An English-Arabic Lexicon 9781463213466

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An English-Arabic Lexicon
 9781463213466

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An English-Arabic Lexicon

ifrrni! J>

vi

.

V. v

GORGIAS H I S T O R I C A L D I C T I O N A R I E S

12

An English-Arabic Lexicon

G E O R G E PERCY BADGER

VOLUME 3

LEE-RESTIVENESS

GORGIAS PRESS

2008

First Gorgias Press Edition, 2008 The special contents of this edition are copyright © 2008 by Gorgias Press LLC

All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise without the prior written permission of Gorgias Press LLC. Published in the United States of America by Gorgias Press LLC, New Jersey

This edition is a facsimile reprint of the original edition published by C. Kegan Paul & Co., London, 1881 ISBN 978-1-59333-728-5 (Set) ISBN 978-1-59333-729-2 (Volume 1) ISBN 978-1-59333-730-8 (Volume 2) ISBN 978-1-59333-731-5 (Volume 3) ISBN 978-1-59333-732-2 (Volume 4) ISSN 1935-3189

& GORGIAS PRESS 180 Centennial Ave., Piscataway, NJ 08854 USA www.gorgiaspress.com

The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the American National Standards. Printed in the United States of America

563

LEG ^ ÍT Loo, n. Tho opposite side to the wind, ^ r O l

4 M .

Lee-gage, n.

. A physician,

,

The leg of a

.

_

j

- gU.

To apply |

article.

¿¿ce lï _

ÍjV^j . A hase, stand, .xi

T o b e o n ono-s legs> t o

a speech, To k

,

stand, ^

ï - ¿ 4 ' - u k & h to make

JOÎ . ¿ytff

0J1 i t s l a g t l e g P i t o ( I r a w t o a n e n d ;

J J J1 i T o he on one's last legs, to he near to death, d & j T ,

Lec-chline, «. A rope to take in sail, J ^ j A ^ r ^ J l .

Icuidt.

j To catch by the leg, J s f j l ! " ' ci To get on one's legs again, to recover, _ 1 .. . il. To recover one's former position,J^sT

Lee-lureh, «. Leek, ». t Leer, n . y i ò _ ¿J^íuS _ 7



— ^JíiVp', To — at, J^VJ — j U V j _ J m J .

c T LS • Leg-rest, ¡Js^-JiJ S^LLJi . S "i ** o Legacy, ». ¿ i ^ j P^~ \S°Y*

To despise. JJiiLjl

"V* Leeringly, ad. JÚL) _ ¿ï-V^ — JliL^U . JJaj _

. . JjÜ

Oil —, c ^ f ü í ( J i ^

Lee-shore, n. ^¿/-¡l Leeward, as. and

5

_ ïj^i

. Wine • - ( o r ) or) ¿ y 3 .

''

— ^jJiib . missible,

- j j J j f ^

-

ji\5

.

• ^ piotis —, i

Legal, a. Laid down by law, c ^ i ^ « .

. ^ p l J X i l . The — side, ¿JIjLSJ! . On

Leeway, ».



According to law,

Pertaining to the law, ¿¿JjLx*

Founded on law, ^ j i l i T ' j ^ ¿ j i ^ * — Cs^J" 1 ' J-

!

.

^ j J U . Legal measures, ¿ j l l i l act, ¿Lliylï ¿Xákklt. A — sale,

A -

. To give a — form to, l l i j 111 T J ^ J 1 ^ Left, pret. of to Leave, q.v. Left, a. and ad. Opposite to the right, Uil. To leave a •—'to, < > - J ^J&j • See also to Endow, v.t. ? C v

¿Js

t i J^-l-s •

the — side, ^ j i l ¿JUL

< Jd

To stand on one's own legs, to be independent, 2



¿rf.

à side, as of a triangle, iS^J pl. b ^ J . Having Jong legs, ¿ j ^ . . To put on leeches, j l ï ] . j y < ) t t o h a v e a l e g t o s t m d o n > a s i n a r g l l m e n t , ¿ J U ¿jJ - .

Leech, v.t. To treat, as a physician, ^

lit.

''

The

; of a boot, j U ; of a table, etc.,

J J ^ J l — ui3\M J? ^ s ? tUiJLsr*. A

*

'iji^LJt.

^¿LilijJ

• In accordance with what is right, Legitimate authority or government, ¡tijL>.

sovereign, ¿ ç } " ^

A — marriage,

child, J 5 U .

^ l i j —U^-w

A — wife, ¿ L i » . .

.

cause,



A.

^

Legitimate measures,

Long - , j p ! _ j \ p _ J ^ / f . Leggin, Legging, n. ¡ J ^ L ^ - p J ^ j j ^ T 5 a single —>

Legitimate, v.t. To make lawful or allowable,

Leggins, e i i U U i . Legibility, n. ) The quality of being legible, p T j j U 1 Legibleness, j being decipherable, i-iitjissi Legible,

_

; of

To — a child,

/^¿fT

u! 1 —

That can bo read, i j J b . Decipherable, J s a j —

j ^ t

im» ¿SÌ\lM.J iuujjLif J j ' J . Legibly,

LilJ —

pl.j-i}"^.

pt-

The Order of the Legion of Honour,

2

_ UI jyj «b « - j j j — V-i - —

J:

LAj.

He

iZ^hj

pi. ^llw

«

^y*

vi*

-

To be at

tJ- ~ í j U J - í u l í . „ —o "í y ^

To be at — from, w ' {^J ç _• ; £ your

-, C S j ' j à .^s-

1 ¿ J . "Walk at & t . At his —, f-l-'f* ^ • They had

— y l ï — ^ U a j . Legislative power, , no —, or opportunity, to write,

l i i y l j i j î — jjii^yü I j-^pj ^Jx. ¿ISali . Legislative measures, I A — section, ^¿jl^Llt *ìj\ù . A — assembly, |

.

Leisure, a. Leisurely,

; zi \ 4 — ç-ft/fcN

_ j-ëlj

Cli'jV^ii

,

Leisure, n. , O -V . -Ï-J

pi

.

Legume, n. A vegetable, ¡Jm pi. J y b — bjL±>~ pi.

o Legislation, The act of making laws, k^fi ' ^ P £ O -¡i laws laid down, 1 '»¿J^. The right of —, ¿isy C-C ^ C-

Candied—,

cc i Y ^ r j t o

plant, v e r b e n a ,

505

L e n g t h w a y s , ad.}

.

^^Jij — ^ ^ l l a i j b —

.

Lengthwise,

,

n. ^•jwiJl

Larnur, » . A

)

lÎ?') ¡j-t^yS

^/-i

Lenity, Lenient,

L e n d , » . ¿ . J j l c î _ J j ^ s — J j â ^ — (—aXiiï — yàjiî.

To —

usury, ^s-jK — J

l

°

To

at interest, To

-(__£.

*

ask one t o —

^

-

To —

one

T o — , on condition of r e c e i v i n g p a r t of

the profits, ^¿"¡li .

'

.

G

¿ r f ^ '



L

c

i

l

d

m e

—at

(JJs! — p U b

L e n i t i v e , a.

L e n d a b l e , a.

— ^ J i

— J



_ iULii —

F u l l length portrait,

_

iLx^j

_

LI

-

JjW ^

I n l e n g t h and b r e a d t h ,

_

part, of

'

( » ^

Lenten,

stretched out, ixiJ»].. Lengthening,

.

Delay, ili?;«.

act of

Extension,

making

— j!

.

—i

jjl^i.



_

L e n t money,

^ • ^ »

t

)

Lentil, » .

' «>8. j j « ^



L e n t i l broth, •

y '

'

A dish m a d e of l e n t i l s and rice, .

T h e tree, J ^ J -

M L k ^ î î fpè- _

.

Lentisk,

To

stretch

jJUiSi],.

T o become

? O?

L e o n i n e , a. Of t h e l i o n ,

long,

n.

JJ^ku _

.









T h e spotted

— . yu

pl.jX)

and

anclj\*j 1 . L e p e r , n.

T o -—, as t h e days, ¡ j L L i j .

n. T h e



1

Leopard, _

¿V^-b . l ^ j

L e o , n. T h e constellation,

2

_

IfclAiJ

L e n d , JiaJ*J*

Lentiscus, n



T o grow long,

»jyk • ¿J^sr^

P l a n o - c o n v e x lens,

i-ris^ . J •

T o l i e at l e n g t h , _ . Lengthen, v . t . T o make longer, J j - b — J L L i .

L e n g t h e n , v.i.

I

lens,

Leutiform,

.

p

or) ti

T h e l e n s of t h e e y e ,

L e n t , n. T h e season

\ • P r o f u s e l y , i n d e t a i l , JL^aJU .

Half length portrait, L i p I

glass,

"

L e n t i c u l a r , a. j s —



A

• ¿J.^1 |

.

'



)

> < H e cut i t — , S j L

J ^ i * .

Leniency, « . )

Madagascar m o n k e y ,

J _

-

L e n g t h y , a. J j j L _

t—>yî> — ¿J

G

money,

, 3 n° Jjyij .

? _

O v» —

A — tree, Lemonade,

LEP

)

/ ; ; . r

n. ¡ j t j —

T o afflict w i t h — ,

u~



^iaTC .

tl)0

—'

:

(

LES

566

)

LET

Let, v.t. To give leave to, J

Leprous, a. See Leper, n. ->t ^ ^tt Lepus, n. The constellation, !

I n the

j>! J i i < — < - i -

Lessen,

^ T* To make smaller,y&\

J51 _ ( J J j ; in dignity or temper, ¡¿ac. 2 _ ¡j^ic!. .

To make less

_

¿ p i 1 — ¿pai — ¡Jsk>!.

To bring down, to abate, kCif

To diminish,

To abase, ^ ¿ v s _

?.

_ ¿pib

2

7.

To

_ (PiLui! .

Lesser Asia, jjyt&l!

Something —

To give a —. instruction, to, Uii _ ¡Jmj5 .

lessons of, from, such an one,



To take (JmjS 2 .

^ j z \Ji - _ ^ l i

• He has attended my lessons assiduously,

¡jaJ

• The money paid for a —, (experience,)

Lessor, n. y>-y* — Lest, co»/. JUL) _ i i i

-

?

o

Lest he should get the advantage of you, 1LJ .

.

Jj^- - —

To let down, —

let down tho boat into the sea,ys;\j! ^ j j

7.

Tliey 1 • Til67

^

They let him down from the wall, ^y*

She let down her wings,

your nets,

.

).

Letdown

IjâJ! .

To let go, to cease to hold, ^

I will not let

^J^-

2 • See also next article.

^•

To let fly, to let go on the w i n g , j £ i _ j l i l . /y i "iv

To let fly, as of s< o

a shot, ¿ p i ! — L-Jjà 7. To dart, throw,

7 —¿ p i 1 .

as of water, ete.,



Jp^i : I t lets in water, *UJt



To let in, as a piece, joint, of wood, etc., ,_pUi ; as of a gore, ¿pj.

To chase, as with jewels, etc., ¿¿J — i l ^ — jJSs,.

To let loose, ¿ p i î — C ^ J J Î . To let loose, asj»^ to pasture, ^ !. H e let loose his tongue against him, ¿pi zr£ To lot oil, to forgive, _ •uT_ . To 1 ^o To lot off, as of as a gun, I—

To let out, to suffer to go out,

9s -

one to let him out, A ^ p j S U _ W j s a i l , .

V i_ J¿>j\. let off, water,

/ To ask To divulge, w*

«or. ^ . 1_

ci1? 6 liJ.

To penetrate,

c, S

This will be a —, example, to others,

is not lost money, (prov.) LlSjaSi U CSlU

we omit it,

-

H e learnt a — from the-past, or I s .

To be bled,

To let down, to make to descend, J j J i _ J S 5 as curtains, etc., J

l^yl.

\.

To let in, to make to enter, J X t > î _

_ JjMj!.

¿Jacj^i . An example, ¿JiA — ¿for p c ,theCorrection, A boy's day, ¡jlZi chastisement, pi.

¿¿l* U j

He let him alone, to do as he would, j

not let you go away,

given one to learn, LfJLk!i. Subject to, J ¡JaJxJL* _ J -jijJ . See also under to Expose, v.t.; also Subject, a. Liaison, n. A bond of tinion, '¿S^ _ ¿131 — . Illicit connection, Liar, «. ( j « ^ - tSLS _—= U j dLilc pi.. An habitual —, ~

sC

O X'—tfi

'



J^5 _ .

Libel, p. i. To defame by writing, l i a s — ! . To defame,JJ.J& — p • - _

ti-^rJc2 -

— (je^T t S ?

2.

.

Libellous, a. ^.Lii _ ^J^^ —s A ^ i ^ L c / . jx . f Liberal, a. Generous, t ^ - — . ' pZ. ^Uls^! ; fern. - . ' • a Ijls" 1 and _ JLaj _ _ -i " ' Ja, i—, Large, abundant, — s - j ' j . j . Liberal minded, j ixSJ c

Free born,

Jiot direct, not literal, of — birth, J i J _ ^



pi.

and A^f —

pi-

i . Liberal, as in politics, Jj&Lu&i« — jJ . A — liberal opinions, gOYOrnment, — ¿Lisi. JtOl

. S & L * 'J,

\ jlx-ilM ^

Liberality, n. Generosity, i j l s - — of mind, T Nobleness, ¿ J l l i _ Absence of strictness, _ ^¿LiJ — ^ ¿ j . Liberalize, ».i. To make liberal, generous, (Cl^Sy Sj&s . To free from narrow views, Liberally,

ad.

Generously,

^ J L )

• Largeness - ¿jUs? . or)

¿ H J f s l



SpJo —

— ijlJj

( 1 4 . ^ 5 or)

aJsj (¿yJo — l i i - l i .

jlis-



'ijVi.^

. Abundantly,

. Without strictness, prejudice, To act —, generously,

. To let things go easily, J^UCJ

• 5 — ^jJJs! —^JLiil. To

s s t* "Z

Liberate, v.t. To release, let go,

s

7 2 — (Jal^i-. To be liberated, ! (JS£ 7. Such an one is

Liberator, n. ^¿.¿r* . Libertine, n. 'j Dissolute, — —jpAi _ J ^ p j . ImLibertine, a. j pious, ¡ j j — pi• ¿J^ViJ . Libertinism, n. Dissoluteness, fjJ^i — j « ^ 1 — oLJJ . Impiety, ^juJ _ . Liberty, n. A free condition, • The being set at liberty, —/ — — — Ll/lxijl. — • c' c. Leave, permission, ¿s^* — j j J U a i - J .

Independence,

j l Jiiii]. _ J l i i ^ l . A privilege, immunity,jLij»5,^>?.



U ^ i . Ereedom At-" of will, of action, Leisure,. i o U J IIäIXuÜ O t l & K ¿/ill . A — action, ¿ ^ p . pi. . To be —. generous,

Liberal principles,

^ Lick, n. ) A stroke with the tougue, y> — J-ii .To lie at one's heart, to be thoughtful, anxious, about, „ C. xA wipe, ¿Jg^*. To lie at the point of death, '¿¿¿Jji-1 ^Js. Qi—^Js. Licking, a. i pi . Lickerish, a. Eager, J j — . Lustful, . To lie by, to be at rest, ^iTjj. • To let lie by, to store, Lick-spittle, n. ^^¿J» _ ^aJb^J* . * -Sl-lSi.-J^--^. Licorice, n. ijmjZi . Licorice root, ^^¿JT^^c . Inspissated — as for another occasion,yi-l i j t^ To lie close, as in layers, ifl^L ly Is . They lie, or lay themselves, juice, j . A seller of —, . • The stones lie close together, Lictor, n. One who bears the rod and flogs in the presence of close together, 2 . J jlls) ^ ( i o r ) . To keep silent upon, the Sultan, J^T?. 2 To lie down, to die, _ CDU _ ¿Jy . (See also under to Lid, n. Slike pi. ; to make to lie flat, Lie, 11. An untruth, jjjj pl.j\jj\ — — ¿JiS — _ Lie.) To make to lie down, j-s^l 2 3 1 ^li jo . To lead one to tell a —, lLsaZ -J-sr . To give the — 2 - — - il'ja To make to lie down, of a / ? '¿A to, - ill _ t^io . To be given to tell lies, ; of a camel, CJy^) . b . They have quadruped, lL>sSj . You have told me lies, To lie hard, as on the stomach, Sax*) I ^Js. JIJ 2 . It lay hard spoken lies against me, 2 Lie, v.«'. To tell untruths, /Til* 7 _ t^jJo «-jiii.1. To upon, was2afflictive to, him, Alie (J-jUj or'JLxj o r ) — < VI ails J i j . The word lay hard upon, was unpleasant to, 2 him, JjLM Alii JO . blend lies with truth, J^r® _ • To lie in, to be confined, of a woman, CUaJj aor. iXU _ Lie, v.i. To be at rest, Sxi 2 _ ¿X^ - ; to cause to lie, ^¿i — jJiil . To lean, rest, j^so'l. To lie, lie down, recline, ~ — aor. t-- -t " . To confine, of a woman, aJJ . To lie in the way, to be an obstacle to, 2 _ ! _ J • j-s^i - j - ^ l • To lie, as on a bed to sleep, Ssj 2 _r 2 To re- To lie in wait, to waylay, j To bo spread out, ^r _ ¡SuaJji • To — for, J (CfSXj — i / r *i 2 main, abide, ct^Sji _ ; < ^ To be buried, of < persons, ¿ j j ; of things, ¿9JJ •(¿T A To be situated, to look To lie on or upon, ^s. Jfe&l • To be regularly c disposed or arranged upon, ^ j z . AH thy want lies towards, — ^Jjj^j 7 _ js^^Jaj 7 or simply ^sT: it lies upon me, • It, the decision, lies or rests towards the north, Jl^llTj^ _ JUlSfj^ To s 5 fr IJuj . with you, lie, to consist in, U

To expose one's life, ¿ w i j ^ i l i - .

2

.

J5 •

(

IVI F

LIG

573 )

Toflvfor one's life, ajUs4 Want of power, weakness, _ J_s^ _ t_iJus . Dullness, To give life to, to make alive again, c t > To in. SU«. - 'f "« spirit, ¡Jhju I _ i — ^Juzo- . Lifelike, a. _ JL. _ i/yiJl ¿ l e . To keep life and soul together, — • Lifelong, a, ilis) ' ¿-V« . P u.' s t ' To lay down one's life, ¿¿Ju nor. . Life-preserver, n. An apparatus for saving life from drowning, To lead a life,'¿Jl^JUj 7 _ l^JJi uJLii 2 . To lead a pleasant life,(jolsi 1 (¡L*\jj£ or) Itilc _ i'lsaJl ( i ' J o r ) - W j i J •

^

To load a hard life, o -. , "" 1 ^jIÄ ; Lifespring, n. or) . . To lead a dissolute life, 7 — ^Lli ? 2 . He led Lifetime, n. Jii- — ' . J -I-. ail exemplary life among them, '¿^¡^ ^ j> Lift, v.t. To raise up, J U _ .



~

^yj —

in which to view, as a picture,

I

" or) UkuJ

Borrowed light, as that of the vooon, yiM I



J*i>.

iJJIt.

To bo —, gay,



i—Xi-7. (The same verb False light, O'A-S J y , s

Good light, as of a candle,

,y _ j ^ J

To make light of a thing, uJ-acLi! : He made light of him, ¿U

The Northern lights, l l l U l l f j ^ V i . The light of one's countenance,

1J y —

— ^ir^'p •

. He considered it light, easy to carry, «Lasa-'l.

To make light, as of advice, J J i s a i j . — J J L i i ^ . Light, v.t. To set on fire,J*i - —

To ask one for a light, i

J J^i _

_ h>- 2 _ J ^ - _

, as of a candle,

To

7 _

\j>\ —j'yj To catch a gleam of light, To come to light, I f 2 _ T'f a' To give light, J U ! _ i j y o .

— AJjl —

— £p>\ _

1—

.

_

-

meet with,

.

{^¿ju or) J-ii

To — off, ^

. 7 1

2

. To — upon, to

7 _

¿ ^ J 7.



make light, not heavy,

-

y^

light, t i l t ; of a fire,, To see in a false light,

. To make easy,

To strike a light, J u J l J j j >

lightens, Ob

Lighterage, —J j _ ^ ¿ ^

. -

Flimsy, i l Ä i — c J - i i - * . _ jJ/i

^U^, . Light

. Light, of a colour, l-c — «J* , t» ? _

Giddy, trifling, J y l _ j U J J _ ^^lulL _ J i l l s i .

_

.

. To gladden,

\¿^a .

I ¿^y^i

_ ¿^J

They began

• — ^U-SJl

.

It

. —

. A cargo boat,

. To

— j b i • Easy, J ^ i _ ¿psS _

^ ¿ l i . Gay, ^ . - f j _ J U _

j

Lighten, v.i. Of lightning, ^VJi _

_ ^jkf •

Nimble, J J J J - l i - L ^ J - c ^ j J _

j

Lighter, n. One who lights,

To throw light upon, of light, j y j _ j U l _ ¿ I i i _

O

\

2

.Aj

• To

] . They cast their wares into the sea to — the boat,

to — the ship,

To show a light, \ j j j — ¡^Sy-a . To stand in one's own light, to disappoint one's self, L ^ l s r o -! c, .. ' ¿JLsu _ ¿ ¿ J u y i \ . To keep off the light by one's self, I

pi. u J t L j - .

_

IL^Jf

.

Light, a. Bright, giving light,

2

.

- "p - Ljp

To lighten, make easy, to, ^ ^ - ¿ j j i _ ^jJx-

To put out, as of a

1



See also to Alight, v.i.

Lighten, v.t. To give light,

'

To be so placed, t_JJ=cM _ ¡j^Sjij] .

Not heavy,

To give light,

. To fall upon, ^Jlx j J J aor. j J i j . To pick up,

i 2_

explain, ^ j j l _

_ J * i 1.

• See also to Kindle, v.t.

Light, v.i. To take fire, J j c i J _

.

To place in a false light, ¡JlS~£ 7 _

of digestion, •Jl (j

One of the scales of the balance was

light, ¿JjJuTf uJU- ? . He is — of hearing, ¿JU- tiM d .

. A good light in

which to view, as a picture, j^SJ) f - i y * •

^¡j _

. To be — in estimation, 7 applies to being light-hearted,

and to be sharp, clever.)

To light a light,

7_

brisk, quick in motion, unsteady, fickle, deranged in intellect,

Floating light, i j i

To hring to light,

^XjLc .

j\ . To be —, not

7. To be —, fickle, trifling, 1



How —, bright, it is! 2

i ] p \ U . To he —, not dark, ¿ [ J ] - j \ j heavy,

JU i



• Light troops.

A — task, t j u s J - Hytl>\ _

Bad light, as of a candle, J s b l c j i — «-LLj J l i J y . A bad light

• Small, of little

_



.

Light, of a

burden, u j ü j i i - . Not deep in the water, £UJT J> (jwLki

Charge for a lighter,

1



Lighterman, Light-fingered, a. Having industrious hands, ^ j l i V i Given to pilfering, J L i J Light-headed, a. j^IuU? —

— ¿ili — —Jf^*

.

iJ-^-j •

• To be —,

li 7 _

^ l e j j l i 7 _ l J U - 7 _ i ^ l t j l L 7. Light-headedness, n. ^Llups _ ¿ i l ^ J s — • *s t s ?cs *f < Light-hearted, a. ¡jlo — — —^ji — i*0 ^

t^

To be-

í¡ ,

•'

/' . u

t

?y —

tie

(

Light-heartedness, n. Lu^ _ ¡__>ps »j
-

t,

Lightness, n. State of being light, not dark, fp> _ j p . Want of weight, ¿ J U . .

Agility, quickness, -\ p s .

{¿¿¡¿j?.

o r ) 1 —iy^y»

^¡k^ . See also Dwarf, n. and a. ' OS S o^

Lily, n. The white — ,

^ r i j i • I t is much more — that he will do it,

'

^ l i . G-o C.C Limitary, «.On the boundaries, ^ ^^Lc _ Jjii^ 1' ^ i^ To be — to, on the boundaries of, J l » . Limitation, n. The act of bounding, ¿ j i i ? ; A boundary, limited time,

.

s?

by law,

. A

. Confined, restrained, Jili

Limner, n. Limning,

_

'¿la-

.k

A builder's •

(

• —

J w 1—

The twelfth part of an inch, J g à

_ ìLLuJ.-: .

. A fishing —,

( j y- J — iyl

_

t

• A ruled — on a book. Jiiiki-

| i-^Ui . Lines on the face, ^¡.o — | the hand, J ^

under Lame, a.

p

• I ^ e of

. ^ s —^ . A profession,

thing else, ^IijU _

-jj-® • —jyast.

. f

pl.

P^-

A — where anything stops, or which separates it from some-

Tamp, v.i. To walk lamely,

Limp, n.

t^U -

(ßty3 ~

I^U^. An instrument to make lines with,

Limitless, a. iis21

Order, LU-»

conduct, »y*

. Limited

• A — time, j j i t ,

jimn, «.i.

I.

. A — as of ancestry, j-CJ

? s

Small, _ ^ J j I_

G

Ci _

mode, manner, ci/^-i — J ^ - ? — ^-"Hr^

of confining,

; confinement,

Limited, a. Bounded, JS^sT4 _ j^jJii""* — j ^os i f t .

outline, contour,

iJLiJSZ*. An ! >,J ' — j-, G C |»IJCJ5 — ¡TjJ'ii

Li ,

A — of fortification, a

-

fTj^-' • See also \ i i n 0 ;

a s 0f a

pl.

and

- A — of the palms of • A — in a drawing, ^ ¿ j .

railway, lai- pl. SsjLrU . They went away in one

uniform — or manner, — ¡¿yj**'

Limping, n. G^C^ a'' Limp, a. j p - j — ^yjLL^i _ ( ^ i i .

He has a

. /S««

Eow, n.)

iJa aZso Flaccid, a.

^J^

That is not in my —,

• (&ee also under

¿r» L i J J i

U

. See also Parallel, n.

Branch line, of a railway, Aj

^

V?

?

. 73

LIX j . Curved line, ^jSX* k i

~

(

578

. . . ^^

Garments of —,

i

Dotted line, i.e. Denoting doubt,

^^Lc

kiLi ^ L i —

LTN

)

.jUj.

Linen or cotton goods, J J _— I it\£i ^ ^. Linen, a.

^

—^ISi •

Equinoctial line,

Linen-draper, n.j\jjj)L

Fishing line,

Linen-press, n. ^ p l i i d 1 t j \ y > . .

pi. ^«j l i i . S, S I n a line, t-jLia^* _ To stand in a line, of many, lylk&i. ki'l _ k ^ J l L^l ,

J A t ? _ LLf-

To make a difference, -

2

To draw up, as troops, in a lino, 2

_

.

kci-^c

To run a line, as of steamers,

2

.

delayed,

UJ .

Lingering, a. Protracted, ^XjSJt — ¡¿¿ijZt — (Jjji? —

£

.

Lingual,

151 . Hereditary, ¿ J \ j j —

I n a direct line, tx^-

. Marked,

.

Linguiform, a. ^ ^ J (¿»'"^

Linguistic, a.

_ j\ pi. -Vj

Linnsean, w.

Lineation, n. See Delineation, n.

* l3 i

.

Link, v.t. To connect by links, ^jJ^s^-^J^ul^.

or streaks, of herbage,

flax,

)

2

To anoint with a - -,

Lining, n. ¿ j I L j _ ( j i L i J .

Lineament, ». Form, && pi. c u i Ila _ JI^aì — ïjyc . Linea-



dJ

— çblà

2

or

c u u l r f Juo ¿JSjl^

Liniment,

^lijj

111 .

monts, countenance, Usr* _

_ ^tpy ,

J^LlJ .

Linguistical, w^i-« -

UauJ —

Jargon,

Linguist, m. 4 i J ' î î

-1 — ^ I ä I ; t o g i v e l o n g l i f e to,_Cte . of, I 's • • j To live alone, iAS-i ' .

little



— c i u ^ j _ ìULs-Ì . A — of, J-Ij .

make

J

.

a. life, to conduct

| does

JiJLil.

little, contemptible,^iCb

quantity,

A — piece,

. To

mind,

-V

as in a place,

! preserved

J..J1 _

Ji

J^Jli?

life,

i ! If a man



.

To make

jr

one's

j lead

jJLsXi!.

To have

of

o f f i c e , ( j w l j J L l ! jjIaJs — ^ L s t —i ^ J a i. Live, r./. To have life, be alive, . « n r f L^ ^oor' »X "i!

numbers,

ij; to despise,

T o e s t e e m l i t t l e ,t o t h i n k l i g h t o f

of number,

— jj u > ^ — — i ' vl l l i - . • Little matters,

L—i t u r g y , n. ^ J L b — iju^e

^ l i T f ^ . T o b e l i t t l e i n o n e ' s o w n e y e s , ; ^ . W h e n j I was little in your eyes, 4 ^ ^ ¿1 • j ¿¿L T o b e t o o l i t t l e f o r , u„•£ - : If the house f' , 0 c^ , y o u ,, ¿il ^f.*^ J 1

-J ."Jä.1

Liturgical, a.

is — ..•if.

'

T o

little in tho eyes

J Littoral, a.



.

l i t t l e ,c o n t e m p t i b l e , ^ * ^ - .

, — tJuOJl

3

-jljJ-/P ,.f —

iXJsjJ^l

Littleness

T h e y

U

_ cJiò ; fewness

>< l ' i l i i _ ù ù as of price, ^jLs:'

.

.

— ^pj^T — 1

n. Smallness,yu5

¿ItolÀi'.

, A

l i t t l e , a s i n b u l k , q u a n t i t y , 'yCe - ; i n b e

b e t t e r ,L i J f l J ^ T U

is only a

¿'.li . Meanness,

t h i s . «.-e ? ^ J Ì laÄi.

liJ

^ykjó

• A — matter,

To be or become J j

&i\j —

He

Littleness,

pi-

j . l u j ; i n n u m b e r s , J ^ I j pi. J J J s and Mean,

.

ness,

brood.

of goods, ^liUjT iJL;; of household rubbish, c;

L i t t l e , a. S m a l l ,

o

j j i ^ iA .

A b e d f o r h o r s e s , etc., lL>JJ3JJ ^ ^ JulJj

— j ILii

s u c h a s i s c a r r i e d b y c a m e l s , etc., \ w a n t e d h u t a — o f n o t d o i n g - i t ,

t

-

L I T

)

continue

—(jJjii

— (jf-ij!.

• by,

^

^li

to live. ^J^J

' — ^ —

(

LIY

582

I O A.

)

Liverwort, n. The plant, j S ^

To live peacably with, ^Jlio.

s K t- ^ ^-^r -

To live together, wti 'y&Z: — U^iJ U j . To live with one, tjioLc •

i t-iTa

uUè-. -f y ° ^ ' "•'tf 't ¿Jyi~ —

.' ? ' '—¿p •

Livery, » . Delivery,

To live up to, to conform to, (j-* -

„ .

Loathe, v.t. To regard with aversion, i six

A — of chains, fetters,

A weight, J a j pl. J l j u f .

LOG

pl.

.



Loan me, lend me,

oi

a

Locate, r.i. To place, ^.L« _ i U j _ l a » . 1 —

•—• —

To cause to dwell,

i.A-IL i l .

Loan, v.t.

See to Lend, v.t.

Loathe, a.

See Loth, a.

— Jj-il —

— ^^iiJ —

lis — ~ t ^ J . iS'ee fl/io Locality, n. Loch, ».

-

^ i r * " pl.

.



Location, ». The act of placing, i S j Z J — r

aor. '^¿j



Lake,

(

IOD L o o k ,

n .

F o r

_

f a s t e n i n g

pi.

J i J

a

J l s J l

• w o o d e n — ,

d o o r ,

;

a

^ ¿ z s r ?

— ^ j i i i

w o o d e n

p i . ^ l i i l .

¿¿La

— , A



;

— ,

a

t r e s s ,



o f

J

cL>j-j6

a g u n , i - l i o J T h e

i i l j

d y e d

_

.

, t, o

¡JyJJ*—

.

p i .

¿ . i l g

J y u i ^

.

p i n

A

g r a p p l e ,

.

T o



o f

p i .



T o

f a s t e n

¿ » A i l .

T o u

TO — T o T o

p

— , J

¡Jyii>

.

t o

— i - j ' b S .

¡Jjj7 - —

J i J i j \

f u r n i s h ,

c l o s e l y ,

o f

o —

i

i

a s

a

c a n a l ,

T

o

J i i ;



2

u

t

,

p ^ l

t o g e t h e r ,

l o c k s ,

l o c k e d t h e

— t — J

U l ¿ ¡ \ y

.

T h e y

w e r e

Jij\jii

o

c

k

e

t

T

t o

o

d



d o o r , —

m

,

J

^

£

, to

, n

. T

h

e o

r

n

a

m

e

n

t

,

J . ü

.

n. A

o f

l o c k s ,

J

T o

u n i t e

L o c o m o t i v e ,

0 .

H a v i n g

t h e

p o w e r

t o

M o v i n g

o f

i t s e l f ,

¿ f p s S f ,

.

L o c o m o t i v e ,

n .

T h e

L o c u m - t e n e n s ,

n.

L o c u s , n.



L o c u s t , n.

T h e

e a c h

o t h e r ' s

a r m s ,

T

.

e n g i n e ,

1

.

A

p o d

n .

O f

a

L o c l e s t o n e , L o d g e , 11.

p i . a n d

w . A

¿ i i ^ - j ^

L o c u s - s t a n d i ,j i n s e c t , —

t r e e ,

m i n e , / S i c L o a d s t o n e ,

« .

J - ^ *

t



.

T h e



A

E g g s

a

k

e i

n l

LliiJjj

I .

\ y

— J j J

o f

t h e _

A

T o .

— ,

V t y *s t *

d

A

n.

1 _

y o u

g

e

j T j

_

c o n -

g i v e

o n e

a

l o d g m e n t t o , H e

l o d g e d

u s

.

T o

'

aor.

b a l l

? ¿ s ' w i

j ? J Á .

t h e m

l o d g e d

u u - j

1 ¿ y 1 —

f a t h e r ' s h o u s e b i r d s

I

' J .

? t i

i n

f o r

T h e

S I j j j ^ . i U a « ]

c o m e H o w

^

h i s

s h o u l d e r ,

w h o

h i r e s

pi-

J J J

a • —

f o r

P r e p a r e

o

e

T o

d

g

i

C U ^ J A l i ^ j .

_ A

n

l i v e a t a — ,

c a v e ,

r e s t

i ^ j & A

i n

y o u r

-

h

h o u s e

. P

r

u

s

i

v

J j U T j b T h e

a c t

o f

session,

Jji.

_

_

a n y t h i n g a —

.

A A n

Ul

t o

g e t

s t o r y ,

T o

g i v e

a

t

l

L

o

d

a —

g

i

n

g

s

( j l s ^



p o s s e s s i o n

or)

,

lzAs"

o r ) 1 t j ^ - S i

i

.

J*

_

(

f u r n i s h e d

o

p l a c e ,

l o d g i n g ,

or) -(jtj\Ji —

n i g h t ,

a — , r

a

— ,



u s

i

i n

a

n.

a t

u p

l

f e l l o w



l o d g i n g s ,

s i g n m e n t ,

C j l ^ >l i

A

G u e s t ,

t a k e

^

l o d g e s

^j^-l-J^Xl

,

T o

l e t

g

L o d g m e n t ,

T o

w h o

U n f u r n i s h e d

f u r n i s h e d

w h e r e

s

o f

m e

or)

t a k e

O n e

¿ j ^ »

.

O n e



r

p l a c e

J j - ^ i

L o f t , n.

d e n ,

y o u r

J t I -

See also

J

n .

.

i n

c .

pi. o

L i / J C « J l c .

n.

.

— C i - i j p i .

T o

T o

g i v e a

l o d g e

a m o n g s t

w a y f a r e r ,



a b o d e ,

L

pi j

.

£



y o u

i — 1

- L i L i t i .

L o d g i n g ,

T o

L i e u t e n a n t ,

' t ^ j y j s tíV-'fU.,^ ' i y s ^ o r )

d o

t

t h o u g h t s

n .

.

G r o u n d , d e f e n c e , .

T o

J * '

r o o m

¿ ' - ^ i

¿ c l i j i - .

T o t a k e r e f u g e i n , ¡ j ; j \ 5— ¡ j j \ J •

W h e r e

t h e r e

I

_

o f



¿¿jy>~ —

s m a l lh o u s e , J k r *

s o m e t h i n g ,

See also

.

t r e e ,

( i ^ f ^ X i

-

J

b l a c k s m i t h ,



c o ^ . l h e

o f t h e —

v a i n

.

"i

; .

J j J .

I s

——

o

L o c k s , d a m s ,

.

S T

^jIí



••fox — sox — ¿ ,1 ií \ j S - j ^ i .

« j

¿ ¿ j J i s r " * m o v e

J - i l i

p l a c e a t n i g h t , C ^ i u

b r a n c h e s ,

'j l O V

H a v e

A

t h e

s h a l l

J j

'

í \ j ~ >

i n



a

_

2

L í J

llt.jSS,

¿

t J j y . s T *



Jo

l o c k e d ,

.i Ü

l i s .



2

a j j aor.


i - H - o l l i

. '

a s t r e a m , etc., < ' ¿ j j j ^ - ; o f

_

— 5 l i j

( o j - ^

o f h a i r , ¡ ^ y

'iyi^- — ¿L^m»- pi. (_)«£:>- — yd* h a n g i n g



584 )

t .

M a t t e r

l o d g e d ,

^ j i - c

L u l L i .

pjjjbyi-1.

• 2

A

g a l l e r y , A

.

A i l J - i . p i .

c o r n - l o f t , ¿ J j - S »

pi.

(

LOI Loftily, ad. To a great elevation, U U j j j . ; haughtily, - f ß i .

Sublimely,

Loftiness, w, H e i g h t , ìi p ; ~ ( ^ ; limity, j - l i - ^ ¡¿J _



Haughtiness,

J-J>Vjü -

-

Ji _

_ Jl£ _

- •

ilia

_

_ ^li, •

Eighty.

..-"¿i, _ j i ' J z _ ^ j ^ k c _ j^iJ-J* , ¿A"» _ ^ . i j — J ^ s .

.

A — purpose,

l i .

sublime, i ~ _ l a Log,

2.

-

£

.

~

jdi.

To heave the — ,

-JtXa

?.

¿ J f t ^

^

^¿-j'l —

— ^s*1/

• '•f 0 —'

^ . H o lolled out his tongue, of men and animals, H i s tongue lolled out, ^ U U J ( ' - J j l or)



pi- ^ ^ ^ A — woman,



A lone

¿ iSp i l _ i'Vpil i

A — man, one whose wife has died, ¿>Ui(| pi.



See also Lorn, Desolate, a. Loneliness, n. The being alone, —

.

Solitariness,

Dreariness, ¿^¿-J .

Lonely, a. j / See Lone, n. Lonesome, )

Log, the day-book

^ K j k l i .

Lonely, ad. Apart, \5\ Ju\-, i n solitariness,





*

Logarithm, ». J U i ^ J i

p - c - î u . Long-headedness. n. , Before long, ) e I ^-r^J* 'Î-f-• Ere long, j * Longing, .

_

.

¿3li _ f'i - .

, J* y—

-Jsl.'s- s ;

- 4

- J i > ^

^

To



look

at one from the angle of the eyes, ¡ ¿ * \ j _ ( J j j _ j i . H l

JPj

: H e looked at him from the corner of the eyes, looked at him askance,

- To look at lightly, glance at,

To t r y to look at,

.

superintend,

— ?•

. Don't look behind you, c ^ s . ' U j J

To look steadfastly on, j j j

To look to one's self, ~ — L-J ^XJXj, .

LS

„iü

Lf i C — uUoi-, J x k ' • Is5 o -

To look one down, JTo look one in the face,



• -

,

-

L

_

P



_

search for, ^ J x ^CiOl£ . 1c ¿LSi - . U i 4 ^ T

1



T o visit

>

'}j aor.jjjJ.

To look out, as out of a house, etc., I S - j l s - J J i i _ l ^ j ^ J ! jj-bl. To look something over, to glance through, To bo watchful, to take care, ^ ¿ y _

^•

^.

To look one up, search for,



J^-w

To look through, as of a hook, £ J l J a — ^

To look something out, to select, ^Us^-) To look one in the face,

t o

; — t_> ^ J J a J .

looked up to, jy^J — ij.

To look into, to scrutinize,

to look upon, Je&A I

7e

°

To look through, as through a telescope, L-J

To depend upon, J x

c - V / ' "•

_ Aj

Ij0 l!:

I •

C^jV^ .

— c j

To have

j.

«or. fc-i People's minds are still looking towards, or directed to . . . ,

affair was looking up, ?—

. To

an eye to,

To look twice, to consider carefully,

- J

To look forward to, to hope for, aor. — — tV • s / ii , To look ill, to appear sick, \ji>ly* US ¿ o ; . To have a had

'



\— J '

To look through, into, the inside of a thing,

— yLssUii..



- ,j]

¡UijiSS»jtyys}^ J p '

down upon, to look at what, is below, ^ J x J i l

'J'-

To t a t o care of,

To look to, towards,, J j

J j O ^ ^ o r ) .

to contemn,

To look

.

sharp after, J ^ j a i M '¿Só

depend upon, ¡ J x

To look, one's self,

To overlook,

, j x *JaJ ?

.,

.

' •

To look behind another, ¿ f T ^

To look down,

- r- _

To read, revise,

Vii.

-

To have recourse to, . j t

To look away from,

behind, jTji ^ J j

To pardon,

\ — To look sharp,

To take a good look at,



To look over, as from a height, ^ L c l 2

—¡jSt'j — 2

LOO

587 )

^ 2

J ! _ , j x O i l . To read, i J l i _ t i ^ . OA O ' > as a lesson, ^ ¡ / ¿ j j ' i.

-

To look over,

Look, m. The act of looking, ^¿•u _ J e j ; a single —, ¿-Sis.' _ Iptu.

A ppearance,





LOO Looks, countenance. J^LaS]

_ JàÛ —

_ ¿U-5U -

¿i-j.!!

JUi-

_ dJLsj .

' 'M

• ^

588

There is a

,

_ jlLl.

To be loosed, untied, J s r j . -

See also to Loosen, n. Loose, a. Unbound, ¿»JJ? _ (Jj-Ls"' _ CS&1LS+ _ LLfj-w» .

of stupidity in Iiis face,

— (J^*5 —

Xot tight, lax, ¡¡Lj y ^ - j — ^ y * ~

pi. irjuäj _ tiA'Ji pi.

¡¿Lit J .

_

pi.

Good

Looking-glass, ». Sl^»

j —

(J





• Loose in the bowels,

Lax, wanton, jIä® —

; vulg. Àj'Cî . c Look-out, ». A place to look out from, ¿ Lir * , ¿JLUc». Loom, n. A weaver's,



Unsewed,, «¿À* .

Separate, unattached, ¿jS&J* _

- ¿¿'I) . A sentinel,

O

^ ' "^"aSuc>

l î L J t . S t r a y , — jÇs- • Hanging down, ¿FT^iU — J i o * -

¿Tpi and

A careful watching,

~ (»A'® •

Incompact, J ^ i l — t_g, »-¿^ . In leaves, not bound, oA&^Jie _

C-O kJl '

— ««¡•¡j'* • HI —, j^oS^t JäiäJI I

into view,

LOO

111 looks, sulkiness, ¿ ¿ U l i —

"A-> Looking, a.

) Lkî 2 _

Good looks,

T

Looker-on, ». -

(

*"

Vaguely,

LOR

(

589

)

LOS

2 CJLi £. To make loss tense, tjyl^j!. Governor, J i . . A husband, Jjo _ ^ ï j . A Loosen, v.t. To untie, _ • To make softer, ^ ¡ J . To —, of a garment, possessor, rtder, kjl^j SslLa _ pi. Head, chief, ij&Zi - 7 — jj&M . To make more ample, — • To U«^ - c^i-'j Our Lord and Saviour Jesus c, 9 s I • 9S ' ! < f relax the bowels, J ^ i \ _ i (¡J*»** or or) ^ J . To — Christ, ^um! ! '9 fiuj j j J Wiiwi UJ 4 i T j i » . i, ¿ ¿ a 'yjk*.. My one's hold, to let go, cl-S-i — ' • To —, as ground, lord, as an address in speech, The House turn it over, yo^Vi d - J j . Loosen the rope for him, ¿J of Lords, yUcll \ ^ILf* _ «UjjUl . Our sovereign lord, ^ VT ? * s ?' ' . Loosen'his shackles, idui ¿JXJ . He loosened or the king, i^a» ! U1X-« ; our sovereign slackened the tie,' • j . He loosened the horse's tether, lady, the queen, 1 i^à I UjJfci. Lord JtlLS • He loosened his turban, KìJ^-as. < paramount, f i l a l i . ThefirstLord of the Treasury, ijjy* lA^J ^¿¿-IjJ . To become Loosen,' v.i. To become loose, ,O J IMM _ pàiV i j i J i • The Lord's day, J^-V 1 j ^ . The Lord's soft, . To —, of the hair, or a garment, to let hang loose, Supper, 1 • To be — over, ^^^Lc ^wVJ ? _ i j ^ y 2 jjijw! 7 — (Jkihuj — Ji^ii! . To make — over, U»]J Looseness, ». Freedom from tightness, Lord, v.i. To rule haughtily, jSsr1 — hLlJ — . The in2 Laxity,flabbiness,«Lilx- _ _ '¿^¿-j. Amplitude, as of a habitants were lorded over, tyrannized, by him, dress, _ . Palling down, as of hair down the shoulders, . JhST. (Jljujj! _ J à w . Looseness of the bowels, lLJvj _ — Lordliness, ». Haughtiness, — _ . Dignity, ^'¿u.1 ) jfjiJ . Softness, ¿ L J . Vagueness, JLj-i . "Want of ex_ — . Dignity, as of deportactitude, XJ J dlï . Negligence, ¿JlSJ&j^ — JiUi". Want of order, ment, ~ • regularity, ki-s l i s _ j*tkj ÎXi . Looseness of style, ¿Sj — ¿S l^J. Lordling, ». — — • Wantonness, lewdness, —htt\s& _ ^¡xc . He has— Lordly, a. Becoming a lord, dignified, — — J^j • of the bowels, tlXi i-vS-i _ < i _ i \. Exalted, J U _ j - j ? ^ • Imperious, — — »j*-* — — c-o ^

• Rne, superb, j^-U _ . Loose-strife, ». The plant lysimachus, «UiJS . Lop, v.t. As of trees, i^j&Jii ? — lLjôJL — Cs-"-^ — iXi — Lordly, ad. See Haughtily, ad. Lordship, n. Rule, - i^ij _ • State of J W ^ J Î ^ ? - j ^ ' ^ 2. To cut off anything, _ being a lord, ¿1' >j — S • A domain, ¿Si** — i-J^JJt — "Là ^ "- " ^ ^ .. 9 Lop-eared, a. G _ . _ . As an address, your lordship, CS--J Lopper, ». As of trees, jujle . Ju 1 t»liXil < ° ?; lopLopping, ». What is cut off, •v' ¿jSJi^ — L-JSji pi. . See also Erudition, n. Lore, ». i ' pings, ^ki . Lorgnette, n. • Lop-sided, «.Inclined to one side, ' J j L « — J j U . Loriea, ». Cuirass, ». V» < Loquacious, a. ^XÂs1 —j\iji —jjo—^lSi —J&f — ¿ i ^ C — Loricate, v.t. To plaster over with, -He 5 _ Li j i j î . A — tongue, JfUa ¿IwJ • Noisy, garrulous, of a woman, _ ¿Âé- . To be • .j «or . JLi _ ^KJ Ì (J C^jui ; . Lorieation, «. Loquaciously, «rf. — Loriot, m. The bird, — • 1 — ¿J-J — Loquaciousness, ». Ì — ià^?* _ Lorn, a. lIS*'---^ • See also Lone, Lonely, a. M. C-O Loquacity, j ¿yJ: _'¿Ji^i. Lory, ». A kind of parrot, «U—J l^li» j^P • Lord, ». God, the Supreme Lord, ^ y ù I —^^»Jl*! ! ¿ J j — Lose, v.t. As opposed tofind,J-s ? _ — I - To miss, ; Lord of lords, C-A/jUl tl/J. A sovereign,'chief, as of i _ S.t.3 7 . To —, as opposed to gain, y^S- - — iSiil . a people, '¿Jà. A master, pi. — i j U and To become deprived of, L_aJj' ^ . To become bereft of, . A nobleman, pi. Aijl _ pi. _ j ^ j J j j j i . To —, of a savour, l ^ J 2 : The salt has lost its savour, '

(

LOS ¿xxJ 2 . To piastres at play, the key. UJ^jI — jifcf-^ ^^ to gain, JLici- — lost, ^Lo aor. —

590

)

LOT

Losingly, ad. s^. — through prodigality, ! . I lost ten . 9s s 9 s Loss, w. Deprivation of what was once possessed, _ _ . Desire, ¿^¿J. Love of self, CJ^iJ^ — mentsy y I(»Jt- JJo • He uttered it with a — voice, . ' ' x k , 9.. 0 • rr cry out with ' i K d ^ i . Covered —, Z j j U , . A labour of —, To I cried with a —• voice, ^ à i j s'* . The first or last traces Mutual • -, iiilsr* — . Getting low, as liquids, uj^u One in love, piand ¿^¡Lite ¿j^uUc ; /»». ¿¡Lilc low down as possible, Ja^^ . LuUlilr. . The two lovers, i.e. the loving and the loved one,Low, v.i. To bellow, - —^-xj - ; vulg.yk£f- il^iuJi ^ (masc.) ¿Jj&Uj Bellow, v.i. Love-sick, a. Ji-J — jJy^^ — U^-ly* • To be —, Low-born, Low-bred, a. j Jj jJ __j j&n ^ j t JJL» ^ J -_ JjijJ _ . ^ J j i ¿XJ s . Lower, p.i. To make —, CLli _ U^ — JjLj . To make Love-sickness, — ¿Jj — • shorter,J^i . To bring down, Jj-M — Jj-i — J-ii . To make Love-suit, n. S i y — t-^issr _ ¡Jm-xj . 2 Love-token, n. — 14^* • to descend to a — place, — . To depress, abase, . Amorous, j^ii.^. 7 . To humiliate, — — ¡ J — (jl&l . To let down, as of a curtain, J _ — ' • To> — O9 ' M f' To as of a rice yards, jjs-l^Jl ^^^ — crf^* • —' P ' — Loving-kindness, n. — "L-iS1 _ [¿&>-j — > stocks, ij^^] - • To weaken, 2 Lovingly, ad. - ¿^H - iil^J _ ^ ^ ' JUL _ JjSj _yii \ — 1—¿us' • To make less, in number, JJJ . To — one's reputation, ¿¿L* 2 — 7 . To —, of the • s ^ s^ ^ 2 Lovingness, n. ^S» — djj . eyes and voice, ,jas. . To be lowered, made less high, Us UaJ _ Low, a. Not high, Jls — JiL _ ¿iLj. Mean, vile, I JlcJ ; shorter,-^¡ai-:; depressed, sad, I — jU-'l; iJj-^jJ ^ - ^ - U^l^: . i humiliated, abased, J - J Jp ; of a %

%

LOW pncf; J

(

593

)

LLC p?

To one's self to, cp^kn {jO&i- — (iZJji.^- or) . Depression, of a . To — aflaghalf-mast high; see under Mast, n. market, 0( Xii O Low-pressure, n. As of a steam-engine, j^kü 1 . Lower, v.i. To fall low, hssn , To become shorter, C^iSJsj.. Low-spirited, a. See Dejected, a. To become less, in number, J J ?. Low-water, n. Of the tide, J-jl? • Lower, v.i. To appear dark, gloomy, of the^ weather, _ ^t, s ; ji-Ji! . To threaten, ¿¿y _ - _ ^ J JT aor. Loyal, a. Obedient, • Faithful,— — ^k^J*. JtjS , To frown, J J J To bo —, . Loyal to the government, • He Lower, a. Loss low, Ik»-1 JÁit _ J j J i . was — in his efforts, To be — to, as in Deeper, ¿¡¿ei. Below, or — down, Us?*. In a — place, friendship, etc., (J Ja^iI 4 • The — pool, tSjJil. The — parts of Loyalist, n. J dj _ jJ jtiijJ Ì Ót^í • thc earth, Jiv^L Belonging to the — class, Loyally, aä. „ ' =r - - ^t, T• £ Lowland, ». ¡^¿^¿i. _ _ k i s _ _£ — i _ J ^ t , To anoint, ¿53 . Lubricity, n. Smoothness, slipperiness, J J l i _ ¿¿A* _ ^J.^. jy Wantonness, . Lowlander, n. k i i ! ¿ i L pi JXl, Lubricous, a. Slippery, smooth, Lowliness, ». Freedom from pride, ^ __ 'isXj^,i. Wanton, . Humbleness, , ~ — p. Lubrifaction, )) The act of making An smooth, Lubrification, iUliL» anointing, ^¿aiäJ . Lowly, a. Free from pride, _ j.JiU- _ ^ ¿ l ^ i . Humble -

(_'

"V

,

*

/

>"

»

"

--

o> j .

Lucent, a. ^yÎ — — -UJ ç. CSyò . Lowly in heart. Lucem, n. The plant, • Ââï-tjS. Lucernal, a. — „, > i/ i1 ¡f p P Lucid, a. Shining, Lowly, ad. _ _ * . Clear Translucent, s,iU^Lk^ . Perspicuous, _ ^ Low-minded, a. ^ u ^ i - _ JJ^J _ J^Li. Base, a. 5 < O _ JÎJti I ^Jli. A — interval, ¿sr Lo-wness, n. Want of elevation, _ J y J , _ j X i J . in mind, Lucidness, n, ) Brightness, —¡JúáJ —jü TransState of poverty, _ .lll^J, _ i j d ^ . Meanness, Lucidity, ) parcncy, j^-s^l —

_



t)rlc

.



a^so

Den, ».

i o i J _ X j U J J J o i J — Xjli-lJ j j J i - .

• Lusciousness, ». 4 j J _ ¿j^-s.' ^ ¿ J ^ • Lusitanian, a. Belonging to Portugal, J ^ j J j J^r ¿ r ? • ii —a s ^ ¿jLlxZJ* — < - — .

Lusory, ». Belonging to play,

.

£

^ , u ' .. . ^ Lurking-place, ». Where one lies hid, Ujst* — ¿¿sj^sr*. The —

of a wild beast,

.

To — for,

• To — in a place, to keep out of

i who lies secreted,



• To — from,

. Something to entice,

Lurk, v.i. To lie in wait, ^ S j — ¿¿sy .

Lunar-caustic, ». i» ^ è •-

2

To-to

Lunar, a. j ^ < .

Lunarian, n.jXÂl !

Jl



— J i * J ! tS J Â i - — '¿'Uf . Com-

mission in —, ^ I s ^ ' J U

Lunch, v.i.Jçjibtls

o

Lurcher, ». The dog,

. Full of small lumps, J J D

Lunation, n . y t k J 1

s

• See also to Lurk, v.i.

Lurch, v.t. To disappoint,

.

Lumpy, a. Abounding in lumps, of earth,

Lunatic, ». j

'

^ o

Lurch, v.t. To roll to one side,

Lumpishness, ». Heaviness, j l i _ XJli.3. Stupidity, j ^ i

Lunatic, a. \

j

To leave one in the —,

( i ^ - ^ j j J or) J-^jti

Lunary,



Lurch, ». A sudden roll of a ship, (»--ols



Lumpish, a. Heavy, J i & i — . Dull, J i ï i — Juli _ (44^Lumpishly, ad. In a heavy manner, JJUiij . Stupidly, _

1

!

Lupus, ». The constellation, ^ J l l i .

Lump, ».». To become lumpy,

i

'

Lunt, ».

1 _

dXïijJ V - ÀiL \ aor. ici- l i .

Ï j S j _ dJl/K»

.

Lung-wort, ». The plant,

or swelling in the neck, . In —, in gross, '¿XX.s'^ _

.

lus

; a — of clay, ï j jJ-i coll.

A collection of articles, ¿¿¡¡Jb _ ^ G

into a mass,

)

i- -? .i ^ J ^ î J . Ulceration of the lungs, < iièr*. Inflammation of the -o 9 • gs, ß . J l c u l J . ¿jÏiJÔ — i i J a ; of dough, ^ • s P — lungs, O» •pfigs,

pl. i—fljii) . A — of j&J* _ J^è"^ —

(

Lust, n. In a general sense, jjpi _

. Covetousness,

desire, XiJli _ ^LM — lusts of the flesh, iliJJ Lust, v.i. To desire, Csjí-.

. Longing desire,

_

— ^ U i . Depraved pi. 'Tj&t —

• The

CuV^-i . To serve Abandoned to lusts lusts,andô pleasures, • To — after,

— ^¡ai - —

(

LUX Lustful, a. J i - fSx* To be —, iLc - _ i l l c l . ~ ' '

_

Iki _

-

-

/

To make .of

596

ilii .



More — than

^O A , . > VJ'VL i - j— Iji^i Lustfully, ad. dJilxj _ i Lustfulness, n. See Lust, n.

a bear (or ape), ijMjjs^



— ^T

_

The meadows were —,

.

.

To grow

Exuberantly,

H i _. J U - f t .

be rich or luxuriant in,

— »-¿j. —

—^ ^ ;

as of cloth, * I* .

Lustrously, ad.

of a colour, ^ ¿ J .

"

S9 * — jp-?'*

. -f. —

u^2^

."r

'

lI? Li

Pi" 1

j Clay for coating vessels,

See also

( - ^ J s or) - ^ ¡ 3 .

jjJj —jjJ. , r > l^jJi i l w i .

¿¿^"J •

?

'J _ ¡Jmi^jjJ

.

. To live —,

A delicacy, dZJij _ i j J pi. C i i l j J —

9



Lute-string, w. J ^ i J l J j j pi. JCl\ . P

. Abound-

»Sie Luxury, n.

— j ^ — ¿i-Li.

Luteous, a. Of a clay colour, J.i-^J I ^ ^ J ^ y _

To

U*1^

•4

— ¿ ¿ S - ' J i . Voluptuous, J^jVj^i _ A " ing in luxuries, =1S>j tO — i U j i J J i S ^ l i . Soft,

Luxury, «. Softness of life,

C^VjlLi — J j i . pi.

Lute, ».¡i. To coat with lute, 'iJiLs: ^

?.

Luxurious, a. Living in luxury, i

Luxuriousness,



• .

Lutarious, a. Pertaining to mud, J ^ - j — /

1_

— L-J jJLLi ,

enjoy,

Luxuriously, ad. ^xi*.S)b _

— (J-jj^ •

Lusus-naturi®,

? —

To

Effeminate, a.



Lustrum, n. A period of five years, ¡juaSLusty, a. Vigorous, -¿Xje — c, pi. ^Uyil . To be —, L ^ i i 2 . To make —,

Lutose,

7 2 . To become —

Luxuriate, v.t. To grow l u x u r i a n t l y ; see preceding article.

— _ ¿ ^

Lustre, re. Brilliancy,

Lute,

Luxuriant herbage, •? *?''C/ -f? v ^ » or) • o

«

Lustration, n.

The •

isCs — i j j _ i j j ^ — j . i j — . . " . ^i 5 Luxuriant, a. Of soil, _ iJU^rM • Exuberant,

P . j y * ~ JsY^lJ* ~ , Tangled, of trees or hair, —

in herbage, u ^ i l l l JkpT.

See Lust, n.

Exuberance,

j

!

^p

— 'i^f* — ij-^ — **

Lustrate, v.t. To cleanse,

l|p.

Luxuriancy,

?

Robustness, re.

Lustral,' a. j

Luxuriance, n.) Of vegetation, lil" _ i i i L f .

beard,

with a loud voico, J U ^

Lusting, «.

LYX

Jii^- •

Lustily, ad. Strongly,

Lustiness, n.

)

-Ji.^-

Lymphatic, a. o i l * _

Luxate, v.t. To put out of j o i n t ; see to Dislocate, v.t.

LTmphatie, n.

Luxated, a. P u t out of j o i n t ; see Dislocate, a.

Lymph-duct,

Luxation, ». Dislocation of a j o i n t ; see Dislocation, n.

Lynch, v.i. ^ i l g V l f J

¿Slit I a>

¿ i U - i J5L» — l i i J . ^

_ c

_

_

.

^liX). - U ^ J t ^ j ^ pi

.

_ \y* ¿ j ^ U j V I j_s)l

( 597 )

MAC Lynch-law, n.

i ) ^ - ^iAjj^M

Lynx, n. J^j /ew.

pi. masc.

MAC

Lyre, ». The instrument,

.

pl.fem.

Lyric, a.



i. •

.

Lyrical, Lyra, n. The constellation,

S

CO ^ Lyrist, ». A player on the lyre, r j I s J p l

Lynx-eyed, a. j J l i l i I A j L ì — j Z ^ l 1 ^ ^ ^ • _ JliXSÌJ1 -



Tjl^Jl.

M. ^jlAJI j U ' 4 ¿ £

M.A. (Master of Arts,)

Ma, n. Mother, H ^ j — l ! . My mother, as an address, abbreviated into, "^

li Machiavelism, n. Cunning, craft,

. Ma, as an infantile expression,

5*



Machicolated, a. Furnished with— openings, LSJ

i i L c ^ji^J Madam, ¿JiaJ ( — —



UlL ¿J

¿¿¿¿.sr*. A—window, ¿Lis** ¿ J lb

S^

^ i

hi

Mab, ». Queen of the fairies,

Machinate, cull

Macadamize, p.i.

ifcs.

V"
applied - ¿ t ^ — « J y ^ pi- ^ ^ - t & ß to animals, J i i l . Inflamed with passion, ¡J^i— (Jhir>~ • De- Madrigal, ». lirious or foolish, li — ^^î ti _ * ! ÀA _ . AA . To be pl. Maelstrom, ». J ^ l i ¿V> • S. To be — against, CT (iT^4^ 1 4 CjjJjfpìj^ ^ J^J i f a . Lo' feien one's Maestoso, ». ^ a ^ I T J x . To he-for, J l b Jx . Ti Magazine, ». A store, ^i/s* pi ¿ j l i * — m i f f . J««'., self —, ¡¿¡Us! b ^ ¿ J • I was exceedingly — against them, for gunpowder, -V^Ü 1 ¿¿r^ — ^ ' ^ ¿ f • A. JJ ieils ^ J ^ • You are mad, don't know what you say, pamphlet, publication, ¿jL>j pi. jJL=j , •li:'"* pi!_S j^J I . I am not mad, ^^al . Much book-learning pi• A. periodical —, ¿L^lili* CjULJ^ii? — hath made him mad, ^ l i ^ J 1 ¿ùùyslL^ÌH . Madagascar, ». The island, JlCi&ki (called by the Magdalen, n. A penitent prostitute. natives on the east coast of Àfrica ^^jÌ). Magenta, n. The colour,'¿jZd-. — — '"--"ti Madam, n. ¡¿¡y^ pi— Maggot, ». The inscet, ¿¡•> '

p.*. T o

)

¡^llcl.

^ - j i S J>

j J b

f

t. ¿ i ^ L s

Sulphate

»v^

.

m a k e

great, J j £

T h e —

Zlut^Llkii

T Ï^jV 1 — '-'lu} T"7

^ i L i i i J

b



^ i k i i ^

¿M^LSJtJi

iUa3 .



J U j .

battery,

Magnetic

needle,

Magnetics,

».

Magnetism,

n.

.

Magnetize,

&

v.t. T o i m p a r t

ot ^ At ^MM^Jt/tJ I «

1

Magnetize,

the

.

.

n.

ü

Magneto-electric,

iSfetf

n.

a

A n i m a l •

magnet,

w n ^ r

or

Jai* ¿ i l l

Electrify, or)

w.

I

( j ^ i k i x S J

,

«

J 1 J

of

T

.

self _

^axÎ I uî ^»Stit —

i^xz.

To

extol

_

or





o n e ' s s e l f , 1-1à*i'

against,

_

size,

o

magni-

e x a g g e r a t e , ^ ' -

T o —

one's

A



^ j l c ^ r ^ '



(J

.

U l s J

.

¿ i l l i c Grievousness,

a

of — ,

crime,

¿ £ \ £ £ ,

importance,

». t J j l x ^ J !



ÏJ*[¿S-

J)U»-|







C j U ^ A .

ïyè

iSJii.

M a h o m e t , n.

!Maidcn,

Mahaleb

n. J u t f .

M a h o g a n y ,

Maid,

Prunus

w. T h e

n. )

j

See A

M a d e

of

of — ,

M u h a m m a d ,

y o u n g

«»Mi A n

-

m a r r v

an

w o m a n ,

.

A

v i r g i n , ^

.

A



old-

a. B e l o n g i n g

to

u u - L j

.

pi.

pi. j \ i j \ —

servant,

t A '

^

of t o r t u r e ,

a virgin,

Virgin,

J«ij

J>1-

I-

1

See also

Cj>j-'

old

j J j l C l T

n.

u n m a r r i e d

pi.

Linn,,

A n instrument

Maiden,

I

— j S j * .

T o

Ad-

.

^ ¿ J l

U _

J ä I c

ï i î U ^ J I .

M

-

.

-

Hungarian,.».

Mahlab,