ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook 9789814380379

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ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook
 9789814380379

Table of contents :
CONTENTS
Introduction
I. The ASEAN Member Countries: Facts and Figures
II. Chronology of Main Events
III. Organizational Structure of ASEAN
IV. ASEAN Economic Co-operation
V. ASEAN External Relations
VI. Private Sector Co-operation
VII. Documentation
VIII. Reference Section

Citation preview

A SEA N Econo mic

Co~operation

The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies was established as an autonomous orgamzation in 1968. It is a regional research centre for scholars and other specialists concerned with modern Southeast Asia, particularly the multi-faceted problems of stability and security, economic developmen t, and political and social change. The Institute is governed by a twenty-two-member Board of Trustees comprising nominees from the Singapore Government, the National University of Singapore, the various Chambers of Commerce, and professional and civic organizations. A ten-man Executive Committee oversees day-to-day operations; it is chaired by the Director, the Institute's chief academic and administrati ve officer. The ASEAN Economic Research Unit is an integral part of the Institute, coming under the overall supervision of the Director who is also the Chairman of its Managemen t Committee. The Unit was formed in 1979 in response to the need to deepen understandin g of economic change and political developmen ts in ASEAN. The day-to-day operations of the Unit are the responsibility of the Co-ordinator. A Regional Advisory Board, consisting of a senior economist from each of the ASEAN countries, guides the work of the Unit.

ASEA

Economic

Co~operation

compiled by

Hans Christoph Rieger

I5ER5

ASEAN Economic Research Unit INSTITUTE OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES

Published by Institute of Southeast Asian Studies Heng Mui Keng Terrace Pasir Panjang Singapore 0511 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

© 1991 Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Catologuing in Publication Data ASEAN economic co-operation: a handbook/compiler, Hans Christoph Rieger. I. ASEAN countries-Economic integration-Handbooks, manuals, etc. 2. ASEAN-Handbooks, manuals, etc. I. Rieger, Hans Christoph. sls90-110014 1991 JX1979 A84 ISBN 981-3035-66-8 The responsibility for facts and opinions expressed in this publication rests exclusively with the compiler and his interpretations do not necessarily reflect the views or the policy of the Institute or its supporters.

Tjpeset by The Fototype Business Printed in Singopore by Prime Pockoging Industries Pte Ltd

CONTENTS

Introduction

vii

I. The ASEAN Member Countries: Facts and Figures II. Chronology of Main Events

II

Ill. Organizational Structure of ASEAN

27

IV. ASEAN Economic Co-operation

35

ASEAN Industrial Projects (AlP)

39

ASEAN Industrial Complementation (AIC)

41

ASEAN Industrial Joint Ventures (AIJV)

43

Preferential Trading Arrangements (PTA)

45

External Relations

50

Other Economic Co-operation Activities, including ASEAN machinery

57

V. ASEAN External Relations

61

Australia

63

Canada

65

Contents

European Community Japan New Zealand United States of America UNDP Other External Co-operation

66 69 72 73 75 76

ASEAN-CCI

77 79

ASEAN NGOs

84

Non-affiliated NGOs

92

VI. Private Sector Co-operation

VII. Documentation List of Documents VIII. Reference Section Abbreviations Useful Addresses Bibliography

97 99 213 215 229 231

INTRODUCTION

This handbook provides basic information on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), its organization and the various co-operation activities. The emphasis is on economic co-operation. In their day-to-day work, political and administrative decision-makers, academics working on ASEAN, as well as all informed citizens of the ASEAN countries regularly require such information. It is available in many forms, but it is mostly scattered in official documents and in the fast expanding current literature on ASEAN. There is, thus, a need to provide the basic information in a handy volume. This handbook attempts to fill that need. The material has been drawn together from many sources, and due care has been taken to be as up-to-date and accurate as possible. Nevertheless, this handbook is not an official ASEAN document and, since ASEAN is a living organization within a continuous process of change, updating will become necessary from time to time. The ASEAN Economic Research Unit of the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies would welcome corrections and suggestions for improvement for the next update of this handbook. All such information should be addressed to the Co-ordinator of the ASEA\1 Economic Research Unit at the address below. The Co-ordinator ASEAN Economic Research Unit Institute of Southeast Asian Studies Heng Mui Keng Terrace Singapore 0511.

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I

The ASEAN Member Countries: Facts and Figures

THE ASEAN MEMBER COUNTRIES

Basic data on the ASEAN member countries are provided in the following synoptic table. A number of readily available sources have been used, but the main compilation of demographic and other statistics is based on L.G. Martin, ed., The Asean Success Story: Social, Economic and Political Dimensions (Honolulu: East-West Center, University of Hawaii Press, 1987). The ASEAN Secretariat also provides comparative statistics in its 1989 publication, ASEAN Selected Statistics 1981-1987.

Facts and Figures

NAME

Brunei

Indonesia

Malaysia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

Brunei Darussalam

Republik Indonesia

Malaysia

Republic of the Philippines

Republic of Singapore

Thailand

President

The Yang DiPertuan Agong

President

President

King

GOVERNMENT Head of State

The Sultan

3

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

4

Brunei GEOGRAPHICAL DATA Ban dar Capital Seri Begawan Area (km 2)

5,776

OFFICIAL LANGUAGES Malay

Indonesia

Malaysia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

Jakarta

Kuala Lumpur

Manila

Singapore

Bangkok

1,906,240

332,456

300,440

618

514,820

Bahasa Indonesia

Bahasa Malaysia

Filipino

Malay, Chinese, Tamil, English

Thai

8,205 10,863 13,870 20,615

27,904 37,540 48,317 74,810

1,634 2,075 2,415 2,976

26,867 36,370 46,455 66,115

25 33 42 63

93 125 161 249

2,812 3,571 4,156 5,122

52 71 90 129

2.71 2.81 2.44 1.98

3.06 2.97 2.52 2.19

4.69 2.39 1.52 1.04

2.79 3.03 2.45 1.76

55.7 63.0 66.9 71.6

54.5 60.4 64.5 71.4

65.8 69.5 72.2 74.9

53.9 59.6 62.7 68.0

DEMOGRAPHY Total population (thousands)

1960 1970 1980 2000 (projected)

90 133 228 386

96,194 120,280 150,958 204,486

Density (population per km 2)

1960 1970 1980 2000 (projected)

16 23 39 67

51 63 79 107

Average annual population growth rate (per cent)

1950-60 1960-70 1970-80 1980-2000 (projected)

6.71 3.91 5.39 2.63

1.90 2.23 2.28 1.52

Expectation of life at birth (years)

1960-65 1970-75 1980-85 2000-05 (projected)

42.5 47.5 52.5 6.2

5

The ASEAN Member Countries

Brunei

Indonesia

Malaysia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

Infant mortality rate (infant deaths per 1,000 live births)

63 40 29 18

97 68 50 24

30 19 II 8

95 65 51 24

6.69 4.87 3.69 2.25

6.57 5.02 4.20 2.46

4.87 2.60 1.74 1.74

6.42 5.01 3.59 2.44

46.9 45.5 40.6 32.9

43.2 38.8 27.1 21.4

45.6 44.9 40.2 29.4

145 112 87 49

1960-65 1970-75 1~80-85

2000-05 (projected)

7btal fertility rate (children per woman)

1960-65 1970-75 1980-85 2000-05 (projected)

5.42 5.53 3.89 2.25

Percentage of population under 15 years of age

1960 1970 1980 2000 (projected)

40.2 42.3 41.0 29.8

44.9 45.1 39.1 30.8

Percentage of population aged 65 and over

3.3 3.1 3.3 4.6

4.2 3.2 3.7 4.5

3.6 2.7 2.9 4.1

2.1 3.3 4.7 7.0

1.0 2.9 3.1 4.5

14.6 17.1 22.2 36.5

25.2 27.0 29.4 41.6

30.3 33.0 37.4 49.0

77.6 75.3 74.1 78.5

12.5 13.2 14.4 23.2

46,780 26,510 11,530

7,020 4,310 7,910

6,940 9,100 7,970

2,360 1,520 1,150

7,950 8,450 7,180

1960 1970 1980 2000 (projected) Percentage of urban population

1960 1970 1980 2000 (projected)

HEALTH INDICATORS Population per physician

1960 1970 1980

ASEAN Economic Co-operation· A Handbook

6

Brunei

Indonesia

Malaysia

Singapore

Thailand

98.5 99.0 116.2

112.2 126.3 134.5

99.0 100.7 104.5

45.8 48.4 52.7

64.5 77.0 80.4

44.7 48.7 47.3

Philippines

Calorie supply per capita (percentage of requirement) 86.5 93.9 109.7

1961-65 1970 1980

107.2 108.9 120.5

Protein supply per capita (grams per day) 38.2 42.4 48.7

1961-65 1970 1980

49.2 49.2 60.3

Percentage of national budget spent on health 1973 1980

1.3 2.5

7.1 5.1

2.9 3.9

7.8 6.9

4.0 4.1

39.0 56.6 62.0

52.8 58.5 60.0

71.9 82.6 75.0

68.9 83.0

67.7 78.6 86.0

EDUCATION INDICATORS

Adult literacy rate (per cent) 1960 1970 1980

Daily general interest newspaper readership (per thousand population) 11.0

1960 1970 1979

17.7

17.7 13.6 20.7

246.8

10.6 20.0 42.3

18.5 17.7 16.4

24.4 10.3

11.7 7.3

20.1 17.3 20.6

96 87 92

95 108 110

Ill 106 107

83 83 96

60.2 72.1 132.6

142.6

Percentage of national budget spent on education 1965 1970 1980

10.1 13.9 11.3

8.9

Primary school enrolment ratio (gross) 1960 1970 1980

71 77 112

7

The ASEAN Member Countries

Brunei

Indonesia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

19 34 51

26 46 63

32 46 59

13 17 29

1.2 1.6 4.1

12.7 19.8 26.1

6.4 6.8 8.1

1.9 1.7 13.5

39.8 36.6 35.5

33.8 35.0 39.6

51.3 46.6 47.8

52.1 48.6 47.6

51.2 50.6 57.1

52.7 49.3 51.3

27.4 24.4 23.2

14.5 18.7 21.5

49.8 43.9 44.2

Malaysia

Secondary school enrolment ratio (gross)

1960 1970 1980

6 15 28

Post-secondary school enrolment (gross)

1960 1970 1980

0.7 2.8 3.9

LABOUR INDICATORS Total labour force participation rate (per cent)

1960 1970 1980

36.7 35.4 35.9

34.1 33.8 35.0

Male labour force participation rate (per cent)

1960 1970 1980

54.2 49.5 51.0

48.8 45.7 47.6

Female labour force participation rate (per cent)

I960 I970 I980

20.0 21.6 20.9

18.9 21.5 22.1

GENERAL ECONOMIC INDICATORS GDP in constant 1.980 national currency (billions) 1960 1970 1980

I4,568.00 21,085.00 45,446.00

24.02 51.84

146.20 266.01

4.19 10.14 24.29

164.05 351.04 684.93

72,483

23,814

35,414

II ,344

33,450

6.0

I0.3 8.7

7.6 6.7

GDP in million US$

I980

Average annual GDP growth rate (per cent)

I960-70 1970-80

3.7 7.7

7.7

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

8

Brunei

Indonesia

Malaysia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

GDP per capita in constant 1980 national currency 1960 1970 1980

151,444 175,299 301,051

2,211 3,738

3,092 3,814 5,486

2,564 4,885 10,056

6,106 9,652 14,744

480

I ,717

730

4,697

720

GDP per capita in US$ 1980

Percentage of income received by the lowest 20 per cent of households 3.2 3.3

1960 1970 1980

6.2 6.1 5.6

4.2 5.2

6.6

Gross national savings as a percentage of GDP 1960 1970 1980

14.8 19.2 24.6

0.8 19.3 32.0

14.1 21.5 20.0

14.1 20.7 28.4

16.0 21.2 30.5

11.4 38.7 45.4

15.7 26.2 27.2

79.1 132.4

79.7 119.8

147.7 155.0

83.2 118.3

23.1 22.1 27.2

9.1 24.8

Gross domestic investment as a percentage of GDP 1960 1970 1980

13.6 20.9

Food production index (1974-76

=

87.8 124.7

1971 1980

100)

Per capita energy consumption (kilograms of coal equivalent) 129 143 266

1960 1970 1980

616 770 881

159 333 380

2,110 4,303 8,544

63 216 370

956.0 1,686.4 12,958.0

560.0 1,061.7 5,741.1

1,136.0 1,553.7 19,378.0

408.0 710.2 6,505.0

FOREIGN TRADE INDICATORS

Total value of exports (million US$) 1960 1970 1980

88.0 92.2 3, 756.9

840.0 1,009.3 21,908.0

The ASEAN Member Countries

Brunei

9

Indonesia

Malaysia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

703.0 I ,412.7 10,820.3

604.0 I ,210.2 8,295.3

1,332.0 2,461.3 24,007.0

453.0 I ,293.4 9,214.0

Total value of imports (million US$)

1960 1970 1980

22.0 87.7 641.7

574.0 893.4 10,834.0

Main trading partners (exports)

1960

Sarawak Singapore Hong Kong

Singapore USA Malaysia

Singapore UK Japan

USA Japan Netherlands

Malaysia UK USA

Japan Malaysia USA

1970

Malaysia Singapore UK

Singapore USA

FRG

Singapore Japan USA

USA Japan Korea

Malaysia USA Japan

Japan USA Netherlands

Japan USA Thailand

Japan USA Singapore

Japan Singapore USA

USA Japan Netherlands

Malaysia USA Japan

Japan Netherlands USA

Indonesia Malaysia UK

Japan USA UK Japan USA

Japan USA S.Arabia

1980

Main trading partners (imports)

1960

1970

1980

UK Singapore USA

Japan USA China

UK Indonesia Thailand

USA Japan

Singapore Austraiia Japan

Japan USA Singapore

Japan UK USA

Japan USA

FRG

Japan Malaysia USA

Singapore Japan USA

Japan USA S.Arabia

Japan USA Singapore

USA Japan S.Arabia

Japan USA Malaysia

FRG

FRG

Official development assistance.· Total bilateral flows from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries (net, million US$)

I970 1980

449.0 844.2

22.9 106.2

41.3 205.4

26.8 9.4

69.4 304.9

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

10

Brunei

Indonesia

Malaysia

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

94.0 875.9

-25.0 260.3

93.0 1,668.6

43.0 186.1

169.3 134.3 149.1

166.6 135.3 78.1

98.2 99.4

110.0 113.9 86.4

356.0 664.0 4,490.7

127.0 251.0 2,932.2

115.0 1,012.0 6,566.8

371.0 906.0 1,670.8

Direct foreign investment (million US$)

1970 1980

83.0 183.5

Terms of trade index (1975 = 100)

1960 1970 1980

36.5 48.2 149.2

International reserves (million US$)

1960 1970 1980

352.0 160.0 5,498.3

II

Chronology of

Main Events

CHRONOLOGY OF MAIN EVENTS

Place

Level

25 April 1955

Bandung

Heads of Govt.

The Asian-African Conference, marking the birth of the Non-Aligned Movement, also adopts principles later included in the Treaty of Amity and Co-operation in Southeast Asia.

5-8 August 1967

Bangkok

AMM

First ASEAN Ministerial Meeting (AMM). The signing of the "ASEAN Declaration" on 8 August 1967 by Adam Malik (Indonesia), Tun Abdul Razak (Malaysia), Narciso Ramos (Philippines), S. Rajaratnam (Singapore) and Thana! Khoman (Thailand) marks the birth of ASEAN (see Documentation section for ASEAN Declaration).

6-7 August 1968

Jakarta

AMM

Second ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

16-17 December 1969

Cameron Highlands

AMM

Third ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

Date

Event

Pre-1976

13

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

14

Date

Place

Level

Event

12-13 March 1971

Manila

AMM

Fourth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting discusses the ultimate goal of ASEAN: a limited free trade area and a payments union.

13 March 1971

Manila

AMM

Multilateral Agreement on Commercial Rights of Non-scheduled Air Services among ASEAN Countries.

26-27 November 1971

Kuala Lumpur

AMM

Special ASEAN Ministerial Meeting adopts the Kuala Lumpur Declaration designating ASEAN as a Zone of Peace, Freedom and Neutrality (ZOPFAN) (see Documentation section).

14 April 1972

Singapore

AMM

Fifth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting moots the establishment of an ASEAN Secretariat. The Foreign Ministers sign an Agreement for the Facilitation of Search for Aircraft in Distress and Rescue of Survivors of Aircraft Accidents.

28 April 1972

Jakarta

CCI

Creation of the ASEAN Chambers of Commerce and Industry (ASEAN-CCI).

16-18 April 1973

Pattaya

AMM

Sixth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

26 November 1973

Jakarta

ASEAN

ASEAN Declaration on the Arab-Israeli Conflict.

7-9 May 1974

Jakarta

AMM

Seventh ASEAN Ministerial Meeting agrees to locate the ASEAN Secretariat in Jakarta. The Philippines proposes an ASEAN Charter.

8-1 I January 1975

Jakarta

AIPO

First ASEAN Parliamentary Meeting considers the idea of establishing an ASEAN Inter-parliamentary Organization (AIPO).

15

Chronology of Main Events

Date

Place

Level

Event

1976 23-24 February

Bali

Heads of Govt.

Bali Summit. First Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Government: General Soeharto (Indonesia), Datuk Hussein Onn (Malaysia), Mr Ferdinand E. Marcos (Philippines), Mr Lee Kuan Yew (Singapore), Mr Kukrit Pramoj (Thailand) give a new thrust to ASEAN co-operation by signing the Declaration of ASEAN Concord and the Treaty of Amity and Co-operation in Southeast Asia (see Documentation section).

24 February

Bali

AMM

The Foreign Ministers, meeting concurrently with the Heads of Government, sign the Agreement on the Establishment of the ASEAN Secretariat (see Documentation section).

24-26 June

Manila

AMM

Ninth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting discusses the basic needs strategy and reviews ASEAN's organizational structure. The Foreign Ministers sign the ASEAN Declaration for Mutual Assistance on Natural Disasters and the ASEAN Declaration of Principles to Combat the Abuse of Narcotic Drugs.

20-22 January

Manila

AEM

The Third Meeting of ASEAN Economic Ministers (AEM) approves the draft of the Preferential Trading Arrangements (PTA).

24 February

Manila

AMM

A special meeting of the ASEAN Foreign Ministers is held to commemorate the first anniversary of the meeting of Heads of Government in Bali in 1976. A New Constitutional Framework for ASEAN

1977

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

16

Date

Place

Level

Event

1977

emerges. The Ministers sign the Agreement on ASEAN Preferential Trading Arrangements (see Documentation section) as well as an Agreement on Safer Navigation in the Straits of Malacca. 5-8 July

Singapore

AMM

Tenth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

4-5 August

Kuala Lumpur

Heads of Govt.

Second ASEAN Summit. Heads of Government President Soeharto (Indonesia), Datuk Hussein Onn (Malaysia), Mr Ferdinand Marcos (Philippines), Mr Lee Kuan Yew (Singapore) and Mr Tanin Kraivixien (Thailand) subsequently meet the Prime Ministers of Australia (Malcolm Fraser), Japan (Takeo Fukuda), and New Zealand (Robert Muldoon).

14-16 June

Pattaya

AMM

Eleventh ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

2 December

Jakarta

AMM

Agreement on the establishment of the ASEAN Cultural Fund. Japan contributes 5 billion yen payable over several years.

4 October

New York

AMM

The Foreign Ministers reach an agreement on a Food Security Reserve for ASEAN.

28-30 June

Bali

AMM

Twelfth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

1978

1979

10 December

1980 22-23 April

2,327 items under the Preferential Trading Arrangements come into effect.

Singapore

AEM

Ninth meeting of ASEAN Economic Ministers. Agreement on 20% across-the-board tariff

17

Chronology of Main Events

Date

Place

Level

Event

1980

cuts for intra-group imports valued at less than US$50,000 per item. 25-26 June

Kuala Lumpur

7 July

Manila

AMM

Establishment of the ASEAN Finance Corporation headquarters in Singapore; initial capital US$50 million. ASEAN Food Security Reserve Agreement comes into force.

24 July

2-6 September

Thirteenth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

Jakarta

AIPO

General Assembly of the ASEAN Inter-parliamentary Organization.

16-17 January

Bangkok

ABC

Ninth Meeting of the ASEAN Banking Council (ABC) agrees to establish an ASEAN Finance Corporation (AFC).

10-12 March

Bali

SOM

Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) on the restructuring of ASEAN.

9 May

Jakarta

Secretariat

Inauguration of the ASEAN Secretariat building.

14-16 May

Jakarta

Task Force

Task Force formed for strengthening the ASEAN Secretariat.

17-20 June

Manila

AMM

Fourteenth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

19-20 June

Manila

AMM

Post Ministerial Meeting with Foreign Ministers of third countries.

13-17 July

New York

UN

United Nations International Conference on Kampuchea.

1981

ASEAN Economic Co-operation.· A Handbook

18

Date

Place

Level

Event

1982

14-16 April

Jakarta

Task Force

Third Meeting of the Task Force for strengthening the ASEAN Secretariat.

14-16 June

Singapore

AMM

Fifteenth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting and Post Ministerial Meeting with third countries.

18 March

Jakarta

COTT

Sixth Working Group on Customs signs a Customs Code of Conduct (see Documentation section) paving the way for the simplification and harmonization of intra-ASEAN trade.

4-6 April

Manila

Task Force

At the Task Force meeting, Foreign Minister of the Philippines Romulo deplores the proliferation of ASEAN meetings and proposes the setting up of a permanent agency.

18-20 May

Singapore

Task Force

Fifth Meeting of the ASEAN Task Force proposes the establishment of an ASEAN committee of permanent representatives and the installation of an ASEAN council of ministers.

24-25 June

Bangkok

AMM

Sixteenth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

1983

1984

Brunei becomes the sixth member of ASEAN.

7 January

Jakarta

18 January

Lhok Seumawe

AMM

President Soeharto inaugurates the first ASEAN Industrial Project (AlP), the urea fertilizer complex, PT ASEAN Aceh Fertilizer.

7-8 May

Jakarta

AMM

Meeting of ASEAN Foreign Ministers clarifies the common position on the question of Cambodia.

19

Chronology of Main Events

Date

Place

Level

Event

1984 9-10 July

Jakarta

AMM

Seventeenth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting proposes to the five Pacific dialogue partners (United States, Japan, Canada, Australia, New Zealand) a human resources development programme. A number of proposals put forward by the Task Force are adopted.

3-6 October

Bangkok

AI PO

The AIPO Seventh General Assembly calls for greater regional economic co-operation.

11-12 February

Bangkok

AMM

ASEAN Foreign Ministers discuss developments in the region and call for more international military assistance for the Cambodian resistance.

24 April

Ban dung

AMM

Unofficial meeting of ASEAN Foreign Ministers accepts proposal of proximity talks between the two warring factions in the Cambodian issue.

6-9 May

Kuala Lumpur

ASC

The ASEAN Standing Committee (ASC) agrees on a budget of US$1.7 million for the ASEAN Secretariat and discusses the participation of Papua New Guinea in ASEAN activities.

17-18 June

Wellington

COTT

A joint ASEAN delegation meets New Zealand officials to persuade New Zealand not to exclude Singapore and Brunei from its GSP. The move is an example of successful co-operation in ASEAN's external relations.

8-10 July

Kuala Lumpur

AMM

Eighteenth Ministerial Meeting agrees on "proximity talks" between Vietnam and the Cambodian resistance. National driving licences are accepted throughout ASEAN.

1985

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

20

Date

Place

Level

Event

1985 10 July

Kuala Lumpur

AMM

Fiji expresses hope of some kind of linkage with ASEAN.

11-13 July

Kuala Lumpur

AMM

Post Ministerial Conference with the six dialogue partners (USA, Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, EEC).

12 July

Kuala Lumpur

AMM

Dialogue sessions with Foreign Ministers/ representatives of the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Japan on the future of the Pacific Basin.

6 August

Bangkok

Former Thai Prime Minister Kukrit Pramoj proposes an ASEAN Summit to lay the groundwork for a treaty on regional economic integration and to forge a united stand against protectionism of advanced countries.

13 August

Kuala Lumpur

Malaysian Finance Minister Daim Zainuddin suggests that ASEAN upgrade its framework for economic co-operation as the existing arrangement is inadequate.

9 September

Jakarta

Thailand's Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda and Foreign Minister Siddhi Savetsila visit Jakarta to discuss the possibility of an ASEAN Summit meeting.

24-28 September

Jakarta

AI PO

Eighth General Assembly of the ASEAN Inter-parliamentary Organization.

15 October

Jakarta

Private

Indonesian Foreign Minister Mochtar Kusumaatmadja characterizes economic co-operation in ASEAN as a "dismal picture".

21 October

Bintulu

AlP

Bintulu fertilizer plant (ASEAN Industrial Project) ships first cargo of urea.

21

Chronology of Main Events

Date

Place

Level

Event

1985 30 November4 December

Kuala Lumpur

CCI

ASEAN Chambers of Commerce and Industry conference opened by Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir who urges ASEAN to take a closer look at the strategy and priorities of economic co-operation among member nations.

1 December

Chiengmai

SOM

Senior officials at a weekend meeting agree in principle to a meeting of Heads of Governments.

2-3 December

Kuala Lumpur

ASCOPE

Third ASCOPE meeting establishes the ASEAN Petroleum Security Reserve (APSR). Japan states that it does not intend to limit imports of oil products.

11-13 December

Singapore

COFAB

Senior customs officials meet to discuss ways to harmonize and simplify customs procedures and documents among ASEAN countries.

4-6 April

Manila

ASC

Fourth ASEAN Standing Committee Meeting proposes holding of an ASEAN Summit in Manila in 1987.

29 April

Bali

AMM

ASEAN Foreign Ministers commemorate the tenth anniversary of the Bali Summit in 1976 and recommend a Summit Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Government.

17-20 June

Manila

ASC

Fifth Standing Committee Meeting discusses a multilateral counter-trade system for ASEAN, proposed by Chairman Salvador Laurel.

1986

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

22

Date

Place

Level

Event

1986

24-25 June

Manila

AMM

Nineteenth Ministerial Meeting urges review of intra-ASEAN economic co-operation and signs Agreement on ASEAN Energy Co-operation, and Agreement on ASEAN Petroleum Security (see Documentation section).

27-28 June

Manila

AMM

Post Ministerial Conference with dialogue partners.

9-12 July

Jakarta

CCI

ASEAN-CCI Council meeting urges the ASEAN governments to adopt "meaningful measures to integrate ASEAN markets".

12 July

Jakarta

CCI

ASEAN-CCI creates the Group of Fourteen to prepare proposals for the ASEAN Summit.

20-22 August

Singapore

ASC

First ASEAN Standing Committee Meeting discusses possible improvements in ASEAN's organizational structure, including the conduct of meetings.

28-30 August

Manila

AEM

ASEAN Economic Ministers discuss models for economic co-operation but reject a proposal by the Philippines for an ASEAN Common Market. They decide to establish an ASEAN Tourist Information Centre (ATIC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

28-30 August

Manila

AEM

Eighteenth AEM adds to list of AIJVs, and increases the margin of preferences (MOP) for AIJVs from 50 to 70%. Thailand withdraws Rock Salt Soda Ash AlP.

20 October

Jakarta

AMM

Foreign Ministers sign agreement on Preferential Shortlisting of ASEAN Contractors for internationally funded projects.

23

Chronology of Main Events

Date

Place

Level

Event

1986 Singapore

CCI

Twenty-ninth ASEAN-CCI Council meeting calls for the scrapping of all tariffs on products of ASEAN joint ventures.

6 February

Singapore

Private

President Soeharto of Indonesia and Mr Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore agree not to discuss a common market or a free trade area at the forthcoming Summit.

6 March

Kuala Lumpur

Private

Closed-door discussion by ASEAN leaders and Dr Henry Kissinger on ASEAN political and economic co-operation.

15-16 June

Singapore

AMM

AMM signs supplementary agreement on AIJVs, increasing MOP from 50 to 75%. ASEAN swap arrangement extended for five years, and credit line raised to US$200 million. Meeting sets up High Level Steering Committee to prepare for the Third ASEAN Summit.

18-20 June

Singapore

AMM

Post Ministerial Conference with dialogue partners.

25-26 June

Bali

NGO

ASEAN Banking Council tentatively agrees on a common currency plan allowing members to pay for imports with their own currencies.

16 August

Bangkok

AMM

Special meeting to discuss the issue of Kampuchea.

25-27 September

Bangkok

Japan

Japanese Prime Minister Nakasone, attending celebrations marking the centenary of Japan-Thai friendship, pledges US$2 billion of Japan's surplus funds for aid to ASEAN.

5 December

1987

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

24

Date

Place

Level

Event

1987

29-30 October

Singapore

AEM

Informal meeting of the ASEAN Economic Ministers to discuss new initiatives in ASEAN economic co-operation. Agreement to finalize the agreement for the protection and promotion of intra-ASEAN investments before the Third ASEAN Summit. Five-year programme to introduce new items into the PTA, to reduce exclusion lists, and deepen MOP to 50%, for implementation from 1 January 1988.

29-30 October

Jakarta

AMME

Third Ministerial Meeting on the Environment adopts "Jakarta Resolution on sustainable development".

14-15 December

Manila

Heads of Govt.

Third ASEAN Summit adopts the "Report of Ministers to the ASEAN Heads of Government" and the "Manila Declaration" (see Documentation section) regarding political and economic co-operation. A protocol amending the Treaty of Amity and Co-operation in Southeast Asia, permitting states outside the region to accede, is also signed, as well as the Revised Basic Agreement on ASEAN Industrial Joint Ventures (BAAIJV).

14-15 December

Manila

AEM

At the Manila Summit, the Economic Ministers sign a Protocol on Improvements on Extension of Tariff Preferences under the PTA; a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Standstill and Rollback of NTBs among ASEAN Countries; and the Agreement for the Promotion and Protection of Investments.

15 December

Manila

Japan

ASEAN Heads of Government meet Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita of Japan. The

25

Chronology of Main Events

Date

Place

Level

Event

1987

Japanese Government provides US$2 billion to ASEAN over a period of three years for the promotion of private sector development under the "ASEAN-Japan Development Fund" (AJDF). 1988

The Agreement on the Recognition of Domestic Driving Licences issued by ASEAN countries, which was signed in July 1985, comes into force after ratification.

17 March

12-15 April

Bandar Seri Begawan

COFAB

Brunei accedes to the Customs Code of Conduct at the twelfth meeting of the Working Group on Customs Matters of the Committee on Finance and Banking (COFAB).

4-5 July

Bangkok

AMM

Twenty-first ASEAN Ministerial Meeting signs a Declaration on the Advancement of Women in the ASEAN Region. Indonesia calls for the immediate revival of the ASEAN-Pacific Co-operation on Human Resources Development (APC-HRD) programme.

7-9 July

Bangkok

AMM

Post Ministerial Conference.

7-18 October

Pattaya

AEM

Twentieth Meeting of ASEAN Economic Ministers reaches agreement on brand-to-brand complementation and signs a MOU accordingly.

Jakarta

Pacific

Ad Hoc Working Group on ASEAN-Pacific Co-operation on Human Resources Development reconvened after a two-year moratorium.

1989

7 March

ASEAN Economic Co-operation: A Handbook

26

Place

Level

Event

2 July

Bandar Seri Begawan

AMM

ASEAN Foreign Ministers issue a statement in support of the Multilateral Assistance Initiative/Phili ppine Assistance Programme (MAl/PAP) prior to their AMM.

2-4 July

Bandar Seri Begawan

AMM

Twenty-second ASEAN Ministerial Meeting signs a protocol amending the Agreement on the Establishment of the ASEAN Secretariat, thereby creating the post of a Deputy Secretary-Gene ral. The AMM also agrees to establish a sectoral dialogue with the Republic of Korea, initially limited to trade, investment and tourism.

6-8 July

Bandar Seri Begawan

AMM

Post Ministerial Meeting with dialogue countries.

21-22 August

Seoul

Korea

Senior officials from the ASEAN countries and Korea meet in Seoul. After an exchange of letters Korea becomes the latest dialogue partner of ASEAN.

11-12 September

Bangkok

Pacific

Informal meeting of AEM on Asia-Pacific co-operation.

Date 1989

00 SEAsians_ASEM.indd 10

9/18/14 10:52:23 AM

Ill

Organizational Structure of ASEAN

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE ASEAN SECRETARIAT Secretary-General (SG) Rusli Noor

Deputy Secretary-General (DSG)

D!Rlll Theng Chye Yam

DIR II Victor S Gusiengfiao

DIR I Sutedja Kartawidjaja

ADR II Caesar Atienza

-COlT

-

C0!\1E

-

COlAC

-

C:OCI

-coso

-

Japan

-

lJS

-

UNIJP

-

-COST

& AlJI

- COFAB

-

011

JJpan-ASE/\:-.J

-

Cu-opcrat1on Pmmot1on Programme

FuturP Sectoral (restricted il.l pre ...,Pnt to

Trade. lnwstnwnt. and Tourism and later

Fund

AI'C-I!Rll

-

LiillSt' Wlth ASEAN hodJP.'> and t\CO.-.

-

bodie::. ,mrl NGOs -

-

Lia1se with ASEAN bodie:. rtnd NCOs

- Other mef:'tmgs decided by SG - Other dutJes directed by Dtrector

Lidisc with ASEt\:\.

Other meeting:-, dended by SG

Other duties d1rectcd by Director

Fund on ASEAN Atlas Book

-

EC

-

Lia1sc with ASEAr\ bodies and :\GO:-.

Australld

Other rneeting.'> decided by SC

-Other dr-cided bv

-

Science and Technology) Co-operation with third countries/organ 1zat ioJIS (eg. Korea)

-

Follow-up actions of ASC and other meetings

COfAF

-

ASEAN Ministerial \1eetings and ASEAN Senior Officials Computer Centre and Information System Public Information

-Canada -

-

Litll::.e w1th ASEAN bodie:. and NGOs

ASOD and other duties and responsibtltties of NDO

-

-Other dutw'> lhrected by DirPctor

-

OthPr dutie.-. direr!Pd by Dm·ctor

-

-

LJaJsc with ASEAJ\: bodtes and NGO'i

Nev.· Zealand

-

Other meetings dirt'rted bv SG

-

L!a!se Wllh ASEAI\i bod1t>S and NGOs

-

Other funct10ns dirf'cted by Director

-

Other rneettngs decided by SG

-

Other meetings directed by SG

Library and Library Fund

OthPr duties directed by Director

-

Other functions directed by Director

DevPlopment of computer resources and research facilitiPs and financial assistance bv Can'!da -

Other meetings and function:; decided/ directed by SG

-

Financial and personll administration Hudget Personnel sf'rvices to Staff and recruitment of LRS

-

\1aintenance (Schedul

-

Assistance on protoC( matters

-

ASEAN Aodit Committee and Hudget Committee

-

Other meetlllgs and functions directed by SG

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF ASEAN MEETINC OF THE ASc:AN HEADS OF COVERNMENT

I MEETING OF THE ASEAN ECONOMIC MINISTERS

-

1 1 1 1 1

ASEAN National Secretariat of BRUNEI DARUSSALAM ASEAN National Secretariat of INDONESIA ASEAN National Secretariat of MALAYSIA ASF:AN National Secretariat of THE PHILIPPINES ASEAN National Secretariat of SINCAPORE

ASEAN MINISTERIAL MEETINC Meeting of the ASEAN Foreign Ministers

f------

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rrr-

MEETING OF THE OTHEH ASEAN MINISTERS

t------

ASEAN STANDINC COMMITTEE MEETINC

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COMMITTEF: ON BUDCJET

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AUDIT COMMITTEE

-

ASEAN National Secretariat of THAilAND

I

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COFAB Committee on

Committee on

Finance and

Food, Agriculture

Banking

and Forestry

and Energy

Conimunicatioii

I

I

I

I

COFAF

COl ME

I

COTAC

COTT

Committee on

Committee on

Committee on

Industry, ivtincrals

Transportation and

Trade and Tourism

L ____ ___ I_______

-j- ____ ___ I__ ___ -

_

I

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I I I I I

L -------------------~----

------

I COST Committee on Science and Technology

ASEAN DIALOCUF: WITH THIRD COUNTRIES/CROUP OF COUNTRIES/ INTERNATIONAL ORC)ANIZATIONS AUSTRALIA CANADA EEC JAPAN NEW ZF.ALAND USA l!I\OP

I

ASEAN COMMITTEES IN THIRD COUNTRIES BONN ASEAN C0~1MITTEE ASEAN BRUSSELS COMMITTEE ASEA:\ CANBERRA COMMITTEE ASEAN GEI\EVA COM\11TTEE ASEAN LOI\DON COMMITTEE ASEA\i OTTAWA COMMITTEE !\SEAN PARIS COMMITTEE ASEAN COMMITTEE IN TOKYO ASEAN WASHINGTO'i COMMITTEE ASEAN C0\1MITTEE 1!'\ WELLI'iGTON

I

COSLJ

C OC I

Committee on

Committee on Culture and !IIformatiuh-Cotnmtttee

S!tb-Coinnuttt't'

Shi[JIJIII'l and PortctJ.11munl