A twelfth grade office practice course

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A TWELFTH GRADE OFFICE PRACTICE COURSE

A Project Presented to the Faculty of the School of Education The University of Southern California

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science In Education

hy Henry Blunt Jr. and Joseph H. Apfel July 1950

UMI Number: EP46201

All rights reserved INFO RM A TIO N TO ALL U SER S The quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted. In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion.

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'57

i3^T9

7 7 » j project report, written under the direction of the candidate’s adviser and approved by him, has been presented to and accepted by the Faculty of the School of Education in partia l fu lfillm ent of the requirements fo r the degree of M a s te r of Science in Education.

Date.

Adviser

Dean

ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER

PAGE PART I.

ON YOUR MARK

HOW TO GET A JOB 1,

APPEARANCES

HOW TO MAKE YOURSELF PRESENTABLE

WHEN LOOKING FOR A JOB

...............

. 2

1.

YOUR BODY*

How to keep In tip-top condition .

2.

HALO-EFFECT: How to arrange your hair . . . .

3.

FACIAL FEATURES*

2 3

How to get rid of pimples

and keep your face looking c l e a n ........... 3 4.

TEETHs

How to enhance your smile . . . . . .

5.

HANDS*

How to take care of your hands and

fingernails . . . . . . 6.

COSTUMES

7.

BEST FOOT FORWARD*

How to choose the correct clothing .

PERSONALITYS

5 6

How to pick and wear

shoes . . . . . . 2.

...

4

. . . . . . . .

7

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR CHARACTER

T R A I T S .......................... 1.

PHYSICAL QUALITIES?

How to perfect a good

outward appearance 2.

INTELLIGENCES

. . 11

How to perfect your mental

qualities 3.

CORDIALITY*

12 How to acquire friends and be­

come interesting to other people • » . . . . .

13

ill CHAPTER 5.

PAGE

HELP WANTED; 1.

HOW TO FIND VACANCIES.............. 17

PREPARATIONS

How to plan your job finding

campaign • . • • • • . • • • • 2.

APPLICATION BLANKS?

........

••

17

How to fill out and place

applications in organizations where you desire a position 3.

...........

APPLICATION LETTERS:

. , 18

How to write a strik­

ing letter to a prospective employer . . . . . 4. 4.

PERSERVERANCE:

INTERVIEWS;

How to look for a job . . .

PLANNING;

........................... 24

How to prepare for your inter­

view . . . . . . . 2.

APPEARANCES

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SPEECH;

. . . . . . .

PRESENTING IDEAS:

BEHAVIORS

25

How to carry on a conver­

sation with the interviewer 5.

25

How to make your voice pleasing to

the e a r ..................... 4.

24

How to dress correctly for the

position you desire . .......... 3.

. 20

HOW TO CONDUCT YOURSELF 1IITH A

PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYER 1.

19

..............

26

How to act at an interview . . . .

26

CHAPTER

PACE .PART II . GET SET

HOW TO DEVELOP THE SKILLS USED IN A MODERN OFFICE 5.

STENCIL CUTTINGS

HOW TO MAKE STENCILS . . . . . . 31

1.

PLANNINGs

How to place the material on paper

2.

PREPARATIONS

31

How to ready stencils for

t y p i n g .......................................32 3.

6.

How to type stencils . • .......... 32

OPERATIONS

4.

CORRECTIONSs

5.

ANALYSIS;

DUPLICATING:

How to proof-read stencils . . . .

33

HOW TO RUN STENCIL DUPLICATORS . .

37

1. PROFICIENCYs 2.

How to remove errors on stencils 33

SPRUCE UPS

How

to produce good copy . . .

How to clean up after using the

stencil duplicator • • « . . . 3.

7.

37



38

provide for greatest efficiency • • • • . • •

38

CARES

How to handle the duplicator to

KEY-DRIVEN CALCULATOR; KEY-DRIVEN MACHINES 1. PREPARATION;

How

HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS WITH .......................42 to get your machine and

yourself ready to w o r k ................ 2.

ADDITIONS

42

How to add columns of numbers and

determine their totals ...................... 3. SUBTRACTIONS machine . . .

How

44

to subtract on this

............

. . . . . . . . .

45

V

CHAPTER 4.

PAGE MULTIPLICATION:

How to multiply on the

key-driven machine 5.

DIVISION*

...........

How to divide on the key-driven

machine ............ . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.

HELPFUL HINTS*

CRANK-DRIVEN CALCULATOR?

..............

PREPARATION:

......... 55

How to get your machine and

yourself ready to work 2.

ADDITIONS

49

HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS

WITH CRANK-DRIVEN MACHINES 1.

48

How to make the operation of

this machine easier 8.

47

..................... 55

How to total columns on the crank-

driven calculator................... 3.

SUBTRACTION: How to subtract on this machine

4.

MULTIPLICATION: How to find the product of two numbers

5.

CREDIT BALANCES:

DIVISION*

58

How to subtract a larger .............. 58

How to master division on the crank-

driven calculator 7.

57

.................

number from a smaller one 6.

57

HELPFUL HINTS*

........

. . . . .

59

How to make the operation of

this machine easier

. . . . •

59

vi

CHAFTER 9.

PAGE

TEN KEY ADDING-LISTING8 HOW TO DO PROBLEMS WITH THE TEN KEY MACHINES. , . . . . . . . . . . . 1.

PREPARATION:

How to got your machine and your­

self ready to work correctly. . . . . . . . . 2.

ADDITIONS

SUBTRACTIONS

........ . . 6 7

How to use the 10 key machine ........... 68

to do accurace subtraction 4.

MULTIPLICATIONS

How to develop skill in using

the 10 key machine to multiply . . . . . . . . 5.

DIVISION:

64

How to add columns of numbers and

determine their totals . . . . . 3.

64

69

How to divide with the ten key

calculator .............. . . . . . . . . . . 7 0 6.

HELPFUL HINTS:

How to make operation of the

ten key calculator easier 10.

71

FULL KEYBOARD ADDING-LISTING8

HOW TO SOLVE

PROBLEMS ON THE FULL KEYBOARD MACHINES .......... 75 1. PREPARATIONS

How to get your machine and

yourself ready to work . . . . . 2. ADDITIONS

. . . . . .

75

How to total columns with the

full keyboard............................. . 7 7 3. SUBTRACTIONS

How to subtract with accuracy . 78

4. MULTIPLICATIONS

How to multiply with the

full keyboard . . . . .

. . . . . .

.....78

vii

CHAPTER 5*

PAGE HELPFUL HINTS :

How to make operation of

the full keyboard easier . . , ........... . . 7 9 11.

DICTATION?

HOW TO GET A MAILABLE LETTER FROM

EDIPHONE RECORDINGS...............................84 1.

QUALIFICATIONS;

How to meet the requirements

to become a dictation machine operator . . . . 2.

CONTROLS:

How to operate the machine

efficiently 3. COPY: 12.

FILING:

.86

How to proof-read the finished product

ALPHABETIC:

. .91

How to arrange related materials

in an alphabetic file • • • • • • • • • . • • 2.

CROSS-REFERENCES:

3. NUMERIC:

97

How to arrange related materials

in a filing system using numbers . . . . . . 4. SUBJECT;

91

How to prepare and file

cross-reference cards

How

GEOGRAPHIC: by location

98

to arrange related materials

in a subject filing system • • • • • • • • • 5.

87

HOW TO PLACE CORRESPONDENCE IN A

SYSTEMATIC O R D E R ........................... 1.

84

.99

How to arrange related materials . • 100

viii

CHAPTER 6. USE OP FILES#

PACE How to remove and replace

materials In the files drawers . . . . . . . 13.

CORRESPONDENCE: HOW TO HANDLE INCOMING AND OUT-GOING M A I L

. 106

1, OUTGOINGS

How to prepare mall for release

2* INCOMINGS

How to handle mail you receive •

3.

POSTAL INFORMATIONS

TELEPHONING 8

INCOMING CALLS#

VOICE#

• 108

113

How to receive a call over

the wire • • • • • • • • • • . . . • • • • « 2.

107

HOW TO RECEIVE CALLS OVER THE

WIRE AND MAKE EFFECTIVE OUTGOING CALLS . . . . . 1.

. 106

How to mail letters

and packages • • • • • • • . • « • • . • • 14.

101

How to talk over a telephone • • .

113 , 114

3. PHONE NUMBERS# How to use your telephone directory . . . . . • . • • • • . . « • • •

115

4.

LOCAL CALLSs

116

5.

LONG DISTANCES

How to use the dial telephone How to make toll calls . .

117

PART III. GO HOW TO HOLD A JOB 15.

ON THE JOB BEHAVIOR#

HOW TO MAKE FRIENDS FOR

YOURSELF AND YOUR COMPANY 1. COURTESY;

............ 122

How to maintain good public

relations .......... . . . . . . . . . . .

122

Ix CHAPTER 2.

PAGE CONDUCT!

How to maintain proper deportment

concerningyour j o b . . . . . . . . . . . 3. FELLOWSHIP;

123

How to get along with your

fellow employees 16.

.

.......................

124

PROMOTIONS;

HOW TO GET AHEAD IN YOUR POSITION . 128

1. SCHOOL!

How to advance through more edu­

cation

.................

2. RECREATIONS

How to gain recognition through

social activities • • • • • • • • • • • • • 3.

128

RELATIONSHIPS

.129

How to Improve your status

with your employer

......... * 129

X

LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE

PAGE .......... .

43

1.

Key-Driven Calculator

2.

Crank-Driven Calculator

3.

Ten Key Adding-Listing Machine • . .. » -* . . •

65

4*

Full Keyboard Adding-ListingMachine . . . . . .

76

5.

Desk Carriage Ediphone

85

.............

...........

56

xi

PREFACE TO TEACHERS What do office managers expect from an employee? Who are the people that get the good job3 in offices? How do you go about getting a job in an office?

These

are but a few of the many questions that are bothering our office practice students.

With these questions in

mind this project was presented from the angle of “This is what you need to know and this is HOW TO DO IT.*' It is in some respects similar to other outlines that have been done in the field of business education.

But

the authors believe this project will be more of a usefhl tool in teaching pupils who plan to enter offices as a profession, in that it does not merely present the information and leave it at that. mation and tell you'how to use it.

We present the infor­ When a student can

see a use for a subject, he becomes interested in it, There is a great need for information on how to get a job and hold it and it should be information that meets the problems of those concerned and solves them in a concrete manner. The authors believe that this syllabus will provide learnings which will contribute directly to the students* occupational adjustment.

If used correctly it should bring

positive and gratifying results not only to you as the

xii

teacher but to your pupils which is the most important*

xiii

PREFACE TO STUDENTS Wouldn't you like to step right out of school into a position in the office of your choice?

It would be

great to be able to have the self confidence that you need to go up to a prospective employer and present yourself and feel sure that you are doing the right things, wouldn't it?

But did you know that many of the young people leaving

high school these days don't get those good jobs they wanted?

So, I'll tell you what we're going to do.

In

this little book we have gathered from the four corners of the earth all the information regarding the snags and problems that you will have to meet and overcome in order to emerge as a successful office employee who is well satisfied with his job.

Why not play it wise and profit

*>y the experience of others? This course will help you to make more money when you go out into the vast field of business with its endless opportunities for success.

This course will

prepare you directly and effectively for securing lasting success In the profession of office work.

But no matter

what your occupation may be, this course deals with many things that you will meet in every day life. This syllabus will help you to get stafcted right, a very important factor in your career.

It will aid you

xiv

in solving day to day problems as they arise.

It teaches

you how to meet new conditions, plan effectively, avoid common mistakes, and utilize the experiences of other men in order to improve your lot in the world. So letb get startedI

Dig into this big problem and

see how you can show this "cruel world” that you are ready to serve it and reap its benefits.

So, go ahead, turn

the page and learn how to "Prepare yourself for an office position”.

Ready now, On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!f1

1

PART I.

ON YOUR MARK

HOW TO GET A JOB At the cry of, "On your mark,” each runner checks his position.

They all start from the same place, hut there

la only one who wins the race.

It would he rather tragic

to trip and fall before you had run ten feet, wouldn* t it? And so It goes with getting a job.

Proper planning and

consideration of all the topics found in the next four chapters will enable you to check your position and get off to a good start.

Follow the suggestions given you by

the 11coach” and you won't be the one who trips and falls by the wayside.

Turn the page and learn how you can

become the "WINNER."

2

CHAPTER 1.

APPEARANCE

HOW TO MAKE YOURSELF PRESENTABLE WHEN LOOKING FOR A JOB A,

MOTIVATION: 1.

Outcomes of dressing well.

FAVOR OF OTHERS*

A neat and well appearing per­

son creates a feeling of positive attitude and secures a favorable response from the employer; remember that one who likes you finds it diffi­ cult not to do you a favor. 2.

THAT PROFESSIONAL LOOK:

Dressing correctly gives

you the appearance of a person who knows his way around*

You know your business because you look

it. 3.

FIRST IMPRESSION:

That first 10 seconds of your

interview is where the prospective employer forms his attitude.

In this respect, your appearance

can make or break you. B.

DIRECTIONS:

Some helpful hints on how you can improve

your appearance. 1.

YOUR BODY:

How to keep your body in tip top con­

dition. a.

Take a bath or shower every day.

b.

Use a deodorant during warm weather. (l)

Perspiration can cause an unpleasant body odor.

s (2)

Place a dab of deodorant under each arm after you bathe each day*

c.

Keep your weight at the amount which best suits your height.

(1)

Obesity creates a sloppy appearance.

(2)

Your health may become impaired if you allow yourself to get fat*

d.

Do some regular exercise to keep yourself trim.

e.

Walk erect, do not slouch.

f.

Get a complete physical checkup from a reputable doctor at least once a year*

HALO-EFFECT: a.

How to arrange your hair.

Wear your hair so as to highlight your best features.

b.

Wash your hair regularly.

c.

See that your hair is always neatly arranged.

d.

Boys should have their hair cut at least once every three weeks.

e.

Don*t use greasy, sticky, or smelly hair oils. (They tend to detract from your appearance.)

f.

Wear your hair in a simple but well planned style.

FACIAL FEATURES:

How to get rid of pimples and

keep your face looking clean.

a.

Correct your diet to clear up most pimples.

b.

ITse a complexion brush, to clear your face of blackheads. (1) Blackheads are caused by dirt* (2) Use a good quality soap,

c.

Wash your face at least 3 times a day aside from your daily bath. (1)

Check your face often to see if it is dirty.

(2) d.

Use a mild soap.

Don*t use too much makeup.

(This will detract

rather than add to your appearance.) e.

Boys should shave at least once a day.

(Pref­

erably each morning.) TEETHs a.

How to enhance your smile.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day. (1)

Morning and evening are the best times to brush your teeth.

(2)

Use a medium-hard brush and good paste or powder.

b.

Use dental floss after a meal to remove food from between the teeth. (1)

These particles will create bad breath if left in the mouth.

(2) Us© the floss by drawing it back and forth between the teeth. c.

Rinse your mouth out with a glass of water after each meal to remove any loose particles of food.

d.

Eat the correct foods. (1) Onions, garlic, etc. will cause offensive breath. (2) Remember bad breath can come from the stomach as well as the mouth.

e*

See your dentist at least once each six months to check up on the condition of your teeth.

HARDS:

How to take care of your hands and finger­

nails . a.

Wash your hands frequently.

b.

Use a hand lotion to keep your hands from becoming rough and red.

e.

Don*t let your nails get over l/4 inch long (for girls) or l/8 inch (for boys).

d.

Keep your nails well shaped and free of hang­ nails by using a file and cuticle scissors.

e.

Remove dirt from under your fingernails daily.

f.

Girls should wear a conservative color of fingernail polish.

COSTUME:

How to choose the correct clothing.

a.

Make it a rule to dress conservatively.

b.

Wear clothes that fit you in size.

c.

Don’t wear flashy ties or daring sportcoats.

d.

Choose a sensible business suit.

e.' Pick colors that attract to and accentuate your good points. f.

Don’t wear horizontal stripes if you are plump.

g.

Don’t wear vertical stripes if you are thin.

h.

Wear colors that harmonize. (1)

Ties and socks should be of matching colors.

(2)

Pick colors that are complementary to your suit so that they add to an overall appearance and don* t attract attention purely of themselves.

(3)

White shirts are still the best taste for men of distinction.

(4)

Girls should always wear hose.

(Be sure

the seams are straight.) i.

Wear skirts which conform to the current style as to length. (1)

Don’t go to extremes either way (long or short).

(2) j»

Pick colors that look well on you.

Consider blouses and dresses by what they do for you.

(You can increase the effectiveness

of your appearance by choosing the right styles and colors. BEST FOOT FORWARDS a.

How to pick and wear shoes.

Wear black or brown shoes. (1)

Boys can never go wrong with these colors.

(2)

Girls should buy shoes to match their ensemble.

b.

Buy the conventional oxford (for men) and a comfortable shoe with not too high a heel for women.

c.

Wear shoes that fit well and feel comfortable regardless of size.

(This is important from

a health standpoint as well as an appearance feature.) d.

Keep your shoes well shined.

(It takes but

five minutes a day to go over your shoes, and the rewards are tenfold.) e.

Don*t let your heels run down, and do not wear shoes with holes in the soles. (1)

It isn*t necessary to buy new shoes.

(2)

In most cases a good shoe repair man will

8 do an excellent job of half soling. 8.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTERS

Where to get further

assistance. a.

King, Eleanore Helens

Glorify Yourself.

Prentice-Hall, New York, 1948. b.

Daily newspaper articles dealing with appearance.

e.

Local offices.

Go in and 3ee how the employees

are dressed* d.

Cooley, E. G., Crawford, Claude C., and Trill Ingham, C. C. s

Living Your Life.

D. G. Heath and Company, New York, 1940. e.

Bartlett, Francis G., and Crawford, C.C.s Art For All.

Harper and Brothers, New York,

1942. C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS;

Projects that will help you to

cultivate an attractive appearance. 1.

CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISMS

Observe and write on slips

of paper any points of appearance that can be im­ proved on by any of the students. explain how these can be corrected. should be anonymous.

On the same slips These slips

The teacher should collect

all slips and read them aloud.

2.

HOMEWORK*

Give yourself a mirror test.

Stand in

front of a full-length mirror to see whether you have that wprofessional look1*. suit you?

Do your colors

Are the seams of your hose straight?

Are your shoes shined?

Is your skirt hem uneven?

Do your clothes fit you?

Check these and other

points to see if you could pass the close scrutiny of a prospective employer* 3,

OBSERVATION*

Go to local offices and see how the

average office worker dresses.

On slips of paper

note any points of defect as regards type of cloth­ ing worn, color harmony, and other points as mentioned in the chapter.

On slips note the type

of business and how you would improve these appear­ ance detractions.

Each student should visit at

least one office* D.

EVALUATION?

Samples of some types of check-ups which

may be applied to appearance* 1.

TRUE-FALSEs

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T F a. ( )( ) A gaudily colored accessory will add to your appearance. b.

( )( ) You should bathe at least once a week.

c.

( )( ) It Is better for you to use a deodorant

than water. BEST ANSWERS

Place the number of the correct

answer in the parenthesis, a.( )

The item that is wrong in this list iss (l)

Blue suit,

(2) Maroon tie,

shirt, (4) Black shoes, b,( )

(5) Maroon socks,

To keep your body in tip top shape you should; (1) Bathe dally, teeth twice dally, nails, (5)

e.( )

(3) Brown

(4)

(3)

(2)

Brush your

Glean your finger­

Wash your hands frequently.

Do all of these,

Of the following practices the one that is right iss

(1)

in your dress.

Always be "sporty"

(2)

Wear clothes that

are a little large so you can grow into them. (4)

(3)

Be sure your colors harmonize.

None of these,

RATING SCALE;

Place X in each space for Ttfiieh

you qualify. a. (

Hair well arranged.

b.(

Face clear of pimples and blackheads.

e.(

Teeth brushed.

d. (

Ears and nose clean.

e.(

Clothes well-fit, clean, and pressed.

(

Total.

CHAPTER 2*

PERSONALITY

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR CHARACTER TRAITS A,

MOTIVATIONS

Values that you will receive from using

your personality effectively* 1.

FRIENDSHIP OF OTHERS*

Using your personality to the

fullest extent will result in accumulation of many friends and admirers* 2,

BETTER HEALTH*

Practicing good mental and physical

habits will ensure more enjoyable living* 3*

ADVANCEMENT*

Your chances for better positions are

much greater when your personality is pleasing* B.

DIRECTIONS*

Suggestions which will aid you in develop**

ing your personality, 1.

PHYSICAL QUALITIES*

How to perfect a good outward

appearance* a*

Be energetic.

b.

Sit and stand erect*

c*

Don’t slouch.

d.

Shake hands firmly and sincerely

e.

Keep in good health.

f.

Eat and sleep regularly.

s.

Keep clean*

h.

Exercise regularly.

1.

Keep well groomed.

j.

Avoid conscious or unconscious irritating mannerisms* (1)

Eliminate annoying repetitious phrases. (Such as “see what I mean”, and 11this and that”, and “let me tell you” .)

(2)

Eliminate swinging key chains, sucking teeth, and twitches.

(3)

Eliminate habits such as chewing tobacco or gum, biting fingernails, eating garlic, or eating other foods which will be offen­ sive.

k.

Use your voice effectively. (1) Enunciate clearly. (2) Use correct grammar. (3)

Don’t try to over-impress people by using “four-bit” words which may make them feel inferior.

(4) Don’t use words incorrectly. INTELLIGENCE; a.

How to perfect your mental qualities.

Use your memory to good advantage. (1) Remember persons* names. (2) Remember persons’ interests* (3) Remember people’s needs.

1s b.

Stay mentally alert. (1)

See the things that need to be done and do them.

(2)

Offer helpful and constructive ideas of Improving on office procedures.

(Be sure

you do this tactfully.) c.

Be helpful and courteous in all dealings with other members of the office force.

3.

d.

Show your eagerness to learn by being attentive.

e.

Don*t flaunt your abilities.

CORDIALITY: How to acquire friends and become Interesting to other people. a.

Show an interest in other people and what they like.

b.

Be helpful,

e.

Be a good listener*

d.

Be able to carry on a conversation in various subjects.

e. 4.

Don‘t be a wtightwad11.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER;

Ihere to get further

assistance. a.

Gregg, John R., Applied Secretarial Practice. Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934.

b.

Roedecker, Elizabeth, Personality Traits

A practicum presented to J, P. Henderson at U.S.C., May 1950. c.

Crawford, Claude C,, Cooley E. G., and Trlllingham, C. C., Living Your Life. D. C. Heath and Company, Hew York, 1940,

d.

Messick, John D., Personality and Character Development. 1939.

C.

Fleming H. Revell CO., New York

15-31 pp.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS8

Projects that will further your

ability to develop and use an effective personality. 1.

EVALUATE OTHERS*

Take a sheet of paper and write

your name on it.

The papers will be collected,

shuffled, and passed back to the class face down. Each student will then see whose paper he has and write an honest and constructive evaluation of that person*s personality. signed.

The evaluation will be un­

It will then be returned to you so that

you can get an insight into your personality, at­ tributes and weaknesses. 2.

YOU, YOURSELF:

Evaluate yourself regarding* posture,

grooming, clothing, voice, mannerisms, hair and skin, eating habits, and condition of parts of your body.

Write on slips what you are doing to maintain

good habits and Improve your weaknesses.

Each of

15

these should be turned in.

They will be read to the

class, but the student's name will not be mentioned* The class will comment on the general soundness of the habits and routines of the individual* 3*

MANNERISMS %

Discuss mannerisms*

Mention some ex­

periences which you or your parents may have had with a businessman who possessed irritating manner­ isms*

State on slips of paper various methods you

would use to correct these annoying traits* D.

EVALUATION*

Samples of wavs in which your personality

may be evaluated* 1.

TRUE-FALSEs Place an X in the correct space T F a. ()( ) Display your superior knowledge over other people and they will like you* b*

()( ) Your hand shake should be firm when used on a woman*

c. ( )( ) It is quite all right to slouch when you are tired* d* ( ) ( ) Your health may improve if you sit and stand erect. e. ( )( ) It is not necessary to brush your teeth after eating

BEST ANSlAERi

Place the number of the best answer

In the parentheses, a. ( ) Regarding good health, you should: (1) Work long hours to keep In shape. (2) Eat and sleep between long working hours*

(5) Exercise regularly*

b. ( ) Use your voice effectively by: ciating clearly.

(1) Enun­

(2) Use correct grammar.

(3) By not using correct words. all of these*

(4) Using

(5) Using none of these,

c. ( ) It is not neGessary to eliminate one of the following: (l) Chewing tobacco* tobacco*

(3) Eating garlic*

(2) Smoking

(4) Biting

fingernails, RATING SCALE:

Place an X in each space for iftilch

you qualify regarding mannerisms. a. (

Repeat hackneyed phrases often

b. (

Pick my nose*

c. (

Bite my fingernails*

d. (

Scratch myself often*

(

Hervous fidgeting.

f. (

Eating offensive foods.

g. (

Suck my teeth.

(

Total.

17

CHAPTER 3.

HELP WANTED

HOW TO FIND VACANCIES A, MOTIVATIONS

Advantages of making the right kind of search

for a .lob. 1.

LESS FATIGUES

If you uae the right method in look*

ing for a job, you won't be out ‘'pounding the pavement“ every day wearing out your shoes and patience, 2.

SELL YOURSELF;

Your chance of convincing a pros*

pectlve employer that he can use you is easier if you go about it the right way, 3.

MONEY;

You*11 make more money and get a job quicker

if you look for a position in a businesslike manner and not in a haphazard fashion, B,

DIRECTIONS;

Key points to guide you in finding that

job, 1,

PREPARATION; a.

How to plan your job-finding campaign*

Decide upon the position ypu want, and prepare yourself to fit that position,

b.

Decide upon your best ability and see which department you fit in best,

c.

Find out what companies need employees with your particular skills,

d.

Analyze your own knowledge and skills.(Are you well enough trained to fit into the job you want?)

e.

Analyze your personality characteristics, social characteristics and work habit.

f.

Prepare a personal data sheet. (1)

Include the following informations Home, address, telephone number. Type of employment desired. Personals

Age, Weight, Height, Marital

Status. Education*

High School, College, Degrees

held if any. Experience*

Any work done previously, for

whom, type, salary, when, where. References* (2)

Name, position, address, phone.

Any other qualifications you may have should also be listed in the personal data sheet.

APPLICATION BLANK*

How to fill out and place ap­

plications in organizations where you desire a position. a.

Write small but be sure ltd legible. (1)

Printing is often advisable.

(2)

It is preferable to use ink.

b.

Follow all instructions as stated on the form.

c.

Don*t ask foolish or unnecessary questions of the person who gave you the blank.

Such

questions as, ”Hhat is, today's date?1' will create a bad impression, d.

Answer all questions truthfully to the best of your ability,

e.

Attempt to make yourself different from other applicants by listing any distinguishing quali­ fications you may have,

(If there is no room

on the blank ask permission to Include a data sheet with this information,) APPLICATION LETTERS*

How to write a striking letter

t

to a prospective employer, a.

Plan your letter with care,

b.

Don't make any mistakes in grammar, spelling, or construction,

c.

Typewrite the letter if possible.

d.

Place these three essential items in your letter. (1)

The opening which should draw attention and state your purpose.

(2)

A few statements about yourself that will be of interest to the employer,

(3)

A closing paragraph that will make the employer pick up the phone and call you right away.

e.

Be brief, make each word count and avoid negative statements*

f.

Remember the objective of a good application letter is to obtain a personal Interview,

PERSERVERANCE;

How to look for a job.

a.

Use the want ads in your daily papers,

b.

Place situation-wanted ads in yourself,

o.

Put ads In special industrial papers that may apply specifically to your type of work,

d.

Mail many application letters (shotgun style) to firms in which you would like to work,

e.

Ask friends for poslbllitles of positions that may be open,

f.

Check with employment agencies for open positions

g.

Find out if your school has an employment service

h.

Join professional organizations that operate in your profession, 1.

Many social organizations may be of help also in obtaining a job,

2.

Often membership in a businessmen*s club will be of aid in gaining employment.

21

5v

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get further

assistance* a.

Gregg* John R., Applied Secretarial Practice. Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934.

b.

Stickney, Rufus, and Stickney, Blanche G. Office and Secretarial Training.

Prentice

Hall, New York, 1941. c.

Want ads in the daily newspapers.

d.

Want ads and situation wanted ads in various industrial organs.

e. C.

Local employment agencies.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS:

Laboratory work to help you

master job getting techniques. 1.

APPLICATION:

Bring in application blanks.

them out in class.

Fill

See that these letters are

actually mailed to a prospective employer. 2.

WANT-ADS:

Find positions in daily papers that you

think you can fill adequately.

Write application

letters to employers and see what the results are. 3.

DATA SHEET:

Prepare a complete personal data sheet.

Be sure all data as stated in this chapter is inclu­ ded.

Also add any other qualifications you may

have that may prove interesting to a probably employer. next job.

Use this to send when applying for your

22



EVALUATION:

Samples of check-up a concerning your

mastery of .job-finding techniques, 1.

TRUE-FALSE*

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T F a. ()( ) There are many ways to find jobs. b.

()( ) Be prepared for the position you desire.

c.

()( ) Application blanks should be filled in hurriedly with little thought since they don11 mean much.

2.

BEST ANSWER*

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses. a. ( ) When writing a letter of application it is not a good technique to* (1) Be brief. (2) Be specific. average guy.

(3) Show that you*re an

(4) Ask for a personal inter­

view. b. ( ) The main objective of an application letter is to*

(l) Get an application blank.

(2) Secure a personal interview. salary schedule.

(3) Settle

(4) Tell the employer what

position you will take.

RATING SCALE: Place an X in each space for those tilings you have available for quick reference in your job-findingcampaign. a. ( )Completed data sheet. b. ( )FU11 list of all availablereferences. c. ( )Record of dates of highschool

and college

experience• d. ( ) A list of office machines with which you are familiar. e. ( ) Record of dates, salary, hours and place of former employment, f. ( ) Your social security card. (

)

Total.

24

CHAPTER 4..

INTERVIEWS

HOW TO CONDUCT YOURSELF WITH A PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYER A , MOTIVATION:

Rewards received from a successful Inter­

view* 1,

BETTING THE JOBS

If your prospective boss Is

favorably Impressed with you at your interview, you willg et the position, 2,

SELF-CONFIDENCES

The ability to carry on a good

interview will create a feeling of assurance in you whenever asked to appear for a second or per­ haps third interview* 3,

FRIENDSHIPS

If you feel at ease and impress the

interviewer with your friendly nature, even though you may not get the job at first, you may gain his good will and thus, perhaps, a job in the future* B,

DIRECTIONSs

Key*points to guide you to a successful

interview. 1,

PLANNINGS

How to prepare yourself for your

interview. a.

Collect all your references.

b.

Present a copy of your high school record.

c.

Include a personal data sheet.

d.

Investigate the company for which you want to work.

e.

Learn the name of your interviewer.

f.

Prepare a work experience chart. (1)

List all jobs you ever held, stating type of work, pay, and hours work per week.

(2)

List all previous employers with ad­ dresses and phone numbers.

g.

Be on time for appointment.

f.

Carry all necessary materials with you to every interview, (1)

A pen (with ink) and pencil,

(2)

Small memo book.

(3)

Any data needed to fill out an application blank.

APPEARANCES

How to dress correctly for the posi­

tion you desire. SPEECH:

(See Chapter *)

How to make your voice pleasing to the ear.

a.

Avoid irritating speech characteristics.

b.

Use a clear-cut vocal tone,

c.

Speak up; don't mumble or shout.

d.

Plan your talk for the interview.

(Be able to

answer the question why you want to work for the X company.) e.

Make use of good English.

f.

Refrain from using constant slang expressions. (1)

Certain colloquial terns may be used.

(2)

The fact your interviewer may makeuse of slang doesn't give you the right to do the same.

PRESENTING IDEASs

How to carry on the conversa­

tion with the interviewer. a.

Don*t be verbose.

b.

Don't talk disconnectedly.

c.

Don't speak illogically.

d.

Don't stray far from the topic at hand*

e.

Don't give indirect answers to direct ques­ tions.

f.

Don't halt and hesitate when answering questions.

BEHAVIOR#

How to act at an interview.

a.

Be friendly.

b.

Display self-confidence.

c.

Don't bite your fingernails. (1) Control your nerves. (2) Be self composed; act natural.

d.

Appear genuinely interested in the w>rk you desire.

e.

Be able to take a joke.

27

f, 6.

Be alert and responsive to all that is said*

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get further

assistance• a.

(loneral Petroleum Corporation, Office of Employment*

b.

Los Angeles City Schools*

Interviews of pro­

spective teachers* c.

Employment agencies interviews of prospective employees*

d.

Gregg, John R., Applied Secretarial Practice. Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934*

0.

ACTIVITY- ASSIGNMENTS:

Projects that will further your

ability to make your interviews J>M : P*£a 1*

INTERVIEWS III THE CLASSROOM:

Invite a member of an

employment agency to give you a lesson.

He will

discuss the good and bad points to look for at an interview.

After this talk he will Interview In

front of the class as many members of the class as possible. The remainder of the class will write down on slips those points that can be Improved upon by the interviewees. 2,

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:

As a member of the class

pick a job that you would like to have after grad­ uation.

After this is done, make up a list of

questions that might be asked of you at an inter­ view. 3.

Prepare answers to these questions.

AUDIO VISUAL:

Your class will have two movies.

The first show will deal with a poor Interview* After this is shown, the class will discuss faults of the interview, and suggest ways in which they may be improved.

Next, the class will

be shown a motion picture in which the interviewee conducted himself properly. D.

EVALUATION:

Sample evaluation instruments for possible

checking of your interview techniques. 1.

TRUE-FALSE*

Place an X In the correct space for

true or false. T F a. ( ) ( ) The best practice is to forget about your interview until it happens. b. ( )( ) It is permissible to shout if your voice is not clear. c. ( )( ) Correct English should be used In any interview. d. ( )( ) It is advisable to stray far from the topic being discussed.

29

BEST ANSWERS

Place the number of the best answer

In the parentheses, a, ( ) At an interview you should: (1) Be friendly, (2) Display self-confidence, Interest.

(3) Show

(4) Do all of these*

b, ( ) As a well-prepared person* you should have which of the following with you at an Interview? arettes,

(1) Pen and pencil. (3) Matches,

(2) Cig­

(4) Watch,

c. ( )Which of the following would not be needed at an interview? school records.

(1) References (3) A friend*

(2) High (4) Memo

pad. RATING SGAIEs

Place an X in each space for which

you qualify regarding interviews. a.

() You speak up,

b.

() You don*t mumble.

e.

() You use a clear-out

d.

() You plan your talkbefore

(

) Total.

vocal tone* each interview,

30

PART II.

GET SET

H0» TO DEVELOP THE SKILLS USED IN A MODERN OFFICE MGet set”, ©very runner is anxious now, bending low ready for the word that sets them off.

It took them a

long time before they were ready to start in this race. A lot of training goes into making a good track man, and you need a lot of training also to become a good employee. The next nine chapters of this book will give you that training to prepare you for the "race" which holds a greater prize in store than a mere trophy.

Flip this

page over quickly and let*s get started with learning how to be a success.

31

CHAPTER 5.

STENCIL CUTTING

HOW TO MAKE A STENCIL A.

MOTIVATION? Benifits received from making a good stencil. 1.

SAVES WORKS

Your mimeographing work will be much

easier if your stencil is in good shape* 2.

PRAISES

Employers for whom you are doing the work

will laud your efforts If the job Is well done. 3.

SAVES MONEYS

Preparing a stencil correctly the

first time will save the funds.

You won’t have

to waste time and materials doing them over again. B.

DIRECTIONS: How to increase your knowledge of making a stencil. 1.

PLANNINGS a.

How to place the material on paper.

Placethe original copy between the stencil and the backing sheet*

b.

Look at the sides of the stencil and record the number of spaces needed in the stencil*

c.

Don’t type below line 66 if you want to use letter-slze paper in duplicating*

d.

Don’t type over line 84 for any size paper.

e.

Don’t type horizontally over 84 strokes when using an elite typewriter,

f.

Don’t type horizontally over 70 strokes when

using the pica typewriter* PREPARATIONi a.

How to ready stencils for typing.

Insert a cushion sheet between the stencil and the backing sheet*

b.

Hold the stencil firmly at the bottom with one hand.

c.

Insert the printed stub into the typewriter.

d.

Holl the stencil into the typewriter the same as you do any paper*

e*

Line up the top of the stencil to insure a perfectly straight piece of work*

f.

Avoid all wrinkles in the stencil as they will show in the duplicated copies.

OPERATIONS

How to type stencils*

a.

Use a uniform, staccato touch.

b.

Stroke with a greater foree for letters with a large printing area such as H or W.

c. Stroke slightly harder on the pica typewriter than on the elite typewriter* d.

Stroke lightly on small letters such as C or D or they will fall out of the stencil.

e.

Shen any letters fall out of the stencil, type extra letters at the bottom of the stencil, pick them up with a pin and press them into position.

CORRECTIONS:

How to remove errors on stencils.

a.

Use stencil correction fluid*

b.

Wipe brush, off on the top of the bottle.

c.

Put very thin coating of correction fluid.

d.

Retype after a few seconds.

e.

Use a light touch In retyping correction.

ANALYSISs a.

How to proof-read stencils.

Proof read stencil while it is still in the typewriter if possible.

b.

Reinsert stencil, lining it up as closely as possible, if error is found after stencil Is removed from the machine.

c.

Press lightly on proper key to check alignment

d.

Shift stencil if necessary to line it up.

e.

Put correction fluid on the error.

f.

Strike proper key.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTERS

Where to get further

assistance. a.

Miller, U. H., Office Duplicating. The Author 1939.

b.

Meadows, Weavers Machines.

An Introduction to Office

Stanford University Press, 1939.

34

c.

Boy sen Alpha G., Duplicating Machine, A practicum, May 1950.

C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS:

Work you do to help you Improve

your stenciling techniques* 1,

GROUND 10RK:

Take an old or spoiled stencil and

use the techniques you have learned in this chap­ ter,

Correct all the errors then retype the

stencil, 2,

FOR YOU*

Prepare a stencil for your own use.

can,deal with any Information you desire.

It

The

requirements will be a good stencil that can be reproduced If necessary, 3,

SCHOOL STENCILS:

Prepare stencils for mimeograph­

ing work for teachers and school administrators. Your instructions will be written or oral and it will be up to you to follow this data thoroughly, D.

EVALUATION:

Samples of some evaluation techniques which

may be applied to preparing stencils. 1.

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false, T F a. ( )( ) There are no numbers on the sides of the stencil, b. ( )( ) You may type below line 66 if you want to use letter size paper in duplicating.

c. ( )( ) Don’t type horizontally over 84 strokes when using the elite typewriter, d. ( )( ) Don’t type horizontally over 70 strokes when using the pica typewriter, e. ( )( ) Insert a cushion sheet; between the stencil and the backing sheet before typing stencil, BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the best answer

in the parenthesis, a, ( ) Which procedure is wrong when typing a stencil?

(1) Stroke with a greater force

for letters .with a large printing area, (2) Use a uniform stacatto touch,

(3) Stroke

slightly lighter on the pica typewriter than on the elite typewriter,

(4) Do all of these

(5) Do none of these, b, ( ) In correcting errors on a stencil you would: (1) Use correction fluid,

(2) Wipe brush

off on the top of the bottle,

(3) put very

thin coating of correction fluid over the error.

(4) Retype a few seconds after you

put on correction fluid,

(5) Do all of these

c, ( ) You wouldn’t proof read a stencils (1) When it is in the typewriter.

(2) When you have

36

taken it out of the typewriter,

(3) Ihen you

have run it off on the mimeograph machine. (4) All the above are right, above are right.

(5) None of the

57

CHAPTER 6.

DUPLICATING

HOW TO RUN STENCIL DUPLICATORS A.

MOTIVATION;

Advantages to be gained by the careful use

of the stencil duplicator, 1.

APPLAUSE:

Your teachers will sing the praises of

your ability when you run off work on the dupli­ cating machines for them. 2. CONFIDENCES

Your instructor will learn to depend

on you if you are able to do a good job on the duplicator and as a result your belief in yourself will increase. 3.

UTILITY;

If you learn to work the stencil dupli­

cator properly your efficiency will increase in an office• B.

DIRECTIONS:

How to become a better stencil duplicator

operator. .1. PROFICIENCY:

How to produce good copy.

a.

Unlock the cylinder and remove the cover sheet.

b.

Put the stencil on the machine, printed stub down.

c.

Run three or four test copies.

d.

Ink machine if necessary.

e.

Place paper in the feeding tray.

f.

Set the recorder and run off the desired number

of copies. g.

Check copies coming off to he sure they are clean.

h.

Reink when necessary.

i.

Adjust knob that regulates the number of sheets that go through the machine, when necessary.

j.

Count the number of good copies to make sure you have enough.

k.

Remove the stencil and replace the cover sheet.

SPRUCE UPs

How to clean up after using the stencil

duplicator. a.

Blot the stencil several times with a soft paper.

b.

Wrap the stencil in wax paper.

c.

Place stencil in envelope.

d.

Place the envelope on top of material udiich you ran off.

e.

Fold all inky surfaces inside of used paper before throwing it into the waste can.

CAREs

How to handle the duplicator to provide for

greatest efficiency. a.

Do not over-ink.

b.

Wipe off all excess ink and lint.

c.

Don*t force any part if it doesn,t work easily.

59

d.

Gall the instructor of the machine if it is not working properly.

4.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTERi

Where to get further

assistance. a.

Miller, 0. H., Office Duplicating.

The Author,

Chicago, 1939. h.. Meadows, Weaver, An Introduction to Office Machines. c.

Stanford University Press, 1939.

Boysen, Alpha C., Duplicating Machine. A practicum, May 1950.

C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTSi

Some experiences which will in­

crease your ability to operate a stencil duplicator. 1.

SCHOOL WORK:

Take those stencils you have prepared

in class for teachers or the administration.

Run

off on the duplicator as many copies as are needed. 2,

M0TI0H PICTURE:

You will see a movie on the correct

way to operate a stencil duplicator.

Write on slips

those things you observed in the film that you think you need improvement in.

Practice improving your

techniques by running off a few copies on the dupli­ cator. 3.

EXPERT:

Invite an experton the stencil duplicator

to give a demonstration employing all the bad techniques he possibly can.

Write on slips all

40

these bad techniques you observe.

Also on the same

slips note how you would correct them, D.

EVALUATION:

Samples of ways in which mastery of

duplicator may be checked, 1,

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false, T F a. ( )( ) You don*t have to unlock the cylinder before you remove the cover sheet, b. ( )( ) You put the stencil on the machine, printed stub down* c. ( )( ) You don*t have to run test copies if you only duplicate 50 sheets of paper, d. ( )( ) Before you run off any copy, be sure to ink the machine, e. ( )( ) Always count the number of good copies to make 3 u re y o u h a v e e n o u g h , 2,

BEST ANSWERS

Place the number of the best answer

in the parenthesis, a, ( ) After you finish duplicatings (1) You remove the stencil,

(2) Replace the cover sheet,

(5) Glean up

(4) All of these,

of these.

(5) None

c. ( ) If you are careful of the machine you wills (1) Not over-ink it, ink and lint, work easily.

(2) Wipe off all excess

(3) Force any part that doean*t (4)

Gall the instructor if

machine is not working properly,

(5) Do all

of these, RATING SCALE:

Place X in each space for which you

qualify regarding operation of the duplicating machine, a. ( ) You run test copies before you run off the good copies, h. ( ) You ink the machine only when necessary, c. ( ) You count the number of good copies to make sure you have enough, d, ( ) You replace the cover sheet when you remove the stencil, (

) Total.

42

CHAPTER 7.

KEY-DRIVER CALCULATOR

HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS WITH KEY DRIVEN MACHINES A.

MOTIVATION:

Advantages that will be yours when you can

operate a key-driven calculator. 1*

MEET ,JOB.REQUIREMENTS*

The key-driven calculator is

recognized as one of the essential office machines* If you have the ability to operate one your chances of getting a job are increased tenfold* 2.

VERSATILITY*

Employers want people who are versatile

so they can do any of the jobs that may be required in the office*

If you add the ability to operate a

comptometer to your skills, you are just one step closer to a good job* 3*

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR*

Many of the large corporations

have separate departments consisting purely of comptometers*

Adding this skill to your qualifica­

tions may be the key that opens the door to the company of your choice* B.

DIRECTIONS*

Guiding techniques for learning to operate

the key driven calculator. (See Figure 1.) 1.

PREPARATION;

How to get your machine and yourself

ready to work* a.

Look at your machine. hand lever.

Note the position of the

b.

Note that there is no zero key (the ciphers (0) are registered automatically),

c.

Cheek the keyboard*

Row X goes from one to

nine cents. Row 2 starts at 10 cents, Row 3 starts at 1 dollar, Row 4 starts at 10 dollars, etc, to Row 10 which starts at ten million dol­ lars. d.

Clear your machine.

(This is done by drawing

the lever forward as far as It will go and releasing it.)

When your machine is cleared

it should register all zeros.

(Dials appear

at bottom of machine.) e.

Note that the figures appear in the dial at the bottom side of the machine merely upon depres­ sing the key.

f.

Note that each key has a small number and a large number on it. (1)

Always use the large numbers in addition and multiplication.

(2)

Both large and small numbers are used in subtraction and division.

ADDITION:

How to add columns of numbers and deter­

mine their totals, a.

Clear the machine.

b.

Depress keys in a number with two digits with the index finger in the tens .column and the second finger in the ones column*

(start the

depression at the extreme right of machine.) c.

Depress numbers for first figure* (1)

Be sure to depress keys firmly all the way down.

(2)

Never depress any two keys simultaneously in .addition* f

d.

Depress the keys for the rest of the numbers in the problem*

e.

Read answer already recorded in the dials*

f.

Try to develop the touch system* (1)

The tops of the even numbered keys (2, 4, 6 etc.) are flat*

(2)

The tops of the odd numbered keys (1, 3, 5 etc.) are concave*

g.

Clear machine and start problem again if you make an error by pressing the wrong key,

h.

Clear the machine and start the problem over if you fail to depress the key all the way down*

SUBTRACTIONS

How to subtract on this machine*

a.

Clear your machine*

b.

Add the minuend (larger number) into the

machine by depressing the keys using the large figures on the keys. Using the small figures on the keys, place the index finger of the right hand on the key corresponding to the extreme left digit in the subtrahend.

(Smaller number.)

Place the fingers of the left hand over all the nine (using the large figures on the keys) keys to the left of the extreme left digit in the subtrahend* Depress (using the small figures on the keys) numbers corresponding to the subtrahend less one. (1)

If the minuend were 6.66, you would add 6.66 into the machine using the large figures on the keys.

(2)

If the subtrahend were 3.33, you would depress (using the small figures on the keys) 3.32.

Depress all number nine keys over which your left hand was plaeed (point d above) simultan­ eously.

(This should Include all nine keys

immediately to the left of the row in vhich keys for the subtrahend were pressed.

g.

Read the answer (It would he 3.33 In the above problem) which is recorded In the machine's dials•

MULTIPLICATION: How to multiply on the key driven ma chine• a.

Clear your machine.

b.

Place the index finger of each hand on the numbers to be multiplied.

c.

Depress the keys repeatedly and rhythmically as many times as is indicated by the first digit in the multiplier.

d.

Move the fingers over one row to the right and depress keys repeatedly and rhythmically as many times as is indicated by the tens (second from the right) digit in the multiplier.

e.

Repeat the moving over of both fingers over one row for each additional digit in the multi­ plier and depress keys repeatedly and rhythymically as many times as is indicated by that number.

f.

Place your decimal point by adding the number of decimal places in the multiplier plus the number of decimal places in the multiplicand and pointing off that many places in the product.

48

5*

DIVISION;

How to divide on the key driven machine.

a.

Problem*

Divide 72 by 24 (72 ■* 24)

b.

Add the dividend (72) into the machine starting at the extreme left of the keyboard and using the large figures on the keys,

The dials should

read 072, c.

Place a decimal point at right of dividend and move it one place to the left for each whole number in the divisor (24) . The dials should now read 0.72.

d.

Use small figures on the keys.

Depress keys

corresponding to the divisor less one (24 - 1 s 23) (1)

This 23 should be depressed In the rows directly above the 72 in the dials.

(2)

When this small 23 has been depressed once the dials at the left of machine will read 1,48.

The 1 represents the answer thus

far and the 48 the remainder of the dividends. (3)

If the remainder of the dividend is equal to or greater than the divisor, again simultaneously strike the small 23 this time on the rows above the 48. the dials will read 2.24.

This time

The 2 represents

til© answer 24 equals the remainder of the dividend. (4) Since the remainder of the dividend is still equal to or greater than the divisor, depress the small 23 once more. will now read 3.

The dials

Since there is no remain**

der, the final answer to the problem 72 « 24 la 3. HELPFUL HINTSs

How to make the operation of this

machine easier, a.

Stroke keys rhythymically,

b.

Do not depress keys simultaneously in per­ forming touch addition,

c.

Train your eyes to follow down a column unaided,

d.

It is possible to hold a pencil in the right hand palm with your thumb.

This makes it easy

to record your answer swiftly, e.

Record your answer immediately after you finish each problem,

f.

Failure to depress a key fully may lock the machine.

If this happens, clear your machine

and begin problem again, g.

Combine key3 In adding whenever possible.

(l)

When adding a number like 6, depress the 3 twice quickly,

This will increase your

speed by eliminating the time spent in reaching up to the 6 key, (3)

When adding a number like 7, strike 3 then 4; a number like 9 strike 4

h.

then 5, etc,

Place your decimal point before beginning the problem,

i,

Don*t use your thumbs to depress

keys,

j.

Useboth hands (index and middle

fingers of right

hand and left hand} when striking a number with four or more digits in it, k.

Change all fractions to their decimal equivalents and then proceed with the problem,

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER;

Where to get further

assistance, a,

Agnew, Peter L,, and Goodfellow, Raymond C,i Key-Driven Calculator Course.

b.

Visit local offices where these machines are being used.

c.

Write to Felt and Tarrant Mfg. Co., 1730 r

Uorth Paulina Street,

Chicago, Illinois

(Comptometer Calculating Machine) c.

Write to Burroughs Adding Machine Co.,

51

6071 - 2nd Ave. Detroit, Michigan C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS:

Problems to do which will improve

your skill in operating a key-driven calculator. 1.

ADDITIONS

Total the following problems in addition

with the key driven calculator, as outlined in this chapter.

(le)

2.

8.64 2.52 .96 6.74 .20

(lb) 3.21 1.30 3.60 4.05 8 f35

.24 .47 .35 5.50 .94

(If) 4.77 .68 .32 2.23 1.35

MULTIPLICATIONS

(lc) 8.63 3.04 7.06 2.44 4.50

(Id) 3.26 7.22 2.12 3.05 8.42

Do the following problems in

multiplication according to the directions given in the chapter.

3.

(2a) 17 x 1.3

(2e) 1.9 x 2.2______

(2b) 5.6 x 2.6

(2f) 47 x .36_______

(2c) 48 x .52 ______

(2g) .25 x 66

(2d) .34 x 51 ____

(2h) 23 x 32________

SUBTRACTIONS

Complete the following problems

in subtraction according to the directions given in the chapter. (3a) 4.85 -3.34

(3b) 5.96 -5.56

(3c) 6.21 -4.46

(3d) 7.33 -5.45

52 (3e) 4.55 -2.24

(3b) 5.44 -4.54

4. DIVISION;

Do the following problems in division

according to the directions as outlined in the chapter. (4a) 792 4 24_____ .

(4e) 966 4 46_____

(4b) 876 4 12______ (4c; 988

19______

4

(4d) 792 4 36______ 5. ANSWERS:

Check the answers you received with the

correct answers as given below. (la) 19.06

(2a) 22.1

(3a) 1.51

(4a) 33

(lb) 20.51

(2b) 14.56

(3b)

.40

(4b) 73

(lc) 25.67

(2c) 24.96

(3c) 1.75

(4c) 52

(Id) 24.07

(2d) 17.34

(3d) 3.88

(4d) 22

(2e)

(3e) 2.31

(4e) 21

(IS)

7.50

4.18

(2f) 16.92

(If) 9.35

(3f)

.90

(2g) 16.50 (2h) UATION;

7.36

your techniques Samples of ways in which ;

for operating the key driven calculator may be checked. 1.

THOE-FALSE;

Place X in the correct space for true

or false. T F a. ( )( ) You should use the zero key after each operation in multiplication.

b. ( )( ) You should remove the printed tape with the answers as soon as it is 6 inches long, c. ( )( ) You should use the large nud> era on the keyboard for addition and multipli­ cation, d. ( )( ) It Is best not to depress any two keys simultaneously in addition. BEST ANSWER*

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses. a. ( ) The first process to complete in doing any problem with the key driven calculator is to (1) Depress the keys,

(2) Clear the machine

(3) Depress all the number nine keys.

(4)

Do none of these first. b. ( ) In doing multiplication the most important operation to consider is to* (1) Clear the machine.

(2),, Depress the keys repeatedly

and rhythymically.

(3) Move., over one row

to the right for each new digit in the multiplier.

(4) Do all of these#

c. ( ) When doing subtraction you should (l) Use only the small numbers. large numbers.

(2) Use only the

(3) Use both the large and

small numbers.

(4) depress the nine keys

with your thumb. RATING SCALE:

Place X In each space for the

operating techniques in which you qualify. a. ( ) Depress the keys firmly. b. ( ) Clear machine before each new problem. c. ( ) Record the answer immediately. d. ( ) Follow number columns with eyes unaided. e. ( ) Strike keys rhythymically. (

) Total.

CHAPTER 8.

CRANK-DRIVEN CALCULATOR

HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS ON THE KEY-DRIVEN MACHINES A.

MOTIVATION: Benefita received from learning the keydriven machine. 1.

USEFULNESSs

This type of machine is widely used

throughout the business world and probably will be used by you when you are on the job. 3.

NO ADDING*

Know how this calculator works and

you won*t add long columns of figures in your head. 3.

ADMIRATIONS

Your friends will respect your great

skill when they see your fingers fly over the keys. B.

DIRECTIONS: How to develop your skill in operating this calculator.(See Figure 2.) 1.

PREPARATIONS

How to get your machine and yourself

ready to work. a.

Place the machine at a alight angle to your right.

b.

Look over the machine arid become acquainted with the position of the keys and dials*

c.

Clear the machine. (l) Release all figures on the keyboard by depressing large 0 key.

Gl^

(2)

Release repeat key by depressing the red blank key just above the repeat key.

(3)

Clear the dials in the carriage by de­ pressing the clear keys on the keyboard which are usually located near the bottom of the keyboard.

ADDITION:

How to total columns on the crank

driven calculator. a.

Clear the machine.

b.

Depress the figure keys for each number.

It

is not necessary to depress a key in order to indicate a cipher. c.

Operate the crank by turning it away from you.

d.

Stop the crank at it*3 highest position.

e.

Depress the plus bar with the little finger instead of turning the crank if the machine is electrically operated.

SUBTRACTIONS

How to subtract on this machine.

a.

Clear machine.

b.

Depress the keys for minuend and add them Into the machine by turning handle clockwise or by depressing motor bar.

c.

Depress the keys for the subtrahend and turn

handle counter clockwise or depress the miss bar. 4*

MULTIPLICATION*

How to find the product of

two numbers* a*

Clear machine.

b.

Depress the keys for the number.

c.

Depress repeat key.

d.

Hit bar or turn crank for the number in the extreme right of the multiplier.

e.

Move carriage one place to the right and hit bar or turn crank for the next number of the multiplier.

f.

Repeat step weM until multiplication is completed.

CREDIT BALANCES:

How to subtract a larger number

from a smaller one. a.

Subtract in the usual manner.

b.

Depress repeat key.

c.

Depress keys on the keyboard for all the figures appearing in the lower dials that are directly above the keys.

d.

Subtract twice.

The first subtraction clears

the lower dials; the second furnishes the actual credit balance.

59

6.

DIVISION:

How to master division on the crank

driven calculator* a.

Clear the machine*

b.

Move the carriage to the extreme right .

c.

Depress keys at the left of the keyboard for the number to be divided and add the number into the machine*

d*

Clear upper dials and the keyboard.

e.

Depress keys at the left of the keyboard for the amount of the division.

f.

Depress the repeat key.

g.

Subtract as many times as possible.

h.

Move the carriage one place to the left, and again subtract as many times as possible.

7.

HELPFUL HINTS;

How to make the operations of

this machine easier. a.

Review the work of the previous day before each new assignment.

b.

Practice the simple operations of the calculator thoroughly and then the more difficult assignments will be easier.

c.

Try to work each new assignment by yourself but ask the instructor for help if you become confused.

60

d.

Read instructions carefully.

They are made as

simple as possible. e.

Write your answers clearly.

There is no sense

in getting the right answers if you cannot read them. 8.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get further

assistance. a.

Agnew, Peter L«, and Goodfallow Raymond G* Crank-Driven Calculator Course.

South-

Western Publishing Company. Cincinnati 1939. b.

Visit Local offices where these machines are being used.

c.

Write to Friden Calculating Machine Co. Inc., 2350 Washington St., San Leandro, California.

d.

Write to Marchant Calculating Machine Company, Emeryville, California.

e.

Write to Monroe Calculating Machine Company, Inc, Orange, New Jersey.

61 C.

ACTIVrrg ASSIGNMENTS

Projects which will help you know

your crank driven, machine, 1*

Add tiie following problems according to the direc­ tions as stated in this chapter, 50 10 7 200 5

2.

50.44 78.05 5.43 12.20

94.05 5.96 8.985.50 4.74

Subtract the following problems according to the directions stated in this chapter. 898 754

3.

6,789 7.846

10.80 7.82

Multiply the following problems according to the directions as stated in this chapter. 265 75

4.

1808 200

4168 504

Divide the following problems according to the directions as stated in this chapter. 67,830 4 55

jB.

568.5

4 6.72

87.44

4 766

EVALUATION?

Sample evaluation instruments for possible

checking of your knowledge of the operations of the crank driven calculator. 1.

TRUE-FALSB8

Place an X in the correct space for

62

D. EVALUATIONS

Sample evaluation instruments for possible

checking of your knowledge of the operations of the crank driven calculator. 1.

TROE-FALSEs

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false* T P a, ( )( ) It is not necessary to release all the figures on the keyboard when you clear your machine, b, ( )( ) On most crank driven calculators you would operate the machine by turning a crank, c, ( )( ) It isn*t necessary to depress a key when you want to indicate a cipher, d, ( )( ) The plus bar is depressed with your little finger, e, ( )( ) Stop the crank at it*s highest position if you want the machine to stay in good working order, 2.

BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the correct

answer in the parenthesest a. ( ) The first step in subtracting is to:

(1)

Depress the keys for the minuend,

(2) Depress

the keys for the subtrahend.

Clear the

machine*

(3)

(4) Do none of these.

b. ( )

Which step Is incorrect when you multiply? (1) Clear machine,

(2) Depress repeat key,

(3) Depress the keys for the nurio er,

(4)

Move carriage to the extreme right, c. ( )

When obtaining credit balances it is not necessary to? (l) Subtract in the usual manner.

(2) Depress the repeat key.

Subtract twice.

(3)

(4) Do all of these.

(5) Do none of these, RATING SCALE?

Place an X in the space for each

operation in which you qualify. a. { ) Clear machine before each new operation. b. ( ) Press each key firmly. c. ( ) Use little finger to depress 4 key. d. ( ) Record each answer as soon as the problem is completed, e. ( ) Work rapidly. (

) Total.

CHAPTER 9.

TEN KEY ADDING-LISTING

HOW TO DO PROBLEMS WITH THE TEN KEY MACHINES A.

MOTIVATIONS

Outcomes of developing the ability to

operate the 10 key adding machine,. 1.

INCREASED STATUS: Whether you have a job or not the person who can use an adding maehine with facility occupys a higher place in social as well as business status*

2.

IMPRESSIVE;

When you can answer "yes1*, to a

prospective employer's question, "Can you use a 10 key adding machine?” it helps to impress him with your ability, and this knowledge may mean the difference between your getting a job or not getting one* 3.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Increasing your job qualifications

by adding the ability to use a 10 key machine may be just the thing which will bring you up from the average run-of-the-mill applicant to the person who gets the position* B.

DIRECTIONS:

Guiding techniques for developing the

ability to use the 10 key addlng-llstlng machine* (See figure 5) 1*

PREPARATION:

How to get your machine and yourself

ready to work correctly,,

FIGURE

3

TEN KEY ADDING-LISTING MACHINE

Look at your machine.

Note the position or the

motor har (if It Is electric) or crank (if it is hand operated). Locate the number keys 0 through 9. (10 would be 1 and 0). Locate the total key, the repeat key, the sub* tract key, and the correction key.

These are

all used for special operations. Clear your machine. (1) Hand-operated machine--depress total key and operate the handle. (2) Electric machine--depress total key once or twice. (3)

Your machine is cleared when it prints the clear symbol «

on the tape.

Locate your hand position. (1)

Wse the 4, 5, and 6 keys as the home row from which you move up or down,

(2)

Strive to develop the touch system.

(3)

The 4, 7, and 1 keys are depressed with the index finger.

(4)

The 5, 8, and 2 keys are depressed with the middle finger.

(5) The 6, 9, and 3 keys are depressed by the

ring finger. (6)

The 0 key is depressed with the thumb.

(7)

The total, *(motor bar), and subtract keys are depressed with the little finger.

(8)

The correction, backspace, and repeat keys are depressed with the index finger .

ADDITION:

How to add columns of numbers and deter­

mine their totals. a.

Clear your machine as stated above.

b.

Depress number keys for the first number. (1)

Do this in the same order that you would write them*

(2)

Keep your eyes off the keyboard.

Find the

keys by touch. c.

Depress the ♦ key (motor bar). This automati­ cally lists the number on the tape.

d.

Repeat operation b and c as stated above for each number in the column.

In case of an error

use correction or back space key. e.

Depress total key when all numbers have been listed.

This will give you the sum of the

whole column. f.

To obtain a sub-total merely depress the * key twice at any time and the machine will automatl

cally print a sub-total. g.

Write the answer at the bottom of your column and the problem is completed.



Clear your machine and proceed to the next problem.

SUBTRACTIONS

How to use the 10 key machine to do

accurate subtraction. a.

Clear the machine as stated above.

b.

Depress the keys for the top number (the min­ uend) •

c.

Depress the plus (♦) or motor bar.

d.

Depress the keys for the figures in the number to be subtracted (subtrahend).

e.

Depress the minus (~-) or subtractbar.

f.

Depress the total key.

g.

Clear your machine and proceed to the next problem.

h.

Use subtraction also when any item is erron­ eously printed.

Merely subtract the incorrect

number out by depressing the same keys as the incorrect number and then depress the subtract key.

Continue the problem by depressing the

correct number.

MULTI PLICATIONS

How to develop skill In using the

10 key machine to multiply. a.

Clear your machine.

b.

Depress the keys for the number to be multiplied.

c.

Depress the repeat key and latch it down.

d.

Depress the plus bar the number of times that is equal to the extreme right digit in the number by which you are multiplying.

e.

Depress the zero key once.

f.

Depress the plus bar the number of times that is equal to the second from the right digit in the number by which you are multiplying.

g.

Depress the zero key once.

h.

Depress the plus bar the number of times that is equal to the third from the right digit in the number by which you are multiplying.

i.

Continue in this manner if there are more than three digits in the number by which you are multiplying.

For each additional figure repeat

steps Cg) and (h) until all digits have been used. j.

Release the repeat key.

k.

Depress correction key to release figure keys.

1.

Take a total by depressing total key once.

DIVISION: a.

How to divide with the ten key calculator.

Clear the machine.

Be sure the clear symbol

appears. b.

Division on the ten key is performed by multi­ plication through the use of reciprocals.

The

reciprocal of a number is the answer obtained by dividing that number into one. c.

Provide yourself with a table of reciprocals.

d.

Complete sample problem in division. (1) 750 ♦ 25.

Look up the reciprocal of 25.

The table shows it to be .04# (2) Multiply 750 by #04.

That Is, multiply by

4 and point off two places. (3) Take a total by depressing motor bar once. e.

Do all division problems in the same way. Simply look up the reciprocal of the divisor. Multiply the dividend by that number and point off as many places, starting from the rigjat of the answer, as there are digits in the recipro­ cal.

f.

Follow multiplication steps as outlined in part 4 in the direction section of this chapter.

HELPFUL HINTS:

How to make operation of the ten

key adding machine easier, a.

Look your machine over to be sure you know how It Is operated before you start to work,

b.

Train

your eyes to follow down a column without

using your finger or a ruler* c.

Place your paper on the desk In the same manner as If you were going to write a letter*

d.

Keep your fingers curved when operating the figure keys,

e.

Remove the tape when it becomes about a foot long.

f.

Strive for speed and accuracy by use of the touch system*

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get further

assistance, a.

Agnew, Peter L, and Ooodfellow, Raymond C.s Ten Key Adding Listing Machine Course.

South-

Western Publishing Company, Cincinnati, 1939, b.

Visit local offices in which these machines are used*

c.

Write to Remington Rand Company, Fourth Ave. and 23rd Street,

Hew York 10, Hew York,

72 C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS;

Laboratory aaaigrarents to Improve

your skill la operating the ten key adding machine. 1.

ADDITIONS

Total the following problems according

to the directions in the chapter*

© H

8.15 .55 469.24 .25 5.32

(lb)

54.50 4.80 4.10 45.64 5.40

CO CO .

(la)

(If)

3.10 369.17 95.63 9.08 200.10

2.72 .04 1.00 .76 2.

SUBTRACTION;

(lc) 1.34 2.67 ' .84 2.54 95.54

(Id) .04 .42 29.47 5.43 5.09

(lg)

(lh) .09 5.30 .12 4.12 6.00

.94 4.36 48.07 .20 701.77

Do the following problems in subtrac­

tion according to the directions in this chapter* (2a) 2.15 - .61

(2b) 125.82 - 27*06

(2c) 32.30 - 5.98

(2d)295.88 - 74.17

(2e) 92.53 67.28 3.

MULTIPLICATION:

Multiply the following problems as

stated in this chapter. (3a) 240 x 365

(3d) 868 x 32

(3b) 526 x 673 ______

(3e) 3.42 x 7.5 ____

(3c) 37

x 918 ______

. '

73 4.

DIVISIONSDa© your reciprocals and follow the directions as stated In the chapter to do the following problems in division,

5.

(4a)

182 4 250_______ ( .004)

(4d)27694 25 ( .041

(4b)

876 4 20._______ ( .05)

(4e)71894 400 (.00255}

(4c)

521 4

50 .

(.02 )

ANSWERSs

Check the answers you determined on all

the above problems with the following correct answers s (3a) 87600

(la) 483.51

(2a)

1.54

(lb) 114.44

(2b)

98.76

(3b) 353998

(lc) 102.93

(2c)

28.32

(3c) 33966

(Id)

40*45

(2d) 221.71

(3d) 27776

(le)

5.40

(2e)

(3e) 25.65

25.25

(If) 677.08

(4a)

(lg) 755.34

(4b) 43.80

(lh)

(4c) 10.42

16.63

.728

(4d)110.76 (4e) 17.9725

74 D.

EVALUATION:

Samples of ways in which to check up on

your mastery of the ten key adding machine. 1.

TRUE-FALSE;

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false* T

F

a. ( )( ) It is best to let the tape ride until all problems are completed* b. ( )( ) You should keep your eyes on the keyboard at all times* c. ( ){ ) It is best to use the correction key when you print a wrong number. 2.

BEST ANSWER;

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses* a. ( ) The zero key is depressed; (1) very seldom, (2) With the index finger operation,

(3) After each

(4) With the thumb.

(3) None

of these* b. ( ) The repeat key receives use In which of the following operations; (1) Multiplication. (2) Addition,

(3) Division,

(4) All of

these* c. ( ) The tape should be removed: problem.

(l) After each

(2) After every other problem.

(3) When it is about a foot long, It Is two feet long*

(4) When

CHAPTER 10.

FULL KEYBOARD ADDING- LIST IRQ

HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS ON THE FULL KEYBOARD MACHINES A.

MOTIVATIONS

Outcomes of possessing the ability to

operate the full keyboard type of adding machine. 1.

ECONOMY OF YOUR TIME:

The ability to use the

adding machine will save you many hours of valuable time which you can put to other uses. 2.

VERSATILITY:

If you have the skill of how to oper­

ate adding machines as well as other office skills you become a much more versatile person with a bet­ ter chance of getting a job. 3.

LISTING:

Use of this machine and the ability to

use it correctly will enable you by saving and filing the tapes to maintain a permanent record of your transactions. B.

DIRECTIONS:

Key points regarding operation of the fall

keyboard adding-llating machine. (See Figure 4.) 1.

PREPARATION:

How to get your machine and yourself

ready to work. a.

Look at your machine.

Note the position of the

motor bar {if it is electric) or the crank(if it is hand operated). b.

Locate the total key (upper right hand comer) and sub-total key.

, \ v • lit

xV>

j

^ /

FIGURE

4

FULL KEYBOARD ADDING-LISTING MACHINE

77 c.

Locate the repeat key, the error key, the non add key.

These keys are all used for

special operations, d.

Clear your machine. 1.

Hand operated; Repress total key and operate handle.

2 . Motor driven; depress total key and motor bar. 3.

Be sure the clear symbol

appears on the

tape before proceeding to a problem, 2.

ADDITION:

How to total eolumns with the fall key**

board. a.

Clear your machine.

b.

Depress keys on extreme right side for the figures in the first number.

c.

Use your index and middle fingers to depress keys simultaneously. (1)

2 figures in the number use first( index) and second (middle) _finger.

(2)

3 figures in the number use first, second, and third fingers or thumb and fingers.

(3)

Four or more figures in number, depress them in groups of three at a time.

d.

Depress motor bar (electric) or operate handle (manualJU

78 e.

List all other numbers in problem following steps a, b, c, and d above.

f.

Take a total after all numbers have been listed. (1)

Depress the total kqy.

(2)

Depress the motor bar or turn crank.

g.

Record answer.

h.

When you wish to indicate a cipher (0) in a number, merely do not depress any keys in the row in which the cipher appears.

3.

SUBTRACTION*

How to subtract with accuracy.

a.

Clear the machine.

(Note clear symbol)^).

b.

Depress the keys for the figures in the larger number (minuend)•

c.

Depress motor bar.

d.

Depress the keys for the figures in the smaller (subtrahend) •

e. Depress

the minus bar.

f. Depress

the total key.

g. Record your answers, 4.

MULTIPLICATIONi

How to multiply with the fill key­

board. a. b.

Clear your machine. Depress

c._ Depress

the keys for the number to be multiplied. the repeat key.

d.

Depress motor baror operate handle a number of times equal to the extreme right

figure in

the number by which you are multiplying. e.

Depress error key to release all keys.

f.

Move one place to the left on keyboard and again depress the keys for the number to be multiplied.

g.

Depress repeat key.

h.

Depress motor bar

or operate

handlea number

of times equal to the second digit from the right in the number' by which you are multiply­ ing. i.

Release all keys by depressing error key.

j.

Repeat the above process Until all digits in the multiplier are accounted for, moving over one place to the left for each number in the multiplier.

k.

Take a total.

HELPFUL HINTSs

How to make operation of the full

keyboard easier. a.

Use the little finger to depress the motor bar. This will increase your speed.

b.

Strive to develop touch control of the keys.

c.

Remove tape as soon as it reaches about 12 inches in length.

d.

Retain tapes as permanent reeord and check,

e. ~Try to depress keys simultaneously in groups of two or three, f.

Use subtraction process if necessary to correct errors already printed, '

g.

Hake use of the repeat key in all problems where the same number appears three or four times,

h.

Use the sub-total key when you desire to know the sum up to a point without removing that amount from the machine,

1,

Use both hands to depress key when the number is exceptionally a large one,

j.

Don’t attempt division on the full keyboard,

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Ihere to get further

assistance, a,

Agnew, Peter I*., and Ooodfellow, Raymond C,: Full Keyboard Adding and Listing Machine. South-Western Publishing Company, Cincinnati, 1939.

b.

Write to Clay Multiplier Corporation, North Main and College Streets, Los Angeles, Calif­ ornia,

81 C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS;

Problems to perfect your

ability to uae the fall keyboard adding machine*. 1.

ADDITION*

Total the following columns of numbers

according to the directions given in the chapters (la)

4.55 12.45 79.46 6.99 1.22

(le) 245.00 569.50 5.05 .40 55.70 SUBTRACTION*

(lb)

.62 .12 .13 .75 .52

(if) 2.70 8.20 411.30 80.20 153.04

(lc) 405.09 50,708.09 102.06 56,000.90 34.607.12

(Id)

(lg)

(lh)

7.03 23.60 188.03 89.70 48.04

3.05 .90 977.40 39391.90 492.60 1.09 .10 298.02 466.00 453.08

Do the following problems in subtree-

tion according to the directions given in the chapter. (2a)

(2e) 5.

48.96 - 25.78

(2b)

91.50 - 5.11

(2c)

64.80 - .82

(2d)

4.24 - 2.79

7096.57 6042.45

COMBINATION*

Add and subtract the following prob­

lems as indicated by signs.

So.these processes

according to the directions given in the directions of this chapter. (5a)

8.05 40.68 .2021.10 7.40

(5b) 771.50 90.20 5025.02152.90 911.90

(5c) 177.17 92.29 9.94 555.40 9.57

82 4.

MULTIPLICATION : Multiply the following problems according to the directions given in the chapter*

5.

(4a)

526 x 673__________ (4d)

3.42 x .75 _____

(4b)

37

2.41 x 3.65_____

(4c)

688 x 23

ANSWERS:

x 819____

(4e)

-

Check your answers with the correct

answers given below. (la) 104.67

(2a) 25.18

(3a) 62.21

(lb)

(2b) 88.39

(3b) 1,118.54

(2c) 63.98

(3c) 638.91

(2d)

(4a) 353,998

1.94

(1c) 141.823.26 (Id)

40,865.85

(le) 851.63

D.

1.45

(2e) 1,054.12

(4b) 30,303

(If) 655.44

(4c) 15,824

(lg) 356.40

(4d) 2.56

(lh) 1,218.29

(4e) 8.79

EVALUATION:

Samples of evaluation techniques that may

be applied to check your ability with the full keyboard machine. 1.

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T F a, ( ) ( ) The full keybpard machine is best used for division. b. ( )( ) When numbers are over 5 digits long you should use both hands.

85 c. ( }( ) The motor bar on the electric machine Is the same as the crank on the hand operated machine, d. ( )( ) The first process when doing any operation on the machine is to depress the numbers* e. ( )( ) You should depress all keys simultaneously If possible* BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the best answer In

the parentheses. a. ( ) The first thing to do before doing any prob­ lems "on the full keyboard machine is (1) Clear the machine. bar.

to:

(2) Depress the motor

(3) Depress the total key.

(4) Depress

the digits of the number you are adding* b. ( ) When you wish to Indicate a cipher (0) In a number you should? (1) Depress the zero key* (2) Skip over the row In which the zero ap­ pears.

(3) Use your subtract key.

(4)

Not include it In your total. c. ( ) You should not attempt which of the following operations on the full keyboard? tion.

(2) Subtraction.

(4) Division. with ease*

(3)

(1) addi­

Multiplication.

(5) 411 of these can be done

84 CHAPTER 11. DICTATION HOW TO GET A MAILABLE LETTER FROM EDIPHONE RECORDINGS A, MOTIVATION;

Outcomes of good dictation machine tech­

niques. 1. BE UP-TO-DATES tion machines*

Most of the now offlees have dicta­ If you donft know how to operate one,

you will be behind the times and perhaps lose the chance of'getting a Job. 2. INDISPENSABLE EMPLOYEES

If you know how to work a

dictation machine you can save a lot of time.

The

time you save will give you a chance to assume more important duties and therefore become a more valuable person to your company. 3 . INTERRUPTION NO BOTHERS

When you are taking dictation

from your employer and are interrupted you will prob­ ably have to reread half the letter before you get going again.

With a dictation machine all you have

to do when you are interrupted is stop the machine. When you are ready to go you tap a lever and you1re off again. B.

DIRECTIONSs

Guiding principles and techniques for

becoming a voice writing machine operator. (See Figure 5) 1.

QUALIFICATIONSs

How to meet the requirements to

become a dictation machine operator.

SWITCH LATCH ( 9 SWITCH MANDREL VOLUME TONE

COMFORTUBE TUBING

FIGURE . 5 DESK CARRIAGE EDIPHONE

a.

Be able to spell correctly.

b.

Use correct English.

c.

Punctuate correctly,

d.

Be able to arrange different letter styles,

e.

fype at least 40 words a minute.

f.

Be able to place a letter attractively on a page,

CONTROLS:

How to operate the machine efficiently.

a.

Locate the reproducer,

b.

Lift lever and raise the reproducer,

c.

Place a record on the mandrel,

d.

Place the record on with the lettered end to the right,

e.

Move the reproducer to the extreme left,

f.

Lower the reproducer until it comes in contact with the record*

g.

Place and adjust the earphones on the head.

h.

Start the motor by pulling forward the switch hook,

i.

Tap the key marked "Ediphone Speaks11 with the left thumb when your fingers are in typing position,

j.

Stop the record by again tapping the ’’Ediphone nSpeaks11 key with the left thumb.

87 k.

Repeat any sentence you fall to hear by tap­ ping with the right hand "Ediphone Repeat” key.

3.

1.

Control

loudness by the volume control.

m.

Control

pitch by the tone eontrol knob.

COPY:

How to proof read the finished product.

a. Read every word, b.

B© sure

punctuation mark and space.

that the words are used in the right

way. c. Be sure that the spelling is correct. d.

Give thought to words that should be capital­ ized.

4.

e.

Be sure each sentence is used correctly.

f.

Look up anything about which you are in doubt.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Ihere to get further

assistance. a.

Allen, Cord, and Copeland:

Ediphone Voice

Writing and Integrated Studies. South-Western Publishing Company, Cincinnati, 1939. b.

Visit local companies and see these machines in use.

C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS:

Work to do which will help you

to become a better ediphone operator.

1.

CRITICISMS

Each student will sit down at the edi-

phone machine and ”take a letter”*

The class will

write on slips any points they think you may toe atole to improve in and give them to you. 2.

TYPE A LETTERS

You will type a complete letter

from the ediphone machine, making out the envelope with the address on it and all.

Finish the letter

so its ready to mail. 3.

INTERRUPTIONS$

Start typing a letter from the

ediphone machine.

During the process you will

toe interrupted toy someone making you stop the machine and start it again from where you left off. D.

EVALUATION:

Samples of some evaluation techniques

which may toe used in operating dictation machines. 1.

TRUE-FALSE*

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T

F

a. ( )( ) You should toe able to spell to toe a good dictaphone operator, to. ( )( ) You should type at least 60 words a minute in order to operate a dictation machine c. ( )( ) It is not necessary for you to retain information in order to be a good

89

ediphone operator# d. ( )( ) fo be able to place a letter attractively on the page will make you a better edi­ phone operator. e. ( }( ) Punctuation is not important when you type a letter from a record# 2.

BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses. a. ( ) Hhich of the following wouldn*t you do when operating a dictating machine?

(1) Place

the record on the mandrel with the lettered end on the left#

(2) Locate the reproducer

left lever and raise the reproducer.

(3)

Move the reproducer to the extreme left. (4) Lower the reproducer until it comes in contact with the record,

(5) Place 'and

adjust the earphones on the head# b. ( )lhat starts the motor on the Ediphone machine?

(l) Ediphone Speaks control.

(2) Repeat key. control#

(3) Control loudness

(4) Tone control knob,

switch hook#

(5) The

c. ( ) You would look for which of thefollowing

when you proof read your eopy? ation marks. zation. RATING SCALE:

(2) Spelling.

(4) Neatness.

(1) Punctu­ (3) Capitali­

(5) All of these*

Place an X in each space for idiich

you qualify. a. ( )Type at least 40 words a minute, h. ( )Use no misspelled words. c. ( ) Move the reproducer to the extreme left before beginning each operation. d. ( ) Read every word, punctuation mark and space in proof reading. (

) Total.

91

CHAPTER 12.

FILING

HOW TO PLACE CORRESPONDENCE IN A SYSTEMATIC ORDER A,

MOTIVATIONs

Gains that accrue from having the ability

to file correctly. 1*

SMOOTH RUNNING OFFICES

If your filing techniques

are good you can keep the office running along smoothly for a great deal depends upon being able to locate a report or a letter when It Is needed* 2.

RECOGNITIONS

Keeping your filing cabinets in good

order and always up-to-date so that materials can be found easily, will be another step toward gaining you that advancement you desire* 3. FILE CLERKS

Many times the job that is open will

be that of a file clerk*

If you have the skill

necessary to fill the position, you will get the job, B*

DIRECTIONSs

Practical suggestions on how to systemati­

cally arrange all types of correspondence* records and reports* 1. ALPHABETICs

How to arrange related materials in an

alphabetic file* a.

Check each piece of correspondence to see if It has been released for filing*

b*

Consider surnames only when the surnames of the

92 individuals are different. (1)

Anders Andersen Anderson Andrews

(2)

Anders precedes Andersen because the nsM is not followed by any letter.

Remember,

“nothing precedes something'1. c.

Consider surname prefixes as part of the surname. (1)

Da Vinci Des Laurier Mac Donald 0 *Brlen 0*Connell

d.

Index hyphenated surnames of Individuals as one unit. Index Order

e.

(1)

Alfred Grey-Mitchell

Grey-Mitehell Alfred

(2)

Helen Sinclair-Cowan

Sinclair-Cowan Helen

Look to the first then middle names when sur­ names are alike.

_ , ^ Index Order

(1) James Brown

Brown James

John Brown

Brown John

Larry Alvin Brown

Brown

Larry Alvin

(2)

Initials In a first and middle name are also considered as indexing units*

(3)

Any abbreviated first or middle name is considered as if it were written in full*

D.A* Garlson Daniel Carlson Via. P, Carlson William George Carlson Index Order Carlson

D* A.

Carlson

Daniel

Garlson

William F*

Garlson

William George

Use a woman* s legal name (her given first name and maiden surname with her husband*s surname) Mrs* Andrew C* Hill (Mary Jones) Mrs* John A* Kramer (Anne Helen) Index Order Hill Mary Jones (Mrs*) (Mrs* Andrew C* Hill) Kramer Anne Helen (Mrs*) (Mrs* John A* Kramer)

94 (1)

Mrs* is placed in parentheses at the end of the name hut is not considered in filing*

(2)

Place the husband* s name in parentheses below the woman*s legal name*

g.

Don*t consider a personal or professional title or degree as an index unit*

It is written in

parentheses at the end of the name* Index Order Balph Long D*D.

Long

Dr, Vincent Macon

Macon

Prof* John Meyers

Meyers

(l)

Ralph (D*D.) Vincent (Dr«) John (Prof*)

A foreigh or religious title followed by

a given name only is indexed as it is writ­ ten* Index Order

h.

Madame Louise

Madame;

Louise

Sister Annette

Sister

Annette

Consider a designation of seniority such as junior or senior as a filing unit at the end of the name*

i*

When full names are identical* consider the alphabetic order of the city in the address.

William Johnson, Boston William Johnson, Camden William Johnson, Duluth William Johnson, Cleveland Index Order Johnson

(l)

William

Boston



11

Camden

n

*

Cleveland



H

Duluth

If individual names are identical and they live in the same city, eonsider the alphabetic order of the street.

File business firms names in the order in which they are written, General Motors Corporation Henry*s Mobil Service Index Order Gene ral Mot ors Corporati on Henry*s Mobil Service (If firm name Includes the full name of an individual, file according to the above rules concerning individual*s names.) Index Order John Brown Grocery

Brown John Grocery

k.

Disregard such words as "thew, "a", and "and" when filing business firm names* Index Order Brown & Pinch Company

Brown Pinch Company

The Arnold Ross Company Ross Arnold Company (The) 1*

Consider abbreviations in the firm names as if they were written in full (U.P.R.R. Union Pacifie Railroad)•

m.

Index single letters in firm names as separate units* Index Order

n*

A.B.C. Mills

A B C

A*B* Candy Company

A

A to Z Stores

A (to) Z

J.A. Aarons & Son

Aarons J. A. (&) Son

B

Mills Candy Company Stores

Consider numbers in firm names as being writ­ ten out and index it as one word* Index Order

o.

Al Meat Market

A

one

Meat Market

2nd Avenue Store

Second Avenue Store

When two words in a firm name are hyphenated consider them as separate words*

Addres sograph-Mult igraph Company Index Order Addre ssograph Multigraph Company p.

Disregard the final s when a possessive ends with apostrophe s (* s), but consider the s when It ends s apostrophe (sf) Index Order

q.

Boy*a Life Magazine

Boy*s Life Magazine

Boy A* Clothing Store

Boys* Clothing Store

Other names to consider in alphabetic filing, (1)

Banks - consider eity of its location first,

(2)

Churches, Schools, Organizations - file under the word that is most important in the name,

(3)

Political «• consider first United States Gov*t, or city or state or county, then the principal words in the name of the bureau or depft.

Cross Reference - How to prepare and file cross reference cards, a.

Prepare original index card according to rules given above using most important name of firm,

b.

Prepare other esrds for same firm with names of secondary importance*

c.

File these cards in their respective places

d.

Follow tlie sample below for cross referencing of cards* National Magazine Hopkins Pub, Co* 239 S* Street Chicago* Illinois

Hopkins Pub. Co. 239 S* Street See Hkt* Mag,

Original e.

second card for cross reference

Prepare cross reference cards for married women witli their husbands* name on second card*

NUMERICS

How to arrange related materials in a

filing system using numbers* a.

Check letter to see if it has been released for filing*

b*

Underscore name or words in letter that will be used as a basis for coding*

c.

Sort correspondence alphabetically in preparation for coding (this is not necessary for a small volume of correspondence)*

d*

Check in card file for every name to be coded* (l)

If a name or piece of correspondence is given in the card file* place that number assigned to it on the letter in the upper right hand comer,

i

99 (2)

If no number has been assigned to the

correspondent, code the letter by placing a capital nU H in the upper right hand comer.

(This is to indicate that the

letter is filed in a miscellaneous alphabetic file, e.

Code every piece of Incoming or outgoing correspondence.

f.

Make cross references in the numeric system only in the card index file.

(Place an x

after the nuntoer (lOOx) to indicate that there is a cross reference card in the file.) § Z , Sort

correspondence in order of numbers and

place 4.

SUBJECTS

in appropriate folders. How to arrange related materials in a

subject filing system. a.

Check to see that correspondence has been released for filing.

b.

Read each letter carefully to determine the subject classification.

c.

Check with master record of subject captions to see if you have chosen the right subject code. (l)

Many times differences of opinion arise

100

regarding subject coding of a piece of correspondence• (2)

Be sure to cheek with, master record before you classify and file any correspondence,

d.

Prepare cross-reference sheets if the corres­ pondence involves more than one subject*

e.

Code all material according to subject classi­ fication by placing subject caption in the upper right hand c o m e r of letters,

f.

Sort material first by main subjeet headings then by subdivisions and place in proper folders. (1)

Arrange material in folders by alphabetic order of correspondent's names,

(2)

Arrange different pieces of correspondence for the same correspondent by date, with the latest date to the front.

5.

GEOGRAPHIC*

How to arrange related materials by

location, a.

Check each piece of correspondence to see that it has been released for filing,

b.

Code each letter by circling the geographic location and underlining the firm or individual name.

101 c.

Prepare any cross references that are needed. .

d.

Sort and place all material In proper folders. (1)

A card index file often supplements a geographic file.

This is used when one

forgets the location of a correspondent. (2)

Place material in Individual folders alphabetically.

6.

USE OF FILES#

How to remove and replace materials

in the files drawers. a.

Fill out requisition cards for any Item which is requested for future delivery. (1)

Identify the material requested and tl» individual requesting itv Also place the date to be delivered on the requisition card.

b.

Plaee all requisition cards in the tickler.(a special card file), which is set up with 12 primary mohthly guides and 31 secondary daily guides.

c.

Check tickler each day and remove those papers needed for current use from files.

d.

Place an out card in the folder from which mat­ erial has been taken. (1)

Put all information on out card that

existed on requisition card* (2)

Cheek files often to see that these items are returned to the files after a certain period of time*

(3)

Discard requisitions as soon as items are returned to the files.

e.

Remove old inactive correspondence from the files at periodic intervals and place it in the transfer files until the time for it fto be discarded*

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTERS

Where to get further

assistance• a*

Eggbert, Lucilles U.S.C.

b.

Filing

A practicum,

Dr* Henderson# May 1950.

Progressive Indexing and, filing. Library Bureau Division, Remington Rand Inc*, Buffalo, 1947.

c.

Kirk, John G*, Scott Wesley E, and Lurie Jacques A., Clerical Practice. The H.M. Rowe Company, Baltimore and Chicago, 1941

103 G.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS*

Problems that will help to develop

■■ ■ ■■ ■ HM' W I I WilMMUMiiin— jy « —

Iiwm i

— '« '■ i «

HI ^III I■i— mnwuimi mni

» HiM'WHH

I

n

rmmm^mmmm

your ability to file correctly, 1,

INDIVIDUALS*

Rearrange the following names correctly

in alphabetic index order according to the directions given in the chapter.

2.

a.

Henry R. Adler

h.

Herbert Browne

b.

Adler*s Grocery Store

I.

Ronald Collins

c.

James Newman

3•

Ronald Colleen

d.

John Adams

k.

Dan A. Carlson

Q.

E. A. Ad amski

1.

D.A. Carlson

f.

Herbert L. Broan

m.

Bn. Smith

g.

Herbert S* Broan

n.

William Smith-Jones

BUSINESS FIRMS*

Rearrange the following names

correctly according to the directions in the chapter. a.

Arizona Loan Company, Phoenix.

b.

Security-first National Bank of Santa Monica.

c.

Citizens Bazik, Los Angeles.

d.

Savings and Loan Company, Seattle, Washington.

e.

Farmers Loan Corporation, San Diego, California.

f.

James A. Garvey Shop.

g.

Garvey - James Sales Company.

h.

James A. Garvey.

i.

General Motors Corporation

1G4 u

Wtn. Jones Supplies.

k.

William Jones1 Supply Co,

1 . A to 2 Store Manufacturers

3.

m.

A-W Stores.

n.

Ohio Avenue Oarage.

o.

S, Robert Powers,

CROSS REFERENCESs

Prepare cross reference carls

for the following companies according to the directions given in this chapter for alphabetic, subject and geographic filing systems,

D,

a.

Fulton-Blue Mining Corp. Cross reference under Blue

b.

Cross-Alien Inc, Cross reference under Allen

c.

Fuller, Barton & Fish Lawyers Cross references under Barton Cross reference under Fish

5VALUATION:

Samples of ways in which your filing

techniques may he checked, 1,

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the eorrect space for

true or false. T F a. ( )( ) The three following names are arranged in correct alphabetic order. Central Loan Company, Cairo Candy Kitchen Central Woolen Manufacturers

b. ( )( )

It is best to make out requisition ear da

for all materials removed from the files* c. ( )( )

Ihen subject filing, you should read a letter through to find out the topic of discussion*

d. { ) ( )

You should consider hyphenated surnames

of individuals as two separate units for indexing. BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the best answer

in the parenthesis. a. ( ) You should place which of the following names first in an alphabetic file: (1) Ohio State University. (2) Old Age Pension Board of Ohio,

(3) Ohio Avenue Garage.

(4) Ohio

Potteries Inc. b. ( ) Of the name Security-First National Bank, Los Angeles, you should consider which of the following as the first index unit;

(1)

Security.

Angeles. c.

(2) Security-Firat. (3) Los

(4) Bank.

(5) National Bank.

( ) Gross reference cards are often prepared for: (1) Difficult Individual names.

(2)

Names

of married women.

(3) Combined surnames in

a firm name.

All of these.

(4)

106

CHAPTER 13.

CORRESPONDENCE

HOW. TO HANDLE INCOMING AND OUTGOING MAIL A.

MOTIVATIONS

Advantages to be gained when you handle

mall properly. 1.

NO DETECTIVE:

If you handle the mail properly

you won’t lose any incoming mall or forget to mail any outgoing correspondence and as a result you won’t arouse your "boss’s anger by making a sleuth out of him* 2.

LESS ROUTINE:When you can handle mail quickly and easily you will spend less time on this job and you will be able to devote more of your hours on work that is less routine*

3.

NO RUBBER CHECK:

If you know what mail belongs

in each class you will plaee the proper amount of postage on your items and you won’t have to worry about "return for insufficient postage*" B.

DIRECTIONS:

Suggestions that will enable you to im­

prove your handling of mail. 1,

OUTGOING: a.

How to prepare mail for release.

Type the addressee’s name and address on both letter and envelope*

b.

Print or type dLr mall, special delivery, or foreign if needed.

c.

Paste stamp on the upper right hand corner of envelope,

d.

Place stamps sent as a remittance in a waxpaper envelope.

e.

Make proper notations on letters calling for enclosures,

f.

Fold letters by making creases straight and free from smudges.

g.

Seal envelopes by hand when you d o n ’t have moistening machine,

(1)

Spread envelopes on table so that gummed flaps are exposed,

h.

(2)

Run moistened sponge over the flaps.

(3)

Seal envelope,

Weigh mail to determine proper amount of postage necessary,

I.

Mail all ltem3 before you go home,

INCOMINGS a.

How to handle mall you. receive.

Organize your duties so that all the different kinds of mall will be handled with dispatch.

b.

Open mall and read.

c.

Don’t open mail marked for the attention of a designated person, official or department,

d.

Inspect mail for enclosures.

e.

Note missing enclosures on Incoming letter.

f.

Attach envelopes to the letters in order to show the date of mailing.

g.

Make sure that all enclosures have heen removed# before you throw away the envelope.

h.

Date all incoming mail.

i.

Plaee name of the person on the letter when it is to be given to anyone in particular.

j.

Deliver mail.

k.

Arrange mail according to its importance on boss*s or other employee*s desks. (1)

Place most urgent matter on top.

(2)

More immediate attention will be given to letter on top of the pile.

POSTAL INFORMATIONS

How to mail letters end

packages. a.

Use latest postal bulletins issued by the U.S. Post Office. (1)

It shows changes made in the classification of mail.

(2) b.

It shows changes in the rates of postages.

Use first class mail for handwritten or type­ written matter, carbon copies, letters, postal card3, private mailing cards, and all matter

partly or wholly In writing, whether sealed or unsealed, Use air mail when you want swift delivery. Use second class mail rate for periodicals, publications and newspapers. Use third class mail for printed circulars, books, catalogues, merchandise, miscellaneous printed matter and all matter except first elass and second class weighing less than 8 ounces. Use parcel post or fourth-class mail for ship­ ment of packages weighing from 8 ounces up to 70 pounds* Use special delivery mall if you want your letter to be delivered by special messenger* Use registered mail when you want to safeguard the sending of money and other valuable mail to domestic destinations. Use insured mail for third and fourth class matter, for assurance against loss, rifling, or damage. Use C.O.D. services for sending matter that is collectible for not more than $200.

110

4.

SOTTBCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get farther

assistance. a.

Gregg, John R.: Applied Secretarial Practice. Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934.

b.

Local post office.

c.

Sary, J. E.:

Business Letters.

Practicum,

May, 1950. d.

American Tel & Tel, 1040 Olive Street, Los Angeles, California.

C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTSi

Visit mail rocan.

Projects that will enable you to

handle mall more easily. 1.

MAIL MAH:

Each member of the class will mail a

letter or a package to a special box at the school. Different members of the class will be assigned to receive, sort and distribute the mail to the proper individuals• 2.

OFFICE MAIL:

Daring the study of this chapter,

each member of the class will visit the mail room of some local company.

You will note the duties

of the employees at work and write down on slips all the things you have observed on your visit concerning prosesses of receiving and mailing correspondence.

Mien you return to class you will

discuss your findings with the other members.

Ill S.

OFFICE JOB:

As a member of the class you will be

assigned to the mail room of the school.

You will

be asked to perform the duties of a mail clerk. D.

EVALUATIONS

Sample evaluation instruments for possible

checking of your mailing techniques.

1.

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T F a. (){ ) You should type the addressee*s name and address on both letter and envelope. b.

()( ) It is not necessary for you to print or type air mail on a special deliveiy letter.

c. ( )( ) It wouldn*t be wise to send stamps as a remittance, in a wax-paper envelope.

d. (• ) ( ) You should fold letters by making crease straight and free from smudges. e.

()( ) It will be easier for you to seal envelopes by hand than by a moistening machine.

2.

BEST ANSWERS

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses. a. ( ) If you wanted to seal envelopes by hand, you should: (1) Spread envelopes on the table. (2) Make sure gummed flaps are exposed. Run moistened sponge over the flaps. Do no® of these.

(5)

(4)

Do all of these.

(3)

112

b.

( ) If you were handling incoming mail you wouldn’t? (2)

(l) Open and read all mail.

Fay attention to mail marked to the

attention of someonein particular. Inspect mail for enclosures. of these.

(3)

(4) Do all

(5) Do any of these,

c. ( ) For which of the following would you use second class mall? sealed.

(2) Matter that is unsealed.

(3) Newspapers. 3.

RATING SCALES

(l) Matter that is

(4) Books*

(5) Circulars.

Place an X in each space for which

you can qualify. a. ( )

You organize your duties so that all the different kinds of mail will be handled with dispatch.

b. ( )

You don’t open mall marked for the attention of a designated person,

c.

() You Inspect mail for enclosures,

d.

( ) You date all incoming mail.

e.

() You note missing enclosures.

(

) Total.

113

CHAPTER 14.

TELEPHONING

HOW TO RECEIVE CALLS OVER THE WIRE AND maktb EFFECTIVE OUTGOING CALLS A.

MOTIVATIONS

Outcomes of having the ability to handle

any of the miscellaneous details in your office. 1.

PROMOTIONS

Haying the know how con coaming the

smaller details in an office will add to your ef­ ficiency and may well he the springboard for a promotion. 2.

GOOD WILLS

When you meet the public, whether face

to face or by means of the telephone, you represent the company— no matter how insignificant your job may be, an outsider will judge the eompany by you. 3.

QUICK SERVICES

The ability to use the telephone and

use It correctly will save you a lot of time and enable you to get better and cpicker service for your company. B.

DIRBCTIONSs

Practical suggestions on how to develop

ability in the everyday use of the telephone. 1.

INCOMING CALLSs

How to receive a call over the wire.

a.

Answer the phone as quickly as possible.

b.

Say, "Mr. Jones office" or "Miss Smith speaking11.

c.

Ask caller for his name if he does not respond to your opening by giving his name.

114 (1)

A good way to do this is, wMay I tell him who is calling?”

(2)

If the party who is wanted isn*t in say, nI«ia sorry, Mr. Jones isn*t in.

May I

take a message for him?” d. Ask the caller to, ”Hold the line please.”

a moment

Mien it is necessary to transfer a

call to another department. (1)

Attract the attention of the switchboard operator by signaling slowly.

(2)

Relay the request so that the caller won?t have to repeat what he has already asked.

e.

Classify your telephone callers so that impor­ tant customers will receive special attention and undesirable callers will not be allowed to become annoying.

8.

VOICE:

How to talk over a telephone.

a. Speak directly into the telephone with your lips about one half inch from the mouthpiece. b.

Depend upon the tone of your voice to convey the experience you wish to put over. (1) A cheerful clear voice and distinct enun­ ciation are essential factors in a good telephone voice.

(2)

A low well-controlled voice carries better than a high-pitched voice*

c*

Be sure to identify yourself*

d.

Speak slowly and finish each word.

e.

Make your conversation concise and to the point*

f.

Avoid slang expressions (O.K., yeah, or yep)*

g.

Answer any requests for imfoimatlon as directly as possible * (1)

If any information requires looking up, ask the caller for his phone number and tell him you* 11 call him back as soon as you have the data he wants*

h.

Do not chew gum or play with a pencil inyour mouth while on the phone*

1*

Terminate a call as soon as the business in­ volved Is completed* (1)

Do not prelong the conversation by needless words*

(2)

Hang up the receiver quietly*

PHONE NUMBERS* a*

How to use your telephone directory*

Look up names in the directory to be sure you are calling the right number. (l)

All individuals* names are arranged in alphabetic order.

(2)

Business firms are listed in a classified directory as well as the regular phone directory,

b,

Use the index reference names printed at the top of each page to save time#

c#

Use the classified directory to find names and phone numbers of business firms^ Classified directories are cross-referenced in alphabetic order according to the firm name and according to the general classification or type of business.)

LOCAL CALLS; a.

How to use the dial telephone,

Lift the receiver off the hook and listen for a steady hum#

b.

Dial your number. (1)

Place your index finger in dial holes corresponding to the first letter of number you are calling#

(2)

Move dial to the right until dial stop is reached,

(3)

Remove finger from dial and allow dial to return to its natural position before dialing second number,

Continue this

process until all letters (usually two)

and all number a have been dialed, c,

Walt for at least 6 rings

before hanging up,

This will give your party time to reach the phone* LONG- DISTANCES

How to make toll calls.

a.

Dial the operator and ask

for long distance,

b.

Dive the long distance operator the number,

c.

State number and whether you are making a person to person or a station-to-station call. Cl)

Person to person calls are those on which you ask particular person to answer the phone.

If you do not get your desired

party there is no charge for the call. (‘ 2)

Station to station calls are those on which you ask the operator for a phone number only and not a particular person. If any one answers the phone a charge is made,

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTERS

Where to get further

assistance, a.

Gregg, John R.s

Applied Secretarial Practice.

Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934. b,

Ghabella, R, M.*

The Telephone, a project

for University of Southern California, May 1950. C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS;

Projects that will further

your ability to use a telephone. 1,

SKITS:

Prepare a telephone skit in which two

members of the class at a time initiate and carry on a telephone conversation.

The class will

write on slips those points in the calling and receiving that need improvement and give these to each participant*

2.

LONG DISTANCE;

Arrange with the school

PBx

operator to act as a long distance operator.

Allow

each member of the class to place a long distance call*

The rest of the class should prepare a

check list for the following points.

Did the student

a.

Know the correct number he was calling.

b.

Listen for dial tone humming.

c.

Remove finger from dial allowing it to come to a natural stop.

d.

Plan his conversation in advance.

e.

Notify the operator if the eall was person to person

f.

Allow party time to answer the phone (at least 6 rings) •

119 3.

REAL CALLS5

Each student should call a railroad

company, a steamship line, an airline or some similar company for information.

Note on slips

the manner in which the receptionist answers the phone and handles the request for information, -tiring these slips hack to class and discuss the good and bad points about tbs calls you made. D.

EVALUATIONS

Sample evaluation instruments for checking

up on your telephone techniques. 1.

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T F a. ( )( ) It is best to use a flat-toneless voice when talking on the phone, b. ( H

) You should speak directly into the mouthpiece,

c. C )( ) When answering the phone your first word should be flHellon . 2.

BEST ANSWER;

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses, a. ( ) When placing a telephone call the first thing to do is: (2)

(1)

Dial the number.

Lift the receiver and listen for the

dial tone.

(3) Call the operator.

(4)

Place your finger in the dial hole corres-

ponding to the number you are calling. b. ( ) When making along distance call it is necessary to? (l) Dial the operator. (2)

State whether your call is person to

person or not.

(3) Give the long distance

operator the number you*re calling.

(4)

Do all of these. c. ( ) Ihen the number you are calling doesn*t answer you should wait for how many rings? (l) about 6. (4) 10 to 12. HATING SCALE;

Place

(2) 15 at least.

(3) 2 or 3.

(5) None of these. an X in each space for which

your telephone technique qualifys. a. ( ) Speak directly into the mouthpiece. b. ( ) Keep mouthpiece within a half inch from lips. c. ( ) Establish your Identity. d. ( ) D©n*t prolong

conversation unnecessarily.

e. ( )Replace receiver gently. (

) Total.

121

PART III.

GO

HOW TO HOLD A JOB nGott, they1re off!

How the runners are all neck and

neck each one fighting for first place.

Slowly one of them

pulls ahead and goes on to become “the winner. that one be you?

Why couldn’t

Somebody has to get the promotions and

be the winner in life as well as in a track meet.

Read

the next two chapters and see how you can become the person who gets ahead* the fellow who gets the raises in pay. Start on the next page and learn how easy it is to leave the pack behind and forge on to greater success. going!

Let’s get

122

CHAPTER 15.

OH THE JOB BEHAVIOR

HOW TO MAKE FRIENDS FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR COMPANY A.

MOTIVATION;

Benefits derived from on the .job friend-

ships. 1.

KEEPING THE JOBS

If customers are pleased with

you they praise you to your employer and he will be less likely to tell you to go should there be a slack season. 2.

REWARDS:

Many customers who stop in at your office

may be influential people and be glad to do you a personal favor in turn for your kindness to them. 3.

FRIENDS:

If you are pleasant and considerate of

your fellow employees you may gain lasting friend­ ships even though future jobs may separate you. B.

DIRECTIONS: 1,

COURTESY:

Suggestions on how to hold your job. How to maintain good public relations.

a.

Don*t be rude to anyone*

b.

Give prompt service.

c.

Hand out accurate Information.

d.

Handle all persona alike without showing pre­ ference .

e.

Smile and put your visitor at ease.

f.

Introduce caller to company representative

if* they haven*t met. g.

Remember as many customers* names as possible*

h.

Make customer feel he is important.

i.

Don*t lie to customer.

3*

Give visitor feeling that you want to help him.

k.

Go out of your way to give customer additional information.

1.

Speak only good of your company,

m.

[email protected] tactful in all situations.

COHBBCf s

How to maintain proper deportment con­

cerning your job* a.

Follow instructions.

b.

Do your best with any job assigned to you.

c.

Welcome new duties.

d.

Be on.time.

e.

Don*t overstay your lunch period*

f.

Stay a few minutes overtime if necessary.

g.

Be willing to take on new responsibilities.

h.

Do all assignments cheerfully.

i.

Be [email protected]>t.

j.

Don*t make a habit of coming to work tired.

FELLOWSHIP:

How to get along with your fellow

employees. a.

Don’t try to be boss.

b.

Don’t gossip about other employees.

c.

Avoid being tempermental.

d.

Be tactful with employees who are tempermental.

e.

Avoid conversations about your troubles.

f.

Avoid arguments.

g.

Keep your nose out of other peoples personal affairs.

h.

Help keep down rumors.

i.

Help your associates when you can.

j.

Don*t hold a grudge.

k,

Don’t neglect work assigned to you by persons you don’t like.

1.

Be diplomatic when put in charge,

m.

Take reprimands gracefully,

n.

Don’t snub employees in lower positions,

o.

Avoid telling employer about other peoples errors.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get further

assistance. a.

uregg, John R.: Applied Secretarial Practices. Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934.

125 b. 0.

Visit a local offiee.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS:

Learning experiences to help you

on tins .lob. 1.

SKIT:

Several members of the class will put on a

play on how to behave in an office and how to receive callers.

The rest of the class will dis­

miss the good and bad points of the demonstration, 2.

OBSERVATION:

While studying this chapter you will

be asked to visit an office in order to observe the behavior of the employees to the customers and to each other.

Write a report on what has been

learned and read it to the class, 3.

OPEN HOUSES

Members of this class will act as

guides during the open house that will take place during the tern,

Xou will be judged on your

courtesy and friendliness,

Don1t forget your

school will be judged on your behavior, D,

EVALUATIONS

Sample evaluations instruments for pos­

sible checking of your on the _1ob behavior. 1,

TRUE-FALSE:

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false, T F a, ( )( ) It pays to be rude to unimportant people, b, ( ) ( ) Handle all persons alike without showing preference.

e.

( )( ) Don’t introduce callers to company representative if they haven’t met.

d. ( )(') Remember as many customers* names as possible• e. ( )( ) Don’t lie to customers. BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the best answer,

in the parenthesis. a. ( } If you want to hold your job: (l) Follow instructions.

(2)

Do your best with any

job assigned to you.

(3) Tell your employer

how important you are. duties.

(4) Welcome new

(5) Be on time.

b. { ) Which of the following would you avoid doing:

(1) Overstay your lunch period.

(2) Be willing to take on new responsibilities. (3) Carry on all assignments cheerfully. (4) Be alert.

(5) All of these.

c. ( ) If you want to get along with your fellow employees you wont:

(1) Try to be boss.

(2) Gossip about other employees. tempermental. any of these.

(4) Start arguments.

(3) Be (3) Do

127 3.

RATING- SCALE:

Place an X in each space for which

yon qualify. a. ( ) Follow Instructions. h. ( } Welcome new duties. c. ( ) Take reprimands gracefully. d. ( ) Do all assignments cheerfully. (

)

Total.

128 CHAPTER 16.

PROMOTIONS

HOW TO GET AHEAD IN YOUR POSITION A.

MOTIVATION«

Rewards received In getting ahead.

1. MORE PRESTIGE!

If you get a promotion your power

to command admiration will increase and you will also Have more respect. 2. SECURITY!

Getting ahead in your Job will bring

you security by increasing your pay check and making your position in the company a steady one. 3. BED AND BOARD?

When you get a better position

you will receive more money and if you receive more wealth you will be able to enjoy a better standard of living. B.

EL RE CTIONS!

Suggestions on how to get promotions.

1. SCHOOL!

How to advance through more education.

a.

Take a course in school which will help you in your job.

b.

Become an expert In your particular field.

c.

Learn a useful skill which no one else in your office knows.

d.

Keep abreast of the world news.

e.

Be able to converse intelligently with your superiors•

f.

Don1t think you know more than everyone in the

office Just because you have taken extra courses in slchool. s.

Read and do constructive thinking.

h.

Study the publications of the company.

i.

Look over trade Journals.

3.

Keep in practice on any skill that you anticlpate using in the future.

RECREATIONs

How to gain recognition through social

activities. ft *

Join the office bowling league.

b.

Write for the office paper.

c.

Arrange picnics.

d.

Arrange parties.

e.

Organize office get togethera.

f.

Play on office baseball team.

s.

Arrange for specially priced tickets for theater parties.

RELATIONSHIPS

How to improve your status with

your employer. a.

Make friends with customers so they ask for you when they want something.

b.

show your ability by action instead of talk,

e.

Treat your boss with respect but not with fear.

ISO d.

Behave in a businesslike manner.

e.

Never discuss your ambitions with persons other than your superiors.

f.

Don't be afraid to let your employer know your ambitions.

g.

Look your best at all times.

h.

Don't ask for raises when business in

i.

Ask for a raise on your merits.

j.

Don't run to your employer everytimeyou have

bad.

a minor problem,

4.

k.

Be dependable.

1.

Don't alibi if you make an error.

SOURCES FOR THIS CHAPTER:

Where to get further

assistance. a.

Gregg, John R.:

Applied Secretarial Practices.

Gregg Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1934. b.

Invite local owners to speak on how to get promotions .

C.

ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS:

Projects that will aid you in

developing the ability to improve your position. 1.

APPLE POLISHINGS

Write on slips as many items

as you can on how to please your boss.

All slips

will be collected and discussed in class. 2.

RATINGS:

Make a rating chart which would apply

151 to any member of the class concerning the way he has worked during this semester.

Hate him as to

merit, and value to the class as a whole, and finally state on the basis of his semester’s performance whether you would give him a promo­ tion or not, Dm

EVALUATIONS

Samples of some types of check-ups which

may be applied to promotions, 1,

TRUE-FALSE*

Place an X in the correct space for

true or false. T F a. ( )( ) Any course in school will help you in your job, b . ( ) ( ) You should become an expert in your par­ ticular field,

c.

()( ) It would be

wise to learn useful skill

nobody else knows in your office. d.

()( ) You don*t have to keep up with world news if you have a typing job.

e. ( )( ) It is net necessary for you to converse intelligently with your superiors. 2.

BEST ANSWER:

Place the number of the best answer

in the parentheses. a. ( ) If you want to get ahead you should* Read and do constructive thinking.

(l) (2) Show

the boss how much more you know than he does,

(3) Study the publications of* the

company,

(4) Do all of these.

(5) Do none

of these, b. ( ) You may help your promotion along bys (1) Inviting your employer and his wife over for dinner,

(2) Inviting your boss1

wife out to lunch,

(3) Joining your

employers* philanthropic organizations. (4) Keeping In physical shape.

(5) Doing

all of these, c. ( ) You will improve your status with your employer bys

(1) Treating him with respect.

(2) Treating him with fear. in a businesslike manner. best at all times. EATING SCALES

(5)

(3) Behaving (4)

Looking your

Doing all of these.

JPlace an X In the spaces for which

you qualify. a. ( )You treat your boss with respect. b. ( )You don*t run to your employer everytime you have a minor problem. c. ( )You are dependable. d. ( )You don*t alibi if you make a mistake. e. ( )You show your ability by action instead

of

talk,

( ) You remember your boss* birthdays. ) Total.

University of

Southern California

Library