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An occupational survey of the West Side Union High School District

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AN OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY OP THE WEST SIDE UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT

A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the School of Education The University of Southern California H

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^ k

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science in Education

by Carlyle Grieve Loftin January 19^0

UMI Number: EP56145

All rights reserved INFORMATION TO ALL USERS The quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted. In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion.

Dissertation Publishing

UMI EP56145 Published by ProQuest LLC (2014). Copyright in the Dissertation held by the Author. Microform Edition © ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. This work is protected against unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code

ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway P.O. Box 1346 Ann Arbor, Ml 48106- 1346

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2^8 2

T h is thesis, w r i t t e n u n d e r the d ir e c t io n o f the t ^ / 3 3 C h a ir m a n o f the candidate's G u id a n c e C o m m itte e a n d a p p r o v e d hy a l l m em bers o f the C o m m it te e , has been p resen ted to a n d a ccep ted by the F a c u lt y o f the S c h o o l o f E d u c a t io n o f the U n iv e r s it y o f S o u th e rn C a l i f o r n i a in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f the r e q u ire m e n ts f o r the degree o f M a s t e r o f Science in E d u c a tio n . rw ,

Jan u ary 2 6 , 1950_____

Dean Guidance Committee

Chairman

TABLE OP CONTENTS CHAPTER

I.

PAGE

THE PROBLEM AND RELATED STUDIES .............

1

The problem . . .....................

1

Statement of the p r o b l e m ..........

1

Analysis of the problem • . ...........*

1

Delimitation of the p r o b l e m .......

2

The need for the s t u d y ............

2

Definition of terms u s e d ............

3

Occupational s u r v e y .....................

If

The community • • • • ...................

If

An occupation • • • ..........

If

Gainfully employed person . .......

If

Related i n v e s t i g a t i o n s ............... ..



Organization of remainder of the thesis • • II.

THE BACKGROUND FOR THE S T U D Y ...............

If 11 12

The geography of the c o m m u n i t y ..........

12

The type

of community and its people

13

The size

of the community

. • •

.............

13

The industries and resources of the c o m m u n i t y ........................... The schools

III.

THE METHOD

of the community

..........

OP P R O C E D U R E ....................

The survey committee

.............

1$

17 19 19

iii CHAPTER

PAGE The scope of the s u r v e y ...................

20

Method of obtaining the data •

..........

20

The s c h e d u l e ..............................

21

Maps and check l i s t s .....................

21

Introducing the survey

2lj_

* .................

Assigning areas to enumerators

...........

26

* ...............

26

Terminating the s u r v e y ...................

29

Tabulating the d a t a .......................

29

Processing the schedules

IV,

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OPTHE DATA . . . Data regarding the survey proper

• • • • •

31 31

Coverage in the s u r v e y ................

31

Value of the s u r v e y .....................

32

The results of the survey

33

Distribution of the gainfully employed persons by occupation .................

33

Distribution of the gainfully employed persons 'between the ages of 1 1\. and 20 and 20 and 25 by o c c u p a t i o n s ........

60

Distribution of the gainfully employed persons by the amount of schooling

completed

.........................

74-

Distribution by length of time in present occupation

...................

102

iv CHAPTER

PAGE Distribution by length of time in present e m p l o y m e n t ...........................

130

The distribution of the nongainfully

V.

employed by activities engaged in

.. .

l£5

SUMMARY OP THE FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS

.. .

1$9

I n t r o d u c t i o n ..............

159

Summary of the findings . . ..........

l6l

Summary of the c o n c l u s i o n s .............. B I B L I O G R A P H Y ..........................................

167 170

LIST OP TABLES TABLE

I.

PAGE

Distribution of Gainfully Employed Persons by Occupations..................

3ij.

II• Distribution of Gainfully Employed Persons by Major Occupational Groups and D i v i s i o n s ..............* ......... III,

53

Distribution of the Gainfully Employed Persons Between the Ages of 1 I4. and 19 and 20 and 2 5 ...............

IV,

6l

Distribution of Gainfully Employed Persons by Amount of Schooling Completed

V*

...........................

75

Distribution of Gainfully Employed Persons by Length of Time in Present Occupation .....................

VI.

103

Distribution of Gainfully Employed Persons by Length of Time in Present Employment.....................

VII.

132

Distribution of Hongainfully Employed Persons by Activities Engaged In ........

157

LIST OP FIGURES FIGURE !•

PAGE

Census Schedule— Front Side and , Figure 1 (continued) Census Schedule-Reverse S i d e ..............

2*

Individual Record

C a r d .......................

22 28

CHAPTER I THE PROBLEM AND RELATED STUDIES A comprehensive and accurate knowledge of all the different phases of the life of the community is an im­ portant factor in successful school administration and teaching*

This study was undertaken with a sincere hope

that it might be a constructive contribution to one phase of this knowledge--occupational information. I.

THE PROBLEM

Statement of the problem*

This occupational survey

was made to determine the local occupational opportunities for the students of the West Side Union High School District. Analysis of the problem.

In order to approach the

solution to the problem, an occupational survey of the West Side Union High School District was made*

In this survey

an attempt was made to collect the data from which the answers to the following questions could be ascertained: 1.

What is the distribution of the gainfully em­

ployed persons, male and female, in the community by occu­ pations? 2.

What is the occupational distribution of the

gainfully employed persons, male and female, between the

2 ages of 1I4. and 25? 3.

What is the occupational distribution of the

gainfully employed persons by amount of schooling com­ pleted? !{.•

What is the occupational distribution of the

gainfully employed persons by length, of time in present occupation? 5*

What is the occupational distribution of the

gainfully employed persons by length of time in present employment? 6.

What is the distribution of the nongainfully

employed persons, male and female, by activities engaged in? Delimitation of the problem.

In this study no at­

tempt was made to determine the age, training, and experi­ ence requirements for entry into an occupation, or the sal­ aries or wages paid for the various occupations. Neither the evaluation of the school’s curriculum nor the improvement of the counseling program in terms of the findings of the survey were within the scope of this study. The need for the study.

For some time the admini­

stration and teaching staff of the West Side Union High School had been faced with a realization of the need for

3 accurate, factual information which would aid them in coun­ seling students in the selection of an occupation in their own community.

Moreover, the making of an accurate evalu­

ation of the curriculum in terms of local occupational needs of the students was impossible without a true picture of their occupational opportunities. Adequate data were not available with which to con­ vince students and their parents of the inadvisability of preparing for occupations in which the chances of employ­ ment were small and for which, in many cases, the individual seemed to be unsuited mentally, physically, or emotionally. Furthermore, with the termination of World War II, many changes had taken place in the occupational pattern of the community, including the introduction of industries and occupations the growth of which had been stimulated by the researches of the war. In view of the foregoing facts, it was evident that there was a definite need for up-to-date, complete, wellorganized, and c omparable data on existing occupational opportunities. II.

DEFINITION OF TERMS USED

The terms used in this study requiring special definitive treatment are the following:

Occupational survey.

As used in this study occu­

pational survey means a family census type survey conducted by interviewing one or more members of each family in the area surveyed. The community.

The community is that area within

the limits of the West Side Union High School District, Merced County, California. An occupation.

In this study the term "occupation*1

will be used to refer to one’s principal business in life, or the activity he or she engages in that occupies time and attention. Gainfully employed person.

A gainfully employed

person is one who works for pay or profit. III.

RELATED INVESTIGATIONS

A review of the available literature dealing with the research that has been done in the field of community occupational surveys revealed many investigations of this type.

Beginning with the year 1930 and continuing through

to the time of the outbreak of World War II, numerous studies were reported, there being a predominance of re­ search in the field of business education.

Following a

period of inactivity during the war years, there has been

5 a revival of emphasis upon the need for the making of com­ munity occupational surveys. At the national level the Vocational Division of the United States Office of Education, the American Youth Com­ mission of the American Council on Education, and the United States Employment Service have, through their publi­ cations, made major contributions to the community occu­ pational survey movement.

One of the most outstanding of

these publications is Zapoleon^ work, Community Occu­ pational Surveys,! done under the auspices of the VocationDivision of the United States Office of Education. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles^ prepared by the Research Division of the United States Employment Service has made possible a standard occupational classi­ fication which has promoted comparability in occupational statistics.

In this dictionary 17*l|-52 separate jobs are

defined, as well as 12,292 alternate titles, making a total of 29 >2l|i}_ titles described.

^Marguerite W. Zapoleon, Community Occupational Surveys (Washington, D.C.: United States Office of Education, Vocational Division, Bulletin No. 223* Occupational Information Series, No. 10, 19lf2), 199 PP* 2 United States Employment Service, Dictionary of Occupational Titles, Part I. “Definitions of Titles,“ (Washington^D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1939), 1287 pp.

6

The research of the United States Bureau of the Census, both on the national and state levels, and the re­ ports based upon this research are valuable for comparative purposes,

A study of two volumes, r!Comparative Occupation

Statistics for the United States, 1870 to 19^0,”^ and "Characteristics of the Populations, Calif or ni a, "

5

-

would be

useful to anyone proposing to do research in the field of occupational information, the principal value being in ob­ taining data on comparability of information and method of treatment of data, McCreary^ has made a study recently at the state level which gives quantitative facts and statistics upon the labor force, major occupations and industries, and the occu­ pational trends in California.

The data for this study were

United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Sixteenth Census of the United States: I 9I4-O, Popu­ lation, "Comparative Occupation Statistics for the United States, 1870 to 19l|.0," (Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 195-3), 206 pp.

5 United -

States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Sixteenth Census of the United States: 195-0, Popu­ lation, Vol. II, Part I, "Characteristics- of the Population, California," (Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 195-2), pp. 513-689#

5

William H. McCreary, Californians at Work, (Sacra­ mento: California State Department of Education, Commission for Vocational Education, Bureau of Occupational Infor­ mation and Guidance, Bulletin No. 9> Occupational Infor­ mation, March 1, 194.8 ), 25- pp. mimeographed.

7 taken from reports of the United States Census Bureau and other federal agencies, and from various state agencies which collect and disseminate occupational information*

The

purposes of this work were (1 ) to help counselors and teachers of classes on units on occupations, and (2 ) to help students who are making vocational plans* Humistonfs6 county-wide survey made in iyl±0 to de­ termine the employment opportunities existing in Orange County, California,, is an example of a well-planned and executed community survey.

Although this study was much

larger in scope and differed in the method of collecting the data, it has many features in common with the present in­ vestigation*

It was undertaken to provide a complete

picture of the professional, business, industrial, agri­ cultural, public, personal, and domestic service opportuni­ ties available in that community.

Coming from one with

practical experience, her discussion of the pitfalls to be avoided in the making of an occupational survey was en­ lightening* A recent occupational research problem in a large

Genevieve Humiston, ftAn Occupational Survey of Orange County, 19i|-0,!l (unpublished Master!s thesis. The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 19kH-)*

256 pp.

8 industrial community, Cuyahoga County, Ohio,7 is an excel­ lent example of a large scale survey in which the accepted research techniques were applied with skill.

The purposes

of this survey were to determine the number of gainfully employed persons in the county at that time, to predict the number that would probably be employed a year later, and, by classifying the workers as to occupation and indus­ try, to secure the occupational pattern of the community. The findings in this survey were published in a 11? page report and proved to be of value to business, industry, unions, and the schools.

It would be well for any person

or persons planning an occupational information survey to analyze carefully the plan used in this survey and par­ ticularly the use and application of the findings. In the city of Guelph, Ontario® in 193® a survey was made of the occupations to learn something about the industries, commerce, and major occupations in the city, and to analyze this information in its relation to second­ ary education in the city.

The report of this study is

exceptional in that the major portion of it is concerned

7

Marion C. McPherson and Helen H. Randall, nA Com­ munity Counts Its Workers ,11 Occupations, 26:l62-f}_, December, 1947.

8

A. M. Laird and J. E. Durrant, 'An Occupational Survey of a Small City ,11 The School, (Secondary Edition),

27:655-61, April, 1939.

9 with interpreting the data and analyzing it in terms of the courses of studies being.pursued by the students in the school system.

The graphic and realistic approach to the

presentation of the findings in this study are noteworthy. An occupational survey of the Highland Park District of Los Angeles was made by Barnett Atkinson^ for the purpose of determining what commercial training was advisable in the high school to meet the business needs of the community. Whereas the type of information sought differed, this survey was related to the present study in the method of collect­ ing the data, which was by interviews conducted by selected pupils in the business training classes.

These pupils had

been given preliminary instructions in the purposes of the survey and the method of conducting the interviews with the individuals in the one hundred firms which were contacted. The findings of the survey were used to show the relation­ ship between the offerings of the commercial education de­ partment in the high school and the actual needs of the community. As a part of the senior course in occupations at the

^Barnett Atkinson, 11An Occupational Survey in the Highland Park District of Los Angeles,” (unpublished Master’s thesis, the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1936), 96 pp*

10 Riverton High School, Riverton,

Wyoming,

10 the students of

the class under the guidance of their instructor made an occupational survey of the community to determine the job possibilities in the Riverton area*

The data in this sur­

vey were gathered by the students through interviews with employers in business and industrial firms within a desig­ nated area*

These data were compiled for use in the school

and reported in the local newspapers*

The implications for

the present investigation to be drawn from the Riverton Survey were that students can do a commendable job of gathering and handling data when they are properly moti­ vated and supervised* To determine the natural and human resources of the community of Glencoe, Illinois,!! the students of the seventh and eighth grades conducted a community survey under the guidance of the school superintendent and teachers and the Community Resources Committee of the Coordinating Council in the community*

This survey brought forth valu­

able statistics on probable future school enrollment, the occupations of the villagers, and their interests and

■^Matilda. Engen, ”Wyoming High School Seniors Dis­ cover Their Community,” Occupations, 26:3^1-2, March, 19i|-8« ^ M i r i a m Sutherland, ”The Children Survey the Com­ munity,” Curriculum Journal, 10:317-19 > November, 1938.

11 hobbies.

The techniques employed were comparable to those

used in the present study. Two other related surveys were those made in Breat­ hitt County, Kentucky,12 and in Rockland County, New York.13

The family census type of schedule was used, the

data being obtained by student interviewers.

The results

of both surveys were used as frameworks upon which to build a series of more comprehensive surveys. IV.

ORGANIZATION OF REMAINDER OF THE THESIS

In Chapter II, The Background for the Study, factual information regarding the geography of the community being surveyed, the type of community and its people, its size, its industries and resources, and its schools are given. In Chapter III the method of procedure is described. Chapter IV contains an analysis and interpretation of the data, followed by a summary of the findings and conclusions in Chapter V.

The bibliography completes the study*

■^Wilbur I. Gooch and Franklin J* Keller, "Revealing and Recording the Data," Occupations, li].:1022-10ii-5, June, 1936 . Wilbur I. Gooch and Leonard M. Miller, "Rockland County's Self-Survey," Occupations, lip:39l4--lilO, February, 1936.

CHAPTER II THE! BACKGROUND FOR THE STUDY To enable the reader of this study to understand more clearly the material presented in the following chapters, a brief description of the geographical features of the community, the type of community and its people, its size, its industries and resources, and its schools is given* The geography of the community.

The West Side Union

High School District, the boundary lines of which were as­ sumed to be contiguous with those of the community surveyed in this study, is one of six high school districts situated in Merced County in Central California.

It is located be­

tween the San Joaquin River on the northeast and the San Benito County line on the southwest*

The Gustine Union

High School joins it to form the northwest boundary line, and to the southeast the Fresno County line and a portion of the Dos Palos Joint Union High School District join it. The area of the district, as computed by counting the sections upon a map of the district, is approximately 592 square miles.

However, much of the area is sparsely

settled or uninhabited due to the presence of much swampy land to the northeast along the San Joaquin River and to the

13 mountains of the Coast Range to the southwest. The city of Los Banos, which is situated near the center of the district,

is the only incorporated city with­

in the district, and it

is the main business, cultural, and

recreational center for the residents of the community. The type of community and its people.

The community

is a typically rural one in which the activities of a major part of its people revolve around its main industry, agri­ culture.

The nature of the community tends to make for

stability of its population, which has been affected very little by the

influx of people to California from other

states during the past fifteen years.

However, the in­

creased production of certain crops requiring migratory laborers has changed this picture somewhat in the past five years.

These seasonal workers do not, as a rule, become a

permanent part of the population, since there are few oppor­ tunities for steady employment for them. The predominance of the population is composed of persons of Italian and Portuguese origin or descent.

The

remainder consists of a heterogeneous group similar to that found in many other American communities. The size of the community.

There are no population

statistics available for the community under study in this survey, the only statistics available being for the city of

34 Los Banos,

The total population of the city of Los Banos

on June 3> 19^6, was 2,770. This figure was the result of a special census conducted at the request of the city of Los Banos by the United States Bureau of the Census and announced in a mimeographed report. Estimates of the population of the community vary, the Los Banos city clerk setting it at about 8,000.

His

figure was based on his various contacts with the community. For the purposes of this study, the population of the community was assumed to be between 8 ,I[.6o and 9 jlfOO.

These

figures were obtained by multiplying the average daily at­ tendance in grades one through eight for the school year I 9I4.8-I 9I4.9 by nine and ten respectively.

The average daily

attendance for grades one through eight was 9^0 students, according to the figures obtained from the files of the Merced County Superintendent of Schools, Merced, California. In the opinion of the writer, the estimate of the population arrived at by this method may be high, since there are two factors which may tend to augment the average daily at­ tendance.

These are (1) the children of migratory farm

workers, who leave the community in the fall and winter;

5ir

Special Census of Los Banos, California, June 3 , I 9I4-6 ," (mimeographed report, Series P-S C, No. 154, Washing­ ton, D.C.: United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, I 9I4-6 ), I p .

1$ and (2) the greater number of children in the younger age group in the larger sized families of this typically rural community.

However, the estimate based upon the average

daily attendance was used in this study and was considered to be an ample one. The industries and resources of the community.

Agri­

culture is the principal industry in the community, and dairy farming is the leading branch of this industry.

The

raising and grazing of sheep and livestock also ranks high in importance.

However, diversification has been showing

a marked increase in recent years, the growing of row crops such as sugar beets, melons, -peas, beans, broccoli, tomatoes, and potatoes having increased appreciably.

Other crops that

are assuming importance are grain, hay, cotton, fruits, and nuts • That agriculture enjoys such prominence in the com­ munity is due to the abundance of low, level, and fertile land, which is well adapted to the use of the ample amount of irrigation water available.

There is an intricate system

of canals for the carrying of surface water obtained from the water shed of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the farms of the community.

This system of canals is maintained and

operated by two canal companies, whose headquarters are located in the city of Los Banos.

Underground water pumped

i6 from wells augments the supply of irrigation water. Three industrial plants in the community are devoted to the processing and manufacturing of dairy products. Much of the milk produced on the dairies here is processed in these plants.

The products of these plants vary accord­

ing to supply and demand, and consist of butter, cheese, dried or powdered milk, canned milk, cream, and whey. These processing plants provide employment for many persons in the community. There are five packing plants engaged in the packing and shipping of melons and other farm produce in the com­ munity.

The growers of these crops maintain and farm large

acreages of land throughout the year.

Many of these growers

are financially interested in these packing plants and thus profit not only from the production of the crops, but also from their distribution and marketing.

Permanent, as well

as seasonal, employment opportunities exist in these indus­ tries for the people of the community. The buying and selling of the various crops and of livestock is another business activity which flourishes in the community as a result of its agriculture. Motor transportation over an adequate system of state and local highways and the Southern Pacific Railroad, which passes through Los Banos, provide the means of transporting commodities to and from the community.

The operation and

17 maintenance of these transportation facilities constitutes a major industry, which provides further employment oppor­ tunities for local personnel. According to the Register of Licenses in the office of the Los Banos city clerk, there were 235 firms or indi­ viduals licensed to do business within the city on March 31* I 9I4.9 .

These figures do not include firms or individuals

from other communities who are licensed to do business with­ in the city, but who do not reside or maintain establish­ ments in it.

The-reader of this study may be enlightened

by a break down of the types of licenses issued. as follows:

They are

(1 ) manufacturing and construction, 38 ; (2 )

retail distribution, 78 $ (3 ) wholesale distribution, 17 ; (*L|_) service distribution, 72 ; (5 ) professional and public service, 2I4.; and (6 ) agriculture and domestic service, 6 . The schools of the community.

To meet the education­

al needs of the community, there are three elementary school districts with one school operating in each, and the high school situated in the district under consideration in this study. plan.

All of these schools operate upon the eight-four The largest of the elementary schools is the Los

Banos Elementary, which is situated within the city of Los Banos.

It had an enrollment of 856 pupils on March 31*

19^9* including 70 kindergarten pupils.

The other two

elementary schools are Charleston and Volta.

These schools

are located on the outskirts of the community and had en­ rollments of 81j. and 6l pupils respectively on March 31* 19^4-9•

West Side Union High School, a four-year high

school, had an enrollment of 271 students on March 1, 19^9* The foregoing statistics, as well as all other statistics concerning the schools used in this study, were obtained at the office of the county superintendent of schools, Merced County, California. The assessed valuation for the fiscal year 1 9^4-^—19^4-9 for the four school districts was as follows:

Charleston

Elementary, §2,087>915; hos Banos Elementary, §7*729*725; Volta Elementary, §l,2ij.2,835; and West Side Union High School, $11,56o ,1j.75. The facilities of the elementary schools are being taxed to their capacities, a condition existing in nearly all other communities in these times.

However, the high

school facilities were designed to accommodate nearly twice the present enrollment and will, in all probability, take care of any future growth without difficulty.

CHAPTER III THE METHOD OF PROCEDURE The preliminary step in undertaking this study was to submit to the school administration for approval a general outline of the purpose and scope of the survey to be made, and the method to be employed in collecting the data.

Per­

mission to conduct the survey was granted by the adminis­ trator, who voiced the opinion that it was a needed project the findings of which should be of value to the school and the community.

With permission granted, it was then possi­

ble to formulate the detailed plans for conducting the sur­ vey. The survey committee.

In order to promote community

interest in the occupational survey to be made in this study, a representative lay committee was organized to as­ sist in formulating the plans, publicizing the survey, and in collecting the data.

The membership of this committee

was comprised of the master of the local G-range, the presi­ dent of the Los Banos Farm Bureau, the president of the Los Banos Chamber of Commerce, the editor of the local news­ paper, and the Los Banos city clerk.

It was felt that

through the combined efforts of this lay committee and of the various faculty members working on the survey, it would

20 be possible to acquaint the public adequately with its purpose and to carry it through to a satisfactory conclusion. The scope of the survey.

It was decided that to be

of value, the survey should cover the entire West Side Union High School District, and that it should include information concerning' not only those persons who were gainfully em­ ployed, but also those not gainfully employed.

The latter

group was included because it was felt that there is among its members a large number of persons, especially females, who pass through the schools and never become employed for pay or profit.

In planning to meet the educational needs

of members of this group, information about their life ac­ tivities is necessary.

The family census type survey in

which the residents of each household were enumerated was selected as the most feasible manner for obtaining the de­ sired information.

In order to reach as many as possible of

' the persons about whom information was desired, it was neces­ sary to set as a goal one hundred per cent coverage of the families residing in the high school district. Method of obtaining the data.

Since the funds avail­

able for conducting the survey were limited and its scope comparatively large, it was decided that the most practi­ cable method for collecting the data was through the use of volunteer student and teacher interviewers.

Also, some

21 mass enumeration was planned with adult organizations. The schedule.

The next step in preparing for the

survey was to design a schedule for obtaining the data from which to formulate the answers to the questions asked in the 1 cr analysis of the problem m Chapter I. ^ Care was taken in constructing the schedule to make it within the comprehen­ sion of the student enumerators to be used in making the survey.

It was mimeographed on both sides of a letter­

sized sheet in order to facilitate its handling.

A sample

is shown in Figure 1 on the following two pages. Maps and check lists.

For the purpose of determin­

ing the boundaries of the West Side Union High School District, and of locating the residences of the families within it to be enumerated, the most recent maps of the high school district and of the city of Los Banos were pro­ cured. In making up the check lists of families to be enum­ erated, the method used in the rural areas differed from that used within the city.

In the rural areas the town­

ships were used as zones and check lists were prepared for many of the sections within each township with the aid of

*^Cf. ante, pp. 1 -2 .

Form No._________

Enumerator's Name_________

OCCUPATIONAL CENSUS RECORD FORM— WEST SIDE UNION HI OH SCHOOL DISTRICT, LOS BANOS, CALIFORNIA Family Name

Address of Residence___________________________________Date,

List all persons living at the above residence.

-

Sex M or F

Middle Init ial

First Name

Relationship

(6)

(7)

, (8) — mrpr r-» C -P rH -H «H flSrl g

0

22 8 I*3 . a 0 c* A a cc •3 u a a sis* •O 43 •h «m a O O -H r iM

(9) Was this person at work for pay or profit on March 1, 1949? 1 Yes or No

Last Name

(5)

Age if 25 years or under. Mark (X) if over 25 Highest grade completed in school

(3)

1

(2)



(1)

1 2

3 4

6 7 INSTRUCTIONS Column No. Name of each person whose usual place of residence (1) on March 1, 1949, was in this household. Be sure (2)— to Include persons temporarily absent. Write (X) (3) after the name of the person furnishing the information. (4) Relationship of each person to the head of the household (put Read for head of family) as: wife, daughter, father, mother-in-law, grandson, lodger, lodger'8 wife, servant, hired hand.

Column No. Write (M) if male, or (F) if female. (6) Age at last birthday if 23 years or under. For infants less than 1 year of age write fractions of twelve, as; 1/12, 6/12, 9/12. 5br persons over 25 (*) f°r over. (7 ) Number of years of school completed. Use (0) zero for persons with no schooling. («> Answer yes or no. (9) Was this person at work for pay or profit on March 1, 1949? Answer yes or no.

T5T

FIGURE 1 CENSUS SCHEDULE— FRONT SIDE

PERSONS IB. FAMILY WHO WORK FOR PAY OR PROFIT (This form is to be filled in for all persons vho answered gee to Item (9) on the other side of this sheet)

(n! Middle Initial

(10)

(12)

(13)

Occupation, trade, or profession, as; sales­ man, laborer, mnsic teacher, dairy farmer, dairy hand, etc.

Code No.



(Leave blank)

-

(isr ..

Industry or business as; retail grocer, farm, public school, auto repairs, milk processing, etc.

First Name

(15) Class of worker as; employer, employee, manager, foreman

(l0 to 55

cent of the

people of the community were reached in the survey.

Obvi­

ously the per cent of coverage fell far short of the 100 per cent goal set', a fact which, no doubt, detracts from the valueof the conclusions drawn from data.

the analysis of the

Probable factors attributing to this low per cent of

*1 Q

Cf. ante, p. 14 .

32 of coverage included the following:

(1) The scope of the

survey was perhaps too large for it to be done entirely on a voluntary basis, since all the volunteer workers were busi­ ly occupied with other activities and found it difficult to devote sufficient time to the enumerating.

The need of

some paid enumerators to contact residents who either lived in inaccessible places or were difficult to reach for other reasons was indicated.

(2) The time which the director had

to devote to conducting the survey was not sufficient for him to coordinate properly all the various phases of the work.

(3) Lack of experience in doing a project of this

type undoubtedly led to errors and omissions in planning and conducting the survey. Value of the survey.

Whereas the per cent of cover­

age obtained was not so complete as had been anticipated, the writer feels that the findings were sufficiently com­ plete to be of value in providing a cross section of the occupational opportunities that exist in the community, providing these findings are used prudently.

The distri­

bution of the occupations of the gainfully employed found in the community should be quite complete, with but few missing occupational titles.

However, the figures for the

numbers of people working at each particular occupation may, in some cases, be misleading when used as a basis for

33 showing proportions or for estimating the total number of workers in a particular occupation*

This is particularly

true in those occupations which employ small numbers of people*

In some of these occupations 100 per cent coverage

was attained in the survey, while in other occupations of this type the per cent of coverage may have been low or completely lacking. II.

THE RESULTS OF THE SURVEY

Distribution of the gainfully employed persons by occupation.

To find what the distribution of the gainfully

employed persons, male and female, in the community was by occupations was one of the six questions to be answered in the making of this study.

Table I, which follows, contains

the answer to this question in terms of the findings in the study.

This table shows not only the number of persons

employed in each occupation, but also the totals for each occupational group.'

The arrangement of the occupational

titles and their code numbers in this table follows closely the arrangement in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, Part 11.^9

This form is employed throughout the thesis for

■^United States Employment Service, Dictionary of Occupational Tities, Part II. ffTitles and Codes , u (Washington, D.G.: United States Government Printing Office, 1939), 330 pp.

TABLE I DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Professional and managerial occupations Code

Job title

Professional: (0-00.00 through 0-39.99) 0-01.20 Accountant, General 0-01.30 Accountant, Public 0-06.51 Editor, Newspaper 0-06.71 Reporter 0-06.97 Public Relations Man 0-07.02 Chemist, Biological 0-08.10 Clergyman 0-13.10 Dentist 0-16.01 Civil Engineer 0-22.10 Lawyer 0-24.31 Teacher, Music 0-25.10 Pharmacist 0-26.10 Physician 0-27.01 Social Worker 0-30.02 Teacher, Kindergarten 0-30.11 Teacher, Grade School 0-31.01 Teacher, High School 0-31.10 Superintendent, Schools 0-32.30 Teacher, Manual Training 0-33.10 Nurse 0-34.10 Veterinarian 0-39.54 Agronomist 0-39.65 Entomologist 0-39.93 Dietician

Male

Female

48

51

4

1 1 0 1

0 0 0 1 0

1 2 3 8 2 2 1 6 0 0 2 5 2 1 0 4 1 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 2 24 7 0 0 11 0 0 0 1

Total 99 4

1 1 1 1 1 2 3 8 2 6 1 6 1 2 26 12 2 1 11 4 1 1 1

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS Professional and managerial occupations Code

Job title

Semiprofessional: (0-40.00 through 0-69*99) 0-41.10 Airplane Pilot, Commercial 0-42.10 Chiropractor 0-45.51 Instructor, Dancing 0-50.01 Medical Technician 0-50.23 Scientific Helper 0-50.45 Dairy Tester 0-50.46 Laboratory Tester 0-53.10 Optometrist 0-56.21 Photographer, Portrait 0-57.01 Athlete 0-61.30 Radio Operator 0-64.10 Surveyor 0-64.30 Instrument Man 0-65.20 Undertaker 0-63.23 Suppression-Crew Foreman (fire) 0-63 .64 Estimator Managerial and Official: (0-70..00 through 0-99.99) 0-71.13 Manager, Hotel 0-71.23 Manager, Restaurant or Coffee Shop 0-72.01 Manager, Retail Apparel 0-72.02 Manager, Retail Shoe 0-72.11 Manager, Retail Automotive 0-72.12 Manager, Retail Automotive Service 0-72.21 Manager, Retail Food-

Male

Female

Total

21 .2 1 0 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 0 2 1 1 3 1

9 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0

30 2 1 1 2 1 2 5 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 3 1

155 2 5 3 2 11 13 14

20 0 4 2 0 0 0 3

175 2 9 5 2 11 13 17

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Professional and managerial occupations Code

Job title

Managerial and Official: (continued) 0-72.31 Manager, Retail Drug 0-72.41 Manager, Retail Floral 0-72.51 Manager, Retail General Merchandise 0-72.52 Manager, Retail Variety 0-72.61 Manager, Retail Liquor 0-72.71 Manager, Retail Hardware and Farm Implements 0-72.72 Manager, Retail Lumber and Building Supplies 0-72.81 Manager, Retail Housefurnishings 0-72.82 Manager, Household Appliance 0-72.91 Manager Retail Store, N. E. C. 0-73.01 Wholesaler 0-74.11 Buyer 0-74.12 Buyer Assistant 0-87.10 Manager, Apartment House 0-91.60 Purchasing Agent 0-94.94 Fish and Game Warden 0-95.92 PIant-Quarantine Inspector 0-97.03 Secretary, Administrative 0-97.12 Manager, Office 0-97.13 Chief Clerk 0-97.41 Manager, Industrial Organization 0-97.51 Manager, Production 0-98.08 Manager, Financial Institution 0-98.41 Manager, Service Establishment

Male

2 0 5 0 2 10 5 2 3 5 7 10 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 7 10 3 4

Female

0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1

Total

2 1 6 1 2 10 5 2 3 6 7 11 1 2 1 2 1 2 5 1 7 10 3 5

.TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS Professional and managerial occupations Code

Job title

Managerial and Official: (continued) 0-9$.54 Manager. Recreation Establishment 0-99.05 Manager, Extraction of Mineral 0-99.11 Superintendent, Construction 0-99.21 Contractor 0-99.$4 Manager, Institution

Male

Female

Total

3 3 2 10 0

1 0 0 0 1

4 3 2 10 1

46 9 2 0 0 1 6 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0

107 42 3 1 7 9 4 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 1 2

153 51 5 1 7 10 10 1 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 2

Clerical and sales Clerical : (1-00.00 through 1-49*99) 1-01.02 Bookkeeper 1-01.52 Cashier I 1-01.53 Cashier II 1-04.01 Clerk, General 1-05.01 Clerk, General Office 1-06.02 Teller 1-06.04 Teller, Head 1-0$.63 Farm Property Lease and Advance Clerk 1-11.06 Freight-Platform Clerk 1-15.02 Collector 1-1$.43 Receptionist 1-1$.6$ Service Clerk 1-1$.$2 Billing Clerk 1-20.01 Librarian Assistant 1-23.02 Office Girl

TABLE I

(continued)

DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Clerical and sales Code

Job title

Clerical : (continued) 1-23.14 Messenger 1-25.22 Duplicating-Machine Operator 1-26.03 Timekeeper 1-27.a Clerks, Postal 1-2$.a Carriers, Mail Postmen 1-32.10 Dentist’s Assistant 1-32.20 Physician’s Assistant 1-33.01 Secretary• 1-34.13 Shipping Clerk 1-37.12 Stenographer 1-37.34 Clerk-Typist 1-3$.01 Stock Clerk 1-41.12 Telegraph Operator 1-42.01 Central-Office Operator 1-42.31 Telephone Operator 1-44.22 Station Agent 1-45.01 Weigher 1-4$.24 Field-Contact Man (dairy prod.) 1-49.94 Meter Reader Sales: (1-50.00 through 1-99*99) 1-51.10 Auctioneer 1-52.21 Commission Man Agricultural Produce 1-55.30 Solicitor I

Male

Female

Total

1 1 1 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 2 0 0 1 1 2 3

0 0 0 2 1 4 1 7 0 5 5 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 5 3 4 1 7 1 5 5 4 2 7 1 1 1 2 3

73 1 1 1

52 0 0 0

125 1 1 1

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Clerical and sales Code

Job title

Sales: (continued) 1-57.10 Salesman, Insurance 1-5$.10 Newspaper Carrier 1-63.10 Salesman. Real Estate 1-63.20 Real-Estate Broker 1-70.10 Sales Clerk 1-75.04 Salesperson, Men!s and Boys* Clothing 1-75.06 Salesperson, Womenfs Garments 1-75.22 Salesperson, Automobile Parts 1-75.31 Salesperson, Farm Implements 1-75.44 Salesperson, Furniture 1-75.71 Salesperson, General 1-75.92 Salesperson, Flowers 1-75.93 Salesperson, General Hardware 1-75.94 Salesperson, Jewelry 1-$0.01 Salesman, General 1-$5.14 Salesman, Vending and Coin Machines 1-&5.21 Salesman, Beverages

Male

Female

Total

6 2 1 4 17 2 0 9 2 2 4 0 5 0 13 1 2

1 1 0 1 31 0 6 0 0 0 7 1 2 2 0 0 0

7 3 1 5 4$ 2 6 9 2 2 11 1 7 2 13 1 2

0 0 0 0

14 5 1 3

14 5 1 3

Service occupations Domestic 2-01.01 2-03.01 2-03.11

Service (2-00.00 through 2-09.99) Day Worker Housekeeper, Home Housekeeper, Working

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Service occupations Code

Job title

Domestic 2-05.01 2-07.01 2-09.03

Service: (continued) Cook Child Monitor Companion

Personal 2-21.10 2-23.10 2-23.20 2-23.30 2-24.11 2-26.05 2-26.32 2-27.11 2-27.12 2-27.13 2-27.14 2-27.61 2-29.71 2-32.01 2-32.12 2-34.10 2-3S.20 2-40.13 2-40.71

Service: (2-20.00 through 2-49.99) Bartender Manager, Rooming House Manager, Boarding House Manager, Tourist Camp Chambermaid Cook, Combination Cook Waiter, Informal Waitress Counterman Hostess, Restaurant or Coffee Shop Soda Dispenser Kitchen Helper Barber Hairdresser Bootblack Nurse, Practical Racker Gambling Dealer

Male

Female

Total

0 0 0

2 2 1

2 2 1

51 21 1 0 5 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 3 0 2 2

69 0 6 2 1 4 1

120 21 7 2 6 4 1 12 1 22 7 1 2 1 11 6 3 1 2 2

A 0

22 7 1 2 1 0 6 0 1 0 0

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Service occupations Code

Personal 2-42.20 2-43.91 2-48.10

Job title

Male

Service: (continued) Nurse Aide Funeral Attendant Usherette

Female

Total

0 1 0

4 0 3

4 1 3

Protective Service: (2-60.00 through 2-69.99) 2-61.03 Watchman 2-63.10 Fireman 2-66.06 Police Chief 2-66.23 Policeman 2-68.10 Soldier (gov. ser.) 2-68.20 Sailor (gov. ser.) 2-68.30 Marine (gov. ser.)

28 1 1 1 10 6 8 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

28 1 1 1 10 6 8 1

Building Service Workers and Porters: through 2-99*99) 2-82.10 Charwoman 2-84.10 Janitor 2—86.20 Porter

21 0 16 5

2 2 0 0

23 2 16 5

(2-80.00

Agricultural, fishery, forestry, and kindred occupations Agricultural and Horticultural: 3-49.99) 3-01.10 Farmer, Cash Grain 3-02.10 Cotton Raiser

(3-00.00 through 492

8 12

7 0 0

499

8 12

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS Agricultural, fishery, forestry, and kindred occupations Code

Job title

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 3-03.10 Farmer, Crop Specialty 3-04.10 Dairyman 3-05.01 Farmer, Fruit 3-05.31 Farmer, Nut 3-06•10 Farmer, General 3-07.10 Farmer, Livestock 3-07.70 Beekeeper 3-06.10 Farmer, Poultry 3-09.10 Truck Farmer 3-12.10 Farm Hand Cotton 3-13.01 Farm Hand Sugar Beet 3-13.91 Farm Hand Crop Specialty 3-13.92 Farm Hand Crop Specialty, N. E. C. 3-14.10 Farm Hand Dairy 3-15.21 Farm Hand Fruit , 3-16.10 Farm Hand General 3-17.10 Farm Hand Livestock 3-16.10 Farm Hand Poultry 3-19.10 Farm Hand Vegetable 3-31.10 Bindweed, Eradicator 3- 32.10 Ditch Tender 3- 32.20 Irrigator 3-32.30 Laborer, Irrigation Ditch 3-35.10 Farm Mechanic

Male

35

211 4

1 26 20 2 5 5 4

2 2 6 66 1 29

1 1 2 1 3

6 4

1

Female

0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total

35

212 4

1 26 22 2 5 5 4

2 2 6 66 1 29

2 1 2 1 3

6 ’ 4

1

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Agricultural, fishery, forestry, and kindred occupations Code

Job title

Agricultural and Horticultural: 3-36.10 Farm Couple 3-37.10 Manager, Farm 3-37.20 Foreman 3-37*30 Caretaker, Farm 3-40.01 Gardener 3-40.04 Grounds Keeper 3-4$.91 Agricultural Aide 3-49*31 Sheep Shearer 3-49.41 Combine Operator

Male

Female

Total

(continued)

Forestry (except Logging) and Hunting and Trapping: (3-90.00 through 3—99•99) 3-97.30 Trapper

1 6 18 1 2 1 1 1 1

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 6 18 1 2 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1

2 2

8 1 1 5 1

0 0 0 0 0

8 1 1 5 1

1 0

1 1

2 1

Skilled occupations Production of Food Products: 4-01.100 Baker 4-06.310 Butter Maker 4-06.410 Cheese Maker 4-09.205 Beef Cutter

(4-01.000 through 4-10.999)

Production of Fabricated Textile Products: (4-21.000 through 4-27.999) 4-25*020 Seamstress

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

.Skilled occupations Code

Job title

Production of Fabricated Textile Products: 4-26.101 Tailor

Male

Female

Total

(continued) 1

0

1

Production of Lumber and Lumber Products: (4-29.000 through 4-39.999) 4-32.100 Cabinetmaker 4-35.710 Furniture Repairman

6 3 3

0 0 0

6 3 3

Printing Occupations: 4-44.010 Printer VII

3 3

0 0

3 3

Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products: (4-59.000 through 4-62.999) 4-60.100 Shoe Repairman

3 3

0 0

3 3

Metalworking Occupations: (4-71.000 through 4-95.999) 4-71.510 Watchmaker 4-75.. 010 Machinist 4-&0.010 Sheet-Metal Worker 4-$5.030 Welder, Acetylene 4-$5.040 Welder, Combination 4-36.010 Blacksmith

16 2 2 2 2 6 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

16 2 2 2 2 6 2

(4-44.000 through 4-49.999)

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Skilled occupations Code

Job title

Male

Electricians: (4-97*000 through 5-00,999) 4-97*010 Electrician 4-97*420 Electrical, Repairman Construction Occupations: (5-23*000 through 5-33*999) 5-23*030 Trench-Digging-Machine Operator 5-25.110 Carpenter 5-27*010 Painter 5-29*100 Plasterer 5-30.010 Pipe Fitter 5-30.210 Plumber Transportation Occupations: 5-36.010 Bus Driver

(5-35*000 through 5-49*999)

Communication and Utility Occupations: through 5-54*999) 5-53.210 Combination Man 5-53*350 Troubleman 5-5 3 *420 Lineman

Female

Total

6 5 1

0 0 0

6 5 1

49 1 30 93 1 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

49 1 30 9 3 1 5

2 2

1 1

3 3

7 1 1 5

0 0 0 0

7 1 1 5

18 2 2

0 0 0

18 2 2

(5-51*000

Trade and Service Occupations: (5-55.000 through 5-60.999) 5-55*010 Motion-Picture Projectionist 5-57.110 Dry Cleaner

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Skilled occupations Code

Job title

Trade and Service Occupations: 5-57.310 Spotter, General 5-5$.100 Meat Cutter

Male

Female

Total

(continued)

Miscellaneous Occupations: (5-63.000 through 5-$9.999) 5-72.010 Stationary Engineer 5-72.020 Maintenance Engineer 5-72.310 Refrigerating Engineer 5-73.210 Power Shovel Operator 5-73.320 Dragline Operator 5-75.230 Well-Drill Operator 5-79.170 Signal-Service Repairman 5-$0,100 Airplane Mechanic 5-81.010 Automobile Mechanic 5-81.040 Tractor Mechanic 5-81.510 Automobile-Body Repairman, Metal 5-81.530 Automobile-Radiator Man 5-81.910 Automobile-Repair Service Man 5-$3.031 Eleetric-Refrigerator Service Man 5-$3.041 Electrieal-Appliance Service Man 5-83.411 Radio Repairman 5-$3.621 Maintenance Man, Factory or Mill 5-83.641 Maintenance Mechanic

1 13 90 13 • 3 1 1 5 3 1 3 27 10 6 1 4 1 1 3 . 1 6

0 0

1 13

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

90 13 3 1 1 5 3 1 3 27 10 6 1 4 1 1 3 1 6 On

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Skilled occupations Code

Foremen: 5-91.011 5-91.031 5-91.711 5-91.901 5-94.0S0 5-95.020 5-95.040 5-95.220 5-95.320 5-95.340 5-97.010 5-97.050 5-99.020

Job title

(5-91.000 through 5-99.999) Foreman (dairy prod.) Foreman (grain and feed mill) Route Supervisor (print, and pub.) Foreman (petrol, refin.) Highway Foreman (const.) Foreman (motor trans.) Foreman (r.r. trans.) Foreman (tel. and tel.) Foreman (light, heat, and power) Foreman (waterworks) Foreman (clean., dye., and press.) Foreman (laund.1 Route Supervisor (irrigation water)

Male

Female

Total

20 7 1 0 1 1 2 2 1 3 1 0 0 1

3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

23 7 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 3 1 1 1 1

13 0 1 5 4 2 1

2 1 0 0 1 0 0

15 1 1 5 5 2 1

Semiskilled occupations Production of Food Products: (6-01.000 through 6-10.999) 6-02.910 Baker Helper 6-06.510 Condenser Man (dairy prod.) 6-06.530 Drier Operator (dairy prod.) 6-06.560 Milk Receiver (dairy prod.) 6-06.610 Separator Man (dairy prod.) 6-06.660 Weigher (dairy prod.)

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY.OCCUPATIONS

Semiskilled occupations Code

Job title

Male

Female

Total

Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products: (6-59.000 through 6-62.999) 6-59*437 Hide Inspector

1 1

0 0

1 1

Metalworking: (6-72.000 through 6-95.999) 6-95.045 Welder Helper

1 1

0 0

1 1

Construction Occupations: (7-23.000 through 7-33*999) 7-23.020 Motor Grader Operator 7-32.$12 Plumber Helper

6 4 2

0 0 0

6 4 2

Transportation Occupations: (7-35.000 through 7-49.999) 7-35.100 Routeman 7-36.040 Taxi Driver 7-36.210 Concrete-Mixing-Truck Driver 7-36.220 Dump-Truck Driver 7-36.250 Truck Driver, Heavy 7-36.260 Truck Driver, Light 7-36.510 Tractor Operator

98 10 1 1 8 53 2 18

1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

99 10 2 1 8 5& 2 18

Trade and Service Occupations: 7-60.999) 7-57*501 Presser, Hand 7-57*511 Presser, Machine 7-57.911 Laundress, Hand

18 1 0 0

10 2 5 1

28 3 5 1

(7-55.000 through

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Semiskilled occupations Code

Job title

Male

Female

Total

Trade and Service Occupations: (continued) 7-59*230 Linoleum Layer 7-60.500 Automobile-Service-Station Attendant

2 15

0 2

2 17

Miscellaneous Occupations: (7-63.000 through 7-#9*999) 7-70*040 Fireman, Stationary Boiler 7-72*520 Booster-Pump Operator 7-75.220 Well-Drill Operator Helper 7-$l*010 Automobile-Mechanic Helper 7-$3*051 Gas Appliance Serviceman 7-$5.010 Greaser (auto ser.) 7-$7.100 Rodman (surveying) 7-$7.300 Note Keeper (surveying) 7-S9.423 Tire Molder

26 7 1 1 $ 2 1 2 2 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

26 7 1 1 $ 2 1 2 2 2

6 4 1 1

0 0 0 0

6 4 1 1

23 1

7 0

30 1

Apprentices: (7-93.000 through 7-99.999) 7-93.100 Carpenter Apprentice 7-95*100 Electrician Apprentice 7-99.510 Jeweler Apprentice Unskilled occupations Production of Food Products: ($-01.00 through $-10*99) $-03.61 Laborer, Process (nonalc. bev.)

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Unskilled occupations Code

Job title

Production of Food Products: (continued) $-06.51 Laborer, Process (dairy prod.) $-10.31 Laborer, Process (ice)

Male

Female

Total

21 1

7 0

2$ 1

Production of Stone, Clay and Glass Products: ($-65.00 through $-70.99) $-67.61 Laborer, Process (conc. prod.)

3 3

0 0

3 3

Extraction of Minerals: (9-20.00 through 9-22.99) 9-22.50 Laborer (quarry)

1 1

0 0

1 1

15 1 4 2 1 6 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15 1 4 2 1 6 1

3 1 1 1

0 0 0 0

3 1 1 1

Construction Occupations: (9-23.00 through 9-32.99) 9-32.01 Hod Carrier 9-32.21 Laborer, Building (const.) 9-32.31 Laborer, Highway (const.) 9-32.35 Laborer, Pipe Line (const.) 9-32.41 Laborer, Railroad (const.) 9-32.vb Cleaners, Tank, Septic Transportation Occupations: (9-35.00 through 9-49.99) 9-35.10 Routeman Helper 9-49.30 Laborer (r.r. trans.) 9-49*40 Laborer (pipe lines)

\Jl

o

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS Unskilled occupations Code

Job title

Communication and Utility Occupations: (9- 51.00 through 9- 54.99) 9-54.10 Laborer (light, heat, and power) Trade and Service Occupations: (9-55.00 through 9-60.99) 9-57.11 Laborer, Process (clean., dye., and press.,) 9-57.21 Laborer, Process (laund.) 9-59.01 Laborer (ret. tr.) 9-59.02 Laborer (whole tr.) Public Service Occupations, N. E. C. (9-61.00 through 9- 61.99 ) 9-61.21 Laborer, Municipal Service Miscellaneous Occupations: (9-63.00 through 9-&9.99) 9-63.02 Laborer (dairy prod.) 9-63.06 Laborer (grain and feed mill) 9-63.71 Laborer (lumber yard) 9-64.51 Laborer (petrol, refin.)

Male

Female

Total

5 5

0 0

5 5

6 0 0

4

10 1

5

1

0 0

1

9 9

0 0

9 9

17

3

11 1

0 0 0 0

20 11 1

3

1

1 3

3 5

3

1

H

TABLE I (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY OCCUPATIONS

Unskilled occupations Code

Job title

Miscellaneous Occupations: (continued) 9-65.5$ Laborer (agric. equip.) 9-65.9$ Laborer (laund.) Totals

Male

Female

Total

1 0

0 3

1 3

1416

364

1760

4

vn ro

TABLE II DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS AND DIVISIONS

Major occupational groups

Male

Female

Total

Percent of gainfully employed

Professional and Managerial Occupations a. Professional occupations b. Semiprofessional occupations c. Managerial and official occupations

224 4$ 21 155

80 51 9 20

304 99 30 175

17.1 5.6 1.6 9.8

Clerical and Sales Occupations a. Clerical and kindred occupations b. Sales and kindred occupations

119 46 73

159 107 52

218

15.6 8.6 7.0

Service Occupations a* Domestic service occupations b. Personal service occupations c. Protective service occupations d. Building service workers and porters

100 0 51 2$ 21

$5 14 69 0 2

185 14 120 23

10.4 0.8 6.7 1.6 1.3

493

8

501

28.1

492 0

7 0

499 0

28.0 0.0

1

1

2

0.1

229

5

234

13.2

Agricultural, Fishery, Forestry and Kindred Occupations a. Agricultural, horticultural and kindred occupations b. Fishery occupations c. Forestry, (except logging) and hunting and trapping occupations Skilled Occupations

153 125

28

TABLE II (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS AND DIVISIONS

Major occupational groups

Semiskilled Occupations Unskilled Occupations Totals

Male

Female

Total

Percent of gainfully employed

169

13

182

10.2

82

14

96

3.4

1416

. 364

1730

100.0

-F-

55 all tables involving gainfully employed persons.

It is

suggested that to facilitate the reading of the tables, the reader familiarize himself with this publication. Table II, Distribution of Gainfully Employed Persons by Major Occupational Groups and Divisions, on pages 53 and 5

following Table I is really a summary of Table I.

Its

purpose is to assist the reader in obtaining a better under­ standing of the statistics presented in Table I. In the discussion which follows the findings from Tables I and II considered by the writer to b e of major importance are analyzed and interpreted in the light of the purpose of this study; namely, to determine the occupation­ al opportunities for the students of the West Side Union High School District.20

it should be borne in mind by the

reader that this analysis and interpretation is based solely upon the findings of this study, which do not present a complete picture of the occupations in the community. In the professions, as shown in Table I, page 3if, 99 persons in 23 separate occupations were enumerated.

Of

this total, I4.9 persons, or I419*5 P©** cent, were engaged in educational pursuits; that is, in various phases of teach­ ing and in school administration. or 75.5 P©** cent, were females.

20Cf. ante, p. 1.

Of these I4.9 persons, 37* Prom these figures, it

56 would seem safe to conclude that among the professions the educational field offers the greatest employment opportuni­ ties to the youth of the community.

That these employment

opportunities are affected by various factors; such as, turn-over, school board policies on the hiring of teachers, and supply and demand, should be borne in mind by the read­ er. Except for nursing, which employed 11 females and no males, or 11.1 per cent of the total professional group, there seem to be no other findings of sufficient signifi­ cance in the professions enumerated upon which to base any valid conclusions regarding employment opportunities. The semiprofessional occupations, Table I, page 35* have l6 occupational titles, with 21 males and 9 females employed in them.

The uneveness of the distribution and the

small number of persons employed in these occupations lead to the conclusion that the employment opportunities in these occupations are not numerous. Of the 1?6 persons enumerated in the managerial and official occupations, as shown on pages 35 to 37 of Table I, 155 were males and 21 were females.

By grouping together

the managers of the 15 kinds of retail stores, code numbers

0- 72.01 through 0-72.91 * we find a total of 86 persons, 77 males and 9 females, engaged in retail store management. Many of these stores are small businesses owned and managed

57 by persons with long tenure in the community.

This is felt

to be significant, since it would seem to indicate that for the young person who acquires the necessary background and experience, the management of a retail store offers the greatest opportunities in the managerial and official group of occupations. There were 153 clerical workers enumerated in the survey.

Of these 107 > or 69.9 Per cent, were females, which

is the largest occupational group for females disclosed in the survey.

Within the clerical group bookkeepers were the

most numerous, there being 51 in all, of which lf2, or 82.if per cent, were females.

It may be concluded from these

findings that the most opportunities for females lie in the clerical occupations, with the occupation of bookkeeper offering the greatest number of openings. Sales occupations employed 73 males and 52 females, a total of 125 persons as shown In Table I, pages 38 and 39*

The occupation of sales clerk, with lf8 persons em­

ployed, or 38 .If per cent of the total persons, leads in this field.

However, there are if2 salespersons, mostly of spe­

cific commodities, listed under nine different titles. Since these occupations have much in common with the occu­ pation of sales clerk, the combined power of employment of these selling occupations seems significant.

58 There were 120 persons, 5l males and 69 females, employed in the personal service occupations as shown in Table I, pages if.0 and ip.

The main body of the personal

service occupations was comprised of bartenders, of which there were 21, all males, or 17.5 P©** cent, and waiters, waitresses, and countermen.

In the three occupations

listed last there were 30 persons employed, 29 females and 1 male, or 25 per cent of the total group.

The occupation

of bartender for males and waitress or counterman for fe­ males seem to offer some employment opportunities. That agriculture is the leading occupation in the community is clearly evident from the statistics presented in Table I, pages ip,

l\.2,

and lj.3 .

There were i|_99 persons

engaged in agricultural pursuits, of which there were I4.92 males and 7 females.

Of these persons engaged in agri­

cultural pursuits, 212, or ^2.5 P©*» cent, were dairymen; and 6 8 , or 13*6 per cent were dairy hands.

These two occu­

pations combined represent 58.1 per cent of all the persons engaged in agricultural pursuits.

Other occupations within

this group worthy of note are crop specialty farmers, gener­ al farm hands, general farmers, and livestock farmers. It may be noted that the number of wage hands in the agricultural group of occupations is low, representing only 33*6 per cent of the total group.

This low figure may be

attributed to three main factors:

(1 ) the increased use of

59 farm machinery, which eliminates many wage hands;

(2) the

period during which the survey was made, which was one of low employment levels in this industry; and (3) the failure to reach many farm laborers in the enumeration* The skilled occupations, which are shown in Table I, . pages lj.3 to 1^7* employed a total of 23I4. persons, 229 Males and 5 females.

The distribution in this major occupational

group shows 63 separate occupational titles.

The occupation

of carpenter under construction occupations, page I4.5 , and that of automobile mechanic under miscellaneous occupations, page !|i>, are the major ones in the skilled occupations group from the standpoint of the numbers employed.

In

general, it would seem that for males a considerable number of occupational opportunities exist in the skilled field. However, because of the small number employed in most of the occupations within this field, the entry choice may be limited. Enumerated in the semiskilled occupations were 169 males and 13 females, a total of 182 persons.

The persons

employed in this group were distributed throughout 3l|- occu­ pations, of which the transportation occupations with 99 persons, or significant.

P©** cent of the total group, were the most From the findings in this study, the general

conclusions regarding the employment opportunities in the semiskilled occupations are the same as those reached for the

6o skilled occupations in the preceding paragraph. The unskilled occupations with a total of 96 persons, 86 males and 1I4. females, represents the smallest occupation­ al group found in the survey.

These persons were dis­

tributed fairly evenly throughout 26 separate occupations, as shown in Table I, pages lj.9 to 52.

However, the number

of laborers employed in the processing and handling of dairy products, 39* or I4.O.6 per cent of the total unskilled group, is significant from the standpoint of opportunities for em­ ployment.

It Is felt by the writer that the number of

people employed in the unskilled group of occupations as found in this study does not represent a true picture of the employment situation in this field.

This is due to the lower

percentage of coverage in the unskilled field.

Of the total number of gainfully employed persons, 1,760, reached In the survey, 3&5* or 25*7 per cent, were

females.

Based upon these findings, it may be concluded

that the opportunities for gainful employment are approxi­ mately three times as great for males as they are for fe­ males. The distribution of the gainfully employed persons between the ages of 1I4. and 19 and 20 and 25 by occupations.

In Table III, which follows, all the gainfully employed persons enumerated in the survey between the ages of llj. and

TABLE III DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Code

Job title

Age groups 14 to 19 20 to 25 Male Female Total Male Female Total

Professional: (0-00.00 through 0-39.99) 0 0-01.20 Accountant, General 0 0-16.01 Civil Engineer 0 0-27.01 Social Worker 0 0 0-30.02 Teacher, Kindergarten 0 0-30.11 Teacher, Grade School 0-31.01 Teacher, High School 0 0-33.10 Nurse 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

3

7

1 1 0 0 1 0 0

0 0 1 0 2

Semiprofessional: (0-40.00 through 0-69.99) 0-50.46 Laboratory Tester 0-6&.23 Suppression-Crew Foreman

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

3

0

0

0 0 0 0 0

Managerial and Official: (0-70.00 through 0-99.99) 0-71.23 Manager, Restaurant or Coffee Shop 0-72.12 Manager, Retail Automotive Service 0-72.21 Manager, Retail Food 0-74*11 Buyer 0-97.12 Manager, Office

10 1 1 1 0

3.

3 3

1

1

2 1

0 0 0

2 1

0

4

3

7

0

0

0

2

2

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

2 1 1 0

0 0 0 1

2 1 1 1

3

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25 Age groups Code

Job title Male

14 to 19 Female Total

Male

20 to 25 Female Tot£

Clerical : (1-00.00 through 1-49.99) 1-01.02 Bookkeeper 1-04.01 Clerk, General 1-05.01 Clerk, General Office 1-06.02 Teller 1-13.43 Receptionist 1-13.63 Service Clerk 1-23.02 Office Girl 1-32.10 DentistTs Assistant 1-33.01 Secretary 1-37.12 Stenographer 1-37.34 Clerk-Typist 1-33.01 Stock Clerk 1-49.94 Meter Reader

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

16 5 2 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0

17 5 2 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0

5 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

19 11 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0

24 12 1 0 3 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 1 2

Sales: (1-50.00 through 1-99*99) 1-51.10 Auctioneer 1-57.10 Salesman, Insurance 1-53.10 Newspaper Carrier 1-70.10 Sales Clerk 1-75.06 Salesperson, Womenfs Garments 1-75.22 Salesperson, Automobile Parts 1-75.71 Salesperson, General 1-75.93 Salesperson, General Hardware

2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

5 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0

7 0 0 1 6 . 0 0 0 0

16 1 1 0 6 0 3 1 1

13 0 0 1 3 1 0 1 1

29 1 1 1 14 1 3 2 2

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Code

Job title

(continued) Sales: 1-75.94 Salesperson, Jewelry 1-80.01 Salesman, General 1-85.14 Salesman, Vending and Coin Machines

Age groups 20 to 25 14 to 19 Male Female Tots Male Female Total

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 2

1 0

1 2

0

0

0

1

0

1

Domestic Service: (2-00.00 through 2-09.99) 2-07.01 Child Monitor

0 0

1 1

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

Personal Service: (2-20.00 through 2-49.99) 2-21.10 Bartender 2-27.11 Waiter, Informal 2-27.12 Waitress 2-27.13 Counterman 2-27.71 Soda Dispenser 2-32.12 Hairdresser 2-34.10 Bootblack 2-42.20 Nurse Aide 2-48.10 Usherette

2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

7 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 1 2

9 0 1 4 0 ’0 0 1 1 2

3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

8 0 0 4 1 1 1 0 0 1

11 3 0 4 1 1 1 0 0 1

Protective Service: 2-69.99)

9

0

9

8

0

8

(2-60.00 through

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Age groups Code

Job title

14 to 19 Male Female Total

Protective Service: (continued) 2-63.10 Fireman 2-66.23 Policeman 2-68.10 Soldier (gov. ser.) 2-68.20 Sailor (gov. ser.) 2-68.30 Marine (gov. ser.)

1 0 3 5 0

Building Service Workers and Porters: (2-80.00 through 2-99.99) 2-86.20 Porter Agricultural and Horticultural: (3-00.00 through 3-49.99) 3-03.10 Farmer, Crop Specialty 3-04.10 Dairymen 3-06.10 Farmer, General 3-08.10 Farmer, Poultry 3-12.10 Farm Hand, Cotton 3-13.01 Farm Hand, Sugar Beet 3-13.92 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty, N. E. C. 3-14.10 Farm Hand, Dairy 3-16.10 Farm Hand, General 3-17.10 Farm Hand, Livestock

20 to 25 Male Female Tote

0 0 0 0 0

1 0 3 5 0

0 1 3 3 1

0 0 0 0 0

0 1 3 3 1

5 5

0 0

5 5

0 0

0 0

0 0

28

29 0 5 1 0 1 1

62 3 33 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

62

0 5 1 0 1 1

1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 14 1 0

0 0 0 1

1 14 1 1

2 16 2 1

0 0 0 0

2 16 2 1

.

3 33 0 1 0 0

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Code

Age groups 14 to 19 20 to 25 Male Female Total Male Female Total

Job title

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 1 3-1$.10 Farm Hand, Poultry 1 3-19.10 Farm Hand, Vegetable 2 3-32.20 Irrigator 0 3-32.30 Laborer, Irrigation Ditch 0 3-37*10 Manager, Farm 3-37.20 Foreman 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 2

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 2

Skilled occupations Electricians: (4-97.000 through 5-00.999) 4-97.010 'Electrician

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

Construction: (5-23.000 through 5-33.999) 5-25.110 Carpenter 5-27.010 Painter 5-30.210 Plumber

1 0 1 0

0 0 0 0

1 0 1 0

5 4 0 1

0 0 0 0

5 4 0 1

Transportation: (5-35.000 through 5-49.999) 5-36.010 Bus Driver

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

1 1

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES.OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Age groups Code

Job title Male

14 to 19 Female Total

Male

20 to 25 Female Total

Skilled occupations (continued) Trade and Service: (5-55.000 through 5-60.999) 5-55.010 Motion-Picture Projectionist 5-57.310 Spotter, General 5-5$.100 Meat Cutter

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

3 1 1 1

0 0 0 0

3 1 1 1

Miscellaneous: (5-63.000 through 5-89.999) 5-73.320 Dragline Operator 5-$1.010 Automobile Mechanic

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

7. 2 5

0 0 0

7 2 5

Foremen: 5-91.011

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

(5-91.000 through 5-99.999) Foreman (dairy prod.)

.

'

Semiskilled occupations Production of Food Products: (6r01.000 through 6-10.999) 6-06.560 Milk Receiver

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

Metalworking: 6-95.999)

0

0

0

1

0

1

(6-72.000 through

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Code

Job title

Age groups 14 to 19 20 to 25 Male Female Total Male Female Total

Semiskilled occupations (continued) Metalworking: (continued) 0 0 0 6-95.045 Welder Helper

1

0

1

Construction: (7-23.000 through 7-33.999) 7-23.020 Motor-Grader Operator

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

Transportation: (7-35.000 through 7-49.999) 7-35.100 Routeman 7-36.220 Dump-Truck Driver 7-36.250 Truck Driver, Heavy 7-36.260 Truck Driver, Light 7-36.510 Tractor Operator

7 1 1 3 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

7 1 1 3 1 1

20 •2 2 13 0 3

6 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

6 0 0 0

3 1 0 0

2 0 1 1

5 1 1 1

6

0

6

2

0

2

Trade and Service: (7-55.000 through 7-60.999) 7-57.501 Presser, Hand 7-57*511 Presser, Machine 7-57.991 Laundress, Hand 7-60.500 Automobile-Service-Station Attendant

0 0 0 0 0 0 ‘

20 2 2 13 0 3

ON

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25 Age groups Code

Job title Male

14 to 19 Female Total

Male

20 to 25 Female Total

Semiskilled occupations (continued) Miscellaneous: (7-63-000 through 7-69.999) 7-61.010 Automobile Mechanic Helper 7-63-051 Gas Appliance Serviceman 7-67.300 Note Keeper (surveying) 7-69.423 Tire Molder

2 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

2 2 0 0 0

6 3 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0

6 3 1 1 1

Apprentices: (7-93.000 through 7-99.999) 7-93.100 Carpenter Apprentice 7-95.100 Electrician Apprentice 7-99.510 Jeweler Apprentice

3 1 1 1

0 0 0 0

3 1 1 1

1 1 0 0

0 0 0 0

1 1 0 0

Unskilled occupations (6-01.00 Production of Food Products: through 6-10.99) &-06.51 Laborer, Process (dairy prod.)

0 0

1 1

1 1

3 3

3 3

6 6

Production of Stone, Clay and Glass Products: (6-65.00 through 6-70.99) 6-67.61 Laborer, Process (conc. prod.)

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

ON

CQ-

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 25

Code

Job title

Age groups 20 to 25 14 to 19 Male Female Total Male Female Total

Unskilled occupations (continued) Construction: (9-23.00 through 9-32.99) 9-32.41 Laborer, Railroad

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

Transportation: (9-35.00 through 9-49.99) 9-35.10 Routeman Helper

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

0

0

0

3

0

3

0

0

0

3

0

3

Trade and Service: (9-55.00 through 9-60.99) 9-59.01 Laborer (ret. tr.)

4 4

0 0

4 4

0 0

0 0

0 0

Public Service, N. E. C.: (9-61.00 through 9-61.99) 9-61.21 Laborer, Municipal Service

1 1

0 0

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

Communication and Utility: (9-51.00 through 9-54.99) 9-54*10 Laborer (light, heat, and power)

TABLE III (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF THE GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 14 AND 19 AND 20 AND 2$

Code

Job title

Age groups 20 to 25 14 to 19 Male Female Total Male Female Total

Unskilled occupations (continued) Miscellaneous: (9-63.00 through 9-69.99) 9-63.02 Laborer (dairy prod,) 9-63.06 Laborer (grain and feed mill) 9-65.96 Laborer (laund.) Totals

3 2 1 0

1 0 0 1

4 2 1 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

'4

33

107

163

56

219

o

71 19 and 20 and 25 were distributed by occupations.

The

purpose of this distribution was to determine the types of occupations engaged in by the younger people in the communi­ ty in order to obtain information regarding the possible entry occupations for them. Before proceeding into a discussion of the findings in Table III, it may be well to explain the reasons for set­ ting the age groupings at 1 distribution.

to 19 and 20 to 25 in this

It was felt that the llj. to 19 age group was

the period when the majority of the students attending the schools in this community are terminating their education and beginning their employment histories, whereas the period between the ages of 20 and 25 is a time when the majority of persons in the community are becoming established in their occupations. The totals for Table III show that there were 107 persons gainfully employed in the ll.}. to 19 age group, 7if males and 33 females.

This total represents 6.0 per cent

of the 1,780 gainfully employed persons reached in the sur­ vey.

Of this group, 63.9 P©i* cent were employed in three

major occupational groups:

agricultural and horticultural,

with 28 males and 1 female; clerical and sales, with 3 males and 21 females; and the service occupations, with l6 males and 8 females.

The remainder of this group is distributed

mainly throughout the occupations within the semiskilled and

72 unskilled groups.

For obvious reasons very ‘few persons in

the 1l\. to 19 age group were employed in the professional and managerial and the skilled occupations. No particular occupations within the distribution shown in Table III contain sufficient numbers to warrant the basing of any valid conclusions for the lij. to 19 age group. There are 7 occupations within this distribution which have a range of from 5 to ll^ employed persons.

They are:

dairy

hands, llj.; sales clerk, 6; automobile service station at­ tendants, 6; bookkeeper, 5» dairymen, 5* porters, 5> and sailors (government service), 5* It may be concluded from the foregoing discussion that for the llj. to 19 age group the most numerous opportuni­ ties for employment lie in the agricultural and horticultural, the clerical and sales, and the service groups of occupa­ tions*

For males the chances are greatest in the agricultur­

al and horticultural occupations and for females in the cleri­ cal and sales occupations* In the 20 to 25 age group there were 219 persons,

163 males and $ 6 females, or 12*3 per cent of the 1,7^0 gain­ fully employed persons enumerated in the survey.

The agri­

cultural and horticultural occupations with 62 persons, all males, employed the largest number in this age group, or 28*3 per cent.

Of the agricultural and horticultural group,

33 dairymen and 16 dairy hands comprised 79 P el* cent*

73 Clerical and sales occupations combined ranked second in this group with a total of 5 3 » 21 males and 32 females*

This was 23*3

Ver

cent of the gainfully employed

persons in the 20 to 25 age group*

In the clerical occu­

pations bookkeepers made up 50 per cent of the group with 1 male and 11 females.

In the sales occupations I4.8.6 per

cent of the workers were made up of sales clerks, of which there were 6 males and 8 females. In the semiskilled occupations there were 35 work­ ers, of which 20 , or 57*1 P®** cent, were employed in trans­ portation occupations.

Of the 20 employed in transporta­

tion, 15 were truck drivers. As would be expected, more workers appeared in the professional and managerial and skilled occupations. the 10 in the professional group, 6 were teachers. 175 managers and officials reached in the survey,

Of Of the

J,

or

only ij. per cent, came from the 20 to 25 age group. General conclusions which may be reached regarding the occupations engaged in by the 20 to 25 age group in the community are:

(1) Most opportunities for males lie in agri­

culture and horticulture, with dairying the most numerous single occupation.

(2) Most opportunities for females lie

in the clerical occupations, with bookkeeping the most numerous single occupation.

(3) Sales occupations provide

opportunities for both males and females, with the occupation

of sales or counter clerk the leading single occupation* (If.) Opportunities for persons engaged in the professions are beginning to appear for this age group, with teaching the leading single occupation. The distribution of the gainfully employed persons by the amount of schooling completed*

To determine what

the relationship was between the kinds of work done by the gainfully employed persons reached in the survey and the amounts of schooling they had completed, that is, success­ fully completed grades or school years, the distribution in Table IV following was made* The eight groupings used in this distribution were selected with the definite purpose in mind of distributing the gainfully employed persons into the critical stages of the educational period.

Persons with no schooling or up to

and ineluding two years were grouped together because they probably would not be able to read and write with sufficient facility to be of value to them occupationally*

Those with

from three through five years of schooling could probably read and write well enough to perform minimum reading and writing requirements in the occupations they would be en­ gaged in.

The periods of 6 to 8 years through 15 to l6

years were selected because they represent terminal educa­ tional periods.

All those having education beyond college

TABLE IV DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

Professional: (0-00,00 through 0-39*99) 0-01,20 Accountant, General 0-01.30 Accountant, Public 0-06.51 Editor, Newspaper 0-06.71 Reporter 0-06.97 Public Relations Man 0-07.02 Chemist, Biological 0-08.10 Clergyman 0-13.10 Dentist 0-16,01 Civil Engineer 0-22.10 Lawyer 0-24.31 Teachers, Music 0-25.10 Pharmacist 0-26.10 Physician 0-27.01 Social Worker 0-30.02 Teacher, Kindergarten 0-30.11 Teacher, Grade School 0-31.01 Teacher, High School 0-31.10 Superintendent, Schools 0-32.30 Teacher, Manual Training 0-33.10 Nurse 0-34.10 Veterinarian 0-39.54 Agronomist 0-39.65 Entomologist 0-39.93 Dietician

0-2

3-5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Years of schooling completed 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

■8 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

20 2 0 1 0 1 0 •1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

35 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 6 0 2 1 0 1 1 7 1 0 0 9 2 1 0 0

Above 16

36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 6 0 0 9 10 2 1 0 2 0 1 0 2

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

Semiprofessional: (0-40.00 through 0-69.99) 0-41.10 Airplane Pilot, Commercial 0-42.10 Chiropractor 0-45.51 Inst ruet o r , Dane ing 0-50.01 Medical Technician 0-50.23 Scientific Helper 0-50.45 Dairy Tester 0-50.46 Laboratory Tester 0-53.10 Optometrist 0-56.21 Photographer, Portrait 0-57.01 Athlete 0-61.30 Radio Operator 0-64.10 Surveyor 0-64.30 Instrument Man 0-65.20 Undertaker 0-68.23 Suppression-Crew Foreman (fire) 0-68.64 Estimator Managerial and Official: (0-70.00 through 0-99.99) 0-71.13 Manager, Hotel 0-71.23 Manager, Restaurant or Coffee Shop

Years of schooling completed 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Above 16

0-2

3-5

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

5 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

14 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 2 0 1 0

4 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

5 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1

1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

2 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 0

5 0

30 0

21 0

74 1

29 1

12 0

3 0

0

1

1

1

4

1

1

0

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

Managerial and Official: (continued) 0-72,01 Manager, Retail Apparel 0 0-72.02 Manager, Retail Shoe 0 0-72.11 Manager, Retail Automotive 0 0-72.12 Manager, Retail Automotive Service 0 0-72.21 Manager, Retail Food 0 0 0-72.31 Manager, Retail Drug 0 0-72.41 Manager, Retail Floral Manager, Retail General 0-72.51 Merchandise 0 0 0-72.52 Manager, Retail Variety 0-72.61 Manager, Retail Liquor 0 Manager, Retail Hardware 0-72.71 and Farm Implements 0 0-72.72 Manager, Retail Lumber and Building Supplies 0 0-72.81 Manager, Retail House0 furnishings 0-72.82 Manager, Household Appliance 0 Manager, Retail Store 0-72.91 N. E. C. 0 0 0-73.01 'Wholesaler 1 0-74.11 Buyer 0 0-74.12 Buyer Assistant

Years of schooling completed 3-5 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Above 16

1 0 1

1 0 3

1 0 0

1 1 3

1 1 3

0 0 1

0 0 0

0 1 0 0

2 5 0 0

3 2 0 0

8 8 0 1

0 1 0 0

0 0 2 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 1

0 0 0

4 1 1

1 0 0

1 0 0

0 0 0

0

1

1

6

2

0

0

0

1

0

2

0

1

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

0

0

0 0 0 0

0 0 3 0

0 0 4 0

5 6 2 1

1 1 1 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OP GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

Managerial and Official: (continued) 0-$7.10 Manager, Apartment House 0 0-91.60 Purchasing Agent 0 Fish and Game Warden 0 0-94.94 0-95.92 Plant-Quarantine Inspector 0 0 0-97.03 Secretary, Administrative 0 0-97.12 Manager, Office 0 0-97.13 Chief Clerk Manager, Industrial 0-97.41 Organization 0 0 0-97.51 Manager, Production Manager, Financial 0-9$.Q$ Institution 0 0-9$.41 Manager, Service Establishment 0 Manager, Recreation 0-9$.54 0 Establishment 0-99.05 Manager, Extraction of Mineral 0 Superintendent, 0-99.11 Construction 0 0 0-99.21 Contractor 0 0-99.$4 Manager, Institution

Years of schooling completed 6-$ 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 3-5

Above 16

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 2 1 0 1 1

0 1 0 0 1 3 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0

0 0

0 2

1 2

1 3

3 2

1 1

1 0

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

0 1 0

0 5 0

0 1 0

1 1 0

0 1 0

1 1 1

0 0 0 os

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Title

Clerical: (1-00*00 through 1-49.99) 1-01.02 Bookkeeper 1-01.52 Cashier I 1-01.53* Cashier II 1-04.01 Clerk, General 1-05.01 Clerk, General Office 1-06.02 Teller 1-06.04 Teller, Head 1-08.63 Farm Property Lease and Advance Clerk 1-11.06 Freight-Platform Clerk 1-15.02 Collector 1-18.43 Receptionist 1-18.68 Service Clerk 1-18.82 Billing Clerk 1-20.01 Librarian Assistant 1- 23.02 Office Girl 1-23.14 Messenger 1-25.22 Duplicating-Machine Operator Timekeeper 1-26.03 Clerks, Postal 1-27.a 1- 28.a Carriers, Mail Postman 1-32.10 Dentistfs Assistant

0-2

Years of schooling completed 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15 3-5

vO r—1 1

Code

Above 16

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

8 3 1 0 1 0 0 0

16 5 1 0 0 0 1 1

86 26 2 1 4 8 8 0

31 15 1 0 1 1 1 0

9 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 2 3 0 0 1 2 0

0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 1

0 0 4 0 2

0 1 0 2 0

1 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 0 0

TABLE 17 (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

Clerical: (continued) 1-32,20 Physician’s Assistant 1-33.01 Secretary• 1-34.13 Shipping Clerk 1-37.12 Stenographer 1-37.34 Clerk-Typist 1-38.01 Stock Clerk 1-41.12 Telegraph Operator 1-42.01 Central-Office Operator 1-42.31 Telephone Operator 1-44.22 Station Agent 1-45.01 Weigher 1-48.24 Field-Contact Man (dairy prod.) 1-49.94 Meter Reader Sales: (1-50.00 through 1-99.99) 1-51.10 Auctioneer 1-52.21 Commission Man, Agri­ cultural Produce 1-55.30 Solicitor I 1-57.10 Salesman, Insurance 1-58.10 Newspaper Carrier 1-63.10 Salesman, Real Estate 1-63.20 Real-Estate Broker 1-70.10 Sales Clerk

0-2

Years of schooling completed 3-5 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Above 16

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0

0 5 0 2 5 1 2 4 1 0 0

1 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 1

1 2

0 0

1 0

0 0

1 0

4 0

15 0

18 1

69 0

15 0

3 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 1 2 0 1 7

0 0 1 0 0 0 9

1 0 2 1 1 2 27

0 1 3 0 0 2 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

>

05-

°

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

Sales: (continued) 1-75.04 Salesperson, Men’s and Boys’ Clothing 1-75.06 Salesperson, Women’s Garments 1-75.22 Salesperson, Automobile Parts 1-75.31 Salesperson, Farm Implements Salesperson, Furniture 1-75.44 1-75.71 Salesperson, General 1-75.92 Salesperson, Flowers 1-75.93 Salesperson, General Hardware 1-75.94 Salesperson, Jewelry 1-80.01 Salesman, General 1-85.14 Salesman, Fending and Coin Machines 1-85.21 Salesman, Beverages Domestic Service: (2-00,00 through 2-09.99) 2-01.01 Day Worker 2-03.01 Housekeeper, Home 2-03.11 Housekeeper, Working

0-2

Years of schooling completed 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 3-5

Above 16

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

3

0

0

0

0

0

0 '

0

7

1

1

0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0

1 0 1 0

1 1 7 0

0 1 3 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 0 1

2 1 0

4 1 8

0 0 3

0 0 1

0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 1

1 0

0 0

0 1

0 0

2 1 0 0

3 1 0 1

5 3 0 1

1 0 0 0

3 0 1 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 g

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Domestic 2-05.01 2-07.01 2-09.03

Title

Service: (continued) Cook Child Monitor Companion

Personal Service: (2-20,00 through 2-49*99) 2-21.10 Bartender 2-23.10 Manager, Rooming House 2-23.20 Manager, Boarding House 2-23.30 Manager, Tourist Camp 2-24.11 Chambermaid 2-26.05 Cook, Combination 2-26.32 Cook 2-27.11 Waiter, Informal 2-27.12 Waitress 2-27.13 Counterman 2-27.14 Hostess, Restaurant and Coffee Shop 2-27.61 Soda Dispenser 2-29.71 Kitchen Helper 2-32.01 Barber 2-32.12 Hairdresser 2-34.10 Bootblack 2-3$*20 Nurse, Practical 2-40,13 Racker

Years of schooling completed 6-a 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Above 16

0-2

3-5

1 0 0

0 0 1

1 0 0

0 1 0

0 1 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

9 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0

11 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

26 4 3 0 1 1 0 4 1

3$ 10 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 5 3

d

6 3

27 2 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 10 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

■0

0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1

0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

0 1 0 4 0 1 0 0

1 1 0 2 3 1 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Years of schooling completed

0-2

3-5

6-8

0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0

0 1 0 0

0 0 1 2

0 1

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

10 1 0 0

12 0 1 0

3 4

3 4 3

0

1

Building Service Workers and Porters: (2- 80.00 through 2-99 .99 ) 4 2-82.10 Charwoman 0 2-84.10 Janitor 4 0 2-86.20 Porter

3

1 2 0

8 1

63

0

Code

Personal 2-40.71 2-42.20 2-43*91 2-48.10

Title

Service; (continued) Gambling Dealer Nurse Aide Funeral Attendant Usherette

Protective Service; (2-60.00 through 2- 69.99 ) 2-61.03 Watchman 2-63.10 Fireman 2-66.06 Police Chief 2-66.23 Policeman 2-68.10 Soldier (gov. ser.) 2-68.20 Sailor (gov. ser.) 2-68.30 Marine (gov. ser.)

Agricultural and Horticultural: (3-00.00 through 3-49.99 ) 3-01.10

Farmer, Cash Grain

9-10

2

Above

11-12

13-14

15-16

16

1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

3

0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2

3

0 0 0 3

3

5

0

5

0 0

2

3

0

0 0 0 0

61

153

78

113

17

12

1

1

0

4

1

1

5

c

0 ^

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 3-02.10 Cotton Raiser 1 3-03.10 Farmer, Crop Specialty 2 3-04.10 Dairyman 34 3-05.10 Farmer, Fruit 0 0 3-05.31 Farmer, Nut 3-06.10 Farmer, General 2 3-07.10 Farmer, Livestock 1 3-07.70 Beekeeper 0 3-03.10 Farmer, Poultry 0 2 3-09.10 Truck Farmer 3-12.10 Farm Hand, Cotton 0 3-13.01 Farm Hand, Sugar Beet 0 3-13.91 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty 1 3-13.92 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty N. E. C. 0 3-14.10 Farm Hand, Dairy 3 3-15.21 Farm Hand, Fruit 0 3-16.10 Farm Hand, General 14 0 3-17.10 Farm Hand, Livestock 3-13.10 Farm Hand, Poultry 0 0 3-19.10 Farm Hand, Vegetable 0 3-31.10 Bindweed, Eradicator 0 3- 32.10 Ditch Tender

Years of schooling completed 6-3 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 3-5

0 3 24

0 0

7 ' 15

60 1 0 6

2 6 31

0

5 56

4 5

0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0

0 1 0 0 1 0

2 1 2 2 1 1

3 3

1

2

1

24

13

15

0

0

4

5

• 0 4

0 0 1 0 0

0 0 1 0 2

0 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 1 0 0 1

7

16

2

2 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 0

4 5

Above

9 5

0 2 1 0 0 0

0 0 2 1 1 4

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED Years of schooling completed

0-2

3-5

6-8

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 3-32.20 Irrigator 3-32.30 Laborer, Irrigation Ditch 3-35.10 Farm Mechanic 3-36.10 Farm Couple 3-37.10 Manager, Farm 3-37.20 Foreman 3-37.30 Caretaker, Farm 3-40.01 Gardener 3-40.04 Grounds Keeper 3-48.91 Agricultural Aide 3-49.31 Sheep Shearer 3-49.41 Combine Operator

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0

2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

2 1 0 0

Forestry (Except Logging) and Hunting and Trapping: (3-90.00 through 3-99.99 ) 3-97.30 Trapper

0 0

0 0

Code

Title

Above

16

11-12

13-14

15-16

1 1 1 0 0 0

2 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

4

0 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

4 4

9-10

Skilled occupations Production of Food Products: (4-01.000 through 4-10.999) 4-01.100 Baker

1 0

1 0

1 1

0

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

3-5

Years of schooling completed 6-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Above 16

Skilled occupations (continued) Production of Food Products: (continued) 4-06,310 Butter Maker 0 0 0 1 0 2 4-06.410 Cheese Maker 1 1 4-09.205 Beef Cutter 0 0 0 1

0 0 0

0 1 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

Production of Fabricated Textile Products: (4-21,000 through 4-27.999) 4-25.020 Seamstress 4-26.101 Tailor

0 0 0

0 0 0

2 1 1

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

Production of Lumber and Lumber Products: (4-29.000 through 4-39.999) 4-32.100 Cabinetmaker 4-35*710 Furniture Repairman

0 0 0

1 1 0

3

2 1

0 0 0

2 0 2

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

Printing: (4-44.000 through 4-49.999) 4-44.010 Printer

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3 3

0 0

0 0

0 0

Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products: (4-59.000 through 4-62.999)

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

Years of schooling completed 3-5 6-3 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Skilled occupations (continued) Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products: (continued) 4-60.100 Shoe Repairman 0 1 1 1

Above 16

0

0

0

0

2 1 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

Metalworking: (4-71.000 through 4-95.999) 4-71.510 Wat chmaker 4-75.010 Machinist 4-30.010 Sheet-Metal Worker 4-35.030 Welder, Acetylene 4-35.040 Welder, Combination 4-36.010 Blacksmith

1 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6 1 1 2 1 0 1

4

3

0 0 0* 1

0 0 0 0

3

3

0

0

Electricians: (4-97.000 through 5-00.999) 4-97.010 Electrician 4-97.420 Electrical, Repairman

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 1 0

1 1 0

4 3

1

0 0 0

1

3

17

11

13

4

0

0

0 1 0

0

0

0

3

9 5

9

1 6

1

3

0 2 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

Construction: (5-23.000 through 5-33.999) 5-23.030 Trench-Digging-Machine Operator 5-25.110 Carpenter 5-27.010 Painter

0

TABLE IY (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

3-5

Years of schooling completed 6-3 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16

Above

16

Skilled occupations (continued) Construction: (continued) 5-29.100 Plasterer 0 0 0 1 5-30.010 Pipe Fitter 0 0 0 1 5-30.210 Plumber 0 0 0 2

2 0 1

0 0 2

0 0 0

0 0 0

Transportation: (5-35.000 through 5-49.999) 5-36.010 Bus Driver

1 1

0 0

2 2

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Communication and Utility: (5- 51.000 through 5-54.999) 5-53.210 Combination Man 5-53.350 Troubleman 5-53.420 Lineman

0 0 0 0

1 0 0 1

3

0 1 2

0 0 0 0

1 0 0 1

2 1 0 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

Trade and Service: (5-55.000 through 5-60.999) 5-55.010 Motion-Picture Projectionist 5-57.110 Dry Cleaner 5-57.310 Spotter, General 5-5$.100 Meat Cutter

1

1

4

1

11

0

0

0

0 0 0 1

0 1 0 0

0 0 1

2 1 0

3

0 0 0 1

3

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

Miscellaneous: (5-63.000 through 5-$9 .999)

0

4

26

15

39

6

0

0

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED

Code

Title

0-2

Years of schooling completed 6-3 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-16 3-5

Skilled occupations (continued) Miscellaneous: (continued) 5-72.010 Stationary Engineer 0 1 4 3 0 0 5- 72.020 Maintenance Engineer 0 2 0 0 0 0* 5-72.310 Refrigerating Engineer 0 5-73-210 Power Shovel Operator 0 0 1 5-73-320 Dragline Operator 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 5-75.230 Well-Drill Operator 1 0 5-79.170 Signal-Service Repairman 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5-30.100 Airplane Mechanic 5-31.010 Automobile Mechanic 2 0 6 4 0 5-31.040 Tractor Mechanic 0 1 5 5-31.510 Automobile-Body, Repairman, Metal 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 5-31.530 Automobile-Radiator Man 0 5-31.910 Automobile-Repair 0 0 Serviceman 0 1 5-33.031 Electric-Refrigerator 0 0 0 Serviceman 0 -Electrical-Appliance 5-33.041 0 0 0 Serviceman 0 0 0 0 0 5-33.411 Radio Repairman 5-33.621 Maintenance Man, Factory 0 0 0 0 or Mill 0 1 0 5-33.641 Maintenance Mechanic 5

Above

16

1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1 2

0 1

0 0

0 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 “

4

1 1 0 1 1 0 2 14 3 4

TABLE IV (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY AMOUNT OF SCHOOLING COMPLETED Years of schooling completed Code

0-2

Title

3-5

6-6

9-10

Skilled occupations (continued) Foremen: (5-91•000 through 5-99.999) 0 3 6 3 5-91.011 Foreman (dairy prod.) 0 0 1 1 5-91.031 Foreman (grain and feed 0 mill) 0 0 1 5-91.711 Route Supervisor (print, and pub.) 0 0 0 0 0 5-91.901 Foreman (petrol, refin.) 0 0 1 5-94.060 Highway Foreman (const.) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5-95.020 Foreman (motor trans.) 1 0 1 0 5-95.040 Foreman (r.r. trans.) 1 0 0 5-95.220 Foreman (tel. and tel.) 0 0 5-95.320 Foreman (light, heat, 0 0 1 1 and power) 0 1 0 0 5-95.340 Foreman (waterworks) 5-97.010 Foreman (clean., dye., 0 0 and press.) 0 0 0 5-97.050 Foreman (laund.) 0 0 1 5-99.020 Route Supervisor 0 (irrigation water) 0 0 0

Abov
who had 9 to 10 years; 69 * or 29*5 per cent, who had 6 to 8 years; 19 # or 8.1 per cent, who had 5 or less years; and 28, or 11.8 per cent, who had more than 12 years of schooling. The pattern of the semiskilled occupations was much the same as that of the skilled occupations in respect to the amounts of schooling completed by the persons in them. Of the 182 persons enumerated in these occupations, 68, or 3

7

P 0r cent,

had

from 11 to 12 years of schooling; Ip., or

22*5 per cent, from 9 to 10 years; 53 * or 29*1 per cent, from 6 to 8 years; 18, or 9*9 P0r cent,

5 years or less; and

only 2, or 1.1 per cent, had more than 12 years. As was true in the case of the agricultural and horti­ cultural occupations, the largest group of persons in the unskilled occupations had from six to eight years of school­ ing.

Of a total of 98 there were 30, or 31*2 per cent, who

had from 6 to 8 years of schooling.

The remainder of this

distribution showed 23* or 2ij..O per cent, had 5 years or

101 less; 21, or 21.9 P®r cent, had from 9 to 10 years; 19, or

19.8 per cent, had from 11 to 12 years; and 3* or 3*1 per cent, had more than 12 years of schooling. Following is a general summary of the relationship found to exist between the amounts of schooling completed by the gainfully employed persons reached in the survey and their occupations.

Since there are so many factors involved

in this relationship, any conclusions based upon the find­ ings concerning it would be of questionable validity.

How­

ever, the findings should be of value in showing general relationships between occupations and the amounts of school­ ing completed by the persons engaged in them. 1.

The majority,

or 6lj..O per cent, of the

gainfully

employed persons in the community had nine or more years of schooling. 2.

The majority, or 71*7 per cent, of the persons

employed in the professional group of occupations had fifteen or more years of 3.

The majority,

schooling. or 80.0 per cent, of the

persons

employed in the semiprofessional occupations had eleven or more years of schooling. The majority, or 6 7 per cent, of the persons employed in the managerial and official occupations had eleven or more years of education. U n iversity o f S o u th e rn C a lifo rn ia LI&fSTy

102 5.

The majority, or 83*0 per

employed in the clerical

cent,of the persons

occupations had eleven or more

years of education* 6*

The majority, or 69*6 per cent, of the persons

employed in the sales occupations had eleven or more years of education* 7.

The majority, or 60.6 per cent, of the persons

employed in the service occupations had eleven or more years of schooling. 8*

The majority, or 75*1 pei* cent, of the persons

employed in the agricultural and horticultural occupations had six or

more years of education.

9*

The majority, or 62.3 P©1*

cent,of the persons

employed in the skilled occupations had nine or more years of education. 10*

The majortiy, or 60.9 P©** cent, of the persons

employed in the semiskilled occupations had nine or more years of education. 11.

The majority, or 76 per cent, of the persons em­

ployed in the unskilled occupations had six or more years of education. Distribution by length of time in present occupation. In Table V, Following, the gainfully employed persons enumer­ ated in the survey are distributed by length of time in

TABLE V DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH .OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

11 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0

14 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

16 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0

10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1

12 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

24 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 6 4 1 0 4 0 0 0 0

Over 30

5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

103

Professional: (0-00.00 through 0-39.99) 0-01.20 Accountant, General 0-01.30 Accountant, Public 0-06.51 Editor, Newspaper 0-06.71 Reporter 0-06.97 Public Relations Man 0-07.02 Chemist, Biological 0-08.10 Clergyman 0-13.10 Dentist 0-16.01 Civil Engineer 0-22.10 Lawyer 0-24.31 Teacher, Music 0-25.10 Pharmacist 0-26.10 Physician 0-27.01 Social Worker 0-30.02 Teacher, Kindergarten 0-30.11 Teacher, Grade School 0-30.01 Teacher, High School 0-31.10 Superintendent, Schools 0-32.30 Teacher, Manual Training 0-33.10 Nurse 0-34.10 Veterinarian 0-39.54 Agronomist 0-39.65 Entomologist 0-39.93 Dietician

Number of years in present occupation 0-1 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

TABLE 7 (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

Semiprofessional: (0-40.00 through 0-69.99) 0-41.10 Airplane Pilot, Commercial 0-42.10 Chiropractor 0-45.51 Instructor, Dancing 0-50.01 Medical Technician 0-50.23 Scientific Helper 0-50.45 Dairy Tester 0-50.46 Laboratory Tester 0-53.10 Optometrist 0-56.21 Photographer, Portrait 0-57.01 Athlete 0-61.30 Radio Operator 0-64.10 Surveyor 0-64.30 Instrument Man 0-65.20 Undertaker 0-6$.23 Suppression-Crew Foreman (fire) Estimator 0-6$.64

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

5 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

6 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0

$ 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

1 0

0 0

2 0

0 0

0 0

0 1

0 0

3 0

24 0

34 2

32 0

22 0

2$ 0

23 0

10 0

0

3

1

0

2

0

2

1

104

Managerial and Official: (0-70.00 through 0-99.99) 0-71.13 Manager, Hotel 0-71.23 Manager, Restaurant or Coffee Shop

0-1

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF- GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

0-1

Managerial and Official: (continued) 0-72.01 Manager, Retail Apparel 0 0-72.02 Manager, Retail Shoe 0 0-72.11 Manager, Retail Automotive 0 0-72.12 Manager, Retail Automotive 1 Service 0 0-72.21 Manager, Retail Food 0 0-72.31 Manager, Retail Drug Manager, Retail Floral 0 0-72.41 0-72.51 Manager, Retail General Merchandise 0 0 0-72.52 Manager, Retail Variety 0-72.61 Manager, Retail Liquor 1 0-72.71 Manager, Retail Hardware 0 and Farm Implements 0-72.72 Manager, Retail Lumber 0 and Building Supplies 0-72.SI Manager, Retail Housefurnishings 0 0-72.S2 Manager, Household 0 Appliance 0-72.91 Manager, Retail Store, 1 N. E. C. 0 0-73.01 Wholesaler 0 0-74.11 Buyer

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

0 1 0

1 0 2

1 1 0

1 0 2

0 0 3

1 0 3

1 0 1

1 2 0 0

6 ■2 0 1

3 4 0 0

1 2 1 0

0 3 1 0

1 3 0 0

0 1 0 0

1 0 0

1 0 0

0 1 0 •

2 0 0

1 0 0

1 0 0

0 0 1

2

3

2

1

1

1

0

1

1

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

3 2 2

1 0 3

1 1 2

0 1 1

0 2 3

0 1 0

0 0 0

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

i 0-1

Over 30

0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 1 3 1

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

0 1

2 1

1 2

0 1

1 3

2 2

1 0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

1

0

0

1

2

1

0

0

1

1

0

2

0

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

0 1 0

0 2 0

0> 2 0

0 3 0

1 0 0

0 1 1

1 1u 0 C c

106

Managerial and Official: (continued) 0-74.12 Buyer Assistant 0 0 0-87.10 Manager, Apartment House 0-91.60 Purchasing Agent 0 0 0-94.94 Fish and Game Warden 0-95.92 Plant-Quarantine Inspector 0 0-97.03 Sec ret ary, Admini st rat ive 0 0 0-97.12 Manager, Office 0 0-97.13 Chief Clerk 0-97.41 Manager, Industrial 0 Organization 0 0-97.51 Manager, Production 0-98.08 Manager, Financial Institution 0 Manager Service 0-98.41 0 Establishment 0-98.54 Manager, Recreation 0 Establishment Manager, Extraction of 0-99.05 Mineral 0 0-99.11 Superintendent, Construction 0 0 0-99.21 Contractor 0 0-99.84 Manager, Institution

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10. 11-15 16-20 21-30

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Number of years in present occupation Code Clerical:

Title

1-2

3-5

6-10

11-15

16-20

21-30

26 7 0 0 2 2 2 0

28 16 0 0 2 1 1 0

41 14 1 1 1 4 2 0

21 2 1 0 2 1 1 0

10 3 0 0 0 0 3 0

14 7 1 0 0 1 1 0

12 2 2 0 0 1 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0

0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2

1 0 0 0 0

0 0 2 1 0

0 1 2 1 1

0 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

30

Advance Clerk Freight-Platform Clerk Collector Receptionist Service Clerk Billing Clerk Librarian Assistant Office Girl Messenger Duplicating-Machine Operator Timekeeper Clerks, Postal Carriers, Mail Postman Dentist’s Assistant

107

1-26.03 1-27.a 1- 28.a 1- 32.10

0-1

(1-00,00 through

1-49*99) 0-01.02 Bookkeeper 1-01.52 Cashier I 0-01.53 Cashier II 1-04.01 Clerk, General 1-05.01 Clerk, General Office 1-06.02 Teller 1-06.04 Teller, Head 1-08.63 Farm Property Lease and 1-11.06 1-15.02 1-18.43 1-18.68 1-18.82 1-20.01 1-23.02 1-23.14 1-25.22

Over

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

Clerical : (continued) 1-32.20 PhysicianTs Assistant 1-33.01 Secretary 1-34.13 Shipping Clerk 1-37.12 Stenographer 1-37.34 Clerk-Typist 1-3®.01 Stock Clerk 1-41.02 Telegraph Operator 1-42.01 Central-Office Operator 1-42.31 Telephone Operator 1-44.22 Station Agent 1-45.01 Weigher 1-4®.24 Field-Contact Man (dairy prod.) Meter Reader 1-49.94

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

0 1 0 2 3 2 0 1 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0

0 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0

0 0

1 2

0 1

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

22 0

26 1

2® 0

19 0

11 0

12 0

6 0

1 0

0 0 0 3 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 2 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0

0 1 2 0 0 2

0 0 1 0 1 1

0 0 1 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 1

108

Sales: (1-50.00 through 1-99.99) 1-51.10 Auctioneer 1-52.21 Commission Man, Agricul­ tural Produce 1-55.30 Solicitor I 1-57.10 Salesman, Insurance 1-5®.10 Newspaper Carrier 1-63.10 Salesman, Real Estate 1-63.20 Real-Estate Broker

0-1

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

Domestic Service: (2-00.00 through 2-09.99) 2-01.01 Day Worker 2-03.01 Housekeeper, Home .

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

7

14

12

9

1

2

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

1

1

1

0

3

3

2

0

1

0

0

0

1 0 1 0

0 0 2 1

0 1 3 0

1 1 2 0

0 0 1 0

0 0 2 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

1 0 3

1 0 0

3 0 4

1 1 3

0 0 2

1 1 1

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 0

0 2

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 0 0

5 1 0

2 1 1

1 1 0

1 0 0

2 , 1 0

1 1 0

*1 0 0

109

Sales: (continued) 1-70.10 Sales Clerk 1-75.04 Salesperson, Men’s and Boys’ Clothing 1-75.06 Salesperson, Women’s Garments 1-75.22 Salesperson, Automobile Parts 1-75.31 Salesperson, Farm Implements Salesperson, Furniture 1-75.44 1-75.71 Salesperson, General 1-75.92 Salesperson, Flowers 1-75.93 Salesperson, General Hardware 1-75.94 Salesperson, Jewelry 1-60.01 Salesman, General 1-65.14 Salesman, Tending and Coin Machines 1-65.21 Salesman, Beverages

0-1

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION Number of years in present occupation Code

Title

Domestic Service: (continued) 2-03.11 Housekeeper, Working 2-05.01 Cook 2-07.01 Child Monitor 2-09.03 Companion

1-2

3-5

6-10

11-15

16-20

21-30

0 0 1 0^

1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0

25 1 0 0 1 2 0 4 0 10 1

13 3 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 3 0

27 6 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 3 3

20 2 2 1 1 1 0 2 0 5 1

11 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0

0 1 0 1 0 1

0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 1 1 1

0 0 0 2 1 0

0 0 0 2 0 0

0 0 0 4 0 0

.

1 0 1 1 3' 0

30

110

Personal Service: (2-20.00 through 2-49*99) 2-21.10 Bartender 2-23.10 Manager, Rooming House 2-23.20 Manager, Boarding House 2-23.30 Manager, Tourist Camp 2-24.11 Chambermaid 2-26.05 Cook, Combination 2-26.32 Cook 2-27.11 Waiter, Informal 2-27.12 Waitress 2-27.13 Counterman 2-27.14 Hostess, Restaurant or Coffee Shop 2-27.61 Soda Dispenser 2-29.71 Kitchen Helper 2-32.01 Barber 2-32.12 Hairdresser 2-34.10 Bootblack

Over

0-1

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

Personal Service: 2-3#*20 2-40.13 2-40.71 2-42.20 2-43.91 2-48.10

0-1

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

(continued)

Nurse, Practical Racker Gambling Dealer Nurse Aide Funeral Attendant Usherette

0 0 0 0 0 1

1 1 0 1 0 1

0 0 0 2 1 0

0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

7 0 1 0 1 0 5 0

8 1 0 0 3 2 1 1

6 0 0 0 1 3 2 0

4 0 0 0 3 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 1 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Building Service Workers and Porters: (2-80.00 through 2-99.99) 4 0 2-82.10 Charwoman 2-84.10 Janitor 2 2-86.20 Porter 2

9 2 4 3

1 0 1 0

3 0 3 0

1 0 1 0

2 0 2 0

3 0 3 0

0 0 0 0

37

57

99

84

60

73

58

Protective Service: (2-60.00 through 2-69.99) 2-61.03 Watchman 2-63.10 Fireman 2-66.06 Police Chief 2-66.23 Policeman 2-68.10 Soldier (gov. ser.) 2-68.20 Sailor (gov. ser.) 2-68.30 Marine (gov. ser.)

Agricultural and Horticultural: (3-00.00 through 3-49.99)

26

111

0 0 1 1 0 1

TABLE V (continued)

DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

Number of years in present occupation 0-1 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

0 0 2 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

1 4 1 5 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0

0 4 3 14 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0

0 0 9 51 4 0 2 4 0 3 0 0 0 0

1 1 7 3S 0 0 4 3 0 1 1 1 0 1

4 2 2 25 0 0

1

1 6 0 5 0 1 0 1

4 16 0 1 0 0 2 0

1 12 1 7 0 0 0 0

0 15 0 3 0 0 0 0

6

0 1 2 0 0 0

4 1 0 1 0 0 0

0 1 7 46 0 1 5 4 1 0 2 1 0 0

2 0 4 29 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 7 0 3 0 0 0 0

0 2 0 5 0 0 0 0

0 2 0 4 0 0 0 0

6

112

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 3-01.10 Farmer, Cash Grain 3-02.10 Cotton Raiser 3-03.10 Farmer, Crop Specialty 3-04.10 Dairyman 3-05.01 Farmer, Fruit 3-05.31 Farmer, Nut 3-06.10 Farmer, General 3-07.10 Farmer, Livestock 3-07.70 Beekeeper 3-OS.10 Farmer, Poultry 3-09.10 Truck Farmer 3-12.10 Farm Hand, Cotton 3-13.01 Farm Hand, Sugar Beet 3-13.91 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty 3-13.92 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty > N. E. C. 3-14.10 Farm Hand, Dairy 3-15.21 Farm Hand, Fruit 3-16.10 Farm Hand, General 3-17.10 Farm Hand, Livestock 3-1S.10 Farm Hand, Poultry 3-19.10 Farm Hand, Vegetable 3-31.10 Bindweed, Eradicator

Over 30

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 3-32.10 Ditch Tender 3- 32.20 Irrigator 3-32.30 Laborer, Irrigation Ditch 3-35.10 Farm Mechanic 3-36.10 Farm Couple 3-37.10 Manager, Farm 3-37.20 Foreman 3-37.30 Caretaker, Farm 3-40.01 Gardener 3-40.04 Grounds Keeper 3-48.91 Agricultural Aide 3-49.31 Sheep Shearer 3-49.41 Combine Operator

0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

1 1 1 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2 2 4 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1

0 0 1 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 0 1 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Forestry (Except Logging) and Hunting and Trapping: (3-90.00 through 3-99.99) 3-97.30 Trapper

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

1

0

1

2

0

Skilled occupations

0

3

1

113

Production of Food Products: (4-01.000 through 4-10.999)

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF T H E IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

Skilled occupations (continued) Production of Food Products: (continued) 4-Q1.10Q Baker 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4-06.310 Butter Maker 1 0 1 4-06.410 Cheese Maker 1 1 0 0 0 4-09*205 Beef Cutter 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0

1 0 1 0

0 0 0 0

Production of Fabricated Textile Products: (4-21.000 through 4-27.999) 4-25.020 Seamstress 4-26.101 Tailor

0 0 0

1 1 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 0 1

0 0 0

Production of Lumber and Lumber Products: (4-29.000 through 4-39.999) 4-32.100 Cabinetmaker 4-35.710 Furniture Repairman

0 0 0

0 0 0

3 1 2

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 1 0

2 1 1

Print ing: (4-44.000 through 4-49.999) 4-44.010 Printer

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

2 2

0 0

0 0

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

0 0

1 1

1 1

0 0

Metalworking: (4-71.000 through 4-95.999) 4-71.510 Watchmaker 4-75.010 Machinist 4-80.010 Sheet-Metal Worker 4-85.030 Welder, Acetylene 4-85.040 Welder, Combination 4-86.010 Blacksmith

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 1 0

.5 1 0 1 0 2 1

4 0 1 0 0 2 1

1 0 0 0 1 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0

3 0 1 1 0 1 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Electricians: (4-97.000 through 5-00,999) 4-97.010 Electrician 4-97.420 Electrical, Repairman

0 0 0

1 0 1

2 2 0

2 2 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 1 0

0

8

12

9

3

3

6

8

0 0

1 5

0 8

0 8

0 1

0 1

0 3

0 4

Construction: (5-23.000 through 5-33.999) 5-23.030 Trench-Digging-Machine Operator 5-25.110 Carpenter

115

Skilled occupations (continued) Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products: (4-59*000 through 4-62.999) 0 0 0 1 0 4-60.100 Shoe Repairman 0 0 1

TABLE ¥ (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

Title

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 0-1 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

Construction: (continued) 5-27,010 Painter 5-29.100 Plasterer 5-30.010 Pipe Fitter 5-30.210 Plumber

0 0 0 0

2 0 0 0

2 0 0 2

0 1 0 0

1 1 0 0

1 0 0 1

2 0 1 0

Transportation: (5-35.000 through 5-49.999) 5-36.010 Bus Driver

0 0

0 0

1 1

1 1

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

Communication and Utility: (5-51.000 through 5-54*999) 5-53.210 Combination Man 5-53.350 Troubleman 5-53.420 Lineman

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

1 0 0 1

0 0 0 0

3 1 0 2

1 0 0 1

2 0 1 1

0 0 0 0

0

2

3

6

2

2

2

1

0 0 0 0

1 0 1 0

0 0 0 3

0 0 0 6

1 0 0 1

0 0 0 2

0 1 0 1

0 1 0 0

Trade and Service: (5-55.000 through 5-60.999) 5-55.010 Motion-Picture Projectionist 5-57.110 Dry Cleaner 5-57.310 Spotter, General 5-5&.100 Meat Cutter

.

1 1 0 2

116

TABLE V (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT OCCUPATION

Code

0-1

Title

Number of years in present occupation 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

Skilled occupations ( 00-

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

(continued) Sales: 1-85.14 Salesman, Vending and Coin Machines 1-85.21 Salesman, Beverages

1 0

0 2

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Domestic Service; (2-00.00 through 2-09.99) 2-01.01 Day Worker 2-03.01 Housekeeper, Home 2-03.11 Housekeeper, Working 2-05.01 Cook 2-07.01 Child Monitor 2-09.03 Companion

2 0 0 0 0 2 0

5 2 0 1 1 0 1

3 2 1 0 0 0 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0

40 5 0 1 1 3 0 5 0 16 3

30 9 1 1 2 1 1 3 1 4 1

25 6 2 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 3

10 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0

6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Personal Service: (2-20.00 through 2-49.99) 2-21.10 Bartender 2-23.10 Manager, Rooming House 2-23.20 Manager, Boarding House 2-23.30 Manager, Tourist Camp 2-24.11 Chambermaid 2-26.05 Cook, Combination 2-26.32 Cook 2-27.11 Waiter, Informal 2-27.12 Waitress 2-27.13 Counterman

'

TABLE 71 (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Personal Service: (continued) Hostess, Restaurant or 2-27.14 Coffee Shop 2-27.61 Soda Dispenser 2-29.71 Kitchen Helper 2-32.01 Barber 2-32.12 Hairdresser 2-34.10 Bootblack 2-3$.20 Nurse, Practical 2-40.13 Racker 2-40.71 Gambling Dealer 2-42.20 Nurse Aide 2-43.91 Funeral Attendant 2-4$.10 Usherette

0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1

0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 2 0 1

0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0

Protective Service: (2-60.00 through 2-69.99) 2-61.03 Watchman 2-63.10 Fireman 2-66.06 Police Chief 2-66.23 Policeman 2-6$.10 Soldier (gov. ser.) 2-6$.20 Sailor (gov. ser.) 2-6$.30 Marine (gov. ser.)

$ 0 1 0 2 0 5 0

9 1 0 0 4 2 1 1

5 0 0 0 0 3 2 0

1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

.

Over 30

0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0

2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Building Service Workers and Porters: (2-30.00 through 2-99.99) 4 2-32.10 Charwoman 0 2 2-34.10 Janitor 2-36.20 Porter 2

Over 30

9 2 4 3

3 0 3 0

3 0 •3 0

1 0 1 0

1 0 1 0

2 0 2 0

0 0 0 0

73 2 7 6 13 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 2

36 0 4 5 33 1 0 3 2 0 0 2 1 0 0

39 0 0 7 52 3 0 2 6 1 3 0 0 0 0

63 1 1 6 23 0 0 5 5 1 1 1 0 0 0

47 4 0 3 17 0 0 9 2 0 0 2 0 0 0

43 0 0 1 33 0 1 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0

26 1 0 3 14 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 13

3 16

0 6

0 3

0 4

0 0

0 1

141

Agricultural and Horticultural: (3-00.00 through 3-49.99) 67 3-01.10 Farmer, Cash Grain 0 0 3-02.10 Cotton Raiser Farmer, Crop Specialty 3-03.10 4 3-04.10 Dairyman 17 3-05.01 Farmer, Fruit 0 Farmer, Nut 0 3-05.31 3-06.10 Farmer, General 0 1 3-07.10 Farmer, Livestock 0 3-47.70 Beekeeper 3-03.10 Farmer, Poultry 0 0 3-09.10 Truck Farmer 3-12.10 Farm Hand, Cotton 3 0 3-13.01 Farm Hand, Sugar Beet 0 3-13.91 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty 3-13.92 Farm Hand, Crop Specialty, N. E. C. 3 20 3-14.10 Farm Hand, Dairy

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Agricultural and Horticultural: (continued) 3-15.21 Farm Hand, Fruit 3-16.10 Farm Hand, General 3-17.10 Farm Hand, Livestock 3-1&.10 Farm Hand, Poultry 3-19.10 Farm Hand, Vegetable 3-31.10 Bindweed, Eradicator 3-32.10 Ditch Tender 3-32.20 Irrigator 3-32.30 Laborer, Irrigation Ditch 3-35.10 Farm Mechanic 3-36.10 Farm Couple 3-37.10 Manager, Farm 3-37.20 Foreman 3-37.30 Caretaker, Farm 3-40.01 Gardener 3-40.04 Grounds Keeper 3-43.91 Agricultural Aide 3-49.31 Sheep Shearer 3-49.41 Combine Operator

0 6 2 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0

Forestry (Except Logging) and Hunting and Trapping: (3-90.00 through 3-99.99) 3-97.30 Trapper

0 0

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

0 1 0 1 1 3 2 0 0 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 5 0 0 1 0 0 1

0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ■5 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 6

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Number of years in present employment Code

0-1

Title

1-2

3-5

6-10

11-15

16-20

21-30

Over 30

Skilled occupations

0 0 0 0 0

0 1 1 1

1 0 0 1 0

2 1 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 1 0

1 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0

Production of Fabricated Textile Products: (4-21.000 through 4-27*999) 4-25*020 Seamstress 4-26.101 Tailor

0 0 0

1 1 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 0 1

0 0 0

0 0 0

Production of Lumber and Lumber Products: (4-29*000 through 4-39*999) 4-32.100 Cabinetmaker 4-35*710 Furniture Repairman

0 0 0

0 0 0

4

2 2

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 1 0

1 0 1

Printing: (4-44*000 through 4-49*999) 4-44*010 Printer

1 1

0 0

1 1

0 0

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

143

Production of Food Products: (4-01.000 through 4-10.999) 4-01.100 Baker 4-06.310 Butter Maker 4-06.410 Cheese Maker 4-09*205 Beef Cutter

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

0-1

16-20

21-30

Skilled occupations (continued) Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products: {4-59•000 through 4-62.999) 1 1 0 0 4-60.100 Shoe Repairman 0 0 1 1

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

Metalworking: (4-71*000 through 4-95*999) 4-71.510 Watchmaker 4-75.010 Machinist 4-60.010 Sheet-Metal Worker 4-65.030 Welder, Acetylene 4-65.040 Welder, Combination 4-66.010 Blacksmith

1 1 0 1 2 0

2 0 0 0 0 1 1

1 0 0 1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Electricians: (4-97.000 through 5-00.999) 4-97.010 Electrician 4-97.420 Electrical Repairman

0 0 0

1 0 1

0

1 1 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1 1 0

6

16

15

6

1

2

1

2

0

1

0

3

9

9

0 6

0 0

0 1

0 1

0 1

Construction: (5-23.000 through 5-33.999) 5-23.030 Trench-Digging-Machine Operator 5-25.110 Carpenter

5

1-2

3-5

5

0 .1 1 0 3

0 3 3

6-10

Over 30

11-15

Title

¥7T

Number of years in present employment Code

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Number of years in present employment

21-30

Skilled occupations (continued) Construction: (continued) 5-27.010 Painter 0 1 4 3 5-29.100 Plasterer 1 0 1 0 5-30.010 Pipe Fitter 0 0 1 0 0 5-30.210 Plumber 1 2 1

1 0 0 0

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0

Transportation: (5-35.000 through 5-49.999) 5-36.010 Bus Driver

0 0

0 0

1 1

1 1

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

Communication and Utility: (5- 51.000 through 5- 54.999) 5-53*210 Combination Man 5-53.350 Troubleman 5-53.420 Lineman

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

2 0 0 2

2 1 0 1

1 0 0 1

0 0 0 0

2 0 1 1

0 0 0 0

2

4

5

2

2

2

1

0

0 0 0 2

1 1 1 1

0 0 0

0 0 0 2

1 0 0 1

0 0 0 2

0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0

Trade and Service: (5-55*000 through 5-60.999) 5-55.010 Motion-Picture Projectionist 5-57.110 Dry Cleaner 5-57.310 Spotter, General 5- 5S .100 Meat Cutter

1-2

3-5

5

6-10

145

16-20

Title

0-1

Over 30

11-15

Code

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT Number of years in present employment Code

Title

0-1

1-2

3-5

6-10

Skilled occupations (continued) Miscellaneous: (5-63.000 through 5-89.999 11 17 31 17 5- 72.010 Stationary Engineer 1 1 0 4 5-72.020 Maintenance Engineer 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 5-72.310 Refrigerating Engineer 5-73.210 Power Shovel Operator 0 0 0 1 0 5-73.320 Dragline Operator 0 2 3 0 5-75.230 Well-Drill Operator 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 5-79.170 Signal-Service Repairman 0 2 0 5- 80.100 Airplane Mechanic 1 5-81.010 Automobile Mechanic 4 5 9 7 0 2 0 5- 81.040 Tractor Mechanic 7 5-81.510 Automobile-Body Repair­ 0 1 1 man, Metal 3 0 1 0 0 5-81.530 Automobile-Radiator Man 5- 81.910 Automobile-Repair 0 2 1 1 Service Man Electric-Refrigerator 5-83.031 0 0 0 Service Man 1 5-83.041 Electrical-Appliance 1 0 Service Man 0 0 0 2 0 1 5-83.411 Radio Repairman 5- 83.621 Maintenance Man, Factory 0 0 1 0 or Mill

11-15

16-20

21-30

5 4

Over 30

1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

5

3

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1

2 0 0 0 ' 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0’

0 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0

0

.

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 ’ 11-15 16-20 21-30

Skilled occupations (continued) Miscellaneous: (continued) 0 2 5-83.641 Maintenance Mechanic 1 2

1

0

0

0

3

4

1

0

0 0

1

5 4

1

1 0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 1 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 1

0 0

1 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 1

0 0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

3

3

0

4

147

Foremen: (5-91.000 through 5-99.999) 5-91.011 Foreman (dairy prod.) 5-91.031 Foreman (grain and feed mill) Route Supervisor (print, 5-91.711 and pub.) 5-91.901 Foreman (petrol, refin.) 5-94.080 Highway Foreman (const.) 5-95.020 Foreman (motor trans.) 5-95.040 Foreman (r.r. trans.) 5-95.220 Foreman (tel. and tel.) 5-95.320 Foreman (light, heat, and power) 5-95.340 Foreman (waterworks) 5-97.010 Foreman (clean, dye., and press.) 5-97.050 Foreman (laund.) 5-99.020 Route Supervisor (irri­ gation water)

Over 30

TABLE 71 (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Number of years in present employment 0-1 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Title

Over 30

Semiskilled occupations Production of Food Products; (6-01,000 through 6-10.999) 6-02.910 Baker Helper 6-06.510 Condenser Man (dairy prod.) 6-06.530 Drier Operator (dairy prod.) 6-06.560 Milk Receiver (dairy prod.) 6-06.610 Separator Man (dairy prod.) 6-06.660 Weigher (dairy prod.)

0

6 1

0 0

2 0

0 0

1 0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

0

1

0

0

1

1

1

2

0

0

0

0

1 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 1

0 0

1 0

Manufacture of Leather and Leather Products; (6-59.999 through 6-62.999) 6-59.437 Hide Inspector

0 0

0 0

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Metalworking; (6-72.000 through 6-95.999) 6-95.045 Welder Helper

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Construction: 7-33.999)

3

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

2 0

1 0

0

3

(7-23.000 through

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 11- 1 $ 16-20 21-30

Semiskilled occupations (continued) Construction: (continued) 7-23.020 Motor-Grader Operator 2 1 1 0 7- 32.812 Plumber Helper 1 1 0 0 Transportation: (7-35.000 through 7- 49.999) 7-35.100 Routeman 7-36.040 Taxi Driver 7- 36.210 Concrete-Mixing-Truck Driver 7- 36.220 Dump-Truck Driver 7-36.250 Truck Driver, Heavy 7- 36.260 Truck Driver,. Light 7-36.510 Tractor Operator Trade and through 7-57.501 7-57.511 7-57.911 7-59.230 7- 60.500

26

0 0

3

31 4

0

0

1

10 1 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

7

3

1 0

1 0

0 0 0

1 0 0

0 1 0 0

0 0 2 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0

2 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0

1

0

0

12 2

0 2 18 0

4

4

7

0 1 6 0 2

7

13

3

3

0 0 1 0

2 0 2

0 1 0 0

1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

6

6

2

2

0

15

4

3

5



149

Service: (7-55.000 7-60.999) Presser, Hand Presser, Machine Laundress, Hand Linoleum Layer Automobile-Service Station Attendant

21 0 2

0 0

Over 30

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT Number of years in present employment Code

0-1

Title

1-2

3-5

6-10

Over 30

11-15

16-20

21-30

3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 *0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Semiskilled occupations (continued) Miscellaneous: (7-63.000 through 7 7-89.999) 5 4 7 7-70.040 Fireman, Stationary Boiler 0 0 2 3 0 0 7-72.520 Booster-Pump Operator 1 0 7-75.220 Well-Drill Operator Helper 0 0 0 1 0 7-81.010 Automobile-Mechanic Helper 6 0 2 2 0 0 7-83.051 Gas Appliance Service Man 0 7-85.010 Greaser (auto ser.) 0 0 0 1 7-87.100 Rodman (surveying) 0 0 0 1 7-87.300 Note Keeper (surveying) 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 7-89.423 Tire Molder

2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Apprentices: (7-93.000 through 7-99.999) 7-93.100 Carpenter Apprentice 7-95.100 Electrician Apprentice 7-99.510 Jeweler Apprentice

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

3

3

2 0 1

2 1 0

0 0 0 0

Unskilled occupations

1

6

12

9

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

150

Production of Food Products: (8-01.00 through 8- 10 .99 ) 8-03.61 Laborer, Process (nonalc. bev.)

TABLE ¥1 (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

Number of years in present employment 0-1 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Unskilled occupations (continued) Production of Food Products: (continued) $-06.51 Laborer, Process (dairy prod,) 1 6 11 9 0 0 0 $-10.31 Laborer, Process (ice) 0 Production of Stone, Clay and Glass Products: (B—65.00 through 3 $-70.99) $-67.61 Laborer Process (conc. prod.) 3 Extraction of Minerals: (9-20.00 through 9- 22.99 ) 9-22.50 Laborer (quarry)

0 1

0 0

1 0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

5

4

4

0 1 1 1 2 0

0 2 0 0 2 0

1 1 0 0 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

,

151

Construction: (9-23.00 through 9-32.99) 9-32.01 Hod Carrier 9-32.21 Laborer, Building (const.) 9-32.31 Laborer, Highway (const.) 9-32.35 Laborer, Pipeline (const.) 9-32.41 Laborer, Railroad (const.) 9-32.vb Cleaners, Tank, Septic

Over 30

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Title

0-1

Unskilled occi Transportation: (9-35.00 through 9-49.99) 0 9-35.10 Routeman. Helper 0 9-49.30 Laborer (r.r.trans.) 0 9r49.40 Laborer (pipe lines) 0

Number of years in present employment 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Over 30

ons5 (continued)

1 0 0 1

1 0 1 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

1

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

3

5

1

1

0

0

0

0

0 1 2 0

1 1 2 1

0 0 0 1

0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

Public Service, N. E. C. (9-61.00 through 9-61.99) 3 9-61.21 Laborer, Municipal Service 3

2 2

3 3

1 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

Communication and Utility: (9- 51.00 through 9-54.99) 9-54.10 Laborer (light, heat, and power) Trade and Services: (9-55.00 through 9-60.99 ) 9-57.11 Laborer, Process, (clean., dye., and press.) 9-57.21 Laborer, Process (laund.) 9-59.01 Laborer (ret.tr.) 9-59.02 Laborer (whole tr.)

152

1 1 0 0

TABLE VI (continued) DISTRIBUTION OF GAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY LENGTH OF TIME IN PRESENT EMPLOYMENT

Code

Number of years in present employment 0-1 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-30

Title

Over 30

Unskilled occupations (continued) 9-39.99) 9-63.02 Laborer 9-63.06 Laborer mill) 9-63.71 Laborer 9-64.51 Laborer 9-65.53 Laborer 9-65.93 Laborer Totals

(dairy prod.) (grain and feed (lumber yard) (petrol, refin.) (agric. equip.) (laurid.)

3 4

2 0

2

2 2

2 1

1 1

2 1

0 0

1 0 1 1 1

0 1 0 0 1

0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0

313

400

40s

243

133

124

104

40

3

153

15V persons not being available in the community to fill these vacancies.

Also, there is probably much changing of posi­

tions among persons in the same occupations within the com­ munity itself.

These kinds of changes would not be apt to

provide many opportunities for new workers. Among the major occupational groups in this distri­ bution, the highest median tenure was in the agricultural and horticultural field, the median here being 7^0 years. The distribution bears up well through the higher tenure levels with 26 persons, or £.2 per cent of the lj.99 enum­ erated in the survey, having been in their present positions over 30 years.

In this field the per cent of opportunities

for new workers may be lower because of the length of time people remain In their positions, but, as was mentioned in the analysis of Table V on page 129, the size of the group would tend to offset this lower per cent* The median tenure for the professional and managerial occupations and the skilled occupations was the same, i|..7 years, the second highest in the distribution.

In these

groups of occupations, more than in any of the others, the opportunities for new workers within the community would probably be fewer because of the fact that many of the workers, such as teachers, engineers, and the managers of large institutions, would be more apt to come to the communi­ ty from other places.

i$5 The clerical and sales occupations,

the semiskilled

occupations, and the •unskilled occupations had median tenures of 3,1 years, 2.8 years, and 3*2 years respectively* These medians are considerably below the median of lj_*3 years for the total distribution and indicate the possibility of a large number of opportunities for new workers in the com­ munity, especially since most of the positions, unlike those in the professional, managerial, and skilled groups, can be filled by local people with the proper training, experience, or ability* The service workers, which include the persons who work in the domestic, personal, protective, and building service groups of occupations, had a median tenure of 2*5 years, the lowest of any of the seven major occupational groups.

The percentage of opportunities should be the high­

est in this group for new workers.

As is true in the cleri­

cal and sales, the semiskilled, and the unskilled groups of occupations, most of the positions in this group can be filled by local people with the proper training, experience, or ability. The distribution of the nongainfully employed by activities engaged in.

Because it was felt that the purpose

of this survey would not be fully achieved without finding out what the people in the community who were not employed

156 for pay or profit do to occupy their time, this distribution of the nongainfully employed by the activities they were en­ gaged in was made in Table VII, which follows.

The reason

for making this distribution was that it was felt that the schools in the community are concerned with all the students whether or not they seek gainful employment upon completing their education. The total for this distribution showed that there were 2,902 nongainfully employed persons, or approximately 62.0 per cent of the total of if,683 persons enumerated in

the survey.

Of the nongainfully employed persons, 932, or

32.1 per cent, were males; and 1 ,970 , or 6?*8 per cent, were

females. The largest group of persons engaged in a single activity or occupation found in the survey was that made up of the housewives, of which there were l,0l 6 persons. These, plus the 86 persons who were enumerated as home­ makers, made up 23*7 per cent of all the persons reached in the survey, and if7.2 per cent of all the females.

The size

of this group implies that much attention should be given by the schools of the community to the training of females for the occupation of housewife or homemaker. The remainder of the nongainfully employed persons were distributed as follows:

38 , or 1.3 per cent, unem­

ployed; 32 , or 1.1 per cent, unable to work; 112 , or 3*8

157

TABLE VII DISTRIBUTION OF NONGAINFULLY EMPLOYED PERSONS BY ACTIVITIES ENGAGED IN Activity engaged in Housewives Homemakers Unemployed Unable to work Retired Unpaid family workers Preschool Students Kindergar ten First grade Second grade Third grade Fourth grade Fifth grade Sixth grade Seventh grade Eighth grade Ninth grade Tenth grade Eleventh grade Twelth grade Thirteenth grade Fourteenth grade Fifteenth grade Sixteenth grade Above sixteenth grade Trade school Totals

Males 0 0

32 17

Females 1016 86 6

15 31 5

Total 1016 86

38 32 112 21

81 16 281

302

583

505

509

1014

26

26

52 91 107

5o 58

P h-v

lj.2 39 29 29

31 23

35 35 32 hB

50 Ij.8 39 4

16

5

6 6 2

5

78 81

20 8

83 8k.

2

3

3 1

1 0

932

1970

87 79 77 7° ^7 36 11

ll)7 5 k 1 2902

■^These figures do no include 2ij. high school males, 13 high school females, and 3 eighth grade males, who were gainfully employed on a part time basis.

158 per cent, retired; 21 , or 0*7 per cent, -unpaid family workers; 583 # or 20.1 per cent, preschool; and lQllj., or 3ij..9 per cent, students*

CHAPTER V SUMMARY OP THE FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS I.

INTRODUCTION

This occupational survey was made to determine the local occupational opportunities for the students of the West Side Union High School District in order to meet the need for accurate, factual information which would be of assistance in the counseling of students in the selection of an occupation in their own community, and also, for evaluating the schools1 curricula in terms of local occupa­ tional needs.

The term, ^occupation,n as used in this study

means one's principal business in life, or the activity he or sheengages sequently,

in that occupies time and attention.

the data

Con­

obtained in the survey includes sta­

tistics about not only persons who were employed for pay or profit, but also the nongainfully employed. A total of If,682 individuals were enumerated in the survey, an estimated coverage of from 50 to 55 P©** cent of the people in the community.

Of this total, l,!fl6 persons

were gainfully employed males, 36I4. were gainfully employed females, 932 were nongainfully employed males, and 1,970 were nongainfully employed females.

of the

The per cent

of coverage in the survey fell far short

100 per cent

goal set at its beginning, but the writer

l6o feels that the findings were sufficiently complete to be of value in providing a cross section of the occupational opportunities that exist in the community# The method used in obtaining the data for this study was a family census type survey, volunteer students and teachers being used as interviewers*

A schedule for obtain­

ing the data was designed, maps of the district were pro­ cured, and the district was divided into zones for con­ venience in enumerating.

Check lists were made for many

of these zones to provide a record of the progress of the survey. The survey was introduced to the community March 1,

19ip9 , after having been publicized through the local news­ paper and talks to local civic, service, and fraternal organizations.

Students in the local schools in grades six

through twelve were instructed in detail as to how to fill out the schedule and were then asked to enumerate their own families.

The remainder of the persons enumerated in the

survey were reached by the sixty-four high school students and the nine teachers who volunteered to serve as enumer­ ators and through some mass enumeration of adult organi­ zations. In order to determine what local occupational oppor­ tunities exist for the students of the district surveyed, six distributions of the data obtained from the survey were

l6l made and analyzed and Interpreted*

The distributions that

(1 ) the gainfully employed

were made are as follows:

persons, male and female, by occupations;

(2 ) the gainfully

employed persons, male and female, between the ages of llj. and 19 and 20 and 25 by occupations;

(3 ) the gainfully em­

ployed persons by amount of schooling completed;

{4 ) the

gainfully employed persons by length of time in present occupation;

(5 ) the gainfully employed persons by length of

time in present employment;

(6 ) the nongainfully employed

persons by activities engaged in*

II.

SUMMARY OP THE FINDINGS

The principal findings in each of the six distribu­ tions listed in the preceding paragraph are summarized by distribution in the following pages. The principal findings in the distribution of the gainfully employed persons, male and female, by occupations were: 1*

In the professions 99 persons were enumerated in

23 separate occupations.

Persons engaged in teaching and

school administration made up l|-9*f> per cent of this group.

2*

There were 176 persons in the managerial and of­

ficial occupations, of which 86 persons were engaged In the management of 15 kinds of retail stores.

162 3.

There were 153 clerical workers, of which 69.9

per cent were females. 5l persons ij..

'The occupation of bookkeeper with

employed in it led all others in this field. There were 12£

persons employed in the sales

occupations, and the occupation of sales clerk or counter clerk employed 38 .if per cent of this group. 5#

There were 120

service occupations.

persons employed in the personal

Bartenders,

waiters, waitresses, and

countermen comprised the main body of this group. 6.

There were lf99 persons, if92 of which were males,

employed in the agricultural and horticultural group of occupations.

This was the largest major occupational group

found in the survey.

Dairymen and dairy hands comprised

56.1 per cent of this group. 7.

There were 23if persons employed in the skilled

group of occupations under 63 separate titles.

The occu­

pations of carpenter and automobile mechanic led this field from the standpoint of the number of persons employed. 8.

There were 182 persons employed in the semi­

skilled occupations distributed throughout 3^- occupations. Transportation occupations employed 5lf.lf per cent of this group♦ 9*

The unskilled occupations employed 96 persons of

which lf0.6 per cent were employed in the processing and handling of dairy products.

163 The principal findings in the distribution of the gainfully employed persons, male and female, between the ages of lij. and 19 and 20 and 25 by 1.

There were 108

occupations were:

persons, or 6*1 per cent of all

the gainfully employed, in the llj. to 19 &g© group.

Of

these, 63.9 P er cent were employed in three major occupa­ tional groups--agricultural and horticultural, clerical and sales, and service occupations. 2.

There were 219

gainfully employed in the

persons, or 12*3 per cent of

the

20 to 25 age group.

the

Most of

workers in this age group were found in agricultural and horticultural and the clerical and sales groups of occupa­ tions. The main findings in the distribution of the gain­ fully employed persons by the amount of schooling completed were: 1.

The majority of all the gainfully employed

persons enumerated in the survey had nine or more years of schooling. 2.

The majority of the persons engaged in the pro­

fessional group of occupations had fifteen or more years of schooling. 3«

The majority of the persons engaged in the semi-

professional, the managerial and official, the clerical and

1614 -

sales, and the service groups of occupations had eleven or more years of schooling.

14..

The majority of those engaged in the skilled and

semiskilled occupations had nine or more years of schooling. 5.

The majority of those engaged in agricultural and

horticultural and the unskilled occupations had six or more years of schooling. The principal findings in the distribution of the gainfully employed persons by the length of time in present i

occupation were: 1.

The median experience level for all of the em­

ployed persons reached in the survey was 7*7 years; and 779 persons, or I4.3.8 percent of the distribution, had 5 o r less years of experience. 2.

In the professional and managerial group of occu­

pations the median experience level was 10.2 years, and 3^4-*^4per cent of the persons engaged in these occupations had less than 5 years of experience. 3*

The median experience level in the clerical and

sales occupations was I4..6 years, and 6l.5 per cent of the persons engaged in these occupations had less than 5 years of experience* 14..

Workers in the service occupations had a median

experience level of 3*9 years, and 6l.l per cent had less than 5 years of experience.

165 $.

The persons engaged in the agricultural and

horticultural occupations had the highest median experience level, 12.8 years.

Persons with 5 years* or less experience

made up 2lj_.3 per cent of this group of occupations, the lowest per cent in all the major occupational groups for persons with 5 or less years of experience. 6.

The median experience level for the skilled group

of occupations was 9*7 years, and 33.8 per cent of the persons engaged in these occupations had 5 or less years of experience. 7.

In the semiskilled occupations the median experi­

ence level was 3*9 years, and 67*7 per cent of the persons engaged in these occupations had 5 or less years of experi­ ence. 8.

The persons employed in the unskilled occupations

had the lowest median experience level, 3*6 years.

The

highest per cent of persons with less than 5 years1 experi­ ence, 70.8 per cent, fell in this group. The principal findings in the distribution of the gainfully employed persons by the length of time in present employment were: 1.

The median length of tenure for the total

distribution was I4..3 years, and 63*3 P©** cent of the em­ ployed persons enumerated had 5 years* or less tenure.

l66 2.

The highest median tenure was found among the

persons engaged in the agricultural and horticultural group of occupations--?.0 years. 3.

In the professional and managerial and in the

shilled groups of occupations the median length of tenure was lj.*7 years, the second highest in t h e distribution. !}..

The persons engaged in the clerical and sales,

the semiskilled, and the unskilled groups of occupations had median tenure levels of 3*1 years, 2.8 years, and 3.2 years respectively.

5*

The lowest median tenure level was found among

the workers in the service occupations--2.5 years. The principal findings in the distribution pf the nongainfully employed persons by activities engaged in were: 1.

There were 2,902 nongainfully employed persons

enumerated in the survey, or 62.0 per cent of the total of i|.,683 persons enumerated.

Of the nongainfully employed

persons, 32.1 per cent were males and 67.8 per cent were females• 2.

The largest group of persons engaged in a single

activity was the 1,01 6 enumerated as housewives.

These

persons, plus the 86 persons enumerated as homemakers, made up 23*7 per cent of all the persons enumerated in the survey.

167 3*

Persons enumerated

percent and those

enumerated

of all the persons enumerated

as preschool comprised as students, 3i|_.9

20•!

P©**cent

in the survey.

III. SUMMARY OPTHE CONCLUSIONS * Following is a summary of the conclusions based upon the findings of the survey:

1.

Among the professions the educational field

offers the greatest employment opportunities. 2.

In the managerial and official group of occu­

pations the management of a retail store offers the great­ est opportunities. 3.

The greatest number of opportunities for females

lies in the clerical occupations, and the occupation of bookkeeper offers the majority of openings within the cleri­ cal field. I4..

The occupations of sales clerk and salesperson

offer numerous employment opportunities. 5*

In the personal service occupations, the occupa-r

tions of bartender for males and waitress or counterman for females offer the most employment opportunities.

6.

The occupations of dairyman and dairyhand offer

the most opportunities for males in the agricultural and horticultural group.

168 7.

A considerable number of occupational opportuni­

ties exist for males in the skilled and semiskilled occu­ pations, but the entry choice may be limited because of the small number employed in most of the occupations. 8.

In the unskilled occupations the processing and

handling of dairy products offers the most opportunities for employment. 9.

The best opportunities for the 1 I4. to 19 age group

lie in the agricultural and horticultural, the clerical and sales, and the service groups of occupations.

For males

the best chances are in the agricultural and horticultural occupations and for females in the clerical and sales occu­ pations. 10.

In the 20 to 25 &g© group most opportunities for

males lie in agriculture and horticulture, with dairying the most outstanding single occupation; and most opportunities for females lie in the clerical occupations, with bookkeeping the most outstanding single occupation.

Sales occupations

provide opportunities for both males and females, and some opportunities for this group are beginning to appear in the professions, with teaching the leading single occupation. 11.

Since there are so many factors involved in the

relationship between the amounts of schooling completed by the gainfully employed persons reached in the survey and their occupations, any conclusions based upon the findings

169

concerning it would be of questionable validity.

However,

the findings should be of value in showing general relation­ ships between occupations and the amounts of schooling com­ pleted by the persons engaged in them. 12.

Because of the high incidence of employed persons

with less than five years1 experience in their respective occupations, it may be concluded that, in general, there are many opportunities for new workers in the occupations enum­ erated. 13*

The service, clerical and sales, and semiskilled

groups of occupations offer the most opportunities for new workers• lJj..

The professional, semi prof essional, managerial

and official, and skilled groups of occupations offer the fewest opportunities for new workers. 15.

The agricultural and horticultural group of

occupations, because of the size of the group, is probably a good source of employment opportunities. 1 6.

The size of the group of the housewives and

homemakers combined implies that much attention should be given in the schools of the community to the training of females for the occupation of housewife or homemaker.

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Gooch, Wilbur I*, and Leonard M. Miller, "Rockland Countyfs Self-Survey," Occupations, , February, 193&* Humiston, Genevieve, "An Occupational Survey of Orange County, 19I4-O." Unpublished Master*s thesis, The Uni­ versity of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1944* 256 pp. Laird, A. M., and J. E. Durrant, "An Occupational Survey of a Small City," The School, Secondary Edition, 27:655-61* April, 1939. McCreary, William H., Californians at Work. Sacramento, California: California State Department of Education, Commission for Vocational Education, Bureau of Occupa­ tional Information and Guidance, Bulletin Ho. 9 * Occupational Information, March 1, 19 I4.8 . Slf. pp. mimeo­ graphed. McPherson, Marion C., and Helen H. Randall, "A Community Counts Its Workers," Occupations, 26:lo2-ii., December, 19^7.

"Special Census of Los Banos, California, June 3, 19 I4.6 ." Mimeographed report, Series P-SC, Ho. 1 5 ^ Washington, D. C.: United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 19l|-6. I p . mimeographed. Sutherland, Miriam, "The Children Survey the Community," Curriculum Journal, 1 0 :317-195 November, 193$.

171 Teed, Mabel U., !fThe Determination of the Placement Value of a Commercial Occupations Survey." Unpublished Master*s thesis, The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1932. 101 pp. Toll, Lewis B., and others, Community Cooperation in Busi­ ness Education. The American Business Education Year­ book, Vol. I. Somerville, Hew Jersey: Somerset Press, Inc., 1 9 M ^ 326 pp. United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Sixteenth Census of the United States: 19^0* Popula­ tion. Vol. II, Part I, "Characteristics of the Popula­ tion, California.11 Washington, D. C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1943* PP* 513-689. United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Sixteenth Census of the United States: 19^0, Popula­ tion, "Comparative Occupation Statistics for the United States, 1870 to 19lf0." Washington, D. C.: United States Government Printing Office, 19q-3« 206 pp. United States Employment Service, Dictionary of 0ccupational Titles, Part I. "Definitions of Titles. Washington, D. C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1939* 1287 pp. United States Employment Service, Dictionary of Occupational Titles, Part II. "Titles and Codes.,f Washington, D. C . : United States Government Printing Office, 1939. 330 pp. Walters, H. G., The Community Survey. Cincinnati, Ohio: South-Western Publishing Co., 194-2. Monograph No. 58* 38 pp. Wilson, Elizabeth K . , "Schools Learn From Industry," The School Executive, 63:ij.O-l, November, 19^3* Zapoleon, Margeurite W . , Community Occupational Surveys. * United States Office of Education* Vocational Division, Bulletin No. 223, Occupational Information Series, No. 10. Washington, D. C.: United States Government Print­ ing Office, 1942. 199 PP* U n iv e rs ity o f S o u th e r n C a lifo rn ia L ib ra ry