An evaluation of selected music for elementary school bands

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AN EVALUATION OP SELECTED MUSIC FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS

A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School The University of Southern California

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Music

hy Manly Vern Wood August 1950

UMI Number: EP61895

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T h i s thesis, w r it t e n by

.. M a n l x .V e rn...Wood.................. u n d e r the g u id a n c e o f h.%3... F a c u l t y C o m m itte e , and approved

by

a ll

its m e m b ers ,

has

been

p re se nte d to a n d a ccepted by the C o u n c i l on G r a d u a t e S tu d y a n d R e s ea rch in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l ­ m e n t o f the re q u ire m e n ts f o r the degree o f

Mas ter., ofl..Music.

Date

A^ust_l§50.

Faculty Qommntee

ACKNOWLEDGMENT The author is deeply indebted to Mr. Justin Burston of Morse M. Preeman, Inc., without whose co-operation in loaning

.

music this study would not have been possible.

TABLE OP CONTENTS CHAPTER I.

PAGE

THE PROBLEM, RELATED STUDIES, AND DEFINITIONS OF T E R M S ............... The problem

1

. . . . ......................... .

.

1

Statement of the p r o b l e m ...................

1

Justification of the p r o b l e m ...............

1

History of the p r o b l e m .....................

4

Definition of terms

.....................

10

Review of related studies

.....................

16

Concert and occasional music for junior

II.

high school b a n d ..........................

16

High school band m a t e r i a l .................

18

Beginning band materials ...................

19

The b a n d ’s m u s i c ............................

20

Selective lists

............................

20

Organization of remaining chapters .............

22

PROCEDURE AND C R I T E R I A .........'..................

23

Method of p r o c e d u r e ............................

23

Obtaining titles

. . . . .

23

Examination of p a r t s ........................

26

Report of f i n d i n g s ..........................

26

General criteria used in selection of music

• •

Music that is worth p l a y i n g ................. Musical value

..............................

27 27 27

iv CHAPTER

PAGE Audience appeal

..........................

29

Level of d i f f i c u l t y ........................

31

Student enjoyment

.....................

Public performance ........................

32 32

Grading of music at the elementary school l e v e l ...........................

33

Importance of the p r o b l e m .................

33

Grade numbering s y s t e m ......................

33

Selection of proper grade of music for organization .............................. Determination of grade of each composition •

III.

37

Individual parts ..........................

37

Ensemble difficulties

.............

40

Form used in reporting r e s u l t s ...............

41

. .

FOLIOS RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS .

47

Problem and c r i t e r i a ..........................

47

Statement of specific p r o b l e m ...........

47

Advantages of folios .....................

47

Special criteria ..........................

48

Evaluation of selected folios

IV.

34

...............

50

S u m m a r y .......................................

81

MARCHES RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS

82

Problem and c r i t e r i a ..........................

82

Statement of specific p r o b l e m ...........

82

CHAPTER

PAGE Value of inarches Special criteria .

V.

VI.

................... ......................

82 83 '

Evaluation of selected m a r c h e s ...............

84

S u m m a r y .......................................

114

OVERTURES RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL B A N D S .........................................

115

Problem and c r i t e r i a ..........................

115

Statement of specific p r o b l e m ..........

115

Value of o v e r t u r e s ........................

115

Special criteria ..........................

116

Evaluation of selected overtures . . . . . . .

116

S u m m a r y .......................................

146

MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS

.....................

Problem and c r i t e r i a .......................... Statement of specific problem . . . . . .

147 147 147

Need for miscellaneous types of compo­ sitions

• • • • • ......................

Special criteria

...................

147 147

Evaluation of selected miscellaneous compo­ sitions

VII.

...................

148

S u m m a r y .......................................

188

SUMMARY AND C O N C L U S I O N S ........................

189

S u m m a r y .......................................

189

vi CHAPTER

PAGE Conclusions

. . . . . . . .

190

B I B L I O G R A P H Y ...........................................

193

APPENDIX As

.................

Chart showing system of pitch-names used

in this s t u d y ................................ APPENDIX Bs

A tabulation of the number of diatonic or

repeated notes to be played in each grade APPENDIX C:

• •

201

Samples of form letter and questionnaire

sent to teachers in the f i e l d ............... APPENDIX Ds

199

Index to music evaluated

.................

203 207

CHAPTER I THE PROBLEM, RELATED STUDIES, AND DEFINITIONS OF TERMS I.

THE PROBLEM

Statement of the problem.

It was the purpose of this

study to select and evaluate the best music available for elementary school bands and to present the results in such form as to be of the greatest help to the directors of such organizations. Justification of the problem.

Several leading music

educators of our time have written enthusiastically about the value of the instrumental music program in general and the grade school band in particular. Nothing is more significant of the increasing social­ ization of education than the rapid extension of instru­ mental study in connection with schools. The idea underlying this movement Is that playing upon an instrument Is not merely a personal accomplishment with individual benefits, but is also a social power which affects many persons in addition to the performer.1 . . . A properly functioning band is certainly one of the most vital organizations in the life of the school. The students like it, the alumni and parents are loyal boosters, and its appeal to the general public is # irresistible. It advertises the school, stimulates a glow of pride in the student body, and thrills the boys and girls actually participating in the organization. Its 1 Peter W.» Dykema and Hannah Cundiff, School Music Handbook (Boston: C. C. Birchard and Company, 1939), p. 198.

2 rather military character, the robust quality of its music, the splendor of its uniforms and shining instru­ ments exert a tremendous appeal to the average boy or girl. These, together with the fine social opportunities it affords to those participating, should insure a firstrate organization in any community.2 The band has a spectacular and civic appeal, even in its beginnings, which an orchestra can only acquire after attaining a rather high degree of ability.* Besides its educative function, elementary band work serves to give children musical experiences, emotional outlets, and training in social living. Performances should be arranged when possible to serve the school and community .4 The instrumental music department is probably unique among the various branches of instruction in that it cannot hope to prosper without the motivating force of public per­ formance.

Students and director alike find it difficult to

work on a piece of music enthusiastically unless a date has been set for public performance of that number. Gehrkens has listed four general objectives for public musical performance by grade school children: (1) To motivate high grade study during the daily music period. (2) To interest parents and other citizens in the mus ic department• 2

Theodore P. Norman, Instrumental Music in the Public Schools (Philadelphia: Oliver Ditson Company, 19417^ pp. 194-195. 5 Dykema and Cundiff, op. cijb., p. 318. ^ Hazel Nohavee Morgan, editor, Music Education Source Book (Chicago: Music Educators National Conference. 1947), p. 68.

3 (3) To give social training in group project activity. (4) To raise money for the purchase of musical equip­ ment •5 Adolescent children like and need public performance of some kind.

As Willard Myer has said,

Planned assembly programs and concerts, or combined concerts with the high school band provide an outlet for that inherent exhibitionism; The student is frequently reluctant to assume the full responsibility of a solo, but all of them love to r,show off” with the group. A planned series of assembly programs and concerts, if judiciously organized, provides progressive and definite objectives toward which the student may be guided. The objective of technical and musical artistry is sufficient motivation for the mature student, but is not grasped by the grade school musician. Therefore, the more immediate objective of displaying real accomplishments to parents and friends becomes the strongest and most practical motivating force to the grade school student. Granted, then, that the grade school band must perform if it is to survive as a valuable educational agency, it follows quite logically that the- band must have music which will sound well when played by a group of student musicians such as we can reasonably expect to produce in the elementary school. Although there is really a surprising amount of good material available, these numbers comprise a comparatively small per­ centage of the total output of the publishing firms serving the schools.

It therefore requires a considerable amount of

5 Karl W. Gehrkens, Music in the Grade Schools (Boston: C. C. Birchard Company, 1934), p. 190. 6 Willard L. Myer, "Not Just Reedersi" The Instru­ mentalist, 3:8, No. 1, September-October, 1948.

4 time and patience on the part of the director to sort out the good elementary music from the musical trash and the music written with the Class A or Class B high school band in mind. Prescott and Chidester have presented the situation as follows : • Editions and arrangements of standard works vary, and their relative value can be ascertained only by examination or trial. When the director goes outside the field of standard composition, however, he finds in a publis h e r ^ catalog little help as to the musical value of a piece. It is then that he must turn to the exper­ ience of his colleagues. The recent release of new compositions written directly for the school band has intensified the need for the mutual aid in appraising band music.' The present study is an attempt to lift this burden from the shoulders of elementary school band directors by providing critical analyses of many compositions which are well-adapted to their needs. History of the problem.

Several authors have written

more or less thorough accounts of the history of public school music in the United States. accepted as the standard. other authors.

The one by Birge

8

is generally

This book is widely quoted by

Hazel Kent has covered largely the same

^ Gerald H. Prescott and Lawrence W. Chidester, Getting Results with School Bands (Minneapolis: Paul A. Schmidt Music Company, 1938), p. 217. ® Edward B. Birge, History of Public School Music in the United States (Boston: Oliver Ditson Publishing Company, 1928TI

5 material in her huge thesis.

9

Other authors have limited their research to the history of instrumental music in the high school.

Norman

gives a fairly complete history in the first chapter of his book, Instrumental Music in the Public Schools.^0 and Chidester in their book thesis

11

Prescott

and Albert Weatherly in his

also devote one chapter to the history of public

school ins trumental instruction.

Hargrave Swift has written

a thesis entitled "A Historical Study of the Development of 13 the High School Band11 in which he gives a thorough history of the development of the high school band, allotting much space to data about the contests.

None of these authors have

devoted more than a few words to the development of the ele­ mentary school instrumental program. 9 Hazel Elizabeth Kent, "Trends in the Development of Music Education in the United States," (unpublished Master’s thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1935). Theodore P. Norman, Instrumental Music in the Public Schools (Philadelphia! Theodore Presser Company, 1941), pp. 1-25. 11 Gerald H. Prescott and Lawrence W. Chidester, Getting Results With School Bands (Minneapolis: Paul A. Schmitt Music Company, 1938), pp. 3-10. 12 Albert Weatherly, "Methods of Procedure in Teaching Instrumental Music in Certain Senior High Schools of the United States," (unpublished Master’s thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1935), pp. 20-29. 1® E. Hargrave Swift, "A Historical Study of the Devel­ opment of the HighrSchool Band," (unpublished Master’s thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1939).

6 Information about the history of the grade school band and its music is harder to find.

We feel quite fortunate to

have uncovered some little-known facts from some rather 14 obscure sources. The Moody thesis, described under "Related Studies", has been especially valuable. Although the school band movement is generally con­ sidered to have begun around 1910 and to have gathered momen­ tum only after World War I, research has turned up some earlier dates which may prove interesting* The Instrumentalist reports the receipt of some adver­ tising material issued by a Boston bank (presumably many years ago) featuring a picture of a parading band over the caption: The first school band in America was formed in 1857 at the Farm and Trades School on Thompson’s Island, Boston Harbor. At the outset the boys used tissuecovered combs, three violins and a bass viol. Regular instruments were acquired by 1859 and in that year the band first paraded through Boston.15 Prescott and Chidester mention this same band and even 16 display a picture of it. They give the date of its founding as 1858. 14 Leo Wilford Moody, "A Survey of Materials for the Beginning Band," (unpublished Master’s thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder, 1946). 15

Instrumentalist Historian, "Early American School and College Bands," The~nstrumentalist, 4:25, Ho. 3, January-February, 1950. 16

cit., p. 7 (photograph facing p. 6).

Albert Weatherly reports that B. W. Merrill was engaged to teach hand in the public school of Aurora, 17 Illinois, in 1895# From the same source we learn that Jessie Clark had a school band in Wichita, Kansas, in 18 1896. The dates of other early high school baads are re­ ported in The Instrumentalist as follows: 1907; Rockford, Illinois; John T. Haight, director; 20 members. 1909; Connersville, Indiana; W. Otto Miessner, dir19 ector; 32 members. (Birge gives 1908 as the year this band was organized.) 1909; Richland Center, Wisconsin. 1912; Joliet, Illinois; A. R. McAllister, director. 1912; Blue Island, Illinois; Raymond N.> Carr, dir­ ector; 16 players. 1914; Morton High School, Cicero, Illinois; Raymond N. Carr, director; 17 players. 1916; North High School, Minneapolis, Minnesota; 20 Raymond N. Carr, director; 15 players.

QP * oit.» p. 25. 18 Lac. cit. ^

2H* cit., p . 183•

^

Loc. cit.

8 Birge reports that a grade school band was organized in Joliet, Illinois, in 1935 by J . M. Thompson, with school21 owned instruments.. During World War I, John Phillip Sousa was placed in charge of all bands in the U. S. Navy.

In this position,

Sousa organized many bands of naval personnel.

Prom these

he selected 500 musicians to form a special band with which he toured the country on behalf of liberty loan drives and 22 navy recruiting. This activity of Mr. Sousa had a tremendous effect upon the school band movement by (1) making the public band-conscious and (2) producing a number of young men with training in band playing and teaching.

These young men were,

as a ru3a , the best available candidates for the position of school band director. The result was a tremendous increase in the number, size, and quality of school bands immediately following the war.

The schools of the middle-west (Illinois, Indiana,

Michigan, and neighboring states) were the leaders in this movement.

The fact that the leading manufacturers of band

instruments have their factories in this section of the country pr obably accounts for this leadership to a certain

^

Q p • cit.. p. 185.

22 Moody, op.. cit.. p. 3.

9 extent.

Another Influencing circumstance was that the

center of Sousa*s wartime operations was the Great Lakes Naval Training Station near Chicago. Up until this time (about 19 20) there was hardly any band music published in the easier grades or what we now recognize as Grades I, XX, and XII.

However, with the wide­

spread growth of school bands in the 1920*s, there was created a great demand for easy music.

Unfortunately, the publishers

had not yet come to the realization that a composition can be easy technically and still have musical substance.

One of

the leading contemporary composers of school band music, Carl Frangkiser, has said of his experiences in the 1920*s, **I was practically impressed with the fact that easy music must be *dinky*.

I did not agree with that dictum and consequently 23 X had practically nothing published. A pioneer in the writing of band music in the easier grades was Karl King, who was a director of circus bands 24 during the early part of this century. In this capacity, Mr. King wrote much music to be used in the circus.

This

included many marches and galops intended to* be played very fast.

When slowed down to reguDa r march tempo, these pieces

were quite easy and therefor fairly well adapted to the needs

Carl Frangkiser, unpublished personal letter dated June 8, 1950. 24 Moody, 0]D. cit.. p. 6-7.

10 of the school band#

With the growth of the school band

movement, Mr# King seems to have begun writing especially for school use#

He has contributed several overtures and

many fine marches in Grades II and III* The years immediately preceding and following 1930 saw a great improvement in the playing quality of school bands.

The national music contests, begun in 1924, un­

doubtedly exerted a strong influence on this development# This improvement increased the demand for musically worth­ while materials#

During this period some of the directors

who knew from experience what was needed began to write# Since that time the amount of good music available has con­ stantly increased# IX#

DEFINITION OF TERMS

Elementary school.

For the purposes of this study we

refer to the elementary school of the conventional eight-four organization (i.e., eight-year elementary school and fouryear high school)•

We assume that the musical numbers eval­

uated are to be played by children in grades five, six, sevaa , and eight#

These compositions could also be used in a junior

high school in the six-three-three plan, as this would include seventh, eighth, and ninth grade students#

A good junior high

school band should play the more difficult numbers on the list#

11 Band*

This word is used in so many different ways as

to make definition rather complicated.

The Punk & Wagnalls

Dictionary defines, band as "a company of persons organized to play musical instruments, especially portable ones, one of the divisions of an o r c h e s t r a . T h e



• •

term has been

used in the past to refer to the various sections of the orchestra, as the 11string band**, the "wind band", etc* At the present time the word is

generally used to.

denote a large ensemble of wind and percussion instruments. This usage probably evolved from the military band, which is literally "a company of persons organized to play musical instruments, especially portable ones," for military purposes. The strings being less adapted to the playing of martial music than the brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments, exclusion from the military band was logical.

their

Devotees of

band music have developed from the military band our modern symphonic band, designed to play the highest type of concert music with the same finish expected of

a fine orchestra*

For the purposes of the present study we shall con­ sider a band as the combination of wind and percussion instru­ ments found practical for concert playing by grade school children.

The minimum instrumentation for such a group would

include B-flat clarinets, cornets, OR

trombones or baritone,

Isaac D. Punk, Editor-in-Chief, Punk & Wagnalls Hew "Standard" Dictionary of the English Language (New Yorks Punk & Wagnalls Company, 1947TI

12 tuba, bass drum, and snare drum*

(The inclusion of* flutes,

saxophones, and French horns or alto horns is highly desir­ able, but the above is considered the minimum group with which band music would be attempted.)

Such other wind and

percussion instruments as may be available in each individual school will of course be added. March.

A march is a piece of music intended originally

to furnish rhythm and inspiration for marching men.

While

marches are now played as concert music as well as for actual marching, they still retain the following characteristics: (1) A strong, continuous rhythmic pulse which continues uninterrupted throughout the march and which had its origin in the tramping of marching feet. (2) A martial spirit pervading the entire composition. Xn our present study we shall recognize three types of marches: Cl) The street march is the most common of the three types and probably the first to originate.

This type is in­

tended primarily as an accompaniment to a marching group but is also used widely as program material.

Street marches are

always played with two beats to the measure. (2)

The concert march is intended not for marching

but for listening only.

Xt is apt to be more elaborate than

the street march, and the tempo may be faster or slower, for

13 it is not restricted to the marching cadence as is a street march. (3) The grand march is more dignified and majestic. It is used for commencement processionals and the like.

It

is often written in 4/4 meter and is usually played slightly slower than either the street march or the concert march. The funeral march is not discussed here because it is hardly ever played by the elementary school band. Overture.

Probably no word in the m u s i c i a n s vocab­

ulary has been bandied about more than the word overture. Literally, it means 11opening” and was originally i n s t r u ­ mental music composed as an introduction to an opera, oratorio, or similar work.”**6

Although the overture has retained its

function as an introduction to an opera, it has also become popular as an independent composition.

Thus we have such

overtures as Mendelssohn*s “Hebrides Overture”, Brahm*s “Academic Festival Overture”, and Tschaikowsky*s “Romeo and Juliet” • In school band repertoire, the word overture is usually applied to any composition of three minutes or more duration involving two or more changes of meter and mood and ending with a furious A13e gro.

Some composers and publishers have

2 ® Willi Apel, Harvard Dictionary of Music (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1944)• p. 548.

14 stretched the term to include any pretentious piece of music which cannot be classified as a march or a waltz ; several medleys of familiar songs have been labeled "Overture"•

How­

ever, we prefer to classify the latter according to the actual type of composition regardless of the label attached by the composer or the publisher. Chorale.

A chorale may be thought of as a composition

originally conceived for human voices in harmony.

Actually,

a chorale could be written originally for instruments.

How­

ever, the origin of the style was in vocal music, and very few chorales have been written originally for instrumental groups. Outstanding characteristics of a choral© are a smooth, sustained style of performance and emphasis on chord progres­ sion, harmonic interest being stronger than melodic or rhythmic interest. Medley.

A medley is a musical number consisting of

two or more individual pieces (usually familiar songs) played one after the other with or without introduction and interludes.

The melodies are not interwoven but are played

consecutively, being joined directly or by transitional material* Serenade. composition.

A serenade is a dreamy, romantic type of

While most of the serenades published for band

15 were originally conceived for band, they are nevertheless suggestive of a love song sung by a romantic young man beneath the window of his lady fair* Tone poem.

This term has apparently originated from

the composer's desire to do with musical tones what the poet does with words.

To be more specific, a tone poem is a compo­

sition of symphonic character much shorter than even one movement of a symphony, not restricted as to form, and usually more descriptive than thematic. Waltz.

Originating as a dance, the waltz is now played

as a concert piece as well as a dance.

The waltz may be fast

and brilliant or slow and dreamy; but it is always in 3/4 meter, and it never strives to portray any deep emotion. Novelty.

A novelty is a musical joke.

It is a piece

of music intended merely to amuse the audience by introducing humor into the program. Folio. a book.

A folio is a collection of pieces bound into

The different kinds of folios published for band

include "march books," consisting only of street marches, usually sixteen marches in a book;

"band books," consisting

of marches, waltzes, serenades, overtures, etc. intermingled, usually eight marches and eight miscellaneous numbers; and "classical collections," consisting of band arrangements of standard works from orchestral or vocal literature.

16 Concert music .

Concert music is any music suitable

for performance before an audience for listening only (as opposed to music for dancing or marching and to background music for conversation)* Training material*

Training material, as opposed to

music for performance, is used primarily for its pedagogical value to the student performers* It is difficult and futile to try to distinguish between concert and educational music at the elementary level. Music for the grade school band will be selected primarily for its educational value, but much of this same material will be played in public as concert music.

This point is

discussed in Section II of Chapter II. III.

band.

REVIEW OF RELATED STUDIES

Concert and occasional music for junior high school P7 This thesis by John Patrick Graham makes a definite

contribution toward the solution of the problem of selecting music for elementary or junior high school bands* of the study, as stated by the author,

The purpose

is nto list and evaluate

the published materials for junior high school band that the director may have a comprehensive knowledge of materials 27 John Patrick Graham, f,A Classification and Evalu^ation of Concert and Occasional Music for Junior High School Band,’1 (unpublished M a s t e r ’s thesis, North Texas State Teachers College, Denton, 1947).

17 28 adapted to that level” . The most valuable feature of this thesis is the graded and evaluated lists of compositions contained in Appendices 99 V and VX. Appendix V contains the titles of 529 individual pieces, classified by type of composition and by grade of difficulty.

Appendix VX consists of a list of sixty-two

folios, classified by grade.

The lists include compositions

in grades X, IX, XIX, and IV. Evaluation of the musical merit of each composition or collection is indicated by a series of asterisks following the listing.

Numbers with no asterisks are considered to have

no distinctive qualities, while those with four asterisks are considered to be the best band music available for that grade. No evaluation is given save for these asterisks. Neither is the grading broken down to indicate which sections of the band have the most difficult part in any given number. Mr. Graham has given a rather complete discussion of the technical facility expected of the players of each instru30 ment at each grade level. He has also prepared a chart showing the range expected of each instrument at each grade level.31 28 Ibid.. p. 1. 29 Ibid..pp. 44-70. 8® I b i d ., p p . 13-22. 81 Ibid.. p. 41.

18 Although this thesis has made a definite contribution to the problem, the present author feels that there is a need for continuing the study in this respect:

A more complete

analysis of each composition should be given.

It seems

particularly important to give the grade of difficulty for each essential instrument of the band, for the grade school instrumentalist may have a strong clarinet section and a weak trombone section one year and just the reverse the following year, to cite one example.

In such a situation, music must

be selected which will keep the more advanced students occu~ pied but which will still not be hopelessly difficult for the weaker players.

This we shall attempt to accomplish in

the present study. High school band material.

Eldon M. Sonnenburg has

written at North Texas State Teachers College a document entitled ”A Critical Compilation of G-raded Band Material at 32 High School Level,” in which he lists seventy-nine compo­ sitions recommended as program material for the high school band.

The seventy-nine pieces are classified by type under

six headings--concert marches, concert music, novelties, overtures, selections, and suites--and are arranged alpha­ betically by title under each heading.

After each title Mr#

Sonnenburg has written a short paragraph describing the music 32 Eldon M. Sonnenburg, ”A Critical Compilation of Graded Band Material at High School Level,” (unpublished M a s t e r ’s thesis, North Texas State Teachers College, Denton, 1947).

19 in general terms and grading it as suitable for Class A, B, or C bands. Beginning band materials.

Leo ‘Wilford Moody has pro­

duced a valuable thesis entitled 11A Survey of Materials for 'z'5

the Beginning Band.”

In his thesis Mr. Moody has analyzed

twenty-nine beginning band methods, including practically everything of this nature ever published, and fifteen inter­ mediate band books.

Each book is discussed in about two

pages of prose, the advantages and disadvantages being pointed out impartially.

Suggestions are also made as to the specific

situations in which certain methods might be used advan­ tageously. Since the line between purely educational material and concert music is so hard to distinguish at the elementary level, and since the modern trend is to start beginners playing pieces in the first few lessons, this study neces­ sarily includes some material which we might consider concert music for the grade school band. Another feature of this thesis is the history of the school band movement set forth in Chapter I, drawn largely from the author!s own experience.

Much of this information

is not to be found in any published works at the present time. 33 Leo Wilford Moody, ,fA Survey of Materials for the Beginning Band,11 (unpublished Master fs thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder, 1946).

20 The B a n d 1s Music. Goldman

34

This book by Richard Pranko

consists largely of program notes for certain con­

cert music for symphonic band.

Recommended compositions are

listed alphabetically by composer.

No mention is made of

grading according to difficulty. This book is obviously intended for use with a con­ cert band of professional musicians.

The grade school band

director will find little use for the book, as the compo­ sitions reviewed are all too difficult for children to even attempt. /-

Selective lists.

The National School Band, Orchestra,

and Vocal Associations formerly published a School Music 35 Competition-Festivals Manual. This book gives rules and suggestions for state and national contests and also contains lists of music from which contest pieces were to be chosen. The compositions on these lists are graded according to diffi­ culty.

But aside from this grading and the blanket recom­

mendation of the committees compiling the lists, there is no evaluation.

Nevertheless, this manual has been a useful

guide to teachers selecting music for school groups. 34 Richard Pranko Goldman, The B a n d 1s Music (New Yorks Pitman Publishing Corporation, 1938). 35 National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associ­ ations, School Music Competition-Festivals Manual (Chicagor National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associations, 64 East Jackson Boulevard, 1943).

21

Unfortunately the 1943 manual was the last one pub­ lished, and it has been out of print for some time.

Xn

1947 the National SehooX Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associa­ tions released a small pamphlet entitled, ’’Selective Music 36 37 Lists” . A similar pamphlet appeared in 1950. These were intended to supplement the 1943 manual by listing music pub­ lished since its release.

This procedure has not proved

entirely satisfactory, as the 1943 manual has not been avail­ able for purchase since the war, and young teachers have been forced to depend upon borrowing from their older colleagues. It is hoped that the national association may see fit to compile

a complete new manual in the near future. Sixteen faculty members of the National Music Camp at

Xnterlochen compiled a list of recommended band music in 1947. 38 This was also published in pamphlet form. This list con­ sists of three hundred numbers in grades XI, III, IV, V, and VI.

All compositions are graded, but no evaluation is

attempted* 36 National School Band, Orchestra and Vocal Associa­ tions, ’’Selective Music Lists - Band, Orchestra, Chorus, Instrumental Ensembles11 (Chicago: National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associations, 64 E. Jackson Blvd*, 1946). 37 National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associa­ tion, ’’Selective Music Lists - Band, Orchestra, String Orches­ tra, Chorus” (Chicago: National School Band, Orchestra and Vocal Association, 64 E. Jackson Blvd., 1949). ^ K e n n e t h Bovee, et al., ’’The Xnterlochen List of Rec­ ommended Materials for Concert Band” (Xnterlochen, Michigan: National Music Camp, 1947).

22

XV.

ORGANIZATION OP REMAINING CHAPTERS

In Chapter II the procedure followed In this investi­ gation is explained, the general criteria for the selection of music are enumerated and elaborated upon, the problem of grading music at the elementary school level is discussed, and the form used in reporting the results'of the study is thoroughly explained. The selected folios recommended for elementary school bands are evaluated in Chapter III; marches, in Chapter IV; overtures, in Chapter V; and miscellaneous selections,

in

Chapter VI. A summary of the study and the conclusions to be drawn from it are presented In Chapter VII.

CHAPTER IX PROCEDURE AND CRITERIA I.

METHOD OF PROCEDURE

In order to fulfill the purpose of this study, as stated earlier, it was necessary (1) to obtain the titles of promising compositions,

(2) to thoroughly examine the parts

to these compositions and in as many cases as possible to play them through with the author1s elementary school band, and (3) to report the findings in a suitable form so that they might be useful to many school band directors. Obtaining titles.

The first step was to compile a

list of titles of pieces which either were known to be worth­ while or were thought to be worthy of consideration by reascn of the recommendation of some individual or committee.

Titles

were obtained from several sources: (a) The investigator*s own experience.

In three years

of teaching in the Garvey (California) School District, a few of the many band numbers tried have proven themselves to be well suited for grade school use.

On the other hand, several

compositions which appear on some of the selective lists for contests have fallen far short of the standards which we try to maintain. (b) Other theses.

Several master*s theses contain

24 lists of music for the school band.

Most of these are merely

lists; of titles and composers with no analysis or evaluation of the music and no criteria given for selection* of list seems to have little if any value*

This type

However, a few

graduate students have made a more thorough study of the com­ positions and have reported in more detail (although no studies have been discovered in which the musical numbers are analyzed 1 in such detail as in the present report). The latter theses have been consulted and numbers recommended, within the grades being studied, have been considered worthy of a thorough examination. (c) Selective lists compiled by committees of music 2 educators. These reports consist of lists of music considered to be worthwhile for school use, classified by grade*

Although

these lists are compiled by experts, the examinations are often cursory because of the lack of sufficient time.,

The easier

grades are usually slighted because the recognized experts who

Namely the following: John Patrick Graham, ”A Classification and Evaluation of Con­ cert and Occasional Music for Junior High School Band11 (un­ published Master1s thesis, North Texas Teachers College, Denton, 1947). Eldon Malcome Sonnenburg, lfA Critical Com­ pilation of Graded Band Material at High School Level” (un­ published Master’s thesis, North Texas Teachers College, Denton, 1947). Deo Wilford Moody, ffA Survey of Materials for the Beginning Band”, (unpublished Master’s thesis, Uni­ versity of Colorado, Boulder, 1946). o

* Several lists of this type are mentioned under ’’Related Studies” in Chapter I.

25 are asked to work on a project of this kind have rarely had any close contact with the elementary school problems within recent years.

However, numbers which appear on these lists

are considered worthy of examination because of the musical value they must possess to have been recommended by the com­ mittee. (d) Suggestions from teachers in the field.

Letters

were mailed to twenty-five instrumental music teachers, re­ questing that they send a list of their favorite numbers for grade school band in the following classifications: marches, overtures, and miscellaneous selections.

folios, This was

done principally to insure against overlooking any excep­ tionally good material. A copy of this letter, together with a form for listing 3 the music and a return envelope, was sent to each of the twenty directors who entered elementary or junior high bands in the Southern California Music Festival in 1948 or in 1949, and also to each of five men known to be successfully engaged in elementary or junior high band work in the middle-west. This procedure was not overwhelmingly successful, as only six directors returned the questionnaire.

However,

these six men supplied a total of eighty-nine titles. (e) Publishers1 catalogs.

While the advertising of

rz

^

Specimens of these two forms are shown in Appendix C.

26 music publishers is notoriously misleading,

their catalogs

and circulars have nevertheless furnished some assistance. For one thing, any composer or arranger who has produced one exceptionally good number is apt to have other worthy produc­ tions to his credit. catalogs.

These titles can be looked up in the

For another .thing, the thematic catalogs or min­

iature condensed scores sometimes printed as advertising material can give one at least a rough idea of a piece. Examination of the actual parts is still advisable before making a final decision. Examination of parts.

Because full scores are not

available for the majority of the numbers studied, it was considered necessary to examine the individual parts in order to have accurate information about the arrangements.

Parts

for instruments considered absolutely essential in any band were given more consideration than the dispensable parts. This is explained in Part IV of this Chapter. Compositions which looked good upon examination were then read by the band if possible.

Unfortunately,

some of

the music was loaned for examination only and could not be played. Report of findings.

Of the music examined, all num­

bers considered unsatisfactory for study by elementary school bands were discarded.

The compositions found satisfactory

27 and recommended for use are evaluated in Chapters XIX, IV, V, and VI*

The form used in reporting this evaluation is

explained in Section X V of this chapter* XX*

GENERAL CRITERIA USED IN SELECTION OP MUSIC

In selecting music for the grade school band the dir­ ector is actually confronted with only two basic problems: (1) the music selected must be worth playing, and (2) the technical requirements must be within the ability of the group that is expected to perform the music.

These two basic prob­

lems will be discussed individually* (1) Music That Is Worth Playing Under this heading we shall consider two subtopics which are, in order of importance, inherent musical value, and audience appeal* Musical value*

This term will have a special meaning

when applied to music for the grade school band.

Very rarely,

If ever, will an elementary school musical organization be able to perform a composition which will represent truly great music in the mind of the director.

But any composition, how­

ever simple, which can help to lead children to a greater understanding of an appreciation for the music of the masters can certainly be said to have musical worth*

28 As a matter of fact, it would not ordinarily be advisable to require young children to work on music that is very far beyond their ability to understand and appreciate, for by so doing we may breed in the child a feeling of re­ sentment toward some of the deeper compositions*

We must

always remember that the primary aim of all public school music is to develop in each child a healthy attitude toward music. Pleasure and satisfaction are two important goals of music education, for we know that without those two ele­ ments further learning would be at a standstill. Our immediate aim, therefore, is to continually foster the joy and satisfaction which comes with participation in music; and through the wise guidance of the teacher, to see to it that the learning situations which bring about that joy and satisfaction will also constantly challenge children and teachers to go further into the realm of music, and to penetrate more deeply its meanings Perhaps the truly inspired music educator who is also a fine musician can recognize a musically worthwhile piece more or less instinctively.

However, many of us can profit

by a few rules to guide our thinking.

Righter has spoken

eloquently on this subject: There are, of course, certain technical rules for the determination of musical quality* The rules of harmony, counterpoint, and form must be respected, or at least any disregard of these rules must be justified by the ultimate musical satisfaction attained through their violation. The rules of proper combination of instruments must be followed unless, again, a very special effect is desired,

^ Mrs. Beatrice Perham Krone, Music in the Hew School (Chicago: Neil A. Kjos Music Company, l94’7}, p. 3.

29 and this effect must be distinctive and purposeful to justify the means employed. The melodic material must be pleasing, it must serve to arouse some particular emotion, or it must appeal to the intellect of the listener through symmetry or interest of line. It may be subtle but it should not be trite or repetitious. Beauty of phrasing and a smooth interlocking of melodic material often mark the composition of distinction. In a work of real merit the subject matter is developed and coordinated, and any accompanying figurations are appropriate to the general spirit of the work. The ob­ vious is left unsaid. Suggestion and sublety stand in place of sordid display. The diverse tastes and prefer­ ences of listeners make if difficult, if not impossible, to establish sound bases for evaluating the worth of particular compositions, but some conclusions can usually be reached by applying these elementary tests: 1. Is it interesting melodically, harmonically, or rhythmically? 2.

Does it seem to have balance and proportion?

5.

Does it have basic unity and cohesion?

4.

Are instrumentation and arrangement satisfactory?

Audience appeal.

5

This factor is not worthy of the

great amount of consideration often accorded to it at the expense of true musical values.

Since the primary aim of any

school subject is the enrichment of the lives of the students, the band director is never justified in feeding his pupils a diet of pure musical trash merely because such numbers may be popular with audiences in that particular community.

The

community looks to the school for cultural leadership; we 5

Charles Boardman Righter, Success in Teaching School Orchestras and Bands (Minneapolis: Paul A. Schmitt Music Company, 1945)', p. 73.

50 must not fall down in performance of our duty in that respect* This point is further amplified by reflecting that the audience at any grade school band concert will be composed largely of proud parents and others sympathetic to the music program*

An educational number, artistically performed, will

be enthusiastically received by this kind of audience because it is evidence of the attainment of the student musicians. These remarks are not intended to imply that the ele­ mentary school band should never play a novelty number*

We

do believe, however, that novelties must be chosen with ex­ treme care.

The humor must be in good taste, and the piece

must be easy enough to be mastered quickly by the students, for there is no satisfaction in working on the same novelty number day after day.

With constant contact the humor fades

and there is no true musical value to fall back upon.

Nov­

elty numbers should occupy not more than ten per cent of the program nor five per cent of the rehearsal time of any school musical organization. Much of this same advice could be applied to popular music.

It should be used sparingly.

Discrimination between

different types of popular music is important.

The love

songs of Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, and George Gershwin are practically semi-classical, and good arrangements of some of these numbers may be worthy of serious study.

On the other

hand, such songs as !,Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the BarM or

31 ^Flat-Foot Floogi© with a Floy, Floy11 are definitely ruled out*

As Dykema and Gehrkens have said, Jazz music is very popular for certain types of dancing and as a background for light conversation*. But it has little value as art, and it is hard to imagine an audience of intelligent and discriminating people giving the same attention to such music as they gladly give to a symphony concert* Although the above statement may seem a bit radical in

this modern age, certainly no on© can dispute the logic of the following argument by the same authors: Let the school provide desirable types of experience that are not adequately supplied by other agencies * The average pupil certainly gets ample experience with dance music outside of school, and the music educator need not worry lest the pupil*s experience be deficient at that pointI7 (2) Level of Difficulty Although the last decade has seen much improvement in a bad situation, there is still comparatively little worth­ while music published within the technical ability of the average grade school band*

It is foolhardy to force children

to continually work on music beyond their ability to master. This is true for at least two reasons:

(a) The students must

enjoy their musical experiences, and (b) The band must sound well when presented in concert*

Let us consider the bases

6 Peter W* Dykema and Karl W. Gehrkens, The Teaching and Administration of High School Music (Boston: C. C. Birchard and Compa n y , 1946}, p. 202. ^ ’Ibid., p* 203*

32 for these arguments# Student en joyment#

The enjoyment which a child

derives from playing in a band is extremely valuable.

In the

first place, this enjoyment is a most powerful factor in developing that favorable attitude toward music in general, mentioned earlier as the most important aim of the entire music program#

In the second place, the morale of the band

members— and with it their ability to progress— will be greatly -jeopardized if the students fail to derive enjoyment from their experiences in the instrumental group# Public performance#

Every band master is expected to

present the band in concert at least once, and usually many times during the year#

While we do not claim that the quality

of our instrumental music instruction should be judged by the ability of our performing groups, the public in general is certain to judge us in this way#

This is one reason that any

band director is anxious to present a public performance of as high a degree of musical excellence as possible#

Aside

from the personal satisfaction of the director, the feeling of pride in a job well done is certainly a valuable experience for the children# The wise band director will therefore strive to select music which is within the technical ability of his group, for only by so doing can he expect his organization to turn out a

33 creditable performance*

No one, not even a fond parent,

enjoys hearing children struggle through a piece of music which is hopelessly beyond their ability. XIX.

GRADING GF MUSIC AT THE

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEVEL (1) Importance of the Problem The problem of accurate grading of music In the easier grades is deserving of far greater attention than it usually receives.

It is often very difficult to select music which

is playable by the less experienced members of the band and which can still offer enough challenge to the more advanced players not to be scroned by them. (2) Grade Numbering System Music for school use is generally classified according to difficulty into six grades, the number of each grade cor­ responding roughly to the number of years the student is expected to have studied before attempting the music.

For

instance, a student who has taken instrumental lessons for one year should be able to play Grade I music, after two years of serious study he should be able to handle Grade II, etc*

Obviously,

this generalization does not hold true in

very many cases because of the wide variation in the rates

34 of progress of different music students.

However, it does

give us some basis for the grading system, and in this respect it is better than snatching numbers out of the air with no basis whatsoever. For the purpose of the present study it seems desirable to have a more accurate system of grading than merely I, XI, III, etc.

Therefore, plus and minus signs have been added. *

A plus raises the grade by approximately one-third of a grade point while a minus lowers it the same amount.

Thus, in such a

sequence as II, II'+, III-, III, any two consecutive figures are an equal distance apart. (3) Selection of Proper Grade of Music for Organization The question as to which grades of music are to be used in the elementary school will naturally assume great importance in a study of this kind.

The grade to be used will generally

depend on the technical ability of the poorest players in the band.

Sight reading ability is relatively unimportant in this

respect, for the weaker players will learn the sound of the music from listening to the stronger players % but a certain degree of skill in the mechanical manipulation of the instrument is a prerequisite to learning any passage.

To ignore the

weaker players and select music above their heads is a mistake and will result in discord and "musical mud".

On the other

hand, many directors prefer to place inexperienced players in

35 the band on the theory that they will learn faster in this situation than they would in a beginners class* justifiable in many cases*

This is

However, the music should still

be simple enough to be played by the younger members with the aid of their more experienced neighbors* Although instruction on band instruments is begun at different ages in different schools, the fourth and fifth grades are generally considered the best levels for starting this activity*,

This statement is born out by the following

quotations: In the first three grades nearly all children have had some experience with vocal music and many have participated in rhythm bands* Fourth-grade children, therefore, seem ready for definite instruction in learning to play instruments; and classes for beginners are usually recruited from fourth or fifth grades; al­ though there are often a few children in the third 01 ? even the second grade interested and eager to begin. • • • The prevailing policy is to allow children their first real instrumental experience beginning in the fourth grade* This grade is the generally accepted one because it allows the children time for some pre­ vious vocal experience, and in addition is about as early as they are physically equipped to handle the instruments *^ A child who has begun his instrumental study in the

California State Department of Education (Helen Hefferman and Mary E. IreDa nd, co-chairmen of committee), Music Education in the Elementary School (Sacramento: California State Department of Education, 1939), p. 118*

® George C. Wilson, “instrumental Music in the Grades”, Music Educators National Conference Yearbook* 5-937, pp. 293-294.

36 early part of the fourth grade and continued seriously would presumably he capable of playing Grade IV music in the eighth grade.

This hypothetical child is, however, the exception

rather than the rule, for it is a rarity to find in an ele­ mentary school a child who has four years of serious instru­ mental study behind him.

The grade school band will ordinarily

be made up largely of pupils who have taken instrumental music for two years or slightly less.

The group may also include

a few older students with three years experience and some who are just completing their first year of study.

This is con­

sidered a typical situation in an elementary school in which the administration is heartily behind the music program. For such a group, the bulk of the music selected should be in Grade II.

The younger players will be able to learn

most of this by dint of hard work and the assistance of the older players, and the more experienced bandmembers will not tire of this music providing pieces with true musical worth are selected and providing also that adequate attention is given to perfection of tone quality, intonation, balance, and expression.

(It is assumed that the better players will

be working on solos and technical studies in preparation for high school band experience.) A band that has been organized less than one year should be limited to Grade I music.

It is far better to play

a simple piece artistically than to stumble through a more

37 difficult number* The present study includes compositions from Grades X, IX, and XIX.

This should cover the needs of all grade school

bands• (4) Determination of Grade of Each Composition The grade number for any given composition is a product of (1) the difficulty of the parts for the various instruments and (2) certain difficulties involved in ensemble playing. Individual parts.

The technical demand on the indi­

vidual player is, of course, a prime consideration in selecting music for a school organization.

Setting up standards for

grading is an extremely difficult task.

Graham has pointed

out some of the factors to be considered: A number of factors affect the number of notes a player of certain degree of expertness may be expected to play per unit of time. These factors are note sequence, articulation, and an understanding of the musical idea. Note sequence is probably the most important factor influencing the rapidity of execution. Diatonic passages lend themselves more readily to swift execution than those containing irregular skips or chromatics. A series of notes of the same time value may be played more rapidly than notes of different lengths.10 There will be some variation in the technical ability expected on different instruments at the same grade level.

John Patrick Graham, ,fA Classification and Evaluation of Concert and Occasional Music-for Junior High School Band” (Unpublished Master*s thesis, North Texas State Teachers College, Denton, 1947), p. 12.

38 This is due mainly to the technical limitations of eaeh instru­ ment and partly to the degree of skill composers and arrangers are in the habit of demanding from the player of that instrument* There is usually little conflict between these two considera­ tions because, as a rule, composers and arrangers'take into account the varying limitations of the various instruments* 11 However, this is not always true. For instance, Graham and 12 Good have both shown that the clarinets are usually required to play the hardest part in the band* by Good

13

The remedy suggested

is to give the beginning clarinetist more intensive

technical drill than is given the beginners on other instru­ ments. The standard expected from a student on any given instrument at any given level is a compromise between (1) the ability reasonably expected in view of the difficulty of the instrument and (2) the technique customarily demanded by composers and arrangers. Graham has made up charts to indicate the rapidity of execution of diatonic or repeated notes to be expected on

11 Ibid., p. 13. 1P

Merle K. Good, flDevelopment of an Advanced Class Instruction Book for Band** (Unpublished Master* s thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1945), pp. 17-20. Loc. cit.

39 on each instrument at each grade level.,

14

Some of the material

from these charts has been extracted and combined into one master chart and is given in Appendix B.

Xt should be born

in mind that these standards are not absolute but will vary according to the manner in which any passage under study is adapted to the instrument for which it is written. The range of the individual parts is also important but is considered independently rather than as a factor in determining the grade.

This seems advisable because of the

wide difference of opinion among different teachers as to what the range should be at each grade level.

For this reason

it was decided to list separately the grade of difficulty and the range of the principal parts of each composition evaluated. Thus, each director will be enabled to select music within the range which he considers best for his students. Band compositions in the easier grades are usually restricted to the six key signatures ranging from no sharps or flats to five flats, concert key.

An analysis of the

twenty-nine marches and twenty-eight overtures evaluated in this study shows the favorite keys to be B-fiat, E-flat,

^

Graham, op. cit., pp. 14-22

40 A-flat, and P concert, in that order*

15

It would seem

advisable for the grade school band to be trained to play in these four keys.

This is the smallest number of keys in

which a satisfactory repertoire can be assembled, and to confuse the young student with a greater number seems foolish. However, on this point also we find some disagreement.

There­

fore, key signatures are considered separately from grade. Ensemble difficulties.

Xn addition to the difficul­

ties of the individual parts it is necessary to consider certain factors involved in combining those parts.

Students

in a band learn to follow each other, and any part may be made harder or easier than it appears merely by its relation­ ship to the other parts in the ensemble.

For instance,

passages in which all instruments have the same rhythm are much easier than those in which the various voices have dif­ ferent rhythms.

Likewise, entrances are much easier if a

whole section or several sections enter at one time.

A well-

known composer of school band music has written an overture, mostly in half- and quarter- notes, in which the first, second, and third clarinets are required to enter separately at The actual count was as follows: key signature of two flats used 53 times; 3 flats, 49 times; 4 flats, 18 times; 1 flat, 17 times; 5 flats, 4 times; key of C used once. Minor keys have been considered with their relative major keys for the purpose of this tabulation, as a modulation between rela­ tive major and minor involves no change of key signature and therefore poses no particular problem for the students.

41 intervals of one measure apart.

This has proven very diffi­

cult to teach, although the individual parts are very simple, because the clarinets are so in the habit of entering as a section. The type less difficulty

of harmony is in

another factor.

playing

Students have

fundamental triads than they do

in playing sharp dissonances or altered chords. Doubling

of parts is a rather obvious aid to ease of

ensemble playing.

To cite an

example,— trombones, baritone,

and tenor saxophone often play in unison; at other times the trombones play in three-part harmony while the baritone and tenor saxophone each have independent parts*

Needless to

say, the former situation is much easier for the young player than the latter. IV. FORM USED IN REPORTING RESULTS Xn reporting the results of this investigation, it seems desirable to have a standard form to be used for all compositions evaluated.

This form should give the information

most needed by band directors searching for materials and should present this information in such a manner as to be easily and quickly grasped. upon;

The following form was decided

TITLE Composer: Arranger: Publisher: Date of copyright: Scores available: G-eneral grade: Grade and Range by sections: Keys (concert): Meters: General musical value: Comments: Each of these Items will be explained individually. The title and composer are given for the obvious pur­ pose of identifying the composition*

Arranger, publisher,

and date of copyright are given to make certain that the best edition is obtained in ease more than one are available. addition,

In

the name of a well-known arranger is an indication

of what kind of scoring may be expected.

The date of copy­

right may also indicate something about the scoring, as instrumentation has changed somewhat in recent years. Under ,fScores available” will be indicated the type or types of con d u c t o r s scores, published— i.e., full, condensed, piano-conductor, or solo cornet*

A full score shows the full

instrumentation as written for each instrument.

A condensed

score, as the name implies, contains all (or most) of the parts, condensed into three or four staves, all in concert key.

A piano-conductor part is still further condensed into

two staves, and the notes are sometimes spaced so as to be easily played on the piano.

The least complete type of

43 conductor’s part is the solo cornet part with a few cues to indicate baritone, trombone, clarinet, or other parts.

Dir­

ectors who are anxious to meet all requirements called for by the composer will give preference to music for which full scores are available. Under 11General grade” is given the composite grade as determined by the factors discussed in Section XII of this chapter. The grade of difficulty and the range of the principal parts is given.

The parts analyzed are First C Flute, First

B-flat Clarinet* First E-flat Alto Saxophone, B-flat Tenor Saxophone, First B-flat Cornet (or Solo Cornet, if published), First E-flat Horn, First Trombone (Bass Clef), Baritone (Bass Clef), Basses (BB-flat Tuba), and Drums.

Oboe, Bassoon, E-

flat Clarinet, Alto and Bass Clarinets, and Baritone and Bass Saxophones have been omitted on the grounds that they are seldom used in elementary school and that if they were used the difficulty of their parts would not likely be a deciding factor in the acceptance or rejection of a piece of music. This breaking down of the grading by instruments seems rather important, for the relative ability of the players on the various instruments is apt to vary widely from year to year or from school to school..

In spite of his best-laid

plans, the grade school band director may find himself with an unusually strong clarinet section and no basses, or he may

44 have a good band except for a weak trombone section..

He

must then try to select music which will favor the weaker sections and still challenge the stronger sections. The range of each part analyzed is indicated by listing the highest note as, written.

Young, inexperienced players

should not be expected to play as high as the older, more advanced students.

This is particularly true on clarinet,

cornet, trombone, and baritone* The notation wusual rangeff for basses indicates that the part for the BB-flat tuba does not go above B-flat (second line, bass clef). To indicate the range of each part it is necessary to have some system of nomenclature for the different octaves. Of the many systems sometimes employed we have selected the one which seems to be in most common use.

In this system the

second octave below middle tfc,f (often called the great octave) is indicated by capital letters; the first octave below middle ,fC ,f (called the small octave) is indicated by small letters; the octave beginning with middle f!C ,f (the one-line octave) is indicated by small letters with the superscript 111*, the next octave (the two-line octave) by the superscript 10 ff2tf, etc. This system is fully explained by the chart in

Melville Smith and Max T. Krone, Fnndamentals of - Musicianship (New York: M. Witmark and Sons^ 1934), Book X, p. 3.

45 Appendix A. The key signatures employed in the composition are listed in the order in which they appear*

This indicates the

number of changes of* key as well as the actual keys used* Each signature named is for concert key--*i.e., the key signa­ ture for non-transposing instruments* Meter signatures are also listed in the order in which they appear*

It was considered advisable to give the meter

signatures in case the director may wish to avoid certain meters with which his students are not familiar* In the ease of folios, key and meter signatures are listed in the order in which they appear for the first time, but the re-appearance of a signature is not indicated.

It

was felt that the listing of every change of key or meter in a folio would be complicated and relatively worthless. Each composition or collection evaluated is given a grade of A, B, C, or D to indicate its general musical value.

17

The grade of A represents the highest type of musical value, while D indicates an unsatisfactory composition as far as musical worth is concerned.

B and C represent intermediate

degrees between these two extremes.

The preponderance of A

and B ratings is explained by the fact that the only composi­ tions evaluated in this thesds are those that are recommended. 1 rt

Refer to the discussion of Musical Value in Section II of this chapter.

46 Those with little or no value have been discarded. Under the heading of "Comments" will be found concise notes elaborating on the grading or further describing the number. It is hoped that this form may be found to fulfill its purpose of presenting the most-needed information in an easy-to-understand manner.

CHAPTER XII FOLEGS RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS I»

PROBLEM AND CRITERIA

Statement of specific problem*

The specific problem

of this chapter was to examine many band folios and to select and evaluate those most suitable for the elementary school band* Advantages of folios*

The use of collections rather

than separately published compositions offers several advan­ tages*

These will be discussed under three headings* (1) Availability.

The very easiest music (Grade I)

is not ordinarily available separately*

This material con­

sists largely of very short pieces and exercises arranged in a progressive order so as to build musicianship systematically. Such material is not readily adaptable to publication on loose sheets. (2) Convenience.

A folio is much easier to handle,

care for, and inventory than are individual pieces.

A child

can turn to a certain page In a folio quicker and with greater certainty than he can find any given loose number among fif­ teen others.

Folios are less apt to become lost than are

individual parts.

Inventory of parts and requisition of new

music is greatly simplified by the use of folios.

48 (3)

Economy.

A folio is almost always cheaper than the

individual compositions purchased separately.

The exact

proportion will depend upon how well the instrumentation of the band coincides with the instrumentation supplied by the publisher and upon how many of the numbers in the folio are actually used. The above arguments are not intended to entirely rule out the use of separate compositions.

A few loose parts in

the folders are interesting to the students and allow the conductor more freedom in choosing music than if he were forced to use folios only.

However, it is recommended that

a beginning band be restricted to one folio for at least the first three or four months and that an advanced group use folios for the bulk of their music, supplementing with a few loose numbers. Special criteria.

All of the general criteria for

selection of music discussed in Chapter II have been applied in selecting folios.

In addition,

there are some special

criteria to be considered* (1)

The individual compositions comprising the folio

are evaluated according to the special criteria mentioned In the following chapters.

The criteria for marches are

discussed in Chapter IV, overtures in Chapter V, and other types of compositions in Chapter VI.

49 While the ideal situation would be one in which every number in the folio w>uld measure up to the standards set for the individual compositions, such a situation is rarely found. However, if half of the contents are useable, it will ordin­ arily be found more economical to buy the folio than to buy the pieces separately*

No folios have been included in this

study in which less than half of the compositions included measure up to the standards set. (2)

The format of the collection must also be taken

into consideration*

Although less important than the quality

of the compositions, the various components of the format have a great effect upon the economy of using a folio as opposed to separate compositions.

The factors involved are,

in order of importance, (a) The size and spacing of the staff, notes, and other symbols must be such as to be easily legible.

A few folios

are printed in such small type that they are very difficult to read.

The bad effects of such material, from the stand­

points of pedagogy and health, are obvious. (b) The cover of the book and the binding must be very rugged.

Xt is surprising how soon the cover of a folio

will fall off under constant handling by children.

Unfor­

tunately, none of the folios examined were found to have an entirely satisfactory binding.

This is a weak spot upon

which the publishers could well devote some research.

50 (c)

The paper upon which the music is printed must be

of high enough quality to stand up under much handling*

This

is no great problem, as the paper will ordinarily far outlast the binding*

However, a few folios are printed on very thin

paper that tears easily* IX.

EVALUATION OP SELECTED POLIOS

The folios evaluated on the following pages are believed to be the finest currently available for elementary school bands*

51 THE ^A-B-C1* FGIIO FOR YOUNG BANDS Band Book Composer: Addison B. Cole Editor: Pat Lee Publisher: Don Keller Date of copyright: 1949 Score available: Incomplete Full Score (7-line) General grade: II Grade by sections: Highest note : II c3 Flutes: II b-f lat: Clarinets: II Alto Saxophones: ap II Tenor Saxophones: sl II Cornets: ef II d Horns in E-flat: II e-flat Trombones: II e-flat Bari tone: II d Basses; II Percussion: Keys (concert): E-flat, A-flat, B-flat, F Meters: 2/4, 4/4, 3/4, 2/2. General musical value: BContents: 1-Our Band, March 2-On the Go, March 3-Apple Blossoms, Serenade 5-Summer Breezes, Waltz

5-Red Roses, Waltz 6-Uncle Reuben, Country Tune 7-Donkey Ride, Characteristic 8-Susanna*s Slippers, Medley

Comments: This is a unique folio. The book for each instrument contains a choice of from two to five parts * This is done in order to facilitate teaching by allowing the strong players to help the weaker. For instance, if the horns are having trouble, all Instruments except the basses and drums can play afterbeats with the horns until they learn their part. Likewise, all instruments can play melody, almost all can play the first harmony part, etc. The principal drawback to this book is the cost. The printing of four parts for each piece for most instruments has taken so much space as to limit the total number of compositions to eight instead of the sixteen or more usually found In a folio. In addition, the price per book is 50/ as against the 40/ usually charged for a march-size folio. The price is probably justified on the basis of the size of the book, as it measures 6,f x 8 ,f, somewhat larger than march-size. However, justifiable.though it may be, the price will still be prohibitive in many schools*

ALL MELODY BAND F0IIG Composers: Arranger:

Many song-writers Henry W. Davis

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1937 4-line Pull Score

X- to IX by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IX IX II II II II II II II 1+

Highest c3 P f f% d^ e-: ee-

B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, F, C, G.

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 6/8

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a progressive collection of 56 familiar songs ranging from Grade X- to Grade XI* (Grades listed under "Grade and Range by sections" above are for the hardest numbers in the book.) All numbers can be played in unison; the last 14 can also be played in four-part harmony. The use of this folio as supplementary material will undoubtedly prove very popular with the students.

AMERICANA COLLECTION Composers:

Many song-writers

Arrangers:

Brandenburg, Skornieka,' Welke, Wersen, and Whistler*

Pub li she r :

Rub ank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1942 Piano-Conductor

11+

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III11+ 11+ 11 + 11+ II' II 11+ II II

Highest note f5 e3 d3 b2 g2 a2 fi (usual :

A-flat, F, C, B-flat, E-flat

3/4, 4/4, 2/4, 6/8, 9/8

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This is a utilitarian collection of 72 American songs patriotic, folk, religious, and popular.

54 ARCHER PROGRESSIVE BAND BOOK Composer: P. T. Archer Arranger: Pat Lee Publisher: Don Keller Date of copyright: 1948 Score available: Piano-Conductor General grade: I* Grade, and Range by sections: Grade Flutes: I Clarinets: I Optional 1st Clar* I Alto Saxophones: I Tenor Saxophones: I Cornets: 1+ Horns in E-flat: I Trombones: IIBaritone: IIBasses: I Percussion: II Keys (concert): B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, F Meters: 2/4, 2/2, 6/8, 3/4, 4/4 General musical value: B Contents: 1-Young America, March 2-0ur Hobby, March 3-The Mascot, March 4-Royal Arch, March 5-Scout!s Favorite, March 6-New Cadets, March 7-Loyal Guards, March 8-Capitan, March

Highest note e3 a2 c^ b2 f2 f2 d2 d^ e^ (usual range)

9-Patricia, Waltz 10-Message of the Rose, Serenade 11-Little Jeanne, Waltz 12-Linden Lane, Novelette 13-Moon Magic, Dansette 14-Piggy Wiggy, Fox Trot 15-Hiram*s Tune, Country Dance 16-The Commander, Overture

Comments: The eight marches and the overture are excellent numbers for a young band* The arrangements are very easy but still sound full* All instruments are kept in a safe range• The other seven compositions are also easy but tend to be rather infantile* They seem to lack the musical ■ substance necessary to hold the interest of player or listener.

55 BENNETT BAND BOCK NO. 1 Composer:

Harold Bennett

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Fillmore Music House

Dates of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

19 23, 1935 Piano-Conductor

IX

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert):

Grade II II II II II I II 11+ II II

Highest note f .0

a3 d3

a2 rr 2 s2 ?1

S (usual range)

E-flat, A-flat, B-flat, D-flat

Meters: 2/4, 6/8, 2/2, 3/4, 4/4 General musical value:

C

Contents: 1-Activity, March 2-Project, March 3-Mutual, March 4-Summit, March 5-Safety, March 6-Normal, March 7-Military Escort, March 8-Mister Joe, March & Two-Step

9 -Indian Boy, Fox Trot 10-Stop, Fox Trot 11-Chalma, Waltz 12-Normafs Dream, Waltz 13-Idle Fancy, Serenade 14-The Little Grey Church, Serenade 15-Ambition, Overture 16-Zenith, Overture

Comments: This band book is an old standby, having been used extensively for many years. Two of the marches--flNormal,f and f,Military Escort1*— are outstanding. The other compo­ sitions are useable but not exceptional.

56 BENNETT BAND BOOK NO. 4 Composers

Harold Bennett

Arranger:

Composer Fillmore Music House

Publisher

Date of copyrights Scores available: General grade s

1937 Piano-Conductor

XI

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concerts Meters:

Grade II IX IX IX IX IX IX* II II II

Highest note ®3 e

°l So f* f

E-flat, A-flat, F, B-flat, D-flat

2/4, 6/8, 2/2, 3/4

General musical values Contents: 1-Aline, March 2-Biga, March 3-Proclar, March 4-System, March 5-Pivot Man, March 6-Genius, March 7-Hightower, March 8-Knighthood, March

B 9 -Hiland, March 10-Eels, March Characteristic 11-Put and Take, Novelty 12-Gyral, Fast Dance 13-Vera, Waltz 14-Janet, Waltz 15-A1 and Hal, Duet for Cornet & Trombone 16-Yare, Overture

Comments s This book contains some good, solid marches. The fast dance, tfGyral,,f has proven very popular with students and audiences* The other miscellaneous numbers are useable but have no distinguishing characteristics to recommend them.

57 BRIDGING THE GAP Band Book Composers:

Irving Cheyette, Charles J. Roberts, et. al#

Arrangers:

Irving Cheyette and Charles J. Roberts

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1934 Condensed

I to II by selections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II II II IIIIII II II

Highest note d° a! ?2 dl C1 d

B-flat, E-flat, F, C, A-flat

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 6/8, 2/2

General musical value:

B

Contents: 9 songs 5 marches 3 waltzes 3 dances 1 overture 6 tuning chorals 2 rounds Comments: This folio gives a nice variety of very easy numbers, many of them suitable for concert selections*

58 CHORALE CLASSICS FOR ENSEMBLE, BAND AND ORCHESTRA Composers: Palestrina, Praetorius, Luther, Bach, Handel, Mendelssohn, Gounod, Schumann, Sain-Saens, Schubert, Brahms, and Mason, Arrangers: Harvey S. Whistler and Herman A, Hummel Publisher: Rubank Date of copyright: 1941 Score available: Piano-Conductor General grade: X Highest note Grade and Range by selections: Grade g3 Flutes: X A3 I Clarinets: % X Alto Saxophones: I Tenor Saxophones: X a: Cornets: I Horns In E-flat: I Trombones: X Baritone: I Basses: Percussion: i+ Keys (concert): B-flat, F, E-flat, C, A-flat Meters: 4/2, 3/4, 2/2 General musical value: A Contents: 1-Exalted Lord 2-Behold Our Faith Divine 3-A Mighty Fortress is Our God 4-Sleepers Awake! 5-When Jesus Our Lord 6-Let All Men Praise the Lord 7-0 God, As Divers Arches of Heart 8-Thy Name We Hail

9-Jesu, Joy of Man*s Desiring 10-Go Forth With Thy Courage 11-For Your Ascension, I Herewith 12-Praise Ye the Lord of Hosts 13-Holy Is the Lord 14-0 Jesus, Tender Shepherd, Hear 15-Tell Us of the Night 16-Lord and Master

Comments: These sixteen chorales are arranged in simple four-part harmony, and the four parts are printed in score for each instrument, Xt is left to the discretion of the director to assign parts to be played by the various players. The f,highest notes** shown above are, of course, for the first, or soprano, part. When players are assigned to lower parts, the range will naturally be lower. This folio is designed to be used for orchestra and small ensembles as well as for band.

59 CLIPPER BAND BOOK Composers; Arrangers

Many song-writers George H. Sanders

Publishers

Emil Asoher

Date of copyrights Score availables General grades

1936 Piano-Conductor

II

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes s Clarinets s Alto Saxophones s Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flats Trombones: Baritone: Basses s Percussions Keys (concert): Meters s

Grade II IX II II IT II II II II II

HighesJ; note g^ d3 b2

S

p

e-flat f1 «.l g (usual range)

C, F, B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, D-flat

2/4. 6/8, 3/4, 4/4, 2/2

General musical value:

B

Comments: This folio contains 34 familiar songs and two marches. The two marches are Grade III-, but the songs are mostly Grade II. Familiar songs are popular with students and with audiences. The value of this collection in elementary schools may be limited by the range of the parts, parti­ cularly the first clarinet part, which goes rather high.

60 FIRST SEMESTER BAND BOOK Composers Forrest L* Buchtel Arranger: Composer Publishers Neil A* Kjos Date of copyrights 1940 Score available: Incomplete Full score (7-line) General grades I- to II Grade and Range by sections: Grade Highest note Flutes: II g~ Clarinets: II c~ Alto Saxophones: II c Tenor Saxophones: II g2 Cornets: II g2 Horns in E-flat: IT d2 Trombones: II f^ Bari tone: H f1 Basses: II c Percussion: II Keys (concert): E-flat, B-flat, F, A-flat Meters: 4/4, 3/4, 2/4 General Musical value: AContents: 1-Eventide, Tone Poem 10-Merry Piper, Dance 2-Chapel Echoes, Tone Poem 11-March of the Marines 12-Alma Mater, Old Song 3-Graduation, Grand March 13-Rhythm Rascals, Novelty 4-In a Sanctuary, Chorale 14-Waltz Medley 5-The Dancers, Waltz 6-Sailing, Waltz 15-The Music Makers, Overture 7-Pomposity, Bass Melody 16-(a)America (b)Silent Night 8-Intermezzo (In fugal style) (c)Adeste Fideles 9 -(a)Solitude, Tone Poem (b)Invitation to the Dance, Theme Comments: This is a progressive folio ranging In difficulty from Grade I- to Grade II* The grades shown under 11Grade and Range by sections11 above are for the hardest numbers in the book* These little pieces are of good musical quality*. All but the last four pages have preparatory exercises to be studied before the piece*

61 FORGING AHEAD Band Book Composers: Bach, Schumann, Taylor, Winnemore, Handel, Von Weber, Muller, Tschaikowsky, Young Nyles, Lawrence, Barrett, and Foster Arrangers: Irving Cheyette and Charles J. Roberts Publisher: Carl Fischer Date of copyright: 1938 Score available: Condensed General grade: 114Grade Highest note Range by sections: 114f3 Flutes: 114divisi: f3 , Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: 114* c-sharp3 Tenor Saxophones 114g2 a2 Cornets: [email protected] Horns in IE-flat: II fl Trombones: III Baritone; IIIfl Basses: IIIe-flat Percussion: II* Keys (concert): D-flat, F, B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, F minor, G minor, C minor, C Meters: 4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 6/8, 2/2 General musical value: AContents: 1-Eternity, Tremendous Word, 9-•Festival March Chorale 10- •Viennese Memories, Valse 2-Rejoice, 0 My Soul, Chorale 11- •Russian Episode 3-Prince and Jester, Overture 12- •In Days of Yore, Gavotte 4-Away to Rio, Sea Chantey 13- •Reflections, Intermezzo 5-The Call of the Prairie, 14- •Billy B o y March Cowboy Song 15- •On the Level, March 6-Hill Billy Stomp, Country 16- ■Auditorium March Dance 7-Old King Crow, Cakewalk 8-Wherefer You Walk, Cornet Solo Comments: This book is intended to provide the music for one complete program. The musical quality is very good* The trombones are expected to execute runs of diatonic sixteenth notes at march tempo. In all but the most advanced groups this will effectively eliminate the trombone part from these passages.

62 GRADED CHORALES FOR BAND Volume X Composers: Neander, Luther Brethern, Gibbons, Herberger, Lindemann, Zinzendorf, Albert, Weiss, Gerhardt, Walther, Hermann, Henrietta, Pappus, Behemb, Haydn, Lwoff, J . B. Bach, Scheidemann, Pugger, Schlegel, J* S# Bach# Arrangers:

Lee M. Lockhart and Edmund M# Goehring

Publisher:

M. Witmark and Sons

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1932 Condensed

XX-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade IIIXXIIIXXIXIIIIII 1+

Highest note g| e3 2 gf2 a| f^ g: f d

Keys (concert): B-flat, G minor, F, D minor, C minor B-flat minor, E-flat, C# Meters:

4/2, 4/4, 3/2

General musical value: Contents:

A

24 chorales by 24 different composers

Comments: This collection of easy arrangements of chorales by the masters should be valuable material for improving the intonation, tone-quality, and phrasing of youpg musicians.

63 HEAR THAT BAND*. Band Book Composer:

Forrest L. Buchtel

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Mills Music

Date op Copyright: Score available: General grade:

1948 Xncomple te Full Score (7-line)

X to XI Grade II XI XI II II IIII II II II-

by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Highest note $ %

f2 2 1 e-f lat-*(usual range)

B-flat, E-flat, F, A-flat

3/4, 2/4, 4/4, 2/2, 6/8.

General musical value :

A

Contents: 24 original compositions, 9 marches 7 waltzes 2 chorales 1 overture 1 tone poem

including 1 intermezzo 1 gavotte 1 minuet 1 novelty

Comments: This is an excellent folio for young bands. The pieces are all good and can be used as concert selections as well as for training purposes. All parts are well-adapted to the instruments and to the ability of young players.

64 JUNIOR CHAMPION BAND BOOK Composers £ W. D. McCaughey, Ed McDonald, Pat Lee, Ray Rossi, P. T. Archer, and Z. G. Thomas Arranger£ Publisher£

Pat Lee and W. D. McCaughey Don Keller

Date of copyright £ Score available £ General grade:

1942

Piano-Conductor

11+ t b y ‘sections: Flutes: Solo Clarinet: First Clarinet: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade 11+ 11+ 11+ 11+ 11+ 11 + II 11+ 11+ 11 + II.

Highest note f3 r3

I , p f-sharps g2 fl fl c

B-flat, E-flat, F, A-flat Meters:

2/2, 6/8, 3/4, 4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Contents: 1-Tanforan, March 2-Camp Taylor, March 3-Campus Capers, March 4-Front and Center, March 5-Gridiron, March 6-Honorary Escort, March 7-Bay Meadows, March 8-The Skipper, March

9-Little Charmer, Waltz 10-In A Southern Garden, Caprice 11-Almond Blossoms, Serenade 12-Enchanted Lake, Waltz 13-Sunset Hour, Romance 14-El Cerrito, Spanish Serenade 15-Laconia, Overture 16-The Ambassador, Overture

Comments: This is a good folio. miscellaneous numbers.

The marches are better than the

The Solo Clarinet part is a dispensable part to be used or omitted at the discretion of the director.

65 MARCHING MANEUVERS Band Book Composer:

Forrest F. Griffin

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Jenkins Music Company

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1944 Piano-Conductor

III( by sections: F lutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meterss

Grade III III II IIIIIIII 11+ IIIIII11+

Highest note b-flat3 e3 d3 S2 S2 si f 1 fl (usual range)

B-flat, E-flat, F

2/4, 4/4,- 3/4, 4/8, 6/8

General musical value:

C

Comments: This is a collection of sixteen stunts for the marching band with specially-written music for each stunt. The conductor’s manual contains the directions for performing each maneuver as well as the piano-conductor score. This is a valuable book for a marching band. Only an advanced elementary band could handle the music, however.

66 MARCHING TO VICTORY March Book Composer:

Karl L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

C. L. Barnhouse

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1942 Piano-Conductor

11+ i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade III Hi­ ll • II Hi­ ll II 11+ II II

Highest note f3 QK> a? 4 e^

fl fl d

B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, F Meters:

2/2, 2/4, 6/8

General musical value: Contents: 1-United Nations 2-Liberty Fleet 3-Gallant Marines 4-Sky Ranger 5-Pan American 6-Night Flight 7-Toreh or Liberty 8-Pursuit Squadron

9-Burma Patrol 10-Coast Guards 11-Aces of the Air 12-Flying Cadets 13-Call to Victory 14-Wings of Army 15-Bombardier 16-Thumbs-Up, U. S. A*

Comments: This is an excellent collection of snappy, tuneful marches. Although the first clarinet part does go up to in some places, this is not the composer’s general practice* On many of the marches the first clarinet part does not go above c^.

67 MELODY TIME Band Book Composer;

Forrest L. Buchtel

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Neil A. Kj.os

Date of copyright: Score available:

1945 Piano-Conduetor

General grade: X Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets; Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Comets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade X X I X X I I X I X

Highest note

?i c5 %Z fS d2

fl f1 d

E-flat* F, B-flat, A-flat

4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 6/8

General musical value:

A

Comments: This march-size folio contains 48 songs (folk-songs, popular songs, and themes from the classics). Some are in unison only, but most are written to be played either in unison or in harmony. The songs are arranged in such an order as to present a logical sequence of problems. Melody Time is an excellent book for providing supple­ mentary material for a beginning band. Many of the numbers could be used as program selections. Scale Time and Rhythm Time by the same composer are companion volumes to Melody Time. These are actually methods and are not considered here because the present study is concerned only with concert music.

68 THE NOEL MARCH BOOK FOR BAND Composers

F* E. Noel

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Fillmore Music House

Date of copyrights Scores available s General grades

1928 None

11+ i by sections: Flute s Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones Cornets s Horn in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussions

Keys (concert)s Meters;

F, B-flat,

Grade III II II II II II 11+ 11+ 11+ II

Highest note f3 d3 d3 b-flat2 8o fl fl

r

;-flat, A-flat

2/2, 6/8, 2/4

General musical value: Contents s 1-Burton 2-Cal 3-Central 4-Creston 5-Dexter 6-Glorious South 7-Harrison 8-K March

*

C 9-Loop the Loop 10-Maverick 11-Ottowa 12-Scout 13-Shelby 14-Stanley 15-Uncle Dudley 16-Union

Comments s This contains sixteen marches which are satisfactory but not distinctive. The trombone parts are rather hard in relation to the other parts.

69 OUR FIRST BAND FGII'O Band Book Composers: Arranger:

Ed Chenette et. al. Ed Chenette

Pub11sh e r :

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1938 Piano-Conductor

II-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IXIIIIIIIIIIII II II II-

Highest note d*5 c^ a f2 ^ 1 e-flat f^ e-flat

B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, F, D-flat

4/4, 2/2, 2/4, 3/4, 6/8

General musical value:

B +

Contents: 32 exercises 33 musical numbers, including 14 songs 3 marches 5 themes from the classics 1 overture 4 waltzes 6 miscellaneous compo’ sitions Comments: This is a good book for training a young band# Most of the pieces are too short to be very good concert selections; however, a few are suitable.

70 PAUL YODER *S BAND BOOK NUMBER 1 Composers? Paul Yoder, Al Van Buskirk, Lester Guthrie, and Frederick Griggs Arranger: Paul Yoder Publisher: The Raymond A. Hoffman Company (Chicago) Date of copyright: 1936 Score available: Piano-Conductor General grade: 11+ Grade Highest note * by sections: f3 IIIFlutes: IIIe-flat^ Clarinets: d3 Alto Saxophones: II Tenor Saxophones: II °2 11 + Cornets: Horns in E-flat: II fi Trombones: 11+ Baritone: 11+ fi Basses: 11+ e-flat 11+ Percussion: Keys (concert): E-flat, A-flat, B-flat, C minor, G minor, F Meterst 6/8, 2/2, 4/4, 2 / 4 , 3/4 General musical value: B+

fi

Contents: 1-Fighting Irish, March 2-Parade of the Tiny Tots, Novelty 3-The Golden Bears, March 4-The Merry Swiss Boy, Novelty 5-Spirit of the Sioux, March 6-At the Animal Fair, Novelty 7-March of the Trojans, March 8-Little Gypsy, Overture

9-Royal Purple, March 10-Grandpa*s Clocks, Novelty 11-American Patriots, March Medley 12-Junior Joins the Band, Novelty 13-Parlez Vous, One Step 14-Loyal and True, School Song 15-Sleepy Time, Waltz Medley 16-Under the Big Top, Selection

Comments: An outstanding attraction of this book is the presence of five novelty numbers in the contents, Yoder*s novelties are cleverly done, and since it is difficult to select suitable numbers of this type for elementary school groups, these five constitute a valuable contribution. The other compositions are also of good quality.

71 PAVING THE WAY FROM INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION TO CLASS PLAYING Band Book Composers: Harvey S. Whistler and Herman A. Hummel Arrangers: Composers Publisher: Rubank Date of copyright: 1940 Score available: Six-line Full Score General Grade: IGrade Highest note Grade and Range by sections: Xd3 Flutes: Xe3 Clarinets: Ibg Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophone: T~ S2 Cornet: I_ ®i Id Horns in E-flat: Trombones: I d?1 Baritone: Id‘ I(usual range) Basses: 1+ Percussion: Keys (concert): B-flat, E-flat, F Meters: 4/4, 3/4 General musical value: C Contents: Starting Together (B-flat Concert) Evening Song, Serenade By the River, Reverie Summer Skies, Waltz On the Lake, Waltz Stepping Along, March Silvery Moon, Waltz Shadow Waltz Largo from New World Symphony A New Key (E-flat Concert) Treasure Isle, Waltz Merry Widow Waltz

Spirit of Victory, March Liebestraume, (Liszt) Volga Boatman Melody in F (Rubenste3n ) Campus Glory, March Another Key (F Concert) Merry Life, Scherzando Oriental Dance In the Ballroom, Waltz Pioneer Days, Allegro Top Flight, March Honor Salute, March

Comments: This beginning band book is carefully put together and contains scales, long tones, and lip slurs as well as little pieces. The one criticism that can be made is that the mel­ odies are rather infantile and may bore the students.

72 PROGRAM AND PARADE BAND POLIO Composers: Harvey S. Whistler, Herman A. Hummel, et. a 1 ♦ Arrangers: Harvey S. Whistler and Herman A. Hummel Publi sher: Rubank Date of copyright: 1949 Score available: Piano-Conductor General grade: IX Highe s t not© Grade and Range by sections: Grade d3 Flutes: XI „3 Clarinets: II Alto Saxophones: II Tenor Saxophones: II Cornets: II e; e: Horns in E-flat: II Trombones: II Baritone: II (usual range) Basses: II Percussion: II Keys (concert): F, E-flat, A-flat, B-flat Meters: 2/2, 3/4, 4/4, 2/4, 6/8 General musical value: BContents: The Thunderer, "March De Molay, March High School Cadets, March Valse Suite from Espana Waltz King Favorites March Majestic The Crusader, March Round-Up Review, March

Salute to Stephen Foster Jolly Coppersmith, March Sharpshooters, March Carmen Selection Chilcothian-Sentinel, March Little Giant, March Fair Maid of Perth, Overture

Comments: This folio consists largely of excerpts from standard repertoire in greatly simplified arrangements,. The one big criticism that may be leveled against this work is that the arrangers may have taken more liberties with the original compositions than they ought. For instance, the first number in the book is entitled ,fThe Thunderer--March** by Sousa * However, the piece actually contains only two,melodies from the original **Thunderer” , and these two have been altered. Likewise, the melodies from the last two strains of tfHigh School Cadets*1 have been re-worked and entitled **High School Cadets*— Mareht! by Sousa. Directors who do not object to this tampering with a composer* s work may find this folio very useful.

73 PROMOTION BAND FO'IXO Band Book Composers: Ed Chenette, Ernest Weber, R. B. Eisenberg Arrangers:

Composers

Pub11s h e r :

Rubank

Date of copyright: Scores available: General Grade:

. H. Ribble, and

1931 Piano-Conductor

XI

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade II II II II II IIII 11+ II II

Highest note d? a: d e-f lat-*f1 e-flat

B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, DMeters:

2/4, 2/2, 6/8, 4/4, 3/4

General musical value: Contents: 1-Promotion, March 2-Starter, March 3-Airport, March 4-Warming Up, March 5-Vanguard, March 6-Honor Band, March 7-Forward, March 8-The Flyer, March

B 9-Yesternight, Serenade 10-Blue Moon, Waltz 11-Playground, Waltz 12-Organ Melody, Reverie 13-Village Chaper, Tone Poem 14-Song of the Rose, Serenade 15-Trombone Toboggan, Novelty 16-Neptune, Overture

Comments: This book has been popular for many years and is still good. Practically every number is useable as a program se­ lection.

74 SECOND SEMESTER BAND BOOK Composer: Forrest L# Buchtel, et* al* Arranger: Forrest L. Buchtel Publisher: Neil A. KJos Date of copyright: 1941 Score available: Piano-Conductor G-eneral grade: XIX Grade Highest note Grade and Range by sections: III g3 Flutes: III ef Clarinets: XII d5 Alto Saxophones: III b-flat2 Tenor Saxophones: III Cornets: 11+ e2 Horns in E-flat: Trombones: III fr­ ill f1 Bari tone: IIId Basses: II Percussion: Keys (concert): E-flat, B-flat, F, A-flat, D-flat, F minor Meters: 4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 6/8, 2/2 General musical value: A Contents: Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord (Mendelssohn) Chorale from Overture 1812 (Tschaikowski) Excerpt from Orpheus Overture (Offenbach) March Premier Franz Lehar Waltz Favorites Recruits, March Victory, March On the Moldau, Excerpt (Smetana) • Comrades March March XJncle Sam Excerpts from Barber of Seville and William Tell Overtures (Rossini) My Bonnie in Shanghai, Novelty Festival March, Processional Landsighting (Grieg) Carnival of Venice, Theme and Variations The Farmer in the Dell, Novelty Overture Amethyst, Overture Star Spangled Banner When Johnny Comes Marching Home America the Beautiful Comments: This is a collection of very musical numbers for an advanced group*

75 SIXTEEN CHORALES BY J. S. BACH Composers

Johann Sebastian Bach

Arrangers

Mayhew Lake

Publisher:

G. Schirmer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1938 Condensed

III-

G-rade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade Highest note II g5 a2 (a3 ) II a2 11+ a2 ■11+ a2 11+ g2 II III al (f1 ) 11+ g1 11+ c (no part published)

Keys (concert): F, E-flat, A minor, A-flat, F minor, G- minor, B-flat Meters:

4/4, 3/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: These chorales are arranged in four part harmony following Bach*s original harmonization. They are intended to serve equally well for band or for small ensembles of almost any description. The B-flat clarinet parts, as written, double the corresponding cornet parts in unison. The arranger has noted that the clarinets should play their parts an octave higher for full band performance. Young clarinetists may have trouble in performing this transposition. The g^- and a^ in the first trombone part are optional, all notes above fl being written in octaves. Choral parts to these chorales are available from the same publisher.

76 THIRTY-FIVE FAMOUS CHORALES SONGS AND INTONATION STUDIES Composers: Bach, Nicolai, Cruger, Palestrina , Luther, Vulpius, Lindeman, Gruber, Praetorius, Beethoven, Tkach, Decius, Kjerulf, Grieg, Handel, Yoder, and Gillette. Arrangers: Paul Yoder and James R . Gillette Publisher: Neil A. Kjos Date of copyright: 1941 Score available: Piano-Conductor General grade: II. Grade and Range by sections: Grade Highest note Flutes: II sf Clarinets: II es e3 Alto Saxophones: II a2 Tenor Saxophones: II a^ Cornets: II ©2 Horns in E-flat II Trombones: f1 11+ fl Baritone: II Basses: Hi­ d Percussion: ll Keys (concert): E-flat, F minor, C minor, F, C, E minor, G, A-flat, B-flat, D-flat Meters: 4/4, 3/4, 6/8, 2/2, 3/2, 2/4 General musical value: A 4* Contents: 27 chorales 8 intonation studies Comments: This is a fine collection of great chorales* Some of the numbers may be unusable by grade school bands because of the unusual keys. Nine of the chorales are by J. S. Bach, the other eighteen by various other composers. On some of the chorales the first clarinet part goes up to e^j on others the highest note is g^,

77 TOP PLIGHT BAND POLIO Composer: G. E. Holmes Arranger: Composer Publisher: Rubank Date of copyright: 1940 Score available: 6-line Pull Score General grade: I- to II Grade and Range by sections: Grade Highest note Flutes: 11+ d-flat3 Clarinets: 11+ Alto Saxophones II b-flat^ Tenor Saxophones: II g Cornets: II e Horns in E-flat: IId Trombones: II d Baritone: II d Basses: II (usual range.) Percussion: II Keys (concert): E-flat, B-flat, P, A-flat, C, D-flat Meters: 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 2/2, 6/8 General musical value: AContents: 30 original compositions including 11 marches, 6 waltzes, 2 chorales, and 11 miscellaneous numbers Comments: This is a progressive folio ranging in difficulty from Grade I- to Grade II. The grades shown under nGrade and Range by sections11 above indicate the highest level of diffi­ culty reached. It will be noted that six key signatures are used rather than the usual four.^ However, the keys of C and D-flat are each used in only one composition. This short experience in unfamiliar keys may sharpen the studentsr.awareness of signatures. However, the director who does not wish to use these keys can omit the two numbers mentioned. This book should be very valuable for a young band. In a well developed instrumental program it could be used for the junior band.

See Chapter II, Section III, for a discussion of keys •

78 TRANSITION BAND BOOK NUMBER 2 Composers

Leon V* Metcalf

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Fillmore Music House

Date of copyrights Score available: General grade:

1949 Incomplete Full Score (7-line)

I ■ by sections: Flutes: Special Clarinet: First Clarinet: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flats Trombones: Baritone s Basses: Percussion:

Grade I 1+ I I I I I I I I 1+

Highest note fS e3 a2 c3 j*2 d2 e-flat e-flat-^* d

E-flat, B-flat, F, A-flat MetersS

2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 2/2, 6/8

General musical values

B-

Comments s This folio contains thirty very short and very easy compositions of various types.

79 UNCLE SAM A-STRUT March Booh Composer:

Karl L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

C. L. Barnhouse

Pate of copyright: Score available: General Grade:

1943 Piano-Conductor

III-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III III 11+ 11+ III II 11+ III11+ II

Highest note d~ b2 b-flat2 g2 e2 fl gl e-flat

B-flat, E-flat, P, A-flat

2/2, 6/8, 2/4

General musical value: Contents: 1-Lexington 2-Bunker Hill 3-Valley Porge 4-Alamo 5-Monterey 6-General Grant 7-General Lee 8-Custer*s Cavalry

A 9-Rough-Riders 10-Manila Bay 11-Santiago 12-Chateau Thierry 13-Saint Mihiel 14-Argonne 15-Henderson Field 16-Algeria

Comments: This book contains some very nice marches for an advanced elementary school band.

80 WITH PIPES AND DRUMS Band Book Composers: Harold Hunt, John Velber, H* M. Johnson, Guy Ferguson, Wilber Harrison, Ted Adison, and Jack Pratt Arranger: Harold M. Johnson Publisher: H. T# FitzSimons Company Date-of copyright: 1938 Score available: Piano-Conductor General grade: II Highest note Grade i by sections: II Flutes: f! Clarinets: II Alto Saxophones: II e| f»2 Tenor Saxophones: II 2 Cornets: II Horns in E-flat: II !? II + Trombones: II Bari tone: II e-flat Basses: Percussion: II Keys (concert): E-flat, A-flat, B-flat F, D-flat MetersJ 2/4, 2/2, 6/8, 3/4, 4/4 General musical value: AContents: 1-Men in Lincoln Green, March 8--Friar Tuck, Characteristic 2-Kingfs Archers, March 9- •Jolly Outlaw, March 3-Qu©enfs Page, March 10- •Chase in Sherwood, Descriptive 4-Maid Marion, Waltz 11- -Lion-Heart, March 5-Signal Horn, March 12- •Selections from ,fThe Forest 6-Allan-I-Dale, Serenade Prince11 7-The Nottingham Guards, Patr0113- •The Golden Arrow, Overture 14- •Call to Arms, Grand March Comments: This folio contains fourteen very tuneful compositions All parts are well-adapted to the ability of young players except for the trombone parts, which are a little bit diffi­ cult*

81 III.

SUMMARY

Approximately fifty-five folios were examined, and thirty were selected to be evaluated in this study.

Each

folio evaluated is recommended for use with elementary school bands.

Those most highly recommended at each grade level

considered are as follows: Grade I :

Melody Time by Forrest L. Buchtel Chorale Classics, arr. Whistler and Hummel

Grade I+:

Hear That Band! by Forrest L. Buchtel Top Flight Band Folio by G. E. Holmes

Grade II-

Graded Chorales for Band, arr. Lockhart and Goehring Archer Progressive Band Book by P. T. Areher

Grade II:

Thirty-Five Famous Chorales, arr. Yoder and Gillette With Pipes and Drums by Harold Hunt et. al.

Grade II+:

Forging Ahead, arr. Cheyette and Roberts Marching to Victory by Karl L. King

Grade III-

Sixteen Chorales by J. S. Bach, arr. Mayhew Lake Uncle Sam A-Strut by Karl L. King

Grade Ills

Second Semester Band Book by Forrest L. Buchtel Tip Top March Book by Ted Mesang et. al.

CHAPTER IV MARCHES RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS I*

PROBLEM AND CRITERIA

Statement of specific problem.

The specific problem

of this chapter was to select and evaluate a group of marches which can be recommended for the use of elementary school bands.

Only those marches which are published separately are

considered here, as folios have already been presented in Chapter III. Value of m arches.

Marches have been associated with

bands ever since the first small military bands were formed. The purposes of a military band are Cl) to provide the rhythmic cadence for marching and (2) to arouse in men feelings of patriotism and bravery.

The composition which best fulfills

these purposes is the street march.

The march has thus

played an important part in the history of band development. The march as a type of composition is truly the char­ acteristic medium of the band.

Although our modern concert

bands play symphonic music with admirable finish, it is still true that a band never 1fshows off11 as well as when playing a march.

Just as a band is at its best when playing a march,

so is a march at its best when played by a band.

Several of

our best band marches have been transcribed for orchestra,

83 piano, organ, and other instruments,

but the product always

sounds like a transcription and never carries the thrill of a march played by a band# The reasons for including marches in the school band repertoire are numerous# to play them.

In the first place, students love

Perhaps it is the strong, steady rhythmic

puls© that appeals to them most.

The snappy melodies,

which are gay and yet martial, and the flashy arrangements, featuring drum flourishes, bugle calls, and piccolo trills, probably exert a strong attraction also.

When a rehearsal

is going badly, there is nothing like a favorite march to pick up morale and remold the band into a smoothly functioning unit. In the second place, the fact that a band is at its best playing a march makes it advantageous to sprinkle pro­ grams generously with marches.

Audiences are fond of them

also. I n the third place, marches are comparatively easy to teach.

The steady tempo,

the absence of meter change, and

the virtual standardization of form, style, and key rela­ tionship are all factors contributing to ease of reading. In view of these arguments it seems mandatory that the library of any band include a number of good marches. Special criteria.

In addition to the general criteria

84 discussed in Chapter II there are three special criteria to he considered in selecting marchess (1) A march should be tuneful.. That is, the melodies used should be appealing.

These tunes should be such that

the march seems to move from its own inherent energy rather than being forced.

March melodies must be gay and yet military.

(2) The arrangement of the march is very important. good melody by itself can become rather dull. interesting countermelodies, full harmony,

A

There must be

and a rhythmic

accompaniment. (3) Consistency of difficulty is also a consideration. The various strains of a march should be of comparable difficulty#

If one strain, phrase, or section is much harder

than.the rest, the players will tend to vary the tempo at this place.

A particularly hard spot may even render the

march unusable. II.

EVALUATION OP SELECTED MARCHES

The marches evaluated on the following pages are con­ sidered the best available for the elementary school band. These evaluations are grouped according to three classifications:

Ca) Street Marches, (b) Concert Marches,

Cc) Grand Marches.^"

Titles are arranged alphabetically

■under each heading. -*• See Chapter I, Section II, for definition of these three terms.

ACES OF THE AIR March Composer:

Karl L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publishers

C* L. Barnhouse

Date of copyrights Score available: General Grade:

1942 Piano-Conductor

11+ > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flats Trombones s Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III III II II II II 11+ II 11 + II

Highest note e3 e3 b-flat^ g2 ?2 ©2 e-flat1 fi c

E-flat, A-flat

2/2

General musical values

A

Comments: This is a fine march* The flute part and the clarinet are rather hard in the second strain.

86

AMERICAN BOY March Composer*

J* E. Wells

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Fred.Jewell

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1925 Solo Cornet

II-r > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones Tenor Saxophones Cornets: Horns in E-flat Trombones s Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade II II II II II IIIIII 1+ II

Highest note d2 a3

e c-sharp2 f1 fl (usual range)

B-flat, E-flat

6/8

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This is an old march h u t a good one. are easy.

All of the parts

The fact that the horn, trombone, and bass parts are unusually easy will make this number especially useful to groups that are weak in these sections.

87 ARGONAUT March Composer:

Paul Weeks

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Gamble Hinged Music Company

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1939 Piano-Conductor

XX

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Gra de II II XI II II II II II II ir

Hi ghe st no te e-flat5 d5 d£ fd 2 fi f1 (usual range)

A-flat, D-flat

2/2

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This is a very full-sounding march* Some players may have trouble remembering their flats in the trio*

88

COAST GUARDS March Composer:

Karl L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

C* L. Barnhouse

Date of copyright: Score available: General Grade:

1942 Piano-Conductor

XX

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade XX II XI IX IX II II II IX IX

Highest note ej: e c^ g_ e2 e-flat* e-flat d-flat

E-flat, A-flat

2/2

General musical value:

B+

* *

Comments: This is a snappy march,

tuneful and well-arranged.

The high notes in the first clarinet part appear only in the last strain of the trio. Up until that point the first clarinet part does not go above cs .

89 DRUMS AND BUGLES March. Composer:

Ed Chenette

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1927 Solo Cornet with cues

II-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ 11+ IIII IIII II II 1+ 11-

Highest note c3 d^ a2 g2 e2 d2 dl d^ c

F, B-flat

2/2

General musical value:

B

Comments: This march is apparently intended to be descriptive of a drum and bugle corps. It gives an excellent opportunity to feature the cornet and drum sections. The high f,d w in the clarinet part seems to be optional, as it is always written in octaves whenever it appears. No alternate note is given for the high nc !l, however. While the first clarinet part is fairly hard, the second and third are very easy. Horns have countermelodies rather than after-beats. Alto and tenor saxophones also have eountermelodies. This will be a great help in a band which is short on trombones.

90 FORT BRAGG March Composer:

Pat Lee

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Don Keller

Date of Copyright: Score available : General Grade:

1959 Solo Cornet with cues

IX

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets; Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion; Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IX IX IX II XX IX II II XIII

Highest note e'z f~ c^ f^ e5 d , e-flat1 e-flat1 c

B-flat, E-flat

2/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: ’’Fort Bragg’1 is a very tuneful march. The composer has made great use of..simple syncopation figures. The trio features trumpet fanfares. There are four clarinet parts— Solo, First, Second, and Third. If the solo part is too high for the players, it can be omitted. The first clarinet part goes up only to a^.

91 GENERAL LEE March Composer:

Karl L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

C. L. Barnhouse

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1943 Piano-Conductor

II

Grade and Range by sections: Elutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ 11+ II II II II II II II II

Highest note e-flat^ c3 b2 f2 t2

e-flat2 e-f lat^e-flat^ (usual range)

G minor, B-flat, E-flat

2/2

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This march is unique in that the first strain is in the minor mode. With the melody in the lower voices, this gives an interesting and somber effect.

92 HAND GRENADE March Composer:

Haul Weeks

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Gamble Hinged Music Company

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1939 Piano-Conductor

XI

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

F, B-flat

2/2

General Musical value:

B*

Comments: This is a good easy march.

Grade XX IX XIIX II IIXI II XI II

Highest note f3 dS

cgsharp'5

f-sharp^ ©2 el ©1 d

93 HIGH SCHOOL CADETS March Composer:

John Phillip Sousa

Arranger:

Forrest L. Buchtel

Publisher:

Heil A* Kjos

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1948 Piano-Conductor

11+

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIIII+

11+ H 11+ IIII II II II

Highest note g5■ *

c3

*

e5 (optional e3 ) g2 g2 (optional b-flat2 ) d2 f1 f1 e-flat

E-flat, A-flat

2/2

General musical value:

A

Comments: The original Sousa arrangement of this march is far too difficult for an elementary school band* Mr. Buchtel has simplified the arrangement without losing any of the sparkle of the original. Outstanding changes in the revision are changing the key and lowering the clarinet parts.

94 THE IOWA BAND LAW March Composers

K. L. King

Arrangers

Composer

Publisher:

K* L* King Music House (Fort Dodge, Iowa)

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1924 Solo Cornet

11+ > by sections: Flu t e s : Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percus sion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ 11 + 11 + 11 + 11 + II 11+ 11 + II 11+

Highest note g3 ©3 g2 ©2 f2 d2 dl

e-flatx d-flat

F, B-flat

6/8

General musical value:

B

Comments: This is an old King march which is still going strong,

95 LEE'S FAVORITE March Composer:

Pat Lee

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Don Keller

Date of copyrights Scores available: General grade s

1938 Solo Cornet with cues

II i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone s Bas ses: Percussion:

Keys (concert) Meter:

Grade II II II II II 1+ II II 11+ II .

Highest note fS f3 (e») d3 0.2

f2 @2 fl el d

F, B-flat

2/2 value:

B

Comments: This is a good, solid, easy march. High notes in the first clarinet part are optional, lower notes being provided as alternatives whenever the part goes above c^*

96 LIBERTY FLEET March Composer:

K. L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

C. L. Barnhouse

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1942 Piano-Conductor

II i by sections: Flute s: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade II II II II II II 11+ II II II

Highest note d3 °3 b-flat2 f! a,2

e-flat* e-flat1 c

E-flat, A-flat

2/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a fine march--worthy of a place beside those of Sousa, and yet easy enough to sound well in a good grade school band.

97 LOYALTY March Composer;

J. E. Skornicka

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1954 None

XI

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade IX XI II IX II II IX II XI XI

Highest note ©5 e3

?! e-flat1 e-f la t*^ (usual range)

E-flat, A-flat

2/2

General musical value:

B+

Comments: A sustained obligato in the trombones, baritone, and tenor saxophone contrasts nicely with the faster-moving melody in the higher instruments.

MEN OP MIGHT March Composer:

Leonard V. Meretta

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Boosey & Hawks

Date of* copyright: Score available: General grade:

1948 Condensed

III

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade IIIIIIIII11 + IIIIIIII IIIIV II

Highest note fS e3 d3 f2 d2 f1 fx (usual range)

B-flat, E-flat

2/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a very tuneful march. However, all instruments are required to play sixteenth notes. This will be hard on such instruments as trombones and tubas#

99 MILITARY ESCORT March. Composer:

Harold Bennett

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Fillmore Music House

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1923, 1935 Solo Cornet with cues

1+

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Bas.ses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade II1+ IIIIIII IIIII II-

Highest note f3 d3 d3 g2 g2 d2 fl fl e

B-flat, E-flat

2/2

General musical value:

B

Comments: This is a very easy march which still sounds full. Much doubling of parts makes it easy to teach. Being written in alia breve, it can be taught to beginners in 4/4 time and then speeded up later. "Military Escort" has been used successfully with students who had only six months experience on their instru­ ments •

100

MONTEREY March Composer:

Karl L. King

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

C* L. Barnhouse

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1943 Piano-Conductor

IX by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Tromb one s : Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade IX II II XI XI II II II 11 II-

Highest no e-flat3 b-flat^ 3 2 b-flat* .p2 & O e-flat f1 d

B-flat, E-flat

2/2

General musical value:

A

Comments: “Monterey11 is another of the fine marches by Karl King.

101

OFFICER OF THE DAY March Composer:

R. B. Hall

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Lyon and Healy

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1931 Solo Cornet

III-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade III IIIIII IIIIII II IIIII1+ 11+

Highest note g3 e by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat Trombones: Baritone: Bas ses : Percussion:

Meters:

Grade II II II IHII IIII11+ II II-

Highest note g3 c3 d3 a2 g2 e2 dl fi c

B-flat, E-flat, C minor.

G minor, B-flat

4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 6/8, 2/2

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This is a rather interesting little overture. The composer has used both rhythmic and melodic counterpoint in an artistic manner. Although there are four changes of key, the key signature changes only twice, as two of the modulations are between relative major and minor.

119 BABB Overture Composer:

Max Thomas

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Neil A. Kjos

Date of copyright: Score available: G-eneral grade:

1937 Piano-Conductor

II-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II II II I II II IIII

Highest note f3 c3 c3 b-flat^ g2 d^ e-f lat**f1 c

E-flat, B-flat, E-flat

4/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B-

Comments: This is a very simple little overture. It is printed in march size and is therefore somewhat crowded. However, it is not as hard to read as many pieces. The flute and the first clarinet have diatonic six­ teenth notes in two places (maestoso). However, both runs are the same, and the fingering for the clarinets is very simple. (The flute fingering is slightly harder.) Young players should be able to master this figure with a little dri11•

120 BALATON Overture Composer:

Forrest L. Buchtel

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Neil A* Kjos

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1940 Piano-Conductor

III> by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III III III IIIIII II 11+ III11+ II

Highest g3 d3 c3 f2 g2 ©2 fl e-: d

B-flat, G minor, C minor, F

3/4, 2/4, 3/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This overture is short but quite musical* It opens with a lovely chorale in the lower voices. This same chorale is played maestoso by the full band as the finale. All three clarinet parts are rather hard, requiring the execution of sixteenth note runs (slurred) at a tempo of 120. The trombone parts are very easy except for one short passage, in which they double the baritone and the tenor saxophone• This number should be interesting for the percussion section. The drum part calls for bass drum, snare drum (with and without snares), bells, cymbals, triangle, and tambourine.

121 CAMEO Overture Composers

Paul Brent

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Belwin

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1942 Full and Condensed

IIIs by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: C o rne t s : Horns in US-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIIIIIIIIIIIIII11+ IIIIII' III11 +

Highest note g5 *2 divisi: f 3 , b2 g2 e2 fl g1 e-flat

B-flat, A-flat, B-flat

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical Value:

A-

Comments: Special problems encountered in this number include dotted eighth and sixteenth notes and staccato tonguing. Clean, crisp articulation is required of all players.

122 CARDINAL OVERTURE Composers

Clair W. Johnson

Arranger:

C omp oser

Publishers

Belwin

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

194Q Condensed

II-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flats Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II IIII IIIIII II II

Highest note e-flat3 d^ c3 b-flat^ g^ e^ f1 rf

E-flat, A-flat

4/4, 2/4, 4/4

General musical value:

B-

Comments: This little overture is very simple and may be useful for that reason.

125 CARNIVAL OP ROSES Overture Composers

J. Olivadoti

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher!

Mills Music

Date of copyrigh.tr Score available! General grader

1947 Condensed

11+ s by sections! Flutes: Clarinets r Alto Saxophones! Tenor Saxophones: Cornets r Horns in E-flat! Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade 11+ 11+ ii; 11 + II II 11+ 11+ 11+ II-

Highest note d3 d3 a2 S2 fl g1 e-flat

F, D minor, B-flat , E-flat Meters:

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 9/8, 2/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments r This overture is rather long* The high notes for the clarinets occur only at the climax of the composition. During the rest of the piece the first clarinet part does not go above b^.

124 CHALLENGER Overture Composer:

E. De Lamater

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Rub auk

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1942 Condensed

II : by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percus sion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II II II IIII 11+ II II

Highest note ©3 fS q3 b-flat2 f2 dS c g1 (usual range)

C minor, E-flat, C minor, E-flat

4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B-

Comments : This overture is fairly easy except for the first clarinet part, which goes rather high for this grade. Although the key changes from minor to relative major and vice versa, this will not confuse the students, as the key signature remains the same throughout. Melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic material is slightly above average. The form is rather interesting. There is plenty of opportunity for contrast in tempo, style, and dynamics.

125 CONCERT OVERTURE IN G MINOR Composers

Clifford P. Lillya and Merle J • Isaac

Arrangers

Composers

Publishers

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grades

1942 Condensed

III > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Key (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ III11+ 11+ 11+ Hi­ ll' 11+ II II'

Highest note g5 divisis f3 , d3 e3 1q 2

a2 ©2 S1

B minor

4/4, 2/2

General musical values

A

Comments: As the title implies, irConcert Overture in G Minor” is a pretentious composition* It opens with the statement (maestoso) of the three themes upon which the work is based* Then follows a fairly long allegro development section. The overture closes with a maestoso chorale for full band. Performance of this work could be a fine lesson in appreci­ ation for the students. Although this overture was evidently written for the high school band, it might be played by an advanced elementary group•

126 ENCHANTED LAKE Overture * Composer:

Clair W. Johnson

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Belwin

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1948 Condensed

11+ i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II 11+ II 11+ II II II 11+ II II'

Highest note g5 e3 c3 ©2 fl fl c

E-flat, B-flat, E-flat, C minor, E-flat

4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This overture has strong melodic appeal and unity, being based almost entirely on one motive* The basses, baritone, trombones, and tenor saxophone have a sixteenth-note run at a tempo of 126, This would probably have to be re-written in eighth-notes for successful performance by elementary school pupils. Consequently, this run has not been considered in grading the parts.

127 GOLDEN GLOW Overture Composer;

Clair W. Johnson

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1947 Full and Condensed

III s by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones; Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade III III+ III III' III IIIIII III II II

Highest note a3 ©3 e3 b-flat2 q2 ©2 fl i e-flat1 c

B-flat, E-flat

2/4

General musical value;

A

Comments: This overture is fairly short and unpretentious but very melodic and musical. f,Golden Glow” is one of the numbers recently recorded by the Band of the Irish Guards.

128 THE GYPSY FESTIVAL Overture Composers

A1 Hayes

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Fillmore Music House

Date of copyrights Scores availables General grades

1924 Condensed (5-line) and Solo Cornet with cues

IIIi by sectionss Flu t e s : Clarinets s Alto S axophone s : Tenor Saxophones: Cornets s Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone s Basses: Percussion:

Keys

(concert)

Meterss

Grade III III III 11+ III 11+ 11 + III IIIIII-

Highest f3 d3 go So d2 f1 f1 f

F-major, F-minor, F-ma jor, F-minor,

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical values

A-

Comments s This overture captures the flavor of gypsy music and has strong audience appeal. The continual change of mode (from- major to parallel minor and vice versa) is confusing to the students, particu­ larly in the closing section where the main theme, originally introduced in the minor key, reappears in major.

129 THE IRON COUNT Overture Composers

Karl L. King

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

C. L. Barnhouse

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1911 Solo Cornet with cues

11+ i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIIIII II III11+ II 11+ III II II-

Highest note f5 e3 f2 a2 SZ

h fi £T 1

B-flat, E-flat, A-flat

4/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical values

A-

Commentss This is a good standard overture for young bands— popular as a contest selection. The baritone part is essential. Although not particu­ larly difficult technically, this part is rather hard to master because of its complete independence of the other parts• The parts must be carefully edited, as there are several misprints.

130 J U D Y 1S DREAM Overture Composer:

Forrest L. Buchtel

Arranger:

Composer



Publisher:

Neil A. Kjos

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1939 Piano-Conductor

II-

Grade and range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II II II II II II II II

Highest note e-flat3 dr c3 cji f~ e~* fr* g1 e-flat

B-flat, C minor, E-flat

3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This overture is short and well-adapted for the use of young students. The parts fit together very easily. This will account for the general grade being slightly lower than the grade of any one part.

131 LITTLE GYPSY Overture Composer:

Paul Yoder

Arrangers

Composer

Publisher

Raymond A. Hoffman Company (Chicago)

Date of copyrights Score available: General grade:

1936 Piano-Conductor

II* by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIIIIIIIIIIf 1+ IIIIII-

Highest note e-f lat*5 d3 c3 f2 f2 d2 e-flat^fl (usual range)

C minor, G minor

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: music.

This catchy little overture is an imitation of gypsy Students love to play this sort of thing.

A fairly strong clarinet section is needed for this number. The clarinet parts are not particularly difficult, but they are very important.

132 LYCEUM OVERTURE Composer:

Otis Taylor

Arranger:

Cheyette-Roberts

Publisher!

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright! Scores available! General grade:

1941 Full and Condensed

III

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: T romb one s : Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

r

Grade 11+ III III III 11+ III_ III 11+ 11+ II

Highest note s3 , divisi: cc _ f® t)2 a2 a2 ©2 fl g1 (normal range)

B-flat, F, B-flat

4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

A+

Comments: This is one of the most musical numbers we have found for elementary bands# The andante sostenuto (in 3/4 meter) is especially beautiful, featuring the interweaving of two graceful, flowing melodies, which gradually build up to a majestic climax at the end of the section. The first clarinet part is written divisi in several places. The upper notes can be omitted without spoiling the arrangement. However, this number should not be attempted without a fairly strong clarinet section, as the clarinets carry the melody alone in several places, the cornets being used merely to reinforce the accents and climaxes. The trombones have a rather difficult sixteenth-note figure in two short passages. However, both of these are in unison with the baritone and other instruments. The remainder of the trombone parts are very easy.

133 MAGIC ISLE Overture Composer:

Porrest L* Buclitel

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Neil A. Kjos

Date of copyright: Score available: General grader

1949 Condensed (6 lines)

III * by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade III IIIIIIIIIIII11 + 11+ III Hi­ ll

Highest note divisi: b-flat^, divisi: f 3 , d3 e-flat3 sz e2 e-flat*^* fl d-flat

Keys (concert): G minor, D minor, P, D-flat, B-flat.minor, A-flat, D-flat Meters:

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/4, 12/8

General musical value:

A-

C omment s : This overture should be attempted only by an advanced group* The key signatures will prove confusing to young players* There are also some tricky places rhythmically*

134 MANHEqUIN'S FESTIVAL

'

Overture Composer:

J, Clivadoti

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Mills Music

Date oP copyright: Score available: General grade:

1945 Piano-Conductor

XII

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Corne t s : Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade III III III Ill III II II III II II-

Highest note g3 c3 cj? f* g2 e2 e-flat1 e-flat1 c

Keys (concert): B-flat, E-flat, G minor, B-flat, E-flat, C minor, E-flat Meters:

4/4, 3/4, 4/4, 12/8, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Comments: Suecessful performance of this number will require a thorough understanding of triplets.

135 MAY OVERTURE Composers

Robert Clerisse

Arranger:

L. W. Chidester

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright; Score available; General grade:

1946 Condensed

II

Grade and Range by sections; Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade II 11+ II II II II II II 11+ II

Highest not© e3 d3 c3 f2 f2 f2 f1 fl e-flat

E-flat

4/4

General musical value:

A+

Comments : This is a very musical number built on two themes, one of which is treated in several different ways* Although the entire piece is in 4/4 meter, six changes of tempo guard against monotony* The horn parts are very unconventional, consisting of melody, countermelody, or sustained tones, but no afterbeats.

136 MEDALLION Overture Composers

Harold M. Johnson

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: G-eneral grade:

1949 Full and Piano-Conductor

II-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussions Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade iriiniiIIIIii

iiii

Highest note e-flat3 °2 f2

f2 e2 e-f latre-f lat (usual range)

ii

E-flat, B-flat, E-flat, B-flat

4/4, 2/4, 4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Comments: This overture is valuable for two reasons: (1) it is very easy, and (2) a full score is available. (Full scores are not usually printed for Grade II compositions.)

137 METROPOLIS Overture Composer:

G. E. Holmes

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Ludwig

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1940 Condensed and Solo Cornet

III-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Comets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III IIX II II II II II II II II

Highest note f3 e3 b2 g.2 S2

&

f1 f1 d

A-flat, E-flat, A-flat, F

4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Comments: This overture is rather long and involves several changes of key and meter. Trombone and clarinet parts are rather high. For these reasons it should not be attempted by inexperienced players.

138 MOUNTAIN MAJESTY Overture Composer:

Paul Yoder

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Belwin

Date of* copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1947 Full and Condensed

III > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III III IIIIIIIII IIIIII III HHII

Highest g3 e3 c3 a.2 a.2 e2 g1 fl f

E-flat, G minor, E-flat, G minor, E-flat

4/4, 2/2, 4/4, 2/2, 4/4

General musical value:

A+

Comments: This majesty and Outstanding duction and

is a beautiful number. Intended to portray "the grandeur of mountain scenery, it does just that. passages are the full-sounding maestoso intro­ the lovely chorale near the middle of the overture

Program notes are printed in the full score.

139 THE ORACLE Overture Composer:

Otis Taylor

Arranger:

Charles J • Roberts

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1934 Condensed

II

Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II II II II IIII IIII

Highes S3 di vi b^ @2 e^* 0I (usual

B-flat

4/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/4, 4/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: way,

The first clarinet part is written divisi most of the The upper notes may be omitted without ill effect.

This is a very musical number. It is' intended as program music, and program notes are provided*

a'

140 OVERTURE CLASSIQUE Composer:

Forrest L. Buchtel

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Neil A* Kjos

Date of copyrights Score availables General grade:

1943 Piano-Conductor

11+ t by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones s Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussions

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ 11 + 11 + 11+ 11 + II III11+ III I

Highest note sp d3

a2 S o d2 fl fl e-flat

D-flat, B-flat minor, B-flat, D-flat, B-flat

3/4, 4/4, 2/2, 4/4, 2/2

General musical values

A

Comments: Handel,

This overture is written in imitation of the style of It is short, clean, and very musical.

There is no part for the bass drum, snare drum, or cymbals. The only percussion instruments used are the bells, the triangle, and the tympani.

141 PEASANT LIFE Overture Composer:

J. Olivadotl

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyrights Score available: General grade:

1941 Piano-Conductor

III> by sections: Flu t e s : Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets s Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade III III II 11+ II II II 11+ 11+ II.

Highest note b-flat^ d3 a^ a2 f1 g1 e-flat

B-flat, E-flat, F minor, B-flat, E-flat Meters:

4/4, 3/4, 6/8, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Comments: A strong clarinet section is needed for this number. The cornets have many rests. A rather difficult syncopated rhythmic pattern in 6/8 meter near the middle of the piece may give trouble.

142 RHODORA Overture Composers

Lester Brockton

Arrangers

Mayhew Lake

Publishers

Ludwig

Date of copyrights Score availables General grade:

1942 Condensed

11+ i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets s Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones s Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meterss

Grade II 11+ II 11+ II II' II 11+ II II"

Highest note a^ f3 (c-sharp^) c3 So gj? e by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIII IIIIIIIIII 11+ II II'

Highest note e2 c3 c2 b2 f2 d2 1 e-flat-1 e-flat^ (usual range)

B-flat, E-flat, B-flat

3/4, 2/4, 4/4, 3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This is an appealing little overture with opportunity for nice work on expression.

146 III.

SUMMARY

Approximately sixty overtures were examined, and twenty-eight were selected to be evaluated in this study. Those recommended most highly at each grade level considered are as follows: Grade II-:

’J u d y ’s Dream” by Forrest L. Buchtel ’Little Gypsy” by Paul Yoder

Grade I I :

’May Overture” by Robert Clerisse ’The Oracle” by Otis Taylor

Grade II+:

’Overture Classique” by Forrest L. Buchtel ’The Iron Count” by Karl L. King

Grade III-

’The Gypsy Festival” by A1 Hayes ’Balaton” by Forrest L. Buchtel

Grade III:

’Mountain Majesty” by Paul Yoder ’Golden Glow” by Clair W. Johnson ’Lyceum Overture” by Otis Taylor

CHAPTER VI MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS RECOMMENDED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BANDS I*

PROBLEM AND CRITERIA

Statement of specific problem.

The specific problem

of this chapter is to examine many compositions of various types other than marches and overtures and to select those most suitable for playing by the elementary school band. Need for miscellaneous types of compositions.

There

are two general reasons for including several compositions of this category in the repertoire of the elementary school bands

(l) the students can profit in technical skill and in

music appreciation from playing many different kinds of numbers, and (2) these pieces are needed to add variety to programs• Special criteria.

In selecting miscellaneous compo­

sitions to be recommended for the elementary school band, we have applied the two general criteria discussed in Chapter IIs

Cl) the selections must be musically worthwhile

and (2) the technical requirements must be within the ability of the students. The question of musical worth has a special connotation when applied to certain special types of compositions,

such

148 as novelties and popular songs#

These numbers are not con­

sidered the highest type of music, but they are included in the repertoire to add interest to programs or to increase the enjoyment of the students* grade of

A novelty number may rate a

for general musical value if it is the best kind

of novelty; it is considered as a novelty and is not judged by the same standards as an overture or a chorale# This matter of the selection of novelties and popular songs is discussed at greater length in Chapter IX, Section IX* II* EVALUATION OF SELECTED MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS The compositions evaluated on the following pages are considered the best available in this category at these grade levels.

Because of the great variety of types of compositions,

no attempt has been made to classify the numbers by type* The evaluations are arranged alphabetically by title.

How­

ever, each piece has been given a descriptive subtitle to indicate the type of composition#

149 BELLE OP THE BALL Selection of Gay Nineties Favorites Composers! Arranger!

Various song-writers Herman A* Hummel

Publisher!

Eubank

Date of copyright! Score available: General grade!

1944 Condensed

II * by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade III11+ II II II II II 11 + II II

Highest note ©3 c3 ©3 a2 d2 fl fl (usual range)

P, A-flat, B-flat, E-flat, B-flat, F, B-flat

2/4, 3/4, 2/2, 3/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/2

General musical value:

B

Comments: This is a medley of the following songs: Shoo Ply, Man on the Plying Trapeze, While Strolling Through the Park One Day, The Bowery, Little Brown Jug, Daisy Bell, The Band Played On.

150 BELLS ACROSS THE MEADOWS Intermezzo Composer:

A. W. Ketelbey

Arranger:

Dan Godfrey

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1923 Condensed

11+ i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys

(concert):

Meters:

Grade II III II II II 11+ IIII II II

Highest note b-flat^ f®

h

a2 @2 fl fl (usual range)

E-flat, B-flat, E-flat

4/4

General musical value:

A-

Comment s : This number is popular as a means of featuring the chimes. All of the B-flat clarinets are re'quired to produce a tremolo effect by alternating between two notes a third apart at the rate of six notes to the beat at M. M. 84.

151 BLUE BELLS OP SCOTLAND Solo for Cornet, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trombone, Baritone, or Piccolo with Band Accompaniment Composer:

Paul de Ville

Arranger:

Lester Brockton

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1924 Piano-Conductor

II ! by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses : Percussion: Solo Cornet:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II IIII II II11+ II IIIII-

Highest note g3 c3 c3 f2 f2 d2 e-flat1 e-flat1 b-flat

E-flat

4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Comme'nts : This is a practical arrangement of a solo with band accompaniment. The solo part is rather flashy without being very difficult.

152 CAVATINA Composers

Joachim Raff

Arranger:

Paul Yoder

Publishers

Neil A* Kjos

Date of copyrights Score available: General grades

1941 Condensed

III : by sections: Flutes: Clarinets s Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussions

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ III11 + II 11+ II II II II II

Highest note a-flat3 e-flat3 c3 g2 s e2 fl

e-flat1 (usual range

A-flat

4/4

General musical values

A

Comments: This beautiful melody is presented in an artistic setting* To do the composition justice, players and director must work for a smooth legato style and fine shadings of expression. This piece should be attempted only by an advanced group•

153 CHAPEL SHRINE Reverie Composer:

Chester Leoni

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Belwin

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1939 Piano-Conductor and First Cornet with cues

II

Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Highest note Grade rf r? 3 II O II 4 II b§ 2 II aD II & II II d^ II f1 II (usual range) (No drums used)

B-flat

4/4

General musical value:

C

Comments: This little reverie is very easy and should give valuable training in playing in a sustained style.

154 CHERUBIM SONG Chorale Composers

Dimitri Bortniansky

Arrangers

Russell Harvey

Publishers

Elkan-Vogel Company (Philadelphia)

Date of copyrights Score available: General grade:

1943 Piano-Conductor

II

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat s Trombones: Baritone: Bassess Percussion: Key (concert): Meters

Grade I I I I I I I I I I

Highest note f3 g^ g^ b-flat^ a-flat^ g^ f1 e-flat^e-flat

D-flat

4/4

General musical values

A*f

Comments: While all of the parts are very easy technically, successful performance of this number will require a rather mature musicianship on the part of all players* Tone quality, intonation, balance of parts, and dynamic shading are very impo rtant• A fairly complete instrumentation is required, as the solo part moves from one section to another quite frequently.

155 CHRISTMASTIDE Medley of Chri stmas Songs Composers: Arrangers

Many Hymn Writers E. De Lamater

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1938 Condensed

II

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade n+

Highest note f3

II' IIII IIII II II II-

d3 c3 f2 d2 e-flat-*fl d

n+

f3

B-flat, E-flat, F, B-flat, E-flat, B-flat

4/4, 6/8, 4/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 2/4, 4/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: Although "Christmas tide1’ is called an overture by the publisher, it is actually a medley of eight Christmas carols, played one after another without introduction or interlude* The eight songs are March of the Three Kings, It Came Upon the Midnight Clear, While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks, The First Noel, Harki the Herald Angels Sing, Silent Night, Joy to the World, and Come, All Ye Faithful*

156 DEEP IN MY HEART Song Composer:

Sigmund Romberg

Arranger:

David Bennett

Publisher:

Harmes, Inc.

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

194G Condensed

III + > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: * Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ III+ 11+ III+ 11+ 11+ III+ III+ 11+ II

Highest note gf ©3 q2 a^ ©2 si g1 (usual range)

F, A-flat, F

3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This is a beautiful arrangement of this selection from The Student Prince. However, very few elementary school bands will be able to play it.

157 FRIENDS - Waltz Caprice Solo or Duet for Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Clarinet, Trombone, or Baritone with. Band Accompaniment Composer:

Clay Smith

Arranger:

G. E. Holmes

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1939 First Cornet with cues

II

Grade and Range by sections: Grade Flutes: II Clarinets: 11+ Alto Saxophones^II Tenor Saxophones: IICornets: IIHorns in E-flat: I Trombones: II Baritone: II Basses: II Percussion: IISolo Clarinet: II Solo Alto Saxophone: II Solo Cornet: II Solo Trombone: 11+ Solo Baritone: II Key (concert): Meter:

Highest note e^ c3 c3

U

d2 dl fl e-flat f3 d3 fl fl

E-flat

3/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This is a good easy solo arrangement. All parts are very easy except for the first clarinet part, which is only slightly harder.

158 FUGHETTA Composers

Sir John Stainer

Arrangers

Charles Boardman Righter

Publishers

Paul A. Schmitt Music Company

Date of copyrights Score availables General grades

1944 Condensed

11+ ' by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:•

Key (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ 11+ 11+ II II 11 + 11+ 11+ III II

Highest note g3 d3 c3 a.2 a2 f-sharp fl e-flat**d

B-flat

4/4

General musical values

A-

Comments: As the title implies, this is a short composition quasi fugue. The adaptation of the fugal form has been made with considerable freedom* Nevertheless, the entire composi­ tion is in polyphonie writing except for the last sixteen measures, which gradually become more and more harmonic, ending with an authentic cadence in block chords*

159 IN THE DEPTHS Solo for Bass, Baritone Saxophone,

or Bassoon

with Band Accompaniment Composers

Baker Freed

Arrangers

M. L. Lake

Publishers

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grades

1921 Solo Cornet with cues

II-

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Solo Tuba: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII11+

Highest note e-flat^ d3 fi

fS d2 Cl 1 e-flat1 (usual range) e-flat

E-flat

4/4

General musical value:

C+

Comments s This is a very easy number, giving an opportunity to feature a tuba player as a means of encouraging interest in this essential instrument.

160 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK Novelty Sketch Composer:

C* Coons

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of* copyright: Score available: General grade:

1940 Piano-Conductor

II

Grade and Range by• sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade II XI III II I II11 III n

Highest note g-flat3 c3 ci c3 a2

±

g-flatx d1 (usual range)

B-flat

4/4

General musical value:

None

Comments: This is the kind of novelty in which a narrator reads a story and at each of certain key words he pauses while the band plays a musical representation or sound-effect appro­ priate to that word. Properly done, this kind of thing can be hilarious.

161 KING- ARTHUR Selection Composer:

Max Thomas

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Neil A. Kjos

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1938 Piano-Conductor

II*f

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Bas ses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIIIIIIIIII III II

Highest note g3 e® t>2 g2 a2 d2

11+

fl

II 11+ II

fl f

E-flat, F, B-flat, F minor, B-flat

4/4, 6/8, 2/4, 4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 4/4

General musical value:

A-

Comment s : The various sections of this composition are descrip­ tive of certain characters in the King Arthur stories. The melodies are outstanding.

16-2 KING JOHN Tone Poem Composer;

H. L. Moehlmann

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1940 Condensed

IIIi by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Grade III III II II 11+ II Hi­ ll IIIII

Highest note a3 f5 a2 c3 a2 f-sharp^ fl e-flatl d

E-flat, C minor, E-flat, C minor Meters:

4/4, 3/4, 4/4, 3/4, 4/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This t one,poem seems to be based largely upon a chorale which opens the composition and is treated in various ways throughout* The key signature does not change throughout the piece. There are several short excursions into various keys, and the last five measures are actually in C Major, but this is all done with accidentals rather than changes of key signature.

163 KOMM, SUSSER TOD (Come, Sweet Death) Chorale Melody Composers

Johann Sebastian Bach

Arrangers

Erik Leidzen

Publishers

Carl Fischer

Date of copyrights Score availables General grades

1936 Condensed

III > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Key (concert): Meters

Grade 1+ II II" II 1+ 11+ II II II I-

Highest note a3 0*3 divisis b^, g p s fi 1 dl (usual range)

F

3/4

General musical values

A+

Comments s "Koram, Susser Tod” is a well-known and beautiful chorale. While none of the parts are hard technically, a finished performance will require more mature musicianship than is normally found in elementary school students. However, working on a number such as this may help to develop that musical maturity. The first clarinet part goes high in two measures near the end. Presumably these two measures could be re-written so that the highest note for the clarinets would be b^.

164 THE LAST SPRING Tone Poem Composers

Edvard Grieg

Arrangers

George C. Wilson

Publishers

Carl Fischer

Date oP copyrights Score availables General grades

1945 Condensed

III > by sectionss Flutes s Clarinets s Alto Saxophones s Tenor Saxophones s Cornets s Horns in E-flats Trombones: Baritone: Basses : Percussion:

Key (concert)s Meters

Grade 11+ 11 + 11+ II 11+ II I II I I

Highest note f3 c3 c-sharp^ go f-sharp^

dl f-sharpl (usual range)

F

4/4

General musical values

A

Comments s This short number is very quiet and beautiful. Although there are no fast notes in any of the parts, two factors make nThe Last Spring11 rather difficult s (1) many accidentals are used, and (2) the composition is so contrapuntal that it is imperative that each player count the rhythm accurately.

165 THE LEGEND OP SLEEPY HOLLOW Descriptive Fantasy Composers

David Bennett

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Mills Music

Date of copyrights Score available: General grades

1941 Condensed

III

Grade and Range by sectionss Flutes: Clarinets s Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones s Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys

(concert):

Meters:

Grade h i

III+ III III 11+ 11+ IIIIII11+

Highest note g3 e3 e3 b3 a2 g2 g1 gl c

B-flat, E-flat, C minor, B-flat

2/2, 4/4, 3/4, 2/2, 6/8, 2/2, 6/8, 2/2, 4/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This descriptive fantasy is based upon Washington Irvingfs short story of the same name* The various sections of the composition have been given descriptive titles to indicate what scene from the story each represents. The score is masterfully done and should make a big hit with players and audiences* There is a rather essential two-measure flute duet which is not cued for any other instrument.

166 LONDONDERRY AIR Solo for Cornet, Trombone, or Baritone with Band Accompaniment Composer:

Traditional

Arranger:

Ed Chenette

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1956 Piano-Conductor

II > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Solo Cornet: Solo Trombone: Solo Baritone:

Key (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ II II II II II IIII 11+ II II 11+ II

Highest note

h fZ 2 b-flat*3 a^ ©2 e-f lat-L gl c-flat

c3 s gi 1

E-flat

4/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This is a good, easy arrangement of an old favorite.

167 MENUET AND TRIO From the "Surprise” Symphony Composer:

Franz Josef Haydn

Arranger:

Roger North

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1945 Condensed

II

Grade and Range by sections: Flu t e s : Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade II 11+ II II' II III II 11+ 1+

Highest note ©3 b2 b£ ©2 ©2 dl f2 (usual :

F

3/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a transcription of a portion of a Haydn symphony. A strong clarinet section is required, as the first clarinet part is the hardest and most important part of all.

168 MINUET Prom ’’Bernice” Composer:

G. P. Handel

Arranger:

Charles J. Roberts

Publisher:

Carl Fischer

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1942 Condensed

III*

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Corne ts: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses : Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade Highest note III* e-flat3 d3 III* n-2 III II h III* f2 II* t2 III' cl III e-flatl IV(usual range) (No drums used)

E-flat

3/4

General musical value:

B*

Comments: This Handel composition, transcribed by a capable arranger, is apparently intended primarily for the high school band. An exceptionally capable elementary group might benefit from trying it.

169 A MORNING SONG Composer:

Charles Woodhouse

Arranger:

T. Conway Brown

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1948 Pull and Condensed

II > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ II II II II II I II 11+ II

Highest note f3 a2 d3 q2 q2 fs e-flat1 c1 c

F, B-flat, P

3/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: MA Morning Song,” as the name implies, is a light­ hearted and lyrical composition. The bass part is unusually low, touching low rtP ,! (fourth leger line below the bass clef) several times. This note is impossible on the E-flat tuba and difficult on the BB-flat instrument. The woodwind instruments, particularly the clarinets, are featured. The cornets have many rests, and the trombones play only twenty-seven measures in the entire composition.

170 THE MOSQUITOES* PARADE Characteristic Novelty Composer:

Howard Whitney

Arranger:

Paul Yoder

Publisher:

M* Witmark and Sons

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1939 Condensed

II > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade 11 + II II' II II II 11+ II II II

Highest note a-flat3 e-flat3 d-flat3 b-flat2 d2 f1 (usual range)

B-flat, E-flat, A-flat, B-flat

6/8

General musical value:

A (as a novelty)

Comments: This is a very clever little tune--gay, dainty, and humorous* In one strain, only the piccolo, flute, horns, and basses play, while the other band members are instructed to whistle.

171 MY HEART STOOD STILL Song Composer:

Richard Rogers

Arranger:

William Teague

Publisher:

Harmes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1942 Condensed

11+ * by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade 11+ IIIII II II II II IIII1+

Highest note a-flat*5 e-flat^ b2 b-flat2 a^ f-sharp^ fl fl (usual range)

B-flat, F, A-flat

2/2

General musical value:

C+

Comments: This is one of the more dignified popular songs arranged in a musical style• Like many popular songs, it is written in alia breve meter but sounds better in 4/4. The above grading assumes that the piece will be played in 4/4 meter at a tempo of 120-130.

172 NOW THANK WE ALL OUR GOD Chorale Melody Composer:

Johann Cruger

Arranger:

Lucien Cailliet

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1947 Pull and Condensed

III

Grade and Range by sections: • Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade III III III III II 11+ IIIIIIIII

Highest note g3 f3 d3 a2 a2 CT2 |i g1 (usual range)

P

4/4

General musical value:

A+

Comments: This is an extended embellished chorale. Although the origin of the melody is not known for certain, it is usually credited to Johann Cruger. Mr. Caillietfs transcription for band closely follows the harmonization and embellishment used by Bach in Church Cantata No. 79# The third clarinet part is divisi, doubling the first and second clarinet parts an octave lower. If the first clarinet part is considered too high for the students, the third clarinet part may be used for all clarinets, firsts playing upper notes, and seconds, lower notes.

173 ON THE RANGE Selection of Western Melodies Composer:

Carl Frangkiser

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Belwin

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1945 Condensed

11+ > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ 11+ 11+ 11+ 11+ II' III 11+ 11 + II

Highest note f3 d3 e-sharp^ b-flat^ ©2 e-flat^fl f

A-flat, E-flat, F, E-flat, A-flat, F

3/4, 2/4, 3/4, 2/2, 6/8, 3/4, 2/2

General musical value:

B

Comments: This is a rather artistic medley of cowboy songs.

174 PRAYER OP THANKSGIVING Hymn Tune Composer:

E. Kremser

Arranger:

Peter Buys

Publisher:

Belwin

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1946 * Condensed

11+

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: First Clarinet: Second Clarinet: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade XI+

11+ XIXIIIII II II II II II 1+

Highest note a-flat3

g3 d2 d.3 f2 a2 e2 g1 fl (usual range)

E-flat

3/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This arrangement consists primarily of three stanzas of the hymn tune* A gradual crescendo is built up by adding instruments and by spreading out the parts. On the third time through the melody the second and third clarinets and the alto and tenor saxophones have a running obligato in e i ghth-no te s • In the first clarinet part all notes above d^ are written in octaves.

175 PROGRAM I (Diligence March, Abide With Me, Springtime Waltz, and Jingle Bells) Composers:

Joseph Bergeim and Joseph E. Skornicka

Arrangers:

Composers

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1947 Full

I

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade I I i X I T-

II II 1+

Highest note a-flat^ b-flat1 g2 c2 c2 b-flat b-flat (usual range)

B-flat, E-flat, B-flat, E-flat, B-flat, E-flat

4/4, 3/4, 4/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments: Program 1 consists of four very easy pieces extracted from the Boosey and Hawkes Band Method. Clarinets remain in the lower register. kept within a very easy range.

All parts are

There are two minor disadvantages to these arrangements: the drum rolls are not notated in the most eommon and easily understandable manner; and the basses are required to execute an eighth-note run in ,!Jingle Bells.If

176 PROGRAM II (Grand March; 0 Come, All Ye Faithful; and Old MacDonald) Composers:

Joseph Bergeim and Joseph E. Skornicka

Arrangers:

Composers

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1947 Full

I

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone': Basses: Percussion: Keys

(concert):

Meter:

Grade I

Highest note c3

I

gg

I I

a^ c3

i

I I*f 1+ IIII-

a2

d2 b-flat cl c

E-flat, A-flat, F

4/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This is another group of very easy pieces, intended to be slightly harder than Program i;.

177 PROGRAM III (Perseverance March, Faith of Our Fathers, and On Parade March) Composers:

Joseph Bergeim and Joseph E* Skornicka

Arrangers:

Composers

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1947 Full

II * by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade II II II II II IIII II IHII

Highest note c3 b-flat2 a2 b-flat2 d2 d2 cl d-flatl e-flat

A-flat, F, E-flat

2/2, 3/4, 6/8

General musical value:

A-

Comments : These pieces seem slightly more musical than those in Programs I and II• The tuba part is rather in proportion to the other parts•

178 PROGRAM IV ("United Nations March" and "Twilight Serenade") Composer:

Joseph Bergeim and Joseph E. Skornicka

Arrangers:

Composers

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1947 Pull

II ! by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade IIII IIII IIIIII II Hi­ ll

Highest note d^ d5 b2 g£ fs c^ d1 e-f lat-*d

E-flat, A-flat, P

2/4, 4/4

General musical value:

B+

Comments: This is the final "program" of the series and consists of or two compo compositions in "regular" band arrangements — i.e., with countermelodies, afterbeats, etc.

179 THE SYNCGPATED CLOCK Novelty Composer:

Leroy Anderson

Arranger:

Philip J. Lang

Publisher:

Mills Music

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1946 Condensed

XI

Grade and Ranget by sections: Flute s: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Bari tone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade II II IX II II IIII IIII II

Highest note a-flat^ r*3

d° ~~2> SP

fi fi (usual range)

E-flat, A-flat, E-flat

4/4

General musical value:

B+ (as a novelty)

Comments: This number should be very popular with jazz-conscious students and audiences. However, the syncopation used is quite simple, and it is emphasized by alternation with measures of straight quarter notes. The percussion section produces clock sound-effects all the way through. A fairly strong clarinet section is needed for this number. Clarinets, horns, and basses play all the time; other instruments are added only at the climaxes. The trom­ bones play only six measures in the entire piece.

180 TEN LITTLE INDIANS Novelty Composer:

Newell H. Long

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Rubank

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1946 Condensed

II

Grade and Ranget by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade II II II II II II II II 11+ 11

Highest note f3 c3 b? gp 1 el f-1

F, d minor, P

4/4

General musical value:

A- (as a novelty)

Comments: This novelty number features ten soloists who stand up for their solos and who may wear Indian head-dress. Whole sections of the band stand on occasion also. This standing and sitting will appeal to the students. The music is a clever arrangement of the children’s song, 11Ten Little Indians.”

181 TO A WILD ROSE Ton© Poem Composer:

Edward MacDowell

Arranger:

Alfred P. Zambarano

Publisher:

Arthur P. Schmidt Company (Boston)

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1948 Condensed

1+

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Comets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Key (concert): Meter:

Grade I I I X 1 I

I

Highest note d5 rz e| d° c3 S 2 d2

si

X c-1X (usual range) (No drum part)

F

2/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a delicate composition, scored very lightly. rz

The clarinet parts are unusually low despite the e shown above as the highest note. Except for four measures at the climax, the range of the first clarinet part is from d1 to g^.

182 TREPAK Russian Dance Composer:

Prosper Morand

Arranger:

Roger North.

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1945 Condensed

III

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade III III+ III III III II 11+ 11+ Hi.. I

Highest note g3 b2 a2 a.2 g2 e2 dl fl (usual range)

F, B-flat, F

2/4

General musical value:

B

Comments: This is a short, fast dance. The clarinet part is full of sixteenth notes, both slurred and tongued.

185 TWO MOODS Tone Poem Composer:

Clare S. Grundman

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Boosey and Hawkes

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1947 Pull and Condensed

11+ > by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percus sion:

Key (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ 11+ II II II II 11+ II Hi­ ll

Highest note f-sharp^ f5 C3 e2 e-flat^ e-f lat-*e-flat

E-flat

3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a new composition striving to depict two moods--the first somber, the second gay. The trombone and bass parts are hard only in two places— easy the rest of the way.

184 TWO SONGS EX BEETHOVEN C!,Love Songtf and "Creation*s Hymn11) Composers

Ludwig van Beethoven

Arrangers

Roger North

Publisher:

Boosey & Hawkes

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1945 Condensed

XI i by sections: Flutes; Solo Clarinet: Second Clarinet: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meter:

Grade Ti­ ll IT* II II II II I II II II

Highest note e-f lat^ ,3 s:12 c:

4

e-flat1 e-flat1 (usual range)

F, B-flat

4/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: "Love Song*1, marked andante, is a tender, lyrical melody. “C r e a t i o n s Hymn", by contrast, is a majestic hymn of praise. The second clarinets have an eighth-note arpeggiotype accompaniment all through the first song. The trombone parts are unusually simple on both numbers.

185 UNDER THE BIG TOP Descriptive Selection Composer:

Paul Yoder

Arrangers

Composer

Publisher:

Raymond A. Hoffman Company (Chicago)

Date of copyright: Score available: General, grade:

1936 Piano-Conductor

II

Grade and Range by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion: Keys (concert): Meters:

Grade 11+ 11+ II II II II II II II II

Highest note f3 d^ g2 g2 d^ fl fl c

F, A-flat, E-flat

6/8, 3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

B

Comments: This is a short but clever number, descriptive of a circus. The four little “movementsn represent the fanfare, the grand entry, the aerial acts, and the pony races.

186 A WALKING TUNE Charaeteris tic Composer:

Clare E# Grundman

Arranger:

Composer

Publisher:

Boosey and Hav/kes

Date of copyright: Scores available: General grade:

1949 Full and Condensed

III+ i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophone s : Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Percussion:

Keys (concert): Meters I

Grade III III III III IIIIIIIIIIIIIII+ II

Highest note a-flat^ b2 cr2 gS 2 f-sharp*5 fi fl f

B-flat, A-flat, D-flat, F, B-flat

2/4, 4/4, 2/2, 3/4, 2/4

General musical value:

A

Comments: This is a gay little composition# The general grade is higher than the grades of the individual parts because of such factors as the independence of parts from each other, the frequent change of meter, and the fast tempos#

187 WOODLAND SERENADE Composer*

Cr* E* Holmes

Arrangers

Composer

Publishers

Mills Music

Date of copyright: Score available: General grade:

1947 Piano-Conductor

II i by sections: Flutes: Clarinets: Alto Saxophones: Tenor Saxophones: Cornets: Horns in E-flat: Trombones: Baritone: Basses: Drums;

Keys: Meter:

Grade II IHII II II II II IHII II-

Highest note q2 q.2 b2 e2 &2 dl dl (usual range)

E-flat, A-flat, E-flat 4/4

General musical value:

A-

Comments: This is a musical little serenade* Cornet, trombone, and baritone solos are featured. Full, sustained, chords are the rule *

188 III.

SUMMARY

Approximately eighty compositions of miscellaneous types were examined and thirty-nine selected to be evaluated in this study.

Those recommended most highly are as follows:

Grade I+:

r,To a Wild Rose," tone poem, by MacDowell, arr. Zambarano.

Grade II:

"Cherubim Song," chorale, by Bortniansky, arr. Harvey. "A Morning Song," by Woodhouse, arr. Brown. "Two Songs by Beethoven," arr. North. "The Mosquitoesf Parade," characteristic novelty, by Whitney, arr. Yoder. "Menuet and Trio" by Haydn, arr. North.

Grade II+:

"Bells Across the Meadows," intermezzo, by Ketelbey, arr. Godfrey. "Fughetta" by Stainer, arr. Righter.

Grade III:

"Now Thank We All Our God," chorale melody, by Cruger, arr. Cailliet. "Koxnm, Susser Tod," chorale melody, by Bach, arr. Leidzen. "Cavatina" by Raff, arr. Yoder. "The L a s t _Spring," tone poem,,by Grieg, arr. Wilson.

Grade III+:

"A Walking Time," characteristic, by , Grundman. "Deep in My Heart," song, by Romberg, arr. D. Bennett.

The above list should not be considered final or complete, for the great number of different kinds of composi­ tions involved and the concentrations at certain grade levels make the compilation of such a list as this very difficult. The reader is reminded that every number evaluated is recom­ mended for use.

CHAPTER VII SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS I*

SUMMARY

It has been the purpose of the present study to enable the elementary school band director to select the best avail­ able music for his band with the least expenditure of time and effort.

This goal we have attempted to achieve by exam­

ining a great amount of band music,

selecting those composi­

tions best suited for grade school use, and evaluating these numbers in the manner believed to be most helpful to directors In the process of this investigation over 250 folios and individual compositions were examined.

These titles were

not merely selected at random but were compiled from a number of sources:

(a) the investigator1s own experience, (b) other

theses, (c) selective lists, (d) suggestions from teachers in the field, and (e) publishers* catalogs. Careful examination showed some numbers to be unsatis­ factory for one or more reasons; these were discarded.

Thirty

nine miscellaneous numbers--a total of 126 titles— were found to be worthy of recommendation for elementary school use. These recommended compositions have been evaluated in the preceding chapters. From each classification by type of composition we

190 have selected those numbers most highly recommended for use by the elementary school band at each grade level* marches,

Polios,

overtures, and miscellaneous compositions most

highly recommended are listed in the summaries at the con­ clusion of Chapters XXX, IV, V, and VI, respectively. II*

CONCLUSIONS

The conclusion drawn from this study are concerned with the quantity and quality of music available for the elementary school band. Although the quantity of good music available in Grades I, II, and III is much greater than previously supposed, there is still a need for more.

The most pressing need is for

music of good quality in Grades IX- and II.

This would have

to be written or arranged by people who have had considerable experience in grade school teaching, for no one else can thoroughly understand the problems involved.

A band director

who has been forced to produce all of .his players without the aid of private teachers would probably have the best under­ standing of these problems.

It is understood that such a

person would also have to be a gifted composer or an arranger with musical taste to write successfully for the grade school band. There are many folios published at all grade levels. Some of these are of poor musical quality; others are excellent.

191 Formerly, there was no good material available in Grade X. However, just within the last three or four years, some very good folios for these beginners have been appearing. The survey of marches showed that there is an adequate supply of good street marches at all levels of difficulty, although Grade XII was found to be better supplied than Grades I and II.

Very few concert marches have been written

for the grades considered, but this is unimportant since street marches are so generally used on concert programs. There is an appalling shortage of grand marches in the easier grades.

This is especially regrettable in view of the

fact that many school bands are required to play one or even two grand marches every year for commencement exercises.

The

necessity of repeating the number several times intensifies the need for a composition which is of good musical quality, is easier than the music ordinarily played by the group (to allow for the handicap of fatigue), and contains sufficient variety of thematic material to avoid excessive monotony. Composers or arrangers who may provide music filling this description will surely endear themselves to the school band directors• The supply of overtures is fairly adequate.

If there

is a need, it is for good material adapted to the ability of the student with twelve to eighteen months experience on his instrument.

192 The field of miscellaneous compositions has been neglected.

There is a need for more good tone poems, suites,

dance forms, chorales, songs, novelties, and instrumental solos with band accompaniment at all levels, A study of the copyright dates reveals that the majority of the compositions evaluated have been published within the last decade.

Fifty per cent of the recommended

folios, 48 per cent of the marches, 68 per cent of the overtures, and 64 per cent of the miscellaneous compositions bear a copyright date of 1941 or later*

By contrast, only

thirteen compositions, about 10 per cent of the total, were published prior to 1931, These figures seem to indicate that the publishers are making progress in meeting the needs of the elementary school band and that during the next few years we may expect an even better supply of good band music in the easier grades•

BIBIIOGRAPHT

194 A.

DICTIONARIES

Apel, Willi, Harvard Dictionary of Music. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1944. 826 pp. Colies, H. C., editor, Grove1s Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Fourth Edition; London: Macmillan and Company, 1940. Five volumes with supplementary volume. Funk, Isaac D., editor-in-chief, Funk & Wagnalls New “Standard11 Dictionary of the English Language. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1947. 2814 pp. B.

BOOKS

Beattie, John, Osbourne McConathy, and Russell V. Morgan, Music in the Junior High School. New York: Silver, Burdett, and Company, 1930. 248 pp. Birge, Edward B., History of Public School Music in the United States. Boston: Oliver Ditson Publishing Com­ pany, 1946. 296 pp. Brooks, B. Marian, and Harry A. Brown, Music Education in the Elementary School. New York: American Book Com­ pany, 1946. 376 pp. California State Department of Education (Helen Hefferman and Mary E. Ireland, co-chairmen of committee), Music Education in the Elementary School. Sacramento: California State Department of Education, 1939. 152 pp. Cundiff, Hannah, and Peter W. Dykema, New School Music Handbook. Boston: C. C* Birchard and Company, 1939. 382 pp. Dykema, Peter W*, and Karl W. Gehrkens, The Teaching and Administration of High School Music. Boston: C. C. Birchard and Company, 1946. 614 pp. Gehrkens, Karl W., Music in the Grade Schools. C. C. Birchard and Company, 1934. 233 pp. _______ , Music in the Junior High School. Birchard and Company, 1936. 228 pp.

Boston:

Boston: C. C.

195 Goldman, Richard Franko, The B a n d 1s Music* Publishing Corporation, 1938* 442 pp*

Hew York: Pitman

Goldman, Richard Franko, The Concert Band, hart and Company, 1946* 246 pp*

New York: Rine­

Hubbard, George E., Music Teaching; in the Elementary Grades. New York: American Book Company, 1934* 228 pp. Krone, (Mrs.) Beatrice Perham, Music in the New School* Chicago: Neil A* Kjos Music Company, 1947* 187 pp. Kwalwasser, Jacob, Problems in Public School Music * York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1932. 159 pp*

New

Morgan, Hazel Novahec, editor, Music Education Source Book* Chicago: Music Educators National Conference, 1947. 256 pp. National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associations, School Music Competition-FestivaIs Manual* Chicago: National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associations, 64 East Jackson Boulevard, 1943. 135 pp* Normann, Theodore F*, Instrumental Music in the Public Schools. Philadelphia: Theodore Presser Company, 1941. 349 pp . Prescott, Gerald R., and Lawrence W. Chidester, Getting Results With School Bands. Minneapolis: Paul A. Schmitt Music Company, 1938. 273 pp. Righter, Charles Boardman, Success in Teaching School Orchestras and Bands. Minneapolis: Paul A. Schmitt Music Company, 1945. 211 pp. Smith, Melville, and Max T. Krone, Fundaments Is of Musician­ ship, Book I. New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1934, 197 pp. C.

PERIODICAL ARTICLES

Hannen, Helen M., "Instrumental Classes, Bands, and Orchestras in the Elementary School," Music Educators National Con­ ference Yearbook. 1938, pp. 301-305. Hannen, Helen M., "The Status of Instrumental Music in the Elementary Schools,11 Music Educators National Conference Yearbook. 1939-40, pp. 223-227.

196 Heagy, Clarence H., lfThe Need for Pull Scores for Easy Orches­ tra Polios,” Music Educators National Conference Yearbook, 1959-40, pp. 254-235. Instrumentalist Historian, “Early American School and College Bands,” The Instrumentalist, 4:25, No. 3, January-February, 1950. . Moore, Donald I., ,fCo-ordination of Elementary and Junior High School Instrumental Music,” Music Educators National Conference Yearbook, 1939-40, pp. 243-247. Myer, Willard L., ”Not Just Feeders!” The Instrumentalist, 3:8-9, No. 1, September-Octover,-1948. Myers, Frederick C., ”Junior High and Elementary Festivals,” The Instrumentalist, 4:13, No. 3, January-February, 1950. Rohner, Traugott, et. al., ”Christmas Music for Instrumental Groups,” The Instrumentalist, 1:25, No. 2, November-Decem­ ber, 1946. Shephard, Wesley, ”Ensembles in the Lower Grades,” Music Educators National Conference Yearbook, 1939-40, pp. 252-53 Thomson, Virgil, ”What Shall Band Music Be?” No. 7, July, 1942.

Etude, 60:5,

Votopka, Raymond, ”The 100 Most Popular Marches,” The Instru­ mentalist , 1:28, No. 1, September-October, 1946. _______ , ”The 100 Most Popular Marches,” The Instrumentalist, 1:24, No. 1, September-October, 1946. Wilson, George C., “Instrumental Music In the Grades,” Music Educators National Conference Yearbook, 1937, p p . .293-294. D. PAMPHLETS Bovee, Kenneth, et. al., ”The Interlochen List of Recommended Materials for Concert.Band.” Interlochen, Michigan: National Music Camp, 1947, 14 pp. National School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Associations, “Selective Music Lists--Band, Orchestra, Chorus, Instru­ mental Ensembles.” Chicago: National School Band, Or­ chestra, and Vocal Associations, 64 East Jackson Boulevard, 1946, 31 pp.

197 National School Band, Orchestra and Vocal Association, S e ­ lective Music Lists--Band, Orchestra, String Orchestra, Chorus.” Chicago: National School Band, Orchestra and Vocal Association, 64 East Jackson Boulevard, 1949. 23 pp. E.

THESES

Good, Merle K . , “Development of an Advanced Class Instruction Book for Band.11 Unpublished Master1s Thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1945. 200 pp. Graham, John Patrick, f,A Classification and Evaluation of Concert and Occasional Music for Junior High School Band.11 Unpublished Master1s Thesis, North Texas Teachers College, Denton, 1947. 75 pp. Kent, Hazel Elizabeth, “Trends in the Development of Music Education in the United States.” Unpublished Master1s Thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1935. 391 pp. Moody, Leo Wilford, “A Survey of Materials for the Beginning Band.” Unpublished M a s t e r s Thesis, University of Colo­ rado, Boulder, 1946. 110 pp. Peterson, Walter H., “A Survey of the Rehearsal Techniques and Procedures o f .the Public School Concert Band.” U n ­ published Master1s Thesis, University of Southern.Cali­ fornia, Los Angeles, 1948. 170 pp. Rice, H. Lynn, “Developing an Instrumental Program in the Public Schools.” Unpublished Master1s Thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1940. 154 pp. Sessions, Alfred P., “The Use and Improvement of Class Methods for Beginning School Band Instruetion.” Unpublished . Master's Thesis, College of the Pacific, Stockton, Cal­ ifornia, 1940# 150 pp. Sonnenburg, Eldon Malcome, “A Critical Compilation of Graded Band Material at High School Level.” Unpublished Master's Thesis, North Texas State Teachers College, Denton, 1947. 21 pp. Swift, E. Hargrave, “A Historical Study of the Development of the High School Band.” Unpublished Master's Thesis, Uni­ versity of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1939. 137 pp.

198 Weatherly, Albert, ^Methods of Procedure in Teaching Instru­ mental Music in.Certain Senior High Schools of the United States.” Unpublished Master1s Thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1935. 160 pp.

APPENDIX A

200

CHART SHOWING SYSTEM OP PITCH-NAMES USED IN THIS STUDY

} VTf /

-O'" cl

--- & —

— X -- — o - c2

d.2 _o_

0

r

c3

d3

o e2 O“

e3

■"£-> f1 --- e — f2 _

f3

- — &1

bl

-Q-

--

a2 -O. —

6

a3

t>3

S1 o 82

-

C\1 ,a

" T -

" a,. —“5t — e --.d! el

---

* Prom Melville Smith, and Max T. Krone, Fundamentals of Musicianship (New Yorkr M. Witmark and Sons, 1934), Book I, p# 3, freely adapted.

4



APPENDIX B

202 ’

A TABULATION OP THE NUMBER OP DIATONIC OR REPEATED NOTES TO BE PLAYED IN EACH GRADE'1 * M. M.

4/4 Meter

Instr.

Grade I

Flute

IJJJJJJJ JW JU JJ j m m i m j m m m m

Clarinet Alto Sax. Tenor 11

Grade II

Grade III

Grade IV

M JJ J J m m im i m m m j M J J J J M M

Oboe

JJJJ m

m

Bassoon Bar. Sax. Bass 11

Jjjj

Cornet

JJJJJJ m m

French Hn. Trombone Baritone

JJJ J m u m

Tuba

JJJJ

Snare Drum

JJJJJJU m u m / / J'&JJ-gj

m m

jjjjjjjjjs j jjjjjjjjjjjjjj

j

jjjj j j j j

JJJJ3JJ7JJ

jjjj jjj j j

j j jj j jjj

j n j n m j j j M JJJJJJJJ jjjj j j j j

JJJJJJJJ

/ /

Condensed and freely adapted from John Patrick Graham, MA Classification and Evaluation of Concert and Occasional Music for Junior High School Band,” (unpublished M a s t e r ’s thesis, North Texas State Teachers College, Denton, 1947), pp* 14-22.

APPENDIX C

204 SAMPLES OP FORM LETTERS AND QUESTIONNAIRE SENT TO TEACHERS IN THE FIELD

1210 N* Peck Rd*, El Monte, Calif. February 24, 1950

Dear Band Director: X believe that anyone who has done any serious work with grade school or junior high school bands will agree that selecting music for such a group is a very difficult task* It is my present purpose to make this task much easier by compiling a list of recommended music with comments on each number* As a matter of fact, I am writing a thesis on this subject: ,fAn Evaluation of Selected Music for Elementary School Bands11• (I refer to the elementary school of the old 8 yr.-4 yr* system— i.e*, through the eighth grade.) In order to be certain that I have not overlooked any good numbers, I am asking several grade school instru­ mentalists to list the pieces they like best. Will you be so kind as to fill out the attached form and return In the enclosed envelope?

Sincerely yours,

20 f5 Please list your favorite folios for grade school band (band books or march books, not methods): Title 1

Composer

.

2. 3* 4.

Please list your favorite marches (published separately): Title 1

.

2

.

Composer

3. 4.

5. 6

. Please list your favorite overtures for grade school

band: Title 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Composer

206 Please list your favorite miscellaneous selections (chorales, medleys, serenades,

tone poems, waltzes, etc.):

Title

Composer

1. 2

. __

________

3. 4.

. ___ __ ________________ _____________________

5. 6.

_______________________ ;

_ _

. .

_____

Would you be willing to loan music from your library for my examination and possibility for one reading by m y band? Yes ____

No__

Use the back of this sheet to list additional numbers or to offer comments or suggestions. Please return this form to Manly V. Wood, 1210 N. Peck Rd., El Monte, California. Thanks!

N. B.— This form was mimeographed on legal size (8^ x 13n ) paper.

Xt is here condensed to conform with the format

of the thesis.

APPENDIX D

208 INDEX TO MUSIC EVALUATED Title

Page A.

FOLIOS

1fA-B-C,f Folios for Young Bands, The

• * • • • • • . • •

51

All Melody Band F o l i o ..................................... 52 Americana C o l l e c t i o n ....................................... 53 Archer Progressive Band B o o k .....................

. . .

Bennett Band Book N o . l ................. Bennett Band Book No. 4

54 55

................................

56

Bridging the C a p ............................................ 57 Chorale C l a s s i c s

. . . .

Clipper Band B o o k ............................ First Semester Band B o o k ............

58 59

. . . .

Forging A h e a d ..........................

60 61

Craded Chorales for B a n d ................................... 62 Hear That Bandl

. ............... . . . . . . ............. 63

Junior Champion Band B o o k .................

64

Marching Maneuvers • .....................................

65

Marching to Victory Melody Time

• • • • ............................. . 66

..............................

Noel March Book, The

67

..................................... 68

Our First Band Folio . ..................................... 69 Paul Yoder !s Band Book N o . l ...............

70

Paving the W a y ............................

71

209 Title

Page

Program and Parade Band Folio

• • • • • • • * • • •

••

72

Promotion Band Folio • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

73

Second Semester Band Book

74

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sixteen Chorales by J. S. B a c h .............................75 Thirty-five Famous Chorales Top Flight Band Folio

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

76

• • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • •

77

Transition Band Book No. 2 . . . . . Uncle Sam A-Strut

. . . . . . . . . .

• • • • • • • • • • • •

78

.............

79

With Pipes and Drums • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

80

B. Aces of the Air

MARCHES

• • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • •

85

..........

86

American Boy

Argonaut • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

87

Coast Guards

88

Drums and Bugles • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • •

89

Fort Bragg • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

90

General Lee

91

...

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hand Grenade

92

High School Cadets .........

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

93

The Xowa Band L a w ..........

94

Leefs Favorite

95

Liberty Fleet Loyalty

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

96

• • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

97

210 Title

Page

Men of* M i g h t ................................................ 98 Military E s c o r t ............................................99 M o n t e r e y ................................................... 100 Officer of the B a y ................. . .. ................

101

Salutation • • • • •.............. ............. . . . • .

102

Show Boy, The

• • • • • • ........................

Thumbs-Up, U . S . A . Thunderer, The

. . . . .

. • • • •

...............

103 104 105-

Torch of L i b e r t y ..............................

1

United N a t i o n s ............................................. 107 Washington Post

...............................

108

With FreedomTs F l a g ...................................... 109 Grand Triumphal March

• • • • « • • • • ................

110'

Huldigungsmarsch . ..............................

Ill

Land of Hope and G l o r y .................................... 112 Pomp and Chivalry

...................................... 113 C.

Afrikander Babs Balaton Cameo

OVERTURES ......................

• • • • •

118

......................................................119 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

120

* • • • .......................................

Cardinal Overture Carnival of R o s e s ........................................

121 122 123

211 Title

Page

C h a l l e n g e r .................................................. Concert Overture in G m i n o r ............................

124 125

Enchanted L a k e ..........................................

126

Golden G l o w ...............................................

127

Gypsy Festival, T h e .......................................

128

Iron Count, T h e ...........................................

129

J u d y !s D r e a m ........................................... Little Gypsy

. . . . .

130 131

Lyceum O v e r t u r e ...........................................

132

Magic I s l e ..................................................

133

Mannequinfs Festival .......................................

134

May O v e r t u r e ...............................................

135

M e d a l l i o n ................................................ * M e t r o p o l i s .................................................

136 137

Mountain M a j e s t y .............................. Oracle, The

.......................................

139

Overture Classique .........................................

140

Peasant L i f e ...............................................

141

H h o d o r a ....................................................

142

S u n b e a m ....................................................

143

Thespian O v e r t u r e .................................. Three Gates of G o l d .......................................

144 145

212 Title

Page D.

MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS

Belle of the B a l l .....................................

149

Bells Across the Meadows

150

...................

Blue Bells of S c o t l a n d ................................

151

C a v a t i n a ................................................

152

Chapel S h r i n e .........................................

153

Cherubim S o n g ........................................... C h r i s t m a s t i d e .........................................

154 155

Deep in My H e a r t .........................................

156

F r i e n d s .................................................

157

F u g h e t t a ..................................................

158

In the D e p t h s ......................................... Jack and the Beanstalk

159

................................

160

King A r t h u r .............................................

161

King J o h n ...............................................

162

Komm Susser T o d .....................................

163

Last Spring, T h e .............................. Legend of Sleepy Hollow, T h e .......................... Londonderry Air

......................................

165 166

Menuet and T r i o .........................................

167

Minuet from B e r e n i c e ....................................

168

Morning Song, A

.......................................

Mosquitoes r Parade, T h e ................................ My Heart Stood S t i l l .........................

169 170

215 Title

Page

Now Thank We All Our G o d ................................ On the R a n g e ............... * .......................... Prayer of T h a n k s g i v i n g .................................. Program I

172 173 174

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175

Program I I ............... * ...........................

176

Program I I I .............................................

177

Program I V ........................................ Syncopated Clock, T h e ......................... Ten Little I n d i a n s ...................................... To a Wild R o s e .........................................

17 179 180 181

T r e p a k ....................................................

182

Two M o o d s ...............................................

183

Two Songs by B e e t h o v e n ...................

184

Under the Big T o p .......................................

185

Walking Tune, A

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186

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187

Woodland Serenade