appropriate to festivals, not the brutal competition of stasis. Extreme stasis was a quite different spectacle for the festival-goers from the civilised interactions of a race or play. In the two historians’ accounts, therefore, the revolutionaries, like modern terrorists, made a performance in the sense that they launched a sudden, premeditated, co-ordinated attack, in which their role as agents was obvious to a clearly defined audience: an attack which gained greatly in meaning and ideological force from being a calculated attack on the ostentatious, performative demonstration of civic order and peaceful working out of tensions inherent in a civic festival. It is possible that these examples should be interpreted in the same way as Xenophon’s other accounts of transgressive stasis violence: the two historians manipulated their accounts to give the impression of condensed, deliberate inversion of civilised norms, in an attempt to discredit dissidents of which they disapproved. However, it is also plausible that their reports were more accurate:74 it is possible to understand why the dissidents in each case might have considered a performance of anti-citizenship an effective way of pursuing their aims. Indeed, in the Phigaleian case, it is likely that it was a successful way to attract support: Diodorus claims that the exiles attracted new supporters when they attacked the civic theatre.75

71 72 73 74

75

Diod. 14.86.1. Xen. hell. 4.4.3. Compare TURNER 1982: 81; GOLDHILL 1999: 11f. For festivals as special occasions particularly vulnerable to outbreaks of violence, partly because of the heightening of emotion, see CHANIOTIS 2006: 211f. (on ancient Greece); DAVIS 1975: 165f., 171–173 (on early modern France). Note also Ain. Takt. 12.16–18; Thuk. 1.126. Diod. 15.40.2.

72

Benjamin Gray

Pragmatic considerations could have dictated the decision to attack during a festival in each case: all opponents were gathered in one place, off their guard and without rigorous defences.76 However, symbolic considerations could well also have been crucial. A performance of anti-citizenship would have been a vivid, concise and shocking way to suggest to other citizens that something was profoundly wrong with the status quo: prevailing policies, structures and relations between citizens were so corrupt that only violent upheaval could put them right. At the conference, the objection was raised against my analysis of these factionaries’ behaviour as a ‘performance of anti-citizenship’ that the citizens concerned would not have considered themselves to be inverting normal citizen roles: they would have seen themselves as heroic citizens, reconquering their polis from an illegitimate regime. However, it is quite plausible that these factionaries took the view that the current state of affairs was so degenerate that the only acceptable option was to engage in dramatic, violent transgression, rather than to continue to go through the motions of conventional citizen behaviour. Simply following the normal civic script would have been a dereliction of patriotic duty: prevailing circumstances meant that the good citizen was obliged to be a revolutionary. As well as being vivid performances of discontent, which called into question at its roots the legitimacy of surrounding civic life, these attacks on civic festivals were probably also more targeted acts of rejection and protest. It is worthwhile to compare them with the mutilation of the Herms in Athens in 415 BC, a symbolic, theatrical act of protest against democratic political and social values.77 Another potentially revealing parallel is the alleged decision of oligarchs in Erythrai to remove the sword from a statue of an earlier tyrannicide, discussed in section 2.1 above:78 that was a framed, dramatic challenge to democratic notions of Erythraian civic liberty and its history. Like an attack of an ideologically charged statue, an attack on an ideologically charged festival would have been a potentially very effective way to reject symbolically the authority of particular citizens and values: that of the organisers of the festival and that of the civic ideals which were symbolised and performed in it.79 It is more straightforward to argue that the Phigaleian exiles acted with this kind of intention: they came from exile to attack the incumbent, anti-Spartan re-

76

77 78

79

Compare Ain. Takt. 12.16–18. See also CARTLEDGE 1987: 256. For other specific examples of the reality or expectation of citizens being off their guard or distracted from military and political affairs during festivals, see Thuk. 3.3.3, 56.2; 7.73.2; Pol. 8.37. See Thuk. 6.27; OSBORNE 1985. See I.Erythrai 503, ll. 2–6. OBER 2003: 228, points out that, if the oligarchs did indeed remove the sword from the statue, they might not have accepted that the stance of the tyrannicide was directed against them; they might well have insisted they were aristocrats rather than tyrants. In that case, they might have presented the removal of the sword as symbolic of an end to all violence between citizens. Compare the profanation of the Eleusinian Mysteries which accompanied the mutilation of the Herms at Athens in 415 BC (see Thuk. 6.28.2), a clear symbolic attack on the Athenian democratic civic order (see, for example, HORNBLOWER 1991–2008: 379).

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

73

gime in their home city, responsible for their exile, which they would almost certainly have regarded as lacking political and religious legitimacy. The situation is more complex in the Corinthian case, since those responsible for the massacre were home citizens rather than exiles: at least some of them had been instrumental in determining Corinth’s current anti-Spartan foreign policy, in which they feared an imminent change. However, they could still have resented those prominent in the Eukleia festival as powerful citizens and magistrates: in particular, as advocates of the alternative, pro-peace foreign policy likely to be soon adopted; and as champions of the traditional oligarchic, pro-Spartan order in Corinth. Εὔκλεια (‘good reputation’) itself was an elastic Greek value, but it could have been interpreted in this case as a value closely entwined with Corinth’s traditional pro-Spartan, oligarchic orientation. Bacchylides juxtaposes it with virtue and good order (εὐνομία) in his praise of aristocratic Aegina,80 and a priesthood of Εὔκλεια and Εὐνομία existed in aristocratically-governed Roman Athens.81 Perhaps significantly, in the light of the aristocratic association of εὔκλεια with εὐνομία elsewhere, Xenophon presents the oligarchic Corinthians expelled from their city as a result of the Eukleia massacre as defenders of εὐνομία.82 This analysis of the motivations of the factionaries at Corinth and Phigaleia can be set alongside evidence presented at the conference for the ideologies of participants in civil war in other periods of antiquity. In particular, Matthias HAAKE discussed a fictional letter from the Historia Augusta, which purports to be a letter to an official by the third-century AD Roman emperor Gallienus, responding to the usurpation of imperial rule by Ingenuus. In that letter, Gallienus is made to call for the killing of all disloyal men, not only those bearing arms. He is then made to state: Ingenuus factus est imperator. lacera, occide, concide, animum meum intellege, mea mente irascere, qui haec manu mea scripsi (“Ingenuus has been made emperor! Wound, kill, slaughter, understand my purpose, share the anger of me, who wrote these things with my own hand”).83 It is true that these lines are a literary invention, probably written, as HAAKE emphasised, to discredit Gallienus as a gruesome tyrant. They do, however, indicate one possible way in which a claimant to the role of Roman emperor could have justified fomenting civil war. With an illegitimate emperor in place, the world is not in order: it is no longer acceptable simply to continue to follow normal standards of decency and law-abiding behaviour; revolutionary violence is the only option. In an inverted world, in which the formal channels of political power are occupied by an illegitimate ruler, the good ruler must, paradoxically, act like a tyrant. In a similar way, at fourth-century BC Corinth and Phigaleia, factionaries could have thought that, in an inverted, illegitimate world in which illegitimate citizens were calmly run-

80 81 82 83

Bakchyl. carm. 13, ll. 176–89. See, for example, IG II2 3738, ll. 2–3. Xen. hell. 4.4.6. HA trig. tyr. 9.6. See now Matthias HAAKE’s chapter in this volume, pp. 253f.

74

Benjamin Gray

ning festivals, the obligation of the good citizen was to disrupt those festivals with brutal violence.

3.3. Stasis as a Performance of Accepted Citizen Roles Xenophon’s Hellenica does, therefore, offer evidence favourable to the view that the ‘performance of civil war’ in a small Greek polis could be a matter of ostentatious transgression and inversion. Nevertheless, other examples in that work suggest that the script of anti-citizenship was not the only one on which factionaries could act, when they performed stasis, in the weak or strong sense: they could also be following accepted scripts of normal, civilised civic behaviour. That is to say that, sometimes, it was precisely through performing their civic roles, those required of them by mainstream civic norms, that citizens became involved in stasis.84 Comparison with other periods of history reveals one quite common way in which participants in civil war may continue to make substantial performances familiar from peacetime: scholars have studied how factions in civil wars and civil unrest from early modern France85 to twentieth-century Argentina86 have used partisan pageants and festivals to claim legitimacy for their cause, sometimes even committing violence against their opponents as part of these rituals.87 At the conference, Marco MATTHEIS and Troels Myrup KRISTENSEN discussed examples of this type of phenomenon from Late Antiquity: partisans of different pretenders to imperial rule sometimes ritualistically displayed or desecrated statues of leading figures.88 There is one case in Xenophon’s Hellenica in which a faction in stasis makes use of formal performative ritual as an instrument of civil war. The Eukleia massacre in Corinth in 392 BC led many pro-Spartan Corinthians to flee into exile. In their absence, the new regime in Corinth entered some kind of union with democratic Argos.89 One result of this was that the new union of Corinth and Argos took responsibility for organising the Panhellenic Isthmian Games, a traditional role of the Corinthians. In 390 BC, in protest against the legitimacy of the new

84

85 86 87 88 89

For this general approach to civil war, which sees political violence as often motivated by underlying political, social and ethical norms and traditions, note (for example) DAVIS 1975: 154; TURNER 1974: e.g. 35 (conflict reveals “fundamental aspects of society”), 87, 122f. (the paradigm of martyrdom interpreted as an influence on the behaviour of dissidents in different societies, from Thomas Becket to Mexican independence fighters). See DAVIS 1975: 172f. See TAYLOR 1994: 275, 286. See DAVIS 1975: 172f., 180 (on Catholic violence against Protestants in the course of rituals and processions during the French Wars of Religion). See now their chapters in this volume, pp. 371, 375f. and 335f. Xen. hell. 4.4.6. For different views on the nature and chronology of this union, see GRIFFITH 1950: 242–252; KAGAN 1962: 453; TUPLIN 1982; WHITBY 1984; SALMON 1984: 357–362.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

75

arrangements, the Corinthian exiles, with the support of King Agesilaos, preempted the new regime by holding their own version of the Isthmian Games. The new regime responded by holding their own Isthmia.90 There are parallel examples in other Greek historians. For example, Herodotus reports that, after desecrating the Athenian acropolis in 480 BC, Xerxes allowed the Athenian exiles in his army to make sacrifices on the acropolis, in accordance with their custom:91 he allowed pro-Persian Athenian dissidents to behave as the legitimate representatives of the Athenian cultic community. In Thucydides’ account of the establishment of the oligarchic regime of the Four Hundred in Athens in 411 BC, a suggestive element is his report that the ringleaders of the plans for oligarchy arranged an assembly to discuss constitutional proposals outside Athens at Colonos, site of a sanctuary of Poseidon. As other evidence shows, this sanctuary of Poseidon was a sanctuary of Poseidon Hippios. It is quite possible that the oligarchs, among whom the cavalry was probably heavily represented, wished to exploit the association of Colonos with horses:92 they may even have held demonstrative, anti-democratic rituals or sacrifices to Poseidon Hippios on this occasion.93 These cases can to some extent be compared with the partisan post-stasis ritual performances by victorious factions, from Erythrai, Priene and Athens, considered in section 2.1 above: as suggested there, those can be interpreted partly as hostile performances, continuations of civil war by other means. Although these cases fit well the pattern evident from other periods, it is perhaps surprising that there is not more clear evidence, in Xenophon or elsewhere, for participants in stasis performing partisan festivals, spectacles and rituals, in defiance of their opponents. There is, for example, little evidence for the use of actual theatrical displays to pour scorn on opponents. The way in which this might have worked is clear from Plutarch’s report of a case involving war between states, as opposed to civil war, in the later third century BC: according to Plutarch, King Cleomenes III of Sparta paused during an invasion of Megalopolis so that travelling Dionysiac artists could perform on a newly assembled stage. Plutarch interprets this as a means of showing utter contempt for the Megalopolitans.94 The relatively limited evidence for partisan rituals and festivals during stasis may be partly explained by the nature of the evidence. Ancient historians, including Xenophon, were probably deterred by the widespread Greek assumptions 90 91 92 93

94

Xen. hell. 4.5.2; SEIBERT 1979: 109. Hdt. 8.54. See HORNBLOWER 1991–2008, vol. III: 949f. A possible parallel for a fifth–century oligarchic ritual, orchestrated as a challenge to the Athenian democracy, is the ritual of ‘fireless sacrifices’ to Athene on Rhodes described in Pind. Ol. 7, as analysed in SFYROERAS 1993: esp. 21f.: a fireless sacrifice to Athene, an inversion of the fire-accompanied rites of the Athenian Panathenaia, could have been orchestrated as a polemical demonstration of defiance of Athens by Rhodian aristocrats, resentful of Rhodes’ subordinate position within the Delian League (see also HORNBLOWER 2011: 38f.). Plut. Agis/Cleomenes 33.3.

76

Benjamin Gray

about stasis influential on them from portraying factionaries engaged in conventional civic religious activities: if stasis had to be understood as the inverse of civic order, it became difficult to conceive of regular rituals as features of stasis behaviour. As for epigraphy, even if more inscriptions do survive regulating or advertising partisan festivals, it would be very difficult to identify them as such: those involved would have been keen to present themselves as the sole legitimate representatives of their polis and its cult traditions. Although there is only limited evidence for partisan festivals, there are signs in the Hellenica of other ways in which participants in stasis sometimes followed, rather than inverting, normal, accepted norms and scripts of civic behaviour. Moreover, there are even signs of substantial performance of such scripts, involving framed, planned, symbolic demonstrations of some vision of civic order, which fell short of being actual theatrical or ritual performances. The most interesting part of Xenophon’s account in this regard is his description of ongoing stasis in the small polis of Phlius in the north-east Peloponnese in the early fourth century. In Xenophon’s Phlius, citizens at different stages followed and adapted in different ways two distinct scripts of acceptable citizen behaviour, sometimes engaging in substantial performance. The two scripts were very similar to the two contrasting scripts embedded in the reconciliation agreements from Nakone and Dikaia considered in the previous section: first, a script of fraternal civic unity; and, second, a script of civic justice and strict reciprocity.95 Xenophon explains that there were already some pro-Spartan Phliasians living in exile, presumably as a result of stasis, during the Corinthian War: in 392 BC, the Spartans took control of the Phliasian acropolis, but did not agitate for the return of Phliasian exiles favourable to them.96 The Spartans did, however, apply more pressure on the incumbent Phliasians to restore their exiles during the period of Spartan ascendancy after the King’s Peace of 386 BC: in 384 BC, they arranged for the exiles to be restored to citizenship in Phlius. The incumbent faction, probably democrats, voted to restore the exiles’ property to them, but delayed in actually doing so.97 The matter had still not been resolved in 381 BC, when the democrats decided that a Spartan campaign in Northern Greece was a good opportunity for them conclusively to deny the exiles their property. At this point, the exiles demanded (ἠξίουν) that the question should be settled by an ‘equal court’: either a court with equal representation for each side, or a court administered by foreign

95 96 97

In this case, as in those discussed in BÖRM’s chapter (e.g. pp. 112f.), internal processes and tensions interacted with the broader diplomatic and military situation in Greece. Xen. hell. 4.4.15. Xen. hell. 5.2.8–10; 3.10. For the view that the Phliasian citizen-body was divided between a probably democratic majority and an oligarchic minority, compare LEGON 1967; CARTLEDGE 1987, 262f.; contrast THOMPSON 1970: 226; LINTOTT 1982: 225.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

77

judges.98 The democrats, however, insisted that they should have their cases judged ‘in the polis itself’: in the civic assembly or a domestic court.99 At this point in Xenophon’s account, therefore, the exiles made a public, demonstrative demand for the enforcement of strict property rights and the satisfaction of their damaged honour, behaving in a way which conveyed their own emotions of anger and grievance to their audience.100 They expressed their demands by appeal to strict justice, of the kind which was shown in section 2.2 above to be idealised in the reconciliation settlement from Dikaia: they pressed for impartial consideration of their claims by an ‘equal’ body, according to impartial, reciprocal standards of justice. They even claimed that there could be no justice (δίκη) if “those committing injustice were to judge” (οἱ ἀδικοῦντες δικάζοιεν).101 The democrats, by contrast, insisted that the trials should be held in the city, before normal civic tribunals. The implication of the democrats’ insistence was that individual entitlements could not be allowed to outweigh the collective interests of the city; the whole civic community should decide a matter of common concern. If the exiles had allowed them to take place, the trials themselves, involving popular, domestic judging, would have been a performative demonstration of civic sovereignty, collective power and the primacy of the common good: a performance of the kind evident in the Nakone reconciliation, considered in section 2.2 above. Xenophon thus here portrays a situation in which community-oriented and justice-oriented notions of civic order, and associated norms of citizen behaviour, came into conflict: the two sides acted out rival scripts of acceptable civic behaviour. He then describes further rival interpretations and performances of shared civic scripts, which occurred as this initial dispute escalated into a full-scale stasis. The former exiles and some of their supporters took the dramatic, even theatrical step of making their own, unauthorised embassy to Sparta to complain about their treatment.102 In making a high-profile embassy, they acted out a further common civic script: the use of an embassy to express grievances and seek foreign support. However, because they were in dispute with their domestic opponents, their ostentatious embassy, which could otherwise have been a demonstration of Phliasian sovereignty and importance at the inter-state level, took on the form of a partisan performance. Xenophon then describes how, in response to the Phliasian exiles’ embassy, Agesilaos brought an army to besiege Phlius. It was in the resulting context of simultaneous external and internal war that the two sides most clearly made sub-

98 For the latter view, see LONIS 1991: 106, n. 6; LORAUX 2001: 243. 99 Xen. hell. 5.3.10. 100 For the importance of considerations of honour and revenge in Xenophon’s account of the Phliasian stasis, see FISHER 2000. 101 Xen. hell. 5.3.10. In Xenophon’s account, the exiles’ claims to have justice on their side are endorsed by both the Spartans (see Xen. hell. 5.2.9) and Xenophon himself (Xen. hell. 5.3.10). 102 Xen. hell. 5.3.11.

78

Benjamin Gray

stantial performances, ostentatious adaptations of shared Phliasian scripts of civic behaviour, which were designed to attract Spartan support and to claim legitimacy for their own visions of civic order. With Agesilaos encamped on the borders of Phlius together with a band of Phliasian dissidents, only a few hundred strong, the Phliasians in the city decided to make some vivid performances: they held their civic assemblies on the border, in open sight for those outside the city (οἱ Φλειάσιοι ἐν τῷ φανερῷ τοῖς ἔξω ἐκκλησίαζον).103 Xenophon’s description emphasises that these demonstrative assemblies were intended, like a substantial performance, to have a specific, strong visual effect on a targeted audience, inspiring awe and respect. The change of location very clearly indicates conscious premeditation of an attempt to manipulate this audience, of the kind associated with a substantial performance. Moreover, like a substantial performance, each assembly would have been marked or framed as a special event, probably through the conventional opening and closing rituals of a Phliasian civic assembly. In addition, like a good substantial performance, these assemblies had a meaning beyond their surface content. Xenophon emphasises that the Phliasians’ intention was to emphasise to Agesilaos and the Spartans that the exiles represented only a very small proportion of the Phliasian citizen-body. Furthermore, demonstrative performance in a new location of civic assemblies, the essential form of democratic decision-making, could also have been a powerful symbolic assertion of the legitimacy and importance of democratic institutions and decision-making. Xenophon’s incumbent Phliasians thus treated these civic assemblies as pieces of political pageantry, demonstrations of civic unity and strength. In doing so, they were performing a common, legitimate civic script: that of congregating in a public place to make political decisions and assert the common good. In these circumstances, however, their performance of this script took on a sharply partisan edge. In response, under Agesilaos’ guidance, the exiles on the border themselves followed a recognised script of civic behaviour and solidarity: they formed common messes (syssitia), gradually incorporating friends and relations who came to visit them. Providing food and weapons for all who were willing to participate, they succeeded in training themselves into a well-ordered body of more than one thousand quasi-Spartan warriors. They then made a substantial performance, framed, calculated and symbolic: they presented a corps of more than one thousand men in excellent bodily condition, well-ordered and very well-armed (ἀπέδειξαν πλείους χιλίων ἀνδρῶν ἄριστα μὲν τὰ σώματα ἔχοντας, εὐτάκτους δὲ καὶ εὐοπλοτάτους). Again, Xenophon emphasises that this performance had a strong visual and emotional effect on a specific audience, the Spartans with Agesilaos: it was sufficient to make the Spartans present, previously sceptical about backing the Phliasian minority, embrace them as ‘fellow soldiers’.104

103 Xen. hell. 5.3.16. 104 Xen. hell. 5.3.17. On this, compare PONTIER 2007: 367f.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

79

The exiles in Xenophon’s account thus succeeded in creating through performance the illusion that they were a strong, self-standing civic community, able to defend itself, consisting of Spartan-style common messes. They also symbolically asserted through their performance an ideological message: they offered an aristocratic, Spartan-style vision of Phliasian civic order, centred on hierarchical, militaristic commensality. In doing these two things, they were following a script which the Phliasians as a whole had long followed. Like other members of the Peloponnesian League, the Phliasians had long behaved as a loyal Spartan satellite community. The exiles were acting out and adapting this Phliasian civic script, ostentatiously presenting themselves as a microcosm of the Spartan polis. Indeed, Xenophon claims that they continued to do so after their subsequent successful return to Phlius: they organised Phlius itself as an ostentatiously loyal Spartan polis, worthy of lavish praise for its loyalty and bravery.105 It might be thought that it was only the pro-Spartan exiles who acted out the ‘microcosm of Sparta’ script in Xenophon’s narrative. In fact, however, their opponents responded to the exiles’ demonstrative philolaconism by constructing their own ‘Sparta-in-microcosm’, a city of restrained, self-controlled fighters. Suffering under the effects of the siege, they took radical measures to guard against treachery or capitulation. They voted to halve rations. Moreover, one of their number, Delphion, who seemed ‘distinguished’ (λαμπρός), assembled around him an elite group of three hundred men to monitor those outside the city and repel attacks from the besiegers.106 This course of action would have been symbolically as well as pragmatically effective: it would have given an impression of order and self-restraint within the city. In particular, the appointment of an elite of three hundred would have strongly recalled the Spartan Three Hundred, a body of elite cavalry famed for endurance.107 Overall, therefore, Xenophon’s representation of stasis in Phlius portrays the factions making both weak and substantial performances of a range of mainstream civic scripts, of justice, solidarity, political organisation and military efficiency. In some cases, the two factions even performed rival versions of the same script: those inside and outside the city acted out their own rival, artificial ‘Spartas-inmicrocosm’. It is impossible to be certain whether any actual Phliasians made performances of these types in the early fourth-century. However, at the very least, Xenophon’s account shows very clearly plausible processes by which conventional types of civic behaviour and organisation could take on partisan, provocative forms. In some cases, members of rival factions in a small Greek polis could have adapted civic rituals and institutions, to suit predetermined factional aims. In others, citizens could have been led into stasis simply by following from the outset the norms and scripts of acceptable civic behaviour imbued in them through their civic upbringing: the Phliasian model shows that citizens’ attempts 105 Xen. hell. 7.2–3.1. 106 Xen. hell. 5.3.21–2. 107 CARTLEDGE 1987: 229.

80

Benjamin Gray

to act out shared civic traditions and ideals could take sharply polarised, irreconcilable forms. In particular, the Phliasian case indicates the possible divisive effects of attempts to act out in practice shared ideals of close-knit civic unity and collective devotion to particular traditions and values. The two sides in Xenophon’s Phliasian stasis each attempted performances which would symbolise and promote the unity of Phlius as a fiercely united mini-Sparta, intolerant of deviants and cowards. However, because their respective performances were each mapped onto their rival material interests and political preferences, they took on sharply partisan, exclusive forms.108

4. CONCLUSION: STASIS AND DIALYSIS AS A SINGLE DRAMA The evidence considered in this article suggests that there were two distinct ways in which civil war and civic reconciliation could constitute two acts of a single drama in a Greek polis. Rituals and documents of civic reconciliation often identify the following two acts in a closed civic drama: a first act of inversion, transgressive violence or even ‘anti-ritual’; and a second act of ordered, structured reconciliation, reversing the damage. This was a comforting model of stasis and reconciliation for a polis to champion. If citizens stuck to the civic script, there would be stability and order; stasis would break out only if citizens switched to a quite different type of performance, that of civil war and anti-ritual or anti-politics. Some historiographical accounts support the implication that stasis itself could be a period of inversion and transgression, with features which were performative in the weak, and also often the substantial, sense. Moreover, some of those accounts suggest that processes and performances of civic reconciliation could serve as a concluding, resolving act of a drama of civic breakdown: consider, for example, Xenophon’s account in the Hellenica of civil war and civic reconciliation in Athens in 404–3. Xenophon and other ancient historians were writing under the influence of the conventional Greek assumptions which made stasis the direct antithesis of civic order: they may well have consciously or unconsciously manipulated their narratives to make them conform with that template. However, it is very probable that some participants in stasis did deliberately and ostentatiously defy expected standards of civic behaviour, sometimes in framed, 108 For the potentially explosive consequences of a concerted attempt to act out in practice ideals of civic purity, according to which the citizen-body should be free from deviants and nonvirtuous men, compare Diodorus’ account of the skytalismos in Argos in 370 BC (see Diod. 15.57.3–58.4; GEHRKE 1985: 31–33): those demagogues who initially called for the elimination of supposed oligarchic conspirators themselves became the next victims of the fervour they had provoked. For an epigraphic example of exclusive, partisan solidarity, performed through the ritual of an oath, see the interpretation of the third-century oath of unity from Chersonesos Taurica on the Black Sea (IOSPE I2 401, esp. l. 5) as a partisan oath, internal to one faction in a stasis, in DÖSSEL 2003: 187–190. Compare partisan rhetoric and rituals of purity and unity in early modern France (DAVIS 1975: 157–161).

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

81

theatrical ways: note, for example, the discussion above of the motivations and claims to legitimacy of the Corinthians and Phigaleians who attacked fourthcentury civic festivals in their home cities. Nevertheless, perpetrators of stasis did not have to deviate from accepted scripts of civic behaviour. Other examples in historiography, especially Xenophon’s account of stasis in fourth-century Phlius, suggest that it was also possible to become embroiled in stasis simply by attempting to perform, in the weak or strong sense, accepted civic scripts. In times of hardship and disagreement, citizens’ separate attempts to derive precise, practical guidance from vague civic values, ideals and scripts, and to act on that guidance, could, as in Xenophon’s Phlius, have devastating results. Citizens could act on two distinct civic scripts, in conflict with each other; or citizens could differ about the correct way to act out in practice scripts dictated by civic tradition and civic culture. In particular, when two factions each attempted to act out their own interpretation of a script of civic solidarity, based on ritual and the ostentatious exclusion of outsiders,109 the competing performances left little scope for compromise. This raises the possibility that there was another sense in which stasis and civic reconciliation, or stasis and stable civic life more generally, could be two acts of the same drama in a small polis: citizens could be following the same script in stasis as they followed during periods of peaceful civic interaction or of reconciliation. Indeed, it is striking that, as suggested in the discussion of the Phliasian stasis in section 3.3, the two factions in Xenophon’s Phlius acted out versions of the visions of civic order performed by the citizens of Nakone and Dikaia in the processes of reconciliation analysed in section 2.2. Some participants in smallpolis stasis probably manipulated accepted civic scripts, but others probably followed them sincerely, seeking solutions to acute problems of civic organisation and material survival. According to this model, the same civic rituals and scripts could encourage political stability in some contexts, but aggressive factionalism in others. It is possible to compare the argument of GEHRKE in this volume that the Greek cities relied for their success on types of passion and spiritedness which could also be very destructive (see pp. 32–34, interpreting Plato and others). I am arguing here that it was also the case that some of the procedures, rituals and ideas adopted by cities to quell or shape those passions were themselves double-edged. Traditional mechanisms and performances of reconciliation were well-equipped to assuage citizens’ differences, but they also often recalled or foreshadowed the posturing of stasis itself: for example, they could recall or foreshadow factionaries’ uncompromising insistence on strict just deserts or uncompromising devotion to cause and interest-group. They could thus rarely conclusively resolve or terminate civic

109 For the ways in which rhetoric of unity, and apparent displays of unity, could conceal divisions within a Hellenistic polis, see BÖRM in this volume, esp. pp. 105f.

82

Benjamin Gray

divisions and animosities: a different civic script would have been required to achieve durable civic peace.110 The performance theorist Richard Schechner argues that the traditional template of Classical drama is not adequate to capture the ongoing uncertainties of modern warfare and conflicts: the dynamics of modern social and political life, including modern terrorism and state responses to it, are closer to a play by Brecht or Beckett, or the “seemingly endless episodes of the Mahabharata”, than to an Aeschylean or other pre-modern Western theatrical drama.111 The argument raised in the previous paragraphs suggests that the politics and conflicts of small Greek poleis were often equally complex, and equally unsuited to representation as a straightforward drama of transgression followed by reconciliation: it was quite possible that civic life in a small polis could be one unending drama, based on a single civic script open to diverse applications and interpretations, which was marked by alternating periods of stability and violence or by ongoing divisions. In Xenophon’s Phlius, for example, in the years after the capitulation to Agesilaos’ siege, no consensus was reached about the precise shape and membership of the Phliasian civic community. Agesilaos organised post-stasis procedures which heavily favoured his returning partisans: questions of punishment and future constitutional organisation were to be determined by an uneven tribunal of one hundred, containing fifty men each from the city party and the much smaller exile party.112 These supposedly even-handed procedures thus themselves possessed a harsh partisan edge similar to that of the behaviour of the factions in the recent stasis, now supposedly resolved. Opponents of the new regime fled into exile. The Phliasians at home made Phlius a loyal, devoted Spartan ally, but those exiles or their successors were still harrying Phlius in the 360s BC.113

BIBLIOGRAPHY AMPOLO, C. (ed.), 2001. Da un’antica città di Sicilia. I decreti di Entella e Nakone. Catalogo della mostra, Pisa. AZOULAY, V., 2014. Repolitiser la cité grecque, trente ans après. Annales (HSS) 69, 689–719. BROSIUS, C. – HÜSKEN, U. (eds.), 2010. Ritual Matters: Dynamic Dimensions in Practice, London. BURKE, P., 2005. Performing History: The Importance of Occasions. Rethinking History 9, 35–52. BUTLER, J., 1997. Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative, New York. CARAWAN, E., 2013. The Athenian Amnesty and Reconstructing the Law, Oxford. CARLSON, M., 1996. Performance: A Critical Introduction, London.

110 On the complexity of the relationship between Greek political rhetoric and practice in times of stability and discord respectively, see recently AZOULAY 2014. I develop further this argument that the same complex civic norms contributed to both order and disorder in Greek poleis in Gray 2015. For a partial modern parallel, see DAVIS 1975: 187, on early modern France. 111 SCHECHNER 2006: 76. 112 Xen. hell. 5.3.25; CARTLEDGE 1987: 265f. 113 Xen. hell. 7.2.5–9; GEHRKE 1985: 56, 107f.; PONTIER 2007: 371, n. 65.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

83

CARTLEDGE, P., 1987. Agesilaos and the Crisis of Sparta, London. CHANIOTIS, A., 1995. Sich selbst feiern? Städtische Feste des Hellenismus im Spannungsfeld von Religion und Politik, in: M. WÖRRLE – P. ZANKER (eds.), Stadtbild und Bürgerbild im Hellenismus, Munich, 147–172. CHANIOTIS, A., 1997. Theatricality beyond the Theatre: Staging Public Life in the Hellenistic World, in: B. LE GUEN (ed.), De la scène aux gradins. Théâtre et représentations dramatiques après Alexandre le Grand dans les cités hellénistiques, Toulouse, 219–259. CHANIOTIS, A., 2006. Rituals between Norms and Emotions: Rituals as Shared Experience and Memory, in: E. STAVRIANOPOULOU (ed.), Rituals and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, Liège, 211–238. CHANIOTIS, A., 2010. Dynamic of Emotions and Dynamic of Rituals: Do Emotions Change Ritual Norms?, in: C. BROSIUS – U. HÜSKEN (eds.), Ritual Matters: Dynamic Dimensions in Practice, London, 208–233. CROWTHER, C. V., 1995. Iasos in the Second Century BC: Foreign Judges from Priene. BICS 40, 91–138. CROWTHER, C. V., 1996. I.Priene 8 and the History of Priene in the Early Hellenistic Period. Chiron 26, 195–250. DAVIS, N. Z., 1975. Society and Culture in Early Modern France: Eight Essays, London. DILLERY, J., 1995. Xenophon and the History of his Times, London. DÖSSEL, A., 2003. Die Beilegung innerstaatlicher Konflikte in den griechischen Poleis vom 5.–3. Jahrhundert v. Chr., Frankfurt am Main. FARENGA, V., 2006. Citizen and Self in Ancient Greece: Individuals Performing Justice and the Law, Cambridge. FISHER, N. R. E., 2000. Hybris, Revenge and Stasis in the Greek City-States, in: H. VAN WEES (ed.), War and Violence in Ancient Greece, Swansea, 83–123. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1985. Stasis. Untersuchungen zu den inneren Kriegen in den griechischen Staaten des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., Munich. GOLDHILL, S., 1987. The Great Dionysia and Civic Ideology. JHS 107, 58–76. GOLDHILL, S., 1999. Programme Notes, in: S. GOLDHILL – R. OSBORNE (eds.), Performance Culture and Athenian Democracy, Cambridge, 1–29. GOLDHILL, S. – OSBORNE, R. (eds.), 1999. Performance Culture and Athenian Democracy, Cambridge. GOUKOWSKY, P. – BRIXHE, CL. (eds.), 1991. Hellenika symmikta: histoire, archéologie, épigraphie, Nancy. GRAY, B. D., 2013. Justice or Harmony? Reconciliation after Stasis at Dikaia and the FourthCentury BC Polis. REA 115, 369–401. GRAY, B. D., 2015. Stasis and Stability: Exile, the Polis, and Political Thought, c. 404–146 BC, Oxford. GRIFFIN, J., 1998. The Social Function of Attic Tragedy. CQ 48, 39–61. GRIFFITH, G. T., 1950. The Union of Corinth and Argos. Historia 1, 236–256. HABERMAS, J., 1984. The Theory of Communicative Action, Volume I: Reason and the Rationalisation of Society, Cambridge. HORNBLOWER, S., 1991–2008. A Commentary on Thucydides; 3 vols., Oxford. HORNBLOWER, S., 2011. The Greek World 479–323 BC, London. KAGAN, D., 1962. Corinthian Politics and the Revolution of 392. Historia 11, 447–457. KAROULAKI, A., 1999. Processional Performance and the Democratic Polis, in: S. GOLDHILL – R. OSBORNE (eds.), Performance Culture and Athenian Democracy, Cambridge, 293–320. LANE FOX, R. (ed.), 2004. The Long March, Yale. LEGON, R. P., 1967. Phliasian Politics and Policy in the Early Fourth Century BC. Historia 16, 324– 337. LE GUEN, B. (ed.), 1997. De la scène aux gradins: Théâtre et représentations dramatiques après Alexandre le Grand dans les cités hellénistiques, Toulouse.

84

Benjamin Gray

LEWIS, S., 2004. Καὶ σαφῶς τύραννος ἦν: Xenophon’s Account of Euphron of Sicyon. JHS 124, 65–74. LEWIS, S. (ed.), 2006. Ancient Tyranny, Edinburgh. LINTOTT, A., 1982. Violence, Civil Strife and Revolution in the Classical City, London. LONIS, R., 1991. La réintégration des exilés politiques en Grèce: le problème des biens, in: P. GOUKOWSKY – CL. BRIXHE (eds.), Hellenika symmikta: histoire, archéologie, épigraphie, Nancy, 91–109. LORAUX, N., 2001. The Divided City: On Memory and Forgetting in Ancient Athens, New York. LORAUX, N., 2005. La tragédie d’Athènes: la politique entre l’ombre et l’utopie, Paris. MAGNETTO, A., 2008. L’arbitrato di Rodi fra Samo e Priene. Edizione critica, commento e indici, Pisa. MORGAN, K. (ed.), 2003. Popular Tyranny: Sovereignty and its Discontents in Ancient Greece, Austin. MURRAY, O. – PRICE, S. R. F. (eds.), 1990. The Greek City from Homer to Alexander, Oxford. NIELSEN, T. H., 2002. Arkadia and its Poleis in the Archaic and Classical Periods, Göttingen. OBER, J., 2003. Tyrant Killing as Therapeutic Stasis: A Political Debate in Images and Texts, in: K. MORGAN (ed.), Popular Tyranny: Sovereignty and its Discontents in Ancient Greece, Austin, 215–250. OSBORNE, R. G., 1985. The Erection and Mutilation of the Herms. PCPhS 31, 47–73. PONTIER, P., 2007. Xénophon, Sparte et Phlionte. Ktema 32, 363–377. ROOD, T. C. B., 2004. Panhellenism and Self-Presentation: Xenophon’s Speeches, in: R. LANE FOX (ed.), The Long March, Yale, 305–329. ROY, J., 1971. Arcadia and Boeotia in Peloponnesian Affairs, 370–362 BC. Historia 20, 569–599. SALMON, J., 1984. Wealthy Corinth: A History of the City to 338 BC, Oxford. SALVO, I., 2012. Ristabilimento della pace civica e riti di purificazione a Dikaia. ASNP 4, 89–102. SCHECHNER, R., 2006. Performance Studies: An Introduction, New York. SEAFORD, R., 1994. Reciprocity and Ritual: Homer and Tragedy in the Developing City-State, Oxford. SEIBERT, J, 1979. Die politischen Flüchtlinge und Verbannten in der griechischen Geschichte. Von den Anfängen bis zur Unterwerfung durch die Römer, Darmstadt. SFYROERAS, P., 1993. Fireless Sacrifices: Pindar’s Olympian 7 and the Panathenaic Festival. AJP 114, 1–26. SHEAR, J., 2011. Polis and Revolution: Responding to Oligarchy in Classical Athens, Cambridge. SOURVINOU-INWOOD, C., 1990. What is Polis Religion?, in: O. MURRAY – S. R. F. PRICE (eds.), The Greek City from Homer to Alexander, Oxford, 295–322. STAVRIANOPOULOU, E. (ed.), 2006. Rituals and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, Liège. STYLIANOU, P. J., 1998. A Commentary on Diodorus Siculus Book XV, Oxford. TAYLOR, D., 1994. Performing Gender: Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo, in: D. TAYLOR – J. VILLEGAS, (eds.), Negotiating Performance: Gender, Sexuality and Theatricality in Latin/o America, Durham, 275–305. TAYLOR, D. – VILLEGAS, J. (eds.), 1994. Negotiating Performance: Gender, Sexuality and Theatricality in Latin/o America, Durham. TEEGARDEN, D., 2014. Death to Tyrants! Ancient Greek Democracy and the Struggle Against Tyranny, Princeton. THOMPSON, W. E., 1970. The Politics of Phlius. Eranos 68, 224–230. THOMPSON, W. E., 1983. Arcadian Factionalism in the 360s. Historia 32, 149–160. TUPLIN, C., 1982. The Date of the Union of Corinth and Argos. CQ 32, 75–83. TURNER, V., 1974. Dramas, Fields and Metaphors: Symbolic Action in Human Society, Ithaca. TURNER, V., 1982. From Ritual to Theatre: The Human Seriousness of Play, New York. VAN WEES, H. (ed.), 2000. War and Violence in Ancient Greece, Swansea.

Civil War and Civil Reconciliation in a Small Greek Polis

85

VINCENT, M., 2009. Expiation as Performative Rhetoric in National Catholicism: The Politics of Gesture in Post-Civil War Spain. P&P 203 (suppl. 4), 235–256. VOUTIRAS, E., 2008. La réconciliation des Dikaiopolites: une nouvelle inscription de Dikaia de Thrace, colonie d’Erétrie. CRAI 2008, 781–792. VOUTIRAS, E. – SISMANIDES, K., 2007. Δικαιοπολιτών συναλλαγαί. Μια νέα επιγραφή από τη Δίκαια, in: D. Kaplanidu (ed.), Ancient Macedonia VII: Macedonia from the Iron Age to the Death of Philip II., Thessaloniki, 255–274. WHITBY, M., 1984. The Union of Corinth and Argos. A Reconsideration. Historia 33, 295–308. WOLPERT, A., 2002. Remembering Defeat, Baltimore. WOLPERT, A., 2006. The Violence of the Thirty Tyrants, in: S. LEWIS (ed.), Ancient Tyranny, Edinburgh, 213–223. WÖRRLE, M. – ZANKER, P. (eds.), 1995. Stadtbild und Bürgerbild im Hellenismus, Munich.

HARMONIE UND WELTHERRSCHAFT. DIE STASIS BEI POLYBIOS Boris Dreyer

ABSTRACT: This contribution discusses the role of stasis in Polybius. According to him, stasis provides an indirect explanation for the rise of Rome. In Polybius’ view, stasis accounts for the self-inflicted decline of many cities, leagues and other powers even in his own time. In this respect, the Carthaginian mercenary revolt has a paradigmatic character. Contrary to the constitution of Rome, the constitution of Carthage had decisive deficits that eventually led to its defeat in the first as well as in the second Punic war. Due to the strong influence of the demos, the state enrolled large numbers of mercenary troops that could not be tamed once rebellion broke out. In his explanation of the phenomenon, Polybius used the explanatory models found in Thucydides regarding the stasis in Kerkyra and the plague in Athens. Polybius combines these separate patterns of explanation, concluding that an unleashed stasis can hardly be domesticated and can be prevented only beforehand by appropriate measures if the constitution operates in an integrative way (as in Rome), when all parts of the socio-political order are brought together in a unifying spirit (deeply founded in long term socialization of each member of society) and appeased by religion.

EINLEITUNG Es wird mitunter immer noch die Meinung vertreten, dass im Hellenismus, in der Zeit nach Alexanders Tod, die griechischen Poleis, die Stadtstaaten, an Bedeutung verloren hätten. Wenn diese Meinung auch zu revidieren ist: den politischen Ton gaben ab dem dritten und dann im zweiten vorchristlichen Jahrhundert in der Tat die makedonischen Flächenmonarchien und zunehmend die römische Republik an. Der innere Bürgerzwist, in Griechisch: Stasis, hat die Geschichte der griechischen Polis von Anfang an begleitet. In der Klassischen Zeit hemmte er das friedliche Miteinander der Bürger im ideologisch bestimmten Gegensatz zwischen der Demokratie Athens und der oligarchischen Hoplitenpoliteia Spartas (GEHRKE).1

1

GEHRKE 1985, bzw. allgemeiner: Bei den inneren Parteikämpfen während der Zeit des Dualismus kam der außenpolitische Bipolarismus als verschärfender Faktor hinzu, indem die Oligarchien sich von Sparta und die Demokraten sich von Athen unterstützt fühlen konnten. Vgl. auch RUSCHENBUSCH 1978: 24–95; über die Stasis in Kerkyra, die Thukydides als Paradigma anführte (3.70–83), s. unten und HEUß 1973: 1–72, bes. 24–34.

88

Boris Dreyer

Im 4. Jahrhundert, also in der Spätklassik, wurde sie als ein Phänomen der sich desintegrierenden Polisgemeinschaft gesehen (Winterling).2 Und in der Zeit nach Alexanders Tod? Hat die Stasis, die blutige Selbstzerfleischung städtischer Mitbürger überhaupt eine Bedeutung, die unser Interesse verdient, wenn die Stadtstaaten im Konzert der großen Mächte nur noch eine untergeordnete Rolle spielten? Eine große, ist die Antwort, eine von weltgeschichtlicher Bedeutung. Die These ist, dass die Stasis im Zusammenhang mit der Erringung der Weltherrschaft und beim Umgang mit einer Weltmacht eine entscheidende Rolle spielte – ganz besonders für den wichtigsten Historiker der Zeit, Polybios. Dieser hat sich bekanntlich den Weg Roms zur Weltmacht zwischen 220 und 146 v. Chr. zum Thema erwählt. Er war Zeitgenosse der beschriebenen Ereignisse, wurde für seine Tätigkeit in Achaia in der Folge des Achäischen Krieges hoch dekoriert3 und war an manchen der Entwicklungen, welche die Mittelmeerwelt entscheidend veränderten, prominent beteiligt. 1.

Es soll die These an einem prominenten Beispiel, am Beispiel des karthagischen Söldneraufstandes direkt nach dem ersten punischen Krieg 241–238 erörtert werden. Am Anfang steht dabei die Begründung, mit der Polybios diese Auseinandersetzung unter die Kategorie eines inneren Bürgerzwistes einordnet.

2. Es folgt die Darstellung des Polybios über den Verlauf dieser Söldnererhebung und die Diagnose über die tiefer liegenden Gründe, welche die Gewalt eskalieren ließen. 3. Polybios überlässt es dabei nicht dem Zufall, ob die lange Darstellung über die karthagische Stasis in ihrer Funktion durch den Leser auch richtig verstanden wird, und zwar in allen in der These formulierten Aspekten, die eine komplexe Botschaft einschließen.

HAUPTTEIL 1) Der ‚Gigantenkampf‘ zwischen Rom und Karthago zog immer mehr die Aufmerksamkeit aller griechischen Staaten auf sich, da sie sich bewusst waren, dass der Sieger auch in den Osten ausgreifen würde.4 Diese Auseinandersetzung hatte Rom alles abverlangt. Die Katastrophe von Cannae brachte die römische Republik 2

3 4

WINTERLING 1991: 193–229. Zur griechischen Stadt und zu den innenpolitischen Auseinandersetzungen in der Spätklassik und während des Hellenismus: BRISCOE 1967: 3–20; CARTLEDGE 2003: 335f.; DÖSSEL 2003; DREYER/MITTAG 2011; FERHADBEGOVIC/WEIFFEN 2011; FRÖHLICH/MÜLLER 2005; GRUEN 1976: 29–60; HEUß 1973: 1–72; KALYVAS 2006; LINTOTT 1982; MAGNINO 1993: 523–554; QUAß 1993; WALSH 2000: 300–303. S. Ehrung aus Kleitor. Für seine Aktivitäten nach 146 v. Chr. s. LAUTER 2002: 375–386; DREYER 2011: 19–21. Pol. 5.104.2–4. Für die späthellenistische Zeit s. auch HENNING BÖRM hier, S. 99–125.

Harmonie und Weltherrschaft. Die Stasis bei Polybios

89

an den Rand einer Niederlage. Polybios ist überzeugt, dass nur die exzellente Verfassung Rom vor dem Untergang bewahrt habe. Dies zu beweisen, schaltet der Historiker ein ganzes Buch, das sechste, ein, von dem nur leider etwa 40 Prozent erhalten ist.5 Die römische Verfassung stellt nach Polybios eine ideale Mischung monarchischer, aristokratischer und demokratischer Elemente dar, die ein Gleichgewicht bilden, das nicht dem genialen Einfall einer Einzelperson entsprungen sei, sondern sich organisch über Generationen entwickelt habe:6 Nach Polybios eine optimale Konstellation! Den Vergleich mit der römischen hält eigentlich nur die karthagische Verfassung aus, so der Historiker; doch einen Nachteil hätte die karthagische: Sie sei in ihrer geschichtlichen Entwicklung bereits auf dem absteigenden Ast gewesen, als die Karthager unter Hannibal die Römer angegriffen hätten, deren Verfassung noch nicht den Höhepunkt ihrer Entwicklung erreicht gehabt hätte: Deshalb seien die Römer in der Lage gewesen, nicht nur die Bestandskrise im Hannibalkrieg zu bewältigen, sondern auch auf der Basis dieser Ordnung im Innern die Weltherrschaft erringen.7 In Karthago hätte dagegen bereits das Volk wesentliche Kompetenzen an sich gezogen, während in Rom noch der Senat die Richtung vorgegeben hätte (6.51– 52): Verfassungsordnungen in dem Entwicklungsstadium wie in Karthago (d.h. auch Rom, wie sehr deutlich wird, unterliegt diesem Gesetz: vgl. 6.9 und 10) würden der Regellosigkeit Tür und Tor öffnen, nämlich dann, wenn das Volk von skrupellos-ehrgeizigen Volksführern in den niedrigsten Bedürfnissen angesprochen würde und selbst keine weiteren durch Religion und Erziehung vermittelten Maßstäbe besitze. Die moralische und religiöse Erziehung war in Rom dagegen überlegen. Das äußere sich auch im Kriegswesen: … Sie (die Römer) wenden ihm (dem Heer) ihre ganze Sorge zu, die Karthager dagegen vernachlässigen das Fußvolk vollständig … Der Grund dafür ist, dass sie fremde und Söldnertruppen verwenden, während das römische Heer aus Einheimischen und Bürgern besteht. Auch deswegen ist die römische Verfassung der karthagischen überlegen.8

Die ausführliche Erörterung des Söldneraufstandes (24 Kapitel: 1.65–88) ist daher für Polybios ein Beweis, welchen Gefahren sich die Führung eines Staates aussetzt, wenn sie – um das eigene Volk zu schonen – sich auf fremdsprachige Söldner verlässt, wie der Historiker in der Einleitung zur Darstellung zum Söldneraufstand deutlich macht: … Man kann am deutlichsten aus den Umständen (im karthagischen Kernland) erkennen, was diejenigen, die Söldnertruppen einsetzen, voraussehen und von langer Hand verhüten müssen. 5 6 7 8

Pol. 5.111.8–10, 6.2.1–10, 6.51.8, 6.58; WALBANK 1957: 635f. zur Überlieferung. Pol. 6.10, 6.11.11–13. Pol. 6.1, 6.43–58, bes. 51–52. Pol. 6.52.3–5: (3) οἱ μὲν γὰρ τὴν ὅλην περὶ τοῦτο ποιοῦνται σπουδήν, Καρχηδόνιοι δὲ τῶν μὲν πεζικῶν εἰς τέλος ὀλιγωροῦσι, τῶν δ’ ἱππικῶν βραχεῖάν τινα ποιοῦνται πρόνοιαν. (4) αἴτιον δὲ τούτων ἐστὶν ὅτι ξενικαῖς καὶ μισθοφόροις χρῶνται δυνάμεσι, Ῥωμαῖοι δ’ ἐγχωρίοις καὶ πολιτικαῖς. (5) ᾗ καὶ περὶ τοῦτο τὸ μέρος ταύτην τὴν πολιτείαν ἀποδεκτέον ἐκείνης μᾶλλον.

90

Boris Dreyer Darüber hinaus, worin und wie sehr sich in moralischer Hinsicht zusammengewürfelte Barbarenhaufen von Truppen unterscheiden, die in Erziehung und in Gesetzen und bürgerlichen Sitten aufgewachsen sind.9

Für Polybios besteht kein Zweifel, dass es sich bei diesem Söldneraufstand, diesen ‚Libyschen Krieg‘ (1.70.7, 1.79.5) um einen emphylios polemos, also einen innerstaatlichen Krieg, eine innerstaatliche Unruhe (tarache) (1.65.2, 1.71.8) bzw. eine Stasis handelt (1.66.10, 1.67.2, 1.67.5).10 Trägt diese erweiterte Anwendung des Stasisbegriffs11 auf die Erhebung der Söldner in Karthago den veränderten politischen Zuständen im Hellenismus Rechnung? Immerhin kann man feststellen, dass auch andere zentrale, aus der archaischen und klassischen Zeit gut bekannte politische Begriffe erweiterte Verwendung finden. So findet das Verständnis der Eunomia, der inneren guten Ordnung, nunmehr Anwendung zur Bezeichnung eines harmonischen Verhältnisses der Staaten einer Region zueinander.12 Weiter kann der Begriff Demokratia jetzt auch das Mitbestimmungsrecht von Staaten in einem größeren politischen Rahmen, in einem Bundesstaat, beschreiben.13 Aber auch Polybios selbst gibt an, dass bei ihm der Begriff der Stasis durchaus weiter verstanden werden muss. Anlässlich einer Meuterei gegen den von ihm verehrten Scipio (d.Ä. = späterer Hannibalbezwinger) äußert er: Obwohl Publius (Scipio) bereits genügend praktische Erfahrung erworben hatte, bereitete ihm doch eine Meuterei (stasis), die im römischen Heer ausbrach, mehr Schwierigkeit und Verlegenheit als zuvor. Und dies erlitt er mit gutem Grund: Denn wie es beim Körper durchaus möglich ist, schädigende Einwirkungen von außen – ich nenne etwa Kälte, Hitze, Anstrengung und Verwundungen –, ehe sie eintreten, zu verhüten, und wenn sie eingetreten sind, ihre Folgen ohne Schwierigkeiten zu heilen, Geschwüre aber und alle Krankheiten sonst, die sich aus dem Körper selbst entwickeln, weder leicht vorauszusehen noch, wenn sie da sind, leicht zu kurieren sind, ebenso muss man es auch in der staatlichen Gemeinschaft und beim Heer sehen: Die Art und Weise der Mittel und der Hilfe gegen Feinde bei Angriffen von außen und bei Kriegen liegen auf der Hand. Bei innerer Opposition aber, bei Bürgerzwist (staseis) und bei politischen Wirren ist eine Hilfe schwierig …14

9

10

11 12 13 14

Pol. 1.65.7–8: τούς τε χρωμένους μισθοφορικαῖς δυνάμεσι τίνα δεῖ προορᾶσθαι καὶ φυλάττεσθαι μακρόθεν ἐναρέγστατ’ ἂν ἐκ τῆς τότε περιστάσεως συνθεωρήσειε, πρὸς δὲ τούτοις τί διαφέρει καὶ κατὰ πόσον ἤθη σύμμικτα καὶ βάρβαρα τῶν ἐν παιδείαις καὶ νόμοις καὶ πολιτικοῖς ἔθεσιν ἐκτεθραμμένων. Die profunde und sicherlich uns überlegene Materialbasis als Grundlage zur Bewertung und Definition des Polybios ist immerhin geeignet, eine Klammer um alle „Phänomene der Stasis“ (vgl. Einleitung) zu ziehen wie etwa auch um die Konflikte des sog. Vierkaiserjahres (emphylios polemos). Vgl. die Benutzung des Begriffs an anderen Stellen bei Polybios: COLLATZ/GÜTZLAF/ HELMS 2002: 74–76. DREYER/ENGELMANN 2003: 42f. DREYER/ENGELMANN 2003: 42, Anm. 146. Pol. 11.25.1–5: (1) Ὅτι στάσεως γενομένης τινῶν ἐν τῷ στρατοπέδῳ τῷ ‘Ρωμαϊκῷ, ὁ Πόπλιος, καίπερ ἤδη πεῖραν εἰληφὼς τῶν πραγμάτων ἐφ’ ἱκανόν, ὅμως οὐδέποτε μᾶλλον εἰς ἀπορίαν ἧκε καὶ δυσχρηστίαν. καὶ τοῦτ’ ἔπασχε κατὰ λόγον· (2) καθάπερ ἐπὶ τῶν σωμάτων τὰς

Harmonie und Weltherrschaft. Die Stasis bei Polybios

91

Der Söldneraufstand in Nordafrika gehört für Polybios also ohne weiteres in den Kontext einer Stasis. Zum einen handelte es sich bei einer Meuterei, wie von Polybios oben beschrieben, um eine Armee, die an einem Geschwür litt. Zum zweiten war der Söldneraufstand ein innenpolitisches Problem, ein emphylios polemos, weil der gesamte Staat einschließlich der Hauptstadt in Nordafrika in große Gefahr geriet. Dazu waren nachher auch die Städte Libyens, die Bundesgenossen Karthagos, involviert und es verloren viele Karthager ihr Leben. Nach Polybios hatten sich die Karthager dieses Problem, das zur Stasis führte, selbst angeschafft, indem sie das Heerwesen so sträflich vernachlässigten. Jetzt war die Erhebung in der Entstehung schwer zu erkennen und nach dem Ausbruch der Unruhen kaum mehr zu bändigen. Damit hatten die inneren Unruhen Karthagos dieselben Symptome wie die von Polybios geschilderten anderen Staseis: a) Dazu gehören etwa die inneren Unruhen in Mantineia, wo zuvor gegen jedes Recht die achäischen Schutzbesatzung, obwohl zuvor zur Hilfe gerufen, hingemordet worden war (2.58.1).15 b) Ähnlich verhielt es sich mit den inneren Unruhen der Stadt Kynaitha in Arkadien, das für seine gute Bildung berühmt war (4.17.4).16 c) Auch die inneren Unruhen Spartas seit der Aufgabe der lykurgischen Verfassung (4.81.13)17 haben dieselben Symptome wie d) die inneren Unruhen in den Städten Kretas, in denen Habsucht und Geldgier regierten (6.46.7 u. 9).18 e) Ähnliches gilt für den Niedergang Boiotiens und Thebens bis 172 (20.4–6 und 27.1.7),19 der zu inneren Unruhen führte.20 Was haben diese recht unterschiedlichen Fälle jedoch mit dem Söldnerkrieg Karthagos gemein? Alle Gemeinden und Staaten, die unter einer Stasis litten, sind nach Polybios wie auch Karthago an ihrem Leid selbst schuld gewesen. Der Fall Karthagos hat für den Historiker – was die Stasis und die Folgen anbelangt – einen paradigmatischen Charakter. Deshalb sind seine Diagnosen bei der Darstellung prinzipiell. μὲν ἐκτὸς αἰτίας τοῦ βλάπτειν, λέγω δ’ οἷον ψύχους, καύματος, κόπου, τραυμάτων, καὶ πρὶν γίνεσθαι φυλάξασθαι δυνατὸν καὶ γενομέναις εὐμαρὲς βοηθῆσαι, τὰ δ’ ἐξ αὐτῶν τῶν σωμάτων γινόμενα φύματα καὶ νόσους δυσχερὲς μὲν προϊδέσθαι, (3) δυσχερὲς δὲ γενομένοις βοηθεῖν, τὸν αὐτὸν δὴ τρόπον καὶ περὶ πολιτείας καὶ περὶ στρατοπέδον διαληπτέον. (4) πρὸς μὲν γὰρ τὰς ἒξωθεν ἐπιβουλὰς καὶ πολέμους πρόχειρος ὁ τρόπος τῆς παρασκευῆς καὶ βοηθείας τοῖς ἐφιστάνουσι, (5) πρὸς δὲ τὰς ἐν αὐτοῖς γενομένας ἀντιπολιτείας καὶ στάσεις καὶ ταραχὰς δύσχρηστος ἡ βοήθεια … 15 WALBANK 1957: 263–265. 16 WALBANK 1957: 474. 17 WALBANK 1957: 534–535. 18 WALBANK 1957: 732. 19 WALBANK, 1979: 66–74 und 290–293. Vgl. MÜLLER 2013: 267–278; DREYER 2011: 119 und 127. 20 Vgl. weitere Belege COLLATZ/GÜTZLAF/HELMS 2002: 74–76.

92

Boris Dreyer

2) Nach dem verlorenen ersten punischen Krieg im Jahr 241 haben die Karthager den Fehler begangen, die Söldnertruppen in Afrika an einem Ort zu sammeln und Frauen und Kinder zu ihnen zu lassen. Als die Soldzahlungen aufgrund von Zahlungsengpässen stockten, kam es zu Unruhen. Zur Empörung über die ausbleibenden Soldzahlungen kam die mangelnde Achtung vor den karthagischen Befehlshabern hinzu (1.63–67), anders als es in Rom der Fall war (sechstes Buch). Das Heer war vielsprachig; einmal entfesselt, war es kaum zu bändigen. Diese Situation nutzten skrupelose Führer aus, die eine offene kriegerische Erhebung provozierten, mit der viele libysche Städte, die durch Tribute von den Karthagern ausgepresst worden waren, sympathisierten. Die Führer der Aufständischen brachen mit der grausamen Abschlachtung ihrer karthagischen Gefangenen jegliche Brücken zu einer Einigung ab, die ihnen vorher noch von karthagischer Seite gebaut worden waren (1.75–80). Hamilkar Barkas, der seinen unfähigen innenpolitischen Gegner ersetzte, konnte jedoch endlich die Aufständischen in die Enge treiben, so dass sie sich gegenseitig umbrachten. Danach unterwarfen sich auch die libyschen Städte: Keiner der Aufständischen überlebte den inneren Zwist, der mehr als drei Jahre andauerte (1.82–88). Der Verlauf der Stasis veranlasst Polybios zu einer eigenen allgemeinen Analyse. Ähnlich wie bei den methodischen Erörterungen zur Anwendung von fiktiven Reden oder zur Kategorisierung von Kriegsursachen kommt der Historiker auch hier zu eigenen Lösungen, wobei – wie häufiger – das Vorbild Thukydides durchscheint. Thukydides hat im Rahmen seines bekannten Berichts über die Stasis in Kerkyra (Korfu) der Jahre 427–425 die Gründe des inneren Bürgerzwists erörtert,21 der vor dem Hintergrund des Peloponnesischen Krieges eine fatale Tendenz der Verrohung der Sitten eingeleitet hätte. Unterstützt von Sparta oder Athen entzündeten sich die Leidenschaften der Parteien, die in einer Spirale der Gewalt übereinander herfielen. Der neutrale Beobachter stellt fest: „Und sie vertauschten die übliche Bedeutung der Begriffe im Hinblick auf die Dinge, so wie sie es für richtig hielten“.22 Die Folge war ein Werteverfall. Tollkühnheit galt fortan für Opferbereitschaft, Zurückhaltung als Feigheit. Positiv galt der, der zur Bosheit anstiftete. Bande wurden durch das gemeinsame Verbrechen geknüpft. Thukydides führte bekanntlich diese Spirale der Gewalt auf die den Menschen innewohnende Konstante, die Herrschsucht (πλεονεξία), zurück, die gerade die führenden Männer der Staaten mit Ordnungen, die wohlklingende Bezeichnungen hatten (Demokratie und Oligarchie), eigennützige Ziele verfolgen ließ. Nicht nur am geschilderten Beispiel von Kerkyra benennt Thukydides die verheerend negativ wirkende Kraft der Stasis, die nicht selten zur Vernichtung

21 22

Zur Stasis mit weiterer Literatur: GEHRKE 1985: 88–96, 391f. Thuk. 3.82.4: καὶ τὴν εἰωθυῖαν ἀξίωσιν τῶν ὀνομάτων ἐς τὰ ἔργα ἀντήλλαξαν τῇ δικαιώσει. GOMME 1956: 374–377.

Harmonie und Weltherrschaft. Die Stasis bei Polybios

93

einer der sich bekämpfenden Parteien, eines Teils der Mitbürger, führt (3.70–8323). Auch in der sogenannten Archäologie des Historikers wird im Rückblick auf die griechische Geschichte seit den Perserkriegen die negativ wirkende Stasis betont (1.2.4, 1.12.2).24 Er stellt sie darüber hinaus der Zerstörungskraft der Peloponnesischen Krieges selbst gleich (1.23.2).25 Sie spielte bei den Anlässen, die zum Ausbruch des Peloponnesischen Krieges führten, in Epidamnos (1.24.4), in Plataiai (2.2.2), ihre zerstörerische Rolle. Auch für Athen selbst führt Thukydides die inneren Unruhen (ἰδίας διαφοράς) als wesentlichen Grund für die endgültige Kapitulation der Stadt an (2.65.12).26 Interessant ist darüber hinaus, dass er die Folgen des Ausbruchs der Seuche in Athen ab 429 (2.48–54) ähnlich wie die der Stasis von Kerkyra beschreibt: Der Schilderung der Krankheit folgt die Darstellung der Auswirkungen auf die Menschen. Die Seuche erfüllt in diesem Zusammenhang die Funktion eines Katalysators. Die Menschen hätten infolgedessen alle Scham verloren sowie auf Götter und Gesetze keine Rücksicht mehr genommen. Weiter geht hier noch Polybios bei der Analyse der tieferen Gründe der Söldnererhebung (1.81.5–11), indem er beides, was bei Thukydides unverbunden steht,27 zu einer eigenen Lösung, in der Krankheitssymptome zur Erklärung der Stasis eingesetzt werden, zusammenzieht. Diese Lösung ist nicht mehr so dicht

23

24 25

26 27

GOMME 1956: 358–382. Nach GOMME sieht Thukydides die Stasis keineswegs als ein an die Stadt gebundenes Phänomen, durch die Formulierung: „from the stasis in Kerkyra to the stasis in the Greek world in generally and one of its causes …“ (S. 374). Auch bei Thukyides kommt es auf den Bezugsrahmen an, um aus einer Auseinandersetzung einen inneren Zwist zu interpretieren. Thuk. 1.2.4: διὰ γὰρ ἀρετὴν γῆς αἵ τε δυνάμεις τισὶ μείζους ἐγγιγνόμεναι στάσεις ἐνεποίουν ἐξ ὧν ἐφθείροντο, καὶ ἅμα ὑπὸ ἀλλοφύλων μᾶλλον ἐπεβουλεύοντο. Thuk. 1.23.2: οὔτε γὰρ πόλεις τοσαίδε ληφθεῖσαι ἠρημώθησαν, αἱ μὲν ὑπὸ βαρβάρων, αἱ δ’ ὑπὸ σφῶν αὐτῶν ἀντιπολεμούντων (εἰσὶ δ’ αἳ καὶ οἰκήτορας μετέβαλον ἁλισκόμεναι), οὔτε φυγαὶ τοσαίδε ἀνθρώπων καὶ φόνος, ὁ μὲν κατ’ αὐτὸν τὸν πόλεμον, ὁ δὲ διὰ τὸ στασιάζειν. Thuk. 2.65.12: … καὶ οὐ πρότερον ἐνέδοσαν ἢ αὐτοὶ ἐν σφίσιν κατὰ τὰς ἰδίας διαφορὰς περιπεσόντες ἐσφάλησαν. Vermutlich steht Polybios, der für seine Zeit in Anspruch nimmt, dass nichts mehr der menschlichen Ratio dank des wissenschaftlichen Fortschritts verschlossen ist (9.2.5), unter dem Eindruck auch der medizinischen Errungenschaften seiner Zeit: s. etwa LLOYD 1984: 321–352; LLOYD 1973; SCHUBERT 2005: 681–685. Dabei scheint bei Polybios die Diskussion der Gründe der Stasis von Aristoteles vornehmlich am Anfang des 5. Buches der Politika Anstoß gegeben zu haben (1301a40–1307b25; vgl. Plat. rep. 352a, 470b, 560a; leg. 629d), indem der Philosoph die Stasis als eine politische Krankheit beschreibt, die in einer charakterlichen Schwäche der Handelnden und in einem subjektiv empfundenen Missverhältnis der politischen Machtverteilung fuße (z.B. 1302b20; zum Vergleich Körperzustand-Staat u.a. 1302b35– 1303a1 u.v.m.; 1305a30–35; vgl. WEED 2007: 28). Dabei spielen die Gründe der Stasis, die Aristoteles anführt (u.a. bei WEED 2007: 119), bei Polybios keine Rolle und nahezu überhaupt nicht der Antagonismus zwischen „den Vielen und den Wenigen“ in der noch allein von den Poleis geprägten Perspektive des Aristoteles. Dass Aristoteles für die theoretischen Erwägungen des Polybios Anstoß geben konnte, wird auch an anderen Stellen deutlich: LEHMANN 2001.

94

Boris Dreyer

und konsequent, wie diejenige des Vorbildes. Dafür wirkt der illustrative Vergleich am Ende im Sinne der Botschaft konkreter: Wenn man dies bedenkt, wird man nicht zögern zuzugeben, dass nicht nur die Körper der Menschen und gewisse an ihm sich bildende Geschwüre und Gewächse bösartig und völlig unheilbar werden können, sondern noch viel mehr die Seelen. Bei den Geschwüren nämlich, wenn jemand diese behandelt, greifen sie manchmal, eben hierdurch gereizt, noch schneller um sich. Wenn man aber wieder von ihnen ablässt, zehren sie ihrer eigenen Natur folgend das Fleisch immer weiter und ruhen nicht eher, als bis der Rest des Körpers, dem sie anhaften, ganz zerstört ist. Ebenso bildet sich auch in den Seelen so etwas Ähnliches wie Brand und Fäulnis, so dass am Ende kein Lebewesen ruchloser und grausamer ist als solch eine Art von Mensch. Wenn man diesen Verzeihung und Milde entgegenbringt, so halten sie das für List und Trug und werden noch treuloser und feindseliger gegen die, die Milde üben. Wenn man ihnen aber strafend entgegentritt, dann gibt es keine Unsäglichkeit und keine Schandtat, derer sie nicht, im Wetteifer mit ihren Leidenschaften, fähig wären, wobei sie solche Anmaßung noch für gut halten. Am Ende aber verwildern sie so sehr, dass sie nichts Menschliches mehr an sich haben. Den Grund und den Hauptanteil an einem solchen Zustand muss man bösen Sitten und schlechter Erziehung von Jugend an zuschreiben. Mitwirkende Ursachen gibt es mehr, die wichtigsten von den Ursachen sind aber immer der Übermut (ὕβρεις) und die Habsucht (πλεονεξίας) der leitenden Männer …28

Bei der Schilderung der grausamen Blutorgie an den karthagischen Gefangenen durch die Aufständischen, gestaltet Polybios sein Vorbild um: Während bei Thukydides die Akteure nach dem Werteverfall gegeneinander, vor allem gegen die Neutralen, wüten und sich darin perverser Weise verstehen, werden bei Polybios diejenigen, die nicht sich haben anstecken lassen und mit einem unverdorbenen Wertekanon sich für die Hinzurichtenden einsetzten, nicht nur nicht mehr durch die aufständischen Söldner verstanden, die fremdsprachig waren und im Blutrausch jedes Maß verloren hatten, sondern gleich mit niedergemacht (Pol. 1.80). 3) Es bleibt die Frage, ob der Mensch überhaupt die Möglichkeit hat, unter den extremen Bedingungen einer Auseinandersetzung, bei der er alle moralischen Regeln außer Acht gelassen hat, Mensch zu bleiben, oder ob ihn seine Physis dazu 28

Pol. 1.81.5–11: (5) διόπερ εἰς ταῦτα βλέπων οὐκ ἄν τις εἰπεῖν ὀκνήσειεν ὡς οὐ μόνον τὰ σώματα τῶν ἀνθρώπων καί τινα τῶν ἐν αὐτοῖς γεννωμένων ἑλκῶν καὶ φυμάτων ἀποθηριοῦσθαι συμβαίνει καὶ τελέως ἀβοήθητα γίνεσθαι, πολὺ δὲ μάλιστα τὰς ψυχάς. (6) ἐπί τε γὰρ τῶν ἑλκῶν, ἐὰν μὲν θεραπείαν τοῖς τοιούτοις πρoσάγῃ τις, ὑπ’ αὐτῆς ἐνίοτε ταύτης ἐρεθιζόμενα θᾶττον ποιεῖται τὴν νομήν· ἐὰν δὲ πάλιν ἀφῇ, κατὰ τὴν ἐξ αὑτῶν φύσιν φθείροντα τὸ συνεχὲς οὐκ ἴσχει παῦλαν, ἕως ἂν ἀφανίσῃ τὸ ὑποκείμενον· (7) ταῖς τε ψυχαῖς παραπλησίως τοιαῦται πολλάκις ἐπιφύονται μελανίαι καὶ σηπεδόνες ὥστε μηδὲν ἀσεβέστερον ἀνθρώπου μηδ’ ὠμότερον ἀποτελεῖσθαι τῶν ζῴων. (8) οἷς ἐὰν μὲν συγγνώμην τινὰ προσάγῃς καὶ φιλανθρωπίαν, ἐπιβουλὴν καὶ παραλογισμὸν ἡγούμενοι τὸ συμβαῖνον ἀπιστότεροι καὶ δυσμενέστεροι γίνονται πρὸς τοὺς φιλανθρωποῦντας· (9) ἐὰν δ’ ἀντιτιμωρῇ, διαμιλλώμενοι τοῖς θυμοῖς οὐκ ἔστι τι τῶν ἀπειρημένων ἢ δεινῶν ὁποῖον οὐκ ἀναδέχονται, σὺν καλῷ τιθέμενοι τὴν τοιαύτην τόλμαν· τέλος δ’ ἀποθηριωθέντες ἐξέστησαν τῆς ἀνθρωπίνης φύσεως. (10) τῆς δὲ διαθέσεως ἀρχηγὸν μὲν καὶ μεγίστην μερίδα νομιστέον ἔθη μοχθηρὰ καὶ τροφὴν ἐκ παίδων κακήν, συνεργὰ δὲ καὶ πλείω, μέγιστα δὲ τῶν συνεργῶν, τὰς ἀεὶ τῶν προεστώτων ὕβρεις καὶ πλεονεξίας. (11) ἃ δὴ τότε συνέβαινε καὶ περὶ μὲν τὸ σύστημα τῶν μισθοφόρων, ἔτι δὲ μᾶλλον περὶ τοὺς ἡγεμόνας αὐτῶν ὑπάρχειν.

Harmonie und Weltherrschaft. Die Stasis bei Polybios

95

zwingt, seinen schlechten Neigungen nachzugehen, wenn nur der Druck von außen stark genug ist. Im Gegensatz zu seinem Vorbild hält Polybios dies für möglich: Im Unterschied zu Thukydides gibt Polybios nicht nur eine Ursachenanalyse, sondern diagnostiziert auch mögliche Wege, diese fatalen Entwicklungen von vornherein zu vermeiden. Denn eins scheint klar: Der einmal beschrittene Weg der Stasis, der Selbstzerfleischung der Bewohner eines Staates, ist nicht mehr umkehrbar und führt notwendig zur Vernichtung einer der Parteien, nach einer Spirale der Radikalisierung. Der Historiker Polybios sieht sich in seiner Verantwortung als magister vitae (um es mit Cicero zu sagen), genauer als Lehrer der politisch Handelnden. Er appelliert an die Verantwortung für die Gemeinde, es nicht so weit kommen zu lassen, da man – was die Karthager vor dem Ausbruch des Söldnerkrieges versäumt hätten – „auf die Zukunft zu schauen hat, nicht nur auf die Gegenwart“ (1.71.1ff.).Vor dem Hintergrund der eingangs geschilderten Verfassungsanalyse hatte Polybios damit aber etwas Entscheidendes ausgesagt: Karthago konnte sich dieser inneren Unruhen nur mit höchster Not nach drei Jahren entledigen, indem es die aufrührerischen Söldner und viele der aufständischen Libyer vernichtete. Ein grundlegender Strukturwandel, der die Karthager von dem Gravamen befreit hätte, an dem der Historiker den Staat kranken sah, wurde auch jetzt nicht vorgenommen: Das Heer blieb ein Söldnerheer aus vielen Nationen. Die integrative Ordnung des römischen Sozialsystems und der römischen Verfassung mit einem sittlich durch die Erziehung und Religion gefestigten Volk,29 das seine politische Führung achtete, gaben nach Polybios den Ausschlag auch im Hannibalkrieg – zuungunsten Karthagos. In einem Ausblick möchte ich am Ende den Blick noch kurz etwas ausweiten. Wenn die Stasis bei den Karthagern für Polybios die Niederlage Karthagos im Gigantenkampf um die Weltherrschaft gegen Rom erklären hilft: Welche Bedeutung haben dann die Staseis, die in anderen Städten und Staaten während des Aufstieges von Rom zur Weltmacht stattgefunden haben? Alle Fälle von innerem Bürgerzwist in den griechischen Städten und Staaten waren nach Polybios entweder durch auswärtige Intervention provoziert oder hätten eine solche zur Folge. Die innere Harmonie in den Städten, die – wie im Falle Karthagos – mit Erziehung und Achtung vor der politischen Führung zu erlangen sei, ist für Polybios konsequenterweise auch das beste Mittel, um gegenüber Hegemoniemächten wie Rom aufzutreten. Gerade für Rom gelte nämlich in besonderen Maße, dass die Republik stets so lange wie möglich sich an die bestehenden Verträge mit den Staaten gehalten und eine Intervention vermieden habe (Pol. 36.930). 29 30

Diese Ansicht der Verantwortung für die Erziehung der eigenen Jugend ist den Zeitgenossen des Polybios nicht fremd, schon um Einfluss von außen nicht zuzulassen: Pol. 31.31.10. Ein gutes Beispiel ist das Verhalten Roms gegenüber den verschiedenen Gruppierungen aus Achaia und insbesondere aus Sparta, die sich initiativ und im Wettbewerb vor dem Senat und vor römischen Repräsentanten in Griechenland gegenseitig Vorwürfe machten und so ein ungünstiges Bild über die Fähigkeit abgaben, dass der Bundesstaat selbst die Konflikte zu lösen imstande war. Hier waren der Senat und die Senatoren nicht aktiv und sie hielten sich an die

96

Boris Dreyer

FAZIT Die Beschreibung der Stasis, des inneren Zwists, im Staatsgebiet von Karthago hat für Polybios eine wichtige Funktion bei der Erörterung der Frage, welche der beiden mächtigsten Staaten in der Mittelmeerwelt sich am ehesten für eine dauerhafte Hegemonieposition eigne. Die detaillierte Analyse der Erhebung der Söldner und der libyschen Städte ist der Beweis für Polybios, dass sich die im Prinzip gute Verfassung Karthagos in eine negative Richtung entwickelt hat. Das karthagische Söldnerheer kämpfe nicht für die eigene Sache, sei nicht im eigenen Sozialsystem herangezogen worden, teile nicht die gleichen Werte wie die Bevölkerung Karthagos und ihre politische Führung. Anders sei dies in Rom, zum Zeitpunkt der Auseinandersetzung mit den Karthagern und bes. im Hannibalkrieg. Polybios kennt die scharfsinnige Analyse der Stasis in Kerkyra bei Thukydides, kommt auf ähnliche Ursachen, geht aber weiter und wird konkreter, indem er direkte Empfehlungen gibt, wie man im Vorhinein eine solche Stasis verhindern könne, sei es nun in einem Heer, in einer Stadt oder in einer Großmacht wie Karthago oder Rom. Auf diese Weise liefert die karthagische Stasis eine weitere Erklärung für den fulminanten Aufstieg Roms zur Weltmacht und für das Scheitern Karthagos. Gleichzeitig wird eine Antwort gegeben auf die Gefahr, die noch im 4. Jahrhundert v. Chr. als die größte für die im Krieg unter Druck geratene Polis, d.h. den Staat in Bestandsgefahr, galt: die eigene Bevölkerung.31 Nur durch die Identifikation für die Sache des Krieges, für das Selbstverständnis des Staates konnte man auf die Loyalität und den Einsatz der Bevölkerung hoffen. Polybios propagiert die langfristige Sozialisierung32 aller gesellschaftlichen Glieder in einer ausgewogenen integrativen Verfassung als das beste Mittel zu diesem Ziel.

LITERATUR BRISCOE, J., 1967. Rome and the Class Struggle in the Greek States 220–146 BC. P&P 36, 3–20. CARTLEDGE, P., 2003. Class struggle. OCD3, 335–336. CHANIOTIS, A., 2005. War in the Hellenistic World, Malden. COLLATZ, C.-F. – GÜTZLAF, M., – HELMS, H. (Hrsg.), 2002. Polybios-Lexikon; Bd. 3, Berlin. DREYER, B., 2004. Die Neoi im hellenistischen Gymnasion, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin 2004, 211–236. DREYER, B., 2007. Die römische Nobilitätsherrschaft und Antiochos III. (205 bis 188 v. Chr.), Hennef. DREYER, B., 2011. Polybios. Leben und Werk im Banne Roms, Hildesheim.

31 32

exklusiven Verträge (foedus aequum) mit dem Bundesstaat, bes. sobald sie darauf verwiesen wurden: DREYER 2007: 367–370. WINTERLING 1991: 228–229. Etwa durch die Betätigung im Gymnasion, s. Hans-Joachim GEHRKE, hier S. 31–52. Vgl. DERS. 2004: 413–419; DREYER 2004: 211–236.

Harmonie und Weltherrschaft. Die Stasis bei Polybios

97

DREYER, B. – ENGELMANN, H. (Hrsg.), 2003. Die Inschriften von Metropolis; Bd. I: Die Dekrete für Apollonios. Städtische Politik unter den Attaliden und im Konflikt zwischen Aristonikos und Rom, Bonn. DREYER, B. – MITTAG, P. F. (Hrsg.), 2011. Lokale Eliten und hellenistische Könige. Zwischen Kooperation und Konfrontation, Berlin. DÖSSEL, A., 2003. Die Beilegung innerstaatlicher Konflikte in den griechischen Poleis. Vom 5.–3. Jahrhundert v. Chr., Frankfurt am Main. FERHADBEGOVIC, S. – WEIFFEN, B. (Hrsg.), 2011. Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz 2011. FRÖHLICH, P. – MÜLLER, C. (Hrsg.), 2005. Citoyenneté et participation a la basse époque hellénistique, Genf. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1985. Stasis. Untersuchungen zu den inneren Kriegen in den griechischen Staaten des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr., München. GEHRKE, H.-J., 2004. Eine Bilanz: Die Entwicklung des Gymnasiums zur Institution der Sozialisierung in der Polis, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin 2004, 413–419. GOMME, A. W., 1956. A Historical Commentary on Thucydides; 2. Bd., Oxford. GRUEN, E., 1976. Class Conflict and the Third Macedonian War. AJAH 1, 29–60. HEUSS, A., 1973. Das Revolutionsproblem im Spiegel der antiken Geschichte. HZ 216, 1–72. KALYVAS, S., 2006. The Logic of Violence in Civil War, Cambridge. LAUTER, H., 2002. „Polybios hat es geweiht …“. Stiftungsinschriften des Polybios und des Philopoimen aus dem neuen Zeus-Heiligtum zu Megalopolis. AW 33, 375–386. LEHMANN, G. A., 2001. Ansätze zu einer Theorie des griechischen Bundesstaates bei Aristoteles und Polybios, Göttingen. LINTOTT, A., 1982. Violence, Civil Strife and Revolution in the Classical City, London. LLOYD, G. E. R., 1973. Greek Science after Aristotle, New York. LLOYD, G. E. R., 1984. Hellenistic Science. CAH2 7.1, 321–351. MAGNINO, D. 1993. Le ‘Guerre Civili’ di Appiano. ANRW II. 34.1, 523–554. MÜLLER, C., 2013. The Rise and Fall of the Boeotians: Polybius 20.4–7 as a Literary Topos, in: B. GIBSON – T. HARRISON (Hrsg.), Polybius and his World: Essays in Memory of F. W. Walbank, Oxford, 267–278. PRICE, J. 2001. Thucydides and Internal War, Cambridge. QUASS, F., 1993. Die Honoratiorenschicht in den Städten des griechischen Osten. Untersuchungen zur politischen und sozialen Entwicklung in hellenistischer und römischer Zeit, Stuttgart. RUSCHENBUSCH, E., 1978. Untersuchungen zu Staat und Politik in Griechenland vom 7.–4. Jh. v. Chr., Bamberg. SCHUBERT, C., 2005. Medizin. Lexikon des Hellenismus, 681–685. TASLER, P. – KEHNE, P., 1999. Bürgerkrieg, in: H. SONNABEND (Hrsg.), Mensch und Landschaft in der Antike, Stuttgart, 76–82. WALBANK, F. W., 1957–1979. A Historical Commentary on Polybius; 3 Bde., Oxford. WALSH, J., 2000. The Disorders of the 170s BC and Roman Intervention in the Class Struggle in Greece. CQ 50, 300–303. WEED, R., 2007. Aristotle on Stasis: A Moral Psychology of Political Conflict, Berlin. WINTERLING, A., 1991. Polisbegriff und Stasistheorie des Aeneas Tacticus. Zur Frage der Grenzen der griechischen Polisgesellschaften im 4. Jahrhundert v. Chr. Historia 40, 193–229.

HELLENISTISCHE POLEIS UND RÖMISCHER BÜRGERKRIEG. STASIS IM GRIECHISCHEN OSTEN NACH DEN IDEN DES MÄRZ (44 BIS 39 V. CHR.) Henning Börm

ABSTRACT: Contrary to what is sometimes assumed, civil strife (stasis) continued to be an essential aspect of the polis in Hellenistic times. However, after the Greek world had come under Roman domination in the course of the second century BCE, those who could claim to be the “friends” of the Romans were usually able to maintain control over their fellow citizens. When, after the Ides of March, the Greek East was turned into the main battlefield of the renewed Roman civil war, the Greeks were once again forced to take sides. In many poleis this seems to have led to an outbreak of stasis, since it was unclear which side would eventually gain the upper hand. Thus for the first time in decades resistance against those in power did not seem futile. In the context of the Roman civil war, therefore, the latent power struggles within many Greek cities became visible again. The aim of this paper is to look at how the Roman civil war after Caesar’s death was intertwined with civil strife in Greek cities: What can we learn from the events about stasis in the late Hellenistic world and about the different ways in which the Roman commanders acted towards the Greeks?

Die letzten Jahre jener Epoche der griechischen Geschichte, die man den Hellenismus zu nennen pflegt, werden durch eine beispiellose Katastrophe markiert. Der Osten des Mittelmeerraums war bekanntlich bereits im Verlauf des 2. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. unter direkte oder indirekte römische Herrschaft gelangt;1 und jahrzehntelang hatten die Griechen immer wieder erleben müssen, dass Rom nicht nur Wohlverhalten belohnte, sondern dass römische Feldherren umgekehrt gerne jeden Vorwand nutzten, um sich ihren Anteil am Reichtum der hellenistischen

*

1

Ich danke Soi AGELIDIS, Johannes BERNHARDT, Boris CHRUBASIK, Steffen DIEFENBACH, Ulrich GOTTER, Kai GRUNDMANN, Matthias HAAKE, Wolfgang HAVENER, Christian MANN, Stefan REBENICH und Jan STENGER für Hinweise und Anregungen. Dieser Aufsatz entstand während eines Aufenthalts im Kulturwissenschaftlichen Kolleg des Exzellenzclusters „Kulturelle Grundlagen von Integration“, das im Rahmen der Exzellenzinitiative des Bundes und der Länder an der Universität Konstanz eingerichtet wurde. Die römische Expansion im Osten und das Verhältnis zwischen der res publica und den griechischen Städten und Monarchen hat vielfach das Interesse der Historiker geweckt. Aus der Fülle an Literatur seien hier stellvertretend genannt: ERRINGTON 1971; DEININGER 1971; SHERWIN-WHITE 1983 (Ereignisgeschichte); GRUEN 1984; BERNHARDT 1985; KALLET-MARX 1995; FERRARY 2001; MCGING 2003; ECKSTEIN 2008; SCHULZ 2011 sowie die Bibliographie bei BERNHARDT 1998.

100

Henning Börm

Welt zu sichern. Der kleinasiatische Raubzug des Manlius Vulso 189 v. Chr.,2 die Plünderung Korinths durch Mummius im Jahr 146 v. Chr.3 oder jene Athens durch die Truppen Sullas im Jahr 86 v. Chr.4 sind dabei lediglich besonders spektakuläre Beispiele. Die Opferrolle war den griechischen Gemeinwesen daher bereits wohlvertraut, als bald nach der Mitte des ersten vorchristlichen Jahrhunderts ein Unheil über sie hereinbrach, das alles Frühere übertraf: Der Balkan, Kleinasien und Syrien wurden zum Schlachtfeld des römischen Bürgerkriegs. Vor allem die Jahre von 44 bis 39 v. Chr. stellten für diese Gebiete eine politische, soziale, militärische und ökonomische Katastrophe sondergleichen dar. Seit Sullas Feldzug gegen Mithridates hatte man nicht mehr in diesem Ausmaß unter römischen Truppen leiden müssen, und zudem war davon noch niemals ein derart großes Gebiet betroffen gewesen. Hinzu kamen die Unübersichtlichkeit und Unvorhersagbarkeit der Ereignisse. Allein Westkleinasien wurde in diesen fünf Jahren nacheinander vom Caesarianer Dolabella, von den Caesarmördern Brutus und Cassius, vom Triumvir Marcus Antonius, von seinem Todfeind Quintus Labienus und schließlich von dessen Überwinder Publius Ventidius Bassus mit Truppen durchzogen und ausgeplündert. Im Folgenden soll nun zum einen der Effekt, den die Bürgerkriege nach den Iden des März auf die hellenistischen Poleis hatten, betrachtet werden, wobei es insbesondere um die Spaltungen und Konflikte innerhalb der griechischen Gemeinwesen und ihren Zusammenhang mit den römischen bella civilia gehen soll. Zum anderen soll die Art und Weise untersucht werden, in der die diversen römischen Feldherrn und Machthaber mit den Poleis interagierten, welche Haltung sie diesen gegenüber einnahmen, wie mit unterlegenen Gegnern umgegangen wurde und welche Rolle hierbei Inszenierungen und symbolische Akte spielten. Und schließlich sollen vor dem Hintergrund der Ereignisse einige grundsätzliche Überlegungen zum Phänomen der Stasis (στάσις)5 im späten Hellenismus angestellt werden. Im Mai 43 schrieb Brutus an Cicero: „Zwei Dinge brauche ich, Cicero, Geld und Nachschub“.6 Dieser Zweck heiligte jedes Mittel, und die anderen Bürgerkriegsgeneräle verfuhren nicht anders. Hatte so bereits Cassius von den Städten der Provinz Asia den zehnfachen Jahrestribut verlangt und erhalten,7 so forderte nach der Doppelschlacht von Philippi auch Antonius extrem hohe Summen ein.8 Insgesamt 2 3 4 5

6 7 8

Pol. 21.34–36; Liv. 38.14.10–15.14. Paus. 7.16.7f.; Vell. Pat. 1.13. Plut. Sulla 13f. Unter „Staseis“ sollen hier lediglich Spaltungen und (meist gewaltsame) Parteienkämpfe innerhalb einer Polis verstanden werden; diese Definition deckt sich nur teilweise mit der Verwendung von στάσις in den Quellen. Duabus rebus egemus, Cicero, pecunia et supplemento; Cic. ad Brut. 2.3.5. App. civ. 4.74, 5.24. Cass. Dio 48.24.3; App. civ. 5.5f. Vgl. BUCHHEIM 1960: 12f. Unklar ist, ob Antonius auch von den Poleis des griechischen Mutterlandes entsprechende Summen einforderte; vgl. HALFMANN 2011: 106.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

101

seien die Provinzen des Ostens, wie laut Cassius Dio bereits Labienus konstatierte, nach den Ereignissen dieser Jahre der römischen Herrschaft mehr denn je entfremdet gewesen;9 eine wenig überraschende Feststellung. Die angeblichen griechischen Brutusbriefe, 35 Paare von Schreiben an kleinasiatische Gemeinwesen nebst Antwort, deren vermeintlicher Herausgeber Mithridates angibt, es handle sich um die Korrespondenz des Caesarmörders im Jahr 43, sind in ihrer Echtheit zwar seit Jahrzehnten umstritten.10 Aber auch wenn sie, wofür vieles spricht, nicht als authentisch anzusehen sein sollten, so belegen sie doch wenigstens, wie tief sich das Trauma jener Zeit in das Bewusstsein der Griechen eingebrannt hatte. Ob die vermeintlichen Briefe, wie etwa Jürgen Deininger gemutmaßt hat,11 zwar gefälscht seien, aber dafür auf gute, heute verlorene Quellen zurückgingen, sei dahingestellt. In jedem Fall aber bezeugen sie, dass man sich gut an die enormen Bürden erinnerte, die Brutus den ohnmächtigen Gemeinden des Ostens auferlegte,12 ebenso daran, dass alle Versuche, mit dem Römer zu verhandeln, zum Scheitern verurteilt waren, und auch an die unverhohlenen Drohungen, die der Caesarmörder formuliert haben soll, sowie an die Belohnungen, die er jenen in Aussicht gestellt habe, die sich für ihn entschieden – so soll der Polis Kyzikos zur Belohnung die Insel Prokonnesos übereignet worden sein.13 Betrachtet man nun die späthellenistische Welt in jenen Jahren, so bietet sich ein Bild der Zersplitterung. Niemals traten die Gemeinden einer Region dem jeweiligen römischen Machthaber, mit dem sie sich konfrontiert sahen, geschlossen gegenüber. Zum einen trugen dabei gewiss teils uralte Rivalitäten und Feindschaften zwischen den Gemeinwesen ihren Teil dazu bei, die eigene Positionsbestimmung zu erleichtern. Folgt man der literarischen Tradition, so halfen zum Beispiel die Bewohner von Oinoanda, als sich die lykische Stadt Xanthos entschlossen hatte, sich Brutus mit aller Gewalt zu widersetzen, dem Römer angeblich nur zu gerne dabei, die Mauern ihrer ewigen Rivalen zu erstürmen. Appian führt das Verhalten der Bürger von Oinoanda dabei ganz ausdrücklich auf ihre Feindschaft mit Xanthos zurück.14 Auch Patara, ebenfalls eine Rivalin der Xanthier, scheint damals bereitwillig mit Brutus kooperiert zu haben.15 Xanthos hingegen erlebte – so will es zumindest die Tradition – eine makabre Wiederholung der Geschichte: Genau wie 500 Jahre zuvor, als angeblich bereits die Perser die Stadt niedergebrannt hatten,16 wurde der Ort nun, wie es heißt, erneut durch ein Feuer schwer verwüstet.17 Ob diese von Plutarch, Appian und Cassius Dio überlieferte Ge9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Cass. Dio 48.24.8. Vgl. zur Diskussion zuletzt GOUKOWSKY 2011. Vgl. DEININGER 1966. Vgl. zu Brutus GELZER 1918, KNIELY 1974 und WISTRAND 1981. Zu seinem Agieren im Osten vgl. GOTTER 1996: 195–205. Ps.-Brut. ep. 35.37. App. civ. 4.79. Plut. Brutus 2. Anderes berichten allerdings Appian und Cassius Dio, denen zufolge Brutus der Stadt erst massiv drohen musste; App. civ. 4.81; Cass. Dio 47.34.4–6. Hdt. 1.176. Plut. Brutus 31; Cass. Dio 47.34.1–3; App. civ. 4.80.

102

Henning Börm

schichte in ihrer augenscheinlichen Stilisierung eine Übertreibung (oder gar eine Erfindung) darstellt, sei hier dahingestellt.18 Den Überlebenden dürfte es gegebenenfalls ein schwacher Trost gewesen sein, dass Antonius die Stadt laut Appian später wieder aufbauen ließ.19 Neben alten Intimfeindschaften konnten gewiss auch andere Motive die Entscheidung für die eine oder andere Seite erleichtern, nämlich immer dann, wenn eine Polis nur von einer der Konfliktparteien Gutes oder Schlechtes zu erhoffen hatte. Einen möglichen Hinweis auf einen solchen Fall kann man wiederum dem Briefwechsel zwischen Brutus und Cicero entnehmen – wohl Ende Mai 43 berichtet ersterer eher beiläufig von einem Streit, in dem Cicero vermitteln möge: Aufgrund einer Erbschaft schulde Dyrrhachion dem Republikaner Flavius einen sehr großen Betrag, weigere sich aber zu zahlen, da der dictator Caesar versprochen habe, der Polis diese Schuld zu erlassen.20 Mit anderen Worten: Eine Stadt wie Dyrrhachion hätte von einem Sieg der Caesarianer profitieren können. Und auch alte Anhänglichkeiten konnten die Parteinahme erleichtern – der galatische Dynast Deiotaros zum Beispiel war ein Klient des Brutus und trat daher auf dessen Seite.21 Doch auch wenn die Quellen nur in Einzelfällen einen genaueren Blick gestatten, genügt dies dennoch, um die Beobachtung anzustellen, dass auch innerhalb der griechischen Gemeinden oftmals keineswegs Einigkeit darüber bestanden haben dürfte, wie man sich zu positionieren habe. In Tarsos zum Beispiel gab es im Jahr 43 eine Stasis zwischen den Unterstützern Dolabellas und denen, die auf Cassius setzten.22 Zum Unglück für die Polis hatte sich hierbei zuletzt die Dolabella18

Appian behauptet, Xanthos sei zudem 334 von Alexander niedergebrannt worden, da es sich nicht habe ergeben wollen; Arrian allerdings berichtet nichts Derartiges (Arr. anab. 1.24.4), was insgesamt die Zweifel an Appians Darstellung zu diesem Punkt verstärkt. Martin ZIMMERMANN (München) verdanke ich den Hinweis darauf, dass sich eine Zerstörung der Stadt archäologisch nicht nachweisen lasse. Dass Appians Bericht über die Ereignisse von 43 jeder Grundlage entbehrt, halte ich dennoch für eher unwahrscheinlich, doch vermutlich wurde das Ausmaß der Katastrophe später zumindest stark übertrieben; vgl. dazu in Kürze ausführlich RONDHOLZ (in Vorbereitung). 19 App. civ. 5,7. 20 Cic. ad Brut. 1.6.4. 21 Cass. Dio 47.24.2f. Vgl. zu Deiotaros SPICKERMANN 1997, COŞKUN 2005 und COŞKUN 2011: 89–93. 22 Ταρσέων δ᾽ ἐς στάσιν διῃρημένων οἱ μὲν τὸν Κάσσιον ἐστεφανώκεσαν ἐλθόντα πρότερον, οἱ δὲ τὸν Δολοβέλλαν ἐπελθόντα: ἀμφότεροι δὲ τῷ τῆς πόλεως σχήματι ταῦτα ἔπρασσον. καὶ παραλλὰξ αὐτῶν προτιμώντων ἑκάτερον, ὡς εὐμεταβόλῳ πόλει χαλεπῶς ἐχρῶντο ἑκάτεροι: Κάσσιος δὲ νικήσας Δολοβέλλαν καὶ ἐσφορὰν ἐπέθηκεν αὐτοῖς χίλια καὶ πεντακόσια τάλαντα. οἱ δὲ ἀποροῦντές τε καὶ ὑπὸ στρατιωτῶν ἐπειγόντων ἀπαιτούμενοι σὺν ὕβρει, τά τε κοινὰ ἀπεδίδοντο πάντα καὶ τὰ ἱερὰ ἐπὶ τοῖς κοινοῖς, ὅσα εἶχον ἐς πομπὰς ἢ ἀναθήματα, ἔκοπτον. οὐδενὸς δὲ μέρους οὐδ᾽ ὣς ἀνυομένου, ἐπώλουν αἱ ἀρχαὶ τὰ ἐλεύθερα: καὶ πρῶτα μὲν ἦν παρθένοι τε καὶ παῖδες, ἐπὶ δὲ γυναῖκές τε καὶ γέροντες ἐλεεινοί, βραχυτάτου πάμπαν ὤνιοι, μετὰ δὲ οἱ νέοι; App. civ. 4.64. – „Die Tarsier standen sich in einer Stasis gegenüber. Die einen hatten Cassius bekränzt, der zuerst gekommen war, die anderen Dolabella, der ihm folgte. In beiden Fällen hatten die Bürger im Namen der ganzen Polis gehandelt, und da sie also zwei Männer abwechselnd auszeichneten, musste jeder von ihnen die Stadt verachtungs-

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

103

Parteiung durchgesetzt;23 jedenfalls forderte Cassius nach Dolabellas Tod eine Strafe von 1500 Talenten. Um diese gewaltige Summe aufbringen zu können, ließen die Magistrate der Stadt schließlich freigeborene Menschen – mutmaßlich solche, deren Familien auf der falschen Seite gestanden hatten – in die Sklaverei verkaufen.24 Kurz zuvor waren auch führende Bürger von Laodikeia, das Dolabella Zuflucht gewährt hatte, von Cassius hart bestraft worden.25 Flavius Josephus beschreibt, wie die römischen Bürgerkriege zu einer Fragmentarisierung Syriens führten,26 und dass überdies verschiedentlich versucht wurde, Partikularinteressen im Kontext des großen Konflikts durchzusetzen. So bezeugt er zum Beispiel, dass die jüdische Gemeinde in Ephesos die scheinbar günstige Gelegenheit genutzt habe, sich 43 v. Chr. von Brutus (dessen Name an der fraglichen Stelle allerdings zu „Marcus Iulius Pompeius, Sohn des Brutus“ wird) Privilegien verleihen zu lassen.27 Dass es im Windschatten des römischen Bürgerkriegs einzelnen Männern oder Gruppen gelang, in ihrer jeweiligen Polis eine dominierende Position zu erlangen, zeigt schon der Umstand, dass, so Appian, nach Philippi zahlreiche „Tyrannen“ aus syrischen Poleis vor Antonius flohen und Zuflucht bei Quintus Labienus und den Parthern suchten.28 Fest steht: Der Bürgerkrieg nach Caesars Ermordung war nicht nur eine traumatische Erfahrung für die Römer,29 sondern auch eine Zeit der Stasis in vielen griechischen Poleis.30

23

24

25 26 27 28 29

30

voll als unzuverlässig betrachten. Nachdem er Dolabella besiegt hatte, erlegte ihnen denn auch Cassius eine Abgabe von 1500 Talenten auf. Da die Einwohner nicht wussten, woher sie das Geld nehmen sollten, während die Soldaten gewaltsam auf Zahlung drängten, verkauften sie ihren gesamten städtischen Besitz und machten auch die heiligen Geräte, die sie bei Prozessionen verwendeten, sowie die Weihgaben zu Geld. Als auch dies nicht genügte, verkauften die Behörden freie Menschen in die Sklaverei; zuerst Mädchen und Jungen, dann Frauen und jämmerliche Greise, die kaum etwas einbrachten, und dann die Jungmänner (νέοι)“. Vgl. BERNHARDT 1985: 150f. Cassius Dio berichtet, die Tarsier hätten sogar auf Seiten der Caesarianer in den Krieg eingegriffen, indem sie zunächst versuchten, dem Caesarmörder Cimber die Tauruspässe zu verlegen, und anschließend die mit Cassius verbündete Polis Adana angriffen; Cass. Dio 47.31.1–3. Noch viele Jahrzehnte nach den Ereignissen konnte Dion von Prusa in seiner zweiten Rede an die Tarsier davon ausgehen, dass die Vorgänge noch in lebendiger Erinnerung waren; Dion Chrys. or. 34.7f. Zu beachten ist allerdings, dass diese Stasis in Tarsos, soweit man den Quellen entnehmen kann, zumindest im Jahr 43 nicht zu Blutvergießen zwischen den beiden Gruppierungen führte. Denkbar ist sogar, dass Appians Bericht so zu verstehen ist, dass man sich innerhalb der Führungsschicht angesichts der Kontributionen darauf einigte, die Schwächsten in der Stadt in die Sklaverei zu verkaufen, statt übereinander herzufallen. App. civ. 4.62. Ios. ant. Iud. 14.297; Ios. bell. Iud. 1.239. Ios. ant. Iud. 14.262–264. App. civ. 5.10. Noch Jahrzehnte später sollte Lucan, allerdings mit Bezug auf den Bürgerkrieg zwischen Caesar und Pompeius, die Betroffenen die Götter anflehen lassen: omnibus hostes reddite nos populis – civile avertite bellum; Lucan. 2.52f. Während das Phänomen der Stasis für die archaische und klassische Zeit gut erforscht ist – verwiesen sei hier nur auf GEHRKE 1985 (grundlegend) sowie WINTERLING 1991: 193–198, BERGER 1992: 57–105, LORAUX 2002, HANSEN 2004 und EICH 2006: 508–604 –, fehlt (trotz

104

Henning Börm

APHRODISIAS UND LABIENUS Dass die historiographische Tradition dabei in der Tat nur einige wenige Fälle herausgreift, belegt das Beispiel Aphrodisias. Hier ist es allein der epigraphische Befund, der es uns erlaubt, Rückschlüsse auf die Ereignisse um 40 v. Chr. zu ziehen, auch wenn ein entsprechendes Narrativ fehlt: Einige Zeit nach Philippi fiel Quintus Labienus mit einem aus Römern und Parthern bestehenden Heer in den römischen Orient ein und gelangte bis Westkleinasien.31 Während er laut Cassius Dio an vielen Orten auf begeisterte Zustimmung stieß,32 weiß man umgekehrt von mehreren Poleis, die sich ihm gewaltsam widersetzten, darunter Laodikeia, Alabanda, Stratonikeia33 und Mylasa, über dessen Widerstand Strabon berichtet.34 Besonders entschlossen stellte sich offenbar Aphrodisias dem Labienus entgegen. Hiervon weiß man allerdings nur dank der so genannten „Archivwand“, deren Inschriften im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. angebracht wurden.35 Die hier aufgezeichneten Texte stammen aus einem Zeitraum von gut drei Jahrhunderten und haben vor allem das Verhältnis der Polis zu Rom zum Gegenstand. Offenbar schien es den Aphrodisiern während des unruhigen 3. Jahrhunderts36 geraten, die außerordentlich privilegierte Stellung des Ortes, die von diversen principes immer wieder bestätigt wurde, durch eine monumentale Inschrift zu dokumentieren. Für uns von Interesse sind dabei jene Texte, die auf die Triumviratszeit zurückgehen. Da ist zunächst ein senatus consultum de Aphrodisiensibus,37 das offenbar die Bestimmungen eines stark beschädigten Ediktes des Triumvirn bestätigt;38 die Privilegien und Ehrungen, die der Polis zuteilwerden, sind enorm. Unter anderem wird dem Aphroditetempel der Stadt die Asylie zugestanden, und vor allem erhalten die Bürger aufgrund ihrer erwiesenen Treue Freiheit (ἐλευθερία) und insbesondere Abgabenfreiheit (ἀτέλεια) sowie den Status als Bundesgenossen (σύμμαχοι) Roms zugesprochen.39 Worin diese „Treue“ gegenüber Rom bestand, für die Aphrodisias nun so üppig belohnt wurde, lässt sich drei weiteren Texten der „Archivwand“ entnehmen – es handelt sich um Briefe. Der eine stellt ein privates Schreiben Octavians an ei-

31 32 33 34 35

36 37 38 39

Ansätzen für das 3. und 2. Jahrhundert bei GRAY 2015) eine entsprechende Analyse für den Hellenismus. Diese wird Gegenstand meiner im Entstehen begriffenen Habilitationsschrift sein; vgl. BÖRM (in Vorbereitung). Cass. Dio 48.24.4–26; Plut. Antonius 30.2f. Vgl. zu Labienus und seinen Motiven CURRAN 2007. Cass. Dio 46.26.3. Cass. Dio 48.26.3f. Strab. 14.2.24. Die Stadt wurde dennoch eingenommen und zerstört; vgl. auch I.Mylasa 602 und CANALI DE ROSSI 2000: 172–178. Die meisten der Texte scheinen unter Alexander Severus angebracht worden zu sein, später ergänzt unter Gordian III. Grundlegend hierzu ist nach wie vor REYNOLDS 1982, mit ausführlichem Kommentar. Vgl. zur Lage um diese Zeit allgemein ALFÖLDY 2011: 254–272 (mit weiterer Literatur). I.Aph 2007: 8.27; REYNOLDS 1982, Text 8. I.Aph 2007: 8.26; REYNOLDS 1982, Text 7. I.Aph 2007: 8.27; REYNOLDS 1982, Text 8, 48–54.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

105

nen gewissen Stephanos dar, in dem der Triumvir festhält, „diese eine Polis in ganz Asia habe ich für mich beansprucht“ (μίαν πόλιν ταύτην ἐξ ὅλης τῆς Ἀσίας ἐμαυτῷ εἴληπφα), und den Adressaten auffordert, dafür Sorge zu tragen, dass keine der Belastungen, die Antonius den Städten der Provinz aufbürdete, Aphrodisias betreffen solle.40 Interessanter noch ist ein offenbar einige Jahre später zu datierendes offizielles Schreiben Octavians an δῆμος und βουλή von Ephesos, in dem diese aufgefordert werden, Aphrodisias, das „im Krieg gegen Labienus“ (ἐν τῷ πολέμῳ τῷ κατὰ Λαβιῆνον) schwer gelitten habe, materiell zu unterstützen und auch eine damals geraubte Weihgabe zurückzugeben.41 Durch diesen Hinweis erst lässt sich der Grund für die Privilegien benennen: Aphrodisias hatte sich Labienus widersetzt und war von dessen Truppen augenscheinlich erobert worden, mutmaßlich unter zumindest indirekter Beteiligung von Ephesos. Dass Aphrodisias in diesem Krieg nun aber keineswegs wie ein Mann auf Seiten der Caesarianer gestanden hatte, auch wenn man dies im Nachhinein offiziell glauben machen wollte, verrät ein Brief des bereits erwähnten Stephanos an Archonten, Rat und Volk der Stadt.42 Dieser teilt mit, er sende ihnen nicht nur wie gewünscht ihre Sklaven zurück, sondern überstelle ihnen überdies freie Männer (wohl Bürger), die die Aphrodisier nach eigenem Gutdünken wegen der Kollaboration mit Labienus bestrafen sollten:

5

10

Στέφανος Πλαρ(ασέων) [Ἀφροδεισι]έων ἄρχουσι βουλῇ δήμῳ χαίρειν. προσελθόντων μοι ὑμετέρων πρεσβευτῶν ἐν Λαοδικήᾳ καὶ τὰ παρ’ ὑμῶν ψηφίσματα ἀναδόντων ἐγὼ πᾶσαν σπουδὴν εἰσηνενκάμην καὶ ἐπιμελέστατα ἐξζητήσας παρά τε τῶν ἔξωθεν καὶ τῶν ἐμῶν ἀπέδωκα αὐτοῖς δούλους ὅσους ποτὲ ἐπέγνωσαν καὶ ἐλευθέρους ὅσους ἔλεγον ἐπὶ Λαβιήνου πάντα ὑμεῖν ἐνδεδεῖχθαι καὶ τούτους ὑμεῖν παρέδωκα ὅπως τὰς καθ̣ ηκουσας ὑμεῖν τιμωρίας ὑποσχῶσιν σὺν τούτοις καὶ στέφανον χρυσοῦν ἀποδέδωκα τοῖς ὑμετέροις πρεσβευταῖς καὶ ἄρχουσιν ὃς ἦν ἀπενηνεγμένος ὑπὸ Πύθου τοῦ Οὐμανίου. Stephanos grüßt die Archonten, den Rat und das Volk von Plarasa und [Aphrodi]sias. Als mich eure Gesandten in Laodikeia aufsuchten und mir eure Beschlüsse (ὑμῶν ψηφίσματα) überbrachten, gab ich mir alle Mühe und übergab ihnen nach gründlicher Suche all die Sklaven, die sie entdeckten, aus den Händen anderer und aus jedem Volk; und auch die Freien, von denen sie sagten, dass sie euch zur Zeit des Labienus angezeigt worden seien, übergab ich euch, damit sie mit diesen (Sklaven) die Bestrafung erfahren sollen, die euch angemessen erscheint; und zusammen mit diesen habe ich euren Gesandten und Archonten einen goldenen Kranz übergeben, der von Pythes, Sohn des Umanios, fortgenommen worden war.

Der Text bezeugt in all seiner Beiläufigkeit, dass es nach dem Ende des Krieges auch innerhalb der Bürgerschaft von Aphrodisias zu einer Abrechnung mit jenen gekommen sein dürfte, die, wie sich nun herausstellte, letztlich auf der falschen Seite gestanden hatten. Leider erfahren wir nichts darüber, welche Behandlung ih40 41 42

I.Aph 2007: 8.29; REYNOLDS 1982, Text 10. I.Aph 2007: 8.31; REYNOLDS 1982, Text 12. I.Aph 2007: 8.30; REYNOLDS 1982, Text 11.

106

Henning Börm

nen zuteilwurde. Da die Gesandten der Aphrodisier Octavians Bevollmächtigten Stephanos jedoch offenbar auf Grundlage von ψηφίσματα ausdrücklich aufgefordert hatten, ihnen die Geflüchteten auszuliefern, darf man allerdings vermuten, dass sie ein unerfreuliches Schicksal erwartete. Wie es genau aussah, entzieht sich aber, wie gesagt, unserer Kenntnis.

RHODOS UND CASSIUS Das Beispiel von Aphrodisias zeigt, dass Meinungsverschiedenheiten und Staseis in den griechischen Poleis angesichts der Extremsituation der römischen Bürgerkriege wohl durchaus häufiger auftraten, als es die Geschichtsschreibung überliefert hat. Es gibt aber zumindest einen Fall, über dessen Verlauf wir dank Appian etwas genauer unterrichtet sind: Rhodos. Rhodos hatte im Jahr 43 seine Glanzzeit bereits hinter sich, vor allem seit 167, als es zwar knapp und wohl ausschließlich aufgrund der Besonderheiten der römischen Innenpolitik einem Krieg mit Rom entgangen, aber dennoch empfindlich bestraft worden war.43 Damals war es zuvor zu einer Stasis zwischen den „Romfreunden“ und den „Perseusfreunden“ in der Polis gekommen.44 Trotzdem war die Insel noch immer ausnehmend reich; und so war es kein Zufall, dass Cassius ihr gegen Ende jenes Jahres, kurz nachdem die Caesarmörder durch die lex Pedia geächtet45 worden waren und der Krieg gegen die Triumvirn unausweichlich geworden war,46 seine Aufmerksamkeit zuwandte. Folgt man dem dürren Bericht bei Cassius Dio, so wurden die Rhodier vom Caesarmörder in zwei Seegefechten geschlagen, ließen Cassius sodann widerstandslos in ihre Stadt und wurden von ihm, der dort wie so viele römische nobiles eine Weile studiert hatte,47 verschont, verloren allerdings ihre Flotte und ihre Reichtümer.48 Pol. 30.31. Vgl. GRUEN 1984: 569–572; WIEMER 2002: 310–317; ERRINGTON 2008: 260f. Mit Recht berühmt ist die fragmentarisch erhaltene Rede Catos des Älteren (Gell. noct. Att. 6.3), in der sich dieser vor dem Senat für eine Bestrafung der Insel, aber gegen einen Krieg aussprach, obwohl er nicht bestreiten konnte, dass aus römischer Sicht fraglos alle Voraussetzungen für ein bellum iustum gegeben waren. Schließlich hatte Rhodos sich mitten im Perseuskrieg den Anschein gegeben, nicht bedingungslos auf Seiten Roms zu stehen. Der Verzicht auf eine militärische Intervention ist daher erklärungsbedürftig. Es ist zu vermuten, dass Cato zu verhindern suchte, dass sich durch einen Krieg gegen das reiche Rhodos weitere nobiles ein Übermaß an Reichtum und auctoritas aneignen könnten. 44 Pol. 28.2.3. 45 Zweifel daran, dass es bei dieser Gelegenheit zu einer regelrechten hostis-Erklärung gekommen sein muss (so GELZER 1918), äußert GOTTER 1996: 201. In jedem Fall sei anzunehmen, dass Brutus und Cassius bereits zuvor mit ihren Rüstungen begonnen hätten. Vgl. zu den Ereignissen 44/43 v. Chr. auch MATIJEVIĆ 2006. 46 Zur Rechtsstellung von Brutus und Cassius vgl. allgemein GIRARDET 1993. 47 Vgl. BRINGMANN 2002. 48 καὶ Κάσσιος μὲν Ῥοδίους, καίτοι τοσοῦτον ἐπὶ τῷ ναυτικῷ φρονοῦντας ὥστε ἔς τε τὴν ἤπειρον ἐπ´ αὐτὸν προδιαπλεῦσαι καὶ τὰς πέδας ἃς ἐκόμιζον ὡς καὶ ζῶντας πολλοὺς αἱρήσοντες ἐπιδεικνύναι σφίσι, ναυμαχίᾳ πρότερον μὲν περὶ Μύνδον, ἔπειτα δὲ πρὸς αὐτῇ τῇ Ῥόδῳ διὰ τοῦ Σταΐου, τῷ τε πλήθει καὶ τῷ μεγέθει τῶν νεῶν τὴν ἐμπειρίαν σφῶν κρατήσας, 43

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

107

Ganz anders liest sich dagegen der Bericht bei Appian,49 dem offensichtlich andere, detailliertere Quellen vorlagen.50 Appian behandelt die Rhodier im Unterschied zu Dio nicht als geschlossene Gruppe, sondern benennt von Anfang an eine Spaltung innerhalb der Bürgerschaft: „Die Ehrbareren unter den Rhodiern waren bestürzt über die Aussicht auf einen Krieg mit den Römern, doch das gemeine Volk war in Hochstimmung, da man sich frühere Siege über Männer verschiedener Art in Erinnerung rief“.51 (Angespielt ist natürlich auf die erfolglosen Belagerungen der Insel durch Demetrios Poliorketes im Jahr 307 und Mithridates VI. im Jahr 88.) Appian berichtet weiter, nach einem ersten Gesandtenaustausch, bei dem Cassius ultimativ die uneingeschränkte Kooperation der Polis eingefordert habe, habe das Volk (πλῆθος)52 die beiden Demagogen Alexandros und Mnaseas zum Prytanen beziehungsweise Nauarchen gewählt; zugleich aber habe man einen weiteren Unterhändler, nämlich Archelaos, den früheren Rhetoriklehrer des Caesarmörders, zu Cassius entsandt. Die Freundschaft (φιλία) zwischen dem prominenten Mitbürger und seinem einstigen Schüler sollte also zum Nutzen der Polis eingesetzt werden – im Hellenismus bekanntlich eine gängige Praxis.53 In diesem Fall aber erreichte sie ihr Ziel nicht. Appian lässt die beiden Männer die unterschiedlichen Positionen in einem kurzen, aber hoch stilisierten Austausch formulieren. Doch Cassius erwidert den

49 50

51

52

53

ἐνίκησε· καὶ μετὰ τοῦτο καὶ αὐτὸς ἐς τὴν νῆσον περαιωθεὶς ἄλλο μὲν κακὸν οὐδὲν αὐτοὺς ἔδρασεν (οὔτε γὰρ ἀντέστησάν οἱ, καὶ εὔνοιαν αὐτῶν ἐκ τῆς διατριβῆς ἣν ἐκεῖ κατὰ παιδείαν ἐπεποίητο εἶχε), τὰς δὲ δὴ ναῦς καὶ τὰ χρήματα καὶ τὰ ὅσια καὶ τὰ ἱερά, πλὴν τοῦ ἅρματος τοῦ Ἡλίου, παρεσπάσατο; Cass. Dio 47.33.3f. – „Obwohl die Rhodier auf ihre Flotte so sehr vertrauten, dass sie Cassius, ohne auf ihn zu warten, zum Festland hin entgegen fuhren und seinen Männern die Fußfesseln zeigten, die sie mitgebracht hatten, ganz so, als würden sie viele von ihnen lebendig zu Gefangenen machen, wurden sie doch zuerst bei Myndos und danach dicht vor Rhodos zur See besiegt; seinen Sieg verdankte Cassius dem Staius, der die nautische Erfahrung der Rhodier durch die Menge und Größe seiner Schiffe überwand. Cassius fuhr daraufhin selbst zur Insel hinüber, wo er auf keinen Widerstand mehr traf (zumal er ja die Zuneigung der Einwohner genoss, weil er sich dort einst zu Studienzwecken aufgehalten hatte). Darum tat er ihnen auch nichts zuleide. Er nahm ihnen allerdings Schiffe, Geld und Staats- und Tempelschätze, mit Ausnahme des Wagens des Helios“ (Übers. nach VEH, mit Modifikationen). App. civ. 4.65–74. Appians Quellen sind unbekannt; mutmaßlich basierte seine Darstellung der Bürgerkriege aber nicht zuletzt auf Asinius Pollio; vgl. auch MAGNINO 1993. Vgl. nun allgemein zur Funktion der Darstellung der römischen bella civilia bei kaiserzeitlichen Autoren GOTTER 2011. Ῥοδίων δὲ οἱ μὲν ἐν λόγῳ μᾶλλον ὄντες ἐδεδοίκεσαν Ῥωμαίοις μέλλοντες ἐς χεῖρας ἰέναι, ὁ δὲ λεὼς ἐμεγαλοφρονεῖτο, ἐπεί οἱ καὶ παλαιῶν ἔργων πρὸς οὐχ ὁμοίους ἄνδρας ἐμνημόνευον; App. civ. 4.66. Im Anschluss an die derzeitige communis opinio gehe ich davon aus, dass Plethos und Demos in dieser Zeit zumeist synonym verwendet werden; vgl. WIEMER 2010: 744. Im vorliegenden Fall zumindest steht aufgrund des Kontextes fest, dass Appian mit Plethos die versammelte wahlberechtigte Bürgerschaft meint. Vgl. SAVALLI-LESTRADE 1998; SCHULZ 2008; SCHULZ 2011; BLOY 2012.

108

Henning Börm

Freundschaftsgruß des Archelaos nicht, sondern entzieht ihm seine Hand;54 die Verhandlungen scheitern.55 Es kommt zu den beiden Seeschlachten, die auch Dio erwähnt, und dann beginnen die Römer mit der Belagerung von Rhodos. Angesichts der angeblich aussichtslosen militärischen Lage beschließen nun die, so Appian, „einsichtigeren unter den Bürgern“, mit den Angreifern zu verhandeln; doch auf einmal stehen Cassius und seine Soldaten kampflos mitten in der Stadt, da ihnen, so wiederum Appian, offensichtlich jene Einwohner, die auf ihrer Seite waren, ein Nebentor geöffnet haben. Bis zu diesem Punkt lassen sich die Berichte Appians und Dios halbwegs miteinander in Einklang bringen; doch nun weicht die weitaus detaillierte Darstellung Appians deutlich ab: Er berichtet nämlich, wie genau die „Schonung“ der Polis Rhodos aussah. Zwar wurde die Stadt in der Tat nicht gebrandschatzt, und den Legionären wurde jede Plünderung verboten; doch Cassius ließ laut Appian ein Tribunal errichten, pflanzte neben sich einen Speer auf, um zu demonstrieren, dass er die Stadt mit Gewalt genommen habe, und ließ sodann fünfzig rhodische Bürger namentlich aufrufen, herbeischaffen und öffentlich hinrichten.56 Etwa 25 weitere Rhodier, denen die Flucht gelungen war, ließ der Römer ächten und verbannen, bevor er alle Schätze, derer man in Tempeln und öffentlichen Gebäuden habhaft werden konnte, beschlagnahmte. Reiche Privatleute wurden aufgefordert, ihren Besitz auszuliefern, und Delatoren wurde ein Zehntel des Gewinns versprochen, sollten sie jene anzeigen, die ihre Schätze verheimlichten. Jenen Sklaven, die ihre Herren verrieten, wurde die Freiheit in Aussicht gestellt.57 Diese Maßnahme erwies sich als so effizient, dass die reichen Rhodier aus lauter Verzweiflung die Gräber ihrer Ahnen geplündert haben sollen.58 An Appians Darstellung sind insbesondere drei Dinge bemerkenswert: Zum einen lässt er Cassius in dem angeblichen Dialog mit seinem einstigen Lehrer das grundsätzliche Dilemma der griechischen Poleis angesichts des römischen Bürgerkrieges sehr präzise formulieren. Überhaupt ist Appians Werk eine Fundgrube für die griechische Rezeption der Ereignisse. Cassius wirft bei ihm den Rhodiern vor, unter dem Vorwand der Neutralität de facto seinen Gegnern zu helfen; denn 54

55 56

57 58

Die Geste des verweigerten Handschlags begegnet unter anderem auch bei Sulla, der Mithridates erst dann den Freundschaftsgruß gewährt haben soll, als dieser seinen Friedensbedingungen zugestimmt hatte; Plut. Sulla 24. App. civ. 4.69. ὧδε μὲν ἑαλώκει Ῥόδος, καὶ Κάσσιος ἐν αὐτῇ προυκάθητο ἐπὶ βήματος καὶ δόρυ τῷ βήματι παρεστήσατο ὡς ἐπὶ δοριαλώτῳ. ἀτρεμεῖν τε κελεύσας τὸν στρατὸν ἀκριβῶς καὶ θάνατον ἐπικηρύξας, εἴ τις ἁρπάσειεν ἢ βιάσαιτό τι, αὐτὸς ἐξ ὀνόματος ἐκάλει Ῥοδίων ἐς πεντήκοντα ἄνδρας καὶ ἀχθέντας ἐκόλαζε θανάτῳ; App. civ. 4.73. – „So kam es zur Einnahme von Rhodos, und Cassius nahm auf einem Tribunal Platz und ließ neben diesem einen Speer aufpflanzen als Zeichen, dass es sich um einen mit dem Speer gewonnenen Ort handle. Dem Heer gab er strengen Befehl, sich ruhig zu verhalten, und bedrohte jeden mit dem Tod, der plündern oder eine Gewalttat begehen sollte. Er selbst rief dann namentlich etwa fünfzig Rhodier auf und ließ sie, als man sie gebracht hatte, hinrichten“ (Übers. nach VEH, modifiziert). Ganz ähnlich hatte laut Appian gut vier Jahrzehnte zuvor bereits Mithridates agiert; App. Mithr. 4.22. App. civ. 4.73.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

109

die Griechen hätten nur zwei Möglichkeiten: Entweder sie akzeptierten ihn und Brutus als offizielle Repräsentanten Roms und seien ihm daher durch ihr foedus zur Hilfe verpflichtet, oder sie sprächen den Caesarmördern diesen Status ab und schlügen sich damit automatisch auf die Seite ihrer Feinde, die in Rom eine Tyrannis errichtet hätten.59 Kurzum, hier wird die Aporie der eigentlich unbeteiligten griechischen Zuschauer des römischen Bürgerkriegs klar benannt: Die Option einer Neutralität wurde ihnen nicht eingeräumt, da der Gegner zum Frevler und Verbrecher erklärt wurde, gegen den jeder Aufrechte zu kämpfen habe. Zum anderen macht Appians Bericht besonders deutlich, dass es angesichts dieser Lage, wie nicht anders zu erwarten, auch auf Rhodos Meinungsverschiedenheiten innerhalb der Polis gab.60 Und so gab es unter den Rhodiern eben solche, die sich, angeführt von Alexandros und Mnaseas, gegen Cassius (und mithin zumindest faktisch für die Triumvirn) entschieden und sich anfangs durchsetzen konnten, und auf der anderen Seite jene, die mit Cassius sympathisierten und ihm schließlich gegen den Willen der anderen Einlass in die Stadt gewährten.61 Dieser Konflikt habe sich, so suggeriert es Appian, entlang der uralten Sollbruchstelle von Oligarchen versus Demokraten oder vielmehr „Elite“ versus „Volk“ manifestiert.62 Ob diese Zuordnung so stimmt, ist allerdings unklar; denn wenn die reiche Elite der Polis wirklich überwiegend mit Cassius sympathisiert haben sollte, so wurde es ihr im Nachhinein wahrlich schlecht gedankt. Erwähnung verdient an dieser Stelle der Umstand, dass Strabon Rhodos einige Jahre nach den Ereignissen ausdrücklich nicht als δημοκρατία bezeichnet, auch wenn die Herrschenden um das Wohl und die Zustimmung der Menge (πλῆθος) bemüht seien.63 Aber wie dem

59 60

61 62

63

App. civ. 4.70. Man darf vermuten, dass Appian hier ähnlich wie wohl auch im Fall von Xanthos direkt oder indirekt auf lokale Traditionen zurückgegriffen hat, dass seiner Darstellung also eine rhodische Quelle zugrunde liegt. Trifft diese Annahme zu, so überrascht zunächst die positive Schilderung derjenigen, die Cassius die Tore geöffnet hatten. Bei näherem Hinsehen trägt der Bericht aber apologetische Züge: Die fraglichen Rhodier seien vernünftig gewesen und hätten erkannt, dass Widerstand zwecklos sei; sie ersparten der Polis daher noch größeres Leid. Auch die Betonung des Unheils, das gerade die reichen Rhodier anschließend betroffen habe, könnte in diesen Kontext gehören. Dass diese Männer bei Appian nicht ausdrücklich als Verräter ihrer Heimat gekennzeichnet werden, obwohl sie ja letztlich auf der „falschen“ Seite standen und sich nach Philippi als Sündenböcke angeboten hätten, kann man vielleicht als Indiz dafür lesen, dass sie auch nach dem Sieg der Caesarianer die Geschicke der Polis Rhodos und mithin die Art und Weise, wie man sich an die Ereignisse erinnerte, bestimmten. App. civ. 4.73. Dass in vielen hellenistischen Poleis tatsächlich ein grundsätzlicher Konflikt zwischen (Teilen) der Oberschicht und dem Demos als „endemisches, weil strukturell ungelöstes Problem“ bestanden und die wesentliche Wurzel für Staseis dargestellt habe, wird auch von Teilen der modernen Forschung angenommen; vgl. etwa SCHOLZ 2008: 74f. δημοκηδεῖς δ᾽ εἰσὶν οἱ Ῥόδιοι καίπερ οὐ δημοκρατούμενοι, συνέχειν δ᾽ ὅμως βουλόμενοι τὸ τῶν πενήτων πλῆθος; Strab. 14.2.5. – „Die Rhodier kümmern sich um das Volk, ohne eine Demokratie zu haben, denn sie wollen sich dennoch der Menge der Armen versichern“. Vgl. auch O’NEIL 1981 und (grundlegend) GABRIELSEN 1997. Die Rhodier selbst verstanden ihre Polis durchaus als Demokratie; vgl. WIEMER 2002: 21f. Sollte Strabon hier die Zustände sei-

110

Henning Börm

auch sei: Fest steht, dass irgendjemand die siegreichen Römer mit der Namensliste versorgt haben muss, die jene verzeichnete, die des Todes waren oder der Ächtung verfielen. Irgendjemand muss profitiert haben, und dass es sich dabei um jene handelte, die heimlich die Tore geöffnet hatten, darf als nahezu sicher gelten. Da die Angehörigen dieser Gruppe in der Polis zuvor, wie die Ereignisse gezeigt hatten, in der unterlegenen Position gewesen waren – sie hatten sich ja in der Volksversammlung nicht durchsetzen und den Krieg gegen Cassius nicht verhindern können –, dürfte für sie nun die Stunde gekommen sein, um mit Hilfe der Römer alte Rechnungen zu begleichen. Und zum dritten und vor allem verdient eben jenes abschließende Tribunal, das Cassius in der eroberten Stadt abhielt, unsere Aufmerksamkeit. Daran, dass es keine Erfindung Appians ist, besteht meines Erachtens kein Zweifel. Und hier kommt nun ein ritueller Aspekt ins Spiel, denn Cassius entschied sich für eine öffentliche Inszenierung. Das Tribunal war der Rahmen par excellence, in dem Magistrate der res publica öffentlich in Erscheinung traten und kraft ihres Amtes für Recht sorgten; diese Tätigkeit stand faktisch sogar im Zentrum der Amtsgeschäfte eines jeden Statthalters.64 Als Ort der Abrechnung war es keine Innovation des Cassius. Zweifellos stand ihm besonders das Beispiel Dolabellas vor Augen, der wenige Monate zuvor den Caesarmörder Trebonius in Smyrna überrumpelt und dessen Kopf öffentlich als den eines ehrlosen Verbrechers zur Schau gestellt hatte: Um Trebonius zu verhöhnen, ließ Dolabella sein abgetrenntes Haupt – die öffentliche Enthauptung, mutmaßlich von Aemilius Paullus in Hellas eingeführt, nannten die Griechen übrigens nicht zufällig „römischer Tod“65 – dabei auf eben jener sella curulis platzieren, auf der der Ermordete zuvor als Propraetor bei Tribunalen den Vorsitz zu führen gepflegt hatte.66 Der Vorgang hatte großes Aufsehen erregt, und der empörte Cicero hatte ihn zum Anlass genommen, Dolabella vom Senat zum hostis erklären zu lassen.67 Cassius hatte Dolabella erst einige Wochen vor der Einnahme von Rhodos in Laodikeia gestellt und getötet; und da er die Rhodier ausdrücklich für die Unterstützung zu bestrafen wünschte, die sie zuvor seinem Feind gewährt hatten,68 dürfte der Rahmen des Tribunals von ihm sehr bewusst gewählt worden sein. Wiewohl mittlerweile proskribiert, demonstrierte Cassius durch sein Auftreten, dass er sich noch immer als römischen Amtsträger und In-

64 65 66 67 68

ner eigenen Zeit beschreiben, so wäre dies ein weiteres (s.o.) Indiz dafür, dass eine herrschende Oberschicht in Rhodos auch nach dem Sieg der Caesarianer an der Macht geblieben war. Dabei hatten sie insbesondere gegenüber den Provinzialen ohne römisches Bürgerrecht sehr weitgehende Befugnisse; vgl. PEPPE 1988 und RICHARDSON 1994: 589. Vgl. LEHMANN 1998: 165. Öffentliche Massenhinrichtungen gab es in Hellas allerdings bereits vor dem Erscheinen der Römer, vgl. z.B. Pol. 2.59.9. App. civ. 3.26; Vell. Pat. 2.69.1. App. civ. 4.58; Cic. Phil. 11.5–9. Die Rhodier hatten dem Republikaner P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther überdies die Stellung von Schiffen für den Kampf gegen Dolabella verweigert; vgl. BERNHARDT 1985: 151.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

111

haber jenes imperium extraordinarium betrachtete, das der Senat ihm und Brutus Monate zuvor verliehen hatte.69 Cassius war dabei denkbar weit entfernt vom Gestus eines Euergeten, also jener Rolle, die für die politische Kommunikation des Ostens eine so zentrale Bedeutung hatte. Von εὔνοια gegenüber Rhodos konnte wahrlich keine Rede sein. Cassius’ Auftritt erinnerte nicht an einen Quinctius Flamininus,70 sondern vielmehr an das Verhalten des Aemilius Paullus 167.71 Als Vertreter Roms und militärischer Sieger war er der unumschränkte Herr über Rhodos, das er ja ausdrücklich als χώρα δορίκτητος, als „speergewonnenes Land“, markierte – womit er übrigens zeigte, dass er sich hellenistischer Symbolsprache durchaus zu bedienen wusste.72 Hatte Dolabella die Rolle des senatorischen Promagistraten im Osten durch die Art, wie er Trebonius’ Leichnam zur Schau gestellt hatte, noch öffentlich verhöhnt und die auctoritas senatus, der Trebonius seine Stellung verdankt hatte, gleich mit dazu, so demonstrierte das Ritual der Aburteilung vor dem Tribunal bei Cassius das genaue Gegenteil. Der Römer verlangte offensichtlich nach der Auslieferung von Verantwortlichen, die man ihm, wie gesagt, auch lieferte. Gerade weil er aus früherer Zeit eine persönliche Nahbeziehung zu Rhodos pflegte, musste er das Verhalten der Polis als infame Treulosigkeit gegenüber ihm und der res publica begreifen, die zwingend geahndet werden musste. Um angesichts dieses Umstandes darauf verzichten zu können, die Stadt dem Erdboden gleichzumachen, mussten Sündenböcke benannt werden. Die fünfzig Rhodier, die vor dem Tribunal öffentlich wie Verbrecher abgeurteilt und hingerichtet wurden, dienten dazu, genau dies zu inszenieren. Das Recht, wie es der Römer verstand, wurde unnachgiebig durchgesetzt. Nur dank dieses Rituals der exemplarischen Bestrafung war es überhaupt möglich, dass sich die später bei Cassius Dio greifbare Tradition, der Caesarmörder habe Rhodos insgesamt geschont, entwickeln konnte.73 Doch mit Gnade hatte das Geschehen nichts zu tun. Dies gilt übrigens auch für Appians Darstellung, derzufolge Brutus in Patara ähnlich wie Cassius auf Rhodos verfügt habe, dass Sklaven belohnt werden sollten, die anzeigten, wenn Bürger Wertgegenstände versteckten. Als ein Sklave nun tatsächlich seinen Herrn angeklagt habe, dessen Mutter daraufhin die Schuld auf sich genommen habe, habe Brutus die beiden Freien verschont und dafür den Sklaven getötet – jedoch nicht etwa aus Gnade gegenüber dem Bürger und seiner 69 70 71

72 73

App. civ. 4.58. Vgl. GIRARDET 1993. Pol. 18.46. Paullus war den Hellenen und Makedonen damals ostentativ als militärischer Sieger gegenüber getreten und hatte die Neuordnung nach Pydna demonstrativ nicht auf Griechisch, sondern auf Latein, also in der Sprache der neuen Herren, verkünden lassen; Liv. 45.29.3–30. Vgl. zu Paullus die Skizze FLAIG 2000 (mit weiterer Literatur). Vgl. MEHL 1980. Auf die Existenz einer entsprechenden Tradition bereits lange vor Cassius Dio weist die Notiz bei Velleius Paterculus hin, demzufolge Cassius „ganz gegen seine Natur sogar den Brutus an Milde übertroffen“ habe (… cum per omnia repugnans naturae suae Cassius etiam Bruti clementiam vinceret); Vell. Pat. 2.69.6.

112

Henning Börm

Mutter, sondern ausdrücklich aus formaljuristischen Gründen: Der Unfreie hatte gesprochen, ohne dazu aufgefordert worden zu sein.74 Folgt man Appians Darstellung, so scheint Brutus diese Chance, sich als milde zu inszenieren, geradezu demonstrativ ungenutzt gelassen zu haben.

SCHLUSSFOLGERUNGEN Als zentrales Dilemma der griechischen Poleis während der Jahre von 44 bis 39 erwies sich immer wieder die Unvorhersagbarkeit der Ereignisse. Man hatte auf griechischer Seite spätestens im Zuge der Mithridatischen Kriege fraglos gelernt, dass Rom stets siegreich war – doch nun kämpfte Rom gegen Rom. Für die Zeitgenossen war der Ausgang der römischen Bürgerkriege vollkommen offen; da aber gleichzeitig, wie wir gesehen haben, Neutralität keine Option war, war es fast schon eine Selbstverständlichkeit, dass sich die einzelnen Poleis unterschiedlich entschieden. Dabei spielten nicht nur Rivalitäten und Feindschaften zwischen den Gemeinden eine Rolle, sondern auch interne Streitigkeiten. Das Drama bestand nun darin, dass es, wie erwähnt, zu einem wiederholten Umschwung kam. Cassius und Brutus bestraften jene, die sich Dolabella angeschlossen hatten, vor Antonius flohen sodann jene, die auf die Caesarmörder gesetzt hatten, woraufhin Labienus seinerseits Rache an denen nahm, die es mit den Triumvirn gehalten hatten. Und schließlich mussten, wie die Stephanos-Inschrift aus Aphrodisias lehrt, unter Octavian jene, die mit Labienus kollaboriert hatten, den Preis für ihre Entscheidung zahlen. Unter diesen wechselvollen Bedingungen konnte es nur Verlierer geben; denn selbst wer am Ende auf der Seite der schließlichen Sieger stand, hatte im Zuge der wiederholten Umschwünge zwischenzeitlich auch zu den Verlierern gehört. Über jene, die Brutus im Jahr 43 als „Sonne Asiens“ gepriesen hatten, konnte Horaz im Nachhinein leicht spotten75 – aber sie hatten ganz einfach auf das falsche Pferd gesetzt. Die Gemeinden des späthellenistischen Ostens waren streng genommen keine Teilnehmer an den Bürgerkriegen nach den Iden des März, da sie ja kein römisches Bürgerrecht besaßen. „Staatsrechtlich“ gesehen waren zumindest jene Poleis, die formal keiner Provinz zugehörig waren, ihre jeweils eigene Partei. Dennoch wurden sie faktisch zwingend in den innerrömischen Konflikt verwickelt, ob sie es wollten oder nicht; denn wie Appians Bericht über Rhodos deutlich macht, beanspruchten beide römischen Bürgerkriegsparteien, rechtmäßige Vertreter Roms zu sein und daher Vertragsleistungen und fides einfordern zu können; stellte sich eine Polis daher aus Sicht des jeweiligen Heerführers auf die falsche Seite, so kam dies einem Bruch der entsprechenden foedera mit Rom gleich und verlangte nach Bestrafung. 74 75

App. civ. 4.81. Laudat Brutum laudatque cohortem, solem Asiae Brutum appellat stellasque salubris appellat comites; Hor. sat. 1.7.23–25. Horaz bezieht sich hier konkret auf Römer, die allerdings vor einem griechischen Publikum sprachen. Vgl. DELLA CORTE 1981.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

113

Ganz ähnlich hatte um 85 v. Chr. bereits Sulla im griechischen Osten agiert, der jedoch weniger seinen recht schwachen römischen Konkurrenten Fimbria,76 dem allerdings Illion zum Opfer fiel,77 als vielmehr Mithridates VI. als Hauptfeind markiert hatte.78 Dennoch fallen die Parallelen zwischen dem sullanischen Griechenlandfeldzug und den Ereignissen nach 44 ins Auge. Auch damals scheint es in einer Reihe von Städten zu Staseis gekommen zu sein,79 und jene Poleis, die sich nicht auf die Seite des schließlichen Siegers gestellt hatten, wurden am Ende schwer bestraft.80 Dass es de facto Sulla war, der zu dieser Zeit für Rom sprach, dürfte den meisten Griechen damals aber recht bald klar gewesen sein.81 Nach den Iden des März war die Situation hingegen unübersichtlicher, und dies zudem über einen längeren Zeitraum und in einem größeren Gebiet; denn selbst jene, die Rom die Treue halten wollten (und mussten), konnten wie gesagt nicht sicher sein, wer eigentlich für Rom stand. Spätestens immer dann, wenn sich römische Truppen näherten, musste aber eine Entscheidung getroffen werden. Dass sich Poleis unterschiedlich positionierten, war unter diesen Umständen unausweichlich, und auch Meinungsverschiedenheiten innerhalb der Gemeinden waren zumindest erwartbar. Bemerkenswert ist allerdings, dass diese des öfteren eskalierten, was meines Erachtens ein Hinweis auf bereits vorher existierende Konflikte ist. Die römischen Bürgerkriege stellten somit zwar den Anlass oder Vorwand dar, damit es in den hellenistischen Städten zur Eskalation interner Gewalt kommen konnte, nicht aber die eigentliche Ursache. Schon allein der Umstand, dass es zwar in vielen, keineswegs aber in allen betroffenen griechischen Gemeinwesen zu Staseis kam, verbietet es, hier einen Automatismus anzunehmen: Die römischen Bürgerkriege nach Caesars Ermordung boten mithin Rah-

76

77 78 79

80

81

Da Fimbria kurz zuvor den eigentlich vom Senat zum Feldherrn bestellten Konsul L. Valerius Flaccus getötet und dann dessen Kommando einfach okkupiert zu haben scheint, war seine Stellung zudem keineswegs über allen Zweifel erhaben; App. Mithr. 8.52. App. Mithr. 8.53; Oros. 6.2.11. Vgl. zu Mithridates und Rom den Überblick bei STROBEL 1996 (mit umfassender Bibliographie). App. Mithr. 9.61. So soll Mithridates Chios wegen der dortigen Romfreunde (διὰ τοὺς ῥωμαΐζοντας) misstraut und bestraft haben; App. Mithr. 7.46f. Folgt man Pompeius Trogus bzw. Justin, so scheint es nach (?) dem Krieg in Antiocheia am Orontes zu einer Stasis gekommen zu sein, bei der sich die Gruppen jeweils Mithridates VI. oder Ptolemaios IX. angeschlossen hätten, bis man sich schließlich auf Tigranes von Armenien geeinigt habe; Iust. 40.1.2. Da die Chronologie des Berichtes aber voller Fehler ist und der Text überdies behauptet, Mithridates sei damals in einen Krieg mit Rom verwickelt gewesen (inplicitus esset), ist es denkbar, dass die Ereignisse bereits früher anzusetzen sind. In zahlreichen Poleis begann mit Sulla eine neue Ärenrechnung, was das Ausmaß der Zäsur illustriert. Den Gemeinden der Provinz Asia wurde die gewaltige Summe von 20.000 Talenten als Strafe auferlegt; vgl. zuletzt FÜNDLING 2010: 95–97. Sulla bestrafte denn auch vor allem jene hart, die auf den Sieg des pontischen Königs gehofft zu haben schienen; Plut. Sulla 25. Allgemein zu Sullas Politik in den Provinzen vgl. SANTANGELO 2007.

114

Henning Börm

menbedingungen, die den Ausbruch interner Gewalt im griechischen Osten begünstigten, aber nicht strukturell hervorriefen.82 Die Frage, wer zumal in den späthellenistischen Poleis die Macht in Händen hielt, wird seit langer Zeit intensiv diskutiert und soll an dieser Stelle nicht erneut aufgeworfen werden. Dominierte in der älteren Forschung die Position, bereits in der Folge der Schlacht von Chaironeia 338, spätestens aber mit der Etablierung der Diadochenreiche sei die große Zeit der Polis und mit ihr der Demokratie an ihr Ende gelangt,83 so wird inzwischen oft erst die Etablierung der römischen Hegemonie im 2. Jahrhundert als entscheidende Zäsur gewertet.84 Doch ob wir es in der Regel mit einem mehr oder weniger oligarchischen „Honoratiorenregiment“85 zu tun haben oder mit Systemen, die die omnipräsente Bezeichnung δημοκρατία tatsächlich verdienten,86 ist nicht zuletzt eine Definitionsfrage.87 Es liegt zumindest der Verdacht nahe, dass der Terminus nun im Grunde oft nicht viel mehr bedeutete als „legitime Ordnung“, weitgehend unabhängig von den jeweiligen realen Machtverhältnissen.88 Daran jedenfalls, dass es zumindest im 1. Jahrhundert 82

83

84

85

86

87

88

Vgl. allgemein zur Vorstellung von Stasis als „stationärer Revolution“, die geeigneter außenpolitischer Rahmenbedingungen bedürfe, um zum Ausbruch gelangen zu können, bereits HEUSS 1973: 19. Vgl. BILLOWS 2003: 196 und STROOTMAN 2011: 141f. Diese Sicht ist bereits in der Antike zu greifen: τὸ γὰρ ἀτύχημα τὸ ἐν Χαιρωνείᾳ ἅπασι τοῖς Ἕλλησιν ἦρξε κακοῦ καὶ οὐχ ἥκιστα δούλους ἐποίησε τοὺς ὑπεριδόντας καὶ ὅσοι μετὰ Μακεδόνων ἐτάχθησαν; Paus. 1.25.3. – „Denn die Niederlage von Chaironeia war [nicht nur für die Besiegten, sondern] für alle Hellenen der Anfang allen Übels und machte jene, die unbeteiligt gewesen waren, in nicht geringerem Maße als auch die, die es mit den Makedonen gehalten hatten, zu Sklaven“. Ein früher Vertreter dieser Position ist GAUTHIER 1985, für den der späte Hellenismus den Übergang vom demokratischen Bürgerstaat zur Provinzstadt markierte; in dieser Tradition stehen auch die Beiträge in FRÖHLICH/MÜLLER 2005. Die Vitalität vieler hellenistischen Poleis betont GRUEN 1993; vgl. auch GEHRKE 2003 und jüngst BIELFELDT 2012 (aus archäologischer Perspektive). Vgl. QUASS 1979; QUASS 1993; MÜLLER 1995 (z.T. contra QUASS); HAMON 2005; DMITRIEV 2005: 140–188 sowie insbesondere die knappen, erhellenden Überlegungen bei HABICHT 1995 und die Kritik bei MANN 2012. SCHOLZ 2008: 71 spricht von der „informelle[n] Herrschaft der ‚Wenigen‘ bzw. von demokratischen Oligarchen“ (97) und betont dabei insbesondere die Rolle des Gymnasions (94–97). Auch GEHRKE 2008: 70f. spricht von einer „Aristokratisierung“ der hellenistischen Poleis. Vgl. GEHRKE 2008: 194. Vgl. dazu ausführlich zuletzt GRIEB 2008, der ähnlich wie Gauthier die Mitte des 2. Jahrhunderts als Zäsur sieht (vgl. aber die Kritik an seinem „simplen Modell“ bei WIEMER 2010), CARLSSON 2010 (bes. 334–343), die Beiträge in MANN/SCHOLZ 2012 und die konzise Zusammenfassung WIEMER 2013. Ob man in diesem Zusammenhang die Gültigkeit von MICHELS’ „ehernem Gesetz der Oligarchie“ (MICHELS 1911) postulieren kann, demzufolge sich „auch in Staatswesen, in denen sie staatsrechtlich und prinzipiell ganz ausgeschlossen erscheint, automatisch eine Aristokratie“ einführt, ist eine Frage, die an dieser Stelle nicht diskutiert werden soll. Dies gilt auch für die etwaige Anwendbarkeit anderer soziologischen Theorien zur Machtbildung, z.B. POPITZ 1976: 3–17. „There is a tendency to see demokratia as a constitution that a polis must have“ (HANSEN 2006: 112). Trifft diese Beobachtung zu, so ist zu vermuten, dass δημοκρατία in den Quellen oftmals eher normativ als deskriptiv verwendet wird. Bemerkenswert ist in diesem Zusam-

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

115

v. Chr. lokale Eliten gab,89 die vielerorts eine dominierende Rolle spielten, besteht kaum ein Zweifel,90 auch wenn unklar ist, wie weit der Prozess, der schließlich zur Entstehung eines erblichen Standes von Bouleuten führen sollte, der spätestens für die Hohe Kaiserzeit allerorten nachweisbar ist, damals bereits fortgeschritten war,91 ab wann also eine zunächst wohl bloß informelle Dominanz institutionell festgeschrieben wurde. Dass ein wachsendes sozioökonomisches Ungleichgewicht vorlag, das nicht nur innerhalb, sondern auch unterhalb der Eliten Unruhepotential entstehen ließ, ist nicht auszuschließen und sogar wahrscheinlich.92 Es wäre daher unzulässig, diesen Aspekt auszublenden.93 Dennoch ist es wohl irreführend, soziale Spannungen zwischen „Arm“ und „Reich“ als die hauptsächliche Triebfeder der Konflikte zu begreifen, wie dies insbesondere die ältere Forschung bisweilen getan hat, indem man die Interpretationen, die die antiken Quellen vorgeben, oft recht unkritisch übernahm.94 Konflikte innerhalb der Eliten scheinen in

89

90 91

92

93

94

menhang das „Tyrannen-Gesetz“ aus Ilion (OGIS 218), in dem unter anderem davon ausgegangen wird, dass es möglich sei, scheinbar demokratische Prozesse zu manipulieren (§ 11). „Elite“ und „Aristokratie“ sind natürlich unscharfe und problematische Begriffe, ungeachtet der Existenz zeitgenössischer Termini wie εὐγενεῖς oder χρηστοί. Eindeutige Zugehörigkeitskriterien fehlen, und bei Definitionsversuchen hat man sich auf ein Konglomerat von Merkmalen zu beziehen, von denen keines unverzichtbar oder hinreichend ist. Im Anschluss an Chris WICKHAM (WICKHAM 2005: 154) zähle ich hierzu grundsätzlich vor allem die folgenden Elemente: Abstammung, eine Position in einer offiziellen – politischen oder religiösen – Hierarchie, Grundbesitz, Nähe zum Herrscher, die Anerkennung durch die peers sowie ein entsprechender Lebensstil. Gerade im Hellenismus wuchs dabei die Bedeutung der παιδεία (etwa im Kontext der Ephebie), zu der nun vielerorts auch die Philosophie als Distinktionsmerkmal gezählt wurde; vgl. HAAKE 2008: 271–285. Vgl. zuletzt SAVALLI-LESTRADE 2003; SCHOLZ 2008; SCHULZ 2011; DREYER/WEBER 2011. Vgl. dazu eingehend MÜLLER 1995. Laut Pausanias (7.16.9) beseitigte bereits Mummius 146 v. Chr. in vielen Poleis die Demokratie und führte offene Oligarchien ein. Bislang eine reine Vermutung wäre, dass sich ein formal erblicher ordo decurionum in Hellas erst flächendeckend etablierte, als in Rom mit Beginn der Kaiserzeit die Zugehörigkeit zum ordo senatorius vererbbar geworden war. Interessant ist in diesem Zusammenhang die Hypothese von Ferrary 2005, demzufolge die civitas Romana erst seit 42 v. Chr. mit der Zugehörigkeit zu einer Polis vereinbar gewesen und damit als Statussymbol verfügbar geworden sei. Vgl. etwa die Bemerkungen zu den sozialen Implikationen von Land- und Geldverleih in spätklassischer und hellenistischer Zeit bei OSBORNE 1988. Zu den ökonomischen Verhältnissen vgl. auch WALBANK 1992: 159–175 (u.a. mit Belegen für die Folgen einer expandierenden Geldwirtschaft) und SCHULER 2007. Einen radikalen Versuch, sozioökonomische Ursachen für Staseis auszuschließen, stellt PASSERINI 1930 dar; sein Ansatz, wenngleich einflussreich, ist methodisch aber ausgesprochen problematisch. Ein gutes Beispiel hierfür ist BRISCOE 1967 sowie (allgemeiner) DE STE. CROIX 1981. Die Annahme, es habe in den Poleis in der Tat einen „class struggle“ zwischen „Arm“ und „Reich“ gegeben, wird aber auch noch in der jüngeren Forschung (vgl. WALSH 2000) vertreten: „There is no doubting the high degree of self-conscious solidarity between the two great antagonistic groups of the ‚rich‘ and the ‚poor‘ (otherwise known as ‚the few‘ and ‚the many‘, and a host of other binary terms). Since the root of their antagonism lay in differential ownership of the means of production, and the aim of the struggle was often the control of the organs of government, this looks very much like political class struggle“ (CARTLEDGE 2012: 323). Eine sehr skeptische Haltung gegenüber der von den Quellen vorgegebenen Interpreta-

116

Henning Börm

aller Regel notwendige Voraussetzung für eine Stasis gewesen zu sein; noch Plutarch warnte, dass private Fehden nur allzu leicht die ganze Polis ins Verderben reißen könnten.95 Eher bildeten die ökonomisch benachteiligten Schichten daher mutmaßlich jenes Reservoir, in dem Mitglieder der Eliten gegebenenfalls um Anhänger im Kampf gegen ihre Rivalen werben konnten,96 indem sie an entsprechende Reflexe appellierten – vielleicht gar nicht so unähnlich jenen römischen nobiles, die sich ungefähr zur selben Zeit der popularen Methode bedienten. Dieser Punkt bedarf allerdings einer eingehenderen Untersuchung, die an dieser Stelle nicht zu leisten ist.97 Gerade die Ereignisse nach 44 v. Chr. illustrieren meines Erachtens zweierlei: Zum einen wird deutlich, dass die Römer in den vorangegangenen Jahrzehnten als Ordnungsmacht aufgetreten waren und interne Gewaltausbrüche in den griechischen Gemeinwesen in der Regel verhindert hatten. Denn wer sich gegen die Freunde Roms stellte, stellte sich gegen die Römer, und Sullas Feldzug hatte ebenso wie auch die folgenden Kämpfe mit Mithridates noch einmal verdeutlicht, was Feinden Roms blühte. Zum anderen aber zeigt der Ausbruch von Staseis an zahlreichen Orten in eben jenem Moment, als sich ein äußerer Anlass bot, dass es offensichtlich in vielen Poleis eine erhebliche Zahl von Menschen gab, deren Integration zu diesem Zeitpunkt derart schlecht gelungen war, dass sie bereit waren, zu Gewalt und Verrat zu greifen. Das damit verbundene Risiko war enorm hoch. Selbst im Falle eines Erfolges machte man sich angreifbar, und die so errungene eigene Stellung musste notwendig prekär und fragwürdig bleiben.98

95 96

97

98

tion nahm (im Zusammenhang des Perseuskrieges) dagegen bereits GRUEN 1976 ein. Die entscheidende Quellenpassage hierzu ist Liv. 42.30.1–7. Vgl. auch die m.E. nicht überzeugende Kritik an GRUEN bei DE STE. CROIX 1981: 659. Plut. Mor. 823e–825f. Diese Position ist natürlich keineswegs neu. Dafür, weder sozioökonomische Spannungen und „Klassenkämpfe“ noch primär oder gar „ausschließlich“ außenpolitische Faktoren (wie RUSCHENBUSCH 1978: 32, für die Zeit zwischen 454 und 346) als die eigentliche Wurzel von Staseis zu begreifen, sondern Machtkämpfe innerhalb der Oberschichten, hat vor allem GEHRKE 1985 plädiert; zu einem ähnlichen Ergebnis kommt auch WINTERLING 1991. Vgl. auch FIGUEIRA 1991. In der Soziologie ist das Modell einer „Zirkulation von Eliten“, die sich im Rahmen ihrer Rivalität der Unterstützung der „gemeinen Bevölkerung“ zu versichern suchen, bereits 1916 von Vilfredo PARETO entwickelt worden; vgl. PARETO 1962: 148–155. (PARETOS Arbeit ist allerdings vielfach durchaus polemisch.) Kritik am „elitären Stasismodell“ übt hingegen EICH 2006: 522–540. Fraglos ist richtig, dass zum Beispiel im Zusammenhang mit der Rückkehr von Verbannten ökonomische Aspekte von zentraler Bedeutung waren (vgl. Plut. Arat. 12.1; SEG 36.752). Hinzu kommt, dass auch Schlagworte wie χρεῶν ἀποκοπή nicht zwingend auf Konflikte zwischen „Reichen“ und „Besitzlosen“ hinweisen müssen – Verschuldung konnte gerade zwischen Angehörigen der Oberschicht leicht zu Konflikten führen, da sie eine Hierarchie implizierte, die für den Schuldner tendenziell inakzeptabel war. Die grundsätzliche „Labilität“ der Stellung der griechischen Eliten betont auch SCHOLZ 2008: 72. Allgemeine und sehr erhellende, allerdings nicht auf die Antike oder Hellas bezogene Beobachtungen zur Legitimierung von innerer Gewalt bieten VEIT/SCHLICHTE 2011.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

117

Offenbar gab es in vielen späthellenistischen Poleis (ebenso wie in früheren Zeiten) keine unumstößliche, unhinterfragbare Quelle von Legitimität.99 Der Vorwurf, man habe eine Oligarchie oder gar Tyrannis errichtet,100 war in einem diskursiven Umfeld, das nur noch „Demokratie“ als legitim ansah, stets abrufbar, und offenkundig gelang es vielerorts zumindest nicht immer, dieses strukturelle Defizit durch den demonstrativen Rekurs auf das meritokratische Prinzip – dessen fraglos berühmtester Ausdruck der Euergetismus war101 – auszugleichen. Auch die bereits im frühen Hellenismus typische Einrichtung von Kulten für die Eintracht (ὁμόνοια)102 oder die Eide auf die bestehende Ordnung, die man die Bürgerschaften schwören ließ,103 waren ihrerseits eher ein Symptom und konnten offenkundig ebenfalls vielfach keine dauerhafte Stabilität, keine für alle plausible Herrschaft und wohl auch keine akzeptable Binnenhierachie innerhalb der Elite hervorbringen. Nicht selten versuchte man, dieses Defizit durch die Herbeirufung fremder Richter aus anderen Poleis auszugleichen;104 doch auch dies scheint nicht immer

99

100

101

102

103

104

Legitimität ist hier im Sinne der Herrschaftssoziologie im Anschluss an Max WEBER zu verstehen; vgl. WEBER 1976: III 1.1. Vgl. auch HILLMANN 2007: 492. Vgl. zu „Macht“ und „Herrschaft“ im antiken Griechenland auch GOTTER 2008. Vgl. zuletzt TEEGARDEN 2014. Wiewohl in mehreren Einzelpunkten durchaus erhellend, leidet die Studie unter der Grundannahme, „Tyrannis“, „Oligarchie“ und „Demokratie“ seien im Hellenismus Tatsachenbeschreibungen (statt Kampfbegriffe) gewesen. Vgl. zum griechischen Tyrannendiskurs zuletzt LURAGHI 2015. Vgl. nur GEHRKE 2008: 193 (mit der wichtigsten Literatur), DOMINGO GYGAX 2009 sowie VAN DER VLIET 2011. Speziell zur Finanzierung von Bauten durch Privatpersonen vgl. MEIER 2012 (besonders Kapitel 6.1). Z.B. SEG 40.412. Vgl. THÉRIAULT 1996; HANSEN 2006: 126. Gegen die Ansicht von VINOGRADOV/SCEGLOV 1997, der Rekurs auf die ὁμόνοια sei stets ein sicherer Hinweis auf die Beendigung einer Stasis, wendet sich DÖSSEL 2003: 187, die annimmt, es sei vielmehr um die „Herstellung der Einigkeit innerhalb der sich gegenüber stehenden Gruppen“ gegangen. Ein bekanntes Beispiel ist der Eid der Bürger von Itanos auf Kreta aus dem 3. Jahrhundert v. Chr., dessen genauer Kontext (vgl. CHANIOTIS 1996: 14) allerdings unklar ist; Syll.3 526 = I.Cret III iv 8. Ebenfalls von Kreta stammt der wohl auf die Jahre um 200 v. Chr. zu datierende berühmte Eid der Jungmannschaften von Dreros, in dem die ἀγελάοι schwören, sich nicht mit verfeindeten Nachbarn zu verbünden und insbesondere keine Stasis zu beginnen: „noch will ich eine Stasis beginnen, und jenem, der eine Stasis beginnt, werde ich entgegentreten, und ich werde keine Verschwörung betreiben, weder in der Polis noch außerhalb, und ich werde auch keiner beitreten“ (μηδὲ στάσιος ἀρξεῖν, καὶ τῶι στασίζοντι ἀντίος τέλομαι, μηδὲ συνωοσίας συναξεῖν μήτε ἐμ πόλει μήτε ἐξοῖ τᾶς πόλεως, μήτε ἄλλωι συντέλεσθαι); Syll.3 527 = I.Cret I ix 1, Z. 60–70. Doch handelt es sich keineswegs um ein auf Kreta beschränktes Phänomen, wie etwa der Eid der Chersoniten (um 300 v. Chr.) demonstriert; Syll.3 360. Und auch der Bürgereid, der gegen 200 v. Chr. in Kos aus Anlass der Eingemeindung von Kalymna geleistet wurde, gehört in diese Reihe; StV III 545 (vgl. dazu auch DÖSSEL 2003: 249–272). Vgl. ferner OGIS 229 = StV III 492 (Smyrna). Stellvertretend für viele sei hier der Fall von Samos genannt, wo man im 3. Jahrhundert v. Chr. auf einen Volksbeschluss hin den Richtern dankte, die auf Vermittlung des Königs Philokles aus Myndos, Milet und Halikarnassos gesandt worden waren, um auf Samos die ὁμόνοια wiederherzustellen; SEG 1.363. Wohl in das 2. Jahrhundert v. Chr. gehört der Fall des Glaukon, der als Xenokrites eine Stasis in Phalanna beilegte; IG IX 2.1230. Vgl. daneben CROWTHER 1993.

118

Henning Börm

alle Beteiligten befriedigt zu haben. In diesem Fall war die Gewaltbereitschaft105 jener, die sich um die ihnen zustehende Stellung in der Gemeinschaft betrogen fühlten,106 potentiell enorm, und sie waren bereit, jedes Mittel zu nutzen, um sich der tatsächlichen oder eingebildeten Dominanz ihrer Gegner zu entledigen.107 Dass sie daher oft nicht zögerten, sich auch mit Feinden ihrer Polis zu verbünden und gegebenenfalls die außenpolitische Freiheit108 einzutauschen gegen die innere Herrschaft der eigenen Gruppe,109 ist (insbesondere für die klassische und archaische Zeit) natürlich längst beobachtet worden.110 Nun, im Spannungsfeld des römischen bellum civile, bot sich in den betroffenen Poleis nach einer längeren Ruhephase ein äußerer Anlass zur Eskalation der internen Konflikte. Man darf getrost annehmen, dass in Friedenszeiten Rom oft derlei Streitigkeiten entschieden und Gewaltausbrüche verhindert hatte. Seit Jahrzehnten hatte die Oberschicht der griechischen Städte mit Rom kooperiert.111 Da nun aber nicht klar war, wer eigentlich für Rom sprach und – vor allem – wer zuletzt obsiegen würde, konnten sich lokale Spannungen entladen. Leider ermöglicht es die Quellenlage nicht,112 viel mehr zu konstatieren als eben den Umstand, dass es während des römischen Bürgerkrieges an diversen Orten zu Staseis kam und teilweise sogar, wenn man Appians Wortwahl übernehmen will, zur zeitwei105 Zur Rolle von Gewalt für die Selbstbestimmung der hellenistischen Eliten und zum entsprechenden Diskurs, allerdings mit einem Fokus auf äußere Konflikte, vgl. die Zusammenfassung CHANIOTIS 2005: 18–43. 106 Mit PARETO könnte man hier vielleicht von einer „gestörten Elitenzirkulation“ sprechen. Zur Bedeutung des Agonalen für die griechischen Eliten vgl. allgemein etwa FLAIG 2010. 107 ἅπαντες γὰρ ἡγεμονικοὶ καὶ φιλελεύθεροι ταῖς φύσεσι μάχονται συνεχῶς πρὸς ἀλλήλους, ἀπαραχωρήτως διακείμενοι περὶ τῶν πρωτείων; Pol. 5.106.5. – „Alle nämlich, die von Natur aus eine Anlage zum Herrschen haben und freiheitsliebend sind, kämpfen ständig gegeneinander, da sie keinem anderen gegenüber von der ersten Stelle zu weichen bereit sind“. Vgl. zur Frage, wieso diese Konflikte so oft dazu führten, dass der politische Gegner physisch vernichtet wurde, auch die Überlegungen bei FINLEY 1986: 152f. 108 Allgemein zur Rolle des Freiheitsslogans für die Griechen vgl. nun umfassend DMITRIEV 2011 (besonders Part III) mit den kritischen Bemerkungen bei ERRINGTON 2012. 109 Polybios nahm an, es fänden sich fast immer Verräter in einer belagerten Stadt (Pol. 18.15.14). Bereits an der Wende von der Klassik zum Hellenismus hatte Aeneas Tacticus (vgl. WHITEHEAD 2002) bezeichnenderweise vor Staseis und damit zusammenhängendem Verrat im Falle einer Belagerung gewarnt; vgl. URBAN 1986 und WINTERLING 1991. WINTERLING betont völlig zu Recht, dass Aeneas nicht von einer „ökonomisch bedingten Spaltung der Gesellschaft“ (217) als Ursache von Staseis ausgeht, sondern eher von Machtkämpfen innerhalb der Elite, gekoppelt mit dem Streben bestimmter Bevölkerungsteile nach ökonomischen Vorteilen (222). Damit ergibt sich bereits für die zweite Hälfte des 4. Jahrhunderts ein Bild, das mir grundsätzlich auch noch auf den späten Hellenismus anwendbar zu sein scheint. 110 Vgl. GEHRKE 1985: 359: „Die Griechen ließen sich relativ leicht beherrschen, paradoxerweise nicht, weil sie zur Servilität geboren waren, sondern im Gegenteil, weil sie nichts mehr perhorreszierten als Herrschaft, die Herrschaft ihres inneren Gegners“. Vgl. auch Pol. 18.15.2f. 111 Vgl. nur Pol. 24.10.3f. 112 Vielfach ist übrigens eine sonderbare Scheu der antiken Autoren zu beobachten, Schilderungen von Staseis zu liefern; bemerkenswert ist dabei die Aussage des Aelius Aristides, Stasis lege wie kaum etwas anderes Schweigen nahe; Ael. Arist. or. 24.41. Vgl. dazu BURASELIS 1998.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

119

ligen Etablierung von Tyrannenherrschaften; man darf letzteres wohl immerhin so verstehen, dass in den fraglichen Gemeinden ephemere Herrschaften etabliert wurden, die im Rückblick als illegitim galten. Wie man gesehen hat, verriet ein Teil der Rhodier die eigene Stadt und öffnete Cassius die Tore, und desgleichen kooperierten – den Ausdruck „Kollaboration“ halte ich hier für problematisch – später offensichtlich mehrere Bürger von Aphrodisias mit Labienus. Die Einzelheiten und konkreten Ursachen entziehen sich hingegen unserer Kenntnis, zumal es, wie gesagt, den Anschein hat, dass selbst dort, wo die Quellen den Konfliktparteien traditionelle Etiketts wie „Oligarchen“ und „Demokraten“ oder „Aristokraten“ und „Volk“ beilegen, Zweifel an der Richtigkeit dieser Zuordnung geraten sind.113 Fest steht aber, dass es am Ende zahllose offene Rechnungen gab, und zwar nicht nur zwischen den Caesarianern und jenen, die die letztlichen Verlierer unterstützt hatten, sondern vor allem innerhalb der Poleis selbst. Gewalt gegen Mitbürger stellt stets einen extremen Tabubruch dar; genau deshalb ist es ein Merkmal gewaltsamer interner Konflikte,114 dass häufig besonders schonungslos mit den Unterlegenen verfahren wird – sei es, dass man sie für Gewalt und Verrat bestrafen will, sei es, dass man sie dafür verantwortlich macht, selbst dazu „gezwungen“ gewesen zu sein, die entsprechenden Tabus zu brechen: Die Bestrafung der Gegner demonstriert ihre Schuld und erweist die Legitimität des eigenen Handelns.115 Die Triumvirn jedenfalls belohnten nach Philippi nicht nur Aphrodisias, sondern auch andere Poleis, die sich gegen Brutus und Cassius gestellt hatten, darunter, wie gesagt, Xanthos, Rhodos, Laodikeia und Tarsos.116 Aber vor allem präsentierte sich Antonius nach dem Sieg ganz anders, als es Cassius auf Rhodos getan hatte.117 Dieser war als indignierter proconsul der res publica aufgetreten, der abfällige Bündner zu bestrafen hatte. Er wollte damit vor allem zeigen, dass er sich selbst im Recht und seine Widersacher im Unrecht sah. Nun aber demonstrierte Antonius, zumal – dieser Umstand ist zweifellos sehr bedeutsam, erklärt aber nicht alles – der Sieg jetzt ja gesichert schien, seine Milde, also seine φιλανθρωπία bzw. clementia.118 Auch die Caesarmörder hätten meines Erachtens durchaus auch während der bedrohlichen Situation der Jahre 43 und 42 darauf setzen können, nicht durch Unerbittlichkeit und das Beharren auf Rechtspositionen, sondern durch die Demonstration von Milde um die Unterstützung der Griechen zu wer113 Auch unterschiedliche Patronagebeziehungen zwischen Griechen und Römern sind ein möglicher Faktor, der im Kontext der bella civilia zu Spaltungen innerhalb einer Polis geführt haben könnte. 114 Vgl. auch KALYVAS 2006 und die allgemeinen Bemerkungen zum Phänomen des Bürgerkrieges bei FERHADBEGOVIĆ/WEIFFEN 2011. 115 Vgl. VEIT/SCHLICHTE 2011: 160–162. 116 App. civ. 5.7. 117 Grundlegend zur Ostpolitik des Antonius ist noch immer BUCHHEIM 1960. Vgl. für die neuere Literatur HALFMANN 2011: 104–129, und HARDERS 2015: 184–187. 118 App. civ. 5.5. Appian berichtet weiter, Antonius habe, nachdem die Griechen ihn als Euergeten angefleht hätten, die zunächst geforderte Last verringert; App. civ. 5.6. Vgl. zur clementia Caesaris GRIFFIN 2003. Mir scheint es wahrscheinlicher, dass die Caesarianer die φιλανθρωπία eines hellenistischen Monarchen nachahmten.

120

Henning Börm

ben. Sie entschieden sich aber, wie dargelegt, gegen diese Option. Antonius hingegen amnestierte nicht nur die meisten Römer, die ihn um Gnade baten, sondern verzichtete demonstrativ auch gegenüber den Poleis der Provinz Asia auf eine Bestrafung.119 Er wählte demnach zur Bewältigung des Bürgerkrieges nicht den Weg der Rache und Kriminalisierung, sondern vielmehr jenen der Reintegration und Verzeihung, während er zugleich wohl bereits damit begann, seiner Selbstdarstellung als wohltätiger „neuer Dionysos“ Kontur zu geben.120 Ökonomisch war dies eine weitgehend leere Geste, forderte der Triumvir doch, wie bereits erwähnt, im selben Atemzug erneut enorme Summen von den Gemeinden, wenn auch nicht als Strafe für ihre Missetaten, wie es hieß,121 sondern nur als Belohnung für die siegreichen Legionäre – was in der Sache natürlich zunächst nicht den geringsten Unterschied machte. Doch der verzeihende Gestus war dennoch sehr bedeutsam: Der Milde demonstrierende Antonius stellte sich über das Gesetz, er okkupierte ein Recht auf Amnestie und Verzeihung und trat damit in die Fußstapfen Caesars. So ist es wohl kein Zufall, dass Octavian, wie sein Brief an die Ephesier belegt, ebenfalls darauf verzichtete, diese Polis für ihr Verhalten während des Labienuskrieges zu bestrafen. Und auch die Frage der Behandlung jener Aphrodisier, die Labienus unterstützt hatten, überließ man ausdrücklich ihren eigenen Mitbürgern, statt sich selbst die Hände schmutzig zu machen, wie es Cassius getan hatte. Kurzum: In der Sache bekamen zwar auch die Caesarianer alles, was sie wollten; doch die Art ihres Auftretens war weitaus konzilianter und wies damit einen Weg in die Zukunft. Fest steht, dass die wechselhaften Kämpfe jener Jahre, die vielerorts für Verwüstung sorgten und teils kaum einen Stein auf dem anderen ließen, nicht nur in der römischen Gesellschaft, sondern auch im griechischen Osten tiefe Wunden hinterlassen haben. Indem die Caesarianer – nach Antonius eben auch Octavian – anders als die Caesarmörder einen Weg der Bewältigung wählten, der versuchte, langfristig eine Reintegration und die Unterbindung erneuter Eskalationen innerund interstädtischer Gewalt zu gewährleisten, stellten sie die schwer erschütterte römische Herrschaft im Osten letztlich auf eine neue Grundlage: die der Monarchie.

119 τῆς δὲ δικαίας τύχης οὐχ, ὡς ἐβούλεσθε, ἀλλ᾽, ὡς ἦν ἄξιον, κρινάσης τὸν πόλεμον, εἰ μὲν ὡς συναγωνισταῖς τῶν πολεμίων ἔδει χρῆσθαι, κολάσεως ὑμῖν ἔδει, ἐπεὶ δὲ ἑκόντες πιστεύομεν ὑμᾶς κατὰ ἀνάγκην τάδε πεποιηκέναι, τῶν μὲν μειζόνων ἀφίεμεν, χρημάτων δὲ ἡμῖν δεῖ καὶ γῆς καὶ πόλεων ἐς τὰ νικητήρια τοῦ στρατοῦ …. συνεῖσι δὲ τῆς χάριτος ὑμῖν τοσοῦτον ἂν ἐπείποιμι, ὅτι μηδενὸς ἁμαρτήματος ἴσον ἐπιτίμιον ὁρίζεται; App. civ. 5.5. – „Nun hat die gerechte Tyche den Krieg nicht so entschieden, wie ihr es wünschtet, sondern so, wie es recht war, und wir haben euch eigentlich zu bestrafen, wenn wir euch als Verbündete unserer Feinde behandeln wollten. Doch da wir glauben möchten, dass ihr nur unter Zwang diesen Weg gegangen seid, sehen wir von harten Strafen ab. Allerdings brauchen wir Geld, Grund und Boden sowie Städte, um unsere Soldaten für den Sieg belohnen zu können …. Da ihr bereits ein Empfinden für unsere Milde habt, möchte ich nur hinzufügen, dass die auferlegte Strafe keinem einzigen eurer Vergehen angemessen ist“. 120 Vgl. HALFMANN 2011: 120–129. 121 App. civ. 5.5.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

121

LITERATUR AGER, S. – FABER, R. (Hrsg.), 2013. Belonging and Isolation in the Hellenistic World, Toronto. ALFÖLDY, G., 42011. Römische Sozialgeschichte, Stuttgart. BECK, H. (Hrsg.), 2012. A Companion to Ancient Greek Government, Malden. BERENT, M., 1998. Stasis, Or The Greek Invention of Politics. HPTh 19, 331–362. BERGER, S., 1992. Revolution and Society in Greek Sicily and Southern Italy, Stuttgart. BERNHARDT, R., 1985. Polis und römische Herrschaft in der späten Republik (149–31 v. Chr.), Berlin. BERNHARDT, R., 1998. Rom und die Städte des hellenistischen Ostens (3.–1. Jahrhundert v. Chr.), München. BIELFELDT, R., 2012. Polis Made Manifest: The Physiognomy of the Public in the Hellenistic City with a Case Study on the Agora in Priene, in: C. KUHN (Hrsg.), Politische Kommunikation und öffentliche Meinung in der antiken Welt, Stuttgart, 87–122. BILLOWS, R., 2003. Cities, in: A. ERSKINE (Hrsg.), A Companion to the Hellenistic World, Oxford, 196–215. BLOY, D., 2012. Roman Patrons of Greek Communities before the Title πάτρων. Historia 61, 168– 201. BÖRM, H. (in Vorbereitung). Mordende Mitbürger. Stasis in hellenistischen Poleis, Konstanz. BOTTERI, P., 1989. Stasis: Le mot grec, la chose romaine. Metis 4, 87–100. BRINGMANN, K., 2002. Rhodos als Bildungszentrum der hellenistischen Welt. Chiron 32, 65–81. BRISCOE, J., 1967. Rome and the Class Struggle in the Greek States 200–146 BC. P&P 36, 3–20. BUCHHEIM, H., 1960. Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn M. Antonius. Ihre Voraussetzungen, Entwicklung und Zusammenhang mit den politischen Ereignissen in Italien, Heidelberg. BURASELIS, K., 1998. Aelius Aristides als Panegyriker und Mahner, in: W. SCHULLER (Hrsg.), Politische Theorie und Praxis im Altertum, Darmstadt, 183–203. CANALI DE ROSSI, F., 2000. Tre epistoli di magistrati romani a città d’Asia. EA 32, 163–181. CARLSSON, S., 2010. Hellenistic Democracies. Freedom, Independence and Political Procedure in Some East Greek City-States, Stuttgart. CARTLEDGE, P., 2012. Class Struggle. OCD4, 322–323. CHANIOTIS, A., 1996. Die Verträge zwischen kretischen Poleis in der hellenistischen Zeit, Stuttgart. CHANIOTIS, A., 2005. War in the Hellenistic World, Malden. COŞKUN, A., 2005. Amicitiae und politische Ambitionen im Kontext der causa Deiotariana (45 v. Chr.), in: A. COŞKUN (Hrsg.), Roms auswärtige Freunde in der späten Republik und im frühen Prinzipat, Göttingen, 127–154. COŞKUN, A., 2011. Annäherungen an die lokalen Eliten der Galater in hellenistischer Zeit, in: B. DREYER – P. F. MITTAG (Hrsg.), Lokale Eliten und hellenistische Könige. Zwischen Kooperation und Konfrontation, Berlin, 80–103. CRAWFORD, M., 1978. Greek Intellectuals and the Roman Aristocracy in the First Century BC, in: P. GARNSEY (Hrsg.), Imperialism in the Ancient World, Cambridge, 193–207. CROWTHER, C. V., 1993. Foreign Judges in Seleucid Cities. JAC 8, 40–77. CURRAN, J., 2007. The Ambitions of Quintus Labienus ‚Parthicus‘. Antichthon 41, 33–53. DEININGER, J., 1966. Brutus und die Bithynier. Bemerkungen zu den sogenannten griechischen Briefen des Brutus. RhM 109, 356–372. DEININGER, J., 1971. Der politische Widerstand gegen Rom in Griechenland 217–86 v. Chr., Göttingen. DELLA CORTE, D., 1981. Bruto e Orazio in Asia Minore, in: L. GASPERINI (Hrsg.), Scritti sul mundo antico in memoria de Fulvio Grosso, Rom, 133–143. DMITRIEV, S., 2005. City Government in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, Oxford. DMITRIEV, S., 2011. The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece, Oxford. DOMINGO GYGAX, M., 2009. Proleptic Honours in Greek Euergetism. Chiron 39, 161–191.

122

Henning Börm

DÖSSEL, A., 2003. Die Beilegung innerstaatlicher Konflikte in den griechischen Poleis vom 5.–3. Jahrhundert v. Chr., Frankfurt am Main. DREYER, B. – WEBER, G., 2011. Lokale Eliten griechischer Städte und königliche Herrschaft, in: B. DREYER – P. F. MITTAG (Hrsg.), Lokale Eliten und hellenistische Könige. Zwischen Kooperation und Konfrontation, Berlin, 14–54. ECKSTEIN, A. M., 2008. Rome Enters the Greek East. From Anarchy to Hierarchy in the Hellenistic Mediterranean, Malden. EICH, A., 2006. Die politische Ökonomie des antiken Griechenland (6.–3. Jahrhundert v. Chr.), Köln. ERRINGTON, R. M., 1971. The Dawn of Empire: Rome’s Rise to World Power, London. ERRINGTON, R. M., 2008. A History of the Hellenistic World, Malden. ERRINGTON, R. M., 2012. Rezension zu DMITRIEV 2011. Sehepunkte 12/4 [15.04.2012]. FERHADBEGOVIĆ, S.– WEIFFEN, B., 2011. Zum Phänomen der Bürgerkriege, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (Hrsg.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 9–33. FERRARY, J.-L., 2001. Rome et les cités grecques d’Asie Mineure au IIe siècle, in: A. BRESSON – R. DESCAT (Hrsg.), Les cités d’Asie Mineure occidentale au IIe siècle a. C., Paris, 93–106. FERRARY, J.-L., 2005. Les Grecs des cités et l’obtention de la civitas Romana, in: P. FRÖHLICH – C. MÜLLER (Hrsg.), Citoyenneté et participation à la basse époque hellénistique, Genf, 51– 75. FIGUEIRA, T., 1991. A Typology of Social Conflict in Greek Poleis, in: A. MOLHO u.a. (Hrsg.), City States in Classical Antiquity and Medieval Italy, Stuttgart, 289–307. FINLEY, M. I., 1986. Das politische Leben in der antiken Welt, München. FISHER, N., 2000. Hybris, Revenge and Stasis in the Greek City-States, in: H. VAN WEES (Hrsg.), War and Violence in Ancient Greece, London, 83–123. FLAIG, E., 2000. Lucius Aemilius Paullus – militärischer Ruhm und familiäre Glücklosigkeit, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP – E. STEIN-HÖLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Von Romulus zu Augustus. Große Gestalten der römischen Republik, München, 131–146. FLAIG, E., 2010. Olympiaden und andere Spiele – „immer der Beste zu sein“, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP – E. STEIN-HÖLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Erinnerungsorte der Antike. Die griechische Welt, München, 353–369. FRÖHLICH, P. – MÜLLER, C. (Hrsg.), 2005. Citoyenneté et participation à la basse époque hellénistique, Genf. FÜNDLING, J., 2010. Sulla, Darmstadt. GABRIELSEN, V., 1997. The Naval Aristocracy of Hellenistic Rhodes, Aarhus. GAUTHIER, P., 1985. Les cités grecques et leurs bienfaiteurs (IVe–Ier siècle avant J.-C.), Paris. GEHRKE, H.-J., 1985. Stasis. Untersuchungen zu den inneren Kriegen in den griechischen Staaten des 5. und 4. Jh. v. Chr., München. GEHRKE, H.-J., 2003. Bürgerliches Selbstverständnis und Polisidentität im Hellenismus, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP u.a. (Hrsg.), Sinn (in) der Antike, Mainz, 225–254. GEHRKE, H.-J., 42008. Geschichte des Hellenismus, München. GELZER, M., 1918. M. Iunius Brutus (53). RE X/1, 973–1020. GIRARDET, K.-M., 1993. Die Rechtsstellung der Caesarattentäter Brutus und Cassius in den Jahren 44–42 v. Chr. Chiron 23, 207–232. GOTTER, U., 1996. Der Diktator ist tot! Politik in Rom zwischen den Iden des März und der Begründung des Zweiten Triumvirats, Stuttgart. GOTTER, U., 2008. Cultural Differences and Cross-Cultural Contact: Greek and Roman Concepts of Power. HSPh 104, 179–230. GOTTER, U., 2011. Abgeschlagene Hände und herausquellendes Gedärm. Das hässliche Antlitz der römischen Bürgerkriege und seine politischen Kontexte, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (Hrsg.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 55–70.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

123

GOUKOWSKY, P., 2011. Les lettres grecques de Brutus: documents authentiques ou forgerie?, in: N. BARRANDON – F. KIRBIHLER (Hrsg.), Les gouverneurs et les provinciaux sous la République Romaine, Rennes, 273–289. GRAY, B., 2015. Stasis and Stability: Exile, the Polis, and Political Thought, c. 404–146 BC, Oxford. GRIEB, V., 2008. Hellenistische Demokratie. Politische Organisation und Struktur in freien griechischen Poleis nach Alexander dem Großen, Stuttgart. GRIFFIN, M., 2003. Clementia after Caesar: From Politics to Philosophy, in: F. CAIRNS – E. FANTHAM (Hrsg.), Caesar Against Liberty? Perspectives on his Autocracy, Liverpool, 157–182. GRUEN, E., 1976. Class Conflict and the Third Macedonian War. AJAH 1, 29–60. GRUEN, E., 1984. The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome, Berkeley. GRUEN, E., 1993. The Polis in the Hellenistic World, in: R. ROSEN – J. FARRELL (Hrsg.), Nomodeiktes. Greek Studies in Honour of Martin Ostwald, Ann Arbor, 339–354. HAAKE, M., 2008. Der Philosoph in der Stadt. Untersuchungen zur öffentlichen Rede über Philosophen und Philosophie in den hellenistischen Poleis, München. HABICHT, C., 1995. Ist ein „Honoratiorenregime“ das Kennzeichen der Stadt im späteren Hellenismus?, in: M. WÖRRLE – P. ZANKER (Hrsg.), Stadtbild und Bürgerbild im Hellenismus, München, 87–92. HALFMANN, H., 2011. Marcus Antonius, Darmstadt. HAMON, P., 2005. Le Conseil et la participation des citoyens: Les mutations de la basse époque hellénistique, in: P. FRÖHLICH – C. MÜLLER (Hrsg.), Citoyenneté et participation à la basse époque Hellenistique, Genf, 121–144. HANSEN, M. H., 2004. Stasis as an Essential Aspect of the Polis, in: M. H. HANSEN – T. H. NIELSEN (Hrsg.), An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis, Oxford, 124–129. HANSEN, M. H., 2006. Polis. An Introduction to the Ancient Greek City-State, Oxford. HARDERS, A.-C., 2015. Consort or Despot? How to Deal With a Queen at the End of the Roman Republic and the Beginning of the Principate, in: H. BÖRM (Hrsg.), Antimonarchic Discourse in Antiquity, Stuttgart, 181–214. HEUSS, A., 1973. Das Revolutionsproblem im Spiegel der antiken Geschichte. HZ 216, 1–72. HILLMANN, K.-H., 52007. Wörterbuch der Soziologie, Stuttgart. KALIMTZIS, K., 2000. Aristotle on Political Enmity and Disease. An Inquiry into Stasis, Albany. KALLET-MARX, R., 1995. Hegemony to Empire. The Development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to 62 BC, Berkeley. KALYVAS, S., 2006. The Logic of Violence in Civil War, Cambridge. KNIELY, E.-M., 1974. Quellenkritische Studien zur Tätigkeit des M. Brutus im Osten 44–42 vor Christus, Wien. KOEHN, C., 2007. Krieg – Diplomatie – Ideologie. Zur Außenpolitik hellenistischer Mittelstaaten, Stuttgart. LEHMANN, G. A., 1998. ‚Römischer Tod‘ in Kolophon/Klaros. Neue Quellen zum Status der „freien“ Polisstaaten an der Westküste Kleinasiens im späten 2. Jh. v. Chr., Göttingen. LINTOTT, A., 1982. Violence, Civil Strife and Revolution in the Classical City, London. LORAUX, N., 2002. The Divided City. On Memory and Forgetting in Ancient Athens, New York. LURAGHI, N., 2015. Anatomy of the Monster: The Discourse of Tyranny in Ancient Greece, in: H. BÖRM (Hrsg.), Antimonarchic Discourse in Antiquity, Stuttgart, 67–84. MA, J., 2000. The Epigraphy of Hellenistic Asia Minor: A Survey of Recent Research. AJA 104, 95–212. MAGIE, D., 1950. Roman Rule in Asia Minor to the End of the Third Century after Christ, Princeton. MAGNINO, D. 1993. Le ‘Guerre Civili’ di Appiano. ANRW II 34.1, 523–554. MANICAS, P. T., 1982. War, Stasis, and Greek Political Thought. Comparative Studies in Society and History 24, 673–688.

124

Henning Börm

MANN, C. – SCHOLZ, P. (Hrsg.), 2012. „Demokratie“ im Hellenismus. Von der Herrschaft des Volkes zur Herrschaft der Honoratioren?, Berlin. MANN, C., 2012. Gleichheiten und Ungleichheiten in der hellenistischen Polis: Überlegungen zum Stand der Forschung, in: C. MANN – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), „Demokratie“ im Hellenismus, Berlin, 11–27. MATIJEVIĆ, K., 2006. Marcus Antonius. Consul – Proconsul – Staatsfeind. Die Politik der Jahre 44 und 43 v. Chr., Rahden. McGING, B., 2003. Subjection and Resistance: To the Death of Mithradates, in: A. ERSKINE, (Hrsg.), A Companion to the Hellenistic World, Oxford, 71–89. MEHL, A., 1980. Chora doriktetos. Kritische Bemerkungen zum „Speererwerb“ in Politik und Völkerrecht der hellenistischen Epoche. AncSoc 11, 173–212. MEIER, L., 2012. Die Finanzierung öffentlicher Bauten in der hellenistischen Polis, Berlin. MICHELS, R., 1911. Zur Soziologie des Parteiwesens in der modernen Demokratie. Untersuchungen über die oligarchischen Tendenzen des Gruppenlebens, Leipzig. MITCHELL, S., 1999. The Administration of Roman Asia from 133 BC to AD 250, in: W. ECK (Hrsg.), Lokale Autonomie und römische Ordnungsmacht in den kaiserzeitlichen Provinzen vom 1. bis 3. Jahrhundert, München, 17–46. MÜLLER, H., 1995. Funktion und Bedeutung des Rates in den hellenistischen Städten, in: M. WÖRRLE – P. ZANKER (Hrsg.), Stadtbild und Bürgerbild im Hellenismus, München, 41–54. O’NEIL, J. L., 1981. How Democratic was Hellenistic Rhodes? Athenaeum 59, 468–473. OSBORNE, R., 1988. Social and Economic Implications of the Leasing of Land and Property in Classical and Hellenistic Greece. Chiron 18, 279–323. PARETO, V., 1962. System der allgemeinen Soziologie, Stuttgart. PASSERINI, A., 1930. Riforme sociali e divisioni di beni nella Grecia del IV secolo a. C. Athenaeum 8, 273–298. PEPPE, L., 1988. Sulla giurisdizione in populos liberos del governatore provinciale al tempo di Cicerone, Mailand. POPITZ, H., 1976. Prozesse der Machtbildung, Tübingen. QUASS, F., 1979. Zur Verfassung der griechischen Städte im Hellenismus. Chiron 9, 37–52. QUASS, F., 1984. Zum Einfluss der römischen Nobilität auf das Honoratiorenregime in den Städten des griechischen Ostens. Hermes 112, 199–215. QUASS, F., 1993. Die Honoratiorenschicht in den Städten des griechischen Osten. Untersuchungen zur politischen und sozialen Entwicklung in hellenistischer und römischer Zeit, Stuttgart. RICHARDSON, J., 1994. The administration of the Empire. CAH2 IX, 564–598. REYNOLDS, J., 1982. Aphrodisias and Rome, London. RONDHOLZ, A. (in Vorbereitung). Die Stadt als Grab: Der Massenselbstmord von Xanthos vor dem Hintergrund historiographischer Topik. RUSCHENBUSCH, E., 1978. Untersuchungen zu Staat und Politik in Griechenland vom 7.–4. Jh. v. Chr., Bamberg. SANTANGELO, F., 2007. Sulla, the Elites and the Empire. A Study of Roman Politics in Italy and the Greek East, Leiden. SAVALLI-LESTRADE, I., 1998. Des „amis“ des rois aux „amis“ des Romains. Amitié et engagement politique dans les cités grecques à l’époque hellénistique (IIIe–Ier s. av. J.-C.). RPh 72, 65– 86. SAVALLI-LESTRADE, I., 2003. Remarques sur les élites dans les poleis hellénistiques, in: M. CEBEILLAC-GERVASONI – L. LAMOINE (Hrsg.), Les Élites et leurs facettes. Les élites locales dans le monde hellénistique et romaine, Rom, 51–64. SCHOLZ, P., 2008. Die ‚Macht der Wenigen‘ in den hellenistischen Städten, in: H. BECK u.a. (Hrsg.), Die Macht der Wenigen. Aristokratische Herrschaftspraxis, Kommunikation und ‚edler‘ Lebensstil in Antike und Früher Neuzeit, München, 70–99. SCHULER, C., 2004. Die Gymnasiarchie in hellenistischer Zeit, in: D. KAH – P. SCHOLZ (Hrsg.), Das hellenistische Gymnasion, Berlin, 163–192.

Hellenistische Poleis und römischer Bürgerkrieg

125

SCHULER, C., 2007. Die Polis und ihr Umland, in: G. WEBER (Hrsg.), Kulturgeschichte des Hellenismus, Stuttgart, 56–77. SCHULZ, R., 2008. Vermittler, Patrioten oder Opportunisten? Die griechischen Eliten und ihre Kommunikation mit Rom 133–49 v. Chr. HZ 286, 341–357. SCHULZ, R., 2011. „Freunde“ der Römer und „Erste“ der Gemeinden. Die griechischen Eliten und ihre Kommunikation mit Rom in der Zeit der späten Republik (133–33 v. Chr.), in: B. DREYER – P. F. MITTAG (Hrsg.), Lokale Eliten und hellenistische Könige. Zwischen Kooperation und Konfrontation, Berlin, 253–286. SHERWIN-WHITE, A., 1983. Roman Foreign Policy in the East 168 BC to AD 1, Oklahoma. SHIPLEY, G., 2000. The Greek World after Alexander, 323–30 BC, London. SKULTETY, S., 2009. Delimiting Aristotle’s Conception of Stasis in the Politics. Phronesis 54, 346–370. SPICKERMANN, W., 1997. Deiotaros. DNP 3, 376–377. DE STE. CROIX, G., 1981. The Class Struggle in the Ancient Greek World from the Archaic Age to the Arab Conquests, London. STROBEL, K., 1996. Mithradates VI. Eupator von Pontos. Der letzte große Monarch der hellenistischen Welt und sein Scheitern an der römischen Macht. Ktema 21, 55–94. STROOTMAN, R., 2011. Kings and Cities in the Hellenistic Age, in: R. ALSTON – O. VAN NIJF (Hrsg.), Political Culture in the Greek City after the Classical Age, Leuven, 141–153. TEEGARDEN, D., 2014. Death to Tyrants! Ancient Greek Democracy and the Struggle against Tyranny, Princeton. THERIAULT, G., 1996. Le Culte d’Homonoia dans les cités Grecques, Lyon. URBAN, R., 1986. Zur inneren und äußeren Gefährdung griechischer Städte bei Aeneas Tacticus, in: H. KALCYK u. a. (Hrsg.), Studien zur Alten Geschichte III, Rom, 991–1002. VAN DER VLIET, E. C., 2011. Pride and Participation: Political Practice, Euergetism, and Oligarchisation in the Hellenistic Polis, in: R. ALSTON – O. VAN NIJF (Hrsg.), Political Culture in the Greek City after the Classical Age, Leuven, 155–184. VEIT, A. – SCHLICHTE, K., 2011. Gewalt und Erzählung. Zur Legitimierung bewaffneter Gruppen, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (Hrsg.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 153–176. VINOGRADOV, J. – ŠČEGLOV, A., 1997. Die Entstehung des chersonesischen Territorialstaates, in: J. VINOGRADOV (Hrsg.), Pontische Studien, Mainz, 421–483. WALBANK, F., 1992. The Hellenistic World, London. WALSH, J., 2000. The Disorders of the 170s BC and Roman Intervention in the Class Struggle in Greece. CQ 50, 300–303. WEBER, M., 1976. Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, Tübingen. WEED, R., 2007. Aristotle on Stasis: A Moral Psychology of Political Conflict, Berlin. WHITEHEAD, D., 2002. Aineas the Tactician, London. WICKHAM, C., 2005. Framing the Early Middle Ages, Oxford. WIEMER, H.-U., 2002. Krieg, Handel und Piraterie. Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des hellenistischen Rhodos, Berlin. WIEMER, H.-U., 2010. Rezension zu GRIEB 2008. HZ 290, 743–744. WIEMER, H.-U., 2013. Hellenistic Cities: The End of Greek Democracy?, in: H. BECK (Hrsg.), A Companion to Ancient Greek Government, Malden, 54–69. WINTERLING, A., 1991. Polisbegriff und Stasistheorie des Aeneas Tacticus. Zur Frage der Grenzen der griechischen Polisgesellschaften im 4. Jahrhundert v. Chr. Historia 40, 193–229. WISTRAND, E., 1981. The policy of Brutus the Tyrannicide, Göteborg.

PERFORMING PASSIONS, NEGOTIATING SURVIVAL: ITALIAN CITIES IN THE LATE REPUBLICAN CIVIL WARS Federico Santangelo

ABSTRACT: The evidence for the impact of the civil wars of the first century BC on local contexts in Italy, especially in the areas that were not directly affected by full-scale military conflict, is rather sparse; the interests of most of the surviving sources revolve around the city of Rome. This paper sets out to explore the standpoints of the Italian cities on the unfolding of the late Republican civil wars. Even the communities that were not directly affected by the military developments had to devise strategies in which war and its consequences could be made sense of and negotiated, and the nature of the resulting changes could be comprehended and represented, both within the city and towards the outside world. The working hypothesis of this piece is that performance is a category through which the impact of the late Republican civil wars on the Italian cities may be usefully read. A number of issues are relevant to the discussion: from the proscription lists that were drafted at municipal level in the Sullan age, through the repercussions of Caesar’s descent into Italy in early 49, to the impact of Octavian’s victory on the political ties between Roman and municipal elites.

The evidence for the impact of the late Republican Civil Wars on the Italian cities, especially in the regions that were not directly affected by full-scale, highintensity military conflict, is rather sparse; the interests of most of the sources revolve around Rome. This paper sets out to explore, in so far as is possible, the standpoints of the Italian cities on the unfolding of the wars; to do so it will choose a specific angle. Even the communities that were only tangentially affected by the civil wars had to devise strategies in which the military conflict and its consequences could be made sense of and negotiated, and through which the nature of the resulting changes could be comprehended and represented, both within the community and towards the outside world. The working hypothesis of this paper is that performance – broadly, even loosely understood – is a category through which the impact of the Civil Wars on cities may be read with some profit.1 The

*

1

Sections of this paper were presented at the Performing Civil War conference and to research seminars in Dublin and Venice. I am grateful to the audiences on those occasions for their reactions, queries, and criticism. I am also greatly indebted to Mireille CÉBEILLAC and Alexander THEIN for helpful discussion and guidance. All dates are BC unless otherwise stated. On late Republican politics as performance cf. SUMI 2005: 7–13, where the focus is on the city of Rome, and more specifically on public ceremonial. Cf. the working definition of ‘public ceremonial’ at 8: “symbolic action that is often also ritually prescribed action performed before an audience”.

128

Federico Santangelo

focus will be almost exclusively on Italy, and the discussion will be confined to the first century BC, with a brief final detour into the Augustan age. The surviving narratives of the long Civil War of the Eighties BC – which was, in fact, a series of civil wars that began in 88 and ended only when the Lepidus revolt was quelled in 77 – are strikingly uninformative about the position of the Italian cities. This is all the more surprising, since the conflict took place on the Italian peninsula and, to some extent, stemmed from another Italian war, the Social or Marsic War.2 Speaking of the Social War as a civil war like Appian did, of course, is an anachronism if there is one, even if it is significant that some informed individuals advocated that view in antiquity. The civil wars that will be discussed in this paper involved communities of Roman citizens, more or less recently enfranchised. After the Social War, the whole of the Italian peninsula up to the Po became land of Roman citizens, but one should not be too optimistic about the new citizens gaining a central political role. The slow pace at which the Roman Senate opened up to the coming of the members of the Italian elites is a revealing sign, and not an isolated one. Italy was widely affected by the Civil Wars of the first century, but the cities of Italy hardly ever played a significant role in determining those conflicts. They were often on the periphery of the dynamics that shaped the destiny of a war. In a world where information circulated slowly, the development of a war and its consequences were often re-enacted in those peripheral contexts. The conflict was, in a way, reproduced at a local level. When a city was involved in the clash between two or more dynasts, it had to negotiate its loyalty and define its position in the wider framework of the war. Disaster was always looming. To quote from John Ma’s ground-breaking discussion of Hellenistic Asia Minor, “the reality and threat of harm weighed heavily in the relation” between the cities and the Roman dynasts who fought the Civil Wars of the late Republic.3 The performance of specific acts enabled complex political statements that could be of great significance to the prospects of a city. Formal diplomacy was an important part of the picture, but not the only one.

1. SULLA’S VICTORY The political crisis that preceded the clash between Marius and Sulla was entirely set in the city of Rome. In the surviving narratives there is no word of the role of the Italians in the tension between the two men over the Mithridatic command in 88 and in the legitimacy crisis that followed Sulla’s victory in the East and accompanied his return to Italy. It is only thanks to a brief notice in Livy’s Periochae that we have evidence for the negotiations that took place between Sulla and the Italian communities in 83, which revolved around a fundamental issue: the preservation of the recent enfranchisement of the Allies, which had largely been 2 3

MOURITSEN 1998 has put the debate on the causes of the Social War on a new footing. MA 1999: 111. The discussion of the predicament of the cities in the Greek East between 44 and 39 that Henning BÖRM offers in this volume corroborates that very picture.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

129

decided and managed by Sulla’s enemies.4 Sulla gave reassurances on his intentions. It is unclear when and where the negotiations took place and who conducted them; they must have ended with a formal arrangement. It is clear that the position of Sulla was strengthened by this agreement and the continuation of his march through Southern Italy was made easier. We are barely more informed on what the Italian cities actually did after the victory of Sulla. We know quite a lot, of course, about the impact of Sulla’s decisions on a number of communities, from the colonial foundations to the land confiscations and the decision to deprive some cities of full citizenship rights.5 However, we do not know much about how the cities responded and tried to negotiate the impact of these decisions. Praeneste is a partial exception. The city had been a stronghold of the Marians and a shelter for many of them, including Gaius Marius, after the defeat of the Colline Gate. All the inhabitants were massacred; the carnage was staged, in a highly ritualised fashion, outside the city walls, and was masterminded by Sulla. There was no negotiation and no direct engagement between Sulla and the city: there is no evidence for talks like those that took place at Athens before the sack of 86.6 The inhabitants of Praeneste surrendered when Sulla made a gesture which betrayed his own keen interest in drama, and was one of the most gruesome examples of the male morte that is a distinctive feature of the age of the proscriptions.7 When the two Marian leaders Marcius and Carrinas were killed in action not far from Praeneste, Sulla ordered that their heads be taken to Praeneste and displayed in front of the besieged city. The Praenestines viewed that gruesome spectacle as a sign that the defeat of their faction was irreversible, and surrendered to Sulla’s officer Lucretius Ofella. When Sulla arrived at Praeneste he took care to divide the prisoners into three groups – Romans, Samnites, and Praenestines. The Romans were pardoned, while the other two groups of people (who consisted, at least in principle, of Roman citizens) were killed without exceptions.8 The enfranchisement of the Allies was – at least on that day – a thing of the past; a division that preceded the Social War was brought back to life in the most gruesome way. Sulla could not have asserted his control over Rome and over the boundaries of its citizen body in more performatively effective terms. Praeneste was sacked and soon afterwards became a veteran colony. It is by now a commonplace to note that the organised physical elimination of political opponents follows a number of quasi-ritual features: the display of the 4

5 6

7 8

Liv. Per. 86.3: Sylla cum Italicis populis, ne timeretur ab his uelut erepturus ciuitatem et suffragii ius nuper datum, foedus percussit (“Sulla struck a treaty with the peoples of Italy, so that they did not fear that he would withdraw their citizenship and the right to vote that had recently been given to them”). THEIN 2006, 245–247; SANTANGELO 2007: 134–191; THEIN 2010. Plut. Sulla 13.4. There is an important difference with the siege of Athens: we do not know of any Praenestines in Sulla’s camp, even if he had personal ties with some local men (App. civ. 1.94). HINARD 1984 and HINARD 1985: 40–49. App. civ. 1.94. According to Plut. Sulla 32, not even the Romans were pardoned and all the captives were put to the death.

130

Federico Santangelo

names of the victims, the public sale of their assets, the dismemberment of the corpses, the male morte are cases in point. The prime setting of this complex process is the city of Rome, where the list was compiled and displayed, and the properties of the proscribed were auctioned off. It does have, however, a number of local re-enactments: people were proscribed in cities far away from Rome, and proscription lists were circulated and displayed in municipal contexts. F. Hinard argued that the massacres that are attested in the municipia were ‘épurations’, rather than ‘proscriptions’: enforcements of decisions made at Rome, massacres that were made possible and legalised by the lists displayed at Rome. On this reading, the assassination of the quattuoruiri at Larinum after the arrival of Oppianicus and his associates finds its legal and factual grounds in the proscription list drawn up by Sulla himself. 9 It is doubtful that things went so neatly. The coming of Oppianicus to Larinum is an instructive case, in which a local, municipal proscription followed and ratified a putsch staged by the new Gauleitern, at the end of the Civil War. The endorsement of the dictator – more or less explicit – was part of the picture, but local initiative was surely predominant.10 The development was also accompanied by a political process, which we can glean from an inscription: a dedication from Larinum (AE 1975: 219), which unfortunately lacks an archaeological context, shows that the dictator became patron of the city. There are several surviving dedications of this kind to Sulla from a number of Italian cities. However, this is the only instance in which Sulla is mentioned as patron of a community, be in Italy or elsewhere. No doubt other cities from which there is no surviving evidence made the same choice. Nonetheless, as M. Mayer has recently pointed out, there is no evidence for an overarching master plan.11 The situation at Larinum is best understood as a case in which the local political elite is toppled by a new elite, and the proscriptions and the victory of Sulla provide an apt legal and political context for a change that is rooted, first and foremost, in a local context. But Cicero must be believed, for once, when he stresses how important a feature of the scene metus, fear, was.12 Fear often leads people to say little or less than they would otherwise do. If we move west of Larinum and turn to the situation at Ameria, in Umbria, we see another instance of the eloquent silence that fear could induce. When the name of the local grandee Q. Roscius was belatedly added to the proscription list, the response of the decem primi was telling: the ten most prominent members of the ordo decuriorum went to Volaterrae, where Sulla was still leading the siege of the city, seeking an audience with the dictator. The ostensible purpose of the mission was to file a formal protest about the proscription of Roscius, but no doubt the

9 10 11 12

Cic. Cluent. 25. See HINARD 1985: 55–66. AMERIO 1987: 177 argues that Oppianicus was sent to Larinum by Sulla, but that he did not lack “potere discrezionale”. MAYER 2008: 131. Cic. Cluent. 25.2: itaque illis crudelissime interfectis non mediocri ab eo ceteri proscriptionis et mortis metu tenebantur.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

131

unspoken intention was to avoid further complications for the rest of the local elite. The involvement of T. Roscius Capito, who had purchased several of Roscius’ proscribed farms, is a clear pointer that the real aim was not to denounce the people who had planned and carried out the proscription of Roscius senior, but to make sure that no more Amerian notables were to be added to the list of the ‘Marians’. They were never received by the dictator; they were seen by some of his aides, including the infamous freedman Chrysogonus, who is the main target of Cicero’s attacks in the speech.13 It was a political move that, while saving the face of the civic elite, asserted its loyalty to the dictator and his agenda, and was at the same time intended to contain the impact of the proscriptions on the other local notables. Moreover, the notables of Ameria took a step that was politically sensible and, from the institutional standpoint, quietly revolutionary: they sought an audience with the dictator, as the only figure who had power and authority to affect the unfolding of the proscriptions. The Italian cities play a marginal, but not unremarkable role in an important episode that took place immediately after the end of Sulla’s life. The funeral of the former dictator was an event that was intrinsically part of the aftermath of the Civil War and in which a collective attempt to pay tribute to his legacy and agenda took place. It was a communal, carefully staged reflection on the recent past. It was also a highly partisan one: Appian speaks of dissent in the Senate, with a faction led by Catulus who proposed to carry Sulla’s body in procession through Italy, and another faction, led by Lepidus, who opposed the plan. Catulus’ view prevailed and Sulla was granted fully-fledged honours. We get a reasonably detailed account of the event in Appian (civ. 1.105–106).14 The planning of the ceremony was clearly done in Rome; it is likely that Sulla heavily contributed to it. Sulla was buried in the Campus Martius in a spot allocated by the Senate, and the whole city took part in the ceremony. What matters most to our purposes, however, is the direct involvement of the Italian communities. Sulla died in his Campanian mansion, in the territory of Cumae or Puteoli, and the first part of the funeral took place away from Rome. His body was carried to the Urbs in a golden litter; Appian notes that it was a funeral worthy of a king (κόσμου βασιλικοῦ). The journey must have taken days; trumpeters and horsemen accompanied the body; centre stage was taken by the veterans who had served in Sulla’s army, their order in the procession mirroring their rank and seniority.15 The soldiers had also contributed to the making of more than 2,000 golden crowns that were offered to Sulla in Rome. Crowns were also offered by the cities of Italy, and the participation of the Italians was also an important part of the build-up of the funeral, when Sulla’s body was carried through a number of towns. Appian explicitly mentions a crowd of common people (ἄλλο τε πλῆθος) who escorted the body on its journey to 13 14 15

LINTOTT 2008: 425f.; cautiously accepted by DYCK 2010: 93. Good discussion in SUMI 2002: 420f., 428. RICHARD 1978: 1122 argues that the presence of the veterans is a ‘loan’ from the protocol that was followed for the triumph and claimed that there was a link between this ritual and Sulla’s connection with Victoria.

132

Federico Santangelo

Rome. Nearly a century later, in AD 14, when Augustus’ body was carried from Nola to Rome, the body was guarded at night in funerary wakes by the decurions of the cities through which it passed. There is no evidence that something comparable was done in honour of Sulla, although this cannot be firmly ruled out. It is likelier that the veterans were at the centre of the celebration; the body was probably carried up the Via Appia, the same road on which Sulla had marched towards Rome in 83, at the beginning of the Civil War. When it arrived at Rome, the ritual involved the whole city, the magistrates, the priests, the Senate, the equites, and the populace. It was a moment in which the whole community came together and paid its respects. In Appian’s account, the funeral becomes a moment in which the Civil War is resolved, if only on the surface. The dénouement that appears to have been reached is immediately undone as soon as the ceremony ends, when the two consuls begin to quarrel. A new season of the long Civil War was about to begin. However, in the following decades the focus of tensions and conflicts was not on the cities. The background of Catiline’s conspiracy is in the Italian countryside, or in the sparse rural settlements, the castella, of the Sullan veterans, rather than in the cities of Etruria or Campania.16

2. COPING WITH CAESAR’S DESCENT We move to safer, more informative territory with the Civil War between Pompey and Caesar. The position of the Italian cities in the first book of Caesar’s De bello ciuili has seldom been considered and deserves close scrutiny.17 What follows will engage only tangentially with the issue of the truthfulness of Caesar’s account, which is in many respects impossible to prove or disprove on the basis of the available evidence. What will be considered in some detail here is the account that Caesar constructed of his dealings with some Italian communities during the Civil War, which is a depiction of how he intended those events to be understood. The first book of De bello ciuili is opened by the familiar sequence of events that take place in the city of Rome between the end of 50 and the beginning of 49. The first chapter depicts the debate that took place in the Senate on the letter that Caesar had sent from Gaul. Caesar describes the process that quickly unfolds and brings about war, and studiously keeps himself at the margins of it, as a distant and interested presence, until the beginning of chapter 7, where the speech to the soldiers is presented. The viewpoint of ch. 1–6 is firmly on the city of Rome and the mach16

17

There are isolated instances: the likely presence of supporters of Catiline at Pompeii, as suggested by the background of Cicero’s pro Sulla (ZEVI 1995), and the decision of some cities to vote decrees of thanksgiving after the conspiracy was repressed (Capua: Cic. Sest. 9–10) and, a few years later, to call for Cicero’s return from exile (Cic. Vatin. 8; dom. 75; Pis. 41, 51, 64, 80; red. pop. 10); see GABBA 1994: 127–129. RAAFLAUB 2010a: 166f., RAAFLAUB 2010b: 171f., RAAFLAUB 2010c: 148f. and GRILLO 2012: 33, 70, 133–135 are recent exceptions, albeit focused on Caesar’s standpoint; see also VOL– PONI 1975: 13–35 and JEHNE 2013: 138. The remarks in Flor. epit. 2.13.3–4 (on which cf. ROSENBERGER 1992: 50f.) are noteworthy.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

133

inations of Pompey and the Senate. The cities are mentioned only at the very end of this section of the narrative (6.8), when Caesar depicts the departure of the consuls and the Senate from Rome and the frantic attempt to avert disaster: tota Italia dilectus habentur, arma imperantur, pecuniae a municipiis exiguntur, e fanis tolluntur, omnia diuina humanaque iura permiscentur (“Troops are levied throughout Italy, weapons are requisitioned, money is exacted from the municipia and taken away from the temples, all divine and human rights are confounded”). In this narrative, the cities take the full blunt of the incompetence and greed of Caesar’s opponents. Caesar purposefully alters the chronology of the events: the negotiations between Caesar and the Senate collapsed definitively only at the end of January, whereas his military involvement in Picenum took place two weeks earlier. He also establishes a link, which actually did not exist, between Pompey’s decision to flee Rome and his conquest of Auximum, which in fact took place ten days after Pompey’s departure.18 This manipulation of the sequence of the events is deliberate: the incompetence of the Pompeiani in the cities of Central Italy becomes a foil to the incompetence of Pompey and his associates in Rome. A fundamental political point is scored by focusing on the plight of the cities in a separate section of Book 1. The Italian viewpoint is eminently suited to corroborate the self-portrait that Caesar is keen to build, that of the worthy outsider who resists the evil schemes of the senatorial oligarchy. Invoking the peace and stability of the whole of Italy, along with his own personal prestige, is part of that strategy. The need to set Italy free from fear (9.1: omnem Italiam metu liberare) is emphatically stated in the last message that Caesar addresses to Pompey, from Ariminum, through L. Iulius Caesar.19 According to a brief notice in Dio, Caesar also sent letters to an unspecified number of Italian cities, in which he urged Pompey to confront him publicly and made a number of promises, presumably to the Italians.20 Caesar makes no reference to these letters or to a wide, concerted effort to open a conversation with the whole of Italy. His dealings with the cities are handled one by one, in a piecemeal fashion. Each city receives some discussion on account of its own specific history and its own position in the conflict. A literary goal is also achieved, though: framing the narrative in this way conveys a deluge effect, as is the case in some prodigy lists in Livy.21 There was also a tangible, immediate factor that put Italy high on the list of Caesar’s interests: Pompey’s agents were carrying out levies throughout the peninsula and it was crucial to stop their action, both by achieving military success and by building political momentum. Against this background, we see Caesar taking action and effortlessly getting hold of Pisaurum, Fanum and Ancona, and then 18 19

20 21

Von FRITZ 1941; BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 61–63. On the importance of fear in this narrative see BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 62. On terror as a decisive historical factor in the late Republic cf. HINARD 2006. Cf. Cic. Att. 9.10.2 (dating 18 March 49) for a cursory reference to Pompey's threats towards the Italian cities (minae municipiis) ahead of his departure to Greece; see BISPHAM 2007: 428. Cass. Dio 41.10.2. DE SAINT-DENIS 1942.

134

Federico Santangelo

turning his attention further inland to the Umbrian city of Iguvium. The events that took place here are especially interesting to our purposes. The praetor Q. Minucius Thermus, an associate of Pompey, is in control of the city with five cohorts. Caesar, however, finds out that the Iguvines are well disposed towards him: omniumque esse Iguuinorum optimum erga se uoluntatem. We can only speculate on how Caesar became aware of the attitude of that community. He does not disclose his intelligence sources, and the narrator of De bello ciuili is usually keen on styling himself as omniscient and omnipresent.22 The uoluntas of the city is central to the whole process and the military developments that unfold; the word is used four times in this chapter.23 Thermus may have had five cohorts under his command, but they were not sufficient, nor sufficiently motivated; no doubt many of his men were recent recruits, hastily levied by the Pompeiani in the weeks before Caesar’s descent. As soon as Thermus realised that the will of the citizens of Iguvium was against him (diffisus municipii uoluntati) he left the city, and his soldiers in turn defected him shortly afterwards.24 When Caesar’s associate Curio entered Iguvium he was saluted summa omnium uoluntate: Caesar stresses that the whole citizen body supported his cause, without any distinction of rank and wealth.25 The events at Iguvium are barely sketched, but they are credited with a decisive role in the conflict, as they persuade Caesar that the municipia can be relied upon: confisus municipiorum uoluntatibus.26 If the dealings between Caesar and Iguvium are not described and the emphasis is exclusively on the aftermath of the city’s defection, the following chapter (1.13) focuses at some length on the situation at Auximum, the city in the Picenum to which Caesar decided to turn his attention after the events at Iguvium. The circulation of information is, once again, the starting point. When the decurions find out about Caesar’s arrival in the territory of their city, they decide to approach P. Attius Varus, the Pompeian officer who was in control of the city. Caesar specifies that the decurions were reasonably numerous, frequentes. No doubt he aims to stress that it was not an isolated initiative of some of his supporters, but he may also be implying that the decision to approach Attius was not shared by the whole ordo. John Ma’s work on the dealings between the Seleucids and the Greek cities in Western Asia Minor has shown how proficiently the cities could speak the words that their regal counterparts wanted to hear, and that ability could be part of an attempt to negotiate their own typology of subordination, and to codify a peculiar form of local knowledge.27 The statements of the Italian elites in Caesar’s De bello 22 23 24 25 26

27

GRILLO 2011 and GRILLO 2012: 9f., 54–56, 73–75, 119f. RAAFLAUB (2010a: 166; 2010c: 148) translates uoluntas with ‘strong sympathies’. Some of them, however, kept their loyalty to Thermus, who joined Domitius at Corfinium a few weeks later: Cic. Att. 7.23.1, with CARTER 1990: 169. On Curio’s characterisation in De bello ciuili see BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 98–101. Other references to the uoluntas of communities in De bello ciuili: 1.12.2 (diffisus municipii uoluntate), 1.21.1, 1.35.4, 2.4.4, 2.17.1 (uoluntas erga Caesarem totius prouinciae), 2.20.1, 2.22.2, 3.12.2, 3.35.1, 3.35.2, 3.56.3. MA 1999: 214–242.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

135

ciuili may be read through the same lenses: the speech of the notables of Auximum was a small masterpiece of intelligent repositioning, and is of special interest to an investigation on civil war. They opened their address with the proviso that it was not for them to decide on the res, i.e. on the controversy between Caesar and Pompey.28 However, they warned Attius that they were not prepared to accept that Julius Caesar be kept outside the city walls after all he had achieved for the commonwealth. The attitude is that of a community that recognises its independent profile and deals with the Pompeian commander as if he were a guest that must conform his behaviour to the will of the city; on the other hand, the city acknowledges its belonging to the wider framework of the Roman commonwealth, and regards Caesar’s success in Gaul as intrinsically relevant to its own history and identity. Both the assumptions of the Auximates are, in different ways, misleading, or at least economical with the truth. The Auximates could never have afforded to speak to an envoy of Pompey in those terms had Caesar not been in the vicinity. While they were a community of Roman citizens, they based their decisions on the immediate interest of their own city, rather than the greater good of the commonwealth. The impression that they put forward a highly manipulative picture of recent history is further corroborated by the fundamental point thy made: they do not tell Pompey’s agent that they are effectively switching sides and do not formally ask him to leave, but they make a more general comment about the merits of Caesar towards the State. The reader of De bello ciuili, who has been presented with Caesar’s speech only a few chapters earlier, immediately notices that the Auximates are taking up the fundamental tenet of Caesar’s case for war. By focusing on the argument of the Auximates, Caesar emphasise the initiative of the city, but also brings an important point home. As Gelzer put it, by relating their argument he pointed out that “[d]iese schlichten Leute hatten erfaßt, was die bornierten Optimaten nicht wahr haben wollten”.29 The cool re-positioning of the Auximates reverses the atmosphere that dominated at the beginning of the conflict: it is now Attius who is overwhelmed by fear and flees the city; the defection of his soldiers follows shortly afterwards. This time Caesar is on site to accept their surrender and deploy his clemency towards the Pompeian deserters. His attention, however, is especially focused on the inhabitants of Auximum, whom he thanks with the promise that he will remember their deed in the future. The prospect of emerging unscathed from potential disaster and, for some, the prospect of imminent and future rewards must have been enticing as Caesar’s march was progressing through the peninsula. Old allegiances could be quickly undone. Auximum was a city that was closely related to the political biography of Pompey. When he decided to take an active role in the Civil War between Sulla and the Marians, in 83, Pompey relied on Picenum, the region where his father used the have the core of his clientelae, and he elected Auximum as his headquar28 29

KRANER-HOFMANN 1959: 31 compare this argument to that used by the Massiliotae (1.35.5), but there are substantial differences, as we shall see below. GELZER 1960: 183.

136

Federico Santangelo

ter in the military actions against Papirius Carbo. According to Plutarch, the people of Picenum were not even prepared to listen to Carbo’s envoys; one of them, Vedius, was killed by the mob after making a disparaging reference to Pompey’s young age.30 A late Republican inscription records a formal bond of patronage between Pompey and the town, which was established (or re-asserted) not earlier than 52.31 Things changed very quickly indeed. Shortly after leaving Auximum, Caesar received the visit of the envoys of Cingulum, who emphatically stated their willingness to obey his orders; he asked for soldiers and was promptly satisfied. Cingulum was a small settlement, albeit of strategic significance, and it is not even clear whether it was a municipium or a praefectura at the time.32 However, it was not a place like any other. T. Atius Labienus, the distinguished associate of Pompey, had spent a considerable sum of money on a comprehensive building programme there (quod oppidum Labienus constituerat suaque pecunia exaedificauerat); it is quite possible, in fact, that Cingulum was his hometown.33 This did not prevent the local inhabitants from choosing the opposite side in the Civil War. The Pompeian clientelae were in meltdown, under the concomitant pressure of Caesar’s advance and of the incompetence of his opponents. It is a reasonable, indeed straightforward guess that there must have been divisions and disagreements within the cities across Italy; however, the Commentarii hardly ever acknowledge their existence. When Caesar started to turn his attention to Corfinium, which was under the control of Pompey’s associate L. Domitius Ahenobarbus, word came to him that the inhabitants of the neighbouring city of Sulmo were eager to take his side, but were prevented from doing so by the presence of seven cohorts of Pompeiani.34 The arrival of five cohorts led by Mark Antony was sufficient to persuade the Sulmonenses to open the gates to Caesar’s troops. The locals were joined by Domitius’ soldiers in an act of submission to Caesar’s cause. Things cannot always have been so simple. When the soldiers in charge of the garrison at Corfinium betrayed and captured their com30 31

32 33 34

Plut. Pompeius 6. ILLRP 382: [Cn(aeo) P]ompeio Cn(aei) [f(ilio)] / [Ma]gno imp(eratori) co(n)s(uli) ter /

[pa]trono publice. GABBA 1994: 129 dates it to 50; VOLPONI 1975: 16, more plausibly, to 52. VOLPONI, ibid. draws attention to the fact that P. Ventidius Bassus (cos. suff. 43), who was then making his way up the ranks of Caesar’s army, belonged to a family of Auximum that had fought against Pompey’s father (Val. Max. 6.9.9; Plin. nat. 7.135; Plut. Pompeius 6; cf. Gell. 15.4.3 on his involvement in the Civil War); ROHR VIO 2009, 33–39 argues that he played an active role in bringing about a switch of loyalty from Pompey to Caesar in the region. BISPHAM 2007: 240–244; PACI 2008: 213–217. Caes. civ. 1.15.3. See SCHULZ 2010: 189f. CARTER 1990: 173 suggests that Labienus was one of the commissioners that gave Cingulum its municipal charter. Caes. civ. 1.18.1. Cf. Cass. Dio 41.10.2, 11.1–3. Events at Sulmo: Cic. Att. 8.4.3, 12A.1; Oros. 6.15.4. See BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 12–18, 160f. The selection of the material in Caesar’s narrative is significant: Caesar deals at length with the events at Corfinium because he intends to stress that his success was not just rooted in military developments, but in a wider political strategy. On the concept of ‘argument by narrative’ in Caes. civ. 1 see BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 42.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

137

mander Domitius, Caesar was very keen to include them into his own army. Acting quickly was necessary, in Caesar’s account, because three factors could potentially undo the progress he had made and lead the soldiers to switch back to their previous allegiance: an offer of money from Domitius; some incitement to resist Caesar’s pressure, presumably from within the ranks; the emergence of unfounded rumours on the possibility of a comeback of the Pompeiani. The early phase of the Civil War was very treacherous territory. Rumours could play an especially important role, in a context in which the circulation of information plays a crucial role and being able to display and perform one’s strength was almost as important as actually having it. The events that precede the capture of Domitius by his own soldiers are instructive. According to Caesar, who could no doubt rely on the testimony of people who were in the Pompeian camp, Domitius’ conduct drastically changed after he received a letter from Pompey: although he kept encouraging his soldiers and spurring them to resist, he looked increasingly worried. Most tellingly, he often spoke to his closest aides in secret, and seemed very keen to avoid large gatherings of people within the camp. The reason, as Caesar makes clear, was that Domitius had been denied by Pompey any military support and was already plotting his escape. His behaviour rapidly appears suspicious to his soldiers, who compel him to declare his intentions; the mutiny follows soon afterwards. Domitius’ flawed leadership is a direct cause of the fall of Corfinium. Moreover, Domitius is portrayed as the embodiment of the faithlessness of the Pompeiani as a whole: he is driven by narrow personal concerns and has little concept of public duty; a flaw that is not shared by his soldiers, who are genuinely driven by the concern to keep their loyalty to the cause they have chosen.35 The position of the oppidani at Corfinium is marginal in Caesar’s account. One of the last stages of the Corfinium affair is Caesar’s decision to return 6,000,000 sesterces that he had found in the treasury of the municipium. Domitius had deposited that substantial sum of money upon his arrival and the quattuorviri dutifully handed it to Caesar after he entered the city. Whatever the source of that sum of money (which Caesar pointedly treated as money belonging to the aerarium, not as war booty) the city magistrates were just interested in co-operating with the new strong man. Perhaps they had done something to seek clemency for. It is striking that, while neighbouring Sulmo is clearly identified as a centre of committed supporters of Caesar, there is no reference whatsoever to the political position of the citizens of Corfinium in Caesar’s narrative.36 But whose war was that, anyway? What were the stakes for the cities and for their inhabitants between two Roman warlords, two factions of the Roman elite that had the force and capability of independent states? Corfinium offers a valuable vantage point in this respect too. Two generations earlier, the city had been 35 36

BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 64f. On Domitius’ later involvement in the war see VOLPONI 1975: 22f. The reference to singulorum hominum occultos exitus (Caes. civ. 1.21.4) might be read as an implicit admission that there were supporters of Pompey even among the oppidani, and not just among the soldiers.

138

Federico Santangelo

the federal centre of the anti-Roman coalition that fought the Social War in 90–89 and it was even renamed Italica. It had a strong Oscan-speaking legacy.37 It was a community of Roman citizens when the war broke out; it maintained an important role in the region even during this period, as we find mention of knights and decurions that Domitius had rallied to Corfinium from the neighbouring town.38 We are told that the magistrates of Corfinium are prepared to acknowledge Caesar’s supremacy, but we do not encounter any statements of loyalty to Caesar and his cause in the narrative, nor do we find a positive assessment of Caesar’s contribution to the welfare of the Republic as we do with the colonists of Auximum. One could argue that there were different approaches in two communities with a strikingly different history. While the Latin colony of Auximum retained a connection with Rome and its inhabitants were prepared to justify their support to Caesar with an historical argument, what appears to prevail at Corfinium is a concern for the survival of the city at a critical time and the need to contain the impact of the requests that would befall upon the city. Such episodes were a constant feature of the period. The early chapters of the first book refer to the levies carried out by Pompey’s associates in Central Italy at the beginning of the war; at a later stage of the conflict (1.30.2) Caesar factually reports his request to all the cities of Spain to provide him with ships and send them to Brundisium. In the same chapter there is a reference to the similar initiatives of Cato in Sicily, which took place at about the same time. A similar pattern seems to hold true for other regions beyond Italy. Massilia is a pivotal site in the early phase of the war, when Caesar takes on Pompey’s forces in Spain and rallies support in preparation for the campaign in Greece. Pompey had made substantial efforts to secure its support, first by using some young Massiliotae as his intermediaries, then by sending Domitius to the city, accompanied by a robust military contingent (1.34). According to Caesar, that mission had firmly persuaded the Massiliotae to support Pompey; he also mentions the instructive detail that the city had been gathering corn from the neighbouring area and had consolidated its defences. Yet, Caesar sought a conversation with the community and summoned the fifteen most prominent citizens (XV primi) to his headquarters in Transalpine Gaul. The argument he presented them with was straightforward: Massilia should follow the example of Italy, co-operate with Caesar, and avoid the outbreak of another war. It is Caesar, this time, who offers to assign a role to the Massiliotae: that of the cooperative, non-belligerent party who is determined to stay on the fringes of the conflict. What follows is an exceptional development, which opens one of the most distinctive sections of De bello ciuili.39 The ambassadors reported Caesar’s re-

37

38 39

CRAWFORD 2011: 14f.; cf. the Oscan inscriptions in Latin alphabet, which may be dated to the first half of the first century BC, at 269–282, 285, 288, 290, 294–298 (Paeligni/Corfinium 7–19, 22, 25, 27, 31–35). Caes. civ. 1.23.2. SHUTTLEWORTH KRAUS 2007 has an excellent literary analysis of Caesar’s account of the Massilia affair. See also GRILLO 2012: 92–95, 159–162.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

139

quest to the Senate of Massilia, which responded in disarming terms. The Massiliotae appreciated that there was civil strife at Rome and that the leading figures of the two camps were Pompey and Caesar; however, since they had both done great services to the city, they were not in a position to favour either of them. Letting Caesar dock in their port would have amounted to a hostile act against Pompey. Caesar does not comment explicitly on this response, but continues his narrative by focusing on what followed immediately afterwards: Domitius arrives to Massilia and is welcomed as the new political and military guide of the city (1.36).40 The pledge to neutrality of the Massiliotae is shown to be misleading and fraudulent. It was the beginning of a long siege, in which the Massiliotae showed considerable skill and commitment to their cause and relied on the support of the Albici, a neighbouring population. While the progress of Caesar’s troops is clear, the victory is slow and the displays of valour of the Massiliotae receive some discussion (1.58). Even at the beginning of the final confrontation with Caesar’s troops they are praised for their courage and their faith in their cause (2.4.2: animo ac fiducia). Caesar is prepared to show equanimity towards them. The arrival of L. Nasidius, an envoy from Pompey, with a fleet of seventeen ships led the Massiliotae to believe that the siege may be brought to an end. The event persuaded them to rebuild the fleet that had been heavily damaged in a previous confrontation with Caesar’s forces. Caesar even mentions the intervention of the elderly, mothers and young girls who begged the men to resume the fight at a time of extreme danger for the city. This passing interest in the position of an enemy community that had betrayed him is an interesting instance of Caesar’s willingness to pay tribute to the decency of his opponents. One could also speculate that a contrast is deliberately drawn between the fear that dominated at Massilia and the relatively marginal role that that incident played in the wider framework of the conflict. He also takes the trouble to explain their behaviour with a general weakness of human nature: men tend to take unnecessary risks or to be frightened when they face difficult situations. The later development of the conflict showed that Nasidius’ reinforcements were useless: the Massiliotae fought with great resolve and ability, but were eventually overwhelmed by Decimus Brutus’ forces.41 When the defences of the city were about to collapse irretrievably, the ‘enemies’ (it is not specified how many of them) went outside the city walls, dressed as suppliants, begging not to destroy the city and asking for the arrival of Julius Caesar, to whom they intended to formally present their surrender. It is only at this stage of the narrative that a fundamental theme of the siege is spelled out: Caesar’s soldiers are exacerbated by the betrayal of Massilia and the length of the siege, and the Massiliotae feared retaliation, had the city been conquered. As it happens, Caesar shares the same concern, and he says that in a letter to Trebonius he had sent specific instructions not to let 40 41

CARTER 1990: 186 stresses the effect of ‘seeming objectivity’ that Caesar achieves by declining to comment. See Caes. civ. 2.11. BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 158–160 show how the style reflects the sudden change of mood among the Massiliotes.

140

Federico Santangelo

the soldiers take on the city, as there was a risk that they would exterminate all the adult citizens.42 The request of the Massiliotae was accepted, both because it was in agreement with Caesar’s requirements and because it was put forward persuasively; the Massiliotae lived up to their reputation for being educated and civilised people. The soldiers voice their discontent, but a further twist of fate suddenly changes the picture: the Massiliotae took advantage of the truce that had been agreed and burned down some siege machines of the Romans; the wind quickly spread the fire. For the first time in the narrative, Caesar expresses a clear moral judgement and points out that the Massiliotae behaved sine fide. This exacerbated the frustration of Caesar’s soldiers and posed a further problem: the forests of the territory near Massilia had all been cut for the purpose. A new solution was devised for the construction of the siege works: the Massiliotae quickly realised that there was no hope and surrendered, accepting the conditions that Caesar had previously set (2.16). When Caesar arrived at Massilia some time later, the city was crippled by the plague and food shortage. Its surrender was complete and unconditional, although it happened three days after the Massiliotae had allowed Domitius and his family to leave the city (2.22). The city surrendered its fleet and its treasury to the aerarium, which was under Caesar’s control: with an argument that is – perhaps unintentionally – reminiscent of that used by Sulla before the sack of Athens in 86, Caesar decided to spare the city from destruction, more for its past benemerences, rather than because of its behaviour towards him.43 The citizens were spared, and two legions were quartered in the city.

3. ‘PASSIONATE CITIES’ REVISITED So far our discussion has been preoccupied with the position of cities that sought to negotiate a position in a dangerous world, that of the Civil Wars, trying to resist the pressures of the parties involved in the war. The emphasis has been on Realpolitik; but one should not think that the choices of the cities happened in an ideological vacuum. John North has warned against the risk of applying a ‘frozenwaste model’ to Roman Republican politics:44 the same applies to the political life of the cities of Roman Italy. It is not uncommon to see some cities taking very emphatic and forceful political decisions in this period.45 In the aftermath of the death of Caesar, on 12 April 44, Cicero received in his villa at Fundi some notables from the municipia; they had not reached a decision on what course of action to follow, but they were – according to Cicero – very pleased with the recent developments and were keen to discuss the political situation with a man of his

42 43 44 45

On Trebonius’ position in the narrative see BATSTONE/DAMON 2006: 20f. Plut. Sulla 14.9. NORTh 1990; see also WISEMAN 2009: 5–32. GABBA 1994: 129.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

141

standing.46 Other cities chose more drastic courses of action, as several passages of the Philippics make clear. The communities of the Firmani and the Marrucini urged the legio Martia, which was quartered at Alba Fucens, to declare Antony a hostis.47 There may be some rhetorical exaggeration in this claim, as there certainly is in the statement that the whole of Cisalpine Gaul was against Antony and committed to the cause of the Senate.48 But the picture is clear: the support of the cities is an important political factor in the war. The Liberators also found a strong following in some communities. Cassius and Brutus became patrons of Teanum Sidicinum and Puteoli (Cic. Phil. 2.107).49 Several cities in Umbria played a part in the wars of the triumviral period – notably, of course, in the bellum Perusinum. Gruesome reports circulated on the retaliation that Octavian decided against the citizens of Perusia; according to Cassius Dio, the wrath of the victor also extended to the Roman senators and knights that had fought in the city.50 Dio then somewhat tentatively reports a tradition that is echoed in other authors, whereby three hundred knights and a number of senators were slaughtered on an altar of Divus Julius.51 The almost complete destruction of the city ensued.52 The story of that mass human sacrifice is implausible, and is usually dismissed in modern scholarship; on the other hand, it is excessive to speak, as Syme did, of a series of ‘judicial murders’.53 Recent studies have drawn attention to Dio’s brief account of the sacrifice of two soldiers who had taken part in the mutiny of 46, performed by Caesar in the city of Rome, in the presence of the pontiffs and the flamen Martialis, after the execution of another soldier, and have suggested that the events of Perusia may also be regarded as a form of ritual execution.54 At any rate, Appian has a very different story, albeit with a similar outcome, which is only slightly more plausible than Dio’s. Octavian pardoned L. Antonius’ soldiers; he then sat on his tribunal outside the city and was shown the senators and knights who were in the town, only to pardon them at the end of their sorry parade; he also pardoned the inhabitants of Perusia, with the significant exception of the decurions, whom he put to death.55 His plan to was to allow his soldiers to plunder the city, but a deranged Perusine, Cestius, set fire to 46 47 48 49 50 51

52 53

54 55

Cic. Att. 14.6.2, with VOLPONI 1975: 37f. and GABBA 1994: 129. Cic. Phil. 4.5–6. Cic. Phil. 3.13. RAMSEY 2003: 317. Cass. Dio 48.14.3. Cass. Dio 48.14.4; Suet. Aug. 15.1; Sen. benef. 1.15.1 (who speaks of arae Perusinae). Cf. Prop. 1.22, esp. 3: si Perusina tibi patriae sunt nota sepulcra. BRIQUEL 2012 offers a full discussion of the complex tradition on this episode; see also WARDLE 2014: 137f. Cass. Dio 48.14.5–6; Vell. Pat. 2.74.4 (who blames the anger of Octavian’s soldiers). SYME 1939: 212. See also SCOTT 1933: 27f.; HARRIS 1971: 301f. Cf. BRIQUEL 2012: 52f., who tries to take the religious implications of the episode seriously, without arguing for its historicity. VÁRHELY 2011: 136–138 argues for a religious interpretation of the Perusine War in light of this episode. Cass. Dio 43.24.2–4, with GROTTANELLI 1999: 45f.; VAN HAEPEREN 2005: 341–344; BRIQUEL 2012: 58f. App. civ. 5.48.458–459.

142

Federico Santangelo

his house, causing a conflagration that soon destroyed the whole city; only the temple of Vulcan survived.56 Nursia managed to escape destruction thanks to a negotiated arrangement with Octavian, but did not renounce to display its allegiance to his opponents even after the end of the conflict. A monument was built to those who fought in the war of Mutina, with an accompanying inscription that stated that they had fallen for freedom. Octavian’s retaliation was harsh and, according to Suetonius, motivated by his need to distance himself very firmly from his early contacts with the Liberators and the Optimates. He imposed a hefty fine on the citizens of Nursia; when they were unable to pay it he had them banned from their own city.57 The title of this paper alludes to an influential study by G. Tibiletti on the political allegiances of the cities in Augustan Italy.58 Tibiletti drew attention to the fact that some Italian communities asserted their past loyalties in the Civil War even some time after the end of the conflict, even if they happened to be different from the camp of Octavian/Augustus. Tibiletti did not envisage a concerted effort of resistance to the advent of monarchy in Cisalpine Gaul, for which there is no evidence whatsoever; his interest was in the persistent survival of municipal traditions, which he implicitly regarded as a precursor of modern campanilismo.59 The cases discussed by Tibiletti are not numerous, but striking; I shall focus on a few. Bononia was exempted from having to perform the oath of loyalty to Octavian that was emphatically celebrated in the Res Gestae.60 It apparently had an established tradition of allegiance to Mark Antony, which, according to a fascinating hypothesis of Bartolomeo Borghesi, was not just tolerated by Augustus, but was 56 57

58 59

60

App. civ. 5.49.459. Suet. Aug. 12.2; Cass. Dio 48.13.6. Suetonius’ reference to the war of Mutina may be erroneous: see WARDLE 2014: 129. On the early agreement see OSGOOD 2006: 172. GABBA 1994, 130 interestingly links this episode to the prohibition in the lex Coloniae Genetiuae Iuliae (ch. 144) against building statues at public expense. Dio links Octavian’s reaction to the aftermath of the bellum Perusinum: this reading is followed by CAMPBELL 2000: 412 and MARENGO 2010: 72. BERRENDONNER 2010: 307 n. 70 argues that this fine is a re-enactment of the stipendium in the context of the Civil Wars. The claim that the city was eventually deserted is excessive, but Lib. col. 176.29, 196.23–24 Campbell mention land assignments that might be dated to the triumviral period; the city was administered by octouiri duouirali potestate (SENSI 1996: 474f.). PANCIERA 2006a (= 2006b: 1.965–976) argues on the basis of AE 2006: 395 that Nursia was a colony of Mark Antony (colonia Iulia Concordia Antonia Ultrix Nursia) and that Octavian’s action against the city does not date to the aftermath of Philippi, but to the aftermath of Actium. TIBILETTI 1976 (= 1978: 119–134). Cf. the salutary proviso in BANDELLI 1992: 38: what is lacking “è la possibilità di una definizione prosopografica in termini quantitativamente apprezzabili delle scelte politiche dei maggiorenti locali”. Res gest. div. Aug. 25.2. On the mechanics of this oath see SYME 1939: 389–392 and OSGOOD 2006: 358–360 (local representatives campaigning for the war and the oath in the towns). A precedent of the Italian oath for Octavian may be viewed in the prayer for the recovery of Pompey from an illness in 50 in Campania and eventually throughout Italy (Cic. Att. 8.16.1; 9.5.3; Plut. Pompeius 57.1–6; Cass. Dio 41.6.3–4); on this event and on Pompey’s frustrated hope to rely on the support of Campania during the Civil War see VOLPONI 1975: 14f.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

143

maintained until the age of Nero, who was a patron of Bononia and had inherited that status from the gens Antonia.61 The impression is that the victor of Actium could afford a small amount of marginal, localised dissent. Moreover, the city could not possibly become the focus of any serious opposition, especially after Actium; the presence of two staunchly pro-Augustan communities, Mutina and Ravenna, on the borders of the city removed any danger. A passage of Dio, however, undermines this picture: in 32 Octavian gave a new charter to the colony of Bononia, so that it appeared that he had deduced the colony. The notice seems to be marred by an anachronism, and it cannot be ruled out that the creation of an Augustan colony dates in fact to the aftermath of Actium.62 Alternatively, it is possible that Octavian gave Bononia a new charter, while at the same time allowing it not to take the oath. Later inscriptions from Bononia refer to Augustus as diuus parens and as pater; the first inscription comes from a bath complex which was probably built by the princeps himself.63 An anecdote related by Pliny also attest a visit of Augustus to the city, during which he was hosted and entertained by a veteran of Antony who had managed to bring back an impressive booty from the Parthian campaign.64 It seems safe to infer that the princeps worked quite intensely to reverse the Antonian allegiance of the city, and that some rhetoric of reconciliation was part of the project.65 According to an ancient tradition, Patavium was a town renowned for the rigour of its moral standards.66 In Pollio’s famous judgement of Livy’s historiographical work, Patauinitas was not so much a criticism of his stylistic imperfection, but the label of a romantic and idealised vision of history, from someone who read and wrote about Roman history as an informed outsider, and who, unlike Pollio, had never held public office in Rome.67 Pollio knew Patavium well: he was in charge of levying money and military support from the city in the aftermath of the Perusine War.68 The propertied Patavini hid in their houses; when Pollio promised their slaves the prospect of freedom in exchange for information, he met a staunch refusal.69 A few years earlier, the city had opposed the same steely resistance to

61

62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

BORGHESI put forward this view in 1851 in a letter to F. ROCCHI (GOZZADINI 1864: 53–55). Contra see KEPPIE 1983: 188. OSGOOD 2006: 368f. emphasises the sense of isolation that the citizens of Bononia must have experienced in 32. Cass. Dio 50.6.3. On Bononia’s Antonian allegiance see Cic. fam. 12.5.2. See FOLCANDO 1996: 86–88; not accepted by KEPPIE 2000: 259. KEPPIE 1983: 188. Plin. nat. 33.82. KEPPIE 1983: 113. Plin. epist. 1.14.6; cf. Mart. 11.16. A notable example was P. Clodius Thrasea Paetus, the Stoic opponent of Nero (references in MRATSCHEK 1984: 182). Quint. inst. 1.5.56 and 8.1.3, with SYME 1939: 486 and MRATSCHEK 1984: 173f. According to ADAMS 2008: 147–153 it was a vague charge of provincialism. Discussion in RICH 1944: 19. Macr. Sat. 1.11.22.

144

Federico Santangelo

Mark Antony and his envoys and shown his loyalty to the cause of the Senate.70 Cicero says that this decision was not unparalleled in the rest of Cisalpine Gaul, but there is clear evidence that Patavium was home to a strong Republican political tradition. The decision of a Cassius Patavinus to publicly express his intention to kill Augustus, for which he was punished with a ‘mild exile’ by the emperor, may have something to do with it.71 Mediolanum had an even less comfortable allegiance. When Augustus visited the city he saw that a statue of Brutus was still on display. Its presence was all the more surprising in light of Caesar’s strong connections in Cisalpine Gaul: Mediolanum became a municipium in 49 and Caesar was hosted there with lavish banquets (Plut. Caesar 17.9); Brutus, however, had been legatus in Cisalpine Gaul in 46, and the ties that he had created there were clearly not severed by the Ides of March. Augustus’ reaction was, on the surface, milder than the one he had in Nursia. It is worth considering Plutarch’s account of that episode in some detail (comp. Dion Brutus 6): Καὶ Δίωνος μὲν τιμωρὸς οὐδεὶς ἐφάνη πεσόντος· ἀλλὰ Βροῦτον καὶ τῶν πολεμίων Ἀντώνιος μὲν ἔθαψεν ἐνδόξως, Καῖσαρ δὲ καὶ τὰς τιμὰς ἐτήρησεν. Ἕστηκε γὰρ χαλκοῦς ἀνδριὰς ἐν Μεδιολάνῳ τῆς ἐντὸς Ἄλπεων Γαλατίας. Τοῦτον ὕστερον ἰδὼν ὁ Καῖσαρ, εἰκονικὸν ὄντα καὶ χαριέντως εἰργασμένον, παρῆλθεν· εἶτ´ ἐπιστὰς μετὰ μικρὸν ἀκροωμένων πολλῶν τοὺς ἄρχοντας ἐκάλει, φάσκων ἔκσπονδον αὐτῶν τὴν πόλιν εἰληφέναι, πολέμιον ἔχουσαν παρ´ αὑτῇ. Τὸ μὲν οὖν πρῶτον ὡς εἰκὸς ἠρνοῦντο, καὶ τίνα λέγοι διαποροῦντες εἰς ἀλλήλους ἀπέβλεψαν. Ὡς δ´ ἐπιστρέψας ὁ Καῖσαρ πρὸς τὸν ἀνδριάντα καὶ συναγαγὼν τὸ πρόσωπον, ‘ἀλλ´ οὐχ οὗτος’ ἔφη ‘πολέμιος ὢν ἡμέτερος ἐνταῦθ´ ἕστηκεν;’ ἔτι μᾶλλον καταπλαγέντες ἐσιώπησαν. Ὁ δὲ μειδιάσας ἐπῄνεσέ τε τοὺς Γαλάτας, ὡς τοῖς φίλοις καὶ παρὰ τὰς τύχας βεβαίους ὄντας, καὶ τὸν ἀνδριάντα κατὰ χώραν μένειν ἐκέλευσεν. No one arose to avenge Dion’s death; but in the case of Brutus, Antony, an enemy, gave him illustrious burial, and Caesar, an enemy, actually took care to preserve his honours. For a bronze statue of him stood in Mediolanum in Cisalpine Gaul. This statue, at a later time, Caesar noticed as he passed by, for it was a good likeness and an artistic piece of work; then stopping, after a little, in the hearing of many he summoned the magistrates and declared that he had caught their city violating its treaty and harbouring an enemy of his. At first, then, as was natural, they denied it, and looked at one another in perplexity, not knowing what he meant. Then Caesar, turning to the statue and knitting his brows, said: “Well, is not this an enemy of mine who stands here?” At this, the magistrates were still more dumbfounded and held their peace. But Caesar, with a smile, praised the Gauls because they were true to their friends even in adversity, and gave orders that the statue should remain where it was.

This story has a theatrical touch to it, and is eminently relevant to a discussion of performance and civil war. The city of Milan performs its loyalty to the legacy of Brutus and his cause; Augustus puts up a different performance, which raises a fundamental political problem. The princeps acts like a consummate performer: he notices the statue, pauses before it, and then shows it to the ordo decurionum, 70

71

Cic. Phil. 12.4.10. Cf. however the prodigy that was reported on the day of the battle of Pharsalus, which the local augur Cornelius read as a sign of Caesar’s victory: Obseq. 65a, with NICE 1999: 198f. Suet. Aug. 51.2: leui exilio. See COGITORE 2002: 147–150 and WARDLE 2014: 368; in general on Republican traditions at Patavium see MRATSCHEK 1984: 172.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

145

with which he engages in a public dispute.72 He then presents the ordo with a joke, which is also very political, and refers to an aspect of the legal position of the community: the city is harbouring an enemy of his, in breach of an unspecified legal arrangement with Octavian, probably the oath of 32. Only after disconcert and fear have set in among his interlocutors does Octavian offer a happy outcome and lets them keep the statue. He comments that Brutus was an enemy of his, but praises the virtue of friendship showed by the people of Mediolanum and urges the city magistrates not to remove the statue from public display. Plutarch the moralist regarded this a symptom of the enduring prestige of Brutus. Jerôme Carcopino, who had been a minister at Vichy and knew a great deal about enmity, civil wars, and the pitfalls of historical memory, more plausibly noted that this was a carefully staged display of the enduring hatred of the emperor for his old enemy. The way in which he overlooked the presence of the statue made sure that it was polluted in the memories of the Mediolanenses for ever.73 The episode is hard to date precisely. The emperor visited the city on several occasions and possibly used it as one of his headquarters in the campaigns on the Alps. However, when in 9 Augustus and Livia went to the Po Valley to meet Tiberius on his way back from the campaigns in Pannonia and Dalmatia, they did not sojourn in Milan, but chose neighbouring Ticinum (modern Pavia) as their temporary residence. Instead of a city that was on a major highway, but had a strong Republican allegiance, they chose a smaller town, founded just a few decades earlier, in 89, which proudly asserted its special relationship with the emperor and his family in the following decades. The statue of Brutus was still in place around 14, when the rhetorician C. Albucius Silus from Novaria, gave a speech before the proconsul L. Piso (cos. 15) and lamented the sad predicament of Italy by addressing the statue of Brutus as that of “the promoter and avenger of our laws and freedom”.74 According to Suetonius, who relates the anecdote as an instance of his firebrand temper, Albucius narrowly avoided punishment. He was hardly a prominent figure in Rome, but he was a respected rhetorician, whose services were no doubt well remunerated, and a distinguished citizen of Novaria, modern Novara, about 27 miles west of Milan. The stories of the ‘passionate cities’ in Augustan Italy draw our attention to two problems. The first one is the vulnerability of the position of individual communities even after the Augustan resettlement of Italy: we find Nursia burdened with a hefty fine like a city that is compelled to pay a war indemnity, and we hear of Albucius complaining about Roman magistrate ruling over a case in a community of Roman citizens, as if it was a provincial community. Unease persisted in some Italian quarters about the hegemonic position that Rome retained in the fabric of Italia.75 The second issue that they raise is the nature and quality of dissent 72 73 74 75

On the princeps as performer cf. Suet. Aug. 99.1, with SUMI 2005: 7. CARCOPINO 1947: 106. Suet. gramm. 30.6: inuocaret legum ac libertatis auctorem et uindicem. On the date of this episode and the office of L. Piso in this context see BRUNA 1972: 297, n. 18; LAFFI 2001: 225f. GIARDINA 1997.

146

Federico Santangelo

after the victory of Octavian and the establishment of monarchy. Tibiletti viewed the decision of the citizens of Bononia not to join the oath to Octavian and Albucius’ passionate outburst in front of the statue of Brutus as instances of that freedom to speak without consequences (“libertà di parlare senza conseguenze”) that he regarded as a fundamental feature of civic life in Augustan Italy.76 He also added that this kind of freedom is almost unthinkable today. That is a matter for debate, which would exceed the scope of this paper. Arguably, in Mediolanum Augustus showed some awareness of the importance of the principle set out by Tacitus when he discussed the reappearance of the works of Cremutius Cordus soon after his death: aiming to obliterate the memory of posterity is the typical ambition of misguided despots who overestimate the extent of their power.77 Showing some willingness to acknowledge the merits of his enemies, albeit posthumously, could be a far more effective political – and performative – choice.

BIBLIOGRAPHY ADAMS, J. N., 2008. The Regional Diversification of Latin 200 BC–AD 600, Cambridge. AMERIO, M. L., 1987. Review of F. Hinard, Les Proscriptions de la Rome républicaine. QS 25, 173–180. BANDELLI, G., 1992. Le classi dirigenti cisalpine e la loro promozione politica. Dialoghi di Archeologia 10, 31–45. BATSTONE, W. W. – DAMON, C., 2006. Caesar’s Civil War, Oxford. BERRENDONNER, C., 2010. La Circulation des fonds publics entre Rome et les cités italiennes durant les périodes républicaine et augustéenne (272 av J.-C.–14 ap. J.-C.), in: L. LAMOINE – C. BERRENDONNER – M. CÉBEILLAC-GERVASONI (eds.), La Praxis municipale dans l’Occident romain, Clermont-Ferrand, 297–316. BISPHAM, E., 2007. From Asculum to Actium. The Municipalization of Italy from the Social War to Augustus, Oxford. BRIQUEL, D., 2012. Le Sacrifice humain attribué à Octave lors du siège de Pérouse, in: G. BONAMENTE (ed.), Augusta Perusia. Studi storici e archeologici sull’epoca del Bellum Perusinum, Perugia, 39–63. BRUNA, F. J., 1972. Lex Rubria. Caesars Regelung für die richterlichen Kompetenzen der Munizipalmagistrate in Gallia Cisalpina, Leiden. CAMPBELL, B., 2000. The Writings of the Roman Land Surveyors: Introduction, Text, Translation and Commentary, London. CARCOPINO, J., 1947. Les Secrets de la correspondance de Cicéron; vol. 2, Paris. CARTER, J. M., 1990. Julius Caesar: The Civil War Books I & II, Warminster. COGITORE, I., 2002. La Légitimité dynastique d’Auguste à Néron à l’épreuve des conspirations, Rome. CRAWFORD, M. H. (ed.), 2011. Imagines Italicae: A Corpus of Italic Inscriptions, London. 76 77

TIBILETTI 1976: 66, fn. 59 = 1978: 134. Tac. ann. 4.35.6: libros per aedilis cremandos censuere patres: set manserunt, occultati et editi. quo magis socordiam eorum inridere libet qui praesenti potentia credunt extingui posse etiam sequentis aeui memoriam (“The Fathers ordered his books to be burnt by the aediles; but copies remained, hidden and afterwards published: a fact which moves us the more to deride the folly of those who believe that by an act of despotism in the present there can be extinguished also the memory of a succeeding age”). On this crucial episode see WISSE 2013.

Performing Passions, Negotiating Survival

147

DE SAINT-DENIS, E., 1942. Les Énumérations des prodiges dans l’oeuvre de Tite-Live. RPh 16, 126–142. DYCK, A. R. (ed.), 2010. Cicero: Pro Sexto Roscio, Cambridge. FOLCANDO, E., 1996. Una rilettura dell’elenco di colonie pliniano, in: M. Chelotti (ed.), Epigrafia e territorio. Politica e società. Temi di antichità romane; vol. IV, Bari, 75–112. GABBA, E., 1994. Italia romana, Como. GELZER, M., 61960. Caesar. Der Politiker und Staatsmann, Wiesbaden. GIARDINA, A., 1997. L’Italia romana. Storie di un’identità incompiuta, Rome. GOZZADINI, G., 1864. Intorno all’acquedotto ed alle terme di Bologna. Atti e Memorie della Regia Deputazione di Storia Patria per le Provincie di Romagna 3, 2–81. GRILLO, L., 2011. Scribam ipse de me: The Personality of the Narrator in Caesar’s Bellum Civile. AJP 132, 243–271. GRILLO, L., 2012. The Art of Caesar’s Bellum Civile. Literature, Ideology, and Community. Cambridge. GROTTANELLI, C., 1999. Ideologie del sacrificio umano: Roma e Cartagine. ARG 1, 41–59. HARRIS, W. V., 1971. Rome in Etruria and Umbria, Oxford. HINARD, F., 1984. La male mort: executions et statut du corps au moment de la première proscription, in: J.-L. VOISIN (ed.), Du châtiment dans la cité: supplices corporels et peine de mort dans le monde antique, Rome, 295–311. HINARD, F., 1985. Les Proscriptions de la Rome républicaine, Rome. HINARD, F., 2006. La Terreur comme mode de gouvernement au cours des guerres civiles du Ier siècle A. C., in: G. URSO (ed.), Terror et pavor. Violenza, intimidazione, clandestinità nel mondo antico, Pisa, 247–264. JEHNE, M., 2013. Politische Partizipation in der römischen Republik, in: H. REINAU – J. VON UNGERN-STERNBERG (eds.), Politische Partizipation. Idee und Wirklichkeit von der Antike bis in die Gegenwart, Berlin, 103–144. KEPPIE, L. J. F., 1983. Colonisation and Veteran Settlement in Italy, 47–14 BC, London. KEPPIE, L. J. F., 2000. Legions and Veterans. Roman Army Papers 1971–2000, Stuttgart. KRANER, F. – HOFMANN, F. (eds.), 1959. C. Iulii Caesaris Commentarii de bello civili, Berlin. LAFFI, U., 2001. Studi di storia romana e di diritto, Rome. LAMOINE, L. – BERRENDONNER, C. – CÉBEILLAC-GERVASONI, M. (eds.), 2010. La Praxis municipale dans l’Occident romain, Clermont-Ferrand. LINTOTT, A., 2008. Cicero as Evidence: A Historian’s Companion, Oxford. MA, J., 1999. Antiochus III and the Cities of Western Asia Minor, Oxford. MARENGO, S. M., 2010. Svetonio, le città, il principe, in: L. LAMOINE et al. (eds.), La Praxis municipale dans l’Occident romain, Clermont-Ferrand, 71–79. MAYER, M., 2008. Sila y el uso politico de la epigrafia, in: M. L. CALDELLI et al. (eds.), Epigrafia 2006. Rome, 121–136. MOURITSEN, H., 1998. Italian Unification. A Study in Ancient and Modern Historiography, London. MRATSCHEK, S., 1984. Literatur und Gesellschaft in der Transpadana. Athenaeum 62, 154–189. NICE, A., 1999. Divination and Roman Historiography, Diss. Exeter. NORTH, J. A., 1990. Politics and Aristocracy in the Roman Republic. CP 85, 277–287. OSGOOD, J., 2006. Caesar’s Legacy, Cambridge. PACI, G., 2008. Ricerche di storia e di epigrafia romana delle Marche, Tivoli. PANCIERA, S., 2006a. Storia locale dell’Italia romana. Nursia colonia antoniana?, in: M. SILVESTRINI et al. (eds.), Scritti in onore di Francesco Grelle, Bari, 181–191 (= 2006b: 965–976). PANCIERA, S., 2006b. Epigrafi, epigrafia, epigrafisti: scritti vari editi e inediti (1956–2005) con note complementari e indici. Rome. RAAFLAUB, K. A., 2010a. Creating a Grand Coalition of True Roman Citizens: On Caesar’s Political Strategy in the Civil War, in: B. W. BREED – C. DAMON – A. ROSSI (eds.), Citizens of Discord: Rome and its Civil Wars, Oxford, 159–170.

148

Federico Santangelo

RAAFLAUB, K. A., 2010b. Poker um Macht und Freiheit: Caesars Bürgerkrieg als Wendepunkt im Übergang von der Republik zur Monarchie, in: B. LINKE – M. MEIER – M. STROTHMANN (eds.), Zwischen Monarchie und Republik. Gesellschaftliche Stabilierungsleistungen und politische Transformationspotentiale in den antiken Stadtstaaten, Stuttgart, 163–186. RAAFLAUB, K. A., 2010c. Between Tradition and Innovation: Shifts in Caesar’s Political Propaganda and Self-Presentation, in: G. URSO (ed.), Cesare: precursore o visionario?, Pisa, 141– 157. RAMSEY, J. T. (ed.), 2003. Cicero: Philippics I–II, Cambridge Mass. RICH, F. B., 1944. The Activities of C. Asinius Pollio 42–38 BC and their Connection with the Eighth and Fourth Eclogues of Virgil, Diss. Bryn Mawr. RICHARD, J.-C., 1978. Recherches sur certains aspects du culte impérial: les funérailles des empereurs romains aux deux premiers siècles de notre ère. ANRW II 16.2, 1121–1134. ROHR VIO, F., 2009. Publio Ventidio Basso. Fautor Caesaris, tra storia e memoria. Rome. ROSENBERGER, V., 1992. Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms. Stuttgart. SANTANGELO, F., 2007. Sulla, the Elites and the Empire. A Study of Roman Policies in Italy and the Greek East, Leiden. SCHULZ, M. W., 2010. Caesar und Labienus. Geschichte einer tödlichen Kamaradschaft. Caesars Karriere als Feldherr im Spiegel der Kommentarien sowie bei Cassius Dio, Appianus and Lucanus, Hildesheim. SCOTT, K., 1933. The Political Propaganda of 44–30 BC. MAAR 11, 7–49. SENSI, L., 1996. Nursia ed il suo territorio, in: M. GUGLIELMO (ed.), Identità e civiltà dei Sabini, Florence, 461–475. SHUTTLEWORTH KRAUS, C., 2007. Caesar’s Account of the Battle of Massilia (BC 1.34–2.22): Some Historiographical and Narratological Approaches, in: J. MARINCOLA (ed.), A Companion to Greek and Roman Historiography; vol. II, Oxford, 371–378. SUMI, G. S., 2002. Spectacles and Sulla’s Public Image. Historia 51, 414–432. SUMI, G. S., 2005. Ceremony and Power: Performing Politics in Rome between Republic and Empire, Ann Arbor. SYME, R., 1939. The Roman Revolution, Oxford. THEIN, A., 2006. Sulla the Weak Tyrant, in S. LEWIS (ed.), Ancient Tyranny, Edinburgh, 238–249. THEIN, A., 2010. Sulla’s Veteran Settlement Policy, in F. DAUBNER (ed.), Militärsiedlungen und Territorialherrschaft in der Antike, Berlin, 79–99. TIBILETTI, G., 1976. Città appassionate nell’Italia settentrionale augustea. Athenaeum 54, 51–66 (= 1978: 119–134). TIBILETTI, G., 1978. Storie locali dell’Italia romana, Pavia. VAN HAEPEREN, F., 2005. Mises à mort rituelles et violences politiques à Rome sous la République et sous l’Empire. Res antiquae 2, 327–346. VÁRHELY, Z., 2011. Political Murder and Sacrifice: From Roman Republic to Empire, in: J. W. KNUST – Z. VÁRHELY (eds.), Ancient Mediterranean Sacrifice, Oxford, 125–142. VOLPONI, M., 1975. Lo sfondo italico della lotta triumvirale. Genova. VON FRITZ, K., 1941. The mission of L. Caesar and L. Roscius in January 49 BC. TAPA 72, 125– 156. WARDLE, D., 2014. Suetonius: Life of Augustus. Oxford. WISEMAN, T. P., 2009. Remembering the Roman People: Essays on Late-Republican Politics and Literature. Oxford. WISSE, J., 2013. Remembering Cremutius Cordus: Tacitus on History, Tyranny and Memory. Histos 7, 299–361. ZEVI, F., 1995. Personaggi della Pompei sillana. PBSR 63, 1–24.

TRIUMPHUS EX BELLO CIVILI? DIE PRÄSENTATION DES BÜRGERKRIEGSSIEGES IM SPÄTREPUBLIKANISCHEN TRIUMPHRITUAL Wolfgang Havener

ABSTRACT: No Roman general ever celebrated a triumph for victory in a civil war. This simple message is propagated by various sources, most prominent among them Valerius Maximus in his treatise on triumphal law. However, as a detailed analysis of the Late Republican ceremonies demonstrates, each of the protagonists of the civil war era staged their victories over Roman fellow-citizens in quite distinct ways. By doing so, they were confronted with a crucial problem: to boast openly to have fought against and won over Roman citizens could result in open criticism. Therefore any general who wished to present a victory over Roman citizens had to walk a tightrope, especially so if this representation took the form of a public triumph. The victorious generals thus had to develop various ways to deal with their victories. This article will detail the different strategies that Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, and Octavian adopted to demonstrate that the victory in civil war gave them power of a new quality that they intended to maintain and exploit.

„Warum“, so wird der Leser von Lukans Pharsalia bereits zu Beginn des Epos gefragt (1.12), „warum soll man Kriege führen, die keine Triumphe nach sich ziehen?“1 Anders formuliert: Bürgerkriege – denn um diese geht es Lukan hier – bringen einem römischen Feldherrn keinen Ruhm und haben folglich keinen strukturellen oder semantischen Mehrwert. Mit einem Sieg über römische Bürger, so wollte Lukan seine Aussage zweifellos verstanden wissen, lassen sich im Gegensatz beispielsweise zu einem Feldzug gegen die Parther keine Ehren gewinnen. Warum also sich die Hände schmutzig machen mit römischem Blut? Und, so wird in den folgenden Versen deutlich, weit wichtiger für den Dichter: Aus welchem Grund griffen Caesar und Pompeius schließlich doch zu den Waffen und stürzten Rom in einen blutigen Zustand innerer Auseinandersetzungen? Die Hoff-

*

1

Für wertvolle Anregungen und Hinweise bin ich Benjamin BIESINGER, Henning BÖRM, Boris CHRUBASIK, Johannes GEISTHARDT, Ingo GILDENHARD, Ulrich GOTTER, Matthias HAAKE, Carsten Hjort LANGE, Christian SEEBACHER, Kathryn WELCH und Johannes WIENAND zu Dank verpflichtet. Dieser Beitrag ist eine erweiterte und überarbeitete Fassung des Artikels „A Ritual Against the Rule“, erschienen in C. H. LANGE – F. J. VERVAET (eds.), Roman Republican Triumph: Beyond the Spectacle, Rom (ARID Suppl.), 2014. Ich danke allen Herausgebern für die Möglichkeit, zu beiden Bänden beizutragen. Lucan. 1.10–12: Cumque superba foret Babylon spolianda tropaeis / Ausoniis, umbraque erraret Crassus inulta, / Bella geri placuit nullos habitura triumphos?

150

Wolfgang Havener

nung auf einen Triumph, die Krönung jeder militärischen Laufbahn zu Zeiten der Republik, hätten die beiden Lukan zufolge von vornherein begraben können.2 Diese von Lukan angenommene Unvereinbarkeit von Bürgerkrieg und Triumph wird auch von Valerius Maximus in seinen Facta ac dicta memorabilia hervorgehoben. Dort heißt es (2.8.7): Niemand, selbst wenn er große Taten in einem Bürgerkrieg vollbracht hatte, die für den Staat von großem Nutzen waren, wurde jedoch dafür zum imperator ausgerufen; es wurden keine Dankesfeste beschlossen und niemand triumphierte in Form der ovatio oder mit dem Triumphgespann, da solche Siege zwar als notwendig, aber stets als traurig angesehen wurden, weil sie mit dem Blut von Landsleuten, nicht dem von Fremden gewonnen wurden.3

Die moderne Forschung ist dieser scheinbar eindeutigen Prämisse im Allgemeinen gefolgt.4 Zwar wird in Einzelfällen darauf hingewiesen, dass bestimmte Triumphe auch mit einem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg in Verbindung gebracht werden können.5 Doch erschöpft sich die Auseinandersetzung mit dem Widerspruch, der sich daraus ergibt, zumeist entweder in der bloßen Feststellung dieser Tatsache, ohne dass die dahinter liegende Problematik eingehender thematisiert würde, oder in dem Verweis auf eine gleichzeitige externe Dimension der Konflikte, die in den jeweiligen Siegesfeiern ganz bewusst besonders hervorgehoben worden sei.6 Folglich stellt Werner Dahlheim in seiner Caesar-Biographie fest: Anfang Oktober 45 zog Caesar in Rom ein und richtete mit gewohnter Pracht seinen fünften Triumph aus. Viele weinten, denn der sich dort in strahlender Spendierlaune auf dem Wagen des Triumphators als Sieger über Spanien bejubeln ließ, feierte in Wahrheit als erster Römer einen Sieg über die eigenen Bürger, die die spanischen Schlachtfelder deckten.7

Zwar existieren mittlerweile durchaus Ansätze, die auch ausgehend von der zitierten Valerius-Maximus-Passage die Frage stellen, ob die besagte Regel insbeson-

2 3

4

5 6

7

Vgl. hierzu auch BEARD 2007: 36 sowie zum Umgang Lukans mit dem Bürgerkrieg GOTTER 2011: 57–61. Val. Max. 2.8.7: Verum quamvis quis praeclaras res maximeque utiles rei publicae civili bello gessisset, imperator tamen eo nomine appellatus non est, neque ullae supplicationes decretae sunt, neque aut ovans aut curru triumphavit, quia ut necessariae istae, ita lugubres semper existimatae sunt victoriae, utpote non externo sed domestico partae cruore. (Bei Quellenzitaten werden im Folgenden die benutzten Ausgaben in Klammern angegeben. Wenn dies nicht geschieht, ist die Übersetzung der entsprechenden Stellen vom Verfasser angefertigt worden.) Vgl. exemplarisch die Aussage von BEARD 2007: 123f.: „The logic was that the triumph was a celebration of victory over external enemies only; that a triumph in civil war, with Roman citizens dragged along where an exotic barbarian foe should be, was a contradiction in terms“. Angeführt werden natürlich zu Recht u.a. immer wieder die Triumphe Caesars in den Jahren 46 und 45 v. Chr.; vgl. BEARD 2007: 124. BASTIEN 2007: 228f. nennt als Ausnahmen der von ihm angenommenen Regel, dass ein Triumph den Sieg über einen externen Feind voraussetze, zudem die ersten beiden Triumphe des Pompeius (81 und 75 v. Chr.) und den Dreifachtriumph Octavians im Jahr 29 v. Chr. Gleichzeitig betont BASTIEN jedoch, dass der Bürgerkriegssieg in diesen Zeremonien bewusst verschleiert worden sei. DAHLHEIM 2005: 221. Vgl. ebenso MAIURO 2008: 27, Anm. 11 sowie WEINSTOCK 1971: 198.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

151

dere in der späten Republik wirklich ohne Ausnahme Geltung besaß.8 Eine systematischere Auseinandersetzung mit dem Phänomen des Bürgerkriegstriumphs wurde bisher jedoch nur selten unternommen.9 Eine umfassende Untersuchung der Quellen führt aber, wie in diesem Beitrag demonstriert werden soll, zu einem anderen Ergebnis. Valerius Maximus war nämlich keineswegs der Einzige, der das Thema des Bürgerkriegstriumphs aufgriff: Sowohl zeitgenössische (Cicero, Livius) als auch spätere (Plutarch, Appian etc.) Autoren äußerten sich in normativen wie deskriptiven Texten zu dieser Problematik.10 Dies lässt den Schluss zu, dass Bürgerkriegstriumphe nicht nur tatsächlich durchgeführt wurden, sondern dass auch die Präsentation eines Sieges im Bürgerkrieg ebenso wie die möglichen Schwierigkeiten einer Umsetzung dieser Präsentation und der potentiell problematischen Folgen, die sie nach sich ziehen konnte, in der politischen Öffentlichkeit (nicht nur der Bürgerkriegsära selbst) sehr wohl rezipiert und diskutiert wurden. Im Rahmen dieses Beitrags soll nun der Versuch unternommen werden, all diese Aspekte des Diskurses über den spätrepublikanischen Bürgerkriegstriumph sowie ihr Verhältnis zueinander nachzuzeichnen. So soll im ersten Abschnitt an einigen ausgewählten Beispielen erörtert werden, inwieweit der Bürgerkriegstriumph in den literarischen Quellen überhaupt als ein Problem angesehen bzw. wie dieses Phänomen im Rahmen der Historiographie und anderer Gattungen rezipiert wurde. Als Beispiel hierfür wird der beschlossene, jedoch nie durchgeführte Triumph des Decimus Brutus im Jahr 43 v. Chr. herangezogen. Zudem soll der Text des Valerius Maximus nochmals einer genauen Analyse unterzogen werden. In den weiteren Abschnitten erfolgt eine Untersuchung der Ereignisse, die dieser 8

9

10

So beispielsweise LUNDGREEN 2011: 223, der zwar einerseits zu bedenken gibt, dass es de facto „undenkbar [gewesen sei], einem militärischen Sieger in einem Bürgerkrieg, wenn er denn will, einen Triumph mit Hinweis auf eine solche Regel (oder auch auf die fehlende Eroberung) zu verweigern“, andererseits jedoch zum Schluss kommt, dass man die von Valerius Maximus angeführte Regel „schon allein aus politischen Erwägungen zumindest pro forma immer respektiert“ habe. Kritisch gegenüber der von Valerius Maximus referierten Regel auch LANGE 2009: 150 mit Verweis auf Munda und Mutina. In den einschlägigen Monographien zum Triumph (vgl. u.a. ÖSTENBERG 2009, BEARD 2007, ITGENSHORST 2005, KÜNZL 1988 sowie VERSNEL 1970) fehlen Ausführungen zum Bürgerkrieg entweder vollkommen oder nehmen lediglich einen sehr geringen Raum ein, ohne dass dabei eine analytische Zusammenschau der sporadisch erwähnten Einzelbeispiele erfolgt. Zu nennen sind allerdings die Arbeiten von LANGE 2013, ÖSTENBERG 2014 und SUMI 2005. Lange kommt dabei das Verdienst zu, die überhaupt für eine Untersuchung des Bürgerkriegstriumphs in Frage kommenden spätrepublikanischen Triumphe zusammenzustellen und jeden für sich näher zu beleuchten. Im vorliegenden Beitrag soll durch die Fokussierung auf die rituelle Dimension des Triumphs der Versuch unternommen werden, eine neue Perspektive auf die von Lange besprochenen Fälle zu entwickeln. Auf die genannten Arbeiten und die Hauptargumente der genannten Beiträge wird im weiteren Verlauf immer wieder zurückzukommen sein, daher sei hier auf eine Zusammenfassung der zentralen Punkte verzichtet. Zumeist wird die grundsätzliche Frage nach der Möglichkeit bzw. Unmöglichkeit eines Bürgerkriegstriumphs jedoch nicht systematisch behandelt, sondern lediglich im Rahmen der Beschreibung spezifischer Zeremonien angeführt (vgl. u.a. Flor. epit. 2.10.9 zum Sieg des Pompeius über Sertorius sowie Plut. Caesar 56.7f. und Cass. Dio 42.18.1 zu den Triumphen Caesars).

152

Wolfgang Havener

literarischen Rezeption zugrunde liegen: Die einzelnen Triumphzüge sollen als Rituale beleuchtet und zueinander in Beziehung gesetzt werden. Auf diese Weise kann ein Bild der verschiedenen Strategien entworfen werden, die die Protagonisten der Bürgerkriegszeit entwickelten, um zum einen ihre Erfolge (die ja zu einem maßgeblichen Teil aus Siegen über römische Bürger bestanden) gebührend in Szene zu setzen und zum anderen der zumindest potentiellen Kritik an diesem Verhalten, wie sie in den Quellen verschiedentlich zum Ausdruck kommt, zu begegnen.

I. Die normative Aussage des Valerius Maximus scheint sich bei einem Blick in den Bereich der politischen Invektive der 40er Jahre zunächst zu bestätigen. In seiner 14. Philippischen Rede ruft Cicero seinen Hörern zu, niemals sei für einen Bürgerkrieg eine supplicatio, also ein oftmals mit dem Triumph verbundenes Dankfest,11 beschlossen worden: „Beschlossen worden, sage ich, und füge hinzu: auch nicht brieflich von dem Sieger gefordert worden“.12 Weder Sulla noch Caesar hätten beim Senat den Antrag gestellt, ihnen für ihre Siege über Marius und Pompeius ein solches Dankfest oder gar einen Triumph zu bewilligen.13 „Und genau ebenso“, fügte Cicero hinzu, „war es in allen früheren Bürgerkriegen gegangen“.14 In diesen Aussagen Ciceros jedoch eine Vorwegnahme der Regel zu sehen, die Valerius Maximus aufstellt, hieße, die angeführte Passage aus ihrem Kontext zu 11

12 13

14

Zu Praxis und Funktion der supplicationes vgl. RÜPKE 1990: 215–217, der die Dankfeste als ein „ziviles Fest“ ansieht, bei dem im Gegensatz zum Triumphritual auch die Anwesenheit des Feldherrn und seiner Soldaten nicht erforderlich war. Dennoch sei auch die supplicatio ein Mittel gewesen, „militärische Erfolge ebenso schnell wie differenziert“ und sogar ohne die „staatsrechtlichen Einstufungen des Siegers“ und die sich daraus ergebenden Notwendigkeiten anzuerkennen und zu zelebrieren. Cic. Phil. 14.22: numquam enim in civili bello supplicatio decreta est. decretam dico; ne victoris quidem litteris postulata est. (Übers. KASTEN) Cic. Phil. 14.23: civile bellum consul Sulla gessit, legionibus in urbem adductis, quos voluit, expulit, quos potuit, occidit; supplicationis mentio nulla. … ad te ipsum, P. Servili, num misit ulla collega litteras de illa calamitosissima pugna Pharsalia, num te de supplicatione voluit referre? profecto noluit. at misit postea de Alexandria, de Pharnace; Pharsaliae vero pugnae ne triumphum quidem egit. eos enim cives pugna illa sustulerat, quibus non modo vivis, sed etiam victoribus incolumis et florens civitas esse posset. „Sulla hat in seinem Konsulat einen Bürgerkrieg geführt, ist mit seinen Legionen in die Stadt eingerückt, hat vertrieben, wen er wollte, und getötet, wen er konnte; kein Wort von Dankfest! … Hat etwa dir selbst, P. Servilius, dein Amtsgenosse irgendwie eine schriftliche Mitteilung über die unheilvolle Schlacht von Pharsalus zukommen lassen, etwa den Wunsch geäußert, du mögest ein Dankfest zur Debatte stellen? Sicher hielt er es nicht für angebracht! Später, über Alexandria, über Pharnaces hat er einen Bericht geschickt, wegen der Schlacht bei Pharsalus aber nicht einmal einen Triumph gefeiert. Diese Schlacht hatte ja auch gerade die Männer beseitigt, die, wenn sie am Leben geblieben wären und gesiegt hätten, ein unversehrtes, blühendes Gemeinwesen hätten gewährleisten können“ (Übers. KASTEN). Cic. Phil. 14.24: quod idem contingerat superioribus bellis civilibus (Übers. KASTEN).

Triumphus ex bello civili?

153

reißen: Es ging Cicero an dieser Stelle keineswegs vorrangig darum, eine Feier des Sieges im Bürgerkrieg zu diskreditieren. Vielmehr dienten ihm die Beispiele Sullas und Caesars und die Anführung der von ihnen geführten, aber nicht gefeierten Bürgerkriege hauptsächlich als Argument für eine Verurteilung des Antonius als hostis publicus.15 Denn – so lautete Ciceros Argument nach der Schlacht von Forum Gallorum und vor der Entscheidung bei Mutina – wenn man Hirtius, Pansa und Octavian für ihre Leistungen eine supplicatio zugestand, so impliziere dies gleichzeitig, dass Antonius als Feind der res publica zu gelten habe. Denn nur nach Siegen gegen einen hostis seien bisher Dankfeste beschlossen worden. Cicero verfolgte also mit der Erwähnung der Bürgerkriege in einem spezifischen Kontext ein ebenso spezifisches Ziel. Seine Äußerungen können daher nicht wie diejenigen des Valerius Maximus als eine normative, allgemeine Feststellung angesehen werden. Und selbst wenn Cicero hier nicht ein politisches Argument vorgebracht, sondern eine normative Aussage gemacht hätte, so hätten ihn die Ereignisse kurz darauf überholt: Nur wenige Tage, nachdem er die 14. Philippische Rede vor dem Senat gehalten und betont hatte, dass kein Bürgerkrieg je mit einer supplicatio oder gar einem Triumph beendet worden sei, wurden die Truppen des Antonius vor Mutina vom Heer des Senats unter Führung Octavians geschlagen. Was danach folgte, lässt sich den Berichten des Livius16 und des Velleius Paterculus17 15

16

17

Vgl. hierzu GOTTER 1996: 131–172, der „drei Maximen“ der Strategie Ciceros identifiziert: „Blockieren von weiteren Gesprächen mit Antonius, Vergrößern der Kluft zwischen diesem und dem Senat, Vorantreiben der militärischen Eskalation“ (150). Es muss folglich die Frage nach Ursache und Wirkung gestellt werden: Diente die hostis-Erklärung des Antonius dazu, die Ehrungen für die Senatsfeldherren zu legitimieren oder sollten es diese umgekehrt Cicero ermöglichen, sein eigentliches Ziel, die Verfemung des Antonius, zu erreichen? Vgl. hierzu LANGE 2013: 78–80; zum Zusammenhang zwischen hostis-Erklärung und Bürgerkriegstriumph s.u. Liv. per. 119: A. Hirtius, qui post victoriam in ipsis hostium castris ceciderat, et C. Pansa ex vulnere quod in adverso proelio exceperat, defunctus in campo Martio sepulti sunt. Adversus C. Caesarem, qui solus ex tribus ducibus supererat, parum gratus senatus fuit, qui Dec. Bruto obsidione Mutinensi a Caesare liberato triumphi honore decreto Caesaris militumque eius mentionem non satis gratam habuit. „Aulus Hirtius, der nach seinem Sieg mitten im Lager der Feinde gefallen, und C. Pansa, der an der Wunde gestorben war, die er in der unglücklich verlaufenen Schlacht erhalten hatte, wurden auf dem Marsfeld bestattet. Gegenüber C. Caesar, der allein von den drei Feldherren noch übrig war, zeigte sich der Senat nicht gerade dankbar: er beschloß für D. Brutus, der von der Belagerung in Mutina durch Caesar befreit worden war, die Ehre eines Triumphes, erwähnte aber Caesar und seine Soldaten nicht mit angemessener Dankbarkeit“ (Übers. HILLEN). Vell. Pat. 2.62.4f.: Quae omnia senatus decretis comprensa et comprobata sunt et D. Bruto, quod alieno beneficio viveret, decretus triumphus, Pansae atque Hirtii corpora publica sepultura honorata, Caesaris adeo nulla habita mentio, ut legati, qui ad exercitum eius missi erant, iuberentur summoto eo milites adloqui. Non fuit tam ingratus exercitus, quam fuerat senatus; nam cum eam iniuriam dissimulando Caesar ipse ferret, negavere milites sine imperatore suo ulla se audituros mandata. „Alle diese Maßnahmen wurden in einem Senatsbeschluss zusammengefasst und gebilligt. Ferner gewährte man D. Brutus dafür, dass er sein Leben einem anderen verdankte, einen Triumph. Pansa und Hirtius ehrte man durch ein Staatsbegräbnis, Caesar aber wurde nicht einmal erwähnt, ja man trug sogar den Abgesand-

154

Wolfgang Havener

entnehmen: Übereinstimmend heißt es dort, dass der Senat seinen siegreichen Feldherrn, d.h. Octavian, den beiden Konsuln Hirtius und Pansa und dem in Mutina belagerten Decimus Brutus, eine Reihe von Ehrungen zukommen ließ: So sei für die Konsuln, die bei den Kämpfen ums Leben gekommen waren, ein feierliches Begräbnis auf dem Marsfeld verfügt worden. Decimus Brutus dagegen, der die Belagerung der Stadt überlebt hatte und den unterlegenen Antonius danach über die Alpen nach Gallien verfolgte, habe man einen Triumph gewährt. Zwar konnte Brutus diesen nicht feiern, da er in Gallien sein Leben verlor, bevor er nach Rom zurückkehren konnte. Er findet sich daher verständlicherweise nicht in den fasti. Doch dass eine Siegesfeier für einen Erfolg im Bürgerkrieg entgegen der scheinbar so eindeutigen Feststellung des Valerius Maximus sehr wohl möglich war und im Fall des Brutus offenbar auch tatsächlich beschlossen wurde, ist an sich bereits bezeichnend genug für die politische Situation der späten Republik.18 Allem Anschein nach war der Triumph des Decimus Brutus nicht einmal Gegenstand längerer Debatten: Keine einzige Quelle, ob nun zeitgenössisch oder nicht, erwähnt solch eine Diskussion, die in anderen Zusammenhängen gerade von Livius in aller Ausführlichkeit referiert werden19 – ein Befund, der vor der Maßgabe einer prinzipiellen Unmöglichkeit des Bürgerkriegstriumphs zumindest erklärungsbedürftig wäre. Interessant ist nun vor allem die Art und Weise, wie dieser Beschluss in den Texten des Livius und des Velleius beurteilt wird: Sowohl in den Periochae wie auch in den Historiae wird ein Nachsatz eingeschoben, der die Ehrung für Brutus deutlich relativiert. Der Zusammensteller der Periochae hielt es für erwähnenswert (und aus diesem Grund darf man annehmen, dass auch Livius selbst auf diesen Punkt einging),20 dass Brutus den Sieg nicht aus eigener Kraft errungen, sondern dass Octavian ihn mit einem Entsatzheer befreit habe (Dec. Bruto obsidione Mutinensi a Caesare liberato). Octavian und seine Soldaten seien dafür jedoch nicht angemessen belohnt worden – schon gar nicht mit einem Triumph (Caesaris militumque eius mentionem non satis gratam habuit). Und Velleius bemerkt bissig, Brutus verdanke seinen Triumph lediglich dem Umstand, dass er dank eines anderen mit dem Leben davon gekommen sei (D. Bruto, quod alieno beneficio viveret) – von Caesar (d.h. Octavian) dagegen kein Wort (Caesaris adeo nulla

18

19 20

ten, die man zum Heer schickte, auf, nur in seiner Abwesenheit zu den Soldaten zu sprechen. Doch die Truppen waren nicht so undankbar, wie es der Senat gewesen war. Denn während Caesar selbst so tat, als merke er die ihm zugefügte Schmach gar nicht, weigerten sich die Soldaten, in Abwesenheit ihres Feldherrn irgendwelche Befehle auch nur anzuhören“ (Übers. GIEBEL). Auf den Triumph des Decimus Brutus als Beispiel für eine Siegesfeier, die ausschließlich für einen Erfolg im Bürgerkrieg dekretiert wurde, verweist explizit auch LANGE 2013: 78–80 und 86. ÖSTENBERG 2014: 183 sieht den Triumphbeschluss als situationsspezifisches Instrument des Senats an, der verlorene Kontrolle über die Ereignisse habe wiedererlangen wollen. Vgl. zu den Triumphdebatten bei Livius PITTENGER 2008. Zu den Periochae, ihrem Entstehungsprozess und ihrem Verhältnis zum Gesamtwerk des Livius vgl. u.a. BINGHAM 1981 sowie Chaplin 2010.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

155

habita mentio).21 Der Senatsbeschluss wird somit von beiden Autoren durchaus kritisch gesehen – allerdings nicht aufgrund einer Norm, die einen solchen Beschluss generell als unrechtmäßig charakterisieren würde, wie man aufgrund der Angaben bei Valerius Maximus oder Lukan vielleicht erwartet hätte, sondern weil Octavian dem Mitfeldherrn gegenüber zurückstecken musste und keinen Triumph zugesprochen bekam. Und dennoch: Die Tatsache, dass hier offenbar eindeutig ein Triumph für einen Sieg über römische Bürger dekretiert wurde, bleibt in den Quellen unhinterfragt und wird als solche mit keinem Wort problematisiert. Gegen diese Ansicht könnte nun die Tatsache angeführt werden, dass Antonius und seine Anhänger nach der Niederlage bei Mutina vom Senat zu hostes populi Romani erklärt wurden.22 Dieser Akt hatte gravierende rechtliche Folgen23, insbesondere beinhaltete eine hostis-Erklärung die Aberkennung der Bürgerrechte.24 Aus formalrechtlicher Perspektive galten Antonius und seine Gefolgsleute folglich bei Dekretierung der Siegesfeier für D. Brutus nicht als römische Bürger, was den Triumph als solchen rechtlich gesehen weit weniger problematisch erscheinen lässt.25 Abstrahiert man jedoch von dieser rein formalrechtlichen Dimension und bezieht die Ebene der Wahrnehmung bzw. der politischen Praxis in die Überlegungen mit ein, lässt sich ein weit differenzierteres Bild der hostis-Erklärung und ihres Einflusses auf den Komplex des Bürgerkriegstriumphs zeichnen. So ist zunächst darauf hinzuweisen, dass es sich beim hostis-Begriff in der späten Republik vor allem um ein politisches Schlagwort handelte. Die Bezeichnung wird erst in der Zeit der Bürgerkriege überhaupt auf den innenpolitischen Bereich übertragen: Der hostis domesticus26, wie er uns im Falle des Antonius entgegentritt, ist wesentlich ein Produkt politischer Machtkämpfe, in deren Rahmen eine existierende formal-rechtliche Kategorie aufgegriffen, in einen neuen Kontext transponiert und den jeweiligen Verhältnissen bzw. Interessen der Akteure angepasst wurde.27 Da21

22 23 24 25

26 27

KOBER 2000: 342–345 sieht in der gesamten Passage vor allem eine Reaktion auf die „antoniusapologetische Historiographie“ und insbesondere auf Appian. Die Formulierung des Velleius und insbesondere seine Datierung der Verleihung des propraetorischen imperium an Octavian erweckten „den Eindruck, dieser habe den Krieg völlig selbständig und eigenverantwortlich geführt …“ (345). Vgl. auch WOODMAN 1983: 131. Die Aussage lässt sich zudem einem durch und durch negativen Bild zuordnen, das Velleius von D. Brutus zeichnet und das sich insbesondere in der Schilderung seiner Ermordung in Gallien manifestiert (Vell. Pat. 2.64.1; vgl. MARINCOLA 2011: 124f.). Zu Velleius i.A. auch SCHMITZER 2000 (mit Schwächen) sowie RICH 2011. Liv. per. 119; vgl. hierzu GOTTER 1996: 155. KUNKEL/WITTMANN 1995: 239: „Wer zum Feind erklärt war, war vogelfrei, niemand durfte ihn in irgendeiner Weise unterstützen, jedermann ihn ungestraft töten“. Vgl. u.a. ebd.: 238–240. Dieser Sachverhalt ließe sich auch auf andere der im Folgenden untersuchten Fallbeispiele übertragen. LANGE 2013: 86 sieht in der hostis-Erkärung eine Alternative zur Externalisierung des Krieges, die zur Legitimierung eines Bürgerkriegstriumphs angeführt werden konnte. Vgl. für diesen Ausdruck u.a. Cic. Sest. 11 Vgl. zur Entwicklung des hostis-Begriffs HELLEGOUARC’H 1972: 188f. sowie UNGERNSTERNBERG 1970.

156

Wolfgang Havener

bei ist die Frage nach eben diesen Akteuren von zentraler Bedeutung: Über den hostis-Status entschied der Senat, der somit vordergründig als Rechtsinstanz auftrat. Tatsächlich nutzte der Senat die hostis-Erklärung in den verschiedensten Situationen als politisches Druckmittel: Marius und seine Anhänger wurden zu hostes erklärt, ebenso wie Sulla. Demgegenüber erfolgte während der Auseinandersetzung zwischen Caesar und Pompeius gegen letzteren keine hostis-Erklärung – schließlich handelte es sich bei ihm gerade um einen Vertreter der Instanz, die das Recht der hostis-Erklärung für sich beanspruchte. Für die Triumphe, die sowohl Sulla als auch Caesar über ihre Gegner feierten, war dieser Unterschied jedoch unerheblich. Schon dies verdeutlicht, dass es sich beim hostis domesticus um eine „künstliche“ Kategorie mit Rechtsanspruch handelt, die von der realen Wahrnehmung der Zeitgenossen jedoch getrennt werden muss. Im Übrigen zeigen gerade die Debatten um die hostis-Erklärung des Antonius im Jahr 43 beispielhaft, wie diese rechtliche Kategorie im Rahmen der politischen Auseinandersetzungen innerhalb des Senats instrumentalisiert werden konnte.28 Ziel war nicht die Parallelisierung des römischen Gegners mit einem externen Feind. Die Hauptfunktion der hostis-Erklärung bestand darin, die Schutzfunktion des römischen Bürgerrechts auszuhebeln. Für diese Annahme spricht auch der Quellenbefund: Die Texte sprechen in allen Fällen – gleichgültig, ob eine hostis-Erklärung vorliegt oder nicht – von Bürgerkriegen (bella civilia), ohne dabei begrifflich zu unterscheiden. Ein Bürgerkrieg wiederum kann per Definition nur gegen jemanden geführt werden, der als Bürger angesehen wird – selbst wenn er rein rechtlich gesehen keine Bürgerrechte mehr besitzt. Dies ist entscheidend. Für die Wahrnehmung der Auseinandersetzungen war die hostis-Erklärung folglich keine maßgebliche Kategorie.29 Schließlich müssen die Sachverhalte angeführt werden, die den Gegenstand der vorliegenden Untersuchung bilden: Wäre die hostis-Erklärung eine Strategie gewesen, mit der die Probleme eines Triumphes von Römern über Römer hätten umgangen werden können, dann hätte in einigen der hier betrachteten Fälle, in denen eine hostis-Erklärung vorlag, die Notwendigkeit einer besonderen Thematisierung der Problematik eines Bürgerkriegstriumphs gar nicht bestanden.30 Aber dass auch Sulla, Pompeius und Octavian, die im Gegensatz zu Caesar möglicherweise mit hostis-Erklärungen hätten operieren können, sich mit dem Problem des Bürgerkriegstriumphs auseinandersetzen mussten, zeigt deutlich, dass man eben trennen muss zwischen einer rein formalrechtlichen Perspektive und der politischen Praxis bzw. dem Diskurs über diese Praxis. Ein Bürgerkriegstriumph barg stets ein enormes Problempotential – ganz gleich, ob es sich im formalrechtlichen 28 29

30

Vgl. GOTTER 1996: 134–155. Sogar Cicero selbst, der den hostis-Begriff wesentlich prägte (vgl. HABICHT 1990: 51), unterschied in den Philippica nicht zwischen Sulla, der ja eigentlich aufgrund der hostis-Erklärung der Marianer keine Schwierigkeiten hätte haben sollte, einen Triumph zu fordern und durchzuführen, und Caesar, für den diese Voraussetzung nicht gegolten hätte. Beide führten laut Cicero Bürgerkriege, forderten jedoch keinen Triumph. Selbst Cicero hielt folglich seine eigene Linie nicht stringent durch, wenn es ihm opportun erschien. Für eine Übersicht der hostis-Erklärungen in der späten Republik vgl. ALLÉLY 2012.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

157

Sinn bei den Gegnern nun um römische Bürger handelte oder um hostes. Ein Triumph über Römer unterschied sich von einem Triumph über tatsächliche auswärtige Feinde, ob nun der Gegner ein hostis war oder nicht. Die hostis-Erklärung stellte daher offenkundig kein probates Mittel im Umgang mit dem Sieg über Römer dar.31 Auch in den betrachteten Textpassagen des Livius und des Velleius wird die hostis-Erklärung des Antonius und seiner Anhänger nicht im Zusammenhang mit den Ehrungen für D. Brutus oder Octavian und zur Klärung der sich aus ihren Formulierungen ergebenden Unstimmigkeiten angeführt. Es stellt sich jedoch die Frage: Muss man bei einer Gegenüberstellung der Aussagen des Livius bzw. Velleius und des Valerius Maximus überhaupt von einer Diskrepanz ausgehen? Um diese Frage beantworten zu können, ist ein detaillierterer Blick auf die bereits angeführte Passage über den Bürgerkriegstriumph in den Facta ac dicta memorabilia vonnöten: Nach der oben zitierten allgemeinen Aussage über die angebliche Unmöglichkeit einer derartigen Siegesfeier führt Valerius Maximus einige Beispiele an, die diese zu untermauern scheinen.32 So seien Nasica und Opimius betrübt gewesen, nachdem sie die Anhänger der Gracchen abgeschlachtet hätten (factiones maesti trucidarunt),33 Marius und Cinna seien nach ihrem Wüten unter den Bürgern Roms nicht sofort zu den Altären der Götter geeilt (non protinus ad templa deorum et aras tetenderunt) und Sulla habe in seinem Triumph keine Abbildung einer römischen Stadt mitgeführt (ita civium Romanorum nullum oppidum vexit). Gerade die Formulierung dieses letzten exemplum lässt aber bereits Zweifel an der scheinbaren Stringenz in der Argumentation des Valerius Maximus auf31 32

33

Es muss an dieser Stelle festgehalten werden: Wenn im Text von „römischen Bürgern“ die Rede ist, wird damit stets Bezug auf die Wahrnehmungsebene genommen. Val. Max. 2.8.7: itaque et Nasica Ti. Gracchi et Gaii Opimius factiones maesti trucidarunt. Q. Catulus, M. Lepido collega suo cum omnibus seditiosis copiis exstincto, vultu moderatum prae se ferens gaudium in urbem revertit. C. etiam Antonius, Catilinae victor, abstersos gladios in castra rettulit. L. Cinna et C. Marius hauserant quidem avidi civilem sanguinem, sed non protinus ad templa deorum et aras tetenderunt. iam L. Sulla, qui plurima bella civilia confecit, cuius crudelissimi et insolentissimi successus fuerunt, cum consummata atque constituta potentia sua triumphum duceret, ut Graeciae et Asiae multas urbes, ita civium Romanorum nullum oppidum vexit. „Daher waren Nasica und Opimius betrübt, als sie das Gefolge des Tiberius und Gaius Gracchus abschlachteten. Als Q. Catulus seinen Amtskollegen M. Lepidus mitsamt seinen aufständischen Truppen auslöschte, kehrte er in die Stadt zurück und trug dabei nur einen Ausdruck gemäßigter Freude auf dem Gesicht. Auch C. Antonius, der Sieger über Catilina, brachte gesäuberte Schwerter ins Lager zurück. L. Cinna und C. Marius tranken gierig das Blut ihrer Mitbürger, strebten aber nicht sogleich zu den Tempeln und Altären der Götter. Bereits L. Sulla, der zahlreiche Bürgerkriege führte und dessen Erfolge in höchstem Maße grausam und unverschämt waren, führte, als er einen Triumph feierte und seine Macht festigte, viele Städte Griechenlands und Asiens mit sich, aber keine Stadt römischer Bürger“. Gerade die Auseinandersetzungen zwischen dem Senat und den Gracchen mit ihren Anhängern wurden im politischen Diskurs der späten Republik von verschiedenen Seiten immer wieder zur Erklärung der Entstehung der Bürgerkriege angeführt und dabei je nach Interessenlage höchst unterschiedlich bewertet; vgl. dazu WISEMAN 2010. Die Aussage des Valerius Maximus spiegelt dabei nur eine von mehreren Perspektiven wider.

158

Wolfgang Havener

kommen, impliziert es doch, dass die Möglichkeit einer solchen Zurschaustellung offensichtlich durchaus gegeben war und vom Publikum auch identifiziert worden wäre.34 Gibt also bereits das Beispiel Sullas Anlass dazu, die von Valerius Maximus eingangs postulierte Grundregel zu hinterfragen, wird dieser Eindruck durch die übrigen exempla, die der Autor anführt, noch verstärkt: Die Truppen des Antonius seien nach dem Sieg über die Catilinarier mit sauberen Schwertern ins Lager zurückgekehrt (abstersos gladios in castra rettulit). Auch Antonius habe – so kann man diese Zeilen selbstverständlich deuten – folglich nicht daran gedacht, einen Triumph für einen Sieg über römische Bürger zu feiern. Doch gleichzeitig weist diese Formulierung dem Leser einen anderen Weg: Antonius hatte einen Sieg errungen, der offenbar durchaus blutig war und der – daran lässt Valerius Maximus mit der Nennung der Catilinarier keinen Zweifel zu – über römische Bürger errungen wurde.35 Auch wenn er seine Soldaten vor der Rückkehr ins Lager ihre Schwerter säubern ließ, blieben diese doch ein Symbol für die Art des Sieges, der durch sie errungen wurde. Selbst wenn also eine allzu ostentative Zurschaustellung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei den Gegnern des Antonius um Römer handelte, unterblieb, musste jegliche Präsentation des Sieges geradezu notwendigerweise auf eben diese Tatsache Bezug nehmen. Eine solche Bezugnahme konnte jedoch unterschiedlich gestaltet werden, wie das exemplum des Catulus eindrücklich vor Augen führt, der Valerius Maximus zufolge nach dem Kampf gegen Lepidus mit einem Siegerlächeln die Stadt betrat – wenn auch nur mit einem zurückhaltenden (vultu moderatum prae se ferens gaudium in urbem revertit). Valerius Maximus relativiert folglich die anfangs wiedergegebene Norm der Unmöglichkeit eines Bürgerkriegstriumphs im Rahmen seiner exempla-Sammlung deutlich und spielt auf eine zentrale Dimension des Bürgerkriegssiegs und seiner Präsentation an.36 Es handelte sich dabei stets um einen Drahtseilakt, der als solcher auch im Bewusstsein sowohl der Akteure wie des Publikums präsent war. Einerseits klingt in den Beispielen des Marius oder Sullas deutlich ein Zusammenhang zwischen der Konsolidierung von politischem Einfluss und der Präsentation des Sieges im Bürgerkrieg an. Gleichzeitig zeigen die exempla jedoch auch die damit verbundenen Probleme auf: Wenngleich eine Instrumentalisierung des Sieges im Bürgerkrieg offenbar prinzipiell möglich war und ein solcher Erfolg natürlich in der Praxis zur Begründung einer herausgehobenen Stellung und zur 34 35

36

Zum Triumph Sullas im Einzelnen s.u. 162–166. Auch für Valerius Maximus stellte die hostis-Erklärung folglich kein Kriterium für die Bewertung von militärischen Auseinandersetzungen dar, das die Auswahl seiner exempla, die ganz eindeutig unter dem Schlagwort der Bürgerkriegstriumphe geführt werden, beeinflusst hätte. Dies lässt sich auch unabhängig von den Quellen wie von der Intention des Autors, über die viel spekuliert worden ist, festhalten. Es ist dabei unerheblich, ob es sich bei Valerius Maximus um einen prinzipats-affirmativen (ENGELS 2001) oder -kritischen Autor (GOLDBECK/MITTAG 2008) handelt; diese Frage kann in diesem Rahmen nicht näher erörtert werden (vgl. hierzu u.a. LANGE 2013: 70f., der davon ausgeht, dass anhand dieser Stelle keine Rückschlüsse auf eine politische Positionierung des Autors gezogen werden können).

Triumphus ex bello civili?

159

Durchsetzung von Machtansprüchen dienen mochte, waren Bürgerkrieg und discordia zu jeder Zeit eindeutig negativ konnotiert.37 Wenn also auch in der politischen Praxis die Nutzung des durch einen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg errungenen Einflusses ein probates Mittel darstellen konnte,38 um die eigene Position zu festigen, ergaben sich dadurch auf der Ebene des politischen Diskurses notwendigerweise neue Angriffspunkte, die auf irgendeine Art und Weise abgefedert werden mussten.39 Ein expliziter Hinweis auf den Gegner und damit ein eindeutiger Verweis auf den Charakter der Auseinandersetzung wurde, wie aus der Struktur der exempla des Valerius Maximus hervorgeht, vor diesem Hintergrund offenbar tatsächlich vermieden, selbst wenn die Existenz einer entsprechenden Norm im 1. Jahrhundert v. Chr. als solche dem Leser der Facta ac dicta memorabilia vor dem Hintergrund der angeführten Fallbeispiele schließlich fragwürdig erscheinen musste.40 Der Grund hierfür liegt nahe: Mochte der Sieger zwar durch seinen Erfolg die Macht errungen haben, galt es danach, diese auch zu sichern und somit einen ephemeren Moment in eine dauerhafte Struktur zu überführen.41 Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen war die Kooperation des Siegers mit der Oberschicht, war die Akzeptanz der neuen Verhältnisse unerlässlich – wie das Beispiel Octavians bzw. des späteren Augustus eindrücklich vor Augen führt.42 Ein allzu deutlicher Verweis darauf, dass man diese Macht mit dem Blut römischer Bürger erkauft hatte, war natürlich nur bedingt dazu angetan, diese Akzeptanz zu fördern – wie ebenfalls der Blick auf Augustus, der sich während seiner gesamten Regierungszeit mit dem eigenen Weg zur Macht und seiner Rolle während der Bürgerkriege auseinander37

38

39 40

41 42

Vgl. GOTTER 2011: 61. BREED/DAMON/ROSSI 2010: 4 stellen fest: „Not only is discord, discordia, the right term for the conflict of citizen against citizen, but the struggle is also one of the Roman citizenry against discord itself and of discord repeatedly assailing the citizens“. Vgl. hierzu auch WISEMAN 2010 sowie BATSTONE 2010. Vgl. BREED/DAMON/ROSSI 2010: 4, wo Bürgerkrieg zu Recht als ein permanentes Element der römischen politischen Kultur charakterisiert wird. FLOWER 2010: 74 sieht in Bürgerkriegen zentrale Markierungen und Momente politischen Wandels. Eine zentrale Rolle spielte dabei u.a. die Zuweisung von Schuld, aus der sich jedoch wiederum neue Problematiken ergeben konnten; vgl. GOTTER 2011: 61f. LANGE 2013: 85f. spricht von einem generellen Spannungsverhältnis zwischen der Maßgabe, dass ein Triumph ausschließlich für Siege über externe Gegner vergeben werden konnte, und dem Bedürfnis der Feldherrn, ihren Machtansprüchen Legitimität zu verleihen. Legt man den Fokus auf den Triumph als Ritual, lässt sich diese Erkenntnis in einem entscheidenden Punkt erweitern: Es trifft zu, dass offenbar im Rahmen der Vergabe von Triumphen auf einen wie auch immer gearteten externen Charakter der zugrundeliegenden Auseinandersetzung fokussiert wurde (allerdings mit den auch von LANGE angegebenen Ausnahmen der Triumphe für Munda und Mutina). Zugleich kann man jedoch zwischen der Vergabe eines Triumphs und seiner Durchführung als Ritual unterscheiden. Im Folgenden soll daher untersucht werden, ob das Kriterium der Externalität für die Präsentation des Bürgerkriegssieges im Rahmen des eigentlichen Rituals eine Rolle spielte. Vgl. HÖLSCHER 2006: 27f. Vgl. grundlegend FLAIG 1992, dessen Überlegungen zum Prinzipat als „Akzeptanzsystem“ sich mit einigen Modifikationen durchaus bereits auf die politische Ordnung der späten Republik anwenden lassen.

160

Wolfgang Havener

setzen musste und sich dabei stets einer auch in den Quellen fassbaren Kritik ausgesetzt sah, verdeutlichen kann.43

II. Ein permanent sichtbarer Eintrag in den Triumphalfasten, der mit den Worten triumphus ex bello civili beginnt, wäre vor dem Hintergrund der im ersten Abschnitt angestellten Überlegungen nur schwer vorstellbar. Und dennoch wurde gerade das Ritual des Triumphs in der späten Republik wiederholt für eine Zurschaustellung des Sieges im Bürgerkrieg und eines durch diesen Sieg errungenen Status instrumentalisiert.44 Von Sulla bis zu Octavian nahm eine ganze Reihe von Feldherrn den beschriebenen Drahtseilakt auf sich, in dessen Rahmen dem Triumphzug eine zentrale Bedeutung zukam. Schließlich war der Triumph ein Ritual, das genau an der Schnittstelle zwischen dem vergänglichen Sieg und der Möglichkeit lag, dauerhaft auf die politischen Verhältnisse Einfluss zu nehmen.45 Rituale erfüllen in jeder Art von Gesellschaft und in den verschiedensten Teilbereichen dieser Gesellschaften eine gewisse sinnstiftende Funktion, sei es für die Entstehung und Praxis von Religion, Formen sozialer Vergemeinschaftung, Erziehung oder Politik.46 Rituale ebenso wie sprachliche Äußerungen stellen Teile von Diskursen dar, sind eine Art von Kommunikation, die das rein Sprachliche übersteigt. Stanley Tambiah betont, dass Rituale stets zwei integrale Bestandteile in sich vereinen: Inhalt und Form.47 Beide Aspekte determinieren den performativen Charakter von Ritualen, die folglich als eine Art von „Aufführungen, die der Selbstdarstellung und Selbstverständigung, Stiftung bzw. Bestätigung oder auch Transformation von Gemeinschaften dienen und unter Anwendung je spezifischer Inszenierungsstrategien und -regeln geschaffen werden“.48 Zugleich müssen Rituale als symbolische Kommunikationsmodelle bzw. Zeichensysteme stets im Rahmen ihres Kontextes untersucht werden, da sich beide wechselseitig beeinflussen können49: Zum einen sind Rituale keineswegs, wie es manche Definitionen nahelegen,50 in ihrer formalen Zusammensetzung unveränderbare Komplexe. Vielmehr 43

44

45 46 47 48 49 50

Dieser Aspekt bildet einen der zentralen Aspekte meiner Dissertation (HAVENER [in Druckvorbereitung]). Zum Nachleben dieser Kritik an der Rolle Octavians im Bürgerkrieg vgl. auch GOTTER 2011: 64–68. Die entgegengesetzte Ansicht vertritt ÖSTENBERG 2014: „In practice …, staged on the streets as a ritual and a procession, the triumph, I would argue, proved time after time monumentally incapable of performing civil war victories“ (184). ÖSTENBERG zufolge wurden stattdessen andere Strategien entwickelt, um den Sieg im Bürgerkrieg öffentlich zu präsentieren und zu kommemorieren (Monumente und Kalender), die sich letztlich jedoch ebenfalls als inadäquat erwiesen hätten. Vgl. HÖLSCHER 2006: 37–39. Vgl. hierzu exemplarisch MICHAELS 2001 sowie WULF/ZIRFAS 2004. Vgl. TAMBIAH 1985. FISCHER-LICHTE 2003: 47. Vgl. hierzu grundlegend GEERTZ 1973 sowie TURNER 1969 und SOEFFNER 1992. So beispielsweise RAPPAPORT 1999: 36f.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

161

zeigt sich bis auf die Ebene einzelner Ritualelemente ein enormes Wandlungspotential. Wenn das Ritual eng mit dem Kontext verflochten ist, in welchem es sich manifestiert und welchen es durch seinen performativen Charakter abbildet, muss daher die Frage gestellt werden, wie sich Änderungen dieses Kontexts auf das Ritual auswirken. Für die hier behandelte Fragestellung bedeutet dies konkret, dass sich Verschiebungen der politischen Rahmenbedingungen durchaus auf das Triumphritual auswirken konnten. Von Sulla bis zu Octavian bildeten sich innerhalb eines relativ kurzen Zeitraums zahlreiche Konstellationen heraus, es wurden Allianzen geschmiedet und gebrochen, einzelne Potentaten lösten sich an der Spitze des römischen Gemeinwesens ab und die Oberschicht, die selbst einen aktiven Part im Geschehen übernahm, sah sich immer wieder neuen Kommunikationspartnern gegenüber, mit denen man sich verständigen musste. Da die Grundlage dieser Verschiebungen stets der militärische Sieg war und insbesondere derjenige über römische Bürger, stellt sich die Frage, ob das Triumphritual als Form der Präsentation solcher Siege mit den politischen Entwicklungen in irgendeiner Form korrespondierte, sprich: ob und wie die jeweiligen Triumphatoren das Ritual nutzten, um spezifische Botschaften zu vermitteln. Zum anderen lassen sich Rituale gleich welcher Art in einzelne Sequenzen zerlegen, aus deren Einzelanalyse sich ein Gesamtbild des Rituals und der mit ihm verbundenen Aussagen ergeben soll. Zwar ist dies in der Ritualforschung bereits vielfach festgestellt worden.51 Interessanterweise wird jedoch nur selten die Frage aufgeworfen, wie die spezifische Anordnung solcher Elemente oder subtile formale wie inhaltliche Schwerpunktsetzungen Einfluss auf das Ritual als solches und seine Aussagen haben.52 Zu überlegen ist folglich, ob nicht nur der Kontext das Ritual beeinflusst, sondern ob auch eine Umgestaltung des Rituals Auswirkungen auf den Kontext haben kann: Wie gingen die intendierten Adressaten der durch das Ritual vermittelten Botschaften mit diesen um? Welche Reaktionen sind zu erkennen und wie lassen sie sich im Hinblick auf den politischen Kontext interpretieren? Und schließlich: Was sagen eventuelle Reaktionen der Adressaten über die Botschaften selbst aus?

51 52

Vgl. u.a. GLADIGOW 2004 sowie SOEFFNER 2004. OPPITZ 2001: 95 spricht in diesem Zusammenhang von einem „Montageplan von Ritualen“ und betont: „Ein Ritual unterscheidet sich von einem zweiten durch die spezifische Auswahl von Gegenständen und deren Anordnung, durch die Auswahl bestimmter sprachlicher Äußerungen und deren Abfolge sowie durch einen festen Satz charakteristischer Handlungen, die allesamt aus einem begrenzten Vorrat stammen, dessen Volumen ein jeweiliges religiöses Universum umschreibt. Die von den berufenen Akteuren getroffene Auswahl und Mischung der diesem Vorrat entstammenden Elemente folgt einem Entwurf, dem Montageplan, an dem der Typ eines Rituals, die Art einer religiösen Äußerung und der Stil einer Religion ablesbar sind“.

162

Wolfgang Havener

III. Den ersten Anhaltspunkt für eine Thematisierung des Bürgerkriegssieges im Rahmen des spätrepublikanischen Triumphs liefert wiederum die bereits mehrmals zitierte Passage des Valerius Maximus: Als Sulla im Jahr 81 v. Chr. seinen in den fasti so betitelten Triumph über den König Mithridates VI. von Pontos feierte,53 habe er keine Abbildungen von eroberten römischen Städten (denn nach der Rückkehr aus dem Osten hatte Sulla ja in Italien die Marianer bekämpft) durch Roms Straßen tragen lassen.54 In dieser Formulierung wird bereits ein möglicher Ansatzpunkt für die Präsentation eines Sieges über römische Bürger angesprochen: Ein zentraler Bestandteil des Rituals war die Zurschaustellung bildlicher Darstellungen oder von Modellen, die die Abläufe der Kämpfe, Siege in einzelnen Schlachten, den Tod prominenter Gegner oder eben die Eroberung feindlicher Städte abbildeten.55 Die Auswahl der Motive oblag dabei offenbar allein dem siegreichen Feldherrn.56 Die Abbildungen boten somit Gelegenheit zur Schwerpunktsetzung und zur illustrativen Hervorhebung bestimmter Aussagen und stellten somit ein Mittel zur individuellen Einflussnahme auf das Ritual dar. Zwar hebt Valerius Maximus hervor, dass Sulla diese Möglichkeiten gerade nicht nutzte. Indem der Autor diese Formulierung wählt, zeigt sich jedoch zugleich, dass die Möglichkeit dazu durchaus bestand und dass es denkbar gewesen wäre, dass Sulla dieses Element hätte einsetzen können, um einen ausdrücklichen Verweis auf seinen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg anzubringen – beispielsweise durch eine Abbildung der Einnahme von Praeneste oder des Sieges an der Porta Collina.57 Sulla standen jedoch andere Stellschrauben zur Verfügung, die er nutzte, um zu verdeutlichen, dass es bei seinem Triumph keineswegs nur um den Sieg über Mithridates ging. Neben den gerade angesprochenen Abbildungen bestanden die römischen Triumphzüge nämlich zu einem großen Teil aus der während des Feldzugs errungenen Beute: Reichtümer aller Art, Münzen, Kunstgegenstände und Ähnliches wurden in möglichst großer Zahl auf Wagen an den Zuschauern vorbeigefahren.58 In den Naturalis Historiae berichtet Plinius d.Ä. über das Gewicht

53

54

55 56 57 58

Zu diesem Triumph vgl. die Zusammenstellung bei DEGRASSI 1947: 563 sowie ITGENSHORST 2005: 329–332 (Kat.-Nr. 243). Im Folgenden werden zur leichteren Nachvollziehbarkeit für jeden der behandelten Triumphe die entsprechenden Einträge in den Katalogen DEGRASSIs und ITGENSHORSTs angegeben, die einen Überblick über die Eckdaten geben. Der Triumph Sullas hat in der Forschung bisher nur eingeschränkte Beachtung gefunden. So wird er beispielsweise in einigen der einschlägigen Biographien gar nicht oder nur am Rande erwähnt (FÜNDLING 2010, CHRIST 2002, KEAVENEY 1982). Vgl. jedoch die prägnanten Überlegungen bei SUMI 2005: 31f. Vgl. hierzu ÖSTENBERG 2009: 189–261, bes. 190–192 mit einer Diskussion des Begriffs „triumphal painting“. Vgl. u. a. HOLLIDAY 1997: 130. Zum Schicksal Praenestes nach Sullas Sieg vgl. den Beitrag von Federico SANTANGELO in diesem Band. Vgl. ÖSTENBERG 2009: 19–127 sowie kritisch BEARD 2007: 143–186.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

163

der Edelmetalle, die in Sullas Triumphzug mitgeführt wurden.59 Interessant ist dabei die Trennung, von der der Autor berichtet: Der Triumph Sullas erstreckte sich – was zu diesem Zeitpunkt zwar ungewöhnlich, aber nicht ausgeschlossen war – über zwei Tage. Am ersten Tag, so geht aus dem Bericht des Plinius hervor, präsentierte man die Beute aus dem Krieg gegen Mithridates. Am zweiten jedoch wurde das Gold, das der Sohn des Marius aus dem Staatsschatz entwendet und nach Praeneste gebracht hatte, feierlich durch die Stadt gekarrt. Die Summe habe man auf spezielle Schilder geschrieben, die dem Beutezug vorangetragen wurden. Im Rahmen dieses Triumphs wurde folglich eine eindeutige und als solche wahrnehmbare Trennung vorgenommen zwischen der Beute, die im Osten durch den Sieg über Mithridates und seine griechischen Verbündeten errungen wurde, und den Reichtümern, die Sulla nach der Niederlage des jüngeren Marius bei Praeneste in die Hände fielen.60 Von entscheidender Bedeutung ist hier, dass letztere dabei ebenso wie die gewöhnliche Kriegsbeute zur Schau gestellt wurden, womit zum einen der Form des Triumphrituals Genüge getan wurde und zum anderen deutlich gemacht wurde, dass eben nicht nur der König von Pontos von Sulla besiegt worden war, sondern dass auch Römer zu den Geschlagenen gehörten.61 Indem jedoch betont wurde, dass es sich dabei um Teile des römischen Staatsschatzes handelte, wurde dem damit unzweideutig verbundenen Hinweis auf den Sieg über römische Bürger die Spitze genommen. Potentiellen Problemen, die 59

60

61

Plin. nat. 33.16: ergo ut maxime MM tantum pondo, cum capta est Roma, anno CCCLXIIII fuere, cum iam capitum liberorum censa essent CLII DLXXIII. in eadem post annos CCCVII, quod ex Capitolinae aedis incendio ceterisque omnibus delubris C. Marius filius Praeneste detulerat, XIIII pondo, quae sub eo titulo in triumpho transtulit Sulla et argenti VI. idem ex reliqua omni victoria pridie transtulerat auri pondo XV, argenti p. CXV. „Es waren demnach höchstens zweitausend Pfund Gold vorhanden, als Rom im Jahre 364 (390 v. Chr.) eingenommen wurde, obgleich schon 152 573 freie Bürger gezählt wurden. In derselben Stadt betrug es 307 Jahre später 14 000 Pfund Gold, was C. Marius der Sohn aus dem Brande des kapitolinischen Tempels und aus allen übrigen Tempeln nach Praeneste fortgeschleppt hatte; unter der gleichen Bezeichnung führte es Sulla zusammen mit 6 000 Pfund Silber im Triumph vor. Dieser hatte auch schon am Tage zuvor 15 000 Pfund Gold und 115 000 Pfund Silber als Beute aller seiner übrigen Siege vorgeführt“ (Übers. KÖNIG). Vgl. auch BEHR 1993: 136. Gegen eine solche Trennung spricht sich SUMI 2005: 32 aus, der davon ausgeht, dass die Zurschaustellung der Beute aus dem Krieg im Osten und aus dem Krieg gegen den jüngeren Marius dazu dienen sollte, die beiden Gegner auf eine Stufe zu stellen, sie beide in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung zu hostes des römischen Staates zu stilisieren. LANGE 2013: 73f. spricht sich zwar explizit gegen SUMIs These der bewussten Verschleierung des Bürgerkriegstriumphs aus, sieht hier jedoch zugleich einen Beleg dafür, dass „the blurring between civil and foreign war is already visible at this early stage of the civil wars“. Doch auch wenn der Triumph offiziell für den Sieg über Mithridates vergeben wurde, wurden auf der performativen Ebene externer Sieg und Sieg im Bürgerkrieg nicht vermischt, sondern explizit voneinander geschieden. Sulla nutzte seien Triumph nicht nur dazu, Verweise auf den Bürgerkrieg anzubringen, sondern stellte seinen Sieg über römische Gegner als eigenständige Leistung dar. Jeder Zuschauer dürfte sich darüber im Klaren gewesen sein, dass es sich beim Sohn des Marius und seinen Anhängern nicht um Samniten handelte. Sulla konnte – und wollte – folglich keineswegs einfach „die Auseinandersetzung in Italien als Neuauflage des bellum sociale erscheinen“ lassen, wie BEHR 1993: 137 dies annimmt.

164

Wolfgang Havener

sich durch die Präsentation des Staatsschatzes im Triumphzug hätten ergeben können, wurde so entgegengewirkt: Sulla hatte, so die Aussage, das Geld, das sich ein anderer – und zwar ein Römer – widerrechtlich angeeignet hatte, seinem rechtmäßigen Besitzer zurückgegeben: dem römischen Volk. Auf diese Weise konnte zum einen der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg als solcher präsentiert, gleichzeitig jedoch umgedeutet und damit ebenso wie die aus diesem Sieg resultierende herausgehobene Stellung in eine etwas akzeptablere Form gebracht werden. Noch deutlicher wird diese Vorgehensweise, wenn man eine Formulierung Plutarchs hinzuzieht. In seiner Biographie Sullas berichtet er,62 mehr noch als durch die erbeuteten Schätze des Mithridates habe sich der Triumph dadurch ausgezeichnet, dass an der Siegesfeier anerkannte und einflussreiche Bürger teilnahmen – nicht als Publikum, sondern als Teil der Prozession. Diese nannten Sulla ihren Retter und Vater, da er ihnen und ihren Familien die Rückkehr in die Heimatstadt ermöglicht habe. Es ist unschwer zu erkennen, dass es sich hierbei um Angehörige der Oberschicht gehandelt haben dürfte, die während der Vorherrschaft des Marius und des Cinna aus Rom hatten fliehen müssen.63 Sulla machte sich folglich neben der Präsentation der Beute noch einen anderen Bestandteil des Triumphrituals zu Nutze – allerdings in einer Art und Weise, die durchaus innovativ war: Zum einen war es durchaus nicht unüblich, in einem Triumphzug befreite Kriegsgefangene mitzuführen, wie Geoffrey Sumi hervorhebt.64 Wenn auch die von Plutarch erwähnten Senatoren natürlich nicht aus einer wie auch immer gearteten Gefangenschaft gerettet werden mussten, so ermöglichte ihnen der Sieg Sullas doch zumindest die Rückkehr aus dem Exil, was sie im Rahmen der Präsentation dieses Sieges natürlich gleichsam zwangsläufig zu einem wichtigen Bestandteil der Legitimierungsstrategie machte.65 Zum anderen scheint mir hier jedoch ein Verweis auf ein weiteres zentrales Element des Rituals vorzuliegen: Ebenso wie Abbildungen und erbeutete Reichtümer, wurden in einem Triumphzug stets auch Gefangene vorgeführt – sowohl 62

63 64 65

Plut. Sulla 34.1f.: ὁ μέντοι θρίαμβος αὐτοῦ τῇ πολυτελαίᾳ καὶ καινότητι τῶν βασιλικῶν λαφύτων σοβαρὸς γενόμενος μείζονα κόσμον ἔσχε καὶ καλὸν θέαμα τοὺς φυγάδας, οἱ γὰρ ἐνδοξότατοι καὶ δυνατώτατοι τῶν πολιτῶν ἐστεφανωμένοι παρείποντο, σωτῆρα καὶ πατέρα τὸν Σύλλαν ἀποκαλοῦντες, ἅτε δὴ δι’ ἐκεῖνον εἰς τὴν πατρίδα κατιόντες καὶ κομιζόμενοι παῖδας καί γυναῖκας. „Sein Triumph jedoch, der schon durch die Kostbarkeit und Seltenheit der dem König abgenommenen Beute von großer Pracht war, erhielt einen noch größeren Schmuck und war ein noch schöneres Schauspiel durch die verbannt Gewesenen. Denn die angesehensten und einflußreichsten Bürger geleiteten ihn bekränzt und priesen Sulla als ihren Retter und Vater; kehrten sie doch durch ihn ins Vaterland zurück und brachten Frauen und Kinder mit“ (Übers. ZIEGLER/WUHRMANN). In diesem Element sieht auch Sumi 2005: 32 korrekterweise „an overt reminder of the civil war“. Ebd. Im Triumph wurde damit eine der zentralen und in verschiedenen Kontexten greifbaren Legitimationsstrategien Sullas aufgegriffen: Die Auseinandersetzung mit Marius und seinen Anhängern war notwendig, um die Ordnung im römischen Staat wiederherzustellen, wobei der wiedererlangte Staatsschatz und die zurückgekehrten Bürger als Symbol dieser Ordnung anzusehen waren; vgl. hierzu BEHR 1993: 89–100 sowie LANGE 2013: 73f.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

165

prominente als auch weniger bekannte.66 Sieht man nun den Zweck dieser Zurschaustellung römischer Bürger ähnlich wie beim Staatsschatz darin, eine möglichst akzeptable Verbindung zweier Aussagen zu erreichen, darf man wohl davon ausgehen, dass diese Gruppe auch mit derjenigen der mitgeführten Gefangenen parallelisiert werden kann. Da es offenbar nicht opportun gewesen wäre, römische Kriegsgefangene in der Prozession mitzuführen, konnten die zurückkehrenden Exilanten auch an ihre Stelle treten.67 Der Schwerpunkt der Aussage wurde dabei auf subtile Weise verschoben: Während gefangene Könige, Adlige oder Heerführer vor allem dazu dienten, dem besiegten Feind ein Gesicht zu geben, so haben wir es hier eben mit einer Präsentation befreiter „Gefangener“ zu tun. Die römischen Bürger, die im Triumph durch die Stadt zogen und Sulla für ihre Rettung dankten, zeigen somit wiederum zweierlei: Zum einen machten auch sie deutlich, dass hier der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg gefeiert wurde. Denn nur der Erfolg Sullas über seine römischen Feinde ermöglichte es ihnen, wieder in die Stadt zurückzukehren – der Sieg über Mithridates hatte auf ihr Geschick keinen Einfluss. Zum anderen ist dies sicherlich als Versuch zu deuten, den Sieg als solchen positiv zu interpretieren und den Sieger dadurch weniger angreifbar zu machen.68 Denn dass sich der Triumph dennoch durchaus dazu eignete, Kritik an Sulla und seinem Vorgehen zu äußern, zeigt eine Passage bei Appian.69 Dieser berichtet von Reaktionen auf Sullas Siegesfeier. Noch während die Prozession durch die 66 67

Hierzu vgl. ÖSTENBERG 2009: 128–167 sowie BEARD 2007: 107–142. An dieser Stelle wäre es natürlich von Vorteil zu wissen, ob die Exilanten am ersten oder zweiten Tag an der Prozession teilnahmen. Aufgrund der Schwerpunktsetzung, die durch die Beute vorgenommen wurde, lässt sich möglicherweise der Schluss ziehen, dass am ersten Tag wirkliche Kriegsgefangene mitgeführt wurden und die Exilanten möglicherweise am zweiten Tag an ihre Stelle traten. Die Parallelisierung wäre damit noch augenfälliger; eine zweifelsfreie Aussage ist hier natürlich nicht möglich. ÖSTENBERG 2014: 188 postuliert, man habe das Fehlen römischer Gefangener lediglich durch einen äußerst transgressiven Akt oder durch einen vollständigen Verzicht auf jeglichen Verweis kompensieren können. Die hier vorgestellte Strategie Sullas demonstriert jedoch, wie man ein solches Dilemma umgehen konnte. 68 Eine eingehende Untersuchung des sullanischen Triumphs erbringt somit keineswegs das Ergebnis, Sulla habe seinen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg verschleiern wollen, indem er den jüngeren Marius mit Mithridates gleichgesetzt habe und somit auch seine römischen Gegner wie auswärtige Feinde behandelt habe (so jedoch SUMI 2005: 31f.). Gerade das Gegenteil war der Fall: Indem der Sieg über den jüngeren Marius vom Sieg über Mithridates performativ eindeutig separiert wurde, wurde die Besonderheit dieser Auseinandersetzung noch betont. Akzeptiert man diese These, so lassen sich auch Widersprüche auflösen, wie sie bei BEHR 1993: 136f. zu greifen sind, der zum einen korrekterweise feststellt, Sulla habe „gleichermaßen bewusst Assoziationen zu seinem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg hergestellt“, dabei jedoch weiterhin bemüht ist, das Leitbild vom verbotenen Bürgerkriegstriumph aufrechtzuerhalten: „Den Waffengang mit cives Romani hat Sulla jedoch nicht in den Mittelpunkt gestellt“. 69 App. civ. 1.101: καί ἐθριάμβευσεν ἐπὶ τῷ Μιθριδατείῳ πολέμῷ. καί τινες αὐτοῦ τῆν ἀρχὴν ἀρνουμένην βασιλείαν ἐπισκώπτοντες ἐκάλουν, ὅτι τὸ τοῦ βασιλέως ὄνομα μόνον ἐπικρύπτοι: οἱ δ’ ἐπὶ τοὐναντίον ἀπὸ τῶν ἔργων μετέφερον καὶ τυραννίδα ὁμολογοῦσαν ἔλεγον. „Er hielt auch wegen des mithridatischen Krieges einen Triumph ab, in dessen Verlauf einige Zuschauer sein Regiment spöttisch ‚eine Verleugnung des Königtums‘ nannten, weil er allein die Bezeichnung König verberge. Andere kamen von seinen Werken her zu einer gegenteiligen Auffassung und sprachen von ‚eingestandener Tyrannis‘.“ (Übers. VEH)

166

Wolfgang Havener

Stadt zog, so schreibt Appian, hätten manche Sullas Regierung als „verkappte Königsherrschaft“ bezeichnet. Andere wiederum hätten angesichts seiner Taten davon gesprochen, dass sich der Tyrann bereits jetzt als solcher zu erkennen gegeben habe. Diese Passage zeigt somit deutlich das Potential für Kritik, das ein Bürgerkriegstriumph auch bei prinzipieller Durchführbarkeit in sich trug. Ein Feldherr musste folglich abwägen, ob der Nutzen einer Zurschaustellung seines Sieges über römische Widersacher die möglicherweise nachteiligen Auswirkungen aufwog. Der Triumph Sullas hat somit bereits einige zentrale Stellschrauben aufgezeigt, die der siegreiche Feldherr im Rahmen des Rituals zur Verfügung hatte: die Zurschaustellung von Gefangenen, die Präsentation von Beute und das Mitführen von Illustrationen. Daneben hatte jedoch jeder Triumphzug ein unbestreitbares Zentrum, um das sich sowohl die Prozession selbst als auch alle mit ihr verbundenen Riten gruppierten: die Person des Triumphators.

IV. Dass Pompeius es verstand, diese spezielle Rolle zu spielen und sich ihrer gern bediente, zeigt sich deutlich im Rahmen seines dritten Triumphs, als er mit dem Mantel Alexanders des Großen bekleidet in die Stadt einzog und in der Prozession ein Portrait seiner selbst, ganz aus Perlen, mitführen ließ.70 Für den hier behandelten Kontext ist jedoch eine andere Begebenheit von größerer Bedeutung: An einem 12. März in den Jahren zwischen 81 und 79 v. Chr. feierte Pompeius, der zu diesem Zeitpunkt weder Senator war noch die Altersgrenze für öffentliche Ämter erreicht hatte, seinen ersten Triumph ex Africa.71 War dies schon für sich gesehen etwas nie Dagewesenes, ging Pompeius sogar noch einen Schritt weiter. Nicht mit der üblichen Pferdequadriga wollte er Plinius d.Ä.72 und Plutarch73 zufolge in die 70

Vgl. hierzu BEARD 2007: 7–41. Dieser dritte Triumph, der in den Quellen weit detaillierter beschrieben wird als die beiden vorhergehenden Siegesfeiern des Pompeius, hat naturgemäß das Hauptinteresse der Forschung auf sich gezogen. Ähnlich wie bei Sulla tritt demgegenüber der erste Triumph in den meisten Arbeiten biographischer wie systematischer Natur in den Hintergrund; vgl. u.a. die knappen Ausführungen bei GELZER 1959: 40 oder CHRIST 2004: 36f. sowie DINGMANN 2007. 71 DEGRASSI 1947: 564; ITGENSHORST 2005: 335 Nr. 246, die den Triumph beide für das Jahr 79 verzeichnen. BADIAN 1955 argumentierte dagegen für das Jahr 81. 72 Plin. nat. 8.4: Romae iuncti primum subiere currum Pompei Magni Africano triumpho, quod prius India victa triumphante Libero patre memoratur. Procilius negat potuisse Pompei triumpho iunctos egredi porta. „In Rom wurden sie zuerst vor den Wagen gespannt beim Triumph Pompeius’ des Großen über Afrika, was vorher schon anlässlich des Triumphes des Vaters Liber nach der Unterwerfung Indiens berichtet wird. Procilius bemerkt, dass Elefantengespanne beim Triumph des Pompeius nicht nebeneinander durch das Tor schreiten konnten“ (Übers. KÖNIG). 73 Plut. Pompeius 14.4: πολλῶν δὲ δυσχεραινόντων καὶ ἀγανακτούντων, ἔτι μᾶλλον αὐτούς, ὥς φασι, βουλόμενος ἀνιᾶν ὁ Πομπήϊος, ἐπεχείρησεν ἐλεφάντων ἅρματι τεττάρων ἐπιβὰς εἰσελαύνειν ἤγαγε γὰρ ἐκ Λιβύης τῶν βασιλικῶν συχνοὺς αἰχμαλώτους: ἀλλὰ τῆς πύλης στενωτέρας οὔσης ἀπέστη καὶ μετῆλθεν ἐπὶ τοὺς ἵππους. „Als jetzt viele sich empörten und entrüsteten, nahm sich Pompejus vor, um sie (wie es heißt) noch mehr zu kränken, auf einem mit

Triumphus ex bello civili?

167

Stadt einziehen, sondern mit einem Viergespann aus Elefanten. Zweifellos lag darin ein Verweis auf den Ort des Sieges, auf Africa.74 Doch darin darf sich die Interpretation dieses Ereignisses nicht erschöpfen. Pompeius hatte in Nordafrika nicht nur einen Sieg über den numidischen König errungen, sondern auch über die Reste der Fraktion des Marius, mithin über römische Gegner. Offenbar zielte Pompeius darauf ab, diesen Sieg zur Festigung seiner Stellung im politischen Gefüge Roms zu instrumentalisieren. Er beabsichtigte, sich als Sieger, als Feldherr und als neuen Faktor im politischen Spiel auch gegenüber seinem Förderer Sulla zu präsentieren.75 Folglich nutzte er die rituelle Präsentation des Sieges – und zwar eines Sieges auch über Römer – und die mittels der Elefantenquadriga angestrebte Überhöhung der eigenen Person, um ein eindeutiges Signal zu geben. Nicht umsonst legt Plutarch dem Triumphator im Gespräch mit Sulla, der ihm angeblich den Triumph verweigern wollte, die Worte in den Mund, dass man die aufgehende Sonne mehr verehre als die untergehende.76 Sulla hatte demonstriert, dass es durchaus möglich war, den Sieg im Bürgerkrieg im Triumph zu thematisieren. Im Rahmen der Zeremonie des Pompeius scheint man auf einen expliziten Verweis auf den Bürgerkrieg verzichtet zu haben – zumindest wird in den Quellen nichts Derartiges berichtet.77 Eine Zusammenschau der Triumphe von Sulla und Pompeius zeigt jedoch, dass Letzterer einen entscheidenden Schritt weiter ging, indem er das Siegesritual nicht im Sinne Sullas zur Selbstdarstellung als Retter

vier Elefanten bespannten Wagen seinen Einzug zu halten; denn er hatte viele Elefanten aus dem Besitz der Könige als Beute aus Afrika mitgebracht. Aber da das Tor zu eng war, nahm er doch davon Abstand und kam auf die Pferde zurück“ (Übers. ZIEGLER/WURHMANN). 74 In der Forschung wurde die Episode zudem immer wieder in den Bereich der imitatio Alexandri verortet; vgl. die Übersicht über die entsprechende Literatur bei MADER 2005: 397, Anm. 2. Ebenso wurden Anbindungen an Venus oder Dionysos ins Spiel gebracht; vgl. für einen Überblick über die verschiedenen Ansätze ROSIVACH 2009. 75 Vgl. auch MADER 2005: 398, der diesen Punkt mit einer Selbststilisierung des Pompeius zum jungen, aufstrebenden Alexander in Verbindung bringen will. 76 Plut. Pompeius 14.3: ὁ δὲ Πομπήϊος οὐχ ὑπέπτηξεν, ἀλλ᾽ ἐννοεῖν ἐκέλευσε τὸν Σύλλαν ὅτι τὸν ἥλιον ἀνατέλλοντα πλείονες ἢ δυόμενον προσκυνοῦσιν, ὡς αὐτῷ μὲν αὐξανομένης, μειουμένης δὲ καὶ μαραινομένης ἐκείνῳ τῆς δυνάμεως, ταῦτα ὁ Σύλλας οὐκ ἀκριβῶς ἐξακούσας, ὁρῶν δὲ τοὺς ἀκούσαντας ἀπὸ τοῦ προσώπου καὶ τοῦ σχήματος ἐν θαύματι ποιουμένους, ἤρετο τί τὸ λεχθὲν εἴη. πυθόμενος δὲ καὶ καταπλαγεὶς τοῦ Πομπηΐου τὴν τόλμαν ἀνεβόησε δὶς ἐφεξῆς, ‘Θριαμβευσάτω.’ „Aber Pompejus ließ sich nicht abschrecken, sondern er sagte zu Sulla, er möchte bedenken, daß vor der aufgehenden Sonne mehr Menschen sich neigten als vor der untergehenden, um anzudeuten, daß seine Macht im Steigen, Sullas Macht hingegen im Sinken und Welken sei. Das hatte Sulla erst nicht deutlich verstanden, und da er aus den Mienen und Gebärden derer, die es gehört hatten, entnahm, daß sie höchlich erstaunt waren, fragte er, was denn da gesagt worden sei; und als er es erfuhr, rief er, betroffen von der Dreistigkeit des Pompejus, zweimal hintereinander: ‚Soll er triumphieren‘!“ (Übers. ZIEGLER/WUHRMANN). 77 So auch LANGE 2013: 74f.

168

Wolfgang Havener

des Gemeinwesens nutzen wollte, sondern als eine bewusste Provokation, die in der Elefantenquadriga zum Ausdruck kam.78 Plutarch berichtet jedoch weiter, dass die Prozession, deren Mittelpunkt die überdimensionierte Quadriga hätte sein sollen, gleichsam endete, bevor sie begann: Da die porta triumphalis sich für die Elefanten als unpassierbar erwies, musste Pompeius das Gespann zurücklassen und auf der üblichen Pferdequadriga in die Stadt einziehen. Natürlich könnte man nun annehmen, das ambitionierte Vorhaben des Pompeius sei schlicht und einfach missglückt und er selbst an seinen überzogenen Ansprüchen gescheitert.79 Sieht man jedoch in der Quadriga eine bewusste Form der Provokation, ergibt sich eine andere Lesart: Das Scheitern war von vornherein einkalkuliert. Es dürfte sehr unwahrscheinlich sein, dass Pompeius von der Größe der wohlbekannten porta triumphalis überrascht wurde. Vielmehr ist denkbar, dass Pompeius den Vorfall inszenierte, um eine besondere Botschaft zu vermitteln: Meldete der Sieger einerseits unmissverständlich seine Ansprüche an, für die er sich ja weder auf ein Amt noch auf seinen sozialen Status, sondern ausschließlich auf seinen militärischen Erfolg über römische Bürger berufen konnte, gab er andererseits durch den Verzicht auf den Einzug mit der Elefantenquadriga zu erkennen, dass er durchaus zur Kooperation mit der senatorischen Elite bereit war.80

V. Sowohl Pompeius als auch Sulla vor ihm scheuten noch davor zurück, römische Bürger als Besiegte darzustellen – ein Schritt, der Caesar vorbehalten blieb, wie Appian in seinem Bericht über den vierfachen Triumph, den der Dictator im Jahr 46 v. Chr. feierte, ausführt.81 Zwar habe auch Caesar darauf verzichtet, offiziell für 78

Tonio HÖLSCHER zufolge lässt sich diese Aktion des Pompeius in das Handlungsschema spätrepublikanischer Politik einordnen, das geprägt war durch bewusste Normentransgression und das Austesten von Grenzen (HÖLSCHER 2004: 83f.). 79 So beispielsweise BEARD 2007: 17. 80 Auf diese Weise lässt sich die These von HÖLSCHER 2004: 88, der zufolge ein gewisses Maß an Scheitern bei solcherlei Aktionen stets eingerechnet und der Position des Scheiternden nicht einmal abträglich sein musste, um einen entscheidenden Punkt erweitern: HÖLSCHER zufolge zielten Aktionen wie diejenige des Pompeius insbesondere darauf ab, „Tatkraft und ‚Größe‘ [zu demonstrieren], die sich in einer Fähigkeit zur Aggression gegen und Transgression über die Normen der Gesellschaft zeigte“ (88). In eine ähnliche Richtung argumentiert auch ROSIVACH 2009: 250, der im Verzicht auf die Elefantenquadriga einen Schachzug sieht, der es Pompeius erlaubt habe „to reap the political benefits that came from showing what he was capable of, with few of the negative consequences of acutally doing it“. Doch darin erschöpfte sich die Aussage dieses Eingriffs in die rituelle Struktur keineswegs: Das einkalkulierte Scheitern öffnete im Prozess permanenter Kommunikation und Konkurrenz auch wieder neue Handlungs- und Verhandlungsräume. 81 App. civ. 2.101: τοῦτο μὲν δὴ καὶ τῷ περὶ Λιβύην Καίσαρος πολέμῳ τέλος ἐγίγνετο, αὐτὸς δ’ ἐπανελθὼν ἐς Ῥώμην ἐθριάμβευε τέσσαρας ὁμοῦ θριάμβους, ἐπί τε Γαλάταις, ὧν δὴ πολλὰ καὶ μέγιστα ἔθνη προσέλαβε καὶ ἀφιστάμενα ἄλλα ἐκρατύνατο, καὶ Ποντικὸν ἐπὶ Φαρνάκει καὶ Λιβυκὸν ἐπὶ Λιβύων τοῖς συμμαχήσασι τῷ Σκιπίωνι: ἔνθα καὶ Ἰόβα παῖς, Ἰόβας ὁ

Triumphus ex bello civili?

169

einen Erfolg über römische Bürger zu triumphieren: Die vierte Siegesfeier wurde nicht für den Sieg über Pompeius und die Angehörigen der Senatsaristokratie abgehalten, sondern für die Überwindung des mit diesen verbündeten numidischen Königs Juba.82 Doch auch die Niederlage der römischen Gegner Caesars wurde den Zuschauern laut Appian eindrücklich vor Augen geführt: Caesar bediente sich dafür eines bekannten Mittels – der Darstellung von Kriegsereignissen und Ähnlichem auf großformatigen Gemälden und Abbildungen. Gezeigt wurden laut Appian Scipio, der sich zuerst in sein Schwert und dann ins Meer stürzte, Petreius, der beim Gastmahl Selbstmord beging, und schließlich Cato, „wie er sich gleich einem wilden Tiere selbst zerfleischte“. Dargestellt wurden also nicht die Kampfhandlungen zwischen Römern selbst, wohl aber ihr Ergebnis: der Sieg Caesars über seine römischen Widersacher, versinnbildlicht in deren unmissverständlichem Eingeständnis der eigenen Niederlage.83 Einzig der Tod des Pompeius wurde laut Appians Bericht nicht dokumentiert, „da die Trauer um ihn bei allen noch zu groß war“. Caesar verzichtete somit daσυγγραφεύς, βρέφος ὢν ἔτι παρήγετο. παρήγαγε δέ τινα καὶ τῆς ἀνὰ τὸν Νεῖλον ναυμαχίας θρίαμβον Αἰγύπτιον, μεταξὺ τοῦ Γαλατῶν καὶ Φαρνάκους. τὰ δὲ Ῥωμαίων φυλαξάμενος ἄρα, ὡς ἐμφύλια οὐκ ἐοικότα τε αὑτῷ καὶ Ῥωμαίοις αἰσχρὰ καὶ ἀπαίσια, ἐπιγράψαι θριάμβῳ, παρήνεγκεν ὅμως αὐτῶν ἐν τοῖσδε τὰ παθήματα ἅπαντα καὶ τοὺς ἄνδρας ἐν εἰκόσι καὶ ποικίλιαις γραφαῖς, χωρίς γε Πομπηίου: τοῦτον γὰρ δὴ μόνον ἐφυλάξατο δεῖξαι, σφόδρα ἔτι πρὸς πάντων ἐπιπουούμενον. ὁ δὲ δῆμος ἐπὶ μὲν τοῖς οἰκείοις κακοῖς, καίπερ δεδιώς, ἔστενε, καὶ μάλιστα ὅτε ἴδοι Λεύκιόν τε Σκιπίωνα τὸν αὐτοκράτορα πλησσόμενον ἐς τὰ στέρνα ὑφ’ ἑαυτοῦ καὶ μεθιέμενον ἐς τὸ πέλαγος, ἢ Πετρήιον ἐπὶ διαίτῃ διαχρώμενον ἑαυτόν, ἢ Κάτωνα ὑφ’ ἑαυτοῦ διασπώμενον ὡς θηρίον: Ἀχιλλᾷ δ’ ἐφήσθησαν καὶ Ποθεινῷ καὶ τὴν Φαρνάκους φυγὴν ἐγέλασαν. „So endete Caesars Krieg in Afrika. und als er nun nach Rom zurückkehrte, konnte er gleichzeitig vier Triumphe feiern: Einen über die Gallier, von denen er eine Menge sehr großer Völkerschaften dem Römerreich hinzugewonnen hatte; einen über Pontos gegen Pharnakes; einen über Afrika gegen die afrikanischen Verbündeten des Scipio, wobei auch Iubas Sohn, der Geschichtsschreiber Iuba, damals noch ein Kind, als Gefangener mitgeführt wurde. Zwischen dem Triumph über die Gallier und dem über Pharnakes hielt Caesar eine Art ägyptischer Siegesfeier ab, und zwar wegen der Seeschlacht auf dem Nil. Wohl verzichtete er darauf, irgendwie bei seinem Triumph die Kämpfe gegen Römer zu erwähnen – als Bürgerkriege dünkten sie ihm selbst unziemlich, erniedrigend und unheilvoll und ebenso auch dem römischen Volke –, doch all diese Unglücksfälle und ebenso die Personen fanden bei den Aufzügen in verschiedenen Abbildungen und Gemälden ihre Darstellung. Die einzige Ausnahme war Pompeius; denn diesen allein scheute sich Caesar zu zeigen, da die Trauer um ihn bei allen noch zu groß war. Das Volk, obgleich voll Angst, seufzte über die heimischen Unglücksfälle, vor allem als es im Bilde den Oberbefehlshaber Lucius Scipio sah, wie er mit eigener Hand seine Brust durchbohrte und sich ins Meer stürzte, oder Petreius, wie er beim Gastmahl Selbstmord beging, oder Cato, wie er sich gleich einem wilden Tiere zerfleischte. Hingegen freuten sich die Leute über den Tod des Achillas und Potheinos und über die Flucht des Pharnakes mussten sie gar lachen“ (Übers. VEH). 82 DEGRASSI 1947: 567; ITGENSHORST 2005: 371–373, Nr. 265. 83 Die Funktion, die die Darstellung der römischen Gegner Caesars in seinem Triumph erfüllte, ging somit weit über die in der Forschung lange Zeit vertretene Auffassung, der Sieger habe damit vor allem seine Widersacher persönlich herabwürdigen wollen, hinaus; für einen Überblick über die entsprechende ältere Forschungsliteratur und eine kritische Haltung vgl. VOISIN 1983: 15f. und 22. Zur Bedeutung der Darstellung von Gewalt im Kontext eines Bürgerkriegs vgl. den Beitrag von Troels Myrup KRISTENSEN in diesem Band.

170

Wolfgang Havener

rauf, seinen Hauptgegner, das Symbol des Widerstandes gegen ihn, vorzuführen. Von Bedeutung ist dieser Aspekt insbesondere angesichts der Funktion des besiegten Anführers im Triumphzug84: Besiegte Könige, Stammesführer oder Feldherrn dienten vor allem dazu, dem Gegner ein Gesicht zu geben. Der Anführer verkörperte im Triumphzug den unterlegenen Feind, auf ihn fokussierte sich die Niederlage. Er stellte somit eine Parallele zum Triumphator dar – der ruhmreiche Sieger stand dem Verlierer gegenüber. Selbst wenn Caesar in seinem Triumph in der Darstellung des Bürgerkriegssieges weiter ging als seine Vorgänger – den Schritt, Pompeius als besiegten Anführer im Triumph mitzuführen (und sei es nur als Abbildung), unternahm er nicht.85 Stattdessen nutzte er gerade diesen Aspekt des Triumphs, um möglicher Kritik zu begegnen. Sein Triumph wurde in die fasti als ex Africa de rege Iuba aufgenommen, der Sohn des Königs wurde in der Prozession mitgeführt und gesondert zur Schau gestellt. Die Kombination und Variation verschiedener Elemente des Rituals diente somit im Africa-Triumph Caesars zur Verdeutlichung einer provokanten Botschaft: Drastisch wie nie zuvor wurde dem römischen Volk im Rahmen des Triumphrituals ein Sieg im Bürgerkrieg vor Augen geführt. Dass dies jedoch zugleich Ansatzpunkt potentieller Kritik sein konnte, zeigt wiederum der Bericht Appians: Während die Zuschauer sich über den Tod der ägyptischen Eunuchen Potheinos oder die Flucht des Pharnakes amüsierten, brachten sie ob der Darstellungen Scipios und Catos ihren Unmut und ihre Sorgen deutlich zum Ausdruck. Mag man Appian in diesem Punkt nun Glauben schenken oder nicht, so illustriert die Passage doch anschaulich die Risiken, die mit der Entscheidung Caesars, römische Aristokraten nicht als Gerettete, sondern als Geschlagene im Triumphzug zu präsentieren, einhergingen.86 Vor diesem Hintergrund erweist sich die Strategie der offiziellen Fokussierung auf den numidischen König bzw. seinen Sohn selbstverständlich als äußerst durchsichtig, was aber Caesar in seiner Situation offenbar bewusst als Provokation in Kauf nahm: Appian betont in seinem Bericht explizit, dass Iuba zum Zeitpunkt der Siegesfeier noch ein Kind gewesen sei. Er dürfte daher schwerlich als ein dem Triumphator vergleichbarer gegnerischer Anführer angesehen worden sein.87 Die Kontrastierung der römischen Gegner mit dem numidischen Königssohn lenkte das Augenmerk des Publikums nur umso deutlicher auf den transgressiven Aspekt der Zeremonie. Ziel des vierfachen 84 85

86

87

Vgl. hierzu BEARD 2007: 107–142. Ein Bezug auf den Sieg bei Pharsalos ist tatsächlich aus den Quellen nicht zu erschließen, woraus in der Forschung allerdings m.E. zu Unrecht geschlossen wurde, dass Caesar dem Eindruck, er feiere einen Triumph über römische Bürger, habe entgegenwirken wollen; vgl. u.a. WILL 2009: 172. Vgl. ÖSTENBERG 2014: 187. Die Erklärung von MEIER 2004: 522, der die Reaktionen des Publikums darauf zurückführen will, dass Caesar in diesem Rahmen seine römischen Gegner „implizit oder explizit … als Sklaven des Numider-Königs Juba bezeichnet“ haben müsse, erweist sich vor diesem Hintergrund als unbefriedigend. LANGE 2013: 77 sieht in der Fokussierung auf den numidischen König einen Hinweis auf die Notwendigkeit einer „Externalisierung“ des Sieges, gibt jedoch unter Verweis auf die Abbildungen der römischen Feldherren zugleich zu bedenken: „Importantly, he was certainly not concealing the civil element of the conflict …“.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

171

Triumphes war es somit nicht nur, Caesar als erfolgreichen Feldherrn zu präsentieren, sondern das Augenmerk der römischen Öffentlichkeit auch darauf zu richten, dass er sich gegen seine römischen Widersacher ebenso eindrucksvoll durchgesetzt hatte wie gegen Gallier, Ägypter oder das Heer des Pharnakes von Pontos. Seine herausgehobene Stellung, die in den vier Siegesfeiern zum Ausdruck kam, beruhte nicht nur auf seinen Siegen über auswärtige Feinde, sondern ebenso auf der Ausschaltung seiner innenpolitischen Rivalen.88 Hatte Caesar somit bereits in seinem Triumph ex Africa die Grenzen des bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt im Rahmen des Triumphrituals als opportun Erscheinenden überschritten, gab er ein Jahr später offenbar sogar die zumindest vordergründige Zurückhaltung des Afrika-Triumphs auf: Nach seinem Sieg über die Söhne des Pompeius bei Munda feierte er einen weiteren Triumph ex Hispania.89 Die Quellen geben über diese Zeremonie unglücklicherweise keine detaillierten Informationen, aus denen man erschließen könnte, auf welche Weise der Gegner hier dargestellt oder ob und wie auf den Bürgerkriegscharakter des Krieges in Spanien näher eingegangen wurde. Dennoch muss man konstatieren, dass ein – wenn auch nur vorgeschobener – auswärtiger Feind wie König Juba in diesem Fall schwerlich zu finden gewesen sein dürfte – und dies möglicherweise auch nicht in der Absicht des Siegers lag.90 Der Senat bewilligte offenbar erstmals einen Triumph für einen Sieg, der definitiv nicht über einen externen Gegner errungen worden war. Ein solch offensiver Umgang mit dem Sieg über römische Bürger stellte vor dem Hintergrund der hier bereits untersuchten Vorläufer notwendigerweise eine Transgression dar. Bezeichnend ist eine Angabe bei Cassius Dio, die durch die entsprechenden Einträge in den fasti belegt wird: Nicht nur Caesar selbst habe für den Sieg in Spanien triumphiert, sondern auch zweien seiner Unterfeldherrn sei ein Triumph ex Hispania bewilligt worden, worüber man sich in Rom jedoch hauptsächlich amüsiert habe.91 Allerdings verbirgt sich auch hinter dieser Aktion 88

89 90 91

Ein Aspekt, den beispielsweise WEINSTOCK 1971: 60–79 in seiner Untersuchung des Vierfachtriumphs vollkommen beiseitelässt; ebenso noch DAHLHEIM 2005: 206–208. In der Zurschaustellung der Selbstmorde eine Anspielung auf die clementia Caesars zu sehen (so VOISIN 1983: 26f.), wird dieser Botschaft des Rituals nur eingeschränkt gerecht: Auch die clementia Caesars konnte nur aus der Position des Siegers heraus erwachsen. DEGRASSI 1947: 567; ITGENSHORST 2005: 374, Nr. 266. So auch LANGE 2013: 77. Cass. Dio 43.42.1f.: τά τε γὰρ ἐπινίκια, καίτοι μηδενὸς ἀλλοτρίου κρατήσας ἀλλὰ καὶ τοσοῦτο πλῆθος πολιτῶν ἀπολέσας, οὐ μόνον αὐτὸς ἔπεμψε, πάντα τὸν δῆμον ἐν αὐτοῖς ὡς καὶ ἐπὶ κοινοῖς τισιν ἀγαθοῖς αὖθις ἑστιάσας, ἀλλὰ καὶ τῷ Φαβίῳ τῷ Κυΐντῳ τῷ τε Κυΐντῳ Πεδίῳ, καίτοι ὑποστρατηγήσασιν αὐτῷ καὶ μηδὲν ἰδίᾳ κατορθώσασι, διεορτάσαι ἐπέτρεψε. καὶ ἦν μέν που γέλος ἐπὶ τε τούτῳ, καὶ ὅτι καὶ ξυλίναις ἀλλ’ οὐκ ἐλεφαντίναις ἔργων τέ τινων εἰκόσιν ἄλλοις τε τοιούτοις πομπείοις ἐχρήσαντο. „Denn obwohl er keinen auswärtigen Gegner besiegt, sondern sogar einer riesigen Menge von Bürgern den Tod gebracht hatte, hielt er nicht nur selbst einen Triumphzug ab und bewirtete hierbei wie zu gewissen die Allgemeinheit betreffenden Glücksfällen wiederum das gesamte Volk, sondern ließ auch den Quintus Fabius und Quintus Pedius Feiern abhalten; und die beiden waren doch nur Unterfeldherrn gewesen und hatten keine eigenen Erfolge erzielt. Natürlich machte man sich darüber lustig sowie über die Tatsache, dass sie hölzerne und nicht elfenbeinerne Darstellungen gewisser Taten zusammen mit derlei anderem Triumphgerät verwendeten. Gleichwohl wurden auf

172

Wolfgang Havener

Caesars mehr, als der etwas launige Bericht Dios vermuten lässt: Caesar trieb die Provokation, die der offene Bürgerkriegstriumph bereits an sich darstellte, noch auf die Spitze, indem er den Senat offenbar dazu brachte, nicht nur ihm selbst, sondern auch seinen Unterfeldherrn einen Triumph zu bewilligen. Auf diese Weise, so konnte man diese Vorgänge interpretieren, sanktionierte der Senat die Handlungen Caesars, seinen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg und vor allem den transgressiven Akt, diesen Sieg auch als solchen zu deklarieren, nachträglich. Denn schließlich erkannte er nicht nur dem Sieger selbst einen Triumph zu, sondern auch zwei senatorischen Amtsträgern, von denen einer gerade das Konsulat angetreten hatte und damit äußerlich an der Spitze der politischen Hierarchie stand. Tatsächlich handelte es sich dabei jedoch vor allem um eine weitere Demonstration gegenüber dem Senat, der in seiner Rolle als Entscheidungsinstanz vorgeführt wurde. Das von Dio kolportierte Amüsement mochte folglich nicht Caesar und seinen triumphierenden Unterfeldherrn gegolten haben, sondern der Machtlosigkeit des Senats, der – so machte es diese Episode deutlich – Triumphe nicht mehr nach seinem Gutdünken, sondern nach Belieben Caesars zu verteilen hatte. Caesar ging ein gewisses Risiko ein, indem er die Angehörigen der Senatsaristokratie derart vor den Kopf stieß: Dass sich gerade das Triumphritual besonders gut dafür eignete, Kritik an den neuen Zuständen und an seiner Stellung zu üben, zeigte ein durch Sueton92 überlieferter Vorfall: Als der Triumphwagen Caesars während einer seiner Siegesfeiern an den Bänken der Volkstribunen vorbeifuhr, weigerte sich einer von ihnen, sich zu erheben und dem Sieger die Ehre zu erweisen. Dies, so schreibt Sueton, habe Caesar zu dem Ausruf verleitet: „So fordere denn die res publica von mir zurück, Tribun Aquila!“ Selbst wenn sich über die Historizität dieser Episode nur schwerlich eine endgültige Aussage treffen lässt, demonstriert sie doch beispielhaft das Kritikpotential, das dem Triumphritual und seinen Kontexten innewohnte, und führt erneut vor Augen, dass die Sieger zwischen möglichen Angriffspunkten einerseits und der Wirkmächtigkeit des Rituals andererseits abzuwägen hatten. Die Triumphe Caesars zeigen somit überdeutlich, wo die Grenzen einer Auseinandersetzung mit dem Bürgerkriegssieg im Rahmen des Triumphrituals liegen konnten. Caesar testete diese Grenzen wie in so vielen anderen Bereichen bewusst aus und nahm die Kritik, die sich aus seinen

92

glänzendste Weise dreifache Triumphe und dreifache Festzüge der Römer zu Ehren jener großen Erfolge abgehalten und dazu noch eine Festzeit von fünfzig Tagen begangen“ (Übers. VEH). Vgl. auch DEGRASSI 1947: 567; ITGENSHORST 2005: 376–378, Nr. 267 u. 268. Suet. Iul. 78: idque factum eius tanto intolerabilius est uisum, quod ipse triumoahnti et subsellia tribunicia praeteruehenti sibi unum e collegio Pontium Aquilam non assurrexisse adeo indignatus sit, ut proclamauerit: ‘repete ergo a me Aquila rem publicam tribunus!’ et nec destiterit per continuos dies quicquam cuiquam nisi sub exceptione polliceri: ‘si tamen per Pontium Aquilam licuerit’. „Dieses sein Vorgehen schien deshalb noch besonders unerträglich, weil er selbst sich empört darüber gezeigt hatte, daß Pontius Aquila, einer aus dem Kollegium, sich nicht erhob, als er bei einem Triumph an den Sitzen der Volkstribunen vorbeizog. Da ließ er sich zu der Äußerung hinreißen: ‚Dann verlange die Republik von mir zurück, wenn du schon Tribune bist, Aquila!‘ Und noch viele Tage danach versprach er niemandem etwas ohne die Einschränkung: ‚Vorausgesetzt, daß es Pontius Aquila genehm ist‘.“ (Übers. WITTSTOCK)

Triumphus ex bello civili?

173

Vorstößen ergeben konnte, in Kauf – man wird davon ausgehen dürfen, dass auch die hier untersuchten Vorgänge dazu beitrugen, dass die Opposition gegen den Dictator sich neu formierte.

VI. Das Beispiel Caesars wies wie in vielen anderen Bereichen auch beim Bürgerkriegstriumph den Weg für seinen Nachfolger: Als er nach dem Sieg über Antonius und Kleopatra dreimal im Triumph in die Stadt einzog, hatte Octavian sämtliche Rivalen um die Macht in blutigen Kämpfen aus dem Feld geschlagen und war der neue Herr Roms. Die Siegesfeiern des Jahres 29 v. Chr.93 waren wie kein anderes Ereignis dazu angetan, der römischen Öffentlichkeit seine primär auf diesem militärischen Erfolg basierende Macht eindrücklich vor Augen zu führen. Ebenso wie Sulla, Pompeius und Caesar nutzte auch Octavian das Triumphritual, um eine bestimmte Botschaft zu verbreiten: Die Bürgerkriege waren endgültig beendet, nun galt es, Ordnung und Sicherheit wiederherzustellen.94 Untrennbar mit dieser Aussage war jedoch auch eine zweite verbunden, die in der Forschung oftmals nicht ausreichend berücksichtigt wird: Die Bürgerkriege waren endgültig beendet – und Octavian war als Sieger daraus hervorgegangen.95 Dies verlieh ihm eine nahezu unumschränkte Macht, deren wesentliche Stütze das Militär war und stets bleiben würde. Doch selbst Octavian scheute davor zurück, einen Triumph für seinen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg zu feiern, der auch als solcher benannt worden wäre. Er hatte jedoch gegenüber seinen Vorgängern den Vorteil, aus einem ganzen Reservoir an bereits erprobten Möglichkeiten des Umgangs mit einem Sieg über römische Bürger schöpfen zu können. Gleichzeitig zeigte ihm das Schicksal seines Adoptivvaters, wo die Grenzen der Provokation lagen.96 Es ist in der Forschung viel Aufwand betrieben worden, um zu zeigen, dass Octavian den Bürgerkriegssieg in seinem Triumph absichtlich verschleiert und ihn so wenig wie möglich thematisiert habe.97 So besteht beispielsweise Robert Gurval 93 94

95

96

97

DEGRASSI 1947: 570; ITGENSHORST 2005: 410–418, Nr. 287–289. Vgl. exemplarisch DAHLHEIM 2010: 158f. und 395f., BLEICKEN 2010: 297–302 sowie BRINGMANN 2007: 105–107 und LANGE 2009: 18–26. In diesem Beitrag muss darauf verzichtet werden, die ovationes der Jahre 40 und 36 v. Chr. ausführlicher zu untersuchen, in deren Rahmen der Bürgerkrieg ebenfalls auf jeweils spezifische Art und Weise thematisiert wurde; vgl. hierzu die entsprechenden Abschnitte in HAVENER (in Druckvorbereitung). An dieser Stelle können weder die ausufernde Forschungslage zum Verhältnis zwischen Sieg und Frieden bei Augustus, zum Konzept der Pax Augusta und zur besonderen Rolle, die der Bürgerkrieg in dieser Konstruktion einnahm, angemessen referiert noch diese Themenkomplexe eingehender thematisiert werden; dies soll jedoch in HAVENER (in Druckvorbereitung) geschehen. So erwies sich die Präsentation des unterlegenen Gegners in Form von großformatigen Gemälden seit Caesar offenbar nicht mehr als gangbarer Weg. Zumindest erwähnt keine einzige Quelle Derartiges für den Triumph Octavians. Vgl. für einen Überblick über die entsprechende Forschungsliteratur LANGE 2009: 79, Anm. 30, der selbst vollkommen zu Recht wiederholt darauf hinweist, dass Octavian den Bürger-

174

Wolfgang Havener

in einer einflussreichen Studie darauf, dass die Triumphe für den Sieg bei Actium und Alexandria als eine Einheit anzusehen seien, in der bewusst nicht der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg angesprochen worden sei, sondern der Sieg im großen Krieg gegen Kleopatra und der Auseinandersetzung des Westens gegen den Osten.98 In dieser Einschätzung sind ihm viele gefolgt.99 Allerdings zieht diese These unwiegerlich die Frage nach einem Mehrwert des Actium-Triumphs nach sich: Weshalb hätte Octavian für vorgeblich nur einen Sieg, wie Gurval postuliert, zwei Triumphe feiern sollen – zumal die Siegesfeier für die Eroberung Alexandrias weit besser dazu geeignet gewesen wäre, den Sieg über Kleopatra und den Osten darzustellen? Um deutlich zu machen, wie der Triumph des zweiten Tages für den Sieg bei Actium interpretiert werden müsse, griff Octavian auf eine Strategie Caesars zurück, die er jedoch in einem entscheidenden Punkt variierte. Der Sieger unterschied die drei Triumphe eindeutig voneinander; jede der Feiern stand zunächst für sich alleine.100 Er nutzte dazu das altbekannte Mittel der Personalisierung des Gegners. Am dritten Tag, so berichtet Cassius Dio,101 wurden im Triumphzug für

98

99 100

101

kriegscharakter der Auseinandersetzung keineswegs verschwiegen habe; vgl. auch BÖRM/HAVENER 2012: 210f. Zu den vereinzelten kritischen Äußerungen in dieser Hinsicht zählen WOODMAN 1983: 211–213 und PELLING 1996: 54. Vgl. GURVAL 1995: 33. Eines der zentralen (und äußerst fragwürdigen) Argumente GURVALS ist dabei, dass der Actium-Triumph den mittleren Tag einnahm und ihm aus diesem Grund im Vergleich zu den anderen weniger Bedeutung zugekommen sei: „The triumph in honor of the Actian victory occupied the middle of the three-day celebration. This fact should not lead us to assume that it held the center of attention or somehow acted as the climax of the triple triumph ceremonies. Placed between the other two triumphs – the first distinguished by a long parade of defeated enemies and the glory of standards returned, and the last adorned with the riches of Egypt and the dramatic representation of the dead queen – the Actian victory was upstaged. This was not an unforeseen event or some act of indifference by Octavian but a shrewd and deliberate manipulation of an audience by the showman of Rome par excellence“ (GURVAL 1995: 28). Vgl. u.a. ÖSTENBERG 2009: 142f., SUMI 2005: 215, sowie BALBUZA 1999: 277. Vgl. auch LANGE 2009, 152, der jedoch nicht so weit geht, darin auch eine konzeptionelle Trennung von Bürgerkrieg und externem Krieg zu sehen. Es ist aus diesem Grund natürlich vollkommen zutreffend, in der Feier des Sieges über Kleopatra und in der Präsentation Octavians als Eroberer eine der zentralen Aussagen des Dreifachtriumphs zu sehen. Diesen Aspekt jedoch zum alleinigen Sinn der Zeremonien zu erklären, greift zu kurz. Cass. Dio 51.21.5–9: ἑώρτασε δὲ τῇ μὲν πρώτῃ ἡμέρα τά τε τῶν Παννονίων καὶ τὰ τῶν Δελματῶν, τῆς τε Ἰαπυδίας καὶ τῶν προσχώρων σφίσι, Κελτῶν τε καὶ Γαλατῶν τινων. Γάιος γὰρ Καρρίνας τούς τε Μωρίνους καὶ ἄλλους τινὰς συνεπαναστάντας αὐτοῖς ἐχειρώσατο, καὶ τοὺς Σουήβους, τὸν Ῥῆνον ἐπὶ πολέμῳ διαβάντας ἀπεώσατο· καὶ διὰ ταῦτα ἤγαγε μὲν καὶ ἐκεῖνος τὰ νικητήρια, καίτοι τοῦ τε πατρὸς αὐτοῦ ὑπὸ τοῦ Σύλλου θανατωθέντος, καὶ αὐτὸς ἄρξαι ποτὲ μετὰ τῶν ἄλλων τῶν ὁμοίων οἱ κωλυθείς, ἤγαγε δὲ καὶ ὁ Καῖσαρ, ἐπειδὴ ἡ ἀναφορὰ τῆς νίκης τῇ αὐτοκράτορι αὐτοῦ ἀρχῇ προσήκουσα ἦν. ἐν δὲ τῇ δευτέρᾳ ἡ πρὸς τῷ Ἀκτίῳ ναυκρατία, κἀν τῇ τρίτῃ ἡ τῆς Αἰγύπτου καταστροφή. τά τε γὰρ ἄλλα καὶ ἡ Κλεοπάτρα ἐπὶ κλίνης ἐν τῷ τοῦ θανάτου μιμήματι παρεκομίσθη, ὥστε τρόπον τινὰ καὶ ἐκείνην μετά τε τῶν ἄλλων αἰχμαλώτων καὶ μετὰ τοῦ Ἀλεξάνδρου τοῦ καὶ Ἡλίου, τῆς τε Κλεοπάτρας τῆς καὶ Σελήνης, τῶν τέκνων, ὡς πομπεῖον ὀφθῆναι. μετὰ δὲ δὴ τοῦτο ὁ Καῖσαρ ἐφ‘ ἅπασιν αὐτοῖς ἐσελάσας τὰ μὲν ἄλλα κατὰ τὸ νομιζόμενον ἔπραξε, τὸν δὲ δὴ συνύπατον τούς τε λοιποὺς

Triumphus ex bello civili?

175

den Sieg bei Alexandria ein marmornes Abbild der Kleopatra sowie ihre beiden Kinder aus der Ehe mit Antonius mitgeführt. Octavian folgte damit dem traditionellen Schema der Fokussierung von Niederlagen auf die jeweiligen gegnerischen Führungspersönlichkeiten, genauso wie er am ersten Tag die gefangenen Anführer der besiegten Dalmater und Pannonier durch die Stadt paradieren ließ. Anders verhielt es sich jedoch beim Triumph für den Sieg bei Actium. Keine der Quellen erwähnt, dass in dieser Prozession ein besiegter gegnerischer Anführer mitgeführt worden sei.102 Wer hätte es auch sein sollen, da Kleopatra in der Prozession des ἄρχοντας περιεῖδε παρὰ τὸ καθεστηκὸς ἐπισπομένους οἱ μετὰ τῶν λοιπῶν βουλευτῶν τῶν συννενικηκότων εἰώθεσαν γὰρ οἱ μὲν ἡγεῖσθαι οἱ δὲ ἐφέπεσθαι. „Um von Caesars Triumph zu sprechen, so feierte er am ersten Tage seine Siege über die Pannonier und Dalmatier, die Japyden und ihre Nachbarstämme, ferner über einige Germanen und Gallier. Denn Gaius Carrinas hatte die Moriner und andere Völkerschaften, die sich mit ihnen zusammen erhoben hatten, unterworfen und die Sueben, die in feindlicher Absicht über den Rhein gegangen waren, zurückgeschlagen. Und deshalb feierte auch Carrinas seinen Triumph und das, obgleich sein Vater von Sulla hingerichtet und er selbst samt den anderen Männern in gleicher Lage einstmals von der Bekleidung eines Amtes ausgeschlossen worden war. Caesar triumphierte ebenfalls, da ihm in seiner Eigenschaft als oberstem Befehlshaber die Ehre des Sieges zukam. Am ersten Tag nun fanden diese Feierlichkeiten statt; anderntags wurde des Seesiegs bei Actium und am dritten Tag der Unterwerfung Ägyptens gedacht. Glänzend erwiesen sich in der Tat schon die anderen Festzüge, dank der aus Ägypten stammenden Beute – man hatte nämlich dort Beute in solcher Menge eingebracht, dass sie für sämtliche Festzüge ausreichte –, die Siegesfeier über Ägypten jedoch ließ an Kostbarkeit und Prunk alles sonstige hinter sich. Unter anderen Schaustücken wurde das Bild der auf einer Liegestatt ruhenden toten Kleopatra mitgeführt, so dass gewissermaßen auch sie mit den übrigen Gefangenen und ihren Kindern Alexander, auch Helios genannt, und Kleopatra, auch Selene genannt, als Siegestrophäe zu sehen war. Sodann kam Caesar hinter ihnen allen in die Stadt geritten und verrichtete sämtliche Handlungen in der hergebrachten Weise, nur dass er seinen Mitkonsul und die übrigen Amtsträger im Gegensatz zur früheren Ordnung zusammen mit den restlichen Senatoren, die an seinem Siege teilgenommen hatten, hinter sich herziehen ließ; denn es war Sitte, dass die Beamten vorausgingen und nur die Senatoren nachfolgten“ (Übers. VEH). 102 GURVAL unternimmt jedoch im Hinblick auf seine These den Versuch, eine solche Situation zu konstruieren, indem er betont, an die Stelle des Antonius seien in der Prozession zwei seiner Verbündeten getreten: der galatische Tetrarch Adiatorix sowie König Alexander von Emesa (vgl. GURVAL 1995: 29). Ein Blick in die entsprechenden Quellen zeigt jedoch, dass sich diese Vermutung keineswegs so eindeutig beweisen lässt, wie GURVAL dies suggeriert. Zwar wird für beide Herrscher bezeugt, sie seien im Rahmen des Dreifach-Triumphs als Gefangene mitgeführt, Alexander gar am Ende hingerichtet worden (zu Adiatorix s. Strab. 12.3.35; zu Alexander s. Cass. Dio 51.2.2). Augustus selbst gibt in seinen Res gestae (4) die Zahl der im Triumph mitgeführten Könige und Königskinder mit 9 an, ohne dabei zwischen den einzelnen Herrscher zu unterscheiden oder einen davon einem speziellen Triumph zuzuordnen. Dass die beiden Genannten am zweiten Tag der Feierlichkeiten zur Schau gestellt wurden, geht jedoch aus den Texten keineswegs hervor. Da Alexander und seine Hinrichtung bei Dio an anderer Stelle (ohne Nennung der Denomination des entsprechenden Triumphs) bereits erwähnt werden, müsste man sich – angesichts der vergleichsweise ausführlichen Beschäftigung mit den Besiegten der beiden anderen Triumphe – eher fragen, weshalb der Autor in der Triumphbeschreibung die Hinrichtung des angeblichen Hauptgegners im Rahmen des Actium-Triumphs verschweigt. Ebenso konnten die beiden Teil des Triumphs über Ägypten und Kleopatra samt ihren Verbündeten gewesen sein und aus diesem Grund in Dios Beschreibung des Dreifachtriumphs, die auf Kleopatra fokussiert, außen vor gelassen worden

176

Wolfgang Havener

dritten Tages den Sieg über Ägypten verkörperte? Die implizite Aussage musste jedem Betrachter offenbar sein: Am zweiten Tag wurde nicht über Kleopatra triumphiert – und auch über niemand anderen, den man ohne Weiteres hätte nennen können. Der besiegte Gegner, der nicht genannt werden konnte, war unzweifelhaft Antonius. Dies muss jedem Beobachter bewusst gewesen sein. Octavian griff somit dasselbe Ritualelement auf wie Caesar. Anstatt jedoch durch eine Fokussierung auf den auswärtigen Gegner den Sieg über römische Bürger tatsächlich zu verschleiern (selbst wenn es sich dabei um eine durchsichtige Strategie handelte), schuf er absichtlich eine auffällige Leerstelle, die im Zusammenspiel mit der am dritten Tag folgenden Fokussierung auf Kleopatra von enormer Aussagekraft war103: Statt einer Vermischung der externen und internen Dimensionen des Krieges, wie sie jüngst Carsten Hjort LANGE postuliert hat104, fand wiederum (ähnlich wie bei Sulla) eine deutliche Unterscheidung zwischen Bürgerkrieg und externem Krieg statt, die sich gerade durch das Nicht-Vorhandensein eines gegnerischen Anführers im Actium-Triumph manifestierte. Der Sieg bei Actium wurde spezifisch dem Bürgerkrieg, dem Krieg gegen Antonius zugeordnet und war nicht nur teilweise ein Sieg im Bürgerkrieg. Octavian unternahm im Rahmen der Präsentation des Sieges keineswegs den Versuch, diesen Krieg mit einem externen zu vermischen.105 Als Beleg hierfür lässt sich ein bisher in der Forschung nur wenig beachteter Eintrag aus den Fasti Amiternini anführen, der sogar explizit Antonius als Gegner Octavians in der Seeschlacht bei Actium benennt und Kleopatra nicht

sein. Die Erdrosselung Alexanders könnte, so sie denn stattfand, vor diesem Hintergrund als eine Reaktion Octavians auf die rituellen Erforderlichkeiten, die die Hinrichtung eines Gegners vorschrieben, gelesen werden. Zudem bleibt die Tatsache, dass kein anderer Bericht über den Dreifachtriumph Octavians die beiden Könige als Gegner des zweiten Tages benennt. Selbst wenn Octavian sie im Rahmen des Triumphes für Actium vorgeführt haben sollte, erfüllten sie offenbar weder in der Präsentation noch in der Wahrnehmung des Sieges die personalisierende Funktion, die insbesondere dem Abbild Kleopatras zukam. 103 Auch GURVAL 1995: 28 stellt fest: „Antony and the Romans who supported his cause were found nowhere in Octavian’s triumphs“. Daraus jedoch den Schluss zu ziehen, Octavian habe den Sieg im Bürgerkrieg bewusst verschleiern wollen, erweist sich vor dem Hintergrund der hier angestellten Überlegungen als zumindest problematisch. ÖSTENBERG 2014, 184–188 sieht gerade das Fehlen eines Hauptgegners im Rahmen der Prozession als einen Grund dafür an, weshalb der Bürgerkriegstriumph als Ritual nicht habe funktionieren können: „… the absence of the true enemies of the victorious side, the defeated Romans, devoided the ritual of much of its meaning. It unveiled the discrepancy between the war fought and the war represented, and the triumph became a halting, unbalanced performance that told only half the story. … Reality and representation simply did not match.“ 104 LANGE 2009: 79–90 und 156f. Für den Bereich der Legitimierungsstrategien im Vorfeld des Krieges trifft dies natürlich zu (vgl. hierzu auch WALLMANN 1989: 296–333). Es muss jedoch zwischen diesen und der Präsentation des Sieges unterschieden werden, wie die eingehende Untersuchung des Triumphs von 29 v. Chr. ja deutlich demonstriert. 105 Vgl. auch BEARD 2007: 303, die den Sieg bei Actium ansieht als „a victory in civil war, without even a euphemistic foreign label“. Allerdings erschöpft sich ihre Analyse der Präsentation dieses Sieges bereits in dieser Feststellung.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

177

erwähnt.106 Ein solcher Eintrag in einem unmittelbar nach den Siegesfeiern veröffentlichten Dokument lässt sich nur erklären, wenn er als Reflex auf den Triumph verstanden wird: Die Inschrift orientierte sich an den Botschaften, die im Rahmen des Rituals vermittelt werden sollten und die Actium eindeutig und ausschließlich mit dem Bürgerkrieg gegen Antonius in Verbindung brachten. Die Leerstelle, die Octavian im Rahmen des Rituals schuf, wurde auf diese Weise in der Rezeption der Ereignisse wieder ausgefüllt. Zusätzlich nutzte Octavian ein anderes zentrales Element des Triumphrituals: Ebenso wie Sulla bediente er sich der Beutepräsentation, um spezifische Schwerpunkte zu setzen.107 Im zweiten Buch seiner Elegien berichtet Properz, dass im Rahmen von Octavians Triumph Schiffschnäbel (rostra) die Via Sacra entlang transportiert wurden, die von der gegnerischen Flotte bei Actium stammten und auf diese Weise an den Erfolg Octavians erinnerten.108 Mit den rostra stand Octavian eine Art Chiffre zur Verfügung, die an die Stelle des besiegten Feindes treten konnte und spezifisch mit Actium verknüpft war. Das dortige Siegesmonument wurde ebenfalls mit erbeuteten rostra der Flotte des Antonius verziert und im Reliefschmuck wurde möglicherweise auf den Dreifachtriumph Bezug genommen.109 Ab den großen Münzserien, die nach dem Triumph geprägt wurden und in denen der Bezug zu Actium ebenfalls prominent in Szene gesetzt wird, nahm das Symbol der rostra – und mit ihm notwendigerweise auch die Erinnerung an den Sieg im Bürgerkrieg – in der augusteischen Bildersprache eine zentrale Stelle ein.110 Die Einführung der rostra-Chiffre im Rahmen des Triumphrituals bildete hierzu den Auftakt. Schließlich nahm Octavian auch bei Pompeius seine Anleihen. Ebenso wie dieser rückte Octavian seine eigene Person, die des siegreichen Triumphators, auf besondere Weise in den Mittelpunkt. Beim Einzug in die Stadt, so berichtet Cassius Dio, gingen die römischen Magistrate nicht wie sonst üblich dem Viergespann voran, sondern schritten hinter dem Triumphator durch die porta triumphalis. In der Forschung wurde hierin oftmals ein Vorgriff auf die Prinzipats106 CIL IX 4190: […]bellum Actie(n)s(e) class[iar(ium)] / cum M(arco) Antonio […]. Vgl. hierzu ALFÖLDY 1991 sowie ROSENBERGER 1992, 53–63, der hervorhebt, dass die explizite Nennung des jeweiligen Gegners in den Einträgen zu den Bürgerkriegen eine Besonderheit der Fasti Amiternini darstellt. 107 GURVAL 1995: 29 sieht auch in der Aussage Dios, man habe alle drei Triumphe mit der Beute aus Ägypten ausgestattet, ein Anzeichen dafür, dass der Triumph über Kleopatra im Mittelpunkt stand und nicht der Sieg bei Actium. Er übergeht dabei jedoch die rostra, die in eine andere Richtung weisen. 108 Prop. 2.1.31–34: aut canerem Aegyptum et Nilum, cum attractus in urbem / septem captivis debilis ibat aquis, / aut regum auratis circumdata colla catenis, / Actiaque in Sacra currere rostra Via … 109 Vgl. hierzu MURRAY/PETSAS 1989 sowie ZACHOS 2003. Zwar ist der Kontext des Siegesdenkmals in Actium natürlich ein grundsätzlich anderer als derjenige der Monumente in Rom selbst, doch spricht einiges dafür, dass als potentielle Adressaten auch die Angehörigen der römischen Oberschicht intendiert waren; vgl. hierzu u.a. LANGE 2009: 116f. sowie konträr GURVAL 1995: 83. 110 Vgl. ZANKER 2003: 90.

178

Wolfgang Havener

ideologie gesehen, Octavian also gleichsam bereits zu diesem Zeitpunkt zum pater patriae stilisiert. Vor allem wurde auf diese Weise jedoch die neue Staatsordnung deutlich: Die Magistrate führten nun nicht mehr den erfolgreichen Feldherrn zurück in die Stadt und integrierten ihn damit wieder in die Gesellschaft. Vielmehr hatte der Triumphator Octavian diese althergebrachte Ordnung überwunden. Den Magistraten wurde ihr Platz in der neuen Ordnung zugewiesen.111 Dabei – und dies wird in der Forschung nur selten berücksichtigt – reihten sie sich an eben jener Stelle ein, an der auch das Heer des Bürgerkriegssiegers in die Stadt einzog.112 Octavian zeigte damit nicht nur, dass er außerhalb der republikanischen Gesellschaftsordnung stand und diese umgestalten konnte. Vielmehr machte er deutlich, wo er seine Machtbasis sah: im Heer und im besonderen Nahverhältnis zu seinen Soldaten. Die Provokation, die sich hinter dieser subtilen Änderung des Rituals verbarg, war damit zwar weit weniger explizit als die Elefantenquadriga des Pompeius. Sie war deswegen jedoch nicht weniger umfassend: Die Bürgerkriege waren endgültig beendet, Octavian war als allmächtiger Sieger daraus hervorgegangen – potens rerum omnium. Und ebenso stellte sein dreifacher Triumph gleichsam den Höhe- und den Endpunkt der Entwicklung des Bürgerkriegstriumphs in der späten Republik dar.

VII. Den Beginn dieses Beitrags bildete eine Auseinandersetzung mit den Aussagen des Valerius Maximus zum Bürgerkriegstriumph. In ihnen kommt ein gleichsam normativer Anspruch zum Ausdruck, der sich beispielsweise auch im Werk des Lukan widerspiegelt: Vermittelt wird der Eindruck, dass es sich bei der Zurschaustellung eines Sieges über römische Bürger im Rahmen des Triumphrituals um einen Tabubruch handelt, eine gleichsam obszöne Handlung, die die Grundwerte der römischen Gesellschaft in Frage stellt. Eine eingehende Analyse der Passage ergab, dass diesen Ausführungen ein Subtext zugrundelag, der den Bürgerkriegstriumph als ein weit komplexeres Problem auffasste, als es vordergründig den Anschein hatte. Der Blick auf die Vorgänge der späten Republik verstärkt diesen Eindruck: Die politische Praxis – das ergab sich aus der Untersuchung einer Reihe prominenter Fallbeispiele – kannte die pauschale Tabuisierung des Bürgerkriegstriumphs, wie sie uns bei Valerius Maximus entgegentritt, in dieser Form nicht. Eine Siegesfeier für einen Erfolg über römische Bürger, gekleidet in die rituelle Form des Triumphzugs, war in der späten Republik prinzipiell durchaus möglich, ohne dass dabei das Vorhandensein eines externen Gegners eine zwingende Voraussetzung gewesen wäre. Selbst wenn der Triumph an sich für einen Sieg über 111 Vgl. hierzu u.a. DAHLHEIM 2010: 158 sowie BLEICKEN 2010: 301f. 112 Vgl. SUMI 2005, 216f. sowie REINHOLD 1988, 158: „The deference to Octavian is patent“. Dagegen TARPIN 2009, 140f., der in der Marschordnung einen Verweis auf den Gefolgschaftseid sieht, den Augustus in den Res gestae (25) erwähnt. VERVAET 2011 sieht ebenfalls unter Berufung auf den Gefolgschaftseid die Initiative für die Änderung der Marschordnung im Triumph bei den Senatoren bzw. Magistraten selbst.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

179

externe Feinde dekretiert wurde (und dies war nicht immer der Fall, wie die Beispiele des Decimus Brutus und Caesars zeigen), konnten im Rahmen des Rituals Siege über römische Gegner als eigenständige, von den Siegen über externe Gegner deutlich unterschiedene Leistungen dargestellt werden. Es war keineswegs zwingend notwendig, einen Erfolg im Bürgerkrieg mit einer externen Dimension zu versehen. Von entscheidender Bedeutung ist daher die Unterscheidung zwischen eventuellen Voraussetzungen für die Dekretierung eines Triumphs und der tatsächlichen Präsentation der Siege.113 Allerdings bot eine solche Vorgehensweise stets auch Anlass zur Kritik an den Siegern und den neuen Verhältnissen. Jeder Feldherr sah sich somit vor die Entscheidung gestellt, ob er einen solchen anstößigen Triumph durchführen wollte (nicht: konnte), und dabei zugleich vor der Herausforderung, Nutzen und Risiken seiner Handlungen gegeneinander abzuwägen. Im vorliegenden Beitrag wurden unterschiedliche Strategien aufgezeigt, die von Protagonisten der Bürgerkriegsära angewendet wurden, um diesen Drahtseilakt erfolgreich zu meistern. Sie alle nutzten die Möglichkeiten individueller Einflussnahme, die das Triumphritual zur Verfügung stellte, um mittels der Variation und des auf die jeweiligen politischen Rahmenbedingungen zugeschnittenen Einsatzes der verschiedenen Elemente des Rituals spezifische Botschaften zu vermitteln. Festzuhalten bleibt an dieser Stelle, dass der Bürgerkriegstriumph sich in der späten Republik als ein Mittel erwies, um Ansprüche und Verschiebungen im Gleichgewicht der politischen Kräfte einer breiten Öffentlichkeit vor Augen zu führen. Vor diesem Hintergrund stellt sich nun die weiterführende Frage, wie sich die politische Praxis der ausgehenden Republik zu den Aussagen des Valerius Maximus oder Lukan verhält. Ohne diese Frage hier umfassend beantworten zu können,114 muss zweifellos konstatiert werden, dass der Schlüssel wie in so vielen anderen Fällen im Prinzipat des Augustus zu suchen ist: Der princeps definierte und legitimierte seine Herrschaft entscheidend vor dem Hintergrund der Bürgerkriege. In den Res Gestae bildet die Beendigung der innerrömischen Auseinandersetzungen den Ausgangspunkt für die Errichtung des Prinzipats.115 Octavian war 113 Vgl. LANGE 2013: 86: „Importantly, apart from a few exceptions – mainly justified by declaring Romans public enemies – a general could not expect to triumph after a victory in an exclusively civil war, only for a civil war that could also be represented as a foreign war; it was by nature of their external character that they qualified for a triumph“. Für die Ebene der Vergabe des Triumphs ist diese Aussage sicherlich zutreffend. Wie die in diesem Beitrag angestellten Überlegungen aufzeigen konnten, kann jedoch hinterfragt werden, ob und inwiefern dieses Prinzip auf der Ebene der Durchführung des Rituals tatsächlich eine bestimmende Maßgabe darstellte. Die Vorgehensweise, die eben nicht nur Caesar in seinem Munda-Triumph, sondern bei genauerer Betrachtung auch Sulla und Octavian wählten, geht über die semantische Aufladung eines Triumphs durch Hinweise auf den Bürgerkrieg, auf die LANGE grundsätzlich vollkommen zu Recht hinweist, sogar noch hinaus. 114 Verwiesen sei hier jedoch auf den entsprechenden Abschnitt in HAVENER (in Druckvorbereitung), der sich eben dieser Frage in der gebotenen Ausführlichkeit widmen soll. 115 Res gest. div. Aug. 34.1: in consulatu sexto et septimo, postquam bella civilian exstinxeram, per consensum universorum potens rerum omnium, rem publicam ex mea potestate in senates

180

Wolfgang Havener

aus diesen Konflikten als alleiniger Sieger hervorgegangen – eine Tatsache, die er während seiner gesamten Regierungszeit immer wieder hervorhob und auf die sich letztlich seine Machtstellung wesentlich gründete. Um diese Stellung aufrechtzuerhalten, musste es im Interesse des nunmehrigen Augustus liegen, dass seine Handlungen nicht mehr wiederholt werden konnten: Er zog seine Macht aus dem Bürgerkriegssieg, aus dem Prestige eines militärischen Erfolges, der über römische Bürger errungen worden war und der durch den Triumph symbolisiert wurde. Nach dem Ende der Bürgerkriege galt es, diese Macht zu sichern und insbesondere die Möglichkeit für sich zu monopolisieren, militärische Erfolge über externe Gegner, mehr noch aber in innerrömischen Kriegen zur Grundlage einer politischen Machtstellung zu machen. Ein Element dieser Monopolisierung bildete die Tabuisierung des Bürgerkriegstriumphs116: Der Triumph Octavians war notwendig, damit Augustus garantieren konnte, dass eine solche Zeremonie nie wieder stattfinden musste.117 Das Versprechen, keine weiteren bella civilia zuzulassen, war ein entscheidender Baustein für die Rechtfertigung der Alleinherrschaft. Ein fader Beigeschmack jedoch blieb: Properz beklagt in seinen Elegien das Schicksal Roms, „so oft ringsum belagert, durch die eigenen Triumphe erschöpft“.118 Ein Schicksal, über das auch ein mildes Siegerlächeln nicht hinwegtäuschen konnte.

populique Romani arbitrium transtuli. „Nachdem ich die Bürgerkriege endgültig beendet hatte, überführte ich während meines sechsten und siebten Konsulates die res publica – obwohl ich durch allgemeine Zustimmung Gewalt über alles besaß – aus meiner potestas in die Verfügungsgewalt von Senat und römischem Volk“. 116 Dass es sich dabei um eine augusteische Innovation handelte, dass sich also die Regel, die Valerius Maximus wiedergibt, im Wesentlichen durch die neue Situation der Monarchie und die Herrschaftslegitimation des Augustus herausbilden konnte und nicht bereits im 1. Jh. v. Chr. Bestand hatte oder gar als solche formuliert war, wird auch durch einen Blick auf die Quellen deutlich: Sämtliche Quellen, die sich mit dem Bürgerkriegstriumph beschäftigen, sind post-augusteisch oder zumindest post-octavianisch. Die Ausnahme sind die Ausführungen in Ciceros Philippica, auf die zu Beginn eingegangen wurde. Es wäre folglich zu untersuchen, wie sich Cicero und sein Einfluss auf Octavian in dieses Bild einordnen lassen. 117 Der augusteische Prinzipat legitimierte sich wesentlich über die Rolle des princeps als Garant für die Abwesenheit von Bürgerkrieg. Die Tatsache, dass Octavian die Bürgerkriege beendet hatte, war sowohl für diesen selbst wie auch für die Angehörigen der senatorischen Elite anschlussfähig (vgl. auch LANGE 2013: 82f. und 85). Dabei konnte diese Rolle mit jeweils spezifischen inhaltlichen Schwerpunkten versehen werden, indem auf der einen Seite der Aspekt des Sieges hervorgehoben wurde (wie Octavian selbst dies im Triumphzug tat), auf der anderen Seite jedoch der Aspekt des inneren Friedens in den Vordergrund gerückt werden konnte. Auf dieser Grundlage konnte sich einer der Grundbegriff augusteischer Herrschaftssemantik entwickeln, der seinen Ausdruck in der Formel der Res gestae fand: parta victoriis pax (Res gest. div. Aug. 13). Vgl. zu dieser Thematik ausführlich HAVENER (in Druckvorbereitung). Zur Entwicklung der Bedeutung des Bürgerkriegssieges im Rahmen der Legitimation monarchischer Herrschaft in der Kaiserzeit vgl. die Beiträge von ICKS und HAAKE. 118 Prop. 2.15.45f.: nec totiens propriis circum oppugnata triumphis / lassa foret crinis solvere Roma suos.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

181

LITERATUR ALFÖLDY, G., 1991. Epigraphische Notizen aus Italien IV. Das Ende der Bürgerkriege in den Fasti Amiternini. ZPE 85, 167–171. ALLÉLY, A., 2012. La déclaration d’hostis sous la République romaine, Bordeaux. BADIAN, E., 1955. The Date of Pompey’s First Triumph. Hermes 83, 107–118. BALBUZA, K., 1999. Die Siegesideologie von Octavian Augustus. Eos 86, 267–295. BASTIEN, J.-L., 2007. Le triomphe Romain et son utilization politique à Rome aux trois derniers siècles de la République, Rom. BATSTONE, W., 2010. Word at War: The Prequel, in: B. BREED – C. DAMON – A. ROSSI (Hrsg.), Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford, 45–71. BEARD, M., 2007. The Roman Triumph, Cambridge Mass. BEHR, H., 1993. Die Selbstdarstellung Sullas. Ein aristokratischer Politiker zwischen persönlichem Führungsanspruch und Standessolidarität, Frankfurt am Main. BINGHAM, W., 1981. A Study of the Livian ‘Periochae’ and their Relation to Livy’s ‘Ab urbe condita’, Ann Arbor. BLEICKEN, J., 2010. Augustus. Eine Biographie, Reinbek. BÖRM, H. – HAVENER, W., 2012. Octavians Rechtsstellung im Januar 27 v. Chr. und das Problem der „Übertragung“ der res publica. Historia 61, 202–220. BREED, B. – DAMON, C. – ROSSI, A. (Hrsg.), 2010. Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford. BRINGMANN, K., 2007. Augustus, Darmstadt. CHAPLIN, J., 2010. The Livian Periochae and the Last Republican Writer, in: M. HORSTER – C. REITZ (Hrsg.), Condensing Texts – Condensed Texts, Stuttgart, 451–467. CHRIST, K., 2002. Sulla. Eine römische Karriere, München. CHRIST, K., 2004. Pompeius. Der Feldherr Roms, München. DAHLHEIM, W., 2005. Julius Caesar. Die Ehre des Kriegers und die Not des Staates, Paderborn. DAHLHEIM, W., 2010. Augustus. Aufrührer, Herrscher, Heiland. Eine Biographie, München. DEGRASSI, A., 1947. Inscriptiones Italiae; vol. 13/1: Fasti Consulares et Triumphales, Rom. DINGMANN, M., 2007. Pompeius Magnus. Machtgrundlagen eines spätrepublikanischen Politikers, Rahden. ENGELS, J., 2001. Die exempla-Reihe de iure triumphandi. Römisch-republikanische Werte und Institutionen im frühkaiserzeitlichen Spiegel der facta et dicta memorabilia des Valerius Maximus, in: A. BARZANÒ et al. (Hrsg.), Identità e valori. Fattori di aggregazione e fattori di crisi nell’esperienza plitica antica, Rom, 139–169. FISCHER-LICHTE, E., 2003. Performance, Inszenierung, Ritual. Zur Klärung kulturwissenschaftlicher Schlüsselbegriffe, in: J. MARTSCHUKAT – S. PATZOLD (Hrsg.), Geschichtswissenschaft und „Performative Turn“. Ritual, Inszenierung und Performanz vom Mittelalter bis zur Neuzeit, Köln, 33–54. FLAIG, E., 1992. Den Kaiser herausfordern. Die Usurpation im Römischen Reich, Frankfurt am Main. FLOWER, H., 2010. Rome’s First Civil War and the Fragility of Republican Political Culture, in: B. BREED – C. DAMON – A. ROSSI (Hrsg.), Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford, 73–86. FÜNDLING, J., 2010. Sulla, Darmstadt. GEERTZ, C., 1973. The Interpretation of Cultures, New York. GELZER, M., 21959. Pompeius, München. GIEBEL, M. (Hrsg.), 1989. C. Velleius Paterculus. Historia Romana. Römische Geschichte, Stuttgart. GLADIGOW, B., 2004. Sequenzierung von Riten und die Ordnung der Rituale, in: M. STAUSBERG (Hrsg.), Zoroastrian Rituals in Context, Leiden, 57–76.

182

Wolfgang Havener

GOLDBECK, F. – MITTAG, P., 2008. Der geregelte Triumph. Der republikanische Triumph bei Valerius Maximus und Aulus Gellius, in: H. KRASSER – D. PAUSCH – I. PETROVIC (Hrsg.), Triplici invectus triumpho. Der römische Triumph in augusteischer Zeit, Stuttgart, 55–74. GOTTER, U., 2011. Abgeschlagene Hände und herausquellendes Gedärm. Das hässliche Antlitz der römischen Bürgerkriege und seine politischen Kontexte, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (Hrsg.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 55–69. GOTTER, U., 1996. Der Dictator ist tot! Politik in Rom zwischen den Iden des März und der Begründung des Zweiten Triumvirats, Stuttgart. GURVAL, R., 1995. Actium and Augustus. The Politics and Emotions of Civil War, Ann Arbor. HABICHT, C., 1990. Cicero der Politiker, München. HAVENER, W. (in Druckvorbereitung). Imperator Augustus. Die diskursive Konstituierung der militärischen persona des römischen Kaisers, Diss. Konstanz. HELLEGOUARC’H, J., 21972. Le vocabulaire latin des relations et des partis politiques souls la République, Paris. HILLEN, H. (Hrsg.), 2000. T. Livius. Römische Geschichte, Buch XLV. Antike Inhaltsangaben und Fragmente der Bücher XLVI–CXLII, Darmstadt. HÖLSCHER, T., 2004. Provokation und Transgression als politischer Habitus in der späten Römischen Republik. MDAI(R) 111, 83–104. HÖLSCHER, T., 2006. The Transformation of Victory into Power: From Event to Structure, in: S. DILLON – K. WELCH (Hrsg.), Representations of War in Ancient Rome, Cambridge, 27–48. HOLLIDAY, P., 1997. Roman Triumphal Painting: Its Function, Development, and Reception. ABull 79, 130–147. ITGENSHORST, T., 2005. Tota illa pompa. Der Triumph in der römischen Republik, Göttingen. KASTEN, H. (Hrsg.), 41988. Cicero. Staatsreden. Dritter Teil: Die Philippischen Reden, Berlin. KEAVENEY, A., 1982. Sulla: The Last Republican, London. KOBER, M., 2000. Die politischen Anfänge Octavians in der Darstellung des Velleius und dessen Verhältnis zur historiographischen Tradition. Ein philologischer Quellenvergleich: Nikolaos von Damaskus, Appianos von Alexandria, Velleius Paterculus, Würzburg. KÖNIG, R. (Hrsg.), 1984. C. Plinius Secundus d. Ä. Naturkunde; Buch XXXIII: Metallurgie, München. KÖNIG, R. (Hrsg.), 22007. C. Plinius Secundus d. Ä. Naturkunde; Buch VIII: Zoologie: Landtiere, Düsseldorf. KUNKEL, W. – WITTMANN, R., 1995. Staatsordnung und Staatspraxis der römischen Republik; Bd. 2: Die Magistratur, München. KÜNZL, E., 1988. Der römische Triumph. Siegesfeiern im antiken Rom, München. LANGE, C. H., 2009. Res publica constituta: Actium, Apollo and the Accomplishment of the Triumviral Assignment, Leiden. LANGE, C. H., 2013. Triumph and Civil War in the Late Republic. PBSR 81, 67–90. LUNDGREEN, C., 2011. Regelkonflikte in der römischen Republik. Geltung und Gewichtung von Normen in politischen Entscheidungsprozessen, Stuttgart. MADER, G., 2005. Triumphal Elephants and Political Circus at Plutarch, Pomp. 14.6. CW 99, 397– 403. MAIURO, M., 2008. Il trionfo della Repubblica a Costantino. Regole, ruoli e pratiche, in: E. LA ROCCA – S. TORTORELLA (Hrsg.), Trionfi Romani, Mailand, 20–29. MARINCOLA, J., 2011. Explanations in Velleius, in: E. COWAN (Hrsg.), Velleius Paterculus: Making History, Swansea, 121–140. MEIER, C., 2004. Caesar, Berlin. MICHAELS, A., 22001. “Le ritual pour le ritual” oder wie sinnlos sind Rituale, in: C. CADUFF – J. PFAFF-CZARNECKA (Hrsg.), Ritual heute. Theorien – Kontroversen – Entwürfe, Berlin, 23–47. MURRAY, W. – PETSAS, P., 1989. Octavian’s Campsite Memorial for the Actian War, Philadelphia. OPPITZ, M., 22001. Montageplan von Ritualen, in: C. CADUFF – J. PFAFF-CZARNECKA (Hrsg.), Ritual heute. Theorien – Kontroversen – Entwürfe, Berlin, 73–95.

Triumphus ex bello civili?

183

ÖSTENBERG, I., 2009. Staging the World: Spoils, Captives, and Representations in the Roman Triumphal Procession, Oxford. ÖSTENBERG, I., 2014. Triumph and Spectacle: Victory Celebrations in the Late Republican Civil Wars, in: C. LANGE – F. VERVAET (Hrsg.), The Roman Republican Triumph: Beyond the Spectacle, Rom, 182–193. PELLING, C., 1996. The Triumviral Period, CAH2 X, 1–69. PITTENGER, M., 2008. Contested Triumphs: Politics, Pageantry, and Performance in Livy’s Republican Rome. Berkeley. RAPPAPORT, R., 1999. Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity, Cambridge. REINHOLD, M., 1988. From Republic to Principate: An Historical Commentary on Cassius Dio’s Roman History, Books 49–52 (36–29 BC), Atlanta. RICH, J., 2011. Velleius’ History: Genre and Purpose, in: E. COWAN (Hrsg.), Velleius Paterculus: Making History, Swansea, 73–92. ROSENBERGER, V., 1992. Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart. ROSIVACH, V., 2009. The Elephant-Drawn Chariot in Pompey’s First Triumph. NECJ 36, 239–252. RÜPKE, J., 1990. Domi militiae. Die religiöse Konstruktion des Krieges in Rom, Stuttgart. SCHMITZER, U., 2000. Velleius Paterculus und das Interesse an der Geschichte im Zeitalter des Tiberius, Heidelberg. SOEFFNER, H.-G., 1992. Die Ordnung der Rituale, Frankfurt am Main. SOEFFNER, H.-G., 2004. Überlegungen zur Soziologie des Symbols und des Rituals, in: C. WULF – J. ZIRFAS (Hrsg.), Die Kultur des Rituals. Inszenierungen, Praktiken, Symbole, München, 149–176. SUMI, G., 2005. Ceremony and Power: Performing Politics in Rome between Republic and Empire, Ann Arbor. TAMBIAH, S., 1985. Culture, Thought and Social Action: An Anthropological Perspective, Cambridge Mass. TARPIN, M., 2009. Le triomphe d’Auguste: heritage de la République ou revolution?, in: F. HURLET – B. MINEO (Hrsg.), Le Principat d’Auguste. Réalités et representations du pouvoir Autour de la Res publica restituta, Rennes, 129–142. TURNER, V., 1969. The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure, Ithaca. UNGERN-STERNBERG, J., 1970. Untersuchungen zum spätrepublikanischen Notstandsrecht. Senatusconsultum ulimum und hostis-Erklärung, München. VEH, O. (Hrsg.), 1989. Appian von Alexandria. Römische Geschichte; Zweiter Teil: Die Bürgerkriege, Stuttgart. VEH, O. (Hrsg.), 2007. Cassius Dio. Römische Geschichte, Düsseldorf. VERSNEL, H., 1970. Triumphus: An Inquiry into the Origin, Development and Meaning of the Roman Triumph, Leiden. VERVAET, F., 2011. On the Order of Appearance in Imperator Caesar’s Third Triumph (15 August 29 BCE). Latomus 70, 96–102. VOISIN, J., 1983. Le triomphe Africain de 46 et l’idéologie Césarienne. AntAfr 19, 7–33. WALLMANN, P., 1989. Triumviri Rei Publicae Constituendae. Untersuchungen zur Politischen Propaganda im Zweiten Triumvirat (43–30 v. Chr.), Frankfurt am Main. WEINSTOCK, S., 1971. Divus Julius, Oxford. WILL, W., 2009. Caesar, Darmstadt. WISEMAN, T., 2010. The Two-Headed State: How Romans Explained Civil War, in: B. BREED – C. DAMON – A. ROSSI (Hrsg.), Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford, 25–44. WITTSTOCK, O. (Hrsg.), 1993. Sueton. Kaiserbiographien, Berlin. WOODMAN, A. (Hrsg.), 1983. Velleius Paterculus, the Caesarian and Augustan Narrative (2,41– 93), Cambridge.

184

Wolfgang Havener

WULF, C. – ZIRFAS, J., 2004. Performative Welten. Einführung in die historischen, systematischen und methodischen Dimensionen des Rituals, in: C. WULF – J. ZIRFAS, Die Kultur des Rituals. Inszenierungen, Praktiken, Symbole, München, 7–45. ZACHOS, K., 2003. The Tropaeum of the Sea-Battle of Actium at Nikopolis: Interim Report. JRA 16, 64–92. ZANKER, P., 42003. Augustus und die Macht der Bilder, München. ZIEGLER, K. – WUHRMANN, W. (Hrsg.), 32010. Plutarch. Große Griechen und Römer; Bd. 3, Mannheim.

PART TWO FROM THE HIGH EMPIRE TO LATE ANTIQUITY

JUPITER, DIE FLAVIER UND DAS KAPITOL ODER: WIE MAN EINEN BÜRGERKRIEG GEWINNT Alexander Heinemann

ABSTRACT: The dramatic end of the civil war of 68/69 AD saw the occupation of the Capitoline hill at the hands of Vespasian’s supporters and the destruction of the temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus by fire. Tacitus’ narrative and our knowledge of the topography allow for a fairly detailed reconstruction of the events (section I). In its aftermath the conflict is ideologically exploited in various ways: The first reconstruction of the temple is styled as a collective effort of reinstated collective consensus (II), while Domitian’s part in the tumultuous events is subsequently glorified as the finest hour of the later emperor (III). Numismatic evidence, however, shows that Capitoline Jupiter, after decades of relative obscurity, had come to be a veritable battle cry during the civil war (IV). Seen against this development, the occupation of the Capitol must be seen not as a fortuitous or desperate act, but as a conscious gesture of high symbolic value, pointing back both to Brennus’ siege and to the Sabines’ taking of the hill, especially meaningful for a family which proudly heralded its Sabine roots. Indeed, Tacitus’ narrative reveals the alleged siege as one not so much actively laid on by Vitellian forces as actually declared by their foes, who thus created a strategic predicament for Vitellius. The eventual destruction of the temple proved beneficial for nobody but Vespasian (V). Für Tonio Hölscher zum 2. November 2015

Können Kriegshandlungen, Akte militärischer Gewalt, in denen die blanke Existenz auf dem Spiel steht, überhaupt fruchtbar als performativ gestaltete Vorgänge angesehen werden? Unter dem Tagungsthema Performing Civil War − Die Inszenierung des Bürgerkriegs diskutierten die Beitragenden dieses Sammelbandes noch diese und andere Fragen, als die medial vermittelte Wirklichkeit sie schon nahezu eingeholt hatte.1 Nur zwei Wochen nach dem Ende der Tagung führten die 1

Die nachstehenden Überlegungen stehen im größeren Kontext eines Forschungsvorhabens zum flavischen Rom. Sie sind aber für die Tagung auf Schloss Reisensburg entstanden, woraus sich ihr spezifischer Fokus auf performative Aspekte erklärt, den der vorliegende Sammelband aus einer Reihe guter Gründe nicht mehr in den Mittelpunkt stellt. Die Organisatoren und Herausgeber haben eine gleichermaßen intensive wie entspannte Gesprächsrunde zusammengeführt, aus der mir zahlreiche wertvolle Hinweise und Bestätigungen zugeflossen sind, namentlich von Henning BÖRM, Hartmut LEPPIN, Federico SANTANGELO und ganz besonders Kai TRAMPEDACH. Ruurd NAUTA teilte mit mir seine Perplexitäten hinsichtlich Stat. silv. 1.6.98–102 und bewahrte mich vor philologischen Fehltritten. Pier Luigi TUCCI kommentierte eine Zwischenfassung dieses Textes; Benjamin WIELAND war hilfreich bei der Bereitstellung originaler Münzen aus der Sammlung des Freiburger Seminars für Alte Geschichte. Ihnen allen gilt mein herzlicher Dank.

188

Alexander Heinemann

Bilder von der Festnahme Muammar al-Gaddafis am 20. Oktober 2011 der Weltöffentlichkeit die Inszenierung des Bürgerkriegs mit aller Drastik vor Augen (Abb. 1). Die Ergreifung und Tötung des libyschen Machthabers durch Rebellenmilizen am Stadtrand von Sirte hatte in dieser Form von keinem der Beteiligten geplant werden können und vollzog sich unter chaotischen Umständen. Gleichwohl wurde der glückliche Fang im Bewusstsein seiner baldigen medialen Rezeption sogleich in ausdrucksstarke Bilder umgemünzt: Die verwackelten, mit Mobiltelefonen aufgenommenen Bilder, die nahezu in Echtzeit in die internationalen Nachrichtenkanäle gelangten, ließen inszenierte Posen und prägnant gewählte visuelle Formulierungen erkennen, welche das turbulente Geschehen um die Ergreifung eines blutenden älteren Mannes mit spezifischen Bedeutungen aufluden: Der wie eine Trophäe auf einen Wagenkühler gehievte Gaddafi machte den umfassenden Sieg seiner Gegner sichtbar und musste wie die grausige Parodie früherer Militärparaden des Obersten wirken; die deiktisch zwischen Mobiltelefon und Ex-Diktator ins Bild gehaltene Schusswaffe wurde über kulturelle Grenzen hinweg als Zeichen auftrumpfender Selbstbehauptung (und Selbstjustiz?) der Rebellen verständlich. Hinzu traten Gewaltakte eklatant symbolischer Qualität wie der Versuch, den eben gefangengenommenen GadAbb. 1: Der libysche Machthaber Muammar al-Gaddafi dafi mit einem Messer oder Stab bald nach seiner Ergreifung am Stadtrand von Sirte, anal zu penetrieren sowie die spä20. Oktober 2011. Mobiltelefonfoto eines unbekannten Fotografen. tere Schleifung seines bereits leblosen Körpers.2 Ausgangspunkt meiner Überlegungen ist das Ende eines anderen Bürgerkriegs, jene Dezembertage im Stadtzentrum Roms, die als der dramatische Höhepunkt des Vierkaiserjahres angesehen werden können, dieses an unerwarteten Wendungen ohnehin nicht armen longus et unus annus zwischen dem Tod Neros im Juni 68 und der Verabschiedung der lex de imperio Vespasiani im Dezember 69 n. Chr.3 Zwar liegt für die Ereignisse keine vergleichbare Dokumentation wie aus 2 3

Zur Penetration und Schleifung Gaddafis s. die Dokumentation im Agenturbericht von SHELTON 2011. Die Formulierung von dem „einen und langen Jahr“ des Galba, Otho und Vitellius findet sich im konzisen Rückblick auf 120 Jahre Kaisergeschichte bei Tac. dial. 17.3. − Eine ausführliche Darstellung der Ereignisse unter starker Betonung der militärischen Aspekte bieten GREENHALGH 1975 und WELLESLEY 1975; narrativ frischer und unter stärkerer Berücksichtigung der literarischen Strategien unserer Quellen jetzt MORGAN 2006, dessen zurückhaltender Umgang mit der Sekundärliteratur die Überprüfung seiner Ergebnisse allerdings nicht erleichtert. Stärker strukturgeschichtlich angelegt ist die knappe Studie von BENOIST 2001; wiederholt auf das

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

189

Libyen vor, gleichwohl erlaubt die kritische Analyse der zur Gebote stehenden Quellen den Nachweis einer rhetorischen, über sich selbst hinausweisenden Qualität im Verhalten einzelner Akteure. Tatsächlich erweisen sich sowohl die militärischen Auseinandersetzungen selbst (zu besprechen in Abschnitten I und V) als auch ihre kurzfristige rituelle Überwindung (II) und ihre mittelfristige ideologische Aneignung (III) im Lichte des vorangegangenen Schlagabtausches (IV) in geradezu musterhafter Form als intentional gestaltete Akte der politischen Kommunikation. Im Mittelpunkt dieser Vorgänge steht der Kapitolshügel in Rom und das ihn beherrschende Heiligtum des Jupiter Optimus Maximus, dessen Tempel am 19. Dezember 69 bei Kämpfen zwischen Flavianern und Vitellianern in Flammen aufgeht. Schon der archaische, auf die Gründungsphase der Republik zurückgehende Vorgängerbau war während eines Bürgerkriegs niedergebrannt. Wie zu zeigen sein wird, drangen im Laufe der Verarbeitung dieses traumatischen Geschehens noch weitere Ereignisse aus der komplexen memorialen Stratigraphie des Gebäudes ins Bewusstsein der Zeitgenossen – oder wurden gezielt aktiviert. Auf diesem Wege sollte es den Akteuren der Nachkriegszeit gelingen, sogar diesem für Tacitus „schmerzlichsten und widerwärtigsten Verbrechen gegen das römische Gemeinwesen seit Gründung der Stadt“ einen politischen Mehrwert, ja, einen Sinn abzugewinnen.4

I. BÜRGERKRIEG: VIER TAGE IM DEZEMBER Mitte Dezember des Jahres 69 n. Chr. befindet sich Vitellius, Kaiser in Rom, in einer misslichen Lage. Ein gut Teil der Rheinarmee, auf die er sich bei seiner Usurpation gestützt hat, ist Ende Oktober in Bedriacum bei Cremona von den Truppen des Prätendenten Vespasians geschlagen worden, die nun unter Führung des Legaten Antonius Primus auf Rom marschieren. Vitellius hat einen Teil der ihm verbleibenden Prätorianerkohorten, die er selbst aus der Rheinarmee ausgehoben hat, unter Leitung seines Bruders Lucius nach Tarracina geschickt, wo sich die meuternde Flotte aus Misenum verschanzt hat. Der Kaiser selbst ist mit ca. 12.000 Mann, davon etwa die Hälfte Auxiliartruppen, in Rom verblieben. Sein

4

Vierkaiserjahr kommt FLAIG 1992 zu sprechen; SEELENTAG 2009 beleuchtet anhand der senatorischen Gesandtschaften an die vier Prätendenten das stark formalisierte Verhalten des Senats und seine eingeschränkten Optionen im Rahmen des monarchischen Akzeptanzsystems; zu den Gesandtschaften jetzt auch Williams 2012. Martijn ICKS bespricht (in diesem Band S. 307–311) Vespasians Überwindung des Vitellius als Beispiel einer erfolgreichen Usurpierung der Kaiserwürde. Nach Erhalt der ersten Fahnen kam mir LINDSAY 2010 zur Kenntnis, der gleichfalls die ideologische Bedeutung des Kapitols für Vespasian herausstellt. Tac. hist. 3.72: id facinus post conditam urbem luctuosissimum foedissimumque rei publicae populi Romani accidit. Zum Kapitol als geradezu paradigmatischem lieu de mémoire s. HÖLSCHER 2006; das weite Feld römischer Erinnerungskultur und insbesondere ihre enge Verflechtung mit der topographischen und monumentalen Gestalt der Stadt behandelt zuletzt HÖLKESKAMP 2012.

190

Alexander Heinemann

Abb. 2: Nord- und Mittelitalien, Schauplätze der letzten Bürgerkriegsmonate des Jahres 69 n. Chr.

Machtbereich, so unterstreicht Tacitus die Zuspitzung der Lage, reicht in diesen Tagen nur von Narnia bis Tarracina (Abb. 2).5 Nach tagelangen Geheimverhandlungen mit dem Bruder Vespasians, dem praefectus urbis Flavius Sabinus, hat Vitellius – so wollen es Tacitus’ Quellen wissen − in seine Abdankung eingewilligt. Als ihn in der Nacht zum 18. Dezember die Nachricht vom Abfall seiner in Narnia stationierten Kohorten erreicht, begibt er sich am Morgen im Trauergewand aufs Forum (Abb. 3 Nr. 2) und erklärt in einem noch nie dagewesenen Akt seinen Rücktritt vom Prinzipat. Die anwesenden Teile der Stadtbevölkerung und Senatorenschaft sowie die Militärs wollen

5

Tac. hist. 3.60: nec plus e toto terrarum orbe reliquum Vitellio quam quod inter Tarracinam Narniamque iaceat. Zur Größe der regulären Truppenkontingente s. BUSCH 2011: 20–22, 170 Tab. 3–4.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

191

davon nichts wissen, und veranlassen den Kaiser, unverrichteter Dinge wieder ins palatium zurückzukehren (Abb. 3 Nr. 1).6 Am gleichen Tage kommt im Haus des Flavius Sabinus auf dem Quirinal (Abb. 3 Nr. 3) eine größere Menschenmenge zusammen, einflussreiche Ritter und Senatoren, sowie die amtierenden Konsuln C. Quintius Atticus und Cn. Caecilius Simplex, ferner Offiziere der cohortes urbanae und der vigiles, jener Einheiten also, die dem Stadtpräfekten direkt unterstellt sind. Man hört vom ausgebliebenen Rücktritt des Kaisers, drängt Sabinus zum Handeln und begibt sich schließlich als bewaffnete Gruppe ins Stadtzentrum. Noch vor Erreichen Abb. 3: Rom im Jahre 69 n. Chr., Schauplätze der Ereignisse vom 18. bis 20. Dezember. 1: Kaiserliche Residenz des Forums, am Wasserbassin auf dem Palatin. – 2: Forum Romanum. – 3: Haus des des lacus Fundani, knapp unter- Flavius Sabinus auf dem Quirinal. – 4: Lacus Fundani. – halb der heutigen Piazza del 5: Kapitol. – 6: Velabrum. Gepunktet der mutmaßliche Quirinale (Abb. 3 Nr. 4) kommt Weg der Flavianer durch das Stadtgebiet. es zu einem Scharmützel mit vitellianischen Militärs, bei dem die Flavianer einige Leute verlieren. Sabinus entscheidet sich das nahegelegene Kapitol zu besetzen (Abb. 3 Nr. 5), das von den Vitellianern umschlossen wird.7

6

7

In dieser Verdichtung schildert Tacitus (hist. 67.2–68) Ereignisse, die bei Sueton (Vit. 15.2–4) auf zwei Tage und drei unterschiedliche Versammlungen verteilt sind; im Ergebnis stimmen sie überein. Cass. Dio 64.16.2–6 beschreibt (ohne chronologische Präzisierungen) gleichfalls Vitellius’ sich über Tage und verschiedene öffentliche Auftritte hinziehendes wankelmütiges Gebaren. Einen schlüssigen, der taciteischen Version zuneigenden Versuch, die Traditionen zu vereinbaren, unternimmt MORGAN 2006: 240f. Weniger überzeugt mich die Interpretation bei KÖNIG 1984: bes. 299–303, die darauf abzielt, die Divergenzen auf unterschiedliche staatsrechtliche Auffassungen der Autoren zurückzuführen. Fraglos liegen doch auch unterschiedliche literarische Strategien zugrunde: Tacitus’ fokussiertere Rekonstruktion ist in narrativer Hinsicht effektvoller, während die ungewöhnlich breite Schilderung bei Sueton vor allem darauf abzielt, Vitellius als Zauderer zu charakterisieren. Tac. hist. 3.69.1–3; Cass. Dio 64.17.1–2; Ios. bell. Iud. 4.645–646. Das Haus des Sabinus auf dem Quirinal läßt sich mit großer Sicherheit lokalisieren: LTUR II, 102f. s.v. domus: T. Flavius Sabinus (M. TORELLI). Die Lage des lacus Fundani ergibt sich aus der taciteischen Schilderung sowie der im Bereich von S. Silvestro al Quirinale gefundenen Inschrift CIL VI 1297 =

192

Alexander Heinemann

Im Schutz eines starken Winterregens lässt Sabinus in der Nacht zum 19. Dezember seine Enkel sowie den 18jährigen Domitian auf den Hügel nachholen; außerdem entsendet er einen Boten, der die nahenden Truppen des Primus über seine Lage verständigen soll. Bei Tagesanbruch schickt er Cornelius Martialis, Tribun der Stadtkohorten, als Unterhändler zu Vitellius, der aber unverrichteter Dinge zurückkommt, da der Kaiser ihm mitteilt, das Handeln seiner Truppen nicht mehr kontrollieren zu können.8 Am Morgen des 19. beginnen die Vitellianer mit der Erstürmung des Kapitolshügels.9 Beide Seiten setzen auch Brandsätze ein; das hölzerne Gebälk des Tempels des Jupiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus fängt Feuer und der Tempel brennt vollständig nieder. Im Verlauf der Kampfeshandlungen auf dem Kapitolshügel können sich nicht wenige Flavianer – darunter Domitian – retten; andere fallen. Sabinus wird von den Truppen des Vitellius gefangengesetzt und kurz darauf ums Leben gebracht.10 Am Abend dieses Tages erreicht das von Antonius Primus befehligte vespasianische Heer die nördlichen Vororte der Stadt; am nächsten Tag, es ist der 20. Dezember, weist Primus eine letzte Gesandtschaft des Vitellius brüsk ab, und marschiert in Rom ein, wo es zu äußerst blutigen Kämpfen kommt, zuletzt um das Prätorianerlager selbst. Domitian und viele ranghohe Senatoren verbringen den Tag in ihren Verstecken; erst gegen Abend wird Domitian sich hervorwagen, zu den flavianischen Heerführern begeben und als Cäsar ausrufen lassen. Vitellius hingegen wird unter kafkaesken Umständen im völlig verlassenen Palatium aufgestöbert, aufs Forum geschleift, und schließlich gelyncht; seine Überreste enden im Tiber.11 Die Bilder von der Ergreifung des Obersten Gaddafi mögen eine plastische Anschauung solcher Vorgänge geben. Erst am nächsten Tag ist es möglich, den Senat zusammenzurufen. Dies ist nun, vermerkt Tacitus lakonisch, „jene Senatssitzung, an der sie die Herrschaft Vespasians beschlossen“.12 Unter anderem verhandelt man auch über die am ab-

8 9

10 11 12

ILS 872 einer vom Vicus Laci Fundani aufgestellten Reiterstatue Sullas; s. LTUR III, 167f. s.v. lacus Fundani (F. COARELLI). Tac. hist. 3.69.4–70; Cass. Dio 64.17.2. WELLESLEY 1981: 176–179 vermutet als Auslöser dieser Aktion den zurückgeschlagenen Angriff der flavianischen Vorhut, etwa 1000 Reitern unter dem Kommando des Petilius Cerialis, die den nordöstlichen Stadtrand in den Morgenstunden des 19. Dezember erreicht hätten (Tac. hist. 79.1–2). Unbefriedigend an WELLESLEYs für sich genommen (und trotz des scheinbaren Widerspruchs Tac. hist. 3.78.3) schlüssiger Rekonstruktion ist der Umstand, dass sie die Prätorianerkohorten von einem Kampfplatz zum andern eilen lässt, während Vitellius’ (schwächere aber zahlenmäßig umfangreichere) Auxiliartruppen unbeschäftigt bleiben. Tac. hist. 3.71–75; Suet. Vit. 15.3; Dom. 1.3; Cass. Dio 64.17.3–4; Ios. bell. Iud. 4.647–649. Tac. hist. 3.79–86; Suet. Vit. 16–17; Cass. Dio 64.18–21; Ios. bell. Iud. 4.650–655. Tac. hist. 4.6.2: eo senatus die, quo de imperio Vespasiani censebant; vgl. Cass. Dio 65.1.1. Die Inhalte dieser Senatssitzung behandelt Tac. hist. 4.3–10; s. dazu MALITZ 1985: 234–236; zur Chronologie auch ROGERS 1949: 438 Anm. 8. Das Datum ist nicht explizit überliefert, wird aber von den Umständen nahegelegt. Am 20. Dezember waren die flavianischen Truppen einmarschiert und Vitellius zu Tode gekommen, es war aber, so Tac. hist. 3.86.3 nicht mehr möglich gewesen den Senat einzuberufen (vocari senatus non potuit). Dass dies eilends

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

193

gebrannten Jupitertempel zu ergreifenden Maßnahmen. Helvidius Priscus, prominenter Vertreter der ‚stoischen Opposition‘ und Verfechter senatorischer Eigenständigkeit, stellt den Antrag, der Senat solle sich des Wiederaufbaus des Tempels annehmen, doch der Tribun Vulcacius Tertullinus schmettert den Antrag – es ist das letzte überlieferte tribunizische Veto der römischen Geschichte – mit dem Hinweis ab, dass über so wichtige Dinge nicht in Abwesenheit des Prinzeps entschieden werden dürfe.13 Es ist der 21. Dezember. Das lange Vierkaiserjahr ist zu Ende.

II. NEUGRÜNDUNG: EIN EINTRÄCHTIGER JUNITAG Ein halbes Jahr nach diesen vier Tagen im Dezember 69, in denen sich die militärische, politische und nicht zuletzt religiöse Verfasstheit der res publica grundlegend wandelt, findet auf dem Gelände des kapitolinischen Jupitertempels eine Zeremonie statt, über die wir durch Tacitus ungewöhnlich detailreich unterrichtet sind:14 Curam restituendi Capitolii in Lucium Vestinum confert, equestris ordinis virum, sed auctoritate famaque inter proceres. ab eo contracti haruspices monuere ut reliquiae prioris delubri in paludes aveherentur, templum isdem vestigiis sisteretur: nolle deos mutari veterem formam. XI kalendas Iulias serena luce spatium omne quod templo dicabatur evinctum vittis coronisque; ingressi milites, quis fausta nomina, felicibus ramis; dein virgines Vestales cum pueris puellisque patrimis matrimisque aqua e fontibus amnibusque hausta perluere. tum Helvidius Priscus praetor, praeeunte Plautio Aeliano pontifice, lustrata suovetaurilibus area et super caespitem redditis extis, Iovem, Iunonem, Minervam praesidesque imperii deos precatus uti coepta prosperarent sedisque suas pietate hominum inchoatas divina ope attollerent, vittas, quis ligatus lapis innexique funes erant, contigit; simul ceteri magistratus et sacerdotes et senatus et eques et magna pars populi, studio laetitiaque conixi, saxum ingens traxere. passimque iniectae fundamentis argenti aurique stipes et metallorum primitiae, nullis fornacibus victae, sed ut gignuntur: praedixere haruspices ne temeraretur opus saxo aurove in aliud destinato. altitudo aedibus adiecta: id solum religio adnuere et prioris templi magnificentiae defuisse credebatur.

13 14

zu geschehen hatte, war für die Senatoren aber bereits zur Routine geworden. In den zurückliegenden Monaten waren sie nach Galbas Ermordung und nach Bekanntwerden von Othos Tod jeweils am gleichen Tage zusammengekommen, um das imperium auf einen neuen Kaiser zu übertragen: s. BRUNT 1977: 99f. Es gibt daher keinen Grund, für die Senatssitzung nach dem Tode des Vitellius mit weiteren Verzögerungen zu rechnen. All dies bedeutet freilich nicht, dass die lex de imperio Vespasiano noch an jenem Tag rechtskräftig wurde, musste sie doch erst von Comitien bestätigt werden. Zu den mit der lex verbundenen Fragen s. in der älteren Literatur vor allem BRUNT 1977, in jüngerer Zeit MANTOVANI 2009; CAPOGROSSI COLOGNESI 2009. Zu Helvidius Priscus’ Rolle im neronischen und flavischen Senat s. MALITZ 1985, ferner PIGÓN 1992. Tac. hist. 4.53.

194

Alexander Heinemann Die Zuständigkeit für die Wiederherstellung des Kapitols übertrug er [Vespasian] dem Lucius Vestinus, einem Mann des Ritterstandes, nach Autorität und Ansehen aber unter den vornehmsten Männern. Dieser zog die Eingeweideschauer (haruspices) heran, die beschieden, die Reste des älteren Tempels seien in Sümpfe zu verbringen und der neue Tempel solle auf den gleichen Fundamenten aufsetzen: die Götter wollten nicht, dass das alte Erscheinungsbild geändert werde. Am 21. Juni, bei heiterem Himmel, war der ganze dem Tempel gewidmete Platz mit Binden und Kränzen umwunden; herein traten Soldaten, die glücksbringende Namen trugen, mit früchtetragenden Zweigen, dann versprengten die vestalischen Jungfrauen gemeinsam mit Knaben und Mädchen, deren Eltern noch am Leben waren, Wasser, das aus Quellen und Flüssen geschöpft worden war. Sodann, nachdem das Areal durch ein Suovetaurilienopfer gereinigt und die Eingeweide auf einer Grasscholle dargebracht worden waren, bat der Prätor Helvidius Priscus, dem der Pontifex Plautius Aelianus voranschritt, im Gebet Jupiter, Juno Minerva und die Götter, die dem Reich vorstehen, das Unterfangen zu begünstigen und ihre Wohnsitze, begründet mit menschlicher Frömmigkeit, mit göttlicher Macht zu erheben. Er berührte die Binden, mit denen der Stein umwunden und die mit Seilen verbunden waren; zugleich zogen den großen Stein Beamte und Priester und Senat und Ritter und ein großer Teil des Volkes, geeint im Bemühen und in der Heiterkeit. Und überall wurden in die Fundamente Weihgaben aus Gold und Silber hineingeworfen, auch Erstlingsgaben von Erzen, durch keine Schmelzöfen bezwungen, sondern so wie sie hervorkommen: Die haruspices hatten bestimmt, das Werk dürfe weder durch Stein noch Gold, das anderem Zwecke bestimmt gewesen sei, entweiht werden. Dem Tempel wurde Höhe hinzugefügt: Dies allein gestattete die Religion und dies allein habe an der Großartigkeit des Vorgängers gefehlt.

Überraschender als die altertümelnden Formen des Rituals mutet darin die völlige Absenz des Kaisers an. Obendrein nimmt ausgerechnet der notorische Verfechter senatorischer Eigenständigkeit Helvidius Priscus als amtierender Prätor (Konsuln sind die abwesenden Vespasian und Titus) eine herausgehobene Rolle ein. Das Fehlen des anderen Prätors, Domitian, ist damit erklärt worden, er sei zu diesem Zeitpunkt bereits abgereist.15 Wahrscheinlich ist diese überraschende Konstellation, die sicher nicht im Sinne des Kaisers gewesen sein dürfte, terminlichem Druck geschuldet, jedenfalls legt das Datum der Zeremonie nahe, dass man sich in der Senatssitzung vom 21. Dezember eine Sechsmonatsfrist für das Einsetzen der Arbeiten gesetzt hatte.16 Ende 69 hatte aber noch niemand absehen können, dass der 15

16

TOWNEND 1987: 244: „Domitian, the urban praetor, was either already on his way to Gaul or disbarred by being only eighteen years old“. Ersteres hat mehr Wahrscheinlichkeit für sich, zumal Domitian als Prätor mit imperium consulare (Tac. hist. 4.3.4; Suet. Dom. 1.3) dem Helvidius gegenüber höherrangig war. Auch WARDLE 1996: 212 hat keine bessere Erklärung für Domitians Abwesenheit. Freilich ist nicht auszuschließen, dass das Los darüber entschied, wer den Tempel einweihen sollte. So war es der Tradition zufolge schon beim ersten capitolinischen Jupitertempel gewesen, und auch da hatte das Los nach Ansicht vieler den weniger würdigen Amtsträger begünstigt: Liv. 2.7.6–8. Vespasian ist jedenfalls nicht vor September in Rom eingetroffen, s. HALFMANN 1986: 178–180. Zur personellen Konstellation s.a. MALITZ 1985: 238 m. Anm. 44, der darauf hinweist, dass immerhin der offizierende pontifex maximus Ti. Plautius Silvanus „ein erprobter Anhänger des neuen Princeps“ ist. TOWNEND 1987: 244 Anm. 1 diskutiert das Datum, das schon deswegen auffällt, weil ihm keine wie auch immer geartete politische oder religiöse Signifikanz beigemessen werden kann; seine hier aufgegriffene These (ebd. 247 Anm. 14), man habe sich auf Drängen des Helvidius auf die Aufnahme der Arbeiten innerhalb von 6 Monaten geeinigt, wird von WARDLE 1996: 210 Anm. 7 in Frage gestellt, weil das Datum der Senatssitzung nicht sicher bestimmbar sei, s. aber o. Anm. 12.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

195

Kaiser ein halbes Jahr nach seinem Herrschaftsantritt immer noch nicht in Rom sein würde. In der Tat scheint mit dem ehrwürdigen Spektakel vom 21. Juni dem Senatsbeschluss Genüge getan, denn nun ruhen die Tätigkeiten erst einmal wieder, bis der Princeps selbst in Rom eintrifft und in einer berühmt gewordenen Geste persönlich die erste Fuhre Schutt vom Bauplatz abräumt.17 Tacitus beschreibt komplexe Vorgänge, die ebenso singulär sind wie ihr Anlass, aber gleichwohl unschwer zu deuten sind. Zu unterscheiden sind in seiner Schilderung der administrative Rahmen der Bautätigkeiten, die religiös begründeten Bauvorgaben der haruspices und die im eigentlichen Sinne performativen Elemente in Gestalt der am Bauplatz durchgeführten Rituale. Mit der Organisation des Wiederaufbaus sendet der abwesende Kaiser ein klares politisches Signal, steht diese doch offenkundig unter den Vorzeichen von Tradition und Kontinuität. Hierzu gehört neben der Konsultation der ehrwürdigen (wenn auch als Körperschaft nicht klar zu fassenden) haruspices die Bestallung eines curator restituendi Capitolii, ein Amt das unter der gleichen Bezeichnung anderthalb Jahrhunderte zuvor Quintus Lutatius Catulus bekleidet hatte, nachdem der archaische Tempel im Jahre 83 v. Chr. abgebrannt war. Dabei fällt die Wahl Vespasians mit L. Iulius Vestinus auf einen altgedienten und renommierten Vertreter seines Standes. Vestinus, ein schon mit Claudius eng verbundener Provinzialer, bekleidet unter Nero das wichtige Amt des Präfekten Ägyptens, ist aber gleichwohl nicht kompromittiert, nachdem sein Sohn im Nachspiel der Pisonischen Verschwörung zum Selbstmord gezwungen worden ist. Zugleich ist Vestinus – als Besitzer einer Ziegelei im Übrigen bereits mit dem Baugewerbe vernetzt − aufgrund von Stand und Alter niemand, der den mit der Aufgabe einhergehenden Prestigezuwachs politisch geltend machen könnte.18 Der Bescheid der haruspices wiederholt teilweise Regelungen, die analog für den spätrepublikanischen Neubau überliefert sind, namentlich das Festhalten an der alten Grundfläche gepaart mit der Erlaubnis, in der Höhenerstreckung vom Vorgänger abzuweichen.19 Den Ausschlag für dieses Vorhaben dürften neben symbolischen Gesichtspunkten auch veränderte Sehgewohnheiten gegeben haben, entsprach der archaische Tempel mit seinen italischen Proportionen doch kaum 17

18

19

Suet. Vesp. 8.5: Ipse restitutionem Capitolii adgressus ruderibus purgandis manus primus admovit ac suo collo quaedam extulit. Vgl. Cass. Dio 65.10.2. Es handelt sich bei den von Vespasian abgetragenen rudera offenbar um die nach dem Urteil der haruspices in Sümpfen zu entsorgenden reliquiae prioris delubri. In den Sümpfen von Ostia hatte schon Nero den Schutt des großen Stadtbrandes von 64 versenken lassen: Tac. hist. 15.43.3. Allgemein zu den haruspices HAACK 2003, die allerdings nicht auf ihre Rolle beim Neubau des Jupitertempels eingeht; zu ihrer Rolle in der späten Republik s. jetzt SANTANGELO 2013: 84–114, ebd. 134–137 zu ihrer Rolle beim Tempelbrand von 83 v. Chr.; die Kuratur des Catulus erwähnen explizit Varro ap. Gell. 2.10.2; Suet. Iul. 15; s. dazu Horster 2001: 22; PINA POLO 2011: 269–271. Zeugnisse und Sekundärliteratur zu Lucius Iulius Vestinus (PIR2 I 622) sammelt und diskutiert DEMOUGIN 1992: 574f. Nr. 683. Die Ziegelei bezeugt ein Stempel aus dem Sabinerland (NSc 1895: 397); zu Vestinus’ Sohn Atticus (cos. 65) s. MRATSCHEKHALFMANN 1993: 308f. Nr. 130. Tac. hist. 3.72.3; s. SANTANGELO 2013: 271. Zum Bestreben, den Tempel höher zu gestalten s.u. Anm. 23.

196

Alexander Heinemann

den ästhetischen Standards des späten Hellenismus.20 Im Ergebnis hatte freilich auch der spätrepublikanische Bau immer noch eigentümlich gewirkt. Vitruv beschreibt aerostyle Tempelbauten, zu denen er auch den kapitolinischen Jupitertempel zählt, als „sperrbeinig, kopflastig, niedrig und breit“.21 Die Neubauten Vespasians und Domitians stellten demgegenüber fraglos einen Schritt hin auf den Mainstream zeitgenössischer Architekturtraditionen dar; Martial (5.10.6) spottet über die allgemeine Wertschätzung alles Alten, noch heute rühmten einige Greise den jämmerlichen Tempelbau des Catulus (sic laudant Catuli vilia templa senes) und flicht auf diesem Weg ein Lob der flavischen Neubauten ein. Zu Recht ist gefragt worden, wie viel die korinthische Front des neuen Tempels der Fassade des augusteischen Mars-Ultor-Tempels verdankte.22 An Höhe musste der Bau allein schon durch den Wechsel von der tuskanischen zur schlanker proportionierten korinthischen Säulenordnung gewinnen.23 Mächtige Säulentrommeln vom domitianischen Neubau, die nach konservativer Schätzung auf eine Höhe von ca. 14m zu rekonstruieren sind, bestätigen diese Annahme.24 20

21

22 23

24

Die bauliche Erscheinung des Tempels steht hier nicht im Vordergrund; hingewiesen sei aber auf die intensive Debatte, die derzeit um die Rekonstruktion des archaischen Tempels und seiner im Grundriss unveränderten Nachfolger geführt wird. Die lange Zeit akzeptierte Rekonstruktion durch GJERSTAD 1960: 168–190 wird zuletzt mehrfach als architekturgeschichtlich unwahrscheinlich und vor allem statisch absurd zurückgewiesen, s. etwa die konzise Darlegung bei TUCCI 2006a. Wie dieser plädiert auch STAMPER 2005: 19–33 für einen deutlich kleineren Tempel, gründet seine Rekonstruktion jedoch kaum auf die vorhanden Befunde (s. die Kritik von SENSENEY 2007: 284). Ähnliches gilt für die an wertvollen Beobachtungen reiche Studie von ARATA 2010: 617–619, von der mich allerdings gerade die Kernthese, der archaische Tempel sei ein tetrastyler Prostylos gewesen, dem erst Lutatius Catulus seitliche Säulenhallen hinzufügte, nicht eben überzeugt hat. An der monumentalen Gestalt des Tempels halten fest: MURA SOMMELLA 2009; HOPKINS 2012. Vitr. 3.3.5: varicatae, barycephalae, humiles et latae; vgl. ARATA 2010 zu den tatsächlichen baulichen Entsprechungen dieser Charakterisierung. − Die Natur von Catulus’ Eingriffen in den Entwurf, wenn sie denn überhaupt substantiell waren, bleibt unklar. Unbewiesen bleibt die Vermutung GJERSTADS (1960: 176f.), die abweichenden Maße in den oberen Lagen der erhaltenen Fundamentmauern gingen auf die catuleische Erhöhung des Podiums zurück; s.a. die vorige Anm. sowie u. Anm. 23. So TUCCI 2006a: 391 in seiner Rezension zu STAMPER 2005, der seine graphische Gegenüberstellung der beiden Fassaden (STAMPER 2005: 153. Abb. 113) nicht näher kommentiert. CATULUS hatte dies seinerzeit vor allem durch eine Anhebung des Unterbaus erreichen wollen – was im Übrigen nahelegt, dass er die tuskanische Ordnung des Vorgängers beibehielt: Varro ap. Gell. 2.10.2: Varro rescripsit in memoria sibi esse, quod Q. Catulus curator restituendi Capitolii dixisset voluisse se aream Capitolinam deprimere, ut pluribus gradibus in aedem conscenderetur suggestusque pro fastigii magnitudine altior fieret, sed facere id non quisse, quoniam ‘favisae’ impedissent. (Varro schrieb zurück [an Servius Sulpicius, der ihn nach der Bedeutung des Begriffes favisae Capitolinae gefragt hatte], ihm sei in Erinnerung, das Quintus Catulus als Beauftragter für die Wiederherstellung des Kapitols gesagt habe, er wolle die area Capitolina absenken, damit man über mehr Stufen zum Tempel hinaufstiege und das Podium im Verhältnis zur Größe des Gebälks höher errichten, habe dies aber nicht umsetzen können, weil die ‚favisae‘ [Votivschächte] es verhinderten.). Zu den erhaltenen oder in Zeichnungen dokumentierten Fragmenten des flavischen Baus s. zuletzt ARATA 2010: 606–608 Abb. 24–26.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

197

Von all der baulichen Pracht ist allerdings bei den rituellen Vorgängen des 21. Juni 70 nicht viel zu sehen, und in ihrem Mittelpunkt steht auch weniger der Tempel als die Kultgemeinschaft selbst. Offenkundig handelt es sich bei dem von Tacitus geschilderten Geschehen um ein für den Anlaß geschaffenes Ritual, in das alle Gruppen des Gemeinwesens – Soldaten, Kinder, die Vestalinnen sowie magistratus et sacerdotes et senatus et eques et magna pars populi – einbezogen werden sollen, alle miteinander studio laetitiaque conixi. In feierlich demonstrierter Eintracht zieht ganz Rom buchstäblich an einem Strang. Es handelt sich dabei nicht, wie lange vermutet worden ist, um eine Grundsteinlegung, die als Ritus auch anachronistisch wäre. Vielmehr ziehen alle Beteiligten nach der lustratio des Abb. 4: Der Gott Terminus. Entwurf eines BuntBauplatzes an einem großen Stein (la- glasfensters von Hans Holbein d. J. für Erasmus pis) und werfen Metallspenden in die von Rotterdam (1525). Tusche, Wasserfarben darunter sichtbar werdende Höhlung. und Kreide auf Papier. Kunstmuseum Basel. Gavin Townend gebührt das Verdienst als erster deutlich herausgestellt zu haben, dass der saxum ingens, um den es hier geht, das Steinmal des Grenzgottes Terminus ist, der nach annalistischer Tradition schon bei Gründung des Jupiterheiligtums auf dem Kapitolshügel saß und nicht bereit gewesen war, sich für Jupiter fortzubewegen (vgl. Hans Holbeins d. J. Imagination des Terminus als Körperherme mit dem Motto ‚concedo nulli‘, Abb. 4).25 Der Gott der Grenzen gilt – wie der kapitolinische Jupitertempel selbst − als Unterpfand römischer Herrschaft und garantiert mit der Integrität der räumlichen Ordnung zugleich den sozialen Frieden.26 25

26

Bei STAMPER 2005: 153f. begegnet weiterhin die Vorstellung von einem „foundation stone“, und noch bei ARATA 2010: 589 wird das Ritual vage als „cerimonia di ridedicazione“ gedeutet; s. aber TOWNEND 1987: 245f. und bereits PICCALUGA 1974: 125–127, ferner WARDLE 1996: 211f. Terminus begegnet als der wohl prominenteste unter einer ganzen Reihe von Kulten, die im Tempel der kapitolinischen Trias integriert sind und in denen m.E. die bei Tacitus neben der Trias genannten praesides imperii deos zu erkennen sind. Überliefert sind ferner Iuventas und Mars (s. PICCALUGA 1974: 193–197 mit allen Quellen) sowie eventuell Summanus (dazu LIPKA 2009: 78–80). Serv. Aen. 9.446: Terminus cum Iove remanens aeternum urbi imperium cum religione significat; Plut. Numa 16.1: Terminus ist εἰρήνης φύλαξ; s.a. HUSKEY 1999 zu Verg. Aen. 12.896– 907. Vgl. zu den mit Terminus verbundenen Konzepten PICCALUGA 1974: passim, bes. 177–

198

Alexander Heinemann

Darüber hinaus knüpft das Ritual für Terminus offenkundig an die Gründung seines Kultes durch Titus Tatius, Romulus sabinischen Mitregenten an. Sein Kultmal gehört nämlich zu jenen „Heiligtümern und Schreinen, die dort [auf dem Kapitol] einst von König Tatius zunächst auf dem Höhepunkt des Kampfes gegen Romulus gelobt, später konsekriert und eingeweiht worden waren“.27 Im Verlauf dieses Kampfes hatten die über den Raub ihrer Töchter erbosten Sabiner der mythhistorischen Tradition zufolge das Kapitol besetzt. Die unentschieden ausgehende militärische Auseinandersetzung stellt einen in der Frühzeit Roms angesiedelten ersten Bürgerkrieg einschließlich seiner erfolgreichen Beilegung dar. Ein Statuenpaar des sabinischen Königs Titus Tatius und des Romulus, die fortan gemeinsam regiert hatten, war wohl um 300 auf dem Kapitol aufgestellt worden; ihr Friedensschluss am Altar des Jupiter begegnet auf dem von Vergil beschriebenen Schild des Aeneas, und eine weitere Statuengruppe an der sacra via (auf dem Forum) zeigte die beiden ebenfalls am Altar, Romulus vom Palatin, Titus Tatius vom Kapitol herkommend.28 Die sabinische Besetzung des Kapitols und der nachfolgende Friedensschluss stellen also kein obskures Gelehrtenwissen dar, sondern sind durch prominente Denkmäler in der städtischen Memoriallandschaft verankert.29 Unter den gegebenen Umständen entfalten sie aber eine besondere Aktualität, sind die aus Reate stammenden Flavier doch sabinischer Herkunft und sich dieses Erbes nach Ausweis der Quellen auch durchaus bewusst.30

27

28

29

30

188 zum sozialen Frieden und 198–201 zu Terminus als Garanten imperialer Macht; s.a. THEIN 2014: 291–293. PICCALUGA 1974: 201–209 und BORGEAUD 1977: 90f. erläutern die Bezüge zwischen Terminus und dem Aition vom caput Oli, dem sprechenden Haupt, das bei der Errichtung des ersten Tempels gefunden wurde und als Vorzeichen römischer Weltherrschaft gedeutet wurde. Zu den Traditionen um diese Weissagung s. jetzt ausführlich THEIN 2014. Liv. 1.55.2: fana sacellaque …, quae aliquot ibi, a Tatio rege primum in ipso discrimine adversus Romulum pugnae vota, consecrata inaugurataque postea fuerant; die vorangehenden Kämpfe schildert Liv. 1.9–13; s.a. Liv. 1.33.2, wo das Kapitol als bevorzugtes Wohngebiet der Sabiner im Rom der Königszeit angesprochen wird. Zu den Kultstiftungen s. PICCALUGA 1974: 169–173, 192f.; GAGÉ 1976: 310–316; die Formierung der Traditionen um Titus Tatius in der frühen und mittleren Republik bespricht PUCET 1972: 94–101. Statuen auf dem Kapitol: HÖLSCHER 1978: 328–331; Schild des Äneas: Verg. Aen. 635–641. Die Statuengruppe an der sacra via überliefert einzig Serv. Aen. 8.641; s. dazu HÖLSCHER 1978: 330 Anm. 67 („zweifellos ebenfalls spät aufgestellt“); SEHLMEYER 1999: 81; ihre zeitliche Stellung ist unklar, und angesichts ihrer Nichterwähnung in früheren Quellen ist eine kaiserzeitliche (flavische?) Entstehung nicht ausgeschlossen. S. zu solchen Vernetzungen zuletzt HÖLKESKAMP 2012. Grundlegend HÖLSCHER 1978: bes. 348–357. Grundsätzlich bietet die römische Geschichte eher zu viele als zu wenige Anknüpfungspunkte. Eine weitere Besetzung des Capitols – wenn auch aus flavischer Sicht weitaus weniger prestigeträchtig als die Eroberung durch Titus Tatius – war die sozialrevolutionäre Einnahme von 460 v. Chr. unter der Führung des Sabiners Appius Herdonius: Liv. 3.15.4– 18.11; Dion. Hal. ant. 10.14.1 –17.1; vgl. Cato fr. 1.26 BECK-WALTER (= fr. 25 PETER). Das weite Feld flavischer Rückbezüge auf sabinische Traditionen wird an anderer Stelle und ausführlicher zu diskutieren sein, als es hier möglich wäre. Hier soll der kursorische Verweis auf die onomastischen Traditionen der Familie, die Einbindung der sodales Titii in den Kaiserkult, die Bedeutung des (sabinisch konnotierten) Quirinals zunächst als Wohnviertel der

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

199

Was die Abläufe betrifft, orientiert sich die Zeremonie vom 21. Juni 70 an den Handlungen, die man im Kleinen am Fest der Terminalia vollzieht, wenn unter allen Grenzsteinen unblutige Opferspenden eingebracht werden.31 Auf der Ebene der rituellen Kommunikation erfüllt sie mehrere Funktionen: Zunächst sanktioniert sie die Wiederherstellung der sakralen und politischen Grenzen, die im zurückliegenden Bürgerkrieg überschritten worden sind; weiter führt sie zu diesem Zweck die Stände, das Heer und andere signifikante Gruppen des Gemeinwesens in einem konsensstiftenden Akt der concordia zusammen32 und bekräftigt damit schließlich Roms ungebrochenen Herrschaftsanspruch, der intrinsisch mit dem Kapitol verbunden ist. Der letzte Punkt erlangt seine Bedeutung auch vor dem Hintergrund außerrömischer Reaktionen auf die Zerstörung des Tempels, hatten gallische Druiden darin doch angeblich ein Zeichen für das Ende der römischen Herrschaft gesehen und waren in Gallien in der Tat Unruhen aufgeflammt.33 Die Katastrophe, die Höhepunkt und Ende des Bürgerkriegs markiert, bietet also den topographischen und rituellen Ausgangspunkt für die Neukonstituierung der res publica unter den Vorzeichen der restitutio, der concordia sowie der auspizierten aeternitas imperii. Bezeichnenderweise begegnet aeternitas unter Vespasian das erste Mal in der Reichsprägung überhaupt. AETERNITAS P(opuli) R(omani) tritt als Legende in der ersten Emission von Sesterzen auf, die zu Vespasians Einzug in Rom oder kurz danach herausgegeben wird und die mit ihren Reverstypen Inhalte aufgreift, deren ideologische Stoßrichtung jener des Rituals vom 21. Juni entspricht.34 Ein weiteres Mal begegnet AETERNITAS dann im Rahmen einer größeren Emission Vespasians, in der bezeichnenderweise auch ein

31 32

33

34

Flavier, später als Standort des Templum Gentis Flaviae sowie schließlich Suet. Vesp. 12 genügen; s.u. Abschnitt V. Zu den Terminalia ausführlich PICCALUGA 1974: 293–325, bes. 309. Ähnlich SANTANGELO 2013: 271f. Die nachdrückliche Betonung von consensus universorum und concordia war natürlich ein Leitmotiv des Bürgekrieges gewesen (s. KÖNIG 1984: 301– 303, 308); doch ist es eine Sache, Eintracht auf Münzen einzufordern, eine andere, sie im Ritual konkret erfahrbar zu machen. Tac. hist. 4.54.2. Freilich sind die Überlegungen, die Tacitus (oder seine Quellen) hier den gallischen Aufständischen in den Sinn legt, mit URBAN 1999: 74–76 „gut römisch gedacht“; für die Historizität der druidischen Weissagung plädiert hingegen ZECCHINI 1984. Unabhängig von den tatsächlichen Geschehnissen in Gallien reflektiert das Zeugnis in jedem Falle die Ängste, die man in Rom an die Zerstörung des Tempels knüpfte (ähnlich BARZANÒ 1984: 118–120) – und auf die nicht zuletzt mit dem hier geschilderten Ritual und dem Wiederaufbau eine Antwort gegeben werden sollte. Wenig hilfreich ist hier KNEPPE 1994: 77–99, bei dem die Ängste und Phobien des Vierkaiserjahres ausschließlich im Hinblick auf konkrete militärische Bedrohungen untersucht werden. RIC II.12 32–38 (Vespasian); vgl. MAYER 2010: 104f., 210. Die Sesterzen bzw. ihre Legenden zeigen neben FORTVNAE REDVCI für die Rückkehr des Prinzeps die nunmehr eingekehrte PAX AVGVSTA, die corona civica mit der Legende SPQR ADSERTORI LIBERTATIS PVBLIC(ae) sowie eben AETERNITAS P(opuli) R(omani), visualisiert allerdings nicht durch eine Personifikation, sondern Victoria, die einem Gepanzerten das Palladion reicht. Parallel dazu erscheinen Dupondien mit Reversbildern der CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, der SECVRITAS P(opuli) R(omani) sowie der designierten Konsuln und Söhne des Kaisers Titus und Domitian.

200

Alexander Heinemann

beschützender Jupiter (IOVIS CVSTOS) figuriert. Dieser aber gehört bereits in eine spätere Phase der ideologischen Verarbeitung des Geschehens vom Jahresende 69, die kapitolinischen Tempelstiftungen Domitians.

III. KOMMEMORATION: DOMITIANS ANEIGNUNG DER DEZEMBEREREIGNISSE Tatsächlich ist Vespasians Neubau des Jupitertempels selbst im Weiteren mit keinen Überraschungen verbunden, wie darüber überhaupt wenig bekannt ist; nicht einmal das Datum der Dedikation lässt sich mit Gewissheit eruieren.35 Im Jahre 74 n. Chr. geprägte Sesterzen mit Darstellung des Tempels (Abb. 5) dürften kaum schon mit der Fertigstellung zusammenfallen. In jedem Fall nimmt der Bau bei dem katastrophalen Brand des Marsfeldes im Jahre 80 ein weiteres Mal schweren Schaden; eine in Rom unter Titus und Domitan geprägte Cistophorenserie kündigt offenAbb. 5: Vespasianischer Sesterz mit Reversdarstellung des kapi- bar die neuerliche restitutolinischen Jupitertempels (RIC II.12 714), 74 n. Chr. tio des Tempels an (s. Tabelle 2), den Domitian schließlich einweihen wird.36 Obwohl für den Neubau des Domitian mit großem Optimismus eine außerordentlich rasche Fertigstellung bis Mitte der 80er Jahre angenommen worden ist, lässt sich der Zeitpunkt auch seiner Fertigstellung nicht mit Gewissheit eruieren.37 Sueton moniert, Domitian habe in seinen Bauinschriften, und so auch am kapitolinischen Jupitertempel nur sich selbst genannt und so jegliche Erinnerung an

35

36

37

Zum vespasianischen Neubau: DARWALL-SMITH 1996: 43–47; LTUR III, 150f. s.v. Iuppiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus, Aedes (fasi tardo-repubblicane e di età imperiale) (S. DE ANGELI); STAMPER 2005: 153f. Zum domitianischen Neubau: DARWALL-SMITH 1996: 105–110; LTUR III, 151–153 s.v. Iuppiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus, Aedes (fasi tardo-repubblicane e di età imperiale) (S. DE ANGELI); STAMPER 2005: 154–156; ARATA 2010: 606–608. So DARWALL-SMITH 1996: 108 unter Berufung auf Mart. 13.74. Doch die zeitliche Stellung von Martials Xenienbuch ist jenseits des terminus post quem 83/84 nicht eindeutig, s. GREWING 2002. Das Präsens in Stat. silv. 1.6.101f. (terris / quod reddis Capitolium) legt einen längeren Bauprozess nahe, denn die Arbeit an den Silven scheint nicht vor 89 begonnen zu haben. Die Darstellung des Neubaus auf einem Denar des Domitian (RIC II.12 815) stammt aus den letzten zwei Regierungsjahren des Kaisers. Unplausibel und durch nichts zu belegen ist das bei SOUTHERN 1997: 37 begegnende und von STAMPER 2005: 154 übernommene Dedikationsdatum 82 n. Chr.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

201

frühere Bauherren ausgeblendet. In der Tat zeigt ein seltener domitianischer Denar das Gebäude samt dem Namen des Bauherrn in der Architravinschrift. Zwar muss Suetons Kritik vor dem zeitgenössischen Hintergrund der programmatischen Zurücknahme Hadrians gesehen werden, wie sie etwa an der berühmten Pantheoninschrift inszeniert wird.38 Jedoch ist auch schon im 1. Jh. bei Restaurierungen die Praxis bezeugt, die Inschrift des Ersterbauers allein oder neben der eigenen stehenzulassen. Augustus betont in seinem Tatenbericht, die umfassende Restaurierung am Jupitertempel sine ulla inscriptione nominis mei vorgenommen zu haben.39 Vespasian soll auch bei in Gänze wiedererrichteten Bauten seinen und den Namen des Ersterbauers genannt haben, eine Praxis, die in Rom epigraphisch nur einmal (unter Trajan) nachgewiesen ist.40 Wenn Domitian diese programmatische Zurückhaltung nicht anwendet, handelt er damit formal nicht viel anders als Lutatius Catulus, der seinen Namen mit Stolz am spätrepublikanischen Tempel angebracht hatte – und dabei übrigens selbst den Namen Sullas, der die Restaurierung begonnen hatte, unterschlagen hatte. Es ist nicht der einzige Fall, in dem der Kaiser in seinen Kommunikationsformen an etablierte Praktiken der Republik anknüpft, die im veränderten Machtgefüge der Kaiserzeit (und erst recht in der gegen ihn eingenommenen Rückschau) als unangemessen und die sozialen Asymmetrien offenlegend wahrgenommen werden mussten. Für Tacitus war Lutatii Catuli nomen inter tanta Caesarum opera ein erhebendes Zeugnis republikanischen Pluralismus’ gewesen;41 die epigraphische Omnipräsenz des Kaisers konnte demgegenüber keine Begeisterung mehr auslösen. Aus verstreuter Überlieferung lassen sich die restauratorischen Maßnahmen im Umfeld des Jupitertempels relativ gut fassen. Plinius erwähnt Statuen des Praxiteles im Tempelinneren, die offenbar für den Neubau Vespasians von woandersher herbeigeschafft werden, um den Tempel in angemessener Weise mit opera nobilia zu schmücken, von denen der spätrepublikanische voll gewesen war.42 In eine ähnliche Richtung dürfte Domitians Aufstellung von columnae rostratae des Augustus zielen, die ursprünglich auf dem Forum gestanden hatten,43 nun aber dazu dienten, dem Heiligtum etwas von der semantischen Dichte und historischen Tiefendimension zurückzugeben, die die zwei Brandkatastrophen fraglos in Mit-

38

39 40 41 42 43

Suet. Dom. 5.1. Zum Denar s. die vorige Anm. Hadrians Inschriftenpraxis, die offenbar in dezidierter Absetzung von Domitian zu sehen ist, bespricht HORSTER 2001: 27f. Seine Pantheonsinschrift gab sich bekanntlich als jene des ursprünglichen Bauherrn: M(arcus) Agrippa L(uci) F(ilius) cos(ul) tertium fecit (CIL VI 896 = ILS 129). Res gest. div. Aug. 20.1; s. dazu und zum Folgenden die Übersicht bei HORSTER 2001: 20–38. Cass. Dio 65.10.1a; vgl. dazu CIL VI 1275. Tac. hist. 3.72.3. Plin. nat. 36.23. Serv. georg. 3.29: Augustus victor totius Aegypti, quam Caesar pro parte superaverat, multa de navali certamine sustulit rostra, quibus conflatis quattuor effecit columnas, quae postea a Domitiano in Capitolio sunt locatae, quas hodieque conspicimus. Es dürfte sich um die Säule für den Seesieg bei Naulochos und ein Dreisäulenmonument für jenen bei Actium gehandelt haben; ihre Dislozierung schuf wahrscheinlich zugleich den nötigen Platz für die Errichtung des equus Domitiani, s. LTUR I, 308 s.v. columnae rostratae Augusti (D. PALOMBI).

202

Alexander Heinemann

leidenschaft gezogen hatten. Welchen Aufwand man für diese Wiederherstellung zu betreiben bereit ist, bezeugt die von Vespasian veranlasste Abschrift von 3000 Inschriften in Bronze – Senatsbeschlüsse, kaiserliche Erlasse, Bürgerrechtskonstitutionen –, die im Umfeld des Tempels angebracht und durch den Brand von 69 zerstört worden waren.44 Ein Militärdiplom aus dem bulgarischen Debelets verweist auf eine solche Konstitution aus dem Jahre 82 oder 83, festgehalten auf einer tabula ae/nea quae fixa est Romae in Capitolio in tribuna/li Caesarum Vespasiani T(iti) Domitiani, einem dynastischen Monument, das die enge Verflechtung der neuen Dynastie mit dem Kapitol und seinem Gott konkret zum Ausdruck brachte und vielleicht als Pendant zur nahen Ara Gentis Juliae verstanden werden kann.45 Jupiter Optimus Maximus erhält nicht nur einen neuen Tempel und ein neu ausgeschmücktes Heiligtum, ihm und seiner Trias werden ferner die seit dem Jahre 86 alle vier Jahre abgehaltenen Capitolia gewidmet, ein an griechischen Agonen inspiriertes Schauspiel mit musisch-rhetorischen, gymnischen und hippischen Wettkämpfen, das bis in das 4 nachchristliche Jahrhundert Bestand haben wird.46 Die mit großem Aufwand eingerichtete Großveranstaltung setzt Rom erstmals als ernstzunehmenden Wettkampfort auf die sportlich-kulturelle Landkarte der Eliten aus dem griechischsprachigen Teil des Reiches, die denn auch das Gros der Teilnehmer stellen. Als Wettkampfleiter fungierte der Kaiser zusammen mit dem flamen dialis als Priester des obersten Gottes, sowie den sodales Augustales Flaviales. Der in diesem Kolleg zum Ausdruck kommende enge Zusammenhang zwischen Jupiter- und Kaiserkult, wird weiter ausgeführt in den büstengeschmückten goldenen Kronen der Agonotheten. Während Domitians Krone mit Bildern der kapitolinischen Trias geschmückt ist, sind die Kopfbedeckungen seiner Kollegen um eine Büste des Kaisers selbst ergänzt.47 Ein konkreter Anlass für die Stiftung der Spiele ist ebensowenig überliefert wie ein unmittelbarer Bezug zu den Aktivitäten der Flavier auf dem Kapitol. Über den ideologischen Zusammenhang und das privilegierte Verhältnis zum Göttervater, das die neue Dynastie aus den Bürgerkriegsereignissen ableitete, können aber keine ernsthaften Zweifel bestehen.

44 45

46 47

Suet. Vesp. 8.5; s. dazu CORBIER 2006: 63, 131–146; ECK 2009: 76–78; LINDSAY 2010: 179. CIL XVI 28; CORBIER 2006: 141f. schlägt eine Lokalisierung des Tribunals am Tempel der vergöttlichten Vespasian und Titus vor, vgl. die zurückhaltende Stellungnahme in LTUR V,

87f. s.v. tribunal Caesarum Vespasiani T(iti) Domitiani (C. LEGA). Eine Notwendigkeit für diese Interpretation der Formulierung in Capitolio kann ich nicht erkennen. Auch dürfte der Tempel im Jahr der Inschrift wohl noch nicht fertiggestellt gewesen sein. Die Entsprechung zur Ara Gentis Iuliae erhellt nicht zuletzt aus dem Umstand, dass auch diese bis zur vespasianischen Neuorganisation des kapitolinischen Areals einen beliebten Platz für die Anbringung kaiserlicher Konstitutionen darstellt (s. die Übersicht bei CORBIER 2006: 138f. Tab. 1). S. umfassend CALDELLI 1993, ferner RIEGER 1999; HEINEMANN 2014. Suet. Dom. 4.4: certamini praesedit crepidatus purpureaque amictus toga Graecanica, capite gestans coronam auream cum effigie Iouis ac Iunonis Mineruaeque, adsidentibus Diali sacerdote et collegio Flauialium pari habitu, nisi quod illorum coronis inerat et ipsius imago. S. dazu CALDELLI 1993: 109f. und vor allem RUMSCHEID 2000: 7–51, bes. 9–11, 49.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

203

Parallel zu den Tätigkeiten am Tempel des Jupiter Optimus Maximus entfaltet Domitian, der die römischen Wirren vom Dezember 69 am eigenen Leib erlebt hatte, noch unter Vespasian eine eigenständige Stiftungstätigkeit. Tacitus berichtet von der Einrichtung eines bescheidenen Schreins (modicum sacellum) für Jupiter den Bewahrer, Iuppiter Conservator, das auf dem Kapitol an der Stelle eingerichtet wurde, an der sich jene Kammer eines Tempelwächters befunden hatte, in die sich der Kaisersohn während der Erstürmung des Hügels geflüchtet hatte. Ein reliefgeschmückter Altar schilderte dort offenbar in mehreren Bildern Domitians Rettung durch den obersten Gott. Einmal Kaiser geworden, habe Domitian dann einen gewaltigen Tempel (templum ingens) für Jupiter den Wächter, Iuppiter Custos, errichtet, in den er ein Bild oder eine Statue weihte, die ihn in sinu dei zeigte.48 Domitian war dort sicher nicht, wie zuweilen vermutet worden ist, im Schoße Jupiters zu sehen, sondern behütet vom ausgebreiteten Mantelbausch des überlebensgroß neben ihm stehen- Abb. 6: Trajanischer Sesterz mit Reversdarstellung des Kaisers im Mantelbausch Jupiters. Reverslegende: CONSERVATORI den Gottes. Eine solche PATRI PATRIAE (RIC II1 643), 112–114 n. Chr. Komposition ist auf trajanischen Münzen mit der Legende CONSERVATORI PATRIS PATRIAE bezeugt (Abb. 6) und darf auch für die domitianische Gruppe (die nicht notwendigerweise rundplastisch gewesen muss) angenommen werden.49 Die beiden Tempelstiftungen Domitians knüpfen an eine Praxis des Dankesvotivs an Jupiter als persönlichen oder kollektiven Schutzgott an, die auf dem Kapitol vor allem in der frühen Kaiserzeit zahlreiche Vorläufer hat: Nero hatte den Dolch, mit dem die pisonischen Verschwörer ihn beseitigen wollten, dem Jupiter Vindex auf das Kapitol geweiht.50 Claudius errichtete dort − aus nicht ganz

48

49

50

Tac. hist. 3.74.1: ac potiente rerum patre, disiecto aeditui contubernio, modicum sacellum Iovi Conservatori aramque posuit casus suos in marmore expressam; mox imperium adeptus Iovi Custodi templum ingens seque in sinu dei sacravit. RIC II1 249 und 643 (Trajan); WOYTEK 2010: 141–143 Nr. 428 (Aureus), 429 (Denar), 479 u. 547 (Sesterzen). WOYTEKS Chronologie zufolge werden die Aurei ab 113 geprägt. Zu den inhaltlichen Implikationen der Darstellung für Trajan s. SEELENTAG 2004: 444 m. Anm. 8. Spätere Prägungen dieses Typus führt HILL 1960, 125 Nr. I (f) auf; hinzufügen ist Ihnen noch ein Nominal Diokletians (RIC V 220). Tac. ann. 15.74; vgl. Vitellius’ Weihung des Dolches, mit dem Otho sich das Leben genommen hatte an den Mars der Colonia Agrippinensis: Suet. Vit. 10.3; die Geste antwortet auf seine Erhebung zum Kaiser, als ihm die Soldaten in Köln ein aus dem Marsheiligtum herbeigeschafftes Schwert Cäsars gereicht hatten: Suet. Vit. 8.1. Es sind dies nicht die einzigen symbolbehafteten Dolche und Schwerter dieser Monate, s. POULLE 1997; KÖNIG 1984: 300.

204

Alexander Heinemann

klarem Anlass − einen Altar für Zeus Alexikakos (der Name ist uns nur auf Griechisch überliefert, vielleicht Jupiter Depulsor),51 und Augustus hatte, nachdem er einem Blitzeinschlag knapp entronnen war, dem Jupiter Tonans einen großen Tempel errichtet.52 Noch weiter zurück ging die ara des Jupiter Pistor, des ‚Bäckers‘ also, dessen Verehrung man auf die Belagerung des Kapitols durch Brennus zurückführte, als die Belagerten auf Jupiters Rat Brote vom Kapitol geschleudert haben sollten, um ihre reichhaltige Versorgung zu demonstrieren.53 In den Augen der Zeitgenossen musste Domitians Stiftungsaktivität also keineswegs als egomane Extravaganz erscheinen, sondern ließ sich als von der Tradition sanktionierte Bezeugung von pietas gegenüber dem Göttervater verstehen, der schon bei anderen Gelegenheiten seine Hand schicksalhaft über das Gemeinwesen oder den Kaiser gehalten hatte. Für beide Tempel sind in jüngerer Zeit Lokalisierungsvorschläge gemacht worden, die an dieser Stelle nicht diskutiert werden sollen.54 In der Forschung regelmäßig übergangen wird jedoch ein Problem in unserer Überlieferung, auf das hier näher einzugehen ist. Die neu eingerichteten Jupiterkulte – jener für den Conservator unter Vespasian und der für Custos unter Domitian – bleiben in der Münzprägung jener Kaiser

51 52

53 54

Phleg. mirab. 6.4; LTUR III, 132 s.v. Iuppiter Depulsor, Ara (L. CHIOFFI). Unsicher ist hingegen die Existenz eines Jupiter Soter, s. LTUR III, 155 s.v. Iuppiter Soter, Ara (J. ARONEN). S. die Quellen in LTUR III, 159f. s.v. Iuppiter Tonans, aedes (P. GROS); die Lokalisierung des Tempels am westlichen Rand des Kapitolshügels durch GROS 1976: 97–100 scheint mir trotz der bei REUSSER 1993: 40 Anm. 42 geäußerten Zweifel noch immer plausibel. Ov. fast. 6.349–394; LTUR III, 154f. s.v. Iuppiter Pistor, Ara (J. ARONEN); zu Brennus s.u. S. 223–225. Ältere Vorschläge zur Lokalisierung des templum ingens, das Domitian während seiner Regierungszeit errichtete, bzw. zu seiner Darstellung in anderen Medien diskutiert LTUR III, 131f. s.v. Iuppiter Conservator (C. REUSSER); dort übergangen: GROS 1976: 98; s. ferner die rezenteren Vorschläge von DARWALL-SMITH 1996: 110f. und ARATA 2009: 213–215, der zwei kaiserzeitliche Caementiciumfundamente im Garten südwestlich der Aracoeli für den Tempel in Anspruch nimmt (hier Abb. 14 Nr. 5); diese Fundamente haben allerdings auch andere Zuweisungen erfahren (GIANNELLI 1978; HESBERG 1995) und trugen angesichts ihres nicht ganz parallelen Verlaufs vielleicht überhaupt keinen Tempelbau: TUCCI 2005: bes. 19–21, 29f. m. Anm. 88. Das noch in den 70er Jahren errichtete modicum sacellum will ARATA 1997 in einem antiken Gelass erkennen, das hinter einer Personaltoilette des Kapitolinischen Museums im Palazzo Nuovo wiederentdeckt worden ist (die Argumentation wird in knapper Form wiederholt bei ARATA 2009: 211–213, s. hier Abb. 14 Nr. 1). Der Raum verknüpft in der Tat in auffälliger Manier Charakteristika von bescheidenen Zweckarchitekturen und von Repräsentations- und Sakralräumen. Auch die Verteilung der Nischen stützt zunächst die Identifikation; ARATA 2009: 213 schlägt vor, in der großen Nische an der westlichen Stirnseite ein Standbild des Jupiter, in den dreien an der Südwand solche des Vespasian, Titus und Domitian unterzubringen. Aufgrund ihrer Größe können die Nischen freilich nur unterlebensgroße Statuen aufgenommen haben; schwerer noch wiegt der Umstand, dass das sacellum nach dem Zeugnis des Tacitus gar nicht aus der Kammer des Tempelwächters gewonnen worden war; vielmehr hatte man diese abgerissen.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

205

nahezu ohne Widerhall.55 Das ist für sich genommen kein überraschender Befund; die Darstellungen auf römischen Münzen stellen eben keine seismographische Nachzeichnung von Gegenwartsereignissen dar, sondern sollen nicht zuletzt grundlegende Wertvorstellungen, denen man im Um- Abb. 7: Denar des Vespasian mit Reversdarstellung des IOVIS CVSTOS (RIC II.12 849), 76 n. Chr. feld des Prägeherrn Bedeutung beimisst, eingängig visualisieren und schlagwortartig in die Gesellschaft projizieren.56 Bemerkenswerterweise gehören Jupiter Conservator und Jupiter Custos durchaus zu diesen Bildern, jedoch in umgekehrter zeitlicher Abfolge (s. Tabelle 2). Während nämlich IOVIS CVSTOS Gegenstand einer umfassenden, unter Vespasian (gem. mit Abb. 8: Domitianisches As mit Reversdarstellung eines Titus) herausgegebenen Emission jugendlichen Jupiter. Reverslegende: IOVI CONSERVATORI (RIC II.12 219), 84 n. Chr. ist (Abb. 7), prägt die römische Münze in den Jahren 84–86 zahlreiche Asse mit einem höchst ungewöhnlichen jugendlichen Jupitertyp (Abb. 8) sowie, etwas früher, Aurei und Denare mit Darstellung eines Adlers auf Blitzbündel, allesamt mit der Legende IOVI CONSERVATORI.57 Grundsätzlich könnten die domitianischen Prägungen retrospektiv auf den zur Zeit seines Vaters eingerichteten, offenbar sehr persönlichen Kult gemünzt sein; doch fügt sich das schlecht dazu, dass Domitian nach Tacitus gerade in diesem Zeitraum (mox imperium adeptus) mit dem Bau des neuen Tempels für Jupiter Custos beschäftigt sein sollte. Die unter seinem Vater ge55

56 57

Vgl. HILL 1960: 121. Jupiter Conservator ist in der Münzprägung Vespasians und Titus’ gar nicht belegt, während ein IVPPITER CVSTOS unter Domitian lediglich auf zwei – jeweils nur in einem Exemplar erhaltenen − Sesterzen begegnet (RIC II.12 466 und 635; vgl. COHEN 321– 322). Er ist dort in dem konventionellen Typus abgebildet, der für den Jupiter Custos schon unter Nero benutzt wird (im Hüftmantel thronend nach links, mit Zepter in der Linken und Victoria auf der Rechten). Der sehr schlechte Zustand des Exemplars, das ich sehen konnte, lässt an einen wiederverwendeten neronischen Stempel denken. Zum Verhältnis allgemein gehaltener Bildformeln und Ereignisprägungen s. WOLTERS 1999: 278–287, bes. 284. Vespasians IOVIS CVSTOS-Emission: RIC II.12 838–874. Domitians IOVI CONSERVATORIPrägungen: RIC II.12 143f. (Aurei und Denare); RIC II.12 218–220, 301f., 382f., 416, 489–491 (Asse). Auf den jugendlichen Jupiter der Asse wird in anderem Zusammenhang einzugehen sein.

206

Alexander Heinemann

prägte Emission mit IOVIS CVSTOS wiederum hat keinerlei zeitgenössische kultische Entsprechung, sondern nimmt gewissermaßen die spätere Stiftung Domitians zuvor. Angesichts einer numismatischen Evidenz, die sich zur literarischen Überlieferung58 genau chiastisch verhält, ist die Hypothese legitim, im Text des Tacitus könne eine Vertauschung vorliegen. Wenn tatsächlich das unter Vespasian eingerichtete sacellum dem Jupiter Custos und das spätere templum ingens dem Jupiter Conservator zugeeignet war, lösen sich nicht nur die bis hierhin aufgezeigten Widersprüche. Auch die Zeugnisse des zweiten und dritten nachchristlichen Jahrhunderts sind damit besser in Einklang zu bringen. Während nämlich Jupiter Custos nahezu aus der Reichsprägung verschwindet,59 wird Jupiter Conservator fortan zu einer festen Größe im Repertoire der stadtrömischen Münze und bleibt dies bis Konstantin.60 Ein ganz ähnlicher Befund zeigt sich – sowohl in quantitativer als auch in qualitativer Hinsicht − beim Vergleich der stadtrömischen Weihungen an beide Götter.61 Dass nun unter den neu begründeten Jupiterkulten ausgerechnet jener Bestand und politische Prominenz haben sollte, der den privaten Schutzgott Domitians in einer einfachen Kapelle feierte, während zugleich der mit einem großen Tempel geehrte Jupiter Custos dem Vergessen anheimgefallen wäre, ist nun tatsächlich erklärungsbedürftig. Die Vermutung, dass die Namen der beiden Kultempfänger von Tacitus vertauscht überliefert werden, gewinnt damit an Plausibilität. Ihren 58

59

60

61

Auch Sueton (Dom. 5) erwähnt den Bau eines Tempels in Capitolio Custodi Iovi, ist hier aber vielleicht von Tacitus abhängig. Vgl. BELLONI 1996: 102: „È uno dei casi in cui le fonti scritte (Tacito e Svetonio) non armonizzano, anzi contrastano con la documentazione monetale“. Eine weitere Erwähnung des frühen sacellum vermutet LEFÈVRE 1971: 20–25 bei Val. Fl. 1.15f., dazu mit berechtigter Skepsis SCAFFAI 1986: 2372. Zugunsten von LEFÈVRES Argument lässt sich immerhin anführen, dass sich Flaccus’ vieldiskutierte (und -emendierte) Formulierung delubra gentis, die für einen Jupiterschrein zunächst überrascht, gut zu den drei Statuennischen in dem neu entdeckten Kultraum fügt, in denen ARATA 2009: 2013 Statuen für die drei flavischen Kaiser annehmen möchte (s.o. Anm. 54). Doch zwei unbewiesene Hypothesen sind einander nur schwachen Stützen. Lediglich unter Hadrian werden noch Sesterzen und Asse, jeweils mit der Legende IOVI CVSTODI und im gleichen Bildtypus wie schon unter Nero geprägt: RIC II1 763 und 815; spätere Bezeugungen des Typus (mit anderer Legende) bei HILL 1960: 124 Nr. I (a). Zu den trajanischen Münzen für Jupiter Conservator s.o. Anm. 499 mit den dort genannten späteren Wiederholungen des Bildtyps; für die zahllosen weiteren Darstellungen des Jupiter Conservator ab dem späteren 3. Jh. n. Chr. s. die einschlägigen Corpora. Die einzige mir bekannte stadtrömische Weihung für Jupiter Custos ist die 157 n. Chr. gestiftete ara eines kaiserlichen Freigelassenen, die Iovi Custodi / et Genio / thesaurorum geweiht ist (CIL VI 376 = ILS 3670). Während hier offenbar eher materielle Werte unter dem Schutz des Gottes stehen, begegnet Jupiter (Optimus Maximus) Conservator in Rom vielfach in Inschriften von Amtsträgern oder mit direktem Bezug zum Kaiser: AE 1995: 194; AE 2001: 224; CIL VI 241, 375 = ILS 2104; CIL VI 434 = ILS 3012; später ist Conservator in Rom eine weitere Epiklese zu Jupiter Heliopolitanus (CIL VI 423) und vor allem Dolichenus (CIL VI 406 = ILS 4316; AE 1940: 75–76.80). Natürlich liefert die Verwendung dieser Epiklesen nur eine Tendenz; die entsprechenden Weihungen sind nicht notwendigerweise mit den kapitolinischen Heiligtümern in Verbindung zu bringen.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

207

Ursprung dürfte die Verwirrung zum einen in der semantischen Nähe der beiden Epiklesen für den ‚Bewahrer‘ und den ‚Wächter‘, zum andern in den massiven Eingriffen haben, welche die unter Domitian geschaffene Kulttopographie nach seinem Tod erfährt: Seine Statuen auf der area Capitolina werden abgerissen, sein Bild in sinu dei aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach überarbeitet, und auch das sacellum – falls es nicht ohnehin schon durch Domitians eigenes templum ingens ersetzt worden war – dürfte keinen Bestand gehabt haben.62 Zwei weitere Zeugnisse sind zu nennen, die geeignet sind, unsere Interpretation zu stützen: Tacitus zufolge weihte Domitian im Tempel des Jupiter Custos ein Bild seiner selbst im Mantelbausch des Gottes. Seit Trajan (für den die originale Darstellung vielleicht umgearbeitet wurde?) ist diese Komposition auch in der Münzprägung bezeugt (Abb. 6), durchgängig jedoch– auch unter späteren Kaisern – verbunden mit dem Namen des Jupiter Conservator.63 Noch auf Prägungen aus der Zeit Diokletians und Maximians ist die Dedikationslegende IOVI CONSERVATORI AVG mit der Darstellung eines hexastylen Tempels verbunden, in dem eine Jupiterstatue steht.64 So generisch die Architekturdarstellung auch ausfällt, fiele es doch schwer, sie auf das (zu diesem Zeitpunkt wohl ohnehin längst beseitigte) modicum sacellum zu beziehen. Bild und Legende passen hingegen (ebenso wie im Fall der Münzen mit Trajan in sinu dei) umstandslos zueinander, sobald Jupiter Conservator als Bewohner des von Domitian gestifteten templum ingens angenommen wird. Wenn der in bescheidene Formen gekleidete Kult, der unter Vespasian eingerichtet wurde, tatsächlich dem Jupiter Custos galt, wird im Übrigen die o. S. 205 bereits erwähnte Emission von Aurei und Denaren verständlich, die Vespasian und Titus im Jahre 76 gemeinsam herausgeben. Ihre variierenden Reverstypen, deren Zusammenhang durch Stempelkopplungen außer Frage steht, formulieren ein kohärentes sakrales Programm. Dargestellt sind Pax, AETERNITAS (auf deren Bedeutung im Zusammenhang mit dem Kapitol bereits eingegangen wurde), ein Opferstier, ein Adler mit Blitzbündel sowie IOVIS CVSTOS, als nackter Vatergott mit Zepter und Spendenschale am Altar stehend (Abb. 7).65 Die Emission 62

63

64

65

Der versuchsweise mit dem sacellum identifizierte Raum wird schon in der ersten Hälfte des 2. Jhs. verändert und seiner ursprünglichen Funktion beraubt: ARATA 1997: 137–140; in jedem Falle gibt es keinen Anlass, mit einem Fortleben der Kapelle über Domitian hinaus zu rechnen. Abriss der Statuen Domitians auf der area Capitolina: Suet. Dom. 13.2; Plin. paneg. 52.3–5. S.o. Anm. 49. SEELENTAG 2004: 444 Anm. 8 ist sich des Problems bewusst, wenn er (ebenfalls gegen das Zeugnis des Tacitus) zum trajanischen Münztyp feststellt: „Es ist durchaus möglich, dass dieses Darstellungsschema bereits aus flavischer Zeit stammte und den Altar des Iuppiter Conservator auf dem Capitol zitierte“. Zusammengestellt bei LUGLI 1969: 365; s. COHEN 1886: 443, 529 (= Diokletian Nr. 275 [die Lugli zufolge allerdings überarbeitet und daher auszuscheiden ist] und Maximian Nr. 364– 365). Die fortdauernde Deutungshoheit des Tacitus bezeugt ARATA 1997: 154 m. Anm. 88, der diese Münzen als Belege für das Fortbestehen des Jupiter-Custos-Tempels (sic!) bis in die Spätantike anführt. RIC II.12 838–874 (Vespasian). Nur mit jeweils einem Exemplar unter den Reverstypen dieser Emission vertreten sind außerdem Securitas sowie VICTORIA AVGVSTI (Nr. 854–855).

208

Alexander Heinemann

fällt in das Jahr, in dem Domitian zum pontifex erhoben wird, und im gleichen Zeitraum könnte der junge Cäsar das sacellum für ‚Jupiter den Wächter‘ am Standort jener vormaligen Stube eines Tempelwächters geweiht haben, in die er sich am 19. Dezember 69 hatte flüchten können. Nicht nur erweist sich die Epiklese Custos in diesem Zusammenhang als besonders sinnfällig, auch der ganz ungewöhnliche vulgärlateinische Nominativ Iovis auf den von seinem Bruder und seinem Vater herausgegebenen Münzen entspricht der betonten Einfachheit des Kultes.66 In der Tat musste sich der Schrein für ‚Jovis Custos‘ auf dem Kapitol mit seinen zahlreichen staatstragenden Heiligtümern als ungewöhnlich bodenständig ausnehmen. Gezielt volkstümelnde Kommunikationsformen sind aus der Regierungszeit des Vespasian aber auch anderweitig bekannt. Offenbar zielt der Kult auf breitere Schichten ab, denen die narrativen Reliefs des Altars einen niederschwelligen Zugang zu den Dezemberereignissen boten. Komplementär zur dort gegebenen Schilderung von Domitians Schicksal in den Dezembertagen (casus suos) wird die Verwendung eines ungleich elitäreren Mediums verständlich, nämlich die Abfassung eines Epos über das bellum Capitolinum, das am Hofe Domitians Pflichtlektüre gewesen sein dürfte.67 Über die Darstellungen auf dem Altar und Details von Domitians carmina wissen wir nichts; sicher aber gaben sie seine Rettung nicht in allen Details so wieder, wie sie mit leichten Abweichungen Tacitus und Sueton überliefern.68 Der spätere Kaiser hatte sich demnach „beim ersten Durchbrechen der Gegner“ bei besagtem Tempelwächter versteckt, dann auf den Ratschlag eines Freigelassenen in lange Gewänder gehüllt und schließlich in eine Isis-Prozession gemischt und hatte so unerkannt entkommen können. Unterschlupf hatte er schließlich bei Cornelius Primus, einem Klienten seines Vaters im nahen Velabrum (so Tacitus, s. Abb. 3 Nr. 6) oder der Mutter eines Schulfreundes in Transtiberim (Sueton) gefunden.69 Die zahlreichen verunglimpfenden Details der Erzählung lassen hier

66

67

68 69

Man dürfte wohl auch beabsichtigt haben, eine allzu enge Assonanz mit Neros IVPPITER CVSTOS-Prägungen zu vermeiden. Die Nominativform Iovis, die durchgängig auf allen Stempeln unserer Emission verwendet wird und also gewiss beabsichtigt ist, ist auf römischen Münzen nicht ohne Parallelen, s. SCHLÖSSER 1989: 329f. und außerdem RRC 449/1a–c (Denare des C. Vibius Pansa Caetronianus mit Pan und Bild des IOVIS AXVR). Mart. 5.5.7–8: ad Capitolini caelestia carmina belli / grande cothurnati pone Maronis opus ([an den Hofbibliothekar Sextus gewandt] „zu den himmlischen Liedern des kapitolinischen Krieges / lege das Werk des kothurnbewehrten Maro“). Caelestis muss hier eine kaiserliche Autorschaft implizieren, s. NAUTA 2002: 327 Anm. 2; s.a. VILLALBA VARNEDA 2011: 326; andere Bezeichnungen für die Auseinandersetzungen mit den Vitellianern sammelt ROSENBERGER 1992: 83. Tac. hist. 3.74.1; Suet. Dom. 1.2; knapper Cass. Dio 65.17.4. Im abweichenden Zufluchtsort liegt der Hauptunterschied zwischen den Versionen des Tacitus und Suetons, die sonst bis in die Formulierungen soweit übereinstimmen, dass an eine gemeinsame Quelle gedacht worden ist (WELLESLEY 1956: 212). Dieser Quelle oder jedenfalls einer domitianfeindlichen Tradition ist wohl das nicht ganz unprekäre Unterkommen bei der condiscipuli sui mater zuzuschreiben. Auf eine von Seiten des Hofes aufrechterhaltene Version dürfte hingegen die Unterstützung durch Vespasians namentlich genannten Klienten

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

209

unschwer eine antidomitianische Tradition erkennen. Wie jede plausible Fabrikation baut auch diese auf unstrittigen Punkten auf – die Episode mit dem aedituus, das tatsächliche Vorhandensein eines Isisheiligtums auf dem Kapitol, die fundierende Rolle ägyptischer Kulte für die Begründung der flavischen Dynastie –, bedient sich aber mit dem feigen Untertauchen beim ersten Anzeichen von Gefahr, der Hilfe durch einen Freigelassenen und vor allem dem Untertauchen im feminin konnotierten Kult einer schillernden Sekte (Sueton: varia superstitio) bewährter diffamatorischer Muster.70 Unabhängig von den realen Hergängen war die Flucht des späteren Prinzeps natürlich durchaus ambivalent. Während er sich in Sicherheit brachte, hatte mancher, der weitaus loser mit Vespasian verbunden war, bei der Erstürmung des Kapitols immerhin sein Leben gelassen. Wenn Domitian gleichwohl und so anhaltend auf den Geschehnissen insistiert, dann weil sie für die öffentliche Persona nicht nur des jungen Caesar, sondern auch des späteren Kaisers von eminenter Wichtigkeit sind. Im Unterschied zu Vater und Bruder hat er keine Lorbeeren aus dem jüdischen Krieg vorzuweisen, der seiner Familie in ähnlicher Weise als militärischer Gründungsmythos dient wie der Sieg von Actium dem Augustus (und dem er analog zum bellum Capitolinum gleichfalls eine Dichtung widmet).71 So avanciert die Teilnahme an der Besetzung des Kapitols zu Domitians finest hour: In den schlimmsten Wirren des Bürgerkriegs rettet sich der 18jährige, ohne die Leibwache des späteren Kaisers, doch mit der Hilfe eines frommen Tempelwächters und loyaler Klienten und mit dem besonderen Beistand des höchsten Gottes und urrömischen Göttervaters.72 Tatsächlich sind wir in der glücklichen Lage, die kontrastierenden Bewertungen, die Domitians Verhalten im Dezember 69 in seinem zeitgenössischen Umfeld und nach seinem Sturz erfährt, einander direkt gegenüberstellen zu können. Für Martial „befreite er die von einer schlechten Herrschaft besetzten Kaiserpaläste, und führte als Knabe seine ersten Kriege für Jupiter“. Auch der Göttervater selbst hebt im Flavierelogium des Silius Italicus die Jugend Domitians hervor und prophezeit ihm, dass „das Feuer des tarpeischen Gipfels dich nicht schrecken wird,

70

71 72

zurückgehen, die nicht nur unbedenklich und topographisch plausibler ist, sondern zudem noch traditionelle Loyalitätspraktiken im Umfeld der Flavier unterstreicht. Klar benannt von WELLESLEY 1956: 212–214, der auch sprachliche Übereinstimmungen bei Tacitus und Sueton herausarbeitet, die von einer gemeinsamen Quelle herrühren dürften. Dort auch schon der Hinweis auf die auffällig ähnliche Geschichte von dem proskribierten Ädil des Jahres 43 v. Chr., M. Volusius, der sich von einem befreundeten Isispriester ein langes Gewand und eine Anubismaske geliehen haben und damit entkommen sein soll (App. civ. 4.47). Das Isisheiligtum auf dem Kapitol ist gut bezeugt und bestand (pace WELLESLEY) bis weit in die Kaiserzeit, s. COARELLI 2009b; SANDBERG 2009. TUCCI 2006b: 64–66 bringt den Bau überzeugend mit einem massiven Mauerzug mit engstehenden, unkannelierten Halbsäulen kolossalen Ausmaßes (abgebildet bei GIANNELLI 1978: Taf. 5) unter dem südlichen Eingang der Kirche S. Maria in Aracoeli zusammen (s. unsere Abb. 14 Nr. 6). Val. Fl. 1.12f. Treffend in diesem Zusammenhang MORGAN 2006: 247: „Truly important persons were not saved by foreign deities it seems. Rome’s principal god took care of them personally“.

210

Alexander Heinemann

inmitten der frevlerischen Flammen wirst du der Welt erhalten bleiben“.73 Eine aktive Rolle des Teenagers begegnet nicht nur in panegyrischer Lyrik, sondern auch im Geschichtswerk des Josephus, der sich zu der Behauptung versteigt, die Siegeshoffnungen der Flavianer hätten sich während der Besetzung des Hügels zum größten Teil auf Domitian gerichtet.74 Erstaunlicher noch ist eine sowohl bei Martial als auch bei Quintilian bezeugte Sicht der Ereignisse, wonach Domitian die kaiserliche Macht bereits in Händen gehalten, aber erst dem Vater und Bruder übergeben habe.75 Hatte Augustus sich noch auf Mars Ultor berufen und sein Handeln auf die pietas gegenüber seinem ermordeten Vater zurückgeführt, wird der Domitian der Dezembertage im panegyrischen Milieu des Kaiserhofes selbst zum ultor deorum76 und seine pietas äußert sich darin, dass er die Kaiserwürde zunächst seinem Vater und Bruder überlässt. Aus dieser Perspektive bedeuten die damaligen Geschehnisse also weitaus mehr als die glückliche Rettung des späteren Kaisers, sondern markieren den vielversprechenden Anfang seiner Herrschaft. Greifbarer Ausdruck dieser Herrschaft und ihrer sinnfälligen Verflechtung mit dem höchsten Gott waren die Tempelbauten Vespasians und Domitians. Von diesen wird der neuerrichtete Tempel für Jupiter Optimus Maximus in der Münzprägung weitaus weniger intensiv kommuniziert als die neuen Kulte für Jovis Custos und Jupiter Conservator, die dort übrigens als allgemein zugängliche Rettergottheiten ohne spezifischen Rekurs auf die Person des Kaisers präsentiert werden (Abb. 7 und 8).77 In der zeitgenössischen Literatur hingegen wird Domitian vor allem für die restitutio des Jupiter Optimus Maximus-Tempels gefeiert. So enden Statius’ Kalendae Decembres, eine rauschhafte Schilderung der Saturnalien Domitians, mit dem trunkenen Wegdämmern des Dichters – der noch einmal aufschreckt mit den abschließenden Zeilen:78

73

74 75 76 77

78

Mart. 9.101.13–16: adseruit possessa malis Palatia regnis, / prima suo gessit pro Iove bella puer; / solus Iuleas cum iam retineret habenas, / tradidit inque suo tertius orbe fuit; Sil. 3.609f.: nec te terruerint Tarpei culminis ignes / sacrilegas inter flammas seruabere terris. Zum Flavierelogium s. den Kommentar bei TAISNE 1992; REITZ 2010: 6f. Ios. bell. Iud. 4.646: Δομετιανὸς ὁ τἀδελφοῦ παῖς, μεγίστη μοῖρα τῶν εἰς τὸ κρατεῖν ἐλπίδων. Martial: s.o. Anm. 73; Quint. inst. 10.91 (p. 53). Stat. silv. 5.3.203f. Damit kehrt die römische Prägestätte zur Praxis der frühen Kaiserzeit zurück – und belegt im Übrigen, dass das weitgehende Fehlen von Jupiterbildern unter den julisch-claudischen Kaisern (s. dazu u. S. 213) kein Indikator für kultische Vernachlässigung sein muss. Aus (vielleicht religiös determinierten?) Gründen ist der höchste stadtrömische Kult – zumindest in Friedenszeiten – keiner, der auf stadtrömischen Münzen seinen Platz hätte. Stat. silv. 1.6.98–102; das gesamte Gedicht besprechen NEWLANDS 2002: 227–259 und (m.E. schlüssiger) LEBERL 2004: 181–198, bes. S. 197 zur Anrufung des Kapitols als Garant ewiger Dauer. LEBERL stellt in diesem Zusammenhang weiter fest: „Die Herrschaftsdarstellung Domitians verwies selbst immer wieder auf den restaurierten Tempel des Iuppiter Capitolinus und machte ihn zu einem Sinnbild des niemals endenden flavischen Principats“. Wo uns eine solche Aussage seitens des Kaisers überliefert wäre, ist mir nicht ersichtlich; denkt LEBERL hier an den o. Anm. 37 genannten seltenen Denar?

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

211

Quos ibit procul hic dies per annos! quin79 nullo sacer exolescet aevo, dum montes Latii paterque Thybris, dum stabit tua Roma dumque terris quod reddis Capitolium manebit. Über wieviel Jahre wird dieser Tag weiter fortdauern! Wahrlich, als heiliger wird er zu keiner Zeit vergehen, solange die Berge Latiums und Vater Tiber, solange Dein Rom stehen wird, und solange das Kapitol, das Du der Welt zurückgibst, bestehen wird.

Für eine Epoche, die den kapitolinischen Tempel schon zweimal hatten niederbrennen sehen, ist das eine nachgerade paradox anmutende Versicherung. Wenn Statius damit gleichwohl seinen Schlusseffekt setzt, zeigt dies vor allem die ungebrochene Wirkungsmacht des Baus als Erinnerungsort, in dem sich römische Macht und Identität verdichtet und immerwährend fortbesteht – und in den sich nun auch Domitian eingeschrieben hat.

IV. VORGESCHICHTE: HERRSCHAFTSKRISE UND JUPITERRENAISSANCE Aus der Rückschau erweist sich der Brand des Tempels des Jupiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus bei aller Tragik, die Zeitgenossen darin sahen – Tacitus unterbricht seine Darstellung in den Historien für einen hochrhetorischen Nachruf auf das Gebäude80 – als ausgesprochen glückliche Fügung für das flavische Kaisergeschlecht. Das immense symbolische Kapital, das aus der Wiedererrichtung zu schlagen war, stand allen Beteiligten sofort vor Augen, wie nicht zuletzt aus dem Streit um die Übernahme des Wiederaufbaus ersichtlich wird, der bereits zwei Tage nach dem Ereignis im Senat losbricht. Das Sühneritual für Terminus am 21. Juni bezieht zwar alle gesellschaftlichen Gruppen in den Neuanfang mit ein; der enorme Prestigegewinn aber, der mit dem eigentlichen Wiederaufbau einhergeht, ist Vespasian vorbehalten, auf den mit dem Einsetzen der Arbeiten gewartet wird und der seinen Bruder verloren, aber die Möglichkeit gewonnen hat, mit dem Tempel des obersten Gottes auch das Gemeinwesen wieder aufzubauen. Mit der Einrichtung des fiscus Iudaicus gelingt es überdies der innenpolitischen Katastrophe eine außenpolitische Bedeutung abzugewinnen.81 Die Übertra-

79 80

81

Coni. SHACKLETON BAILEY. MSS: quam. Tac. hist. 3.72; s. dazu FLOWER 2008: 89–92. Ein eingehender Vergleich des Passus mit den Reflexionen, die Flavius Josephus (bell. Iud. 6.267–270) zur Zerstörung des Jerusalemers Tempels anstellt, schiene mir lohnend. Ios. bell. Iud. 7.218; vgl. App. Syr. 50; Cass. Dio 65.7.2 (Xiph.). Zum fiscus Judaicus s. HEEMSTRA 2010: bes. 9–12 zu seiner Einführung; ferner: GOODMAN 2005. Weniger hilfreich hingegen THOMPSON 1982, dessen ökonomischer Pragmatismus (s. etwa S. 333: „Vespasian’s decree was an opportunistic measure, motivated by fiscal considerations“) die symbolischen Aspekte der Steuer doch wohl unterschätzt.

212

Alexander Heinemann

gung der Jerusalemer Tempelsteuer auf den kapitolinischen Jupitertempel korreliert die nur wenige Monate auseinanderliegenden Zerstörungen der beiden Kultbauten – die eine reversibel, die andere nicht – und begleicht den Verlust im Innern mit einer Kompensation von außen. Noch Jahre später kommt Domitian, der den Tempel ebenfalls wieder aufbauen, weitere Heiligtümer hinzufügen und groß angelegte Spiele für den kapitolinischen Jupiter und seine Trias einrichten wird, auf die tragischen Ereignisse zurück. Mit den Stiftungen für seinen olympischen Beschützer manifestiert er nicht nur seine pietas als dankbar Erretteter, sondern auch die schicksalshafte Verknüpfung der flavischen und insbesondere seiner persönlichen Herrschaft mit dem höchsten Gott. An dieser Stelle ist ein Blick zurück auf die Vorgeschichte der Dezemberereignisse des Jahres 69 angebracht, um die hier skizzierte ideologische Gemengelage deutlicher herauszuarbeiten. Diese Vorgeschichte betrifft nicht die militärischen oder staatsrechtlichen Verwerfungen des Vierkaiserjahres, sondern den Gott, der für die Flavier und namentlich Domitian im Weiteren eine so fundierende Rolle spielen sollte. Die zentrale Bedeutung, die Jupiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus in Rom zu allen Zeiten innegehabt hat, und die ausgeprägt politische Dimension, in der viele Aspekte seines Kultes angesiedelt sind – angefangen etwa vom Triumphzug –, sind nicht kontrovers und bedürfen hier keiner weiteren Erläuterung.82 In der Sekundärliteratur weniger prominent, wenngleich verschiedentlich diskutiert, ist die scheinbare Vernachlässigung, die der höchste Gott in der frühen Kaiserzeit, namentlich unter Augustus erfährt: Sowohl die sibyllinischen Bücher als auch der Triumphalornat werden aus dem kapitolinischen Tempel entfernt, die einen um im Tempel des Apollon Palatinus, der andere um im Heiligtum des Mars Ultor eine neue Verwahrung zu finden. Letzteres soll von nun an auch als Ausgangspunkt für aufbrechende Heerführer dienen.83 Mehr als eine aktive Zurückstellung des obersten Gottes scheint eine funktionale Ausdifferenzierung angestrebt zu sein, die zentrale politische Belange wie Krieg und Divination auf neu begründete Kulte verlagert und so dem kaiserlichen Zugriff besser verfügbar macht. Ähnliches gilt für die ägyptischen Beutestücke, die auf die Curia Iulia, den Tempel des Divus Iulius und die kapitolinische Trias verteilt werden; eine wieder andere Streuung ist für die Säcularspiele des Augustus überliefert, wo die Ausgabe der rituellen Reinigungsmittel sowie das Opfer von Feldfrüchten vor dem Tempel des Jupiter Optimus Maximus stattfindet – aber auch vor den vom

82 83

S. einführend und mit reicher Bibliographie LIMC VIII.1, 421–423, 461f. s.v. Zeus/Iuppiter (F. CANCIANI und A. COSTANTINI). Zur Debatte um eine angebliche Zurückstellung Jupiters s. CAIN 2002: 140 Anm. 67 mit weiterer Literatur. – Sibyllinische Bücher: Suet. Aug. 31.1, s. dazu SANTANGELO 2013, 137–140; zum Zeitpunkt der Maßnahme und frühen literarischen Anspielungen darauf s. MILLER 2000: 412f. Anm. 13. Triumphalornat: BERGMANN 2010: 69–73; die von BERGMANN vermutete Rückverlagerung des Ornats auf das Kapitol könnte übrigens gut unter Vespasian vorgenommen worden sein. Zum Mars-Ultor-Tempel als neu festgelegtem Ausgangspunkt militärischer Kampagnen: SPANNAGEL 1999: 26f.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

213

Prinzeps gestifteten Tempeln des Apollo Palatinus und des Jupiter Tonans.84 Die Stiftung des letztgenannten Kultes wurde tatsächlich bereits von Zeitgenossen als unangemessen empfunden, der Bau seines Tempels auf dem Kapitol als buchstäblich deplaziert kritisiert.85 Am eklatantesten ist vordergründig der numismatische Befund (s. dazu Tabelle 1): Nach den 19 v. Chr. in Spanien geprägten Aurei und Denaren für IVPPITER TONANS ziert für über 80 Jahre kein einziger Jupiter eine Münze der Reichsprägung. Das muss nicht auf einen generellen Bedeutungsverlust des Gottes hinweisen, vielmehr zeigt es, dass dieser für die Botschaften der Münzprägung und ihre Adressaten in diesem Zeitraum kein angemessenes Thema darstellt.86 Dies ändert sich schlagartig nach der Pisonischen Verschwörung, nach deren Verrat Abb. 9: Denar des Nero mit Reversdarstellung des und Niederschlagung Nero ei- IVPPITER CVSTOS (RIC I2 53), 65 n. Chr. ne Serie von Aurei und Denaren mit einem thronenden IVPPITER CVSTOS herausgibt (Abb. 9). Unter Umständen wurden die ersten dieser Emissionen benutzt, um das Donativ an die Prätorianer auszuzahlen, das Nero nach seiner Rettung beschloß.87 Von Neros Weihung des ihm bestimmten Dolches an Jupiter Vindex (ausgerechnet!) war bereits die Rede. Als sich nun im Frühjahr 68 in Gallien Iulius Vindex gegen Nero erhebt, setzen die sogenannten anonymen Bürgerkriegsprägungen ein. Die lange umstrittene Frage nach ihrer – wahrscheinlich im Umfeld Galbas zu suchenden – Urheberschaft braucht hier nicht diskutiert zu werden;88 festzuhalten ist, dass ihre Münzbilder dezidiert antineronische Motive mit einer Vielzahl von Jupiterbildern und 84

85

86

87 88

Aἰγυπτία λάφυρα: Cass. Dio 51.22.2–3. Säcularspiele: CIL VI 32323, Z. 30–32: purgamenta dari et fruges accipi colle(g)io [in Capitolio ante aedem Iovis Optimi] / Maximi et ante aedem Iovis Tonantis et [in Palatio ante aedem] / Apollinis et in porticu eius. Suet. Aug. 91.2; Cass. Dio 54.4.3–4; PIERRE GROS (in: LTUR III, 159f. s.v. Iuppiter Tonans, aedes) interpretiert die Berichte als aitiologische Konstruktionen; dies ändert freilich nichts daran, dass schon für Suetons Quellen ein Konflikt zwischen der Stiftungsaktivität des ersten Prinzeps und dem Stellenwert des Jupiter Optimus Maximus vorstellbar war. S.o. Anm. 77. Bezeichnend ist der Fall Caligulas, für den der kapitolinische Jupiter eine nicht unwichtige Rolle spielt (s. etwa Suet. Cal. 16.4, 22.4), die aber keinerlei numismatische Reflexe erfährt. Zu Jupiterprägungen ab 65 n. Chr. s. HILL 1960, dessen Vorstellungen über zugrundeliegende Kultbilder und laxer Umgang mit Epiklesen den Befund jedoch eher verunklären. RIC I2 52f., 63f., 69 (Nero). Zum Donativ s. FLAIG 1992: 457. Zum Aufstand des Vindex s. die durchaus nicht einhelligen Positionen von BRUNT 1959; TALBERT 1977; FLAIG 1992: 240–249, 269–272; URBAN 1999: 49–65. Die fraglichen Prägungen sind RIC I2, S. 203–215 zusammengestellt. Die Rückführung der in der älteren Forschung

214

Alexander Heinemann

-epiklesen verbinden, und dabei sogar Neros neuen IVPPITER CVSTOS-Typ aufgreifen, aber offenbar als Beschützer Roms uminterpretieren. Neben Vesta, Roma und anderen traditionellen Bildern begegnet unter diesen Prägungen auch schon Jupiter Optimus Maximus CapitoliAbb. 10: Anonymer Denar der sog. Gruppe IV (Südgallien?) nus (Abb. 10). Dieses plötzlimit Darstellung des I(uppiter) O(ptimus) MAX(imus) und che Aufflammen der Jupiterder VESTA P(opuli) R(omani) QVIRITIVM (RIC I2 128a), Frühjahr 69 n. Chr. thematik setzt sich in der Münzprägung des Vierkaiserjahres fort: Für jeden der vier Principes der folgenden anderthalb Jahre sind Jupiterprägungen bezeugt, und mit Ausnahme Othos ist auch stets ein Bezug auf den Jupiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus nachweisbar.89 Am besten ist die Beleglage für Galba – und dies unabhängig von der Zuweisung der Bürgerkriegsprägungen an ihm nahestehende Kreise. Eine während seiner Regierungszeit in Alexandria geprägte Münze zeigt einen Tempel, der anhand der drei Cellae und der Quadriga auf dem First unzweideutig als jener der kapitolinischen Trias erkennbar ist.90 Hinzu tritt eine reiche literarische Überlieferung, die eine prononcierte Rückberufung Galbas auf seinen Urgroßvater Quintus Lutatius Catulus bezeugt, den Wiedererrichter des 83 abgebrannten Kapitols.91 Unter den Vorzeichen, die Galbas Kaiserwürde vorhergesagt haben sollten, stammten

89

90

91

vielfach mit Vindex zusammengebrachten Münzen auf das Umfeld Galbas durch MARTIN 1974, setzt sich in der numismatischen Forschung nur mit Mühe durch, s. den Literaturüberblick bei URBAN 1999: 49. Vgl. BENOIST 2001: 306: „L’investissement de la colline sacrée est un enjeu majeur pour chacun des compétiteurs, car elle est certes un lieu stratégique dans Rome mais également la résidence de l’empereur des dieux qui est le dieu des empereurs“. Bekannt gemacht durch KLEINER 1989: 71–77 Taf. 9, der (S. 76) auf andere stadtrömische Bauten auf alexandrinischen Münzen hinweist; konkreter ZIMMERMANN 1995: 65f., der andere Prägungen aus Alexandria mit in Galbas Sinne programmatischen Motiven bespricht. Vgl. auch Titus’ angekündigte Rekonstruktion des im Jahre 80 wieder abgebrannten kapitolinischen Tempels auf ephesischen Cistophoren (RPC 860; DARWALL-SMITH 1996: 97). Kompensieren diese Provinzialprägungen etwa die o. Anm. 77 erwähnte Zurückhaltung der stadtrömischen Münze gegenüber Bildern des kapitolinischen Jupiter oder seines Tempels? – Natürlich können bei der Darstellung auf den alexandrinischen Prägungen auch lokale Gesichtspunkte eine Rolle gespielt haben, die uns entgehen; bereits unter Nero hatte die Münze von Alexandria ein großes Bronzenominal mit einem thronenden ΖΕΥΣ [ΚΑ]ΠΕ[ΤΩΛ]ΙΟΣ herausgegeben (RPC I 5285). Es stellt ein eigentümliches Zusammentreffen dar, dass zur Zeit dieser Prägung oder bis kurz davor eben jener L. Iulius Vestinius als Präfekt Ägyptens fungiert, dem Vespasian später die cura für den kapitolinischen Tempelneubau anvertraut. Tac. hist. 1.15; Plut. Galba 3.1; Suet. Galba 2; dazu KLEINER 1989: 76f. und POULLE 1999: 40f.; s.a. Suet. Galba 18.2: Galba stiftet eine wertvolle Halskette nicht wie erst vorgesehen seiner Fortuna in Tusculum sondern der Venus Capitolina.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

215

die meisten von Jupiter selbst, und einmal Kaiser geworden ließ er in seinem Atrium (auf dem Palatin?) einen Stammbaum anbringen, der seine Abkunft väterlicherseits auf den Göttervater zurückführte.92 Aus der Regierungszeit Othos hingegen, der unter den tres principes am stärksten an Nero anknüpft, ist bezeichnenderweise nur eine einzige Jupiterprägung überliefert, die den Typus der Jupiter-Custos-Münzen des letzten Julio-Claudiers aufgreift. Die unter Vitellius herausgegebenen Asse und Denare schließen wiederum an Galbas Kapitolsrhetorik an und interpretieren den Göttervater nach dem Sieg über Otho schließlich als IVPPITER VICTOR (Abb. 11). Jupiter wird also schnell zum Schlachtruf der antineronischen Opposition, was nicht zuletzt daran deutlich wird, dass man seine Anrufung bereits den Opfern von Neros Willkürherrschaft in den Mund legt: Dem Jupiter Liberator, der auch auf Bürgerkriegsprägungen begegnet, weiht Seneca das Wasser seines letzten, todbringenden Dampfbades, während der gleichfalls zum Selbstmord gezwungene Thrasea Paetus dem gleichen Jupiter Liberator das aus seinen aufgeschnittenen Adern quellende Blut spendet.93 Die Ursachen für diese Renaissance des Jupiter in der Münzprägung der Jahre 68–69 Abb. 11: Denar des Vitellius mit Reversdarstellung des dürften in der engen Wechselbe- IVPPITER VICTOR (RIC I2 68), April-Dezember 69 n. ziehung zu sehen sein, die zwi- Chr. schen dem öffentlichen Wohl und dem kapitolinischen Jupiter wahrgenommen wird. Die Weihung des ersten Tempels war mit der Vertreibung eines autokratischen Monarchen und der Geburt der res publica zusammengefallen, und schon in spätrepublikanischer Zeit war ein Zusammenhang zwischen seiner Vernichtung durch Brand und der Staatskrise gesehen worden.94 In einer neuerlichen Phase der Instabilität, vermittelte die Berufung auf diese Konstante ein Signal der Sicherheit, das auf den Kern des römischen Identitätshaushalts zurückgriff. Dies gilt für den nur knapp der Pisonischen Verschwörung entgangenen Nero nicht minder als für seine Gegner. Nicht zufällig ist die Flut neuer Jupiterbilder auf den Bürgerkriegsprägungen Teil einer umfassenden Restitutionsrhetorik, die ebenso auf Augustus zurückverweist wie auf die Wiederherstellung des öffentlichen Wohls.95 92

93 94 95

Suet. Galba 2, 8.2, 9.2. s.a. Cass. Dio 63.6.2–3 (Xiph.): Auf die (falsche) Nachricht vom Tode Othos, macht sich Galba sogleich auf, um Jupiter auf dem Kapitol (Plut. Galba 26: auf dem Forum) ein Opfer darzubringen; das Kapitol als möglicher Rückzugsort Galbas auch bei Tac. hist. 1.39.1, 40.2; s. BENOIST 2001: 307f. Tac. ann. 15.64 (Seneca) und 16.35 (Thrasea Paetus). FLOWER 2008: bes. 80f. KRAAY 1949; SUTHERLAND 1984; URBAN 1999: 53f. Nicht leicht zu erklären sind vereinzelte Vorläufer dieser Themen in neronischen Provinzialprägungen; s.o. Anm. 90 zu alexandrinischen Münzen für den kapitolinischen Jupiter und außerdem die mit Neros Porträt und Titula-

216

Alexander Heinemann

Ihren Ausgang dürften die dort neu lancierten Jupiter-Epiklesen Conservator, Capitolinus, Custos und Liberator tatsächlich im Umfeld Galbas genommen haben, der sich bis in seine Stilisierung als Nachfahre des Catulus betont traditionell als Mann des Kapitols präsentiert. Der Begründer der flavischen Dynastie sollte genau dort anknüpfen.96 So wusste man nach dem Bürgerkrieg zu berichten, dass noch während Vitellius’ Herrschaft in Rom sich eines Nachts die Türen des Jupitertempels unter Dröhnen geöffnet hätten und riesige Fußspuren erschienen seien, ein Aufbruch der Götter, aus dem klar hervorging, wem ihre Gunst galt.97 Und in der Tat hatte Jupiter das Geschick ja zum Vorteil des Vespasian gewendet. Vor allem aber bot sich diesem – just in dieser historischen Konstellation und im Unterschied noch zu Galba – die überaus glückliche Gelegenheit, dem nun unbehausten Göttervater auf dem Kapitol einen neuen Tempel zu errichten.

V. PERFORMANZ: NOCH EINMAL AUF DAS KAPITOL Wie der Rückblick über die – vor allem an den Münzen abzulesenden98 – politischen Parolen des Vierkaiserjahres gezeigt hat, ereignet sich der folgenreiche Brand des kapitolinischen Jupitertempels, der anderthalb ereignisreiche Jahrhunderte schadlos überstanden hatte, in einem Zeitraum, in dem sein Bewohner nach Jahrzehnten vergleichsweiser Vernachlässigung von verschiedenen Seiten wieder als positiv belegter Kampfbegriff im Mund geführt wird. Diese bemerkenswerte Koinzidenz und die Ereignisse, die sie herbeiführten, gilt es abschließend näher ins Auge zu fassen. Denn die Schauplätze des politischen Geschehens entwickeln, wie Stéphane Benoist zu Recht hervorgehoben hat, in den gänzlich präzedenzlosen Vorgängen des Vierkaiserjahres ein spezifisches Eigengewicht und kommen alles andere als zufällig zustande.99 Zurück also zu den Ereignissen, die von Vitellius’ ausgebliebener Abdankung ihren Ausgang nehmen. Moderne Interpreten sind sich uneins, ob der Versuch,

96 97

98

99

tur auf dem Obvers verbundene Münze der Kolonie Patras (RPC I 1279–1280) mit Darstellung des IVPPITER LIBERATOR! Erhellend zu Vespasians Übernahme von Galbas politischer Programmatik: ZIMMERMANN 1995: bes. 68–71, 74f. Cass. Dio 64.8.2. Man vergleiche für das Motiv, das offenkundige Anklänge an den altrömischen Brauch der evocatio aufweist, den Aufbruch des Dionysos und seines Thiasos aus Alexandria kurz vor der Niederlage von Actium: Plut. Antonius 75. Von einem ähnlichen Omen am Jerusalemer Tempel berichtet Ios. bell. Iud. 6.293–299. Die herausragende Rolle der Münzprägung als Medium der Auseinandersetzung zwischen den Prätendenten, zeigt nicht zuletzt eine lobende Bemerkung bei Cass. Dio 64.6.1 (Zon.), Vitellius habe die Münzen Neros, Galbas und Othos im Umlauf belassen und ihre darauf geprägten Porträts (ταῖς εἰκόσιν αὐτῶν) ohne Widerwillen betrachtet; s. dazu WOLTERS 1999: 150f. BENOIST 2001: 304: „Ces dix-huit mois ont multiplié les occasions d’investissement de l’espace public et de parcours orientés, chaque événement ne prenant pas place par hasard en certains lieux“.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

217

das imperium abzugeben, als solcher ernst zu nehmen oder vielmehr als Konsensritual zu sehen sei, das darauf abzielte, „die Aristokratie und sämtliche Schichten des Volkes zu einer totalen Mobilisierung aller Kräfte zu verpflichten“.100 Die Interpretation von Vitellius’ Verhalten am Morgen des 18. Dezember ist deswegen schwierig, weil es für das, was der Kaiser vorhat – oder vorgibt vorzuhaben, schlicht keinerlei Protokoll gibt, an dem die Konzeption, Umsetzung und letztlich Glaubwürdigkeit seines versuchten Verzichts überprüfbar wäre. Im entscheidenden Punkt aber ist wohl Egon Flaig zuzustimmen: Der Kaiser hätte die gesellschaftlichen Gruppen „auf Vespasian umvereidigen müssen, um Klarheit … zu schaffen. Genau das unterließ er füglich“. 101 Von diesem Zeitpunkt an ist Vitellius nicht mehr Teil der Lösung. Unstrittig sind die Konsequenzen dieser abortiven Abdankung. Noch am gleichen Tag begibt sich die Gruppe um Flavius Sabinus bewaffnet ins Stadtzentrum, wobei ihre ursprünglichen Absichten zunächst nebulös bleiben. Vitellius gewaltsam absetzen zu wollen, wie Cassius Dio es ihnen unterstellt, wäre angesichts des militärischen Ungleichgewichts in der Stadt ebenso illusorisch wie unnötig, da doch die Ankunft des Antonius Primus mit seinem Heer unmittelbar bevorsteht.102 In jedem Fall flüchten sich die Flavianer nach dem heftigen Zusammenstoß an den südlichen Abhängen des Quirinalshügels auf das Kapitol, dessen steilerer nördlicher Teil, die sogenannte arx, in der Tat nahebei liegt. Wir hören nichts davon, dass die Flavianer dabei verfolgt worden seien. Was nun folgt, ist praktisch ausnahmslos als regelrechte Belagerung des Kapitolshügels (oder der arx) verstanden worden.103 Dass es sich dabei nicht um eine Belagerung im konventionellen Sinne gehandelt haben kann, lässt sich allerdings an einer Reihe von Gesichtspunkten aufzeigen. 100 FLAIG 1992: 396f., 566–568; anders KÖNIG 1984: 305, dem es „unsinnig“ scheint, hinter Vitellius’ Verhalten andere Intentionen als die tatsächlich vorgebrachten zu vermuten. Auch MORGAN 2006: 240f. erkennt hier keine Hintergedanken. 101 FLAIG 1992: 566 (seine Hervorhebung). 102 Dies scheint mir − neben einer abweichenden Auffassung von der Chronologie der Ereignisse und einer allzu psychologisierenden Sicht auf die Moral der Stadtkohorten − das zentrale Problem in der Interpretation bei FLAIG 1992: 393–398, der Sabinus als Urheber eines ‚flavianischen Putsches‘ sieht. Was hätte Sabinus kurz vor dem Eintreffen des Primus zu einem so riskanten Handeln veranlassen sollen? Doch man kann die Frage auch anders stellen: Was, wenn der ‚flavianische Putsch‘ von vorne herein auf das Kapitol und gar nicht auf das Palatium abzielte – und also wie geplant umgesetzt wurde? 103 Viel Tinte und Verve ist auf die Frage verwendet worden, ob Tacitus’ Aussage, die Flavianer hätten die arx Capitolina besetzt, ausschließlich auf die nordöstliche Kuppe des Hügels zu beziehen sei, die heute zum Großteil vom Vittoriano und S. Maria in Aracoeli eingenommen wird. Eine Differenzierung zwischen arx (Nordostkuppe) und Capitolium (Südwestkuppe) ist in einigen Quellen fraglos auszumachen, doch ebenso wie Capitolium oft den ganzen Hügel bezeichnet, kann auch arx auf den gesamten Hügel bzw. das Areal des Jupitertempels bezogen werden; s. die Belege bei WELLESLEY 1981: 181f.; FILIPPI 1998: 75f. Für eine Beschränkung der Belagerung auf die arx plädiert WISEMAN 1978, dem noch ARATA 2010: 149 Anm. 74 beipflichtet; s. aber die stichhaltigen Einwände von WELLESLEY 1981: 179–187 und FILIPPI 1998: 76–78; ferner SCOTT 1984. Auch ist zwischen den beiden Kuppen weder eine Trennung noch ein fortifikatorischer Unterschied greifbar: LTUR I, 128 s.v. arx (G. GIANNELLI).

218

Alexander Heinemann

Abb. 12: Hochkaiserzeitliches Forum Romanum und Kapitolshügel von Osten; Rekonstruktion von G. Gatteschi (1924) mit übertriebener Betonung des fortifikatorischen Charakters des Hügels.

Zunächst sind die topographischen Verhältnisse im 1. Jh. n. Chr. einer Verschanzung auf dem Kapitolshügel nur bedingt günstig. Anders als manche ältere, noch stark dem Gedanken an eine frühzeitliche Fluchtburg verhaftete Rekonstruktion glauben machen will (s. etwa Abb. 12), ragt das kaiserzeitliche Kapitol durchaus nicht als solitärer Klotz aus der Stadtlandschaft. Über einen Sattel (Abb. 13), den erst Domitian und Trajan abtragen werden, ist es mit dem Quirinal verbunden104, außerdem seit spätrepublikanischer Zeit eng mit Privathäusern umstellt.105 Wie die Studien Pier Luigi Tuccis in den letzten Jahren gezeigt haben, ist die Kuppe der

104 Der von der Inschrift der Trajanssäule implizierte Sattel zwischen Quirinal und Kapitolshügel ist mittlerweile auch geologisch nachweisbar, s. RIZZO 2001: 215–220. Demnach markiert die Höhe der Säule nicht die ursprüngliche Höhe des Sattels – was auch schwer vorstellbar ist, da sie nahezu an die Gesamthöhe des Kapitols heranreicht. Vielmehr gibt sie das Niveau an, bis zu dem an den Quirinalsabhängen Abgrabungen vorgenommen wurden; s. RIZZO 2001: 220: „sarebbe pertanto evidente che l’iscrizione riportata sul basamento della Colonna non potesse riferirsi che alla quota massima del taglio effettuato per arretrare il versante del Quirinale“. Dennoch ist davon auszugehen, dass für die Anlage des Trajansforums das Niveau an einigen Stellen um bis zu 15m abgesenkt wurde. 105 Über die Häuser dringen die Vitellianer dann schließlich in Massen ein und sind denn auch wie Tac. hist. 3.71.3 trocken feststellt, nicht aufzuhalten: nec sisti poterant. Einen Eindruck von dieser Bebauung liefert die fünfgeschossige sogenannte Insula dell’Aracoeli am Westhang der arx (Abb. 14 Nr. 2), die allerdings erst nach dem Capitolsbrand von 80 n. Chr. entstanden sein dürfte, s. dazu PRIESTER 2002: 47–114, zur Datierung ebd. 193. Die Grundstücke rund um das Kapitol (d.h. vor allem die Areale im Westen zum Circus Flaminius und im Norden zum Marsfeld hin), waren bereits nach dem Bundesgenossenkrieg zur Sanierung des Staatshaushaltes verkauft worden: Oros. 5.18: loca publica quae in circuitu Capitolii pontificibus auguribus decemuiris et flaminibus in possessionem tradita erant, cogente inopia uendita sunt; s. dazu TUCCI 2005: 28f.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

219

Abb. 13: Rom, antikes Höhenrelief und rekonstruiertes geologisches Profil im Areal der Kaiserfora (im Plan dunkelgrau ausgespart), nach RIZZO 2001.

arx selbst dicht bebaut.106 Obendrein führt eine regelrechte Brücke − die Wasserleitung der aqua Marcia − vom Quirinal her an die arx heran (Abb. 14).107 Einen echten Belagerungskrieg kann man hier gar nicht führen. Dies geschieht auch nicht. Schon Tacitus betont die Laxheit der vitellianischen Nachtwachen, die es Flavius Sabinus ermöglicht, seine Angehörigen und Domitian zu sich zu holen, außerdem einen Boten an die flavianischen Truppen außerhalb Roms abzusetzen und bei Tagesanbruch sogar einen Emissär auf den Palatin zu schicken, den die Soldaten des Vitellius ausdrücklich nicht bemerken. Während der Nacht, so Tacitus’ Quelle, hätten die Flavianer den Hügel ohne Schwierigkeiten verlassen können, und offenbar war dies sogar später noch möglich, als der eigentliche Sturm auf den Hügel begonnen hatte. Jene, denen die Flucht gelang, hatten keine Schwierigkeiten sich zu verstecken; mit den Legionen des Antonius Primus vor den Toren der Stadt hatte Vitellius weder die Zeit noch die Mittel, um die Stadt einer Rasterfahndung nach ein paar untergetauchten Flavianern zu unterziehen.108 Das ist eine seltsame Belagerung, in der die Belagerten freien Zugang nach außen haben, und noch seltsamer muten die Geschichten an, die Tacitus über die Flucht einzelner Flavianer zu Ohren gekommen waren.109 Da ist die Rede von Einzelnen, die sich als Sklaven verkleideten oder in großen Gepäckstücken ver106 TUCCI 2006a; TUCCI 2006b: 65f.; s.a. PRIESTER 2002: 110–114. Zur Topographie der arx ist eine Monographie von PIER LUIGI TUCCI in Vorbereitung. 107 Die Errichtung der aqua Marcia bis auf den Kapitolshügel in den späten 140er Jahren v. Chr. war Gegenstand heftiger Kontroversen gewesen, s. dazu MORGAN 1978: 48–53. Ihr Fortbestehen in der Kaiserzeit belegt TUCCI 2006b: 67–73. 108 S.a. Tac. hist. 3.59.3, der berichtet, Sabinus und Domitian hätten auch vor der Zuspitzung vom 18. Dezember reichlich Möglichkeit gehabt die Stadt zu verlassen. Sehr streng können die dort erwähnten Bewacher Domitians nicht gewesen sein, wenn sie ihrem Schützling ermöglichten, sich den Seinen auf dem Kapitol anzuschließen. 109 Tac. hist. 3.73.3.

220

Alexander Heinemann

borgen von Klienten forttragen ließen.110 Bereits erwähnt wurde Domitians Flucht inmitten einer Isisprozession. Eine Belagerung aber, die von einem regen Strom von Boten, Kultgemeinschaften, Klienten, Sklaven und auffällig unauffälligen Gepäckträgern durchbrochen wird, ist keine Belagerung.111 Dank dieser Durchlässigkeit erreicht noch vor dem Sturm der Vitellianer, bei Sonnenaufgang des 19. Dezember, Cornelius Martialis, Tribun der cohortes urbanae, Vitellius auf dem Palatin cum mandatis et questu von Seiten des Flavius Sabinus. Das Bemerkenswerteste an dieser Mission ist die völlig marginale Rolle, welche das Kapitol darin spielt. Vielmehr dreht sich das Gespräch primär um Vitellius’ ausgebliebenen Rücktritt und die Loyalität, die Flavius Sabinus ihm gegenüber bislang an den Tag gelegt hat.112 Für eine mitten in der Stadt belagerte Gruppe von Bürgern, der es gelingt, einen Botschafter abzusetzen, sind das überraschende Prioritäten. Ebenso überraschend ist die mangelhafte fortifikatorische Vorbereitung der Belagerten, der im Übrigen auch die Sorglosigkeit ihrer Angreifer entspricht.113 Diese „waren nur mit Schwertern in den Händen bewaffnet und Geschütze oder Wurfgeschosse herbeizuholen, schien ihnen langwierig“, so Tacitus; das Kapitol war eben seit langem keine Festung mehr, der man mit entsprechendem Kriegsgerät hätte zu Leibe rücken müssen. Auf der anderen Seite hatte Sabinus in einer den Ernst der Lage unterstreichenden Maßnahme altehrwürdige Statuen aus dem ganzen Tempelbezirk herbeiholen und vor dem Tor am oberen Ende des clivus Capitolinus auftürmen lassen. Doch als die Vitellianer diesen Zugang versperrt vorfanden und sich stattdessen daran machten, die Hügelkuppe über die alternativen Aufgänge am asylum und an den ‚Hundert Stufen‘ zu erreichen – was man kaum als besonders trickreiches Stratagem ansehen wird −, traf dies die Belagerten un-

110 BARZANÒ 1984: 115f. bemerkt die mangelnde Glaubwürdigkeit dieser Fluchtmethoden und vermutet, es handle sich bei diesen Geschichten um „i sistemi utilizzati da alcuni per fuggire da Roma fin dalla mattina del 18“, die später, sich einer Teilnahme an der Belagerung rühmend, mit den gleichen Tricks ihre Flucht vom Kapitol erklärt hätten. Die These ist weder belegbar noch überzeugend. Zum einen war eine systematische Abriegelung der Stadt, die solche Mittel notwendig gemacht hätte, in voraurelianischer Zeit schlicht nicht möglich − weswegen Vitellius es ja auch vorzog, dem Domitian Bewacher an die Seite zu stellen (s.o. Anm. 108). Zum andern finden die Fluchtgeschichten Rückhalt in dem (auch von BARZANÒ nicht bestrittenen) regen Verkehr von Boten und Nachzüglern zum und vom Kapitolshügel. 111 Seltener Zweifel an der Belagerung schimmert bei WELLESLEY 1981: 178 auf: „The besiegers of the Capitol, if siege this was, were not sufficiently alert to prevent messages for help going out and persons coming in“. Hinsichtlich der bei Tacitus überlieferten unterschiedlichen Formen heimlicher Absetzung (Verkleidung, Gepäckstücke) stellt sich die Frage, vor wem sich die ‚Belagerten‘ eigentlich verbargen: Vor den Argusaugen der vitellianischen Belagerer oder dem kollektiven Druck ihrer Gefährten? 112 Tac. hist. 3.70. Als Quelle für diese Unterredung zweier Männer, die innerhalb von 48 Stunden beide tot sein sollten, dürfte mit BARZANÒ 1984: 112f. Vitellius’ Berater Cluvius Rufus in Frage kommen, der auch bei anderen vertraulichen Gesprächen des Kaisers bezeugt ist (Tac. hist. 3.65.2). 113 Zum Folgenden s. die Schilderung der Kampfhandlungen bei Tac. hist. 3.71.1–3.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

221

Abb. 14: Kaiserzeitliche Bebauung der Arx Capitolina (Plan nach Tucci 2006). 1: Nischenraum, nach ARATA 1997 sacellum für Jupiter Conservator. – 2: sog. Insula dell’Aracoeli (wohl erst nach 80 n. Chr. entstanden) – 3: Große domus mit republikanischen bis severischen Bauphasen. – 4: Ungefähre Anlaufstelle der republikanischen Leitung der Aqua Marcia. – 5: Caementiciumfundamente, nach ARATA 2009 zum templum ingens Domitians gehörig. – 6: Heiligtum der Isis Capitolina. – 7: Tempel des Jupiter Optimus Maximus.

222

Alexander Heinemann

vorbereitet (improvisa utraque vis). Die resultierende Überforderung der Flavianer entlarvt die Verbarrikadierung hinter den decora maiorum als weniger militärisch denn vielmehr rhetorisch wirksame Geste. Um ein überspitztes Ergebnis zu formulieren: Wir müssen uns die Belagerten als freie Menschen vorstellen – zumindest als solche, die zu fast jedem Zeitpunkt die Wahl über ihren Verbleib haben. Freilich lässt sich nicht ausschließen, dass der Rückzug auf das Kapitol nach dem ersten Schrecken über den Ausgang des Treffens am lacus Fundani tatsächlich spontan erfolgt. Spätestens aber, als dann nichts weiter passiert, nimmt das Handeln der Flavianer um Flavius Sabinus einen rhetorischen Charakter an. Mehr als tatsächlich belagert zu werden, erklären sie sich auf dem Kapitol zu Belagerten und dürften auf Entsatz durch Antonius Primus gerechnet haben.114 Vor dem Hintergrund der oben skizzierten Renaissance des Jupiter Optimus Maximus als politischem Schlachtruf im Kampf gegen einen tyrannischen Kaiser, kommt diese Entscheidung nicht von ungefähr. Mit dem Entschluss, auf dem Kapitol zu bleiben, besetzt Flavius Sabinus ganz buchstäblich diese seit knapp zwei Jahren im Mittelpunkt des ideologischen Schlagabtausches stehenden Parolen, in denen der kapitolinische Jupiter eine wirkmächtige Verkörperung des Staatswohls abgibt. Die Okkupation – vielleicht schon im Moment des Aufbruchs vom Quirinal geplant – ist also ein Akt der symbolischen Kommunikation, der überdies außerordentlich reich an Rekursen auf die republikanische Vergangenheit ist. Auf dem Sattel zwischen den beiden Kuppen des Kapitolshügels hatte Romulus das asylum eingerichtet, Keimzelle des römischen Gemeinwesens, und im Laufe seiner wechselvollen Geschichte war der Hügel wiederholt Gegenstand von mehr oder minder symbolischen Besetzungen gewesen.115 Von diesen stellen zwei Ereignisse in unserem Zusammenhang besonders wirkmächtige Paradigmen dar, die sich in ihrem Effekt durchaus nicht gegenseitig ausschließen müssen. Dies ist zunächst die bereits erwähnte Besetzung des Kapitols durch die Sabiner auf dem Höhepunkt dessen, was nach der Vereinigung der frühen Römer mit den Sabinerinnen de facto einen Bürgerkrieg darstellte (s. o. S. 198). Wir dürfen annehmen, dass diese Tradition, auf welche die friedliche Koexistenz von Römern und Sabi-

114 Tac. hist. 3.78 überliefert spätere Schuldzuweisungen, die einerseits auf den schleppenden Vormarsch des Antonius, andererseits auf das überstürzte Handeln des Sabinus verwiesen, welch letzterer munitissimam Capitolii arcem nicht habe halten können. Diese Aussage steht freilich bereits im Kontext des von den Flavianern geprägten Diskurses, es habe sich bei den Vorgängen um das Kapitol tatsächlich um eine Belagerung gehandelt. Wie stark sich das Kapitol als Projektionsfläche für derart aufgeladene Gesten eignet, erhellt bereits aus Livius’ Schilderung der Besetzung durch die Gruppe um Appius Herdonius im Jahr 460 (s.o. Anm. 29), die ganz auf die Ereignisse vom Dezember 69 übertragbar scheint: In ihrem antipatrizischen furor, so Liv. 3.16.5, hätten sich die Tribunen damals zu der Behauptung verstiegen „kein Krieg sondern das eitle Trugbild eines Krieges“ habe sich dort eingenistet (non bellum, sed vanam imaginem belli … Capitolium insedisse); s.a. SYME 1939: 99 von den Cäsarmördern, die unmittelbar nach ihrer Tat aufs Kapitol stiegen: „Their occupation of the Capitol was a symbolical act, antiquarian and even Hellenic“. 115 LTUR I, 130 s.v. asylum (T. P. WISEMAN); FREYBURGER 2003.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

223

nern zurückgeführt wurde, dem aus Reate stammenden und diese Herkunft im Namen tragenden Flavius Sabinus lieb und teuer war. Weitaus bekannter noch und von ungleich größerer Relevanz für das gesamte stadtrömische Gemeinwesen waren die Geschehnisse um das Jahr 390 v. Chr. herum, als Rom von den gallischen Truppen des Brennus erobert und das Kapitol als letzte römische Bastion belagert worden war. Vor allen anderen dürfte es dieser Präzedenzfall sein, den die Zeitgenossen in der konkreten Situation des Jahres 69 vor Augen haben.116 Ihre Plausibilität zieht die Parallele nicht zuletzt aus den äußeren Formen der Herrschaft des Vitellius, die sich auf die Rheinlegionen und germanischen Auxiliartruppen stützt. Tacitus legt schon dem Otho die Aussage in den Mund, Vitellius hetze Germanen gegen Rom.117 Nach dem Einmarsch des vitellianischen Heeres in Rom, dessen Unterbringung offenbar logistische Herausforderungen mit sich bringt, macht Vitellius kurzerhand „ganz Rom zur Kaserne“, so sieht es jedenfalls die flavische Geschichtsschreibung.118 Auch in den Augen des Tacitus geben die Truppen des neuen Kaisers, „starrend von den Fellen wilder Tiere und ungeheurem Kriegsgerät“ inmitten der Stadtbevölkerung eine exotisch-bedrohliche Erscheinung ab.119 Cassius Dio bezeichnet die das Kapitol bestürmenden Truppen sogar unverblümt als Κελτοί!120 Die vitellianischen Truppen in Rom werden in unseren Quellen also durchgängig über ihre drückende Präsenz und kulturelle Andersartigkeit charakterisiert; obzwar römische Legionen (mit Auxiliartruppen) unter römischem Kommando bieten sie genug Angriffspunkte, um als fremdländische Okkupationsarmee überzeichnet zu werden.121 Ein Übriges trägt zu dieser Wahrnehmung Vitellius’ eigene Titulatur bei: Seine prioritäre Annahme des Germanicus-Titels (noch vor den Titelnamen Caesar und Augustus) stützt sich weder auf Vererbung noch einen Germanensieg, sondern verweist auf die Umstände seiner Kaisererhebung.122 Germanischen Ursprungs schließlich ist auch die Wahrsa-

116 S. WILLIAMS 2001: 140–184 zum Galliersturm und seinem Platz im Vorstellungshaushalt der Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit. Ob die Gallier das Kapitol tatsächlich eingenommen hatten oder nicht, war schon in der Antike umstritten; s. dazu SORDI 1984 und zuletzt ausführlich PERL 2007. 117 Tac. hist. 1.84.3. 118 Ios. bell. Iud. 4.586f.: ὅλην ἐποιήσατο τὴν Ῥώμην στρατόπεδον. s.a. Tac. hist. 2.93.1. 119 Tac. hist. 2.88: nec minus saevum spectaculum erant ipsi, tergis ferarum et ingentibus telis horrentes, cum turbam populi per inscitiam parum vitarent. 120 Cass. Dio 64.17.2 (Xiph.). Vgl. die Formel οἱ ἀπὸ τῆς Γερμανίας bei Ios. bell. Iud. 4.648, die allerdings, da die Rede ja von den Rheinlegionen ist, keine ethnische Zuordnung implizieren muss. 121 Den Okkupationscharakter von Vitellius’ Herrschaft und die fremdländische Charakterisierung seiner Truppen besprechen auch KNEPPE 1994: 91–93 und BARZANÒ 1984: 114, 118f. Zu kurz greift dieser aber doch wohl, wenn er die vitellianischen Truppen – immerhin auch römische Legionäre aus Regionen die seit langem unter römischer Herrschaft standen − aufgrund ihres kulturellen Hintergrundes für nichts anderes als mutwillige Marodeure hält: „Per essi il Campidoglio era soltanto un luogo da saccheggiare e distruggere“. 122 CEAUŞESCU 1984 (allerdings mit irreführenden Angaben zu Vitellius’ Ablehung des Augustustitels, der numismatisch und durch Tac. hist. 2.90.2 bezeugt ist); KÖNIG 1984: 312f.

224

Alexander Heinemann

gerin, von deren Einfluss auf Vitellius Sueton lustvoll berichtet.123 Es sind also reichlich Voraussetzungen gegeben, um die Auseinandersetzung mit Vitellius a posteriori zu einer Neuauflage der Besetzung Roms durch Brennus’ Gallier zu machen – und im Umkehrschluss die Besetzer des Kapitols zu den last men standing der res publica. Die Sensibilität für derlei Rückkopplungen ist auch im fortgeschrittenen 1. Jh. n. Chr. ungebrochen.124 Erst zu Beginn des Jahres wird Galba auf dem Forum ermordet, und aus der Emphase, mit der in der Folge der Lacus Curtius als Tatort hervorgehoben wird, ist ersichtlich, dass der altgediente Senator offenbar mit jenen höchsten römischen Tugenden assoziiert werden soll, die schon Marcus Curtius an den Tag gelegt hatte, als er sich dort vorzeiten in den Tod gestürzt hatte.125 Wenige Monate später führte Vitellius einen Eklat herbei, als er die Würde des pontifex maximus ausgerechnet am 18. Juli annahm, ungeachtet der Tatsache, dass dies der Jahrestag der entscheidenden Niederlage gegen Brennus am Fluß Allia war, ein dies ater, an dem jede Amtshandlung vermieden gehört hätte.126 Im oppositionellen Diskurs ist die semantische Nähe zwischen Vitellius und Brennus also bereits etabliert, bevor die Flavianer noch auf das Kapitol steigen. Dass diese Traditionslinien nach dem Ausgang der Auseinandersetzungen, in der kurz- und mittelfristig einsetzenden Retrospektive, auch tatsächlich gezogen werden, zeigt das Trauergedicht des Statius auf den eigenen Vater, der die Ereignisse vom Dezember 69 seinerzeit dichterisch verarbeitet hatte. In Statius’ Paraphrase der Handlung ist von der ‚senonischen Raserei‘ die Rede, in welche die Truppen des Vitellius verfallen seien. Der explizite Verweis auf den von Brennus angeführten Stamm der Senonen zeigt, dass hier kein generischer metus Gallicus aktiviert, sondern ein präziser historischer Präzedenzfall angeführt werden soll.127 Auch hinter der Stiftung des agon Capitolinus durch Domitian darf wohl ein entsprechender Rekurs vermutet werden. Nominell knüpft die Veranstaltung an die ludi Capitolini republikanischer Zeit an, mit denen sie inhaltlich freilich nichts 123 Suet. Vit. 14.5. 124 S. zu diesem Themenkomplex jetzt die grundsätzlichen Überlegungen von HÖLKESKAMP 2012, der die fortdauernde Wirksamkeit der mythhistorischen Überlieferung betont und (S. 406) „die geradezu kulturspezifische römische Art einer unsichtbaren, impliziten symbolischsuggestiven Vernetzung von Bildern und Botschaften, Geschichte und Geschichten, von Marksteinen und Mythen des Aufstiegs von kleinen Anfängen zu imperialer Größe“ hervorhebt. 125 Ähnlich ZIMMERMANN 1995: 66f. Die Episode um Marcus Curtius: Liv. 7.6.1–6; Varro ling. 5.32.148. Ehrenbezeugungen römischer Bürger für Galba am Lacus Curtius: Tac. hist. 2.55; geplant war auch die (von Vespasian unterbundene) Aufstellung einer columna rostrata für Galba am gleichen Ort: Suet. Galba 23; s.a. Tac. hist. 2.88, wo Vitellius’ eben eingetroffene Truppen aufs Forum eilen, um als erstes den Ort zu sehen, in quo Galba iacuisset. 126 Tac. hist. 91.1. 127 Stat. silv. 5.3.195–204, bes. 198: et Senonum furias Latiae sumpsere cohortes. Zu Persistenz und Aktualisierung des metus Gallicus in der Kaiserzeit s. GRÜNEWALD 2001; Urban 2004; dass Tacitus die Auseinandersetzungen des Vierkaiserjahres in ihrer Anfangsphase als bellum Gallicum bezeichnet, geht hingegen auf den Schauplatz des Vindexaufstandes zurück, s. ROSENBERG 1992: 83.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

225

gemein hat. Die Tradition führte diese ludi (sicher zu Unrecht) auf M. Furius Camillus zurück, der sie zum Dank für die Errettung des Kapitols vor den Horden des Brennus gestiftet haben sollte.128 In unseren Quellen fehlt eine ausdrückliche Bestätigung dieser Bezüge, doch ist die Konvergenz von Veranstaltungstyp, Bezeichnung und Anlass zu schlagend, um dahinter keine intentionale Sinnstiftung vermuten zu wollen. Im zeitgemäßen Gewand eines reichsweit wahrgenommenen griechisch-römischen Agons zelebrieren Domitians Capitolia die neuerliche Bestätigung römischer Macht nach höchster, das Kapitol selbst bestürmender Gefahr.129 Der Vergleich der Dezemberereignisse mit dem Galliersturm ermöglicht zumindest auf metaphorischer Ebene die Auslagerung der schmerzhaftesten Aspekte dessen, was der Bürgerkrieg angerichtet hat. Zugleich bedeutet er fraglos eine Überhöhung der flavianischen Akteure, und in der Tat spielen die offiziellen Reaktionen auf dem höchsten verfügbaren Register: Noch im Januar 70 beschließt der Senat für Flavius Sabinus ein Staatsbegräbnis und die Aufstellung einer Statue am Augustusforum, unter den principes viri der res publica.130 Vor allem aber verleiht die historische Parallele dem grauenvollen Geschehen einen politischen Sinn. Das Trauma der gallischen Eroberung war immer auch mit der Vorstellung eines neuerlichen Aufbruchs zu noch strahlenderer Größe verbunden gewesen.131 Nach einem Krieg der an seinem buchstäblich letzten Tag im Herzen des Reiches selbst gewütet hat, kann es für jene, die sich nun anschicken, die Führung des Reiches zu übernehmen, kein stärkeres und hoffnungsvolleres Bild geben als einen solchen Neubeginn nach ausgestandener höchster Bedrohung.132 Und der Tempelbrand? Schon unter Zeitgenossen war die Schuldfrage umstritten. Tacitus neigt dazu, das Ereignis den Flavianern anzulasten, führt es aber insgesamt auf unglücklichen Funkenflug zurück, der von den Brandsätzen der Verteidiger ausgegangen sei.133 Hingegen steht für die flavischen Autoren Jo128 Zu den Liv. 5.50.4 überlieferten ludi Capitolini s. BERNSTEIN 1998: 103–106, ferner GALSTERER 1981: 416 m. Anm 17. 129 Dies soll freilich nicht bedeuten, dass sich die politische Funktion des Wettkampfes in diesem Rückverweis erschöpfte; s. dazu die o. Anm. 46 genannte Literatur. 130 Tac. hist. 4.47: funus censorium Flavio Sabino ductum; ausführlicher CIL VI 31293 = ILS 984 (mit den abweichenden Ergänzungen MOMMSENs): [iterum hui]c senatus auctor[e] / [Imp(eratore) Caes(are) Vesp]asiano fratre [---] / [funus fieri cen]suit vadimon[i(i)s] / [honoris cau]sa dilatis [et] / [censorium esse] censuit stat[uam] / [in for]o Augusti [ponen]/[dam] [decrevit]. MOMMSENs Ergänzung sieht außerdem die Anbringung eines Porträtclipeus vor, allerdings ohne Ortsangabe und unter dem dafür wenig angebrachten Verb posuit. − Ein Staatsbegräbnis für einen vormaligen Stadtpräfekten ist im 1. Jh. n. Chr. nichts Ungewöhnliches, seltener ist schon die damit einhergehende Aufstellung einer Ehrenstatue, s. ECK 1972: 468; SPANNAGEL 1999: 34 Anm. 127; CAMERON 2002: 292. 131 WILLIAMS 2001: 150–157. 132 S. in diesem Zusammenhang GOTTER 2006: 257 (über die spätrepublikanischen Bürgerkriege): „Um die Anomie der Selbstzerfleischung überhaupt kommemorierbar zu machen, bedurfte es einer Ideologie“. 133 Tac. hist. 3.71.4. BARZANÒ 1984: 110–114 führt diese Sicht nicht unplausibel auf Cluvius Rufus zurück (s.o. Anm. 112).

226

Alexander Heinemann

sephus und Plinius den Älteren, aber auch noch für Sueton und Cassius Dio, außer Frage, dass die vitellianischen Truppen den Tempel in Brand steckten.134 Plausibel ist keine dieser Erklärungen: Die militärisch überlegenen Vitellianer hatten sich von einer solchen Tat keinerlei Vorteil zu versprechen, und die heftigen Regenfälle, die noch in der Nacht vor dem Brand niedergingen, waren einer versehentlichen Entzündung nicht eben günstig.135 Der Umstand, dass außer dem Jupitertempel kein weiterer Kultbau überliefert ist, der ein Opfer um sich greifender Brandsätze geworden sei, spricht freilich eher für eine gezielte Brandstiftung. Für wen aber diese Zerstörung politisch opportun sein musste, dürfte an dieser Stelle deutlich geworden sein. Fassen wir zusammen: „In Bürgerkriegen … mußte noch mehr als sonst der Verlierer der Schuldige sein, denn anders ließ sich weder mit den eigenen Toten noch mit denen der anderen Seite leben“ – so hat es im Zusammenhang mit der späten Republik Ulrich Gotter formuliert.136 Mit der Entscheidung, sich kurzerhand zu Besetzern des Capitolium zu erklären, sorgte die Gruppe um Flavius Sabinus handstreichartig dafür, dass dieser Anspruch erfüllt wurde und löste zugleich das bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt schwärende Legitimationsproblem seines Bruders. Schließlich war Vespasian, dessen Legionen gerade auf Rom marschierten, bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt keinen Deut legitimer als Vitellius, den der Senat immerhin akzeptiert hatte, für den die Arvalbrüder opferten, für den noch am 19. Dezember die vestalischen Jungfrauen interzedierten und der sich bis zu diesem Tag offenbar eines beträchtlichen Rückhalts in der Bevölkerung und bei seinen Truppen erfreuen kann.137 Erst später und als einziger unter allen Kaisern, urteilt Tacitus, habe sich Vespasian, dem eine ambigua fama vorauseilte, zum Besseren entwickelt.138 So eindeutig die Situation sich militärisch ausnahm, war sie politisch noch lange nicht gelöst, als Flavius Sabinus auf das Kapitol stieg. Dieser Akt aber war, die longue durée der römischen Geschichte im Blick, ein in der gegenwärtigen Konstellation gewinnender Schachzug, der jeden Gegner – unabhängig von seiner Reaktion − delegitimieren musste. Dass die berittene Vorhut des Petilius Cerialis in die Flucht geschlagen und das Heer des Antonius Primus um einen halben Tag zu spät eintreffen würde, dass viele von ihnen mit dem 134 Tac. hist. 3.71.4; der von den Vitellianern gefangengenommene Konsul Atticus gibt vor Vitellius zu, die Flavianer hätten den Brand gelegt, doch schon Tacitus setzt in dieses (unter der Folter gewonnene?) Geständnis nicht viel Vertrauen: hist. 3.75.3. Brandstiftung durch die Vitellianer: Ios. bell. Iud. 4.649; Suet. Vit. 15.3 (dessen Beschreibung des Vitellius, der auf dem Palatin speisend dem Brand des Kapitols zusieht, verdächtig an Nero erinnert); Plin. nat. 34.38; Cass. Dio 64.17.3. 135 Regen: Tac. hist. 3.69.4. Tac. hist. 3.75.3 bezeugt Vitellius’ unmittelbar nach dem Brand einsetzende Bemühungen, sich und seine Truppen von einem so rufschädigenden Verbrechen (invidiam crimenque) zu entlasten. Für eine andere Sicht s.o. Anm. 121. 136 GOTTER 2006: 246. 137 Tac. hist. 3.80–81; s.a. die einige Wochen früher stattfindende Episode in Cremona bei Cass. Dio 64.10.3–4, wo sich vitellianische Truppen erst zum Abfall bewegen lassen und dann doch loyal zu Vitellius erklären. 138 Tac. hist. 1.50.4: Et ambigua de Vespasiano fama solusque omnium ante se principum in melius mutatus.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

227

Leben bezahlen würden, dürften die Besetzer so nicht abgesehen haben, doch verlieh es ihrem Tun im Nachhinein nicht nur größere Glaubwürdigkeit, sondern auch eine gesteigerte Bedeutung im Sinne jener Qualitäten, für die wie kein anderes Denkmal der – gerade wieder ins öffentliche Interesse gerückte – Lacus Curtius stand. Die Frage, ob Besetzung und Verteidigung des Kapitols durch die Flavianer von römischen Geschichtsbildern vorgeprägt und entsprechend performativ überformt waren, erweist sich angesichts der existenziellen Dimension von Kriegshandlungen als durchaus prekär und führt auf den Ausgang unserer Überlegungen zurück. Sind Dekonstruktion und Diskursanalyse dort, wo die Akteure tatsächlich ihr Leben lassen, noch hilfreiche heuristische Mittel? Das Blut, das am Ende des symbolischen Aktes fließt, als den wir das Handeln des Sabinus hier interpretiert haben, ist schließlich kein Theaterblut.139 Zugleich aber stehen die Kämpfenden in all ihren Handlungen – auch ihren letzten – unweigerlich auf dem Boden kollektiver Ängste, Erinnerungen und Bedeutungszuschreibungen, die ihr Tun gar nicht nicht mitbedingen können. So ist es nicht nur zulässig, sondern – sofern unsere Argumente bis hierher überzeugt haben – zum Verständnis des blutigen Geschehens geradezu notwendig, die weit über sich selbst hinausweisende Dimension der Besetzung des Kapitols zu konstatieren, die einen personalisierten und militarisierten Konflikt in die viel eindeutiger zu beantwortende Frage nach dem Erhalt der res publica ummünzte.

139 Vgl. GREENBLATT 1991: 63, der in seiner Untersuchung zur spanischen Eroberung der Neuen Welt ähnliche Überlegungen anstellt, da „words … seem always to be trailing after events that pursue a terrible logic quite other than the fragile meanings that they construct.“ Greenblatt äußert den berechtigten Skrupel, dass die sprachliche Analyse „actions and the physiological consequences of these actions“ überlagern könnte und erwägt (bevor er sich dann doch anders entscheidet): „The webs of discourse should be stripped away and discarded in order to face unflinchingly the terrible meaning of the 1492 and its aftermath: swords and bullets pierce naked flesh and microbes kill bodies that lack sufficient immunities“.

228

Alexander Heinemann

TABELLE 1 Prägeherr

Nom.

Reverslegende

Reversdarstellung

RIC I2

Datierung

AUGUSTUS

Au/D

IOVIS TONANTIS

J., im Tempel stehend, nackt; m. Blitz u. Zepter

59, 63–67

c. 19 v. Chr.

Au/D

IVPPITER CVSTOS

J., thronend, im Hüftman- 52f., 63f. c. 65–66 tel; m. Blitz u. Zepter (Abb. 9)

D

IVPPITER CVSTOS

J., thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. Blitz u. Zepter

69

c. 67/8

Alexandria (unter Nero)

AE

ΖΕΥΣ [ΚΑ]ΠΕ[Τ Λ]ΙΟΣ

Zeus, thronend, im Hüftmantel; mit Nike (?)

RPC I 5285

64/65

Patras (unter Nero)

AE

IVPPITER LIBERATOR C(olonia) P(atrensis)

Zeus, stehend, bartlos, nackt; m. Adler u. Zepter

RPC I 1279f.

Kret. Koinon (unter Nero)

AE

ΖΕΥΣ

Zeuskopf, bärtig

RPC I 1039

J., stehend, nackt; m. Blitz u. Zepter

40

Frühjahr 68

NERO

D

IVPPITER CONSERVATOR

(Obvers: - - AVGVSTI)

D

I O MAX CAPITOLINVS (Obvers: GENIVS P R)

J., im Tempel thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. Blitz u. Zepter

42

Frühjahr 68

D

IVPPITER CVSTOS (Obvers: ROMA)

J., thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. Blitz u. Zepter

59

Frühjahr 68

D

IVPPITER CONSERVATOR (Obvers: ROMA RESTITVTA)

"

60

Frühjahr 68

D

IVPPITER LIBERATOR (Obvers: ROMA RESTITVTA)

"

61

Frühjahr 68

D

IVPPITER CVSTOS (Obvers: VIRT)

"

78

Frühjahr 68

Anonyme Bürgerkriegsprägungen „Group IV“ (aus Südgallien? Fabius Valens?)

D

I O MAX CAPITOLINVS (Obvers: VESTA P R QVRITIVM)

J., im Tempel thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. Blitz u. Zepter

127f. (Abb. 10)

Frühjahr 69

Alexandria (unter Galba)

Dr.

L –A [= Jahr 1]

Capitolinischer Jupitertempel, ohne Statuen

KLEINER 1989

68

OTHO

D

PONT MAX

J., thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. Blitz u. Zepter

21

15.1.– 14.4.69

Anonyme Bürgerkriegsprägungen „Group II“ (aus Gallien? Vindex?)

229

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

D

J., im Tempel thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. Blitz u. Zepter

31, 56

1. Jahreshälfte 69

I O MAX CAPITO

"

127

Ende April – Dezember 69

D

IVPPITER VICTOR

J., thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. kleiner Victoria u. Zepter

68 (Abb. 11)

Ende April – Dezember 69

Au/D

IVPPITER VICTOR

J., thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. kleiner Victoria u. Zepter

74f.

Ende April – Dezember 69

Au/D

IVPPITER VICTOR

J., thronend, im Hüftmantel; m. kleiner Victoria u. Zepter

92f.

Ende April – Dezember 69

As

VITELLIUS

I O MAX CAPITOLINVS

Tabelle 1: Münzen der Reichsprägung mit Bezug zu Jupiter bzw. Jupitertempeln von Augustus bis Vitellius. Grau hinterlegt sind Provinzialprägungen des gleichen Zeitraums mit mutmaßlich auf Rom bezogenen Darstellungen Jupiters bzw. von Jupitertempeln.

TABELLE 2 Prägeherr

Nom.

Reverslegende

Reversdarstellung

RIC I2

Datierung

323, 598, sechssäuliger Tempel mit 714, 817, kapitolinischer Trias 886, 996, 1239

71–78

VESPASIAN

S/As

S C

TITUS (unter Vespasian)

S/As

S C

"

638, 740, 1024

73, 74, 77–78

As

S C

"

491, 646, 1293f.

72,73, 77–78

Cist.

COM ASIA

sechssäuliger Tempel mit Kultbild (kapitolinischer Jupitertempel?)

1451 (= RPC S2-II 859A)

72–73

D

IOVIS CVSTOS

J., stehend, nackt; m. Zepter, aus Patera über Altar opfernd

849f.

76

D

IOVIS CVSTOS

"

863, 874

76

DOMITIAN(unter Vespasian)

VESPASIAN

TITUS (unter Vespasian)

230

Alexander Heinemann

Ephesos ? (unter Vespasian) TITUS

aes

S C

S

S C

Cist.

CAPIT RESTIT

Au/D

IVPPITER CONSERVATOR

As

IOVI CONSERVATORI, S C

As As As

As

DOMITIAN

S

IOVI VICTORI S C

S

IVPPITER CVSTOS S C

S

IVPPITER CVSTOS S C

D

D

Prusias ad Hyp. (u. Domitian)

IOVI CONSERVAT, S C IOVI CONSERVAT, S C IVPPITER CONSERVAT, S C IOVI CONSERVATORI, S C

IMP CAESAR

(auf Architrav) IMP CAESAR

(auf Architrav)

Cist.

CAPIT RESTIT

aes

ΚΑΠΕΤ ΛΙΟΝ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΝ

J., stehend; m. Blitz u. Zepter

1501f. (= RPC 1474– 1475)

sechssäuliger Tempel viersäuliger Tempel mit kapitolinischer Trias

172 515 (= RPC 86)

80–81

Adler auf Blitzbündel

143f.

82–83

J., stehend, bartlos, im 218–220 Hüftmantel m. Schulter(Abb. 8) bausch; m. Blitz u. Zepter

77–78

80–81

84

"

301f.

85

"

381

85

"

382

85

"

416, 489–491

85–86

275, 352f., 398, J., thronend, im Hüftman464f., tel m. Schulterbausch; m. 526f., kleiner Victoria u. Zepter 633f., 702,751, 794 J., stehend; mit Blitz u. 466 Zepter (non vidi) J., thronend im Hüftmantel; m. kleiner Victoria u. 635 Zepter sechssäuliger Tempel mit kapitolinischer Trias, 815 Giebelfiguren, Quadriga achtsäuliger Tempel mit Kultbild (des Jupiter?), 816 Giebelfiguren, Quadriga 841f. = viersäuliger Tempel mit RPC II kapitolinischer Trias 864, 867 RPC II viersäuliger Tempel 687

85–96

86 88–89

95–96

95–96

82 83–96

Tabelle 2: Münzen der Reichsprägung mit Bezug zu Jupiter bzw. Jupitertempeln von Vespasian bis Domitian. Grau hinterlegt sind Provinzialprägungen des gleichen Zeitraums mit mutmaßlich auf Rom bezogenen Darstellungen Jupiters bzw. von Jupitertempeln.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

231

LITERATUR ARATA, F. P., 1997. Un sacellum d’età imperiale all’interno del Museo Capitolino. BCAR 98, 129– 162. ARATA, F. P., 2009. I Flavi e il Campidoglio, in: F. COARELLI (Hrsg.), Divus Vespasianus. Il bimillenario dei Flavi, Mailand, 210–217. ARATA, F. P., 2010. Nuove considerazioni a proposito del Tempio di Giove Capitolino. MEFRA 122, 585–624. BARZANÒ, A., 1984. La distruzione del Campidoglio nell’anno 69 d. C., in: M. SORDI (Hrsg.), I santuari e la guerra nel mondo classico, Mailand, 107–120. BELLONI, G. G., 1996. Ideologia e prassi del potere dopo Nerone in contesti figurativi ed epigrafici delle monete: la conclusione traianea, in: C. STELLA – A. VALVO (Hrsg.), Studi in Onore di Albino Garzetti, Brescia, 97–114. BENOIST, S., 2001. Le prince, la cité les événements: l’année 68–69 à Rome. Historia 50, 279–311. BERGMANN, B., 2010. Der Kranz des Kaisers. Genese und Bedeutung einer römischen Insignie, Berlin. BERNSTEIN, F., 1998. Ludi publici. Untersuchungen zur Entstehung und Entwicklung der öffentlichen Spiele im republikanischen Rom, Stuttgart. BONNEFOND, M., 1987. Transferts de fonctions et mutation idéologique: le Capitole et le Forum d’Auguste, in: L’Urbs. Espace urbain et histoire (Ier siècle av. J.-C.–IIIe siècle ap. J.-C.), Rom, 251–278. BORGEAUD, P., 1977. Du mythe à l’idéologie: la tête du Capitole. MH 44, 86–100. BRUNT, P. A., 1959. The revolt of Vindex and the Fall of Nero. Latomus 18, 531–559. BRUNT, P. A., 1977. Lex de imperio Vespasiani. JRS 67, 95–116. BUSCH, A., 2011. Militär in Rom. Militärische und paramilitärische Einheiten im kaiserzeitlichen Stadtbild, Wiesbaden. CAIN, H.-U., 2002. Kaiser und Gott auf römischen Fora, in: F.-R. ERKENS (Hrsg.), Die Sakralität von Herrschaft − Herrschaftslegitimierung im Wechsel der Zeiten und Räume. Fünfzehn interdisziplinäre Beiträge zu einem weltweiten und epochenübergreifenden Phänomen, Berlin, 123–141. CALDELLI, M. L., 1993. L’Agon Capitolinus. Storia e protagonisti dall’istituzione domizianea al IV secolo, Rom. CAMERON, A., 2002. The Funeral of Junius Bassus. ZPE 139, 288–292. CAPOGROSSI COLOGNESI, L. (Hrsg.), 2009. La Lex de imperio Vespasiani e la Roma dei Flavi, Rom. CEAUŞESCU, G., 1984. Vitellius’ kaiserliche Titel. StudClas 22, 69–79. COARELLI, F. (Hrsg.), 2009a. Divus Vespasianus. Il bimillenario dei Flavi, Mailand. COARELLI, F., 2009b. Isis Capitolina, in: F. COARELLI (Hrsg.), Divus Vespasianus. Il bimillenario dei Flavi, Mailand, 222–223. COHEN, H., 1886. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l’empire romain. Deuxième éd; Bd. 6, Paris [Repr. Graz 1955]. CORBIER, M., 2006. Donner à voir, donner à lire. Mémoire et communication dans la Rome ancienne, Paris. DARWALL-SMITH, R. H., 1996. Emperors and Architecture: A Study of Flavian Rome, Brüssel. DEMOUGIN, S., 1992. Prosopographie des chevaliers Romains Julio-Claudiens (43 av. J.-C.–70 ap. J.-C.), Rom. ECK, W., 1972. Die Familie der Volusii Saturnini in Neuen Inschriften aus Lucus Feroniae. Hermes 100, 461–484. ECK, W., 2009. Öffentlichkeit, Politik und Administration. Epigraphische Dokumente von Kaisern, Senat und Amtsträgern in Rom, in: R. HAENSCH (Hrsg.), Selbstdarstellung und Kommunikation. Die Veröffentlichung staatlicher Urkunden auf Stein und Bronze in der Römischen Welt, München, 75–96.

232

Alexander Heinemann

FILIPPI, D., 1998. L’arx Capitolina e le primae Capitolinae arcis fores di Tacito (hist., III, 71): una proposta di lettura. BCAR 99, 73–84. FLAIG, E., 1992. Den Kaiser herausfordern. Die Usurpation im Römischen Reich, Frankfurt am Main. FLOWER, H. I., 2008. Remembering and Forgetting Temple Destruction: The Destruction of the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus in 83 BC, in: G. GARDNER – K. L. OSTERLOH (Hrsg.), Antiquity in Antiquity. Jewish and Christian Pasts in the Greco-Roman World, Tübingen, 74– 92. FREYBURGER, G., 2003. Le dieu Veiovis et l’asile accordé a Rome aux suppliants, in: M. DREHER (Hrsg.), Das antike Asyl. Kultische Grundlagen, rechtliche Ausgestaltung und politiche Funktion, Köln, 161–175. GAGÉ, J., 1976. Les autels de Titus Tatius: une variante sabine des rites d’intégration dans les curies?, in: J. HEURGON (Hrsg.), L’Italie préromaine et la Rome républicaine, 309–322. GALSTERER, H., 1981. Spiele und ‚Spiele‘. Die Organisation der ludi Juvenales in der Kaiserzeit. Athenaeum 59, 410–438. GIANNELLI, G., 1978. La leggenda dei ‘Mirabilia’ e l’antica topografia dell’Arce Capitolina. StudRom 26, 60–71. GJERSTAD, E., 1960. Early Rome III: Fortifications, Domestic Architecture, Sanctuaries. Stratigraphic Excavations, Lund. GOODMAN, M. D., 2005. The ‘fiscus Iudaicus’ and Gentile Attitudes to Judaism in Flavian Rome, in: J. C. EDMONDSON – S. MASON – J. B. RIVES (Hrsg.), Flavius Josephus and Flavian Rome, Oxford, 167–177. GOTTER, U., 2006. Vom Rubicon nach Actium – Schauplätze der Bürgerkriege, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP – E. STEIN-HÖLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Erinnerungsorte der Antike. Die römische Welt, München, 242–257. GREENBLATT, S., 1991. Marvellous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World, Oxford. GREENHALGH, P. A., 1975. The Year of the Four Emperors, London. GREWING, F. F., 2002. Rez. zu LEARY, T. J., 2001, Martial Book XIII: The Xenia. Text with introduction and commentary, London. BMCRev 2002.08.38. GROS, P., 1976. Aurea templa: recherches sur l’architecture religieuse de Rome à l’époque d’Auguste, Rom. GRÜNEWALD, T., 2001. Von metus Gallicus zum metus Gothicus. Roms Furcht vor den Völkern des Nordens. Ktema 26, 285–305. HAACK, M.-L., 2003. Les haruspices dans le monde romain, Paris. HALFMANN, H., 1986. Itinera principum. Geschichte und Typologie der Kaiserreisen im Römischen Reich, Stuttgart. HEEMSTRA, M., 2010. The Fiscus Judaicus and the Parting of the Ways, Tübingen. HEINEMANN, A., 2014. Sportsfreunde. Nero und Domitian als Begründer griechischer Agone in Rom, in: S. BOENISCH et al. (Hrsg.), Nero und Domitian. Mediale Diskurse der Herrscherrepräsentation im Vergleich, Tübingen, 217–264. HESBERG, H. v., 1995. Ein Tempel spätrepublikanischer Zeit mit Konsolengesims, in: D. RÖSSLER – V. STÜRMER (Hrsg.), Modus in rebus. Gedenkschrift für Wolfgang Schindler, Berlin, 77–80. HILL, P. V., 1960. Aspects of Jupiter on Coins of the Rome Mint, AD 65–318. NC 20, 113–128. HÖLKESKAMP, K.-J., 2012. Im Gewebe der Geschichte(n). Memoria, Monumente und ihre mythhistorische Vernetzung. Klio 94, 380–414. HÖLSCHER, F., 2006. Das Capitol – das Haupt der Welt, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP – E. STEINHÖLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Erinnerungsorte der Antike. Die römische Welt, München, 75–99. HÖLSCHER, T., 1978. Die Anfänge römischer Repräsentationskunst. MDAI(R) 85, 315–357. HOPKINS, J. N., 2012. The Capitoline Temple and the Effects of Monumentality on Roman Temple Design, in: M. L. THOMAS – G. E. MEYERS (Hrsg.), Monumentality in Etruscan and Early Roman Architecture: Ideology and Innovation, Austin, 111–138.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

233

HORSTER, M., 2001. Bauinschriften römischer Kaiser. Untersuchungen zu Inschriftenpraxis und Bautätigkeit in Städten des westlichen Imperium Romanum in der Zeit des Prinzipats, Suttgart. HUSKEY, S. J., 1999. Turnus and Terminus in Aeneid 12. Mnemosyne 52, 77–82. KLEINER, F. S., 1989. Galba and the Sullan Capitolium. AJN 1, 71–77. KNEPPE, A., 1994. Metus temporum. Zur Bedeutung von Angst in Politik und Gesellschaft der römischen Kaiserzeit des 1. und 2. Jhdts. n. Chr., Stuttgart. KÖNIG, I., 1984. exire de imperio – cedere imperio, in: V. GIUFFRÈ (Hrsg.), Sodalitas. Scritti in onore di Antonio Guarino; Bd. 1, Neapel, 295–314. KRAAY, C. M., 1949. The Coinage of Vindex and Galba, AD 68, and the Continuity of the Augustan Principate. NC 96, 129–149. LEBERL, J., 2004. Domitian und die Dichter. Poesie als Medium der Herrschaftsdarstellung, Göttingen. LEFÈVRE, E., 1971. Das Prooemium der Argonautica des Valerius Flaccus. Ein Beitrag zur Typik epischer Prooemien der römischen Kaiserzeit, Wiesbaden. LINDSAY, H., 2010. Vespasian and the City of Rome: The Centrality of the Capitolium. AClass 53, 165–180. LIPKA, M., 2009. Roman Gods. A Conceptual Approach, Leiden. LUGLI, G., 1969. Fontes ad Topographiam Veteris Urbis Romae Pertinentes; 6.2: Liber XVII: Capitolium, Rom. MALITZ, J., 1985. Helvidius Priscus und Vespasian. Zur Geschichte der ‚stoischen‘ Senatsopposition. Hermes 113, 231–246. MANTOVANI, D., 2009. La lex de imperio Vespasiani, in: F. COARELLI (Hrsg.), Divus Vespasianus. Il bimillenario dei Flavi, Mailand, 24–27. MARTIN, P.-H., 1974. Die anonymen Münzen des Jahres 68 nach Christus, Mainz. MAYER, M., 2010. Numismatisch-ikonographische Untersuchungen zur Kommunikation und Selbstdarstellung des flavischen Kaiserhauses, Diss. Augsburg [urn:nbn:de:bvb:384-opus18704]. MILLER, J. F., 2000. Triumphus in Palatio. AJPh 121, 409–422. MORGAN, G., 1978. The Introduction of the Aqua Marcia into Rome, 144–140 BC. Philologus 122, 25–58. MORGAN, G., 2006. 69 AD: The Year of the Four Emperors, Oxford. MRATSCHEK-HALFMANN, S., 1993. Divites et praepotentes. Reichtum und soziale Stellung in der Literatur der Prinzipatszeit, Stuttgart. MURA SOMMELLA, A., 2009. Il Tempio di Giove Capitolino: Una nuova proposta di lettura, in: G. M. DELLA FINA (Hrsg.), Gli Etrusci e Roma. Fasi monarchica e alto-repubblicana. Atti del XVI Convegno Internazionale di Studi sulla Storia e l’Archeologia dell’Etruria, 333–372. NAUTA, R., 2002. Poetry for Patrons: Literary Communication in the Age of Domitian, Leiden. NEWLANDS, C. E., 2002. Statius’ Silvae and the Poetics of Empire, Cambridge. PERL, G., 2007. Haben die Gallier bei der Eroberung Roms 386 v. Chr. auch den Capitolinischen Hügel eingenommen? Klio 89, 346–355. PICCALUGA, G., 1974. Terminus. I segni di confine nella religione Romana, Rom. PIGÓN, J., 1992. Helvidius Priscus, Eprius Marcellus, and Iudicium Senatus: Observations on Tacitus, Histories 4.7–8. CQ 42, 235–246. PINA POLO, F., 2011. The Consul at Rome: The Civil Functions of the Consuls in the Roman Republic, Cambridge. POULLE, B., 1997. Les poignards de l’année 68–69. RPh 71, 243–252. POULLE, B., 1999. Les présages de l’arrivée de Galba au pouvoir, in: E. GENY – E. SMADJA (Hrsg.), Pouvoir, divination, prédestination dans le monde antique, Paris, 33–42. PRIESTER, S., 2002. Ad summas tegulas. Untersuchungen zu vielgeschossigen Gebäudeblöcken mit Wohneinheiten und Insulae im kaiserzeitlichen Rom, Rom. PUCET, J., 1972. Les Sabines aux origines de Rome, ANRW I 1, 48–135.

234

Alexander Heinemann

REITZ, C., 2010. Einleitung, in: N. KRAMER – C. REITZ (Hrsg.), Tradition und Erneuerung. Mediale Strategien in der Zeit der Flavier, Berlin, 1–7. REUSSER, C., 1993. Der Fidestempel auf dem Kapitol in Rom und seine Ausstattung. Ein Beitrag zu den Ausgrabungen an der Via del Mare und um das Kapitol 1926–1943, Rom. RIEGER, B., 1999. Die Capitolia des Kaisers Domitian. Nikephoros 12, 171–203. RIZZO, S., 2001. Indagini nei Fori Imperiali. Oroidrografia, foro di Cesare, foro di Augusto, templum Pacis. MDAI(R) 108, 215–244. ROGERS, R. S., 1949. A Criminal Trial of AD 70 (Tacitus, Histories, 4.44). TAPhA 80, 347–350. ROSENBERGER, V., 1992. Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart. RUMSCHEID, J., 2000. Kranz und Krone. Zu Insignien, Siegespreisen und Ehrenzeichen der römischen Kaiserzeit, Mainz. SANDBERG, K., 2009. Isis, the Pomerium and the Augural Topography of the Capitoline Area. Arctos 43, 141–160. SANTANGELO, F., 2013. Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic, Cambridge. SCAFFAI, M., 1986. Rassegna di studi su Valerio Flacco (1938–1982). ANRW II 32.4, 2359– 2447. SCHLÖSSER, R., 1989. Römische Münzen als Quelle für das Vulgärlatein. NumAntCl 18, 319–336. SCOTT, R. T., 1984. A Note on the City and the Camp in Tacitus, Histories 3.71. AJAH 9, 109–111. SEELENTAG, G., 2004. Taten und Tugenden Traians. Herrschaftsdarstellung im Principat, Stuttgart. SEELENTAG, G., 2009. „Dem Staate zum Nutzen, dem Herrscher zur Ehre“. Senatsgesandtschaften als Medium der Herrschaftsdarstellung im Principat. Hermes 137, 202–219; 356–376. SEHLMEYER, M., 1999. Stadtrömische Ehrenstatuen der republikanischen Zeit. Historizität und Kontext von Symbolen nobilitären Standesbewusstseins, Stuttgart. SENSENEY, J. R., 2007. Rez. zu STAMPER (2005). AJA 111, 184–185. SHELTON, T., 2011. Gaddafi Sodomized: Video Shows Abuse Frame by Frame. Global Post, October 24, 2011, 11:13 (http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/middle-east/111024/ gaddafi-sodomized-video-gaddafi-sodomy [26.8.2015]). SORDI, M., 1984. Il Campidoglio e l’invasione gallica del 386 a. C., in: M. SORDI (Hrsg.), I santuari e la guerra nel mondo classico, Mailand, 82–91. SOUTHERN, P., 1997. Domitian: Tragic Tyrant, London. SPANNAGEL, M., 1999. Exemplaria principis. Untersuchungen zu Entstehung und Ausstattung des Augustusforums, Heidelberg. STAMPER, J. W., 2005. The Architecture of Roman Temples: The Republic to the Middle Empire, Cambridge. SUTHERLAND, H., 1984. The Concepts adsertor and salus as Used by Vindex and Galba. NC 144, 29–32. SYME, R., 1939. The Roman Revolution, Oxford. TAISNE, M.-A., 1992. L’éloge des Flaviens chez Silius Italicus (Punica, III 594–629). VL 125, 21– 28. TALBERT, R. J. A., 1977. Some Causes of Disorder in AD 68–69. AJAH 2, 69–85. THEIN, A., 2014. Capitoline Jupiter and the Historiography of Roman World Rule. Histos 8, 284– 319. THOMPSON, L. A., 1982. Domitian and the Jewish Tax. Historia 31, 329–342. TOWNEND, G. B., 1987. The Restoration of the Capitol in AD 70. Historia 36, 243–248. TUCCI, P. L., 2005. “Where High Moneta Leads Her Steps Sublime”: The ‘Tabularium’ and the Temple of Juno Moneta. JRA 18, 6–33. TUCCI, P. L., 2006a. Il tempio di Giove Capitolino e la sua influenza. JRA 19, 386–392. TUCCI, P. L., 2006b. L’Arx Capitolina: tra mito e realtà, in: L. HASELBERGER – J. HUMPHREY (Hrsg.), Imaging Ancient Rome: Documentation, Visualization, Imagination, Portsmouth, 63– 73.

Jupiter, die Flavier und das Kapitol

235

TUCCI, P. L., 2009. La sommità settentrionale del Campidoglio all’epoca dei Flavi, in: F. COARELLI (Hrsg.), Divus Vespasianus. Il bimillenario dei Flavi, Mailand, 218–221. URBAN, R., 1999. Gallia rebellis. Erhebungen in Gallien im Spiegel antiker Zeugnisse, Stuttgart. URBAN, R., 2004. Zwischen ‚metus Gallicus‘ und Triumphgeschrei, in: H. HEFTNER – K. TOMASCHITZ (Hrsg.), Ad fontes! Festschrift für Gerhard Dobesch, Wien, 681–686. VILLALBA VARNEDA, P., 2011. The Early Empire, in: G. MARASCO (Hrsg.), Political Autobiographies and Memoirs in Antiquity: A Brill Companion, Leiden, 315–362. WARDLE, D., 1996. Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol. Historia 45, 208–222. WELLESLEY, K., 1956. Three Historical Puzzles in Histories III. CQ 50, 207–214. WELLESLEY, K., 1975. The Long Year AD 69, London. WELLESLEY, K., 1981. What Happened on the Capitol in December AD 69? AJAH 6, 166– 190. WILLIAMS, J. H. C., 2001. Beyond the Rubicon: Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy, Oxford. WILLIAMS, K. F., 2012. Tacitus’ Senatorial Embassies of 69 CE, in: V. E. PAGÁN (Hrsg.), A Companion to Tacitus, Malden, 212–236. WISEMAN, T. P., 1978. Flavians on the Capitol. AJAH 3, 163–178. WOLTERS, R., 1999. Nummi signati. Untersuchungen zur römischen Münzprägung und Geldwirtschaft, München. WOYTEK, B., 2010. Die Reichsprägung des Kaisers Trajanus (98–117), Wien. ZECCHINI, G., 1984. La profezia dei druidi sull’incendio del Campidoglio nel 69 d. C., in: M. SORDI (Hrsg.), I santuari e la guerra nel mondo classico, Mailand, 121–131. ZIMMERMANN, M., 1995. Die ‚restitutio honorum‘ Galbas. Historia 44, 56–82.

BILDNACHWEIS Abb. 1: Fotograf unbekannt. Abb. 2: Erstellt vom Verfasser auf der Grundlage von https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: Italy_relief_location_map-blank.jpg (CC WikimediaCommons-Nutzer Sting und NordNordWest). Abb. 3: Erstellt vom Verfasser auf der Grundlage von https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: Planrome2b.png (CC Wikimedia-Nutzer Cassius Ahenobarbus). Abb. 4: nach: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Design_for_a_Stained_Glass_Window_ with_Terminus,_by_Hans_Holbein_the_Younger.jpg. Abb. 5, 7: Numismatische Bilddatenbank Eichstätt. Abb. 6: Courtesy Gemini Numismatic Auctions Ltd. Foto: Jay Crawford. Abb. 8–11: Foto Verfasser; Münze im Besitz des Seminars für Alte Geschichte Freiburg. Abb. 12: Nach G. GATTESCHI, Restauri della Roma imperiale con gli stati attuali ed il testo spiegativo (Rom 1924) Falttaf. 1. Abb. 13: Nach RIZZO 2001, Abb. 2.6–7. Abb. 14: Nach TUCCI 2006b, Abb. 2.

„TROPHÄEN, DIE NICHT VOM ÄUSSEREN FEINDE GEWONNEN WURDEN, TRIUMPHE, DIE DER RUHM MIT BLUT BEFLECKT DAVON TRUG …“. DER SIEG IM IMPERIALEN BÜRGERKRIEG IM ‚LANGEN DRITTEN JAHRHUNDERT‘ ALS AMBIVALENTES EREIGNIS1 Matthias Haake ABSTRACT: Against the backdrop of the way in which Constantius II dealt with his success in the civil war over the usurper Magnentius in the early 350s on the one hand, and against the backdrop of the interpretive patterns of the victory in a civil war, on the other hand, which were established during the Roman imperial period of the first two centuries, the present paper aims to analyse the way in which a victory

1

Prob. cento 5–6 ed. BALDINI/RIZZI (= Poet. Christ. Min. I [CSEL 16], p. 569, vv. 5–6 ed. SCHENKL): (…) nulloque ex hoste tropea, / sanguine conspersos tulerat quos fama triumphos. – Die Übersetzung stammt von BLECKMANN 1999b: 70; s. BALDINI/RIZZI 2011: 150 ad loc. Zu Probas heute verlorenem und anderweitig nur sehr entlegen bezeugtem Werk, auf das die Dichterin in der zitierten Passage verweist, nämlich eine Dichtung über den in der Schlacht von Mursa im Jahre 351 kulminierenden Bürgerkrieg zwischen Constantius II. und Magnentius, vgl. grundlegend BLECKMANN 1999b: 69–74; anders hingegen, jedoch nicht überzeugend MATTHEWS 1992: 291–299; s. nun auch SCHOTTENIUS CULLHED 2015: 114–117. Zur Person der Proba s. zuletzt GREEN 2008 sowie auch BALDINI/RIZZI 2011: 13–19. Vgl. BARNES 1993: 101– 108; DRINKWATER 2000: bes. 131–145; RAIMONDI 2006; CONTI 2007 und LE BOHEC 2007: 99f., 103 zur Usurpation des Magnentius sowie SZIDAT 2003: 326–330 zu deren chronologischem Verlauf. – Bei dem vorliegenden Text handelt es sich um den erweiterten, inhaltlich jedoch nur geringfügig überarbeiteten und mit Anmerkungen versehenen Text meines bei der Tagung „Die Inszenierung des Bürgerkrieges. Zur rituellen Ordnung politischer Desintegration“ gehaltenen Vortrags. Mein herzlicher Dank gilt Henning BÖRM (Konstanz), Marco MATTHEIS (Heidelberg) und Johannes WIENAND (Düsseldorf) für die Einladung zu dieser Tagung. Profitiert hat der Text von den dortigen Diskussionen ebenso wie von der Möglichkeit, meine Überlegungen im Rahmen des althistorischen Kolloquiums an der Universität zu Köln im Juni 2013 vorstellen zu können. Für eine kritische Lektüre des Manuskripts in seinen unterschiedlichen Entstehungsphasen sowie wertvolle Hinweise gilt mein herzlicher Dank A.-S. ALETSEE (Münster), P. BONNEKOH (Münster), L. DE BLOIS (Nijmegen), A.-C. HARDERS (Bielefeld), Y. LE BOHEC (Paris) und J. WIENAND (Düsseldorf), dem ich zugleich – ebenso wie C. H. LANGE (Rom) und W. HAVENER (Konstanz) – für die großzügige Gewährung der Lektüre noch unpublizierter Aufsatzmanuskripte Dank sage. E. FLAIG (Rostock) weiß ich mich zu großem Dank verpflichtet für die Zurverfügungstellung eines unpuliziert gebliebenen Vortragsmanuskripts. U.a. CHRISTIE 2013, POTTER 2013 und STROBEL 2013 erschienen zu spät, um noch berücksichtigt werden zu können. Sofern nicht anders angegeben, verstehen sich alle Zeitangaben n. Chr.

238

Matthias Haake in a civil war was staged during the “long” third century. The study focuses on a period in which civil wars occured more often than ever before in Roman history. As an example, the article shall examine how Septimius Severus, Aurelianus and Constantine dealt with a form of victory which was considered to be highly illegitimate according to Roman beliefs, but which at the same time could constitute a fundamental element of imperial reign. It becomes apparent that despite all efforts to exploit the victory in a civil war as a resource to prove imperial victory, the defeat of the inner enemy remained an ambivalent event for the triumphant emperor.

[Augustus:] ideo civilia bella compescui? „Deswegen habe ich die Bürgerkriege gebändigt?“ Sen. apocol. 10.2 Civil War: „… organised collective violence within a single polity which leads to a division of sovereignity and consequently a struggle for authority“. Armitage 2009: 1

I. ZWISCHEN NORMENTRANSGRESSION UND ‚WILLEN ZUR MACHT‘: PROLEGOMENA ZUM SIEG IM BÜRGERKRIEG IM IMPERIUM ROMANUM DES DRITTEN UND VIERTEN JAHRHUNDERTS (4) Wenn nämlich jemand die ganze Zeit von Augustus an, seit sich die römische Herrschaft zur Monarchie gewandelt hat, zum Vergleich heranzöge, so fände er wohl in den rund zweihundert Jahren bis zur Zeit des Marcus weder so rasch einander ablösende Herrschaften, noch so vielfältige Wechselfälle von Bürgerkriegen und äußeren Kriegen, Erschütterungen von Provinzen, Eroberungen von Städten sowohl in unserem Land wie auch in vielen Barbarenländern, Erdbeben und Seuchen und außergewöhnliche Lebensläufe von Tyrannen und Kaisern, wie sie früher entweder ganz selten oder überhaupt nicht zu verzeichnen waren. (5) Von diesen hatten einige die Herrschaft eher lange inne, andere nur für kurze Zeit; manche wurden vernichtet, kaum hatten sie Titel und Würde gerade für einen Tag erlangt. Da die römische Herrschaft nämlich in sechzig Jahren auf mehr Herrscher verteilt war, als es die Zeit erforderte, brachte sie viel Verschiedenartiges und Staunenswertes hervor.2

2

Herodian. 1.1.4–5: (4) εἰ γοῦν τις παραβάλοι πάντα τὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ Σεβαστοῦ χρόνον, ἐξ οὗπερ ἡ Ῥωμαίων δυναστεία μετέπεσεν ἐς μοναρχίαν, οὐκ ἂν εὕροι ἐν ἔτεσι περί που διακοσίοις μέχρι τῶν Μάρκου καιρῶν οὔτε βασιλειῶν οὕτως ἐπαλλήλους διαδοχὰς οὔτε πολέμων ἐμφυλίων τε καὶ ξένων τύχας ποικίλας ἐθνῶν τε κινήσεις καὶ πόλεων ἁλώσεις τῶν τε ἐν τῇ ἡμεδαπῇ καὶ ἐν πολλοῖς βαρβάροις, γῆς τε σεισμοὺς καὶ ἀέρων φθορὰς τυράννων τε καὶ βασιλέων βίους παραδόξους πρότερον ἢ σπανίως ἢ μηδ’ ὅλως μνημονευθέντας· (5) ὧν οἳ μὲν ἐπιμηκεστέραν ἔσχον τὴν ἀρχήν, οἳ δὲ πρόσκαιρον τὴν δυναστείαν· εἰσὶ δ’ οἳ μέχρι προσηγορίας καὶ τιμῆς ἐφημέρου μόνης ἐλθόντες εὐθέως κατελύθησαν. μερισθεῖσα γὰρ ἡ Ῥωμαίων ἀρχὴ ἐν ἔτεσιν ἑξήκοντα ἐς πλείους δυνάστας ἢ ὁ χρόνος ἀπῄτει, πολλὰ καὶ ποικίλα ἤνεγκε καὶ θαύματος ἄξια. – Die Übersetzung stammt – geringfügig modifiziert – von HIDBER 2006: 106.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

239

Mit diesen Worten skizziert Herodian im Proömium seiner um das Jahr 250 geschriebenen Geschichte des Kaisertums nach Marc Aurel prägnant die Geschichte der römischen Monarchie von Augustus bis zum Herrschaftsantritt Gordians III. im Jahr 238.3 Die Herrschaft Marc Aurels markiert für Herodian dabei eine Zäsur – und eines der wesentlichen Charakteristika, das diese Zäsur konstituiert, ist die Häufigkeit des Auftretens von Bürgerkriegen: Diese sei in den sechs Jahrzehnten nach dem Tode Marc Aurels größer gewesen als in den zwei vorangegangenen Jahrhunderten seit der Begründung der Alleinherrschaft in Rom durch Augustus – eine durchaus zutreffende Beobachtung des antiken Historikers. Gut einhundertzwanzig Jahre später, zu Beginn der 360er Jahre, verfaßte Aurelius Victor sein Werk über die römischen Kaiser, das von der Grundlegung des Prinzipats durch Augustus bis in die Gegenwart des Autors, die Regierungszeit von Constantius II., reicht und das bei Johannes Lydos späterhin unter dem bezeichnenden Titel Geschichte der Bürgerkriege firmiert.4 Auch für Aurelius Victor stellen Bürgerkriege einen Indikator für eine Periodisierung der Kaiserzeit dar. Eine seiner Zäsuren ist die Herrschaft des Severus Alexander, denn [v]on damals an haben die Kaiser, da sie begieriger danach waren, die Ihren zu unterdrücken als Auswärtige niederzuwerfen und eher gegeneinander in Waffen standen, das römische Reich gleichsam jählings abwärts gestürzt ….5

Bürgerkriege waren, das verdeutlichen die beiden exemplarisch ausgewählten Passagen, seit der Ermordung des Commodus am 31. Dezember 192 und erst recht seit der Ermordung des Severus Alexander im März des Jahres 235 im Imperium Romanum ein omnipräsentes und verschiedentlich geradezu endemisches Phänomen, das wiederholt von antiken Autoren – nicht allein von Aurelius Victor – in einen kausalen Zusammenhang mit dem Niedergang des Imperium Romanum gesetzt worden ist. Deutlich läßt sich dies beispielsweise an Hand einer Aussage Eutrops über die Schlacht von Mursa am 28. September 351 zwischen Constantius II. und Magnentius vor Augen führen:6

3

4 5

6

Zu dieser in der Forschung viel behandelten Stelle s. etwa ALFÖLDY 1989b: 277, 281f. (= 1971: 433, 437f.); MARASCO 1998: 2857; SIDEBOTTOM 1998: 2776f., 2804; ZIMMERMANN 1999b: 19f. und HIDBER 2006: 106–120. Zur bislang nicht einhellig beantworteten Frage der Datierung von Herodians Werk vgl. zuletzt mit Verweisen auf die ältere Literatur KUHNCHEN 2002: 251–253; POLLEY 2003 sowie HIDBER 2006: 10–15. Io. Lyd. mag. 3.7.4: … Οὐΐκτωρ ὁ ἱστορικὸς ἐν τῇ Ἱστορίᾳ τῶν Ἐμφυλίων …; s. dazu BLECKMANN 1999b: 47. Aur. Vict. 24.9: Abhinc dum dominandi suis quam subigendi externos cupientiores sunt atque inter se armantur magis, Romanum statum quasi abrupto praecipitavere …. – Die Übersetzung stammt von FUHRMANN 2002. Zu dieser Stelle s. STARR 1956: 578; BIRD 1994: 119 ad loc. sowie auch CHRIST 2005: 184; vgl. CHRIST 2005: 177–194, 198–200 grundsätzlich zu „Kaiserideal und Geschichtsbild“ des Aurelius Victor. Zur Schlacht von Mursa und ihren vielfältigen Deutungen in literarischen Texten s. umfassend BLECKMANN 1999b.

240

Matthias Haake Nicht viel später wurde Magnentius bei Mursa in einer Schlacht besiegt und beinahe gefangengenommen. Gewaltige Kräfte des römischen Reichs wurden in diesem Kampf aufgerieben, die zu beliebigen auswärtigen Kriegen geeignet gewesen wären und viele Triumphe und viel Sicherheit hätten gewährleisten können.7

Ob diese Einschätzung Eutrops zutreffend ist oder nicht, mag dahingestellt sein und ist in vorliegendem Kontext nicht weiter von Belang. Vor dem Hintergrund der Tatsache allerdings, daß sich Constantius während nahezu seiner gesamten Herrschaftszeit in kriegerischen Auseinandersetzungen in unterschiedlicher Intensität und mit sehr wechselhaftem Erfolg gegen die Sasaniden im Osten des Imperiums, gegen sarmatische Verbände an der Donau- und gegen germanische Stämme an der Rheingrenze befand, gewinnt Eutrops Aussage jedenfalls an argumentativer Plausibilität.8 Vor allem aber machen Eutrops Ausführungen zur Schlacht von Mursa ebenso wie die Aussagen von Herodian und Aurelius Victor deutlich, daß Bürgerkriege grundsätzlich als Geschehnisse angesehen wurden, die im dritten und vierten Jahrhundert in der Historiographie negativ konnotiert werden konnten. Darüber hinaus beinhalten Eutrops Einlassungen zu Constantius’ Sieg über Magnentius noch einen weiteren wichtigen Aspekt: Er bringt durch seine Formulierung klar zum Ausdruck, daß dieser Sieg aus seiner Perspektive – und somit im Gegensatz zu einer anderen Sichtweise, nämlich, wie sich in aller Deutlichkeit noch herausstellen wird, derjenigen des Constantius und seiner Parteigänger – kein bzw. zumindest kein vollwertiger Triumph war.9 Noch markanter als Eutrop bringt diesen Punkt Ammianus Marcellinus im Rahmen seines Nekrologs über Constantius zum Ausdruck: Wenn dieser Kaiser (sc. Constantius II.) auch in Kriegen gegen auswärtige Feinde Verluste und Rückschläge erlitt, so war er doch infolge günstig verlaufener Bürgerkriege aufgebläht und überströmt vom furchtbaren Eiter infolge der inneren Geschwüre des Staates. Aus diesem üblen Grund, eher als aus einem gerechten und üblichen, ließ er unter großen Kosten Triumphbögen nach dem Ruin der Provinzen in Gallien und Pannonien errichten und auf ihnen Inschriften über seine Taten anbringen, damit die Menschen von ihm lesen sollten, solange die Denkmäler stünden.10

7

8 9

10

Eutr. 10.12.1: Non multo post Magnentius apud Mursam profligatus acie est ac paene captus: ingentes Romani imperii vires ea dimicatione consumptae sunt, ad quaelibet bella externa idoneae, quae multum triumphorum possent securitatisque conferre. – Die Übersetzung stammt, geringfügig verändert, von MÜLLER 1995. Vgl. zu dieser Stelle die knappen Bemerkungen von BLECKMANN 1999b: 92 sowie die nicht restlos überzeugenden Bemerkungen von BIRD 1987: 148. Vgl. zu Eutrops Perspektive auf die römischen Kaiser allgemein BIRD 1987 und s. zu Eutrops Charakteristik römischer Kaiser MOUCHOVÁ 2001. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang WARDMAN 1984: 220, 235f. Zu den Kriegen unter Constantius sei verwiesen auf die Darstellung von BARCELÓ 2004: 113–123, 148–158, 159–167. Grundsätzlich zur nahezu einhellig negativen Beurteilung von Siegen in Bürgerkriegen in der kaiserzeitlichen wie auch spätantiken Literatur sei an dieser Stelle auf JAL 1963: 60–488 verwiesen; s. in diesem Zusammenhang auch BLECKMANN 2002. Amm. Marc. 21.16.15: Vt autem in externis bellis hic princeps fuit saucius et afflictus, ita prospere succedentibus puignis ciuilibus tumidus et intestinis ulceribus rei publicae sanie

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

241

Neben Ammianus’ negativer Beurteilung der Bürgerkriege als Ausdruck des schlechten inneren Zustands des Imperium Romanum ist in dieser Passage deutlich ein weiterer, durch den Historiker kritisch bewerteter Aspekt formuliert: die Inszenierung des Sieges in Bürgerkriegen durch Constantius.11 Während die Existenz der beiden erwähnten Triumphbögen weder durch archäologische oder epigraphische Zeugnisse belegt ist,12 gibt es eine Reihe auf kaiserliche Initiativen zurückgehende Verdinglichungen, die Constantius’ auftrumpfende Propagierung seines Bürgerkriegssieges über Magnentius ebenso auf instruktive Weise veranschaulichen wie verschiedene Aussagen in Wort und Stein von seinen Parteigängern.

II. ANTONYMISCHE SEMANTISIERUNGSSTRATEGIEN DES BÜRGERKRIEGSSIEGES – DER FALL CONSTANTIUS II. ALS FOLIE Zu kaum einem anderen Bürgerkriegssieg aus der römischen Kaiserzeit liegen so viele und divergierende Aussagen antiker Akteure und Autoren vor wie zu Constantius’ Überwindung des Magnentius im Jahre 351. Dies gilt nicht allein für Äußerungen in den unterschiedlichsten literarischen Texten verschiedenster Provenienz, auf die partiell bereits verwiesen wurde, sondern auch für die Bandbreite der eingesetzten Medien, in denen entsprechende Botschaften ihren Niederschlag gefunden haben. Die durch diesen variierenden Umgang zu Tage tretende Ambivalenz des Bürgerkriegssieges soll nachfolgend an Hand dieses besonders instruktiven Exempels aufgezeigt werden, um auf diese Weise eine Folie für die sich anschließende Untersuchung zur Verarbeitung des Sieges im Bürgerkrieg im ‚langen dritten Jahrhundert‘ – mithin zwischen der Ermordung des Commodus am 31. Dezember 192 und Konstantins Sieg an der Milvischen Brücke am 28. Oktober 312 – zu produzieren. Auf dem Forum Romanum errichtete der praefectus urbi in den Jahren 352 bis 353, Naeratius Cerealis, ein Reiterstandbild des Constantius. In der Widmungsinschrift dieses Reiterstandbildes wird der Kaiser als restitutor urbis Romae

11

12

perfusus horrenda. quo prauo proposito magisquam recto uel usitato triumphales arcus ex clade prouinciarum sumptibus magnis erexit in Galliis et Pannoniis titulis gestorum affixis se, quod stare poterunt monumenta, lecturis. – Die Übersetzung stammt von SEYFARTH 1968b. Vgl. zu dieser Textpassage DEN BOEFT/DEN HENGST/TEITLER 1991: 265–267 ad loc.; SZIDAT 1996: 219f. ad loc.; BLECKMANN 1999b: 52 und WHITBY 1999: 81f. Es ist in diesem Zusammenhang bezeichnend, daß – wie BORHY 2000 überzeugend dargelegt hat – Ammianus Marcellinus versucht, genau diejenigen Bestandteile der Kaisertitulatur von Constantius zu desavouieren, die auf dessen militärische Sieghaftigkeit gegen äußere Feinde Roms verweisen und somit die von ihm kritisierte und negativ konnotierte Sieghaftigkeit dieses Kaisers in Bürgerkriegen noch zu unterstreichen. Allgemein zu Ammianus’ Umgang mit Bürgerkriegen und auswärtigen Kriegen s. MARIÉ 2003. Vgl. dazu auch SZIDAT 1996: 221 ad loc.

242

Matthias Haake

adque orbis et extinctor pestiferae tyrannidis verherrlicht.13 Eine vergleichbare Aussage transportiert ein in Mailand geprägter Sesqui-Solidus, der in die Monate zwischen Herbst 352 und Sommer 353 zu datieren ist:14 Auf dem Avers, dessen Legende FL(avius) IVL(ius) CONSTANTIVS PERP(etuus) AVG(ustus) lautet, ist eine nach links gerichtete Büste von Constantius mit Diadem abgebildet und auf dem Revers ein auf einem nach rechts galloppierenden Pferd sitzender Kaiser mit Diadem und wehendem Mantel sowie erhobener rechter Hand, wobei das Pferd über eine am Boden zusammengerollte Schlange hinwegsprengt. Die Legende DEBELLATOR HOSTIVM läßt an der Aussage der Münze keinen Zweifel: Constantius’ Hinwegreiten über die Schlange, die den besiegten Magnentius verkörpert,15 feiert den Sieg des Kaisers im Bürgerkrieg und die Wiederherstellung der rechten Ordnung.16 Nur kurz zuvor, zwischen Ende des Jahres 351 und der ersten Jahreshälfte 352, war der nunmehr im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes verteufelte Magnentius in einer Inschrift aus Monte Romano in Latium unter anderem noch selbst als liberator orbis Romani et restitutor libertatis et rei publicae gepriesen worden.17 Doch was prima facie nach einer ebenso homogenen wie ostentativen Siegesrhetorik in Sachen Bürgerkriegssieg seitens des Constantius und seiner Parteigänger in verschiedenen Medien erscheinen mag, das erweist sich bei genauerer Betrachtung als durchaus facettenreiche Angelegenheit:18 So sind einerseits zumindest feine Unterschiede hinsichtlich des Grades der Unzweideutigkeit und Explizitheit auf der Aussageebene auszumachen, die nicht dem Zufall oder auktorialem 13

14 15

16

17

18

CIL VI 1158 (+ pp. 3071, 377, 4330) = ILS 731 – s. LSA-838; die zitierte Formulierung findet sich in ll. 1–2. Zu Statue und Basis vgl. BERGEMANN 1990: 121f. E5 sowie auch BAUER 1996: 20 und RUCK 2007: 161 Anm. 678; zu Naeratius Cerealis s. PLRE I, 197f. s.v. Cerealis 2. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa MCCORMICK 1986: 40; HUMPHRIES 2003: 38f.; CHENAULT 2008: 57f.; STICHEL 2012: 199–201 und WEISWEILER 2012: 333f. RIC VIII, p. 233 no. 1 mit pl. 8.1 (P); s. auch GNECCHI 1912: 29 no. 3 mit tav. 10 no. 9. Zu den besiegten hostes dürfte, wenn man streng personalisierend denkt, neben Magnentius auch dessen Bruder, der im Verlaufe der Usurpation zum Caesar erhobene Decentius, gerechnet werden. In wie weit auch Vetranio hier zu verorten ist, mag an dieser Stelle auf sich beruhen; wohl eher nicht unter die hostes dürfte der römische Kurzzeitusurpator Nepotianus gefallen sein. Für einen kurzen, nicht in jeder Hinsicht zutreffenden Überblick zu diesem sehr ungleichen Usurpatorenquartett s. ELBERN 1984: 19–21. Zu Decentius s. BLECKMANN 1999a: 85f.; Vetranio ist zuletzt eingehend von BLECKMANN 1994: 42–59 und DRINKWATER 2000: 146–158 behandelt worden; vgl. EHLING 2001 sowie MORENO RESARO 2009 zu Nepotianus. Zur Aussage dieser singulären, heute in Paris befindlichen Münze s. zuletzt die knappen Bemerkungen von SZIDAT 2010: 340. Vgl. zum motivlichen Hintergrund COURCELLE 1966: bes. 344–348 und ALFÖLDI/ALFÖLDI 1990: 39f. mit Anm. 77 sowie auch DEMOUGEOT 1986: bes. 97f.; TOYNBEE 1986: 182 und ENGEMANN 1988: 1026–1028. AE 1997: n. 525; die zitierte Wendung findet sich in ll. 1–3. Zu dieser Inschrift vgl. FORTINI 1997: 318–321. Für einen Überblick zu den epigraphischen Zeugnissen für Magnentius s. DIDU 1977. Anders hingegen in der Ausdeutung und Bewertung des Befundes beispielsweise BLECKMANN 1999b: 52–57 und WIENAND 2011: 249–251. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang auch MCCORMICK 1986: 81f.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

243

Laissez-faire geschuldet, sondern als intendiert und somit als relevant und signifikant anzusehen sind. Andererseits lassen sich grundsätzlich divergierende Strategien der Konzeptionalisierung bzw. der Semantisierung des Bürgerkriegssieges des Constantius feststellen. So wird in der Widmungsinschrift von Constantius’ Reiterstatue unmittelbar – in der politischen Sprache des vierten Jahrhunderts – auf den Erfolg des siegreichen Kaisers über Magnentius verwiesen, indem dieser Erfolg als Vernichtung einer Tyrannis propagiert wird.19 Wenn die Rekonstruktion der Reiterstatue des Constantius an Hand vor allem der Dübellöcher auf der Basis zutrifft, daß nämlich der Kaiser zu Pferde über einen am Boden liegenden Barbaren hinwegsprengt,20 dann ist zwar für den wissenden Betrachter eindeutig, was mit dieser Statue in Szene gesetzt und zum Ausdruck gebracht werden soll: Constantius’ Sieg über Magnentius. Doch funktioniert die verwendete Bildchiffre anders als der dazugehörige Text – nämlich weniger explizit und eindeutig: Auf einer allgemeinen Aussageebene transportiert die Reiterstatue in einer etablierten Mustern folgenden Ikonographie zunächst die kaiserliche Sieghaftigkeit über Barbaren, mithin also auswärtige Feinde.21 In ihrem spezifischen Kontext jedoch verweist die Reiterstatue sehr wohl auf den Sieg über Magnentius, da dieser im Umfeld des Constantius verschiedentlich als Barbar diskreditiert und die Usurpation zur barbarischen Insurrektion semantisch umgedeutet wurde.22 Das etablierte Bildschema des sieghaften Kaisers auf einem Pferd in der Levade über einem unterlegenen Barbaren in seinem ikonographischen Grundmuster wird auch auf dem in Mailand geprägten Sesqui-Solidus aufgegriffen, jedoch en detail umgebildet, der Barbar durch eine Schlange ersetzt: Auch die Botschaft des Sesqui-Solidus ist auf Grund der Ikonographie und des Prägedatums erneut eindeutig, doch wird wiederum weder in der Legende noch in der Abbildung auf dem Revers unverschlüsselt Constantius’ Sieg über Magnentius zum Ausdruck gebracht. Vielmehr dient die Schlange als semantisch hoch aufgeladene Chiffre: Sie greift ein konstantinisches, christlich konnotiertes Motiv auf und substituiert den gescheiterten Usurpator, der nicht nur ex 19

20 21

22

Zur seit dem frühen vierten Jahrhundert etablierten Praxis, den unterlegenen Bürgerkriegsgegner nach seiner physischen Vernichtung durch die Imaginierung als Tyrann politisch maximal zu delegitimieren und letzten Endes nicht nur physisch, sondern auch sozial zu töten, s. unten S. 277f., 285. Vgl. BERGEMANN 1990: 121f. Anstelle zahlreicher Verweise s. prägnant in diesem Zusammenhang ZANKER 2007: 52–55; vgl. WIENAND 2012: 211 mit Beispielen für die Verwendung dieser Bildchiffre zur Darstellung von Maxentius’ Sieg Ende des Jahres 309 / Anfang des Jahres 310 über den im Jahre 308 in Africa zum Kaiser proklamierten Lucius Domitius Alexander (PLRE I, 43 s.v. L. Domitius Alexander 17). Vgl. etwa Them. or. 3.43a – zu dieser Gesandtschaftsrede für Konstantinopel s. u. S. 246f. – sowie Iul. or. 1.27.13–15 mit TANTILLO 1997: 333–336 ad loc.; zu Julians Panegyricus auf Constantius s. ebenfalls unten S. 247f. Grundlegend zur Interpretation der in den Quellen auf unterschiedliche Art geäußerten ‚barbarischen‘ Herkunft des Magnentius s. DRINKWATER 2000: 138–145. Zur Rolle von Barbaren in römischen Bürgerkriegen und in literarischen Darstellungen von Bürgerkriegen insbesondere zwischen Sulla und Vespasian vgl. JAL 1962.

244

Matthias Haake

eventu als Zerstörer der legitimen politischen Ordnung, sondern zugleich auch als Feind des rechten Glaubens dämonisiert wird.23 In höchstem Maße verdichtet beobachten läßt sich dieses Changieren zwischen explizitem und uneigentlichem Reden über den bei Mursa im Jahre 351 errungenen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg unter Constantius beim kaiserlichen Rombesuch im Frühjahr des Jahres 357, anläßlich dessen von der römischen Münzstätte GoldMultipla mit der Legende FELIX ADVENTVS AVG(usti) N(ostri) auf dem Revers emittiert wurden.24 In der tendenziösen Darstellung von Ammianus Marcellinus

23

24

Vgl. KENT 1994: 56. Das Verhältnis von Magnentius zum Christentum hat ZIEGLER 1970: 53– 74 einer eingehenden Analyse unterzogen. Weitaus wichtiger jedoch als die Frage nach Magnentius’ Verhältnis zum Christentum ist die religiöse Aufladung des Bürgerkrieges zwischen Constantius und Magnentius während der Geschichnisse und aus der ex eventu-Perspektive; s. in diesem Zusammenhang RUBIN 1998, dessen Ausführungen jedoch nicht in jeder Hinsicht zu überzeugen vermögen, sowie insbesondere LEPPIN 1999: bes. 459–461. Diese ideologische Aufladung steht primär allerdings in keinem unmittelbar kausalen Zusammenhang mit einer wie auch immer gearteten imperialen Kirchenpolitik des Constantius; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang DIEFENBACH 2012. Zur Substituierung eines Gegenkaisers durch eine Schlange in der konstantinischen Propaganda sei auf folgende Zeugnisse verwiesen, die allesamt MERKELBACH 1959: 243f. kurz erwähnt: In einem in Eusebius’ Über das Leben Konstantins überlieferten Brief Konstantins an Eusebius, der als Rundschreiben auch an alle Bischöfe versandt wurde, bezeichnet Konstantin den unlängst besiegten Licinius als Schlange; s. Euseb. v. Const. 2.46.2 mit TARTAGLIA 1984: 105 Anm. 75 ad loc. und CAMERON/HALL 1999: 244 ad loc. Gemäß der in der Forschung nicht sonderlich stark beachteten eusebianischen Ekphrasis eines Gemäldes, das sich am Eingang einer Palastanlage befand – womöglich handelt es sich um das Bronzene Tor des Kaiserpalastes in Konstantinopel –, ließ Konstantin auf diesem Bild reich an biblischen Anspielungen den von ihm überwundenen Tyrannen, i.e. Licinius, als Drachen darstellen; s. Euseb. v. Const. 3.3.1–3 mit TARTAGLIA 1984: 122f. Anm. 18–21 ad loc. und CAMERON/HALL 1999: 255f. ad loc. und vgl. auch GRABAR 1936: 43f., 130; MANGO 1959: 23f.; MACMULLEN 1969: 136f.; CAMERON 1991: 63; ODAHL 2004: 201 sowie KUHN-CHEN 2011: 102–104. Schließlich ist auf eine seltene, jedoch sehr bekannte konstantinische Münzprägung aus Konstantinopel zu verweisen – die SPES PVBLIC(a)-Prägungen, die um 327 emittiert worden sind und auf deren Rückseite eine durch die Spitze eines Vexillums mit Labarum aufgespießte Schlange abgebildet ist, die Licinius symbolisiert; s. RIC VII, pp. 572– 573 nos. 19 (mit pl. 18, 19) u. 26 – vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa BRUUN 1962: 21f.; BRUUN 1997: 45f.; GIRARDET 2010: 133–136; BARDILL 2012: 143 und WIENAND 2012: 263. Grundsätzlich zur Schlange bzw. zum Drachen im christlichen Kontext s. OGDEN 2013: 383– 426. Es ist in diesem Zusammenhang bemerkenswert, auf welche Weise nach der Usurpation des Magnentius die verschiedenen Parteien auf die Konstantinische Kreuzesvision zurückgriffen und wie sich zu einer späteren Zeit eine Tradition über eine Kreuzeserscheinung während der Schlacht von Mursa ausbildete, die erstmals in Philostorgios’ Kirchengeschichte greifbar ist (Philost. hist. eccl. 3.26); s. CHANTRAINE 1993–1994; BLECKMANN 1994: 42–49 und WEBER 2000: 296–300. RIC VIII, p. 276 nos. 287–288; s. dazu BEYELER 2011: 140 sowie ferner auch LEHNEN 1997: 82f. Ebenso wenig wie diese Münzlegende kann die Inschrift auf der Statuenbasis für Attius Caecilius Maximilianus, praefectus annonae während Constantius’ Romaufenthalt (zur Person s. ECK 1974: 66; MARTINDALE 1974: 249), als eindeutige Aussage über den spezifischen Charakter und die korrekte Kategorisierung der Feierlichkeiten im Frühjahr 357 zu Rom betrachtet werden. Bei der besagten Inschrift handelt es sich um CIL VI 41332 – s. LSA-1252;

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

245

heißt es in diesem Zusammenhang, daß es Constantius danach verlangt hätte, „als wenn der Tempel des Janus geschlossen und alle Feinde niedergeworfen wären, … Rom einen Besuch abzustatten, um nach dem Ende des Magnentius, zwar ohne einen Titel, aber wegen vergossenen römischen Blutes einen Triumph zu feiern.“25 Der Charakter der Feierlichkeiten anläßlich von Constantius’ Besuch in der Ewigen Stadt ist ebenso wie Ammianus’ Darstellung des kaiserlichen Einzugs in die Stadt vielfach Gegenstand der Forschung gewesen. Es ist in vorliegendem Kontext nicht von zentraler Bedeutung, wie der Einzug des Constantius in Rom formal zu klassifizieren ist – ein Aspekt, der mit der grundsätzlichen Frage der Metamorphose des Triumphzugs in nach-konstantinischer Zeit verbunden ist –, da außer Zweifel steht, da Constantius auf jeden Fall auch seinen Sieg über Magnentius im Frühjahr 357 zelebrierte,26 so daß man von einem „aduentus triomphal“27 sprechen kann. Die Bedeutung der Kommemoration des Sieges über Magnentius im Kontext von Constantius’ Aufenthalt in Rom im Jahre 357 zeigt in aller Deutlichkeit eine heute nicht mehr erhaltene Inschrift, die vom kaiserlichen Sieg über den Usurpator kündete und in der der unterlegene Widersacher zweimal als Tyrann gebrandmarkt wurde: die 24 Hexameter umfassende Inschrift auf der Basis des von Constantius im Circus Maximus aufgestellten, seit dem späten sechzehnten Jahrhundert vor San Giovanni in Laterano stehenden Obelisken.28 Doch anders als es

25

26

27 28

vgl. dazu GATTI 1969; MAZZARINO 1974: 198–213 (= 1969–1970: 605–615); DUFRAIGNE 1994: 78 sowie BLECKMANN 1999b: 51 Anm. 15 Amm. Marc. 16.10.1: … Constantius quasi cluso Iani templo stratisque hostibus cunctis Romam uisere gestiebat post Magnenti exitium absque nomine ex sanguine Romano triumphaturus. – Die Übersetzung stammt von SEYFAHRT 1968a; vgl. DE JONGE 1972: 110f. ad loc. So etwa auch HUMPHRIES 2007: 32; vgl. allgemein ferner CALTABIANO 1987. Aus der umfangreichen Forschungsliteratur zum Einzug des Constantius in Rom und zur Frage, ob Constantius einen Triumph, mehrere Triumphe, vicennalia oder eine Kombination aus Jubiläums- und Triumphfeierlichkeiten zelebrierte, sei verwiesen auf die kontroversen Sichtweisen von STRAUB 1939: 175–204; HARTKE 1951: 305–322; ENSSLIN 1953: 505; DAGRON 1968: 20f., 205–212; KLEIN 1979; MACCORMACK 1981: 39–45; MCCORMICK 1986: 40f., 84–91; LEHNEN 1997: 75–77, 209–213; FRASCHETTI 1999: 54, 253–257; ERRINGTON 2000: 871f.; KOLB 2001: 122; MATTHEWS 2007: 231–235 sowie MACHADO 2010: 290–295. Zu Ammianus’ Darstellung von Constantius’ römischem Einzug (16.10.1–17; s. dazu DE JONGE 1972: 109–137 ad loc.) seien nur KLODT 2001: 63–96; WITTCHOW 2001: 299–304; BEHRWALD 2009, 78–86 und SCHMIDT-HOFNER 2010 sowie SCHMIDT-HOFNER 2012: 38–43 angeführt. Zu Constantius’ Rombesuch und -aufenthalt allgemein s. etwa EDBROOKE, JR. 1976; CURRAN 2000: 134–135; HENCK 2002: 281–284 und HUMPHRIES 2003: 27–29. So die Formulierung von DUFRAIGNE 1994: 79. CIL VI 1163, 31249 [= CIL X 1883 = CIL XIV 174* = ILMN I 28] (+ pp. 3778, 4331) = CLE 279 = ILS 736 = COURTNEY, Musa lapidaria n. 31. Die beiden relevanten Passagen befinden sich in ll. 15 u. 21. Während es an der ersten Stelle heißt, daß Rom von einem abscheulichen Tyrannen verwüstet worden sei (interea Romam ta[et]ro uastante tyranno), ist in der zweiten Passage vom Tod des Tyrannen die Rede (… cum caede tyranni …). Zu diesem Obelisken, über dessen Aufstellung Ammianus Marcellinus handelt (Amm. Marc. 17.4.12–15; s. dazu DE JONGE 1976: 92–117 ad loc.; KELLY 2008: 225–230), und seiner Deutung vgl. WREDE 1966:

246

Matthias Haake

Ammianus Marcellinus seinem Leser in der zitierten Passage vermitteln will, feierte Constantius eben nicht nur seinen Sieg über Magnentius, sondern auch Erfolge über auswärtige Gegner: In dieser Hinsicht stimmt die Aussage der Inschrift auf der reinen Informationsebene ebenso mit Themistios’ Ausführungen in seiner im Jahre 357 im Kontext der ‚Feste Romane‘ des Constantius gehaltenen Gesandtschaftsrede für Konstantinopel wie auch mit Passagen in Julians im Jahre 356 oder 357 vorgetragenen erstem Panegyricus auf Constantius überein. Allerdings ist zu konstatieren und konzedieren, daß auf der Deutungsebene der Erfolg über den Tyrannen Magnentius die grundsätzliche Propagierung von Constantius’ Siegen und Sieghaftigkeit auf der Obeliskenbasis eindeutig dominiert;29 insofern besitzt Ammianus’ Aussage zumindest hinsichtlich der propagandistischen Gewichtung der Siege des Constantius eine gewisse Berechtigung. In Angesicht des Kaisers und vor einem römischen Publikum thematisierte Themistios an drei Stellen seiner bereits erwähnten Rede militärische Erfolge des Constantius.30 An der mittleren dieser drei Stellen führt er aus, daß sich Konstantinopel nicht gräme, den zweiten Rang anstelle des ersten einzunehmen und weder unwillig noch enttäuscht darüber sei, daß der Kaiser nicht im ‚neuen Rom‘, sondern in Rom selbst die Siegesfeier für seine nicht näher spezifizierten Heldentaten und Erfolge feiere.31 Da allerdings nur wenige Sätze zuvor Themistios ebenfalls von nicht näher bestimmten Siegen im Osten und Westen des Imperiums gesprochen hatte, mithin also von Erfolgen gegen äußere Gegner, ist die autoriale Strategie evident:32 Durch den Argumentationsaufbau sollen das Auditorium als primärer Adressat der Rede und die spätere intendierte Leserschaft als deren sekundärer Adressat die Siegesfeierlichkeiten des Constantius mit dessen Erfolgen gegen auswärtige Feinde verbinden. Erst im Anschluß daran kommt Themistios auf das zu sprechen, was er bislang so bewußt verschwiegen hat und das er auch jetzt nicht beim Namen nennt: die Usurpation des Magnentius. Themistios deutet dieses Geschehen, das nach seinen eigenen Worten der Erinnerung wert sei, um, indem er von der immensen Gefahr spricht, die durch den Aufstand des Barbaren – i.e. Magnentius – für die Römer und das Haus Konstantins des Großen bestanden habe. Diese Gefahr habe Constantius so erfolgreich zu bannen vermocht, daß er auch die gerechte Strafe an demjenigen habe exekutieren können, der sich auf schändliche Weise am stadtrömischen Volk und am Senat vergangen und mit sei-

29

30 31 32

185–191, 198; IVERSEN 1968: 57–64; FOWDEN 1987; VITIELLO 1999; CURRAN 2000: 247–251; MAYER 2006: 148f.; RITZERFELD 2001: 176f.; LIVERANI 2012 und WESTALL 2015: 234–237. Grundsätzlich zur Aufstellung von Obelisken in Rom durch römische Kaiser s. SCHNEIDER 2004. Es handelt sich dabei um die ll. 2–4 von CIL VI 1163 = CLE 279 = ILS 736 = COURTNEY, Musa lapidaria n. 31; s. dazu STRAUB 1939: 178 und VITIELLO 1999: 378 mit Anm. 50; vgl. ferner LIVERANI 2012: 474–478. Zu dieser Rede des Themistios s. etwa VANDERSPOEL 1995: 100–103 und ERRINGTON 2000: 871f. Them. or. 3.42c–d. Them. or. 3.42b.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

247

nen Mord- und Gräueltaten des Tibers reine Fluten verunreinigt habe.33 Daß es sich bei diesen Gewaltexzessen nicht allein um die eines Barbaren würdigen Taten handelt, wird wenig später von Themistios ausgeführt: Es sind dies die eindeutigen Indikatoren einer Tyrannis.34 Auf diese in der politischen Sprache des vierten Jahrhunderts eindeutige Explikation einer Usurpation greift auch Julian in seinem ersten Panegyricus auf seinen Onkel Constantius zurück.35 Bereits zu Beginn des Proömiums legt der Kaiserneffe dar, daß er in seiner Rede erwartungsgemäß von kaiserlichen Tugenden und Taten handeln werde; dabei werde er sein Augenmerk einerseits auf Constantius’ Feldzüge gegen äußere Feinde und andererseits auf dessen Überwindung von Tyrannen, also Usurpatoren, richten.36 Auf dieses Thema zu sprechen kommt Julian dann allerdings erst, nachdem er dem schematischen Aufbau der Rede folgend,37 in der Rubrik der Taten des Constantius chronologisch korrekt bereits eingehend dessen große Erfolge gegen die Sasaniden gepriesen hat.38 Doch noch größer seien laut Julian Constantius’ Leistungen im Kampf gegen die beiden namentlich niemals genannten Usurpatoren Vetranio und vor allem Magnentius.39 Diese bewundernswerten Leistungen führt Julian seinen Zuhörern und Lesern allerdings nicht unmittelbar nach dieser Feststellung vor Ohren beziehungsweise Augen, sondern beschreibt zunächst erneute Kämpfe gegen die Parther und reichert diesen verherrlichenden Bericht mit historischen Exkursen an, die sich insbesondere, aber nicht ausschließlich um das Thema der Perserkriege ranken. Erst danach wendet sich Julian den Auseinandersetzungen des Constantius mit Vetranio, der unblutig überwunden wird,40 und Magnentius zu. Bei dem Krieg gegen Magnentius, den Julian mit erheblichem literarischem Aufwand in Szene setzt, handele es sich nach dem kaiserlichen Neffen um einen „heiligen Krieg“ – Julian verwendet hier die Begrifflichkeit πόλεμος ἱερός –, der dazu gedient habe, Gesetze, Verfassung und unzählige Bürger zu rächen,41 mithin also denjenigen seiner gerechten Strafe zuzuführen, der Gesetze mißachtet, die Verfassung außer Kraft gesetzt und Mitbürger massakriert habe. Diese verabscheuungswürdige Trias von jegliche Ordnung vernichtenden Untaten sei jedoch nicht nur das Werk eines Tyrannen, sondern vielmehr das Wüten eines Tyrannen barbarischer Herkunft gewesen, das dieser gemeinsam mit einer Reihe von auswärtigen Barbaren begangen

33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41

Them. or. 3.43a–c. Dies wird explizit auch in Them. or. 3.44a zum Ausdruck gebracht. Umfassend zu Iulians erstem Panegyricus auf Constantius ist TANTILLO 1997: 9–50, 133–428; s. auch TOUGHER 2012. Iul. or. 1.1; s. dazu TANTILLO 1997: 134 ad loc. Vgl. dazu TOUGHER 2012: 24–28, 30. Iul. or. 1.22a–25b; s. dazu TANTILLO 1997: 280–295 ad loc. Iul. or. 1.26b. Iul. or. 1.30b–d; s. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa BLECKMANN 1994: 49–58 und vgl. auch TANTILLO 1997: 315–323 ad loc. sowie TANTILLO 1999: 83. Iul. or. 1.33c–d; s. dazu TANTILLO 1997: 327–333 ad loc.

248

Matthias Haake

habe, so daß man in Bezug auf Constantius’ nicht genug zu preisenden Kriegszug gegen Magnentius eigentlich nicht von einem Bürgerkrieg sprechen könne.42 Solchermaßen zugleich eindeutig, aber nicht uneingeschränkt explizit gestaltete sich um das Jahr 357 ein Großteil des Diskurses über den Bürgerkriegssieg des Constantius, der ganz wesentlich durch das Abarbeiten am Bürgerkriegssieg in Form der semantischen Umdeutung als Beseitigung eines Tyrannen und Barbarensieg geprägt ist. Nicht diesen Weg, sondern vielmehr das Verschweigen des für den Kaiser so zentralen Erfolges für Macht, Leib und Leben wählten hingegen die praefecti urbi der Jahre 355 bis 356 und 353 bis 355 sowie 357 bis 359, Flavius Leontius und Memmius Vitrasius Orfitus.43 Während ersterer vermutlich im Kontext der Bäder des Decius auf dem Aventin dem allein als D(ominus) N(oster) bezeichneten Constantius eine Statue weihte,44 hatte letzterer bereits zuvor während seiner ersten Stadtpräfektur im gleichen Kontext ebenfalls eine Statue des als D(ominus) N(oster) titulierten Constantius errichtet45 und platzierte während seiner erneuten Stadtpräfektur wohl vor dem kaiserlichen Rombesuch gleich einen Satz von drei Kolossalstatuen des Kaisers auf dem Forum Romanum prominent auf dem Vorplatz der Kurie.46 Über das genaue Bildprogramm dieser drei Kolossalstatuen kann keine Aussage getroffen werden; anders verhält es sich hingegen mit den auf wiederverwendeten Statuenbasen befindlichen, inhaltlich identischen Texten: In ihnen wird Constantius als propagator imperii Romani und toto orbe victor ac triumfator, semper Augustus gepriesen.47 Es wird also auf die kaiserlichen Erfolge über Roms auswärtige Feinde fokussiert, ohne daß unzweideutige Indikatoren verwandt werden, die den Sieg über Magnentius thematisierten. Der Umgang mit Constantius’ Sieg in der Schlacht von Mursa führt exemplarisch die unterschiedlichen Modi in der propagandistischen Aufbereitung von Bürgerkriegssiegen in der frühen zweiten Hälfte des vierten Jahrhunderts seitens des siegreichen Kaisers und seines Umfeldes vor Augen. Diese Aufbereitung bewegt sich zwischen zwei Extremen: der zwar nicht absolut expliziten, jedoch ostentativen Propagierung der gerechtfertigten Vernichtung des als Tyrannen und 42 43 44 45 46

47

Iul. or. 1.42a; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang VERA 1980: 127f. und TANTILLO 1997: 382 ad loc. Zur Verwendung von πόλεμος ἐμφύλιος s. MCCAIL 1978: 51. Zu Leontius s. PLRE I, 503 s.v. Flavius Leontius 22; zu Orfitus vgl. PLRE I, 652 s.v. Memmius Vitrasius Orfitus signo Honorius 3. CIL VI 1160 (+ pp. 3071, 4331) mit Suppl. It.-Imag. Roma (CIL VI) I 199 – s. LSA-1097. Vgl. dazu LA FOLLETTE 1994: 15 Anm. 34, 16, 84 no. 10 und CHENAULT 2008: 103f. CIL VI 1159a (+ pp. 3071, 4330) mit Suppl. It.-Imag. Roma (CIL VI) I 198.1; s. LA FOLLETTE 1994: 15 Anm. 34, 16, 84 no. 9 und CHENAULT 2008: 103f. CIL VI 1161 (+ pp. 3071, 4331) – s. LSA-1278, CIL VI 1162, 36887 (+ pp. 4331, 4351) – s. LSA1279 und CIL VI 31395 (+ pp. 3778, 4345) – s. LSA-1360. Zu den drei Statuen des Constantius gesellte Orfitus noch eine vierte des Caesar Julian: CIL VI 1168 (+ p. 3071); s. CONTI 2004: 136f. Nr. 113. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang HUMPHRIES 2003: 39f.; RUCK 2007: 48, 232, 253, 259 mit Anm. 215, 293 Kat. 79f.; CHENAULT 2008: 59; MACHADO 2010: 294f.; STICHEL 2012: 200 und WEISWEILER 2012: 334. Es handelt sich um die unterschiedlich gut erhaltenen ll. 1 u. 4–5 der in Anm. 46 zitierten Inschriften auf den Basen für die Statuen des Constantius.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

249

verschiedentlich auch als Barbaren gebrandmarkten unterlegenen Gegners im Kampf um das Purpur einerseits und der unterschiedlich stark camouflierenden Integration des Bürgerkriegssieges in die Thematik kaiserlicher Sieghaftigkeit andererseits. Die Entscheidung für eine der möglichen Optionen wurde durch verschiedene Faktoren situativer, kontextueller, struktureller und adressatenorientierter Natur bedingt, wesentlich jedoch auch von der Intention des jeweiligen auctor der spezifischen Aussage über den Bürgerkriegssieg geprägt, so daß eine unbedingte Regelhaftigkeit im Umgang mit einem Sieg in einem Bürgerkrieg nicht konstatierbar ist.

III. DER SIEG IM IMPERIALEN BÜRGERKRIEG IM ‚LANGEN DRITTEN JAHRHUNDERT‘ – ANSÄTZE UND ZIELE Die dargelegten divergierenden Aussagen über einen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg berühren den zentralen Aspekt der nachfolgenden Ausführungen. In diesen wird es nicht um strukturelle Bedingungen und kontingente Faktoren für das Ausbrechen von Bürgerkriegen einerseits oder deren häufiges Auftreten andererseits im Imperium Romanum des ‚langen dritten Jahrhunderts‘ gehen, sondern wesentlich um den Fragekomplex: Welche Modi des Umgangs mit einem Sieg in einem um den Kaiserthron geführten Bürgerkrieg bestanden zwischen der Ermordung des Commodus am letzten Tag des Jahres 192 und Konstantins Sieg über Maxentius am 28. Oktober 312? Der Fokus der vorliegenden Untersuchung wird dabei ganz wesentlich auf den zentralen historischen Akteur, den siegreichen Kaiser, und sein Umfeld gerichtet sein. Die Verarbeitung von Bürgerkriegsgeschehnissen auf provinzialer, regionaler und lokaler sowie auch individueller Ebene hingegen wird ausgeschlossen bleiben. Diese fokussierte Perspektive liegt begründet in der Tatsache, daß in der römischen Vorstellungswelt Bürgerkriege traditionell als zutiefst illegitime Vorkommnisse galten: So konnte der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg einerseits auf die Position des erfolgreichen Monarchen delegitimierend wirken; andererseits war er auch in Bezug auf das Phänomen Alleinherrschaft in Rom keineswegs systemaffirmativ. Wie gestaltete sich aber unter diesen Voraussetzungen in einer Zeit, die durch eine hohe Dichte von Bürgerkriegen geprägt war, der Umgang mit einem Ereignis, dessen Deutung in die kulturelle Matrix strukturell als monströs eingeschrieben war?48 Bedingte die Häufigkeit von Bürgerkriegen im ‚langen dritten Jahrhundert‘ Veränderungen im Umgang mit diesem Ereignis und – um eine ammianische Formulierung aufzugreifen – dem Sieg ex sanguine Romano?49 Läßt sich hier ein historischer Wandel beschreiben und erklären oder verbleiben die auszumachenden Deutungsmuster der historischen Akteure in etablierten Bahnen?

48

49

Ein instruktives Beispiel ist in dieser Hinsicht die Bezeichnung von Maxentius als monstrum im Panegyricus von 313: Paneg. lat. 12(9).3.5. Vgl. dazu etwa GRÜNEWALD 1990: 66; RONNING 2007: 321 und WIENAND 2012: 241. Amm. Marc. 16.10.1; s. DE JONGE 1972: 111 ad loc.

250

Matthias Haake

Da es im vorliegenden Kontext nicht möglich ist, die Verarbeitung des Sieges im imperialen Bürgerkrieg im ‚langen dritten Jahrhundert‘ unter Berücksichtigung aller Fälle und bei vollständiger Erfassung, Analyse und Interpretation des gesamten Quellenmaterials zu untersuchen – was eine zweifelsohne lohnendes monographisches Unterfangen wäre –, erfolgt die Beschäftigung mit der aufgeworfenen Fragestellung an Hand von drei Fallbeispielen, die Septimius Severus, Aurelian und Konstantin betreffen, ohne daß eine eingehende Untersuchung sämtlicher relevanter Aussagen in solch unterschiedlichen Medien wie literarischen Texten, Münzen, Statuen und Monumenten geleistet werden könnte. Bevor aber nun der Frage nach dem Umgang mit dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg im ‚langen dritten Jahrhundert’ exemplarisch nachgegangen wird, sind zunächst in aller Kürze allgemeine Grundzüge zum Thema ‚Bürgerkrieg, die römische Ordnung und die römische Monarchie‘ zu rekapitulieren; abschließend werden einige aus den Einzeluntersuchungen zu folgernde grundsätzliche Überlegungen skizziert werden.

IV. DER BÜRGERKRIEG, DIE RÖMISCHE ORDNUNG UND DIE RÖMISCHE MONARCHIE „The burden of civil war on Roman minds would be hard to overestimate“ haben Brian Breed, Cynthia Damon und Andreola Rossi unlängst in der „Introduction“ ihres Sammelbands Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars geschrieben.50 Das Profil dieser für sich genommen recht allgemein anmutenden Aussage läßt sich schärfen, wenn man nach ihren soziokulturellen und politischen Voraussetzungen fragt, deren Wurzeln ganz wesentlich in der zu Zeiten der Republik generierten römischen Ordnung zu verorten sind, deren mächtige Schatten bis in die Spätantike auf der römischen Monarchie lagen.51 Zentrale Bedeutung ist in diesem Zusammenhang der in der römischen Vorstellungswelt zutiefst verwurzelten Ansicht von der grundsätzlichen politischen Illegitimität des Bürgerkriegs zuzuschreiben. Diese politische Illegitimität basiert auf der geregelten Konstruktion des römischen Krieges vor dem Hintergrund der ideologischen wie praxeologischen Dichotomisierung der Welt in domi, das friedliche Innen, und militiae, das kriegsträchtige Außen: Vor diesem Hintergrund ist das bellum civile eine contradictio in adiecto, die maximale Pervertierung des bellum iustum.52 Diese Konstellation bedingt, daß ein Bürgerkrieg in Rom grundsätzlich nicht rechtfertigt werden konnte. Wenn jedoch geschah, was eigentlich nicht passieren durfte, es also zu einem Bürgerkrieg kam, so bedurfte es aufwändiger argumentativer Begründungsstrategien, die auf dem strukturell eher wenig

50 51 52

So BREED/DAMON/ROSSI 2010: 4. S. dazu GOTTER 2008: 185. Vgl. prägnant GOTTER 2011: 61. Grundlegend in diesem Zusammenhang ist RÜPKE 1990: 29– 57, 235–249. Zum bellum iustum s. beispielsweise RAMPAZZO 2005 und RAMPAZZO 2012.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

251

komplexen Muster basierten, daß stets der Feind schuld an der Katastrophe vergossenen Bürgerblutes war.53 Diese Zuweisung der Kriegsschuldfrage an den jeweiligen Gegner, die während des Bürgerkriegs stets kontrovers war und nach dessen Beendigung vom Sieger zumindest in der offiziellen Sichtweise zuungunsten des Unterlegenen entschieden wurde, ging einher mit einer propagandistischen Perhorreszierung des Feindes, der als Zerstörer der guten Ordnung imaginiert wurde.54 Zu diesem allgemeinen Aspekt in Bezug auf die Rede über den Bürgerkrieg in Rom kommt hinsichtlich des Umgangs mit dem Bürgerkrieg unter den Vorzeichen der Alleinherrschaft in Rom ein weiterer Punkt: Die Geburt des Prinzipats aus dem (Un-)Geist der Bürgerkriege stellte für die römische Monarchie über Jahrhunderte hinweg ein Menetekel dar. Zwar war für Augustus’ Implementierung der Alleinherrschaft in Rom die Beendigung der Jahrzehnte währenden Bürgerkriege, deren letzten Octavian für die res publica geführt zu haben beanspruchte,55 eine zentrale Voraussetzung.56 Doch so sehr Octavian spätestens nach seinem

53 54

55

Zu römischen Erklärungsansätzen des Bürgerkrieges in republikanischer Zeit vgl. WISEMAN 2010. S. allgemein GOTTER 2000: 338f. und vgl. RAAFLAUB 2003 als instruktive Fallstudie. Die obigen Ausführungen bedeuten allerdings nicht, daß zu Zeiten ‚der Krise und des Untergangs der Römischen Republik‘ nicht versucht worden wäre, aus dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg politisch Kapital zu schlagen; vgl. zu diesem in der Forschung oftmals zu wenig berücksichtigten Aspekt HAVENER 2014 und HAVENER in diesem Band (S. 149–184). Die Tatsache, daß der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg in der späten Republik im Triumph präsentiert und der Versuch unternommen wurde, den Bürgerkriegssieg nutzbar zu machen, darf jedoch nicht dazu verleiten, daß ein derartiger Umgang mit dem (Sieg im) Bürgerkrieg auf eine positive Resonanz oder große Akzeptanz gestoßen wäre; vgl. in diesem Kontext LANGE 2013. Ein höchst instruktives und beredtes Beispiel für den etablierten Handlungsmustern und diskursiven Strategien zuwiderlaufenden Umgang mit dem Bürgerkrieg in der Spätphase der Republik ist Ciceros vierzehnte Philippica, die er am 21. April 43 v. Chr. unmittelbar nach Eintreffen der Nachricht von den für die Senatsseite siegreichen Kämpfen der Truppen unter Aulus Hirtius, Caius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus und Caius Caesar (i.e. Octavian) gegen Marcus Antonius bei Forum Gallorum hielt: Neben dem bellizistischen Grundtenor der Rede, der triumphierenden und lobpreisenden Beschreibung der Taten der ‚anti-antoninischen Koalition‘, der Verteufelung des Marcus Antonius und seiner Gefolgsleute ist vor allem Ciceros absolut neuartiger Antrag zu sehen, daß Hirtius und Pansa für die gefallenen Soldaten ein Denkmal errichten sollten; s. besonders Cic. Phil. 14.36–38. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang HOPE 2003: 90f. und COOLEY 2012: 64– 67; s. WOOTEN 1983: 164–168 und HALL 2002: bes. 279f. zu Ciceros Rhetorik in der vierzehnten Philippica. So die Aussage in der textlich in mancherlei Hinsicht noch nicht endgültig rekonstruierten fragmentarischen Inschrift am octavianischen Siegesmonument in Nikopolis; zum Text s. etwa AE 1977: no. 778; ZACHOS 2003: 76 sowie „approximativ“ ECK 2008: 76 Anm. 12. Bezeichnenderweise wird der Bürgerkrieg, dessen Beendigung durch Octavians Sieg im Siegesmonument gefeiert wird, nicht explizit als solcher angesprochen; in der Inschrift heißt es nämlich gemäß der Rekonstruktion von Eck: [… bell]o, quod pro [re pu]blic[a] ges[s]it, … Zu Vergils „epigraphic interaction“ mit dieser Inschrift (Verg. Aen. 3.286–288) s. NELISCLÉMENT/NELIS 2013: 326f.

252

Matthias Haake

vom 13. bis zum 15. August 29 v. Chr. zelebrierten dreifachen Triumph de Dalmatis, ex Actio und ex Aegypto die Devise ausgab,57 daß er – wie die Legende eines in zwei Exemplaren bekannten Aureus aus dem Jahr 28 v. Chr. verkündet58 – entweder „Gesetz und Recht für das römische Volk wiederhergestellt“ oder eher „Gesetz und Recht des römischen Volkes wiederhergestellt“ habe:59 Die ‚Große Erzählung‘ von der Befreiung der res publica von einer despotischen Parteiung und der Wiederherstellung der Freiheit60 sowie von der Beendigung der Bürgerkriege,61 die die neue, unter dem Label res publica restituta62 firmierende Ordnung substruieren sollte,63 war nicht exklusiv systemaffirmativ, sondern konnte bei ge-

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

Vgl. dazu etwa GOTTER 1996: 260f.; RICH 2010: 182f. und GOTTER 2011: 63 sowie auch FLAIG 2009b: 212. S. andererseits UNGERN-STERNBERG 2004: 106 und FLAIG 2011: bes. 74–76 zum Untergang der Republik im Zuge eines Legitimitätsverlustes dieser politischen Ordnung. Zu Octavians / Augustus’ Umgang mit dem Thema ‚Krieg und Frieden‘ s. etwa GRUEN 1985 und RICH 2003. Zur Implementierung der Alleinherrschaft in Rom unter Octavian/Augustus vgl. etwa JEHNE 2012; zur Interpretation des ‚Staatsaktes‘ im Januar 27 v. Chr. s. zuletzt BÖRM/HAVENER 2012. Zu Octavians dreifachem Triumph im Jahre 29 v. Chr. s. etwa GURVAL 1995: 19–36; LANGE 2009: 148–157; BARNES 2008: 253f. und TARPIN 2009: 136–141 sowie – mit neuer Akzentuierung – HAVENER in diesem Band (S. 173–178). Zu Actium als Erinnerungsort im Imperium Romanum zwischen Augustus und den Severern vgl. HOËT-VAN CAUWENBERGHE/KANTIREA 2013. Das erste Exemplar haben RICH/WILLIAMS 1999 vorgelegt und eingehend kommentiert; vgl. auch ZEHNACKER 2003 und die ausführlichen Erörterungen von MANTOVANI 2008. Das zweite Exemplar haben ABDY/HARLING 2005: 175f. bekannt gemacht. Diese Prägung steht in unmittelbarem Zusammenhang mit Octavians Edikt aus dem gleichen Jahr, mit dem er die triumviralen Unrechtstaten wiederrief: Cass. Dio 53.2.5; Tac. ann. 3.28.2. Die Legende lautet entweder LEGES ET IVRA P(opulo) R(omano) RESTITVIT – so RICH/WILLIAM 1999: 180–182 – oder eben eher LEGES ET IVRA P(opuli) R(omani) RESTITVIT – so MANTOVANI 2008: 24–27; vgl. auch BARNES 2008: 256 Anm. 23. S. in diesem Zusammenhang Res gest. div. Aug. 1.1: … rem publicam a dominatione factionis opressam in libertatem vindicavi. / … τὰ κοινὰ πράγματα [ἐκ τῆ]ς τ[ῶ]ν συνο[μοσα]μένων δουλήσας [ἠλευ]θή[ρωσα. Vgl. dazu etwa Scheid 2007: 28 ad loc. und COOLEY 2009: 108–111 ad loc. Res gest. div. Aug. 34.1; s. dazu SCHEID 2007: 82f. ad loc. sowie COOLEY 2009: 256f. ad loc. und vgl. LANGE 2008: 193–199 zur Darstellung des Bürgerkrieges in den Res Gestae des Augustus. Diese Formulierung findet sich in der sog. Laudatio Turiae: CIL VI 1527, frg. d, l. 25 = 41062, frg. d, l. 25 = ILS 8393 ii, l. 35; s. dazu WISTRAND 1976: 51 ad loc. und FLACH 1991: 104 ad loc. Grundsätzlich zur res publica restituta-Thematik s. etwa BRINGMANN 2002: 118–123; MILLAR 2002: 260–270 (= 1973: 61–67); FERRARY 2003 und HURLET/MINEO 2009: 10–20. In höchstem Maße instruktiv ist in diesem Zusammenhang ein Passus aus dem senatus consultum de Cn. Pisone patre; in ll. 45–47 heißt es nämlich: bellum etiam civile ex-|citare conatus sit, iam pridem numine divi Aug(usti) virtutibusq(ue) Ti. Caesaris Aug(usti) | omnibus civilis bellis sepultis malis … – „Auch einen Bürgerkrieg habe er zu entfachen versucht, nachdem schon seit langem durch das numen des vergöttlichten Augustus und die vielfältige Tüchtigkeit des Ti. Caesar Aug. alle Übel des Bürgerkriegs zu Grabe getragen worden seien …“. Die Übersetzung stammt aus ECK/CABALLOS/FERNÁNDEZ 1996: 43. Zu dieser Stelle s. ECK/CABALLOS/FERNÁNDEZ 1996: 167f. ad loc.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

253

ringfügiger Akzentverschiebung auch intentional delegitimierend für die neue Ordnung eingesetzt werden.64 Die ‚Befriedung der Welt‘65 konnte in dieser Hinsicht als ‚Friedhofsruhe‘ imaginiert werden, die die Konsequenz des großen Mordens und der exzessiven Gewalt in den Bürgerkriegen war, an denen der Begründer des Prinzipats ganz wesentlich beteiligt gewesen und deren größter Profiteur er zugleich war66 – anders gesprochen: Zwei basale Elemente der augusteischen Prinzipatsideologie, consensus und concordia,67 konnten nur deshalb ungestört propagiert werden, da diejenigen, die sie hätten stören können, größtenteils ‚in Frieden ruhten‘.68 Beiden möglichen Versionen der ‚Großen Erzählung‘ über die Bürgerkriege nach Caesars Ermordung im Jahre 44 v. Chr. war grundsätzlich die zentrale Rolle der exzessiven Gewaltanwendung gemein. Diese wurde nicht nur in den zahllosen literarischen Verarbeitungen der post-caesarischen Bürgerkriege bis in die Spätantike immer wieder neu ausgemalt, sondern stellte ein geradezu konstitutives Element in allen literarischen Abhandlungen über Bürgerkriege bis zum Ende der römischen Kaiserzeit dar.69 Die massive Gewaltanwendung im römischen Bürgerkrieg war in der historischen Erfahrung ebenso wie in der literarischen Ausgestaltung endemisch, was für den Sieger im Bürgerkrieg eine schwere Hypothek bei der Reintegration des Imperium Romanum bedeutete. Plastisch vor Augen führen läßt sich die exzessive Anwendung von Gewalt im Bürgerkrieg an Hand eines fiktiven Briefs des Gallienus, der vom Autor der Historia Augusta in den Tyranni Triginta in Zusammenhang mit der Usurpation des Ingenuus angeführt wird: (6) Gallienus an Verianus. Du wirst mich nicht zufriedenstellen, falls Du lediglich Waffenträger tötest; denn diese hätte auch der Zufall im Kampf hinwegraffen können. (7) Alles, was männlichen Geschlechts ist, muß umgebracht werden; auch Greise und Unmündige können mit unserer Billigung getötet werden. (8) Getötet werden muß jeder Schlechtgesinnte, getötet werden muß jeder, der Schmähungen gegen mich ausgestoßen hat, gegen Valerians Sohn, gegen den Vater und Bruder so vieler Herrscher. (9) Ingenuus ist zum Kaiser gemacht worden. Laß martern, morden, metzeln, erkenne meinen Willen, zürne in meinem Namen, der ich dieses eigenhändig geschrieben habe!70

64

So GOTTER 2011: 63f.; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang ferner JAL 1963: 257–267 und LE33–38. In der sog. Laudatio Turiae findet sich die Formulierung Pacato orbe terrarum (…): CIL VI 1527, frg. d, l. 25 = 41062, frg. d, l. 25 = ILS 8393 ii, l. 35; vgl. WISTRAND 1976: 51 ad loc. und FLACH 1991: 104 ad loc. Vgl. etwa GOTTER 2011: 64. S. dazu u.a. LOBUR 2008: 1–58. Klassisch in diesem Zusammenhang ist SYME 1939: bes. 490–524; vgl. aber auch OSGOOD 2006: 251–297. Vgl. GOTTER 2011: bes. 57–61; s. auch BLECKMANN 1999b: 72 sowie ferner – in Bezug auf die Bürgerkriege zwischen Sulla und Vespasian – JAL 1961. HA trig. tyr. 9.6–9: (6) Gallienus Veranio. Non mihi satisfacies, si tantum armatos occideri, quos et fors in bellis interime potuisset. (7) Perimendus est omnis sexus virilis, si et senes atque inpuberes sine reprehensione nostra occidi possent. (8) Occidendus est quicum male voluit, occidendus est quicumque male dixit contra me, Valeriani filium contra tot prinDENTU 2009:

65

66 67 68 69 70

254

Matthias Haake

Auch wenn es sich bei diesem Schreiben des Gallienus um einen fiktiven Text handelt, so ist sein Inhalt für die intendierte zeitgenössische Leserschaft des Autors der Historia Augusta zweifelsohne mehr als plausibel gewesen.71 Die Botschaft ist eindeutig: Gallienus, der sich erfolgreich gegen den Usurpator Ingenuus zu behaupten vermochte, soll als grausamer und maßloser Tyrannen dargestellt werden.72 Daß Bürgerkriegen realiter strukturell stets ein besonderes Maß an exzessiver Gewaltanwendung wesenseigen ist, bildete die historische Folie für die literarischen Aushandlungsprozesse über die Kriege, die römische Kaiser um die Macht im bzw. über das Imperium Romanum führten; jedoch liegen die Gründe für die überaus gewaltreichen Darstellungen von Kämpfen in Bürgerkriegen in der kaiserzeitlichen Literatur weit mehr denn in der historischen Realität in der aus der spezifischen Konstellation des Ereignisses resultierenden Monstrosität eines derartigen Konfliktes begründet.73

V. DIE DREI BÜRGERKRIEGSSIEGER SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS, AURELIAN UND KONSTANTIN – DER ‚WANDEL DES BESTÄNDIGEN‘? 1.) Septimius Severus – der ‚punische Sulla‘ bzw. der ‚punische Marius‘74 Im Jahre 197 oder 198 verfaßte Septimius Severus im Alter von etwas mehr als fünfzig Jahren seine Autobiographie.75 Wenn man nicht anzunehmen bereit ist, daß Septimius Severus plötzlich von einer Muse geküßt worden war oder unvermittelt seine literarische Ader entdeckt hatte, so stellt sich die Frage: Was veranlaßte den römischen Kaiser ein gutes Quinquennium nach seiner Proklamation zum Kaiser am 9. April 193 in Carnuntum zu diesem Schritt? Über die Intention des Autors gibt ein Passus in der Historia Augusta Aufschluß:

71 72 73 74 75

cipum patrem fratrem. (9) Ingenuus factus est imperator. Lacera, occide, animum meum intellege[re], mea mente irascere, qui haec manu mea scripsi. – Die Übersetzung stammt von HOHL 1985. Vgl. zu dieser Stelle LIEBS 2007: 261. Zu und Gewaltdarstellungen Gewalt in der Historia Augusta vor dem Hintergrund der Gewalterfahrungen der zeitgenössischen Leserschaft vgl. ZIMMERMANN 2007. Vgl. auch HA Gall. duo 21(3).1 u. 5 sowie HA trig. tyr. 9.3–4; s. in diesem Zusammenhang FITZ 1966: 36. So GOTTER 2011: 59–61. Zu diesen überaus sinnfälligen Beinamen s. HA Pesc. Nig. 6.4. Zu dieser s. etwa RUBIN 1980: 133–162; CHAUSSON 1995; BARNES 2008: 257; CHAUSSON 2009: 100–109 und WESTALL/BRENK 2011: 394–407 sowie nun auch FRomHist I, 599–601 (B. LEVICK). Ungefähr gleichzeitig dürfte die verlorene, wohl Die Taten des Kaisers Severus betitelte Schrift des Sophisten Antipater von Hierapolis (PIR2 A 137 Ael[ius] Antipater mit PIR2 I, p. xiv A 137), ab epistulis Graecis unter Septimius Severus, anzusetzen sein, die die gleiche Intention wie Severus’ eigenes Werk hatte: FGrHist 211 Antipatros von Hierapolis T 3 ap. Philostr. soph. 2.24 – s. CIVILETTI 2002, 621–627 ad loc.; zu Antipaters Schrift vgl. RUBIN 1980: 25–27 sowie auch ZIMMERMANN 1999a: 51. Zur Person des Antipater s. umfassend RITTI 1988.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

255

Sein privates und sein öffentliches Leben schilderte er selbst wahrheitsgetreu, wobei er sich jedoch einzig gegen den Makel der Grausamkeit verwahrte.76

Daß Septimius Severus die Absicht hatte, sich mittels seiner Autobiographie vom „Makel der Grausamkeit“ freizusprechen, nimmt nicht Wunder, wenn man bedenkt, daß er in den fünf vorangegangenen Jahren drei Bürgerkriege adversus hostes publicos77 bzw. adversus rebelles hostes publicos78 unter den folgenden verschleiernden Bezeichnungen geführt hatte: zunächst die expeditio felicissima Urbica, die Didius Iulianus galt;79 sodann die expeditio felicissima Asiana, die gegen Pescennius Niger gerichtet war,80 und nicht zuletzt die expeditio felicissima Gallica gegen Clodius Albinus,81 die factio Gallicana.82 Am Ende der Bürgerkriege stand der siegreiche Septimius Severus – eine Tatsache, die ihren Niederschlag auch in einem knappen halben Dutzend imperatorAkklamationen durch severische Truppen gefunden hatte.83 Doch der Weg, der Septimius Severus zur alleinigen und unangefochtenen Herrschaft im Imperium Romanum geführt hatte, war in Folge der Bürgerkriege getränkt in römischem Blut und gepflastert mit den Leichen unzähliger römischer Bürger und Bewohner des Imperium Romanum:84 Die Voraussetzung seiner kaiserlichen Herrschaft stellte somit eine schwere Hypothek dar. Welches immense, seine Position delegitimierende Potential in den blutigen Schlachtensiegen in den Bürgerkriegen grundsätzlich lag, scheint Septimius Severus durchaus bewußt gewesen zu sein, auch wenn er andererseits seine in Bürgerkriegsschlachten wiederholt bewiesene Sieghaftigkeit keineswegs von vornherein in einen Mantel des Schweigens hüllen wollte und konnte.

76

77

78

79 80 81 82 83 84

HA Sept. Sev. 18.6 = FRHist 100 Imp. L. Septimius Severus T 4: Vitam suam privatam publicamque ipse composuit ad fidem, solum tamen vitium crudelitatis excusans. – Die Übersetzung stammt von HOHL 1976. Zu dieser Stelle s. TIMONEN 1992: 63–65; CHAUSSON 2009: 104–106 sowie WESTALL/BRENK 2011: 395f. Die Formulierung adver[sus] | hostes publicos findet sich in den ll. 6–7 von I.Caesarea Maritima 4 = CIIP II 1284. Hierzu wie auch zu den nachfolgend angeführten Belegen s. ROSENBERGER 1992: 111–114. Die Wendung adversus rebelles H H P P (i.e. hostes publicos) ist in l. 5 von CIL II 4114 = ILS 1140 = CIL II2 14 975 bezeugt. Basierend v.a. auf den kaiserzeitichen epigraphischen Zeugnissen hat BITTO 2009: 178–182 den Terminus rebelles untersucht. Die Formulierung feliciss(imae) [expedit(ionis)] | Urbic(ae) steht in ll. 5–6 von I.Caesarea Maritima 4 = CIIP II 1284. Der Ausdruck feliciss(imae) [expedit(ionis)] | … Asianae ist ebenfalls in den ll. 5–6 von I.Caesarea Maritima 4 = CIIP II 1284 bezeugt. Die Wendung exped(itionem) felicis(simam) Gall(icam) ist in l. 2 von ILAfr 455 = AE 1914: no. 248 + AE 1911: no. 7 zu finden. Das Wortpaar factionem | Gallicanam ist in ll. 7–8 von CIL III 4037, 10868 = ILS 3029 belegt. Es handelt sich dabei um die Imperatorakklamationen II, III, IV, VIII und IX; vgl. dazu RUBIN 1980: 201f., 207–209; s. auch BIRLEY 1988: 110–120 und LE BOHEC 2009: 76–79. Zu Septimius Severus’ Bürgerkriegen sei verwiesen auf HALFMANN 1986: 216f., 219f.; BIRLEY 1988: 92–128; DAGUET-GAGEY 2000: 201–204, 220–241, 261–278 und LE BOHEC 2009: 75–79; vgl. auch ANDO 2000: 182–190.

256

Matthias Haake

Als Septimius Severus am 9. Juni 193 keine zehn Tage nach der Ermordung des Didius Iulianus und seiner Anerkennung als Kaiser durch den Senat nach seinem erfolgreichen, waffenstarrenden ‚Marsch auf Rom‘ in die Hauptstadt des Imperiums einzog, da inszenierte er diesen Einzug – gemäß der nur in Auszügen erhaltenen Schilderung des Augenzeugen Cassius Dio – als „introitus ‚comme il faut‘“85, um durch sein persönliches Auftreten in der zweifelsohne angespannten Situation des erstmaligen Aufeinandertreffens der hauptstädtischen Bevölkerung mit dem neuen Princeps seine civilitas zu demonstrieren.86 Gleichzeitig markierte dieser Einzug in die Ewige Stadt durch seine Choreographie aber auch gänzlich unverschleiert, was schon längst kein arcanum imperii mehr war: die Machtgrundlage des Kaisers waren seine Truppen. Denn, so lautet einer der zentralen Bausteine dieser Einschätzung in Xiphilinos’ Epitome, die vermutlich von Dio aus seiner Geschichte über die Kriege und Bürgerkriege nach Commodus’ Ermordung in seine Römische Geschichte integriert worden war,87 [b]is hin zu den Toren war er zu Pferd und trug Reiteruniform, von dort wählte er bürgerliche Tracht und ging zu Fuß. Und das gesamte Heer, Fußvolk und Reiterei, gab ihm in voller Rüstung das Geleite. (4) Es war die allerglänzendste Schau, der ich jemals beigewohnt habe; denn die ganze Stadt war mit Blumen und Lorbeerzweigen bekränzt und mit bunten Tüchern geschmückt, strahlte von Fackeln und loderndem Räucherwerk, und die Bürger, in weißen Gewändern und mit frohen Gesichtern, ergingen sich in vielen Heilrufen, während die Soldaten im Waffenschmuck wie auf einem Festzug prunkend dahinschritten und auch wir [Senatoren] in Staatskleidung umhergingen.88

Dios Schilderung der Ereignisse des 9. Juni 193 verweist darauf, daß in Rom versucht wurde, die Inszenierung eines Konsenses zwischen Septimius Severus, dem Senat, der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung und dem Heer auf die römische Bühne zu bringen. Ausgeschlossen waren hiervon allein die Prätorianer, die wegen der Ermordung des Pertinax zuvor in einem symbolträchtigen und ehrabschneidenden Akt aufgelöst worden waren.89 Bedenkt man, daß der Senat noch im Mai 193 Sep-

85 86

So die treffende Formulierung von FLAIG 2009a: 182. Cass. Dio 75(76).1.3–2.1. Zu Severus’ Einzug in Rom s. BIRLEY 1988: 103f.; SÜNSKES THOMPSON 1993: 41; DUFRAIGNE 1994: 57f.; BENOIST 1999: 155–157 und MITTAG 2009: 459; vgl. insbesondere FLAIG 2009a: 182–184. Zum Konzept der civilitas principis s. grundsätzlich WALLACE-HADRILL 1982. 87 Vgl. dazu Cass. Dio 73(74).23.1–2; s. in diesem Zusammenhang MILLAR 1964: 28f., 119f., 139. 88 Cass. Dio 75(76).1.3–4: … μέχρι μὲν τῶν πυλῶν ἐπί τε τοῦ ἵππου καὶ ἐν ἐσθῆτι ἱππικῇ ἐλθών, ἐντεῦθεν δὲ τήν τε πολιτικὴν ἀλλαξάμενος καὶ βαδίσας· καὶ αὐτῷ καὶ ὁ στρατὸς πᾶς, καὶ οἱ πεζοὶ καὶ οἱ ἱππεῖς, ὡπλισμένοι παρηκολούθησαν. (4) καὶ ἐγένετο ἡ θέα πασῶν ὧν ἑόρακα λαμπροτάτη· ἥ τε γὰρ πόλις πᾶσα ἄνθεσί τε καὶ δάφναις ἐστεφάνωτο καὶ ἱματίοις ποικίλοις ἐκεκόσμητο, φωσί τε καὶ θυμιάμασιν ἔλαμπε, καὶ οἱ ἄνθρωποι λευχειμονοῦντες καὶ γανύμενοι πολλὰ ἐπευφήμουν, οἵ τε στρατιῶται ἐν τοῖς ὅπλοις ὥσπερ ἐν πανηγύρει τινὶ πομπῆς ἐκπρεπόντως ἀνεστρέφοντο, καὶ προσέτι ἡμεῖς ἐν κόσμῳ περιῄειμεν. – Die Übersetzung stammt von VEH 1987. 89 Zum Ende der ‚klassischen‘ Prätorianer und der Neuorganisation dieser Einheit unter Severus vgl. nur BIRLEY 1988: 102f. und BINGHAM 2013: 44–46.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

257

timius Severus zum hostis erklärt und Didius Iulianus erst am 1. Juni gleichzeitig mit Severus’ Anerkennung als Kaiser seinerseits zum hostis erklärt hatte,90 so nimmt es nicht Wunder, daß tatsächlich insbesondere Senat und Kaiser um die Herstellung und Inszenierung von Eintracht bemüht waren. Darauf deutet auch die Rede des Septimius Severus vor dem Senat hin, in der er Zusagen machte, wie sie uns auch schon die guten Kaiser der früheren Zeit gegeben hatten, zum Beispiel daß er keinen Senator wolle hinrichten lassen.91

In ihren strukturellen Grundzügen findet sich Dios Darstellung auch bei Herodian, obschon dieser durch bestimmte Nuancierungen eine bedrohlichere Stimmung des gesamten Szenarios evoziert.92 Durch die Veränderung eines allerdings wesentlichen Details verschiebt der Autor der Historia Augusta den Sinn der bei Cassius Dio und Herodian beschriebenen Inszenierung; gemäß der Darstellung in der vita des Severus hielt er in voller Rüstung mit bewaffneter Heeresmacht seinen Einzug in Rom ….93

Dies erscheint im Kontext der Geschehnisse des Jahres 193 schwer vorstellbar, sondern ist zweifelsohne eine literarische Erfindung und der Intention des Verfassers der Historia Augusta oder seiner Vorlage geschuldet, Septimius Severus wie einen Eroberer und künftigen Schreckensherrscher darzustellen.94 Berücksichtigt man neben der Schilderung Cassius Dios die plausiblen Nachrichten von Herodian und aus der Historia Augusta, daß Septimius seinen Einzug in Rom auf dem Kapitol mit einem Opfer an Jupiter abgeschlossen und in den übrigen Tempeln die nach kaiserlicher Sitte üblichen Opfer dargebracht hätte,95 dann erscheint es überzeugend von der Annahme auszugehen, daß in Septimius Severus’ Einzug in Rom traditionale Elemente des kaiserlichen adventus und der Triumphalsymbolik kombiniert wurden: So wurde gleichzeitig die neue Stellung des Septimius markiert, deren Grundlage manifestiert und die Herstellung des Konsenses zwischen Kaiser, Heer, Senat und stadtrömischer Bevölkerung inszeniert.96

90 91 92 93 94 95 96

Zur hostis-Erklärung eines lebenden Kaisers s. noch immer VITTINGHOFF 1936: 99–101. Cass. Dio 75(76).2.1: … ἐνεανιεύσατο μὲν οἷα καὶ οἱ πρῴην ἀγαθοὶ αὐτοκράτορες πρὸς ἡμᾶς, ὡς οὐδένα τῶν βουλευτῶν ἀποκτενεῖ. – Die Übersetzung stammt von VEH 1987. Herodian. 2.14.1–4; vgl. dazu ZIMMERMANN 1999b: 165, 176, 186, 238. HA Sept. Sev. 7.1: Ingressus deinde Romam armatus cum armatis militibus …. – Die Übersetzung stammt von HOHL 1976. Zur Darstellung des Severus in der Historia Augusta s. etwa BIRLEY 1988: 199f. sowie HAAKE 2015: 277. HA Sept. Sev. 7.1; Herodian. 14.2. Septimius Severus tätigte noch eine ganze Reihe weiterer Akte, um sich der Loyalität von Senat, stadtrömischer Bevölkerung und seines Heeres zu vergewissern, die hier nicht im Einzelnen betrachtet werden können: So organisierte der neue Kaiser insbesondere an den Senat adressierte aufwendige Begräbnisfeierlichkeiten für den nur wenige Monate zuvor ermordeten Pertinax, in deren Kontext erneut die Inszenierung von Konsens ein wesentlicher Bestandteil war; die stadtrömische Bevölkerung wurde mit einer großzügigen Getreidespende bedacht

258

Matthias Haake

Trotz dieser (inszenatorischen) Bemühungen um den Konsens zwischen Kaiser, Heer, Senat und stadtrömischer Bevölkerung blieb insbesondere das Verhältnis zwischen Kaiser und Senat überaus fragil.97 Bedingt hat das angespannte Verhältnis von Septimius Severus zum Senat, so ist mit guten Gründen anzunehmen, die Präsenz von Septimius’ Heer in Rom98 ebenso wie der Umstand, daß Severus bereits nach einem Monat Rom wieder verließ, um in den Osten in den Krieg gegen Pescennius Niger zu ziehen, der Mitte April des Jahres 193 in Antiocheia am Orontes zum Kaiser proklamiert worden war. Vor Septimius Severus’ profectio fand Nigers hostis-Erklärung durch den Senat statt – auch dies ein symbolischer Akt, der den Konsens zwischen Septimius Severus und dem Senat zum Ausdruck bringen und Severus’ Krieg eine Legitimationsgrundlage verschaffen sollte, auch wenn es eine ganze Reihe von Senatoren gab, die auf Seiten des Pescennius Niger standen. Dieser Umstand führt deutlich vor Augen, daß der inszenierte Konsens zwischen Kaiser und dem also keineswegs homogen agierenden Senat mehr als nur brüchig war.99 In den Jahren 194 bis 196 weilte Septimius Severus im Osten des Imperium Romanum. In dieser Zeit besiegte er seinen Konkurrenten um den Thron, Pescennius Niger, in drei blutigen Schlachten bei Kyzikos, Nikaia und Kios sowie Issos, ließ ihn, nachdem er seiner habhaft geworden war, bei Antiocheia am Orontes hinrichten und brachte die von ihm kontrollierten bzw. zu ihm stehenden Städte und Gebiete im östlichen Imperium Romanum – teilweise unter dem massiven Einsatz von Gewalt – unter seine Kontrolle.100 Er führte zudem auch einen in seinen Einzelheiten schwer nachzuzeichnenden, jedoch durch beachtliche Erfolge gekennzeichneten Krieg jenseits der römischen Grenzen im nördlichen Mesopotamien, seinen sogenannten ersten Partherkrieg.101 In der Historia Augusta heißt es in diesem Zusammenhang:

und seine Truppen erhielten ein Donativ. In diesem Zusammenhang s. BIRLEY 1988: 104f. und SÜNSKES THOMPSON 1990: 105; vgl. auch ANDO 2012: 24–28. 97 Dies überrascht nicht, da Septimius Severus alsbald sein im Senat gegebenes und beeidetes Versprechen, keine Senatoren zu töten, brach – auch wenn die Darstellung von Cassius Dio – zumindest in der von Xiphilinos überlieferten Form – ein deutlich größeres Ausmaß imaginiert als es der historischen Realität entspricht; s. Cass. Dio 75(76).2.2–3 und vgl. dazu MILLAR 1964: 140. Die drei nach ALFÖLDY 1968: 135 (Asellius Aemilianus: PIR2 A 1211), 138 (Ceionius Albinus: PIR2 C 599), 152f. (Valerius Catullinus: PIR V 33), 154 von Septimius Severus umgebrachten Senatoren werden in der Forschung allerdings diskutiert; s. etwa ALFÖLDY 1989a: 167f. (= 1970: 4f.) mit 176f.; BRUUN 1990: 6–9; JACQUES 1992: 130f., 132, 143f.; KLINGENBERG 2011: 217f. und OKOŃ 2013: 46–48, 51f. 98 Cass. Dio 75(76).2.3. 99 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang nur ALFÖLDY 1989a: 174–176. 100 Zum Krieg zwischen Septimius Severus und Pescennius Niger vgl. die Darstellungen von BIRLEY 1988: 108–120 und ANDO 2012: 28–37; s. auch MINUCCI 2002. Zur Schlacht von Issos zwischen Septimius Severus und ihrer kommemorativen Verarbeitung s. BLONCE 2013. 101 Zu Septimius’ Itinerar zwischen seiner Abreise aus Rom im Juli 193 und seiner Rückkehr in die Hauptstadt des Imperiums in der zweiten Jahreshälfte 196 s. HALFMANN 1986: 216f. Zu

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

259

(10) Dafür wurde ihm nach seiner Rückkehr der Triumph bewilligt, und er wurde als Arabicus Adiabenicus Parthicus bezeichnet. (11) Doch den Triumph lehnte er ab, damit es nicht so aussähe, als triumphiere er anläßlich des im Bürgerkrieg errungenen Sieges.102

Gegen die grundsätzliche Historizität dieser Nachricht des ‚notorisch unzuverlässigen Sudelautors‘103 der Historia Augusta lassen sich keine zwingenden Einwände vorbringen, sondern Septimius Severus’ Umgang mit dem ihm angebotenen Triumph ist plausibel in das größere Gesamtbild einer kaiserlichen Strategie einzufügen. Mit guten Gründen ist nämlich anzunehmen, daß der Kriegszug jenseits des Euphrats ganz wesentlich auch dem Kalkül des Septimius Severus entsprungen war, sich neben den für sein Überleben und seine Macht notwendigen Erfolgen über Pescennius Niger Lorbeeren als siegreicher Feldherr in einem auswärtigen Konflikt zu erwerben, um auf diese Weise nicht mit dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg als singulärem militärischen Siegesereignis und ohne weitere Erweise der kaiserlichen Sieghaftigkeit umgehen zu müssen.104 Sein seit dem Jahr 195 bezeugter Titel propagator imperii spricht in dieser Hinsicht eine deutliche Sprache.105 Stützen läßt sich diese Überlegung durch die Tatsache, daß unmittelbar nach seinen Erfolgen jenseits des Euphrat während der expeditio Parthica106 in der Kaisertitulatur die Bestandteile Parthicus Arabicus Parthicus Adiabenicus und Arabicus Adiabenicus auftreten.107 Demnach müßte die Ehrung mit einem Triumph seitens des Senats eigentlich genau Septimius Severus’ Intention entsprochen haben oder zumindest dieser nicht zuwidergelaufen sein. Doch warum lehnte er diesen dann ab? Der Verweis auf den Bürgerkriegssieg trifft hier des Pudels Kern: Septimius Severus befürchtete, wie mit guten Gründen angenommen werden kann, daß sich die hauptstädtische Bevölkerung bei seinem Triumphzug konsensualer

102

103 104 105 106

107

Septimius’ 1. Partherkrieg sei verwiesen auf ANGELI BERTINELLI 1976: 34–37; BIRLEY 1988: 115–120 und SCHMITT 1997: 69f. HA Sept. Sev. 9.10–11: Atque ob hoc reversus triumpho delato appelatus est Arabicus Adiabenicus Parthicus. Sed triumphum respuit, ne videretur di civili triumphare victoria. – Die Übersetzung stammt, geringfügig modifiziert, von HOHL 1976. Dies nach DESSAU 1889: 383, 392 und MOMMSEN 1890: 229. Vgl. in dieser Hinsicht auch BIRLEY 1988: 115 sowie BARNES 2008: 254f. Vgl. dazu BIRLEY 1974 sowie auch SPEIDEL 2009: 209 Anm. 160 (= 2007: 432 Anm. 160). Die Formulierung expeditione … Parthica findet sich in l. 8 von CIL II 4114 = ILS 1140 = CIL II2 14 975. Für diesen Kriegszug ist auch der Name felicissima expeditio Mesopotamena bezeugt: ILS 9098, l. 5 u. I.Caesarea Maritima 4, ll. 3–4 = CIIP II 1284, ll. 3–4; s. ROSENBERGER 1992: 112f. und SPEIDEL 2009: 181 (= 2007: 405). Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang KNEISSL 1969: 126–138, 211–215; RUBIN 1980: 205f. und ANDO 2000: 182f. Es ist in vorliegendem Kontext nicht von entscheidender Bedeutung, ob man wie KNEISSL 1969: bes. 129f. davon ausgeht, daß der Senat in Rom unmittelbar nach Eintreffen von Siegesmeldungen aus dem Osten Septimius Severus die Siegestitulatur Parthicus Arabicus Parthicus Adiabenicus zuerkannte und diese späterhin auf Wunsch des Kaisers in Arabicus Adiabenicus umwandelte, oder ob man ANDO 2000: 183 folgt, der sich dafür ausspricht, daß die Siegestitel Arabicus Adiabenicus und Parthicus Arabicus Parthicus Adiabenicus ohne Senatsbeschluß in Folge der Verbreitung der severischen Siegesnachrichten im Imperium quasi dezentral emergierten und fluide wurden.

260

Matthias Haake

Akte und affirmativer Akzeptanzerweise versagen oder gar explizite Mißfallensbekundungen zum Ausdruck bringen könnte. Dies, so dürfte er sich nicht grundlos gesorgt haben, hätte eine Erosion seiner ohnehin prekären Machtposition zur Konsequenz haben können. Daß eine derartige Befürchtung einer von der römischen Plebs demonstrativ in Szene gesetzten Mißfallensbekundung zumindest nicht gänzlich unbegründet war, läßt sich anhand eines Vorkommnisses im Dezember des Jahres 196 aufzeigen: Laut Cassius Dio kam es in Abwesenheit des Kaisers bei einem Wagenrennen in Rom, dem er selbst beiwohnte, zu deutlichen Unmutsäußerungen über den erneuten Ausbruch eines Bürgerkriegs – dieses Mal zwischen Septimius Severus und Clodius Albinus.108 Neben dieser in Bezug auf die stadtrömische Bevölkerung getroffenen Entscheidung zur Ablehnung des Triumphzuges kalkulierte Septimius Severus wohl auch eine Botschaft an den ‚Rumpfsenat‘ mit seiner demonstrativen Verweigerung, den Triumphzug anzunehmen, ein. Allerdings ist diese nicht zwingend eindeutig: Sie kann einerseits bedeuten, daß Septimius Severus die in Rom beziehungsweise in seinem Machtbereich weilenden Senatoren mit seiner Geste zu noch größeren Loyalitätserweisen ‚zwingen‘ wollte;109 sie kann aber auch bedeuten, daß er dem Senat gegenüber mit einem gewissen Grad an demonstrativer Selbstbescheidung operieren wollte, und es ist gut möglich, daß er beide Strategien gleichzeitig durch sein uneindeutiges Verhalten verfolgte. Septimius Severus agierte also im Bewußtsein seiner noch keineswegs arrondierten Machtstellung bei seiner Rückkehr aus dem Osten des Imperium Romanum nach Rom defensiv und verzichtete keineswegs grundlos auf den ihm vom Senat zugesprochenen Triumphzug, sondern beließ es bei einem semantisch weniger aufgeladenen und mithin weniger ‚provokanten‘ adventus, der die weniger riskante Möglichkeit bot, das Nahverhältnis zwischen Kaiser, Senat und stadt-

108 Cass. Dio 76(77).4.2–6. Vgl. dazu etwa MILLAR 1964: 141; CAMERON 1976: 236f. und SÜNSKES THOMPSON 1990: 106f. Zentral für die hier vorgelegte Interpretation sind die Ausführungen zum „unablässige[n] Konsens. Kaiser und Plebs urbana“ von FLAIG 1992: 38–93. Ohne implizieren zu wollen, daß Septimius Severus Wissen über spätrepublikanische Triumphe besaß: Es ist dennoch instruktiv, auf die Reaktion der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung bei Caesars Triumph des Jahres 46 v. Chr. zu verweisen, als zumindest Teile der Öffentlichkeit auf die im Triumphzug präsentierten 20 Gemälde mit Bürgerkriegsthemen mit Wehklagen reagierten; s. App. civ. 2.101 – s. dazu HAVENER (in diesem Band), S. 168f. 109 Eine derartige Interpretation des Befundes hat MITTAG 2009: bes. 456f. vorgelegt: Er betont – u.a. auch durch Verweis auf Cass. Dio 75(76).15.2b –, daß Septimius Severus’ Weigerung den ihm vom Senat zuerkannten Triumphzug anzunehmen intentional dazu gedient hätte, dem Senat die Möglichkeit zu nehmen, „durch Ehrenbeschlüsse seine Loyalität zu beweisen“. Auch wenn diese Lesart für sich hat, daß sie auf die in severischer Zeit bereits ‚klassische‘ Störanfälligkeit der Kommunikation zwischen Kaiser und Senat gerade in Bezug auf die Zuerkennung und Ablehnung von Ehrungen für den Kaiser durch den Senat verweisen kann und ganz zweifelsohne die Kommunikation zwischen Septimius Severus und dem Senat keinesfalls ohne Irritationen verlief, so berücksichtigt diese Interpretation doch zu wenig die spezifische Gesamtsituation des Jahres 195.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

261

römischer Bevölkerung zu inszenieren.110 Daß der gewährte Triumphzug tatsächlich auch mit Septimius Severus’ Sieg über Pescennius Niger in einem kausalen Zusammenhang stand, indiziert ein überaus instruktives Zeugnis aus dem Repertoire der römischen Triumphalsymbolik, auf das Septimius Severus im Gegensatz zum Triumphzug keineswegs verzichtete und das keine Erwähnung in der Historia Augusta findet: der Triumphbogen. Der Septimius Severus-Bogen auf dem Forum Romanum111 wurde zwar ausweislich der Weihinschrift erst im Jahre 203 dem Kaiser und seinen beiden Söhnen dediziert, war jedoch bereits im Jahre 195 von Senat und Volk von Rom gelobt worden.112 Dies sollte aber keineswegs zu der Annahme führen, daß die Botschaft des Bogens exklusiv die Perspektive des Senats und der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung widerspiegeln würde; vielmehr ist davon auszugehen, daß sich als Konsequenz eines anzunehmenden Aushandlungsprozesses zwischen den Beteiligten kaiserliche Vorstellungen in dem Monument widerspiegeln. Auf Grund seiner Dimensionen – der Bogen ist etwa 21 Meter hoch, 25 Meter breit und 11 Meter tief – sowie seiner prominenten Lage in unmittelbarer Nähe zum Tempel der Concordia zwischen Rostra und Kurie an der Gabelung der Sacra Via in die Wege zum Kapitol und zur Arx war dieses Monument ein überaus sprechendes Zeichen severischer Sieghaftigkeit im Stadtbild Roms.113 Dies gilt um so mehr, da auf Grund dieser Lage alle zukünftige Triumphatoren durch diesen Bogen ziehen mußten, der sinnfällig auch im Rahmen der Säkularfeiern des Jahres 204 von einer pompa auf ihrem Weg vom Palatin zum Kapitol durchschritten wurde.114 In höchstem Maße instruktiv ist die Begründung für die Errichtung des Septimius Severus-Bogens, die mit überzeugendem Potential erst nach der erfolgreichen Beendigung des Bürgerkrieges gegen Clodius Albinus propagiert werden konnte. In der Dedikationsinschrift, in der der Kaiser die Siegestitel Parthicus Arabicus und Parthicus Adiabenicus trägt und in der auch seine beiden Söhne, der nach seiner Ermordung der damnatio memoriae anheimgefallene Caesar Geta sowie der Augustus Caracalla, genannt sind,115 lautet die Begründung nämlich: 110 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang ANDO 2000: 183. 111 Umfassend und grundlegend zu diesem BRILLIANT 1967; s. außerdem HANNESTAD 1986: 262–267; DE MARIA 1988: 305–307 no. 89; DESNIER 1993: 549–578 und ROLLÉ DITZLER 2011: 229–234; vgl. nun auch FAVRO 2014: 97f. sowie VENTURA VILLANUEVA 2014. 112 Grundlegend für die Chronologie des Bogens sind die überzeugenden und wohl begründeten Ausführungen von BRILLIANT 1967: 91–95, denen hier gefolgt wird. Sie haben Zustimmung gefunden – etwa von KOEPPEL 1990: 2 und NEWBY 2007: 202f. –, aber auch Widerspruch erfahren; s. beispielsweise FAUST 2012: 121 Anm. 675. 113 Vgl. hierzu KOLB 2002: 646. 114 Dies ist in den Acta ludorum saecularium des Jahres 204 vermerkt: PIGHI 1965: 166f., ll. 71– 75; der arcus Severi et Antonini Augustorum et Getae Caesaris ist in l. 73 erwähnt. Vgl. dazu HÜLSEN 1932: 380f. 115 Zu Geta und der Rasur seines Namens in der Inschrift des Septimius Severus-Bogens s. FLOWER 2008: 103–105 und KRÜPE 2011: 227–229. Daß Iulia Domna in dieser Inschrift keine Erwähnung findet, hat KUHOFF 1993: 259 mit der „ganz auf einen kriegerischen Inhalt abzielende[n] Thematik“ des Bogens zu begründen versucht.

262

Matthias Haake … wegen der Wiederherstellung des Gemeinwesens und der Vergrößerung des Reiches des römischen Volkes durch ihre herausragenden Tugenden im Innern und auswärts.116

Es ist mehr als evident, daß die Sprache dieser Inschrift eine deutliche Bezugnahme auf einen Aspekt der augusteischen Ideologie aufweist, mit der seinerzeit die Implementierung der Alleinherrschaft in Rom unter Augustus substruiert worden war.117 Diese Bezugnahme ist jedoch nicht nur einer der zahlreichen Belege für die überaus programmatische severische imitatio Augusti.118 Sie zeigt vielmehr, und das macht sie in besonderer Weise interessant, wie problematisch auch nach zweihundert Jahren Monarchie in Rom das Sprechen über den Bürgerkrieg war und wie der Erfolg im Bürgerkrieg nicht expliziert, sondern allein die als positiv dargestellte Folge des Unsagbaren unscharf thematisiert wurde. In dieser Hinsicht sprechen auch die Reliefs am Septimius Severus-Bogen eine eindeutige Sprache, die eine segmentäre militärische Leistungsbilanz des Kaisers im Jahr nach seinen Dezennalienfeiern, in deren Kontext der prädestinierte Nachfolger, Caracalla, Plautilla heiratete,119 und im Jahr vor den Säkularspielen120 präsentieren: Zwar werden auf den Reliefs neben der Präsentation von gefangenen Parthern und anderen Barbaren Schlachtszenen in einer für ein Bogenmonument im stadtrömischen Kontext bislang unbekannten Quantität und Qualität abgebildet, doch sind das Thema dieser Schlachtszenen stets die Partherkriege des Septimius Severus; jegliche bildliche Evozierung der Bürgerkriege ist vermieden.121 Anders gesprochen: Dargestellt ist die territoriale Vergrößerung des Imperiums, nicht aber die Wiederherstellung der res publica. Eine andere Form des Umgangs mit dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg wählte Septimius Severus im Jahre 197, als es einen Moment gab, zu dem er in aller Plastizität und Drastizität seine Sieghaftigkeit in einem Bürgerkrieg in Rom auf eine in der Kaiserzeit nie zuvor dagewesene Art und Weise in Szene setzte.122 Cassius Dio schildert detailliert das blutige Gemetzel der Entscheidungsschlacht zwischen

116 CIL VI 1033, 31230, 36881 (+ pp. 4318, 4351 [ad 36881]) = ILS 425; in ll. 5–6 heißt es: ob rem publicam restitutam imperiumque populi Romani propagatum | insignibus virtutibus eorum domi forisque. Eingehend analysiert hat die Inschrift BRILLIANT 1967: 91–95; vgl. auch DESNIER 1994: 756 und NOREÑA 2011: 226f. 117 Vgl. in dieser Hinsicht etwa COOLEY 2007: 395 und BARNES 2008: 256; s. auch BENOIST 2008: 137f. Zum augusteischen Ideologem der res publica restituta s. oben S. 252f. 118 S. dazu nun sowohl COOLEY 2007 wie auch BARNES 2008. 119 Zu Septimius Severus’ Dezennalienfeiern vgl. CHASTAGNOL 1984: 96–106; HEIL 2009: 177– 179 und MITTAG 2009: 457f.; s. außerdem MACCORMACK 1986: 18. 120 Zu den Säkularspielen des Jahres 204 vgl. etwa GAGÉ 1934; BIRLEY 1988: 156–160 sowie BARNES 2008: 259–266. 121 Zu den Reliefs am Septimius Severus-Bogen vgl. BRILLIANT 1967: 99–250; RUBIN 1975: bes. 425–431, 441; KOEPPEL 1990: 9–32; LUSNIA 2006: 275–299; NEWBY 2007: 203–206 und FAUST 2012: 121–141. 122 Zum Bürgerkrieg gegen Clodius Albinus s. HEIL 2006; organisatorische Fragen dieses Krieges hat HERZ 2013 untersucht.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

263

Septimius Severus und Clodius Albinus bei Lugdunum am 19. Februar 197,123 das den erfolgreichen Abschluß der severischen expeditio Gallica darstellte.124 Das, was mit dem Leichnam des Verlierers geschah, stellten in ähnlicher, aber nicht gleicher Weise Cassius Dio, Herodian und der Autor der Historia Augusta dar, dessen Bericht die drastischste Schilderung der Vorgänge beinhaltet.125 Cassius Dio schrieb laut Xiphilinos: (3) Ich berichte nämlich nicht all das, was Severus darüber schrieb, sondern was sich in Wahrheit abspielte. Nachdem der Kaiser die Leiche des Albinus betrachtet und sattsam seine Augen daran geweidet und seiner Zunge freien Lauf gegeben hatte, befahl er den Rumpf hinzuwerfen, das Haupt aber sandte er nach Rom und ließ es dort aufpfählen.126

Zwar hatte Septimius Severus auch den Bewohnern des belagerten Byzanz in einem an sich ungeheuerlichen Akt den abgeschlagenen Kopf des Pescennius Niger vor den Stadtmauern präsentiert127 – doch Byzanz war nicht Rom: Die Zurschaustellung des Hauptes eines in einem Bürgerkrieg besiegten Kaisers in Rom auf Veranlassung des siegreichen Kaisers stellt im Jahre 197 eine kaiserzeitliche Premiere dar und ist gegenüber der Präsentation des abgeschlagenen Kaiserkopfes am Bosporus noch einmal ein qualitative Steigerung. Denn auch wenn schon zuvor die Köpfe ermordeter Kaiser durch die Straßen Roms getragen worden waren, wie beispielsweise im Jahre 193 derjenige des Pertinax,128 so handelte es sich dabei doch immer um ungeregelte Akte durch Truppen, die den Kaiser zuvor ermordetet hatten.129 Nun hat man es unzweifelhaft bei der Präsentation abgeschlagener Kaiserköpfe stets mit einer blutigen Manifestation des gewaltsamen Endes eines Herrschers zu tun; allerdings ist die Semantik der Dekapitation eines Kaisers durch Soldaten mit derjenigen durch einen überlegenen Herrscherkonkurrenten ebenso wenig deckungsgleich wie die soldatische mit der kaiserlichen Inszenie-

123 Cass. Dio 76(75).6.1–7.2; s. auch Herodian. 3.7.2–6 und HA Sept. Sev. 11.1–9. 124 Zu dieser Wendung s. oben 255. Vgl. dazu die nicht in jeder Hinsicht zwingenden Überlegungen von URBAN 2000. 125 Cass. Dio 76(75).7.3; Herodian. 3.6.1 und HA Sept. Sev. 11.6–9. 126 Cass. Dio 76(75).7.3: λέγω γὰρ οὐχ ὅσα ὁ Σεουῆρος ἔγραψεν, ἀλλ᾽ ὅσα ἀληθῶς ἐγένετο. ἰδὼν δ᾽ οὖν τὸ σῶμα αὐτοῦ, καὶ πολλὰ μὲν τοῖς ὀφθαλμοῖς πολλὰ δὲ τῇ γλώττῃ χαρισάμενος, τὸ μὲν ἄλλο ῥιφῆναι ἐκέλευσε, τὴν δὲ κεφαλὴν ἐς τὴν Ῥώμην πέμψας ἀνεσταύρωσεν. – Die Übersetzung stammt von VEH 1987; vgl. zu dieser Stelle ZIMMERMANN 1999a: 50 mit Anm. 159 und s. in diesem Zusammenhang auch BRANDT 2002: 70–72. 127 Cass. Dio 75(74).8.3; s. dazu VOISIN 1984: 269 und vgl. auch BRANDT 2002: 70. Ein princeps bonus hätte sich niemals zu einem solche Akt hinreißen lassen: Marc Aurel befahl, als er erfuhr, daß Soldaten ihm das abgeschlagene Haupt des Avidius Cassius zu präsentieren gedachten, den Kopf zu bestatten, ohne daß er ihn zuvor würde gesehen haben; s. Cass. Dio 72(71).27.2–28.3. 128 Cass. Dio 74(73).10.2. 129 Die nachfolgende Liste ist aus VOISIN 1984: 251f. zusammengestellt; die abgeschlagenen Köpfe folgender gewaltsam umgebrachter Kaiser wurden in Rom von Soldaten präsentiert: Galba (Suet. Galba 20.2), Vitellius (Cass. Dio 65[64].21.2; anders allerdings Suet. Vit. 17.2) und Pertinax (Cass. Dio 74[73].10.2).

264

Matthias Haake

rung eines abgeschlagenen Kaiserkopfes in der Hauptstadt des Imperium Romanum. So ungeheuerlich die Zurschaustellung des abgeschlagenen Kopfes des Clodius Albinus in Rom zweifelsohne war: Es handelte sich dabei, und dies ist wichtig zu betonen, zwar um ein grausiges, nichts desto weniger dennoch ephemeres Zeichen im Stadtbild Roms. Erklären läßt sich dieser massive und intendierte Tabubruch des Septimius Severus, der mit einem Vorgehen gegen insbesondere senatorische Parteigänger des Clodius Albinus einherging, im Kontext der severischen Herrschaft, die in ihren ersten fünf Jahren in besonderem Maße prekär war und seitens der Senatorenschaft nicht die Zustimmung und Unterstützung erhielt, die der Kaiser erwartete. Die zunächst in hohem Maße prekäre Position des Septimius Severus, so ist plausibel anzunehmen, dürfte neben dem dieser Inszenierung unzweifelhaft innewohnenden Drohpotential die qualitativ neuartige kaiserliche Zurschaustellung des Kopfes des Clodius Albinus mitbedingt haben, um Septimius Severus’ endgültigen Sieg im ‚Kampf um Rom‘ zwar nicht permanent, jedoch drastisch zu manifestieren. Zugleich mag die Präsentation von Clodius Albinus’ abgeschlagenem Kopf der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung ebenso wie den Senatoren die Möglichkeit eröffnet haben, durch Schmähungen dieses Schaustücks ihre Loyalität zu Septimius Severus zu bekunden.130 Resümierend ist an dieser Stelle festzuhalten: Obschon Severus ohne seine Siege in den Bürgerkriegen gegen Pescennius Niger und Clodius Albinus nie hätte Kaiser bleiben können, stellten seine Erfolge über diese beiden Gegenspieler für den siegreichen Kaiser stets eine janusköpfige Angelegenheit dar. Ihren Niederschlag findet dieser Befund einerseits in einer drastischen Sprache in Form einer ephemären, durch den Kaiser veranlaßten Inszenierung des abgeschlagenen Hauptes des Clodius Albinus – eine Praxis, die in nach-severischer Zeit verschiedentlich nach Bürgerkriegssiegen wieder aufgegriffen werden sollte.131 Andererseits griff Septimius Severus auf bereits erprobte Muster im Umgang mit einem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg zurück: Sowohl das Kaschieren des Erfolges über Pescennius Niger durch außenpolitische Erfolge über die Parther wie auch die defensive Rhetorik über die Wiederherstellung des Gemeinwesens verweisen auf den Begründer des Prinzipats als Folie und sollten auch späterhin weitere Nachahmer finden.

130 Als Parallele sei in diesem Zusammenhang auf den entsprechenden Umgang mit dem abgeschlagenen Haupt des Maxentius in Rom nach dessen Niederlage an der Milvischen Brücke verwiesen; s. unten S. 271–273. 131 Verwiesen sei dazu auf SZIDAT 2010: 326.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

265

2.) Aurelian – der restitutor orbis und super omnes principes victoriosissimus132 Im Jahr 274 erlebte die Stadt Rom eine prächtige Siegesfeier.133 Der Autor der Historia Augusta schreibt dazu in der vita des Aurelian: (4) So trat er denn als Herr der ganzen Welt nach der Befriedung des Ostens, der gallischen Provinzen und aller Gebiete ringsum den Marsch nach Rom an, um den schaulustigen Römern den Triumph über Zenobia und Tetricus, das heißt über Ost und West, vorzuführen. [33] Es ist nicht uninteressant, Einzelheiten über diesen Triumph zu erfahren; es war nämlich ein glanzvolles Schauspiel. (2) Es gab drei Königswagen zu sehen, nämlich einen des Odenatus, aus Silber, Gold und Edelgestein kunstreich gebaut, einen anderen, den der Perserkönig dem Aurelian geschenkt hatte, in derselben Weise gearbeitet, und drittens den Wagen, den Zenobia für sich hatte bauen lassen in der Hoffnung, mit diesem Gefährt Rom zu besuchen, eine Hoffnung, die sie nicht getäuscht hat, hielt sie doch mit ihm ihren Einzug in Rom als besiegtes Schaustück des Triumphes. (3) Es war noch ein anderer Wagen mit einem Viergespann von Hirschen zu sehen, der dem Gotenkönig gehört haben soll. (4) Den Zug eröffneten zwanzig Elefanten, gezähmte libysche Bestien, zweihundert verschiedene Tiere aus Palästina, die Aurelian alsbald an Privatleute verschenkte, um den Fiskus nicht mit ihrem Unterhalt zu belasten; vier Tiger, Giraffen, Elche und andere Tiergattungen, in Gruppen zusammengefaßt, achthundert Paar Gladiatoren – abgesehen von den fremdstämmigen Kriegsgefangenen –, Blemnyer, Exomiten, Araber aus der Arabia Felix, Inder, Baktrer, Hiberer, Sarazenen und Perser, alle mit ihren Gaben, Goten, Alanen, Roxolanen, Sarmaten, Franken, Sueven, Vandalen und Germanen, als Kriegsgefangene mit gefesselten Händen. (5) Unter ihnen schritten im Zuge auch die überlebenden Stadthäupter von Palmyra und die Ägypter zur Strafe für ihre Empörung. [34] Es wurden auch zehn Frauen aufgeführt, die Aurelian, als sie in Männertracht unter den Goten kämpften, gefangengenommen hatte, nachdem viele getötet worden waren, und die ein Plakat als vom Stamm der Amazonen bezeichnete; Plakate mit den Namen der betreffenden Völker wurden vorausgetragen. (2) Im Zuge schritt Tetricus, angetan mit einem Scharlachmantel, hellgelber Tunika und gallischen Hosen, zur Seite seinen Sohn, den er in Gallien zum Imperator ernannt hatte. (3) Auch Zenobia schritt im Zuge, juwelengeschmückt und mit goldenen Fesseln beladen, die von anderen getragen wurden. Goldkränze von sämtlichen Gemeinden wurden vorbeigetragen, durch riesige Plakate angekündigt. (4) Wesentlich zum Glanz der Veranstaltung trugen die Einwohner Roms bei, die Fahnen der Zünfte und der Standlager, die Panzerreiter, die Gardetruppen, das gesamte Heer und der Senat – dieser übrigens ziemlich niedergeschlagen, weil er Augenzeuge eines Triumphs über Senatsmitglieder werden mußte. (5) Der Zug erreichte gerade noch zur neunten Stunde das Kapitol und erst spät den Kaiserpalast.134

132 Die im dritten Jahrhundert für einige Kaiser selten verwendete Bezeichnung super omnes principes victoriosissimus ist für Aurelian in einer Inschrift aus dem unweit nördlich von Rom gelegenen Capena bezeugt: CIL XI 3878, ll. 2–4. 133 Die hier zugrundegelegte Chronologie für die Herrschaftszeit Aurelians hat überzeugend MITTHOF 2007 herausgearbeitet; sie weicht von bis dato etablierten Rekonstruktionen wie etwa derjenigen von HALFMANN 1986: 239f. in einigen wichtigen Punkten ab. 134 HA Aur. 32.4–34.5: (4) Princeps igitur totius orbis Aurelianus, pacatis Oriente, Gallis atque undique terris, Romam iter flexit, ut de Zenobia et Tetrico, hoc est de Oriente et de Occidente, triumphum Romanis oculis exhiberet. [33] Non absque re est cognoscere qui fuerit Aureliani triumphus; fuit enim speciosissimus. (2) Currus regii tres fuerunt, in his unus Odenati, argento, auro, gemmis operosus atque distinctus, alter, quem rex Persarum Aureliano dono dedit, ipse quoque pari opere fabricatus, tertius, quem sibi Zenobia composuerat, sperans se

266

Matthias Haake

Daß es sich bei vorliegendem Text um ein in hohem Maße artifizielles Produkt aus der Feder eines nicht in jeder Hinsicht zuverlässigen Autors handelt, steht selbstredend völlig außer Zweifel. Unzweifelhaft ist es auch, daß die literarische Ausgestaltung des Triumphzuges zu weiten Teilen eine kunstvolle Erfindung ist.135 In vorliegendem Kontext interessiert primär nun nicht das literarische Gesamtkunstwerk, sondern der Fokus des Interesses ist auf zwei Personen gerichtet, die der Autor der Historia Augusta in dieser Siegesinszenierung auftreten läßt: Zenobia, die 273 besiegte Augusta aus dem ‚Palmyrenischen Teilreich‘,136 und Tetricus, den 274 überwundenen Kaiser des ‚Gallischen Sonderreiches‘.137 Nicht allein der Autor der Historia Augusta, sondern auch Eutrop138 bezeugt beider Präsenz im Triumphzug; hingegen überliefert Aurelius Victor, der Zenobia allerdings an keiner Stelle seines Werkes erwähnt, allein Tetricus als mitgeführten Gefange-

135

136

137

138

urbem Romanam cum eo visuram; quod illam non fefellit, nam cum eo urbem ingressa est victa et triumphata. (3) Fuit alius currus, quatuor ceruis iunctus, qui fuisse dicitur regis Gothorum; quo, ut multi memoriae tradiderunt, Capitolium Aurelianus inuectus est ut illic caederet cervos, quos cum eodem curru captos uouisse Ioui Optimo Maximo ferebatur. (4) Praecesserunt elephanti uiginti, ferae mansuetae Libycae, Palaestinae diuersae ducentae, quas statim Aurelianus priuatis donauit, ne fiscum annonis grauaret; tigrides quatuor, camelopardali, alces, cetera talia per ordinem ducta, gladiatorum paria octingenta, – praeter captiuos gentium barbararum –, Blemmyes, Exomitae, Arabes Eudaemones, Indi, Bactriani, Hiberi, Saraceni, Persae cum suis quique muneribus, Gothi, Alani, Roxolani, Sarmatae, Franci, Sueui, Vandali, Germani, religatis minibus, captiui utpote. (5) Praecesserunt inter hos etiam Palmyreni qui superfuerant, principes ciuitatis et Aegyptii ob rebellionem. [34] Ductae sunt et decem mulieres, quas uirili habitu pugnantes inter Gothos ceperat, cum multae essent interemptae, quas de Amazonum genere titulus indicabat (praelati sunt tituli gentium nomina continents). (2) Inter haec fuit Tetricus chlamyde coccea, tunica galbina, bracis Gallicis ornatus, adiuncto sibi filio, quem imperatorem in Gallia nuncupauerat. (3) Incedebat etiam Zenobia, ornata gemmis, catenis aureis, quas alii sustentabant. Praeferebantur coronae omnium ciuitatum aureae titulis eminentibus proditae. (4) Iam populus ipse Romanus, iam uexilla collegiorum atque castrorum et catafractarii milites et opes regiae et omnis exercitus et senatus (etsi aliquantulo tristior quod senatores triumphari uidebant) multum pompae addiderant. (5) Denique uix nona hora in Capitolium peruenit, sero autem ad Palatium. – Die Übersetzung stammt von HOHL 1985. Eingehend, wenn auch nicht immer überzeugend, hat MERTEN 1968: 101–140 die Darstellung des aurelianischen Triumphzuges untersucht; vgl. auch den Kommentar von PASCHOUD 1996: 160–169 ad loc. und s. ferner etwa auch KOTULA 1997: 152–158; BEARD 2007: 122f., 321 sowie COLOMBO 2010: 481f. In diesem Zusammenhang sei auf eine höchst instruktive, jedoch nur sehr fragmentarisch erhaltene Weihung aus dem in Moesia Inferior gelegenen Durostorum, dem heutigen Silistria in Bulgarien, verwiesen; s. die unterschiedlichen Textrekonstruktionen AE 1891: no. 50 und CIL III 12456. Vgl. zu dieser Inschrift VELKOV 1998: 163f. und HARTMANN 2001: 391 Anm. 103. HA Aur. 34.2–3; s. PASCHOUD 1996: 167 ad loc. Zu den Feldzügen Aurelians gegen Zenobia bzw. Tetricus vgl. etwa HARTMANN 2008a: 316–318; HARTMANN 2008b: 366–372 und LUTHER 2008: 337f. Eutr. 9.13.2; vgl. HELLEGOUARC’H 1999: 121, 230 ad loc.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

267

nen in Aurelians Siegesparade,139 und laut Zosimos sage man, Zenobia sei auf dem Weg nach Europa umgekommen.140 Auch wenn auf Grund der in Ansätzen skizzierten problematischen literarischen Quellenlage der endgültige Erweis nicht zu erbringen ist, daß Tetricus und Zenobia tatsächlich in Triumphzug im Jahre 274 mitgeführt wurden, so gibt es doch gute Gründe, dieses Detail des Autors der Historia Augusta über die aurelianische Siegesinszenierung ebenso als historisch zu erachten wie die Nachricht, daß beide am Ende des Triumphzuges nicht die Hinrichtung erwartete, sondern sie in Ehren und – dies gilt selbstverständlich nur für Tetricus – in neuen Ämtern weiterleben durften.141 Akzeptiert man die Historizität der Vorführung von Zenobia und Tetricus im aurelianischen Triumphzug, dann stellen die Siegesfeierlichkeiten im Jahre 274 eine Zäsur in der Geschichte des römischen Triumphs dar: Erstmalig wären nämlich mit Zenobia – außergewöhnlich genug – eine ehemalige Augusta und mit Tetricus ein gewesener Augustus, mithin also in Bürgerkriegen besiegte Kaiser, in einem Triumphzug präsentiert worden.142 Bemerkenswert ist auch die Integration gefangener palmyrenischer Notabeln und nach einem Aufstand zum Jahreswechsel 273/274 zur Raison gebrachter Ägypter, also Reichsbewohnern, im Triumph.143 Um die Mitte der 270er Jahre erschien es also Aurelian opportun, mit der Präsentation von besiegten Konkurrenten um die Kaiserherrschaft in einem Triumphzug eine zuvor nicht-akzeptable Form der Siegesinszenierung zu tätigen, die angeblich allerdings nicht auf ein ungeteiltes positives Echo gestoßen sein soll – zumindest nicht bei den Senatoren.144 Wenn, wovon wohl ausgegangen werden darf, Aurelian nicht nur seine Siege über Tetricus und Zenobia feierte,145 dann ist

139 Aur. Vict. 35.5; s. DUFRAIGNE 1975: 170f. ad loc. 140 Zos. 1.49; vgl. PASCHOUD 2000: 175f. ad loc. 141 Gemäß dem Autor der Historia Augusta (HA Aur. 39.1) machte Aurelian Tetricus zum corrector Lucaniae und sein gleichnamiger Sohn durfte im Senatorenstand verbleiben; für Zenobia berichtet der Verfasser der Historia Augusta (HA trig. tyr. 30.27), daß sie mit ihrer Nachkommenschaft in Tibur in einem ihr von Aurelian überlassenen Besitz gemäß römischer Sitten gelebt habe. Es kann an dieser Stelle keine umfassende Erörterung vorgelegt werden, warum – wenn auch nicht zwingend, so doch mit guten Gründen – davon ausgegangen werden kann, daß Aurelian Tetricus, der sich in der Schlacht auf den Katalaunischen Feldern dem Aurelian ergeben hatte, und Zenobia in seinem Triumphzug im Jahre 274 mitführte und anschließend ein ehrenvolles Leben führen ließ – eine Position, die in der gegenwärtigen Forschung dominiert. Verwiesen sei für Tetricus auf KÖNIG 1981: bes. 177–181; DRINKWATER 1987: 90f.; WATSON 1999: 94f.; ZIEGLER 2003: 231; ECK 2004: 580 und LUTHER 2008: 337f. In Bezug auf Zenobia vgl. etwa STONEMAN 1992: 181–183, 187f.; EQUINI SCHNEIDER 1993: 54–60 und HARTMANN 2001: 413–424 sowie HARTMANN 2008b: 371f. Vgl. auch HARTMANN 2008a: 319. 142 HA Aur. 34.2–3; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang MITTHOF 2007: 242. 143 HA Aur. 33.5; s. PASCHOUD 1996: 166f. ad loc. 144 Vgl. HA Aur. 34.4; vgl. PASCHOUD 1996: 168f. ad loc. 145 ZECCHINI 1998: bes. 357, der sich bei seiner Analyse ausschließlich auf die literarische Überlieferung stützt, ist zu dem Ergebnis gelangt, daß der aurelianische Triumph von einem Tri-

268

Matthias Haake

zu konstatieren, daß er zwar in bis dato singulärer Weise seine in Bürgerkriegssiegen erwiesene Sieghaftigkeit in Rom in Szene setzte, diese zugleich aber in Triumphfeierlichkeiten einbettete, die auch seine militärischen Erfolge über äußere Feinde miteinbezog. Diese Lesart des aurelianischen Triumphgeschehens hat für sich, daß sie sich schlüssig mit der offiziellen Siegestitulatur des Kaisers kombinieren läßt: Da der lediglich einmal epigraphisch bezeugte Siegestitel Palmyrenicus Maximus nur inoffiziellen Charakter besitzt,146 verweist Aurelians offizielle Siegestitulatur – bestehend aus den Elementen Gothicus Maximus, Carpicus Maximus, Germanicus Maximus, Parthicus/Persicus Maximus – auf äußere Erfolge.147 Dazu paßt, daß sowohl Tetricus als auch Zenobia, wenn man bereit ist, auch dieser Nachricht des Autors der Historia Augusta Glauben zu schenken, nicht in einem römischen Gewande im Triumphzug in Erscheinung traten, sondern à la mode barbare: Während Tetricus als ‚gallischer Herrscher‘ präsentiert wurde,

umph der Wiedervereinigung des Imperiums (also einer Siegesfeier über Zenobia und Tetricus) durch den Autor der Historia Augusta zu einem Triumph auch über die Goten ausgestaltet worden wäre. MITTHOF 2007: 241f. hat aber zeigen können, daß der Siegestitel Germanicus Maximus anders als bis dato angenommen (s. etwa auch KETTENHOFEN 1986: 142f.) nicht in die Jahre 270/271 zu datieren ist, sondern in Zusammenhang mit dem Triumph von 274 zu sehen ist – eventuell mit von Aurelius Victor (Aur. Vict. 35.3) erwähnten Kämpfen gegen Germanen im Rahmen der Niederwerfung der Truppen des Tetricus. Es ist anzunehmen, daß der Autor der Historia Augusta Aurelians Sieg über Goten jenseits der Donau in den letzten Monaten des Jahres 271 (HA Aur. 22.2), der dem Kaiser den Siegestitel Gothicus Maximus einbrachte (KETTENHOFEN 1986: 143; MITTHOF 2007: 240; HARTMANN 2008a: 314), in das Triumphgeschehen von 274 eingewoben hat. 146 CIL V 4319 = ILS 579 = InscrIt X 5.103; die Bezeichnung Palmyrenicus Maximus findet sich in l. 9 dieser aus Brixen stammenden Inschrift. Zum inoffiziellen Charakter der Siegestitulatur Palmyrenicus Maximus vgl. etwa SOTGIU 1961: 24; KETTENHOFEN 1986: 143f. und HARTMANN 2001: 386; anders hingegen KNEISSL 1969: 177, 247. Die offizielle Verwendung von Siegestitulaturen, die auf militärische Erfolge im Reichsinnern verweisen, ist ein Phänomen erst der Tetrarchie und mit deren spezifischen Bedingungen zu erklären: Nachdem Constantius im Jahre 296 Allectus besiegt und Britannien wieder der Herrschaft der Tetrarchen unterworfen hatte, trugen die beiden Augusti Diocletian und und Maximian ebenso wie die Caesares Constantius und Galerius den Siegestitel Britannicus; vgl. etwa BARNES 1976a: 188. Im Panegyricus von 297 wird der Krieg zwischen Constantius und Allectus explzit zu einem Sieg über auswärtige Gegner ausgestaltet (Paneg. lat. 8(5).16.1–17,); die Aussage im Panegyricus von 297/298 ist in dieser Hinsicht weniger explizit: Immerhin führt Eumenius aber aus, daß nach den Siegen des tetrarchischen Kollegiums in Ägypten, bei den Batavern, in Britannien sowie über die Perser auf der Weltkarte „nichts Fremdes“ (nihil … alienum; Paneg. lat. 9(4).21.3) mehr sei, was eher eine Entbürgerkrieglichung von Constantius’ Sieges über Allectus indiziert. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang – wenn auch teilweise mit anderer Ausdeutung des Befundes – LASSANDRO 2002; CORCORAN 2006: 234 und WIENAND 2012: 208–210 147 Vgl. zuletzt MITTHOF 2007: bes. 240; s. auch KETTENHOFEN 1986: 138. Für den Siegestitel Persicus/Parthicus Maximus ist nicht mit Sicherheit zu klären, auf was für einen Erfolg Aurelians er zurückgehen könnte; verschiedentlich wird er auf erfolgreiche Kämpfe mit sasanidischen Truppen im Krieg gegen Zenobia zurückgeführt, die in der Historia Augusta erwähnt werden: HA Aur. 28.2; vgl. dazu KETTENHOFEN 1986: 144; MITTHOF 2007: 241 und HARTMANN 2008a: 317.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

269

wurde Zenobia als ‚orientalische Despotin‘, als ‚Kleopatra reloaded‘ in Szene gesetzt.148 Folgt man diesen Darlegungen, so ergibt sich folgender Sinn des Gesamtkonzeptes des aurelianischen Triumphs von 274, das sich in ein grundsätzliches Bestreben von Aurelians herrscherlicher Präsentation einfügen läßt: Es geht um die qualitative Maximalisierung und Ubiquität der sich diesseits und jenseits der Grenzen des Imperium Romanum manifestierenden kaiserlichen Sieghaftigkeit,149 die sich auch in zahlreichen Epitheta Aurelians – wie etwa in der überaus instruktiven Bezeichnung victoriosissimus150 – widerspiegelt.151 Um diese maximale Sieghaftigkeit in Szene zu setzen, brach Aurelian wohl vor allem aus zwei Gründen mit dem Tabu, besiegte Bürgerkriegsgegner nicht im Triumphzug mitzuführen: Zum einen dürfte der Kaiser die Intention gehabt haben, grundsätzlich die schwere Krise des Imperium Romanum insbesondere in den 260er Jahren als durch ihn überwunden darzustellen;152 zum anderen dürfte er die Absicht gehegt haben, nach den mehr als schwierigen und zunächst nicht durchweg erfolgreichen Anfängen seiner Herrschaft seine Erfolghaftigkeit herauszustellen.153 Doch grenzte er diesen demonstrativen Tabubruch sogleich dadurch ein, daß sowohl Tetricus als auch Zenobia in einer ganzen Reihe von auswärtigen Feinden präsentiert wurden und nicht als Römer in Erscheinung traten, sondern wie auswärtige Feinde. Dies kann als deutliches Indiz dafür gewertet werden, daß sich Aurelian der seiner Inszenierung der Bürgerkriegssiege innenwohnenden Problematik sehr wohl bewußt war und sie auch berücksichtigte: Denn die Präsentation seiner beiden unterlegenen Bürgerkriegsgegner im Triumphzug war ein ephemerer Akt, nicht aber eine permanente Inszenierung. Die in intentional dauerhaften Medien zum Ausdruck gebrachte Kommemorierung erfolgte vielmehr über eine nach wie vor indirekte Sprache: Zu nennen sind diesem Zusammenhang insbesondere die zwar

148 Zur Gewandung von Tetricus und Zenobia s. HA Aur. 34.2–3 und vgl. dazu die allerdings nicht in jeder Hinsicht überzeugenden Ausführungen von MERTEN 1968: 132–137 ad loc. Zu Zenobia als ‚neuer Kleopatra‘ vgl. WATSON 1999: 65f., 86f.; BUSSI 2003: bes. 261f., 265f. und HARDERS 2015: 204–206. Der Sophist und Historiker Kallinikos von Petra widmete Zenobia die Schrift An Kleopatra: Über die Geschichte von Alexandria in 10 Büchern (Πρὸς Κλεοπάτραν περὶ τῶν κατʼἈλεξάνδρειαν ἱστοριῶν βιβλία δέκα): FGrHist 281 Kallinikos von Petra T 1a = FGrHist 1090 Callinicus of Petra T 1a = BNJ 281 Callinicus of Petra T 1a = Kallinikos von Petra T 11 Pernot ap. Suda s.v. Καλλίνικος (Κ 231) ADLER. Daß es sich nicht um zwei Werke, betitelt An Kleopatra und Über die Geschichte von Alexandria in 10 Büchern handelt, hat bereits STEIN 1923: 448 dargelegt: Das Komma nach Κλεοπάτραν, noch gegeben in ADLERs Text, muß getilgt werden; s. dazu auch PERNOT 2010: 83–85. 149 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa ALLARD 2006. 150 Vgl. etwa AE 1992: no. 1847; die Bezeichnung victoriosissimus ist in l. 2 dieser aus einem kleinen Fort am Zusammenfluß der Wadis Fadhala und Maafa in Algerien stammenden Inschrift zu finden. Für weitere Belege s. PEACHIN 1990: 393 no. 79. 151 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa KNEISSL 1969: 177 und MITTHOF 2007: 242f. 152 Zum Imperium Romanum in den 260er Jahren s. allein WATSON 1999: 23–38. 153 Zu den schwierigen Anfängen zu Beginn von Aurelians Herrschaft sei allein auf HARTMANN 2008a: 308–316 verwiesen.

270

Matthias Haake

nicht neuen, jedoch nie zuvor in auch nur annähernd vergleichbarer Massierung auftretenden Bezeichnungen restitutor orbis, conservator orbis, pacator orbis und pacator et restitutor orbis, die in den Jahren 274 und 275 für Aurelian bezeugt sind.154 Dem zugleich markanten wie auch zurückhaltenden Umgehen mit Tetricus und Zenobia im Triumphzug ließ Aurelian schlußendlich noch ein keineswegs an etablierten Handlungsmustern orientiertes Finale folgen: Beide wurden am Ende des Triumphzuges nicht getötet, sondern durften ehrenhaft weiterleben. Auf diese Weise setzte Aurelian noch eine weitere Facette seiner herrscherlichen Selbstdarstellung in Szene, die zugleich auch einen höchst pragmatischen Grund besaß: seine clementia.155 Diese war ein wesentliches Mittel, auf das er bei der Reintegration des Imperium Romanum in der zweiten Hälfte seiner Herrschaftszeit setzte. Zugleich mögen Aurelians Akte der clementia auch das zum Ausdruck gebracht haben, was ihr seit den Tagen Caesars innewohnte: die Wohltat, die nicht auf horizontaler Gleichheit, sondern vertikaler Ungleichheit basierte und keinen ‚Gabentausch‘ zwischen Gleichrangigen ermöglichte, sondern hierarchische Differenzen in einer asymetrischen Beziehung konkretisierte und perpetuierte. Somit konnte Aurelian also durch seine clementia gegenüber seinen ehemaligen Bürgerkriegsgegnern auch seine maximale Überlegenheit manifest werden lassen.156 Aurelians Triumphzug des Jahres 274 und der grundsätzliche Umgang der siegreichen Kaisers mit seinen Erfolgen in Bürgerkriegen über Tetricus, den (Ex-) Augustus aus dem Westen des Reiches, und Zenobia, der (Ex-)Augusta aus dem Orient, zeigt mithin deutlich den auch in den siebziger Jahren des dritten Jahrhunderts nach wie vor ambivalenten Charakter des Verweises auf unterlegene Bürgerkriegsgegner in der Inszenierung der Siegers auf.

3.) Konstantin – noch eine ‚konstantinische Wende‘? Nicht allein, aber besonders in jüngster Zeit ist in der Forschung darauf hingewiesen worden, daß Konstantin nach seinem Sieg über Maxentius in der Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke am 28. Oktober 312 „erstmals und auf umfassende Weise Topoi, die zuvor der Inszenierung externer Siege vorbehalten waren, für die Ausgestaltung einer victoria civilis“ eingesetzt habe.157 Der keineswegs monolithische, sondern überaus komplexe und vielschichtige Umgang mit Konstantins Sieg ex 154 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang die allerdings nicht mehr auf dem neuesten Stand befindlichen Zusammenstellungen von PEACHIN 1990: 514 s.v. restitutor orbis, 513 s.v. conservator orbis und 514 s.v. pacator orbis sowie Mitthof 2007: 247 Nr. 17 (pacator et conservator orbis); s. auch grundsätzlich MITTHOF 2007: 246f. 155 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa HARTMANN 2001: 388f. 156 Zur clementia Caesaris s. DAHLMANN 1934 sowie GRIFFIN 2003: 157–169; vgl. ferner auch HAAKE 2003: 106 Anm. 12. 157 So WIENAND 2011: 237; s. etwa auch MAYER 2002: 189. Vgl. eingehend WIENAND 2012: 199– 280 sowie WIENAND 2015: 176–187.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

271

sanguine Romano unmittelbar vor den Toren Roms und quasi unter den Augen des Senates und der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung stellt das dritte und zweifellos am besten erforschte Fallbeispiel zum Umgang mit dem Sieg im imperialen Bürgerkrieg im ‚langen dritten Jahrhundert‘ dar.158 Die Ursache dafür ist in dem Umstand zu sehen, daß die auf Grund der noch nicht endgültig geklärten Machtsitiation im Reich unmittelbar nach der Schlacht einsetzende propagandistische Ausschlachtung dieses Erfolges qualitativ und quantitativ nicht nur in Bezug auf den geradezu notorischen Bürgerkriegssieger Konstantin eine herausragende Stellung einnimmt.159 Am Tag nach der Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke160 zog der Sieger mit seinen Truppen in Rom ein – mithin also sechs Jahre und einen Tag, nachdem Maxentius am 28. Oktober 306 dort zum Imperator proklamiert worden war.161 Bei seinem Einzug in die Ewige Stadt führte Konstantin auch ein blutiges Zeichen seines Sieges mit sich: das Haupt desjenigen, der sich bis zum Vortag gegenüber Rom als conservator urbis suae bezeichnet und monumental in Szene gesetzt hatte.162 Der anonyme Verfasser des in Trier vorgetragenen Panegyricus von 313 beschreibt die Szenerie folgendermaßen: Nachdem der Leichnam also aufgefunden worden und in Stücke gehackt war, brach das gesamte römische Volk in Jubel aus und entbrannte in Rache, und es ließ die ganze Stadt, in der jenes verbrecherische Haupt auf einer Lanze aufgespießt umhergetragen wurde, nicht davon ab, es zu schänden ….163

Der abgeschlagene Kopf des Maxentius war Bestandteil der für alle Beteiligten diffizilen Kommunikationssituation beim erstmaligen Aufeinandertreffen des neuen Herrschers mit der alten Hauptstadt nach seinem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg.164 Die Präsentation des Kopfes des unterlegenen Rivalen im Kampf um die Kaiserherr158 Verwiesen sei an dieser Stelle jetzt auch auf LANGE 2012. 159 Dies zeigt ein Vergleich der Propagierung von Konstantins Sieg über Maxentius mit dem Sieg von Konstantin über Licinius im Jahre 324. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa, wenn auch mit teilweise anderer Akzentuierung, WIENAND 2012: 89–181, 355–482. 160 Zur Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke und ihrem Nachleben s. KUHOFF 1991 und VAN DAM 2011. 161 Zu Maxentius’ Usurpation und seiner Proklamation in Rom am 28. Oktober 306 s. zuletzt DONCIU 2012: 59–91. 162 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa CULLHED 1994: 45–67; HEKSTER 1999: 724–737 und CURRAN 2000: 43–69; s. auch ZIEMSSEN 2010. 163 Paneg. lat. 12(9).18.3: Reperto igitur et trucidato corpore universus in gaudia et vindictam populus Romanus exarsit, nec desiit a tota Urbe, qua suffixum hasta ferebatur, caput illud piaculare foederari, …. – Die Übersetzung stammt von MÜLLER-RETTIG 2008. 164 Vgl. zur Präsentation des abgeschlagenen Kopfes des Maxentius, die auch von Nazarius im Panegyricus von 321 (Paneg. lat. 4[10].31.4), Praxagoras von Athen (FGrHist 219 Praxagoras von Athen T 1[4] ap. Phot. I, p. 62.13–15 [62.21a] HENRY) in der Origo Constantini (Or. Const. [Anon. Val. I] 4.12) und von Zosimos (Zos. 2.17.1) erwähnt wird, RONNING 2007: 331– 339 und WIENAND 2012: 214. Eusebius (Eus. v. Const. 1.39.1–3) und Lactanz (Lact. mort. pers. 44.10–12) hingegen erwähnen im Rahmen ihrer Schilderung der frohgestimmten Inbesitznahme Roms durch Konstantin den abgeschlagenen Kopf des Maxentius nicht.

272

Matthias Haake

schaft im Rahmen eines kaiserlichen Einzugs in Rom stellt ein konstantinisches Novum dar:165 Zwar hatte Septimius Severus seinerzeit den Kopf des Clodius Albinus nach Rom gesandt,166 und gut vierzig Jahre später, im Frühjahr des Jahres 238, waren die abgeschlagenen Köpfe des Maximinus Thrax und seines Sohnes Maximus der jubelnden Menge in Rom präsentiert worden167 – doch geschah beides nicht im Kontext eines kaiserlichen Einzugs in die Hauptstadt.168 Was war also Konstantins ratio für seine expressive und innovative Zurschaustellung des Sieges über Maxentius bei sei seinem Einzug in Rom? Mehrere Gründe dürften Konstantin zu seiner Entscheidung dieses kalkulierten Tabubruchs bewogen haben: In der Situation des 29. Oktobers 312 war es für den siegreichen Kaiser erstens von fundamentaler Bedeutung, den Tod des Maxentius ganz Rom eindeutig vor Augen zu führen,169 zumal dieser beziehungsweise sein Leichnam nach der Schlacht zunächst anscheinend für eine Weile nicht auffindbar war: Da Maxentius zur Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke aus ‚seiner Residenz‘ Rom ausgezogen und das Verhältnis zwischen Maxentius und Senat und Volk von Rom nicht angespannt gewesen war,170 muß es in Konstantins Interesse gelegen haben, bereits das Aufkommen und erst recht die mögliche Verbreitung des Gerüchtes, daß Maxentius trotz seiner Niederlage nicht tot sein könnte, unbedingt zu unterbinden.171 Daß es entgegen der Darstellung in den durchweg Konstantin gegenüber positiv eingestellten relevanten Quellen wenig überraschend in Rom tatsächlich noch Anhänger des Maxentius mit einem potentiellen Interesse an einem entsprechenden Gerücht gab,172 zeigt eindrücklich die vor nicht allzu langer Zeit gemachte Entdeckung von Maxentius’ kaiserlichen Insignien: Diese waren nach Konstantins Sieg von Parteigängern des besiegten Kaisers sorgsam in einem in Seide eingeschlagenen Pappelholzkasten am nordöstlichen Hang

165 Auch wenn in den entsprechenden Quellen nirgends expliziert wird, daß Maxentius’ Kopf bei Konstantins Einzug in Rom präsentiert wurde, so gibt es dennoch keinen Grund, die Präsentation des Kopfes des unterlegenen Gegners vom Einzug Konstantins zu trennen und zwei separate Geschehnisse anzunehmen. 166 Vgl. oben S. 263f. 167 Herodian. 8.5.9 u. 8.6.5–8; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang WIENAND 2012: 207f. Anm. 23. Stärker als MCCORMICK 1986: 19 dies tut, sind die Differenzen zwischen den triumphartigen Geschehnissen der Jahre 238 und 312 zu betonen. 168 Dies hat zu Recht auch RONNING 2007: 333 Anm. 183 betont. 169 Diese Deutung wird durch den Umstand gestützt, daß Maxentius’ Haupt nicht nur in Rom, sondern auch in anderen italischen Städten gezeigt und anschließend noch nach Nordafrika gesandt wurde, um dort eindeutig die neuen Machtverhältnisse zu manifestieren; s. Paneg. lat. 4(10).32.5–6. 170 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa KUHOFF 1991: 150–152. 171 In dieser Weise jetzt auch ZANKER 2012: 90. Verwiesen sei in diesem Kontext auf Paneg. lat. 12(9).17.3. 172 Zum in den antiken Quellen einhellig überlieferten Jubel der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung und des Senats bei Konstantins Einzug in Rom als Produkt der konstantinfreundlichen Darstellung der Geschehnisse s. DIEFENBACH 2007: 126; zur Stimmungslage in Rom Ende Oktober 312 vgl. DIEFENBACH 2007: 141. S. in diesem Zusammenhang auch ZANKER 2012: 90.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

273

des Palatin vergraben worden, um sie nicht dem Sieger in die Hände fallen zu lassen.173 Neben der Demonstration des unzweifelhaften Sieges über Maxentius dürfte die Präsentation des abgeschlagenen Hauptes des Besiegten zum zweiten auch eine eindeutige Botschaft an dessen verbliebende Parteigänger gewesen sein, nämlich die einer mehr oder weniger subtilen Drohung, daß jede Form von an den Tag gelegter Widerständigkeit gebrochen werden würde. Schließlich und drittens bot sich für Konstantin auf Grund des unmittelbar vor den Toren Roms gelegenen Schlachtgeschehens nicht wirklich die Option an, den Kopf quasi in einem Vorabkommando als Siegeszeichen in die Hauptstadt zu senden, zumal zu berücksichtigen ist, daß er sich des zu erwartenden Verhaltens von Senat und Volk von Rom nicht absolut sicher sein konnte und ihm unzweifelhaft auf Grund der Gesamtlage auch daran gelegen gewesen sein dürfte, Rom am Tag nach der Schlacht ohne weitere Verzögerungen tatsächlich und symbolisch im Rahmen eines Einzugs in die Stadt in Besitz zu nehmen und den Konsens zwischen Kaiser, Heer, stadtrömischer Bevölkerung und Senat in Szene zu setzen. In welcher Form aber dieser Einzug in Rom von Statten ging, ist eine der ebenso intensiv wie viel diskutierten Fragen der Forschungen zu Konstantin – die Frage lautet: Handelte es sich formal um einen ‚klassischen‘ Triumphzug, einen abgewandelten Triumph oder aber um einen (triumphalen) adventus, also einen Einzug in Rom ohne spezifische zum Triumph gehörige Elemente?174 Dabei ist im Blick zu behalten, daß jeder dieser genannten Optionen eine spezifische Semantik zu Eigen ist und somit eine programmatische Aussage Konstantins beinhaltet hätte.175 Von zentraler Bedeutung bei Beantwortung der Frage nach dem Charakter von Konstantins Einzug in Rom ist der überaus kontrovers diskutierter Aspekt, ob Konstantin am Ende seines Einzuges in und Zuges durch die Ewige Stadt auf dem Kapitol dem Jupiter Optimus Maximus opferte wie dies zum Abschluß eines Triumphzuges seit jeher geschah.176 Überzeugend ist jüngst auf der Grundlage einer detaillierten Analyse der überaus disparaten antiken Quellenzeugnisse und in kritischer Auseinandersetzung mit der modernen Forschungsliteratur dargelegt worden, daß davon auszugehen ist, daß Konstantin am 29. Oktober 312 keinen Triumph, sondern einen triumphalen adventus mit dem abgeschlagenen Maxentius-

173 Vergraben wurden die Insignien in der Nähe eines Sanktuariums, womöglich der in flavischer Zeit wiederaufgebauten Curiae veteres, in einer Grube im Fußboden eines unterirdischen Raumes, der zu den Substruktionen einer in neronische Zeit datierenden Terrasse gehört. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang PANELLA 2011 und FERRANDES 2011; s. ferner die knappen Bemerkungen von DONCIU 2012: 222. 174 S. dazu auch GIULIANI 2000: 274. 175 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang, allerdings sehr pointiert, RONNING 2007: 335f. 176 Verwiesen sei an dieser Stelle exemplarisch nur auf ALTHEIM 1957; PASCHOUD 1971; STRAUB 1972 (= 1955); BONAMENTE 1981; DUFRAIGNE 1994: 74–78; WIEMER 1994: 480–493; PASCHOUD 1997; FRASCHETTI 1999: bes. 9–31; CURRAN 2000: 71–75; GIRARDET 2007: 57–70 und RONNING 2007: 331–342.

274

Matthias Haake

haupt an der Spitze des Zuges zelebrierte.177 Am Ende dieses adventus vollzog der neue Herr Roms aus politischen Erwägungen – ‚Rom ist ein Opfer wert!‘ – auf dem Kapitol das bei kaiserlichen Einzügen in Rom übliche Opfer an Jupiter Optimus Maximus; dieses Opfer tilgte er jedoch anschließend aus religiösen und religionspolitischen Motiven aus der offiziellen Kommemorierung der Ereignisse am 29. Oktober 312.178 Wesentlich für diese Sichtweise ist, daß weder die Panegyrici von 313 und 321 noch der konstantinische Fries am im Jahre 315 geweihten Konstantinsbogen als quasi dokumentarische Zeugnisse dafür aufgefaßt werden können, wie es en detail eigentlich am 29. Oktober 312 gewesen ist, sondern als ex eventu-Festlegung der Geschehnisse, wie sie fürderhin stattgefunden haben sollten. Die Entscheidung Konstantins für einen „triumphalen adventus“179 als Einzugsmodalität in die Stadt diente dazu, einerseits den eigenen Sieg in Szene zu setzen und andererseits Rom möglichst problemlos in die konstantinische Machtsphäre zu integrieren ohne es als besiegt zu inszenieren. Dabei spielte die Präsentation von Maxentius’ abgeschlagenem Kopf eine wichtige Rolle: Durch die zweifellos zumindest in groben Zügen im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes über Nacht zwischen Konstantin sowie Senat und Volk von Rom ausgehandelte Choreographie des konstantinischen Einzugs in Ewige Stadt – und somit auch des Umgangs mit dem Kopf des im Bürgerkrieg besiegten Kaisers – konnte eine Deutung der Bürgerkriegsgeschehnisse inszeniert werden, in der der Schuldige für die Notwendigkeit des Bürgerkriegs Maxentius war und in der Senat und stadtrömischer Bevölkerung die Rolle der befreiten Opfer des Tyrannen Maxentius zukam. Um ihre Loyalität gegenüber dem neuen Machthaber in Rom zu kommunizieren, jubelten Senat und Volk von Rom Konstantin zu und verhöhnten das Haupt des Besiegten: Der Konsens zwischen Konstantin und Rom konnte auf diese Weise für die Beteiligten wie Außenstehende sinnfällig in Szene gesetzt werden.180 Im Zusammenhang mit der Frage nach der Inszenierung des konstantinischen Sieges im Bürgerkrieg gegen Maxentius und deren innovativem Gehalt bezüglich der Drastizität des Dargestellten kommt neben dem Geschehen am 29. Oktober 312 in Rom selbst dessen späterer Verarbeitung in verschiedenen Medien entscheidende Bedeutung zu. Von besonderer Bedeutung für eine Analyse dieser späteren Inszenierung sind nicht allein, aber insbesondere der Panegyricus von 313, in dem einerseits auf geradezu ebenso ungeheuerliche wie innovative Weise 177 WIENAND 2012: 214f. führt einige wesentliche Abweichungen von einem klassischen Triumphzug an. Daß Nazarius im Panegyricus von 321 den von ihm mit den Worten ingressus in Vrbem beschriebenen Einzug Konstantins mit den Triumphen der Vergangenheit vergleicht (Paneg. lat. 4(10).30.4–5), impliziert keineswegs, daß „der festliche Einzug in die Stadt Rom … als triumphus verstanden“ wurde – so aber WIENAND 2012: 215. 178 Diese überaus geraffte Darstellung basiert auf den luziden Ausführungen von DIEFENBACH 2007: 133–153, die keine Berücksichtigung in Wienand 2012 gefunden haben; anders nach wie vor etwa BARNES 2011: 83. 179 So LEHNEN 1997: 215. 180 S. in diesem Zusammenhang ausführlich RONNING 2007: 333–336.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

275

Konstantins Sieg über Maxentius verherrlicht und andererseits in traditionellen Bahnen Konstantins Sieg über germanische Stämme im Jahre 313 gepriesen wird,181 und der Konstantinsbogen, dessen in der Regel wenig beachtetes, jedoch an an einem höchst signifikanten Ort befindliches, ja geradezu korrespondierendes ‚Pendant‘ hier wenigstens erwähnt sei: der Bogen von Malborghetto. Dieser wurde über der Via Flaminia wohl genau an der Stelle errichtet, an der Konstantins letztes Heerlager vor der Schlacht am 28. Oktober 312 gelegen hatte, und ist nur wenige Kilometer von den Saxa Rubra entfernt, wo die Kampfhandlungen zwischen Konstantins und Maxentius’ Heeren ihren Anfang nahmen.182 Knapp drei Jahre nach Konstantins Sieg an der Milvischen Brücke wurde in Anwesenheit des Kaisers im Rahmen seiner Dezennalienfeiern im Sommer des Jahres 315 der prominent über der Via Triumphalis auf dem Platz vor dem Colosseum errichtete,183 21 Meter hohe, über 25 Meter breite und sieben Meter tiefe Konstantinsbogen eingeweiht,184 bei dem es sich im technischen Sinne nicht um einen Triumphbogen handelt.185 Im vorliegenden Kontext sind vier Elemente dieses Bogens von besonderem Interesse: erstens, der konstantinische Fries, der aus sechs aufeinanderfolgenden Szenen besteht: dem Auszug von Konstantins Truppen aus einer Stadt, bei der es sich womöglich um Mailand handelt (sog. profectio-Szene); der Belagerung einer vielleicht mit Verona zu identifizierenden Stadt in Beisein Konstantins, auf den eine Victoria mit Lorbeerkranz in der rechten und Tropaion in der linken Hand zuschwebt (sog. obsidio-Szene);186 der Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke, der erneut der Kaiser, umringt von Victoria, Roma / Vir181 Vgl. ausführlich zu diesem Pangeyricus RONNING 2007: 291–379; zum Aufbau der Rede vgl. WIENAND 2012: 202. 182 Grundlegend zum Bogen von Malborghetto sind TOEBELMANN 1915 und MESSINEO 1989; vgl. außerdem DE MARIA 1988: 243f. no. 23; KUHOFF 1991: 154–157; MAYER 2002: 194; HOLLOWAY 2004: 53f. sowie VAN DAM 2011: 181–190. 183 Zu Konstantins Dezennalienfeiern s. CHASTAGNOL 1983: 18f.; zum topographischen Kontext des Konstantinsbogens vgl. BRAVI 2012. 184 Für einen kurzen Überblick zum Konstantinsbogen s. HANNESTAD 1986: 319–326; HOLLOWAY 2004: 19–53; ENGEMANN 2007 und auch GIRARDET 2010: 83–88; vgl. ferner PENSABENE/PANELLA 1999. Grundlegend zum Konstantinsbogen und seinen spätantiken Friesen ist L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939; s. auch KOEPPEL 1990: 38–64. Darüber hinaus sei verwiesen auf HANNESTAD 1986: 319–326; DE MARIA 1988: 316–319 no. 98; RAECK 1998; GIULIANI 2000; JONES 2000; MAYER 2002: 185–202; MAYER 2006: 145–149 und ZANKER 2012. Zu den am Konstantinsbogen verwandten Spolienreliefs und ihrer Deutung vgl. etwa ELSNER 2000: bes. 153–175; LIVERANI 2004; RONNING 2010: 170–177 und FAUST 2011. Zur kontroversen, hier aber nicht weiter interessierenden Frage, ob es sich beim Konstantinsbogen um einen Neubau oder einen wiederverwendeten Bau handelt, s. etwa MELUCCO/VACCARO/FERRONI 1993– 1994. 185 So auch L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 77 Anm. 1 und DIEFENBACH 2007: 126. 186 Auffällig ist die demonstrative nicht-Involvierung Konstantins in das Schlachtgeschehen, die in einem deutlichen Gegensatz zum aktiven, heroisch-tollkühn dargestellten Eingreifen des Kaisers in die Schlacht um Verona in der Darstellung des Panegyrikers von 313: Paneg. lat. 12(9).9.2–10.3; zu dieser Stelle vgl. etwa RONNING 2007: 326. S. in diesem Zusammenhang auch ZANKER 2012: 86.

276

Matthias Haake

tus und dem Flußgott Tiber, abseits des Schlachtgeschehens beiwohnt (sog. proelium apud Tiberim-Szene); Constantins Einzug in die Hauptstadt (sog. ingressus Augusti-Szene); einer kaiserlichen Ansprache an das Volk (sog. oratio AugustiSzene) und einer abschließenden Szene, die Konstantin bei der Verteilung von Geldgeschenken zeigt (sog. liberalitas Augusti-Szene);187 zweitens, die Dedikationsinschrift auf der Attika; drittens, die – wie mit guten Gründen anzunehmen ist – fehlende Quadriga mit Triumphator auf dem Bogen und schließlich viertens, die Darstellung bezwungener Barbaren auf den Postamentreliefs des Bogens. An dieser Stelle soll es nun nicht um die in höchstem Maße innovative, exzeptionelle und tabubrechende, zweifelsohne überaus bemerkenswerte und in der Forschung zu Recht immer wieder herausgehobene martialische Darstellung des Kampfgeschehens an der Milvischen Brücke gehen, in der römische Soldaten römische Soldaten erschlagen – der ersten den Sieger verherrlichenden Schlachtendarstellung eines römischen Bürgerkrieges in der stadtrömischen Repräsentationskunst.188 Betont werden sollen vielmehr diejenigen Elemente des konstantinischen Frieses, die die Gewalt des Bürgerkriegssieges einhegen: die letzten drei Szenen, die sich bezeichnenderweise anders als die drei Kriegsszenen, die auf der stadtabgewandten Seite des Bogens angebracht sind, auf der stadtzugewandten Seite befinden.189 Die erste der drei den konstantinischen Fries abschließenden Szenen betont noch stark den Aspekt der ‚Inbesitznahme‘ Roms durch Konstantin: Beim Einzug in die Hauptstadt des Imperium Romanum nicht als Triumphzug in Szene gesetzt, sind auf dem ersten der drei letzten Bilder verschiedene bewaffnete Truppen des neuen Herren sowie der ins sogenannte militärische Friedenskostüm gewandete Kaiser,190 der auf einem von vier Pferden gezogenen vierrädrigen Reisewagen sitzt, dargestellt, ohne daß allerdings irgendwo das abgeschlagene Haupt des Maxentius in die Szenerie integriert wäre;191 auf der vorletzten Szene spricht der Kaiser, nach wie vor ins sogenannte militärische Friedenskostüm gekleidet, auf dem Forum Romanum in Anwesenheit von zwei Kindern und in Gegenwart einiger Gardesoldaten zur männlichen Bevölkerung Roms;192 in der letzten Szene vergibt der nun in eine Toga gewandete Kaiser, der kleidungsmäßig nicht von den Senatoren zu unterscheiden ist, in Abwesenheit jeglichen Militärs

187 Zu den sechs Szenen des konstantinischen Frieses vgl. L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 34–102 und KOEPPEL 1990: 38–64. 188 S. zu dieser Schlachtdarstellung L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 65–71 und KOEPPEL 1990: 47–51; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang MAYER 2006: 147 sowie WIENAND 2011: 247 und WIENAND 2012: 212f. 189 Vgl. dazu MAYER 2002: 189f. 190 Zum sogenannten militärischen Friedenskostüm s. ALFÖLDI 1970: 165–167 (= 1935: 47–49); vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang auch RONNING 2007: 343. 191 Vgl. L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 72–80 und KOEPPEL 1990: 51–56. Nach SPEIDEL 1992: 284 (= 1986: 258) ist Maxentius immerhin auf dem konstantinischen Fries präsent – und zwar in der Figur KOEPPEL 1990: 50 Nr. 6 in der proelium apud Tiberim-Szene; allerdings ist diese Annahme keineswegs zwingend. 192 Vgl. L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 80–89 und KOEPPEL 1990: 56–60.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

277

und in Anwesenheit einer Reihe von Kindern persönlich und unmittelbar Geld in unterschiedlicher Höhe hierarchisch geordnet an Senatoren und römische Bürger.193 Am Ende des konstantinischen Frieses ist also das Bürgerkriegsgemetzel an der Milvischen Brücke bildlich wieder eingefangen: In den drei letzten Bildern des Frieses nimmt die Präsenz des Militärischen stetig ab (das Kriegerische fehlt überhaupt ganz), die friedliche Grundstimmung hingegen nimmt proportional zu. In Stein gemeißelt stehen am Ende als positive Konsequenz des konstantinischen Bürgerkriegssieges die wiederhergestellte Eintracht zwischen Kaiser, Heer, Senat und stadtrömischer Bevölkerung und die restituierte Ordnung der Gesellschaft. An diese bildliche Botschaft des konstantinischen Frieses schließt sich inhaltlich mit einer substantiellen Erweiterung der Aussage die Weihinschrift des Konstantinsbogens an, die, obschon der Bogen Konstantin von Senat und Volk von Rom dediziert wurde, zweifelsohne gerade in den interpretatorischen Grundgedanken auch die konstantinische Sicht der Dinge widerspiegelt:194 Konstantin wurde mit dem Bogen geehrt, weil er das Gemeinwesen sowohl vom Tyrannen als auch von dessen ganzer Parteiung gleichzeitig durch einen gerechten Waffengang befreit hat.195

Diese Aussage, die trotz des eine semantische Verschiebung bedingenden fehlenden Verweises auf das res publica restituta-Ideologem196 in mancher Hinsicht stark im augusteischen Argumentationshaushalt in Sachen Bürgerkriegsbegründung, beziehungsweise allgemeiner gesprochen in der augusteischen Prinzipatsideologie, verhaftet ist,197 enthält als innovatives Element die maximale Legitimation für Konstantins Bürgerkrieg: die Stigmatisierung des Gegners als Tyrann. Seit Bestehen des Prinzipats war es zwar in literarischen Texten eine durchaus gängige Praxis, Kaiser durch die Zuschreibung von Elementen aus der Tyrannentopik auf die massivst mögliche Weise zu diskreditieren; doch erst seit Konstantins Sieg über Maxentius ist die Brandmarkung des im Kampf um die Kaiserherrschaft unterlegenen Gegners als Tyrann in der ‚offiziellen‘ Sprache des Siegers etabliert, wodurch die Sache des Siegers zu einem gerechten und gerechtfertigten, ja geradezu notwendigen Unterfangen wird.198 Die unter Konstantin innovative,

193 Vgl. L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 89–102 und KOEPPEL 1990: 60–63. Zu den einzelnen Szenen vgl. auch GIULIANI 2000: 274–279, 284–286 sowie ZANKER 2012: 86–99. 194 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang GIULIANI 2000: 284 und s. auch WIENAND 2012: 214. 195 CIL VI 1139, 31245 (+ pp. 3378, 4328) = ILS 694 i; für das Zitat s. ll. 5–7: (…) tam de tyranno quam de omni eius | factione uno tempore iustis | rempublicam ultus est armis, (…). Vgl. zu dieser Inschrift ausführlich etwa GRÜNEWALD 1990: 63–86; KUHOFF 1991: 163–171 und – zur Bedeutung der Formulierung instinctu divinitatis in l. 3 – LENSKI 2008. 196 Aufgegriffen wird dies allerdings im Panegyricus von 313: Paneg. lat. 12(9).1.1. 197 So etwa auch MAYER 2002: 228 und DIEFENBACH 2007: 127 Anm. 179. 198 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa GRÜNEWALD 1990: 66–71; BARNES 1996: 60–62, der allerdings – wie DIEFENBACH 2007: 128 Anm. 185 zu Recht kritisiert – nicht überzeugend „die Lexik tyrannus für Maxentius als Anlehnung Konstantins an die Bezeichnung für die

278

Matthias Haake

späterhin vielfach wieder aufgegriffene Verwendung des Tyrannisarguments im Kampf gegen Konkurrenten um den Kaiserthron zur Rechtfertigung eines Bürgerkrieges kann als ein sinnfälliger Indikator dafür gesehen werden, wie problematisch dessen Begründbarkeit war. Die von Konstantin betriebene Stigmatisierung des Maxentius als Tyrann brachte es mit sich, daß der sieghafte Kaiser eine überaus positive Rolle auf der politischen Bühne besetzten konnte: die des Befreiers. Diese Rolle ist nicht nur im Mitteldurchgang des Konstantinsbogen, wo Konstantin als liberator urbis und fundator quietis bezeichnet wird,199 formuliert, sondern wurde durch eine ganze Reihe von Maßnahmen ab dem 29. Oktober 312 nachdrücklich in Szene gesetzt, so daß Konstantin als liberator urbis suae auftreten konnte und der vormalige conservator urbis suae Maxentius systematisch aus dem Stadtbild – und damit auch aus der (stadtrömischen) Erinnerung – im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes ‚ausradiert‘ werden sollte.200 Die bisherigen Ausführungen zeigen, daß es völlig außer Zweifel steht, daß Konstantin seinen Sieg im Bürgerkrieg in bis dato ungekannter Weise in Szene gesetzt hat, in dem er das abgeschlagene Haupt des unterlegenen Gegners bei seinem Einzug nach Rom aufgespießt präsentieren ließ. Trotz aller Triumphhaftigkeit dieses Einzuges kann es aber als plausibel angesehen werden, daß es sich unter formalen Gesichtspunkten nicht um einen Triumph handelte, Konstantin also – jenseits der Transgressivität seiner Siegesinszenierung – nicht den maximalen Tabubruch der Feier eines Triumphes über römische Bürger beging,201 was neben den zweifellos dominierenden ‚ideologischen‘ Beweggründen und herrschaftspraktischen Erwägungen in gewisser Weise auch organisatorischpragmatische Ursachen geschuldet gewesen sein mag, da der Triumph nur wenige Stunden nach der Schlacht hätte stattfinden müssen.202 Daß der formale nichtTriumph beim triumphalen Einzug in Rom für Konstantin nicht nur während der Geschehnisse selbst, sondern auch späterhin eine äußerst wichtige Rolle gespielt haben muß, läßt sich einerseits aus der bildlichen Darstellung seines Einzuges in Rom auf dem konstantinischen Fries ersehen und andererseits aus der gewichtigen Tatsache ableiten, daß auf dem Konstantinsbogen – wie mit guten Gründen anzu-

199 200 201

202

Christenverfolger interpretiert“, und HUMPHRIES 2008: 94f.; s. auch grundsätzlich NERI 1997 sowie ferner auch ESCRIBANO 1998. SWOBODA 2007 das Themenfeld ‚Kaiser und Tyrann‘ in den Panegyrici latini untersucht. CIL VI 1139 = ILS 694 ii u. iii: Der Bogen ist auch Konstantin als liberator urbis und fundator quietis dediziert. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa HEKSTER 1999: 737–744; CURRAN 2000: 70–115; DIEFENBACH 2007: 122–133 und MARLOWE 2010. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa KÄHLER 1952: 1f.; FRASCHETTI 1999: 49f.; DIEFENBACH 2007: 126f. und RONNING 2007: 335f. Anders hingegen, ohne jedoch zu überzeugen WIENAND 2012: 214f. Vgl. in dieser Hinsicht KUHOFF 1991: 165f. Anm. 101 und GIULIANI 2000: 277f.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

279

nehmen ist – das weithin sichtbare Zeichen fehlte, das einen Bogen zu einem Triumphbogen machte: die Triumphalquadriga.203 Das letzte hier in Augenschein zu nehmende Element des Konstantinsbogens sind dessen Postamentreliefs, die ein ganz zentrales Thema haben: Siege über nordische Barbaren und Orientalen.204 Mit dieser Aussage über Konstantins auswärtige Erfolge wird auf das übliche kaiserliche militärische Betätigungsfeld verwiesen und zugleich ein Aspekt aus der Weihinschrift aufgegriffen, ist doch dort unspezifisch von Triumphen Konstantins die Rede.205 Der Konstantinsbogen ist somit nicht nur ein Monument, das den Sieger in einem Bürgerkrieg feiert, sondern zugleich auch ein Monument, das im Zusammenhang mit Konstantins Dezennalienfeiern „den Kaiser als den immer Siegreichen, den allzeit Triumphierenden“ verherrlicht,206 oder, wie es der anonyme Panegyriker von 313 formulierte: Du, Konstantin, allein reihst unermüdlich Krieg an Krieg, häufst Sieg auf Sieg.207

Der Konstantinsbogen feiert mithin auf der einen Seite also in noch nie dagewesener Weise Konstantins Sieg im Bürgerkrieg über Maxentius; auf der anderen Seite werden aber auch bereits etablierte Strategien verwandt, diesen Sieg nicht zum alleinigen Thema des Bogens zu machen, sondern in die allgemeine Sieghaftigkeit des Kaisers einzugliedern. Zu diesem Bestreben paßt, daß in Konstantins wahrlich ausgeprägter Siegestitutlatur keinerlei Verweise auf seine zahlreichen Siege in Bürgerkriegen zu finden sind.208 Nach dem Konstanstinsbogen ist in aller Kürze auf den Panegyricus von 313 als überaus sprechendem Zeugen für die Ambivalenz des durch einen Bürgerkrieg errungen Sieg zu verweisen.209 Während in der Forschung der Fokus oft vollkommen zu Recht auf die Verherrlichung von Konstantins Sieg gerichtet ist, gibt es eine Reihe von Passagen, die deutlich das negative Potential genau dieses Sieges thematisieren; so heißt es etwa an einer Stelle: [D]u mußtest über Soldaten den Sieg erringen, die (welch ein Frevel!) kurz zuvor noch Römer waren ….210

203 Vgl. dazu überzeugend GIULIANI 2000: 283f., der in seinen Ausführungen auf MAGI 1956– 1957 basiert; s. auch DE MARIA 1988: 316. Anders hingegen PENSABENE 1999: 147, der auch auf Ausführungen in der mir nirgends zugänglichen Arbeit von CASSATELLA/CONFORTO 1989 verweist. 204 Vgl. dazu L’ORANGE/GERKAN 1939: 112–136. 205 CIL VI 1139 = ILS 694 i; in l. 8 ist von triumphis die Rede. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang GIULIANI 2000: 281; DIEFENBACH 2007: 126 und ZANKER 2012: 82. 206 Für das Zitat s. KÄHLER 1952: 2f. 207 Paneg. lat. 12(9).22.2: Tu, Constantine, solus infatigabilis bellis bella continuas, victorias victoriis cumulas. – Die Übersetzung stammt von MÜLLER-RETTIG 2008. 208 Zu Konstantins Siegestitulatur s. v.a. BARNES 1976a: 191–193; BARNES 1976b; ARNALDI 1977 sowie COLOMBO 2008. 209 Vgl. zuletzt mit anderer Akzentuierung WIENAND 2012: 239–246. 210 Paneg. lat. 12(9).5.3: Tibi vincendi erant milites (pro nefas!) paulo ante Romani (…). – Die Übersetzung stammt von MÜLLER-RETTIG 2008.

280

Matthias Haake

Diese häufig wenig beachtete Textpassage, die im Kontext des Lobpreises der Größe von Konstantins Sieg über Maxentius steht,211 bringt deutlich zum Ausdruck, das selbst im Panegyricus von 313, der hinsichtlich der Verherrlichung des konstantinischen Bürgerkriegssieges qualitativ und quantitativ Neuland betreten hat, Strategien Anwendung finden, diesen Sieg nicht als einen Sieg ex sanguine Romano erscheinen zu lassen, sondern als einen ‚klassischen‘ römischen Erfolg über auswärtige, mithin also nicht-römische Gegner. Zu diesem Zwecke werden die Konstantin feindlichen Soldaten kurzerhand ihres Römerseins enthoben. Und nur wenig später erfolgt unter Verwendung eines bereits in der späten Republik zur Anwendung gekommenen Arguments eine Exkulpierung Konstantins für das vergossene römische Blut: Schuld daran hat nämlich niemand anderes als der Gegner. Denn, so teilt der Panegyriker dem direkt angesprochenen, unseligen feindlichen Soldaten mit: Du bist es ja, der Konstantin gezwungen hat, soviel Blut zu vergießen, ihn, dem der Sieg selbst fast schon missfallen hat, da es ihm nicht möglich war, eure Rettung von euch zu erwirken.212

Abschließend sei an dieser Stelle auf eine Ehreninschrift für Konstantin aus Augusta Traiana, dem thrakischen Beroia und heute in Bulgarien gelegenen Stara Sagora verwiesen. Diese kaum beachtete griechische Inschrift, nach dem ersten Herausgeber „schillern[d] im poetischen Redeprunk der damaligen Sophisten“,213 datiert in die Zeit zwischen den Jahren 324 und 337, womöglich in die Zeit kurz nach des Kaisers Tod,214 und feiert Konstantin als [d]en Vorkämpfer des Friedens und Beförderer allen Glücks [und] denjenigen, der vom Abendland bis zum Morgenland ohne Blutvergießen überall Siege errungen hat ….215

Wenn diese Aussage über Konstantins überall erbrachte Erweise seiner Sieghaftigkeit auch auf seine Bürgerkriegssiege über Maxentius im Westen und Licinius im Osten anspielt – eine Annahme, die wohl berechtigt ist –,216 dann zeigt sich erneut die Ambivalenz des Sieges im Bürgerkrieg: Zwar wird zunächst grundsätzlich die ubiquitäre Sieghaftigkeit Konstantins gepriesen, aber wirklich preiswürdig ist ein Sieg im Bürgerkrieg eigentlich nur unter der Bedingung, daß er ohne Blutvergießen errungen wurde. Um Konstantin in Bezug auf seine Bürgerkriegs211 Paneg. lat. 12(9).5.1–6.2. 212 Paneg. lat. 12(9).7.2: Constantinum tu tantum sanguinis fundere coegisti, cui, quia salutem vestram a vobis impetrare non licuit, paene displicuit ipsa victoria. – Die Übersetzung stammt von MÜLLER-RETTIG 2008. 213 Vgl. KALINKA 1906: 69. 214 So TANTILLO 1999: 85f. 215 KALINKA 1906: 69f. Nr. 75 = BEŠEVLIEV 1964: 128f. Nr. 190 = POPESCU 1990: 85 = SEG 52.695 – bei dem Zitat handelt es sich um ll. 1–6: Τὸν εἰρήνης πρόμ̣[αχον] | καὶ ἁπάσης εὐδαιμο[νίας] | χορηγόν, τὸν τὰς ὅ̣[λας?] | ἀναιμωτὶ νείκας ἀπ[ὸ τῆς] | ἑσπέρας μέχρι τῆς ἕ[ω] | ἀν[αδ]η̣σάμενον (…). Für die Ergänzung ἀν[αδ]η̣σάμενον in l. 6 s. BE 1991, no. 696 und BE 2004, no. 533 = SEG 53.647. Vgl. zu dieser Inschrift ausführlich TANTILLO 1999. 216 Vgl. TANTILLO 1999: 81–83.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

281

siege in dieser Hinsicht loben zu können, bedurfte es einer nicht unbeträchtlichen Umschreibung der tatsächlichen Geschehnisse. Zum Erweis seiner permanenten und allgegenwärtigen Sieghaftigkeit versuchte Konstantin in bis dato ungekannter Weise, auch aus seinen Bürgerkriegssiegen Kapital zu generieren.217 Daß dieses Unterfangen nicht unhinterfragbar war, zeigt sein immer wieder einhegender Umgang mit seinen zum Teil überaus expressiven und exzessiven Siegesinszenierungen. Den allgemeinen Verweis auf einen Sieg zu produzieren, der explizit nicht als Bürgerkriegssieg spezifiziert wird, jedoch durch den Kontext (zunächst) eindeutig als solcher identifizierbar ist, das gelang Konstantin und seinem Umfeld vielleicht nirgends so gut, wie in einem zwischen Ende Oktober 312 und Frühjahr 313 geprägten Solidus aus Ostia: Abgebildet ist auf dessen Revers eine nach links schreitende Victoria mit einem Kranz in der rechten und einem Palmzweig in der linken Hand abgebildet; die Legende lautet: VICTORIA CONSTANTINI AVG(usti).218

VI. DER SIEG IM BÜRGERKRIEG ALS AMBIVALENTES EREIGNIS IM IMPERIUM ROMANUM WÄHREND DES ‚LANGEN DRITTEN JAHRHUNDERTS‘ Seit der Implementierung der monarchischen Ordnung in Rom durch OctavianAugustus stellte der Sieg über römische Bürger ein ambivalentes Ereignis für jeden Kaiser dar, der als Sieger aus einem Bürgerkrieg hervorging: Auf der einen Seite war der ex sanguine Romano erkämpfte Sieg die basale Bedingung der kaiserlichen Herrschaft, die im Bürgerkrieg entweder erobert oder verteidigt worden war; auf der anderen Seite war das an den kaiserlichen Händen klebende römische Bürgerblut ein Menetekel. Dieses Menetekel war einerseits ein Erbe überkommener römischer Vorstellungen und andererseits auch Folge der von Augustus seit dem Jahr 27 v. Chr. ausgehenden Perhorreszierung von Bürgerkriegen, die darauf abzielte, jeden erneuten Bürgerkrieg prospektiv auf maximale Weise zu delegitimieren. Der erste Princeps bezweckte damit – wie mit guten Gründen zu vermuten steht – sowohl die Immunisierung seiner kaiserlichen Herrschaft vor möglichen bürgerkriegsbereiten Kontrahenten als auch die Legitimierung der Monarchie als Herrschaftsform; zugleich traf sich Augustus’ Intention mit den Interessen all derjenigen im Imperium Romanum, die von der ‚augusteischen Revolution‘ und ihren Folgen profitierten und den neuen status quo perpetuieren wollten, da ein Bürgerkrieg ein unkalkulierbares Risiko für die Stellung etablierter Eliten auf der imperialer, provinzialer und lokaler Ebene bedeutete.219

217 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang eingehend WIENAND 2012: 483–505. 218 RIC VI, p. 407 no. 70; zu dieser Prägung vgl. BEYELER 2011: 97f. 219 Im Zusammenhang mit letzterem Aspekt s. grundsätzlich CHRISTOL 1988: 177; in Bezug auf den Bürgerkrieg zwischen Septimius Severus und Pescennius Niger hat diesen Punkt THIEL 2005 analysiert.

282

Matthias Haake

Wie läßt sich nun der Befund des Umgangs mit dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg insbesondere im Resonanzraum Rom von Septimius Severus im Dezennium zwischen den Jahren 193 und 203, von Aurelian im Jahre 274 und von Konstantin in den Jahren zwischen 312 und 315 erklären? Auszugehen ist dabei von folgenden Punkten, die in aller Kürze wichtige Aspekte der vorangegangenen Ausführungen rekapitulieren: Septimius Severus choreographierte im Jahre 193 einen Einzug in die Ewige Stadt „comme il faut“, um den Konsens zwischen ihm, seinem Heer, dem Senat und der stadtrömischen Bevölkerung in Szene zu setzen und zu befördern. Seinen endgültigen Sieg über Pescennius Niger im Jahre 194 und die folgende – teilweise überaus gewaltsame – (Re-)Integration der östlichen Reichshälfte in seine Herrschaft versuchte er zunächst mit seinem sogenannten ersten Partherkrieg zu camouflieren. Dem Sieg über Clodius Albinus im Jahre 197 ließ Septimius Severus eine bis dato in ihrer Form noch nie dagewesene drastische Form der ephemären Manifestation des Erfolges im Bürgerkrieg folgen: Er sandte das abgeschlagene Haupt des unterlegenen Widersachers nach Rom, um seinen finalen Sieg über seine Konkurrenten um den Kaiserthron zu demonstrieren und ein deutliches Zeichen zur Abschreckung jedweder weiterer Widerständigkeit insbesondere seitens senatorischer Kreise gegen seine Herrschaft zu setzen. Erst im Rahmen seiner Dezennalien wurde der ihm bereits im Jahre 195 von Senat und Volk von Rom gelobte Triumphbogen, der neben militärischen Erfolgen gegen äußere Gegner als eine zentrale Botschaft in augusteischer Manier die Widerherstellung der res publica propagierte. Aurelian, der im Jahre 274 einen großen Triumph zelebrierte, feierte neben einigen Erfolgen über auswärtige Feinde dabei insbesondere die Wiederherstellung der Einheit des Imperium Romanum, die durch die erstmalige Präsentation von unterlegenen Bürgerkriegsgegnern im Triumph, nämlich des Tetricus und der Zenobia, in besonderer Weise verdeutlicht wurde, auch wenn beide durch ihr Auftreten ‚deromanisiert‘ wurden. Konstantin schließlich, aufs Ganze betrachtet wohl der größte Bürgerkriegssieger auf dem römischen Kaiserthron überhaupt, zelebrierte seinen Erfolg über Maxentius im Jahre 312 in einer Weise, die über alle bislang dagewesenen Manifestationen der Sieghaftigkeit in Bürgerkriegen hinausgingen: An der Spitze seines triumphalen Einzuges in Rom wurde das abgeschlagene Haupt des unterlegenen Gegners präsentiert, um alle Zweifel an dessen Tod aus dem Weg zu räumen und potentielle Widerständigkeit in Rom zu brechen. Doch nicht nur in der ephemeren Inszenierung des Sieges beschritt Konstantin neue Wege, sondern auch in der permanenten Inszenierung seines Erfolges über Maxentius. Die Darstellung der Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke, in der erstmalig in der stadtrömischen Repräsentationskunst die Tötung römischer Soldaten durch römischen Truppen abgebildet ist, stellt einen massiven Tabubruch dar, auch wenn nachdrücklich zu betonen ist, daß in der bildlichen Gesamtbotschaft des Konstantinsbogens diese Darstellung durch andere Bilder eingehegt wird.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

283

Diese Punkte sind vor einem trotz aller Wandlungen des römischen Kaisertums basalen Aspekt kaiserlicher Herrschaft im Imperium Romanum zu sehen: der Sieghaftigkeit des Kaisers.220 Den Sieg im Bürgerkrieg zu nutzen, die auf diese Weise manifest gewordene eigene Sieghaftigkeit zu propagieren, blieb jedoch zwischen der Herrschaft des Augustus und dem vierten Jahrhundert ungeachtet der qualitativen Veränderungen im Umgang mit dem Erfolg ex sanguine Romano zumindest partiell immer problematisch und hinterfragbar. Dies läßt sich trotz aller Intensivierungstendenzen der Nutzbarmachung von Bürgerkriegssiegen an einem Set verwandter Begründungsstrategien deutlich ablesen, die ihrer Natur nach einen defensiven Charakter aufweisen. Doch bevor es sich diesen zuzuwenden gilt, sind noch die Ursachen und Voraussetzungen für die angesprochenenen Intensivierungstendenzen der Nutzung der Ressource Bürgerkriegssieg in Augenschein zu nehmen. Vier Elemente sind in diesem Zusammenhang zu nennen: Zum ersten bedingte die je spezifisch prekäre Situation, in der sich die Bürgerkriegssieger bis zu ihrem militärischen Erfolg über ihre Konkurrenten um die kaiserlicher Herrschaft befunden hatten oder auch noch darüber hinaus befanden die Art und Weise des Umgangs mit dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg. Die Handlungsoptionen, die insbsondere der unmittelbaren Manifestation der neuen Machtverhältnise dienten, konnten zwischen Akten der Reintegration und der (temporären) Desintegration politischer Parteiungen und sozialer Gruppen changieren, zwischen der Ausübung von clementia und der exzessiven Anwendung von Gewalt, die als „Machtaktion“ sowohl als „bloße Aktionsmacht“ als auch als „bindende Aktionsmacht“ intendiert sein konnte.221 Wie bezüglich der Manifestation der neuen Machtverhältnisse bestand auch hinsichtlich der Inszenierung der neuen Machtverhältnisse für den ‚bürgerkriegssiegreichen‘ Kaiser eine Spannbreite von Optionen, die zwischen dichter Verschleierung und ostentativer Demonstration oszillierten. Zum zweiten gilt es, die seit dem dritten Jahrhundert stattfindenden Wandlungen im Konzept der kaiserlichen Sieghaftigkeit zu berücksichtigen, die den konkreten einzelnen Sieg in den Hintergund treten ließen und die Kumulation permanent erbrachter Siege als Erweis eines ‚Seinszustandes‘ perpetuierten Siegens in den Vordergrund rückte. Darüber hinaus ist drittens auf Verschiebungen im ideologischen Fundament des Imperium Romanum zu verweisen, die durch die im Verlauf des dritten Jahrhunderts regimentsfähig gewordene neue, vielfach aus den Grenzprovinzen stammende Militärelite bedingt sind:222 Zwar nicht vollkommen an die Stelle, jedoch

220 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa GAGÉ 1933; MCCORMICK 1986: 11–34, bes. 13 sowie WIENAND 2012: 13–24. 221 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhag POPITZ 1992: 48: „Gewalt meint eine Machtaktion, die zur absichtlichen körperlichen Verletzung anderer führt, gleichgültig, ob sie für den Agierenden ihren Sinn im Vollzug selbst hat (als bloße Machtaktion) oder, in Drohungen umgesetzt, zu einer dauerhaften Unterwerfung (als bindende Aktionsmacht) führen soll“. 222 Die Überlegungen zu diesem Punkt basieren auf einem unpubliziert gebliebenen Vortragsmanuskript von E. FLAIG aus dem Jahre 1996 mit dem Titel „Blut, Tränen, Schweiß und Mühe“

284

Matthias Haake

machtvoll vor den die Kaiserzeit gut zwei Jahrhunderte dominierenden, von civischen Eliten geprägten Diskurs über ‚des Reiches Herrlichkeit‘ wie er sich etwa in Aelius Aristides’ Romrede widerspiegelt, tritt eine mit den Worten ‚blood, toil, tears and sweat‘ charakterisierbare Ideologie, auf deren Grundlage ein Bürgerkrieg zwar nicht unbedingt problemlos, jedoch einfacher plausibiliert werden konnte. Schließlich und letztens gilt es viertens, die seit der Tetrarchie in verstärktem Maße aufretende Mehrkaiserherrschaft als wichtigen Faktor zu berücksichtigen,223 die trotz stets versuchter formalisierter Hierarchisierungen zwischen den Herrschern ein immenses, dieser Herrschaftskonstruktion inhärentes Konfliktpotential in sich barg, das von Streitigkeiten um Rang und Ehre bis hin zu Kriegen um die (Vor-)Macht reichte. Nach diesem Blick auf die Ursachen und Voraussetzungen für die angesprochenenen Intensivierungstendenzen der Nutzung der Ressource Bürgerkriegssieg sind nunmehr die Rechtfertigungsstrategien für Bürgerkriege in den Blick zu nehmen. Obschon sich beginnend mit der Herrschaft des Septimius Severus der Umgang mit dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg seitens der Bürgerkriegssieger unter bestimmten Bedingungen immer offensiver gestaltete bis, ohne daß es sich dabei um eine lineare Entwicklung der Jahre 193 bis 312 handelte, seit konstantinischer Zeit der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg zu einer stets operationalisierten Option der ostentativen Siegesunszenierung wurde und der kalkulierte Nutzen der Bürgerkriegssieginszenierung mithin deren erwartbare kollaterale Kosten überstieg,224 schrieben die siegreichen Bürgerkriegskrieger noch das gesamte vierte Jahrhundert hindurch massive Rechtfertigungsargumente in die öffentliche Inszenierung des Sieges ex sanguine Romano ein: Der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg blieb trotz seiner zunehmenden Einbindung in die kaiserliche Sieghaftigkeit strukturell stets ein ambivalentes Ereignis, das moralisch und politisch im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes kontaminiert war. Daneben war die Exploitation eines Bürgerkriegssieges über einen Konkurrenten um den kaiserlichen Purpur zur Steigerung der Sieghaftigkeit eines Kaiser mit einer gegenläufigen Strategie konfrontiert: dem Versuch, die Wertigkeit des Bürgerkriegssieges zu minimieren und als minderwertig im Vergleich zu einem Sieg über auswärtige Feinde zu taxieren. Bei den Rechtfertigungsstrategien für Bürgerkriege im Kampf um die Kaiserherrschaft im Imperium Romanum wurden im Laufe der Geschichte verschiedene Argumentationsfiguren bemüht, um den Sieg im Bürgerkrieg akzeptabel und profitabel zu machen; es handelt sich bei diesen Argumentationsfiguren, die zum Teil ihren Ausgang in den Anfängen der Prinzipatszeit genommen haben, um die nachfolgend dargelegten fünf Optionen, die das Charakteristikum eint, daß sie den

– Das Bildprogramm einer neuen Politik auf den Münzen des Kaisers Ämilian, das auf Beobachtungen von CHRISTOL 1976 zurückgreift. 223 Zur Mehrkaiserherrschaft im Imperium Romanum seit diokletianischer Zeit s. beispielsweise KOLB 1997: 38–44 und MARTIN 2009: 543f. (= 1997: 47f.). 224 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang etwa MCCORMICK 1986: 80–83; SZIDAT 2010: 339f. und WIENAND 2012: 219.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

285

wesentlichen Grund für alle Bürgerkriege in der römischen Kaiserzeit intentional und konsequent verschweigen: den aus welchen Interessen auch immer geleiteten ‚Willen zur Macht‘ der um die Kaiserkrone ringenden Protagonisten. Erstens, die bewußte Verknüpfung zumindest in der Inszenierung von Bürgerkriegssiegen mit Erfolgen in auswärtigen Kriegen sowie beziehungsweise oder, wenn möglich, die ‚Deromanisierung‘ und Barbarisierung des inneren Gegners, die sich seit Octavians Kampf gegen Marcus Antonius immer wieder beobachten läßt.225 Zweitens, die semantische Umdeutung eines Bürgerkrieges in die Bekämpfung einer Rebellion gegen die römische Herrschaft,226 die den Einsatz militärischer Mittel zur Wiederherstellung der imperialen Ordnung rechtfertigte. Drittens, der Tyrannisvorwurf. Dieser führte zum Rückgriff auf eine der wirkungsmächtigsten Argumentationsfiguren, auf die in der Antike überhaupt rekurriert werden konnte: das Tyrannisargument. Dieses spielte in der römischen Kaiserzeit nicht nur, aber besonders auch in Aushandlungsprozessen von Bürgerkriegen stets eine wichtige Rolle, nachdem bereits seit Augustus die Wahrung und der Schutz der libertas ein wichtiges Thema der herrscherlichen Selbstdarstellung war.227 Wohl auch als Konsequenz der Häufigkeit von Bürgerkriegen im dritten Jahrhundert wurden seit Beginn des vierten Jahrhunderts Konkurrenten um den Kaiserthron terminologisch nicht nur, aber insbesondere ex post als Tyrannen stigmatisiert. Das Operieren mit dem Tyrannisvorwurf eröffnete während der Auseinandersetzungen und ex eventu für den Sieger, der, wie etwa die einleitende Passage der vita des Pescennius Niger in der Historia Augusta illustriert,228 bekanntlich die Geschichte schreibt (wenn auch à la longue nicht immer exklusiv), die maximale Legitimation der eigenen Position sowie die maximale Delegitimation des Gegners. Da der Tyrann in der Vorstellungswelt der Antike kein zoon politikon, sondern ein monstrum war, gegen das jedes Mittel recht war, bot der Tyrannisvorwurf zugleich auch einen unhinterfragbaren Rechtfertigungsansatz für den exzessiven Einsatz von Gewalt.229 225 In hohem Maße instruktiv sind in diesem Zusammenhang Orosius’ Ausführungen über die Frage nach der Existenz von Bürgerkriegen zu seinen Zeiten: Oros. 5.22.5–15. Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang, allerdings mit einer anderen Deutung, BLECKMANN 1999b: 47; s. grundsätzlich zu Bürgerkriegen in Orosius’ Geschichtswerk VAN NUFFELEN 2012: 122–132. Ein anderes aufschlußreiches Beispiel stammt aus dem Bügerkrieg des Jahres 69; in Tac. hist. 4.2.2 findet sich die folgende Nachricht über die Auszeichnung des Gaius Licinius Mucianus mit ornamenta triumphalia: Multo cum honore verborum Maciano triumphalia de bello civium data, sed in Sarmatas expeditio fingebatur. – „Mit vielen ehrenden Worten verlieh man Mucian die Triumphabzeichen für den Bürgerkrieg, aber man nahm sein Unternehmen gegen die Sarmaten zum Vorwand.“ – Die deutsche Übersetzung stammt von STÄDELE 2014; zu Mucianus s. zuletzt DE KLEIJN 2013. 226 Verwiesen sei hier auf die Ausführungen von BITTO 2009: 178–182 zur Verwendung des Wortes rebelles. 227 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang z.B. WALSER 1955 und BÉRANGER 1970: 260–262, 265. 228 HA Pesc. Nig. 1.1–2. 229 Vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang SCHEID 1984: 182–190 und ZIMMERMANN 2009: 43.

286

Matthias Haake

Viertens, die Wiederherstellung der res publica: Das bereits in den Bürgerkriegen republikanischer Zeit verwandte Ideologem der res publica restituta war seit der Begründung des Prinzipats durch Augustus ein zentraler Baustein zur Rechtfertigung von Bürgerkriegen und diente als legitimatorische Grundlage gerade für diejenigen Monarchen, die sich erfolgreich auf den römischen Kaiserthron gekämpft und somit den gewaltsamen Bruch mit dem Vorgänger zu vermitteln sowie eine neue Herrschaft ideologisch zu fundieren hatten. Diese Rechtfertigung war vor dem Hintergrund der in der römischen Welt gesellschaftlich tief weit verbreiteten Skepsis gegenüber den res novae wenig überraschend ‚konservativ‘.230 Fünftens, als Ausblick auf die nachkonstantinische Zeit: der Kampf um den rechten Glauben. Mit Konstantins Sieg an der Milvischen Brücke begann die Einbindung religiöser Argumente in die Legitimation von Bürgerkriegen – sowohl zwischen im weitesten Sinne christlichen und paganen Kontrahenten wie auch zwischen, wiederum im weitesten Sinne, christlichen Kontrahenten. Der Kampf konnte mit der Frage nach Orthodoxie und Orthopraxie diskursiv aufgeladen werden. Diese religiöse Komponente stellt nur eine Erweiterung des Argumentationshaushaltes für die Rechtfertigung eines Bürgerkrieges und die semantische Überhöhung des Bürgerkriegssieges dar; sie löste die traditionellen Argumentationsfiguren aber keineswegs ab. Im achtzehnten Buch seiner Etymologien schreibt Isidor von Sevilla im Kapitel über Kriege, daß es vier Typen des Krieges gäbe:231 den gerechten und den ungerechten Krieg, also das bellum iustum und das bellum iniustum, den Bürgerkrieg, das bellum civile, und dessen Steigerung, den ‚mehr als‘-Bürgerkrieg, das bellum plus quam civile. Während der Bürgerkrieg dadurch gekennzeichnet sei, so Isidor, daß der Krieg zwischen Bürgern ausgefochten werde, sei das Charakteristikum des ‚mehr als‘-Bürgerkrieges, daß in ihm nicht nur zwischen Bürgern, sondern sogar unter Verwandten, den cognati, die Waffen gegeneinander gerichtet würden. Isidor beschließt seine Ausführungen mit zwei Zitaten aus Lucans Bürgerkrieg – daß nämlich Brudermord Brüdern Prämien eingebracht habe und daß Söhne darum stritten, wem der abgeschlagene Kopf des Vaters zukomme:232 Der Bürgerkrieg führt, so die eindeutige Botschaft, zur maximalen Korrosion aller sozialen Bindungen und jeglicher Ordnung. Daß gegen ein solches Denken über den Bürgerkrieg selbst die ‚metaphysisch‘ in höchstem Maße aufgeladene, politisch-normative Argumentationstrias ‚Barbaren, Tyrannen, rechter Glaube‘ keinen zwingenden Erfolg in der Legitimation von Bürgerkriegen zu garantieren vermochte, liegt auf der Hand. Trotz aller Bereitschaft vieler Protagonisten, Bürgerkriege zu führen, trotz allem Streben

230 Verwiesen sei in diesem Zusammenhang – wenn auch mit Fokus auf der römischen Republik – WALTER 2011: 122–126. 231 Isid. etym. 18.2–4. 232 Lucan. 2.151 u. 150; vgl. in diesem Zusammenhang JAL 1963: 393–417 und FEICHTINGER 2007: 75.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

287

zahlreicher Akteure, Prestige aus dem Sieg im Bürgerkrieg zu gewinnen, und trotz aller Mühen, die stärksten Begründungen für das Führen eine Bürgerkrieges ins Feld zu führen: Der Bürgerkrieg und der Sieg im Bürgerkrieg blieben die ganze römische Antike hindurch ein ambivalentes Ereignis.

LITERATUR ABDY, R. – HARLING, N., 2005. Two Important New Roman Coins. NC 165, 175–178. ALFÖLDI, A., 1970. Die Ausgestaltung des monarchischen Zeremoniells am römischen Kaiserhofe, in: A. ALFÖLDI, Die monarchische Repräsentation im römischen Kaiserreiche, Darmstadt, 1– 118 (zuerst in: MDAI(R) 49, 1935, 3–118). ALFÖLDI, A. – ALFÖLDI, E., 1990. Die Kontorniat-Medaillons; Teil 2: Text, Berlin. ALFÖLDY, G., 1968. Septimius Severus und der Senat. BJ 168, 112–160. ALFÖLDY, G., 1989a. Eine Proskriptionsliste in der Historia Augusta, in: G. ALFÖLDY (Hrsg.), Die Krise des Römischen Reiches. Geschichte, Geschichtsschreibung und Geschichtsbetrachtung. Ausgewählte Beiträge, Stuttgart, 164–174 [mit Nachträgen: 174–178] (zuerst in: Bonner Historia-Augusta-Colloquium 1968/1969, Bonn 1970, 1–12). ALFÖLDY, G., 1989b. Zeitgeschichte und Krisenempfinden bei Herodian, in: G. ALFÖLDY (Hrsg.), Die Krise des Römischen Reiches. Geschichte, Geschichtsschreibung und Geschichtsbetrachtung. Ausgewählte Beiträge, Stuttgart, 273–293 [mit Nachträgen: 293–294] (zuerst in: Hermes 99, 1971, 429–449). ALLARD, V., 2006. Aurélien, restitutor orbis et triomphateur, in: M.-H. QUET (Hrsg.), La «crise» de l’Empire romain de Marc Aurèle à Constantin: mutations, continuités, ruptures, Paris, 149–172. ALTHEIM, F., 1957. Konstantins Triumph von 312. ZRGG 9, 221–231. ANDO, C., 2000. Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, Berkeley. ANDO, C., 2012. Imperial Rome AD 193 to 284: The Critical Century, Edinburgh. ANGELI BERTINELLI, M. G., 1976. I Romani oltre l’Eufrate nel II secolo d.C. (le province di Assiria, di Mesopotamia e di Osroene). ANRW II 9.1, 3–45. ARMITAGE, D., 2009. Civil War and Revolution. What Can the Study of Civil War Bring to Our Understanding of Revolutions? Agora 44.2, 18–22. ARNALDI, A., 1977. La successione dei cognomina devictarum gentium e le loro iterazioni nella titolatura di Costantino il Grande, in: Contributi di storia antica in onore di Albino Garzetti, Genua, 175–202. BALDINI, A. – RIZZI, A., 2011. Proba: Il Centone. Introduzione, testo, traduzione e commento, Bologna. BARCELÓ, P., 2004. Constantius II. und seine Zeit. Die Anfänge des Staatskirchentums, Stuttgart. BARDILL, J., 2012. Constantine, Divine Emperor of the Christian Golden Age, Cambridge. BARNES, T. D., 1976a. Imperial Campaigns, AD 285–311. Phoenix 30, 174–193. BARNES, T. D., 1976b. The Victories of Constantine. ZPE 20, 149–155. BARNES, T. D., 1993. Athanasius and Constantius: Theology and Politics in the Constantinian Empire, Cambridge Mass. BARNES, T. D., 1996. Oppressor, Persecutor, Usurper: The Meaning of ‘tyrannus’ in the Fourth Century, in: G. BONAMENTE – M. MAYER (Hrsg.), Historiae Augustae Colloquium Barcinonense, Bari, 55–65. BARNES, T. D., 2008. Aspects of the Severan Empire; part I: Severus as a New Augustus. NECJ 35, 251–267. BARNES, T. D., 2011. Constantine. Dynasty, Religion and Power in the Later Roman Empire, Malden.

288

Matthias Haake

BAUER, F. A., 1996. Stadt, Platz und Denkmal in der Spätantike. Untersuchungen zur Ausstattung des öffentlichen Raums in den spätantiken Städten Rom, Konstantinopel und Ephesos, Mainz. BEARD, M., 2007. The Roman Triumph, Cambridge Mass. BEHRWALD, R., 2009. Die Stadt als Museum? Die Wahrnehmung der Monumente Roms in der Spätantike, Berlin. BENOIST, S., 1999. Le retour du prince dans la cité (juin 193–juillet 326). CCG 10, 149–175. BENOIST, S., 2008. L’usage de la memoria des Sévères à Constantin: notes d’épigraphie et d’histoire. CCG 19, 129–143. BÉRANGER, J., 1970. Diagnostic du principat: l’empereur romain, chef de parti, in: J. BÉRANGER (Hrsg.), Principatus. Etudes de notions et d’histoire politiques dans l’Antiquité grécoromaine, Genf, 259–280 (zuerst in: REL 37, 1959, 151–170). BERGEMANN, J., 1990. Römische Reiterstatuen. Ehrendenkmäler im öffentlichen Bereich, Mainz. BEŠEVLIEV, V., 1964. Spätgriechische und spätlateinische Inschriften aus Bulgarien, Berlin. BEYELER, M., 2011. Geschenke des Kaisers. Studien zur Chronologie, zu den Empfängern und zu den Gegenständen der kaiserlichen Vergabungen im 4. Jahrhundert n. Chr. Berlin. BINGHAM, S., 2013. The Praetorian Guard. A History of Rome’s Elite Special Forces, London. BIRD, H. W., 1987. The Roman Emperors: Eutropius’ Perspective. AHB 1, 139–151. BIRD, H. W., 1994. Liber de Caesaribus of Sextus Aurelius Victor: Translated with Introduction and Commentary, Liverpool. BIRLEY, A. R., 1974. Septimius Severus, Propagator Imperii, in: D. M. PIPPIDI (Hrsg.), Actes du IXe congrès international d’études sur les frontiers romaines, Bukarest, 297–299. BIRLEY, A. R., 21988. Septimius Severus: The African Emperor, London. BITTO, I., 2009. (La) terminologia del ribellismo nelle testimonianze epigrafiche dell’impero romano. MediterrAnt 12, 169–184. BLECKMANN, B., 1994. Constantina, Vetranio und Gallus Caesar. Chiron 24, 29–68. BLECKMANN, B., 1999a. Decentius, Bruder oder Cousin des Magnentius. GFA 2, 85–87. BLECKMANN, B., 1999b. Die Schlacht von Mursa und die zeitgenössische Deutung eines spätantiken Bürgerkrieges, in: H. BRANDT (Hrsg.), Gedeutete Realität. Krisen, Wirklichkeiten, Interpretationen (3.–6. Jh. n. Chr.), Stuttgart, 47–101. BLECKMANN, B., 2002. Bürgerkriege in der spätantiken Historiographie und in der Historia Augusta, in: G. BONAMENTE – F. PASCHOUD (Hrsg.), Historiae Augustae Colloquium Perusinum, Bari, 49–64. BLONCE, C., 2013. Issos, Alexandre le Grand et Septime Sévère, in: A. GANGLOFF (Hrsg.), Lieux de mémoire en Orient grec à l’époque impériale, Bern, 333–352. BÖRM, H. – HAVENER, W., 2012. Octavians Rechtsstellung im Januar 27 v. Chr. und das Problem der „Übertragung“ der res publica. Historia 61, 202–220. BONAMENTE, G., 1981. Eusebio, Storia Ecclesiastica IX 9 e la versione cristiana del trionfo di Costantino nel 312, in: L. GASPERINI (Hrsg.), Scritti sul mondo antico in memoria di Fulvio Grosso, Rom, 55–76. BORHY, L., 2000. Constantius toto orbe victor triumfator semper Augustus. Die Titulatur des Constantius II. bei Ammianus Marcellinus – Ein Kommentar zur Kaiserpropaganda. AAnt Hung 40, 35–44. BRANDT, H., 2002. De mortibus principum et tyrannorum. Tod und Leichenschändung in der Historia Augusta, in: G. BONAMENTE – F. PASCHOUD (Hrsg.), Historiae Augustae Colloquium Perusinum, Bari, 65–72. BRAVI, A., 2012. L’Arco di Costantino nel suo contesto topografico, in: G. BONAMENTE – N. LENSKI – R. LIZZI TESTA (Hrsg.), Costantino primo e dopo Costantino – Constantine before and after Constantine, Bari, 445–462. BREED, B. W. – DAMON, C. – ROSSI, A., 2010. Introduction, in: B. W. BREED – C. DAMON – A. ROSSI (Hrsg.), Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford, 3–22. BRILLIANT, R., 1967. The Arch of Septimius Severus in the Roman Forum, Rom.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

289

BRINGMANN, K., 2002. Von der res publica amissa zur res publica restituta. Zu zwei Schlagworten aus der Zeit zwischen Republik und Monarchie, in: J. SPIELVOGEL (Hrsg.), Res publica reperta. Zur Verfassung und Gesellschaft der römischen Republik und des frühen Prinzipats, Stuttgart, 113–123. BRUUN, C., 1990. Die Historia Augusta, die Proskriptionen des Severus und die curatores operum publicorum. Arctos 24, 5–14. BRUUN, P., 1962. The Christian Signs on the Coins of Constantine. Arctos 3, 5–35. BRUUN, P., 1997. The Victorious Signs of Constantine: A Reappraisal. NC 157, 41–59. BUSSI, S., 2003. Zenobia/Cleopatra: imagine e propaganda. RIN 104, 261–268. CALTABIANO, M., 1987. I trionfi di Costanzo II, in: Studi di antichità in memoria di Clementina Gatti, Mailand, 37–46. CAMERON, Al., 1976. Circus Factions: Blues and Greens at Rome and Byzantium, Oxford. CAMERON, Av., 1991. Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire: The Development of Christian Discourse, Berkeley. CAMERON, Av. – HALL, S. G., 1999. Eusebius: Life of Constantine. Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, Oxford. CASSATELLA, A. – CONFORTO, M. L., 1989. Arco di Costantino. Il restauro della sommità, Pesaro. CHANTRAINE, H., 1993–1994. Die Kreuzesvision von 351 – Fakten und Probleme. ByzZ 86/87, 430–441. CHASTAGNOL, A., 1983. Les jubilés impériaux de 260 à 337, in: E. FRÉZOULS (Hrsg.), Crise et redressement dans les provinces européennes de l’Empire (milieu du IIIe – milieu du IVe siècle ap. J.-C.), Straßburg, 11–25. CHASTAGNOL, A., 1984. Les fêtes décennales de Septime-Sévère. BSAF, 91–107. CHAUSSON, F., 1995. L’autobiographie de Septime Sévère. REL 73, 183–198. CHAUSSON, F., 2009. La pratique de l’autobiographie politique aux IIe–IIIe siècles. CCG 20, 79– 110. CHENAULT, R. R., 2008. Rome without Emperors: The Revival of a Senatorial City in the Fourth Century, Ann Arbor. CHRIST, K., 2005. Kaiserideal und Geschichtsbild bei Sextus Aurelius Victor. Klio 87, 177–200. CHRISTIE, N., 2013. Wars within the Frontiers: Archaeologies of Rebellion, Revolt and Civil War, in: A. SARANTIS – N. CHRISTIE (Hrsg.), War and Warfare in Late Antiquity II, Leiden, 927– 968. CHRISTOL, M., 1976. L’image du Phénix sur les revers monétaires, au milieu du IIIe siècle: une référence à la crise de l’Empire? RN 18, 82–96. CHRISTOL, M., 1988. Armée et société politique dans l’Empire romain au IIIe siècle ap. J.-C. (de l’époque sévérienne au début de l’éoique constantinienne). CCC 9, 169–204. CIVILETTI, M., 2002. Filostrato: Vite dei Sofisti. Testo greco a fronte. Introduzione, traduzione e note, Mailand. COLOMBO, M., 2008. I sopranomi trionfali di Costantino: una revisione critica della cronologia corrente. Arctos 42, 45–64. COLOMBO, M., 2010. La presenza dei Sarmati e di altri popoli nei trionfi di Gallieno, Aureliano e Probo: contributo alla storia dei Sarmati e all’esegesi della Historia Augusta. Hermes 138, 470–486. CONTI, S., 2004. Die Inschriften Kaiser Julians, Stuttgart. CONTI, S., 2007. Religione e usurpazione: Magnenzio tra cristianesimo e paganesimo, in: P. DESIDERI – M. MOGGI – M. PANI (Hrsg.), Antidoron. Studi in onore di Barbara Scardigli Forster, Pisa, 105–119. COOLEY, A., 2007. Septimius Severus: The Augustan Emperor, in: S. SWAIN – S. HARRISON – J. ELSNER (Hrsg.), Severan Culture, Cambridge, 385–397. COOLEY, A. E. 2009. Res Gestae Divi Augusti: Text, Translation, and Commentary, Cambridge.

290

Matthias Haake

COOLEY, A., 2012. Commemorating the War Dead of the Roman World, in: P. LOW – G. OLIVER – P. J. RHODES (Hrsg.), Cultures of Commemoration. War Memorials, Ancient and Modern, Oxford, 63–88. CORCORAN, S., 2006. Galerius, Maximinus and the Titulature of the Third Tetrarchy. BICS 49, 231–240. COURCELLE, P., 1966. Le serpent à face humaine dans la numismatique impériale du Ve siècle, in: R. CHEVALLIER (Hrsg.), Mélanges d’archéologie et d’histoire offerts à André Piganiol; Bd. 1, Paris, 343–353. CULLHED, M., 1994. Conservator Urbis Suae: Studies in the Politics and Propaganda of the Emperor Maxentius, Stockholm. CURRAN, J. R., 2000. Pagan City and Christian Capital: Rome in the Fourth Century, Oxford. DAGRON, G., 1968. L’Empire romain d’Orient au IVe siècle et les traditions politiques de l’hellénisme: le témoignage de Thémistios. T&MByz 3, 1–242. DAGUET-GAGEY, A., 2000. Septime Sévère: Rome, l’Afrique et l’Orient, Paris. DAHLMANN, H., 1934. Clementia Caesaris. Neue Jahrbücher für Wissenschaft und Jugendbildung 10, 17–26. DE JONGE, P., 1972. Philological and Historical Commentary on Ammianus Marcellinus XVI, Groningen. DE JONGE, P., 1976. Philological and Historical Commentary on Ammianus Marcellinus XVII, Groningen. DE KLEIJN, G., 2013. C. Licinius Mucianus, Vespasianus’ Co-Ruler in Rome, Mnemosyne 66, 433–459. DE MARIA, S., 1988. Gli archi onorari di Roma e dell’Italia romana, Rom. DEMOUGEOT, É., 1986. La symbolique du lion et du serpent sur les solidi des empereurs d’Occident de la première moitié du Ve siècle. RN 28, 94–118. DEN BOEFT, J. – DEN HENGST, D. – TEITLER, H. C., 1991. Philological and Historical Commentary on Ammianus Marcellinus XXI, Groningen. DESNIER, J.-L., 1993. Omnia et realia: naissance de l’Urbs sacra sévérienne (193–204 ap. J.-C.). MEFRA 105, 547–620. DESNIER, J.-L., 1994. Septime Sévère, rassembleur de l’Orbis Romanus, in: Y. LE BOHEC (Hrsg.), L’Afrique, la Gaule, la religion à l’époque romaine. Mélanges à la mémoire de Marcel Le Glay, Brüssel, 754–766. DESSAU, H., 1889. Über Zeit und Persönlichkeit der Scriptores Historiae Augustae. Hermes 24, 337–392. DIDU, I., 1977. Magno Magnenzio. Problemi cronologici ed ampiezza della sua usurpazione: I dati epigrafici. CS 14, 11–56. DIEFENBACH, S., 2007. Römische Erinnerungsräume. Heiligenmemoria und kollektive Identitäten im Rom des 3. bis 5. Jahrhunderts n. Chr., Berlin. DIEFENBACH, S., 2012. Constantius II. und die Reichskirche – ein Beitrag zum Verhältnis von kaiserlicher Kirchenpolitik und politischer Integration im 4. Jh. Millenium 9, 59–121. DONCIU, R., 2012. L’empereur Maxence, Bari. DRINKWATER, J. F., 1987. The Gallic Empire: Seperatism and Continuity in the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire AD 260–274, Stuttgart. DRINKWATER, J. F., 2000. The Revolt and Ethnic Origin of the Usurper Magnentius (350–353), and the Rebellion of Vetranio (350). Chiron 30, 131–159. DUFRAIGNE, P., 1975. Aurelius Victor: Livre des Césars, Paris. DUFRAIGNE, P., 1994. Adventus Augusti, Adventus Christi. Recherche sur l’exploitation idéologique et littéraire d’un cérémonial dans l’antiquité tardive, Paris. ECK, W., 1974. Attius (11a). RE Suppl. XIV, 66. ECK, W., 2004. Köln in römischer Zeit. Geschichte einer Stadt im Rahmen des Imperium Romanum, Köln.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

291

ECK, W., 2008. Vom See Regillus bis zum flumen Frigidus. Constantins Sieg an der Milvischen Brücke als Modell für den Heiligen Krieg?, in: K. SCHREINER (Hrsg.), Heilige Kriege. Religiöse Begründungen militärischer Gewaltanwendung: Judentum, Christentum und Islam im Vergleich, München, 71–91. ECK, W. – CABALLOS, A. – FERNÁNDEZ, F., 1996. Das senatus consultum de Cn. Pisone patre, München. EDBROOKE Jr., R. O., 1976. The Visit of Constantius II to Rome in 357 and its Effect on the Pagan Roman Senatorial Aristocracy. AJPh 97, 40–61. EHLING, K., 2001. Die Erhebung des Nepotianus in Rom im Juni 350 n. Chr. und sein Programm der urbs Roma christiana. GFA 4, 141–158. ELBERN, S., 1984. Usurpationen im spätrömischen Reich, Bonn. ELSNER, J., 2000. From the Culture of spolia to the Cult of Relics: The Arch of Constantine and the Genesis of Late Antique Forms. PBSR 68, 149–184. ENGEMANN, J., 1988. Herrscherbild. RAC XIV, 966–1047. ENGEMANN, J., 2007. Der Konstantinsbogen, in: A. DEMANDT – J. ENGEMANN (Hrsg.), Konstantin der Große – Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus, Mainz, 85–89. ENSSLIN, W., 1953. War Kaiser Theodosius I. zweimal in Rom? Hermes 81, 500–507. EQUINI SCHNEIDER, E., 1993. Septimia Zenobia Sebaste, Rom. ERRINGTON, R. M., 2000. Themistius and His Emperors. Chiron, 861–904. ESCRIBANO, V., 1998. Constantino y la rescissio actorum del tirano-usurpador. Gerión 16, 307– 338. FAUST, S., 2011. Original und Spolie. Integrative Strategien im Bildprogramm des Konstantinsbogens. MDAI(R) 117, 377–408. FAUST, S., 2012. Schlachtenbilder der römischen Kaiserzeit. Erzählerische Darstellungskonzepte in der Reliefkunst von Traian bis Septimius Severus, Rahden. FAVRO, D., 2014. Moving Events: Curating the Memory of the Roman Triumph, in: K. GALINSKY (Hrsg.), Memoria Romana: Memory in Rome and Rome in Memory, Ann Arbor, 85–102. FEICHTINGER, B., 2007. Das Lied vom Krieg. Literarische Inszenierung von Krieg und Bürgerkrieg bei Vergil und Lucan, in: B. FEICHTINGER – H. SENG (Hrsg.), Krieg und Kultur, Konstanz, 63–83. FERRANDES, A. F., 2011. Il contesto topografico e la stratigrafia, in: C. PANELLA (Hrsg.), I segni del potere. Realità e immaginario della sovranità nella Roma imperiale, Bari, 125–159 FERRARY, J.-L., 2003. Res publica restituta et les pouvoirs d’Auguste, in: S. FRANCHET D’ESPÈREY et al. (Hrsg.), Fondements et crises du pouvoir, Bordeaux, 419–428. FITZ, J., 1966. Ingenuus et Régalien, Brüssel. FLACH, D., 1991. Die sogenannte Laudatio Turiae. Einleitung, Text, Übersetzung und Kommentar, Darmstadt. FLAIG, E., 1992. Den Kaiser herausfordern. Die Usurpation im Römischen Reich, Frankfurt am Main. FLAIG, E., 2009a. Introitus infaustus. L’adventus des usurpateurs – trois exemples: Galba, Vitellius, Septime Sévère, in: A. BÉRENGER – É. PERRIN-SAMINADAYAR (Hrsg.), Les entrées royales et imperials: histoire, représentation et diffusion d’une cérémonie publique, de l’Orient ancien à Byzance, Paris, 177–185. FLAIG, E., 2009b. Neugründung der res publica und Racheritual, in: K.-J. HÖKLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Eine politische Kultur (in) der Krise? Die ‚letzte Generation‘ der römischen Republik, München, 195–213. FLAIG, E., 2011. The Transition from Republic to Principate: Loss of Legitimacy, Revolution, and Acceptance, in: J. A. ARNASON – K. A. RAAFLAUB (Hrsg.), The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives, Malden, 67–84. FLOWER, H. I., 2008. Les Sévères et l’usage de la memoria: l’arcus du Forum Boarium à Rome, in: S. BENOIST – A. DAGUET-GAGEY (Hrsg.), Un discours en images de la condamnation de mémoire, Metz, 97–115.

292

Matthias Haake

FORTINI, P., 1997. Flavius Magnus Magnentius in una iscrizione da Monte Romano (Ager Tarquiniensis). Indagine preliminare, in: Etrusca et Italica. Scritti in ricordo di Massimo Pallotino; vol. II, Pisa, 315–321. FOWDEN, G., 1987. Nicagoras of Athens and the Lateran Obelisk. JHS 107, 51–57. FRASCHETTI, A., 1999. La conversione. Da Roma pagana a Roma cristiana, Bari. FUHRMANN, H., 22002. Text und Übersetzung, in: K. GROSS-ALBENHAUSEN – M. FUHRMANN (Hrsg.), S. Aurelius Victor: Die römischen Kaiser – Liber de Caesaribus. Lateinisch – deutsch. Herausgegeben, übersetzt und erläutert, Zürich. GAGÉ, J., 1933. La théologie de la victoire impériale. RH 58, 1–43. GAGÉ, J., 1934. Les jeux séculaires de 204 ap. J.-C. et la dynastie de Sévères. MEFR 51, 33–78. GATTI, L., 1969. Un nuovo senatore del basso impero: Attius (?) Caecilius Maximilianus. RAL 24, 321–327. GIRARDET, K. M., 22007. Die Konstantinische Wende. Voraussetzungen und geistige Grundlagen der Religionspolitik Konstantins des Großen, Darmstadt. GIRARDET, K. M., 2010. Der Kaiser und sein Gott. Das Christentum im Denken und in der Religionspolitik Konstantins des Großen, Berlin. GIULIANI, L., 2000. Des Siegers Ansprache an das Volk: Zur politischen Brisanz der Frieserzählung am Constantinsbogen, in: C. NEUMEISTER – W. RAECK (Hrsg.), Rede und Redner – Bewertung und Darstellung in den antiken Kulturen, Möhnesee, 269–287. GNECCHI, F., 1912. I medaglioni romani; vol. I: Oro ed argento, Mailand. GOTTER, U., 1996. Der Diktator ist tot! Politik in Rom zwischen den Iden des März und der Begründung des Zweiten Triumvirats, Stuttgart. GOTTER, U., 2000. Marcus Iunius Brutus – oder: die Nemesis des Namens, in: K.-J. HÖLKESKAMP – E. STEIN-HÖLKESKAMP (Hrsg.), Von Romulus zu Augustus. Große Gestalten der römischen Republik, München, 328–339. GOTTER, U., 2008. Die Nemesis des Allgemein-Gültigen. Max Webers Charisma-Konzept und die antiken Monarchien, in: P. RYCHTEROVÁ – S. SEIT – R. VEIT (Hrsg.), Das Charisma. Funktion und symbolische Repräsentation, Berlin, 173–186. GOTTER, U., 2011. Abgeschlagene Hände und herausquellendes Gedärm. Das hässliche Antlitz der römischen Bürgerkriege und seine politischen Kontexte, in: S. FERHADBEGOVIĆ – B. WEIFFEN (Hrsg.), Bürgerkriege erzählen. Zum Verlauf unziviler Konflikte, Konstanz, 55–69. GRARBAR, A., 1936. L’empereur dans l’art byzantin, Straßburg. GREEN, R., 2008. Which Proba Wrote the Cento? CQ 58, 264–276. GRIFFIN, M., 2003. Clementia after Caesar: From Politics to Philosophy, in: F. CAIRNS – E. FANTHAM (Hrsg.), Caesar against Liberty? Perspectives on his Autocracy, Cambridge, 157–182. GRUEN, E. S., 1985. Augustus and the Ideology of War and Peace, in: R. WINKES (Hrsg.), The Age of Augustus, Providence, 51–72. GRÜNEWALD, T., 1990. Constantinus Maximus Augustus. Herrschaftspropaganda in der zeitgenössischen Überlieferung, Stuttgart. GURVAL, R. A., 1995. Actium and Augustus. The Politics and Emotions of Civil War, Ann Arbor. HAAKE, M., 2003. Warum und zu welchem Ende schreibt man peri basileias? Überlegungen zum historischen Kontext einer literarischen Gattung im Hellenismus, in: K. PIEPENBRINK (Hrsg.), Philosophie und Lebenswelt in der Antike, Darmstadt, 83–138. HAAKE, M., 2015. ‘In search of good emperors’: Emperors, Caesars, and Usurpers in the Mirror of Antimonarchic Patterns in the Historia Augusta – Some Considerations, in: H. BÖRM (Hrsg.), Antimonarchic Discourse in Antiquity, Stuttgart, 269–303. HALFMANN, H., 1986. Itinera principum. Geschichte und Typologie der Kaiserreisen im Römischen Reich, Stuttgart. HALL, J., 2002. The Philippics, in: J. M. MAY (Hrsg.), Brill’s Companion to Cicero: Oratory and Rhetoric, Leiden, 273–304. HANNESTAD, N., 1986. Roman Art and Imperial Policy, Aarhus.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

293

HARDERS, A.-C., 2015. Consort or Despot – How to Deal with a Queen at the End of the Republic and the Beginning of the Principate, in: H. BÖRM (Hrsg.), Antimonarchic Discourse in Antiquity, Stuttgart, 181–214. HARTKE, W., 1951. Römische Kinderkaiser. Eine Strukturanalyse römischen Denkens und Daseins, Berlin. HARTMANN, U., 2001. Das palmyrenische Teilreich, Stuttgart. HARTMANN, U., 2008a. Claudius Gothicus und Aurelianus, in: K.-P. JOHNE (Hrsg.), Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. (235–284); Bd. I, Berlin, 297–323. HARTMANN, U., 2008b. Das palmyrenische Teilreich, in: K.-P. JOHNE (Hrsg.), Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. (235– 284); Bd. I, Berlin, 343–378. HAVENER, W., 2014. A Ritual Against the Rule? The Representation of Civil War Victory in the Late Republican Triumph, in: C. HJORT LANGE – F. J. VERVAET (Hrsg.), The Roman Republican Triumph beyond the Spectacle, Rom, 165–179. HEIL, M., 2006. Clodius Albinus und der Bürgerkrieg von 197, in: H.-U. WIEMER (Hrsg.), Staatlichkeit und politisches Handeln in der römischen Kaiserzeit, Berlin, 55–85. HEIL, M., 2009. Die Jubilarfeiern der römischen Kaiser, in: H. BECK – H.-U. WIEMER (Hrsg.), Feiern und Erinnern. Geschichtsbilder im Spiegel antiker Feste, Berlin, 167–202. HEKSTER, O., 1999. The City of Rome in Late Imperial Ideology: The Tetrarchs, Maxentius, and Constantine. MediterrAnt 2, 717–748. HELLEGOUARC’H, J., 1999. Eutrope: Abrégé d’Histoire romaine. Texte établi et traduit, Paris. HENCK, N., 2002. Constantius ὁ Φιλοκτίστης. DOP 55, 279–304. HERZ, P., 2013. Die expeditio Gallica des Septimius Severus. Überlegungen zur Organisation eines Bürgerkrieges, in: R. BREITWIESER – M. FRAS – G. NIGHTINGALE (Hrsg.), Calamus. Festschrift für Herbert Graßl zum 65. Geburtstag, Wiesbaden, 261–275. HIDBER, T., 2006. Herodians Darstellung der Kaisergeschichte nach Marc Aurel, Basel. HOËT-VAN CAUWENBERGHE, C. – KANTIREA, M., 2013. Lieu grec de mémoire romaine: la perpétuation de la victoire d’Actium des Julio-Claudiens aux Sévères, in: A. GANGLOFF (Hrsg.), Lieux de mémoire en Orient grec à l’époque impériale, Bern, 279–303. HOHL, E., 1976. Historia Augusta. Römische Herrschergestalten; Bd. I: Von Hadrianus bis Alexander Severus. Eingeleitet und übersetzt, in: Historia Augusta. Römische Herrschergestalten; Bd. I: Von Hadrianus bis Alexander Severus. Eingeleitet und übersetzt v. E. Hohl, bearbeitet und erläutert von E. Merten und A. Rösger, mit einem Vorwort von J. Straub, München, 1–367. HOHL, E., 1985. Historia Augusta. Römische Herrschergestalten; Bd. II: Von Maximinus Thrax bis Carinus. Übersetzt, in: Historia Augusta. Römische Herrschergestalten; Bd. II: Von Maximinus Thrax bis Carinus. Übersetzt v. E. Hohl, bearbeitet und erläutert von E. Merten, A. Rösger und N. Ziegler, mit einem Vorwort von J. Straub, München, 9–291. HOLLOWAY, R. R., 2004. Constantine & Rome, New Haven. HOPE, V. M., 2003. Trophies and Tombstones: Commemorating the Roman Soldier. World Archaeology 35, 79–97. HÜLSEN, C., 1932. Neue Fragmente der Acta ludorum saecularium von 204 n. Chr. RhM 81, 366– 394. HUMPHRIES, M., 2003. Roman Senators and Absent Emperors in Late Antiquity, in: J. R. Brandt et al. (Hrsg.), Rome AD 300–800. Power and Symbol – Image and Reality, Rom, 27–46. HUMPHRIES, M., 2007. From Emperor to Pope? Ceremonial, Space, and Authority at Rome from Constantine to Gregory the Great, in: K. COOPER – J. HILLNER (Hrsg.), Religion, Dynasty, and Patronage in Early Christian Rome, 300–900, Cambridge, 21–58. HUMPHRIES, M., 2008. From Usurper to Emperor: The Politics of Legitimation in the Age of Constantine. JLA 1, 82–100.

294

Matthias Haake

HURLET, F. – MINEO, B., 2009. Introduction: Res publica restituta. Le pouvoir et ses représentations à Rome sous le principat d’Auguste, in: F. HURLET – B. MINEO (Hrsg.), Le Principat d’Auguste. Réalités et représentations du pouvoir – autour de la Res publica restituta. Actes du colloque de l’Université de Nantes, 1er–2ème juin 2007, Rennes, 9–22. IVERSEN, E., 1968. Obelisks in Exile; vol. I: The Obelisks of Rome, Kopenhagen. JACQUES, F., 1992. Les nobiles exécutés par Septime Sévère selon l’Histoire Auguste: liste de proscription ou énumération fantaisiste? Latomus 51, 119–144. JAL, P., 1961. Remarques sur la cruauté à Rome pendant les guerres civiles (de Sylla à Vespasien). BAGB 20, 475–501. JAL, P., 1962. Le rôle des Barbares dans le guerres civiles de Rome, de Sylla à Vespasien. Latomus 21, 8–48. JAL, P., 1963. La guerre civile à Rome. Étude littéraire et morale, Paris. JEHNE, M., 2012. Die organisatorische Verankerung der Alleinherrschaft und die republikanische Tradition: von Caesar zu Augustus, in: O. DEVILLERS – K. SION-JENKIS (Hrsg.), César sous Auguste, Bordeaux, 29–41. JONES, M. W., 2000. Genesis and Mimesis: The Design of the Arch of Constantine in Rome. JSAH 59, 50–77. KÄHLER, H., 1952. Konstantin 313. JDAI 67, 1–30. KALINKA, E., 1906. Antike Denkmäler in Bulgarien, Wien. KELLY, G., 2008. Ammianus Marcellinus: The Allusive Historian, Cambridge. KENT, J. P. C., 1994. The Roman Imperial Coinage; vol. X: The Divided Empire and the Fall of the Western Parts. AD 395–491, London. KETTENHOFEN, E., 1986. Zur Siegestitulatur Kaiser Aurelians. Tyche 1, 138–146. KLEIN, R., 1979. Der Rombesuch des Kaisers Konstantius II im Jahre 357. Athenaeum 57, 98–115. KLINGENBERG, A., 2011. Sozialer Abstieg in der römischen Kaiserzeit. Risiken der Oberschicht in der Zeit von Augustus bis zum Ende der Severer, Paderborn. KLODT, C., 2001. Bescheidene Größe. Die Herrschergestalt, der Kaiserpalast und die Stadt Rom: Literarische Reflexionen monarchischer Selbstdarstellung, Göttingen. KNEISSL, P., 1969. Die Siegestitulatur der römischen Kaiser. Untersuchungen zu den Siegerbeinamen des ersten und zweiten Jahrhunderts, Göttingen. KÖNIG, I., 1981. Die gallischen Usurpatoren von Postumus bis Tetricus, München. KOEPPEL, G. M., 1990. Die historischen Reliefs der römischen Kaiserzeit VII: Der Bogen des Septimius Severus, die Decennalienbasis und der Konstantinsbogen. BJ 190, 1–64. KOLB, F., 1997. Die Gestalt des spätantiken Kaisertums unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Tetrarchie, in: F. PASCHOUD – J. SZIDAT (Hrsg.), Usurpationen in der Spätantike, Stuttgart, 35–45. KOLB, F., 2001. Herrscherideologie in der Spätantike, Berlin. KOLB, F., 22002. Rom. Die Geschichte der Stadt in der Antike, München. KOTULA, T., 1997. Aurélien et Zénobie: l’unité ou la division de l’Empire, Breslau. KRÜPE, F., 2011. Die Damnatio memoriae. Über die Vernichtung von Erinnerung. Eine Fallstudie zu Publius Septimius Geta (198–211 n. Chr.), Gutenberg. KUEHN, S., 2011. The Dragon in Medieval East Christian and Islamic Art, Leiden. KUHN-CHEN, B., 2002. Geschichtskonzeptionen griechischer Historiker im 2. und 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr., Frankfurt am Main. KUHOFF, W., 1991. Ein Mythos in der römischen Geschichte: Der Sieg Konstantins des Großen über Maxentius vor den Toren Roms am 28. Oktober 312 n. Chr. Chiron 21, 127–174. KUHOFF, W., 1993. Iulia Aug. mater Aug. n. et castrorum et senatus et patriae. ZPE 97, 259–271. LA FOLLETTE, L., 1994. The Baths of Trajan Decius on the Aventine, in: Rome Papers. The Baths of Trajan Decius, Iside e Serapide nel Palazzo, a Late Domus on the Palatine, and Nero’s Golden House, Ann Arbor, 6–88. LANGE, C. H., 2008. Civil War in the Res Gestae Divi Augusti: Conquering the World and Fighting War at Home, in: E. BRAGG – L. I. HAU – E. MACAULAY-LEWIS (Hrsg.), Beyond the

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

295

Battlefields: New Perspectives on Warfare and Society in the Graeco-Roman World, Newcastle, 185–204. LANGE, C. H., 2009. Res Publica Constituta. Actium, Apollo and the Accomplishment of the Triumviral Assignment, Leiden. LANGE, C. H., 2012. Constantine’s Civil War Triumph of AD 312 and the Adaptability of Triumphal Tradition. ARID 37, 29–53. LANGE, C. H., 2013. Triumph and Civil War in the Late Republic. PBSR 81, 67–90. LASSANDRO, D., 2002. La spedizione di Costanzo Cesare in Britannia nel Panegirico del 297 d.C., in: M. SORDI (Hrsg.), Guerra e diritto nel mondo greco e romano, Mailand, 259–267. LE BOHEC, Y., 2007. „L’usurpation“ au IVe siècle: le risque de l’exclusion, in: C. WOLFF (Hrsg.), Les exclus dans l’antiquité, Lyon, 95–105. LE BOHEC, Y., 2009. L’armée romaine dans la tourmente: une nouvelle approche de la „crise du IIIe siècle“, Monaco. LEDENTU, M., 2009. In arto […] labor: la parole de l’historien à l’épreuve des guerres civiles et du principat, in: O. DEVILLERS – J. MEYERS (Hrsg.), Pouvoir des hommes, pouvoir des mots, des Gracques à Trajan, Louvain, 25–38. LEHNEN, J., 1997. Adventus Principis. Untersuchungen zu Sinngehalt und Zeremoniell der Kaiserankunft in den Städten des Imperium Romanum, Frankfurt am Main. LENSKI, N., 2008. Evoking the Pagan Past: Instinctu divinitatis and Constantine’s Capture of Rome. JLA 1, 204–257. LEPPIN, H., 1999. Constantius II. und das Heidentum. Athenaeum 87, 457–480. LIEBS, D., 2007. Fiktives Strafrecht in der Historia Augusta, in: G. BONAMENTE – H. BRANDT (Hrsg.), Historiae Augustae Colloquium Bambergense, Bari, 259–277. LIVERANI, P., 2004. Reimpiego senza ideologia. La letteratura antica degli spolia dall’arco di Costantino all’età carolingia. MDAI(R) 111, 383–434. LIVERANI, P., 2012. Costanzo II e l’obelisco del Circo Massimo a Roma, in: A. GASSE – F. SERVAJEAN – C. THIERS (Hrsg.), Et in Ægypto et ad Ægyptum. Recueil d’études dédiées à JeanClaude Grenier; Bd. III, Montpellier, 471–487. LOBUR, J. A., 2008. Consensus, Concordia, and the Formation of Roman Imperial Ideology, New York. L’ORANGE, H. P. – GERKAN, H. v., 1939. Der spätantike Bildschmuck des Konstantinsbogen, Berlin. LUSNIA, S., 2006. Battle Imagery and Politics on the Severan Arch in the Roman Forum, in: S. DILLON – K. E. WELCH (Hrsg.), Representations of War in Ancient Rome, Cambridge, 272– 299. LUTHER, A., 2008. Das gallische Sonderreich, in: K.-P. JOHNE (Hrsg.), Die Zeit der Soldatenkaiser. Krise und Transformation des Römischen Reiches im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. (235–284); Bd. I, Berlin, 325–341. MACCORMACK, S. G., 1981. Art and Ceremony in Late Antiquity, Berkeley. MACHADO, C., 2010. The City as Stage: Aristocratic Commemorations in Late Antique Rome, in: É. REBILLARD – C. SOTINEL (Hrsg.), Les frontiers du profane dans l’Antiquité tardive, Rom, 287–317. MACMULLEN, R., 1969. Constantine, New York. MAGI, F., 1956–1957. Il coronamento dell’arco di Costantino. RPAA 29, 83–110. MANGO, C., 1959. The Brazen House: A Study of the Vestibule of the Imperial Palace of Constantinople, Kopenhagen. MANTOVANI, D., 2008. Leges et iura p(opuli) R(omani) restituit. Principe e diritto in un aureo di Ottaviano. Athenaeum 96, 5–54. MARASCO, G., 1998. Erodiano e la crisi dell’impero. ANRW II 34.4, 2837–2927. MARIÉ, M.-A., 2003. Guerre civile et guerre étrangère chez Ammien Marcellin, in: G. LACHENAUD – D. LONGRÉE (Hrsg.), Grecs et Romains aux prises avec l’histoire. Réprésentations, récits et idéologie; Bd. I, Rennes, 219–230.

296

Matthias Haake

MARLOWE, E., 2010. Liberator urbis suae, in: B. C. EWALD – C. F. NOREÑA (Hrsg.), The Emperor and Rome. Space, Representation, and Ritual, Cambridge, 199–219. MARTIN, J., 2009. Das Kaisertum in der Spätantike, in: W. SCHMITZ (Hrsg.), Bedingungen menschlichen Handelns in der Antike. Gesammelte Beiträge zur Historischen Anthropologie, Stuttgart, 543–558 (zuerst in: F. PASCHOUD – J. SZIDAT [Hrsg.], Usurpationen in der Spätantike, Stuttgart 1997, 47–62). MARTINDALE, J. R., 1974. Prosopography of the Later Roman Emepire: Addenda et Corrigenda to Volume I. Historia 23, 246–252. MATTHEWS, J., 1992. The Poetess Proba and Fourth-Century Rome: Questions of Interpretation, in: M. CHRISTOL et al. (Hrsg.), Institutions, société et vie politique dans l’Empire romain au IVe siècle ap. J.-C., Paris, 277–304. MATTHEWS, J., 2007. The Roman Empire of Ammianus. With a New Introduction, Ann Arbor. MAYER, E., 2002. Rom ist dort, wo der Kaiser ist. Untersuchungen zu den Staatsdenkmälern des dezentralisierten Reiches von Diocletian bis zu Theodosius II., Mainz. MAYER, E., 2006. Civil War and Public Dissent: The State Monuments of the Decentralised Roman Empire, in: H. BOWDEN – A. GUTTERIDGE – C. MACHADO (Hrsg.), Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity, Leiden, 141–155. MAZZARINO, S., 1974. L’adventus di Costanzo II a Roma e la carriera di Pancharius (con appendice sulla denominazione tardoromana dell’attuale Calabria), in: S. MAZZARINO (Hrsg.), Antico, tardoantico ed èra costantiniana, Città di Castello, 197–220 (zuerst in: Intorno alla carriera di un nuovo corrector di Lucania et Brittii e all’adventus di Costanzo II a Roma con appendice sulla denominazione tardoromana dell’attuale Calabria. Helikon 9–10, 1969–1970, 604–621). MCCAIL, R. C., 1978. P. Gr. Vindob. 29788C: Hexameter Encomium on an Un-Named Emperor. JHS 98, 38–63. MCCORMICK, M., 1986. Eternal Victory: Triumphal Rulership in Late Antiquity, Byzantium and the Early Medieval West, Cambridge. MELUCCO VACCARO, A. – FERRONI, A. M., 1993–1994. Chi costruì l’arco di Costantino? Un interrogative ancora attuale. RPAA 66, 1–60. MERKELBACH, R., 1959. Drache. RAC 4, 226–250. MERTEN, E., 1968. Zwei Herrscherfeste in der Historia Augusta. Untersuchungen zu den pompae der Kaiser Gallienus und Aurelianus, Bonn. MESSINEO, G. (Hrsg.), 1989. Malborghetto, Rom. MILLAR, F., 1964. A Study of Cassius Dio, Oxford. MILLAR, F., 2002. Triumvirate and Principate, in: H. M COTTON – G. M. ROGERS (Hrsg.), Rome, the Greek World, and the East; vol. I: The Roman Republic and the Augustan Revolution, Chapel Hill, 241–270 (zuerst in: JRS 63, 1973, 50–67). MINUCCI, F., 2002. Precisazioni cronologiche sulla lotta tra Settimio Severo e Pescennio Nigro. AFLS 23, 43–70. MITTAG, P. F., 2009. Processus consularis, adventus und Herrschaftsjubiläum. Zur Verwendung von Triumphsymbolik in der mittleren Kaiserzeit. Hermes 137, 447–462. MITTHOF, F., 2007. ‚Ubique terrarum victor‘. Zur Chronologie der Siegestitulatur Kaiser Aurelians, in: K. STROBEL (Hrsg.), Von Noricum nach Ägypten – Eine Reise durch die Welt der Antike, Klagenfurt, 237–250. MOMMSEN, T., 1890. Die Scriptores Historiae Augustae. Hermes 25, 228–292. MORENO RESARO, E., 2009. La usurpación de Nepociano (350 d.C.): una revisión historiográfica. Veleia 26, 297–322. MOUCHOVÁ, B., 2001. Eutropius’ Charakteristik der römischen Kaiser und ihre weitere Tradition, in: G. THOME – J. HOLZHAUSEN (Hrsg.), Es hat sich viel ereignet, Gutes wie Böses. Lateinische Geschichtsschreibung der Spät- und Nachantike, München, 15–25.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

297

MÜLLER, F., 1995. Eutropii Breviarium ab Urbe condita – Eutropius, Kurze Geschichte Roms seit der Gründung (753 v. Chr.–364 n. Chr.). Einleitung, Text und Übersetzung, Anmerkungen. Stuttgart. MÜLLER-RETTIG, B., 2008. Panegyrici Latini – Lobreden auf römische Kaiser; Bd. I: Von Diokletian bis Konstantin – Lateinisch und deutsch. Eingeleitet, übersetzt und kommentiert, Darmstadt. NELIS-CLÉMENT, J. – NELIS, D., 2013. Furor epigraphicus: Augustus, the Poets, and the Inscriptions, in: P. LIDDEL – P. LOW (Hrsg.), Inscriptions and Their Uses in Greek and Latin Literature, Oxford, 317–347. NERI, V., 1997. Usurpatore come tiranno nel lessico politico della tarda antichità, in: F. PASCHOUD – J. SZIDAT (Hrsg.), Usurpationen in der Spätantike, Stuttgart, 71–86. NEWBY, Z., 2007. Art at the Crossroads? Themes and Styles in Severan Art, in: S. SWAIN – S. HARRISON – J. ELSNER (Hrsg.), Severan Culture, Cambridge, 201–249. NOREÑA, C. F., 2011. Imperial Ideals in the Roman West: Representation, Circulation, Power. Cambridge. ODAHL, C. M., 2004. Constantine and the Christian Empire, London. OGDEN, D., 2013. Drakōn. Dragon Myth and Serpent Cult in the Greek and Roman Worlds, Oxford. OKOŃ, D., 2013. Septimius Severus et senatores. Septimius Severus’ Personal Policy towards Senators in the Light of Prosopographic Research (193–211 AD), Stettin. OSGOOD, J., 2006. Caesar’s Legacy: Civil War and the Emergence of the Roman Empire, Cambridge. PANELLA, C., 2011. I segni del potere, in: C. PANELLA (Hrsg.), I segni del potere. Realtà e immaginario della sovranità nella Roma imperiale, Bari, 25–76. PASCHOUD, F., 1971. Zosime 2,29 et la version païenne de la conversion de Constantin. Historia 20, 334–353. PASCHOUD, F., 1996. Histoire Auguste. Tome V 1ère partie: Vies d’Aurélien, Tacite. Texte établi, traduit et commenté, Paris. PASCHOUD, F., 1997. Zosime et Constantin. Nouvelles controverses. MH 54, 9–28. PASCHOUD, F., 22000. Zosime. Histoire nouvelle. Tome I: Livres I–II. Text établi et traduit, Paris. PAUSCH, D., 2011. Aurelian in der Historia Augusta – ein Kaiser und seine Biographie zwischen Literatur- und Geschichtswissenschaft, in: U. EGELHAAF-GAISER – D. PAUSCH – M. RÜHL (Hrsg.), Kultur der Antike. Transdisziplinäres Arbeiten in den Altertumswissenschaften, Berlin, 129–151. PEACHIN, M., 1990. Roman Imperial Titulature and Chronology, AD 235–284, Amsterdam. PENSABENE, P., 1999. Parte superiore dell’Arco: composizione strutturale e classificazione dei marni, in: P. PENSABENE – C. PANELLA (Hrsg.), Arco di Costantino. Tra archeologia e archeometria, Rom, 139–156. PENSABENE, P. – PANELLA, C. (Hrsg.), 1999. Arco di Costantino. Tra archeologia e archeometria, Rom. PERNOT, L., 2010. Callinicos de Pétra, sophiste et historien. REG 123, 71–90. PIGHI, G. B., 21965. De ludis saecularibus populi Romani Quiritium: Libri sex, Amsterdam. POLLEY, A. R., 2003. The Date of Herodian’s History. AC 72, 203–208. POPESCU, E., 1990. Griechische Inschriften, in: F. WINKELMANN – W. BRANDES (Hrsg.), Quellen zur Geschichte des frühen Byzanz (4. – 9. Jahrhundert). Bestand und Probleme, Amsterdam, 81–105. POPITZ, H., 21992. Phänomene der Macht, Tübingen. POTTER, D., 2013. Constantine the Emperor, Oxford. RAAFLAUB, K. A., 2003. Caesar the Liberator? Factional Politics, Civil War, and Ideology, in: F. CAIRNS – E. FANTHAM (Hrsg.), Caesar against Liberty? Perspectives on His Autocracy, Cambridge, 35–67.

298

Matthias Haake

RAECK, W., 1998. Ankunft an der Milvischen Brücke. Wort, Bild und Botschaft am Konstantinsbogen in Rom, in: J. HOLZHAUSEN (Hrsg.), ψυχή – Seele – anima. Festschrit für Karin Alt zum 7. Mai 1998, Stuttgart, 345–354. RAIMONDI, M., 2006. Modello costantiniano e regionalismo gallico nell’usurpazione di Magnenzio. MediterrAnt 9, 267–292. RAMPAZZO, N., 2005. Il «bellum iustum» e le sue cause. Index 33, 235–261. RAMPAZZO, N., 2012. Iustitia e bellum. Prospettive storiografiche sulla guerra nella repubblica romana, Neapel. RICH, J. W., 2003. Augustus, War and Peace, in: L. DE BLOIS – P. ERDKAMP – O. HEKSTER – G. DE KLEIJN – S. MOLS (Hrsg.), The Representation and Perception of Roman Imperial Power, Amsterdam, 329–357. RICH, J., 2010. Deception, Lies, and Economy with the Truth: Augustus and the Establishment of the Principate, in: A.-J. TURNER et al. (Hrsg.), Private and Public Lies: The Discourse of Despotism and Deceit in the Graeco-Roman World, Leiden, 167–191. RICH, J. W. – WILLIAMS, J. H. C., 1999. Leges et Iura P. R. Restitvit: A New Aureus of Octavian and the Settlement of 28–27 BC. NC 159, 169–213. RITTI, T., 1988. Il sofista Antipatros di Hierapolis. MGR 13, 71–128. RITZERFELD, U., 2001. „Omnia Theodosio cedunt subolique perenni“. Überlegungen zu Bildprogramm und Bedeutung des Theodosiusobelisken und seiner Basen in Konstantinopel. JbAC 44, 168–184. ROLLÉ DITZLER, I., 2011. Senat und Severer in Rom – Formen medialer Präsenz, in: S. FAUST – F. LEITMEIR (Hrsg.), Repräsentationsformen in severischer Zeit, Berlin, 220–252. RONNING, C., 2007. Herrscherpanegyrik unter Trajan und Konstantin. Studien zur symbolischen Kommunikation in der römischen Kaiserzeit, Tübingen. RONNING, C., 2010. Die Bedeutung der Vergangenheit in der Herrschaftsrepräsentation diokletianischer und konstantinischer Zeit. Millennium 7, 169–203. ROSENBERGER, V., 1992. Bella et expeditiones. Die antike Terminologie der Kriege Roms, Stuttgart. RUBIN, Z., 1975. Dio, Herodian, and Severus’ Second Parthian War. Chiron 5, 419–441. RUBIN, Z., 1980. Civil-War Propaganda and Historiography, Brüssel. RUBIN, Z., 1998. Pagan Propaganda During the Usurpation of Magnentius (350–353). SCI 17, 124– 141. RUCK, B., 2007. Die Großen dieser Welt. Kolossalporträts im antiken Rom, Heidelberg. RÜPKE, J., 1990. Domi militiae. Die religiöse Konstruktion des Krieges in Rom, Stuttgart. SCHEID, J., 1984. La mort du tyran: chronique de quelques morts programmées, in: Du châtiment dans la cite: supplices corporels et peine de mort dans le monde antique, Paris, 177–190. SCHEID, J., 2007. Res Gestae Divi Augusti – Hauts faits du divin Auguste. Texte établi et traduit, Paris. SCHMIDT-HOFNER, S., 2010. Trajanische Epiphanien, Rom-Erlebnis, Präsenzeffekte und der Monarchie-Diskurs bei Ammianus Marcellinus (Buch 16, Kapitel 10), in: S. BÖRNCHEN – G. HEIM (Hrsg.), Weltliche Wallfahrten. Auf der Spur des Realen, München, 75–102. SCHMIDT-HOFNER, S., 2012. Trajan und die symbolische Kommunikation bei kaiserlichen Rombesuchen in der Spätantike, in: R. BEHRWALD – C. WITSCHEL (Hrsg.), Rom in der Spätantike. Historische Erinnerung im städtischen Raum, Stuttgart, 33–59. SCHMITT, M. T., 1997. Die römische Außenpolitik des 2. Jahrhunderts n. Chr. – Friedenssicherung oder Expansion, Stuttgart. SCHNEIDER, R. M., 2004. Nicht mehr Ägypten, sondern Rom. Der neue Lebensraum der Obelisken. Städel Jahrbuch 19, 155–179. SCHOTTENIUS CULLHED, S., 2015. Proba the Prophet: The Christian Virgilian Cento of Faltonia Betitia Proba, Leiden. SEYFARTH, W., 1968a. Ammianus Marcellinus: Römische Geschichte. Lateinisch und deutsch und mit einem Kommentar; Erster Teil: Buch 14–17, Berlin.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

299

SEYFARTH, W., 1968b. Ammianus Marcellinus: Römische Geschichte. Lateinisch und deutsch und mit einem Kommentar; Zweiter Teil: Buch 18–21, Berlin. SIDEBOTTOM, H., 1998. Herodian’s Historical Methods and Understanding of History. ANRW II 34.4, 2775–2836. SOTGIU, G., 1961. Studi sull’epigrafia di Aureliano, Sassari. SPEIDEL, M. A., 2009. Ein Bollwerk für Syrien. Septimius Severus und die Provinzordnung Nordmesopotamiens im dritten Jahrhundert, in: M. A. SPEIDEL, Heer und Herrschaft im Römischen Reich der Hohem Kaiserzeit, Stuttgart, 181–210 (zuerst in: Chiron 37, 2007: 405–433). SPEIDEL, M. P., 1992. Maxentius and his equites singulares in the Battle at the Milvian Bridge, in: M. P. SPEIDEL, Roman Army Studies; vol. II, Stuttgart, 279–288 [mit Nachtrag, 289] (zuerst in: ClAnt 5, 1986, 253–262). STARR, C. G., 1956. Aurelius Victor: Historian of Empire. AHR 61, 574–586. STÄDELE, A., 2014. Cornelius Tacitus: Historien; Bd. II. Lateinisch und deutsch, eingeleitet, übersetzt und kommentiert. Darmstadt. STEIN, A., 1923. Kallinikos von Petrai. Hermes 58, 448–456. STICHEL, R. H. W., 2012. Kaiser Constantius II. und die Monumente Roms, in: H. SVENSHON – M. BOOS – F. LANG (Hrsg.), Werkraum Antike. Beiträge zur Archäologie und antiken Baugeschichte, Darmstadt, 197–210. STONEMAN, R., 1992. Palmyra and Its Empire: Zenobia’s Revolt against Rome, Ann Arbor. STRAUB, J., 1939. Vom Herrscherideal in der Spätantike, Stuttgart. STRAUB, J., 1972. Konstantins Verzicht auf den Gang zum Kapitol, in: J. STRAUB, Regeneratio Imperii. Aufsätze über Roms Kaisertum und Reich im Spiegel der heidnischen und christlichen Publizistik, Darmstadt, 100–118 (zuerst in: Historia 4, 1955, 297–313). STROBEL, K., 2013. Herrscherwechsel, politische Verfolgung, Bürgerkriege in der römischen Kaiserzeit: Zwischen Rekonziliation, Amnestie und Säuberung, in: K. HARTER-UIBOPUU – F. MITTHOF (Hrsg.), Vergeben und Vergessen? Amnestie in der Antike, Wien, 285–298. SÜNSKES THOMPSON, J., 1990. Aufstände und Protestaktionen im Imperium Romanum. Die severischen Kaiser im Spannungsfeld innenpolitischer Konflikte, Bonn. SÜNSKES THOMPSON, J., 1993. Demonstrative Legitimation der Kaiserherrschaft im Epochenvergleich. Zur politischen Macht des stadtrömischen Volkes, Stuttgart. SWOBODA, F., 2007. Kaiser und Tyrann: Tyrannentopik in den Panegyrici Latini, in: J. HAHN – M. VIELBERG (Hrsg.), Formen und Funktionen von Leitbildern, Stuttgart, 83–95. SYME, R., 1939. The Roman Revolution, Oxford. SZIDAT, J., 1996. Historischer Kommentar zu Ammianus Marcellinus Buch XX–XXI. Teil III: Die Konfrontation, Stuttgart. SZIDAT, J., 2003. Chronologische Übersicht der Jahre 337–353, in: M. A. GUGGISBERG (Hrsg.), Der spätrömische Silberschatz von Kaiseraugst: Die neuen Funde. Silber im Spannungsfeld von Geschichte, Politik und Gesellschaft der Spätantike, Augst, 323–331. SZIDAT, J., 2010. Usurpator tanti nominis. Kaiser und Usurpator in der Spätantike (337–476 n. Chr.), Stuttgart. TANTILLO, I., 1997. La prima orazione di Giuliano a Costanzo. Introduzione, traduzione e commento, Rom. TANTILLO, I., 1999. L’ideologia imperiale tra centro e periferie. A proposito di un ‘elogio’ di Costantino da Augusta Traiana in Tracia. RFIC 127, 73–95. TARPIN, M., 2009. Le triomphe d’Auguste: héritage de la République ou revolution, in: F. HURLET – B. MINEO (Hrsg.), Le Principat d’Auguste. Réalités et représentations du pouvoir – autour de la Res publica restituta, Rennes, 129–142. TARTAGLIA, L., 1984. Eusebio di Cesarea: Sulla vita di Costantino. Introduzione, traduzione e note, Neapel. THIEL, W., 2005. Lohn und Strafe – Zur Situation der Städte im Osten des Römischen Reiches während des Bürgerkrieges zwischen Septimius Severus und Pescennius Niger, in: D. KREI-

300

Matthias Haake

KENBOOM – K.-U. MAHLER – T. M. WEBER (Hrsg.), Urbanistik und städtische Kultur in Westasien und Nordafrika unter den Severern, Worms, 103–117. TIMONEN, A., 1992. Criticism of Defense: The Blaming of “crudelitas” in the “Historia Augusta”, in: T. VILJAMAA – A. TIMONEN – C. KRÖTZL (Hrsg.), Crudelitas: The Politics of Cruelty in the Ancient and Medieval World, Krems, 63–73. TOEBELMANN, F., 1915. Der Bogen von Malborghetto, Heidelberg. TOUGHER, S., 2012. Reading between the Lines: Julian’s First Panegyric on Constantius II, in: N. BAKER-BRIAN – S. TOUGHER (Hrsg.), Emperor and Author: The Writings of Julian the Apostate, Swansea, 20–34. TOYNBEE, J. M. C., 1986. Roman Medallions: With an Introduction to the Reprint Edition by W. E. Metcalf, New York. UNGERN-STERNBERG, J. v., 2004. The Crisis of the Republic, in: H. I. FLOWER (Hrsg.), The Roman Republic, Cambridge, 89–109. URBAN, R., 2000. Clodius Albinus, gallischer Rebell in der severischen Propaganda, in: Τιμαί Ιωάννου Τριανταφυλλοπούλου, Athen, 335–337. VAN DAM, R., 2011. Remembering Constantine at the Milvian Bridge, Cambridge. VANDERSPOEL, J., 1995. Themistius and the Imperial Court: Oratory, Civic Duty, and Paideia from Constantius to Theodosius, Ann Arbor. VAN NUFFELEN, P., 2012. Orosius and the Rhetoric of History, Oxford. VEH, O., 1987. Cassius Dio: Römische Geschichte; Bd. V: Epitome der Bücher 61–80, Zürich. VELKOV, V., 1998. Aurélien et sa politique en Mésie et en Thrace, in: E. FRÈZOULS – H. JOUFFROY (Hrsg.), Les empereurs illyriens, Straßburg, 155–169. VENTURA VILLANEUVA, Á., 2014. L’arco di trionfo di Settimio Severo a Roma e le sue iscrizioni con litterae aureae. Una nuova prospettiva. MDAI(R) 120, 267–311. VERA, D., 1980. La polemica contro l’abuso imperiale del trionfo: rapporti fra ideologia, economia e propaganda nel basso impero. RSA 10, 89–132. VITIELLO, M., 1999. La vicenda dell’obelisco tra versione ufficiale e tradizione senatoria. Magnenzio, Costanzo e il senato di Roma. MediterrAnt 2, 359–408. VITTINGHOFF, F., 1936. Der Staatsfeind in der römischen Kaiserzeit. Untersuchungen zur ‚damnatio memoriae‘, Berlin. VOISIN, J.-L., 1984. Les Romains, chasseurs de têtes, in: Du châtiment dans la cite: supplices corporels et peine de mort dans le monde antique, Paris, 241–293. WALLACE-HADRILL, A., 1982. Civilis Princeps: Between Citizen and King. JRS 72, 32–48. WALSER, G., 1955. Der Kaiser als Vindex Libertatis. Historia 4, 353–367. WALTER, U., 2011. Praxis ohne Begriff? ‚Reformen‘ in der Antike, in: B. ONKEN – D. ROHDE (Hrsg.), In omni historia curiosus. Studien zur Geschichte von der Antike bis zur Neuzeit. Festschrift für Helmut Schneider zum 65. Geburtstag, Wiesbaden, 111–127. WARDMAN, A. E., 1984. Usurpers and Internal Conflicts in the 4th Century A.D. Historia 33, 220– 237. WATSON, A., 1999. Aurelian and the Third Century, London. WEBER, G., 2000. Kaiser, Träume und Visionen in Prinzipat und Spätantike, Stuttgart. WEISWEILER, J., 2012. From Equality to Asymmetry: Honorific Statues, Imperial Power, and Senatorial Identity in Late-Antique Rome. JRA 25, 319–350. WESTALL, R., 2015. Constantius II and the Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican. Historia 64, 205– 242. WESTALL, R. – BRENK, F., 2011. The Second and Third Century, in: G. MARASCO (Hrsg.), Political Autobiographies and Memoirs in Antiquity: A Brill Companion, Leiden, 363–416. WHITBY, M., 1999. Images of Constantius, in: J. W. DRIJVERS – D. HUNT (Hrsg.), The Late Roman World and Its Historian: Interpreting Ammianus Marcellinus, London, 77–88. WIEMER, H.-U., 1994. Libanios und Zosimos über den Rom-Besuch Konstantins I. im Jahre 326. Historia 43, 469–494.

„Trophäen, die nicht vom äußeren Feinde gewonnen wurden …“

301

WIENAND, J., 2011. Der blutbefleckte Kaiser. Constantin und die martialische Inszenierung eines prekären Sieges, in: M. FAHLENBOCK – L. MADERSBACHER – I. SCHNEIDER (Hrsg.), Inszenierung des Sieges – Sieg der Inszenierung. Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven, Innsbruck, 237–254. WIENAND, J., 2012. Der Kaiser als Sieger. Metamorphosen triumphaler Herrschaft unter Constantin I., Berlin. WIENAND, J., 2015. O tandem felix civili, Roma, victoria! Civil War Triumphs from Honorius to Constantine and Back, in: J. WIENAND (Hrsg.), Contested Monarchy: Integrating the Roman Empire in the 4th Century AD, New York, 169–197. WISEMAN, T. P., 2010. The Two-Headed State: How Romans Explained Civil War, in: B. W. BREED – C. DAMON – A. ROSSI (Hrsg.), Citizens of Discord: Rome and Its Civil Wars, Oxford, 25–44. WISTRAND, E., 1976. The So-Called Laudatio Turiae: Introduction, Text, Translation, Commentary, Lund. WITTCHOW, F., 2001. Exemplarisches Erzählen bei Ammianus Marcellinus. Episode, Exemplum, Anekdote, Leipzig. WOOTEN, C. W., 1983. Cicero’s Philippics and Their Demosthenic Model: The Rhetoric of Crisis, Chapel Hill. WREDE, H., 1966. Zur Errichtung des Theodosiusobelisken in Istanbul. MDAI(I) 16, 178–198. ZACHOS, K. L., 2003. The tropaeum of the Sea-Battle of Actium at Nikopolis: Interim Report. JRA 16, 64–92. ZANKER, P., 2007. Die römische Kunst, München. ZANKER, P., 2012. Der Konstantinsbogen als Monument des Senates. AAAH 25, 77–105. ZECCHINI, G., 1998. I cervi, le Ammazzoni e il trionfo «gotico» di Aureliano, in: G. BONAMENTE – F. HEIM – J.-P. CALLU (Hrsg.), Historiae Augustae Colloquium Argentoratense, Bari, 349– 358. ZEHNACKER, H., 2003. Quelques remarques sur le revers du nouvel aureus d’Octavien (28 av. J.C.). BSFN 58, 1–3. ZIEGLER, P., 1970. Zur religiösen Haltung der Gegenkaiser im 4. Jh. n. Chr., Kallmünz. ZIEGLER, R., 2003. Kaiser Tetricus und der senatorische Adel. Tyche 18, 223–232. ZIEMSSEN, H., 2010. Roma Auctrix Augusti. Die Veränderung des römischen Stadtbilds unter Kaiser Maxentius (306–312 n. Chr.), in: N. BURKHARDT – R. H. STICHEL (Hrsg.), Die antike Stadt im Umbruch, Wiesbaden, 16–27. ZIMMERMANN, M., 1999a. Enkomion und Historiographie: Entwicklungslinien der kaiserzeitlichen Historiographie vom 1. bis zum frühen 3. Jh. n. Chr., in: M. ZIMMERMAN (Hrsg.), Geschichtsschreibung und politischer Wandel im 3. Jh. n. Chr., Stuttgart, 17–56. ZIMMERMANN, M., 1999b. Kaiser und Ereignis. Studien zum Geschichtswerk Herodians, München. ZIMMERMANN, M., 2007. Gewalt in der Historia Augusta, in: G. BONAMENTE – H. BRANDT (Hrsg.), Historiae Augustae Colloquium Bambergense, Bari, 355–370. ZIMMERMANN, M., 2009. Zur Deutung von Gewaltdarstellungen, in: M. ZIMMERMANN (Hrsg.), Extreme Formen von Gewalt in Bild und Text des Altertums, München, 7–45.

GREAT PRETENDERS: ELEVATIONS OF ‘GOOD’ USURPERS IN ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHY Martijn Icks

ABSTRACT: In the works of Greco-Roman historians and biographers, descriptions of imperial investiture rituals often served to express a verdict on the candidate in question, signalling his virtues and/or vices to the reader. Those who attempted to usurp the throne were usually cast in a negative light as power-hungry villains who betrayed the legitimate ruler, disturbed the peace and shed blood to attain their selfish goals. As a result the descriptions of their investitures typically included allegations of violence, intimidation, bribery and/or deceit. However, Roman historiography provides several records of ‘good’ pretenders who supposedly had noble motives for claiming the throne. This article examines the literary representation of the elevations of three such men, namely Vespasian (AD 69), Pescennius Niger (AD 193), and Julian (AD 360, to the rank of Augustus). In all three cases, sympathetic authors alleged that these candidates were willingly acclaimed by the people and/or the soldiers, without having to resort to bribes or threats, unlike their less benign counterparts. Although not all of them were alleged to have uttered the recusatio imperii that characterised the worthy ruler, it is clear that they only refrained from doing so out of a desire to save the commonwealth from the clutches of tyrants. Through their descriptions of the investiture ritual, sympathetic authors thus managed to dissolve the tension between the pretenders’ use of violence to seize power on the one hand and the ideal of the emperor as the reluctant servant of the state on the other.

When Tiberius succeeded Augustus in AD 14, his rule was not universally accepted. The Germanic and Illyrian legions rose in revolt, demanding higher salaries and a discharge for veterans. Germanicus hastened to the Rhine legions to prevent the outbreak of civil war, but his appeals to discipline and obedience fell on deaf ears. The men cried out that he should grant their wishes and even offered to make him emperor. This was too much for the young commander, who reacted with great indignation: On this he leapt straight from the platform as if he was being infected with their guilt [quasi scelere contaminaretur]. They barred his way with their weapons, threatening to use them unless he returned: but he, exclaiming that he would sooner die than turn traitor [fidem exueret], snatched the sword from his side, raised it, and would have buried it in his breast, if the bystanders had not caught his arm and held it by force.1

Germanicus’s loyalty to the emperor earned him the admiration of Tacitus, who noted that the nearer the young man stood to the supreme power, the more energy he devoted to the cause of Tiberius. He thus embodied the ideal of the Roman 1

Tac. ann. 1.35. Unless specified otherwise, all quoted translations are from Loeb editions.

304

Martijn Icks

citizen who is devoted to the service of the state but, like Cincinnatus, has no interest in controlling it.2 Paradoxically, even emperors were held to this standard. In his Res gestae, Augustus carefully stressed that he had spared no effort to save the Roman people from tyranny, famine and other calamities, yet “refused to accept any power offered me which was contrary to the traditions of our ancestors”. Velleius Paterculus attributed the same reluctance to his hero Tiberius, describing how the senate and the people of Rome had to “wrestle” with the future emperor before he was willing to accept power. In the end, Tiberius only gave in because he realised “that whatever he did not undertake to protect was likely to perish”.3 As the literary sources attest, the Roman elite conceived of the principate as the highest honour that could be bestowed on a man – but also as a heavy burden that entailed great responsibilities. This notion persisted in Late Antiquity. In the Historia Augusta’s highly fictional account of the accession of the emperor Tacitus in AD 275, the aged senator was offered the purple by his peers, “for by reason of your rank, your life and your mind you deserve it”. Surprised by this unsought honour, Tacitus sputtered that he was too old to be emperor: “Scarce can I fulfill the duties of a senator, scarce can I speak the opinions to which my position constrains me”. Yet it made no difference: the interests of the res publica outweighed any personal objections, and the old man had to accept.4 In the eyes of the senate, the purple was ideally granted to the candidate who was deemed most suited to rule because of his noble lineage, moral excellence and leadership qualities. Unfortunately, many unworthy men were all too eager to rule. Roman historiography provides countless examples of pretenders who tried to wrestle power from the reigning emperor. Hostile authors often portray these men as arrogant, bloodthirsty, power-hungry and craving a life of luxury and leisure.5 Even for such villains, however, it was not enough to simply butcher or scheme their way to the top: if they wanted to rule, they had to be formally invested with imperial power by the army, the senate and the people of Rome. Since these acts were of great significance for an emperor’s legitimacy, Greco-Roman historians and biographers often give detailed descriptions of such investitures. Rather than approaching these descriptions as more or less accurate factual reports, we should read them as highly coloured representations that use the investiture ritual to express a verdict on the man who assumes the purple. Commenting on the works of Tacitus, Egon Flaig distinguished two discourses, a neutral one that chronicles events and a ‘maximic’ one that is guided by the author’s bias as a senator. This second discourse interacts with the first, professing interpretations of 2 3

4 5

For the role of exempla in Roman culture, see ROLLER 2004. Res gest. div. Aug 6; Vell. Pat. 2.124.2. Inevitably, the hostile Tacitus attributed Tiberius’s reluctance to hypocrisy, remarking that the latter’s plea to distribute the burden of rule between several men was “more dignified than convincing” (Tac. ann. 1.11). HA Tacit. 3.1–7.1. A good example is Otho, whose slaves and freedmen “constantly held before his eager eyes Nero’s luxurious court, his adulteries, his many marriages, and other royal vices, exhibiting them as his own if he only dared to take them, but taunting him with them as the privilege of others if he did not act” (Tac. hist. 1.22).

Great Pretenders: Elevations of ‘Good’ Usurpers in Roman Historiography

305

events that are often demonstrably false, or at least distorted.6 The same holds true for other authors. In their hostile accounts of events, power-hungry pretenders like Otho and Didius Julianus did not manage to gain the heartfelt consent of the soldiers, the senators and the people, but resorted to violence, intimidation, bribery and deceit to win the throne. Hence they forced themselves upon their unwilling subjects.7 However, not every man who seized power by force was necessarily evil. Roman historiography also provides several records of ‘good’ pretenders who had noble motives for claiming the throne. Usually these were men who rose against ‘bad’ emperors and (in some cases) managed to found new dynasties, such as Vespasian and Constantine. Authors who portrayed such men favourably had to dissolve the tension between the pretenders’ use of violence to seize power on the one hand and the ideal of the emperor as the reluctant servant of the state on the other. How did they manage this? Or, to formulate it differently: how could descriptions of investiture rituals be used to construct images of ‘good’ pretenders? In order to answer this question, I will examine three cases: the elevation of Vespasian in AD 69, the elevations of the rivals Septimius Severus and Pescennius Niger in AD 193, and the elevation of Julian (to the rank of Augustus) in AD 360. First, however, I need to make some brief remarks on the investiture of a Roman emperor and the way it tied in to his legitimacy.

IMPERIAL INVESTITURE AND LEGITIMACY During the principate, there was no single ritual which could turn a private individual into an emperor.8 Rather, the man who claimed the throne had to interact with different groups at different places. These interactions could all take place on the same day, but they could also be spread over a longer period – even months, if the initial rise to power did not take place at Rome. First, a candidate presented himself to the soldiers, who acclaimed him as emperor and swore an oath of loyalty to him. If the investiture took place at Rome, the army was usually represented by the Praetorian Guard; outside the capital, any legion could do the honours. In response, the candidate gave a speech (adlocutio) and promised the men a donative. Next, he presented himself to the senate and made another speech. This was followed by a vote by the senators (later replaced by acclamations) and, ultimately, by the people’s assembly. From these two bodies, he received the offices and mandates that formed the legal foundation for his authority – most importantly a proconsular imperium and the tribuniciae potestas.9 However, as Flaig has right-

6 7 8 9

FLAIG 1992: 23–32. For more on this, see ICKS 2011, ICKS 2014 and (for late antiquity) ICKS 2012. Parts of the contents of this paragraph on imperial investiture and legitimacy have been drawn from Icks 2011, Icks 2012 and Icks 2014. For a detailed analysis of the roles of the army, the senate and the comitia in the investiture of an emperor during the first two centuries of the principate, see PARSI 1963.

306

Martijn Icks

fully pointed out, the crucial aspect of an imperial investiture was not so much the bestowal of titles and offices, but rather the fact that the army, the senate and the people’s assembly expressed their consent to the accession of the new emperor. If the man on the throne did not live up to their expectations – for instance, if he turned into a tyrant – they could withdraw their support. Therefore, an emperor was only legitimate as long as he enjoyed the consensus universorum.10 Under Diocletian, a more elaborate investiture ritual was introduced. Since the turmoil of the third century had rendered the senate and the people of Rome largely irrelevant, they no longer played a role in the accession of a new emperor. Only the military aspect mattered. Troops from different legions, representing the army as a whole, were gathered on an open field outside the city, a Campus Martius. There, the reigning emperor – or high military and civic officials, if no emperor was available – mounted a tribunal with the imperial candidate and introduced him to the soldiers. After the men had signalled their approval through acclamations, the candidate was invested with a purple mantle and hailed as emperor. He subsequently addressed the troops and promised them a donative. Finally, the troops swore an oath of loyalty to the new emperor.11 By the time of Valentinian, three elements had been added to the investiture ceremony: the candidate was crowned with a diadem and a torques and raised on a shield by the soldiers.12 Angela Pabst has argued that the troops who acclaimed the emperor gained the legal status of a people’s assembly in Late Antiquity, but this thesis has rightfully been rejected by other scholars.13 The simple fact is that, by the end of the third century, imperial power no longer rested on a lex and a senatus consultum. The bestowal of authority was now affected solely by the acts and attributes of the ritual itself, especially the investiture with the purple mantle and the coronation with the diadem.14 However, access to this ritual was not limited to ‘proper’ rulers and their intended heirs: it could be performed by any rebellious commander and his troops to claim the throne – as it very regularly was. Even the approval of the reigning emperor did not constitute a definite criterion to distinguish legitimate from illegitimate rulers, since his authority could be contested as well. In the end, all hinged on military consent, and since the granting or denial of this consent by the soldiers was in practice not governed by any strict rules, Flaig has argued that the concept of legitimacy as an analytical tool is useless for Late Antiquity: “Wenn wichtige Gruppen eine vom Historiker postulierte Legitimität nicht respektieren, dann wirkt sie nicht. Wenn sie nicht wirkt, existiert sie nur als Postulat – entweder definitionsmächtiger aber politisch schwach gestellter Gruppen oder gar nur im Kopf des Historikers.“15 This last remark, however, is going too far. As arbitrary as the concept of imperial legitimacy may have been in Late Antiquity,

10 11 12 13 14 15

FLAIG 1992: 174–207. KOLB 2001: 25–27, 98f.; SZIDAT 2010: 71–75. TEITLER 2002; SZIDAT 2010: 71–75. PABSt 1997; refuted by KOLB 2001: 214–218 and SZIDAT 2010: 77 n. 252. AVERY 1940: 78; SZIDAT 2010: 74. FLAIG 1997: 30.

Great Pretenders: Elevations of ‘Good’ Usurpers in Roman Historiography

307

Roman authors and orators were still concerned with the question whether or not an emperor should be considered legitimus and judged him accordingly.16 Both during the principate and Late Antiquity, many descriptions of imperial investitures include a recusatio imperii – a formal refusal of imperial power by the chosen candidate. We can assume that this was not just a literary topos, but part of the ritual actions one had to perform to be recognised as emperor.17 It usually took place before the troops. Obviously, most candidates who uttered a recusatio did not decline the throne in earnest, as Germanicus had done when he faced the rebelling Rhine legions, but merely wanted to demonstrate that they were modest and did not crave power. They hoped and expected that their recusatio would lead to an ‘explosion of loyalty’ from the side of their audience, who would insist that they had to accept the purple. Once it was established that this was the wish of all those present, a man could give in without running the risk of being labelled a tyrant. Moreover, his initial refusal allowed the gods the opportunity to interfere. If the heavenly powers wanted him to become emperor, they would make sure that it happened despite his resistance. Protests against a candidate’s recusatio could, therefore, not only be interpreted as an expression of popular support, but also of divine blessing.18

VESPASIAN (AD 69) When Nero committed suicide and plunged the Roman Empire into civil war, Vespasian was in Judaea with a special command to quell the Jewish revolt. The general did not immediately make a bid for power, but swore allegiance to the succession of short-lived emperors who seized but failed to keep the throne in this tumultuous period. Only in the summer of AD 69 did he revolt against Vitellius and, with the aid of his fellow-conspirator Mucianus, governor of Syria, managed to seize the purple for himself.19 Four ancient authors give a detailed account of Vespasian’s rise to power: Flavius Josephus, Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio. All of them cast the emperor in a positive light – especially Josephus, who, as the only contemporary among the four, had been captured by Vespasian for his part in the Jewish revolt and had turned over to the Roman side. He was awarded with

16

17

18 19

In late antiquity, the word tyrannus no longer indicated a bad ruler, but one who had lost or lacked imperial authority, or – from about AD 400 – a usurper who had risen against the reigning emperor(s); see GRÜNEWALD 1990: 64–71. For negative descriptions of the investitures of usurpers in late antiquity, see ICKS 2012. SZIDAT 2010: 75f. The recusatio imperii is usually considered as one of the standard elements of an imperial investiture, although Frank Kolb claims that it only occurred occasionally (KOLB 2001: 99). It certainly became a much-used tool to indicate the modesty or hypocrisy of imperial candidates in literary accounts of investitures; see HUTTNER 2004. BÉRANGER 1953: 137–169. See also WALLACE-HADRill 1982: 36–38 and HUTTNER 2004. Detailed factual accounts of Vespasian’s usurpation are provided by FLAIG 1992: 356–416, LEVICK 1999: 43–64 and MORGAN 2006: 170–255.

308

Martijn Icks

Roman citizenship and henceforth enjoyed the favour of the Flavians.20 To what extent these authors were interdependent is, as usual, impossible to say with certainty. Suetonius may or may not have made use of Tacitus’s Historiae, while Cassius Dio may have used the works of Josephus and Suetonius, but certainly made little to no use of Tacitus. In addition, all three based their accounts on lost contemporary sources, such as the historical work of Pliny the Elder.21 Undoubtedly, these sources had a pro-Flavian bias.22 In his Jewish Wars, Josephus records that Vespasian was appalled when he heard that Vitellius had seized the throne and was laying waste to the Empire, feeling a passionate desire to “avenge his country”. Only the long distance and the fact that it was still winter season prevented him from taking action at once.23 As Flaig has pointed out, all other authors claim that Vespasian already contemplated rebellion when he heard of Otho’s usurpation, but this tale is conspicuously absent from Josephus’s account.24 After all, it might make the future emperor seem like a man who was just awaiting his opportunity to seize the throne. Since Vespasian eventually moved against Vitellius, not against Otho, Vitellius had to be painted as the villain whose reign was intolerable.25 According to Josephus, this man had acted “madly”, since “he seized upon the government as if it were absolutely destitute of a governor” – a comment that could just as well have been made about Otho, or, for that matter, about Vespasian himself.26 It was the latter that the Jewish historian definitely wanted to avoid, so he had to make it clear to his readers that the revolt of his beloved general and patron was in no way comparable to Vitellius’s contemptible grab for power. Significantly, Josephus explicitly states that Vespasian did not intend to rule himself.27 That notion is first conceived by his soldiers, who deliberate among themselves, comparing Vespasian’s many qualities to Vitellius’s numerous vices, and considering that “neither will the Roman senate, nor people, bear such a lascivious emperor” when Vespasian provides such a superior alternative. The comment is important, since it indicates that what follows is not just another military coup, but a measure taken on behalf of all the significant groups that constitute the

20 21

22 23 24 25

26 27

RAJAK 1983: 185–222. Tacitus’s sources: SYME 1958: 176–190. Suetonius’s sources: JONES/MILNS 2002: 4f. Dio’s sources: MURISON 1999: 13–17. Another important Flavian historian was Cluvius Rufus, but his work appears to have ended with the death of Nero, or perhaps Otho. Tacitus indicates as much in hist. 2.101. Ios. bell. Iud. 4.10.2. FLAIG 1992: 365 n. 34. According to Suetonius, Vespasian’s revolt against Vitellius was greatly aided by the circulation of a letter that had allegedly been written by the late Otho, begging Vespasian to avenge him (Vesp. 6.4). This may indicate that Vespasian staged himself as Otho’s avenger during the early stages of his rebellion. Ios. bell. Iud. 4.10.2. For the vilification of Vitellius in Flavian historiography, see RICHTER 1992: 243–256. Ios. bell. Iud. 4.10.4.

Great Pretenders: Elevations of ‘Good’ Usurpers in Roman Historiography

309

res publica.28 In the same vein, it is important that the soldiers argue that they are “more deserving” to acclaim an emperor than the troops who acclaimed Otho and Vitellius, since they had fought the hardest in wars. Next, the acclamation is described. According to Josephus, the troops gathered in a great body and declared Vespasian emperor, urging him “to save the government, which was now in danger”. When the general refused, “the commanders insisted the more earnestly upon his acceptance; and the soldiers came about him, with their drawn swords in their hands, and threatened to kill him, unless he would now live according to his dignity”. This is highly reminiscent of the scene in which soldiers tried to force the throne on Germanicus, with one significant difference: Vespasian “at length, being not able to persuade them, yielded to their solicitations that would salute him emperor”.29 Josephus thus interprets Vespasian’s recusatio imperii as perfectly sincere, rather than as a calculated gesture to appear modest. This establishes the future emperor’s reluctance to rule, absolving him from any allegations that he sought power for his own advantage. Seen in this light, the usurpation is no longer problematical – in fact, it becomes admirable. Whereas Germanicus had rightfully refused to rise against the appointed heir of Augustus, Vespasian saw himself confronted with a man who had seized the throne by force and was evidently unworthy to rule. His willingness to act against this usurper characterises him as a good Roman who is prepared to do his duty – even if that duty entails becoming emperor himself. In the works of other authors, Vitellius also features as the villain. He is addicted to luxury and licentiousness, squanders money and sets a bad example to his soldiers. In the Historiae, Mucianus scourns his “sloth, ignorance and cruelty”, urging Vespasian that it would be a disgrace “to leave the state to corruption and ruin”.30 Like Josephus, later authors claim that the soldiers took the initiative for the acclamation. Tacitus records that the men who were drawn up to greet Vespasian when he stepped from his quarters saluted him as emperor, whereupon “the rest ran up and began to call him Caesar and Augustus; they heaped on him all the titles of an emperor”. Dio has a similar tale, relating that the soldiers surrounded Vespasian’s tent and hailed him as emperor. Suetonius claims that Vespasian was prompted to action because the three legions from Moesia had unanimously declared for him on their own initiative, while he was not even present among them.31 Unlike Josephus, however, these authors do not portray Vespasian as a man who had no interest in ruling. For one thing, they completely fail to mention the recusatio imperii that featured so prominently in Josephus’s account. Moreover, Suetonius and Dio allege that Vespasian was already considering to seize the purple before he was acclaimed – Suetonius even refers to a “hope … long 28

29 30 31

Ios. bell. Iud. 4.10.3. However, we should note that, in the same chapter, the soldiers decide to act quickly because “the senate may choose an emperor, whom the soldiers, who are the saviours of the empire, will have in contempt.” Evidently, they felt that those who did the fighting should also have the greatest say in appointing a new leader. Ios. bell. Iud. 4.10.4. Cass. Dio 64.2.1–2, 4.4; Tac. hist. 2.76–77. See also RICHTER 1992: 243–256. Tac. hist. 2.80; Cass. Dio 64.8.4; Suet. Vesp. 6.1–3.

310

Martijn Icks

since conceived” – while Tacitus claims that he had already made up his mind and was in the process of organizing his rebellion with the help of Mucianus. “The time is already past and gone when you could seem to have no desires for supreme power,” the latter had remarked; “your only refuge is the throne”.32 In the narratives of these authors, then, the spontaneous acclamation by the troops does not serve to exonerate Vespasian from the ‘accusation’ that he wanted to seize power by force. Rather, it emphasises that this desire did not run contrary to the wishes of his men. According to Cassius Dio, the popular feeling was “strong in his favour” because of his personal qualities and achievements.33 Unlike ‘bad’ pretenders like Otho and (to a lesser extent) Vitellius, Vespasian did not need to persuade the soldiers to follow him by stooping to bribes, promises of favours and exaggerated gestures of affection.34 In fact, Tacitus and Dio do not even bother to mention the customary promise of a donative on this occasion – a ritual action often used in literary sources to suggest that an unworthy pretender had bought the loyalty of his troops.35 Admittedly, Dio does mention the granting of a donative at a later instance, but that was enacted by Mucianus and Domitian, the latter of whom addressed the troops in Rome in his father’s absence.36 Moreover, since Vitellius was already dead at this time and there were no more pretenders to dispute Vespasian’s claim, there is nothing to suggest that this gesture should be interpreted as a bribe. The senate, too, needed no persuasion to accept Vespasian as emperor. As Tacitus records, the senators were “filled with joy and confident hope” when they voted imperial honours and mandates to the new ruler. Since Vespasian was still in Egypt, he could not hold the customary speech, but he sent a letter in which he “spoke as an emperor, with humility of himself, magnificently of the state”.37 This was certainly a vast improvement over Otho’s introduction to the Curia, at which the short-lived emperor had struck a false note by his affected modesty and the kisses he kept throwing to everybody on his fingers – a performance, according to Dio, that had fooled nobody about his true nature.38 Even the gods went out of their way to express their approval of Vespasian’s rise to power. Reflecting Flavian propaganda, Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio record numerous omens that foretold the man’s great destiny, including a prophecy by Josephus, who allegedly

32

33 34 35 36 37 38

Suet. Vesp. 5.1: spem … iam pridem sibi … conceptam; Cass. Dio 64.8.3(1)–4; Tac. hist. 2.78– 79. Interestingly, Dio’s epitomators provide two different versions of events, with Xiphilinus alleging that Vespasian was still deliberating whether he would claim the throne after Galba’s death and Zonaras claiming that he had already made up his mind to do so (MURISOn 1999: 91f.). Cass. Dio 64.8.3(2). Otho: Tac. hist. 1.24, 36, 38; Suet. Otho 6.3; Cass. Dio 63.5.3, 9.1; Vitellius: Suet. Vit. 7.3–8.1. Plutarch assigns a more passive role to Vitellius (Galba 22.1–8). FLAIG 1992: 455–456. The prime example of a man who allegedly bought his way to power is Didius Julianus: Cass. Dio 74.11.2–5; Herodian. 2.6.4–11. Cass. Dio 64.22.2. Tac. hist. 4.3. Cass. Dio 65.1.1 also mentions Vespasian’s acceptance by the senate. Cass. Dio 64.8.1–2.

Great Pretenders: Elevations of ‘Good’ Usurpers in Roman Historiography

311

predicted Vespasian’s imperial future after he had been captured.39 Although Tacitus is sceptical about these omens, remarking that the emperor-to-be was not wholly free from “superstitious belief”, Suetonius seems sincere when he jubilantly records that prestige and a “certain divinity” were “given” the new ruler when he cured a blind and a lame man. Cassius Dio leaves no doubt: “Vespasian, like some others, had been born for the throne”.40 These three authors, then, emphasise that Vespasian gained the purple with widespread consent among soldiers, senators and gods. Although the pretender does not display the disinterest in power that was considered typical for ‘good’ emperors, as he did in the work of Josephus, his qualities still make him vastly superior to the incumbent, the gluttonous and slothful Vitellius, who brings nothing but ruin to the Empire. Vespasian’s revolt is therefore to be cheered, rather than condemned. The first Flavian was that rare and fortunate case where personal ambition coincided with the suitability to rule.

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS AND PESCENNIUS NIGER (AD 193) In AD 193, the Roman Empire entered another period of civil war. After revolting praetorians had murdered the short-lived emperor Pertinax, the throne was occupied by Didius Julianus, who could barely control the guard and was unpopular with the senate and the people. Soon Pescennius Niger, the governor of Syria, rose against him, but he was beaten to Rome by a rival claimant, the general Septimius Severus.41 The investitures of these pretenders as emperors are not described by the age’s foremost historian, Cassius Dio, who merely remarks that they “attempted to secure the control of affairs”. However, their circumstances have been recorded by Dio’s contemporary Herodian, as well as by the anonymous biographer of the Historia Augusta, who may have used Herodian as one of his sources.42 Both authors, but particularly Herodian, are more in favour of Niger than of Severus. This sentiment is reflected in the descriptions of the investitures of both men. Herodian draws parallels between the imperial candidates by describing how they took the same steps to organise their bids for power. Niger and Severus both started by calling together their officers and persuading them to assist them in their undertaking. Then they courted the favour of the soldiers and the provincial population – in Niger’s case by “constantly staging shows” for the Syrians and by 39 40 41 42

Tac. hist. 2.78; Suet. Vesp. 5.1–7, 7.1; Cass. Dio 64.9.1, 65.1.1–4. Josephus’s prophecy is also recorded by himself in Ios. bell. Iud. 3.8.9. Tac. hist. 2.79; Suet. Vesp. 7.2–3: quasi maiestas … accessit; Cass. Dio 65.2.1. ANTHONY BIRLEY provides a detailed factual account of the year AD 193: BIRLEY 1988: 89– 107. Cass. Dio 74.14.3. According to KOLB, Cassius Dio was the main source for Herodian’s work, while both were used as sources by the Historia Augusta (KOLB 1972: 159–161). Timothy BARNES has objected to this view, arguing that Dio was just one among several of Herodian’s sources and that the Historia Augusta drew upon an independent Latin source (BARNES 1978: 79–89).

312

Martijn Icks

“allowing them free license to celebrate the holidays and make merry”; in Severus’s case by “lavish promises” made to neighbouring provinces and the rules of the northern nations, raising “the expectation of great rewards”.43 Only after these preparations had been made did both pretenders stage the acclamations of the soldiers. They assembled all the troops in one location, mounted a platform and held the traditional adlocutio. Emperors who came to the throne in more stable circumstances – that is, emperors who had been appointed by their predecessors – held this speech after they had been acclaimed to give expression to the close and personal bond that now existed between themselves and the soldiers.44 Severus and Niger, however, held their speeches to garner military support in the first place. Both succeeded and were enthusiastically hailed as Augustus by the troops. Niger was even invested with a purple mantle; the first recorded use of such an attribute during an imperial investiture ceremony.45 However, Herodian also draws attention to a significant difference between the elevations of Niger and Severus. As several authors attest, the former was prompted to rise against Didius Julianus by the populace of Rome, who gathered at the Circus Maximus and shouted that he should come to their rescue as soon as possible. Herodian adds that the people also called for Niger “in all the public assemblies …, cheering for [him] and offering him the Empire with loud shouts”.46 In effect, this meant that one part of the investiture ritual – namely the acclamations by the comitia – had already been performed before the candidate in question had even announced his bid for power. Niger made much of this popular mandate in his adlocutio to the troops, remarking: Never would I have come before you to discuss these matters if I were motivated solely by personal aims [εἰ ἐκ μόνης προαιρέσεως ἰδιωτικῆς], by unreasonable hopes, or by the desire to realize even greater achievements. But the Romans are calling me [ἀλλ᾽ ἐμὲ καλοῦσι ῾Ρωμαῖοι] and with unceasing cries beg me to extend to them the saviour’s hand and not allow an empire so illustrious, one made famous by our ancestors from the earliest times, to be brought to disgraceful ruin.47

Septimius Severus did not enjoy the support of the Roman people. Herodian records that the future emperor dreamt that a stallion threw off Pertinax and then slipped underneath him, taking him up on its back and raising him aloft, so that all could see and cheer him. Significantly, this occurred in the middle of the Forum Romanum, “where, in the old days of the Republic, the popular assemblies had been held”. With this explicit reference to the comitia, the dream seems like a 43 44 45 46 47

Pescennius Niger: Herodian. 2.7.7–10; Septimius Severus: Herodian. 2.9.7–12. All quoted translations of Herodian are taken from the translation of E. C. ECHOLS. SOMMER 2005: 339–341. Herodian. 2.10.1–9. Nevertheless, ANDREAS ALFÖLDI has argued that the practice went back even further: ALFÖLDI 1970: 167–169, 263–268. Cass. Dio 74.13.5; Herodian. 2.7.3, 5; HA Pesc. Nig. 3.1. Herodian. 2.8.2. Amusingly, Niger professes a very different argument for his usurpation in Dio’s history. When someone asked the pretender what gave him the right to name himself emperor, he pointed to his sword and said “This” (75.7.2ª). Perhaps it was the more honest answer.

Great Pretenders: Elevations of ‘Good’ Usurpers in Roman Historiography

313

clear sign of popular consent to Severus’s rise to power. Undoubtedly, it functioned as such in Severan propaganda, but Herodian undermines its significance in his narrative, claiming that the Roman people actually feared Severus’s approaching army and only pretended to support his cause, and that his entrance in the city – accompanied by armed troops – “brought fear and panic to the Romans”.48 In his adlocutio to the soldiers, Severus, like Niger, stated that “I must not allow the Roman Empire to lie helpless” now that it had fallen into the hands of Didius Julianus. Unlike Niger, he did not claim that the Roman people had called upon him, but used a different argument: he wanted to march on Rome to avenge the murder of Pertinax. Indeed, he had even assumed Pertinax’ name next to his own. Although many of his supporters were persuaded by this professed motive, Herodian is quick to reveal it as nothing more than a convenient excuse, uttered by a man who “lied whenever it was advantageous to him” and whose “tongue said many things which his heart did not mean”.49 Another argument Severus allegedly used in his speech echoes the sentiment expressed by Vespasian’s troops, namely that his soldiers were much more courageous and hardened by battle and labour than “those luxury-loving sots” who guarded Julianus in Rome or the Syrian troops of Niger, who were “suited only to games and childish banter”. Many provinces and cities did not consider either candidate worthy of the throne, Severus argued, but if they would hear that the well-respected Illyrian army had chosen an emperor of its own, they were likely to abandon their feigned support of Niger and favour Severus’s cause.50 In the Historia Augusta, the ruthless ambition of the future emperor is not so clear-cut. According to the biographer, Severus was hailed as emperor “at the behest of many, but actually against his own will”. Yet this image of the reluctant pretender appears to be immediately contradicted by the statement that Severus paid his legionaries a donative of one thousand sesterces – allegedly “a sum which no prince had ever given before” (although Pertinax and Julianus had actually paid the praetorians a lot more).51 The mention of a donative in literary sources can often be read as an implication that a candidate for the purple had to bribe the troops to support him, but in those cases, the promise of money precedes the acclamation. Here, the mention of a high donative may rather serve to indicate that Severus was not at all sure that his troops would stay loyal to him. Both Herodian and the Historia Augusta record that Severus introduced himself to the senate after he had defeated Julianus. According to Herodian, the victorious emperor once again claimed that he had revolted to avenge the murder of Pertinax. Although his mild tone and ample promises for the future allegedly managed to convince many in the audience, some of the older senators were not

48 49 50 51

Herodian. 2.9.6, 12.2, 14.1. Herodian. 2.9.7–11 (Severus garnering first support in his quarters), 13 (his treacherous nature), 10.1–4 (assumption of Pertinax’ name and address to the troops). Herodian. 2.10.5–8. HA Sept. Sev. 5.1–2. For the heights of donatives granted by emperors at their accession during the principate, see BASTIEN 1988: 11–16.

314

Martijn Icks

deceived and rightfully suspected that Severus would only act in his own interest.52 In the Vita Severi, the emperor appeared in the Curia in the company of armed soldiers and armed friends – hardly the behaviour of a proper princeps. Here, clearly, was a man who intended to rule through the soldiers, rather than with the senators. However, while the meeting was still ongoing, the troops sudden